CueStation 5.2.0 User Guide
USER GUIDE
CueStation 5.
D-Mitri Audio Show Control System
Edition: 2011-05-13 for CueStation 5.2.0
Copyright © © 2011 Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc.
05.164.005.09
CueStation 5.2.0: D-Mitri Audio Show Control System
Publication date
© 2011 Meyer Sound. All rights reserved.
CueStation 5.2.0 User Guide
The contents of this manual are furnished for informational purposes only, are subject to change without notice, and
should not be construed as a commitment by Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc. Meyer Sound assumes no responsibility or
liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this manual. Except as permitted by applicable copyright law,
no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission from Meyer Sound.
CueStation, D-Mitri, D-Mitri Updater, LCS, VRAS, CueConsole, and Wild Tracks are trademarks of Meyer Sound
Laboratories Inc. SpaceMap is a trademark of Meyer Sound Laboratories Inc. and is registered in the United States Patent
and Trademark Office. MEYER SOUND and the Meyer Sound wave logo are trademarks of Meyer Sound Laboratories
Inc. and are registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office, as well as in other countries.
Printed in the U.S.A.
2
CONTENTS
Preface
CueStation Documentation
User Guide Conventions
Meyer Sound Laboratories
Acknowledgements
System Setup
Chapter 1: D-Mitri Setup
Before You Begin
Chapter 2: CueStation Overview
System Requirements
CueStation Overview
Chapter 3: Connecting Hardware and
Software
Connect with CueStation
Routing Signal
D-Mitri Mixer
Chapter 4: Signal Flow
Overview
Chapter 5: Mixer Controls
Input Channel Strips
Global Controls
Bus Masters
Output Masters
Aux Masters
PAFL Masters
Virtual Groups
Grand Master
Adjusting Settings across Multiple Channels
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xiii
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5
5
7
7
7
9
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11
15
15
17
18
21
23
24
25
26
27
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Chapter 6: Matrix Window
Bus and Output Controls
Special Commands
Chapter 7: Signal Processing Controls
Channel Strips
User Traces
Special Commands
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32
33
33
35
37
Chapter 8: System Monitoring
39
CueStation Connection Status
Log Window
System Status Window
Signal Path
Channel Meters
39
41
44
48
49
Chapter 9: VirtualD-Mitri
Working Offline
Virtual CueConsole
CueStation Automation
Chapter 10: Mixer Automation
Automation Overview
Automation Basics
Channel Select
Capturing Cues
Capture Window tabs
Building a Cue List
Running a Show
Cue List Players
Editing Cues
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Command Subcues
Chapter 11: SpaceMap Automation
SpaceMap Overview
Elements of SpaceMap
iv
31
53
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57
61
61
63
65
69
74
85
89
93
95
101
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115
115
116
Types of Nodes
SpaceMap Controls
Creating a SpaceMap
Creating Trajectories
Creating SpaceMap Subcues
SpaceMap Design
Chapter 12: Wild Tracks Playback
117
120
127
131
133
134
143
Importing Audio Using Drive Setup
Wild Tracks Window
Wild Tracks Entries
Wild Tracks Subcues
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
Advanced Techniques
Using Wild Tracks Offline
144
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163
167
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175
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181
Chapter 13: VRAS Processing
183
User Interface
VRAS Subcues
183
187
CueStation Workflow
191
Chapter 14: File Management
Saving Files
Opening Files
Merging Projects
Chapter 15: Customizing CueStation
Layouts
Custom Utility Buttons
Key Mappings Window
Project Notes and Reports
Chat and Paging
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207
209
210
Chapter 16: Access Policies
213
Creating Access Policies
Securing Your System
Recovering Lost Passwords
213
215
216
v
Hardware and Configuration
Chapter 17: Mixer Configuration
Configuring D-Mitri
Mixer Configuration Window
D-Mitri Backup Modules
Appendices
Appendix A: CueStation Networking
Client/Server Systems
Network Ports
Supported Audio File Types
Appendix B: Capture Window Advanced
Mode
Advanced Mode Overview
Advanced Mode Example
Appendix C: CueStation Hotkeys
All Windows
Access Policies Window
Capture Window
Chat Window
Cue Library Window
Cue List Window
Inputs Window
Matrix Window
Mixer Windows
SpaceMap Window
Subcue Library Window
Support Files Window
Wild Tracks Window
Appendix D: D-Mitri Text Commands
Command List
Index
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List of Tables
System Status Module Role Designations
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vii
PREFACE
Thank you for choosing Meyer Sound's D-Mitri™.
CueStation™ is the software interface to D-Mitri. It offers a graphic user interface that emulates
a familiar mixing console and combines it with a cue-based automation system that is designed
to integrate easily into theatrical, theme park, and other show control situations.
CueStation Documentation
The CueStation 5.2.0 User Guide is a supplement to the CueStation classroom training course.
The combination of classroom training and this User Guide will have you up and running quickly
and effectively.
User Guide Chapters
This Preface introduces Meyer Sound, describes the conventions used in this User Guide, and
provides details regarding your documentation and support options.
Part I, “System Setup” provides a quick-start guide to getting your system up and running.
Part II, “D-Mitri Mixer” describes the signal flow through the D-Mitri, and how the software controls
the signal flow. It also covers system monitoring topics such as metering and log messages.
Part III, “CueStation Automation” explains how to build and edit a show in CueStation using
subcues, cues, and cue lists, as well as SpaceMap® multichannel surround panning, Wild
Tracks™ audio playback, and VRAS™ processing.
Part IV, “CueStation Workflow” addresses several components of CueStation that are not directly
related to the creation and control of audio automation programs, such as file management,
layouts, and access policies.
Part V, “Hardware and Configuration” describes how to configure a D-Mitri system in CueStation.
The Part VI, “Appendices” contains reference information about operating systems, networks,
and some advanced automation topics, as well as an index.
ix
PREFACE
User Guide Conventions
This guide uses Mac OS X hotkey conventions. The Command key on Mac OS X keyboards
corresponds to the Control key on Windows keyboards. The Option key on Mac OS X keyboards
corresponds to the Alt key on Windows keyboards.
When you see this...
...perform this action.
Click
Click the left mouse button once.
Double-click
Click the left mouse button, twice in rapid succession, without moving the mouse.
Drag
Press the left mouse button, move the mouse, and release the mouse button.
Right-click
Click the right mouse button once.
Right-drag
Press the right mouse button, move the mouse, and release the mouse button.
Select
Point the mouse cursor at the object, then click the left mouse button once.
Press F1
Press (and release) the F1 key on your keyboard.
Cmd+Shift+A
Hold the Cmd and Shift keys down and press the A key, then release the keys.
Type "ping 127.0.0.1"
Type the specified text, without the quotation marks.
Typographic Conventions
IMPORTANT
Provides an explanation or further detail that needs to be brought to your attention.
x
TIP
Provides information that can help you work faster or better.
CAUTION
Indicates a place where you have to be careful what you are doing.
WARNING
Indicates a place where extreme care must be taken: data corruption may occur.
Meyer Sound Laboratories
Meyer Sound Laboratories, Inc. designs and manufactures premium professional loudspeakers
for sound reinforcement and fixed installation, studio monitors, digital audio systems for live
sound, theatrical, and other entertainment applications, electroacoustic architecture, acoustical
prediction software, and electroacoustic measurement systems. The D-Mitri system contains
multichannel digital audio mixing and processing products for theatrical productions and
installations, as well as Constellation electroacoustic architecture.
Founded in 1979 by John and Helen Meyer, Meyer Sound has grown to become a leading
worldwide supplier of systems for theaters, arenas, stadiums, theme parks, convention centers
and touring concert sound rental operations.
Meyer Sound’s main office and manufacturing facility are located in Berkeley, California, with
field offices and authorized distributors located throughout the USA and around the world.
More information is available at:
Tel: +1 510 486.1166
Fax: +1 510 486.8356
E-mail: info@meyersound.com
http://www.meyersound.com
Meyer Sound is a registered trademark of Meyer Sound Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.
Patents pending. All other registered trademarks are property of their respective owners.
xi
PREFACE
Service and Support
Training Program
Purchase of CueStation software entitles you to attend a training program. Meyer Sound conducts
training classes worldwide. The standard course is three days long.
If you are interested in training please contact us at education@meyersound.com or by telephone
at +1 510 486.1166.
Forums Support
Users who register at our website can access our free product support forums. These discussions
focus on users-helping-users: it's a great place to exchange tips, techniques, and information.
Our technical service personnel will provide their expertise, as their schedules permit.
http://forums.meyersound.com/
Web Site Support
Our product documentation (PDF format) is freely available on our website. Registered users
can participate in our free message forums. The latest version of our software is available on
our website:
http://www.meyersound.com/products/software/
Telephone Support
Telephone support is available by calling our office at +1 510 486.1166. We are open
Monday-Friday, standard business hours (Pacific Standard Time).
Before Contacting Support
Before contacting Technical Support, please have the noted information available. This will help
us assist you more quickly and effectively.
•
xii
A description of the problem.
•
The firmware version used in your D-Mitri system.
•
The components used in your D-Mitri system.
•
The version of CueStation and support applications used in your D-Mitri system.
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The operating system version you are using on the computer running CueStation.
Acknowledgements
The CueStation 5.2.0 software was written by Jeremy Friesner. Special thanks to our beta testers
and end users for their helpful feedback that ultimately has driven our product development. We
are thrilled to provide you with the world’s best hardware and software sound automation system.
xiii
Part I. System Setup
Chapter 1: D-Mitri Setup
Before You Begin
Chapter 2: CueStation Overview
System Requirements
CueStation Overview
Chapter 3: Connecting Hardware and Software
Connect with CueStation
Routing Signal
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3
D-MITRI SETUP
This chapter contains information about the different components of a D-Mitri system, as well
as instructions on how to set up and connect to the hardware.
Before You Begin
When setting up a new D-Mitri system, make sure all the necessary components are present.
The following sections list these components.
Hardware Package
The following items should be included with each D-Mitri module:
•
Power cable
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Hardware paperwork, including the following: module installation letter, test reports for
analog I/O modules, and an ESD warning notice.
Software Package
The D-Mitri software package includes the following items:
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CueStation 5.2.0 CD
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CueStation 5.2.0 Release Notes
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CueStation 5.2.0 Installation Guide
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CueStation 5.2.0 User Guide (this manual)
Additional Items
In addition to the items provided with your D-Mitri system, you will need:
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A computer to run CueStation (see Chapter 2, CueStation Overview for more information)
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CHAPTER 1: D-MITRI SETUP
•
6
Network infrastructure for connecting the CueStation host computer to the D-Mitri system.
This includes an audio network and a control network.
CUESTATION OVERVIEW
CueStation software controls D-Mitri's operations. This chapter provides a brief overview of
CueStation. For instructions on installing CueStation 5.2.0, see the CueStation 5.2.0 Installation
Guide.
System Requirements
CueStation 5.2.0 runs only on Windows 7 and Mac OS X 10.6.
Global Requirements
Regardless of the operating system you are using, to run CueStation 5.2.0, a computer must
have the following components:
•
Monitor
•
Keyboard and pointing device
•
Network port (RJ45)
CueStation Overview
The Software Interface
CueStation models the controls of an expansive physical analog mixing console in a graphical
user interface, augmenting the console model through the use of data entry fields and tables.
To make this kind of representation operate efficiently, CueStation apportions the functions of
the console among a collection of functionally specific windows.
Most CueStation windows fall into one of two main categories: mixer programming controls,
which look more or less like a conventional mixer, and automation windows that support the
creation and organization of cues and cue lists.
The automation windows also allow control over how the control surface settings are captured
into cues, the editing of cues, and putting cues into a cue list for a show.
7
CHAPTER 2: CUESTATION OVERVIEW
Other windows, such as Access Policies or Key Mappings, provide an interface for configuring
how you use CueStation. The next chapter provides a walk-through of some of the basic functions
and features of CueStation.
8
CONNECTING HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE
This Quick Start guide explains basic steps for connecting to a D-Mitri system and routing audio.
Connect with CueStation
The next step is to use CueStation to connect to the hardware and provide a configuration.
1. In CueStation, select Network > Connect... to bring up the Connection Manager window.
2. Select the D-Mitri system you will use and click on Connect (all windows).
At this point, CueStation 5.2.0 is connected to a D-Mitri system, or to VirtualD-Mitri. You
should see the system name of the server you selected in the title bar of all CueStation
windows. The next step is to configure the D-Mitri hardware, or, in the case of VirtualD-Mitri,
the emulated D-Mitri hardware.
3. Open the Mixer Configuration window from the Windows menu (Option+Cmd+0).
4. Click the Auto Setup button.
5. To assign I/Os (Aux, PAFL, etc.), right-click in the I/O Type column for your output and
select your type.
6. Click the Send Config button at the upper right corner of the window.
Your D-Mitri system is now ready to process audio.
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CHAPTER 3: CONNECTING HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE
Routing Signal
We will now use the mixer windows in CueStation to pass audio from inputs 1 and 2 to outputs
1 and 2.
1. Open the Inputs window (Cmd+2), and set Inputs 1 and 2 fader levels to unity.
2. Pan inputs 1 and 2 to hard left and hard right, respectively.
3. In the bus assigns, select bus 1 and bus 2 for both channels.
4. Open the Matrix window (Cmd+6) and select Matrix > Set Diagonal, Buses, Outputs.
This will set all bus masters and output masters to unity and create a diagonal matrix mix.
5. Open the Grand Master window (Cmd+1) and set both the System Level and Trim to unity.
At this point, audio connected to inputs 1 and 2 will be mixed to outputs 1 and 2.
10
Part II. D-Mitri Mixer
Chapter 4: Signal Flow
Overview
Chapter 5: Mixer Controls
Input Channel Strips
Global Controls
Bus Masters
Output Masters
Aux Masters
PAFL Masters
Virtual Groups
Grand Master
Adjusting Settings across Multiple Channels
Chapter 6: Matrix Window
Bus and Output Controls
Special Commands
Chapter 7: Signal Processing Controls
Channel Strips
User Traces
Special Commands
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25
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27
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31
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35
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Chapter 8: System Monitoring
39
CueStation Connection Status
Log Window
System Status Window
Signal Path
Channel Meters
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41
44
48
49
Chapter 9: VirtualD-Mitri
Working Offline
Virtual CueConsole
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13
SIGNAL FLOW
The audio signal flow in CueStation is very similar to that of a traditional analog console, with a
few additional features. The signal flow overview diagram on this page shows the overall flow
of audio through the various CueStation windows, and diagrams on subsequent pages cover
each area in detail.
Overview
15
MIXER CONTROLS
The most complex and commonly-used sets of controls are in the various mixer windows.
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CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
Input Channel Strips
18
Depending on their configuration, input channel strips can include
the following components:
- A Channel Select button, labeled with its channel number (assigned
when you configured the system). This control has a function for
both automation and mixing. When capturing cues, the selection of
channels can be used to constrain the range of channels captured
into subcues. More information on using Channel Selects can be
found in Channel Select (p. 65).
- A fader Label text box. Faders can be automatically labeled when
configuring the mixer, or you can click inside the box and type a new
label.
- An Auxiliary Send level or pan box, possibly with a Pre-Fader
Listen button. This control appears only when the mixer is configured
for auxiliary sends and Display > Show Aux Sends is selected.
- A +48v Phantom power enable button. The phantom power setting
can only be changed after clicking on the Unlock +48v button on
the far left.
- A Pad (-18db) button, which reduces signal levels by 18 dB.
- A Preamp button, which toggles the built-in preamplifier on or off.
- A Gain knob that controls Analog gain.
- A Scale display, which shows the signal scaling factor from the
combination of Pad, Preamp, and Gain values. This control is only
active for analog input or output channels.
- A Trim knob with a text value box below it. You can drag the knob
to adjust the value, type a value directly, or click on the text box and
drag up and down. The adjacent Unity button resets the control.
These trims can be used to adjust the relative levels of the automated
mix during a performance without interfering with the overall contour
of the automation.
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CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
Bus Assign channel buttons, arranged in paired (left/right) columns. To select a bus with a
higher number than what is listed, right-click on one of the buttons and select an available bus
from the context menu.
- A Pan control knob with a text value box below it. You can drag the knob to adjust the value,
type in a value, or click on the text and drag up and down. The adjacent Center button resets
the control.
- Wait and Fade timing boxes for the pan control. The Fade time specifies how long it should
take for the pan control to reach the desired position. The Wait time specifies how much time
will pass before the fade will begin.
- A set of automation controls, supporting Mute, + (polarity), Flip (restores Level control when
swapped with Aux, Trim, etc.), Solo, EQ Bypass, and Isolate. A master set of controls to the far
left of the fader strips provides global control, toggling or resetting all buttons simultaneously.
- The Fader level control, which is described in detail in Fader Level Control (p. 21).
TIP
CueStation provides a set of keyboard modifiers for you to use as you work with a mouse
to change settings across a selection of several inputs or outputs. Using these modifiers,
you can work with channels in stereo pairs or as larger selections.
To apply changes to a stereo pair on an absolute basis, select one channel of the pair,
and press the Shift key as you make changes.
To apply changes on an absolute basis to all selected channels, press the Cmd key.
To apply changes to a stereo pair in a relative fashion, such that the channels adjust
uniformly while maintaining their differences, press the Shift+Option key combination.
To apply changes to selected channels in a relative fashion, such that channels with
different settings adjust uniformly while maintaining their differences, press the Cmd+Option
key combination.
20
Fader Level Control
The fader control is similar across all mixer windows, and contains the following elements:
•
A Signal Meter, to the left of the fader slider.
•
The Fader Slider, which can be dragged up and down to adjust the level.
•
A Channel Number at the top-right of the control, corresponding to the
channel number at the top of the channel strip. Clicking on the channel
number will disable the channel completely, similar to the channel on/off
function found on analog consoles.
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An EQ shortcut button, which opens the EQ window. This is enabled only
when the system is configured to allow signal processing.
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A Unity (0 dB) shortcut button.
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A Listen button. A listen button is enabled only when a PAFL output is
configured. You map the listen button to a PAFL output or to a set of PAFL outputs using
a set of checkboxes that become avilable when PAFL output is configured.
•
VGroup A and VGroup B boxes. When the channel is assigned to a VGroup, its fader will
show a scaling bar along the fader track, indicating the scaling factor being applied to the
fader level. When using two VGroups, the scaling factor is the product of the VGroup levels
(multiplicative, not additive).
•
An off (-inf dB) shortcut button.
•
Level Wait, and Fade value boxes. You can drag the meter or value, or type a value directly.
Global Controls
Along the far left of the control panel, adjacent to and outside the channel strips, are some
controls and labels. From top to bottom, with variations dependent on your mixer configuration,
these include:
•
A master Channel Select button. This indicates whether any channel has been selected
and toggles the Channel Select for all faders simultaneously.
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CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
•
An Auxiliary Select button labeled with the Auxiliary Number, and a text box for the Auxiliary
Label. These controls appear only when the mixer is configured for auxiliary sends and
Display > Show Aux Sends is selected. Double-clicking the label flips the Aux Fader and
Channel Fader controls.
•
An Unlock +48v button which, when selected, enables the +48v Phantom power enable
button for each channel.
•
A Digital Trim button which, when double-clicked, flips the Trim and Level controls. The
label text changes to indicate which type of control the adjacent pan pot adjusts. To switch
back, click the F button.
•
A master set of automation controls, including Mute, + (polarity), Flip (restores Level control
when swapped with Aux, Trim, etc.), Solo, EQ enaBle, and Isolate. These buttons allow the
settings to be toggled globally for all inputs.
•
Two global Auxiliary Select buttons labeled with their Auxiliary Number.
•
A HOLD button. When enabled, multiple PFL buttons can be activated simultaneously.
When disabled, only one PFL can be activated at a time.
•
A set of checkboxes between the HOLD and CLEAR buttons. These select which PAFL
outputs have audio routed to them when you select the CLEAR button on each channel.
•
A CLEAR button which turns off any Listen buttons.
•
The Level (dB) button. After the Digital Trim button has been clicked up above, these
buttons "switch places". (Digital Trim becomes Level (dB), and vice-versa.) At this point,
double-click to flip the trim and level controls back to their original positions.
TIP
You can disable the global control buttons in the mixer windows by right-clicking within the
master set of buttons along the left side of the window. The Mute, + (polarity), Solo, EQ
Bypass, and Isolate buttons can be disabled for all channels.
Aux Flipping
The fader slider, because of its length and orientation, provides a finer level of mouse control
than the rotating control knobs. When you find yourself making many fine adjustments to a Trim
or Aux Level control, you may wish to “flip” it to the fader slider.
22
To flip a control for a single channel, click that channel’s Flip button. To restore normal fader
control, click the Flip button again.
To flip a control for all channels of that type, click the global Flip button (near the left hand side
of the window). To restore normal fader control for all channels, click the global Flip button again.
To flip all faders to a row of Aux Levels, double click the appropriate Aux Level row label (at the
left edge of the Aux Row you wish to edit). When you are done editing Aux Levels, double-click
the Aux Sends label (at the left hand edge of the window) to return to normal Trim/Level flipping.
The F9 and F10 keys flip through auxiliary channel rows, backward and forward, respectively.
Bus Masters
The Bus Master faders control the audio signal mixed from
the input channels assigned to each bus before it reaches the
matrix. Bus channel strips, pictured on the right, have the
following controls:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the bus number.
•
A Bus Label text box. Bus labels also appear in the Matrix
window.
•
A Digital Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
•
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input
Channel Strips (p. 18).
•
A set of fader controls, with a fader slider, Unity button,
Virtual Group assigns, HOLD and CLEAR buttons, and
Level, Wait, and Fade value boxes.
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CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
Output Masters
The Output Masters have controls similar to the Bus Masters:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the output number.
•
An Output Label text box. Output labels also appear in
the Matrix window.
•
An Analog Scale setting, to adjust the scale of the output
signal.
•
A Digital Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
•
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input Channel
Strips (p. 18).
•
A set of fader controls, as described in Fader Level Control
(p. 21).
•
A G. Master button. When enabled, the Output Master is
controlled by the Grand Master. When disabled, the Output
Master remains independent.
24
Aux Masters
The Aux Masters window displays controls for Auxiliary Output
channels:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the aux output
number.
•
An Aux Output Label text box.
•
An Analog Scale setting, to adjust the scale of the output
signal.
•
A Digital Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
•
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input Channel
Strips (p. 18).
•
A set of fader controls, as described in Fader Level Control
(p. 21).
•
A G. Master button, as described in Output Masters (p.
24).
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CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
PAFL Masters
The PAFL Masters window displays controls for PAFL Output
channels:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the aux output
number.
•
A PAFL Output Label text box.
•
An Analog Scale setting, to adjust the scale of the output
signal.
•
A Digital Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
•
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input
Channel Strips (p. 18).
•
A set of fader controls, as described in Fader Level
Control (p. 21).
•
A G. Master button, as described in Output Masters (p.
24).
26
Virtual Groups
The values of arbitrary groups of faders can be scaled by
Virtual Group Faders. VGroups can be used like the VCA
Groups in an analog console. A single Virtual Group Fader
can be assigned to control many types of faders at the same
time. You can assign any number of Input faders, Bus Master
faders, Output Master faders, and Aux Master faders to the
same Virtual Group fader. You can also assign any fader to
two Virtual Groups, allowing even more control. The Virtual
Groups window has the following controls:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the VGroup
number.
•
A VGroup Label text box.
•
A Digital Trim knob, with a button to reset it to unity.
•
A set of automation controls, as explained in Input
Channel Strips (p. 18).
•
A set of fader controls, with a fader slider, Unity button,
and Level, Wait, and Fade controls.
27
CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
Grand Master
The Grand Master controls the level of all regular output channels.
The Grand Master window contains the following controls:
•
An Aux Mute button. When active, mutes all Aux sends.
•
A Solo-In-Place button. This button turns green whenever
a solo is active. Click on the button to clear the solo.
•
A Master Stop button. This button has the same function
as the Master Stop button in the Transport window: clicking
on the button stops all automation, including Wild Tracks,
SpaceMap trajectories, fades, wait times, and autofollows.
•
A Mute button, which mutes the audio on all main output
channels.
•
An Isolate button, which isolates isolates the Grand Master
level, trim, and mute from automation.
•
The Grand Master fader, with Unity and -inf shortcut buttons.
•
Level, Wait, and Fade value boxes for the Grand Master fader.
•
The Trim fader, with Unity and -inf shortcut buttons.
•
Level value box for the Grand Master fader.
28
Adjusting Settings across Multiple Channels
There are several ways to apply changes to more than one channel at a time, either by entering
new settings with the keyboard alone, or by using the mouse in combination with keyboard
modifier keys and key combinations.
Changing Channel Settings by Entering Field Data
When you are changing channel settings by typing data into channel strip fields, you can apply
your changes to channels in stereo pairs, or to broader channel selections, either on an absolute
or a relative basis, as outlined below.
•
Shift-click to change a control point to make changes in stereo pairs.
•
Use Shift-Enter after typing in a new control point value (such as a Fade time) to make
changes in stereo pairs.
•
Command-click on control points to make proportionate changes to all selected channels.
•
Press Command-Enter after typing in a control point value to change that value for all
selected channels.
•
Command-middle-click to change control points for all selected channels in the window.
Changing Multiple Channel Settings by Mouse
CueStation also provides a set of keyboard modifiers for you to use as you work with a mouse
to change settings across a selection of several inputs or outputs. Using these modifiers, you
can alter channels in stereo pairs or in larger groups, as described below.
•
You can right-click-drag (Windows) or Ctrl-drag (Mac) to copy control values from one
channel to another. You can use this technique to copy the entirety of settings from one
channel to another, or just a particular section of the channel strip, such as the bus assigns
or the fader level.
•
To apply changes to a stereo pair on an absolute basis, select one channel of the pair, and
press the Shift key as you make changes.
•
To apply changes on an absolute basis to all selected channels, press the Cmd key.
29
CHAPTER 5: MIXER CONTROLS
•
To apply changes to a stereo pair in a relative fashion, such that the channels adjust uniformly
while maintaining their differences, press the Shift+Option key combination.
•
To apply changes to selected channels in a relative fashion, such that channels with different
settings adjust uniformly while maintaining their differences, press the Cmd+Option key
combination.
30
MATRIX WINDOW
The matrix in CueStation 5.2.0 is an adaptation of a matrix found on traditional analog consoles.
It provides distribution of input bus signals to output channels.
Bus and Output Controls
The matrix is presented as a grid. Rows correspond to bus input and columns to output channels.
Along the left and top of the grid are corresponding control strips of Channel Select buttons.
These are labeled with their Bus Number or Output Channel Number and names.
The rest of the matrix is devoted to cross-point value boxes, which correspond to the knobs on
a physical console matrix. These value boxes can be adjusted by typing in a value directly, or
by clicking inside a box and dragging the value up and down. Levels are measured in dB (0 dB
= unity).
31
CHAPTER 6: MATRIX WINDOW
Special Commands
Display Menu
Show Waits (Cmd+J)
Displays the wait time at each crosspoint.
Show Fades (Cmd+K)
Displays the fade time at each crosspoint.
Show Levels (Cmd+L)
Default view. Displays the levels at each crosspoint.
Show Page Group Controls
Displays Page Group controls at the bottom of the window.
Show All
Displays all levels, wait time, and fade time in each crosspoint.
Matrix Menu
Clear Output Matrix
Set all levels to -inf dB.
Clear Displayed Region
Set all levels on the current page to -inf dB. The page is determined by the blue horizontal
and vertical scroll bars.
Set Diagonal
For each output, the crosspoint with the corresponding bus number is set to 0.0 dB, creating
a 1-to-1 relationship between buses and outputs.
Set Diagonal, Buses, Outputs
Sets a diagonal as explained above, and sets all Bus Masters and Output Masters to 0.0
dB.
32
SIGNAL PROCESSING CONTROLS
The Input Processing and Bus Processong windows provide input/output and auxiliary signal
processing controls you can use to adjust equalization, delay, and dynamics.
Channel Strips
Channel strips can have the following components, from top to bottom:
•
A Channel Select button, labeled with the Channel Number. Selecting a channel in the
Processing window is equivalent to selecting the channel in its corresponding fader window.
•
A channel Label box. Faders can be automatically named when configuring the mixer, or
you can click the box and type a name.
•
A Graphic Equalizer with 20Hz-20kHz ±20 dB range and draggable control points.
•
A pair of meters to the left of the Graphic EQ.
•
A Bypass All EQ Bands button, which will disable EQ for the channel.
•
EQ band controls, each with:
•
A Bypass button. When selected, the corresponding equalizer control point is disabled.
•
A Band Label text box.
33
CHAPTER 7: SIGNAL PROCESSING CONTROLS
•
34
•
An EQ Type selector, allowing you to choose various equalization algorithms. The
options available are Parametric, Low Shelf, High Shelf, Notch, Low Pass, High Pass,
and Band Pass.
•
Gain, Freq, and Q value boxes. You can type in a value directly, or click on the number
and drag up and down to change the value.
Dynamics band controls for Noise Gate, Compressor, Limiter, and Expander, with:
•
A Bypass All Dynamics button, for disabling all of the band dynamics at once.
•
Bypass buttons to bypass selected dynamics processing: Noise Gate, Compressor,
Limiter, and Expander.
•
The Threshold, Attack, Hold, Release, Range/Ratio, and Makeup Gain value boxes,
which can be adjusted by dragging or by typing a value directly.
•
Delay controls, with:
•
A Bypass Delay button, to disable the delay on that channel.
•
A Delay value box. Type 0 to disable delay for the channel, or a decimal value to set
delay in milliseconds.
TIP
To make changes in smaller increments, hold down the Option key when dragging values.
You can also use the page-up and page-down keys to make incremental changes.
User Traces
When configuring EQ settings, it can sometimes be helpful to view a reference trace in addition
to the actual processing trace. You can add a trace in the form of a CSV file. There are several
other programs that can output EQ data as a CSV file, such as Matlab or SIM3.
To add a user CSV trace:
1. In the Input Processing window, go to Display > User CSV Trace Settings....
2. Click on Choose Directory... to direct your file search.
3. Click on Choose File... to select a CSV file.
35
CHAPTER 7: SIGNAL PROCESSING CONTROLS
4. At this point, the CSV data should be visible in the EQ graph. If not, you may have to adjust
the Gain Offset up or down.
5. Click on Color to select the color for your trace.
6. To view multiple traces at once, click on Add Another Trace and follow the same steps.
Each trace can have a different color.
Advanced Feature: Channel-Specific Traces
Adding a user trace typically results in the same trace being visible on all channels. However,
by using a specific file naming technique, you can view a different trace on each channel. For
this example, let's say you have three files:
•
FirstTrace.csv
•
SecondTrace.csv
•
ThirdTrace.csv
And you would like to view these traces on channels 25, 26, and 27, respectively. To accomplish
this:
1. Rename all of your CSV files with the same name, except for the channel number. For this
example, you would rename your files:
•
Trace_25.csv
•
Trace_26.csv
•
Trace_27.csv
2. In the User CSV Trace Settings window, click on Choose Directory... and navigate to the
directory where your trace files are stored.
3. In the File(s) text box, type "Trace_%CHAN%.csv". CueStation will automatically replace
the "%CHAN%" text with the channel number in the file name. This means that Trace_25.csv,
originally named FirstTrace.csv, will only appear on channel 25, Trace_26.csv will appear
only on channel 26, and so on.
36
Special Commands
Display Menu
Show EQ Graph
Display visual representation of frequency and gain.
Show EQ Phase
Display green phase line behind the EQ graph line.
Show EQ Band Settings
Display controls for all EQ processing.
Show Delay Settings
Display controls for delay processing.
Show Delay Distances
Display delay as distances, in both feet and meters. Changing the time field will affect the
distance field, and vice versa.
Show Dynamics Settings
Display controls for dynamics processing.
Show Meters
Display signal and compression meters.
Show Peak Hold
Display Peak Hold mark.
Set Peak Hold Duration...
Enter a time for the Peak Hold mark to remain visible.
Show User CSV Traces
Display user-added graph data.
User CSV Trace Settings...
Import a file to create an additional EQ trace.
Show Page Group Controls
Display Page Group controls at the bottom of the window.
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CHAPTER 7: SIGNAL PROCESSING CONTROLS
Keyboard
In addition to the regular menu shortcuts, the arrow and tab keys navigate the various value
boxes. By holding down Shift when changing values, you can make changes in stereo pairs.
Hold down the Option key when dragging values, to make smaller changes.
Mouse
Right-click and drag to copy control point values from one channel to another.
38
SYSTEM MONITORING
CueStation provides several ways of monitoring the activity and health of the system, including
connection status indicators in the bottom corner of every window. There are also several windows
dedicated to providing feedback about the state of the system.
CueStation Connection Status
When CueStation is connected to a server, the name of that server will be displayed in the title
bar of every CueStation window, next to the window title. This makes it easy to tell whether your
CueStation client is connected or not. One basic method of monitoring network activity exists at
the bottom of every CueStation window.
In the image above, the text field shows the name of the current project file. In this case the
project file would be "beta test.dmitriProject". You can set your own project title by selecting
Projects > Set Project Title... and entering a name.
The two arrows in the bottom right corner of the window are communication status arrows. The
upward (upload) arrow represents communication from the window to the server, and the
downward (download) arrow represents communication from the server to the window. The
arrows are gray unless there is active communication between the window and the server, in
which case they turn yellow or green.
An arrow's background color also carries meaning. A yellow background, for example, indicates
an interruption in communication. In the case of a window failing to receive a response from the
server for four seconds, the background of the downward arrow will turn yellow, as shown above.
If such an interruption should persist for ten seconds, the entire CueStation window background
color will change.
In tandem, the color of an arrow and its background show which server background process is
not responding. The following illustration denotes the arrow/background color combinations and
their meanings.
39
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
Log Alert, Page Alert, and Status Alert
To the left of the connection status arrows, there are three icons: a System Status icon, a
telephone, and a LOG icon.
The system status icon will show a green "OK" when CueStation
is running normally. It has a red blinking background during an
Alert condition, and a yellow background during an acknowledged
Alert condition. Click on this icon to bring up the System Status
window (see System Status Window (p. 44)). To change the
threshold for system status alerts, right-click on this icon when
the System Status window is up, then select the threshold
from the menu. For instance, if you select Alert on Critical
Error Condition, the system status icon will only blink when
a Critical Error occurs.
Whenever a log entry of Warning level or higher is printed to
the log, the LOG icon will flash the corresponding color on all connected CueStation windows.
Clicking on the icon will open the Log window and clear the flashing.
Similar to the system status threshold, if you right-click on the LOG icon, you can change the
threshold of log alerts. For instance, if you select Blink on Critical Error, the LOG icon will only
40
blink when a Critical Error message appears in the log. See Log Window (p. 41) for more details
about error messages.
The telephone icon gives you quick access to the Chat window. When another user pages you,
all of your CueStation windows will flash cyan once, and the telephone icon will continue to flash
until you open the Chat window. When you hover over the telephone icon with the mouse, a
tooltip displays the last several page instances with timestamps.
Log Window
The Log records all important system messages, both from CueStation and from D-Mitri modules.
It provides a useful tool for troubleshooting hardware issues, communication problems,
configuration errors, and cue automation issues. CueStation stores logs as files in the D-Mitri_Logs
directory, within the CueStation_Settings directory. CueStation creates a new log for each
session, and incorporates date and time stamps into the name of each log file.
Log Entries
Clicking a column heading will sort the log alphabetically by that heading; clicking the heading
a second time will sort it in reverse alphabetical order. The time and date format is compatible
with alphabetical sorting.
The Log # and Time columns show the order in which the messages were received. The Source
column indicates which software or hardware component sent the message, while the Level
41
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
column shows the severity of the message and the Description contains the message. You can
annotate the log entry in the Comment column. The Source Serial # column shows the serial
number of the device CueStation read for each message. The Code column shows a code
number associated with each log, useful for debugging and troubleshooting.
You can reorder the log entries by clicking on a column header to sort the table, or reorder
columns by dragging the columns from one position to another within the table.
42
Adding Log Entries
The Log window also has an Enter Log Comment text field which can be used to easily enter
comment lines into the log. The warning level of the comment entry can be set using the
drop-down box to the right of the text box. Note that selecting an error level from the drop-down
box also filters the error display to show only errors of the type selected.
To add an entry, type the comment into the Enter Log Comment text field and press Enter.
Types of Log Entries
There are six levels of log messages that might appear in your log window:
Info
These messages contain information about normal system activity. This includes recalling
a cue, or the completion of certain processes such as track-from-top or saving a project to
flash. These messages have a white background.
Warn
The Warn level is for messages that are important to note, but do not necessarily indicate
that an error has occurred (i.e., a version mismatch between the client and the server).
These messages have a yellow background.
Error
This level indicates that an error has taken place. Error messages do not necessarily mean
that the system is in danger of failure. For example, an attempt to recall a nonexistent cue
would be logged as an error, but such an occurrence does not jeopardize the function of
any D-Mitri module, or of a D-Mitri system. Error messages have a pink background.
Critical
This level indicates a critical system failure. These messages have a red background.
Debug
Debug messages contain debugging information only, and do not usually appear in normal
CueStation operation. These messages have a green background.
Trace
These messages are used to trace program execution, and do not usually appear in normal
CueStation operation. These messages have a cyan background.
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CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
Special Commands
Log Menu
Clear Log
Clear the log window of all log entries. This command clears the log for all CueStation clients
connected to the target D-Mitri system, as opposed to clearing just the local Log window.
Save Log...
Save the log to a text file.
Save Log As...
Save the log to a text file, with a different file name.
System Status Window
The System Status window provides a remote view of the performance of D-Mitri modules
included in system configuration. It monitors processor modules and Matrix modules in real time.
The window now provides a live link state diagram, as shown below, which displays which DCP
modules are currently passing audio to which DCM modules. This diagram is particularly useful
in operating D-Mitri systems containing redundant modules, as it shows which redundant modules
are active.
NOTE
No system details are available when connected to VirtualD-Mitri. The System Status
window will be blank.
44
When everything is operating normally, the entries will have a green background. The color
changes according to unit's status. The following three values have specific reporting values
and formats:
•
Temperature values are reported in centigrade, in this format:
Core1/Core2/Core3/Core4/MCH/FCC/CB
•
Voltage values are reported in volts, in this format: in0/in1/in2/in3/in4/in5
•
Fan speeds are reported as a percentage of full speed, in this format: fan1/fan2/fan3
Status
Online or Offline.
Module Name
Displays pre-determined name.
45
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
Module Type
Displays pre-determined type.
Role
Displays the role of a processor module as primary or backup. The role of a module as
shown in the System Status window reflects its role as specified in the Mixer Configuration
window, with a minor differences in how some backup modules are denoted. The table
below shows how modules are presented in the Role column of the System Status window,
and provides the corresponding name for each module as it is displayed in the Unit column
of the Mixer Configuration window.
Table 8.1. System Status Module Role Designations
Module Type
Functional
Role
System Status Role
Name
Mixer Configuration Unit Name
D-Mitri Core Matrix
Primary
MTRX-1
MTRX-1
Backup
MTRX
MTRX-X
Primary
PROC-1, PROC-2,
PROC-3, etc.
PROC-1, PROC-2, etc.
Backup
PROC
PROC-X
Wild Tracks
Primary
WTRX-1, WTRX-2, etc.
WTRX-1, WTRX-2, etc.
VRAS
Primary
VRAS-1, VRAS-2, etc.
VRAS-1, VRAS-2, etc.
D-Mitri Core
Processor
Serial Number
Module serial number.
Version
Version and build information.
Temp
If the temperature is between 5% under to 5% over the maximum working limits, the
background is yellow with black text. If greater than 5% over the working limit, the background
is red with white text.
Power
If the voltage is less than 5% of the working value, the background is yellow with black text.
If greater than 1% over the working value, the background is red with white text.
46
Uptime
How long the system has been active. Time is given in increments ranging from seconds
to days.
CPU
Percentage of CPU used.
RAM
Percentage of RAM used.
Fan Speed
Percentage of fan speed (25 percent capacity, etc.).
Heartbeat Error
Shows the difference between each module's system clocks. There should never be more
than a few milliseconds in a properly functioning system. If the values go out of range, an
error will be written to the log.
Audio Port Status
Shows which GNet audio connections (between a DCP and a DCM) are down or missing.
FPGA Version
Displays the version of the FPGA firmware that a module is running. Note that I/O modules
do not use FPGA firmware.
Recommended Maximums
D-Mitri hardware may not function properly if any of the following values are exceeded:
Temperature thresholds:
Core1 through Core4: warn at 60ºC/140ºF, error at 72ºC/162ºF.
MCH: warn at 90ºC/136ºF, error at 100ºC/212ºF.
FCC: warn at 65ºC/150ºF, error at 75ºC/167ºF.
CB: warn at 55ºC/131ºF, error at 75ºC/167ºF.
47
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
Voltage thresholds:
in0: expected is 1.8v, warn at ±5%, error at ±10%.
in1: expected is 1.1v, warn at ±22%, error at ±23%.
in2: expected is 3.3v, warn at ±5%, error at ±10%.
in3: expected is 5.0v, warn at ±5%, error at ±10%.
in4: expected is 12.0v, warn at ±5%, error at ±10%.
in5: expected is 1.1v, warn at ±5%, error at ±10%.
Signal Path
It can sometimes be helpful to see the signal path to or from a particular channel. To this end,
CueStation offers a signal path view which changes dynamically as the routing of a source
changes.
To view the signal path for an input channel:
•
Open the Inputs window (Cmd+2).
•
Right-click on the channel number in the Channel Select button at the top of the window.
•
In the menu that appears, select Show Signal Path.
A window should appear similar to the ones shown at right.
48
You can also view the signal path in relation to an Aux Send, Bus, PAFL, or Output Channel by
right-clicking on its channel select button.
Channel Meters
The meters provide real-time metering of Input, Output, Bus, and Aux signals. Input is scaled to
trim levels. PAFL channel meters are displayed in the Aux Meters window.
The Input Meter itself shows signals in the range
-80 dB to unity (0 dB).
The meter scroll bar functions the same as blue
scroll bars in other windows: The horizontal scroll
bar has + and - buttons to add or remove
channel strips from the window, as well as < and
> buttons to scroll through the strips when they
don’t all fit in the window.
Other features:
•
The meter labels will flash red after peaking has occurred. Peaks can be cleared by clicking
on the meter.
•
The meters have peak hold indicators that you can adjust in the Display menu. Select Set
Peak Hold Duration... to change the peak hold time.
•
Also in the Display menu, use Show Peak Hold Bar and Show Peak Hold Text to display
the current dB level of that channel in text above the meter
•
A horizontal reference line is available in any of the Meters windows. This has a default of
-20 dB, and can be accessed through Display > Show Reference Line. To adjust the level,
go to Display > Set Reference Level... and enter the decibel you want.
Tablet Controls
The Meter windows have additional channel editing controls, accessible through the Display
menu. These controls are particularly useful for tablet/touch screen displays, but can also be
used with a regular mouse.
49
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM MONITORING
In the Display menu, if you enable Show Tablet Controls, you will see five buttons across the
bottom of the window:
Show EQ
If this button is active, touching or clicking on a meter will cause the corresponding channel
processing window to open, allowing quick access to EQ, dynamics, and delay controls.
Mute
Selecting a meter will mute that channel.
Show Strip
Selecting a meter will open the corresponding mixer window, with the selected channel in
the first column.
Isolate
Selecting a meter will isolate that channel.
Select
Allows you to select and deselect several channels at one time.
Grey Meters
Sometimes, the meters will appear grey and show no signal. This can happen in any of the
following conditions:
•
CueStation is connected to a VirtualD-Mitri that is running in "built-in simulator" (offline)
mode. VirtualD-Mitri does not connect to real D-Mitri hardware.
•
If CueStation is connected to a D-Mitri, your network might have a firewall which is preventing
the transmission of UDP packets.
UDP Metering
CueStation's default metering setting is UDP multicast packets. UDP packets are multicast by
the D-Mitri, and all of the clients "listen" to receive the metering information. This allows the
meters to update faster and be more accurate. If you are experiencing network problems with
metering, you can switch back to TCP metering by de-selecting Use UDP Metering in the
Network menu.
50
Special Commands
Display Menu
Show Meter Levels
Displays green meter bars.
Show Compression
Displays compression activity.
Show Names
Displays channel names.
Show Channel Selects
Shows the Channel Select buttons.
Show Horizontal Meters
Switches meters from vertical to horizontal array.
Show Peak Hold Bar
Shows a peak hold bar for each channel.
Show Peak Hold Text
Displays current dB value of peak hold.
Set Peak Hold Duration...
Opens a dialog box to set the amount of time a peak hold bar should remain visible.
Show Tablet Controls
Enables Tablet controls (see Tablet Controls (p. 49)).
Show Page Group Controls
Displays group controls (see SpaceMap Grid Settings (p. 125)).
51
VIRTUALD-MITRI
CueStation provides a client interface to D-Mitri server modules. When no actual D-Mitri module
is available to you, or when you wish to experiment with CueStation without having to connect
to an actual D-Mitri module, you can use VirtualD-Mitri. VirtualD-Mitri is a software-based server
component for CueStation.
Working Offline
The CueStation 5.2.0 client normally connects to the server running on D-Mitri. There are times,
however, when you may find it necessary to do your cue programming work without having
access to your hardware. In such cases, VirtualD-Mitri provides a simulation of the system. You
connect to this server through the Network > Connect... command.
VirtualD-Mitri provides status information and a set of windows that allow control of specific
server components.
Show/Hide Details
Clicking the Show Details button expands the VirtualD-Mitri window to the status shown above.
It displays status information, five window tabs, and various controls. Clicking Hide Details will
reduce the window down to a minimum size.
53
CHAPTER 9: VIRTUALD-MITRI
Status Information
Near the top of the window, you'll find the system name, version number, memory usage, and
build date for VirtualD-Mitri.
Control Buttons
The five VirtualD-Mitri window tabs have different sets of control buttons. Two of these control
the server component background processes, program routines that are responsible for monitoring
communications and status, and providing server services.
•
Restart Daemon is enabled only when the background process associated with the selected
tab has been killed. Killing and restarting a background process is basically equivalent to
rebooting that component of the server.
•
Kill Daemon shuts down the background process associated with the selected tab.
•
Scroll Down moves the tab’s scrollbar to the bottom of the message list.
•
Clear Output removes all the messages from the selected tab.
Job Manager
The Job Manager tab contains the output of the djobd daemon, which launches all of the other
daemons and dictates their roles in the system. It's also responsible for restarting the other
daemons if they should crash or exit.
Project Database
The Project Database tab lists system messages regarding the database background process,
its communication with other background processes, and any project stored within the database.
The database process controls access to subcues, cues, cue lists, and other project components.
Mixer Control
The Mixer Control tab lists system messages regarding the mixer background process, its
communication with other background processes, and the status of various signal mix paths.
The mixer background process is responsible for controlling and adjusting the signal mix.
54
Audio Processing
The Audio Processing tab contains the dcasld daemon. This daemon maintains the state of all
system control points, as well as related tasks such as cue recalls and cue lists.
CueConsole
The CueConsole tab has controls for the CueConsole background process. This process is
started automatically when VirtualD-Mitri starts. See the Virtual CueConsole™ (p. 55) section
for more details.
TIP
To access the web server, point your web browser to port 8080 of the computer running
VirtualD-Mitri (e.g. http://localhost:8080). To add HTML files for the web server, drag them
in to the Support Files window.
Virtual CueConsole
The CueConsole window lists system messages regarding the CueConsole background process,
its communication with other background processes, and the status of any connected CueConsole
modules. The CueConsole background process is responsible for monitoring and controlling the
movement of CueConsole controls.
In order to use the CueConsole emulator, open CueStation and connect to VirtualD-Mitri. In the
Subcue Library or Commands window, create a Command with Type CueConsole2 and
Command of "Map Transporter Module". When you recall the subcue or click on Recall Selected,
a new window will appear, containing a virtual Transporter module. All CueConsole2 modules
are supported.
55
CHAPTER 9: VIRTUALD-MITRI
56
Part III. CueStation Automation
Chapter 10: Mixer Automation
Automation Overview
Automation Basics
Channel Select
Capturing Cues
Capture Window tabs
Building a Cue List
Running a Show
Cue List Players
Editing Cues
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Command Subcues
Chapter 11: SpaceMap Automation
SpaceMap Overview
Elements of SpaceMap
Types of Nodes
SpaceMap Controls
Creating a SpaceMap
Creating Trajectories
Creating SpaceMap Subcues
SpaceMap Design
Chapter 12: Wild Tracks Playback
61
61
63
65
69
74
85
89
93
95
101
111
115
115
116
117
120
127
131
133
134
143
Importing Audio Using Drive Setup
Wild Tracks Window
Wild Tracks Entries
Wild Tracks Subcues
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
Advanced Techniques
Using Wild Tracks Offline
144
144
163
167
173
175
177
181
Chapter 13: VRAS Processing
183
User Interface
VRAS Subcues
183
187
59
MIXER AUTOMATION
Automation Overview
CueStation mixer automation is based on the movement of mixer controls over time. It provides
transition automation, which allows for fades and other changes over time, as compared to
simple snapshot automation, which typically sets all controls instantaneously.
CueStation offers a graphical interface for various mixer control points. A control point is any
adjustable mixer control, such as a fader, pan knob, or EQ setting. The values for a set of control
points are contained in a subcue and a set of subcues can be captured to create a cue. These
cues can be placed in a cue list. During a show, the cues in the cue list will be triggered manually,
automatically in sequence, at a certain time point, or via a controller external to the system.
The subcue, cue, and cue list structure provides a system for defining control automation. The
complete CueStation data hierarchy, from the bottom up, is as follows:
Control Points
A control point in CueStation is defined in a general sense as any parameter that can be
adjusted manually or by the automation system. As with physical consoles, a lot of the
control points are associated with faders, knobs, and switches. Some control points address
signal-processing parameters, such as equalization and delay, while other control points,
like isolate, affect the operation of the automation system itself.
For example, Input faders have three control points: Level, Wait, and Fade. Level sets the
target fader value, and Fade sets how long it will take to move the fader to the target value.
Wait sets the delay between recalling the cue and the start of the fader movement. This
allows one to program a cue that starts a three-second fade to unity one second after recall.
All three control points are contained in each Input Level subcue.
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Subcues
A Subcue is a collection of control points. The automation structure in CueStation is based
on absolute destinations. This means that the control points contained in subcues reflect
the state the mixer will be in when the recall of that subcue is complete, regardless of what
those control points were set to initially. In other words, it doesn't matter whether the fader
for input channel 10 is at 0 dB or -inf dB; if a subcue is recalled with the information "Input
10 Level: -20.0 dB Fade: 5 Wait: 0", the fader will move from wherever it was to -20 dB over
five seconds.
You can, however, work within the subcue structure definition to set control points as relative
values. You might, for example, choose to define a subcue that increases or decreases an
input level. To do this, you would enter the value using a prefix to indicate the relative
increase or decrease. The prefix for specifying a relative increase is ++, and the prefix for
specifying a relative decrease is -.
Cues
A Cue in CueStation refers to a collection of subcues that will be recalled as a group. A cue
could contain many different types of subcues, or only one subcue. Cues do not contain
any information about control points. A cue only has references to subcues; it "points" to all
of the subcues it contains. If a subcue has a wait time associated with it, that information is
also stored as part of the cue.
Cue Lists
A Cue List is an indexed collection of cues that are intended to be recalled in a certain order.
Like a cue, a cue list does not have any control point data in itself. It merely contains
references to the cues associated with it. A cue list can also have triggering and timing
information associated with each cue (see Building a Cue List (p. 85)).
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Project File
The Project File is the container which stores all automation data. A project file also contains
the configuration of the hardware, layout information, and network port settings. Any of the
data in a project file can be "merged" into another project; this provides a method for
"importing" cues, cue lists, or any other automation data. Project files can be saved to your
client computer's hard drive, or to the flash memory inside a D-Mitri. Projects saved to your
hard drive will have a ".dmitriProject" extension.
IMPORTANT
D-Mitri's flash memory saves only one file across all the modules in the system. Whenever
a user chooses to save a project to a system’s flash memory, by choosing the Save Project
to Flash… command from CueStation’s Projects menu, CueStation overwrites any existing
project file already in the system’s flash memory.
Cue-Based Automation
Control point settings are stored and organized through the automation editing windows. These
windows support the creation and management of subcues, cues, and cue lists. Subcues contain
the control data for all mixer functions and external device commands.
CueStation stores discrete states, target values, and time intervals, and calculates the continuous
transformations from cue to cue on the fly. Such efficiency is essential for large configurations.
The flexibility of cue automation is also critical in live performance where timing and order can
not be accurately determined ahead of time.
Automation Basics
This section will step through the process of capturing cues into a cue list. Each of these steps
is explained in more detail in subsequent sections.
1. Set Control Points
The first steps in creating a cue are determining what the cue should do and setting the control
points on the mixer accordingly. Because of the way automation works in CueStation, set the
mixer to the state you would like it to be in once the cue is complete. For instance, if you wanted
an input fader to fade from 0 to -20 dB over five seconds, you would set the fader to -20 dB,
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then set the fade time to 5. (The controls of the mixer windows are covered in the Part II, “D-Mitri
Mixer” section.)
2. Select Channels
Once you have set the mixer to the desired state, you can use Channel Select to filter which
parts of the mixer will be captured into the cue. For instance, if you want the level of input channels
5 and 6 to fade out, without changing the level of the other input channels, you would only select
channels 5 and 6. Channel Select is described in more detail in Channel Select (p. 65).
3. Open Capture Window
When the control points have been set and the appropriate channels have been selected, press
the F4 key to open the Capture window. In the Capture window, you can enter a name and
comment for the cue. The cue capturing process is described further in Capturing Cues (p. 69).
4. Select Subcue Types
The next step is to determine which parts of the selected channels you wish to capture. In the
middle of the Capture window there are several lists of subcue types; place a check mark next
to each subcue type you want to capture, and leave the other ones unchecked. If you want to
capture the input levels, but don't want the cue to change the input labels, you would check the
box next to Input Levels and uncheck the box next to Input Labels.
5. Capture Cue
Once all the relevant subcue types have been selected, click on the button in the lower right
corner labeled Click to Capture New. A new cue will be created with the name you entered,
referencing the subcues you selected, which contain information about the channels you selected.
The new cue will be appended to the current Cue List, and will also appear in the Cue Library.
The new subcues will appear in the Subcue Library.
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6. Build a Cue List
After you have created some cues, you can organize them into a Cue List within the Cue List
window. You can add more cues from the Cue Library window by right-clicking and dragging
them into the Cue List, or change the order of the existing cues, again by right-clicking and
dragging. The Cue List window is also where you set whether a cue is triggered manually or by
time code, or autofollows a previous cue by a certain length of time. This process is explained
in more detail in Building a Cue List (p. 85).
7. Edit Cues
If you find that you need to edit a cue after it has been captured, there are several ways of
accomplishing this. One way is through the Capture window, in Capture Differences mode.
Instead of creating a new cue with the selected control points, it will amend the changes to the
most recently recalled cue, or any other cue you select. Another way to change a cue is to edit
the values of the control points manually, by viewing the contents of the subcues. These methods
are described more fully in Editing Cues (p. 95).
Channel Select
In each of the mixer windows, you see a group of channels or controls that are all of the same
type, whether they are input channels, output channels, Wild Tracks Decks, SpaceMap buses,
etc. You can capture all the information, from all the channels, at once in a subcue. Or, using
Channel Select, you can only capture information from the channels that need to change in a
particular cue.
For example, on a large console you usually wouldn't need all 64 faders to simultaneously change
value. Rather, you’d probably be fading only a few channels. As well, faders that are already in
motion must be eliminated from subsequent cue triggering if they are to complete their movement
uninterrupted.
The same thing applies to Wild Tracks Deck and SpaceMap trajectories. If you have a cue where
a song starts playing in one deck, you wouldn't want to include in the cue that all the other decks
are stopped, because you might have other sounds playing. For this cue, to only capture the
deck where the new song starts, you need to select that deck.
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Using Channel Select in Each Window
At the top of or beside all channel, bus, and virtual
group controls, CueStation offers a button labeled
Select, adjoined by an arrow pointing across the
channel strip columns to the right. This is the master
select button. Clicking this button selects all
channels in the given window, highlighting the
channels.
For greater convenience in selecting large numbers
or discontiguous ranges of channels, you can also
right-click on the master select button to summon
the Selects dialog, as shown below.
The Selects dialog lets you select columns from a
list, without having to scroll about the window to
choose channel strips through mouse selection.
You can either click selections in the list, or enter
channel numbers in the text field atop the dialog.
The text field recognizes both individual channels
and ranges of channels. You specify a range of
channels by separating the first and last channels
of the range with a dash.To input multiple
selections, you separate them using commas.
To select channels 1 through 7, channel 12, and
channels 24-29, for example, you would enter:
1-7,12,24-29.
The Capture window has controls that further
refine Channel Select. You can see which
channels will be captured by clicking on the Use
Channel Selects button. Each type of channel
has a checkbox next to it which you can de-select
if you want to capture all channels instead of just
the selected ones.
When a cue that uses Channel Select is
captured, the new subcues that are created only
contain information about those controls that were selected. Later, when that cue is recalled,
66
only those channels that were selected will be affected. All other controls will continue to do
whatever they were doing. If a channel was in mid-fade, it will continue to fade; if at rest, it will
remain at rest.
Using Channel Select in the Capture Window
It is also possible to edit channel selects from within the Capture window. This is especially
useful when you need to select multiple channels from different areas (Wild Tracks, SpaceMaps,
Aux, etc.).
1. Right-click on the Channel Selection area (see Channel Selection (p. 71)), to the right of
the Channel Select buttons, to bring up the pop-up editor.
2. Select your channel type from the list to bring up the control dialog.
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3. Select the channels you want to capture, then close the dialog by clicking on the close box
in the upper right corner.
4. Repeat the process for every different channel type you want to capture.
5. Your channels are now selected in the Channel Selection area.
Channel Select Capture Logic
In most mixer windows, if no channels are selected, then control points for all channels will be
captured. For instance, if you have no Input channels selected, but are capturing an Input Level
subcue, then the captured subcue will include the levels of all Input channels.
However, there are a few exceptions:
•
If the Wild Tracks Deck subcue type is selected, but no Wild Tracks Deck is selected, then
only Deck 1 on Unit 1 will be captured into the cue.
•
If the SpaceMap Trajectory or Position subcue type is selected, but no SpaceMap bus is
selected, then the captured SpaceMap subcue will contain no control points.
•
If the Cue List Player subcue type is selected, but no Cue List Player is selected, then the
captured Cue List Player subcue will contain no control points.
Follow Channel Selects
In the Mixer menu, there is a Follow Channel Selects option. If this is enabled, then whenever
a cue with Channel Selects is recalled, the channels selected in that cue will be automatically
selected in the mixer windows.
IMPORTANT
This function is enabled only on a per-client basis. It is recommended that you leave this
function off, as it can sometimes cause you to capture a different set of items into a cue
than you intended.
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Capturing Cues
The Capture window is where the actual cue and subcue creation takes place. The Capture
window controls make it easy to limit the control points and channels that will be captured, and
to create a new set of subcues corresponding to only those control points that have been changed.
Capture Window Controls
The Capture window has four tabs: Capture, Subcue Types, Control Point Sets, and Index Sets.
The latter three tabs allow you to customize the set of control points captured for a subcue, or
create new subcue types. These tabs are detailed in the Capture Window tabs (p. 74) section.
The Capture tab is your main working window for cue creation. There are five groups of controls:
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•
A Cue Selection area, which identifies the source cue for Capture Differences or shows
(Create New Cue) for Capture New. It also shows the new cue’s name and description.
•
A Channel Selection area, where you can use Channel Select to identify which channels
will be captured.
•
Capture Differences controls, active in Capture Differences mode, where you can specify
how new control points will be integrated with the cue's current subcues.
•
A Subcue Types Selection area, identifying the set of mixer component controls to be
captured.
•
A Capture Controls area, with options relating to the behavior of the Capture window and
how the cue will be captured.
Cue Selection
The Cue Selection area provides a set of controls that allow you to create new cues, update
existing cues, or recall settings on which to base a new cue.
This area contains:
•
A Cue drop-down box showing (Create New Cue) by default. If you select an existing cue
from the drop-down box, the subcues can be updated or replaced.
•
A Name text box showing Cue 0 or the name of the cue you selected. You can type in a
name for the new cue, or rename the selected cue.
•
A Recall button, which triggers the cue, moving its control points to their previously-saved
values.
•
A Comment text box, in which you can type any comments regarding the cue.
70
•
A Details button, which opens the Cue Library to show the current cue’s subcues
Channel Selection
The Channel Selection area
controls the selection of
channels to be included in the
cue. This area contains:
•
A Use Channel Selects
button that specifies
whether the captured subcues will include values for all channels, or only selected channels.
•
One or more Channel Selection Range check boxes to the right of Use Channel Selects.
The channels selected via Channel Select are shown, and you can turn some of these sets
off to further refine the channels that will be included in the subcues.
•
A Capture Isolated Channels button that specifies whether channels that are isolated are
to be captured or not.
•
A Share Existing Subcues button, active by default. When inactive, new cues never use
the existing subcues. (That is, a new subcue will be created for every checked subcue type.)
•
An Uncheck All Subcue Types button that unchecks all subcue types in the Subcue Types
Selection area below.
Capture Differences Controls
This section is only active for Capture
Differences or Update Subcues, and
controls how the intersection between
the new and old subcues will be handled.
This area contains:
•
Replace, Amend, and Existing
mode buttons, to toggle between the three most frequently used update options.
•
A Capture-Operator box with four options: New Control Points Only, Intersection, Union,
and Old Control Points Only.
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•
A Capture-Precedence box with three options: New Values Preferred, Old Values
Preferred, and New Values Always.
•
A Venn Diagram showing a graphical description of how the subcues will be updated.
These controls are described in detail in Appendix B, Capture Window Advanced Mode, located
in the appendices.
Subcue Types Selection
The Subcue Types Selection area controls the
selection of subcue types to be included in the cue.
This is divided into sections by category. Each
section contains:
•
Category labels, such as Inputs or Trim. The
labels are also buttons which select or de-select
all the subcue check boxes within that category.
•
A list of Subcue Types. Each selected subcue
type will be included in the cue.
The lists are grouped according to their subcue type category, as defined on the Subcue Types
tab.
Capture Controls
At the bottom of the Capture window are additional controls that modify the behavior of the
Capture operation:
72
•
If the AutoHide Window checkbox is checked, then the Capture window will close
automatically when the Capture button is clicked. The window can be restored by pressing
the F4 key, or by selecting Windows > Capture.
•
If the Persistent Subcue Select checkbox is checked, then the last subcue types captured
will be automatically selected the next time the Capture window is opened.
•
An Add New Cue to Cue List checkbox and a Cue Lists selector. When the checkbox is
enabled, the captured cue will be added to the selected cue list in addition to the cue library.
The Capture Type menu selects one of the three capture types:
•
Capture New captures a new cue according to the parameters you have set (cue name,
channel automations, and subcue types).
•
Capture Differences causes new subcues of the same types included in the selected cue
to be created and referenced in the cue.
•
Update Subcues causes the information in existing subcues to be changed, thus allowing
global changes to be made.
The Capture Differences and Update Subcue functions are described in Editing Cues (p. 95).
TIP
The Functions keys F1 through F4 will open the Capture window. Each key opens the
window in a different mode:
F1 - Opens the Capture window in Update Subcues mode, with the last cue that was
triggered selected.
F2 - Opens in Capture Differences mode, with the last cue triggered selected.
F3 - Opens in Capture New mode, but does not add the new cue to the cue list.
F4 - Opens in Capture New mode, and adds the cue to the cue list.
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If you are currently in the Cue List or Cue Library window when you press the Fn key,
Capture opens to the currently-selected cue. Otherwise, the last cue recalled will be the
one opened. When you use F4, it sets some of the capture controls automatically.
Capture Window tabs
The Subcue Types tab
The Subcue Types tab lists a number of basic subcue types and any custom subcue types you
have designed.
IMPORTANT
Please do not modify the basic subcue types. Use the Duplicate button and modify a copy
of a basic type.
Each of the standard subcue types captures a single control point set for all applicable channels:
the Input Level subcue captures the Input Level control set, the Aux Sends subcue captures the
Aux Sends control set, and so on.
You can create your own specialized subcue types that capture any combination of control point
settings on any number of channels. This is an advanced task, accomplished through the use
of control point sets and index sets.
This tab has four main components: a set of command buttons, a list of subcue types, a list of
control point sets, and a list of index sets.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete subcue types:
•
New (Cmd+N) creates a new subcue type from scratch. You can then name the subcue
type, choose its category, select its control point sets, and define its index sets.
•
Duplicate (Cmd+D) creates a new subcue type based on the selected subcue. You can
then name the subcue type and fine-tune its category, parameter, and index sets.
•
Delete (Del) deletes the selected subcue type. Any subcues that made use of this subcue
type will be changed, which in turn will affect all cues that use that subcue.
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Subcue Types List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries alphabetically by the contents of that column. Clicking
it again will sort them in reverse order. The format of the ID and Created dates are compatible
with alphabetical sorting:
•
The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
•
The subcue type Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name. Subcues that used
this subcue type will show this change.
•
The Category lets you sort the names according to type. Right-click the entry to select from
the available types, or type a new name to create a new category.
•
The Display Order number determines the order in which the subcue types appear in the
Capture pane of the Capturewindow.
•
The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
•
The Created label is a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Modified label is a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Enabled label shows whether a subcue type has been enabled or disabled. Disabled
subcue types do not appear in the Capture pane of the Capture window. Right-click the
entry to toggle between enabled and disabled states.
•
The Locked column shows whether a subcue type is locked or unlocked.
Control Point Sets List
When a subcue type is selected, the control point sets associated with it will be listed to its right.
The control point sets to be included in the subcue can be selected by clicking their associated
checkboxes. The actual definitions for the control point sets are found in The Control Point Sets
Tab (p. 76).
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Index Sets List
For each control point set that is selected, its index set will be listed. The column labels for this
list can be clicked to sort the list alphabetically.
Right-clicking an Index Set entry allows you to choose between Manual and any applicable
custom index sets you have defined.
When you have selected a Manual index set, you can type a list of channels in the Channels
entry. You can separate channels with a space or comma, or select a range of channels by using
a dash between numbers (1-4,6,7). To select all channels, use an asterisk (*).
The Control Point Sets Tab
The Control Point Sets tab lists the 55 standard preset control point sets and any custom control
point sets you have designed.
IMPORTANT
Please do not modify the basic subcue types. Use the Duplicate button and modify a copy
of a basic type.
The Control Point Set is used by Subcue Types to identify which CueStation mixer components
will be captured in a subcue. The standard control point sets cover every common combination
of components. Input Levels, for instance, captures the channel invert, input level, and input
mute settings.
You can create your own specialized Control Point Sets that capture any imaginable combination
of controls.
This tab has three main components: a set of command buttons, a list of Control Point sets, and
a list of mixer control points.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete Control Point Sets.
•
76
New (Cmd+N) creates a new control point set from scratch. You can then rename the new
control point set and modify its list of Address Patterns.
•
Duplicate (Cmd+D) creates a new control point set based on the selected subcue. You
can then rename the new control point set and modify its list of Address Patterns.
•
Delete (Cmd+Del) deletes the selected control point set.
When a control point set is selected, you can add or remove Address Patterns from it:
•
Add Pattern adds a new Address Pattern to the list. Right-click the entry to select from an
extensive list of common Address Patterns.
•
Delete Selected Patterns removes any selected Address Patterns from the list.
Control Point Sets List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries by the contents of that column. Clicking it again will
sort them in reverse order.
•
The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
•
The subcue Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name.
•
The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
•
The Created label is a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Modified label is a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Enabled label shows whether a set has been enabled or disabled. Right-click the entry
to toggle between enabled and disabled states.
•
The Locked column shows whether a set is locked or unlocked.
Control Points List
When a control point set is selected, the Address Patterns associated with it will be listed to its
right.
Right-clicking an Address Patterns entry allows you to choose from an extensive list of
commonly-used patterns.
The command buttons above this are previously described in Command Buttons.
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Index Sets Tab
The Index Sets tab shows a list of common index sets and any custom index sets you have
designed.
IMPORTANT
Please do not modify the basic subcue types. Use the Duplicate button and modify a copy
of a basic type.
The Index Set is used by Subcue Types to identify which channels of a particular Control Point
Set to capture. Each of the standard Index Sets captures all channels for a particular mixer
component.
You can create your own specialized Index Sets that limit the subcue capture to a specific set
channels for any of the CueStation mixer components.
This tab has two components: a set of command buttons and a list of Index Sets.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create or delete Index Sets.
•
New (Cmd+N) creates a new index set from scratch. You can then name the index set and
define the mixer component and channels it uses.
•
Duplicate (Cmd+D) creates a new index set based on the selected subcue. You can then
rename the index set and fine-tune its mixer component and channels.
•
Delete (Cmd+Del) deletes the selected index set. Any subcues that made use of this index
set will be changed, which in turn will affect all cues that use that subcue.
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Index Sets List
Clicking a column label will sort the entries alphabetically by the contents of that column. Clicking
it again will sort them in reverse order. The format of the ID and Creation dates are compatible
with alphabetical sorting.
•
The ID label is a system-assigned number and can not be changed.
•
The Index Set Name can be changed. Select it and type a new name. Subcues that used
this Index Set will show this change.
•
Right-click the Index Type box to select the mixer component used by this Index Set.
•
Type a list of channels in the Default Indices box to select the default subset of channels
for this Index Set. You can separate channels with a space or comma, or select a range of
channels by using a dash between numbers ( 1-4,6,7). To select all channels, use an asterisk
(*).
NOTE
If there are any channels selected in the mixer window, those channels will be used instead
of the ones specified here.
•
The Allowed Indices box lets you constrain the indices to a particular range. For instance,
if you only wanted your Index Set to include the first four Input channels, then you would
enter 1-4. Otherwise, use an asterisk (*). To select no channels, type “None”.
NOTE
Any indices that are not specified in the Allowed Indices column will not be used, even if
those indices have been selected manually in the mixer window.
•
The Comment box can contain anything you wish to type.
•
The Created label shows the time stamp as a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Modified label is a convenience and can not be changed.
•
The Locked column shows whether a set is locked or unlocked.
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Custom Subcue Types
This section is for advanced users who wish to create their own subcue types, for more
customizable automation. Creating custom subcue types is not necessary for normal CueStation
operations. However, it can make some advanced cue capture functions more accessible.
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Control Point Addresses
In CueStation every control point in the system is assigned a unique Control Point Address. This
address unambiguously identifies that control with an intuitive, human-readable string. For
example, the control point address of the first input channel’s mute control is Input 1 Mute. The
fader level of the third output channel is Output 3 Level.
To find out what a given control’s address is, make sure Layout > Tooltips Enabled has been
selected. When Tooltips are enabled, hovering the cursor over a control will display that control’s
address.
A typical setup will have thousands or even hundreds of thousands of valid control point
addresses. Furthermore, you may want to capture the current state of all controls in the system,
or just a few, or any of a number of subsets of the controls. Because of this, the Capture Window
has been made to be extremely flexible in how it operates.
When creating cues and subcues, the first problem that the Capture window must solve is which
control points to capture. The Capture Window determines which control points to capture (and
where to save the data) using a hierarchical system consisting of Index Sets, Control Point Sets,
and Subcue Types.
Index Sets
The simplest specifier is the Index Set. An index set is nothing more than a set of numbers and
an Index Type tag that indicates what sort of system parameter is related to those numbers.
(The index type value is chosen from a small, pre-defined set of possible values. These include
Inputs, Outputs, Auxes, VGroups, and a few other types.)
All the index sets known to the system can be viewed by opening the Capture window and
choosing the Index Sets tab.
The default index sets are often all you need, but you are free to make your own custom index
sets. For example, you could create an index set that refers to the first eight inputs in your system
by adding an entry in the index sets table with the cells filled out as follows:
Name: First Eight Inputs
Index Type: Input
Default Indices: 1-8
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Allowed Indices: 1-8
Or you could create an index set that refers to just a few specific input indices (perhaps you
want to specify just the input channels of your three vocalists?):
Name: The Three Tenors
Index Type: Input
Default Indices: 23,47,59
Allowed Indices: 23,47,59
You could even create an index set that includes specific values in addition to value ranges:
Name: Fancy Index Set
Index Type: Input
Default Indices: 3-7,23,40,42-47,59-62
Allowed Indices: 3-7,23,40,42-47,59-62
An index set is merely a convenient way to assign a name and type to a group of channel
numbers.
By this point you may have noticed that the pre-defined entries in the index sets table don’t have
any numeric values in their Allowed Indices field. Instead, they all have an asterisk. This asterisk
has a special meaning: it means “All valid channels of the given type in the system, as specified
in the Mixer Configuration window”. For example, in a 64-input, 32-output system, the asterisk
in the All Channels/Input index set would be interpreted to mean “1 through 64,” whereas the
asterisk in the All Channels/Output index set would be interpreted to mean “1 through 32” (both
inclusive).
This special logic is very useful, because otherwise it would be necessary to re-define new index
sets every time the Mixer Configuration changed. This way, a single set of pre-defined index
sets is sufficient to handle most things.
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Control Point Sets
A Control Point Set specifies one or more patterns of control point addresses.
As with index sets, the default project comes with a number of pre-defined, non-editable control
point sets, but you are free to make your own if you choose to. The control point sets known to
the system can be viewed by opening the Capture window and choosing the Control Point Sets
tab.
Each control point set consists of one or more Control Point Address Patterns, which look a lot
like the control point addresses described in Control Point Addresses (p. 81), except that some
parts of the addresses may be left unspecified. For an example, switch to the Control Point Sets
tab and select the Input EQs control point set. The area to the right of the list will show the
following control point address patterns:
Input *
Input *
Input *
Input *
Input *
EQ
EQ
EQ
EQ
EQ
* Type
* Level
* Frequency
*Q
* BandBypass
As you can see, these patterns refer to control point addresses relevant to the EQ portion of the
Input Processing window, but the numeric portions of the addresses have been replaced by
asterisks. Like the asterisks on the Index Sets tab, these asterisks have a special meaning.
Here, they mean that it is up to the system to figure out the numbers to place there. When
capturing a cue, the asterisks will be expanded out to concrete numbers, as in this example:
Input 1-8 EQ 1-4 Type
Input 1-8 EQ 1-4 Level
Input 1-8 EQ 1-4 Frequency
Input 1-8 EQ 1-4 Q
Input 1-8 EQ 1-4 BandBypass
But how does the Capture window know what numbers to replace the asterisks with? The control
point set, by itself, doesn't have enough information to do that. Which leads us to the next level
of specifier, the Subcue Type.
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Subcue Types
A Subcue Type is the top-level specifier in the Capture window. Its job is to correlate a group of
control point sets with the appropriate index sets in such a way that together there is enough
information to fully specify the set of control point addresses to capture into a subcue. As always,
the default project comes with a number of pre-defined, read-only subcue types, but you are
free to create your own subcue types as well.
Let’s look at the Matrix Levels subcue type. To view this subcue type, open the Capture window,
choose the Subcue Types tab, and select the Matrix Levels entry. The area to the right of the
list will show you the contents of the Matrix Levels subcue type.
The center list, labeled Control Point Sets, tells you which control point sets are specified by
this subcue type. The Matrix Levels subcue type specifies only one control point set, the Matrix
Levels control point set. (In fact, most of the pre-defined subcue types contain only one control
point set.)
The area on the right contains a list of index sets used by the subcue type. The column headings
for this list are at the bottom of the screen: Index Type, Index Set, and Index Values. The
Capture window automatically determines which types of index set are relevant to the subcue
type.
In this example, our Matrix Levels subcue type specifies only the Matrix Levels control point
set, which contains only the following Address Patterns:
Output All Channels
Bus All Buses
The Capture window knows that to expand the asterisks in those patterns, it is going to need
one index set with IndexType=“Bus”, and one index set with IndexType=“Output”.
These items appear in the right sub-pane, in the Index Type column. The first item describes
how to expand asterisks that represent Buses, and the second describes how to expand asterisks
that represent Outputs. As you can see, they are currently set to “All Buses” and “All Channels”,
respectively. The corresponding Index Values entries show the actual interpretation of these
values: that for Buses, the asterisk represents channels 1–32, and for Outputs, the asterisk
represents channels 1–8.
This rather complex, detailed analysis of the address pattern can be simply interpreted thus:
Bus 1-32 Output 1-8 Level
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Which is to say that the subcue will capture the complete state of the Matrix. If the subcue type
were editable, you could modify it to specify other index sets instead of “All Buses” and “All
Channels”. If you’d like to try doing that now, click Duplicate (near the upper left of the Subcue
Types tab) to create an editable subcue type, then right-click in the Index Set column of the
window area on the right to choose a new index set for buses and/or outputs. Note that there is
also a Manual option, which lets you type in indices directly instead of referencing a pre-defined
index set.
Lastly, each subcue type has attributes called Category, Display Order, and Comment. These
attributes can be viewed and/or edited via the table at the left-hand side of the Subcue Types
tab. Note that these attributes do not affect which control point addresses will be captured: the
only thing they affect are how the subcue types appear on the Capture tab. In the Capture tab,
each subcue type’s name appears with a checkbox next to it. Subcue types are grouped
separately by category—for example, in the default project all the Input subcue types get grouped
together in one area of the Capture tab, and the subcue types in the outputs category get their
own separate section. You are free to create your own categories if you wish. Display Order
gives you some measure of control over the order in which subcue types will be listed within
their category in the Capture tab. Subcue types with smaller Display Order values will always
appear before subcue types with larger Display Order values. The Comment field provides a
place for you to enter a comment about the subcue type. This will not appear on the Capture
tab.
Building a Cue List
The Cue List is a sequence of cues that will be used in controlling the show. Each cue may
automatically follow a previous cue, be triggered by a time code value, or be triggered manually.
The Cue List Window
Cue list management is handled through the Cue List window. The Cue List area of the window
shows an ordered sequence of cues. These are the cues that will be triggered during show
control. They are always sorted according to their Index sequence. You may drag cues to the
list from the Cue Library, or you may create a new cue entry and right-click on it to select a cue.
Note that you cannot create new cues in the Cue List window; you can only create references
to cues that already exist.
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The columns of the Cue List pane control a range of cue automation details. When you select
a cue in the cue list, the Subcue Library pane is displayed to the right. Selecting a subcue will
cause the Control Point pane to be displayed beneath the other two panes.
Creating a New Cue List
When you start a new project, a Defaults cue list is created
automatically, and all newly captured cues will be added to this list.
To create another cue list, click the Cue Lists button and select New
Cue List.
Additional cue lists can be used to create speaker check cue lists,
different versions of a show cue list for different performers, or even
cues for system testing and diagnostics.
In the Cue Lists drop-down menu, you can also rename, set new
IDs for, duplicate, or delete cue lists, as well as select the cue list
you want to work on.
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Adding Cues to a Cue List
There are several different ways of adding cues to your cue list:
Capture Window > Capture New
If you use the Capture Window to create a new cue, you can check the box next to the Add
New Cue To Cue List and then select the cue list the cue should be added to. The cue will
be appended to the end of the cue list you select.
Drag Cues from the Cue Library
Open the Cue List and Cue Library windows. Right-drag cues from the Cue Library directly
into the Cue List. A green line will show the position in the list where the cue will be added.
You can also add multiple cues at the same time, by selecting several cues in the Cue
Library window and right-dragging them into the Cue List window.
Cue Entries > New Cue Entry
In the Cue List window, select Cue Entry > New Cue Entry to create an empty cue
entry.Then right-click in the Cue ID column to select the cue you want to add.
Moving Cues Within a Cue List
You can right-click on the Cue Index number of a cue and drag it to a different position in the
list. This also works when multiple cues are selected.
Cue List Timing and Automation
CueStation's cue automation allows you to set up timed sequences of cues that will trigger
automatically, using either autofollow or time code. This kind of automation is particularly useful
when the timing of a sequence is known and unchanging (to match video playback, for instance),
and can greatly reduce the need for manual cue triggering.
AutoFollow
AutoFollow is controlled by two parameters: the identity of the cue to be triggered, and the time
delay before this triggering happens. The automatically-triggered cue can be Next, which allows
the creation of linear sequences of cues, or it can point to any cue in the list, which allows a
variety of looping and branching strategies.
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To set up a sequence of cues triggered by AutoFollow:
TIP
If you have a sequence of cues that you would like to trigger all at the same time, you can
set an AutoFollow of 0.0 seconds for each cue in the sequence.
1. Right-click in the AutoFollow column for the first cue in the sequence. This cue will still be
triggered manually.
2. Choose Next, or the index value for the cue that will follow it.
3. Set a time in the Wait column. This is the time between the triggering of the first cue and
the second.
4. Repeat for subsequent sequential cues.
AutoFollow delays are cumulative, because AutoFollow cues are organized in a sequential list.
The time between the triggering of the first cue in a sequence and the last will be the sum of all
the AutoFollow delays. In a sequence of five linked AutoFollow cues with 1 second delays, the
final cue will be triggered four seconds after the first cue.
AutoFollow Techniques
AutoFollow can be used to loop a sequence of cues indefinitely by pointing the last cue in a
sequence back to the first cue (or back to itself in the minimal case). This can be useful for a
“vamping” sort of structure, where a sequence of events must repeat for an indeterminate period.
It is always possible to break out of such a loop by manually triggering a cue that is not in the
loop. More information about vamping in CueStation can be found in Regions, Loops, and
Vamping (p. 175).
AutoFollow can also be useful if you prefer to build up automation sequences in functional chunks
by defining some cues as Console only, others as Matrix only, and so on. This is especially true
for External Command subcues, like the triggering of MIDI Machine Control Locate followed by
a sequence of Play commands.
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Time Code
To trigger a cue by time code:
1. Right-click in the Trigger column for the cue and choose
either Time Code or TC-Fwd ONLY.
2. Enter the time code in the Time column for the cue.
Cues triggered by time code can be arranged into very complex
and precisely timed sequences. Time code has the advantage
of much finer control over the timing of a sequence, down to
a single frame. It is possible to change the timing of one cue
without affecting the timing of all of the subsequent cues.
Time Code in Forward-Only Mode
There are two options for how cues are triggered by time code. The TC-Fwd ONLY option
matches the original design of the software: only those Time Code cues after the current
cue-on-deck in the Transport window will be triggered by time code. The alternative option,
labeled simply Time Code, is to allow any Time Code cues in the cue list to be recalled by time
code, regardless of whether they are listed before or after the current cue-on-deck.
Running a Show
The Transport window provides an interface for recalling cues while running a show.
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Transport Window Overview
The Transport window displays the cue list players, and provides controls for triggering cues
and navigating through the cue lists. The columns shown are exactly the same as the ones in
the cue list window, including the cue index, ID, name, and other details. The active cue and
cue-on-deck for each cue list are shown at the top of each cue list player. At the top of the window
is a time code display and a Master Stop button. At the bottom of each cue list player are five
control buttons: Stop, rewind to the beginning (|<-), previous (<<), next (>>), and Go.
The Stop button on each cue list player only stops automation and playback triggered by that
cue list player. The Master Stop button stops all automation and playback, regardless of origin.
TIP
The Master Stop can be invoked at any time with Option+Cmd+Shift+M.
Selecting a Cue List
Each cue list player has a cue list menu next to the transport controls. To create or edit cue lists,
use the Cue List window, as described in Building a Cue List (p. 85).
Navigating the Cue List
At the top of the cue list window, the name of the active cue is displayed, along with its cue index
number (reflecting its position in the cue list). Directly below it is the name of the cue-on-deck.
The active cue is the cue that was most recently triggered by Go button, time code, autofollow,
or external control. The active cue is highlighted with a green background in the Transport
window.
The cue-on-deck is the cue that will be recalled when you click on the Go button. At that point,
the cue-on-deck will move to the active cue position, and the next cue in the list will become the
cue-on-deck. The cue-on-deck is highlighted with a yellow background.
You can also set the cue-on-deck by double-clicking on a cue in the Transport window.
The yellow buttons at the bottom of the window allow you to change the cue-on-deck without
triggering cues. Clicking on the rewind button (|<-) will set the first cue in the cue list to the
cue-on-deck. The previous and next buttons (<< and >>) allow you to skip forward or backwards
one cue at a time.
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Recalling Cues
1. Open the Transport window and select Cue Lists > [cue list]. The first entry in the list will
be the cue-on-deck by default.
2. Click Go to fire the cue-on-deck. It will become the active cue, and the next cue in the list
will become the new cue-on-deck.
3. If the cue has any wait or fade times associated with it, the Go button will become a status
bar, with the percent complete matching the countdown (in seconds) on the Go button. The
countdown time is based on subcue durations, wait times, and autofollow wait times. Wild
Tracks and SpaceMap Trajectory times are not included.
Time Code and AutoFollow
Cues triggered by time code will be recalled automatically when the time code marker is reached.
At the top of the window is a time code display, which shows the current time and frame rate.
The Enable Time Code Triggers button toggles whether time code is online or offline.
If the Enable Time Code Triggers button is green, and the box next to it checked, time code
is enabled and D-Mitri will receive time code normally.
If the Enable Time Code Triggers button is grey, and the box next to it not checked, time code
is disabled and D-Mitri will ignore any time code it receives.
The time code display can be hidden by de-selecting Show Time Code in the Display menu.
This will not affect the online/offline state.
TIP
If you want to de-activate a cue list player, deselect its Enable Cue List Player checkbox.
Track-From-Top
CueStation has a Track-From-Top function similar to that used in many lighting consoles.
Track-From-Top is a powerful command that allows you to quickly skip to a different point in the
cue list, and still have all of the control points updated correctly. To use Track-From-Top:
1. In the Transport window, double-click on the cue that you would like to trigger next. The
cue will be highlighted in yellow and the name will appear as the cue-on-deck.
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2. In the Mixer menu, select Track from Top (Option+Cmd+Shift+T). A dialog box will ask
for confirmation, and then CueStation will update all control points as if every previous cue
had been triggered in order, with a few exceptions:
•
Wild Tracks Deck subcues will be loaded, but not played.
•
External subcues will not be triggered unless specifically enabled (or keyed) for each
subcue.
3. A status window will show the progress of the Track-From-Top operation, as well as the
status of each DCP.
4. When the Track-From-Top is complete, the cue you originally selected will still be the
cue-on-deck, ready to be fired as needed.
Track-From-Top can be initiated from any window, but if the Cue List window is active, then
Track-From-Top will track to the cue selected in the cue list. Otherwise, Track-From-Top will
use the cue-on-deck in the Transport window.
Track-From-Top: External Commands
For subcue types other than External Commands, the control point addresses act as a key so
that only the last one in a sequence is used. This makes Track-From-Top more efficient: instead
of recalling hundreds of input level control points at one time, only the most recent level for each
channel is recalled. Commands have three different Track-From-Top settings, which are assigned
default values automatically when they are created. These can be edited by the user by
right-clicking in the TrackFromTop column in the subcue detail section.
Yes
The Command will always be recalled during Track-From-Top.
No
The Command will never be recalled during Track-From-Top.
Key [string]
The Command will only be recalled if it is the last external with the assigned key. For example,
if cues 1, 3, and 5 each have a Command that is assigned to Key: A, and cues 2 and 4 each
have a Command that is assigned to Key: B, only the Commands in cues 4 and 5 will be
recalled.
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In the right-click menu, there is also a Reset option, which will reset the Track-From-Top setting
back to the default.
Commands saved in older projects will be assigned default Track-From-Top values.
Special Commands
Keyboard
Home selects the first cue in the cue list (top of list).
End selects the last cue in the cue list.
Arrow keys select the previous or next cue in the cue list (step back and step forward).
Enter triggers the Cue-on-Deck (Go).
Cue List Players
Through the use of Cue List Players, the Transport window can have multiple active cue lists.
Each Cue List Player has its own set of transport controls, and can be used to create complex
sequences of automation running in parallel.
Configuring Cue List Players
The number of Cue List Players is configured in the Mixer Configuration window, just like Virtual
Groups, Buses, and Bus Assigns.
1. At the bottom of the Mixer Configuration window, enter the number of Cue List Players you
would like to use.
2. In the Configuration menu, select Send Configuration....
3. Open the Transport window, and use the vertical blue scroll bar to page between Cue List
Players.
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Controlling Cue List Players
Cue List Players can be captured into cues. A Cue List Player type subcue contains the value
of the cue list ID, and the cue-on-deck index.
To capture a Cue List Player subcue:
1. In the Cue List Player you would like to capture, select the appropriate cue list.
2. Optionally, select a cue in the cue list to be the target cue-on-deck.
3. Select the Cue List Player, by clicking on the Select button on the left of the Cue List Player.
4. Open the Capture window using F4.
5. In the System Subcue Type Selection area, add a checkmark in the box next to Cue List
Player.
6. In the Name text box, type a name for your cue.
7. Click on the Click to Capture New button in the lower right to capture the cue.
When the cue is recalled, the selected Cue List Player will switch to the chosen cue list, with the
chosen cue as the cue-on-deck.
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Editing Cues
In the ever-changing environment of show control, it is frequently necessary to revise cue settings.
In cutting-edge design, there are times when you’ll also need to build cues manually.
There are several different methods for editing cues. Most changes can be performed without
needing to recall the cue, but sometimes it can be easier to set the mixer to the desired values
and re-capture the cue with new settings.
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Capture Window: Capture Differences
The first method of editing cues uses the Capture window, and requires that changes be made
live to the mixer.
1. Open the Mixer window and recall the cue you want to edit. Select the correct channels and
make the necessary adjustments to the control points you wish to change.
2. Use the F2 key to open the Capture window in Capture Differences mode. Make sure that
the correct cue is listed in the top left drop-down box, otherwise the changes might be
applied to the wrong cue.
3. In the Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence boxes, assisted by the Venn (overlapping
circles) diagram, choose the combination that will modify the correct set of subcue control
points. Amend Mode is the default, and is appropriate for most situations. These settings
are explained in detail in Appendix B, Capture Window Advanced Mode.
4. Select the types of subcues in which you would like the values to be updated, or to add
subcue types to a cue. Subcue types that are already present in the cue will be underlined.
5. Click Click to Capture Differences. The subcues in the cue will be updated with the new
control point values.
Capture Window: Update Subcues
When you directly update a specific subcue using Update Subcues, all cues that reference that
subcue will use the new settings. This allows you to quickly and easily effect a global change.
Use this with care: it also allows you to quickly effect a global mistake! See Working with Shared
Subcues (p. 100) for more on this topic.
1. Trigger a cue that contains the subcue you want to change. Adjust control points as needed.
2. Use the F1 key to open the Capture window in Update Subcues mode. Make sure the correct
cue is listed in the top left drop-down box.
3. In the Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence boxes, assisted by the Venn (overlapping
circles) diagram, choose the combination that will modify the correct set of subcue control
points. Amend Mode is selected by default. A detailed explanation of these settings is
provided in Appendix B, Capture Window Advanced Mode.
4. Select the types of subcues to be updated.
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5. Click Click to Update Subcues. The subcues will all be updated, but will retain their original
name. All cues that use this set of subcues will now use the updated settings.
Editing Subcue Control Points
1. Using either of the Library windows, select the subcue that needs to be updated. The control
points associated with the subcue will be shown in the lower pane.
2. If you want to use the cue or subcue mixer control settings as a starting-point, instant recall
the cue or subcue by double-clicking on the arrow to the right of the ID number. The mixer
controls will move to the settings specified by the subcue(s).
3. Set the mixer controls to the desired settings.
4. In the control point settings area of the window, click the Update All Rows or Update
Selected Rows button as appropriate. Update All Rows will update all the control points
in the subcue; Update Selected Rows will update only those you selected.
Control point values in a subcue can also be edited by changing the values listed in the Value
column. See the following section for more information on editing control point values.
Using the Preview Subcue Feature to Edit Control Points
You can also use the Preview Subcue button to edit control points in a subcue.
1. Using either of the Library windows, select a subcue to edit.
2. Click the Preview Subcue button at the top of the subcue editor pane.
A yellow-bordered preview window appears, displaying the contents of the subcue as a
mixer window.
3. Modify the enabled controls in the yellow-bordered preview window.
This updates the subcue, without requiring changes to the actual audio mix.
4. Close the yellow-bordered preview window to finalize the changes.
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Adding Control Points
You can add or remove control points from a subcue. This is a particularly useful way of creating
subcues that contain combinations of control points that are not easily selected through the
Capture window.
1. Click Add Entry. A new, blank control point will be added at the bottom of the list.
2. Type the exact name of the control point in the Control Points column. This name must
correspond to an existing name in the Control Point Sets tab of the Capture window. You
can add a channel range to the name. You can separate channels with a space or comma,
or select a range of channels by using a dash between numbers (i.e. 1-4,6,7).
3. Using either the CueStation graphical interface, or by typing values directly, set the value,
wait, and fade parameters for the control point.
4. To have the changes immediately take effect, double-click the arrow to the right of the ID
number.
You can add control points using the Capture window by selecting additional channels in the
mixer windows and then selecting Amend Mode.
Removing Control Points
To remove control points, select the control point(s) and click on Delete Selected.
Control points can also be removed from a subcue when using the Capture window. When a
Capture Differences is performed in Replace Mode, only those channels which are selected at
the time will be included in the subcue. For instance, if a subcue originally contains control point
values for inputs 1-4, and channels 3-6 are selected for Capture Differences, the resulting subcue
will contain control point values for 3-6.
Copy-On-Write
A shared subcue is a subcue that is referenced by more than one cue. Updating a shared subcue
in the Subcue Library window will change that subcue globally, and all cues that reference it will
now use the new control point values. However, if you update a shared subcue within the Cue
Library or Cue List, Copy-On-Write is implemented, so that the control points for the current cue
are changed, but all other cues retain the original control point values.
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Copy-On-Write effects the following changes when a subcue is updated in the Cue Library:
•
A copy of the original subcue is created with a new ID number. All other cues are edited to
reference the new subcue ID number.
•
The original subcue (which is then no longer shared) is changed to reflect the new control
point values.
Note that if your project includes External Commands that trigger subcues, the subcue ID numbers
stored in an External Command subcue will be changed as necessary when this process occurs.
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Working with Shared Subcues
CueStation has two items in the Edit menu to assist in working with shared subcues:
Individualize Subcues
This command will convert all subcues to unique copies, so that no subcue is referenced
by more than one cue. After the operation, all subcue names will include the name of the
cue that references it.
Share Subcues
This operation is the converse of Individualize Subcues. When initiated, any subcues that
have the same set of control points and values are combined into one subcue, and
referencing cues are updated to reference one subcue.
Searching Cues and Subcues
In the Cue List, Cue Library, and Subcue Library, you can search for cues and subcues using
the Find... command in the Edit menu. This will open a dialog box with the following controls:
•
A drop-down box to choose between Select Only (to clear any current selections first),
Select More (to add to the current selection), or Deselect (to deselect items matching the
search parameters).
•
A drop-down box to select the parameter type (name, ID, type, etc.).
•
A drop-down box to select between is or is not.
•
A drop-down box to select the type of matching: Equal To, Containing, Less Than, etc.
•
A text box to enter parameter terms, such as a subcue ID number or channel number.
•
A Do it button to perform the search.
Items selected by the search will also have their text rendered in bold, so the selection can be
changed without losing the search results. To reset the text to normal, close and reopen the
window.
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Search and Replace
Control points in cues can be batch-edited to save time. For instance, if you have programmed
a sequence of cues that include System Level subcues, and you wish to change the level for
the entire sequence to -3 dB, follow these steps:
1. Open the Cue List window, and select all of the cues in the sequence you wish to change.
Or, use the steps listed above to select a particular subset of cues to change.
2. In the Edit menu, select Batch Modify Control Point Entries... to open the Batch Modify
dialog box.
3. In the first drop-down box on the left, select Set.
4. In the next drop-down box, select match.
5. The next text entry box is where you enter the control points you wish to affect. For this
example, enter "System Level".
6. The last text entry box is where you enter the value the control points should be set to. For
this example, enter "-3".
7. At this point, the dialog box should read: "Set any control points that match System Level
to -3". Click on Do it to make the changes.
Cue and Subcue Libraries
Subcue Library Window
The Subcue Library provides access to all the subcues that have been captured or built manually
for the project, and allows you to create new subcues. Selecting a subcue shows the control
point values associated with it. You can add, remove, or change the control points as needed.
NOTE
These controls are different for Wild Tracks subcues. For more information, see Editing a
Wild Tracks Subcue (p. 171).
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There are two major components in the Subcue Library window: the Subcue List, to the left, and
the Subcue Parameters List to the right.
Subcue List Area
This area has two control areas: a subcue type selection box on top, and a subcue list underneath.
Subcue Type Selection Box
The Show selection box allows you to limit the types of subcues listed. You can choose All
Subcue Types, which lists all known subcues, or you can choose a specific type of subcue.
The subcue types are maintained using the Subcue Types tab of the Capture window.
TIP
If a specific type of subcue is selected, then using Subcues > New Subcue (Cmd+N) will
create a new subcue of that same type. For instance, if you have selected Mixer Settings
as your filter, then Cmd+N will create a new Mixer Settings subcue.
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Subcue List
The subcues can be sorted by any of the column headings:
•
ID is a system-assigned number. It is user-modifiable.
•
Name is the subcue name. When subcues are created by capturing, they are given the
same name as that of the cue, with the subcue type appended to the name. When a subcue
is renamed, any cues that reference it will use the new name.
•
Type identifies the subcue type. New subcue types can be created using the Capture
window.
•
Refs shows how many times the subcue is used (referenced) by a cue, or by another subcue.
Right-click in the Refs column to display a list of all of the cues (or other subcues) which
reference it.
•
Comment provides a place to type a comment.
•
Created is a timestamp showing the date and time the cue was created.
•
Modified is a timestamp showing the last time the cue was edited.
•
Enabled shows whether the subcue is enabled or not. Disabled subcues are highlighted in
pink, and will not be recalled, even where the ybelong to cues that are recalled.
•
Locked shows whether or not the subcue is locked. Locked subcues are highlighted in
grey.
TIP
The keyboard shortcuts for Disable and Enable are Cmd+Period and Cmd+Comma,
respectively. The Lock and Unlock functions also have hotkeys: Cmd+Shift+U and Cmd+U.
If a subcue is disabled globally within the Subcue Library, it will also appear disabled within
any of the cues that reference it (i.e.in the Cue Library and Cue List windows).
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Subcue Parameters List Area
The Subcue Parameters List area displays control points associated with any selected subcue.
This area has two collections of controls: Command Buttons on top, and Control Point List
underneath.
Command Buttons
The command buttons create, remove, update, and analyze the control points.
•
Add Entry adds a new, blank control point to the list. When you name the control point,
that name must correspond exactly to an existing name in the Control Point Sets tab of the
Capture window.
•
Resolve Duplicates is enabled when you have selected one of a set of duplicated control
points. All duplicates of the selected control point will be deleted, and if there are other sets
of duplicate entries, only the most recently created one will be saved.
•
Delete Selected deletes a control point from the list.
•
Update All Rows sets all of the subcue’s control points to the values of the graphical mixer
controls.
•
Update Selected Rows sets only the selected control points to the values of the graphical
mixer controls.
•
Preview Subcue opens a window of the selected subcue type and allows you to look at a
subcue without recalling the settings on the hardware. The window has a yellow background.
Its active controls match those that are part of the subcue, and can be used to adjust the
subcue.
•
Display: determines how much detail is displayed in the Control Point List. There are three
options:
Compact
This makes the list as short as possible by combining control points with the same type and
values into one entry.
Semicompact
This combines some control points of the same type and values into one entry.
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Expanded
This displays every control point on a separate line.
•
Channel Selects shows which channels were selected on the latest capture.
•
The Adjust Selected Indices box has a list of all subcue types used in that subcue, and it
allows you to change the index for all types at the same time instead of having to edit each
one by hand.
To adjust an index:
1. Select the control points you want to edit.
2. Choose the control point type from the Adjust Selected Indices box.
3. For the Adjust by value, type in the difference between the current value and the desired
value. For instance, if the value is 4 and you want it to be 6, you would type "2". To reduce
that 6 value back to 3, type "-3".
4. Click the Adjust Selected Indices button to make the changes you requested.
NOTE
In subcues with over 10,000 control points (such as a bus assign subcue affecting all input
channels), the Expanded view still shows a semicompact view, to improve performance.
To override this setting, re-select the Expanded option to view all control points individually.
Control Point List
With the exception of the Control Points column, clicking a column label will sort the entries
alphabetically by descending order, and clicking it again will sort them in reverse order. Clicking
Control Points will toggle between different sorting methods. The first method is the traditional
way of sorting by type and then by channel; all the entries of one type display first, then all the
entries of the next type, and so on. The second method sorts strictly alphabetically by channel,
so types will alternate in the display instead of being grouped together.
•
Control Points identifies a specific set of control points by name. These names correspond
to those available in the Control Point Sets tab of the Capture window. You can type a new
name, but if it does not exactly correspond to an existing name it will not be valid. Use the
Capture window to create new control point sets.
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•
Value sets the destination value for the control point. The values can be decibels, text labels,
true/false, and so on.
•
Wait sets the delay between recalling the subcue and the actual start of movement for the
control point. This value is measured in seconds.
•
Fade sets the length of time it will take the control point to reach its destination value. This
value is measured in seconds.
•
Enabled shows whether the control point is enabled or not. Disabled control points are also
highlighted in pink, and will not be recalled as part of the subcue recall.
IMPORTANT
Duplicate control points will be highlighted in red. These conflicting control point value
assignments must be resolved: you cannot play two identical control points at the same
time within a subcue. The only way to resolve such a conflict is to remove one of the control
points.
Creating New Subcues
1. In the Subcue Library, select Subcues > New Subcue > [...] appropriately for the type of
control points that will be used.
2. A name will be automatically created for the subcue depending on the type. (For some
types, control points will be automatically included as well.)
3. Add and update control points as needed.
Special Commands
Subcues Menu
Recall Subcue
Recalls the selected subcue.
Instant Recall Subcue
Recalls the selected subcue, but ignores all wait and fade times.
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New Subcue > [Subcue Type]
Select a subcue type from the list to create a new subcue of that type.
Duplicate Subcue
Duplicates the selected subcue (or subcues).
Delete Subcue
Deletes the selected subcue (or subcues).
Cue Library Window
The Cue Library provides access to the cues that have been captured or constructed for the
project. The Cue Library window has three areas: Cue Library, Subcue, and Control Point list.
Selecting a cue shows the subcues it references, and selecting a subcue shows the control
points it uses.
NOTE
These controls are different for Wild Tracks subcues. For more information, see Editing a
Wild Tracks Subcue (p. 171).
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Cue Library Area
The Cue Library area of the window, in the upper left corner, shows the set of all cues in the
project. These can be sorted by any of the column headings.
TIP
In the Display menu, select Show Time Code to display the current received time code
value.
•
ID is a unique number assigned to the cue. Show control systems recalling a cue must refer
to it by its ID.
•
Name is the cue name. If you rename the cue the change will also be seen in the Cue List.
•
Overlap indicates whether pending cue actions such as delayed subcues will be allowed
to complete (Yes) or will be cancelled (No) when the cue is triggered. Yes is the default
setting.
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•
Refs shows how many times the cue is referenced by a cue list. Right-click in the Refs
column to see which cue lists reference the cue.
•
Comment provides a place to type a comment.
•
Created is a convenience value indicating the date and time the cue was created.
•
Modified shows the time and date that the subcue was last edited.
•
Enabled shows whether a cue is enabled or disabled. Right-click to toggle between states.
•
Locked shows whether a cue is unlocked (editable) or locked. Right-click to toggle between
states.
•
Wild Tracks Channel Assignments shows which channels are used by Wild Tracks in
that cue, indicated by a green background. Right-click and drag the numbers to change the
channel assignments.
Subcue and Control Point List Areas
When you select a cue in the Cue Library window, the subcues are listed on the right, and the
control points are listed in the lower pane of the window. For the most part, the subcue and
control point areas of this window function like those of the Subcue Library Window (p. 101), with
the following exceptions:
•
The Update All button does not change the subcue globally. If the subcue is referenced by
other cues, Copy-On-Write will be used instead. More information about this process can
be found in Editing Cues (p. 95).
•
Update Selected works similarly to Update All, but only for the selected control points.
Building Cues
•
In the Cue Library window, select Cues > New Cue (Cmd+N). A new blank cue will be
shown in the appropriate list.
•
The cue will be created with the name Cue X automatically. However, you can immediately
type the name you want right after the cue is created, without having to highlight it.
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•
Select Subcues > New Subcue Entry (Cmd+N). Right-click in the ID column of the subcue
entry and select a subcue from the list.
TIP
You can add subcues to a cue by right-dragging them from the Subcue Library into the
Cue Library and dropping them in the Subcue List area. You can also create a cue by
selecting several subcues in the Subcue Library and dropping them directly into the Cue
List area.
Special Commands
Cues Menu
Recall Cue
Recalls the selected cue.
Instant Recall Subcue
Recalls the selected cue, but ignores all wait and fade times.
New Cue
Create a new cue.
Duplicate Cue
Duplicates the selected cue (or cues).
Delete Cue
Deletes the selected cue (or cues).
Subcue Entries Menu
Recall Subcue Entry
Recalls the selected subcue entry.
Instant Recall Subcue Entry
Recalls the selected subcue entry, but ignores all wait and fade times.
New Subcue Entry
Create a new subcue entry.
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Duplicate Subcue Entry
Duplicates the selected subcue entry (or entries).
Delete Subcue Entry
Deletes the selected subcue entry (or entries).
Capture Differences
Create a duplicate of the selected subcue, except with the current mixer values.
Update Subcues
Capture the current mixer state into the selected subcue. All other cues that reference the
subcue will now include the updated values.
Command Subcues
You can use command subcues to control external devices—like hard disk playback units and
samplers—connected to D-Mitri hardware. More often, however, you use command subcues to
control various aspects of D-Mitri hardware.
You create Command Subcues in the Subcue Library window. This is by contrast to the method
of creating mixer subcues, where you proceed by adjusting the mixer until you like what you
hear and then capture its state. Available commands range from simple MIDI commands to
elaborate CueConsole configuration settings.
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Creating a Command Subcue
1. Open the Subcue Library window.
2. Select Subcues > New Subcue > Commands.
A new subcue appears in the subcue list in the Subcue Library window.
3. In the area to the right, click Add Entry.
4. Right-click the Type and Command entries to select from a list of available options. Type
a Wait time as desired.
Type
Specifies the category of command. For this command example, select External Control.
Command
Selects the specific command.
5. For most commands, you can configure the parameters. These fields vary dependent on
the command that you have specified.
Beneath the parameter configuration area is a string of hexadecimal pairs. This is the byte
sequence which will be transmitted.
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Command Example
For this example, you have a Multi-Media Control (MMC) compatible video machine connected
to the system by an RS-232 cable, and wish to control it through the Transport window as part
of an overall audio-visual show. Specifically, you wish to start the video at one point in the show
and stop it at another point.
To create a pair of subcues for these commands:
1. Create a new Command subcue and click Add Entry.
2. Right-click in the Type column, and select MMC.
3. Right-click in the Command column, and select Play.
4. In the left pane, name the subcue Play Video.
Repeat the above steps, but choose Stop as the command, and name the subcue "Stop Video".
You can now add either subcue to a cue. When the cue is triggered (via the Transport, time
code, CueConsole, or other means), the MMC-aware video machine will start and stop the video.
If you have the option to rewind the video to the start location, you might also create a rewind
subcue to be used at the start of the show during initialization.
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SPACEMAP AUTOMATION
SpaceMap multichannel surround panning enables you to place and move sound through space
using a graphical interface. This chapter contains definitions of the elements that make up
SpaceMap, instructions for integrating SpaceMap automation, and design guidelines on how to
set up SpaceMap for various applications.
SpaceMap Overview
Traditional pan controls for stereo sound are one-dimensional. They shift sound along a line
between two points: left and right. SpaceMap, on the other hand, uses a two-dimensional layout,
and can even be used for three-dimensional work. It can position sound anywhere on a plane,
or anywhere in space.
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Elements of SpaceMap
A SpaceMap design is constructed from two basic elements: nodes and trisets. Nodes commonly
represent the positions of loudspeakers or groups of speakers, and may be of several types.
Trisets link three nodes together, providing the means to distribute signal proportionally among
them. A Trajectory is the path along which the spatial pan control will travel.
Nodes
Nodes are the points that audio is panned to within a map. They can represent physical speakers
(Speaker nodes) or simulate an output location (Virtual nodes). Nodes can also derive their
audio from other nodes (Derived nodes), or discard their audio completely (Silent nodes). These
types are defined more fully in Types of Nodes (p. 117).
Trisets
Trisets are triangular panning surfaces defined by three nodes. They ensure a smooth pan
without signal drop, like a two-dimensional panning law used by a conventional pan pot. Just as
two points are the minimum required to define a line, three points are the minimum required to
define a plane.
CAUTION
Trisets can not overlap one another: signal distribution would be unpredictable within the
overlapped areas. An overlapping triset turns red as a warning.
The physical dimensions of the triangle are not critical because the power-preserving panning
law is proportional rather than absolute. It is based on the relative distance between the spatial
pan control and each of the three surrounding nodes, rather than the actual “physical” distance
within the grid.
Trajectories
The path along which a sound moves is called a Trajectory. A trajectory may be recorded, edited,
and reshaped, then mapped to an input bus and recalled as part of a SpaceMap Trajectory
subcue.
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Trajectories can create the illusion of a moving sound, fade sounds in and out, or control a variety
of other effects depending on the design of the map. The relative position of the SpaceMap bus
within a triset determines the proportion of signal sent to each of the nodes in the triset. The
actual signal levels can be seen in the Matrix window, along the row of the input bus assigned
to the control.
Each trajectory is an entirely independent entity, with no absolute relationship to any one map.
One map can have several different trajectories, or one trajectory for several different maps.
Several trajectories can be active at once (one per bus), and there can be an arbitrary number
of trajectories (and maps) in a project file.
Additionally, a trajectory can be played back with real-time modifications, such as the number
of repetitions, rate, orientation, scaling, and offset in both X and Y dimensions. Several copies
of the same trajectory could be assigned to different buses and performed simultaneously with
different modifiers on each.
Types of Nodes
Speaker Nodes
Speaker nodes represent the physical outputs in the D-Mitri
system. Each node is assigned to a single output. Outputs
can be connected to speakers, effects processors, or any
other devices. You may even assign multiple nodes to the
same output.
When a triset contains three speaker nodes, the audio is
distributed amongst the nodes as determined by the location
of the bus or trajectory within the triset, and the relative
distance between the nodes. For more information on how
to create these nodes, see Adding Nodes (p. 127) and
Creating Trisets (p. 129).
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Virtual Nodes
A Virtual node simulates a physical output in space by
distributing its signal to the Speaker nodes to which it is
linked. By default the signal will be divided equally among
all the linked Speaker nodes, but you can define proportional
link weights that change the balance of the distribution. For
more information on how to create these nodes, see Adding
Nodes (p. 127).
In this example, the Virtual node is linked to the four Speaker
nodes so that any signal that is assigned to it will be equally
distributed among the surrounding speakers. Thus a trajectory traveling around the perimeter
of the map will pan linearly from one speaker to the next, but a trajectory that moves toward the
Virtual node at the center of the map will cause the signal to spread out to all four speakers
gradually. This proportional distribution method creates a convincing phantom image throughout
the panning area.
Silent Nodes
A Silent node takes part in a triset in place
of a Speaker node but it is not associated
with an output. A signal panned toward a
Silent node simply disappears, providing an
easy way to create fade-in and fade-out
effects.
This feature also solves the signal dropout
problem that exists when a trajectory strays
outside the panning area defined by a triset
of Speaker nodes. Since the area outside
the map is currently undefined, the signal
abruptly drops out. By surrounding the
existing map with Silent nodes, we can
create a perimeter of “fadeout” trisets and
guard against unintended loss of signal. For
more information on how to create these nodes, see Adding Nodes (p. 127).
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To complete our model, place four Silent nodes, one outside each side. Create trisets, each with
two Speaker and one Silent node, or two Silent and one Speaker node. The end result will have
the Speaker nodes entirely enclosed within trisets. Sound panning will now be gap-free.
Derived Nodes
The Derived node provides a way to
send a signal to a secondary output
whenever that signal is also being
sent to a set of Speaker nodes. Like
a Virtual node, it is linked to one or
more Speaker nodes, but the logic of
the signal routing is reversed.
Whereas a Virtual node divides a
signal proportionally among its linked
Speaker nodes, the Derived node
receives a sum of the signals from its
linked Speaker nodes. The Derived
node will generally not be part of a
triset. If they happen to be in a triset,
they participate as a silent node,
discarding any signal proportioned to
them. For more information on how
to create these nodes, see Adding
Nodes (p. 127).
Derived nodes are commonly used for subwoofer sends, fill mixes, balconies, and other cases
where a secondary mix-down of a multichannel mix is required. For example, a Derived node
feeding a single subwoofer would be linked to all the main channels, so that even if the source
signal is being panned the subwoofer will receive a constant feed.
Virtual Weights
By default, Virtual and Derived nodes distribute and receive, respectively, an equal proportion
of the signal of their linked nodes. Virtual Weights allow you to alter these proportions.
When you choose a link, you can change its weight using the Set Link Weight command (see
Setting Link Weights (p. 130)).
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Link weights for Derived nodes are expressed in decibels, with a maximum value of 0 dB. Since
Derived nodes are essentially the result of a Y-cable, with signal going directly to physical outputs,
it is easier to express the difference in signal using decibels. Any number you put in, down to
-99.8 dB, is considered negative, unless you put a "+" sign in front.
Link weights for Virtual nodes are expressed as a ratio. The weight values are not absolute: they
represent ratios between the amounts of signal related to each Speaker node. You can represent
a ratio of 2:1 by weights of 2.0 and 1.0, 1.0 and 0.5, 30.0 to 15.0, or any other equivalent.
As you change the weighting values, remember that signal levels are measured in decibels, and
that +3 dB is equivalent to a 2:1 ratio between two signals (just as -3 dB represents a 1:2 ratio).
Similarly, a 6 dB difference can be achieved with a 4:1 or 1:4 ratio between weights.
For example, a Left-Center-Right map is set up so that a hard pan Left or Right causes the signal
to be 3 dB down in the Center speaker, and a pan to the Center causes the signal to be 6 dB
down in each of the Left and Right speakers. (The combined L+R signal is 3 dB below the Center,
so the overall level is the same.) This is achieved by using Virtual nodes for the Left, Center,
and Right positions. The weights for the Left and Right Virtual speakers are (1.0, 0.5) so that
the Center receives half the power (-3 dB) of either side speaker. For the Center the ratio is
doubled to (2.0, 0.5, 0.5) to achieve an additional 3 dB difference between the Center and each
side speaker.
SpaceMap Controls
In the SpaceMap window, each bus has its own SpaceMap grid view, trajectory parameters,
and tools for editing both maps and trajectories.
At the top of each bus view is the matrix row, so that you can see exactly how much signal is
going to each output.
SpaceMap Grid
Most of the SpaceMap window is devoted to a drawing area. This is where you place and link
nodes, create trisets, test the map, and draw trajectories.
TIP
You can zoom the scale of the window using the Cmd+[ and Cmd+] keys. The display
can be re-centered using the scrollbars.
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Grid Settings
There are two different grid options: cartesian and polar. The displayed grid type and size can
be changed in the Display menu.
For cleaner-looking maps and trajectories, go to the Display menu and select Snap to Cartesian
Grid or Snap to Polar Grid.
Editing Tools
Directly below the SpaceMap grid view is a row of buttons for selecting different editing tools.
From left to right:
Select
Select objects, trisets, and trajectory nodes. (Note that this is different from the Select button
in the upper left corner.)
Add Speaker Nodes
Click on the grid to add Speaker nodes.
Add Virtual Nodes
Click on the grid to add Virtual nodes.
Add Derived Nodes
Click on the grid to add Derived nodes.
Add Silent Nodes
Click on the grid to add Silent nodes.
Add Trisets
As you move your mouse around the grid, you will see preview lines indicating where a triset
would be placed. Click to create the triset. Each set will be numbered in order of creation.
Test
Click and drag to test different locations on the grid with the active bus. This is a good way
to experiment with a trajectory path.
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Trajectory Playback Controls
Below the SpaceMap grid area, there is also a set of trajectory playback controls. The text box
displaying a time in milliseconds shows the position of the bus along the trajectory, relative to
time. The transport controls include the following:
Play
Starts the bus moving along the selected trajectory's path. When playing back a trajectory,
you can also use the space bar to play and pause.
Pause
Pauses the movement of the bus.
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Stop
Stops the movement of the bus, and repositions it at the start of the trajectory. You can also
use the Enter key to stop a playing trajectory.
Record
Enters record mode, for recording a trajectory. The process of recording a new trajectory is
fully described in Creating Trajectories (p. 131).
Hold
Holds playback of the Trajectory, similar to the way the Hold button holds playback of a Wild
Tracks deck in the Wild Tracks window.
Isolate
Isolates playback of the Trajectory, similar to the way the Isolate button isolates playback
of a Wild Tracks deck in the Wild Tracks window.
You can hide or show the transport controls through the Display menu.
Bus Playback Settings
This section of the window contains the SpaceMap automaton settings for each bus.
Trajectory
Select a trajectory from the drop-down menu, or access Trajectory editing functions.
SpaceMap A
Select a map through which the trajectory will travel, or access SpaceMap editing functions.
SpaceMap B
Optionally select a second map, in order to "pan" the trajectory between two different maps.
The following parameters are visible when Display > Show Playback Details is enabled. These
parameters control how a bus moves along the selected trajectory, but do not affect the actual
trajectory. They are not saved with each SpaceMap or Trajectory.
Scale X
Multiplies the value of the X coordinate (horizontal).
Scale Y
Multiplies the value of the Y coordinate (vertical).
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Offset X
Adds an offset value to the X coordinate (horizontal).
Offset Y
Adds an offset value to the Y coordinate (vertical).
Divergence
Controls the amount of "bleed" to all other SpaceMap nodes.
Level
Controls the volume of audio signal routed to SpaceMap nodes, from +10.0 dB to -inf
(silence).
Pan
Sets the pan value between two maps. This control has no effect when SpaceMap B is set
to None.
Rate
Controls the relative speed at which the bus moves along the trajectory.
Rotation
Rotates the trajectory path around the origin (0,0) by a relative amount.
Repetitions
Controls how many times the bus will traverse the trajectory before stopping.
Position
Sets the starting position of the bus along the trajectory path.
Trajectory Editor
To view the trajectory editor, open the Display menu and select Show Trajectory Editor.
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The trajectory editor shows a timeline view of the currently selected trajectory. A drop-down box
in the upper left allows you to select whether you are editing the Level, Pan, or Divergence of
each trajectory node. Across the top are buttons for scroll to start, scroll left, scroll right, scroll
to end, zoom in, zoom to fit, and zoom out.
These controls affect the actual trajectory, and the parameters will affect any bus that uses the
trajectory.
SpaceMap Grid Settings
Change the appearance and behaviour of the background grid through the Display menu.
Show Matrix Rows
Display the matrix rows at the top of the grid.
Show SpaceMaps
Display the grid.
Show Transport Buttons
Display the trajectory playback controls.
Show Trajectory Editor
Display the trajectory editor at the bottom of the screen.
Show Playback Settings
Display the bus playback settings controls.
Show Playback Details
Display the playback details value boxes to the right of the trajectory buttons.
Show Mouse Coordinates
Display a value box to the left of the editing tools, which shows the mouse's current position
as map coordinates.
Show All Bus Positions
Display all bus positions at once on the grid.
Show Bus Names
Display the name of the visible bus points.
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Show Names
Display the names of all speaker nodes.
Show Links
Display all links.
Show Nodes
Display all speaker nodes.
Show Trajectories
Display all trajectories.
Show Node Durations
Display time between trajectory nodes.
Show Trisets
Display the trisets.
Show Images
Display any images added to the SpaceMap.
Fill Trisets
Display trisets as filled with color.
Show Cartesian Grid
Display a cartesian (square) grid.
Snap to Cartesian Grid
Snap all SpaceMap objects to cartesian grid points.
Set Cartesian Grid Spacing...
Set the spacing of cartesian grid lines.
Show Polar Grid
Show a polar (circular) grid.
Snap to Polar Grid
Snap all SpaceMap objects to polar grid points.
Set Polar Grid Spacing...
Set the spacing of polar grid lines.
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Show Page Group Controls
Shows or hides the Page Group controls on the bottom of the screen.
Creating a SpaceMap
This section describes the process of creating and editing a new map.
To create a new map, click on the SpaceMap A button, select New SpaceMap, and enter a
name.
Adding Nodes
The first step in building the SpaceMap is to add speaker nodes, virtual nodes, derived nodes,
and/or silent nodes.
1. Click Add Speaker Node.
2. Click on the map grid to add speaker nodes.
3. Click Add Virtual Node, Add Derived Node, or Add Silent Node, and then click on the
grid to add other types of nodes.
Speaker nodes and Derived nodes are numbered with the corresponding output channel.
Modifying Nodes
1. Click the Select tool.
2. Select the nodes you wish to modify. Select a single node by clicking on it, or select several
nodes by holding down the Shift key while clicking on them. You can also select multiple
nodes by dragging a selection box around them.
Other operations you can perform with the Select tool include:
•
Drag the node(s) to a new position.
•
Change the node(s) types. Right-click the selected node(s), choose Set Nodes Types, and
select Speaker, Virtual, Derived, or Silent.
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•
Delete the node(s). Use the Delete key, or right-click on one of the selected node(s) and
choose Delete Nodes.
•
Link or Unlink the connection between virtual or derived nodes and their associated speaker
nodes. Right-click the selected node(s) and choose Link Virtual/Derived Nodes or Unlink
Virtual/Derived Nodes.
•
Change the output channel for a single node. Select a node and type the number of the
output you wish to change it to. Or, right-click a node, select Set Output, and choose an
output channel number.
•
Give a single node a name. Right-click a node and choose Rename. The name will be
displayed beside the node.
Right-click on a node (or set of nodes) to edit it with the following parameters:
Set Node Type
Select from Speaker, Virtual, Derived, or Silent.
Set Output...
Select the output number from the list, or type a number and press Enter.
Set Aux...
Select the aux number from the list, or type a number and press Enter.
Set Node Trim
Enter a trim level for the node.
Rename Node
Enter a new name for the node (this will not change the number in front of the name).
Add Triset
When three nodes are selected, choose Add Triset to create a triset connecting them.
Delete Triset
Removes the triset.
Link Virtual/Derived Nodes
Creates links between the Virtual or Derived node and the currently selected Speaker nodes.
Unlink Virtual/Derived Nodes
Removes any links to the currently selected nodes.
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Set Derived Link Gains
Type in a number from +22.1 dB to -99.8 dB.
Delete Node
Deletes the currently selected nodes.
Creating Trisets
Add trisets to create "zones" for the SpaceMap buses to move through. Buses that are outside
of a triset will not produce any output signal.
1. Click Add Triset.
2. Move the pointer to the middle of any three nodes. A light green line shows the triset that
will be formed. Click to create that triset.
Alternatively, you can shift+select three nodes, right-click on one of them, and select Add Triset.
Trisets are named automatically using sequential numbers. If you prefer to name a triset, right-click
the triset and choose Rename Triset.
CAUTION
Trisets can not overlap one another: signal distribution would be unpredictable within the
overlapped areas.
Deleting Trisets
1. Click Add Trisets.
2. Click on a triset to remove it.
Alternatively, using the Select tool, right-click a triset and choose Delete Triset.
If you delete a node that is part of a triset, the triset will be deleted as well.
Testing Trisets
1. Set your mixer control points to route audio signal to the bus you are using.
2. Click Test Map.
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3. Drag the bus through the map. If your speaker nodes are sending to functioning speakers
you will hear the sound pan through the trisets.
If you watch the Matrix window you can observe the output signal distribution changing as you
move the bus.
NOTE
The bus is represented as a small yellow circle. Its label corresponds to the bus label.
Linking Nodes
Derived nodes and virtual nodes must be linked to speaker nodes in order to function.
1. Select the virtual or derived node, plus the other nodes to which it will be linked. For virtual
nodes, these will be nodes that receive signal from the virtual node. For derived nodes,
these will be nodes that send signal to the derived node.
2. Hold down the Shift key and click on each node that you wish to have linked.
3. Right-click one of the selected nodes and choose Link Virtual/Derived Nodes.
Each link will be labeled with its “link weight”, a value representing the proportion of signal it
sends.
Unlinking Nodes
To unlink all the links for a virtual, derived, or speaker node, right-click the node and choose
Unlink Virtual/Derived Nodes.
Setting Link Weights
To change a link’s weight, right-click its weight value and choose Set Link Weight. Provide a
new value.
The proportion of signal that a link distributes is equal to the proportion of its link weight versus
the sum of link weights for its associated virtual or derived node.
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Creating Trajectories
When you are satisfied with your triset layout, you can create a SpaceMap Trajectory that can
be used in a cue.
Creating a New Trajectory
To create a SpaceMap Trajectory:
1. Click on the Trajectory button, and select New Trajectory....
2. Enter a name for the trajectory.
3. Click Record. It will start flashing red.
4. Draw the trajectory on the grid by clicking its start position, then clicking at several discrete
locations along the desired trajectory path. CueStation will automatically connect the dots.
The time interval between dots initially corresponds to the time between clicks (see Modifying
a Trajectory (p. 132)).
5. To stop recording, move the mouse outside the SpaceMap grid.
You may re-record the trajectory by clicking Record again and drawing a new path. This will
clear the trajectory you have already recorded.
Auto-Cue
If you would like to record your trajectory in time with Wild Tracks playback, or other types of
automation, you can use the Auto Cue function.
1. Click on the R button. To the right, two new controls become visible: an Auto checkbox and
a Cue text box.
2. Click in the Auto checkbox to enable Auto Cue.
3. Type a cue ID in the Cue text box. This cue will be recalled when you add your first trajectory
point.
4. Click on the map to add a trajectory point. The cue is recalled, and you can continue placing
trajectory points as needed.
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5. To stop the trajectory recording, move the mouse outside the SpaceMap grid.
Modifying a Trajectory
To edit a SpaceMap trajectory:
1. Select the trajectory from the drop-down menu next to the Trajectory button.
2. Click the Select tool.
3. Select points on the trajectory. Multiple points can be selected using the Shift key or by
dragging a selection box around them.
Any of the following operations can be performed on trajectory points:
TIP
When a trajectory node is selected, the duration is displayed in the status bar, to the left
of the Record button, for quick reference.
•
Drag points to new positions.
•
Delete points by right-clicking a selected point and choosing Delete TrajectoryNode.
•
Insert points by right-clicking a selected point and choosing Insert TrajectoryNode.
•
Adjust the duration by right-clicking a selected point or line segment and choosing Modify
Duration. If multiple trajectory points have been selected, the change in duration will be
distributed in proportion to the ratio of each segment’s duration to the sum duration of the
selected segments.
•
Adjust the offset of an individual segment by right-clicking the line segment and choosing
Modify Offset. While one can change the offset for multiple-selected segments, the result
will also change the durations of the segments. It is better to change their offsets by changing
the overall duration.
•
Name the trajectory point by right-clicking the point and choosing Rename TrajectoryNode.
Testing a Trajectory
SpaceMap trajectories can be tested by playing them:
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1. Select the trajectory from the drop-down menu next to the Trajectory button.
2. Click Play.
To stop playback, click Stop.
TIP
Observing the Matrix row while the bus is moving (by dragging the test control or by playing
a trajectory) will help you identify awkward transition zones.
To ensure seamless panning, check that the trisets have no gaps, and consider using
virtual nodes to provide a smooth fade-out zone for moving to areas beyond the speaker
output sets.
A trajectory that crosses any part of the SpaceMap window that is not inside a triset will
result in a complete dropout of the signal. It is a useful practice to surround the main part
of your map with a “safety zone” of trisets that include one or two silent nodes. This will
result in the sound fading as the bus moves towards the silent nodes.
Automatic Trajectory Generation
CueStation can auto-draw a trajectory based on a parametric equation. To access this function:
1. Open the Commands window and add a SpaceMap type entry.
2. Change the Command to AutoDraw Trajectory. Then enter the values and functions to
generate the X and Y coordinates, duration, pan, divergence, and level for each point. The
default values will create a circle.
3. Click Recall Selected to have the trajectory drawn automatically.
This External Command can also be used in a subcue.
Creating SpaceMap Subcues
SpaceMap Trajectory Subcues
After you have created and fine-tuned your trajectory, you can add trajectory playback to a cue.
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1. Channel Select the bus you want to assign to the trajectory.
2. For that bus, select the trajectory you wish to use, along with the SpaceMap A (and optionally
a SpaceMap B). The SpaceMap grid will reflect what you are about to capture.
3. Open the Capture window using F4, and type a name for the new cue. Or, open the Capture
window using F2, and select an already existing cue to add trajectory automation.
4. Under the bus/matrix category, add a checkmark next to SpaceMap Trajectory, to include
that subcue type in the new cue.
5. Click on the Capture button in the bottom right to create the new cue. When the cue is
recalled, the selected bus will start moving along the trajectory.
SpaceMap Design
SpaceMap is a very flexible control mechanism, and can be used in many different applications.
Here are some guidelines for various ways to design and implement SpaceMap automation.
General Design Guidelines
Unlike surround-sound pan controls optimized for cinema sound in 5.1, 6.1, or other “standard”
formats, the SpaceMap interface has been designed to be extremely general and adaptable to
any conceivable speaker configuration. This means that there is no single correct way to design
a map, though there are some methods that work better than others.
SpaceMap Design "Do's"
•
Analyze your venue, your system configuration, and your sound design needs before
embarking on an elaborate SpaceMap design.
•
Create “sub-maps” of portions of a large configuration rather than trying to represent it all
in one map. You’ll gain more detailed control of trajectories if you have more room to draw
them.
•
Surround your map with a perimeter of trisets involving Silent nodes, to guard against sudden
dropouts.
•
Define links for all Virtual and Derived nodes.
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SpaceMap Design "Don'ts"
•
Don’t leave any parts of a map undefined, or you’ll suffer signal dropouts.
•
Don’t get hung up on designing a map as a literal representation of your physical speaker
layout: sometimes the most creative and useful applications will be more abstract.
Design Guidelines for Simple Systems
Although we just advised you against getting hung up on designing a map as a literal
representation, this is still the easiest way to get started. With simple speaker configurations it
may be all you really need to do.
The first step in creating a simple SpaceMap design is to place a set of Speaker nodes in a
configuration that represents the physical layout of the loudspeakers. This arrangement doesn't
need to be exactly to scale. After all, your physical system configuration may have to be designed
for a room that doesn't have the same proportions as the virtual space you are trying to simulate.
How you accommodate to this situation will depend on too many particulars to provide any
general rules. Try to keep in mind that you’ll always be striving for a compromise between physical
space and perceptual space.
Learn by doing. Experiment with the system and you’ll learn quickly.
Similarly, no hard rules can determine your Speaker node layout, though typical configurations
serve particular types of venues and shows. One common design is for the creation of a
soundscape framed by the proscenium, as in a crowded street scene. Some speakers may be
placed at the level of the stage and others suspended higher up, forming a panorama that has
both width and height. A map for such a design would be drawn as a front view of the stage,
from the audience’s perspective. Other configurations might employ surround speakers encircling
the audience, possibly even including some overhead speakers. Here the map would represent
an overhead view, looking down on the audience.
Once the Speaker nodes have been laid out, it is necessary to connect them into trisets. Most
of the time you will also need to create some Virtual nodes to “tie together” the Speaker nodes.
As a rule of thumb, it is common to place a Virtual node at the center of a group of four Speaker
nodes, creating smooth panning transitions from any location to any other. Virtual nodes are
also handy when speakers are laid out so that they don’t enclose any space (such as in a linear
array). A Virtual node can provide the essential third vertex of the triangle.
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Once you have a set of Speaker nodes and Virtual nodes connected neatly by trisets, you’ll want
to create a “buffer zone” around the perimeter. This will usually be done with Silent nodes. The
easiest way to do this is to place Silent nodes near the edge of the window, positioned to form
trisets between each pair of outer-edge Speaker or Virtual nodes. This will ensure that any
trajectory that slips outside the main trisets will not drop out abruptly. It also provides a way to
fade signals in and out. Another common effect is to include Speaker nodes functioning as reverb
sends. This can allow a sound to move from the inner “dry” region of the map, out to a “distant”
reverberant zone, and finally to silence.
Your finished map should be neatly laid out and represent your venue and speaker configuration
in a clear and intuitive fashion. All areas of the map should be defined by trisets and there should
be no boundaries where signal drops off abruptly from one side to another. Check your work in
Test mode by moving the pan controller inside and between trisets while monitoring the
smoothness of the pan. Test the edges of the map to be sure that the signal fades smoothly in
and out.
If possible, do all your testing in the venue itself, from the audience’s perspective and with
loudspeakers on. If this isn't possible, you can at least check the map’s basic functionality by
placing the Matrix window in the same workspace as the SpaceMap window and watching the
behavior of the crosspoint values as you move the spatial pan control.
Design Guidelines for Complex Systems
Most systems that are large enough to invite the use of SpaceMap are also complicated enough
to require a SpaceMap design that goes beyond simple mirroring of speaker locations. The first
stage of abstraction is to subdivide the speaker system into zones, each with its own map or set
of maps. Such subdivisions may be obvious (such as creating one map for surround sound
environmental effects and another for a virtual pit orchestra) or subtle (such as maps that cover
the same physical region but incorporate different groups of speakers).
When starting to venture beyond simple physical mapping, remember:
•
A map is not one comprehensive representation of a sound system configuration.
•
Multiple maps and trajectories can operate simultaneously.
•
Maps can function together, function independently, or overlap.
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One reason to use multiple maps is to reduce complexity. If a given trajectory will use only a few
speakers, there is no need to map all the speakers; they just add complexity and unnecessary
design overhead.
Another reason for subdivision can be found in larger surround configurations, where a trajectory
moves from one part of a room to another. In such cases you might build a chained sequence
of SpaceMap Subcues, each using a different but connected map and trajectory. For example,
a sound will be flown across the stage and then to the right wall, across the back, up the left
wall, and back to the stage. One can set up a separate SpaceMap design for each surface,
reducing the complexity of the maps. When using this technique, particular care must be taken
to “smooth the joints” where a trajectory crosses from one zone to the next.
Non-theater applications, like theme park attractions and outdoor installations, may consist of
multiple independent spaces and will require completely independent SpaceMap designs. Again,
there can be a great deal of variation in design. A set of adjoining rooms that are acoustically
isolated would have entirely independent sound fields and therefore distinct maps. On the other
hand, an outdoor soundscape is more likely to have “bleed” from one area to another, requiring
adjoining maps to share their edge nodes.
Design Guidelines for Trajectories
As always, it’s a good idea to plan ahead before recording your trajectories. It helps to imagine
your sound environment, both aurally and visually, before designing the map. If possible, sit in
the venue and picture how your sounds will move around the space. Consider the audience’s
perspective from various seating areas. Make sketches. Think about timing. Take a stopwatch
to rehearsals and time how long certain stage actions, music cues, and scene changes take so
you can plan your sound cues objectively. Do this as early as possible: you may find that part
of your spatial design must be done before you even approach map and trajectory creation.
Once you have a clear idea of how your sounds need to move through space, you can design
an appropriate map or set of maps. It may also help to spend some time listening to moving
sounds in the real world. It is often surprising how many wrong assumptions we make about our
own perceptions.
Be sure to take advantage of the Trajectory editing features. Trajectories can be created segment
by segment, and the paths along these segments will be smoothly interpolated.
Details regarding the creation and editing of trajectories are found in Creating a SpaceMap (p.
127).
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Advanced Design: The Z-Axis
The simple examples we've looked at are immediately useful as the basis for spatial panning in
a planar array of speakers, but what about installations with width, depth, and height? The Z-axis
may be the orphan child of cinematic surround sound, but in many larger theatrical and theme
park installations, the perception of height is crucial to convincing sonic illusions. D-Mitri can
easily handle this, but the current SpaceMap window uses a strictly two-dimensional interface,
which tends to limit one’s ability to think in three dimensions.
The trick to getting out of this box is to think about the box in various and novel ways. The
simplest technique is to deconstruct your three-dimensional speaker array into its component
planes. If we expand our previous four-speaker example and think about a cubic configuration
with eight speakers, we find that we can visualize this three-dimensional arrangement as six
two-dimensional quad arrays, each representing a face of the cube.
Sound can be navigated across any one of these surfaces by using a rectangular map similar
to the one we designed previously. If we want to move the sound from one face to another, we
can change from one map to another at the point where the trajectory crosses cube faces, using
two SpaceMap subcues in succession.
An alternative to this could be to create one map that contains both panning surfaces, so that
we could use just one continuous trajectory for the entire sound path. This is where the process
gets really fun (or really confusing), because there is no end to the topological games you can
play with SpaceMap. If you think of SpaceMap design in the light of cartography, you will see
that you are faced with similar problems of deconstruction and unfolding that map-makers face
when they want to represent our spherical Earth on the flat pages of an atlas.
The core problem is also akin to those faced in mechanical drawing and architecture. You can
view any three dimensional object in many ways: front, side, or overhead; in perspective; exploded
component view; unfolded box; whatever you can imagine. It’s a bit of a mental stretch, perhaps,
but we've seen many ingenious solutions to the flat earth problem in mathematics, engineering,
visual art, and literature (recommended readings: Flatland, books on topology, M.C. Escher,
origami, cartography, engineering drawing, cubism).
Using Degrees of Abstraction
It is possible to design a map with trisets that are composed entirely of Virtual nodes. One
practical application of this is in the type of large environmental sound installation that uses
repeating zones or “cells” of loudspeakers to cover a wide area with surround sound effects.
138
The Fremont Street Experience in Las Vegas and the annual New Year’s Eve celebration in
Times Square are examples. In both cases a single rectangular map controls multiple quad
arrays of speakers. The corners of the rectangle are formed by Virtual nodes linked to
corresponding speakers in the various cells (the stereo orientation alternates from one to the
next). This map is used with an alternative map made up of individual Speaker nodes. This
provides for “fly-though” effects that span all the individual zones.
Such a strategy can be applied to other complex installations where many speaker channels
are individually controllable but must be re-zoned dynamically. In such cases you can duplicate
a single map made up of Virtual nodes, and then redefine the linked Speaker nodes for each
copy of the map. This saves on drawing many similar maps and it presents intriguing possibilities
for dynamic sound transformations that may not be imagined by one working with a more
conventional one-to-one representation.
Using SpaceMap Subcues
Before a Trajectory can be used for playback in a cue or cue list, it must be incorporated in a
SpaceMap Subcue. The mapping of Trajectory and SpaceMap parameters to each bus is
displayed at the bottom of the SpaceMap window. Both SpaceMap Subcues, SpaceMap Trajectory
and SpaceMap Position, are captured like other mixer subcues in the system.
The SpaceMap Trajectory subcue allows the binding of a trajectory to a pair of maps, with several
modifier parameters to reshape the path of the trajectory and govern its performance. The
trajectory can be made to repeat a fixed number of times, or indefinitely. It may be rotated, scaled
and/or offset in X and Y dimensions, and panned between two maps. Its playback rate and its
signal level can be scaled.
A parameter called Divergence causes a certain amount of the signal to be spread evenly
throughout all the Speaker nodes in the map. This is used to counterbalance the “sweet spot”
limitations that plague surround sound for larger audiences. It may reduce the strength of the
panning effect, but it keeps the signal from being lost to some listeners as the sound pans away
from them.
These modifiers can be used in various ways, ranging from simple adjustment of trajectory
performance to an efficient way to “multiply” a single trajectory and to use it in several guises.
For instance, a single figure-8 shaped trajectory could be used in several simultaneous SpaceMap
subcues, with a variety of rotation settings, to create a precisely choreographed swarming of
sounds. Several sounds could be made to chase each other along a single path just by putting
time offsets between their subcues.
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The view can be simplified to show the most common parameters (trajectory, SpaceMap, and
iterations) by de-selecting Display > Show Playback Settings/Details.
SpaceMap Position subcues contain the position of the bus and designated map only. These
can be used to create static surround mixes. Subcue parameter details are found in the Creating
a SpaceMap (p. 127) section.
More Information
The following books contain information on spatial hearing:
Begault, D., 3-D Sound for Virtual Reality and Multimedia. A clear and comprehensive presentation
of 3-D audio principles and current technology. Unfortunately, this book is now out of print. (You
may find it at
http://human-factors.arc.nasa.gov/ihh/spatial/papers/pdfs_db/Begault_2000_3d_Sound_Multimedia.pdf)
ISBN 0120847353.
Blauert, J., Spatial Hearing: The Psychophysics of Human Sound Localization. The standard
reference on the psychophysics of three-dimensional hearing. (See Mills (1972) for a shorter
overview.) ISBN 0262024136.
Bregman, A. S., Auditory Scene Analysis: The Perpetual Organization of Sound. A massive
description of experiments by the author and his students on the factors that influence the
formation and segregation of sound streams. The first and last chapters are readable by
nonspecialists, but see Handel (1989) or Yost (1991) for an easier introduction. ISBN 0262521954.
Carlile, Simon, Ed., Virtual Auditory Space: Generation and Applications. An excellent survey
of the psychophysics of spatial hearing and the generation for spatial audio. Highly recommended.
ISBN 1570593418.
Handel, S., Listening: An Introduction to the Perception of Auditory Events. A recommended
general introduction to the psychology of hearing; includes a good summary chapter on
neurophysiology. ISBN 0262081792.
Stern, R. M., Jr., An overview of models of binaural perception. A useful survey paper directed
at models that attempt to explain all known psychoacoustic phenomena. Available in Proc. 1988
National Research Council CHABA Symposium.
140
Yost, W. A., and G. Gourevitch, Eds., Directional Hearing. The most important collection of
research contributions since Blauert’s book. Includes results of direct measurements of
head-related transfer functions. ISBN 0387964932.
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WILD TRACKS PLAYBACK
Wild Tracks is the audio playback and recording system for D-Mitri. It uses SATA hard drives to
store audio files.
Each Deck is a collection of entries that share the same set of play, pause, and stop commands.
These entries can be arranged in time to create complex multitrack sequences, then captured
into a Wild Tracks Deck subcue. This process is explained in Wild Tracks Subcues (p. 167).
A Wild Tracks entry can be the playback of an audio file or tone generator, the recalling a cue
or subcue, and a few other types. These are covered in Wild Tracks Entries (p. 163).
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Importing Audio Using Drive Setup
The Setup Drives dialog (see Setup Drives Window (p. 146)) makes it easy to import files into
the Wild Tracks window:
1. Click the Drive Setup button to bring up the Setup Drives dialog.
2. Click on the Drive Contents tab and navigate to the folder.
3. Drag the audio file(s) from the local directory to the Drive Contents tab.
4. Drag the file(s) to the Wild Tracks window to place it in the Wild Tracks deck.
Wild Tracks Window
The Wild Tracks window is where you can setup and control each Wild Tracks Deck. Each Wild
Tracks Unit has 32 decks.
A Wild Tracks Deck is a collection of Wild Tracks entries which all share the same time line and
transport controls. Decks can be triggered individually or in groups.
If you are familiar with multitrack audio editing programs, you can think of each deck as a separate
multitrack session, each of which can be captured into a cue and recalled independently. Each
deck has a time line, transport controls, and a list of entries (usually audio files) associated with
it. Capturing a deck into a cue captures all of the information about the entries (including timing
144
placement within the deck, volume envelopes, and loops) in addition to information about the
deck as a whole (such as cursor placement or time code locking).
Wild Tracks entries can be audio files, tone generators, or even a cue recall. Entries that have
audio associated with them can be assigned to any of the Wild Tracks channels, as configured
in the Chapter 17, Mixer Configuration window. You can even assign multiple entries to the same
channel.
The Wild Tracks window has four areas, each of which can be turned on or off via the Display
menu. These are Meters, Deck Graphics, Deck Info, and File Search Path.
Meters
The Meters area of the Wild Tracks window shows the audio playback activity for all channels,
as well as global Wild Tracks controls. This section includes:
•
Global Select buttons. Units Selected toggles channel select for all Wild Tracks Units.
Decks Selected toggles channel select for all Wild Tracks Decks.
•
A Unit ID number. Click on this number to select the entire Wild Tracks Unit.
•
A Wild Tracks Unit Label.
•
A global Master Hold button. Clicking the Master Hold button will hold all decks of the
current Wild Tracks unit, effectively pausing playback from all those decks currently playing,
and preventing the initiation of playback from those decks in the unit not already playing.
Clicking the Master Hold button again will remove the hold on all decks in the current Wild
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Tracks unit, and decks which had been playing when the hold was placed will resume
playback.
•
A Unit Stop button, which stops all the playbacks from decks in the current Wild Tracks
unit, without affecting other functions, such as autofollow and SpaceMaps.
•
A Drive Setup button, which opens the Setup Drives window (see Setup Drives Window
(p. 146)).
•
An Isolate button, to toggle the Isolate function for all decks in the current unit, or, if chosen,
for all decks in all units.
•
Metering for each channel of playback. The number of channels is configured in the Mixer
Configuration window.
•
Above each meter is a PAFL button, which is labeled with the Wild Tracks Send channel
number. To use this feature, you must have at least one output configured as a PAFL.
NOTE
This button’s mapping to PAFLs follows the PAFL mapping established in the Inputs window.
This means that the checkboxes in the left column of the Inputs window control these PAFL
buttons the same way they control the L button in the Inputs window.
NOTE
It is also possible to bring up the Show Signal Path dialog by right-clicking on any Send
channel number.
•
The Deck Indicator buttons are below the PFL buttons. If audio is playing on a channel, the
button will display the number of the deck in use. This button is a shortcut to display the
deck that is playing audio on that channel.
Setup Drives Window
The Drive Setup button brings up the Setup Drives window, where you can import audio
(Importing Audio Using Drive Setup (p. 144)) and create virtual drives (Using Wild Tracks Offline
(p. 181)). The contents of the window depend on which tab is selected.
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Drive Setup Tab
Mount Point
Refers to the physical location of the Wild Tracks drives; left drive sled or right drive sled.
Drive Status
Status of the Wild Tracks drive: Online or Offline.
FSType
Displays what file system (if any) is installed on your drives. This column is populated even
when the drives are not mounted.
Volume Label
Name of the drive. This value is editable, and can be used to set the name of the drive as
it should appear in the Drive Setup pane henceforward.
Size
Total size of the drive.
Used
Amount of space currently assigned to files.
Available
Amount of free space.
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Comment
Enter text comments here.
Close
Click to close the window.
Mount Drives
Click to search for connected drives that are not listed in the Setup Drive window.
Unmount Drives
Click to stop the drive so it can be safely disconnected (similar to "ejecting" a flash drive
before physical removal).
Verify Subcues
Click to check if the subcues are present on all locally mounted drives.
Create Virtual Drive File
Click to create a virtual drive file.
Backup Drive
Click to back up one selected drive to another.
Format Drive
Click to format the selected drive. (This will erase all content on the drive: a dialog will request
you to confirm.)
Repair Drive
Click to attempt repairs to the selected drive.
IMPORTANT
Drive repair is generally used to attempt recovery of a drive’s file system on those rare
occasions when the file system structure has become corrupt. This function does not
recover files which may themselves be damaged, but rather recovers access to files by
attempting to repair a drive’s file system.
Drive Contents Tab
A row of standard buttons runs at the top of the tab:
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Refresh Directory
Click to refresh the window.
Viewing:
Text box that displays the current directory's file path.
Parent Directory
Click to go up one directory level.
Create New Folder
Click to create a new folder in the current directory.
Copy Selected Files
Click to copy the selected files and/or folders.
Cut Selected Files
Click to cut the selected files and/or folders.
Paste Selected Files
Click to paste the selected files and/or folders.
Delete Selected Files
Click to delete the selected files and/or folders.
IMPORTANT
The Delete function does not move a file to the trash for possible retrieval later. It deletes
it from the drive completely.
Upper Section:
Upload to both Drives checkbox
When selected, automatically copies any file you upload to one drive to the other drive as
well.
Upload to both Modules checkbox
On a system configured with redundant Wild Tracks modules, CueStation presents an
Upload to both Modules checkbox. When this checkbox is selected, CueStation directs
uploaded files to both the primary and redundant Wild Tracks modules. This checkbox can
be used in conjunction with the Upload to both Drives checkbox to simultaneously upload
to four different destination drives (two drives on each module).
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File Name
The name of the file.
File Size
The size of the file in MB.
Audio Length
How long the file will play in hours, minutes, seconds, etc.
Chans
The number of tracks within the audio file.
Last Modified
The last date the file was modified.
Lower Section:
Status
The percentage completed of a file download or upload.
Xfer Speed
How many MB per second is being transferred.
Xfer Information
What files or folders are being downloaded or uploaded. If multiple files are being downloaded
or uploaded simultaneously, the information for all the file trasnfers will appear on a single
line, which will be updated as the transactions progress. For example, for a download of six
files, the information line will read 1/6 for the first of the six files, 2/6 for the second, and so
on.
Import Files...
Imports audio files from any connected directory.
Import Folder...
Imports folders and their contents from any connected directory.
Remove Selected File Transfers
Click to stop an exporting file in mid-transfer.
NOTE
150
File transfer is an incremental process. If stopped in the middle of a transfer, an incomplete
file of whatever percentage had finished downloading will remain on the destination drive(s).
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Deck Graphics
This displays a graphic representation of the relative position of the Wild Tracks entries included
in that deck. The controls for this area are as follows:
•
Controls for panning and zooming of the deck view: Scroll to Start (|<<), Scroll Left (<<),
Scroll Right (>>), and Scroll To End (>>|).
•
Horizontal zoom controls: Zoom In, Zoom to Extents, and Zoom Out.
•
Three sets of time code numbers, which define the span of locations currently visible within
the deck view. From left to right, the numbers indicate the minimum location, the median
location, and the maximum location that are visible within the window.
•
If there are any Wild Tracks elements enabled on the deck, they will be represented by a
green bar in the time line view. You can click and drag the audio files in the time line view
to change the time when that file will start playing.
If you right-click on one of the elements within the time line view, you will see a context menu
with the following options:
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Render Track Waveform
([length])
This allows you to view the
waveform of the track you
are using, similar to many
multitrack editing programs.
In order to preserve
processing power, only the
portions of the files that are
currently visible within the
deck are rendered.
Render All Track Waveforms
([length])
Selecting this will cause all
waveforms in the deck to be
rendered.
Cancel Waveform Rendering
Stops rendering the selected file.
Cancel All Waveform Rendering
Stops all rendering.
Clear Waveform Image
Clears the waveform rendered on the selected track.
Clear All Waveform Images
Clears the waveforms rendered on all tracks.
Clip Initial Silence...
Adjusts the Wild Tracks Entry to eliminate silence at the beginning of the track. Choose the
threshold (dB) for determining where silence ends and audio content begins. (The file itself
is not changed.)
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Seek to Beginning of Track
Click to go to the beginning
of the track.
Seek to End of Track
Click to go to the end of the
track.
Clear Selected Track Region
Click to remove a selected
portion of the track.
Select Entire Track as Track
Region
Selects the entire track
(equivalent to
command-dragging the
mouse along the entire
length of the green bar).
Select Intro Region as Track
Region
Selects only the intro region
of the track (from the left edge of the green bar to left edge of the first loop).
Select Loop Region as Track Region
Selects only the loops region of the track.
Select Outro Region as Track Region
Selects only the outro region of the track (from the right edge of the last loop to the right
edge of the green bar).
Clear Track Loop Region
Click to clear any looping designations on a track.
Clip Track to Selection
This option is only available if a region is selected, and it will set the File Offset, Play Offset,
and Play Length values to correspond with that region of the file.
Unclip Track
Click to reset File Offset, Play Offset, and Play Length values back to their defaults.
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Make Batch File from Track
This will make a batch file of the track you have selected, which can then be used in other
subcues.
The rest of the menu options are explained in the next section, Wild Tracks Envelopes (p. 155).
TIP
Use Cmd+[Arrow key] when a file is selected in the time line to have it "snap" to the
nearest edge of another file, the top of the deck, or the cursor.
Wild Tracks Envelopes
In the Wild Tracks window, you can draw volume envelopes in the Deck time line, and capture
them as part of the Wild Tracks Deck subcue. This allows greater control over level adjustments
between tracks and reduces the number of additional cues required to make level changes.
Right-click on a track in the time line to access the following options:
Adjust Envelope Levels in Selected Range...
This will adjust all selected points by the same amount. This is only enabled when a region
of the entry is selected.
Convert Envelope to 'Simple/Loop-Aware' Envelope Type
There are two types of envelope types: Simple and Loop-Aware. Loop-Aware envelope
points will repeat with looped regions, whereas Simple ones will not.
Clear Envelope Points in Selected Range
Clears all of the envelope points in the selection.
Display File Format Information...
Displays the file format type (.WAV, .AIFF, etc.).
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TIP
When editing envelope points in the Wild Tracks window, you can hold down the Shift key
when dragging to only affect the time (horizontal movement), or the Option key to only
affect the level (vertical movement). Hold down the Command key for fine control of point
movement when zoomed out.
Deck Info
The Deck Info area has two sections: Deck Controls and Wild Track Elements.
Deck Controls
This section has options and controls that relate to the entire deck:
•
A Deck ID number, on the long button to the far left. Click on this to select a deck for
capturing subcue information.
•
The Deck Label displays the ID number of the subcue recalled for that deck, the name of
the file assigned to that deck, and the Wild Tracks and Deck ID numbers.
•
The Deck Playback Position shows the current cursor position within the time line of that
deck.
•
Transport buttons: Play, Pause, Stop, and Record.
•
A Total Play Length label.
•
A Hold button, which acts similar to a pause button, but does not affect the playing/stopped
status of the deck.
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•
An Isolate button. When active (yellow), the deck will not be affected by cue automation.
•
Add Entry allows you to add a Wild Tracks element to the deck. This can include a file for
playback, a tone or noise generator, or a few other types; these are listed in the Wild Tracks
Entries (p. 163) section.
•
Choose Files... brings up a dialog box to add audio files to the deck. You can also add files
by dragging them into the Deck Info area from a directory listing.
•
Replace File Names... allows you to switch out the selected file for a different one.
•
Delete Selected removes the selected element from the list.
•
The Set/Recall Rehearsal Point buttons allow you to place or go to rehearsal points in the
deck, which means you can start a Wild Track at any point in its playback sequence. For
more information on setting and recalling rehearsal points, see Set/Recall Rehearsal Points
(p. 161).
•
The Deck Play Offset indicates the point on the deck time line where playback will start.
The default is the beginning of the deck.
•
The Lock to Time Code checkbox and Time Code field are used to lock the deck playback
to time code. Playback will stop when the Time Code stops, or the deck reaches the end
of the playback range.
•
Deck Enabled is normally selected, activating the subcue. When this box is unchecked,
the subcue will not play back when triggered. If you are programming a sequence of
overlapping Wild Tracks Deck cues, this allows you to listen to only the subcues you are
working on.
•
The Any Deck checkbox, if checked, signifies that the Wild Tracks subcue does not explicitly
specify which deck should be used for that subcue. In this case, when the subcue is recalled,
CueStation assigns it to a deck that is currently not in use, starting with the highest number
available. If Any Deck is NOT checked, then every time the subcue is recalled, it will use
the same deck.
•
A Deck Key: text box, to set a key for the deck. More information about using deck keys
can be found in Advanced Techniques (p. 177).
•
An On Recall: drop-down menu, to select which state the deck should be in when recalled
by a subcue.
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•
An On Complete: drop-down menu, to select the desired action when the deck cursor
reaches the end of the last entry in the timeline.
•
An action text box next to the On Complete drop-down menu, to the right of the and label.
This provides the option of assigning any valid text command, as described in the
specs/cs5/cs5_text_commands.txt document.
Wild Tracks Elements
The next area within the Deck Info section is a list of all the elements included within the Wild
Tracks Deck subcue. Clicking on a column heading will sort the elements alphabetically by the
contents of that column. Clicking it again will sort them in reverse order.
•
Type shows the type of element, and also determines what kind of information is listed in
the File Name column. Right-click in the Type column to change the type of element. See
Wild Tracks Entries (p. 163) for a full description of these types.
•
File Name identifies the name of the file, if the entry is a Playback type. If it is a Record
entry, File Name indicates the name of the file that will be written to.
•
Sends specifies a list of Wild Tracks sends to which the audio should be routed.
•
Loops allows you to replay the file or file region repeatedly. Set this value to -1 to loop
indefinitely.
•
Level specifies the volume level (in dB) of the file or tone generator.
•
Play Length (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) specifies the duration of playback. Note that this can be set
to a value shorter than the actual length of the file to play back a region of the file.
•
Loop Start sets the start time of the region to be looped. The default is the start of the file,
but you can create smaller regions within the file to be looped.
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•
Loop End sets the end time of the region to be looped.
•
Cross Fade sets the amount of cross fading you want Wild Tracks to use for loop-iteration
discontinuities. The default cross fade time is 30ms. For no cross fade, set it to 0ms. There
is no maximum cross fade time, although values greater than half of a loop iteration will be
treated as if they were equal to half of a loop iteration.
•
File Offset specifies the point within the file where playback should begin. This, combined
with Play Length, allows you to play back a region of the file.
•
Play At (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) is the point in the deck time line where the file will start playing.
•
File Format displays the format of the file, for recording entries.
•
ID sets a unique ID for the file entry.
•
Enabled displays whether the track is enabled or disabled.
File Search Path
File Search Path is the default directory string through which Wild Tracks searches for audio
files on the Wild Tracks disk(s).
Recording Path is the default directory where Wild Tracks will record audio.
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TIP
When you are using multiple decks, it can be difficult to keep track of which decks are
playing. One helpful technique is to open an additional Wild Tracks window using the
Windows > Clone Window command, and turn off all display options. This will result in
only the deck label, deck playback position, transport buttons being shown for each deck.
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Set/Recall Rehearsal Points
One of the most visible user changes is the adding of Set Rehearsal Point and Recall Rehearsal
Point buttons. These allow you to place or go to rehearsal points in the deck, which means you
can start a Wild Track at any point in its playback sequence.
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To Set and Recall Rehearsal Points
1. In the Wild Tracks deck, move the red time indicator bar to the desired spot.
2. Click the Set Rehearsal Point button
3. In the context window, select the letter you want to associate with the rehearsal point.
4. The rehearsal point will be placed at that point in the Wild Tracks deck. To start the cue at
that point, click Recall Rehearsal Point and select the point's letter from the context window.
Special Commands
Change Height of Tracks in Timeline
The deck time line can be zoomed vertically as well as horizontally. In the Display menu, use
the following commands to change the vertical zoom:
Make Bars Shorter
Zoom out vertically.
Make Bars Taller
Zoom in vertically.
Reset to Default Bar Height
Reset to the default zoom level.
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Wild Tracks Entries
This section describes the different types of Wild Tracks deck entries and the parameters
associated with them.
Playback
This is the most common type of Wild Tracks entry. The Playback type has an audio file
associated with it, which will be played according to the offset and loop values. The file will
be listed in the File Name column.
Record
This indicates that when the subcue is triggered, recording will begin on that deck, on the
channel(s) listed in the Sends column.
Sine Wave
This will generate a sine wave for an infinite length of time. The default frequency is 261.63
Hz (middle C), but you can specify any frequency between 1Hz-24kHz by typing the number
into the File Name column.
Pink Noise
This will generate an infinite amount of pink noise.
White Noise
This will generate an infinite amount of white noise.
Frequency Sweep
This will generate a series of tones that sweep a range of frequencies. The default is a five
second sweep that rises from 20Hz to 20kHz.
TIP
To adjust the length of the sweep, enter a different value into the Play Length column. To
adjust the starting frequency, type the value into the File Name column. To start at 500Hz,
type "pitch=500". To specify both starting and ending frequencies, specify the pitch twice.
Typing in "pitch=500 pitch=100" will specify a sweep that starts at 500Hz and sweeps down
to 100Hz.
Square Wave
This will generate a square wave of infinite length. The frequency and duty cycle can be
specified in the File Name column.
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Triangle Wave
This generates a triangle wave. The frequency and duty cycle can be specified in the File
Name column.
Sawtooth Wave
This generates a sawtooth wave. The frequency and duty cycle can be specified in the File
Name column.
TIP
To generate a wave at 440Hz with a duty cycle of 50%, enter "440 duty=50" in the File
Name column.
Command
Executes the specified text command. Right-clicking in the File Name field of a Command
entry reveals examples of commands that can be executed. The commands include Recall
Cue…, Recall Subcue…, Update Cue…, Update Subcue…, Print Message to Log…, and
others.
TIP
You can create a Recall Cue or Recall Subcue entry by right-clicking on a cue or subcue
and dragging it into a Wild Tracks deck or Wild Tracks deck subcue.
Rehearsal Point
This allows you to set a rehearsal point in the time line view.
File Name Context Menu
For cues with the Command Type, right-clicking in the File Name area activates a new context
menu containing descriptions of commonly used D-Mitri Text Commands. You can leave the
command as-is or edit it to suit your parameters.
Example: after selecting Go Next from the context menu, the text "Go on Player 1" appears in
the cell. This command presses the GO button in the Transport Window for Cue List Player #1
when the command track is played.
NOTE
Any valid D-Mitri text command can be entered into the File Name field. The context menu
only provides examples of commands that are likely to be useful when being executed
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from a Wild Tracks deck. For more information on D-Mitri text commands, see Appendix D,
D-Mitri Text Commands.
Recall Cue...
Brings up the Select a Cue dialog with a list of current cues, along with their ID numbers
and names.
Recall Subcue...
Brings up the Select a Cue dialog with a list of current subcues, along with their ID numbers
and names.
Update Cue...
Brings up the Select a Cue dialog with a list of current cues, along with their ID numbers
and names.
Update Subcue...
Brings up the Select a Cue dialog with a list of current subcues, along with their ID numbers
and names.
Go Next
Equivalent to pressing a GO button in the Transport window. If on player N is specified,
then the GO button will be pressed on Cue List Player #N. If not, it will default to Cue List
Player #1.
Skip to Previous Cue Entry
Skips to the previous cue position in the Transport window.
Skip to Next Cue Entry
Skips to the upcoming cue position in the Transport window.
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Print Message to Log
Prints the specified text to the system log.
Set Control Point Value
Sets the specified values to the specified addresses. The syntax is similar to what is seen
in Mixer Parameter subcues. For example, set input 1-8 level = +5.5 or set
output 5,7,9-11 mute = false. The following example specifies a wait of 5.5
seconds followed by a fade over 10 seconds:
set input 1 level = -50.0 waitTime=5.5 fadeTime=10.0
Sent Trigger Event
Sends a trigger-event to the D-Mitri system. Any triggers (previously set up with the External
Control/Setup Triggers command) that match eventstring will be activated.
Sent Message to Python Script
Launches a new Python script process in the specified slot in the Script Execution window.
A slotindex value of -1 will cause the script to be run "in the background" (i.e. not shown in
the Script Execution window). The filename should be the name of a python script in the
Support Files window, or in the templates folder.
Also, for cues with the Command Type, the file name of any cue or subcue now includes its
reference name (such as “Recall Cue 0”).
Select a Cue Dialog
Upon selecting Recall Cue, Recall Subcue, Update Cue, or Update Subcue, the Select a Cue
dialog displays the list of current cues or subcues, along with their ID numbers and names. When
a cue or subcue is selected, the effect depends on whether you previously selected Recall or
Update:
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Recall Cue/Subcue...
Selected cues or subcues will play when triggered.
Update Cue/Subcue...
Allows you to modify the selected cue or subcue so that its control points match the values
of those control points currently set in CueStation.
Wild Tracks Subcues
Wild Tracks Deck subcues contain a variety of information about playback (or recording) of audio
files. Each subcue corresponds to a single Wild Tracks Deck, which can contain up to 24 tracks
of audio playback. You can specify the deck number explicitly, or set it to Any Deck to let
CueStation choose a deck automatically.
There are two main methods of creating a Wild Tracks subcue. The easiest and fastest method
is by dragging audio files into the Cue List window. Another method is to set up a multitrack
sequence within the Wild Tracks window.
Creating a Wild Tracks Subcue in the Cue List Window
This is the quickest way to create Wild Tracks subcues.
1. Open the Cue List (or Cue Library) window.
2. In your operating system, open a file browser window and navigate to the wtrxaudio directory.
3. Click on an audio file and drag it directly into the list of cues section of the Cue List window.
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CueStation will automatically create a cue that contains one Wild Tracks deck subcue with the
following information:
•
The subcue will be a playback type Wild Tracks deck subcue, with the file offset, play offset,
level, loop count, and playback position set to defaults.
•
CueStation will automatically detect how many tracks are in the audio file and assign it the
appropriate number of sends.
•
In the subcue, the Name field will be set to an asterisk (*), which signifies "Any Deck". When
the cue is recalled, CueStation will automatically assign it to the first available deck, starting
with the highest number. For instance, if you have 32 decks, the cue will be assigned to
deck 32, unless that deck is already in use, in which case it will be assigned to deck 31.
At this point, you can edit the subcue directly within the Cue List window. If you want to change
the deck number, for instance, that can only be done by editing the Name field in the subcue.
Or, if you recall the cue, you can
then set the input levels, pans, and
other settings appropriately, and then
use Capture Differences to add
these control points into the same
cue.
When the subcue is recalled, the Deck Label in the Wild Tracks window is automatically set to
the name of the subcue, as shown.
Creating a Wild Tracks Subcue in the Wild Tracks Window
This method of creating a Wild Tracks deck subcue is useful for creating more complex multitrack
sequences.
1. Open the Wild Tracks window and locate a deck that is not in use. Drag in audio files;
playback entries will be created for them automatically. Alternatively, you can click on
Choose Files... to add audio files.
2. The sends are assigned automatically for each file, but you can change them by clicking in
Sends column and typing in new channel numbers. You can assign multiple Wild Tracks
files to the same channels.
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TIP
Drop a file directly onto a meter to automatically assign the file to that channel.
3. As you add files, you will see them appear in the time line view as green bars. Click and
drag on the green bars to move them forwards or backwards in time within the deck.
4. You can fine-tune the timing by editing the Play Offset value for each file. This value
determines the point in the deck's time line where the file will start playing.
5. The Level is set to 0 dB by default; this can also be edited to balance out the mix within
that deck. Additionally, you can assign a different gain for each track in the audio file,
separating the values with commas (for instance: "-10,-5"). If you add volume envelopes,
this value will be replaced with envelope values.
6. If you would like to loop part or all of a file, set the Loops value to the number of times you
want the file to be looped, or type "-1" for infinite looping. See the Regions, Loops, and
Vamping (p. 175) section for more information.
7. Once you have finished adding files and arranging them in the deck timeline, select the
deck by clicking on the deck number button on the left side of the window.
8. Press the F4 key to open the Capture window. The deck you selected should be listed in
the Channel Selects area. If the deck is the only thing you are capturing into the cue, make
sure that all other subcues types are unchecked, and then click on the checkbox next to
Wild Tracks Deck. Click on Click to Capture New to capture the cue.
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Editing a Wild Tracks Subcue
Wild Tracks parameters captured by CueStation can be directly edited in the subcue window.
Wild Tracks subcues can also be created entirely within the Subcue Library. Use Subcues >
New Subcue > Wild Tracks Deck to create a new subcue. Most controls work the same as
described in Wild Tracks Window (p. 144), but there are several additional options. The following
values constrain the operation of the entire deck:
•
Deck Enabled is normally selected, activating the deck. When not selected, the deck will
not respond to automation. This allows you to easily skip specific subcues while designing
your list.
•
Deck Recall Position: (hh:mm:ss:fr:sf) specifies the point along the deck time line at which
the deck cursor will begin playback.
•
On Recall: selects one of the following values:
Continue
This will load in the new deck info, without affecting the playback status of the deck. If the
deck was paused before the subcue was recalled, then it will remain paused.
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Stop
This stops the deck when the subcue is recalled.
Play
This loads the start of the file into the playback buffer, and then starts playing audio.
Play from Top
This works similarly to Play, except that the Deck Recall Position is ignored and playback
always starts from the beginning of the deck.
Record
This lets you record audio from an input channel to a file on the Wild Tracks drive.
•
WTRX: specifies the Wild Tracks unit used by the subcue.
•
Deck: specifies the Wild Tracks deck within that unit. Enter an asterisk ("*") to signify "Any
Deck".
•
On Complete: selects one of the following values:
Stop
This is the default selection. When the cursor reaches the end of the last entry in the timeline,
playback stops and the cursor returns to the beginning of the deck.
Pause
The deck will pause after the last entry, with the cursor remaining in place.
Reset Deck
Removes all entries and resets deck parameters to default values.
Clear Deck
Removes all entries.
Disable Deck
Disables the deck.
Continue
The deck continues playing past the end of the last entry.
Continue from Top
The deck starts playing at the beginning of the deck.
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Assigning Multitrack Files to Sends
Track assignments are made in the order listed in the Sends column. The first track of a
multi-track file is mapped to the first send listed, the second track to the second send listed, and
so forth.
For example you could specify "8,1,6,2-4", so that the file's first track will play on channel 8, the
second on channel 1, the third track on channel 6, the fourth on channel 2, the fifth on channel
3, and the sixth track on channel 4.
Descending ranges are also permitted. For example, a multi-track audio file can be mapped to
sends "16-1". The first track of the audio file is routed to the 16th channel, the second track is
routed to the 15th channel, and so on.
Playing Individual Tracks
You can extract tracks out of a multi-track file by making a null assignment of the unwanted
tracks. If you specify 0 (zero) as a send value, the track will not be played.
For example, to play only the right-hand stream of a stereo file, you can specify the send as
"0,1".
To send only the right channel of a stereo file to several different input channels, you could
specify "0,1,0,2,0,3". For the left channel only, it would be "1,0,2,0,3,0".
Or if you wanted to do the normal round-robin assignment mapping, but you want to start the
assignments with the second stream, you could prepend a zero to the sends. For example,
"0,1-16" would cause channel 1 to play the right-hand stream, channel 2 to play the left-hand
stream, channel 3 the right-hand stream, and so on.
Recalling Wild Tracks Subcues
When traversing through a cue list, CueStation will look ahead and preload Wild Tracks deck
subcues into a buffer. When the cue is recalled, the playback of audio files will begin as soon
as each track is halfway buffered, for more immediate playback when the subcue is recalled.
Optimizing Wild Tracks Playback
This section describes how to get the best performance for Wild Tracks playback.
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File Type and Format
Wild Tracks supports many different formats of audio files (see Supported Audio File Types (p.
239) for a complete list). All files must have a 96kHz sample rate.
Deck Recall Time
For a Wild Tracks deck subcue, the length time between when the subcue is recalled and when
the deck starts playing can be longer than desired, especially if there are many audio files to be
loaded. Therefore, it can be very beneficial to load the deck (without playback) at a time before
playback is required.
When recalling cues in a cue list, CueStation will "look ahead" at the next cue and automatically
preload Wild Tracks deck subcues. These subcues will not be visible in the Wild Tracks window;
they are loaded in the background. This can reduce time-until-playback by up to 98%.
It is possible also to manually control when decks are loaded, rather relying on the preloader
algorithm to perform preloading. This technique may be useful in circumstances where the
preloader algorithm lacks visibility into user intent, and thus will not preload a deck. One such
circumstance occurs when a loaded deck is going to be played by by means of a remote cue
recall. To manually control deck loading, you will need two cues per Wild Tracks playback: one
cue to load the deck, and another cue to start playback.
1. Create a Wild Tracks deck subcue as you normally would, then change the On Recall action
from Play from Top to Stop. This will prevent the deck from playing after it is loaded.
2. Take note of which deck the subcue will use.
3. Add this subcue to a cue in your cue list before the cue where you want to trigger playback.
4. Arrange your CueStation windows so you can see both the Wild Tracks window and the
Cue List window, and select the cue where you would like to trigger playback.
5. Right click + drag the Play button in the Wild Tracks window into the list of subcues of the
cue you selected in the Cue List window. This will create a new Mixer Settings subcue,
which should have the following information: WildTracks 1 Deck 1 Status Play. Make sure
the Wild Tracks unit and deck number match the Wild Tracks Deck subcue you created
earlier.
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At this point your cue list will have a sequence of two cues to initiate Wild Tracks playback. The
first cue loads the files into a deck, and the second cue triggers playback. This can significantly
reduce the trigger time when recalling the second cue. However, note that if you recall the second
cue without first recalling the loading cue, playback may not work as desired. For instance, if
there are other files loaded into that deck, then those files will be played instead of the ones you
were expecting.
You can also Control Decks by Key (p. 177) to control the playback of a preloaded deck.
CAUTION
It is possible to trigger multiple decks on one Wild Tracks Unit, such that more than 216
tracks are playing simultaneously. In this situation, audio dropouts are highly likely to occur,
and warning messages will be printed to the log. If you attempt to play more than 250
tracks, the most recently triggered deck(s) will automatically Hold until manually reset.
Regions, Loops, and Vamping
In Wild Tracks, you can create regions within an audio file. These regions allow you to loop a
section of a file infinitely or a certain number of times. You can also change the number of
remaining loops while the deck is playing to create a "vamp until triggered" effect.
By control-dragging on a green bar in the Wild Tracks window, you can specify a section of the
playback region. The specified section will be highlighted in blue. Once the selection is made,
you can control-drag on either end of the blue selection bar to adjust the area it covers. You can
also make the blue selection area match the entire length of the audio track by right-clicking on
the green bar, and then choosing Select Entire Track as Track Region from the context menu
(or press A).
Loops
In Wild Tracks you can loop an entire file, or a region within a file.
To loop an entire file, simply change the Loops value to the number of times you want the file
to loop; if you want it to loop infinitely, enter -1.
To create a loop for a region within a file:
1. Create a region by control-dragging the mouse over the part of the file you want to loop.
The region will be highlighted in blue.
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2. Right-click on the region and select Set Track Loop Region. This command will change
the Loop Start and Loop End times for the selected file to match the region you created.
You can also edit these values manually to fine-tune the timing of your regions.
3. Change the Loops value to the number of times you want the region to loop; if you want
the region to loop infinitely, enter -1.
Vamping
Vamping is used to loop a region of an audio file continuously until it is triggered to continue, at
which point it will finish playing the current region and then continue on to the next region.
To accomplish this in Wild Tracks, use the following procedure:
1. Create a region as described in the previous section.
2. Set Loops to infinite by typing "-1" or "inf" in the Loops column.
3. Capture the deck into a cue called “Start Vamp”. This will be the “setup” cue that starts the
vamping sequence. Note the deck number and the ID for the looping playback entry.
4. Open the Subcue Library and create a new Commands subcue with a Type of Wild Tracks
and a Command of Set Loop Counter.
5. For Target Deck:, enter the number of the deck used in the Wild Tracks subcue. For Target
Track:, enter the ID number of the Wild Tracks playback entry.
6. Create a new cue that includes the External Commands subcue, and name it “End Vamp”.
Add both cues to the Cue List. The “Start Vamp” cue will begin Wild Tracks playback, and
loop indefinitely until “End Vamp” is recalled.
NOTE
If the End Vamp cue is triggered less than two seconds before the end of the region, an
extra loop will be played. This is because part of the next loop has already been loaded
into the Wild Tracks audio buffer. If the looped region is less than two seconds, it could
result in several extra loops after the loop counter is reset.
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Advanced Techniques
This section lists some advanced techniques for using or controlling Wild Tracks.
Mixer Settings Subcues
Mixer Settings subcues can be used to control transport actions on a deck or set of decks. Mixer
Settings subcues can be created for any control point in CueStation by right-clicking on the
control and dragging it into the cue or subcue library. For example:
1. Open the Wild Tracks window and the Cue Library window, so that you can see both of
them.
2. In the Wild Tracks window, in Deck 1, right-click on the Stop button, and drag it into the
Cue Library. A new cue will be created, containing a Mixer Settings subcue.
3. If you click on the subcue, you will see "WildTracks 1 Deck 1 Status" in the Control Points
column. You can change the value of the deck, for example, "...Deck 1-5...", to stop a range
of decks at the same time.
4. In the Value column, you will see the word "Stop". This can be changed to Play, Pause,
etc. The Wait and Fade times are not valid for this type of control point, and the Enabled
column shows whether or not the control point(s) are enabled.
Control Decks by Key
Mixer Settings subcues can only control decks if you know which decks will be in use. For
subcues assigned to "Any Deck", the deck number may vary depending on which other decks
are in use. However, it is still possible to automate control of these decks, using deck keys.
There is a Wild Tracks external subcue, Control Decks by Key, which allows you to control a
set of Wild Tracks Decks that share the same pre-assigned key. To use this feature:
1. Create a Wild Tracks Deck subcue with a sine wave entry, and set the Deck to "*" (Any
Deck). For the Deck Key, type "cue1".
2. In the Subcue Library window, go to Subcue > New Subcue > Commands, and name the
command "Pause cue1 Decks".
3. In the area to the right, click Add Entry.
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4. For the new subcue, change the Type to WildTracks and change the Command to Control
Decks by Key. For the subcue parameters:
•
For the Deck Key: text box, type "cue1".
•
For the Action: drop-down box, select "Pause".
•
For Set Deck Position, remain at default.
•
For Match Only These Decks:, remain at default for this example.
5. Recall the Wild Tracks Deck subcue, and check the Wild Tracks window to see that it is
playing (most likely on deck 32).
6. In the Subcue Library window, recall the "Pause cue1 Decks" subcue. The deck used by
the Wild Tracks subcue should now be paused.
You can even change the deck number in the subcue, and the "Pause" subcue will still work. If
you create more Wild Tracks Deck subcues with the same key, then the "Pause" subcue will
pause all of those decks, if they have been loaded when the subcue is recalled.
Batch Files
Wild Tracks supports the use of batch files, or "scripts" to be executed.
Here are the contents of an example batch file:
# This batch file appears in WTRX window like any other audio file
file=makehaste.wav
# Play this first
file=BirdOwl.wav
# Then this
file=Congo.wav loops=5
# then play this one in a loop 5 times
file=PalindromicMessage.aiff backwards
# Play the palindromic message backwards(!)
source=tone pitch=440 length=1s
# generate 440Hz tone for 1 second
file=Romeo.wav loops=10 offset=1m length=2m # play 1-minute segment, 10 times
file=another_batch_file.bat loops=3
# you can even do "subroutines"
file=yet_another_batch_file.bat random
# execute batch file in random order(!)
When the user specifies a batch file in the Wild Tracks window, it will work like an audio file that
is the concatenation of all the items specified in the batch script. So to span drives, you could
write a batch file like this:
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# This is a batch file that lets us span drives
file=/mnt/wtdrives/left/wtrxaudio/FirstPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=/mnt/wtdrives/right/wtrxaudio/SecondPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
Of course, if you didn't want to have to specify hard-coded IDs for each drive, you could just put
the file names in the batch file instead (assuming they are unique):
# Same as above, but works with any IDs
file=FirstPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=SecondPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
file=ThirdPartOfReallyLongFile.wav
This would enable failover/SafetyNet functionality also. Or, if that is still too much typing...
# Using wildcards...
file=First*
file=Second*
file=Third*
TIP
Batch file scripts can also be typed directly into a Wild Tracks Deck Playback entry without
the need to create an external file. In this case, lines of script should be separated by
semicolons.
Changing the File Path with a Subcue
The file search path defines where Wild Tracks will look for its files.
The default path is: /tmp/supportfiles:/mnt/*/wtrxaudio:/tmp/flashfiles:/wtrxaudio
There are four sections, each separated by a colon (:). Each section represents a search path.
A search path is a list of directories each separated by a slash (/).
Media Path Subcue
It is possible to create a subcue to change the File Search Path in the Wild Tracks window.
Create a new Commands subcue, change the Type to WildTracks, and set the Command to
Adjust WildTracks Media Path. There are several options for this command:
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•
In the Path to Modify drop-down menu, select either File Search Path or File Record
Path.
•
In the Action: drop-down menu, select Set Path Clauses, Add Path Clauses, or Remove
Path Clauses.
•
In the Path Clauses text box, type in the paths to be added or removed.
Understudy Voice Over
Since you can use the Commands subcue to change the File Search Path, it is possible to have
a setup cue that changes what version of a file will be used for a show without having to create
duplicate Wild Tracks subcues with different file versions.
For example, if you had offstage voice-overs that were delivered by a principal character, and
there were two understudies for that part, then you need to match the actor for the performance
to the specific voice-over files. Since understudies often go in with short notice, it would be good
to automate the selection so that a change was not missed in a voice over cue.
The simple way to do this is to put the voice over files for each actor in a separate directory.
These directories need to be located on the Wild Tracks drives at the same level as the /wtrxaudio
directory and not inside the wtrxaudio directory where you would typically put files.
Let's say our actors names are Alfred, Bob, and Carole. Alfred is the principal and Bob and
Carole are the two understudies. On the Wild Tracks drive we create three directories, VO_Alfred,
VO_Bob, and VO_Carole.
So for the drive example in the preceding section on file search path, you would see a list of
directories for the drive that would include:
•
wtrxaudio
•
VO_Alfred
•
VO_Bob
•
VO_Carole
In each directory we put the voice over files for that actor. These might be named with the voice
over number and the actors name. Perhaps VO1-Alfred.wav, VO1-Bob.wav, and VO1-Carole.wav.
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In order to make it possible to use the same Wild Tracks cue work for any of the actors we need
to duplicate each of the actors files and use the same name for the duplicate. For our example
we could name each of the duplicates VO1.wav. To do this, you can use the drag-and-drop
method of creating a Wild Tracks subcue file entry without having to edit the file name.
For this process to work, all we have to do is add a file search path that includes the directory
for the chosen actor. If Bob is going on, we add a file search path to the VO_Bob directory. This
can be added as another entry to the path:
1. In the Adjust WildTracks Media Path command, set the Path to Modify to File Search
Path.
2. For Action:, select Add Path Clauses.
3. For Path Clauses:, type "/mnt/*/VO_Bob".
At the end of the system check-out cue list we could insert three cues that set the path for each
of the three actors: Alfred, Bob, and Carole. When we know which actor will be going on, the
cue for that actor is executed and the file search path will be set to use that actor's files for all
voice overs.
Using Wild Tracks Offline
CueStation allows you to edit Wild Tracks deck subcues in "offline" mode while connected to
VirtualD-Mitri.
1. Create a "virtual drive" (.dmitriDisk file), which will contain information about the files and
directories on the hard drive you are using.
•
In CueStation, while connected to the D-Mitri(s), open the Wild Tracks window.
•
Click the Drive Setup button and select the Drive Setup tab.
•
Highlight the drive you wish to use, then click the Create Virtual Drive File button.
•
When prompted, save this file in the same directory as VirtualD-Mitri.
2. In CueStation, go to Network > Connect.... VirtualD-Mitri will automatically use the .dmitriDisk
file(s) within the same directory.
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3. Open the Wild Tracks window. In the Display menu, select Browse Virtual Drive File...
and navigate to the saved .dmitriDisk file.
4. After opening the .dmitriDisk file, a window opens, displaying the contents of the virtual
drive. You can drag files directly from the virtual drive into a Wild Tracks deck, draw
envelopes, and capture Wild Tracks Deck subcues as if you were connected to an actual
D-Mitri.
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VRAS PROCESSING
VRAS processing is used in Constellation™ electroacoustic architecture to electronically alter
the acoustics of a room. VRAS processing provides two algorithms: reverberation and early
reflections.
User Interface
Configuring VRAS
You configure a VRAS module in the VRAS window, where you can set the module’s parameters.
Global Parameters
The VRAS window shows all current parameter values for each instance of VRAS configured
in the system.
Label
Sets the name for the VRAS instance.
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Type
Early Reflection, Reverberation (16 Channles), or Reverberation (32 Channels).
Reverberation Parameters (16 or 32 Channels)
Input Matrix Type (16 channel only):
Specifies the input cross-coupling matrix. Selection of this matrix controls the distribution of
direct signals from the VRAS inputs to the VRAS outputs. All matrix options maintain the
same amount of total power at all outputs. Therefore, while the option “Inputs 1-16” can be
selected with only input 1 active, this will result in less power output than if the “Inputs
Channel 1” option is selected. A full table of Input options is provided later in this chapter.
Max Reverb Time:
Adjusts the reverberation time. The Time/Frequency graph near the top provides a visual
model of the setting.
Unitary Level:
Adjusts the unitary property of the reverberator. True unity is set at 100.0, which is
recommended for normal operation.
As the unitary level is reduced, the amplitude response of the reverberator will vary, gain
levels will decrease, and the system will behave more like a conventional electronic reverb
unit. This may be useful if VRAS is used as an in-line “effects” reverberator.
# Diffusion Chans:
This sets the number of channels to be used as Diffusion Channels.
NOTE
The Delta Maximum control interacts with the Shape Factor control. When you go outside
of the normal operating envelope, the graph in the VRAS Editor will not be drawn.
Delta Maximum:
The higher the delta maximum, the more echo density. However, the amount of direct energy
in the reverberator increases proportionately to delta maximum, so there is a trade off
between echo density and direct-to-reverberant levels.
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Shape Factor:
Shape factor is the ratio of the longest to the shortest delay. Low shape factors produce
similar internal delay times across channels, while high settings produce a wide spread of
delay times.
The shape factor also defines how quickly the direct levels drop as the channel numbers
rise. A high shape factor will give you a rapid drop in loop gains and direct levels.
High Freq. Damping Frequency:
This is the corner frequency for the reverberator damping. You will see the results of your
setting on the Time/Frequency graph.
You can simultaneously adjust high frequency damping frequency and amount by clicking
and dragging directly in the Time/Frequency graph.
High Freq. Damping Percentage:
This is the amount of damping applied to the reverberator at high frequencies (above the
damping frequency). You will see the results of your setting on the Time/Frequency graph.
Mid/Low Freq. Damping Type:
VRAS has a second damping filter that can be configured as a mid or low band damping.
This control sets the type of the filter. Set to Low if you need low frequency damping to
compensate for an excessively “boomy” room.
Mid/Low Freq. Damping Frequency:
This is the corner frequency for the reverberator damping. You will see the results of your
setting on the Time/Frequency graph.
Mid/Low Freq. Damping Percentage:
This is the amount of damping applied to the reverberator at high frequencies (above the
damping frequency). You will see the results of your setting on the Time/Frequency graph.
Channel Assignments
This specifies up to 16 inputs to be processed by VRAS Reverberation. For each channel
row, there is also a channel label, a mute button, channel attenuation value, and two VGroup
assignment boxes.
The combination of reverb time, delta max, and shape factor affect how the hardware memory
is allocated and used. Some combinations may exceed the memory capacity of the VRAS DSP,
truncating some of the reverberator delays and creating distinct echoes. D-Mitri will warn you
with messages in the Log window when you enter values that exceed its memory capacity.
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TIP
If you have already calculated the desired delays and attenuations, you can copy and
paste in data from your spreadsheet.
Early Reflections Parameters
ER Zone Config
Selects the configuration for early reflections zones.
Input Matrix
Specifies the input cross-coupling matrix. This matrix controls the distribution of direct signals
from the VRAS inputs to the VRAS outputs. A full table of Input options is provided later in
this chapter.
Output Matrix
Specifies the output cross-coupling matrix. Selection of this matrix controls the distribution
of user-specified delays to VRAS outputs. Two or four independent ER “sub-zones” can be
specified using appropriate Input and Output Matrix options. For instance, if set to “Outputs16”
then all 16 delays will be matrixed to all 16 outputs. If set to “Outputs 8/8”, the first eight
delays will be matrixed to the first eight outputs, and the last eight delays to the last eight
outputs.
Cutoff Frequency:
Adjusts the cutoff frequency of the included low pass filter applied to VRAS inputs.
High Frequency Attenuation:
Adjusts the amount of attenuation of the high frequencies in the low pass filter.
Channel Assignments
Specifies up to 16 inputs to be processed by VRAS Early Reflections. For each channel
row, there is also a channel label, a mute button, channel attenuation value, and two VGroup
assignment boxes.
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Early Reflection Delays and Attenuation
For each early reflection signal, you can configure the delay and attenuation, either by typing in
different values, or by dragging the points on the graph.
Min:
Minimum (initial) delay time.
Max:
Maximum (final) delay time.
Spread:
Controls the spread of the early reflections between the minimum and maximum delay times.
Atten:
Controls the range of attenuation levels for each early reflection signal.
VRAS Subcues
Capturing VRAS Subcues
VRAS parameters are captured like other subcues in the system, using the Capture window.
There are two VRAS subcue types: VRAS Inputs, which captures channel assignments and
attenuations, and VRAS Processing, which captures ER and reverberation settings. To capture
a VRAS Processing subcue:
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1. In the VRAS window, change the parameters to the desired values.
2. Channel select the VRAS unit(s) you have configured.
3. Press the F4 key to open the Capture window, and enter a name for the cue.
4. Deselect all subcue types, and then click in the checkbox next to VRAS Processing.
5. Click the Capture New button at the bottom of the window.
188
When using VRAS Reverberation, you may want to create a preset that turns VRAS off. One
way of doing this is to create a cue that includes a System Level subcue that sets the System
Level to -inf dB. However, the effect of recalling this cue may be somewhat jarring, as the
reverberant tail will be abruptly cut off. A better way of doing this is to set the attenuation of the
inputs to VRAS to -inf dB. This way the existing tail will decay naturally when the cue is recalled
and the effect will not be so abrupt. For this effect, you will need to capture a VRAS Inputs
subcue:
1. In the VRAS window, set the input channel attenuations to -inf.
2. Press the F4 key to open the Capture window, and type in a name for the cue (such as
"VRAS Off").
3. Deselect all subcue types, and then click in the checkbox next to VRAS Inputs.
4. Click the Capture New button at the bottom of the window.
If you create a cue that sets all attenuations to -inf, it is a good idea to create another cue that
restores the attenuations (a "VRAS On" cue). This cue can be created using the same method
described above, except that you would set each attenuation to the appropriate level before
capturing the cue.
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Part IV. CueStation Workflow
Chapter 14: File Management
Saving Files
Opening Files
Merging Projects
Chapter 15: Customizing CueStation
Layouts
Custom Utility Buttons
Key Mappings Window
Project Notes and Reports
Chat and Paging
195
195
199
202
203
203
204
207
209
210
Chapter 16: Access Policies
213
Creating Access Policies
Securing Your System
Recovering Lost Passwords
213
215
216
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FILE MANAGEMENT
CueStation 5.2.0 uses several application-specific files to store project data, layouts, and
configurations. In addition to saving these files to your computer's hard drive, you can also save
projects to flash within a D-Mitri module, with the option to load them automatically when the
D-Mitri module boots. CueStation can also save default versions of project and layout files.
This chapter explains how to save and open these files. It also describes how to use the Merge
Project function, which allows you to import cue lists, cues, subcues, and other automation data
from other projects into the active project.
Saving Files
This section shows you how to save your CueStation files and create backup projects. CueStation
also creates its own files, such as log files, which it stores
Saving Files Locally
Project files, layout files, and mixer configuration files can be saved locally to your computer's
hard drive. The Projects menu has several different options for saving the current project.
•
The Save Project... (Cmd+S) option is available if you have not yet saved a new project.
Selecting this option will bring up a dialog box where you type a name for your project and
decide where to save it.
•
The Save Project to <project name> (Cmd+S) option is available if you have opened an
existing project file. This option will automatically overwrite that project file with any changes
you have made since the last save.
•
The Save Project As... (Cmd+Shift+S) command will let you save the project under a
different file name, in a different location, or both.
Save Project As Default
The Save Project As Default function lets you save a default project or layout file. If a default
layout file is saved on your client computer, then CueStation will automatically open that layout
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file when CueStation is started. See Layouts (p. 203) for more information on setting up custom
window layouts.
If you save a default project file, then you can use the Open Default Project... command in the
Projects menu as a shortcut to that project.
Default layout and project files are saved to the CueStation_Settings directory, and are named
"Default.dmitriLayout" and "Default.dmitriProject", respectively.
Backup Project
The Backup Project (Cmd+B) command saves a copy of the current project as a backup.
Backup projects are saved to CueStation_Settings/D-Mitri_Backups, with an automatically
generated name that includes a time and date stamp, in this format:
"Backup_year_month_day_hour_min_sec.dmitriProject".
Since saving a project as a backup does not prompt you for a location and file name to save to,
backup project files can be used to take a quick "snapshot" of the state of the system throughout
a programming session, which can later be recalled if accidental changes are made that cannot
be easily undone.
Saving Projects to Flash
Projects can be saved to the flash memory in the D-Mitri. These projects can be retrieved
automatically on startup by configuring the Auto Start settings upon saving.
To save a project to flash, select Projects > Save Project To Flash. The Save Project to Flash
window has the following options:
On Power Up:
There are two selections: Auto Start Project in Flash, or Do Not Autostart.
Startup Delay:
The startup delay is the time after bootup is complete, but before the startup cue is recalled.
The default startup delay is 30 seconds.
Recall Cue ID on Startup:
If desired, enter the name of the cue you want to recall at startup.
196
Set Cue List ID on Startup:
If desired, enter the name of the cue list you want to recall at startup.
Completion Message:
This message is printed to the log when the Auto Start is triggered. If desired, you can enter
a different message here.
AutoStart
This checkbox is enabled when you enter a valid cue list in the corresponding value box.
When selected, the first cue in the cue list will be played on startup, along with any other
cues or AutoFollow settings.
A message in the log window will indicate when the operation is complete.
Another benefit of saving a project to flash is that it can be opened by any client on any computer
that is connected to the D-Mitri, without needing to have the project already saved on a local
hard drive.
The Save Project Dialog Box
At the top of the window is a drop-down box, with the name of the current directory. The buttons
directly to the right are:
•
Back to the previous location.
•
Forward to the next location.
•
Up to a higher level directory.
•
New Folder within the current directory.
•
Icon View for viewing files.
•
Details View to see details for each file in the list.
Next, there is a list of the files in the current directory, followed by a File name: text entry box.
Enter the name of the file you would like to save to, and then click Save to close the dialog and
save the file.
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Shortcut Icons
In the left sidebar is a set of directory shortcuts. The default icons point to Computer, User Home,
User Desktop, and CueStation_Settings. (For Mac OS users, there's also a Volumes icon.) This
gives you quick access to common save areas.
Add shortcuts to the sidebar by dragging your desired folder in from another window. To delete
a shortcut, right-click it and select Remove. This only removes instant access to the folder, not
the folder and the data inside.
Recent Files
In the lower half of the Save Project dialog box, there is a list of the five most recently accessed
files. These files also have hotkeys associated with them, for easier access. In order to use the
hotkeys, hold down the Command key and then type the number of the file twice. The selected
file will then be overwritten.
If you want to remove a file from the list, click on the grey Eject icon to the right of the file name.
198
Filter Project Checkbox
At the bottom of the Save Project dialog window is the Filter Project checkbox. When this
checkbox is checked, the Filter Project features appear as a pane inside the Save Project
dialog. These filtering features give you the option of choosing which parts of the automation
data to save.
NOTE
When you select an item in the Filter Project pane for action, any other project items the
selected item references also receive that action. For example, if you choose to load Cue
5, then any subcues in Cue 5 also are loaded, even if those subcues are not explicitly
selected in the Subcues tab of the encompassing Save Project dialog window.
Opening Files
The options for opening files in CueStation are similar to those for saving files. A project file is
divided into four categories of information: automation data, configuration settings, layout
information, and port settings. When you open a project, any project information currently in the
server will be cleared and replaced by the new project.
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The Open Project Dialog Box
In the top left corner, there are controls for navigating to different directories, and a list of files
in the current directory. To open a project, select the project you want and click the Open button.
The Recent Files list works as described in Saving Files (p. 195).
Open Project Options
Below the list of recently used files are six check boxes to toggle different options for opening
projects:
Load Project
Load Project lets you select whether to load the project database. You can uncheck this
box if you only want to load the configuration or the layout.
Send Configuration
The Send Configuration checkbox toggles whether or not the configuration stored in the
project is sent to the D-Mitris. If this box is unchecked, the configuration will be opened and
visible in the Mixer Configuration window, but it will not be sent.
Filter Project
Filter Project is an option that lets you choose specifically which parts of the automation
data you would like to load. See Custom Project Filter (p. 201) for more information.
200
Load Mixer Settings
Load Mixer Settings lets you choose specifically which mixer settings you would like to
load. If this box is checked, the window will load all of the mixer settings that were in place
when the file was last saved. the "Send Configuration" checkbox unchecked. Otherwise,
assuming the Send Configuration checkbox is unchecked, your current mixer settings will
remain untouched when the new file opens.
NOTE
If the Send Configuration checkbox is checked, but Load Mixer Settings is unchecked,
all control points will be reset to their default values.
Verify Wild Tracks Subcues
Verify Wild Tracks Subcues is a function that will read through all of the Wild Tracks Deck
subcues, and verify that the files they reference can be located on the connected Wild Tracks
drive(s). If a file is not found, an error message will be printed to the log.
Load Layout
Load Layout toggles whether the layout saved with the project will be loaded. You can
uncheck this box if you would rather keep your current layout.
Load Connection Settings
Load Connection Settings is for network connection settings, and is only enabled when
Load Layout is checked. If Load Connection Settings is checked, opened windows will
be connected to the server to which they were connected when the layout was saved. If
Load Connection Settings is left unchecked, opened windows will be connected to the
same server as the current window.
Custom Project Filter
These options can be accessed in the Open Project dialog using the Filter Project checkbox.
If checked, the Filter Project dialog opens and gives you the option of choosing which parts of
the automation data you would like to import. For instance, you could choose to not load in Key
Mappings if you would rather use ones you have already created. Or, if you only wanted to load
in one cue list, you would deselect all of the cues except for the one you want to load (see Filter
Project Checkbox (p. 199)).
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Merging Projects
In CueStation, it is possible to merge automation data from one project to another. This provides
a method to import cue lists, cues, subcues, or other automation data in a selective way. Merged
elements will also include all referenced elements. For example, importing a cue list will also
cause the cues in the cue list to be imported, as well as those cues' subcues, and so on.
The Merge Project dialog box has all of the same controls as The Open Project Dialog Box (p.
200).
The difference between opening a project and merging a project is that during a project merge,
the current project data is not cleared from the server.
NOTE
All project files to be merged need to have been created by the currently running version
of CueStation. If they are not the same version, update the older project file(s) by opening
and saving it under a new file name.
Effects of a Merge Project Operation
When you start with Project A and choose to merge data from Project B, the existing data in
Project A remains unaffected. However, the merged items from Project B are affected in the
following ways:
•
Items with a conflicting ID number are assigned a new ID number. For instance, if Project
A has cue IDs 0 and 1, and you are importing cue ID 0 from Project B, Project B's cue will
be re-assigned to ID 2.
•
Items that contain references to other imported items will have the reference IDs updated
to reflect the new ID numbers.
Changes to ID numbers and references will be reported in the log.
NOTE
The layout and port settings of a project cannot be merged.
202
CUSTOMIZING CUESTATION
This chapter will show you how to improve your workflow when using CueStation, through saved
layouts, keyboard shortcuts, project notes and reports, and communication between clients.
Layouts
CueStation allows you to save your own custom layouts, or arrangements of windows on your
screen. It can be very convenient to have several saved layouts with different purposes, and be
able to switch between layouts quickly. For instance, if you are running a show, then you might
load a "performance" layout that displays the Transport, Log, System Status, and Meter windows.
If you are editing a show, then you might a "Rehearsal" layout that displays the Cue List, Cue
Library, and Subcue Library windows.
CueStation layouts are saved as .dmitriLayout files. You can also save a "Default" layout, which
will be opened automatically whenever CueStation is launched. To save a default layout, select
Layout > Save Layout As Default.
In addition to window selection and placement, a layout file also includes client connection
information. For example, if your client is connected to a specific server when you save a layout
as default, then whenever you launch CueStation, it will automatically try to connect to that
server.
In order to save a custom layout:
1. Arrange your CueStation windows into the desired positions.
2. Select Layout > Save Layout As....
3. Type a name for the layout, and save it to your hard drive.
Mapping Layouts to Hotkeys
CueStation has an "Open Layout" subcue, which makes it possible to open a layout using a
custom key mapping. (See Key Mappings Window (p. 207) for more information about creating
key mappings.) To assign a saved layout to a hotkey combination:
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1. Open the Support Files window and add the .dmitriLayout file to the list of support files. This
can be done by dragging the file directly into the window. The layout file must be included
in the support files in order for it to be accessed by CueStation.
2. Open the Subcue Library window and create a new Commands subcue, with a Type of
Cuestation Control and a Command of Open Layout. Take note of the Subcue ID.
3. Type the name of the layout file in the Layout File Name: text box. If you would like to
simulate the Open More Layout... command, uncheck the box next to Close Existing
Windows First:.
4. Open the Key Mappings window (Option+Cmd+7) and create a new key mapping (Cmd+N).
Use the Appendix C, CueStation Hotkeys list in the Appendices to find a key mapping that
is not already used by CueStation.
5. Set the Action to Recall, and the Target Type to Subcue. For the Target ID, enter the ID
number of the "Open Layout" subcue you created previously.
You have now created a key mapping that opens a saved layout. You can create additional key
mappings that open different layouts using the same procedure.
Custom Utility Buttons
User Buttons
User-customizable utility buttons can now be added to the bottom of any CueStation window.
You define these buttons using the Custom Utility Button Properties Editor, which you reach
by selecting the Add Custom Utility Button… menu item from the CueStation Layout menu. You
can set custom buttons to execute cue or subcue recalls, control points, cue/subcue updates,
or text commands. The buttons function by recognizing click and release events, allowing you
to assign actions to these events. The actions are: Do Nothing, Do Text Command, Recall,
Update, and Set Value.
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To add a utility button to one of your CueStation windows:
1. Select Layout > Add Custom Utility Button.... A dialog box will appear.
2. Type a new label for the button. Optionally, in the next text box, enter a different name to
be displayed when the button is active.
3. Select an On Click: action: Do Nothing, Recall, Update, or Set Value.
4. If you selected Recall or Update, select the cue or subcue to be affected. If you selected
Set Value, enter the control point's target value.
5. Optionally, select an On Release: action.
6. If you wish, alter the color of the button for its normal and active modes. For example, if the
button toggles a channel mute, you might wish to make the Active Color red. You can
select from the basic, pre-made colors to the left, or create a custom color using the RGB
sliders.
7. If you selected Set Value above, type the name of the control point in the Control Address
text box. Then in the On Click/Release Value(s): text box(es), enter the value you want
the control point set to.
8. The Active When: parameters control when the button appears "active". If it is set to Mouse
Button is Down, the button will only be active momentarily. This setting is useful for cue
recalls and other momentary actions.
Alternatively, if you want the state of the button to reflect the state of a control point, change
Active When: to either Value is or Value is not, and enter a value. Or, set Active When:
to Never or Always if you don't want the active state to change. See the next section, Utility
Button Example (p. 206), for an example on how this function is used.
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9. Optionally, add a Button Key String. Custom utility buttons can be controlled by subcues,
and the button key string allows each button to be changed separately.
10. Click Accept to add the button to the bottom of the window.
Utility Button Example
Here is an example of one use for the custom utility buttons. Let's say that in the Transport
window, you want a way to easily switch between cue lists. In this example project, there are
three cue lists: one "Speaker Check" cue list and two "Show Cue" lists.
1. Open the Transport window.
2. Select Add Custom Utility Button in the Layout menu to bring up the Utility Button dialog.
3. Change the Label: from "New Button" to "Speaker Check".
4. In the On Click: menu, select Set Value.
5. In the On Click Value(s): field, type the ID of the Speaker Check cue list.
6. For the Control Address, type "Automation 1 Active CueList ID".
7. In the next line, select Value is, Equal To, and type the ID of the Speaker Check cue list
again.
8. Click Accept to create the first button.
For the other two buttons, these options will mostly stay the same, except:
•
206
The button label should reflect the name of the cue list.
•
The Active When: and Equal To value will be the ID of the Cue List.
When you are done, you should have three buttons at the bottom of the Transport window, and
clicking on them should switch between active cue lists.
To edit or delete a custom button, right-click on the button and select Edit or Delete.
Key Mappings Window
The Key Mappings window provides an area to bind a key or keys to cue and subcue recalls
and updates. Remember that Client Control External Command subcues can be used to bring
any window to the front, complete with a specification for the window to display. By using Key
Mappings in conjunction with this subcue, you can create a set of custom key mappings to show
you particular sets of windows.
Key lets you select the key to be pressed in conjunction with the modifiers for this mapping. The
available set of keys will be displayed in a context menu by right-button clicking on top of this
field. Multiple simultaneous mappings may be configured. Each mapping is represented by a
row in the window. Each row consists of several fields, described below:
•
ID is a unique index for the mapping.
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•
Modifiers lets you select which combination of modifiers are to be pressed for this mapping.
The available set of modifiers will be displayed in a context menu by right-button clicking
on top of this field.
•
Key lets you select the key to be pressed in conjunction with the modifiers for this mapping.
The available set of keys will be displayed in a context menu by right-button clicking on top
of this field.
•
Action specifies whether to Recall or Update the specified target cue or subcue.
•
Target Type specifies whether Target ID refers to a cue or subcue.
•
Target ID specifies the ID of the target cue or subcue.
•
Client Name(s) is either the IP address of a particular computer running CueStation, or any
computer running CueStation detected on the network.
•
Comment is an editable text field for a comment.
NOTE
This guide uses Mac OS X hotkey conventions. The Command key on Mac OS X keyboards
corresponds to the Control key on Windows keyboards. The Option key on Mac OS X
keyboards corresponds to the Alt key on Windows keyboards. A complete list of the default
key mappings can be found in Appendix C, CueStation Hotkeys.
Special Commands
Mappings Menu
New Mapping
Create new mapping.
Duplicate Mapping
Duplicate the selected mapping.
Delete Mapping
Delete the selected mapping.
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Project Notes and Reports
The Project Notes window provides an area to type free-form unformatted text. This text is stored
within the project file. Project Notes are a convenient place to store information about the
configuration of the system, the purpose of certain cues, or other useful information related to
the project.
Special Commands
Notes Menu
Clear Notes
Remove all notes.
Save Notes As...
Save the notes to a new text file.
Save Notes...
Save the notes over the previously saved version.
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Generate Report
In the Projects menu, there is a Generate Project Report... function. This will create a text file
that includes information about the project, including project notes, mixer configuration, cue lists,
cues, subcues, and control points. This report is useful for archival purposes, or for transforming
the information into a different format, such as a spreadsheet or database.
Chat and Paging
The Chat window lets you communicate with other members of your cue-programming team.
The window provides three panels of information:
•
A Chat Log, containing the chat messages with a date+time stamp and the sender’s name.
•
A Member Log, listing the Name and Status for each member of the team.
•
A Message Entry area, providing Name:, Status:, and Enter Chat Text: boxes.
•
A Page Selected Users button, for paging members of your team.
To send a message to your team, type your name in the (smaller) Name: box and your message
in the Enter Chat Text: box. Press Enter and your message will be displayed in the Chat Log
panel of your team members’ Chat windows.
To page another user, click on the Page Selected Users button, and select the name of the
person you wish to page. On the paged person's screen, all CueStation windows will flash cyan
once, and the telephone icon will flash continuously until the page is answered.
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Special Commands
Chat Menu
Clear Chat
Clears the chat log.
Save Chat As...
Save the chat log to a new text file.
Save Chat...
Save the chat log over the previously saved version.
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ACCESS POLICIES
CueStation has an Access Policies window that allows you to set up different levels of access
permissions or restrictions. Access policies implementation was designed to be as transparent
as possible: it is not necessary to configure access policies before using the software or hardware.
The Access Policies feature was created as a way to prevent accidental or unauthorized changes
to the system, while allowing full unrestricted access in the default state.
Creating Access Policies
Access policies can be configured to restrict or allow access to everything from changing control
points to changing system configuration. This example demonstrates how to restrict unauthorized
access to certain control points.
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1. Open the Access Policies window.
2. In the Access Policies menu, select New Access Policy. Change the name from "Access
Policy 0" to "Input 1 Restricted".
3. Double-click in the Password column and add a password.
4. Right-click in the Type column and select "Opt-Out". The background of the access policy
will change to yellow, which means it is invoked. At this point, however, nothing is restricted
yet, because nothing in this access policy has been selected.
5. To the right of the list of access policies, there is a list of all of the possible actions that can
be restricted or allowed. Locate the checkbox for Set Control Points, and click on it twice.
There should now be a red X in the checkbox.
6. In the box to the right of Set Control Points, type "Input 1 Level". If you open the Inputs
window (Cmd+2) you will see that the fader for Input 1 is greyed-out.
7. In the Access Policies window, create a new access policy, and rename it "Input 1 Allowed".
Click in the Password column and type an easy-to-remember password.
8. Right-click in the Priority column and select 1.00. This access policy now has priority over
Input 1 Restricted.
9. In the list to the right, click once on the checkbox next to Set Control Points. There should
now be a green check mark in the box. Then type "Input 1 Level" in the box to the right.
10. In the Access Policies menu, select Reset All Access Policies. This will clear the "cookies"
for the passwords you entered, so that anyone using your CueStation client will have to
re-enter the passwords to gain access to restricted items.
214
At this point, Input 1 is restricted for all CueStation clients, and this setting will be saved with the
project, since it is applied by default.
To regain access to Input 1:
1. In the Access Policies window, select "Input 1 Allowed", and then in the Access Policies
menu, select Invoke Selected Access Policies.
2. A dialog box will appear and ask for the password. Your options are Retain password until
I manually reset it or Use password for this session only.
3. Enter the password and click one of the login options. The background of "Input 1 Allowed"
will turn green to show that it is invoked, but not applied by default.
NOTE
Access Policies that are not applied by default are applied on a per-client basis. For
instance, after invoking "Input 1 Allowed", your client is now permitted to change the level
of Input 1, but the permissions of other clients are not affected.
Securing Your System
Access Policies in CueStation 5.2.0 do not provide complete security from malicious attacks.
However, there are a few things you can do to prevent other users from accidentally gaining
access to restricted items:
•
Create an access policy that has Edit Access Policies restricted. Without this invoked, it
is possible to delete access policies, change the priority, or change the password.
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CHAPTER 16: ACCESS POLICIES
•
If Set Control Points is restricted, control points cannot be changed by users, but they can
be changed by recalled cues and subcues. For instance, if you have an access policy that
restricts access to Input 1, other users cannot change Input 1 directly, but it would be possible
to create a subcue that changes the fader level, or bus assigns, etc. Therefore, your access
policy restricting control points should also restrict Edit Subcues. With this restricted, it is
possible to capture new cues using the capture window, but editing the subcues is disabled.
•
If there is more than one person using the same CueStation client, make sure to use the
Reset All Access Policies function when you have finished editing to reset the "cookies"
for the password(s) you entered.
Recovering Lost Passwords
If you are the administrator of your D-Mitri system and have lost the password(s) to your access
policies, or have been locked out of your system with access policies, there is a password
recovery feature available. To regain access to your system:
1. In the Access Policies window, select Recover Lost Password... in the Access Policies
menu. A dialog box will appear with instructions and an access code.
2. Write down the access code, or click Copy Access Code to Clipboard if you want to paste
it into an email.
3. Contact Meyer Sound Technical Support and provide the access code. You will be given a
new password with which you can override the access policies in place and regain access
to your system
NOTE
The access code and recovery password are only valid until the system is rebooted, and
is randomly generated on startup. This prevents users who know one recovery password
from accessing other systems.
216
Part V. Hardware and Configuration
Chapter 17: Mixer Configuration
Configuring D-Mitri
Mixer Configuration Window
D-Mitri Backup Modules
221
221
223
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MIXER CONFIGURATION
Your D-Mitri system can be configured using the Mixer Configuration window. The Mixer
Configuration window is where you specify which I/O modules represent which channels.
When you save a project file, the configuration is saved with it. Configurations can also be saved
separately as .dmitriMixerConfig files.
CueStation has been designed to make the configuration as transparent as possible, after the
initial set up. In the software, once you have configured the system, you never have to worry
about which channel is on which module, or routing signal from one D-Mitri to another. The entire
system works as one complete unit.
Configuring D-Mitri
Every time the D-Mitri is turned on or power-cycled, it must receive a valid configuration before
audio can be processed. A configuration contains the following information:
•
The number of D-Mitris in the system.
•
The type and number of modules available.
•
The number of buses, bus assigns, and VGroups.
For each I/O module:
•
The range of channels the module will use, and in some cases, the type of channels.
•
The DCP module that will handle the processing.
Optionally, your system configuration may also include custom labels for I/O channels in the I/O
Location column.
A valid configuration will never duplicate channel numbers per channel type (i.e., you can not
map two inputs to channel 10). A configuration can be loaded automatically on power up if a
project is saved to flash memory inside the D-Mitri. A configuration can also be sent from a
CueStation client as part of a project file.
If one D-Mitri within a larger system goes offline, it will automatically have the configuration
re-sent once it has reconnected.
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CHAPTER 17: MIXER CONFIGURATION
The following section will describe how to configure your system using the Mixer Configuration
window.
Configuring Modules
To configure your system:
1. Open CueStation, and connect to the system you will be configuring.
2. Open the Mixer Configuration (Option+Cmd+0) window. If you are running CueStation
for the first time, the Mixer Configuration is the default startup window.
3. The easiest way to start configuring the system is to have CueStation automatically detect
what hardware is installed. Go to Configuration > Query Hardware for Configuration.
CueStation will automatically find and configure any hardware you have connected.
NOTE
The Mixer Configuration window is unique from other CueStation windows, in that changes
made in this window are not automatically sent to the DCPs. Similarly, if changes are made
in the Mixer Configuration window by another client, your window will not be updated
automatically. The Mixer Configuration window is live on all clients in D-Mitri.
If you are working offline with VirtualD-Mitri, you will have to add the hardware manually.
Send Configuration
When the configuration is complete, it must be sent to the hardware before it takes effect. Click
Send Config... in the upper right corner of the Mixer Configuration window.
Once you have finished configuring your D-Mitri system, you must then send the configuration
to the hardware before it takes effect. Click Send Config... in the upper right corner of the Mixer
Configuration window. You will see notification in the Log window that the configuration has
been sent.
The CueStation mixer windows should now show faders and other controls corresponding to
the configuration.
222
Mixer Configuration Window
The Mixer Configuration Window has two tabs: Modules and Network Address Alaises.
Modules Tab
Module Type
Module type; assigned automatically when configuration is sent, but can be changed.
Name
Module name; assigned automatically when configuration is sent, but can be changed.
Unit
Automatically assigned unit name to distinguish between multiple processing units; can be
changed.
Comment
Enter text comments here.
Status
Displays Emulated, Online, or Offline.
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CHAPTER 17: MIXER CONFIGURATION
Network Address Alaises Tab
ID#
The module ID number: assigned automatically when the alias is created, but can be
changed.
Name
The module name: assigned automatically when the alias is created, but can be changed.
Expands to
Enter the IP address of the alias here.
Comment
Enter text comments here.
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Common Controls
The following is a list of buttons and columns common to both tabs of the Mixer Configuration
Window.
Send Config...
Sends the current Mixer Window configuration to CueStation.
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CHAPTER 17: MIXER CONFIGURATION
Auto Setup
Automatically configures the Mixer Window to the current hardware or virtual setup.
Config
A pull-down menu with the following choices:
•
New Config
•
Rename Config
•
Duplicate Config
•
Delete Config
•
Set Config ID
•
Lock Config
•
Unlock Config
Select Config menu
A pull-down menu that lets you select between saved or active configuration setups.
IMPORTANT
Of all the columns, only Proc Locations and Comment columns are designed to be edited
by hand. The rest are automatically assigned. Do NOT edit the I/O Type, Index, I/O
Location, or Default Label contents.
I/O Type
The type of the I/O point is automatically assigned during configuration.
Index
The index number of the I/O point is automatically assigned during configuration.
I/O Location
The location of the I/O point is automatically assigned during configuration.
Proc Location
The processor location is manually set for each I/O point using the following syntax:
processor-I/O-channel number.
226
Default Label
The default label of the I/O point is automatically assigned during configuration.
Comment
Enter text comments here.
Show:
Filters view by I/O point type (All, Input, PAFL, etc.).
# Cue List Players
Enter the amount of cue list players here.
# Buses
Enter the amount of buses here.
# Assigns
Enter the amount of assigns here.
# VGroups
Enter the amount of virtual groups here.
System IP
Pressing the System IP button will call up the System IP Config dialog, with fields for IP
Address, Netmask, and Gateway IP.
D-Mitri Backup Modules
It is recommended that one D-Mitri module be designated as a "hot-standby" module, coming
on-line in the case of emergency. DCP, DCM-2, DCM-4, and Wild Tracks modules can be
designated as backup modules using the Live Backup command. Modules configured as Live
Backup modules will automatically be put into use if one of the regular modules suddenly goes
off-line.
DCP
A live backup DCP must be given the unit ID DCP-X in the Mixer Configuration window, and
must be plugged into the 5th matrix link port on the DCM-2 or DCM-4 modules(s). One
standby DCP can stand in for any one of up to 4 primary DCP modules.
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CHAPTER 17: MIXER CONFIGURATION
DCM-2 or DCM-4
A live backup DCM-2 or DCM-4 must be given the unit ID MTRX-X in the Mixer Configuration
window.
Wild Tracks
Both the primary and the standby Wild Tracks unit must be configured with the same unit
ID (though this ID can be whatever you want). Only associate I/O Points with the primary
Wild Tracks module.
Disabling Modules Remotely
Modules can be enabled or disabled directly through the Status window, or by subcue through
the Set Disabled Modules command. Disabling marks the module as one that should not be
used for passing audio, forcing the system to use its assigned backup modules for audio routing
instead.
Status Window Module Enable or Disable
Right-click in the Status column to bring up a context menu that allows you to set the module
to Enabled or Disabled .
Subcue Window Set Disabled Modules Command
The External Command subcue Live Backup allows you to enable or disable the module .
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Part VI. Appendices
Appendix A: CueStation Networking
Client/Server Systems
Network Ports
Supported Audio File Types
Appendix B: Capture Window Advanced Mode
Advanced Mode Overview
Advanced Mode Example
Appendix C: CueStation Hotkeys
All Windows
Access Policies Window
Capture Window
Chat Window
Cue Library Window
Cue List Window
Inputs Window
Matrix Window
Mixer Windows
SpaceMap Window
Subcue Library Window
Support Files Window
Wild Tracks Window
Appendix D: D-Mitri Text Commands
Command List
Index
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235
238
239
245
245
247
253
253
257
258
258
259
260
261
261
261
262
262
263
263
265
265
269
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CUESTATION NETWORKING
Client/Server Systems
A Client-Server system is one that uses a central program to keep track of data and which is
designed to pass the data to other programs when requested.
The program that manages the data is called a server. The programs requesting data are called
clients. A server can support requests from many clients.
An analogy of this can be found in a restaurant looking at the waiters and the kitchen. Waiters
take the customers orders to the kitchen. The kitchen responds with the food that was ordered
for the waiters to take back to the customers. In this way one kitchen can serve many customers.
235
APPENDIX A
In the D-Mitri, there are Server programs that manage the automation, the mixer settings, Wild
Tracks, CueConsole and the user interface. These programs start automatically. The program
CueStation is a client.
D-Mitri Client/Server Connections
There are many advantages to a Client Server system for a sound mixing and automation system.
Redundant control is possible. Since there can be more than one client, you can have a backup
computer connected and running at the same time without the need for any special software or
hardware.
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APPENDIX A
There is a natural ease of connection between all elements in the system. Since all parts of the
system communicate with the server a well designed system will make it easy to connect
everything.
Multiple users can work on the same system at the same time and everyone sees what controls
are being changed as the changes are made.
Backup of the automation data is simple since each connected client can save the project file
locally.
Accurate indication of control settings is guaranteed for all users since all clients are connected
to the same server that is responsible for the control of the audio.
IPv4 Addresses
Each device on an internet must have a unique address. These are used to pass messages
from one device to another and are interpreted in order much like a mailing address.CueStation
recognizes both the emerging IPv6 address standard, and the older IPv4 address standard. An
IPv4 address is shown as four sets of numbers in the range of 0 to 255.
Subnet Mask and Gateway
The Subnet Mask is used to set the boundaries for the local address. Any messages for addresses
outside of the local boundary will be sent to the gateway. Messages pass to the local area through
holes in the mask (zero's). The subnet mask is in binary, but for humans is shown in four sets
of decimal numbers in the range 0-255, the same way as IP addresses are shown.
237
APPENDIX A
Network Ports
Network ports enable two or more networked devices to establish a line of communication. Both
CueStation and the server processes rely on several network ports for communication. If your
computer, network switch, or router use a firewall, you may have to reconfigure them to enable
the following ports:
18000
CueStation uses this as a system control/debug port.
18001
DCued port, used to adjust the current project.
18002
DMixerD port, used to adjust the current state of the mixing system.
18033
OpenSoundControl clients send OpenSoundControl messages to the system on this port.
18034
Text-command port, used to send text commands to the system.
8080
Web server port.
238
APPENDIX A
Supported Audio File Types
The following file formats and encodings are supported for use with both AudioMove and Wild
Tracks.
Microsoft WAV
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IMA ADPCM
MS ADPCM
GSM 6.10
G721 ADPCM 32kbps
SGI/Apple AIFF/AIFC
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
239
APPENDIX A
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
GSM 6.10
12 bit DWVW
16 bit DWVW
24 bit DWVW
Sun/DEC/NeXT AU/SND
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
G721 ADPCM 32kbps
G723 ADPCM 24kbps
G723 ADPCM 40kbps
240
APPENDIX A
Headerless RAW
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
GSM 6.10
12 bit DWVW
16 bit DWVW
24 bit DWVW
Ok Dialogic ADPCM
Paris Audio File PAF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Commodore Amiga IFF/SVX
Signed 8 bit PCM
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APPENDIX A
Signed 16 bit PCM
Sphere Nist WAV
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IRCAM SF
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
Creative VOC
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
242
APPENDIX A
SoundForge W64
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
IMA ADPCM
MS ADPCM
GSM 6.10
GNU Octave 2.0 MATLAB 4.2
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
GNU Octave 2.1 MATLAB 5.0
Unsigned 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
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APPENDIX A
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
Portable Voice Format PVF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
Fasttracker2
8 bit DPCM
16 bit DPCM
HMM Tool Kit HTK
Signed 16 bit PCM
Apple CAF
Signed 8 bit PCM
Signed 16 bit PCM
Signed 24 bit PCM
Signed 32 bit PCM
32 bit float
64 bit double precision
u-law encoding
A-law encoding
244
CAPTURE WINDOW ADVANCED MODE
Advanced Mode Overview
If the basic cue capturing options do not provide what you need, there are additional Advanced
Mode options that will give you detailed control over how the capturing process works.
Advanced Mode is only enabled for the Capture Differences and Update Subcues modes.
These controls will only affect the capture process if they are visible when the capture operation
is executed. Advanced Mode controls operate as follows:
Replace Mode/Amend Mode/Existing Mode
These buttons provide shortcuts to the most commonly used settings. When the Capture window
is opened, Amend Mode is selected by default.
•
Replace Mode: Sets Capture-Operator to New Control Points Only, and sets
Capture-Precedence to New Values Preferred.
•
Amend Mode: Sets Capture-Operator to Union, and sets Capture-Precedence to New
Values Preferred.
•
Existing Mode: Sets Capture-Operator to Old Points Only, and sets Capture-Precedence
to New Values Preferred.
Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence Options
These boxes specify how the newly-captured data should be combined with the data that is
already present inside subcues during Capture Differences and Update Subcues operations.
These controls are not relevant during Capture New operations and are therefore disabled when
Capture New (F3 or F4) is selected.
In the following description, we deal with two sets of control point addresses:
•
The first set, which we will refer to as the NEW set, is the set specified by the Subcue Type
definition, the currently-selected Channel Selects, etc. In other words it is the set of control
point addresses values which are to be captured from the current state of the system. The
NEW set is represented in the Venn Diagram by the green circle on the left.
245
APPENDIX B
•
The second set, which we will refer to as the OLD set, is the set of control point addresses
that are already present in the pre-existing subcue. This set may be equivalent to the NEW
set, or it might not be. For example, the sets could be different if the OLD set was captured
while a different set of Channel Selects was active than are currently active during this
Capture operation.
The Capture-Operator box (the first box) specifies which control point addresses should end
up in the resulting subcue. It has four possible states:
•
New Control Points Only entirely discards the OLD set of control point addresses and
replaces them with the control point addresses from the NEW set. This is the logic used
when Advanced Mode is not active.
•
Intersection retains only those control point addresses that are present in both the OLD
and NEW sets. Control point addresses appearing in only one of the two sets will not be
present in the resulting subcue.
•
Union retains the control point addresses that exist in the OLD set and adds the control
point addresses from the NEW set.
•
Old Control Points Only replaces the existing OLD set of control point addresses with the
corresponding NEW set, discarding all NEW control point addresses that were not already
present in OLD set.
The Capture-Precedence box (the second box) specifies what should happen when the NEW
set and the OLD set both specify the same control point address. In our case of “overlapping
sets”, we have a decision to make: we have a single control point address and two values that
correspond to it (the old value in the existing subcue and the new value that we just captured).
Since a subcue can only hold one value per control point address, we have to decide which of
these two values to keep and which to throw away. The Capture-Precedence box has the
following possible states:
•
New Values Preferred replaces the existing value with the corresponding NEW value. This
is the most commonly used setting and is the logic used when Advanced Mode is not
active.
•
Old Values Preferred retains the OLD set’s value, discarding the NEW value. This mode
is useful if you want to “fill in” additional control point addresses in your subcue without
changing any of the subcue’s existing values.
246
APPENDIX B
•
New Values Always is especially interesting, because it affects not only how value-conflicts
are resolved, but also which control point addresses are captured. In this mode, every
specified control point address will be updated with a newly-captured value, including control
point addresses that are only part of the OLD set!
Advanced Mode Example
Because the various modes specified by Capture-Operator and Capture-Precedence are often
hard to understand by description alone, we present an example update-subcue scenario and
the results you would get from the operation with each possible combination of Capture-Operator
and Capture-Precedence settings.
For this example, we will look at just a single, very simple subcue type: Input Mute.
Let’s assume our pre-existing cue contains an Input Mute subcue, and this subcue contains the
following data:
Input 1–6 Mute = false
For convenience, this manual will introduce a convention of expressing the mute values
graphically, like this:
OLD: [ffffff..]
(I.E. the subcue specifies input mutes 1–6 as false and does not contain mutes 7–8)
Now let’s say we've used the Channel Select feature to specify that we want to capture Input
Mutes 3–8 only, and that all the system’s Input Mutes are active (muted) at the time we do the
capture. Our newly captured data set would look like this:
Input 3–8 Mute = true
Or graphically:
NEW: [..TTTTTT]
(I.E. captured data specifies mutes 3–8 as true, and does not contain mutes 1–2)
Since Capture-Operator has four possible states and Capture-Precedence has three possible
states, a total of twelve operations is possible. Each combination and its resulting subcue data
is shown below:
247
APPENDIX B
New Control Points Only
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..ffffTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = false; Input 7-8 Mute
= true
[Operator = “New Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
NOTE
This mode is equivalent to the first example.
248
APPENDIX B
Intersection
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
249
APPENDIX B
Union
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[..TTTT..]
Input 1-2 Mute = false; Input 3-6 Mute
= true; Input 7-8 Mute = false
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[ffffffTT]
Input 1-6 Mute = false; Input 7-8 Mute
= true
[Operator = “Union”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[TTTTTTTT]
Input 1-8 Mute = true
NOTE
In this mode, control point values can be changed for channels that are not selected. For
this example, we are assuming that all input channels are muted on the mixer.
250
APPENDIX B
Old Control Points Only
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[ffTTTT..]
Input 1-2 Mute = false; Input 3-6 Mute
= true
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“Old Values Preferred”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[ffffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
[Operator = “Old Control Points Only”] [Precedence=“New Values Always”]
Set
Value
Interpretation
Old
[fffff..]
Input 1-6 Mute = false
New
[..TTTTTT]
Input 3-8 Mute = true
Result
[TTTTTT..]
Input 1-6 Mute = true
251
CUESTATION HOTKEYS
This appendix lists the default hotkey commands used by CueStation. The hotkey combinations
listed are for the Mac OS X version of CueStation.
IMPORTANT
The Command key on Mac OS X keyboards corresponds to the Control key on Windows
keyboards. The Option key on Mac OS X keyboards corresponds to the Alt key on Windows
keyboards.
All Windows
F1: Summon Capture Window (Update Subcue Mode)
F2: Summon Capture Window (Capture Differences Mode)
F3: Summon Capture Window (Capture New Mode)
F4: Summon Capture Window (Capture New into Cue List Mode)
F11: Switch to Previous Window
F12: Switch to Next Window
Command+A: Edit > Select All
Command+B: Projects > Backup Project
Command+C: Edit > Copy
Command+D: Edit > Duplicate
Command+E: Edit > Enable
Command+F: Edit > Select... (Find)
Command+H: Windows > Hide All Windows
Command+M: Windows > Maximize Window
253
APPENDIX C
Command+N: Edit > New
Command+O: Projects > Open
Command+P: Mixer > Pause Fades
Command+Q: CueStation > Quit (Mac OS X), Network > Quit (Windows)
Command+S: Projects > Save
Command+U: Edit > Unlock Items
Command+V: Edit > Paste
Command+W: Windows > Close Window
Command+X: Edit > Cut
Command+Y: Edit > Redo
Command+Z: Edit > Undo
Command+0: Windows > PAFL Masters
Command+1: Windows > Grand Master
Command+2: Windows > Inputs
Command+3: Windows > Wild Tracks
Command+4: Windows > Virtual Groups
Command+5: Windows > Bus Masters
Command+6: Windows > Matrix
Command+7: Windows > Output Masters
Command+8: Windows > Aux Matrix
Command+9: Windows > Aux Masters
Command+- : Windows > VRAS
254
APPENDIX C
Command+; : Mixer > Finish Fades
Command+' : Layout > Add Custom Utility Button...
Command+, : Edit > Enable
Command+. : Edit > Disable
Command+/ : Mixer > Cancel Fades
Command+Delete: Edit > Delete
Option+0: Windows > Log
Option+1: Windows > Subcue Library
Option+2: Windows > Cue Library
Option+3: Windows > Cue List
Option+4: Windows > Capture
Option+5: Windows > SpaceMap
Option+6: Windows > Transport
Option+7: Windows > Commands
Option+8: Windows > System Status
Option+9: Windows > Chat
Option+D: Focus: Display Menu
Option+I: Isolate (Meters Windows)
Option+L: Focus: Layout Menu
Option+M: Focus: Mixer Menu
Option+N: Focus: Network Menu
Option+P: Focus: Projects Menu
255
APPENDIX C
Option+S: Show EQ (Meters Windows)
Option+T: Focus: Show Strip (Meters Windows)
Option+U: Mute (Meters Windows)
Option+W: Focus: Windows Menu
Command+Shift+0: Windows > PAFL Processing
Command+Shift+2: Windows > Input Processing
Command+Shift+5: Windows > Bus Processing
Command+Shift+7: Windows > Output Processing
Command+Shift+9: Windows > Aux Processing
Command+Shift+- : Windows > VRAS Input Processing
Command+Shift+= : Windows > Clone Window
Command+Shift+B: Edit > Batch Modify Control Point Entries...
Command+Shift+C: Network > Connect...
Command+Shift+D: Network > Disconnect
Command+Shift+F: Windows > Full Screen Mode
Command+Shift+I: Edit > Individualize Subcues
Command+Shift+M: Windows > Zoom Window
Command+Shift+O: Edit > Share Subcues
Command+Shift+P: Mixer > Resume Fades
Command+Shift+S: Projects > Save As...
Command+Shift+U: Edit > Lock Items
Command+Shift+W: Windows > Reset Window
256
APPENDIX C
Command+Shift+- : Layout > Open More Layout...
Command+Shift+/ : Mixer > Stop All Cue List Players
Option+Command+Shift+D: Network > Disconnect All
Option+Command+Shift+M: Mixer > Master Stop
Option+Command+Shift+O: Layout > Open More Layout
Option+Command+Shift+S: Mixer > Silence
Option+Command+Shift+T: Mixer > Track From Top
Option+Command+0: Windows > Mixer Configuration
Option+Command+1: Windows > Input Meters
Option+Command+2: Windows > Bus Meters
Option+Command+3: Windows > Output Meters
Option+Command+4: Windows > Aux Meters
Option+Command+5: Windows > Support Files
Option+Command+6: Windows > Script Execution
Option+Command+7: Windows > Key Mappings
Option+Command+9: Windows > Project Notes
Option+Command+O: Layout > Open Layout...
Option+Command+- : Windows > Access Policies
Access Policies Window
Command+I: Access Policies > Invoke Selected Access Policies
Command+R: Access Policies > Rescind Selected Access Policies
257
APPENDIX C
Command+Shift+R: Access Policies > Reset Selected Policies
Capture Window
Option+A: Focus: Name
Option+C: Focus: Choose Cue
Option+H: AutoHide Window
Option+I: Capture Isolated Channels
Option+K: Uncheck All Subcue Types
Option+O: Focus: Comment
Option+R: Focus: Recall
Option+S: Persistent Subcue Select
Option+T: Details Button
Option+U: Use Channel Selects
Option+X: Focus: Share Existing Subcues
Option+Y: Focus: Cue List Player
Chat Window
Option+A: Focus: Name
Option+G: Page Selected Users
Option+S: Focus: Status
Option+T: Focus: Enter Chat Text
258
APPENDIX C
Cue Library Window
Command+I: Subcue Entries > Capture Differences
Command+J: Subcue Entries > Update Subcues
Command+R: Subcue Entries > Recall Subcue Entry
Command+T: Subcue Entries > Instant Recall Subcue Entry
Command+U: Subcue Entries > Update Subcues
Command+Shift+R: Cues > Recall Cue
Command+Shift+T: Cues > Instant Recall Cue
Option+A: Add Entry (in subcue editor)
Option+B: Focus: Enabled (in subcue editor)
Option+C: Focus: Cues Menu
Option+D: Delete Selected
Option+F: Focus: Choose Files (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+I: Focus: Display (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Lock to Time Code (for Wild
Tracks subcue)
Option+K: Focus: Deck Key (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+O: Resolve Duplicates (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Deck Play Offset (for
Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+R: Recall Selected (for subcues)
Option+S: Focus: Subcues Entries Menu
Option+T: Focus: Channel Select (for subcues)
Option+V: Update Subcue (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+Y: Focus: Any Deck (for Wild Tracks subcue)
259
APPENDIX C
Cue List Window
Command+G: Cue Entries > Stab Time Code
Command+I: Subcue Entries > Capture Differences
Command+J: Subcue Entries > Update Subcues
Command+R: Subcue Entries > Recall Subcue Entry
Command+T: Subcue Entries > Instant Recall Subcue Entry
Command+U: Subcue Entries > Update Subcues
Command+Shift+R: Cue Entries > Recall Cue Entry
Command+Shift+T: Cue Entries > Instant Recall Cue Entry
Option+A: Add Entry (in subcue editor)
Option+B: Focus: Enabled (in subcue editor)
Option+D: Delete Selected
Option+F: Focus: Choose Files (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+H: Show Time Code
Option+I: Focus: Display (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Lock to Time Code (for Wild
Tracks subcue)
Option+K: Focus: Deck Key (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+O: Resolve Duplicates (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Deck Play Offset (for
Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+R: Recall Selected (for subcues)
Option+S: Focus: Subcues Menu
Option+T: Focus: Channel Select (for subcues)
Option+U: Focus: Cue Entries Menu
260
APPENDIX C
Option+V: Focus: Cue List Selector, or Update Subcue (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+Y: Focus: Any Deck (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Inputs Window
F9: Move Flip Row Up
F10: Move Flip Row Down
Command+J: Show Aux Waits
Command+K: Show Aux Fades
Command+L: Show Aux Pans and Levels
Matrix Window
Command+J: Display > Show Waits
Command+K: Display > Show Fades
Command+L: Display > Show Levels
Mixer Windows
F5: Page Up
F6: Page Down
F7: Page Left
F8: Page Right
Option+F5: Step Up
Option+F6: Step Down
Option+F7: Step Left
261
APPENDIX C
Option+F8: Step Right
SpaceMap Window
F7: Previous Bus
F8: Next Bus
Command+G: SpaceMap > Enable/Disable Snap to Cartesian Grid
Command+I: SpaceMap > Insert Image
Command+K: SpaceMap > Halt Playback
Command+L: Display > Lock SpaceMap
Command+R: SpaceMap > Recall Trajectory
Command+T: SpaceMap > Insert Triset
Command+[ : SpaceMap > Zoom Out
Command+] : SpaceMap > Zoom In
Command+\ : SpaceMap > Reset Zoom
Command+Shift+G: SpaceMap > Enable/Disable Snap to Polar Grid
Option+A: AutoRecall checkbox
Option+C: Focus: AutoRecall Cue ID
Subcue Library Window
Command+R: Subcues > Recall Subcue
Command+T: Subcues > Instant Recall Subcue
Option+A: Add Entry (in subcue editor)
Option+B: Focus: Enabled (in subcue editor)
262
APPENDIX C
Option+D: Delete Selected
Option+F: Focus: Choose Files (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+H: Focus: Show Filter
Option+I: Focus: Display (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Lock to Time Code (for Wild
Tracks subcue)
Option+K: Focus: Deck Key (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+O: Resolve Duplicates (for Mixer Parameter subcue), or Focus: Deck Play Offset (for
Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+R: Recall Selected (for subcues)
Option+S: Focus: Subcues Menu
Option+T: Focus: Channel Select (for subcues)
Option+V: Update Subcue (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Option+Y: Focus: Any Deck (for Wild Tracks subcue)
Support Files Window
Command+E: Files > Export Selected Files
Command+I: Files > Import Selected Files
Wild Tracks Window
Command+I: Display > Browse Virtual Drive File
Command+J: Display > Bar Graph Layout > One Row Per Voice
Command+K: Display > Bar Graph Layout > One Row Per Send
Command+L: Display > Bar Graph Layout > One Row Per Entry
Command+R: Recall Rehearsal Point
263
APPENDIX C
Command+[ : Display > Track Display Height > Make Bars Shorter
Command+] : Display > Track Display Height > Make Bars Taller
Command+\ : Display > Track Display Height > Reset to Default Bar Height
Command+Shift+R: Set Rehearsal Point
Option+F: Focus: Choose Files
Option+I: Focus: Lock to Time Code
Option+K: Focus: Deck Key
Option+O: Focus: Deck Play Offset
Option+R: Recall Rehearsal Point
Option+V: Update Subcue
Option+Y: Focus: Any Deck
Option+Command+I: Zoom Deck View In
Option+Command+J: Pan Deck View Left
Option+Command+K: Pan Deck View Right
Option+Command+U: Zoom Deck View Out
Option+Command+Shift+J: Pan Deck View to Start
Option+Command+Shift+K: Pan Deck View to End
Option+Command+Shift+U: Zoom Deck View All
264
D-MITRI TEXT COMMANDS
This appendix describes the text commands for D-Mitri modules. Commands are in bold, variables
are in brackets [ ], and additional information is below each command.
Command List
begin
This command causes the receiving command parser to enter batch-processing mode. In
batch-processing mode, commands are not executed, they are merely queued up for
processing later. When the matching end command is received, all of the queued up
commands will be processed at once. This allows the entire command group to be sent as
a single RepDB transaction, which can be more efficient than a large number of smaller
transactions. While nesting is allowed, nested begin/end commands will be ignored; only
the outermost begin/end will have any effect.
crit [text]
debug [text]
end
This command marks the end of a batch. There should be one end sent for every begin
command sent. The end, if it is not nested inside another begin/end pair, will cause the
gateway to finally execute any commands it had been queuing up.
error [text]
get [tag=] [addresses]
Requests the current values of the specified addresses. For example, get input 1-8
level will cause the current values of the first eight input faders to be printed. If an optional
tag is specified (get abcd = input 1-8 level) then the returned values text will
include the specified tag string (abcd).
go [on player N]
Equivalent to pressing a GO button in the Transport window. If on player N is specified,
then the GO button will be pressed on Cue List Player #N. If not, it will default to Cue List
Player #1.
265
APPENDIX D
heypython [slotindex] [message]
This command sends a text message to the Python script running in slot slotindex in the
script execution window. The message can be any string you like; it will be passed in as the
argument in a call to UserCommandReceived() in the Python script. The default
implementation of UserCommandReceived() in the BasicClient class will try to execute the
string as Python source code. However, scripts can (and often do) override
UserCommandReceived in a subclass of BasicClient to to handle the incoming text in a
different manner.
log [text]
moveby D [on player N]
Moves the upcoming-cue position (aka the yellow bar) in the Transport window by D positions.
For example, moveby 1 is the same as skip next, and moveby -1 is the same as
skip previous. Attempts to move off the top or bottom of the list will move the yellow
bar to the top or bottom of the list, so moveby -99999 is a good way to "skip to the top"
of the cue list. If no player ID is specified, the command will be applied to Cue List Player
#1.
ping [tag]
Sends a "ping" to dmixerd, which is immediately echoed back with a corresponding "pong".
You can optionally specify a tag string, which will be included in the pong result.
print [nodepath] [maxdepth=D]
Prints all nodes matching nodepath, and recursively prints their child nodes as well. You
can optionally specify a maxdepth=D argument to limit the maximum depth of the recursion;
by default it will recurse as far as it can.
Example:
print default/subcues/0
default/subcues/0: QNetSubcueHeader: name=[jr_FIRE DRILL!]
type=[1] typeString=[Commands]
default/subcues/0/scd: [External_Control / Print Message To Log]:
enabled=1 waitTime=0 Cmt=[] tttMode=1 tttKey=[] user=0
projectping [tag]
This is similar to the ping command, except that the ping is routed through dcued and back,
rather than just through dmixerd. This can be helpful when you want to be notified that dcued
has finished processing a command that you previously sent it.
266
APPENDIX D
recall [cue,subcue] D [on player N]
Recalls the specified cue or subcue. If the on player N suffix is not present, the recall will
occur on Cue List Player #1.
runpython [slotindex] [filename] [arguments]
Launches a new Python script process in the specified slot in the Script Execution window.
A slotindex value of -1 will cause the script to be run "in the background" (i.e. not shown in
the Script Execution window). The filename should be the name of a python script in the
Support Files window, or in the templates folder.
set [addresses] = [values]
Sets the specified values to the specified addresses. The syntax is similar to what is seen
in Mixer Parameter subcues. For example, set input 1-8 level = +5.5 or set
output 5,7,9-11 mute = false. The following example specifies a wait of 5.5
seconds followed by a fade over 10 seconds:
set input 1 level = -50.0 waitTime=5.5 fadeTime=10.0
stop [on player N]
Equivalent to pressing a STOP button in the Transport window. If on player N is specified,
then the STOP button will be pressed on Cue List Player #N. If not, it will default to Cue List
Player #1.
subscribe [addresses]
Tells the system to send text messages whenever the specified control point(s) change.
Also, an initial update is always sent immediately after the subscribe command is received.
Example:
subscribe input 1-2 level
Got: Input 2 Level = -inf
Got: Input 1 Level = -inf
trace [text]
trigger [eventstring]
Sends a trigger-event to the D-Mitri system. Any triggers (previously set up with the External
Control/Setup Triggers command) that match eventstring will be activated.
unsubscribe [addresses]
Removes the specified addresses from the current subscribed-addresses set for this client.
267
APPENDIX D
unsubscribe [addresses]
Removes the specified addresses from the current subscribed-addresses set for this client.
unsubscribeall
Removes all subscribed addresses from the subscribed-addresses set for this client.
unwatch [nodepath]
Cancels a previously set watch path.
unwatchall
Cancels all previous set watch paths for this client.
update [cue,subcue] D
Updates the control point values in the specified cue or subcue to the mixer's current state
for those values.
warn [text]
watch [nodepath]
Starts watching the specified nodes in the project. Whenever a project node whose path
matches (nodepath) is created, changed, or destroyed, update text will be generated to
notify you about the change.
Example:
watch log/*
log/I0: QNetLogEntry: name=[Received state #0 of primary database from the senior peer.]
when=[2010/08/31 12:56:39] severity=[info] sourceName=[dcasld@Processor-1] msgSerNum=[0]
sourceSerNum=[1000] scloc=[JBTS]
log/I1: QNetLogEntry: name=[Sending state #0 of primary database to peer 429-493-4527.]
when=[2010/08/31 12:56:39] severity=[info] sourceName=[dcued@Processor-1] msgSerNum=[1]
sourceSerNum=[1000] scloc=[JBG8]
268
INDEX
A
Access policies, 213-216
creating, 213-215
recovering loss passwords, 216
active cue, 90
AutoFollow, 87
Automation
disabling, 103
enabling, 103
overview, 61
aux masters, 25
Aux Mute, 28
B
Batch Modifying, 101
bus masters, 23
C
Capture
amend mode, 71
channel selects, 71
Differences, 65, 71, 73
procedure, 96
New, 64
replace mode, 71
subcue types, 72
trajectory subcues, 133
Update Subcues, 73
procedure, 96
Use Channel Selects, 66
window, 64, 69-74
Control Point Sets tab, 83
Index Sets tab, 81
Capture Differences (see Capture)
Channel Meters
window, 49-50
Channel select
buttons, 19
Channel Select, 21, 23-27, 64-68
exceptions, 68
Follow Channel Selects, 68
using, 66
Chat
log, 210
member log, 210
send page, 210
window, 210
connection status, 39
Control Point Addresses, 81
identifying, 81
Control Point Sets, 83
Control Points
adding to subcues, 98
batch editing, 101
definition, 61
editing, 97
editing with Preview Subcue feature, 97
Recapture All Rows, 97
Recapture Selected Rows, 97
removing from subcues, 98
setting, 63
Control points
adjust indices, 105
editing, 104-105
enabling, 106
fade, 106
overriding semi-compact view, 105
sorting, 105
value, 106
wait, 106
Copy-On-Write, 98
effect on externals, 99
COW (see Copy-On-Write)
Cue Library
window, 107-111
269
INDEX
Cue List
dragging audio files into, 167
preloading Wild Tracks Decks, 173
Cue List Players, 90, 93
(see also Transport)
automation, 94
configuring, 93
subcues, 68
Cue Lists
adding cues, 87
creating, 65, 86
definition, 62
reordering cues, 87
window, 85-86
cue-on-deck, 90
Cues
adding subcues to, 110
capturing, 64
(see also Capture)
copy-on-write, 98
creating new, 109
definition, 62
editing, 65, 95-101
(see also Capture)
overlap, 108
recalling, 91
refs, 109
searching, 100
selecting, 100
sorting, 108
triggering with time code, 89
wild tracks channel assignments, 109
CueStation
system requirements, 7
Custom utility buttons, 204-207
creating, 205
example, 206
270
D
D-Mitri Live Backup, 227-229
Deck (see Wild Tracks Deck)
Drive Setup
importing audio, 144
Drive setup (see Wild Tracks, Drive Setup)
E
Edit menu
Batch Modify Control Point Entries, 101
Find, 100
Individualize Shared Subcues, 100
Optimize Duplicate Subcues, 100
externals, 111
adjust WildTracks media path, 179-181
autodraw trajectory, 133
control decks by key, 177
example, 113
MMC, 113
F
fade time, 20-21
Follow Channel Selects, 68
G
gain, 19
Go, 90
Grand Master, 28
I
Index Sets, 81-82
creating, 81
examples, 81
Index Type, 81
Index Values
asterisk in, 82
Inputs
aux sends, 19
bus assign, 20
channel strips, 18-21
INDEX
PAFL, 21
pan, 20
phantom power, 19
trim, 19
Isolate, 22
K
Key mappings, 207-208
action, 208
client ip, 208
comment, 208
examples, 204
id, 207
key, 207-208
modifiers, 208
target id, 208
target type, 208
window, 207
L
labels, 19
layouts, 203-204
mapping to hotkeys, 203
opening with an external, 203
save as default, 203
Log
entries, 43
icon, 40
window, 41-44
M
Master Stop, 28, 90
Matrix
window, 31
merge projects, 202
(see also opening files)
effects of, 202
Meters
grey meters, 50
tablet controls, 49
UDP vs. TCP, 50
Mixer
signal path, 48
Mixer settings subcues, 174
Mixer Settings subcues, 177
MMC (Multi-Media Control), 113
O
opening files, 199-201
custom project filter, 201
dialog, 200
load layout, 201
load project, 200
send configuration, 200
output masters, 24
P
pad, 19
PAFL
channel controls, 25-26
PAFL masters, 26
Page alert, 41
preamp, 19
Project file
definition, 63
Project files, opening, 200
projects
title, 39
Projects
notes, 209
Projects, reports, 210
S
saving files, 195-199
as default, 195
backup, 196
dialog, 197
directory shortcuts, 198-199
recent files, 198
to flash, 196
271
INDEX
scale, 19
select server
VirtualD-Mitri, 53
Signal Flow
system, 15
signal path, 48
Solo, 22, 28
Solo-In-Place, 28
SpaceMap, 115-141
adding nodes, 121
creating, 127-130
derived nodes, 119
Derived nodes, 121
editing, 121, 127
grid, 121
guidelines, 134-140
link weight, 130
link weights, 119
linking nodes, 130
nodes, 116
references, 140
silent nodes, 118
Silent nodes, 121
speaker nodes, 117
Speaker nodes, 121
subcues, 68, 133
testing, 121, 129
trajectories (see Trajectories)
trisets, 116, 129
virtual nodes, 118
Virtual nodes, 121
z-axis panning, 138
Subcue Library
subcue type filter, 102
window, 101-107, 111
Subcue Types
selecting, 64
Subcues
comment, 103
272
copy-on-write, 98
creating new, 106
custom types, 80-85
definition, 62
disabling, 103
editing, 97
enabling, 103
externals, 111-113
Individualize Shared, 100
matching name to cue name, 100
Optimize Duplicate, 100
refs, 103
shared references, 100
Support files
layout files, 204
System Status
maximums, 47
window, 44-48
T
Time Code
display, 91
enabling cues triggered by, 91
TC-Fwd ONLY, 89
triggering cues, 89
time code
in Wild Tracks Decks, 157
Tooltips, 81
Track-From-Top, 91-93
externals
effect on, 92
key string, 92
initiated from Cue List window, 92
Trajectories
auto-cue, 131
autodraw, 133
creating, 131
definition, 116
divergence, 124
INDEX
editing, 124, 132
guidelines, 137
level, 124
offset, 124
pan, 124
playback controls, 122
playing, 132
position, 124
rate, 124
recording, 123
repetitions, 124
rotation, 124
scale, 123
subcues, 133
testing, 132
Trajectory Editor, 124
Transport
Cue List Players, 90
keyboard shortcuts, 93
navigating the cue list, 90
time code, 91
(see also Time Code)
window, 89-93
Trim, 28
U
Update Subcues (see Capture)
V
verify wild tracks subcues, 201
VGroups, 27
input assigns, 21
Virtual Groups (see VGroups)
VirtualD-Mitri, 53-56
audio processing, 55
CueConsole, 55
job manager, 54
mixer control, 54
project database, 54
virtual CueConsole, 55
VRAS, 183-189
channel assignments, 185-186
cutoff frequency, 186
delta maximum, 184
diffusion channels, 184
early reflections
attenuation, 187
maximum delay time, 187
minimum delay time, 187
parameters, 186-187
spread, 187
ER zone configuration, 186
high frequency attenuation, 186
high frequency damping frequency, 185
high frequency damping percentage, 185
input matrix type, 184, 186
label, 183
max reverb time, 184
mid/low frequency damping frequency, 185
mid/low frequency damping percentage, 185
mid/low frequency damping type, 185
output matrix type, 186
reverberation
parameters, 184-186
shape factor, 185
type, 184
unitary level, 184
window, 183-187
W
wait time, 20-21
Wild Tracks, 143
batch files, 155, 178
Deck (see Wild Tracks Deck)
Deck enabled, 171
Deck Graphics, 152
deck keys, 157, 177
dmitriDisk file, 181
273
INDEX
Drive Setup, 146
entries, 143, 158
parameters of, 158
envelopes, 155
file search path, 159, 179
file types, 174
frequency sweep, 163
hold, 145
isolate, 146
loop buffer time, 176
loops, 175
media path subcue, 179
Meters, 145
number of channels, 146
offline editing, 181-182
optimizing playback, 173
PAFL, 146
pink noise, 163
playback, 163
recording, 163
recording path, 159
regions, 175
sawtooth wave, 164
sine wave, 163
square wave, 163
subcues (see Wild Tracks Deck subcues)
triangle wave, 164
Unit ID, 145
vamping, 176
verify subcues, 201
virtual drive, 181
waveform rendering, 153
white noise, 163
window, 144
WTRX ID, 172
Wild Tracks Deck
action, 158
adding entries, 157
Any deck, 157, 168
274
asterisk, 168
choosing files, 157
command, 164
controls, 152-162
cue recalls,
Deck info, 156
deck keys, 157
definition, 144
deleting entries, 157
enabling, 157
hold, 156
ID, 156
isolate, 157
label, 168
loops, 169
on complete, 158, 172
on recall, 157
On Recall action, 171
play offset, 157
Play offset, 169
Playback position, 156
preloading, 173-174
Recall position, 171
rehearsal point, 164
rehearsal points, 157
replacing files, 157
sends, 168, 173
subcue recalls, 164
subcues, 68, 167-173
capturing, 169
creating, 167-172
recall time, 174
time code, 157
time line view, 152
wtrxaudio, 179
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