Communications Manual
EZT-570i
User Communication Reference Manual
EZT570i User Communication Reference Manual revA
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.
Introduction....................................................................................................... 3
1.1 Definition of Terms................................................................................................................ 3
2.
Serial Communication ...................................................................................... 5
2.1 Interface Standards .............................................................................................................. 6
2.1.1 Interface Converters ................................................................................................ 7
2.2 Protocol................................................................................................................................. 8
2.3 Write your own Modbus Application ................................................................................... 10
2.3.1 Packet Syntax........................................................................................................ 12
2.4 EZT-570i Control Registers ................................................................................................ 15
2.5 EZT-570i Profile Registers ................................................................................................. 35
2.5.1 Profile Download Algorithm ................................................................................... 41
2.5.2 Sending a Profile to the EZT-570i ......................................................................... 43
2.5.3 Starting a Profile in the EZT-570i .......................................................................... 44
Appendix
Common Terms and Definitions
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
1. Introduction
This document is targeted towards new users interested in using data communications with CSZ
EZT-570i controllers. The purpose of this manual is to enable users to:
1. Understand the basics of data communications via standard definitions, interfaces and
protocols.
2. Set up and use a simple network of one or more EZT-570i controller(s).
In this manual, numbers in the format 0x00 represent values in hexadecimal. Numbers in the format
0 represent values in decimal and finally, numbers in the format 00000000 represent values in
binary unless otherwise stated.
1.1
Definition of Terms
Machine-to-Machine Communication
In order for machines to communicate with each other, they need a code called a character format or
character set. They need rules called protocol to govern their conversation and prevent confusion and
errors. Computers need a connecting interface over which to communicate. They may use one pair
of wires to send information in one direction and another pair to send in the opposite direction (full
duplex). Or they may use one pair to send in both directions (half duplex).
Character Format
The code or character format for the EZT-570i data communication is shared by virtually everyone in
the electronics industry. This code defines a computer stream of 1’s and 0’s, that are created by
varying a voltage signal in a regular manner. This code is the American Standard Code for
Information Interchange, called ASCII.
Bits and Bytes
The word bit is simply the contraction of the words binary digit. A bit is the basic unit in ASCII. It is
either a “1” or a “0”. A byte is a string of eight bits that a computer treats as a single character. ASCII
can use a single byte to represent each letter of the alphabet, each digit and each punctuation mark
we use.
ASCII
The ASCII code defines 128 separate characters, one for each letter, digit and punctuation mark.
ASCII also includes control characters similar to those we find on computer keys, such as backspace,
shift and return. It also has nine communications control characters for identification, enquiry
(inquiry), start of text, end of text, end of transmission, acknowledge, negative acknowledge and
escape. The ASCII code is sometimes written in a base 16 number system that is called
hexadecimal or “hex” for short. The numbers 0 through 9 represents the first ten digits of this system,
and the letters A through F represents the final six digits. The 128 ASCII character codes with the
decimal, binary and hexadecimal equivalents are listed in the following table.
ASCII Control Codes
ASCII Control Codes are used to give instructions to the remote device and result in specific actions,
such as a line feed instruction on a printer. ASCII Control Codes, the first 33 ASCII characters (non
printable), are important for the operation of communicating equipment. They give instruction to
remote devices that result in specific actions such as a line feed on a printer. Holding down the
keyboard control key while pressing the appropriate keyboard key is what sends these values.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
ASCII Character Chart
4
Char
Code
Decimal
Binary
Hex
Char
Code
Decimal
Binary
Hex
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
TAB
LF
VT
FF
CR
SO
SI
DLE
DC1
DC2
DC3
DC4
NAK
SYN
ETB
CAN
EM
SUB
ESC
FS
GS
RS
US
SP
!
"
#
$
%
&
‘
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
Ctrl @
Ctrl A
Ctrl B
Ctrl C
Ctrl D
Ctrl E
Ctrl F
Ctrl G
Ctrl H
Ctrl I
Ctrl J
Ctrl K
Ctrl L
Ctrl M
Ctrl N
Ctrl O
Ctrl P
Ctrl Q
Ctrl R
Ctrl S
Ctrl T
Ctrl U
Ctrl V
Ctrl W
Ctrl X
Ctrl Y
Ctrl Z
Ctrl [
Ctrl \
Ctrl ]
Ctrl ^
Ctrl _
SPACE
Shift 1
Shift ‘
Shift 3
Shift 4
Shift 5
Shift 7
‘
Shift 9
Shift 0
Shift 8
Shift =
,
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Shift ;
;
Shift ,
=
Shift .
Shift /
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
00000000
00000001
00000010
00000011
00000100
00000101
00000110
00000111
00001000
00001001
00001010
00001011
00001100
00001101
00001110
00001111
00010000
00010001
00010010
00010011
00010100
00010101
00010110
00010111
00011000
00011001
00011010
00011011
00011100
00011101
00011110
00011111
00100000
00100001
00100010
00100011
00100100
00100101
00100110
00100111
00101000
00101001
00101010
00101011
00101100
00101101
00101110
00101111
00110000
00110001
00110010
00110011
00110100
00110101
00110110
00110111
00111000
00111001
00111010
00111011
00111100
00111101
00111110
00111111
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
Shift 2
Shift A
Shift B
Shift C
Shift D
Shift E
Shift F
Shift G
Shift H
Shift I
Shift J
Shift K
Shift L
Shift M
Shift N
Shift O
Shift P
Shift Q
Shift R
Shift S
Shift T
Shift U
Shift V
Shift W
Shift X
Shift Y
Shift Z
[
\
]
Shift 6
Shift `
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Shift [
Shift \
Shift ]
Shift `
Delete
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
01000000
01000001
01000010
01000011
01000100
01000101
01000110
01000111
01001000
01001001
01001010
01001011
01001100
01001101
01001110
01001111
01010000
01010001
01010010
01010011
01010100
01010101
01010110
01010111
01011000
01011001
01011010
01011011
01011100
01011101
01011110
01011111
01100000
01100001
01100010
01100011
01100100
01100101
01100110
01100111
01101000
01101001
01101010
01101011
01101100
01101101
01101110
01101111
01110000
01110001
01110010
01110011
01110100
01110101
01110110
01110111
01111000
01111001
01111010
01111011
01111100
01111101
01111110
01111111
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2. Serial Communication
The primary interface CSZ has chosen for the EZT-570i employs serial communication, which is the
exchange of data in a one-bit-at-a-time, sequential manner on a single data line or channel. Serial
contrasts with parallel communication, which sends several bits of information simultaneously over
multiple lines or channels. Not only is serial data communication simpler than parallel, it is also less
costly.
Baud Rate
The baud unit is named after Jean Maurice Emile Baudot, who was an officer in the French Telegraph
Service. He is credited with devising the first uniform-length 5-bit code for characters of the alphabet
in the late 19th century. What baud really refers to is modulation rate or the number of times per
second that a line changes state. This is not always the same as bits per second (BPS). However, if
you connect two serial devices together using direct cables then baud and BPS are in fact the same.
Thus, if you are running at 9600 BPS, then the line is also changing states 9600 times per second.
Typical baud rates for computers are 9600, 19200, 38400 and 57600 baud. As the baud rate
increases, so does the transmission rate of data. Thus you get more information in a shorter period
of time. However, the faster the transmission rate, the more susceptible it is to error due to the
quality of the cable and sources of electrical “noise” in the environment. In order to balance
throughput with reliability, CSZ has chosen to use 9600 baud as the data rate for the EZT-570i. Thus
a device used to communicate with the EZT-570i must have its serial port set for 9600 baud in order
to for data communications to work properly.
Start and Stop Bits
The start bit informs the receiving device that a character is coming, and a stop bit tells it that a
character is complete. The start bit is always a 0. The stop bit is always a 1. The human speech
equivalent of these bits could be a clearing of the throat to get someone’s attention (start bit); and a
pause at the end of a phrase (stop bit). Both help the listener understand the message.
A stop bit has a value of 1 - or a mark state - and it can be detected correctly even if the previous
data bit also had a value of 1. This is accomplished by the stop bit's duration. Stop bits can be 1,
1.5, or 2 bit periods in length. CSZ has chosen to use the default – and most common – length of 1
period for the EZT-570i. A device used to communicate with the EZT-570i must also have its serial
port set to use a stop bit of 1 in order for data communications to work properly.
Parity Bit
Besides the synchronization provided by the use of start and stop bits, an additional bit called a parity
bit may optionally be transmitted along with the data. A parity bit affords a small amount of error
checking, to help detect data corruption that might occur during transmission. You can choose either
even parity, odd parity, mark parity, space parity or none at all. When even or odd parity is being
used, the number of marks (logical 1 bits) in each data byte are counted, and a single bit is
transmitted following the data bits to indicate whether the number of 1 bits just sent is even or odd.
For example, when even parity is chosen, the parity bit is transmitted with a value of 0 if the number
of preceding marks is an even number. For the binary value of 0110 0011 the parity bit would be 0.
If even parity were in effect and the binary number 1101 0110 were sent, then the parity bit would be
1. Odd parity is just the opposite, and the parity bit is 0 when the number of mark bits in the
preceding word is an odd number. Mark parity means that the parity bit is always set to the mark
signal condition and likewise space parity always sends the parity bit in the space signal condition.
Since these two parity options serve no useful purpose whatsoever, they are almost never used. The
EZT-570i can be set for even, odd or no parity. A device used to communicate with the EZT-570i
must also have its serial port set to use the same parity setting as the EZT-570i in order for data
communications to work properly.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.1
Interface Standards
An interface is a means for electronic systems to interact. It’s a specific kind of electrical wiring
configuration. CSZ has selected to use two of the most common serial interfaces used today. This
provides both a simple 1 to 1 connection to a PC or PLC using readily available cabling as well as a
multi-drop connection where more than one EZT-570i can be placed on the line.
EIA-232 (Full Duplex)
An EIA-232 (formerly RS-232C) interface uses three wires: a single transmit wire; a single receive
wire; and a common line. Only two devices can use an EIA-232 interface. A -3 to -24 volt signal
indicates a 1 and a +3 to +24 volt signal indicates a 0. The EIA-232 signal is referenced to the
common line rather than to a separate wire, as in EIA-485. Thus, an EIA-232 cable is limited to a
maximum of 50 feet, due to noise susceptibility.
EIA-485 (Half Duplex)
An EIA-485 interface uses two wires: a T+/R+, a T-/R- line. A -5-volt signal is interpreted as a 1, a
+5-volt signal as a 0. As many as 31 remote devices can be connected to a master on a multi-drop
network up to 4000 feet long.
Wiring
Most PCs have a standard EIA-232 port (usually referred to as RS-232). In these instances, you
must use an interface converter to connect to EIA-485. These interface standards are required to
have a multi-drop system (more than one EZT-570i on the link). The following list references some
vendors who sell these converters. Should your PC have the appropriate interface, just connect
using the wiring shown in the Getting Started section.
For EIA-485, the terminal marked “A” usually connects to the T+/R+ while the “B” terminal connects to
the T-/R- of the EZT-570i controller. The standards do not specify the wire size and type. Use of
AWG 24 twisted pair provides excellent results. If shielded cable is used, terminate the shield at one
end only. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions supplied with the interface converter. See
Biasing of Buses next.
Biasing of Buses
The EIA-485 standard requires the bus to be biased for reliable communication. This requires
termination resistors to be placed across the T+/R+ and T-/R- wires. One resistor is placed at the PC
where it connects to the EIA-485 bus. The second resistor is placed at the last controller on the
network. Do not place resistors at each controller. The impedance of the wires used for the bus
determines the resistor value. For twisted pair, the value is typically 120 ohms. In addition, it may be
necessary to have a pull-up and pull-down resistor between the power supply and ground of the
interface adapter.
Check the documentation that came with your interface adapter. Biasing the bus reduces reflection
of signals sent down the bus. These reflections are sometimes referred to as a standing wave. This
condition is most notable when communicating at high baud rates over longer distances.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.1.1 Interface Converters
The purpose of an interface converter is to allow two different buses to be connected together.
Interface converters are required when connecting an EIA-232 port to an EIA-485 bus. The EIA-485
bus is a half duplex bus. This means that it can only send or receive data at any given time. Some
interface converters on the market provide the ability to have full duplex with the EIA-485 bus. This is
accomplished by using two receivers and transmitters tied in tandem. This type of converter will not
work with the EZT-570i controller. Be sure that the model you purchase is designed for half duplex.
Another consideration when selecting an interface converter is how the converter handles switching
between transmit and receive. Typically it is accomplished via a handshake line from the PC. When
data flows into the converter from the PC, a handshake line is placed high. When data flows out of
the converter to the PC, the handshake line is placed low. In this way, the handshake line controls
the direction of information. Another method of achieving this is to use a built-in timer. The converter
switches to transmit when a character is sent to it from the PC. After a period of time when the PC
has not transmitted, the converter switches to a receive mode.
It is important that you understand how your converter accomplishes this task. You are required to
wire this feature or make settings on the converter to enable this function. The PC will not talk to the
controller correctly with out properly setting this. Your converter may also require settings through dip
switches, to set up communications parameters like baud rate, data bits, start bits, stop bits and
handshaking. The converter may also require a separate power supply. Some converters get their
power from the handshake lines of the PC. If you rely on this method, you will need to wire these
additional lines. In addition, your software must set these lines high. A more reliable method is to
use the external power supply. This is especially necessary when using a laptop computer. See the
documentation that is provided with your converter for more detail.
Not all converters are equal in performance. If your chamber operates in a harsh, electrically noisy
environment, this can cause less robust converters to work intermittently or not at all. CSZ has only
tested the converters listed below; however, CSZ makes no claims as to the performance or
compatibility of these converters with your PC. These converters are equipped with automatic send
data control circuits, driver control in the converter hardware, so you don’t have to work with software
at all. The circuit monitors data flow and enables the driver during transmission and automatically
disables it when no data is being sent. There is no need to rework software or install new drivers.
B&B Electronics
707 Dayton Road
PO Box 1040
Ottawa, IL 61350
Phone 815-433-5100
http://www.bb-elec.com
Part # 485OI9TB for EIA-232 to EIA-85
Part # 485PS2 (external power supply – required if handshake lines unavailable for power)
RESmith
4311 Smith Drive
Hamilton, OH 45011
Phone 513-874-4796
http://www.RS485.com
Part # ASC24T-B9FPS for EIA-232 to EIA-485 (provided with adapter cables and power supply)
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.2
Protocol
Protocol describes how to initiate an exchange. It also prevents two machines from attempting to
send data at the same time. There are a number of different data communications protocols, just as
there are different human cultural protocols that vary according to the situation.
The protocol portion of EZT-570i communications is very important, because it provides a quality of
communication that others often don’t have. Protocol-driven communications are more accurate,
because they are less prone to both operator and noise errors. Protocol maintains system integrity
by requiring a response to each message. It’s like registered mail — you know that your letter has
been received because the post office sends you a signed receipt.
In EZT-570i data communications, a dialog will continue successfully as long as the messages are in
the correct form and responses are returned to the protocol leader. If the operator enters an incorrect
message, or interference comes on to the data line, there will be no response. In that case the
master must retransmit the message or go to a recovery procedure. If an operator continues to enter
an incorrect message or interference continues on the data line, the system will halt until the problem
is resolved. CSZ has selected Modbus RTU as the protocol of choice. Modbus RTU enables a PC to
read and write directly to registers containing the EZT-570i’s parameters. With it, you can read all
180 of the controller’s parameters with three read commands.
Modbus Remote Terminal Unit (RTU)
Gould Modicon, now called AEG Schneider, created this protocol for process control systems called
"Modbus". It has the advantage over other protocols of being extremely reliable in exchanging
information. This protocol works on the principle of packet exchanges. The packet contains the
address of the controller to receive the information, a command field that says what is to be done with
the information and several fields of data. Reading from these registers retrieves all information in
the controller. The last item sent in the packet is a field to ensure the data is received intact. This is
called a cyclic redundancy check-sum. See the following example for information on how to generate
this value. All information exchanged is in hex numbers. The EZT-570i only supports the binary
version of Modbus, referenced as RTU. The ASCII version is less efficient and is not supported.
The CRC (Cyclical Redundancy Checksum) is calculated by the following steps:
1. Load a 16-bit register (called CRC register) with 0xFFFF
2. Exclusive OR the first 8-bit byte of the command message with the low order byte of the 16-bit
CRC register, putting the result in the CRC register.
3. Shift the CRC register one bit to the right with MSB zero filling. Extract and examine the LSB.
4. If the LSB of the CRC register is zero, repeat step 3, else Exclusive OR the CRC register with the
polynomial value 0xA001.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until eight shifts have been performed. When this is done, a complete 8-bit
byte will have been processed.
6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the next 8-bit byte of the command message. Continue doing this
until all bytes of the command message have been processed. The final contents of the CRC
register is the CRC value.
When transmitting the CRC value in the message, the upper and lower bytes of the CRC value
must be swapped, i.e. the lower order byte will be transmitted first.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Cyclical Redundancy Checksum (CRC) Algorithm
unsigned int calc_crc(unsigned char *start_of_packet, unsigned char *end_of_packet)
{
unsigned int crc;
unsigned char bit_count;
unsigned char *char_ptr;
/* Start at the beginning of the packet */
char_ptr = start_of_packet;
/* Initialize CRC */
crc = 0xFFFF;
/* Loop through the entire packet */
do{
/* Exclusive-OR the byte with the CRC */
crc ^= (unsigned int)*char_ptr;
/* Loop through all 8 data bits */
bit_count = 0;
do{
/* If the LSB is 1, shift the CRC and XOR the polynomial mask with the CRC */
if(crc & 0x0001){
crc >>= 1;
crc ^= 0xA001;
}
/* If the LSB is 0, shift the CRC only */
else{
crc >>= 1;
}
} while(bit_count++ < 7);
} while(char_ptr++ < end_of_packet);
return(crc);
}
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.3
Write your own Modbus Application
Listed below are a few of the more common software packages that claim to support the Modbus
protocol. CSZ does not recommend any one software package nor supports the implementation of
any software package not sold by CSZ. This list is provided as informational only. CSZ makes no
claims as to the performance or compatibility of any software package with your. Contact the
software manufacturer for more information on applying their software.
LabView by National Instruments
6504 Bridge Point Parkway
Austin, TX 78730-5039
Phone 512-794-0100
http://www.natinst.com
OI-2000 by Software Horizons, Inc.
10 Tower Office Park
Suite 200
Woburn, MA 01801-2120
Phone 617-933-3747
http://www.shorizons.com
SpecView by SpecView, LLC
41 Canyon Green Court
San Ramon, CA 94583
Phone 510-275-0600
http://www.specview.com
Wonderware 2000 by Wonderware
Corp.
100 Technology Drive
Irvine, CA 92718
Phone 714-727-3200
http://www.wonderware.com
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
If you already have a software application that uses Modbus, you can simply skip to EZT-570i
parameter table in the Getting Started section for the information your program requires. The rest of
this section provides information on writing a software application that uses Modbus.
1. You need to code messages in eight-bit bytes, with event parity, one stop bit (8, even, 1). The
EZT-570i has its parity set to even as default from the factory. If a different parity setting is
desired, just set the EZT-570i to match the coded parity setting.
2. Negative parameter values must be written in twos' complement format. Parameters are stored
in two-byte registers accessed with read and write commands to a relative address.
3. Messages are sent in packets that must be delimited by a pause at least as long as the time it
takes to send 28 bits (3.5 characters). To determine this time in seconds, divide 28 by the baud
rate. In the case of EZT-570i communications at 9600 baud, this calculates to a minimum period
of 3ms.
In addition, the EZT’s timeout period must be added to that, in order to properly time the send and
receive messages between the host computer and multiple EZT’s on the serial link. With a
default timeout period in the EZT-570i of 200ms, it makes a total pause of 203ms minimum.
4. Values containing decimal points such as process values and setpoints, have the decimal point
assumed, i.e., the data exchange can only be performed using whole numbers. Thus, the value
must be offset by a factor of 10 in order to exchange the data correctly. For example, a setpoint
of 42.4 degrees must be sent as a value of 424 in order for the EZT-570i to be set correctly.
Likewise, a process value read from the EZT-570i with a value of 967 is actually 96.7 degrees.
Consult the parameter table for the proper format of each value.
5. When monitoring a process, try to keep the number of read and write commands to a minimum of
500ms between exchanges to a single controller. Continuously reading data at a faster rate
consumes an excess amount of the controller’s processor time and does not provided any
additional benefits in process monitoring.
Handling Communication Errors
Reading or writing from/to a register that does not exist or is currently disabled will typically respond
with an erroneous value or result in a time-out response, i.e., the EZT will not respond with a return
message. Messages with the wrong format, timing or CRC are also ignored. A response will not be
given to them. Only messages with the proper format, timing and CRC will be acknowledged. It is
the user’s responsibility to handle the error appropriately within their own software and determine
whether to resend the message or halt for operator intervention.
User Responsibility
Refrain from altering prompts that do not appear on the EZT-570i’s front panel or are not included on
the specific model. Care must also be taken that the process can not cause damage to property or
injury to personnel if the wrong commands are sent due to operator error or equipment malfunction.
Be sure to use limit devices on any equipment placed inside the chamber that can generate heat to
prevent system thermal runaway.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.3.1 Packet Syntax
Each message packet begins with a one-byte controller address, from 0x01 to 0xF7. The second
byte in the message packet identifies the message command: read (0x03); write (0x10); or loop back
(0x08). The next n bytes of the message packet contain register addresses and/or data. The last two
bytes in the message packet contain a two-byte Cyclical Redundancy Checksum (CRC) for error
detection.
Packet format:
nn
nn
nnnn…
nn nn
address
command
registers and/or data
CRC
Read Register(s) Command (0x03)
This command returns from 1 to 60 registers. This command is to be used for reading one or more
data locations from the EZT-570i.
Packet sent to EZT-570i:
nn
03
nn nn
nn
03
00 nn
nn nn
controller address (1 byte)
read command (0x03)
starting register high byte
starting register low byte
number of registers high byte (0x00)
number of registers low byte
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
Packet returned from EZT-570i:
nn
nn nn … nn nn
nn nn
controller address (1 byte)
read command (0x03)
number of bytes (1 byte)
first register data low byte
first register data high byte
…
…
register n data high byte
register n data low byte
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
Example:
Sent:
Received:
Message:
12
Read register 61 (chamber temperature) of controller at address 1.
01 03 00 3D 00 01 15 C6
01 03 02 00 EC B9 C9
236 (0x00EC) – temperature is 23.6 degrees
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Example:
Sent:
Received:
Message:
Read registers 60 and 61 (chamber setpoint and temperature) of controller at address 1.
01 03 00 3C 00 02 04 07
01 03 04 01 90 01 48 FA 44
400 (0x0190) and 328 (0x0148) – setpoint is 40.0 and temperature is 32.8 degrees
Write Register Command (0x06)
This command writes a value to a single register. This command is to be used for setting control
values in the EZT-570i. To set multiple values, repeat the command for each data location.
Packet sent to EZT-570i:
nn
06
nn nn
nn nn
nn nn
controller address (1 byte)
write command (0x06)
register high byte
register low byte
data high byte
data low byte
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
Packet returned from EZT-570i:
nn
06
nn nn
nn nn
nn nn
controller address (1 byte)
write command (0x06)
register high byte
register low byte
data high byte
data low byte
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
Example: Write register 60 (temperature set point) of controller at address one to 20 degrees.
Sent:
01 06 00 3C 00 C8 48 50
Received: 01 06 00 3C 00 C8 48 50
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Write Registers Command (0x10)
This command is for use with profile download only. It is used to transmit profile data one
step at a time to the EZT-570i. See the Profile Parameters section for the list of registers and
their use. If this command is used to write to registers other than the correct profile step
registers, the EZT-570i will respond with an acknowledge that the message was received;
however, the command will not be executed.
Packet sent to EZT-570i:
nn
10
nn nn
00 0F
1E
nn nn … nn nn
controller address (1 byte)
write command (0x10)
starting register high byte
starting register low byte
number of registers to write high byte (0x00)
number of registers to write low byte (0x0F)
number of data bytes (0x1E)
data high byte
data low byte
…
…
register n data high byte
register n data low byte
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
Packet returned from EZT-570i:
nn
10
controller address (1 byte)
write command (0x10)
starting register high byte
starting register low byte
number of registers to write high byte (0x00)
number of registers to write low byte (0x0F)
CRC low byte
CRC high byte
14
nn nn
00 0F
nn nn
nn nn
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.4
EZT-570i Control Registers
The EZT-570i is capable of utilizing up to five control loops and eight monitor inputs. The register list
in this section of the manual lists the associated values for all of the loops, inputs and their associated
alarms by the loop or monitor input number, i.e., 1 - 5 and 1 - 8. While the monitor inputs will be easy
to decipher, since they are shipped from the factory with the relative number in their tag name, the
loops are not. The loop names are defined by the chamber process they control, i.e., temperature,
humidity, etc., thus the number of control loops required and their function can vary between different
chamber models.
The EZT-570i displays all control loops and monitor inputs in sequential order. The loop/monitor
order can be viewed from the “All Loops View” screen. Starting at the top of the list and counting
down, the first entry is loop 1, the second is loop 2, and so on. The following chart provides a loop
number to controlled process reference for use in selecting the desired parameter from the register
list.
TEMPERATURE/HUMIDITY
MODELS
ALTITUDE MODELS
VTS/TSB
MODELS
DTS MODELS
LOOP
1
TEMPERATURE
TEMPERATURE
TEMPERATURE
TEMPERATURE
HOT CHAMBER (BATH)
LEFT CHAMBER
PRODUCT
H UM ID I T Y
ALTITUDE
H UM ID I T Y
COLD CHAMBER (BATH)
CENTER CHAMBER
PRODUCT
PRODUCT
ALTITUDE
PRODUCT
RIGHT CHAMBER
2
3
-
4
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
PRODUCT
DUT LEFT BASKET
-
DUT RIGHT BASKET
The chamber events also vary based on the model of chamber and options present. In order to turn
the chamber and associated options on and off, it is necessary to set the proper event. The chart
below provides the chamber event number and its associated function based on the chamber model.
The chamber events are listed in order from top to bottom on the EZT-570i “Manual Event Control”
screen.
STANDARD MODELS
(TMP/RH/ALTITUDE)
VTS/TSB MODELS
DTS MODELS
EVENT
1
CHAMBER
HOT CHAMBER / BATH ON
LEFT CHAMBER
2
HUMIDITY
COLD CHAMBER (VTS ONLY)
CENTER CHAMBER
3
AUX COOL
AUX COOL
AUX COOL
4
PURGE
PURGE
PURGE
5
ALTITUDE
XFR HOT
XFR LEFT
6
-
XFR COLD
XFR RIGHT
7
-
XFR UNLOAD (TSB ONLY)
RIGHT CHAMBER
8
-
-
-
9
INITIATE DEFROST
INITIATE DEFROST (VTS ONLY)
INITIATE DEFROST (CENTER ONLY)
10
PRODUCT CONTROL
PRODUCT CONTROL
PRODUCT CONTROL
11
REMOTE SETPOINT 1
REMOTE SETPOINT 1
REMOTE SETPOINT 1
12
REMOTE SETPOINT 2
REMOTE SETPOINT 2
REMOTE SETPOINT 2
13
REMOTE SETPOINT 3
REMOTE SETPOINT 3
REMOTE SETPOINT 3
14
REMOTE SETPOINT 4
REMOTE SETPOINT 4
REMOTE SETPOINT 4
15
REMOTE SETPOINT 5
REMOTE SETPOINT 5
REMOTE SETPOINT 5
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
The control registers are grouped into three blocks of 60 (for a total of 180) registers relating to the
specific types of data they contain. The first group of 60 registers (0 – 59) contains the configuration
settings for various options on the EZT-570i as well as all of the alarm status, profile status and
manual on/off settings for the chamber. The second group of 60 registers (60 – 119) contains all of
the loop control/monitor settings which include the setpoint and alarm settings for each loop. The
third group of 60 registers (120 – 179) contains all of the optional monitor input settings including the
individual alarm settings for each.
Bit Oriented Parameters
Some of the values contained in the EZT-570i’s register base contain bit oriented values. This means
that each bit of the word indicates an on/off status for a specific setting or condition. In handling
these values, it is recommended that the word be converted to its binary equivalent.
By converting the value to its binary equivalent, it produces a Boolean array of true [bit on (1)] and
false [bit off (0)] values. This allows each bit to be examined individually. In the same manner,
creating a Boolean array of 16 bits produces an equivalent decimal value that can be sent to the EZT570i in order to set a control value.
For the purpose of this manual, parameters defined as bit oriented will have the function of each bit
associated with the bit’s index number in the data word. The index number is equal to that of a
typical array function. Thus, an index number of zero, selects the first bit in the word. An index
number of 1 selects the second bit in the word, and so on. This helps eliminate offset selection errors
that may occur when coding software and using array functions to select which bit in the word that is
required for examination.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Adhere to the following list of registers and their allowable data ranges. Do not attempt to
write to any other register number than those listed below. Do not write to registers that are
for options your chamber does not have. Failure to adhere to this requirement can result in
erratic control and/or damage to equipment. Note that register numbers listed are relative
values. To convert to absolute values, add 40001.
0
r
(0x0000)
EZT-570i Operational Mode
0 Offline (system maintenance mode)
1 Online
When the EZT-570i is in maintenance mode, it no longer updates any of the
control register values. They remain at their previous setting until the EZT-570i is
placed back into normal operation. When offline, the chamber is not in operation.
1
r
(0x0001)
Clock (YY/MM)
0-99
Year (high byte)
1-12
Month (low byte)
1 January
2 February
3 March
4 April
5 May
6 June
7 July
8 August
9 September
10 October
11 November
12 December
This parameter contains both the current year and month of the EZT-570i’s clock.
The data contained in the word will be an integer value based on the combined
bytes of both the year and month. In order to obtain the individual values, split
the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x0801 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x08 for the
high byte and 0x01 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x08 when
converted to decimal is 8 (year of 2008). The low byte of 0x01 when
converted to decimal is 1 (month of January).
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2
r
(0x0002)
Clock (DAY/DOW)
1 - 31 Day of Month (high byte)
0-6
Day of Week (low byte)
0 Sunday
1 Monday
2 Tuesday
3 Wednesday
4 Thursday
5 Friday
6 Saturday
This parameter contains both the current day of month and day of week of the
EZT-570i’s clock. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based
on the combined bytes of both the day of month and day of week. In order to
obtain the individual values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x1702 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x17 for the
high byte and 0x02 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x17 when
converted to decimal is 23 (23rd day of the month). The low byte of
0x02 when converted to decimal is 2 (Tuesday).
3
r
(0x0003)
Clock (HH/MM)
1 - 23 Hours (high byte)
0 - 59 Minutes (low byte)
This parameter contains both the current hours and minutes of the EZT-570i’s
clock. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based on the
combined bytes of both the hours and minutes. In order to obtain the individual
values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x1131 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x11 for the
high byte and 0x31 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x11 when
converted to decimal is 17 (17:00 hours – 5pm). The low byte of
0x31 when converted to decimal is 49 (minutes). The resultant time
is 17:49 or 5:49pm.
4
r
(0x0004)
Clock (seconds)
0 - 59 seconds
5
r/w
(0x0005)
Power Recovery Mode
0 Continue
1 Hold
2 Terminate
4 Reset
8 Resume
6
r/w
(0x0006)
Power Out Time
0 - 32767 seconds
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
7
r/w
(0x0007)
Defrost Operating Mode
0 Disabled
1 Manual Mode Selected
2 Auto Mode Selected
8
r/w
(0x0008)
Auto Defrost Temperature Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7 degrees)
This parameter contains an assumed decimal point. Since only whole numbers
can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol, the value
contained in this register must be divided by 10 to get the actual value. Likewise,
when sending a setpoint, the setpoint must be multiplied by 10 in order for it to be
set properly in the EZT-570i.
9
r/w
(0x0009)
Auto Defrost Time Interval
0 - 32767 minutes
10
r
(0x000A)
Defrost Status
0 Not in Defrost
1 In Defrost
2 In Prechill
11
r
(0x000B)
Time Remaining Until Next Defrost
0 - 32767 minutes
12
r/w
(0x000C)
Product Control
0 Off
1 Deviation
2 Process
4 Off
5 Deviation using Event for enable
6 Process using Event for enable
13
14
r/w
(0x000D)
(0x000E)
Product Control Upper Setpoint
Product Control Lower Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7 degrees)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
15
r/w
(0x000F)
Condensation Control
0 Off
1 On
16
r/w
(0x0010)
Condensation Control Monitor Mode
1 Use Single Input
2 Use Lowest Input
4 Use Highest Input
8 Use Average of all Inputs
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
17
r/w
(0x0011)
Condensation Control Input Selection
Bit0
Product
Bit1
PV1 (monitor)
Bit2
PV2 (monitor)
Bit3
PV3 (monitor)
Bit4
PV4 (monitor)
Bit5
PV5 (monitor)
Bit6
PV6 (monitor)
Bit7
PV7 (monitor)
Bit8
PV8 (monitor)
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., enabling the different bits of the word
enables (1) or disables (0) the use of the input for condensation control.
Note that if monitor inputs are not available on your chamber, the associated
bits should be set to zero.
Example:
Select the product, PV1, PV5, PV6 and PV7 inputs for control
Set the bits of the word for the selected inputs. The bit number
defines the position (index) of the bit (element) in the word which
can be thought of as an array of bits starting at the LSB.
The bit values then become: 00000000 11100011. The decimal
equivalent of the binary array is 227 (0x00E3). By setting
register 17 to a value off 227, the selected inputs will be used.
18
r/w
(0x0012)
Condensation Control Temperature Ramp Rate Limit
0 - 100 (0.0 – 10.0 degrees C)
0 - 180 (0.0 – 18.0 degrees F)
This parameter contains an assumed decimal point. Since only whole numbers
can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol, the value
contained in this register must be divided by 10 to get the actual value. Likewise,
when sending a setpoint, the setpoint must be multiplied by 10 in order for it to be
set properly in the EZT-570i.
19
20
r
(0x0013)
(0x0014)
Condensation Control Dewpoint Limit
Condensation Control Dewpoint Actual
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7 degrees)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values.
21
r/w
20
(0x0015)
Chamber Light Control
0 Chamber Light Off
1 Chamber Light On
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
22
23
r/w
(0x0016)
(0x0017)
Chamber Manual Event Control
Customer Manual Event Control
Bit0
Event 1
Bit1
Event 2
Bit2
Event 3
Bit3
Event 4
Bit4
Event 5
Bit5
Event 6
Bit6
Event 7
Bit7
Event 8
Bit8
Event 9
Bit9
Event 10
Bit10 Event 11
Bit11 Event 12
Bit12 Event 13
Bit13 Event 14
Bit14 Event 15
These parameters are bit oriented, i.e., enabling the different bits of the word
turns on (1) or turns off (0) the event. Note that if an event is for controlling
an option not available on your chamber, the associated bit should be set to
zero.
Example:
Turn on the chamber.
According to the event table at the beginning of this section, the
chamber event for a standard temperature/humidity chamber is
event 1. The bit number for event 1 is zero, thus the bit at
position (index) zero of the word should be set.
The bit values of the word then become: 00000000 00000001.
The decimal equivalent of the binary array is 1 (0x0001). By
setting register 22 to a value of 1, the chamber will turn on.
Example:
Turn on customer events 7, 10, 14 and 15.
By comparing the event numbers to their bit positions, set the
bits in the word accordingly: 0110001001000000. The decimal
equivalent is 25152 (0x6240). Setting register 23 to a value of
25152 will turn on each of the selected customer events.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
24
r/w
(0x0018)
Profile Control/Status
0
Stop/Off
1
Stop/All Off
2
Hold
4
Run/Resume
8
Autostart
16
Wait
32
Ramp
64
Soak
128 Guaranteed Soak
This parameter is used to control (start/stop) a profile and to monitor the
operating status of the profile. The control values; 0, 1, 2 and 4 are used to stop,
hold or run a profile. The status values; 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 are used to
indicate the mode of operation of the profile. These values are set by the EZT570i based on the step type or operating condition that the profile is in.
If the profile is placed into hold by setting a value of 2 the register, it will remain in
hold until it is changed back to run by setting a value of 4 to the register. Once
placed back into run, the EZT-570i will then change the value of the register back
to one of the five status values based on operating status.
25
w
(0x0019)
Profile Advance Step
1 Advance Previous Step
2 Advance Next Step
This parameter automatically resets to zero once the command is executed.
26
27
28
29
30
r
(0x001A)
(0x001B)
(0x001C)
(0x001D)
(0x001E)
Profile Name (characters 1 and 2)
Profile Name (characters 3 and 4)
Profile Name (characters 5 and 6)
Profile Name (characters 7 and 8)
Profile Name (characters 9 and 10)
32 – 126 (high byte)
32 – 126 (low byte)
These parameters store the profile name up to 10 characters in length. The
decimal values are representative of the standard ASCII character set for
printable characters. The characters of the profile name are stored in sequence
through the registers from low byte to high byte starting with register 26.
Example:
Read registers 26 – 30 from EZT-570i and convert byte values to
ASCII equivalents:
0x4554
E T
0x5453
T S
0x3120
1
0x3332
3 2
0x2020
Put ASCII values in order from low to high byte starting with register
26 in order to assemble the profile name: TEST 123 . Note that null
characters are not used at the end of the profile name. A space is
used in place of a null character to maintain the 10 character name
length if the profile name is not at least ten characters long.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
31
34
r
(0x001F)
(0x0022)
Profile Start Date (YY/MM)
Profile Stop Date (YY/MM)
0-99
Year (high byte)
1-12
Month (low byte)
1 January
2 February
3 March
4 April
5 May
6 June
7 July
8 August
9 September
10 October
11 November
12 December
These parameters contain both the current year and month of the profile’s
start/stop dates. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based
on the combined bytes of both the year and month. In order to obtain the
individual values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x0801 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x08 for the
high byte and 0x01 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x08 when
converted to decimal is 8 (year of 2008). The low byte of 0x01 when
converted to decimal is 1 (month of January).
32
35
r
(0x0020)
(0x0023)
Profile Start Date (DAY/DOW)
Profile Stop Date (DAY/DOW)
1 - 31 Day of Month (high byte)
0-6
Day of Week (low byte)
0 Sunday
1 Monday
2 Tuesday
3 Wednesday
4 Thursday
5 Friday
6 Saturday
These parameters contain both the current day of month and day of week of the
profiles start/stop date. The data contained in the word will be an integer value
based on the combined bytes of both the day of month and day of week. In order
to obtain the individual values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x1702 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x17 for the
high byte and 0x02 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x17 when
converted to decimal is 23 (23rd day of the month). The low byte of
0x02 when converted to decimal is 2 (Tuesday).
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
33
36
r
(0x0021)
(0x0024)
Profile Start Date (HH/MM)
Profile Stop Date (HH/MM)
1 - 23 Hours (high byte)
0 - 59 Minutes (low byte)
These parameters contain both the current hours and minutes of the profiles
start/stop date. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based on
the combined bytes of both the hours and minutes. In order to obtain the
individual values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x1131 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x11 for the
high byte and 0x31 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x11 when
converted to decimal is 17 (17:00 hours – 5pm). The low byte of
0x31 when converted to decimal is 49 (minutes). The resultant time
is 17:49 or 5:49pm.
37
r/w
(0x0025)
Profile Start Step
1 - 99
This parameter is used to set the step that the profile will start on. Note that once
the profile has started, this register will be set to zero. The EZT-570i requires
that this register be set prior to starting a profile each time, in order to prevent a
profile from being started on the wrong step.
38
39
r
(0x0026)
(0x0027)
Profile Current Step
Profile Last Step
1 - 99
40
r
(0x0028)
Profile Time Left in Current Step (HHH)
1 – 999 Hours
41
r
(0x0029)
Profile Time Left in Current Step (MM/SS)
0 - 59 Minutes (high byte)
0 - 59 Seconds (low byte)
These parameters contain both the current minutes and seconds left in the
current step of the profiles. The data contained in the word will be an integer
value based on the combined bytes of both the minutes and seconds. In order to
obtain the individual values, split the word into its two component bytes.
Example:
0x1131 read from EZT-570i
Splitting the word into its two component bytes yields 0x11 for the
high byte and 0x31 for the low byte. The high byte of 0x11 when
converted to decimal is 17. The low byte of 0x31 when converted to
decimal is 49. The resultant time left is then 17 minutes and 31
seconds.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
42
r
(0x002A)
Profile Wait for Status
0
Not Waiting
1
Input 1
2
Input 2
4
Input 3
8
Input 4
16
Input 5
32
Input 6
64
Input 7
128
Input 8
256
Input 9
512
Input 10
1024 Input 11
2048 Input 12
4096 Input 13
8192 Digital Input
43
r
(0x002B)
Profile Wait for Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
This parameter contains an assumed decimal point. Since only whole numbers
can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol, the value
contained in this register must be divided by 10 to get the actual value.
If the EZT-570i is in a “wait for digital input” state, the value contained in this
register will be the number of the digital input that the EZT-570i is waiting for.
44
r
(0x002C)
Profile Current Jump Step
1 – 99
45
r
(0x002D)
Profile Jumps Remaining in Current Step
0 – 999
46
47
48
49
50
r
(0x002E)
(0x002F)
(0x0030)
(0x0031)
(0x0032)
Profile Loop 1 Target Setpoint
Profile Loop 2 Target Setpoint
Profile Loop 3 Target Setpoint
Profile Loop 4 Target Setpoint
Profile Loop 5 Target Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values.
51
52
r
(0x0033)
(0x0034)
Profile Last Jump from Step
Profile Last Jump to Step
1 – 99
53
r
(0x0035)
Profile Total Jumps Made
0 – 32767
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
54
w
(0x0036)
Alarm Acknowledge
1 Alarm Silence
2 Pumpdown Reset
This parameter automatically resets to zero once the command is executed.
55
r
(0x0037)
EZT-570i Alarm Status
Bit0
Input 1 Sensor Break
Bit1
Input 2 Sensor Break
Bit2
Input 3 Sensor Break
Bit3
Input 4 Sensor Break
Bit4
Input 5 Sensor Break
Bit5
Input 6 Sensor Break
Bit6
Input 7 Sensor Break
Bit7
Input 8 Sensor Break
Bit8
Input 9 Sensor Break
Bit9
Input 10 Sensor Break
Bit10 Input 11 Sensor Break
Bit11 Input 12 Sensor Break
Bit12 Input 13 Sensor Break
Bit13 (not assigned)
Bit14 Loop Communications Failure
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., the individual bits of the word indicate a
specific alarm condition. When the bit is on (1) the alarm is present. Note
that more than one alarm can be present at a time.
56
r
(0x0038)
Input Alarm Status
Bit0
Input 1 Alarm
Bit1
Input 2 Alarm
Bit2
Input 3 Alarm
Bit3
Input 4 Alarm
Bit4
Input 5 Alarm
Bit5
Input 6 Alarm
Bit6
Input 7 Alarm
Bit7
Input 8 Alarm
Bit8
Input 9 Alarm
Bit9
Input 10 Alarm
Bit10 Input 11 Alarm
Bit11 Input 12 Alarm
Bit12 Input 13 Alarm
Bit13 (not assigned)
Bit14 (not assigned)
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., the individual bits of the word indicate a
specific alarm condition. When the bit is on (1) the alarm is present. Note
that more than one alarm can be present at a time.
The alarm point is determined by the alarm settings for the associated loop
or monitor input. If the alarm has not been configured, the alarm bit will
remain off.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
57
r
(0x0039)
Chamber Alarm Status
Bit0
Heater High Limit (Plenum A)
Bit1
External Product Safety
Bit2
Boiler Over-Temperature (Plenum A)
Bit3
Boiler Low Water (Plenum A)
Bit4
Dehumidifier System Fault (System B Boiler Over-Temperature)
Bit5
Motor Overload (Plenum A)
Bit6
Fluid System High Limit (Plenum B Heater High Limit)
Bit7
Fluid System High Pressure (Plenum B Motor Overload)
Bit8
Fluid System Low Flow
Bit9
Door Open
Bit10 (System B Boiler Low Water)
Bit11 (not assigned)
Bit12 Emergency Stop
Bit13 Power Failure
Bit14 Transfer Error
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., the individual bits of the word indicate a
specific alarm condition. When the bit is on (1) the alarm is present. Note
that more than one alarm can be present at a time.
The “A” and “B” plenum designations are for chambers that are equipped with two
conditioning plenums. For standard chambers, the default alarm descriptions apply.
58
r
(0x003A)
Refrigeration Alarm Status
Bit0
System 1(A) High/Low Pressure
Bit1
System 1(A) Low Oil Pressure
Bit2
System 1(A) High Discharge Temperature
Bit3
System 1(A) Compressor Protection Module
Bit4
Pumpdown Disabled
Bit5
System 1(A) Floodback Monitor
Bit6
(not assigned)
Bit7
(not assigned)
Bit8
System 2(B) High/Low Pressure
Bit9
System 2(B) Low Oil Pressure
Bit10 System 2(B) High Discharge Temperature
Bit11 System 2(B) Compressor Protection Module
Bit12 (not assigned)
Bit13 System B Floodback Monitor
Bit14 (not assigned)
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., the individual bits of the word indicate a
specific alarm condition. When the bit is on (1) the alarm is present. Note
that more than one alarm can be present at a time.
The “A” and “B” designations for the refrigeration system safeties correspond to the system
number if the chamber is equipped with dual refrigeration, i.e., dual single stage or cascade
refrigeration systems. For cascade systems, the refrigeration system safeties for both the
system 1 and system 2 compressors of each system will be combined. Thus, system A
safeties are the combination of the system 1 and system 2 safeties for refrigeration system A,
and system B safeties are the combined safeties of the second system.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
59
r
(0x003B)
System Status Monitor
Bit0
Humidity Water Reservoir Low
Bit1
Humidity Disabled (temperature out-of-range)
Bit2
Humidity High Dewpoint Limit
Bit3
Humidity Low Dewpoint Limit
Bit4
Door Open
Bit5
(not assigned)
Bit6
(not assigned)
Bit7
(not assigned)
Bit8
Service Air Circulators
Bit9
Service Heating/Cooling System
Bit10 Service Humidity System
Bit11 Service Purge System
Bit12 Service Altitude System
Bit13 Service Transfer Mechanism
Bit14 (not assigned)
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., the individual bits of the word indicate a
specific alarm condition. When the bit is on (1) the alarm is present. Note
that more than one alarm can be present at a time. The alarms are in
sequential order as the appear on the “System Status Monitor” screen on the
EZT-570i.
60
72
84
96
108
r/w
(0x003C)
(0x0048)
(0x0054)
(0x0060)
(0x006C)
Loop 1 Setpoint (SP)
Loop 2 Setpoint (SP)
Loop 3 Setpoint (SP)
Loop 4 Setpoint (SP)
Loop 5 Setpoint (SP)
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
61
73
85
97
109
r
(0x003D)
(0x0049)
(0x0055)
(0x0061)
(0x006D)
Loop 1 Process Value (PV)
Loop 2 Process Value (PV)
Loop 3 Process Value (PV)
Loop 4 Process Value (PV)
Loop 5 Process Value (PV)
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
62
74
86
98
110
r
(0x003E)
(0x004A)
(0x0056)
(0x0062)
(0x006E)
Loop 1 Percent Output (%out)
Loop 2 Percent Output (%out)
Loop 3 Percent Output (%out)
Loop 4 Percent Output (%out)
Loop 5 Percent Output (%out)
-10000 – 10000 (-100.00 – 100.00)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 100 to get the actual
values.
63
75
87
99
111
r/w
(0x003F)
(0x004B)
(0x0057)
(0x0063)
(0x006F)
Loop 1 Autotune Status
Loop 2 Autotune Status
Loop 3 Autotune Status
Loop 4 Autotune Status
Loop 5 Autotune Status
0 Autotune Off
1 Start Autotune
2 Autotune In Progress
4 Cancel Autotune
64
65
r/w
(0x0040)
(0x0041)
Loop 1 Upper Setpoint Limit
Loop 1 Lower Setpoint Limit
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
76
77
r/w
(0x004C)
(0x004D)
Loop 2 Upper Setpoint Limit
Loop 2 Lower Setpoint Limit
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
88
89
r/w
(0x0058)
(0x0059)
Loop 3 Upper Setpoint Limit
Loop 3 Lower Setpoint Limit
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
100
101
r/w
(0x0064)
(0x0065)
Loop 4 Upper Setpoint Limit
Loop 4 Lower Setpoint Limit
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
112
113
r/w
(0x0070)
(0x0071)
Loop 5 Upper Setpoint Limit
Loop 5 Lower Setpoint Limit
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
The loop setpoint limits are typically protected from adjustment through the EZT570i’s security settings. However, these values are not protected over the
communications interface and can be changed remotely. Safeguards should be
put in place in user software to prevent setpoint limits from exceeded chamber
design limits.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
66
78
90
102
114
r/w
(0x0042)
(0x004E)
(0x005A)
(0x0066)
(0x0072)
Loop 1 Alarm Type
Loop 2 Alarm Type
Loop 3 Alarm Type
Loop 4 Alarm Type
Loop 5 Alarm Type
0 Alarm Off
3 Process High
5 Process Low
7 Process Both
24 Deviation High
40 Deviation Low
56 Deviation Both
67
79
91
103
115
r/w
(0x0043)
(0x004F)
(0x005B)
(0x0067)
(0x0073)
Loop 1 Alarm Mode
Loop 2 Alarm Mode
Loop 3 Alarm Mode
Loop 4 Alarm Mode
Loop 5 Alarm Mode
Bit0
Alarm Self Clears (0)
Alarm Latches (1)
Bit1
Close on Alarm (0) – action of assigned alarm output
Open on Alarm (1) – action of assigned alarm output
Bit4
Audible Alarm Off (0)
Audible Alarm On (1)
Bit5
Chamber Continues On Alarm (0)
Chamber Shuts Down On Alarm (1)
Parameter is bit oriented. Note that only bits listed perform control action.
The state of the other bits do not affect operation.
68
80
92
104
116
r/w
30
(0x0044)
(0x0050)
(0x005C)
(0x0068)
(0x0074)
Loop 1 Alarm Output Assignment
Loop 2 Alarm Output Assignment
Loop 3 Alarm Output Assignment
Loop 4 Alarm Output Assignment
Loop 5 Alarm Output Assignment
0
No Output Selected
1
Digital Output (Customer Event) 1 Selected
2
Digital Output (Customer Event) 2 Selected
4
Digital Output (Customer Event) 3 Selected
8
Digital Output (Customer Event) 4 Selected
16
Digital Output (Customer Event) 5 Selected
32
Digital Output (Customer Event) 6 Selected
64
Digital Output (Customer Event) 7 Selected
128
Digital Output (Customer Event) 8 Selected
256
Digital Output (Customer Event) 9 Selected
512
Digital Output (Customer Event) 10 Selected
1024 Digital Output (Customer Event) 11 Selected
2048 Digital Output (Customer Event) 12 Selected
4096 Digital Output (Customer Event) 13 Selected
8192 Digital Output (Customer Event) 14 Selected
16384 Digital Output (Customer Event) 15 Selected
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
69
70
r/w
(0x0045)
(0x0046)
Loop 1 High Alarm Setpoint
Loop 1 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
81
82
r/w
(0x0051)
(0x0052)
Loop 2 High Alarm Setpoint
Loop 2 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
93
94
r/w
(0x005D)
(0x005E)
Loop 3 High Alarm Setpoint
Loop 3 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
105
106
r/w
(0x0069)
(0x006A)
Loop 4 High Alarm Setpoint
Loop 4 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
117
118
r/w
(0x0075)
(0x0076)
Loop 5 High Alarm Setpoint
Loop 5 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
71
83
95
107
119
r/w
(0x0047)
(0x0053)
(0x005F)
(0x006B)
(0x0077)
Loop 1 Alarm Hysteresis
Loop 2 Alarm Hysteresis
Loop 3 Alarm Hysteresis
Loop 4 Alarm Hysteresis
Loop 5 Alarm Hysteresis
0 – 32767 (0.0 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
120
127
134
141
148
155
162
169
r
(0x0078)
(0x007F)
(0x0086)
(0x008D)
(0x0094)
(0x009B)
(0x00A2)
(0x00A9)
Monitor Input 1 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 2 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 3 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 4 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 5 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 6 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 7 Process Value (PV)
Monitor Input 8 Process Value (PV)
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
(System 1 Suction Temperature)
(System 1 Suction Pressure)
(System 1 Discharge Temperature)
(System 1 Discharge Pressure)
(System 2 Suction Temperature)
(System 2 Suction Pressure)
(System 2 Discharge Temperature)
(System 2 Discharge Pressure)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
The “system 1 and 2” pressure and temperature descriptions define the monitor input values
when the refrigeration system monitor option is used. The standard 8-input thermocouple
monitor option is not available when equipped with the refrigeration monitor option.
121
128
135
142
149
156
163
170
r/w
(0x0079)
(0x0080)
(0x0087)
(0x008E)
(0x0095)
(0x009C)
(0x00A3)
(0x00AA)
Monitor Input 1 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 2 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 3 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 4 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 5 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 6 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 7 Alarm Type
Monitor Input 8 Alarm Type
0 Alarm Off
3 Process High
5 Process Low
7 Process Both
122
129
136
143
150
157
164
171
r/w
(0x007A)
(0x0081)
(0x0088)
(0x008F)
(0x0096)
(0x009D)
(0x00A4)
(0x00AB)
Monitor Input 1 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 2 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 3 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 4 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 5 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 6 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 7 Alarm Mode
Monitor Input 8 Alarm Mode
Bit0
Alarm Self Clears (0)
Alarm Latches (1)
Bit1
Close on Alarm (0) – action of assigned alarm output
Open on Alarm (1) – action of assigned alarm output
Bit4
Audible Alarm Off (0)
Audible Alarm On (1)
Bit5
Chamber Continues On Alarm (0)
Chamber Shuts Down On Alarm (1)
Parameter is bit oriented. Note that only bits listed perform control action.
The state of the other bits do not affect operation.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
123
130
137
144
151
158
165
172
r/w
(0x007B)
(0x0082)
(0x0089)
(0x0090)
(0x0097)
(0x009E)
(0x00A5)
(0x00AC)
Monitor Input 1 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 2 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 3 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 4 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 5 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 6 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 7 Alarm Output Assignment
Monitor Input 8 Alarm Output Assignment
0
No Output Selected
1
Digital Output (Customer Event) 1 Selected
2
Digital Output (Customer Event) 2 Selected
4
Digital Output (Customer Event) 3 Selected
8
Digital Output (Customer Event) 4 Selected
16
Digital Output (Customer Event) 5 Selected
32
Digital Output (Customer Event) 6 Selected
64
Digital Output (Customer Event) 7 Selected
128
Digital Output (Customer Event) 8 Selected
256
Digital Output (Customer Event) 9 Selected
512
Digital Output (Customer Event) 10 Selected
1024 Digital Output (Customer Event) 11 Selected
2048 Digital Output (Customer Event) 12 Selected
4096 Digital Output (Customer Event) 13 Selected
8192 Digital Output (Customer Event) 14 Selected
16384 Digital Output (Customer Event) 15 Selected
124
125
r/w
(0x007C)
(0x007D)
Monitor Input 1 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 1 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
131
132
r/w
(0x0083)
(0x0084)
Monitor Input 2 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 2 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
138
139
r/w
(0x008A)
(0x008B)
Monitor Input 3 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 3 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
145
146
r/w
(0x0091)
(0x0092)
Monitor Input 4 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 4 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
152
153
r/w
(0x0098)
(0x0099)
Monitor Input 5 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 5 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
159
160
r/w
(0x009F)
(0x00A0)
Monitor Input 6 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 6 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
166
167
r/w
(0x00A6)
(0x00A7)
Monitor Input 7 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 7 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
173
174
r/w
(0x00AD)
(0x00AE)
Monitor Input 8 High Alarm Setpoint
Monitor Input 8 Low Alarm Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
126
133
140
147
154
161
168
175
r/w
(0x007E)
(0x0085)
(0x008C)
(0x0093)
(0x009A)
(0x00A1)
(0x00A8)
(0x00AF)
Monitor Input 1 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 2 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 3 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 4 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 5 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 6 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 7 Alarm Hysteresis
Monitor Input 8 Alarm Hysteresis
0 – 32767 (0.0 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
179
w
(0x00B3)
Profile Step Time Adjustment
0 – 32767 minutes
180
r
(0x00B4)
EZT570i Offline/Downloading Profile
0 Online
1 Offline/Downloading Profile
When the EZT-570i is offline/downloading a profile, refrain from writing to any
control registers. In offline mode, there are no updates made to any control
registers.
After a profile transfer to the EZT-570i from a PC, the EZT-570i will go into profile
download. Do not write to any registers until profile download is complete. Once
profile download complete, normal operation may commence.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.5
EZT-570i Profile Registers
The profile parameters are a separate group of registers that are used for sending profiles to the EZT570i. The manner in which the profile steps are sent to the EZT-570i is specific and must be followed
exactly. Each step of the profile consists of 15 data registers. A profile is written one step at a time,
using a single command to transmit the data for all 15 registers at once. The steps must be sent one
at a time with a 1 second pause between steps.
You must use the write multiple registers command (0x10) to transmit the profile to the EZT-570i.
See Section 2.3.1, Packet Syntax, for the command format.
It is the user’s responsibility to make sure that the format and data ranges for each step of
the profile is followed correctly. Failure to do so can result in erratic control and or damage
to equipment. Note that register numbers listed are relative values. To convert to absolute
values, add 40001.
The first 15 registers of the profile download contain specific values related to the profile.
These include the Autostart settings, profile name, length of the profile and guaranteed soak
settings. These values are always transmitted as the first “step” of the profile:
200
w
(0x00C8)
Autostart
0 Off
1 Start by Date
2 Start by Day
201
w
(0x00C9)
Autostart Time (YY/MM)
0-99
Year (high byte)
1-12
Month (low byte)
1 January
2 February
3 March
4 April
5 May
6 June
7 July
8 August
9 September
10 October
11 November
12 December
This parameter contains both the current year and month of the profile’s autostart
date. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based on the
combined bytes of both the year and month. In order to create the value, join the
individual bytes into a single word.
Example:
Set the year to 2010 and the month to February
To create the proper data value, convert the two digit year “10” to
hexadecimal (x0A). Convert the month “2” to hexadecimal (x02).
Combine the two hexadecimal bytes to create the word “x0A02”.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
202
w
(0x00CA)
Autostart Time (DAY/DOW)
1 - 31 Day of Month (high byte)
0-6
Day of Week (low byte)
0 Sunday
1 Monday
2 Tuesday
3 Wednesday
4 Thursday
5 Friday
6 Saturday
This parameter contains both the current day of month and day of week of the
EZT-570i’s clock. The data contained in the word will be an integer value based
on the combined bytes of both the day of month and day of week. In order to
create the value, join the individual bytes into a single word.
Example:
Set the day to 23 and the day of week to Sunday.
To create the proper data value, convert the day of 23 to
hexadecimal (x17). Convert the day of week, Sunday (0) to
hexadecimal (x00). Combine the two hexadecimal bytes to create
the word “x1700”.
203
w
(0x00CB)
Autostart Time (HH/MM)
1 - 23 Hours (high byte)
0 - 59 Minutes (low byte)
This parameter contains the time in both hours and minutes for when the profile
is to start when Autostart is enabled. The data contained in the word will be an
integer value based on the combined bytes of both the hours and minutes. In
order to create the value, join the individual bytes into a single word.
Example:
Set a start time of 5:49pm.
Convert the hours into the 24 hour clock format (5+12) which yields
17 (x11). Convert the seconds into hexadecimal (x31). Combine the
two bytes to form the word “x1131”
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
204
205
206
207
208
w
(0x00CC)
(0x00CD)
(0x00CE)
(0x00CF)
(0x00D0)
Profile Name (characters 1 and 2)
Profile Name (characters 3 and 4)
Profile Name (characters 5 and 6)
Profile Name (characters 7 and 8)
Profile Name (characters 9 and 10)
32 – 126 (high byte)
32 – 126 (low byte)
These parameters hold the profile name up to 10 characters in length. The
decimal values are representative of the standard ASCII character set for
printable characters. The characters of the profile name are stored in sequence
through the registers from low byte to high byte starting with register 204.
Example:
Set the profile name to JESD22A.
First, convert the ASCII characters to their equivalent hexadecimal
values:
J = x4A
E = x45
S = x53
D = x44
2 = x32
2 = x32
A = x41
Note that null characters should not be used. The remaining three
characters should thus be set as white spaces (x20). Placing the
values in order from low byte to high byte yields register values of:
204 =
205 =
206 =
207 =
208 =
209
w
(0x00D1)
x454A
x4453
x3232
x2041
x2020
Total Number of Steps in profile
1 – 99
This value must be set to the total number of operating steps in the profile. It
indicates the number of steps that the EZT is to expect from a remote PC
when a profile is sent. If this value is not equal to the number of steps sent,
the profile download will not take place properly.
210
211
212
213
214
w
(0x00D2)
(0x00D3)
(0x00D4)
(0x00D5)
(0x00D6)
Guaranteed Soak Band Loop 1
Guaranteed Soak Band Loop 2
Guaranteed Soak Band Loop 3
Guaranteed Soak Band Loop 4
Guaranteed Soak Band Loop 5
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
The following 1485 registers of the profile download contain specific values related to each
operating step of the profile. When sending a profile to the EZT, transmit only the number of
steps as set in register 209.
215
w
(0x00D7)
Profile Step 1 Time (hours)
0 - 999
216
w
(0x00D8)
Profile Step 1 Time (MM/SS)
0 - 59 Minutes (high byte)
0 - 59 Seconds (low byte)
This parameter contains both minutes and seconds for the profile step duration.
The value will be an integer value based on the combined bytes of both the
minutes and seconds. In order to set the value, combine the two component
bytes into the word.
Example:
Set a time of 1 minute, 30 seconds:
Converting the two decimal values into their hexadecimal equivalents
yields 0x01 (1 minute) for the high byte and 0x1E (30 seconds) for
the low byte. The resultant vale to be written to the EZT is the
combined bytes: x001E.
217
218
w
(0x00D9)
(0x00DA)
Profile Step 1 Chamber Events
Profile Step 1 Customer Events
Bit0
Event 1
Bit1
Event 2
Bit2
Event 3
Bit3
Event 4
Bit4
Event 5
Bit5
Event 6
Bit6
Event 7
Bit7
Event 8
Bit8
Event 9
Bit9
Event 10
Bit10 Event 11
Bit11 Event 12
Bit12 Event 13
Bit13 Event 14
Bit14 Event 15
These parameters are bit oriented, i.e., enabling the different bits of the word
turns on (1) or turns off (0) the event. Note that if an event is for controlling
an option not available on your chamber, the associated bit should be set to
zero.
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EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
219
w
(0x00DB)
Profile Step 1 Guaranteed Soak / Wait for Digital Input Events
Bit0
Guaranteed Soak Loop 1
Bit1
Guaranteed Soak Loop 2
Bit2
Guaranteed Soak Loop 3
Bit3
Guaranteed Soak Loop 4
Bit4
Guaranteed Soak Loop 5
Bit5
Digital Input 1 Wait For
Bit6
Digital Input 2 Wait For
Bit7
Digital Input 3 Wait For
Bit8
Digital Input 4 Wait For
Bit9
Digital Input 5 Wait For
Bit10 Digital Input 6 Wait For
Bit11 Digital Input 7 Wait For
Bit12 Digital Input 8 Wait For
This parameter is bit oriented, i.e., enabling the different bits of the word
turns on (1) or turns off (0) the event. Note that if an event is for controlling
an option not available on your chamber, the associated bit should be set to
zero.
Multiple guaranteed soak events can be enabled at a time; however, only
one “digital input wait for” should be enabled at time. The guaranteed soak
and “wait for” events can be used concurrently on the same step.
220
w
(0x00DC)
Profile Step 1 Wait For Loop Events
0
Wait for Disabled (no loop selected)
1
Loop 1 Selected
2
Loop 2 Selected
4
Loop 3 Selected
8
Loop 4 Selected
16
Loop 5 Selected
221
w
(0x00DD)
Profile Step 1 Wait For Monitor Events
0
Wait for Disabled (no input selected)
1
Monitor Input 1 Selected
2
Monitor Input 2 Selected
4
Monitor Input 3 Selected
8
Monitor Input 4 Selected
16
Monitor Input 5 Selected
32
Monitor Input 6 Selected
64
Monitor Input 7 Selected
128
Monitor Input 8 Selected
Only one “wait for” can be enabled per step. Do not enable more than one at a time. If
multiple wait for conditions are desired, they must be enabled on sequential steps. The
profile may not continue properly if more than one “wait for” is enabled on a step.
39
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
222
w
(0x00DE)
Profile Step 1 Wait For Setpoint
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
This parameter contains an assumed decimal point. Since only whole numbers
can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol, the
values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
223
w
(0x00DF)
Profile Step 1 Jump Step Number
1 – 99
224
w
(0x00E0)
Profile Step 1 Jump Count
0 – 999
A jump count greater than zero will initiate a jump to the step number entered in
the jump step field when the current step is complete. To disable the jump, set a
value of zero to this field. At the end of the step, the profile will then continue to
the next step in sequence.
225
226
227
228
229
w
(0x00E1)
(0x00E2)
(0x00E3)
(0x00E4)
(0x00E5)
Profile Step 1 Target Setpoint for Loop 1
Profile Step 1 Target Setpoint for Loop 2
Profile Step 1 Target Setpoint for Loop 3
Profile Step 1 Target Setpoint for Loop 4
Profile Step 1 Target Setpoint for Loop 5
-32768 – 32767 (-3276.8 – 3276.7)
These parameters contain an assumed decimal point. Since only whole
numbers can be sent to and received from the EZT-570i using Modbus protocol,
the values contained in these registers must be divided by 10 to get the actual
values. Likewise, when sending the setpoints, the setpoints must be multiplied
by 10 in order for it to be set properly in the EZT-570i.
All remaining steps of the profile follow the same format and data structure as in step 1. By
storing profiles as a 2-dimenional array, each row of the file can be read, and then transmitted
to the EZT one step at a time in sequential order of 15 registers for each step.
230 (0x00E6) – 244 (0x00F4)
245 (0x00F5) – 259 (0x0103)
260 (0x0104) – 274 (0x0112)
275 (0x0113) – 289 (0x0121)
290 (0x0122) – 304 (0x0130)
305 (0x0131) – 319 (0x013F)
320 (0x0140) – 334 (0x014E)
335 (0x014F) – 349 (0x015D)
----------through
----------1685 (0x0695) – 1699 (0x06A3)
40
Profile Step 2 Data Registers
Profile Step 3 Data Registers
Profile Step 4 Data Registers
Profile Step 5 Data Registers
Profile Step 6 Data Registers
Profile Step 7 Data Registers
Profile Step 8 Data Registers
Profile Step 9 Data Registers
Profile Step 99 Data Registers
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.5.1 Profile Download Algorithm
An example download profile procedure as well as the timer procedure is provided below in VB
format. These are sample procedures and CSZ does not take responsibility for end user actions.
The user must pay close attention regarding ranges and user interaction during profile download.
Private Sub downloadProfile()
'This sub will initiate the profile download and start the timer for profile download. Timer should be set at 1 second intervals
'to make sure timeout from EZT controller does not occur.
'-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------'Variables used in procedure. User can select static, form, global variables or class type based on preference.
G_vary(x,x) is array for each EZT in system. First element is EZT number, second element is EZT register. EZT register
are a total of 180 registers per EZT.
f_curProfileName is form var that holds currently loaded profile.
f_profRegsToWrite is form var that holds the current profile array point being written when timer ticks are active.
f_writeNum is form var that holds the current segment being written when timer ticks are active.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------'User error checking for sub should go here
'Check to see if profile is running before downloading profile (see EZT register list for profile status register)
'if EZT is offline mode or downloading a profile do not start profile download from PC and alert user
If G_vAry(f_EztNum, 180) = 1 Then
MsgBox "Local EZT-570i is in the offline mode or running/downloading a profile!" & vbCrLf & _
"Writes from the PC can not be initiated at this time.", _
vbInformation
Exit Sub
End If
'Before download, make sure to save the profile name to disk as well as to array registers within profile list.
'EZT manual outlines profile register list. Profile name is 5 registers (10 chars total) and must be converted from
'text to integer values (2 chars per register)
If f_curProfileName = "" Then
MsgBoxOver "You must load or save a Profile before download to processor!", vbInformation, "Download Profile", Me.hWnd
Exit Sub
End If
'following should disable graphic user interface for profile download while profile is being downloaded. User dependent code but
'user should not press download button again during download of profile from PC to EZT controller.
f_profRegsToWrite = 0 'set var to zero each time profile download is initiated.
f_writeNum = 0 'set var to zero each time profile download is initiated.
f_regAdd = 201 'registers for profile data start at register 200 in HMI. Modbus master dependent based on zero based addressing.
End Sub
41
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Private Sub downloadTimer_Timer()
'timer code that is initiated by downloadProfile procedure. Timer should be set at a minimum of 1 second intervals.
'write profile data array to PLC
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------'variables used in procedure. User can select static, form, global variables or class type based on preference.
Dim x As Integer, writeValue As Integer 'write values to EZT must be integer values.
profileData(x,x) is array that holds profile data for currently active profile that is being edited (14,99) elements zero based.
'refer to downloadProfile procedure for form or global variables used.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------'Error checking should go here
f_profWrite = True 'profile write in progress flag form var. Not required - user dependent to block other actions during download
If f_writeNum < (totalNumSegs) Then 'totalNumSegs should be var or reference to total number of segs created for profile.
'for all element in profile array (15 elements total per segement. zero based)
For x = 0 To 14 '14 total elements in profile
If f_profRegsToWrite = 0 Then 'first element that hold data global to complete profile
Select Case x
Case 0 To 9 'autostart and profile name requires no scaling in element 0
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite))
Case 10 To 14 'gs soak band requires scale by 10
'values are for SP's so scale by 10 for PLC
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite) * 10)
End Select
Else 'elements 1 to 99 of profarray which holds data for each segment
Select Case x
Case 0 To 6
' hours, mins,/secs, chamber events, cust events, gs events
'wait or loop input, wait for monitor input.
'first 6 elements require no scale by 10
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite))
Case 7 'wait for input setpoint. value for SP so scale by 10
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite) * 10)
Case 8, 9 'jump step and jump count are integers, dont scale by 10
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite))
Case 10 To 14 'setpoint values for loop1 - 5. scale by 10
writeValue = CInt(profileData(x, f_profRegsToWrite) * 10)
End Select
End If
ModProf.WordVal(x) = writeValue 'modbus master array. code line is modbus server dependent for multi-writes.
Next
ModProf.Address = f_regAdd 'start register for profile download. code is modbus server dependent
ModProf.Size = 15 'size of array. code is modbus server dependent
ModProf.Trigger 'trigger comms write. command is modbus master dependent
'increment writes for end of loop when total writes equal
'total number of segments in profile.
f_writeNum = f_writeNum + 1
f_profRegsToWrite = f_profRegsToWrite + 1 'increment registers within profile for write
f_regAdd = f_regAdd + 15 'increment to next 15 profile registers
Else
'profile writes are complete. Segments written = total number of segments created for profile.
downloadTimerer2.Enabled = False 'stop download timer
'hide progress bar and download messages. Unlock screen if user locked to block other actions here.
f_profWrite = False 'profile write completed reset flag if used.
End If
End Sub
42
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.5.2 Sending a Profile to the EZT-570i
Profiles are sent to the EZT in a step-by-step process. The download sequence must be followed in
order and must complete without errors to be valid. If a write error is detected during the transfer of a
profile from a PC to the EZT (no response from EZT or NACK returned), the profile download must be
aborted and restarted.
The EZT-570i is put into profile transfer mode when the first group of registers containing the profile
specific data is sent (registers 200-214). The EZT then begins looking for the number of steps of the
profile to be sent as was set in register 209. As each step is received, it increments the count. Once
all steps have been received, the EZT downloads the profile into the profiler memory. During this
transfer, register 180 will be set to 1 to indicate that the process is taking place. Once the register
value returns to zero, the profile is ready to be started.
If an error occurs during the transfer process from the PC to the EZT, the profile transfer process
should be stopped at the PC. The data sent to the EZT was either corrupted in transmission or not
received properly. It is not possible to resend the failed step because it is not known if any of the
previous data was received by the EZT properly. On the transmission error, the EZT will enter a 15
second timeout process. At the end of the timeout period, the buffer will be cleared and the profile
can be resent. In order to insure that the new download begins properly, induce a 20 second wait
period on the host PC after the failed transmission attempt to insure that enough time has elapsed.
Modbus Timeout
The Modbus timeout setting one the Web Server/Modbus/VNC communication setup screen is
provided as a means of adjusting the EZT’s internal communication buffer to help in correcting write
errors during the profile transfer process from a PC.
The EZT’s processor supports the GUI, data logging processes, internal controller communications,
VNC and web server connections as well as communications to the PC. Depending upon the current
work load on the EZT’s based on operating processes, the EZT may not properly process the entire
step data message during the transfer process before its own serial port buffer times out.
By increasing the timeout setting, it will provide more time for the EZT to process the command while
it is cycling through the other multi-threaded processes. If frequent write errors are occurring
between the EZT and the PC, try increasing this value slightly in order to minimize the transmission
failures. Note that this should not be used to correct issues relating to poor connections or wiring
practices. Good wiring practices should always be followed when making communication
connections between all devices.
It is important to note that increasing the timeout period too much will also slow down overall
performance when multiple chambers are connected on a single RS485 link. Each EZT on the link
will see the response of other EZT’s as a message. Since it is not a valid command for them, they
will initiate the timeout to clear their buffer before they can accept another valid message. Thus, once
a response from an EZT is received, the host computer must wait a minimum of the longest timeout
setting prior to sending another message to another EZT on the link. Otherwise, the EZT will not
receive the command properly and will not respond.
43
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
2.5.3
Starting a Profile in the EZT-570i
Starting a Profile
-20 second pause –
(EZT clears profile buffer)
Send profile to EZT one step at a
time with a minimum 1 second
pause between write commands:
Is the
profile already
loaded?
Send profile data – 200 thru 214
- 1 second pause Send step 1 data – 215 thru 229
- 1 second pause Send step 2 data – 230 thru 244
-1 second pause –
…..
…..
Send last step data
NO
YES
Write error
during profile
download?
YES
NO
Set profile start step.
37=(1-99)
-1 second pause –
(EZT begins profile download)
Set profile to run.
24=4
NO
YES
Done
44
Is EZT
online?
180=0
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
A. Appendix
A.1
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Common Terms and Definitions
address – A unique designator for a location of data or a controller that allows each location or
controller on a single communications bus to respond to its own message.
ASCII (pronounced AS-KEY) – American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A universal
standard for encoding alphanumeric characters into 7 or 8 binary bits.
Asynchronous – Communications where characters can be transmitted at an unsynchronized point
in time. In other words, it can start and stop anytime. The time between transmitted characters may
be of varying lengths. Communication is controlled by “start” and “stop” bits at the beginning and end
of each character.
Baud – Unit of signaling speed derived from the number of events per second (i.e., bits per second).
Baud rate – The rate of information transfer in serial communications, measured in bits per second.
Binary – Number based system where only two characters exist, 0 and 1. Counting is 0, 1, 10, 11...
Bit – Derived from “B I nary digi T”, a one or zero condition in the binary system.
Byte – A term referring to eight associated bits of information, sometimes called a “character”.
Character – Letter, numeral, punctuation, control figure or any other symbol contained in a message.
Typically this is encoded in one byte.
Communications – The use of digital computer messages to link components. (See serial
communications and baud rate)
Converter – This device will convert from one hardware interface to another such as from EIA-232 to
EIA-485. The converter may be transparent to the software, which means you do not have to give
any special considerations to software programming.
CRC – When data is corrupted during transmission, a method is used to return the data to its correct
value. This can be accomplished through several methods: parity, checksum and CRC (cyclic
redundancy checksum) are three of these. C yclic R edundancy C hecksum is an error-checking
mechanism using a polynomial algorithm based on the content of a message frame at the transmitter
and included in a field appended to the frame. At the receiver, it is then compared with the results of
the calculation that is performed by the receiver.
Data – The information that is transferred across the communications bus. This may be a setpoint,
setup parameter, or any character. This information is transferred to an address or register.
DB-9 – A standardized connector shaped like the letter “D” when viewed on edge. This connector
has 9 contacts. It is utilized on most IBM AT compatible PCs as the serial port.
DB-15 – A standardized connector shaped like the letter “D” when viewed on edge. This connector
has 15 contacts. It is utilized on most IBM AT compatible PCs as the game/midi port.
DB-25 – A standardized connector shaped like the letter “D” when viewed on edge. This connector
has 25 contacts. It is utilized on most IBM AT compatible PC’s as the parallel port when the PC end
contains socket contacts. Can also be the serial port when the PC end contains pin contacts.
A.2
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Common Terms and Definitions (cont’d)
Decode – This is the reverse of encode. When a piece of data has information embedded in it,
decode is to extract that information. Example: to extract an “A” from 01000001.
Duplex – The ability to send and receive data at the same time. “To listen and talk at the same time.”
EIA-232 – Electronic Industries Association developed this standard hardware interface to allow one
device to talk to another device in full duplex mode. This method uses a differential voltage between
one wire and ground. Also called an unbalanced system since the ground wire carries the sum of
current of all lines. Transmission is limited to about 50 feet.
EIA-485 – Electronic Industries Association developed this standard hardware interface to allow up to
32 devices to be on a bus at one time. This method uses a differential voltage between two wires.
Also called a balanced system since each wire carries the same current value. This has the
advantage of being immune to outside electrical disturbances.
EIA/TIA -232 and -485 – Data communications standards set by the Electronic Industries Association
and Telecommunications Industry Association. Formerly referred to as RS- (Recommended
Standard). (See EIA-232 and EIA-485)
Electronic Industries Association (EIA) – An association in the US that establishes standards for
electronics and data communications.
Encode – To embed information into a piece of data. This is the reverse of decode. Example: let
01000001 stand for an “A”.
Error Correction – When an inconsistency is in the data, a method is used to detect and/or return
the data to its correct value. This can be done through several methods, parity, checksum and CRC
(cyclic redundancy checksum) area three of these.
Even – This term is used with parity. See parity.
Firmware – Instruction or data stored in an IC (integrated circuit) or on a read only disk. This data is
programmed once and cannot easily be changed as software can.
Full Duplex – Full is used to mean the duplex’s full capability. The ability to send and receive data at
the same time. The same as duplex.
GPIB – See IEEE488
Half Duplex – The ability to send or receive data, but not at the same time. “To listen or talk, but not
both at the same time.”
Handshake (Handshaking) – Exchange of predetermined signals between two devices establishing
a connection. Using extra wires or software signals to coordinate communications, signals can be
sent to tell the transmitter the current status of the other device receiver. Example: Are you busy or
are you ready?
Hex or Hexadecimal – Number based system where sixteen characters exist, 0 to 9, A to F.
Counting is 0..9,A,B,C...
HMI – Human to Machine Interface typically performed in software on a personal computer. Also
called MMI.
A.3
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Common Terms and Definitions (cont’d)
IEEE488 – Bus developed by Hewlett-Packard in 1965 as HP-IB. Also referred to as GPIB (General
Purpose Interface Bus). Consists of 8 data lines and 8 control lines. Bus length limited to 20.0
meters. Supports 15 devices on the bus at one time.
Logic Level – A voltage measurement system where only two stable voltage values exist. Example:
0v and 5V, or -3v and +3v.
Mark – Represents the transmission of data bit logic 1 (see logic level). Usually this is the most
negative voltage value in serial communications.
Master – The device on the bus that controls all communications. Only the master can initiate
conversation.
Modbus – A software protocol developed by Gould Modicon (now AEG) for process control systems.
No hardware interface is defined. Modbus is accessed on the master/slave principle, the protocol
providing for one master and up to 247 slaves. Only the master can initiate a transaction. This is a
half duplex protocol.
MMI – Man to Machine Interface typically performed in software on a personal computer. Also called
HMI.
Network – When two or more devices share communication lines, the devices are “networked”.
Node – A point of interconnection to a network.
Noise Immunity – The ability of communication lines to ignore electrical noise generated in the lines
by nearby magnetic and electrostatic fields.
Odd – This term is used with parity. See parity.
Parallel – Communication using this method, transfers eight bits or one byte at a time over eight data
wires and one ground wire. This method is eight times faster than using serial but utilizes more
hardware.
Parity – A bit is assigned at the beginning of a byte to stand for parity. When the ‘1’ bits are counted,
the number will be even or odd. A parity bit is used to ensure that the answer is always even if even
parity or odd if odd parity. If the receiving end counts the ‘1’ bits and the sum is not the same odd or
even, an error is generated. Parity is used to detect errors caused by noise in data transmission.
Protocol – A set of rules for communication. This will specify what method to transfer information,
packet size, information headers and who should talk when. It is used to coordinate communication
activity.
Receive – To accept data sent from another device. The device that receives the data is the
receiver.
Register – An area of memory that provides temporary storage of digital data.
RJ11 – A connector used on most telephones that has four terminals.
A.4
EZT-570i User Communication Reference Manual
Common Terms and Definitions (cont’d)
Slave – A device that only responds to commands. This device never starts communication on it’s
own. Only the Master can do this. (See Master)
SCADA – Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
Serial – To process something in order. First item, second item, etc.
Serial Communications – A method of transmitting information between devices by sending all bits
serially (see serial) over a single communication channel.
Software – Information of data or program stored in an easily changeable format. (RAM, Floppy
Disk, Hard Disk)
Space – Represents the transmission of a data bit logic 0 (see logic level). Usually this is the most
positive voltage value in serial communications.
Start Bit – A binary bit or logic level that represents when the serial data information is about to start
(at the beginning of a character or byte). This voltage level is positive.
Stop Bit – A binary bit or logic level that represents when the serial data information is complete (at
the end of a character or byte). This voltage level is negative.
Synchronous – When data is transmitted on a data line and a clock signal is used on another line
to determine when to check the data line for a logic level. This clock is said to “synchronize” the data.
Transmit – To send data from one device to another. The device that sends the data is the
transmitter.
Word – Two bytes make a word. This contains 16 bits.
A.5
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