ECU Annual Report 2007 2007

ECU Annual Report 2007 2007

2

Mission

To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships.

Vision

For our staff, students and graduates to be highly regarded as ethical and self-reliant contributors to more prosperous, inclusive and sustainable communities.

Values

We value:

integrity – behaving ethically and pursuing rigorous intellectual positions.

respect – valuing individual differences and diversity.

rational inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning.

personal excellence – striving to realise potential and performing at exacting international standards.

Joondalup Campus

100 Joondalup Drive,

Joondalup WA 6027

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: +61 (08) 9300 1257

Mount Lawley Campus

2 Bradford Street,

Mount Lawley WA 6050

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: +61 (08) 9370 2910

South West Campus (Bunbury)

Robertson Drive,

Bunbury WA 6230

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: +61 (08) 9780 7800

ECu Email & Web Address

Email: [email protected] www.ecu.edu.au

Contents

Overview

Statement of Compliance

Chancellor’s Foreword

Vice-Chancellor’s Commentary

About ECU

Mission, Vision, Values and

Strategic Priority Areas 11

ECU Organisational Structure

ECU Governance Structure

Council Membership

University Committees

The Work of the University Council

Highlights of 2007 19

Student Achievements

Staff Achievements

Engaging and Serving Our Communities

Providing a Supportive and

Stimulating Learning Community 23

Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact 24

Building Organisational Sustainability 25

19

20

22

12

13

13

15

16

7

8

10

5

6

Agency Performance

Report on Operations

26

27

Engaging and Serving Our Communities 27

Providing a Supportive and

Stimulating Learning Community 31

Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact 42

Building Organisational Sustainability 48

Summary Statistics 54

Summary Comment on Performance Against

Financial and Key Performance Indicator Targets 55

Significant Issues and Trends

Economic and Social Trends

57

58

Current and Emerging Trends in Student Demand 60

Legislative Impacts 61

ECU’s Response to Significant Issues and Trends 62

Disclosures and Legal Compliance 63

Financial Statements, Key Performance

Indicator Report and Other Financial Disclosures 64

Financial Statements and

Key Performance Indicator Report

Pricing Policies

Major Capital Projects

Employees and Industrial Relations

Governance Disclosures

Corporate Standards and Risk Management

Risk Management Statement

Corporate Governance Statement

Compliance with Relevant Written Laws

Other Legal Requirements

Advertising

Equity and Indigenous

Record Keeping

Environmental Performance

67

68

69

74

75

75

76

78

79

64

64

64

65

67

Attached Disk

Auditor General’s Statement

Financial Statements

Key Performance Indicator Report

83

Edith Cowan university: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards 2020 can be viewed at: http://www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/ppas/strategic_plan.html

Published by Edith Cowan University

Official correspondence relating to the Annual Report should be addressed to: the Executive Director (Governance & Planning), Edith Cowan University, 100 Joondalup Drive, JOONDALUP, Western Australia 6027

Annual Report available for download from: www.ecu.edu.au/pr/downloads/ECU_AR_07.pdf

CRICOS IPC 00279B

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 3

Figures and Tables

4

Figure 1:

ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2007 12

Figure 2:

University Committees as at 31 December 2007 15

Figure 3:

Proportion of ECU Student Population by

Equity Group, 2003-2007

Figure 4:

ECU UTEI Mean Overall Satisfaction with

Teaching Quality and Unit Content, 2003-2007

36

40

Figure 5:

Workers’ Compensation Costs & Annual Premium,

1998/99-2007/08

Figure 6:

Lost Time Injuries, Workers’ Compensation Claims

& Days Lost, 1998/99-2006/07

66

66

Table 1:

ECU Domestic Student Enrolments, 2003-2007 33

Table 2:

ECU International Student Enrolments, 2003-2007 33

Table 3:

Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2004-2007 34

Table 4:

Proportion of ECU Student Population by Equity Group,

2003-2007 37

Table 5:

Number of ECU Student Population by Equity Group,

2003-2007 37

Table 6:

Research Block Funding by Category, 2004-2007

Table 7:

Research Grant Funding by Category, 2004-2007

Table 8:

Higher Degree by Research Load, 2005-2007

Table 9:

ECU Student and Staff Data as at 31 March 2007

43

43

46

54

Table 10:

Financial Ratios, 2007 55

Table 11:

Summary of Performance Against KPI Targets, 2007 56

Table 12:

Major Capital Projects Completed, 2007 64

Table 13:

Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2007

Table 14:

Characteristics of the Workforce

(excluding casual staff), 2006-2007

Table 15:

ECU Advertising Expenditure, 2007

64

65

75

Table 16:

Examples of ECU’s Disability Access and

Inclusion Plan Outcomes, 2006/2007

Table 17:

ECU Paper Purchases, 2005-2007

Table 18:

ECU Energy Use, 2004-2007

Table 19:

ECU Water Use, 2004-2007

Table 20:

ECU Waste to Landfill, 2005-2007

77

79

80

81

81

Overview

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 5

Statement of Compliance

The Hon Mark McGowan, MLA

Minister for Education and Training

21st Floor, 197 St George’s Terrace

PERTH WA 6000

13 March 2008

Dear Minister

In accordance with Section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006, we hereby submit for your information and presentation to Parliament the Annual Report of Edith Cowan University for the year ending 31 December 2007.

The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006 and is made in accordance with a resolution of the University’s Council.

Yours sincerely

Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

On behalf of the University Council

Edith Cowan University

Joondalup Drive

JOONDALUP WA 6027

Telephone: +61 8 6304 2443

Facsimile: +61 8 6304 2661

6

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Chancellor’s Foreword

The University Council and the senior management of the University continue to work together to ensure that the University achieves its goals. 2007 saw the implementation of a new strategic direction, one which built upon the strengths of the past, but looked forward to more active engagement by the University with its many and diverse communities.

As part of this shift in emphasis, Council undertook a number of workshops during the year. Early in the year, Council worked with the University’s senior management to agree on goals for the University for 2007. From the extensive work program which the University had set itself, we agreed eight critical goals dealing with academic outreach, teaching quality, attracting and retaining students, the student experience, research outcomes, attraction and retention of staff, leadership capacity and financial strength. Achievement against these goals was reviewed by Council mid-year and at the end of 2007, with the University making good progress.

At its July workshop, Council focused on ‘Engagement’, receiving information about the many projects underway, and providing input into the development of the

University’s Engagement Plan.

Council continued its governance reform program, approving a revision of the Corporate Governance Statement and a revised evaluation program for Council.

In October 2007, Council undertook a self-review exercise, the outcomes of which will provide a starting point for the 2008 professional development program.

ECU continued to comply with the National Governance Protocols and reported its compliance to the Commonwealth Minister for Education, Science & Training.

Importantly, however, Council is actively engaged in an ongoing process of review and improvement – making it even more effective in guiding and supporting the University in its endeavours.

Council retains great confidence in the ability of the University’s Senior Leadership Team. Committees of Council are actively involved in oversight of the

University, particularly in Resources, Quality and Audit and Governance areas. Council monitored the key financial and performance indicators during the year, receiving regular reports from the Senior Leadership Team. The Budget for 2008 was approved at the December 2007 meeting of Council, providing a sound financial basis to support the strategic goals of the University for 2008.

It is an honour to serve as Chancellor of Edith Cowan University and to work with outstanding students, staff and Council members. As will be seen from the

Annual Report, our students, staff and graduates continue to achieve great results.

The University has much of which to be proud.

Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

13 March 2008

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 7

Vice-Chancellor’s Commentary

For Edith Cowan University (ECU), 2007 was a year of substantial advances and many exceptional achievements by our students and staff. Particularly outstanding was the success of a team of ECU advertising students who, in competition with 29 other entries from 22 countries, won the prestigious

International Advertising Association’s Dentsu InterAd Xl Global Student Competition. The team presented its winning advertising campaign to the United

Nations in New York in July 2007. To have our students judged “best in the world” is an achievement which is a source of immense pride for the ECU community.

ECU’s new Mission and Vision commits us to value-add to our communities, particularly by providing opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds to experience and succeed in higher education. During 2007, ECU’s alternative entry pathways continued to open the door to a significant number of talented and motivated individuals, who might otherwise have been excluded from university-level education. In adopting the value of Personal Excellence, ECU recognises the potential of all of our students and staff to achieve to high standards, if given appropriate opportunities and support.

The strong commitment of our staff to teaching and learning was reflected in a major achievement this year - the University’s success in the Federal

Government’s Learning and Teaching Performance Fund. As a result of our performance, ECU will receive a grant of $1.58m in 2008, which will be used strategically to make further improvements to outcomes for our students.

Our research staff continued to make significant contributions in areas of high social impact. Examples include: Professor Donna Cross, who was recognised for her landmark research on bullying; Professor Kamal Alameh, who won the Early Stage category of the Western Australian Inventor of the Year for his work on very high speed digital communication; and Professor Ralph Martins, whose research into newly identified genes linked to Alzheimer’s disease, continues to add to the understanding of an illness which is of great community concern.

During 2007, ECU’s innovative building program continued, with the completion of the Health and Wellness Building on our Joondalup Campus and significant progress was made on the Business and Law Building (to be completed in 2008) on our Mount Lawley Campus. The completion of these two buildings will enable the University to finalise its exit from the Churchlands Campus, completing our ten-year program of campus consolidation.

8

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

It was a pleasure for me to announce a number of outstanding staffing appointments during 2007. These appointments included: Professor Arshad Omari who was appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic); Professor Ronald Oliver who was appointed Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching & Learning); Professor Brenda

Cherednichenko who was appointed Executive Dean (Education & Arts) and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity & Indigenous); and late in 2007, Professor John Finlay-

Jones who was appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Designate.

Professor Patrick Garnett, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Operations), retired on 31 December 2007, after 34 years of distinguished service with ECU and its predecessor organisations. Professor Garnett has made outstanding contributions to the strategic direction and reputation of the University through his exemplary and sustained service. On behalf of the ECU community, I congratulate Patrick on his outstanding career achievements, I thank him for his many contributions to the University and I wish him all the best for the future.

I thank our Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy Cowan, for his exemplary leadership and support. Along with the rest of the University community, I welcome his unanimous re-election as Chancellor for a further three-year term, commencing 1 January 2008. I also thank all other members of the University Council and of

Council Committees/Boards for their service to ECU.

Finally, I thank all members of the broader University community for their efforts during the year. I acknowledge the hard work and commitment evident within the ECU community, which has enabled us to achieve so much together during 2007. I urge all of you to continue your pursuit of Personal Excellence in the year ahead, and I wish you on-going success.

Kerry O. Cox

Vice-Chancellor

13 March 2008

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 9

About ECU

Edith Cowan University (ECU) is a large multi-campus institution providing higher education and vocational education and training courses to communities in Western Australia and beyond.

ECU has almost 21,000 enrolled students; approximately 16,000 undergraduates and 5000 postgraduates. The University educates Australian students, as well as a significant cohort of international students. In 2007,

ECU had more than 4000 International On-shore and International Off-shore students originating from approximately 90 countries.

For more than a century ECU, through its forerunner organisations, has been

Western Australia’s major provider of teacher education. ECU was established as a university in 1991 and has since developed innovative and practical courses across a wide range of disciplines, established a vibrant research culture and attracted quality research partners and researchers, many working at the cutting edge of their fields.

The University has three metropolitan campuses in Mount Lawley, Joondalup and Churchlands and serves Western Australia’s South West region from a campus in Bunbury, 200 km south of Perth.

ECU offers high quality education across a broad discipline range including

Education, Nursing, Finance, Business, Computing, Communications,

Biomedical Sciences, Electronic Engineering and the Creative and the

Performing Arts. More than 390 courses are offered through four faculties:

Business and Law;

Computing, Health and Science;

Education and Arts (which incorporates the Western Australian Academy

• of Performing Arts); and

Regional Professional Studies.

In addition, the University has a number of administrative service centres which support the University’s core activities of teaching and research through the provision of professional expertise in areas such as Information

Technology, Facilities’ Management, Risk Management and Audit, Governance,

Planning, Finance, Student Support, International and Research.

Consistent with its Mission, ECU engages with private and public sector organisations, locally and overseas, in designing study programs which are relevant to the communities it serves. Research is undertaken in collaboration with industry and is valued for its high social, economic, environmental and cultural impacts.

Edith Cowan University is a body corporate established under the Edith Cowan

University Act 1984 (WA). It is domiciled in Australia. ECU has one subsidiary company, ECU Resources For Learning Ltd, which is wholly-owned by ECU.

10

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Mission, Vision, Values and Strategic Priority Areas

At its December 2006 meeting, Council approved ECU’s new strategic direction as outlined in a Statement of Strategic Priorities entitled:

Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities.

Towards 2020. This document includes the following Mission,

Vision and Values for 2007 and beyond.

Mission

To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships.

Vision

For our staff, students and graduates to be highly regarded as ethical and self-reliant contributors to more prosperous, inclusive and sustainable communities.

Values

We value:

integrity – behaving ethically and pursuing rigorous intellectual positions.

respect – valuing individual differences and diversity.

rational inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning.

personal excellence – striving to realise potential and performing at exacting international standards.

Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards 2020 can be viewed at: http://www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/ppas/strategic_plan.html.

ECU’s Strategic Priority Areas

ECU’s new strategic direction emphasises a future which is inclusive of all parts of society and which commits the University to mutually beneficial engagement with its many communities. The following four strategic priority areas have been developed to help achieve this strategic direction, which are:

Engaging and serving our communities;

Providing a supportive and stimulating learning community;

Developing research focus, depth and impact; and

Building organisational sustainability.

These four strategic priority areas have been used to structure the report on operations in this Annual Report (see page 27).

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 11

ECU Organisational Structure

Fees, Scholarships & Business Management

Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2007

12

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Executive Director & Council Secretary

University Preparation & Student Development

Communications & Contemporary Arts

International, Cultural & Community Studies

Exercise, Biomedical & Health Sciences

Electron Science Research Institute

Nursing, Midwifery & Postgraduate Medicine

ECU Governance Structure

Council Membership

(as at 31 December 2007)

Chancellor

Hon Hendy Cowan

Members appointed by the Governor

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(a))

Mr Steve Abbott (Pro-Chancellor)

Ms Leslie Chalmers

Hon Hendy Cowan

Mr Kempton Cowan

Ms Karen Macdonald

Member nominated by Minister charged with administration of the ‘School Education Act 1999

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(aa))

Dr Norman Ashton

Chief Executive Officer – ex-officio

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(b))

Professor Kerry O. Cox

Academic Staff – elected

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(c))

Professor Ron Oliver

Dr Alan Needham

Salaried Staff – elected

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(d))

Ms Nerissa Eaton

Enrolled Students – elected

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(e))

Ms Diana Tan

Ms Natalie Moire

01.01.2008 – 31.12.2010

01.01.2005 – 31.12.2007

30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008

14.05.2002 – 13.05.2005

12.04.2005 – 26.04.2008

01.03.2007 – 28.02.2010

01.03.2004 – 28.02.2007

19.12.2006 – 19.12.2009

07.12.2007 – 06.12.2010

07.12.2005 – 06.12.2007

19.01.2003 – 19.12.2005

30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008

Ex-officio

01.10.2006 – 30.09.2009

01.10.2003 – 30.09.2006

21.11.2007 – 30.09.2009

22.08.2007 – 30.09.2009

18.10.2007 – 17.10.2008

18.10.2007 – 17.10.2008

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 13

Alumni – elected

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(f))

Mrs Helen Charlesworth

Mr Richard Cairnes

Members co-opted by Council

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(i))

Mr Neil Douglas

(Nb: previously held one term as a Member appointed by the Governor, 28.11.2003 – 01.03.2006)

Justice Rene Le Miere

Ms Denise McComish

Mr Simon Holthouse

Council Secretary

Dr Susan E. King

Accredited Observers

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Operations)

Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Vice-President (Resources) & Chief Financial Officer

Executive Director (Governance & Planning)

Chair, Academic Board (if not an elected member of Council)

ECU Student Guild President

President, Academic Staff Association

22.12.2005 – 21.12.2008

22.12.2002 – 21.12.2005

20.09.2007 – 19.09.2010

18.03.2006 – 17.03.2009

18.08.2005 – 17.08.2008

01.01.2005 – 17.08.2005

22.03.2007 – 21.03.2010

12.09.2007 – 11.09.2010

Professor Patrick Garnett

Professor Arshad Omari

Mr Warren Snell

Dr Susan E. King

Professor Ron Oliver

Mr Shane Cucow

Dr Ute Mueller

14

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Council Executive

Resources Committee

Quality and Audit Committee

Nominations Committee

Legislative Committee

Remuneration Committee

Governance Committee

Honorary Awards Committee

University Committees

South West Campus

(Bunbury) Advisory Board

WA Academy of

Performing Arts Board

Fees Allocation Committee

(Amenities and Services Fee)

ECU Foundation Board

University Council

Academic Board

Academic Services

Committee

Curriculum Teaching and

Learning Committee

Research and Higher

Degrees Committee

Student Appeals Committee

Human Research

Ethics Committee

Animal Ethics Committee

Vice-Chancellor/President/CEO

Vice-Chancellor’s Planning and Management Group

Academic Planning and Campus

Co-ordinating Committee

Equity Committee

Disability Access

Working Party

Indigenous Consultative

Committee

Indigenous Employment

(Implementation & Development)

Sub-committee

Strategic Information

Management Steering Committee

International Management Committee

Vice-Chancellor’s Student

Advisory Forum

Occupational Health and

Safety Policy Committee

Institutional Bio-safety

Committee

Figure 2: University Committees as at 31 December 2007

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 15

The Work of the University Council

Edith Cowan University’s enabling Act provides that the Council is the governing authority of the University. The fundamental responsibilities of the

Council are to determine the strategic direction and governance framework of the University. The Council is chaired by the Chancellor and consists of the

Vice-Chancellor (ex-officio) and members drawn from the community and the

University’s alumni, staff and students. Council members fulfil an important duty for the University and the community and do so on an honorary basis.

ECU’s Council addressed key strategic and governance tasks and fulfilled a demanding work program in 2007. The Council met on eight occasions during

2007 under the chairmanship of its Chancellor, the Hon Hendy Cowan. It held six regular meetings, and two workshops. The first workshop of the year was held in February and had as its topic: Goal Setting for 2007, thus identifying the key goals of the University to be monitored by Council. The second workshop took place in July and focused on ‘Engagement’ and provided an opportunity for Council to gain insights into the many projects underway, and to shape the University’s direction in relation to this key strategic priority. A number of

Council members also attended an Engagement seminar, run by the University and facilitated by a recognised international leader in university engagement.

At its December meeting, Council unanimously elected the Hon Hendy Cowan as Chancellor for a further three-year term.

The major activities of Council in 2007 fell into four categories:

• strategic direction of the University;

• self-governance of the Council;

• governance of the University; and

• compliance.

Strategic Direction of the university

To inform and enhance Council’s role in shaping the strategic direction of the

University, discussion on key strategic issues was included in the Council’s meeting and work program for 2007. The strategic issues topics were: Equity

Profile; Student Journey/ Student Experience; Key success factors in higher education; Academic Governance, Quality and Standards and the role of the

Academic Board; and Internationalisation at ECU.

Council also considered the operations of the ECU Foundation, with an ECU

Foundation Board being re-established to help develop a new approach to fundraising at ECU.

At its December 2007 meeting, Council considered and approved the Budget for 2008.

Self-Governance of the Council

During 2007, Council continued to implement its governance reform program.

The following governance matters were resolved by Council during the year:

• a revised Corporate Governance Statement;

• all Council members were required to sign the Code of Conduct;

• a revised process for Council Evaluation was approved; and

• a review of Council and individual members’ performance was undertaken in October 2007. This included the completion of a questionnaire, the responses to which were analysed by an external consultant. Findings of the evaluations were relayed to Council at its 6 December meeting and will inform professional development activities for 2008.

Governance of the university

Key Council activities relating to the governance of the University included:

• regular meetings of all Council committees occurred during the year.

Reports from these committees were subsequently provided to Council to keep it informed of activities across the academic and operational areas of the University;

• the Vice-Chancellor provided a mid-year and end-of-year report on the achievements of the University in relation to its Key Performance

Indicators; and in June and December 2007, the Vice-Chancellor reported on progress against the key goals of the University, as identified by Council early in the year.

Compliance

Key Council activities related to compliance included approval of measures that ensure compliance with the National Governance Protocols and Higher

Education Workplace Relations Requirements. The 2006 Annual Report was approved by Council at its 22 March 2007 meeting. Monitoring of the University, through the Resources Committee and Quality and Audit

Committee, provided assurance to Council that the University has appropriate risk management, financial and quality controls in place.

16

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Attendance by Council Members at Council Meetings

Council held six regular meetings during the year. The bracketed figure indicates the potential number of attendances for members whose term of office did not cover the full year.

Hon Hendy Cowan (Chancellor)

Mr Steve Abbott (Pro-Chancellor)

Dr Norman Ashton

Ms Jenni Ballantyne

Ms Marilyn Beresford

Mr Richard Cairnes

Ms Leslie Chalmers

Mrs Helen Charlesworth

Mr Kempton Cowan

Professor Kerry Cox (Vice-Chancellor)

Mr Neil Douglas

Ms Nerissa Eaton

Mr Simon Holthouse

Mr Jerry Koh

Justice Rene Le Miere

Mrs Karen Macdonald

Ms Denise McComish

Ms Natalie Moir

Dr Alan Needham

Professor Ron Oliver

Professor Arshad Omari

Mr James Pollard

Ms Diana Tan

Mr Serge Walberg

3 (3)

2 (2)

4 (4)

6

6

5

4

5 (6)

6

6

6

1 (2)

2 (2)

2 (2)

4

4

4 (4)

3 (4)

1 (2)

3 (4)

4

3

2 (2)

1 (1)

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 17

18

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Highlights of 2007

Winning advertising Students Anthony Gregory

Student Achievements

ECu Advertising Students World Winners

– A Group of ECU

Advertising Students were the worldwide winners of a United Nations’ competition to produce a comprehensive marketing communications plan for the United Nations’ Millennium campaign. The School of

Communications & Contemporary Arts student team of Samantha Hassall,

Stephen Burge, Donny McDermid, Francis Yang Mu Jia, David Schultink,

Bryan Chiang Lip Wai, Anne Hallam, Holly Gibson, Amber Micallef and

Annika Van Grootel, were assisted by advertising lecturer Diane Slade and presented their campaign to the UN’s Under-Secretary-General for

Communications and Public Information and executives from Dentsu in

September 2007.

Indigenous Students Honoured

– Regional students Travis McGuire and Anthony Gregory were recognised for their academic excellence and their contribution to the community with the award of ECU’s 2007 Vice-

Chancellor’s Indigenous Australian Scholarships.

WA Web Award 2007

– Students from ECU’s School of Communications and Contemporary Arts won the WA Web Award 2007 Student category.

Daniel Roffman, Alex MacRae, Moe Aung, Keith Atkinson, and Andrew

Ellis formed the group Risbec Design and Drafting, and won the award for their housing and architecture website.

Prestigious Writing Award

– ECU Media Studies student Claire Tonkin won the Australian Writer’s Guild Industry Award (AWGIE) for her short film

Button.

Japanese Speech Contest

– For the second consecutive year, an ECU

Japanese language student won the WA Japanese Speech Contest. ECU’s

Peter Polmeartagami won the Open Division section of the competition with a five minute speech on homelessness.

Journalism Students Win Five Top Tertiary Awards

– ECU students received five of the 13 national tertiary awards for journalism, known as the “2007 Ossie Awards for Journalism Students”, which recognise high achievement in journalism at 26 universities in Australia. 3 rd

Degree won

Best On-line Student Publication for the second year in a row.

Student Publication Achievements:

Amanda Curtin’s PhD novel, Ellipsis was given a Special Commendation by the State Records Office at the 2007 Margaret Medcalf Awards for outstanding achievement in the use of the State Archives collection.

PhD graduate, Simone Lazaroo, won the Western Australian Premier’s

Book Award in the fiction category for her novel, The Travel Writer.

Sally Clarke’s PhD biography In The Space Behind His Eyes. Donald R. Stuart

1913-1983. A Biography was short-listed for the Western Australian

Premier’s Book Award.

Deanne Leber, ECU PhD Writing student, was nominated for the Western

Australian Premier’s Book Awards – Premier’s Prize.

ECu Graduate wins a Western Australian Citizen of the Year Award

– WAAPA graduate, Duncan Rock, won the Youth Arts Award at the

Western Australian Citizen of the Year Awards.

ECu Graduate receives PR Student of the Year Award

– Public

Relations student Chloe Holland was awarded the WW Mitchell Student of the Year Award at the Public Relations Institute of Australia State Awards.

National Script Pitching Competition

– Three ECU students were selected as finalists in the Western Australian round of the national

Holding Redlich Pitching Competition. Lucinda Marty, Julie Speight and

Mark Willig competed against 21 Western Australian writers.

National Law Competition

– ECU law students Katie McKenzie and

James Graham won a major award at the Sir Harry Gibbs National

Constitutional Law Mooting Competition held in Melbourne.

Rotary Scholarship

– ECU’s Electron Science Research Institute student,

Sanjeev Hiremath was awarded the Duane Sterling ambassadorial scholarship from the Rotary Foundation.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 19

Professor Donna Cross Professor Judith Rivalland

Staff Achievements

ECu Researcher Named Inventor of the Year

– Professor Kamal

Alameh won the Early Stage category of the Western Australian Inventor of the Year for his High-Speed Inter-Chip Optical Interconnect. This invention uses micro-lenses in a novel way to substantially increase the speed and performance of home and office computers. It facilitates higher rates of data transfer at lower cost and reduced energy consumption.

The Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards

– Associate

Professor Quentin Beresford won the non-fiction category of the Western

Australian Premier’s Book Awards for his book on Western Australian

Aboriginal leader Rob Riley.

Professor Donna Cross named in the “Smart 100” list

– Professor

Donna Cross, Professor of Child and Adolescent Health, was included in

the Bulletin’s “Smart 100” List. The “Smart 100” recognises 100 of the most innovative and creative people working in various industries across

Australia. Professor Cross was recognised for her work on child health promotion, particularly her research in prevention of bullying, depression and obesity.

Conference Travel Awards

– Professor Ross Dowling won a prestigious

$10,000 Perth Airport Tourism and Aviation Scholarship.

Outstanding Young Investigator Award

– ECU’s Senior Lecturer in Exercise and Sports Science, Dr Mike McGuigan was awarded the

“Outstanding Young Investigator” for 2007 by the National Strength and

Conditioning Association at its annual conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

Publishing Award

– ECU Senior Lecturer in Music Education Geoff Lowe, was presented with a prestigious award by the Australian Publishers

Association for his book The Jazz and Rock Resource.

National Literacy Award

– ECU’s Professor Judith Rivalland was recognised for her outstanding contribution to literacy education with a National Literacy and Numeracy Week Minister’s Award.

ECu lecturer recognised as one of Australia’s best

– Mr Travis

Kelleher received $25,000 in the 2007 Carrick Awards for Australian

University Teaching.

Carrick Citations

– ECU staff were recognised for their contribution to high quality teaching and learning in the higher education sector:

Dr Jan Gray and Dr Danielle Brady (joint citation)

Dr Bridget Leggett, Dr Michael Harvey, Associate Professor Glenda

Campbell-Evans (group citation)

Associate Professor Joseph Luca

Professor Judith Rivalland

Associate Professor Susan Stoney

20

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Shark Patrols - Andrew Spencer

Associate Professor Peter Van Onselen

Professor Ralph Martins, Chair in

Ageing and Alzheimer’s disease Professor Patrick Garnett

ICT Achiever of the Year 2006

– At the 16 th

annual Western Australian

Information Technology and Telecommunications Awards (WAITTA) in

March 2007 Mr Garry Trinder, of the School of Computer and Information

Science, was awarded the prestigious WAITTA “Achiever of the Year”

2006 Award.

LOGIE Nomination

– Associate Professor Margaret Sims received the honour of being nominated for a Logie for her documentary on early childhood, Life at 1.

First Australian to be named Fellow of the Association for the

Advancement of Computing in Education – Professor Ron Oliver was made a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Computing in

Education (FAACE).

Acclaim by Engineers Australia

– Associate Professor Daryoush Habibi,

Head of School, Engineering and Mathematics, was made a Fellow of

Engineers. Professor Tony Watson was made a Companion of Engineers

Australia, the highest level of membership awarded to individuals outside the engineering profession.

Book Launch

– Associate Professor Peter van Onselen co-authored with

Australian National University’s Dr Wayne Errington a biography called

John Winston Howard.

Chemistry Educator of the Year Award

– Dr Magdalena Wajrak was named the inaugural Pearson Education Chemistry Educator of the Year by the Royal Australian Chemical Institute.

Professor Patrick Garnett

, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research &

Operations) retired from ECU at the end of 2007, having served for 34 years with the University and its predecessor organisations. University Council awarded Professor Garnett the title Emeritus Professor and conferred the degree of Doctor of Education honoris causa for Professor Garnett’s outstanding contribution to the strategic directions and reputation of the

University through exemplary and sustained service.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 21

Murray Lampard Deputy Commissioner of WA Police with Vice-Chancellor,

Professor Kerry Cox and Professor Patrick Garnett Sam Walsh, Chief Executive of Rio Tinto Iron Ore

Engaging and Serving Our Communities

The Governor of Western Australia

, His Excellency Dr Ken Michael AC, visited ECU’s Joondalup Campus in November, touring the new Library and

Technology Centre and the new Health and Wellness Building.

On-campus addresses in 2007

included the Vice-Chancellor’s 2007

Distinguished Oration by Sam Walsh, Chief Executive of Rio Tinto Iron

Ore, who gave an inspiring presentation entitled: Global discussions,

local conversations – how business communicates, involves and engages.

The presentation was attended by over 120 representatives from local government, business and mining sectors and the ECU community.

Other public addresses

on issues of relevance to the community included a presentation by the Commissioner of Corruption and Crime, the Hon Len Roberts-Smith RFD, QC.

The Vice-Chancellor hosted three dinners with school principals

from the Joondalup, Mount Lawley and South West areas during the year.

Community Policing Award

– ECU, in partnership with the City of

Gosnells, was awarded the National Community Crime Prevention Award.

ECu Hosts Rural Clinical School in Bunbury

– The Commonwealth

Department of Health and Ageing allocated $1m for the housing of the

Rural Clinical School at ECU’s South West Campus.

ECu Law Students Serve Local Communities

– ECU Law students, under the supervision of legal practitioners and University staff, gained invaluable work experience and assisted the local community, following the opening in May 2007 of the Northern Suburbs Community Legal Centre in Joondalup.

The Vario Wellness Clinic at ECu

– This new centre for community health offers a number of programs including: Diabetes Wellness,

Weigh to Go Kids, Cancer Survivors and Healthy Ageing.

Leadership in Stem Cell Research

– A public forum was held at

ECU’s Joondalup Campus by Dr Mel Ziman and Dr Meghan Thomas on the issues surrounding the use of stem cells in research and for therapeutic intervention for those with debilitating diseases.

Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project

– ECU hosted a successful public lecture entitled: What is needed for Australia to win the Square

Kilometre Array Project. The lecture showcased a ground-breaking optical interconnect technology developed by ECU’s Professor Kamal Alameh,

Director of the Western Australian Centre of Excellence for MicroPhotonic

Systems as a potential enabling technology for the SKA project. Guest speakers included Hon Fran Logan, Minister for Energy, Resources, Industry and Enterprise, Professor Lyn Beazley, Chief Scientist for Western Australia and Professor Peter Quinn, Premier’s Fellow.

22

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Professor Kerry Cox and Dr Abdulla open ECu

– Emirates university Centre at Dubai airport Science for Kids Day at ECu

Providing a Supportive and Stimulating

Learning Community

Learning and Teaching Performance Fund

– ECU was one of 23 universities (from a total of 38 institutions) to be recognised for teaching quality. ECU will receive a grant of $1.58m in 2008 which will be used strategically to make further improvements to outcomes for students.

ECu-Emirates university Centre Opened in Dubai

– ECU expanded its operations with the Emirates Group with the opening of the ECU-Emirates

University Centre at Dubai airport.

Enrolled Nurse Work Program

– ECU launched an Enrolled Nurse

Registration Pathway Program, the first in Western Australia.

Combating Teacher Shortages in Western Australia

– ECU developed an innovative approach towards addressing teacher shortages in Western

Australia through the introduction of a special two-year teaching degree.

New Suite of ECu-funded Scholarships

– ECU introduced a new range of scholarships and prizes recognising excellence and achievement, as well as a new suite of equity-based scholarships, to attract and retain talented students.

ECu Centre to Improve Teaching in the Asia-Pacific Region

Teaching quality in the Asia-Pacific Region received a major boost, thanks to a new partnership between ECU and the philanthropic Sampoerna

Foundation.

New Centre for Learning and Teaching (CLT)

– The CLT will actively promote and enhance the quality of the student experience at ECU by building its capacity to deliver world-class educational outcomes.

State-of-the-Art Teaching Facilities

– The building program continued with new facilities designed to enhance the quality of the learning experience for ECU students. First-class facilities for ECU’s health and wellness programs were completed on the Joondalup Campus. A 350-seat lecture theatre was close to completion at the Joondalup Campus and construction was underway for the new Business and Law Building on the

Mount Lawley Campus.

2007 saw an increase in international student numbers

with a more than nine per cent increase in enrolments overall and an almost 30 per cent increase in International Off-shore enrolments.

Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in Teaching (VCAET)

Five staff received this award:

Mr Ray Boffey, Faculty of Business and Law

(Accounting, Finance and Economics);

Dr Trevor Cullen, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts);

Associate Professor Joseph Luca, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts);

Dr Maria Northcote, Faculty of Education and Arts (Education); and

Miss Diane Slade, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts).

One VCAET group award was made to: Associate Professor Gavin Leslie,

Ms Kerry Southerland, Ms Fenella Gill and Ms Lucia Gillman, from the

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science (Nursing, Midwifery and

Postgraduate Medicine).

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 23

Professor Mark Hackling

Premier Alan Carpenter presents Professor Kamal Alameh with the Early Stage Inventor of the Year Award

Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact

Research income for 2007

was $9.79 million. 136 research projects were awarded funding which will generate $10.8m in research income over the next four years.

New Professorial Chairs

– 12 new professorial chairs were advertised in September 2007.

Memorandum of understanding Signed to Support ECu’s Work in

Microphotonics – An MOU was signed between Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, a world class research institute engaged in the development of chip-to-chip optical interconnects and ECU’s Centre of

Excellence for Microphotonics Systems.

ECu Amongst Top Western Australian Inventors

– Professor Kamal

Alameh was named winner of the 2007 Western Australian Inventor of the Year Award - the Early Stage category, for his High-Speed Inter-Chip

Optical Interconnect.

ARC Grant

– Professor Kamal Alameh was successful in the ARC Grants, winning $327,500 for his project: Automated photonic multi-spectral weed

discrimination sensor for precision agriculture.

AusIndustry Grant for Small and Medium Enterprise Research Centre

– The Small and Medium Enterprise Research Centre was successful in gaining $337,000 for the Green Advantage for Small Business project through AusIndustry.

Linkage Grants

– Two ECU research teams were successful in gaining

Linkage Grant funding. Dr Judith Cockram and Professor Mark Rapley received $60,000 to investigate the cost of meeting the need for support services for people with intellectual disabilities. Associate Professor Paul

Newhouse, Professor Mark Hackling, Professor Ron Oliver, Associate

Professor Cher Ping Lim, Dr Jeremy Pagram, Dr Dawn Penney and Dr

Russell Waugh received $30,000 to investigate the feasibility of using digital representations of work for authentic and reliable performance assessment in senior secondary school courses.

Discovery Research Grant

– Professor Craig Standing was awarded

$202,000 over three years to investigate a strategic evaluation model for business-to-business electronic marketplace participation.

The Western Australian Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care

The Western Australian Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care was officially launched.

ECu Partnership in Western Australian Marine Science Institute

Joint Venture – The Western Australian Marine Science Institute Joint

Venture Agreement was signed at Parliament House on 21 March 2007.

Professor Donna Cross Leads Landmark Research on Bullying

Professor Donna Cross announced findings of research by the Child Health

Promotion Research Centre (CHPRC), which show that about 25 per cent of young people who are bullied have been bullied with the use of technology

(such as mobile phone text messages and emails).

Nanoscale Characterisation Centre

– This State Government Centre of Excellence, in which ECU participates, was officially opened by the

Western Australian Chief Scientist, Professor Lyn Beazley.

Hokkaido university and ECu: Partnering to Combat Alzheimer’s

Japan’s Hokkaido University and ECU commenced a joint research project into Alzheimer’s disease. Hokkaido’s Professor Toshiharu Suzuki and his team will work with ECU’s Professor Ralph Martins to conduct research into newly identified genes linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

24

SECTION 1 OVERVIEW

Health and Wellness Building The Library and Technology Centre

Building Organisational Sustainability

Leadership capacity at the university

was enhanced with a number of key leadership appointments in 2007, including the appointment of

Professor Brenda Cherednichenko as the Executive Dean for the Faculty of

Education & Arts, Professor Ron Oliver as the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching

& Learning), Professor Arshad Omari as Deputy Vice-Chancellor and

Professor John Finlay-Jones as Deputy Vice-Chancellor with responsibility for research.

The university’s 2007 Operating Result

was $20.1m which included

$10.6m gain on sale of assets relating to the Churchlands stage 1 and stage

2 development. The 2007 operating result excluding the gain on sale of assets was $9.5m, which compares favourably to the reforecast budget of

$6.0m. This excellent outcome was due to the significant staff commitment to manage resources effectively within the available funding.

Design Awards for ECu’s New Library and Technology Centre

ECU’s striking new complex received wide recognition and was voted Best

Building in the Royal Australian Institute of Architects (WA)’s 2007 Public

Architecture Awards, as well as receiving the Royal Institute of British

Architects’ International Award.

Sports and Recreation Facilities at the South West Campus

– Sport and recreation at Bunbury was given a major boost with the announcement that ECU had successfully secured $2.2m of Commonwealth funds in two separate competitive funding rounds to build a recreation centre and outdoor courts in a new “recreation hub” – a focal point for sports, recreation and social activities on the South West Campus precinct.

Health and Wellness Building

– 2007 saw the occupation of the new $35m Health and Wellness Building on the Joondalup Campus.

The building will house the Vario Health Institute as well as the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine.

ECu’s Internet Presence

– A review and significant redevelopment of the ECU website was initiated in 2007. The review recommended that the

University re-assess its use of the web and apply a stronger governance model. The redesign will deliver a web experience more consistent with users’ individual needs.

ECu Amongst the Best in using Energy Efficiently

– ECU’s energy usage per student and per square metre is well below usage levels of other Western Australian universities and the average for the Australian university sector as a whole, according to the latest benchmarking survey from the Tertiary Education Facilities Management Association.

Nursing Facilities

– In 2007 ECU received additional Commonwealth funding support for the building and fit-out of its Nursing facilities. In total

ECU has received more than $5.2m towards the $14m costs of developing these facilities.

Churchlands Exit Nearing Completion

– Good progress was made towards the completion of ECU’s campus consolidation strategy, with major new projects at the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses to accommodate relocation of activities from the Churchlands Campus.

A new five-year Asset Management Plan

was developed in 2007, which will support the quality, growth and maintenance of the University’s assets from 2008 onwards.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 25

Agency

Performance

26

SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Report on Operations

Engaging and Serving Our Communities

ECU’s strategic direction gives a particular emphasis to engagement and the positive impact on the communities served by the University. In the long-term,

ECU seeks to be recognised for its range and quality of engagement activities, which will be a point of differentiation for ECU, producing mutual benefits and productive relationships with the University’s various communities.

In 2007, ECU’s goals in this Strategic Priority Area were:

• to build a reputation for academic outreach, research and creative output

• which impact and serve the needs of ECU’s communities; to ensure that ECU’s curriculum reflects its commitment to engagement;

• to promote broad understanding of ECU as an “engaged university”; and

• to enhance the physical and cultural development of its local communities by promoting access to ECU resources and skills.

In July 2007, a Council workshop was held focusing on the theme of

Engagement. This provided an opportunity to highlight some of the excellent engagement activities which were occurring across the University.

A summary of ECU’s engagement activities is provided below.

Academic Outreach, Research and Creative Output

ECU seeks to build a reputation for academic outreach, research and creative output which impact and serve the needs of ECU’s communities. Some 2007 highlights are listed below.

The Vario Institute

– The Institute is a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary alliance of ECU’s research capabilities, which aims to improve health and wellness outcomes within the community. The Institute combines the knowledge, skills and resources of researchers in a range of disciplines, including exercise and sports science, nutrition and psychology, to undertake research and develop programs that generate significant health improvements for the community. Current projects include: Diabetes Wellness Program,

Cancer Survivor Program, Weigh to go Kids and Healthy Ageing.

ECu Psychological Services Centre

– This Centre provides services to the community at a teaching clinic located in Lakeside Joondalup Shopping

Centre. The clinic is the primary training centre for postgraduate students in the School of Psychology at ECU. Counsellors are graduate psychologists undergoing specialist advanced training at the Masters or Doctoral level and are closely supervised by ECU staff members.

Pilbara Health Challenge

– In August 2007, 20 Nursing students and their supervisors visited Tom Price and Paraburdoo to complete health assessments on Pilbara Iron mine staff and community members. After reviewing the health assessments, the highest ranking health issues were identified, from which the students developed health promotion activities which were subsequently delivered to both mine employees and community members, in collaboration with community-based health programs.

Child Health Promotion Research Centre

– The Centre has established collaborative partnerships with the Western Australian Primary Principals

Association, the Office of Road Safety, the Western Australian Police

Service and the Department of Education and Training to deliver improved child health outcomes through a range of projects.

Shark Patrol Flights

– On behalf of the Fisheries Department, ECU conducts shark patrol flights along the coast each summer. Patrols are flown by ECU students who are qualified pilots and trainee pilots act as observers, looking for sharks and other marine life. The patrols run between

Two Rocks and Mandurah for up to eight hours each day, providing a valuable service to the community and benefiting students by providing work-based learning in Aviation studies.

Northern Suburbs Community Legal Centre

– Based in Joondalup, the

Centre was launched by the State Attorney General in May 2007 and is a joint initiative of ECU and the Northern Suburbs Community Legal Centre. It aims to make the law accessible to the communities of the northern suburbs and provide an opportunity for law students to gain experience and practical skills in the legal field and reach out to local communities. The Centre provides legal information and advice for the community in the areas of family and criminal law, domestic violence and some areas of civil law.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 27

Strengthening relationships with schools

– ECU launched a collaborative partnership with Clarkson Community High School and the

Vice-Chancellor hosted three dinners with school principals from the

Joondalup and Mount Lawley areas. In addition, 2007 saw the introduction of Year 11 and Year 12 scholarships and awards for a selection of over 160 schools throughout Western Australia.

[email protected] Engagement event

– ECU held a University-wide event in December 2007 to showcase ECU’s research excellence and to build potential collaborative links between ECU and business, industry, the professions, government agencies and the community.

ECu Industry Collaboration Scheme

– This scheme secures new research partnerships for the University and funding in 2007 was increased by almost 30 per cent to $500,000 per annum. Historically, more than half of the partners coming into the ECU Industry Collaboration Scheme are new partners for the University.

Practical Employee Management Skills Workshops

– Workshops were held in Perth, Denmark, Mount Barker, Katanning and Jerramungup and attended by 470 small business owners who received information and advice on basic HR skills such as recruitment, selection and employee training.

ECu Alumni, Donors and Friends

– Alumni and development initiatives include:

– re-establishment of the ECU Foundation Board and commencement of a review by the Vice-Chancellor of future fundraising strategies and governance arrangements;

– donations to the ECU Arts Collection totalling $320,000, including donations of art by one single donor totalling $200,000;

ECU continued its campaign to seek community investment and support for the Vario Health Institute, producing a DVD and brochure, as well as assisting in other profiling opportunities;

ECU Alumni relationships were further enhanced through social events, reunions and networking opportunities. A special campaign to gather staff Alumni information resulted in 415 responses to update contact details; and

– the Path of Honour program welcomed 23 new inductees bringing the total number of Path of Honour tiles to 115. A Path of Honour ceremony in November proved to be a moving and inspirational experience for all involved.

Engagement in the Curriculum

In 2007, ECU continued to build effective relationships with key external stakeholders, including key industry groups, employers and professional bodies. ECU’s Academic Profile reflects its strong relationships with external stakeholders, particularly in the areas of health, education, arts and entertainment, law, policing and small business.

ECU’s challenge in 2007 and beyond is to ensure that all parts of the curriculum reflect its commitment to engagement. In 2007 there was progress in a number of areas as shown below.

Strategies for enhancing engagement in teaching and learning

– A project is underway to identify and implement strategies to fully incorporate engagement into the curriculum and establish engagement as a critical component of program delivery for courses at ECU.

Consultative Committees

– Through the operation of ECU’s consultative committees, representatives of business and industry are able to influence course design in all disciplines. In 2007, 34 committees went through a process of re-invigoration and one additional committee was established. This process will continue in 2008, with a further four new committees planned.

Practicums

, giving students practical workplace learning experiences, are integral to many course programs including in Education, Health,

Paramedicine, Psychology and Planning.

New engineering courses and practicums have been developed

as a result of collaborations with WA Main Roads, the Water Corporation,

KBR, Western Power and Wood & Grieve, which identified areas of civil and mechanical engineering not taught in the State’s universities.

ECu - Emirates Education and Research Centre

– In collaboration with the Emirates Group, ECU has established the ECU-Emirates Education and

Research Centre in Dubai. Through the Centre, ECU facilitates the delivery of specialised security programs and research. The programs are affiliated with the International Civil Aviation Authority.

28

SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Postgraduate students in the Child Health Promotion Research

Centre are working with community agencies to develop and assess community health promotion interventions.

Final year students in Interactive Media Development

are working with local industry and community groups to apply new technologies to business. Six ECU graduates were employed by a mining company as a direct result.

ECu as an “Engaged university”

ECU’s relationships are multi-layered, diverse and complex and one community partner may have links with a number of different areas of ECU, for a range of purposes. Nevertheless, the University’s engagement profile reflects its locations with strong links to the northern corridor of Perth and the

South West region of Western Australia. ECU’s engagement partners include:

Local, State and Federal Government

– e.g. local government organisations, the Western Australia Department of Health, the

Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and Workplace

Relations, local politicians;

Other Education Providers

– e.g. West Coast TAFE, South West

Regional College of TAFE, High Schools, Primary Schools, PIBT;

Employers

– e.g. Department of Education and Training, Water

Corporation, BHP, Ernst & Young, Department of Environment and

Conservation;

Professional Bodies

– e.g. Law Society of Western Australian, CPA

Australia, Nurses Board of Western Australia, Institute of Hospitality,

Engineers Australia, Child Care Licensing Board, Australian Human

Resources Institute, Australian Computer Society; and

Community

– e.g. community groups, Indigenous Australians, Alumni.

ECU seeks to promote a broad understanding of itself as an “engaged university”. Some 2007 strategic developments are outlined below.

An Engagement Plan

was drafted to guide engagement activities.

An Engagement Reference Group

, chaired by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor

(Engagement) was established, charged with co-ordinating engagement activities and building links with businesses and professional bodies.

An Engagement Scorecard

was developed as a basis for measuring progress and success in engagement.

ECu has contributed to sector-wide debate

on measuring engagement and the establishment of benchmarks, through its participation in the

National Engagement Benchmarking Project led by the Australian

Universities Community Engagement Alliance.

ECu has defined the types of organisations with which it expects

to engage, by categorising these organisations according to interest and influence and recognising that in some cases an organisation can fit into more than one category depending on the engagement activity.

The South West Engagement Plan was implemented in 2007

, through links with key industry, government and community organisations.

This included a collaboration with the South West Development Commission and local government to host the Regional Futures Conference in early 2007.

Early Career Development Program

– ECU’s School of Nursing,

Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine has engaged with 31 students from

12 secondary schools as part of this State Government-funded scheme.

ECu has introduced incentives and rewards for effective

engagement by staff, including recognition for engagement in the

University’s Promotions Policy and in the criteria for the Vice-Chancellor’s

Awards to staff.

Student Awards

– The University plans to introduce two new student awards in 2008: the Student Award for Outstanding Contribution to

University Life; and the Student Award for Engagement.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 29

Physical and Cultural Development of Local Communities

ECU seeks to enhance the physical and cultural development of its local communities by promoting access to ECU resources and skills. Some 2007

Engagement achievements are shown below.

Mount Lawley Educational Precinct

– ECU and Mount Lawley Senior

High School (MLSHS) have a memorandum of understanding to share resources, facilities and curricula and to provide enhanced opportunities for students. The two institutions have collaborated in sharing facilities, the construction of a shared Sport and Fitness Centre, the construction of a shared multi-level car park, the development of joint MLSHS / ECU programs and many other initiatives.

The Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts

(WAAPA) continues to play a key role in generating and maintaining numerous partnerships and close associations. In 2007 WAAPA produced over 200 public performances and held corporate workshops and audition master classes in acting, arts management, broadcasting, dance, music theatre and music, attended by over 400 people. WAAPA also provided rehearsal facilities for the Western Australian Youth Orchestra and Western

Australian Youth Jazz Orchestra and both organisations collaborated with

WAAPA on a number of projects.

The Vice-Chancellor’s 2007 Distinguished Oration

was by Rio

Tinto Iron Ore Chief Executive, Sam Walsh, who spoke on the value of communications in business to a diverse group of staff, students, businesses and the wider community at ECU’s Joondalup Campus.

ECu also hosted many other public lectures and on-campus public

addresses, including by the Hon Len Roberts-Smith RFD, QC, newly appointed Commissioner for Corruption and Crime, who gave his first public address at the Mount Lawley Campus in October. Lectures on issues of relevance to the community were held on subjects such as stem cell research and Alzheimer’s disease.

Community initiatives in health

included programs delivered by the

Vario Wellness Clinic @ ECU to fight diabetes, provide weight training for overweight children, help cancer survivors and improve health for the elderly.

ECu hosted the Creating Safe and Happy Schools – Free from

Bullying Conference, part of the National Safe Schools Week.

ECu is working with Twin Cities FM

and the Lotteries Commission to relocate the community radio station from the City of Wanneroo Works

Depot to ECU’s Joondalup Campus.

Perth International Film Festival

movies were again screened at the

Joondalup Pines Picture Garden, attracting strong community support from more than 16,500 attendees. This event has become part of Western

Australia’s annual cultural calendar.

The Joondalup Learning Precinct (JLP)

, which began in 2002 with the establishment of the Western Australia Police Academy on a site adjacent to the campuses of ECU and West Coast TAFE, develops strategies and programs which, through collaboration and engagement, add value to the member institutions, their staff and students and the wider community.

In 2007 the JLP was reinvigorated and now formally includes the City of

Joondalup. The JLP Board met monthly in the latter part of 2007.

The JLP Centre for Leadership’s

Leading Edge program continued in

2007 with 13 participants recruited from six organisations in the state and local government sector: Western Australian Police Service, Department of Housing and Works, Disability Services Commission, Racing & Gaming

Western Australia, City of Joondalup and West Coast College of TAFE.

Evaluations of the program from participants and external facilitators have been very positive.

A successful cross-institutional staff mentoring program

involving

ECU, the West Coast College of TAFE and the Western Australian Police

Academy continued with 28 staff participating in 2007.

30

SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Providing a Supportive and Stimulating

Learning Community

ECU seeks to be recognised for providing a world-class education and a fulfilling student experience. In 2007, ECU’s goals in this Strategic Priority

Area were:

• to improve the quality of teaching across the University;

• to optimise student load through attracting and retaining students;

• to be responsive to students and employer needs by providing relevant

• programs, taught in ways that engage its students; and to enhance the overall “student experience”.

Quality in Teaching

In order to improve the quality of teaching, during 2007 ECU focused on:

• engaging in debate on the University’s performance;

• developing new mechanisms to recognise and reward good teaching;

• better utilising performance measurement and reporting mechanisms; and

• implementing changes to teaching support services.

Much progress was made in 2007, with a number of key initiatives commencing. A Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching & Learning), Professor Ron

Oliver, was appointed to co-ordinate these initiatives.

During 2007 the Vice-Chancellor visited each of the schools within ECU, to open up dialogue on teaching performance and opportunities for improvement.

Improving performance in teaching and learning is aided by reliable and timely measurement and reporting of teaching performance data to faculties and schools. In the area of teaching performance measurement and reporting, initiatives in 2007 included:

Surveying was improved by the introduction of a new standardised on-line

Mid-course version of the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) which showed response rates (49 per cent), similar to those of the previous paper

• survey method.

An internal Teaching Quality Index was developed using the CEQ/ Graduate

Destination Survey (GDS) and Unit and Teaching Evaluation Instrument

(UTEI) results and will be used in the 2008 budget process to recognise and reward good teaching.

Teaching performance was reported to the University community with:

– the results of the Mid-course CEQ reported to Heads of School;

– on-line UTEI and CEQ results reported to schools and committees;

– new course co-ordinators’ reports on course evaluation, graduate destinations, student progression and retention; and

– reports produced which analysed ECU’s CEQ and GDS results, particularly with regard to Learning and Teaching Performance Fund outcomes for 2007.

A review of ECU’s teaching support services was conducted during 2007, with the resultant McKinnon Walker Report leading to the creation of a Centre for Learning and Teaching (CLT). Professor Susan Stoney was appointed in

December 2007 as inaugural head of the CLT, an academic leader with more than 25 years experience in tertiary teaching. The CLT will have a researchled focus on improving the quality of learning & teaching, with learning and teaching award winners utilised as champions to guide CLT projects. Scoping work for early projects included: engagement in learning and teaching; implementing ECU’s new Graduate Attributes; quality audits of units; and on-line induction to teaching at ECU for ECU staff teaching off-shore.

In addition, the Learning and Teaching website is being redeveloped to provide a more seamless and effective way to support teaching staff and to provide access to learning and teaching information.

Achievements in Teaching

Recognition for ECU

In October 2007, it was announced that ECU was one of 23 universities which will receive funding through the Commonwealth Government’s Learning and Teaching Performance Fund for 2008. The assessment uses indicators of performance from the Course Experience Survey (Generic Skills, Good

Teaching and Overall Satisfaction), the Graduate Destinations Survey (Fulltime Employment and Further Study), together with two further measures of student success (Progress and Retention).

This is the first time that the quality of the University’s teaching and learning has been recognised in this way. ECU showed a strong relative performance in the discipline group Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and

Agriculture and improvement was also seen in the discipline group Business,

Law and Economics.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 31

ECU was also successful in its bid to host a Literacy & Numeracy Summer

School in January 2008, part of the Australian Government Summer Schools

for Teachers initiative. The summer school is a collaboration between

ECU, the University of Wollongong, the University of New England and the

Australian Literacy Educators’ Association.

Staff Recognition

The ECU learning community also enjoyed significant success in a variety of awards given by the Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher

Education. These were:

2007 Carrick Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning

Dr Jan Gray, Dr Danielle Brady

Dr Bridget Leggett, Dr Michael Harvey, Associate Professor Glenda

Campbell-Evans (group award)

Associate Professor Joe Luca

Professor Judith Rivalland

Associate Professor Susan Stoney

2007 Carrick Award for Teaching Excellence - Early Career

Mr Travis Kelleher

2007 Carrick Award for Programs that Enhance Learning

The International Student Support Team (Ms Cassandra Colvin, Mr Peter

Mitchell, Mr Nicholas Tan, Mr Fozzil Jaffar and Miss Vanessa Trovato) for

The First-Year Experience: ECU’s International Student Orientation: a model of collaboration, inclusiveness and student-informed planning.

Five staff received this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in

Teaching (VCAET):

Mr Ray Boffey, Faculty of Business and Law

(Accounting, Finance and Economics);

Dr Trevor Cullen, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts);

Associate Professor Joseph Luca, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts);

Dr Maria Northcote, Faculty of Education and Arts (Education); and

Miss Diane Slade, Faculty of Education and Arts

(Communications and Contemporary Arts).

There was also one group VCAET award:

Associate Professor Gavin Leslie, Ms Kerry Southerland, Ms Fenella Gill and Ms Lucia Gillman, from the Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

(Nursing, Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine).

Attracting and Retaining Students

ECU seeks to optimise its student load by attracting and retaining students motivated and capable of benefiting from higher education. A number of strategies are employed to achieve this aim, including by widening opportunities, enhancing the “first year at university” experience, re-focusing student marketing strategies and improving ECU’s internet presence.

Domestic Student Numbers

In 2007, ECU’s domestic student enrolments fell for a fourth consecutive year to 16,207. The continuing economic boom and buoyant labour market in Western Australia is believed to be a major contributor to this downturn

(see Economic and Social Trends page 58).

Table 1 shows that domestic student enrolments have been in decline from

2003 to 2007. Domestic student enrolments were 17,077 in 2006 and 16,210 in 2007, a fall of 5 per cent.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Table 1: ECU Domestic Student Enrolments, 2003-2007

Domestic Student Enrolments

Undergraduate and below

2003

15,557

2004

15,223

2005

14,448

2006

13,975

2007

13,256

Change 2006 – 2007

-5.1%

Postgraduate 2,717 2,790 3,086 3,102 2,954 -4.8%

Total 18,274 18,013 17,534 17,077 16,210 -5.1%

Note: 1. Cross-institutional and Non-award enrolments have been allocated to the Undergraduate and below category. 2. Data reference date is 31st March. 3. Domestic Student enrolments include

Australian and New Zealand Citizens, Permanent Residents and those with Humanitarian Visas.

International Student Numbers

ECU’s international student numbers grew for the second year in a row and in 2007 showed a marked increase of 9.4 per cent (379), which contrasts with the trend in domestic student enrolments. Table 2 below shows that this increase was due to growth in International Off-shore enrolments of almost 30 per cent

(419) in 2007 compared with 2006.

Table 2: ECU International Student Enrolments, 2003-2007

International Student Enrolments

International On-shore

International Off-shore

Total

2003

2,100

1,337

3,437

2004

2,297

1,359

3,656

2005

2,443

1,127

3,570

2006

2,616

1,400

4,016

2007

2,576

1,819

4,395

Change 2006 – 2007

-1.5%

29.9%

9.4%

Note: 1. The 2006 Annual Report misquoted the 2005 International On-shore enrolment figure as 2240. This has been corrected here. 2. Data reference date is 31st March.

Student Load – all categories

Student load, measured in full-time equivalents (EFTSL), is the usual way to describe student participation across all funding categories.

Table 3 below shows that the majority of the University’s load is in the Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding category, which in 2007 accounted for

67.2 per cent of the total load. Fee-paying Overseas load (On-shore and Off-shore) is 22.4 per cent of total load.

Total student load has been in decline for the last four years and the total load for 2007 (15,290 EFTSL) was 618 EFTSL, or 3.9 per cent below target.

The total load through the Commonwealth Grant Scheme was 10,279 EFTSL, down by 589 EFTSL, or 5.4 per cent on the previous year.

Fee-paying Overseas load (On-shore and Off-shore) has increased in each year from 2004 to 2007. It is also an increasing proportion of the University’s total load and rose from 2792 (or 17.2 per cent of total load) in 2004 to 3419 (or 22.4 per cent of total load) in 2007.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 33

Table 3: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2004-2007

2004

Funding Category

Commonwealth Grant Scheme

Research Training Scheme

1

Target

11,205

190

Actual

11,876

275

Fee-paying Overseas On-shore

Fee-paying Overseas Off-shore

Fee-paying Australian Postgraduate

Fee-paying Australian Undergraduate

Vocational Education & Training

TOTAL (all categories)

2,152

838

972

75

430

15,862

1,990

802

827

45

430

16,245

Target

11,722

242

2,086

741

920

51

430

16,192

2005

Actual

11,384

259

2,154

784

930

69

430

16,010

Target

12,025

237

2,161

579

985

14

430

16,431

2006

Actual

10,868

264

2,248

1,013

894

16

430

15,733

Target

10,868

270

2,318

1,196

798

24

434

15,908

2007

Actual

10,279

247

2,219

1,200

838

77

430

15,290

Notes: All figures are full year as at 23 January 2008 and therefore cannot be compared to the 31 March figures shown in the Summary Statistics table. 1. Includes ECU-funded HDR. 2. 2007 Actuals are provisional. Targets shown are those externally-reported. ECU also uses internal targets for budgetary purposes. Source: DEST Educational Profiles Data Collection, Edith Cowan University. Definition: Full-year

Load by Funding Category, excluding TAFE EFTSL, Tuition Fee exempt (HDR exchange), Tuition waivers and Non Award EFTSL. As per HESA reporting requirements, 2007 figures include total official load figures reported to DEST for 31st March 2007 and 31st August 2007 (includes preliminary load figures for Summer School and post August [Trimester 3 and Term 4]).

Widening Opportunities

During 2007 ECU pursued a number of strategies to improve access by widening opportunities. These strategies included the development of admissions pathways, providing more options for flexible learning and on-line learning and by providing additional support for those students “at risk” of failing or ceasing their studies.

Admission Pathways and Enabling Courses

The Portfolio Entry pathway continued to grow in 2007. In total 423 applications were received, up from 344 applications in 2006. 299 offers were made, compared with 255 in 2006.

ECU continued to develop its non-TER entry pathways. In 2007 approximately 36 per cent of commencing undergraduates entered Bachelor courses directly, rather than through the Tertiary Institutions Service Centre, which mainly processes TER applications. 2007 initiatives included:

• an additional portfolio entry pathway for ECU’s Education programs, based on nomination by school principals;

• pathways for TAFE graduates wishing to articulate to ECU’s undergraduate programs; and

• the Enrolled Nurse Registration Pathway Program, developed in partnership with the Western Australian Department of Health’s Office of the Chief Nurse and the Program.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Enabling courses were expanded with the provision of a greater number of

Commonwealth-supported places for the University Preparation Course (UPC), designed for those wishing to develop tertiary learning skills before commencing an undergraduate course. The UPC consistently elicits positive student responses and is a means of equipping students for successful study, providing a pathway for those who might not have otherwise gained entry to ECU.

In 2007 four UPC units gained Curriculum Council recognition as contributing to the new Western Australian Certificate of Education. In a trial project designed to give high school students an experience of study in a university environment, 85 Year 11 students from St Stephen’s School studied one unit of the UPC on campus in 2007 Semester 2.

In addition, the TAPS (Teacher Assistants Program) course was converted into an Enabling course.

An analysis of retention and success of students entering ECU through its various admission pathways was conducted in 2007. Extension of ECU’s admissions pathways has meant that in 2006 and 2007 190 students, who under previous admission pathways would have not met entry requirements for ECU, have taken up the opportunity offered by ECU and are succeeding in their higher education studies.

Scholarships

In 2007 ECU developed a revised suite of ECU-funded scholarships and awards for 2008 entrants. These have been promoted with secondary schools in Western Australia and especially with those schools in areas in proximity to ECU’s campuses. The intention is to encourage students who may not have considered university study to engage with ECU while still in Year 11 and Year 12.

In addition, in a competitive bidding process in 2007, ECU obtained four additional Commonwealth Scholarships for Associate Degree students and

45 new Indigenous Enabling and Access Scholarships. This brings the total

Commonwealth Scholarships available to ECU students for 2008 to more than

1100, worth approximately $3.3m.

Flexible Delivery and Off-Campus Options for Study

The University has completed its move from print-based external studies and will now seek to grow on-line and off-campus courses. Offerings of this nature are largely in the coursework graduate studies area. 2007 saw the introduction of a streamlined process for identifying, offering and promoting on-line and off-campus courses. Off-campus offerings have been clearly identified and possible additions are being evaluated.

ECU further developed its distinctive style of teaching and learning in 2007, with more than 1000 units now available on-line and course developments continue to provide support for flexibility in, and opportunities for, multiple exit modes and delivery formats.

Retention Strategies

The Key Performance Indicator Report contained in the CD at the back of the

Annual Report includes a retention key performance measure for commencing

Bachelor pass students. This shows that ECU’s retention rates declined to

79.1 per cent in 2004 and have since improved to 79.6 per cent in 2006.

This is slightly below the national average of 80.9 per cent.

Retention strategies continue to be a priority for the University. Retention of students is co-ordinated by a specially designated manager within ECU’s Student

Services Centre and strategies are in place to identify those students most at risk of dropping out. In 2007 each faculty also put in place a retention strategy.

In addition, the University is responding to the new ESOS National Code with a co-ordinated project to deliver a new approach to identify “at-risk” international students and establish appropriate intervention strategies.

Although focusing on international students, all student cohorts are expected to benefit from this initiative.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 35

A Diverse Student Cohort

ECU has created a diverse and contemporary learning and working environment for its students and staff which respects diversity and difference. The University prides itself on its support for this positive environment and continues to instigate and implement policies and processes to develop a welcoming, vibrant culture that is supportive and inclusive and free from discrimination, harassment and bullying, thereby making ECU an attractive place to learn and work.

ECU maintains a broad commitment to removing barriers to access for disadvantaged students and to promote equality of opportunity in higher education. The

University has placed a special focus on assisting students from low socio-economic status backgrounds (low SES), from rural areas, with disabilities and from

Indigenous backgrounds, with the aim of improving both access to ECU courses and study success.

Consistent with an overall reduction in enrolments at ECU, enrolments for Equity Group students have shown a decline in recent years.

As shown in Figure 3 and Tables 4 and 5, Equity Group participants as a proportion of the total student body have also been in decline and this trend is consistent with the Australian higher education sector as a whole.

The number and proportion of students identifying as having a disability increased in 2007 compared with 2006.

Figure 3: Proportion of ECU Student Population by Equity Group, 2003-2007

25

20

15

10

5

0

Low SES

2003 2004

Rural ATSI

Equity Group

2005 2006 2007

Disability

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Table 4: Proportion of ECU Student Population by Equity Group, 2003-2007

Proportion

Low SES

2003

21.0%

2004

20.8%

2005

18.7%

2006

18.9%

2007

18.6%

Rural

Indigenous

Disability

10.5%

2.4%

2.2%

10.0%

1.8%

2.0%

9.0%

1.5%

2.0%

9.0%

1.4%

1.7%

8.9%

1.2%

2.0%

Table 5: Number of ECU Student Population by Equity Group, 2003-2007

Numbers

Low SES

Rural

2003

3,714

1,855

2004

3,750

1,805

2005

3,155

1,518

2006

3,078

1,464

2007

2,910

1,390

Indigenous

Disability

417

395

328

352

260

336

230

285

186

318

Figure 3 shows that the proportion of low SES, Rural and Disability students has remained relatively steady for the period 2005 to 2007. The proportion of

Indigenous students has been in decline over the full period 2003 to 2007.

These trends may be linked to the strong domestic economy, as low unemployment rates may attract people to employment rather than study, particularly for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. In the case of

Indigenous people, the decline in participation may result, in part, from changes to the financial support arrangements introduced by previous

Commonwealth Governments.

First Year at University

The commencing year of university study is regarded as a crucial one for student retention. In 2007 the provision of study skills and learning support was reviewed and reorganised. Services in future will be delivered through

Learning Centres, established on each campus.

A First Year at University Working Party was established, leading to the development of a series of discrete programs to support first-year student, including:

• the development of restructured orientation program to provide coordinated support to students in early stages of their university study;

• planning for a First Year Website which will contain support materials and relevant supporting information;

• planning for the establishment of Learning Centres to provide enhance learning and language support; and

• the establishment of a pilot project to set up a support group for matureaged first year students.

A comprehensively enhanced orientation and transition program was developed during 2007, building on initiatives begun in 2006. This program includes a number of projects such as support groups for mature-aged students and rural students; workshops in “survival cooking” and “survival budgeting” and cultural awareness; “Launch Days” to welcome new students; and orientation publications, an orientation website and a Campus Tour podcast.

ECU’s Marketing Strategies

In 2007, based on research with students, staff and key stakeholders, a new brand model for ECU was developed and launched. The brand model sets the tone for all ECU external communications, defines the key messages that the University wishes to convey and explains the position that ECU wants to hold in the marketplace. The university’s previous marketing revolved around

‘great careers’ while the current marketing aims to portray ECU as the place to go to ‘reach your potential’. Correspondingly, the previous ‘ecugreatcareers’ marketing website was relaunched as ‘reachyourpotential.com’.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 37

A new marketing campaign was also launched in 2007 – “ECU Students

Speak for Themselves”. Key to this campaign was a series of television advertisements that demonstrated the quality of the teaching and learning environment at ECU. These featured students in scenarios that showcased the University’s excellent study facilities and teaching programs in disciplines such as Sports Science, Nursing, Teacher Education, Engineering and

Communications. Supporting press and radio advertisements used student, staff and employer testimonials to deliver key messages relating to the relevance and practical nature of the University’s programs and the quality of the teaching staff and facilities at ECU. This highly successful campaign was adopted across the University, in all faculties and schools.

A collaborative advertising campaign featuring a research graduate (an ECU alumnus) was also conducted to attract Research & Higher Degree students to ECU.

A new Student Recruitment and Careers team enabled the University to increase its recruitment activities in schools and in the community for schoolleavers and mature-aged prospective students. During August, September and October the team worked to engage with schools and students prior to commencement of the TEE. Two successful open days were also staged and student recruitment staff made presentations to more than 10,000 prospective students. Advice was also provided to 5500 careers event patrons.

Throughout the year recruitment officers handled 24,000 phone inquiries, 6500 queries via e-mail, and 1300 campus visitors. The reachyourpotential.com website attracted 329,000 unique visitors, an increase of 6 per cent compared with 2006. Student Recruitment has utilised a wide variety of events such as pizza evenings, information seminars and targeted presentations to improve the information available to future students. A monthly e-newsletter was sent to about 12,000 subscribers

Recruitment strategies for international students in 2007 were three-pronged: a focus on source countries with significant growth potential (e.g. China and

India); maintenance of markets in key source countries (e.g. Zambia, Kenya,

Norway and most of South East Asia); and further development of emerging markets in the Middle East and South America.

Continued attention was given to ECU’s network of international student recruitment agents, to supplement direct recruitment and there was further development of an enhanced web presence and electronic processes for marketing, application and admission. Strategic links with off-shore partners providing pathways for study on-shore were also developed and in 2007 some

24 new twinning, articulation, exchange and study abroad agreements were established with institutions in South East Asia, North America, Europe and

Africa, as well as a further 14 memoranda of understanding.

ECU’s Internet Presence

A significant redevelopment of the ECU website is underway, led by Professor

Arshad Omari, Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Its initial focus will be visual redesign, the development of new website governance processes, a content management system to ensure consistency and accuracy throughout the site, a web portal so users can achieve a web experience more consistent with their individual needs and improvements to a range of systems associated with student support, such as Callista, Blackboard, the Course Management

System and the reachyourpotential.com website.

Responsiveness to Students and Employers

Assessment Practices

A review of the University’s Assessment Policy and practices began in 2007.

The Faculty of Education and Arts conducted seminars on the challenge of assessment.

The “ECU Business Edge” program was established by the Faculty of Business and Law to address employer concerns over perceived business skills deficiencies in graduates. Assessment now includes reviews by “industry judges”.

On-line Learning Resources

On-line support for units increased throughout 2007. On-line materials are now also available via Blackboard to “student communities” enrolled in a cluster of awards, in addition to the familiar unit sites, as well as to staff.

This allows communication by course co-ordinators with their students both actively via email and via the provision of on-line resources for that course.

The number and types of these “student communities” has grown to more than 150 over the course of the year.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Good quality in off-campus units is supported by the introduction of standards for the provision of resources for on-line and off-campus courses and for on-line materials where face-to-face teaching is supplemented with resources available on-line via the Blackboard learning management system. A process of auditing against these standards is in operation. In 2007 Semester 2, ECU had Blackboard unit sites for 1262 units, involving 85 per cent of students.

During 2007 the “FlexiLecture” project continued to equip teaching spaces for the automatic capture of lecture material to assist student learning by making lectures available on an ad hoc basis to be viewed on-line (videostreaming) and downloaded as podcasts via Blackboard and faculty servers. Seven such spaces were available at the end of the year, with major lecture theatres on the Joondalup, Mount Lawley and Bunbury campuses fully installed. New installations will be provided for Nursing lectures early in 2008.

A comprehensive roll-out of lecture capture technologies is underway and by mid-2008 over 40 teaching spaces across the University’s campuses will be served by state-of-the-art lecture capture facilities.

Review of the Academic Profile

In 2007 there was a review of performance of major academic programs across a range of indicators of student satisfaction and graduate outcomes. This analysis will help to inform a broad review of ECU’s Academic Profile in 2008 and to identify new opportunities to further differentiate ECU within the sector.

During 2007 each faculty actively explored new course initiatives to respond to emerging demand for education in a number of new areas. As a result, new programs will be offered in 2008, including in Writing, Criminology and

Juvenile Justice, Disability Studies, a two-year teaching degree and the

Diploma in Science (at the Faculty of Regional Professional Studies).

Enhancing the “Student Experience”

During 2007 ECU implemented enhanced support services to assist students to maximise the outcomes of their learning experiences at ECU. These enhancements included:

• the introduction of highly successful information evenings for commencing students, which encouraged students to attend with a support person to begin to engage in and understand the level of support services available to ECU students;

• the implementation of centralised orientation and transition programs to ensure a student’s experience are not dependent on the course in which they are enrolled. These programs will be further refined in 2008;

• the introduction of infrastructure to enhance student access to information, services and a tailored experience at ECU. These strategies included:

– the introduction of an enquiry management system;

– the opening of “student-friendly” Student Central at the Mount Lawley

Campus with i-point infrastructure;

– planning for further i-point areas in buildings on the Mount Lawley,

Joondalup and South West campuses;

– provision of additional formal and informal teaching and learning spaces with refit projects on the Joondalup Campus and the Mount Lawley

Campus;

– the amalgamation of student recruitment and careers advisory services to provide a continuous service in career choice and development for prospective students through to alumni; and

– the implementation of a teaching timetable using a sophisticated system which groups units on certain days to allow students campus free days;

• consulting students at every stage in the planning and implementation of services;

• innovative support programs for students in areas such as pastoral, cultural, health and well-being; and

• support for the development and maintenance of international student groups.

Enquiry Management and Student Admissions

The Enquiry Management System was implemented across the University in early 2007 to help attract and retain students by streamlining sources of information and advice. The system channels enquiries through 23 service points, primarily in the Student Recruitment and Careers Centre and the

Student Contact Centre, while more complex enquires go to designated referral points within faculties and service centres. Each campus has clearly sign-posted information points for face-to-face enquiries.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 39

Student Feedback

The Unit and Teaching Evaluation Instrument (UTEI) provides a student assessment of unit content and teaching quality on a semester by semester basis.

2007 saw the implementation of a revised and on-line UTEI. Through marketing and an incentive scheme to encourage participation, response rates were achieved which were similar or better than the previous paper-based version of the survey.

A new student experience survey was developed and implemented in 2007 with the objective of providing more meaningful and comprehensive data to underpin both short and long-term planning for student needs. The first student survey was conducted on-line in October 2007 with response rates (at around 30 per cent) almost triple the result of the 2004 survey. An interim analysis of survey results was conducted during November and December and reported to student service providers and facilities managers to inform their planning. Further detailed analysis and reporting is planned for the March quarter of 2008.

Development of a surveys policy, aimed at ensuring that students are surveyed in a co-ordinated and appropriate manner, commenced in 2007. This policy will be finalised in the first half of 2008.

ECU Teaching Outcomes

Teaching and learning quality at ECU is measured and reviewed through a number of mechanisms including the UTEI, CEQ and GDS survey instruments.

As can be seen from Figure 4 below, student perception of teaching quality has steadily improved since the introduction of the UTEI in 2002 until the end 2006.

Likewise overall satisfaction with content has grown from 2002 until the end of 2006. The revised questions and data collection process implemented in 2007 has led to changed outcomes with new baseline data for comparisons. The University will continue to implement activities to improve student satisfaction using student feedback from the UTEI.

Figure 4: ECU UTEI Mean Overall Satisfaction with Teaching Quality and Unit Content, 2003-2007

70

60

50

40

30

Teaching Quality

Unit Content

20

10

0

S1 2003 S2 2003 S1 2004 S2 2004 S1 2005 S2 2005

Semester/ Year

S1 2006 S2 2006 S1 2007 S2 2007

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

The most recent results for ECU graduates in 2006 (surveyed in 2007) have not yet been made available by Graduate Careers Australia and so no comment is made in the Annual Report on performance for 2007 concerning the

University’s Generic Skills, Good Teaching or Overall Satisfaction scores, or on the Graduate Destination Survey outcomes: Full-time Employment and Further

Study. The Key Performance Indicator Report contained in the CD at the back of the Annual Report provides the latest information on ECU’s performance on these measures.

Analyses and strategies to improve ECU’s student satisfaction and graduate outcomes were considered by the Quality and Audit Committee and the

Academic Board in 2007. Further work will be done in 2008 to identify areas for particular attention.

“Job-ready” Graduates

Additional work is required to improve the success of ECU graduates in gaining and succeeding in employment and this will continue to be a priority in 2008. Initiatives in 2007 included:

• a volunteer accreditation program, established by the Child Health

Promotion Research Centre, allowed more than 25 students to gain research work experience;

• the Student Recruitment and Careers team is now in place and is focusing on working with faculties to ensure opportunities are available to prepare

• job-ready students; and embedding ECU’s Graduate Attributes into the University’s teaching and learning. ECU graduates will be valued for their: ability to communicate;

ability to work in teams; critical appraisal skills; ability to generate ideas; and cross-cultural and international outlook.

ECU contributed to a Universities Australia proposal for a “national internship scheme” and will engage with others in the sector and with graduates and employer groups to develop this strategy further.

Campus Facilities

ECU continues to develop its campus facilities to enhance the “university experience” of its students. 2007 saw a number of improvements in campus facilities including:

• completion of a state-of-the-art library building, which includes a 200 seat computer megalab and group study rooms, on the Joondalup Campus;

• improved food outlet and bookshop facilities on the Joondalup Campus;

• a new short-term childcare facility introduced in response to student feedback;

• a number of security initiatives at the South West Campus precinct, including the upgrade of access control, CCTV and duress alarm systems, the introduction of a Security Officer on campus during University operating hours, the improvement of walkway and campus external lighting and the introduction of pathways from Student Housing; and

• planning for additional student housing accommodation on the Mount

Lawley Campus has commenced.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 41

Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact

ECU seeks to be recognised for high impact research which contributes social, economic, environmental and cultural benefits. In 2007 ECU’s goals in the Strategic

Priority Area of research were:

• to build its research enterprise and generate enhanced research outcomes in selected areas of excellence, particularly those with the potential for high social, economic, environmental and cultural impact; and

• to provide high quality research training to produce high rates of research higher degree completions and research graduates with valued knowledge and skills.

High Impact Research

Areas of Strength and Opportunity

The Research and Research Training Functional Plan, 2007-2010 was endorsed by the Academic Board and then approved by Council in July 2007. Based on research income and publications, six areas of strength and two of areas of opportunity were identified and will be fostered for the next three years:

Areas of strength

1. Health and Wellness

2. Education

3. Environment and Sustainability

4. Electronic Engineering and Information and Communications Technology

5. Social and Community

6. Business and Society

Areas of opportunity

1. Communications and Creative Arts

2. Security, Law and Justice

Building Areas of Concentration, Depth and Sustainability

Strategies for building the identified areas of strength include: targeted senior research appointments, generating additional research income, better allocation of research resources and increasing the Higher Degree by Research (HDR) load in strategic areas.

Research Appointments

Senior research appointments in 2007 included three Professors and 12 Associate Professors. In addition, 12 new Professorial Chairs were advertised in

September 2007.

The recruitment of these additional senior research-oriented positions is expected to provide a substantial boost to future research productivity at ECU.

Research Income in 2007

Allocation of Research Block Funding is based on ECU’s research performance relative to the sector, in income, publications and Higher Degree by Research completions. ECU has continued to improve its overall research performance with consequent increases in Research Block Funding to $6.7m in 2007, which is a

3.9 per cent increase on 2006 (see Table 6 below).

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Table 6: Research Block Funding by Category, 2004-2007

Research Block Funding Category

Institutional Grants Scheme

Research Training Scheme

Research Infrastructure Block Grant

Total

2004

1.53

3.94

0.52

5.99

2005

Income ($m)

2006

1.70

3.97

1.83

4.07

0.47

6.14

0.55

6.45

2007

1.94

4.22

0.54

6.70

Change 2006-2007

6.0%

3.7%

-1.8%

3.9%

Total research grant income grew from 2004 to 2006 and although total research grant income for 2007 ($9.65m) was slightly lower than 2006, overall there has been a 18 per cent increase since 2004 (see Table 7 below).

Table 7: Research Grant Funding by Category, 2004-2007

Research Grant Funding Category

National Competitive Research Grants

Other Public Sector Research Funding

Industry and Other Funding

Co-operative Research Centre Funding

Total

2004

2.27

4.19

1.80

0.01

8.27

2005

Income ($m)

2006

1.95

5.47

2.03

4.83

3.06

0.03

10.51

3.07

0.09

10.02

2007

1.28

4.33

4.09

0.09

9.79

Change 2006-2007

-58.7%

-11.4%

24.9%

-2.5%

-2.3%

Initiatives to Grow Research Income

Additional research income was generated through a number of initiatives, including:

• the re-introduction of external review of grant applications;

• the establishment of a Grant Mentorship Scheme;

• improved information on research grant applications through a revamped Office of Research and Innovation website; and

• the delivery of a comprehensive program of research seminars to develop grant writing and management capabilities.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 43

Strategic use of Research Funds

Funding allocations for research will increase for 2008, as flagged in the 2007 budget process, and the following points are noteworthy.

Funding for strategic initiatives in research

aligns with the

University’s new Research and Research Training Functional Plan, Goals and Strategies. Funds are used to support strategic initiatives, matching funding for Centres of Excellence and similar programs and part-funding of institutes. Funding for 2008 has been increased by $1.34m.

The ECu Early Career Researcher Scheme

– This is a key strategy in building capacity and organisational sustainability, which provides seed funding to assist early career researchers gain experience in grant applications, project management and reporting procedures. This scheme will receive a 50 per cent funding increase (from $100,000 in 2007 to

$150,000 in 2008).

Postdoctoral Fellowships

are used strategically to maximise their impact on ECU’s research outcomes by increasing the cohort of earlycareer researchers in the University. As such, Postdoctoral Fellows are the

“backbone” of many research groups and are essential to the development of the research culture at ECU. The amount of funding provided will increase from $429,000 in 2007 to $603,000 in 2008.

The Research Activity Index (RAI) Scheme

rewards staff for research performance and assists in data collection. Funding will be increased from

$677,000 in 2007 to $700,000 in 2008.

In addition, the 2008 budget allocation will allow ECU to increase its Higher

Degree by Research load in strategic areas by:

• increasing the ECU-funded Higher Degree by Research load from 60 EFTSL to 100 EFTSL ($500,000) in order to supplement the limited availability of

Research Training Scheme (RTS) load funded by DEST; and increasing Postgraduate research scholarships from $1.11m in 2007 to

$1.42m in 2008.

Increasing Research Collaboration

The University continues to pursue new research partnerships through its

ECU Industry Collaboration Scheme. This scheme secures new research partnerships to the University which in turn can impact on total research revenue secured from industry. In 2007, industry partners pledged almost

$699,000 towards ECU Industry Collaboration projects.

University funding for the ECU Industry Collaboration Scheme will be increased from $390,000 in 2007 to $500,000 in 2008. In previous years, greater than 50 per cent of the partners involved in the ECU Industry

Collaboration Scheme have been new to the University.

In an effort to increase opportunities for collaboration, targeted visits between industry partners and potential investors and several research groups at ECU were undertaken in 2007.

A University-wide [email protected] Engagement event was organised to showcase ECU’s research excellence and to build potential collaborative links between ECU and business, industry, the professions, government agencies and the community.

In 2007 several new research collaborations were initiated:

Western Australian Marine Science Institute;

Western Australian Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care;

Asia-Pacific Centre for Excellence for Teacher Education

(with Sampoerna Foundation – Indonesia);

Fudan University (China) in micro- and nano-photonics;

Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology (China) in the development of chip to chip optical interconnects;

Nanoscale Characterisation Centre;

CSIRO Flagship program in Alzheimer’s Disease research;

Yadgalah Aboriginal Corporation; and

Broome Family Relationship Consortium.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

These new research partnerships are in addition to existing collaborations, as listed below.

Five State or Commonwealth Centres of Excellence:

Western Australian Centre of Excellence for Microphotonic Systems;

Western Australian Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care;

Nanoscale Characterisation Centre for Western Australia (NCC WA);

Centre for Comparative Genomics; and

ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation.

Two CSIRO Collaborative Research Flagships:

Preventative Health Flagship: Detecting and preventing Alzheimer’s

Disease: Towards diet and lifestyle interventions; and

Wealth From the Oceans Flagship: Ningaloo Cluster Reef use, biodiversity and socio-economics for integrated management strategy evaluation of

Ningaloo.

One Co-operative Research Centre:

Sustainable Tourism Co-operative Research Centre.

Three ARC Research Networks:

ARC Financial Integrity Research Network;

ARC Research Network in Enterprise Information Infrastructure; and

ARC Research Network for Early European Research.

Five collaborative ARC Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities grants:

AusStage: Gateway to the Australian Performing Arts - live performance phase 3 - enhancing collaborative research methodologies through digital

• networking technologies;

High Performance Optical Profilometer for Mapping micro/meso/

• macroscopic topography;

The Nanoscale Characterisation Centre WA Focused Ion Beam

Nanofabrication and Milling Facility;

A cryopreparation facility for Western Australia; and

MALDI Imaging and Protein Analysis Facility WA.

Developing and Implementing ECU’s Research Quality

Framework Response Plan

A major goal for the year was to prepare ECU for the Research Quality

Framework. During 2007:

• an RQF Response Plan for ECU was developed and implemented;

• an RQF Officer was appointed;

• a Digital Repository, administrative staff and information systems for

RQF were put in place;

• the allocation of staff to 20 Research Panel groups, spread across 11 of the 13 panels was completed;

• draft evidence portfolios were completed and are being externally reviewed; and

• briefing sessions for ECU Heads of School, senior researchers and group leaders were held, providing information on the latest RQF developments from the Department of Education, Science and Training.

It should be noted that in December 2007 the new Commonwealth

Government announced that it would not proceed with the implementation of the RQF process.

ECU’s work to develop an Open Access Digital Repository for ECU publications, initiated as part of the RQF process, will continue in 2008.

Commercialisation of Research

ECU has increased its focus on commercialisation of its research outputs and resultant income in 2007 was $815,000. Significant progress was made in establishing processes and documentation, with the development of a more streamlined Commercialisation Protocol, registers for Projects, Patents and Trademarks, and legal documentation covering Invention Disclosure and Revenue Sharing. A review of the Intellectual Property Policy was also undertaken. Eighteen commercialisation projects were managed by the

Commercialisation Office, one of which won the 2007 Western Australian

Inventor of the Year (Early Stage Category). Research commercialisation is

University-wide and meets the requirements of the National Principles of

Intellectual Property Management for Publicly Funded Research.

The University continued as the preferred contract research organisation for several significant commercial projects, partnered with industry to commercialise outputs from ECU research projects and identified commercially-viable technological advances in key areas of its research strength.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 45

High Quality Research Training

Research by Higher Degree Load

Following a period of rapid growth in the 1990s, research higher degree enrolments at ECU peaked at 451 EFTSL in 2001 and then steadily declined in the period

2002 to 2007. This decline was a result of changes in Commonwealth Government policy that reduced funded research higher degree places. With a change in the funding model that rewards completions, ECU has adopted a deliberate strategy of targeting high quality students likely to complete their research higher degree within the time limits prescribed by the Research Training Scheme (RTS).

In 2007, the University exceeded its 2007 Higher Degree by Research Load targets by 2 per cent overall. Compared with 2006, there was a small increase in actual load in the International category (see Table 8 below).

Table 8: Higher Degree by Research Load, 2005-2007

Commonwealth Supported

ECU Funded

Target

190

67

2005

Actual

192

68

International

Domestic Tuition Fee

Total

60

6

323

68

6

334

Variance

1.1%

1.5%

13.3%

0%

3.4%

Target

183

54

62

6

305

2006

Actual

188

78

80

4

350

Variance

2.7%

44.4%

29.0%

-33.3%

14.8%

Target

191

79

50

8

328

2007

Actual

186

61

84

4

335

Variance

-2.6%

-22.8%

68.0%

-50.0%

2.1%

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Research Training Initiatives

In 2007, ECU continued to foster a strengthened research training culture through a number of initiatives, which are listed below.

Research and writing consultants were appointed in each of the metropolitan-based faculties. One research consultant was appointed

• to the Centre for Learning & Teaching.

A series of workshops were conducted to provide staff with strategies for provision of effective research supervision and information relating to research policy and practices.

A series of postgraduate research seminars was run at each campus.

Students and research staff were encouraged to attend these with a view of sharing experience and knowledge. These were accompanied by lunches and social sessions (ten were run in 2007).

A University-wide research calendar was developed with up-to-date information on seminars, research centres, research proposals, and guest

• speakers.

A multi-user blog site on the ECU website was created to provide students with a forum to encourage dialogue, reflection and collaboration across all disciplines, staff and students.

ECU training courses (including new MS Word and other workshops) were made available to research students.

A new part-time position was established to help promote research culture and support Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students. The new position will be active in updating the research calendar, and running regular social events with a view to helping students collaborate with others, as well as identifying issues and facilitating the resolution of these (by identifying appropriate help and resources).

Faculty resources and support for HDR students were reviewed, which included office space, research software licensing and the breadth of research training courses being offered across ECU.

HDR student marketing was enhanced through a Research Expo (conducted for the first time in August 2007) and a centralised marketing campaign

(conducted in September/October 2007) to promote intake across faculties.

The 2008 Budget, approved in 2007, will provide additional ECU scholarships from 2008. There will be four new International (fee and stipend) Scholarships, five new ECU Excellence (top-up) Scholarships and eight new ECU PRS (stipend) Scholarships.

Postgraduate Research Students’ Experience

In September 2007, an analysis of Postgraduate Research Experience

Questionnaire (PREQ) data from a three-year survey period was reported by Graduate Careers Australia, in its publication Postgraduate Research

Experience 2006. Positive results were shown for ECU as follows:

• of the seven qualities of research experience, ECU is ranked 2 nd

in

“Supervision” and “Setting Goals & Expectations”, and in the top 20 per cent of institutions for “Skill Development” and “Overall Satisfaction for the Research Experience”; and

• there was an improvement in ECU’s national PREQ ranking for each of the seven qualities.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 47

Building Organisational Sustainability

ECU seeks to be recognised for attracting and retaining high quality, committed staff and for approaches to teaching and research which are supported by costeffective, responsive and sustainable organisational systems.

The Strategic Priority Area of organisational sustainability includes Staffing,

Financial Strength and Enabling Infrastructure.

Staffing

ECU recognises its staff as its most valuable resource. In 2007, ECU’s goals were:

• to attract and retain the staff required to achieve ECU’s strategic priorities;

• to strengthen leadership capacity and build a strong performance culture; and

• to provide a safe, healthy and positive work environment.

Attracting and Retaining Staff

ECU’s staff profile is one of the older staff profiles in the higher education sector, although this has improved within the last 12 months. Building on earlier research on staff demographics, in 2007 ECU devised a strategy, due to be implemented in 2008, which addresses both the projected loss of staff due to retirement and issues of attraction and retention in the highly competitive

Western Australian labour market. This strategy is similar to the student marketing brand “Reach Your Potential”, providing a fresh basis upon which to build ECU’s employment brand and its employee value proposition. The strategy encompasses the extension of workforce planning across all business units, succession planning and enhanced career development initiatives and talent management processes.

In 2007, the University complied with the Commonwealth’s Higher Education

Workplace Relations Requirements (HEWRRs) and offered Australian Workplace

Agreements consistent with the HEWRRs, in order to provide additional flexibility in working conditions and attract new staff and retain existing staff.

Analyses indicate that continuing competition within the Western Australian labour market, particularly for discipline experts, has not impacted on staff attrition rates, which are close to sector averages, but applicant rates and acceptance of offer rates are showing some detrimental effects.

In addition, the following 2007 activities are noteworthy:

ECU undertook benchmarking of its recruitment procedures with two other

Australian universities. Results will feed into the upgrade of the existing process and the design of e-recruitment procedures in 2008.

ECU was successful in obtaining $535,000 funding under the

Commonwealth Government’s Workplace Productivity Programme as a contribution towards the development of e-recruitment, on-line performance management and succession planning systems and to improve

• workforce planning capability. The project is due to commence in 2008.

The Human Resources Services Centre underwent an external review

• which identified areas of good practice and opportunities for improvement.

The ECU Staffing Functional Plan was revised in 2007 and covers the period

2007-2009.

Work began on a new staff survey to measure satisfaction levels across a range of indicators. The survey will be run in 2008.

Strategies to grow research capacity, including through research staff recruitment, are described on page 42 of the Annual Report. This contributes to general growth in the size of the professoriate of the University. Initiatives aimed at growth of this segment of the staff profile have increased the proportion from 5 per cent to 7 per cent of academic staff since 2003.

Leadership Capacity

Changes to the Senior Leadership Team in 2007 included:

• the appointment of Professor Arshad Omari as Deputy Vice-Chancellor;

• the appointment of Professor Brenda Cherednichenko as Executive Dean

(Faculty of Education & Arts); and

• the appointment of Professor John Finlay-Jones, who will take up the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the end of March 2008.

A number of other key leadership appointments were made in 2007, including:

Professor Ron Oliver, who became Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching & Learning);

Professor Anne Wilkinson, who was appointed to the position of the Cancer

Council of Western Australia Chair in Palliative and Supportive Care;

Professor Clive Barstow, who was appointed Professor of Creative Arts; and

Professor Sue Stoney, who was appointed as the inaugural head of the

Centre for Learning and Teaching.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

An additional 12 new Professorial Chairs were advertised in September 2007 to further supplement the professoriate at ECU.

Building leadership capacity was again a major focus for the year. Two leadership programs: the [email protected] Accredited Program and the

Academic Leadership Program, operated during 2007 and were accessed by 267 individual ECU staff in 2007, many of whom attended more than one program.

The [email protected] Accredited Program (LEAP) is an internally developed course which articulates into formal University programs and management qualifications. In 2007, LEAP had 25 general staff participants, down from more than 60 staff in 2006. Consequently, the program has been reviewed and restructured.

The Academic Leadership Program (ALP), which targets Course Co-ordinators,

Program Directors, Heads of School and Associate Deans, had a small cohort in 2007, most rating the program very highly. The ALP’s module offerings continue to be revised in response to staff feedback.

In addition, in November 2007, a two-day Leadership Residential Program was held for 41 senior staff (academic and general), including the University’s

Senior Leadership Team. The program’s objective was to strengthen ECU’s senior leaders’ understanding of ECU’s strategic priorities, leadership culture, coaching and customer engagement. Participants committed to collegial processes by increasing their levels of self-awareness around ‘more effective’ and ‘less effective’ thinking styles to improve engagement with staff, students and members of the community.

A Strong Performance Culture

2007 saw the completion of enhancements to objective setting under the

Senior Staff Performance Payment System (SSPPS), with the expectation that there will be alignment of SSPPS with ECU’s new strategic directions as outlined in Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities.

Towards 2020.

An audit of the Management for Performance System (MPS) was conducted in 2007 and findings were implemented as improvements to the process.

The MPS Policy and Guidelines were revised to incorporate a rating system against each objective, aimed at providing more focused feedback to employees.

A Safe, Healthy and Positive Work Environment

The University has maintained an excellent long-term record with regard to workers’ compensation claims. Workers’ compensation claims costs and injury rates continue to remain low. This is a strong indication of the University’s on-going success in the development and implementation of occupational safety and health plans for each of ECU’s faculties and service centres, a management process supported by the ECU Occupational Safety and Health

(OS&H) Office. Each faculty and service centre now has a local OS&H

Committee chaired by its respective Business Manager. Key performance indicators will be developed by faculties and service centres as part of the bi-annual reporting process.

In addition, professional development opportunities related to OS&H have been introduced for ‘fun and stimulation’ (e.g. verbal judo and meditation) and a wellness program was developed by the OS&H Office, in collaboration with

ECU Sports and HBF. Corporate membership packages have been developed for staff with private health providers HBF and Medicare Private.

During the year ECU was visited by inspectors from WorkSafe Western

Australia as per its annual regulatory framework. The investigation, which focused on plant and machinery, was positive and allowed ECU staff to engage openly on matters of compliance. Although points were raised requiring attention, WorkSafe was satisfied with ECU’s approach to the management of Occupational Safety and Health and its adherence to regulatory requirements.

Information on ECU’s workers’ compensation claims is provided at page 66 of the Annual Report.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 49

Financial Strength

In 2007, ECU’s goals in relation to its financial positioning were:

• to maintain a strong financial position and ensure that its financial

• resources continued to be managed efficiently and effectively; and over time, to build alternative sources of revenue such as fee-paying courses, commercial activities, fundraising and its investment portfolio.

Budget Setting

The four strategic priorities in Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds;

Engaging Communities. Towards 2020 provided the context within which the

2007 budget was developed and are reflected in University-wide strategic budget allocations, as well as the expenditure plans of individual business units. In this way, the 2007 budget acted as a key driver for the University’s ongoing strategic growth and development.

Given the challenging environment in which ECU operates, the University needs the capacity to adjust quickly if major changes are forced upon it.

Accordingly, strategies have been set in place at both the University-wide and business unit level to ensure that ECU is in a position to respond quickly when external circumstances change. ECU responded promptly to the lower demand for Commonwealth Grant Scheme places and implemented a number of strategies that focused on improving student services, revenue growth initiatives, process efficiencies, marketing and alignment of activities to strategic priorities, while still achieving its key financial performance targets.

These budget initiatives are working in parallel with complementary initiatives designed to:

• continue to focus the University’s academic activities and staff profile in

• areas of strength; improve the quality of activities, services and outcomes in teaching and

• research; ensure that ECU remains financially viable by a combination of strategies aimed at cost savings and improved efficiencies, but particularly by achieving revenue targets; and

• consolidate campuses and enhance the communications and information technology infrastructure.

In 2007, ECU operated within the key budget parameters approved by Council.

The 2008 consolidated budget was presented to Council at its December meeting and received its approval. It includes key financial performance measures for 2008.

Financial Position

ECU adopts a prudent approach to financial management and its overall financial position remains sound. The University once again received an unqualified external audit opinion for 2007 and received a “clean bill of health” from the Department of Education, Science and Training, which undertakes an annual review of the financial position of Australian universities.

The University posted a 2007 operating result of $20.1m, which included

$10.6m gain on sale of assets relating to the Churchlands stage 1 and stage 2 development. The 2007 operating result excluding the gain on sale of assets was $9.5m, which compares favourably to the reforecast budget of $6.0m.

This excellent outcome was due to the significant staff commitment to manage resources effectively within the available funding.

2007 operating revenue excluding the Churchlands development was $259m, which compares favourably against the 2007 reforecast budget of $251m. Total revenue for the University in 2007 was $270m compared to $255m in 2006.

In terms of performance against the 2007 financial targets set by Council, the following financial ratios were achieved:

• operating margin of 7.5 per cent, (favourable), well in excess of the target

• of 3 per cent; interest cover on borrowings of eleven times, (favourable) to a target of

• three times; current ratio of 0.9, above the target of 0.8; and

• debt to equity ratio of 11 per cent against a maximum agreed level of 30 per cent.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Building Alternative Revenues

Revenues from international students increased by $3.6m (9.4 per cent) in 2007 compared with 2006. International On-shore revenue in 2007 was $35.0m and for International Off-shore activities, revenue amounted to some $6.6m.

Research income from sources other than the Commonwealth Government’s

Research Block Funding (industry, community groups/ organisations and the public sector (other than National Competitive Grants)), was $9.79m in 2007, a slight decline compared with 2006, but an overall increase of 18 per cent since 2004.

In 2007, an Investment Policy Statement was approved by Council and an investment portfolio was established.

ECU again complied with Commonwealth requirements under the

National Governance Protocols and Higher Education Workplace Relations

Requirements in order to be eligible for the 7.5 per cent contingent allocation in Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding for 2008.

In 2007, ECU also successfully secured funding in three Commonwealth competitive funding schemes:

Capital Development Pool (CDP)

– funding of $1.73m for 2009 and $1m for 2010 was granted to assist with construction of the Nursing facilities in the Health and Wellness Building on the Joondalup Campus. ECU has been granted funds for the Nursing facilities in each of the last three CDP funding rounds, totalling $5.23m, as a contribution to the $14m building costs;

Voluntary Student unionism Transition Fund for Sporting and

Recreational Facilities – funding allocations of $360,000 and $1.85m were made to build outdoor courts and an indoor recreation centre at the

South West Campus;

Workplace Productivity Programme

– ECU was successful in its bid for $530,000 funding for its project: Integrated Human Resource

Planning, Recruitment and Performance Development System, to develop e-recruitment, on-line performance management and succession planning systems and to improve workforce planning capability; and

Learning and Teaching Performance Fund 2008

– an allocation to

ECU of $1.58m was announced in October 2007 for high performance in the

Science, Computing, Engineering, Architecture and Agriculture discipline group and for improved performance in the Business, Law and Economics discipline group.

ECu Foundation

– a comprehensive review of the ECU Foundation commenced in 2007 and is being undertaken under the auspices of the reestablished ECU Foundation Board. An interim report from the Board was provided at the December 2007 meeting of Council, with a final report and set of recommendations scheduled to be presented to Council in mid-2008.

New funding strategies and governance arrangements will be developed in

2008, informed by best practice.

Enabling Infrastructure

In 2007, ECU’s goals in this area were:

• to provide leading edge infrastructure which gives high quality services to stakeholders; and

• to ensure that the University’s infrastructure and services were managed efficiently and effectively.

The current Asset Management Plan includes a combination of approved projects, proposed funding allocations, planned maintenance and projects that are in the conceptual stage only. These infrastructure projects incorporate research infrastructure requirements.

A new five-year Asset Management Plan has been developed for 2008 onwards, to support the quality, growth and maintenance of the University’s assets.

During 2007, the University progressed major building works, campus enhancement, the Churchlands redevelopment project and a number of communications and information technology development projects.

In addition, ECU implemented efficiency measures to streamline administrative processes in a number of areas.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 51

Capital Projects, Campus Enhancement and the Churchlands

Redevelopment

ECU has a significant capital development program in place. During 2007, in line with the University’s Asset Management Plan, expenditure on major capital works and infrastructure totalled $36.3m and expenditure on minor works totalled $2.8m.

During 2007, there was good progress towards completion of ECU’s campus consolidation strategy. Key priorities of the strategy are: i) the redevelopment of the Churchlands Campus; and ii) the construction of major new projects at the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses, to accommodate activities relocated from Churchlands.

With State Government support, the 20ha Churchlands Campus is being redeveloped as a premium housing estate, known as Churchlands Green.

This redevelopment has been carefully staged over several years to minimise disruption to ECU’s students and staff. A team of consultants has been appointed, a detailed project plan has been prepared and planning is proceeding for the Churchlands Campus exit and redevelopment. The relocation strategy documents and reports on the outcomes for the University and addresses cost, campus operations and University planning requirements.

The land sales and relocation strategies were actioned to agreed timelines and on budget. 2007 saw the sale of the majority of residential lots (as part of stage 1 and stage 2) and stage 3 is currently under construction.

In 2007, the Health and Wellness Building ($35.5m) was completed at the

Joondalup Campus. The following major projects were also progressed. All have met their project milestone targets and will be completed in accordance with the campus consolidation strategy:

• a new 350-seat lecture theatre at the Joondalup Campus;

• the library fit-outs at the Mount Lawley and Joondalup campuses;

• new and upgraded teaching and learning facilities at the South

West Campus. These include the upgrade of the Student Central and administration area, incorporating the e-lab into the library, and the introduction of a Rural Clinical School and PD Centre;

• planning commenced for new recreational facilities at the South West

Campus, with construction of multi-purpose courts, changing rooms and indoor recreation centre funded through the Voluntary Student Unionism

Transition Fund;

• planning commenced for new Student Housing on the Mount Lawley

Campus; and

• construction of a Business and Law Building on the Mount Lawley Campus

($27.9m) began and is due for completion in 2008.

A summary of capital works completed in 2007 and in progress at the end of

2007 is provided on page 64 of the Annual Report.

During the year, architects for the Joondalup Library and Technology

Centre won the Royal Australian Institute of Architects (WA)’s 2007 Public

Architecture Award for Best Building. The architects also received the Royal

Institute of British Architects’ International Award.

Information Technology

The IT Capital Asset Plan allowed for $12.9m of upgrades and improvements to University information technology infrastructure. The majority of the allocation has been directed to network services and notebook and desktop computer replacement.

The second phase of the network roll-out was completed through the installation of a high capacity link between the Mount Lawley and Joondalup campuses. This link effectively connects the disc storage array which is connected to the server fleet at both campuses. Enhanced business continuity, resiliency and reliability will result from this increased capacity.

The third iteration of the University’s successful standards for desktop and notebook computers was implemented in the year. The manner of approach to this project was enhanced to reduce the burden on cash flow, and so one third of computers are now replaced each year in a rolling, three-yearly program.

Student Laboratory and staff computers with the Windows operating system were replaced with the latest models from Lenovo. Significant efforts were made in preparation for the 2008 release of the Windows Vista operating system and extensive application testing and self-help user training courses were completed.

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SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

The University Identification Card was upgraded with the latest smartcard technology to provide students with an integrated payment card for public transport, eLab and library borrowing and photocopying and printing. The ECU smartcard is fully integrated with TransPerth transport services, improving services and convenience for ECU students.

A new server and storage strategy was released in 2007 and has resulted in a renewed five-year relationship with Moncrieff and IBM for servers and storage. These two areas of University infrastructure are rapidly expanding to cope with increased demands from internet downloads, application information and streaming media from captured teaching sessions.

To ensure that the risks associated with IT Governance are well managed, there was an increased focus and priority given to addressing outstanding audit recommendations, with 70 per cent of past recommendations having now been closed. This has resulted in a more secure environment with enhancements to password security, information security awareness, software management and licensing and domain administration and control. On the recommendation of Internal Audit, in 2008 ECU will adopt the Control Objectives for IT (CobIT) framework of IT Governance. This is a program of best practice that will assist the University to ensure it will receive maximum value from its IT investments.

A full review of the University’s website was undertaken and a major upgrade initiative is planned for 2008. New website governance procedures and a web content management system will ensure that students and other major stakeholders experience improved access to information and web resources.

Three high-level video capture installations were completed this year to support learning via the Flexilecture system and a further 40 audio-only spaces have been identified for completion early in 2008. The Flexilecture system allows automated capture of teaching content, so that students can review lectures in a more flexible manner from any internet-connected location.

Streamlining Administrative Processes

ECU continued to pursue a range of value-for-money strategies in 2007, while taking into account the need for sound business planning and risk management. This has enabled additional resources to be re-allocated to teaching and research and other areas of higher priority.

2007 initiatives to increase effectiveness and/ or efficiency included:

• the establishment of the Surveys Services Unit to provide a more cohesive, consistent and higher quality approach to the University’s major surveying of students and staff;

• the implementation of a software application to determine maintenance funding levels required to ensure the future integrity of the University’s facilities and the management of backlog maintenance;

• a reconfiguration of the University’s contract management framework;

• a review of the financial assessment model used to evaluate capital projects was conducted and a new financial model developed;

• the implementation of an improved service delivery model to support financial processes across the University;

• reviews of Admissions, Assessments and Student Records to ensure administrative processes are efficient and effective; and

• undertaking two Workplace Productivity Programme projects: the effective delivery of national benchmarking data; and a comprehensive set of Course and Unit Co-ordinator reports.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 53

Summary Statistics

Table 9: ECU Student and Staff Data as at 31 March 2007

Students

Full-time Students

Part-time Students

External Students

Total Students

2000

11,096

4,951

3,757

19,804

2001

11,735

4,815

3,379

19,929

Higher Degree by Research Students

Master and PhD by Coursework Students

Other Postgraduate Students

Undergraduate Students

687

948

1,166

17,004

707

1,015

1,061

17,027

2002

12,920

4,849

3,430

21,199

638

1,217

1,540

17,804

2003

13,731

5,338

2,642

21,711

597

1,217

1,654

18,273

2004

12,930

6,631

2,108

21,669

559

1,501

2,024

17,585

2005

14,151

4,765

2,188

21,104

488

1,704

2,015

16,897

2006

13,707

4,872

2,514

21,093

504

2,071

1,992

16,526

16,391

2007

13,211

4,820

2,574

20,605

481

2,307

1,939

15,878

15,730 Equivalent Full-time Student Load (EFTSL) 14,848

Course Completions

Fee-paying Overseas Students

Staff

Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Staff 2

Library

3 Volumes Held

Serial Subscriptions

4,135

2,180

1,775

787,487

14,611

15,324

4,458

2,559

1,794

626,766

16,343

16,599

5,173

3,069

1,817

17,126

5,366

3,393

1,813

700,591

18,693

661,420

15,005

17,104

5,616

3,638

1,8342

16,445

5,809

3,567

1,869

6,411

4,016

1,820

Not Available

4,398

1,868

651,980

19,279

647,644

21,109

651,829

32,003

643,561

33,982

1

Total Income ($000)

4

161,543 191,730 205,708 204,613 278,685 251,131 254,786 269,764

Notes: 1 - 2007 Course Completions not available until 31 March 2008. 2 - Includes an estimate of casual staff FTE. 3 - Data is at 31 December 2007. 4 - Total Income for the General University 2003-2007

(external reporting) based on current IFRS classification requirements.

54

SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Summary Comment on Performance

Against Financial and Key

Performance Indicator Targets

Performance Against 2007 Financial Targets

2007 Operating Result

The University posted a 2007 operating result of $20.1m, which included $10.6m gain on sale of assets relating to the Churchlands stage 1 and 2 development.

The 2007 operating result excluding the gain on sale of assets was $9.5m which compares favourably to the reforecast budget of $6m.

2007 Revenue

2007 operating revenue excluding the Churchlands development was $259m, which compares favourably against the 2007 reforecast budget of $251m.

Total revenue for the University in 2007 was $270m compared to $255m in 2006.

2007 Financial Ratios

Table 10: Financial Ratios, 2007

Operating Margin

Interest cover on borrowings

Liquidity - Current Ratio

Debt to equity ratio

Cash Reserves (no. of weeks)

Actual

7.45%

11x

0.9

11%

11.3

Target

At least 3%

At least 3x

At least 0.8

Not more than 30%

At least 4

Variance / Comment

The operating margin exceeded the target set for 2007

The interest cover on borrowings exceeded the target set for 2007

The current ratio exceeded the target set for 2007

The debt to equity ratio exceeded the target set for 2007

The number of weeks revenue in cash assets exceeded the target set for 2007

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 55

Performance Against 2007 Key Performance Indicator Targets

During 2007 ECU’s Council reviewed and streamlined the University’s KPI Framework and changes included an alignment with the strategic priorities in

Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards 2020, as approved by Council in December 2006. A process to establish targets for the KPIs has since commenced and targets will be finalised by mid-2008.

The Key Performance Indicator Report can be found contained in the CD at the back of this Annual Report and gives detailed information on the University’s performance against the KPIs. Noteworthy trends and comparisons with National and State averages are summarised below, using the latest audited data.

Table 11: Summary of Performance Against KPI Targets, 2007

Performance Indicator Commentary

Retention

Course Satisfaction

Quality of Teaching

Graduate Employment

Student retention has increased over the last two years, but is still just below the National average

(79.6% for ECU, compared with the National average of 80.9%).

Student ratings for Course Satisfaction at ECU have been relatively stable over the last four years. Course

Satisfaction is above the National average (89.7% for ECU, compared with the National average of 89.5%), but below the State average of 90.1%.

Student ratings for Good Teaching at ECU have increased for the past three years. Good Teaching is above the

National and State averages (86.6% for ECU, compared with the National average of 82.3% and the State average of 84.1%).

ECU graduate employment improved by 5.3 percentage points over the last year, but at 73.4% remains below the

National average (82.4%) and the State average (80.2%).

Share of First Preference

Teaching-Related Expenditure per Student Load

Research Income

ECU’s share of first preferences through TISC declined slightly over the last year, from 20.2% to 19.4%, although these figures exclude the large number of commencing students whose admissions are not managed by TISC. In 2007 approximately 36% of commencing undergraduates entered Bachelor courses directly, rather than through TISC.

Teaching-related expenditure/EFTSL has continued to increase. While this may reflect the fact that most costs are fixed and student numbers have fallen, it may also indicate the success of ECU’s budget approach, which is to prioritise funding support for core teaching and learning activities.

ECU’s total research income increased 83% over the last five years (from $5.48m to $10.02m). Research income from Industry and Other Funding increased by 166% over this period and makes up 31% of total research income.

Higher Degree Research Completions

Higher degree research completions have increased over the last five years (from 73 to 90), with a recent increase in PhD completions more than offsetting a decrease in Masters by Research completions.

Research Publications

Although Weighted Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE has declined in the last two years, ECU’s emphasis on

“high quality” research publications has seen an increase in the “Articles in Scholarly Refereed Journal” category of research publications in the last year from 4.29 per 10 Academic Staff FTE to 4.78 per 10 Academic Staff FTE.

56

SECTION 2 AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Significant

Issues and

Trends

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 57

Economic and Social Trends

2007 saw significant on-going change in the higher education sector emanating from economic, demographic and public policy changes.

The strong domestic economy, coupled with strong labour market pressures, continues to impact on the higher education sector. Western Australia’s buoyant economy has led to sustained employment growth, with the State’s unemployment rate and youth unemployment rate currently the lowest of all states and territories. This has had the effect of reducing demand for tertiary education, as described below. These factors are exacerbated by disincentives to study such as increases in student financial contributions and cost of living pressures resulting from housing, petrol and food price inflation.

The Western Australian economy and job market is likely to remain buoyant through 2008 and into the medium term, with skills shortages in a number of occupations persisting. The Western Australian Premier has noted that when the “boom” does end, the less skilled and less educated will find it difficult to remain in employment, unless they gain appropriate education and training in the meantime.

Australia’s ageing population, in common with most developed countries, will bring skills shortages in the workforce and a greater need for re-training and skills upgrading at both professional and sub-professional levels. Ironically, recent declines in applications for higher education places are most evident amongst the older, non-school leaver cohort. This suggests that in future, higher education providers will need to provide more options for flexible study and shorter or accelerated course programs.

The ageing demographic will also result in significant additional demand for healthcare services and workers.

Skills shortages continue to influence the sector’s planning of courses and programs. Critical shortages of university graduates for managerial, professional and associated professional jobs already exist. These have been caused by skills gaps as the “baby boomer” generation begins to retire and increased business and industry demand for workers with tertiary qualifications. State Government concern at skills shortages has resulted in campaigns to encourage university graduates and other skilled workers to migrate from other states and from overseas.

Skills shortages in the following occupations continue to be of particular concern: teachers (in particular secondary school teachers) nurses, other health specialisations such as mental health, engineering and accounting. These have been the focus for Commonwealth and State government training initiatives.

These changes have potential implications for university programs, particularly those in teacher education and nursing.

58

SECTION 3 SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND TRENDS

Commonwealth Government policy significantly impacts on the Australian higher education sector, especially as Commonwealth funding is a major source of income for public universities. Some of the policies and initiatives impacting on universities in 2007 are listed below.

Changes were made to the National Protocols for Higher Education Approval Processes which are likely to increase numbers of private providers becoming

• self-accrediting institutions and will extend use of the title “university”.

The previous Commonwealth Government sought to encourage further differentiation and stressed that the current model of a large number of comprehensive

• universities (the “one size fits all” model) was not sustainable.

Changes in funding arrangements were introduced to allow greater flexibility by removing caps on full-fee paying places and penalties for over-enrolment in

Commonwealth Grant Scheme places.

There were ongoing delays to the implementation of the Research Quality Framework.

There was continued emphasis on competitive funding for specific programs.

Contingent funding arrangements, tied to compliance with the National Governance Protocols and Higher Education Workplace Relations Requirements,

• continued to operate.

Further support for private higher education providers was evident, with the allocation of additional Commonwealth Grant Scheme places and the extension of

FEE-HELP.

Development of an Australian “Graduation Statement” began, to provide for greater recognition of Australian qualifications in other countries. This initiative is a response to the “diploma supplement” planned by European universities under the so called “Bologna Process” and will help Australian universities to compete for international students.

The policy setting in which higher education operates may well change as a result of the election of the new Commonwealth Government in late 2007.

Although some initiatives already in train may be retained by the new government, there is likely to be additional emphasis on early childhood education, replacement of the Research Quality Framework in favour of another means of assessing and funding research, the phasing-out of Domestic Tuition Fee places at public universities, reduced Student Contributions for students studying Mathematics and Science and a substantial increase in Commonwealth scholarships and research fellowships.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 59

Current and Emerging Trends in Student Demand

Domestic Student Demand

2007 saw a continuation of the trend of reducing enrolments in higher education. At the national level, demand for higher education was static for

2006-07, having declined by about 4 per cent over 2005-6. The downturn in enrolments has been particularly evident amongst the regional and newer universities. Western Australia, however, with its very buoyant economy, suffered a decline in demand of about 8 per cent for 2005-06 and a further

2.8 per cent for 2006-07.

ECU, in common with other universities with a strong mature-aged student profile, has also faced an enrolment downturn because of a decline in the mature-aged student market. Again, this trend was evident across Australia, as potential students pursue work options in preference to study, but was particularly marked in Western Australia, where mature-aged applications for undergraduate places in 2007 were down approximately 5 per cent.

The downward trend in mature-aged applications seems likely to continue into 2008, with applications (as at end January 2008) down by 14 per cent on the same time in the previous year. Some improvement in school-leaver applications to Western Australian universities is predicted, with applications for 2008 up by 7 per cent, compared with the same time last year.

International Student Demand

International student numbers at Australian universities have grown over a number of years and provide not just an important source of income, but also a mutual benefit in terms of the enrichment of the curriculum and widening cultural experiences for students.

Growth in international student numbers has slowed in the last 12 months as

Australian universities continue to face an uncertain global environment and difficult market conditions.

Although the number of international enrolments has continued to increase in absolute terms, the higher education sector’s share of the international student market has slowly declined in the last three years, in contrast to the strong growth in the vocational education and training sector. In 2007 (to

September), international student enrolments in Australian higher education increased by 4.0 per cent on the same period in 2006. The strongest growth in commencing enrolments was from citizens from the Republic of Korea (14.5 per cent), India (13.7 per cent) and Malaysia (8.4 per cent).

Exchange rate changes have significantly increased the cost of Australian higher education in many key source countries and terrorism and safety concerns continue to impact on decisions about where to study. Importantly,

Australian universities are experiencing intensified competition from other

English-speaking countries and also from traditional source countries such as Singapore and Malaysia. These countries are now more self-sufficient in providing higher education for their citizens, as well as becoming more desirable destinations for international students from elsewhere.

60

SECTION 3 SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND TRENDS

Legislative Impacts

The main legislative impacts on ECu’s operations in 2007 were from the following existing and new legislation:

Higher Education Support Act 2003

(Cwlth) [HESA]

This legislation determines the University’s Commonwealth funding for teaching and research and its responsibilities in terms of governance and acquittal. HESA includes provisions for contingent funding, tied to compliance with the National Governance Protocols and the Higher

Education Workplace Reform Requirements, as well as a number of competitive funding schemes in areas such as capital works, improved productivity and teaching excellence.

Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000

(Cwlth) [ESOS] and

New National Code

A revised ESOS Act and National Code came into effect in July 2007 and

ECU’s international student procedures have been amended to comply with the new National Code.

Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act 2004

(WA)

This legislation requires compulsory criminal record checking for ECU students and staff engaged in child-related work. ECU policies and guidelines have been developed and are expected to be finalised in 2008, when the maximum age of children for whom a record check is required will be raised to 17.

Financial Management Act 2006

(WA)

Revised annual reporting requirements came into effect on 1 February

2007 and ECU’s annual reporting processes have been revised to meet the requirements of this Act and of the Auditor General Act 2006 (WA).

Further legislative developments likely to impact upon ECu’s operations in the future include those listed below:

Higher Education Support Act 2003

(Cwlth) [HESA]

A range of amendments to HESA are likely, including the replacement of the Research Quality Framework, repeal of sections of HESA providing for contingent funding linked to governance and industrial relations requirements and changes to Voluntary Student Unionism arrangements.

Information Privacy Bill 2007

(WA)

The Information Privacy Bill 2007 amends the Freedom of Information Act

1992 and other relevant legislation. At the end of 2007, the Bill’s Second

Reading was adjourned by the Western Australian Legislative Council.

The Bill provides for policies and procedures for obtaining, storing and dealing with the personal and health information of staff, students, suppliers, customers and other persons.

ECU has commenced work on a policy and supporting guidelines in anticipation of the passing of the Bill.

Australian Standard AS3806 – Compliance Programs

ECU has begun to review its Compliance Policy and Framework to align with the revised Australian standard. This work will be completed in 2008.

Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006

(Cwlth)

There may be some limited impact upon ECU operations as a result of new requirements to report physical cash transactions with overseas origins or destinations.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 61

ECU’s Response to Significant Issues and Trends

ECU’s response to changes in State, national and international higher education environments is through a realistic and flexible approach which attempts to anticipate external change and engages with government, while at the same time progressing its Mission, Vision, Values and Strategic Priorities and pursuing strategic opportunities which will strengthen the University’s position.

ECU’s strategic direction is focused on ways to further differentiate and position ECU in the competitive environment in which it operates. During 2007 the

University implemented steps to help it attract and retain more students and these steps included:

• the introduction of new courses;

• re-examination of TER cut-offs for courses;

• extension of the Portfolio Entry pathway;

• early offer arrangements to students completing TAFE courses;

• re-vitalising and repackaging of ECU-funded scholarships; and

• renewed focus on the student experience and the support provided to students, especially in their first year at ECU.

More broadly, ECU is increasing its emphasis on mutual engagement with its communities and with relevant professions and industries. ECU seeks to position itself to respond to the needs of business and industry and to contribute to the social and economic betterment of its graduates and the communities ECU serves.

62

SECTION 3 SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND TRENDS

and Legal

Compliance

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 63

Financial Statements,

Key Performance Indicator Report and Other Financial Disclosures

Financial Statements and Key Performance Indicator Report

ECU’s 2007 Financial Statements and Key Performance Indicator Report can be found contained in the CD at the back of this Annual Report.

Pricing Policies

Like the majority of Australian universities, ECU sets the level of the student contribution for Commonwealth-supported places at the maximum allowed under the Higher Education Support Act 2003.

Fees for fee-paying courses are determined on the basis of cost and market conditions and take into account Commonwealth requirements regarding fees for non-Commonwealth supported places.

Major Capital Projects

Major capital projects completed during 2007 are shown below:

Table 12: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2007

Project

JOONDALUP CAMPUS

Library and Technology Centre

Health and Wellness Building

Estimated total cost ($m) Actual total cost ($m)

36.2

35.4

36.2

35.5

Major capital projects that were in progress as at 31 December 2007 are shown below:

Table 13: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2007

Project Estimated total cost ($m)

Actual total cost to complete ($m)

JOONDALUP CAMPUS

Lecture Theatre

Refit for Campus Consolidation

MOUNT LAWLEY CAMPUS

Business and Law Building

Refit for Campus Consolidation

Additional Student Housing

SOUTH WEST CAMPUS

Campus Developments

6.6

5.4

27.9

5.0

30.0

4.0

6.5

5.4

27.9

5.51

30.0

4.0

Note: 1. estimated cost increase due to shortage of building industry resources, uncompetitive tendering environment and escalating costs of materials and labour.

Expected year of completion

2008

2008

2008

2008

2011

2009

64

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Employees and Industrial Relations

Employees

The number of ECU staff, excluding casual staff, in full-time, part-time, permanent and contract employment categories is shown in Table 14 below.

Table 14: Characteristics of the Workforce (excluding casual staff), 2006-2007

Full-time

Headcount

Permanent

As at 30 June 2006

Academic Staff General Staff

415 640

Full-time Total

Part-time

Part-time Total

Grand Total

Contract

Permanent

Contract

92

507

42

62

104

611

127

767

186

113

299

1,066

Total

1,055

219

1,274

228

175

403

1,677

As at 30 June 2007

Academic Staff General Staff

375 574

78

453

43

42

85

538

149

723

186

120

306

1,029

Total

949

227

1,176

229

162

391

1,567

Note: In the 2006 Annual Report, headcount numbers as at 30 June 2006, were in fact those as at 30 September 2006. The actual headcount as at 30 June 2006 was 1677 in total and not 1620 as previously reported (variance is 57: 19 for Academic staff and 38 for General staff). Further clarification of variance within part-time/ full-time and permanent/ contract categories is available on request.

In 2007, ECU had 1567 staff (as a head count) compared to 1677 staff in 2006. Preliminary casual staff figures for 2007 were 250.9 (expressed as a conversion to full-time equivalent (FTE) of casual hours paid), compared to 253.0 in 2006.

Staffing Policies

The ECU Staffing Plan is one of several functional plans that identify specific operational priorities and actions which support the strategic priorities identified in Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards 2020.

The ECU Staffing Plan encompasses two key philosophies which are promulgated through ECU’s staffing policies. These are:

ECU believes that it will optimise its human capital through ensuring a diverse and flexible mix of staff and staffing arrangements; and

ECU will endeavour to provide an environment that recognises and rewards strong, positive leadership and experience.

The University completed all Commonwealth Government requirements relating to the Higher Education Workplace Relations Requirements and successfully bid for funding under the Workplace Productivity Programme.

Industrial Relations

Internal resolution of a number of concerns, grievances and disputes meant that during 2007 the University was not required to attend any conciliation conferences or arbitration hearings in the Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission, the Australian Industrial Relations Commission, the Human Rights

& Equal Opportunity Commission or the Equal Opportunity Commission. ECU was required to attend one formal hearing at the State Administrative Tribunal, at which the Tribunal found in ECU’s favour.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 65

Workers’ Compensation

ECU’s occupational safety and health statistics and performance are reported to two committees of Council: the Resources Committee and the Quality and

Audit Committee.

Figure 5 below shows that the University’s workers’ compensation liabilities, in terms of total projected costs and costs paid, remain low and confirms that the

University’s workers’ compensation claims management is active and successful.

Figure 5: Workers’ Compensation Costs & Annual Premium, 1998/99-2007/08

$600,000

$500,000

Costs Paid

Costs Outstanding

Total Projected Costs

Annual Premium

$400,000

$300,000

$200,000

$100,000

$0

1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

Period

2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08

Figure 6 shows that the number of workers’ compensation claims lodged continued its downward trend in 2007, while the number of lost time injuries and working days lost rose slightly compared with 2006, the trend continues downwards, demonstrating the successful integration of good OSH practices and application of the University’s Return to Work Program.

Figure 6: Lost Time Injuries, Workers’ Compensation Claims & Days Lost, 1998/99-2006/07

60

50

Lost Time Injuries

Number of Claims

Working Days Lost x 10

40

30

Number

20

10

66

0

1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03

Period

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07

Governance Disclosures

Corporate Standards and Risk Management

Equity

To meet the requirements of the Disability Services Act 1993 (WA), ECU continued to deliver its commitments as expressed in the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2006-2010. A report on achievements against the Plan’s strategies in 2006/2007 was submitted to the Disability Services Commission

(see page 77 of the Annual Report). The University’s Annual Implementation

Plan for 2007/2008 was drafted by ECU’s Disability Access Working Party.

In 2007, the University developed a draft Equity Action Plan and a separate, but linked, draft Indigenous Action Plan. These action plans reflect a whole-of-

University approach to mainstreaming equity principles and practices and to improving equity outcomes for students and staff.

ECU complies with the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act

1999 (Cwlth) and, as a result of its earlier positive outcomes, was exempted from reporting to the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency

(EOWA) until 2008. Work on securing a further waiver has commenced.

The University committee structure for matters relating to equity comprises: the Equity Committee; the Indigenous Employment (Development and

Implementation) Sub-committee; the Indigenous Consultative Committee; and the Disability Access Working Party. During 2007, these committees continued to advise on equity issues in the University.

ECU has a number of volunteer Contact Officers trained in Equal Opportunity legislation who can assist students and staff to choose an appropriate course of action to resolve any individual complaints or concerns. They provide confidential advice and information on existing complaints resolution processes at the University.

ECU has also adopted the ALLY program which provides a visible network of trained contacts (“Allies”) for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex

(GLBTI) students and staff on ECU’s campuses.

For more information on equity visit: http://www.ecu.edu.au/equ/

Quality

During 2007, the [email protected] model was reviewed and revised to more closely align it with ECU’s strategic directions and priorities as outlined in

Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards

2020 and the revised Australian Business Excellence Framework. The model continues to focus on a Plan Do Review Improve cycle of improvement.

Sixteen annual reviews of faculties and service centres were completed in

2007, with action identified to improve performance and strive for excellence.

Guidelines for the Annual Review cycle were streamlined. A program of

Annual Reviews for 2007 is scheduled for February to April 2008.

An on-line benchmarking course was developed for staff. In order to share current good practice, the course includes case studies, bulletin boards and communities of practice and interviews with ECU staff who have undertaken benchmarking activities.

For more information on Quality visit: http://www.ecu.edu.au/equ/

Risk Management

A major component of corporate governance at ECU is effective risk management. In 2007 progress was made on revisions to the ECU Risk

Management Framework and Policy and the identification of strategic risks as they impact upon the University’s new Mission and Strategic Priorities.

The Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) has foreshadowed identification of academic risks in its second round of institutional reviews.

ECU commenced its own identification of academic risks to assist in the preparation of an AUQA Audit anticipated for 2010.

An external peer review of ECU internal audit, risk management, legislative compliance and business continuity frameworks and functions was completed in

2007. ECU was assessed as conforming to the relevant professional standards.

Training on ECU’s Fraud and Misconduct Policy was provided to senior staff and this included presentations by the Corruption and Crime Commission and

ECU’s Vice-Chancellor. A fraud risk assessment will be performed in 2008, along with further training for new staff on fraud and misconduct avoidance.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 67

Subject to approval of the new Risk Management Framework and Policy by the University Council, it is intended that Risk Register software will be implemented in 2008. This will enable the University to aggregate its risk data and to systematically and strategically manage its risks.

During 2007, the legislative compliance framework was revised and legislation impacting on ECU’s operations was re-assessed for the risk posed to the University. Comments on legislative trends are provided at page 61 of the Annual Report.

During 2007, the Office of Risk Management and Audit Assurance issued an audit report on contract management practices which led to improvements in practices to reduce ECU’s exposure to contract risk in both outbound and inbound contracts. Revised practices and a contract management system will be implemented in 2008.

The Critical Incident Management Guide for the senior management of the

University was updated and this has since been used effectively. At the operational level, automated processes were implemented to ensure that staff and postgraduate students overseas on University business can be located more quickly. These processes will allow the University to respond quickly to overseas threats and events impacting on the safety of its students and staff and on its international operations. Work has also begun to improve and test

IT disaster recovery plans.

For more information on Risk Management, visit: www.ecu.edu.au/RMAA/index.html

Risk Management Statement

This statement is consistent with National Governance Protocol 9.

Edith Cowan University has an integrated risk management policy that was initially approved by the University Council in December 2001. It is compliant with ASNZ Standard 4360: Risk Management (2004). This policy is being reviewed to accommodate emerging risk management practices in accord with timelines laid down in the University’s policy development framework.

Strategic oversight of risk management is included in the terms of reference for the Council’s Quality and Audit Committee and the Quality and Audit

Committee Charter approved by Council in December 2006. A Risk Reference

Forum, chaired by a Deputy Vice-Chancellor, assists with the exchange of experiences of best practice and dissemination of risk management-related material within the University.

Functionally, the Office of Risk Management and Audit Assurance is responsible for the development and implementation of risk management strategies such as the maintenance of risk registers, risk management methodology, legislative compliance, business continuity as well as fraud and misconduct prevention.

The Finance and Business Services Centre is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the insurance portfolio. The Human Resources Services Centre is responsible for the day-to-day operation of occupational safety and health strategies and workers’ compensation. Legal risk is handled by the Legal

Services Office, within the Governance and Planning Services Centre.

68

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Corporate Governance Statement

Council endorsed a statement on corporate governance in December 2002.

The statement was amended by Council in December 2004 and in June 2007 pursuant to the implementation of the National Governance Protocols. The following is an abridged and updated version summarising the statement.

The full statement can be viewed at: www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/committees/corp_gov_stmt.html.

Statutory Framework

The governance of the University takes place within a specific statutory framework. At the highest level of that framework is the Edith Cowan

University Act 1984 (WA) (‘the Act’), as amended, which establishes the

University as a body corporate, consisting of the Council, the members of staff and the enrolled students (s.5).

Functions of the university

Section 7 of the Act sets out, in non-exhaustive terms, the functions of the

University which include: providing courses of study to meet the needs of the community in Western Australia; encouraging and providing for tertiary education; supporting and pursuing scholarship and research; fostering the welfare and development of all enrolled students; promoting and encouraging collaboration and consultation with other institutions; and providing such facilities that relate to its functions.

Council: its authority, functions and duties, powers and responsibilities

Section 8 of the Act provides that the Council is the governing authority of the

University.

Section 16 specifies the functions and duties of Council, with s.16(1)(c) encapsulating the full scope of the Council’s functions.

(1) Subject to this Act the Council shall –

(a) perform any function or duty conferred or imposed upon the University under this Act;

(b) act in all matters concerning the University in such manner as appears to it best calculated to promote the objects and interests of the

University; and

(c) control and manage the operation, affairs, concerns and property of

the University.

Council has, however, exercised its power of delegation to delegate to the

Vice-Chancellor powers to manage the University.

Section 17 relates to the powers of Council and provides in the preamble that:

Subject to this Act and the Statutes the Council has power to do all things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the operation, affairs, concerns and property of the University.

Section 17 then specifies a number of specific matters relating to contracts, courses of study, use of facilities, and award degrees, diplomas and certificates.

Under the Act, Council has responsibility for University lands (s.28), finance

(s.36), the appointment, termination, terms and conditions of academic and other staff, including the chief executive officer (ss.30 and 31), and to make

Statutes, and By-laws and Rules under the Statutes (s.26).

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 69

Responsibilities of Council

Pursuant to the National Governance Protocols, Council has adopted the following responsibilities: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) appointing the Vice-Chancellor as the chief executive officer of the

University, and monitoring his/her performance; approving the mission and strategic direction of the University, as well as the annual budget and business plan; overseeing and reviewing the management of the University and its performance; establishing policy and procedural principles, consistent with legal requirements and community expectations; approving and monitoring systems of control and accountability, including general overview of any controlled entities. A controlled entity is one that satisfies the test of control in s.50AA of the Corporations Act; overseeing and monitoring the assessment and management of risk across the University, including commercial undertakings; overseeing and monitoring the academic activities of the University; and approving significant commercial activities of the University.

These are high order responsibilities and should be read in conjunction with the functions and duties of Council as specified in the Act.

Duties and responsibilities of Council members

The University Council Code of Conduct is designed to: a) ensure that members of Council are aware of the legal duties, b) c) liabilities and protections arising from their membership of the Council; promote good practice among Council members by describing the general responsibilities they have to the University, the Council and fellow members and to the staff and students of ECU; and describe the University’s obligations to Council members, which will assist them to carry out their duties and responsibilities to the best of their abilities.

The legal duties of members of Council are set out in Schedule 1 of the Act.

Under the Act each member: a) must at all times act honestly in the performance of the functions of a b) member, whether within or outside the State; must at all times exercise the degree of care and diligence in the performance of the functions of a member, whether within or outside the State, that a reasonable person in that position would reasonably be c) d) e) expected to exercise in the Council’s circumstances; must at all times act in the best interests of the University and give precedence to the interests of the University over the interests of any person appointing or electing a member; must not, whether within or outside the State, make improper use of information acquired by virtue of the position of member to gain, directly or indirectly, an advantage for any person or to cause detriment to the

University; must not, whether within or outside the State, make improper use of the position of member to gain, directly or indirectly, an advantage for any person or to cause detriment to the University.

Furthermore, under the Act a member who has a material personal interest in a matter being considered or about to be considered by Council must, as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to the member’s knowledge, disclose the nature and extent of the interest at a meeting of the Council.

70

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Under the Code of Conduct, in addition to these legal duties, the responsibilities of members in respect of the general operation of Council include: a) attend, unless unavoidably absent, and be prepared to constructively contribute to all Council meetings and meetings of committees on which they serve; b) c) d) e) f) draw relevant matters to the attention of the Chancellor for the information of or possible action by the Council or the Vice-Chancellor; inform the Chancellor if at any time they consider that the information provided is insufficient to permit the Council to discharge its responsibilities; inform the Chancellor of any concerns that they might hold about any

Council decisions or actions that appear contrary to its public duties, and to do so as soon as these concerns arise; inform the Chancellor of the possible material interests of other members of the Council in matters before or about to come before the Council, if those interests are not declared by the member or members concerned; and accept collective responsibility for decisions of the Council and support

University management in the implementation of these decisions.

To assist Council members to carry out their duties and responsibilities to the best of their abilities, under the Code of Conduct, the obligations of the

University include: a) provide Council members with such comprehensive, accurate and timely information as is required for members to act with the degree of care, b) c) skill and diligence required of them by the Act, other relevant Statutes and the general law; provide such legal and financial advice as may be necessary to enable

Council members to discharge their duties; and provide, subject to any contrary legal restrictions, Council members with access to any University documentation required to perform their duties.

Maintaining the distinction between governance and executive management

In order for Council and executive management to perform their respective roles effectively, Council recognises that a distinction needs to be maintained between governance and executive management.

In recognising the importance of this distinction, Council considers that the advice given in the Higher Education Management Review Report (Hoare

1995:42) is relevant and pertinent:

The governing body should have strategic planning oversight for the university. It should set the broad strategic framework within which the

Vice-Chancellor and senior university administrators can operate. It is important that the governing body does not get caught up in a ‘local response syndrome’ but should confine itself to strategic and policy issues.

Clarity as to which matters require Council approval is an important foundation for good governance and helps define decision making boundaries.

Council has therefore adopted a list of matters it has decided to reserve to itself for approval and a reporting back framework on those matters delegated to executive management.

Evaluating Council Performance

Council is committed to both collective and individual performance appraisal.

To allow for more concrete assessment of Council’s performance, Council will undertake a regular evaluation of its performance. This will usually be carried out every second year at a suitable time determined by Council. a) b) c)

Induction of Members

Council is committed to its members being well informed about: their role and responsibilities; the role of Council as the governing body of the University; and the strategic direction and key features of the University.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 71

As soon as practicable after appointment, each Council member shall receive: a) an invitation to meet with the Chancellor, Pro-Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor; b) appropriate materials including those listed below: i.

Edith Cowan University Act 1984

ii. Corporate Governance Statement iii. Council Standing Orders iv. University Council Code of Conduct v. Council Membership list and profiles c) vi. University Organisational Chart and profiles of Executive Staff vii. Key committees and the University’s Meeting Schedule viii. ECU Budget Principles ix. ECU Strategic Plan x. xi.

Annual Report

Policies approved by Council; and

ECU promotional material.

Professional Development

The University aims to provide a structured but flexible professional development program for members of the Council.

Accordingly, Council has adopted a professional development program that consists of the following components: a) series of discussions on agreed topics of strategic interest; b) c) workshops on agreed themes; and individual professional development activities based on need.

Council Committees

Council establishes committees to assist it to meet its responsibilities.

The Standing Committees of Council, as at 31 December 2007, were: i. ii.

Council Executive

Quality and Audit iii. Resources iv. Honorary Awards v. vi.

Governance

Nominations vii. Remuneration viii. Legislative

Academic Board

The Academic Board has a special role within the governance framework of the University. This is indicated by the fact that, while Council can determine its committee structure, the Act under which the University operates specifies that there “shall be an Academic Board of the University” (s18(1)), the constitution of which may be prescribed by Statute.

The Act specifies that the functions of the Academic Board shall include:

the discussion and submission to the Council of opinions and recommendations on academic policy, academic development, the admission of students, instruction, studies and examinations, research, the admission to degrees, the discipline of the University and any other matters which in the opinion of the Academic Board are relevant to the objects of this Act (s.18(3)(a)).

The Council views the Academic Board as a forum through which senior academics within the University can provide advice to Council on the

University’s core business of teaching, learning and research. It also looks to the Academic Board to ensure that appropriate quality assurance processes are in place relating to academic programs and services, and that academic standards are maintained.

72

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Role of the Chancellor

The Chancellor is elected by Council to facilitate its work and collegiality by effective and ethical means, providing a focal point to ensure the high standing of the University in the wider community. As part of this role, the

Chancellor presides over Council meetings.

Role of the Vice-Chancellor

The Act provides that Council shall appoint a person to be the chief executive officer of the University (s.30(1)). University Statute No. 6 provides that the person appointed as the chief executive officer is the Vice-Chancellor of the

University (s.1). This Statute further provides that subject to the Act, the

Statutes, By-laws and Rules of the University, and resolutions of the Council, the Vice-Chancellor is responsible for the academic, administrative and other affairs of the University (s.2). As well as being the chief executive officer of the University, the Vice-Chancellor is also its senior academic officer.

Role of the Pro-Chancellor

The Act provides that there shall be a Pro-Chancellor and that the Pro-

Chancellor presides at meeting of Council in the absence of the Chancellor

(Act s.12). The role of the Pro-Chancellor is to act for the Chancellor in the absence of that Officer and on other occasions support the Chancellor in all the Chancellor’s roles.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 73

Compliance with

Relevant Written Laws

In the performance of its functions during the year ended 31 December 2007 the University has operated within the provisions of the Edith Cowan University Act 1984.

Having made or caused to be made on our behalf all relevant enquiries, but noting the very broad extent of application of written laws to the University, to the best of our knowledge, information and belief, the University has complied with all relevant written law.

We are aware of no fact or circumstance apparent or existing at the date of signing this statement, to lead us to conclude otherwise.

Professor Kerry O. Cox

Vice-Chancellor

7 March 2008

Warren Snell

Vice-President (Resources) and Chief Financial Officer

7 March 2008

74

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Other Legal Requirements

Advertising

In accordance with the requirements of section 175ZE of the Electoral Act

1907, the University is required to report all expenditure incurred by, or on behalf of, the University on advertising, market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising during the financial year.

The amount in each expenditure class and the organisations paid, are listing in Table 15 below.

Table 15: ECU Advertising Expenditure, 2007

$ 000

$252 Advertising agencies

MarketForce Productions

Market research organisations

The Customers Voice

Customer Service Benchmarking Australia

Polling organisations

Direct mail organisations

Mail Makers Pty Ltd

Expo Documents Copy Centre

Media advertising organisations

Media Decisions WA

303 Advertising Pty Ltd

Total Expenditure

$52

$0

$105

$4,172

$4,581

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 75

Equity and Indigenous

ECU’s high order Equity Statement of Commitment and Statement of

Commitment to Indigenous Australians align well with the strategic priorities of the University articulated in Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds;

Engaging Communities. Towards 2020.

The University’s governing Council receives reports on equity issues and performance trends. ECU has four committees which focus on equity issues.

These are:

• the Equity Committee;

• the Indigenous Consultative Committee;

• the Indigenous Employment (Development and Implementation)

Sub-committee; and

• the Disability Access Working Party.

Membership comprises relevant University staff and, in the case of the

Indigenous Consultative Committee, also includes members from the wider community. The committees advise on the implications of University policies and practice and inform institutional responses to equity and disability policy initiatives by government and other external agencies.

During 2007, a draft Equity Action Plan was developed aimed at improving

ECU performance and equity outcomes for equity target groups. Once finalised, this will provide a succinct statement of a whole-of-ECU approach to addressing equity issues for students and staff. In addition, an Indigenous

Action Plan has also been drafted. This is aligned to the Equity Action Plan, but allows for a greater focus on Indigenous issues, with more targeted strategies and accountabilities.

Strategies within the Equity Action Plan are expected to be mainstreamed and embedded in the core strategic, functional and operational plans of the

University, with monitoring by the Equity Committee. Monitoring will also be through the University’s normal review processes, including the annual reviews of faculties and service centres, school reviews and strategic reviews including the external review conducted as part of the Australian Universities

Quality Agency audit.

In 2007, ECU:

• reviewed its scholarship program to provide a new range of equity scholarships and successfully secured additional Commonwealth

• scholarships for Indigenous people wishing to come to ECU to study; organised a range of successful equity events as part of NAIDOC week celebrations, International Women’s Day, Pride Month and Mental Health

Week. NAIDOC events were planned and presented in conjunction with the City of Joondalup and West Coast TAFE and included flag-raising, honouring successful Indigenous students and a cultural forum; and

• adopted the ALLY program to provide a visible network of trained contacts for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students and staff.

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes

During 2007, ECU reported on the achievements against its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DIAP) for the 2006/2007 reporting year, as required by

Schedule 3 of the Disability Services Regulations 2004. This report was submitted to the Disability Services Commission (DSC) in a template produced by the DSC.

It is important to acknowledge that ECU’s DAIP covers a five-year period

(2006-2010) and many of the strategies will be throughout that timeframe.

Some examples of achievements against ECU’s DIAP Outcomes in 2006/2007 are listed in Table 16 below.

76

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Table 16: Examples of ECU’s Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes, 2006/2007

Outcome 1: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the University.

A review of the events checklist was undertaken.

Invitations to graduation ceremonies and corporate events provide an opportunity for people to identify special requirements.

Outcome 2: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the University.

Priority items were identified in the ECU Disability Access Audit. All Priority 1 items were completed. Priority items 2 and 3 were partially completed.

Outcome 3: People with disabilities receive information from the University in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

Disability Awareness training was provided to staff to assist with information provision in appropriate formats.

Outcome 4: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the University as other people receive from the staff of

the University.

Specific support services are provided for students with disabilities including options for laptop scholarships, learning support hardware, software, equipment and iPods.

Outcome 5: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the University.

A culture of fairness has been developed through training and communication. The University Contact Officer network increased and was publicised widely.

Outcome 6: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the University.

Public consultation on the ECU Disability Access and Inclusion Plan included key groups such as the Mental Health Association.

In addition to the six outcomes prescribed by the Disability Services Regulations 2004, ECU’s DIAP includes an additional two outcomes:

Outcome 7: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment and work experience placements with the University.

Job vacancies are advertised on ECU’s accessible website. An ECU partnership with the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Services has established a link to employment for people with disabilities.

Outcome 8: The University promotes an inclusive culture that values diversity, does not tolerate harassment or discrimination and encourages a secure and safe environment for all students and staff.

Disability Awareness training was provided. A ”Stress Less” event was held during Mental Health Week.

Equal Employment Opportunities Outcomes

The Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) requires outcomes against an Equal Opportunity Management Plan to be reported annually.

ECU is developing an Equal Opportunity Management Plan in consultation with the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity. This will draw on ECU’s Equity Action

Plan and Staffing Plan, which include equity goals and strategies. Progress against these equity goals and strategies will be reported for the first time in late 2008.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 77

Record Keeping

As a university established under State legislation, ECU is subject to the requirements of the State Records Act 2000 (WA). ECU is committed to compliance in its record keeping activities. ECU’s Record Keeping Plan (RKP), a requirement under the State Records Act, was updated and submitted to the State Records Office in

December 2005. The plan was approved for a five-year term.

State Records Commission Standard 2 Record Keeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance

The efficiency and effectiveness of the organisation’s record keeping system is evaluated not less than once every 5 years.

ECU has completed a pilot implementation of an Electronic Document and Records Management

System (EDRMS) to increase efficiency. Following the pilot, a business case for full implementation of an EDRMS across the whole of ECU was developed. Phased implementation is envisaged, with the extent and timelines dependent on budget availability. The revised University Records

Management Policy was approved in October 2007 and a Disaster Management Plan for records was developed and implemented in 2007.

The organisation conducts a record keeping training program.

Records Management Officers have been deployed to business units across the University to provide record keeping training to system users. The officers have received external training on appraisal and classification, as well as on the record keeping system. Training has been given to all staff involved in the EDRMS pilot program. A computer-based training package, the Records

Awareness Training System (RATS), was purchased in late 2007 and will be implemented in

2008 to raise record keeping awareness for staff.

Yearly reviews are conducted on record keeping awareness training. Customer feedback evaluation forms are also utilised.

The efficiency and effectiveness of the record keeping training program is reviewed from time to time.

The organisation’s induction program addresses employees’ roles and responsibilities with regards to their compliance with the organisation’s record keeping plan.

All new ECU employees undergo an induction course which addresses employee roles and responsibilities in regard to the compliance aspects of the RKP. Additionally, this material is included in a handbook issued to employees when they join ECU. The handbook was reviewed in 2007 and will be updated in 2008.

78

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Environmental Performance

Summary of Environmental Performance in 2007

2007 saw the consolidation of many of the environmental management programs initiated during the previous year and the introduction of some new initiatives to further ECU’s commitment to environmental sustainability.

Key achievements in 2007 were:

Environmental Management System

– ECU began developing a formal

Environmental Management System (EMS) based upon ISO 14001 for implementation in 2008/2009. This project will bring the University in line with environmental best practice and further demonstrate its commitment to environmental sustainability. The initial steps involved undertaking a pilot Environmental Risk Assessment for the Facilities and Services Centre, which highlighted a range of environmental issues and risks which require management. An EMS will be developed for other areas of the University in 2008.

Environmental Sustainability Platform

– A new reporting platform was developed for trial in the Library and Technology Centre at the

Joondalup Campus. The system delivers a comprehensive energy and water monitoring and reporting platform for individual buildings on which management decisions can be made to conserve these utilities.

Green Office Program

– The Green Office Program continued to be promoted and supported throughout 2007. The Program now involves over

50 Green Office Representatives from all faculties and service centres on all campuses. Presentations by guest speakers from Al Gore’s Climate

Change Project were well attended by staff and students.

ECU’s environmental programs are described below under the headings of:

Green Procurement;

Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions;

Water Use; and

Waste and Recycling.

Green Procurement

ECU continued with its commitment to environmental sustainability and supporting recycled product markets with 98.5 per cent of paper purchases being paper with recycled content. New tenders for copiers and printing services include a requirement for recycled paper content, ensuring that the policy remains viable into the future. Table 17 shows that ECU’s paper purchases in 2007 were below 2005 levels, but higher than in 2006. Paper purchases per student and staff full-time equivalent in 2007 were higher than in 2005 and 2006. However, the proportion of recycled paper purchased has increased each year and in 2007 almost all paper purchased was recycled paper.

Table 17: ECU Paper Purchases, 2005-2007

Total paper purchased

Average annual Earthsaver spend

Recycled paper purchased

Proportion of recycled paper purchased

Paper/EFTSL + FTE

2005

38,815

18.5%

4,803

12.4%

2.27

2006

31,110

27.3%

8,771

28.2%

1.97

2007

35,133

38.6%

34,603

98.5%

2.34

Note: All figures are in reams (500 sheets/ ream). FTE is staff “full-time equivalent”. EFTSL is student full-time equivalent load.

Energy use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

ECU is one of the most energy-efficient universities in Australia. According to the latest benchmarking survey from the Tertiary Education Facilities

Management Association, on a per capita and area basis, ECU’s energy usage is well below levels of other Western Australian universities and the

Australian university sector average.

ECU acknowledges that as a large organisation it is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and therefore strives to reduce or offset its total emissions and influencing staff, students and the broader community to do likewise.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 79

ECU can benefit significantly by further improving its energy management practices. Effective energy management can contribute to more than reduced costs; it can drive improved performance through its effect on production, operations, maintenance and environmental management.

Table 18 shows that energy use, and by extrapolation, CO

2

emissions, were higher in 2007 than in 2006, in total, per student and staff full-time equivalent and per square metre.

Table 18: ECU Energy Use, 2004-2007

Energy GJ/yr

2004 2005 2006 2007

93,121.22 97,877.87 94,596.55 101,247.14

TCO

2

/yr 22,851 23,709 23,215 25,178

GJ/m 2

GJ/ EFTSL + FTE

0.518

5.320

0.522

5.719

0.449

5.996

0.466

6.734

TCO

2

/m

2

TCO

2

/ EFTSL + FTE

0.127

1.306

0.126

1.385

0.110

1.471

0.116

1.675

Note: TCO

2

was calculated using the coefficients 1.052 kg CO

2

per kWh electricity and 68 kg CO

2

per

GJ gas consumed. Energy use figures are exclusive of South West Campus and Student Housing. Area is measured as gross useable floor area. FTE is staff “full-time equivalent”. EFTSL is student full-time equivalent load.

Initiatives to manage energy use

ECU began work to develop an Energy Management Program to set out ECU’s energy and greenhouse gas targets and to identify strategies to address significant issues. It will also set out the strategic direction for energy management for 2008 to help address climate change in anticipation of changes in the energy market sector.

The energy management strategies identified in the Energy Management

Program will also be incorporated into the University’s Environmental

Management System based on ISO 14001, in order to ensure integration into established systems and processes and set the stage for reduction targets for energy and greenhouse emissions in 2008.

The Environmental Sustainability Platform will input data into the

University’s Energy Management Program and monitor trends in energy consumption. This is an important initiative to reduce energy use as it gives the management team high quality information on which to base decisions.

The development of the Green Transport Plan is another program aimed at reducing the University’s greenhouse gas emissions associated with car travel. In 2007 74 per cent of trips made by staff and 46-58 per cent of those made by students (campus dependant) involved driving alone. ECU is committed to reducing these numbers by developing a program of incentives and supporting alternatives to car use. Survey results have shown little change in the use of private vehicles as the dominant means of commuting for students in the last five years.

In 2007 an on-line matching service, ECU Carpool was launched as a strategy to reduce the number of single-occupant car trips to and from the University campuses and offer alternatives to those without access to their own car.

To date the program has 428 registered users.

The University has also been proactive in reducing the emissions produced by its vehicle fleet. Initiatives to date include actively introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles, (from 6 cylinder to 4 cylinder) reducing the number of vehicles, and offsetting the remaining emissions through the Carbon Neutral

Program. In 2006/2007, 380 tonnes of CO

2

were offset by planting 1680 trees.

Water use

Rainfall trends across Australia suggest that water will become a more important issue for large organisations such as universities in the near future, with rainfall for the South West of Western Australia predicted to decline by up to 20 per cent by 2030 (Australian Greenhouse Office, 2003).

A number of state and territory governments have responded to significant water shortages by introducing tough new water reduction and efficiency targets for high water users. Water use by large businesses and public organisations (including universities, colleges and schools) will become a particular focus in the future.

While ECU’s water management practices are comparable with best practice, there are opportunities for further savings and to promote water conservation with ECU staff and students.

80

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Table 19 shows that ECU’s water use has declined from 2004 to 2006, but rose slightly in 2007 in total, per student and staff full-time equivalent and per square metre.

Table 19: ECU Water Use, 2004-2007

Potable kL/yr

Potable kL/ EFTSL + FTE

Potable kL/m

Bore kL/yr

2

2004

150,776

8.61

0.839

2005

119,033

6.96

0.634

187,978

Data unavailable

2006

103,944

6.59

0.493

152,259

2007

109,583

7.29

0.504

158,576

Note: Water consumption figures are exclusive of the South West Campus and Student Housing. Area is measured as gross useable floor area. FTE is staff “full-time equivalent”. EFTSL is student full-time equivalent load.

Initiatives to manage water use

In late 2006 the Commonwealth Government awarded ECU with $16,550 funding to support a water recycling project at the Joondalup Campus. The project is estimated to reuse around 3000 kL of scheme water per annum.

The water will be piped from the cooling towers on site to the storage lake for use on the grounds, which will mean that the equivalent amount of ground water will be conserved. This is an important saving due to the sensitivity of the wetland system abutting the Joondalup Campus to variations in water level. The on-ground works were completed in August 2007 and the project will begin to deliver water savings in 2008. Monitoring of the lake water has begun and will be continued throughout 2008 to ensure that the lake’s ecosystem is not adversely affected.

The number of waterless urinals has been increased throughout the University in 2007. The new Health and Wellness Building has been fitted out with inbuilt waterless urinals and these units will be installed into all new buildings and refurbishments. A staged process will replace urinals with waterless urinals as part of normal maintenance of the facilities.

Waste and Recycling

The Western Australian Government has introduced a waste reduction strategy, Zero Waste 2020 which sets out strategies for the prevention, recovery and safe disposal of waste, with the specific target of zero waste by the year 2020. ECU is supportive of this ambitious target.

A student-based waste audit completed in August 2007 showed that paper waste to landfill decreased by 17.8 tonnes/annum (or 75 per cent overall) at the Joondalup Campus over the period August 2006 to August 2007. Trends will continue to be monitored through annual audits which will be expanded to the Mount Lawley and South West campuses in 2008.

Table 20 shows that waste to landfill has increased over the period 2005 to

2007, although the proportion of paper to landfill has declined to six per cent in 2007. The weight of paper recycled in 2007 is not yet available, but in 2006 more than 50 per cent of paper was recycled.

Table 20: ECU Waste to Landfill, 2005-2007

Waste to landfill (t)

Paper to landfill (t)

Proportion paper to landfill

Commingled to landfill (t)

Proportion commingled to landfill

2005

86.85

43.3

42.9%

12.9

14.9%

Paper recycled (t)

Proportion paper recycled

Waste to landfill (t/ EFTSL + FTE)

12.4

22%

0.0132

2006

87.11

23.7

27.2%

14.0

16.1%

25.4

2007

95.40

5.9

6.2%

22.3

23.2%

Data unavailable

52%

0.0138

Data unavailable

0.0154

Note: Waste data is based on annual waste audit results extrapolated across a 50 week for the

Joondalup Campus only. Does not include construction, gardening, electronic or furniture waste.

FTE is staff “full-time equivalent”. EFTSL is student full-time equivalent load.

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 81

Initiatives to reduce waste to landfill

ECU continued to expand its recycling programs throughout 2007, encouraging recycling through the Green Office Program and through the introduction of the ‘Mini Bin’ Recycling Program.

In 2007 ECU initiated a fluorescent tube recycling program. Fluorescent tubes contain small but significant amounts of mercury and other hazardous substances that if left in landfill, contaminate ground water. As mercury is bio-accumulative and persistent it is a risk to both wildlife and human health.

Recycling these materials helps reduce land and water pollution.

The ‘Mini Bin’ Recycling Program was expanded in 2007. This involves replacing desk-side bins with paper recycling boxes and mini bins for general waste, helping staff to separate recyclable and non-recyclable waste and reducing waste to landfill. Data collected from the Chancellery Building on the Joondalup Campus showed that the proportion of paper office waste to landfill reduced by 25 per cent in the year August 2006 to August 2007.

82

SECTION 4 DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

Auditor General’s Statement,

Financial Statements and

Key Performance Indicator Report

ECU ANNUAL REPORT 2007 83

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General’s

Statement

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Annual

Financial

Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2007

Contents

Income Statement

Balance Sheet

Statement of Changes in Equity

Cash Flow Statement

Notes to the Financial Statements

93

94

95

96

97

Edith Cowan University

Income Statement for the year ended 31 December 2007

Revenue from continuing operations

Australian Government financial assistance

Australian Government grants

HECS-HELP Australian Government payments

FEE-HELP

State and Local Government financial assistance

HECS-HELP - Student payments

Fees and charges

Investment income

Royalties, trademarks and licences

Consultancy and contracts

Sale of goods

Other revenue

Total revenue from continuing operations

Notes

5

5

5

6

7

8

9

10

12

Consolidated

2007

$'000

111,728

45,377

5,950

10,697

7,185

52,460

2,945

6,338

5,207

7,280

1,528

256,695

2006

$'000

Gain on disposal of assets

Gain on revaluation of investment property

Other income

Total income

Total income and revenue from continuing operations before deferred Government superannuation contributions

Deferred government superannuation contributions

Total revenue and income from continuing operations

Expenses from continuing operations

Employee related expenses

Depreciation and amortisation

Repairs and maintenance

Finance costs

Impairment of assets

Other expenses

Cost of goods sold

Total expenses from continuing operations before deferred employee benefits for superannuation

Deferred employment benefits superannuation

Total expenses from continuing operations

11

28

12

22

14

15

16

17

18

19

10,700

-

4,378

15,078

271,773

2,975

274,748

141,541

19,953

6,122

2,105

503

77,516

3,764

251,504

40

1,932

3,254

5,226

256,039

3,083

259,122

147,299

18,553

4,897

1,348

716

68,615

3,424

244,852

14 2,975

254,479

3,083

247,935

Operating result before income tax

Income tax income/(expense)

Operating result after income tax for the period

20

35(b)

20,269

56

20,325

11,187

(68)

11,119

The above income statements should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

108,548

45,299

5,515

8,959

6,918

53,477

2,683

5,404

6,208

6,949

853

250,813

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

111,728

45,377

5,950

10,697

7,185

52,460

2,913

3,930

5,158

7,280

1,528

254,206

10,701

-

1,882

12,583

266,789

108,548

45,299

5,515

8,959

6,918

53,477

2,644

3,379

6,176

6,949

853

248,717

40

1,932

1,014

2,986

251,703

2,975

269,764

139,525

19,925

6,122

2,105

500

74,755

3,764

246,696

2,975

249,671

20,093

-

20,093

3,083

254,786

145,562

18,499

4,897

1,348

716

66,457

3,424

240,903

3,083

243,986

10,800

-

10,800

4.

Edith Cowan University

Balance Sheet as at 31 December 2007

ASSETS

Current assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Receivables

Inventories

Other financial assets

Non-current assets classified as held for sale

Other non-financial assets

Total current assets

Non-current assets

Receivables

Other financial assets

Property, plant and equipment

Investment properties

Deferred tax assets

Intangible assets

Total non-current assets

Total assets

LIABILITIES

Current liabilities

Payables

Borrowings

Provisions

Other current liabilities

Total current liabilities

Non-current liabilities

Payables

Borrowings

Provisions

Deferred tax liabilities

Total non-current liabilities

Total liabilities

Notes

21

22

23

24

25

26

22

24

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

31

32

33

29

Consolidated

2007

$'000

11,792

13,269

1,753

10,174

10,590

5,469

53,047

26,267

37,689

675,367

12,493

303

-

752,119

805,166

10,013

10,187

20,104

20,696

61,000

61,000

427

61,102

31,414

118

93,061

154,061

2006

$'000

17,758

12,179

2,011

11,004

-

598

43,550

Net assets

EQUITY

Reserves

Retained surplus

Total equity

35(a)

35(b)

651,105

327,538

323,567

651,105

630,974

333,091

297,883

630,974

The above balance sheets should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

29,664

780

674,821

12,493

103

2,834

720,695

764,245

14,907

181

17,209

28,201

60,498

60,498

340

36,639

35,768

26

72,773

133,271

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

10,790

12,433

1,604

10,165

10,590

5,240

50,822

16,802

11,845

1,838

11,004

-

418

41,907

26,386

37,689

675,237

12,493

-

-

751,805

802,627

9,435

10,187

19,957

20,275

59,854

59,854

-

61,102

31,339

-

92,441

152,295

650,332

327,521

322,811

650,332

29,775

780

674,670

12,493

-

2,834

720,552

762,459

14,520

181

17,035

27,949

59,685

59,685

-

36,639

35,704

-

72,343

132,028

630,431

333,072

297,359

630,431

4/

Edith Cowan University

Statement of Changes in Equity for the year ended 31 December 2007

Consolidated

2007

Balance at 1 January 2007

Gain/loss on revaluation

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

Transfers

Total movements for the year

Balance at 31 December 2007

Property plant and equipment Investments revaluation reserve

$'000 revaluation reserve

$'000

Foreign currency revaluation reserve

$'000

Retained surplus

$'000

333,072

-

-

(5,939)

(5,939)

327,133

Balance at 1 January 2006

Adjustment to prior year operating result (subsidiary)

222,508

-

Gain/loss on revaluation

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

Exchange differences on translation of foreign

110,564

- operations (subsidiary)

Total movements for the year

-

110,564

Balance at 31 December 2006

333,072

(192)

580

388

388

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(2)

-

-

(2)

17

-

20,325

5,359

25,684

323,567

Total

$'000

19 297,883 630,974

(194)

20,325

-

20,131

651,105

(38) 286,758 509,228

-

-

-

57

57

19

6

-

11,119

-

6

110,564

11,119

57

11,125 121,746

297,883 630,974

Parent

2007

Balance at 1 January 2007

Gain/loss on revaluation

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

Transfers

Total movements for the year

Balance at 31 December 2007

Balance at 1 January 2006

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

Gain on revaluation

Total movements for the year

Balance at 31 December 2006

Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve

$'000

Investments revaluation reserve

$'000

Foreign currency revaluation reserve

$'000

333,072

-

-

(5,939)

(5,939)

-

(192)

-

580

388

Retained earnings

$'000

Total

$'000

- 297,359 630,431

-

-

-

20,093

(192)

20,093

-

-

5,359

25,452

-

19,901

327,133

222,508

-

110,564

110,564

333,072

388

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

322,811

- 286,559

- 10,800

650,332

509,067

10,800

- 110,564

10,800 121,364

297,359 630,431

45

Edith Cowan University

Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 31 December 2007

Notes

Cash flows from operating activities

Australian Government financial assistance

CGS and other grants

Higher Education Loan Programmes

Scholarships

DEEWR research

Australian Research Council Grants

Discovery

Linkages

Other Australian Government financial assistance received

HECS-HELP - Student payments

State Government financial assistance

Receipts from student fees and other customers

Dividends and distributions received

Interest and bill discounts

Payments to employees

Payments to suppliers

Interest paid to WA Treasury Corporation

Interest paid to Homeswest

Net cash provided by operating activities

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

5(g)

6

8

8

43

Cash flows from investing activities

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

Bank bills

Loans to related parties

Payments for property, plant and equipment

Payments for works of art

Payments for financial assets

Net cash used in investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds from borrowings from WA Treasury

Corporation

Net cash provided by financing activities

Consolidated

2007

$'000

92,968

52,765

3,948

6,902

265

371

3,027

7,185

10,697

71,223

282

2,663

(140,258)

(93,427)

(2,105)

-

16,506

33,707

830

-

(54,184)

(205)

(37,089)

(56,941)

34,469

34,469

2006

$'000

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents held

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

21

(5,966)

17,758

11,792

6,697

11,061

17,758

Non-cash financing and investing activities 44

The above cash flow statements should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

99,921

57,225

3,286

6,444

286

639

2,421

6,918

8,959

65,133

291

2,392

(147,882)

(60,957)

(1,335)

(13)

43,728

91

221

200

(49,945)

(90)

-

(49,523)

12,492

12,492

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

92,968

52,765

3,948

6,902

265

371

3,027

7,185

10,697

66,655

282

2,631

(138,276)

(90,872)

(2,105)

-

16,443

33,707

839

-

(54,176)

(205)

(37,089)

(56,924)

34,469

34,469

(6,012)

16,802

10,790

99,921

57,225

3,286

6,444

286

639

2,421

6,918

8,959

60,722

291

2,353

(146,171)

(58,509)

(1,335)

(13)

43,437

91

221

200

(49,871)

(90)

-

(49,449)

12,492

12,492

6,480

10,322

16,802

4+

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

4

5

6

7

1

2

3

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

38

39

40

41

42

33

34

35

36

37

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

Note Contents of the notes to the financial statements Page

University Organisation

Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards

Summary of significant accounting policies

Disaggregated information

Australian Government financial assistance

State and Local Government financial assistance

Fees and charges

Investment income

Royalties, trademarks and licences

Consultancy and contracts

Gain on disposal of assets

Other revenue and income

Change in accounting policy

Employee related expenses

Depreciation and amortisation

Repairs and maintenance

Finance costs

Impairment of assets

Other expenses

Income tax expense

Cash and cash equivalents

Receivables

Inventories

Other financial assets

Non-current assets classified as held for sale

Other non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment

Investment property

Deferred tax assets and liabilities

Intangible assets

Payables

Borrowings

Provisions

Other current liabilities

Reserves and retained surplus

Restricted cash

Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers

Remuneration of auditors

Contingencies

Commitments

Related parties

Subsidiaries

Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities

Non-cash investing and financing activities

Events occurring after the balance sheet date

Explanatory statement

Financial risk management

Write-off's

Superannuation

Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance

31

31

32

36

36

37

38

39

25

25

25

26

26

27

28

30

31

22

22

23

23

23

24

24

25

19

20

21

22

7

7

7

50

50

50

51

53

55

55

59

47

48

48

49

49

41

42

43

44

45

4-

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

1 University Organisation

Edith Cowan University (the University) is a Statutory Authority of the Government of Western Australia and is domiciled in

Australia. The address of its registered office is 100 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia.

The University is a public not-for-profit institution of higher education funded primarily through Commonwealth grant funding.

Established in 1902 when it began as a teaching college, the University gained university status in 1991. Its principal activities cover teaching, learning and research.

The University Council is the governing body which controls the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the University.

The Vice-Chancellor has been delegated the responsibility of managing the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the

University.

2 Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards

General

The University’s financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 have been prepared in accordance with

Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS), which comprise a Framework for the

Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements (the Framework) and Australian Accounting Standards (including the

Australian Accounting Interpretations).

In preparing these financial statements the University has adopted, where relevant to its operations, new and revised

Standards and Interpretations from their operative dates as issued by the AASB and formerly the Urgent Issues Group

(UIG).

The Australian Accounting Interpretations are adopted through AASB 1048 ‘Interpretation and Application of Standards’ and are classified into those corresponding to IASB Interpretations and those only applicable in Australia.

The AASB has decided to maintain the statements of accounting concepts (SAC 1and SAC 2) and has continued to revise and maintain accounting standards and the interpretations that are of particular relevance to the Australian environment, especially those that deal more specifically with not-for-profit entity issues and/or do not have an equivalent IASB Standard or Interpretation.

Early adoption of standards

The University cannot early adopt an Australian Accounting Standard or Interpretation unless specifically permitted by

Treasurer's Instructions (TI) 1101 ‘Application of Australian Accounting Standards and Other Pronouncements’. No

Standards and Interpretations that have been issued or amended and are not yet effective have been early adopted by the

University for the annual reporting period ended 31 December 2007.

3 Summary of significant accounting policies

The following accounting policies have been adopted in the preparation of the financial statements. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

General Statement

The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial report which has been prepared in accordance with

Australian Accounting Standards, the framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board as applied by the Treasurer's Instructions. Several of these are modified by the Treasurer's Instructions to vary application, disclosure, format and wording.

The Financial Management Act and the Treasurer's Instructions are legislative provisions governing the preparation of financial statements and take precedence over Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting

Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board.

Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

Modifications or clarifications to accounting standards through the TI’s are to provide certainty and ensure consistency and appropriate reporting across the public sector.

40

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

Reporting Entity

The reporting entity is Edith Cowan University and its controlled entity; ECU Resources for Learning Ltd.

Control is taken to exist where:

(i) the entity is accountable to the University;

(ii) the University has a residual financial interest in the net assets of the entity

(iii) the University has the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities.

Specific details of controlled entities appear in Note 42.

(a) Basis of preparation

The Balance Sheet and Income Statement have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with historical cost convention, modified by the revaluation available-for-sale financial assets and financial liabilities and certain classes of property, plant and equipment which have been measured at fair value.

The accounting policies applied in the preparation of the financial statements have been consistently applied throughout all periods unless otherwise stated.

Assets and liabilities are recognised in the Balance Sheet when, and only when, it is probable that future economic benefits will flow and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured.

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the Balance Sheet, but are discussed in the relevant Notes to the Financial Statements. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset, or represent an existing liability or asset in respect of which settlement is not probable or the amount cannot be reliably measured. Where settlement becomes probable, a liability or asset is recognised.

The consolidated financial report is presented in Australian dollars and all amounts are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($’000).

(b) Principles of consolidation

Subsidiary

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the financial statements of Edith Cowan University (the parent entity) and entities controlled by the University (its subsidiary) up to 31 December each year. Control is achieved where the University has the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an investee entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities. A list of controlled entities appears in Note 42. Consistent accounting policies have been employed in the preparation and presentation of the consolidated financial statements.

The consolidated financial statements include the information and results of each controlled entity from the date on which the University obtains control and until such time as the University ceases to control such entities.

Inter-company transactions, balances and unrealised gains on transactions between the University and controlled entities are eliminated in full on consolidation.

44

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(c) Grants and other contributions

Government grants

Grant contributions for financial assistance for operational purposes from the Commonwealth Government and Western

Australia State Government are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the asset comprising the contributions. When the University does not have control of the contribution or, does not have the right to receive the contribution or, has not fulfilled grant conditions, the grant contribution is treated as deferred income.

Sponsored research

Research funds provide the opportunity for graduate and undergraduate students to work within a faculty in areas of research as part of their educational experience. Research grant contributions from various sources of sponsored research, including corporations, foundations, Commonwealth, State and local governments and research institutes are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the asset comprising the contributions. When the University does not have control of the contribution or does not have the right to receive the contribution or, has not fulfilled grant conditions, the grant contribution is treated as deferred income.

Donations

Donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions. Control is normally obtained upon their receipt.

Endowment and bequests contributions

The University receives restricted funds from donors who wish to fund specific programs or initiatives of the University.

Endowments and bequests are invested to create a source of income which is used for scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs. Endowment contributions are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions. Control is normally obtained upon their receipt.

(d) Revenue recognition

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and represents amounts receivable for goods and services provided in the normal course of business, net of discounts and Goods and Service Tax (GST).

Revenue is recognised as follows:

(i) Sale of goods

Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably.

(ii) Fees and charges for services

Revenue from fees and charges is recognised in the accounting period in which the services are rendered, by reference to completion of the specific transaction assessed, on the basis of the actual service provided as a proportion of the total services to be provided.

(iii) Interest income

Interest income is accrued on a time-proportion basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable.

(iv) Parking and library fines

Revenue from parking and library fines is recognised on a cash basis, as the purpose of the fine is to act as a deterrent not strictly for raising revenue. Non-payment of these fines is not actively pursued.

(v) Royalty, trademark and licences income

Royalties, trademark and licences income is recognised on an accrual basis in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.

(vi) Land development and resale

Revenue is recognised when the risk and rewards have been transferred, which is considered to occur on execution of an unconditional contract for sale.

'((

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(vii) Gains

Gains may be realised or unrealised. Realised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the sale proceeds received or receivable and the carrying amount of the non-current asset. Unrealised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of an asset.

The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of gains are as follows:

Realised gains on disposal of non-current assets

Gains arising on the disposal or retirement of a non-current asset are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and rewards of ownership have passed from the University. Net gains are included in revenue for the period in which they arise.

Unrealised gains associated with investment property at fair value

Gains arising from changes in the fair value of an investment property are included in revenue for the period in which they arise.

(e) Expense recognition

Expenses are recognised when they are incurred and are subsequently reported in the year to which they relate.

The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of expenses are as follows:

Depreciation on property, plant and equipment and leasehold improvements is provided on a straight-line basis at rates based on the expected useful lives of those assets. The expected useful lives for each class of depreciable asset are provided under property, plant and equipment.

Amortisation is provided on intangible assets and assets held under finance leases and is calculated on a straight-line basis, generally over the expected useful lives.

Impairment losses are recognised as an expense when an asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount (unless it is relates to a revalued asset, where the value change is recognised directly in equity).

The University receives Commonwealth Government superannuation supplementary funding for employer contributions of the Pension Scheme and Gold State Superannuation (GSS). These contributions are paid to the state-administered

Government Employed Superannuation Board (GESB) during the year. The University also receives Commonwealth

Government general operating funding for employer contributions of the various UniSuper superannuation plans.

The University includes the following elements in calculating the superannuation expense:

(i) Defined benefit plan – change in the unfunded employer’s liability in respect of current employees who are members of the Pension Scheme and current employees who accrued a benefit on transfer from that Scheme to the Gold State

Superannuation Scheme; and

(ii) Defined benefit plan – emerging cost in respect of current employees who are members of the Pension Scheme and current employees who accrued a benefit on transfer from that Scheme to the Gold State Superannuation Scheme; and

(iii) Defined contribution plan – employer contributions paid to the Gold State Superannuation Scheme and all of the

Unisuper superannuation plans. A revenue ‘Superannuation – deferred government contributions’ equivalent to (ii) is recognised under Revenue in the Income Statement as emerging cost superannuation which is recouped by the

Commonwealth superannuation supplementary grant.

'('

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(f) Property, plant and equipment

Land and buildings held for use in the production or supply of goods or services and for administrative purposes, are stated in the Balance Sheet at their fair value, the fair value is determined by independent professional valuers, less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and impairment losses and subsequent accumulated recoverable amount write-down.

Revaluations are performed with sufficient regularity such that the carrying amount does not differ materially from that which would be determined using fair values at the reporting date.

Any revaluation increase arising on the revaluation of such land and buildings is credited to the asset revaluation reserve, except to the extent that it reverses a revaluation decrease for the same asset class previously recognised as an expense, in which case the increase is credited to the Income Statement to the extent of the decrease previously charged on a asset class basis. A decrease in carrying amount arising on the revaluation of such land and buildings is charged as an expense to the extent that it exceeds the balance, if any, held in the asset revaluation reserve relating to a previous revaluation of that asset class.

Depreciation on revalued assets is charged to the Income Statement. On the subsequent sale or retirement of a revalued asset, the attributable revaluation surplus remaining in the asset revaluation reserve is transferred directly to the retained surplus.

Properties in the course of construction for production, rental or administrative purposes, or for purposes not yet determined, are carried at cost, less any accumulated impairment losses. Cost includes professional fees and, for qualifying assets, borrowing costs are capitalised. Depreciation of these assets commences when the assets are ready for their intended use.

Fixtures and computer equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses.

Purchases of fixtures and computer equipment which individually cost less than $5,000 are expensed in the Income

Statement in the year of acquisition.

Depreciation is charged so as to write off the cost or valuation of assets, other than land and properties under construction, over their useful lives, using the straight-line method.

Expected useful lives for each class of depreciable asset are:

Asset category

Land

Buildings

Computing Equipment

Other equipment and furniture

Motor vehicles

Leased motor vehicles

Works of art

Library collections

Leasehold improvements

Life

Not depreciated

50 years

4 years

6-10 years

4-6 years

6 years

Not depreciated

Depreciated at 100% in the fourth year after acquisition

Depreciated over life of lease

'(,

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

During the year the estimated useful life of the buildings on the Churchlands campus was revised. It was determined that the buildings no longer have a useful life due to the redevelopment of the Churchlands campus. As a result the buildings were completely written off in the current period. The additional depreciation charge in the current period due to the change was

$635,330.

Library Collections are stated at cost of the last three years’ acquisition of library books. In each year, that year’s cost of acquisition is added to the carrying value and the earliest year’s cost of acquisition within the carrying value is written off.

Works of art are classified as heritage assets. These artefacts are protected and preserved for public exhibition, education, research and the furtherance of public service. They are neither disposed of for financial gain nor encumbered in any manner. Accordingly, such collections are capitalised, irrespective of value and are not depreciated as it is anticipated that they have indefinite useful lives. Their service potential has not, in any material sense, been consumed during the reporting period.

(g) Investment properties

Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of the University and comprises land and/or buildings which are held to earn rentals and/or capital appreciation.

Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is probable that future economics benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the

University. Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its cost shall be deemed to be its fair value, as at the date of acquisition.

Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment properties are re-valued to fair value with changes in the fair value recognised in the income statements in the period that they arise. The properties are not depreciated.

Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the income statements in the periods in which it is receivable, as this represents the pattern of service rendered through the provisions of the properties.

(h) Intangible assets

Computer software

The intangible assets comprise of externally acquired Computer software that is customised by the University, stated at historical cost less amortisation. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items.

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the University and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the income statement during the financial period in which they are incurred.

Computer software is amortised using the straight line method, over its estimated useful life. Computer software is amortised between 2-5 years

During 2007, the estimated useful life of the intangible assets was revised. It was determined that the software had reached the end of its useful life, on the basis that as it requires continuous upgrades and it had significantly changed from its original state due to this upgrades.

(i) Non-current assets (or disposal groups) held for sale and discontinued operations

Non-current assets (or disposal groups) are classified as held for sale and stated at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use.

Non current assets are not depreciated or amortised while they are classified as held for sale.

Non current assets classified as held for sale are presented separately from the other assets in the balance sheet.

'(.

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(j) Impairment

The University is required to assess property, plant and equipment and intangible assets for any indication of impairment at each reporting date. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount must be estimated. As the

University is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified as a surplus asset, AASB 136 prescribes that the recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less selling costs and depreciated replacement cost.

Consequently, the risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an asset’s depreciation is materially understated or where the replacement cost is falling.

The University reviews each relevant class of assets annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation/amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of an asset’s future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs.

For assets identified as surplus assets, the recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less selling costs and the present value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset.

(k) Leases

Rentals payable under operating leases are charged as an expense to the income statement on a straight-line basis over the term of the relevant lease.

(l) Cash

For the purposes of the Cashflow Statement, cash includes cash assets and restricted cash assets. These include short-term deposits that are readily convertible to cash on hand and are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

(m) Restricted cash

Endowment and bequest funds are classified as restricted cash assets. Endowment and bequest funds have been received from benefactors who, by the terms of their conveying instruments, have stipulated that the use of funds is limited in future years to the purposes designated by the benefactors.

(n) Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost comprises direct materials and where applicable, import duties, transport and handling costs that have been incurred to bring the inventories to their present location and condition. Cost is calculated using the weighted average method.

(o) Receivables

Accounts receivable include amounts due from students for tuition fees, housing and other enrolment related services and reimbursements due from sponsors for externally funded research. Accounts receivables are recognised at the amounts receivable as they are due for settlement no more than 30 days from the date of recognition. Accounts receivables do not carry any interest and are stated at their nominal value as reduced by appropriate allowances for estimated irrecoverable amounts.

(p) Investments and other financial assets

The University has classified its financial assets into the following categories: Loans and receivables, held-to-maturity investments and available-for-sale assets.

(i) Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market.

They typically arise when the University provides money, goods or services directly to a debtor who has no intention of trading the receivable. Assets in this category are currently recorded at amortised cost.

'(/

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(ii) Held-to-maturity investments

Held-to-maturity investments are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and of fixed maturity that are intended to be held to maturity. The University currently invests in bank bills, which are classified under this category. The University records bank bills at purchase price (not maturity value) and accrues the interest on a monthly basis until that interest is recorded at maturity.

(iii) Available-for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale financial assets, comprising principally of marketable equity securities (held through managed funds), are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets unless management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

Purchases and sales of investments are recognised on trade-date - the date on which the University commits to purchase or sell the asset. Investments are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction costs for all financial assets not carried at fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets are derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired or have been transferred and the University has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership.

Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Loans and receivables and held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Unrealised gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of non monetary securities classified as available-for-sale are recognised in equity in the investments revaluation reserve. When securities classified as available-for-sale are sold or impaired, the accumulated fair value adjustments are included in the income statement as gains and losses from investment securities.

The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the University establishes fair value by using valuation techniques.

The University assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity securities classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of a security below its cost is considered in determining whether the security is impaired. If any such evidence exists for available-for-sale financial assets, the cumulative loss (measured as the difference between the acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously recognised in profit and loss) is removed from equity and recognised in the income statement. Impairment losses recognised in the income statement on equity instruments are not reversed through the income statement, but are recognised in equity in the available-for-sale investments revaluation reserve.

(q) Payables

Payables are recognised when the University becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services. Accounts payable are not interest bearing and are stated at their nominal value.

(r) Borrowings

Interest-bearing loans and overdrafts are recorded when the proceeds are received, net of direct issued costs. Finance charges, including premiums payable on settlement or redemption and direct issue costs, are accounted for on an accrual basis using the effective interest method and are added to the carrying amount of the instrument to the extent that they are not settled in the period in which they arise.

Interest bearing liabilities are classified as current liabilities unless the University has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the balance sheet date.

'(5

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(s) Provisions

Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and amount and are recognised where there is a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable and are liable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at each balance sheet date. See note

33 ‘Provisions’.

(i) Employee benefits - annual leave

The liability for annual leave that will fall due within 12 months after the end of the reporting date is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and is measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid. The liability for annual leave that will fall due more than 12 months after the end of the reporting date is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and is measured at the present value of amounts expected to be paid in the future in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Consideration is given, when assessing expected future payments, to expected future wage and salary levels including superannuation on-costs. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash flows.

(ii) Employee benefits - long service leave

The liability for long service leave that will fall due within 12 months after the end of the reporting date is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and is measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid. The liability for long service leave that will fall due more than 12 months after the end of the reporting date is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and is measured at the present value of amounts expected to be paid in the future in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Consideration is given, when assessing expected future payments, to expected future wage and salary levels including superannuation on-costs. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash flows.

Leave benefits are calculated at remuneration rates expected to be paid when liabilities are settled. A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed four years of service. An actuarial assessment of long service leave undertaken in-house in 2007 determined that the liability measured using the short-hand method was not materially different from the liability measured using the present value of expected future payments.

In 2007, the University has adopted the shorthand method to calculate long service leave liabilities.

All unconditional long service leave is classified as a current liability.

Employee On-Costs

Employee on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance and payroll tax, are not employee benefits and are recognised as liabilities and expenses when the employee benefits to which they relate have occurred. Employee on-costs are not included as part of the University’s Employee benefits expense and the related liability is included in Employee on-costs provision.

Other compensated absences

Employees accrue and accumulate sick leave and study leave in accordance with University policies. It is the policy of the

University to recognise the cost of sick leave and study leave when paid. Employees who leave University employment are not entitled to be paid for accrued sick leave or study leave. Therefore, no liability is shown in the financial statements.

'(+

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(iii) Superannuation

The University contributes to the GESB Pension Scheme, GESB Gold State Superannuation Scheme and various UniSuper superannuation schemes on behalf of its employees. The contributions made to these schemes by the University, and emerging costs from unfunded schemes, are expensed in the Income Statement. Actuarial gains and losses are recognised immediately in profit and loss in the year in which they occur.

Refer to Note 49 for details relating to the individual schemes.

GESB Scheme Information

Pension Scheme members’ receive pension benefits on retirement, death or invalidity. The Fund Share of the pension benefit, which is based on the members’ contributions plus investment earnings, may be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

The State Share of the pension benefit, which is employer-financed, cannot be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

Some former Pension Scheme members’ have transferred to the Gold State Scheme. The members receive a lump sum benefit in respect of their transferred benefit at retirement, death or invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment.

(t)

Foreign currency translation and hedges

Transactions in currencies other than Australian dollars are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the dates of the transactions. At each reporting date, monetary assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rates prevailing on the reporting date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at the date when the fair value was determined.

Gains and losses arising on retranslation are included in the Income Statement for the period.

(u) Disaggregation information

The University has determined reportable segment information on the basis of business segments and geographical segments.

A business segment is a group of assets and operations engaged in providing products or services that are subject to risks and returns that are different from those of other business segments. A geographic segment is engaged in providing services within a particular economic environment that are subject to risks and returns that are different from those of segments operating in other economic environments.

The University have two reportable business segments consisting of higher education and vocational education and training

(VET). The higher education segment is an aggregation of operations that deliver progressive university degree programs for the modern workplace and focus on the service professions. The VET segment primarily delivers nationally accredited flexible training solutions designed to meet the varied needs of businesses and individuals activities.

Geographically, the University and its subsidiary's activities are conducted and operated predominantly in Australia.

Off-shore activities are analysed as a separate geographical segment.

Segment revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities are allocated to business and geographic segments on the basis of direct attribution and reasonable estimates of usage. Income tax has not been included in assets and liabilities.

(v) Special reserves

The special reserve represents restricted funds, whose use is limited in future years to the purposes designated by the benefactors, donors or sponsors such as research financial assistance, scholarships and capital equipment replacement.

No funds are currently held in special reserves at the reporting date.

'(-

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(w) Taxation

The controlled entity, E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd. (ECURL) trading as Steps Professional Development, is subject to income tax in Australia under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. Authority has been granted to ECURL to adopt a calendar tax year.

The overseas branches are subject to income tax relating to income and expenditure items attributable to permanent establishments in the United Kingdom, the United States of America and New Zealand. The taxation expense represents the sum of tax currently payable and is measured at 31 December each year.

Taxable profit differs from net profit as reported in the Income Statement because it excludes items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and it further excludes items that are never taxable or deductible. The liability for current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted by the reporting date.

(x) Deferred tax

The consolidated entity adopts an income statement liability method to account for expected income tax consequences inherent in the financial statements. The provision for deferred income tax liability and deferred tax assets includes the tax effect (at current tax rates) of the differences between income and expense items recognised in different accounting periods for book and tax purposes. The benefit arising from estimated carry-forward tax losses, has also been recorded as a deferred tax asset only where realisation of the asset is considered to be virtually certain. The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each reporting date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer virtually certain that sufficient taxable profits will be available to allow all or part of the asset to be recovered.

(y) Comparative figures

Comparative figures have been restated on the AIFRS basis except for financial instruments information which has been prepared under the previous AGAAP Accounting Standard AAS 33 as permitted by AASB 1.36A. The transition to AIFRS for data prepared under AASB 132 and AASB 139 was 1 January 2005.

(z) Rounding

Amounts in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars.

(aa) New accounting standards and Interpretations

Certain new Accounting Standards and Interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for 31 December 2007 reporting periods. The University’s assessment of the impact of these new Standards and Interpretations is set out below:

(i) AASB 8 Operating Segments and AASB 2007-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 8

AASB 8 and AASB 2007-3 are effective for annual reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2009. AASB 8 will result in a significant change in the approach to segment reporting, as it requires adoption of a 'management approach' to reporting on the financial performance. The information being reported will be based on what the key decision-makers use internally for evaluating segment performance and deciding how to allocate resources to operating segments. The

University has not yet decided when to adopt AASB 8. Application of AASB 8 may result in different segments, segment results and different type of information being reported in the segment note of the financial report. However, it will not affect any of the amounts recognised in the financial statements.

(ii) Revised AASB 123 Borrowing Costs and AASB 2007-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from

AASB 123 [AASB 1, AASB 101, AASB 107, AASB 111, AASB 116 & AASB 138 and Interpretations 1 & 12]

The revised AASB 123 is applicable to annual reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2009. It has removed the option to expense all borrowing costs and - when adopted - will require the capitalisation of all borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset. There will be no impact on the financial report of the University, as the University does already capitalise borrowing costs relating to qualifying assets.

'(0

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(iii) Revised AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements and AASB2007-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting

Standards arising from AASB 101

A revised AASB 101 that was issued in September 2007 is applicable for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1

January 2009. Local governments, government departments and governments were subject to requirements that differed from requirements applicable to other not-for-profit entities and for-profit entities contained in Australian Accounting

Standards. An objective of this standard is to put in place transaction-neutral standards that will precribe treatment of like transactions and events consistently, the application of this standard will not affect any if the amounts recognised in the financial statements.

'(4

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

4 Disaggregated information

4.1 Industry

Parent Higher Education

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Income statements

Total revenue and income from continuing activities

Total expenses from continuing activities

Operating result from continuing activities

Balance sheets

Assets

Current assets

Non-current assets

Total assets

Liabilities

Current liabilities

Non-current liabilities

Total liabilities

Net Assets

Equity

255,105

239,254

15,851

240,701

233,708

6,993

50,770

751,598

802,368

59,436

92,245

151,681

650,687

650,687

41,858

720,320

762,178

59,327

72,188

131,515

630,663

630,663

2007

$'000

VET

2006

$'000

14,659

10,417

4,242

52

207

259

418

196

614

(355)

(355)

Total Entity

2007

$'000

14,085

10,278

3,807

269,764

249,671

20,093

49

232

281

358

155

513

(232)

(232)

50,822

751,805

802,627

59,854

92,441

152,295

650,332

650,332

2006

$'000

254,786

243,986

10,800

41,907

720,552

762,459

59,685

72,343

132,028

630,431

630,431

4.2 Geographical

Consolidated

Australia

Other

Total

Revenue

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

267,461

7,287

274,748

252,114

7,008

259,122

2007

$'000

Results

2006

$'000

18,563

1,762

20,325

8,850

2,269

11,119

2007

$'000

Assets

2006

$'000

804,593

428

805,021

763,929

316

764,245

''(

5 Australian Government financial assistance

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

(a) Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants

Commonwealth Grants Scheme

Indigenous Support Fund

Equity Support programmes

Disability Support Programme

Workplace Reform Programme

Workplace Productivity Programme

Capital Development Pool

Superannuation Programme

Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants

88,099

905

217

42

1,144

1,587

585

4,660

97,239

86,907

986

392

46

1,232

-

2,129

3,681

95,373

(b) Higher Education Loan Programmes

HECS-HELP

FEE-HELP

Total Higher Education Loan Programmes

(c) Scholarships

Australian Postgraduate Awards

International Postgraduate Research Scholarships

Commonwealth Education Cost Scholarships

Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships

Indigenous Scholarships

Total Scholarships

(d) DEEWR - Research

Institutional Grants Scheme

Research Training Scheme

Research Infrastructure Block Grants

Implementation assistance programme

Australian scheme for higher education repositories

Commercialisation Training Scheme

Total DEEWR-Research Grants

45,377

5,950

51,327

873

140

1,257

1,645

33

3,948

1,945

4,223

544

44

98

48

6,902

45,299

5,515

50,814

874

153

932

1,327

-

3,286

1,825

4,074

545

-

-

-

6,444

(e) Australian Research Council

(i) Discovery

Discovery - Projects

Total Discovery

(ii) Linkages

Linkages - Other

Total Linkages

Total Australian Research Council

196

196

416

416

612

359

359

665

665

1,024

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

88,099

905

217

42

1,144

1,587

585

4,660

97,239

86,907

986

392

46

1,232

-

2,129

3,681

95,373

45,377

5,950

51,327

873

140

1,257

1,645

33

3,948

1,945

4,223

544

44

98

48

6,902

45,299

5,515

50,814

874

153

932

1,327

-

3,286

1,825

4,074

545

-

-

-

6,444

196

196

416

416

612

359

359

665

665

1,024

'''

5 Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

(f) Other Australian Government financial assistance

National competitive

Other research grants

Other

Total Other Australian Government financial assistance

667

1,083

1,277

3,027

Total Australian Government financial assistance

163,055

Reconciliation

Australian Government grants (a+c+d+e+f)

HECS-HELP - Australian Government payments

Other Australian Government loan programmes

[FEE-HELP]

Total Australian Government financial assistance

(g) Australian Government grants received - cash basis (Ref Note 50)

CGS and Other DEEWR Grants

Higher Education Loan Programmes

Scholarships

DEEWR Research Grants

ARC grants - Discovery

ARC grants - Linkages

Other Australian Government Grants

Total Australian Government Grants received - cash basis

OS-Help (Net)

Total Australian Government funding received - cash basis

111,728

45,377

5,950

163,055

92,968

52,765

3,948

6,902

265

371

3,027

-

160,246

3

160,249

99,921

57,225

3,286

6,444

286

639

2,421

-

170,222

12

170,234

733

1,322

366

2,421

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

667

1,083

1,277

3,027

733

1,322

366

2,421

159,362 163,055 159,362

108,548

45,299

5,515

159,362

111,728

45,377

5,950

163,055

108,548

45,299

5,515

159,362

92,968

52,765

3,948

6,902

265

371

3,027

-

160,246

3

160,249

99,921

57,225

3,286

6,444

286

639

2,421

-

170,222

12

170,234

6 State and Local Government financial assistance

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

State financial assistance

WA State Department of Education and Training*

Other

Total State and Local Government financial assistance

7,294

3,403

10,697

6,918

2,041

8,959

* The funding relates to West Australian Academy of Performing Arts ([email protected])

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

7,294

3,403

10,697

6,918

2,041

8,959

'',

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

7 Fees and charges

Course fees and charges

Continuing education

Fee-paying overseas students

Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students

Fee-paying domestic undergraduate students

Fee-paying domestic non-award students

Total course fees and charges

Other non-course fees and charges

Student accommodation

Rental charges

Seminar and workshop fees

Examination, registration and photocoping fees

Library fines

Late fees

Parking fees

Amenities and service fees

Course consumable fee

All other

Total other non-course fees and charges

Total fees and charges

8 Investment income

Interest revenue on loan to subsidiary

Interest from current account

Interest from bank bills and trust accounts

Dividends received

Distributions from investments in managed funds

Total investment income

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

1,023

41,621

3,406

15

-

46,065

2,869

38,008

3,896

818

38

45,629

1,835

1,199

846

315

34

203

1,235

96

91

541

6,395

52,460

1,677

1,284

758

512

171

169

1,284

947

447

599

7,848

53,477

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

1,023

41,621

3,406

15

-

46,065

1,835

1,199

846

315

34

203

1,235

96

91

541

6,395

52,460

2,869

38,008

3,896

818

38

45,629

1,677

1,284

758

512

171

169

1,284

947

447

599

7,848

53,477

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

-

1,015

1,648

197

85

2,945

-

706

1,686

291

-

2,683

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

8

975

1,648

197

85

2,913

6

661

1,686

291

-

2,644

9 Royalties, trademarks and licences

Royalties

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

6,338 5,404

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

3,930 3,379

''.

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

10 Consultancy and contracts

Research

Consultancy

Contract research

Total consultancy and contracts

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

712

4,495

5,207

686

5,522

6,208

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

663

4,495

5,158

654

5,522

6,176

11 Gain on disposal of assets

Carrying amounts of disposal of non-current assets

Property, plant and equipment

Proceeds from disposal of non-current assets

Property, plant and equipment

Net gain on disposal of assets

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

(25,927)

36,627

10,700

(51)

91

40

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

(25,926)

36,627

10,701

(51)

91

40

12 Other revenue and income

Other revenue

Donations, bequests and scholarships

Prizes, contributions and sponsorships

Commissions and rebates received

Expense recoups

Total other revenue

Other income

Insurance claims

Box office - WAAPA

Miscellaneous Income

Medical practitioners fees

Bad debts recovered

Professional development courses

Other

Total other income

Total other revenue and income

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

730

309

342

147

1,528

134

207

382

130

853

26

304

1,392

94

10

2,385

167

4,378

5,906

19

231

323

100

301

2,150

130

3,254

4,107

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

730

309

342

147

1,528

134

207

382

130

853

26

304

1,392

94

10

-

56

1,882

3,410

19

231

323

100

301

-

40

1,014

1,867

''/

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

13 Change in accounting policy

Change in accounting policy regarding the recording of property plant and equipment in the previous financial year as inventory

The University embarked on the redevelopment of the Churchlands campus into residential blocks to be sold in 6 stages during the 2006 financial year. The land under development was initially interpreted to be treated as Inventory. Considering the substance of the actual transaction pertaining to the purchase of land from WA Government and obtaining technical professional advise and considering the definitions, recognitions requirements and appropriate measurement of the relevant accounting standards, it was established that the development of land does not form part of the ordinary course of business for the University and it was therefore concluded that the initial application of the relevant accounting policies needed to be revised.

It was determined that the appropriate accounting treatment for the development of land is to classify this as property, plant and equipment. All the unsold lots meeting the requirements of AASB 5 at the end of a year should be reclassified to non-current assets classified as held for sale. In the prior year the land and any development costs has been restated back to property, plant and equipment as stages 1 and 2 were not ready for sale as at 31 December 2006.

The change in accounting policy has been effected by restating each of the affected financial statement line items for the prior year. The land under development was held at cost in the prior year at $23,138,000, as per the University’s accounting policy for Inventory. In these financials the prior year carrying value of land and development cost capitalised was restated to property plant and equipment of $31,735,000 from inventory. This represents the fair value of land as per the accounting policy on property plant and equipment. A corresponding increase to the property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve of $8,597,000 was accounted for.

14 Employee related expenses

Academic

Salaries

Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:

Emerging cost

Funded

Long service leave expense

Annual leave

Redundancy payouts

Other

Total Academic

Non-academic

Salaries

Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:

Emerging cost

Funded

Long service leave expense

Annual leave

Redundancy payouts

Other

Total Non-academic

Total academic and non-academic employee related expenses

Deferred employment benefits for superannuation

Total Employee related expenses

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

55,888

3,972

8,032

1,719

480

446

1,686

72,223

57,931

315

8,049

1,514

396

778

335

69,318

56,589

3,510

8,093

1,795

1,347

4,521

688

76,543

57,616

1,614

8,028

835

(89)

2,532

220

70,756

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

55,888

3,972

8,032

1,719

480

446

1,686

72,223

56,156

124

8,049

1,490

370

778

335

67,302

56,589

3,510

8,093

1,795

1,347

4,521

688

76,543

56,054

1,467

8,028

823

(105)

2,532

220

69,019

141,541

2,975

144,516

147,299

3,083

150,382

139,525

2,975

142,500

145,562

3,083

148,645

''5

15 Depreciation and amortisation

Depreciation

Buildings

Leasehold improvements

Other equipment and furniture

Computing equipment

Motor vehicles

Library collections

Total depreciation

Amortisation

Intangible assets

Total amortisation

Total depreciation and amortisation

16 Repairs and maintenance

Buildings maintenance

Grounds maintenance

Other

Total repairs and maintenance

17 Finance costs

Interest cost

18 Impairment of assets

Impairments of receivables written off directly

Impairments of receivables provided for

Total impairments of assets

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

10,189

616

2,816

940

48

2,510

17,119

2,834

2,834

19,953

9,397

447

2,582

1,489

107

2,616

16,638

1,915

1,915

18,553

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

10,189

612

2,810

924

46

2,510

17,091

2,834

2,834

19,925

9,397

444

2,570

1,454

103

2,616

16,584

1,915

1,915

18,499

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

4,394

433

1,295

6,122

3,696

449

752

4,897

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

4,394

433

1,295

6,122

3,696

449

752

4,897

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2,105 1,348

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

2,105 1,348

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

3

500

503

2

714

716

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

-

500

500

2

714

716

''+

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

19 Other expenses

Employee on-costs*

Student related expenditure

Telecommunications

Non-capitalised equipment

Computer software and maintenance

Travel, staff development & entertainment

Operating lease rental expenses

Professional and consulting fees

General consumables

Printing, postage and stationery

Electricity, gas and rates

Advertising & marketing

Asset write-offs during the year

Other

Total Other expenses

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

8,557

9,558

1,545

6,628

7,950

6,504

556

10,826

4,300

3,274

3,659

6,672

14

7,473

77,516

8,385

9,451

1,454

4,604

8,853

5,909

946

7,845

3,751

3,577

3,389

3,664

5

6,782

68,615

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

8,420

9,558

1,511

6,628

7,950

6,069

540

10,504

3,715

3,122

3,532

6,312

14

6,880

74,755

8,293

9,451

1,424

4,604

8,853

5,566

936

7,755

3,225

3,416

3,260

3,377

5

6,292

66,457

*Includes workers’ compensation insurance, payroll tax and other employment on-costs. The on-costs liability associated with the recognition of annual leave and long service leave liability is included at Note 33 ‘Provisions’. Superannuation contributions accrued as part of the provision for leave are employee benefits and are not included in employment on-costs.

20 Income tax expense

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

(a) Income tax expense

Current tax

Deferred tax

Under / (over) provided in prior years

Deferred income tax (revenue) / expense included in income tax expense comprises:

Decrease / (increase) in deferred tax assets

(Decrease) / increase in deferred tax liabilities

58

(108)

(6)

(56)

(200)

92

(108)

Income tax is in relation to the Controlled Entity E.C.U Resources for Learning Ltd. which includes overseas branches.

68

(1)

1

68

(3)

2

(1)

''-

20 Income tax expense (continued)

(b) Numerical reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable

Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30% (2006 - 30%)

Deferred tax underprovision

Difference in overseas tax rates

Under / (over) provision in prior years

Prior year tax losses not recognised

Income tax expense

Tax effect of amounts which are not deductible (assessable) in calculating taxable income:

Depreciation and amortisation

Sundry items

Income tax expense adjusted for permanent differences

Benefit of tax losses of prior years recouped

Income tax expense - tax consolidated group (excluding parent entity)

Total income tax expense

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

49

(10)

(18)

(6)

23

(1)

38

1

(21)

(20)

(74)

(94)

(56)

1

-

1

(37)

(36)

68

118

-

(38)

2

22

(14)

104

(c) Tax losses

Unused tax losses for which no deferred tax asset has been recognised

Potential tax benefit

These tax losses include US unused tax losses which will expire in the year ending 31 December 2021.

76

23

149

45

21 Cash and cash equivalents

Cash at bank and on hand

Bank Bills

Cash held in imprests

Restricted cash and cash equivalents

Total cash and cash equivalents

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

1,404

5,912

28

4,448

11,792

7,906

5,808

27

4,017

17,758

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

629

5,685

28

4,448

10,790

6,950

5,808

27

4,017

16,802

''0

21 Cash and cash equivalents (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year

The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the cash flow statement as follows:

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Unrestricted cash assets

Restricted cash assets (note 36)

Balances per cash flow statement

7,344

4,448

11,792

13,741

4,017

17,758

6,342

4,448

10,790

12,785

4,017

16,802

22 Receivables

Current

Receivables

Trade receivables

Less: allowance for impairment of receivables

Deferred government contribution for superannuation*

GST

Total current receivables

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

10,057

(1,782)

8,275

3,550

1,444

13,269

26,267

-

26,267

9,672

(1,584)

8,088

3,128

963

12,179

29,664

-

29,664

2007

$'000

Parent

9,416

(1,782)

7,634

3,550

1,249

12,433

26,267

119

26,386

2006

$'000

9,338

(1,584)

7,754

3,128

963

11,845

Non-current

Deferred government contribution for superannuation*

Loans to related parties

Total non-current receivables

29,664

111

29,775

Total trade and other receivables

39,536 41,843 38,819 41,620

*The total income for the 2007 from deferred government superannuation contributions recognised in the income statement is $2,975,000 (2006: $3,083,000) which is derived from the difference between current and prior year balances. A corresponding expense is also recognised (Refer to Note 14).

(a) Impaired receivables

As at 31 December 2007 current receivables of the University with a nominal value of $10,504,000 (2006: $9,190,000) were impaired. The amount of the provision was $1,782,000 (2006: $1,584,000). The individually impaired receivables mainly relate to individual overseas students and trade debt, which are more difficult to collect due to their location. It was assessed that a portion of the receivables is expected to be recovered.

''4

22 Receivables (continued)

The ageing of these receivables is as follows:

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

3 to 6 months

Over 6 months

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

650

1,811

2,461

1,606

4,136

5,742

As of 31 December 2007, trade receivables of $679,000 (2006: $4,158,000) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of independent customers for whom there is no recent history of default.

The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

3 to 6 months

Over 6 months

492

187

679

1,559

2,599

4,158

Movements in the provision for impaired receivables are as follows:

At 1 January 2007

Provision for impairment recognised during the year

Receivables written off during the year as uncollectible

Unused amount reversed

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

1,584

500

(292)

(10)

1,782

1,262

714

(91)

(301)

1,584

The creation and release of the provision for impaired receivables has been included in 'Impairment of assets' in the income statement. Amounts charged to the provision account are generally written off when there is no expectation of recovering additional cash.

The other classes within trade and other receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history of these other classes, it is expected that these amounts will be received when due

(b) Foreign exchange and interest rate risk

A summarised analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other receivables to foreign exchange and interest rate risk can be found in Note 47.

',(

22 Receivables (continued)

Australian Dollars

U.A.E Dirhams

GB Pounds

NZ Dollars

US Dollars

Current receivables

Non-current receivables

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

39,026

66

228

1

215

39,536

13,269

26,267

39,536

41,532

-

178

3

130

41,843

12,179

29,664

41,843

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

38,753

66

-

-

-

38,819

12,433

26,386

38,819

41,585

-

-

-

35

41,620

11,845

29,775

41,620

A summarised analysis of the sensitivity of receivables to foreign exchange and interest rate risk can be found in note 47.

(c) Fair value and credit risk

Due to the short-term nature of these receivables, their carrying amount is assumed to approximate their fair value.

23 Inventories

Current

Trading stock

- at cost

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

1,753 2,011

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

1,604 1,838

','

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

24 Other financial assets

Current

Other current financial assets

Bank bills

Floating rate notes

Total current other financial assets

Non-current

Available for sale investments

Investment in shares

Investment in managed funds

Total available for sale

Held to maturity

Term deposits

Total held to maturity

Total non-current other financial assets

Total other financial assets

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

10,174

-

10,174

6,000

5,004

11,004

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

10,165

-

10,165

6,000

5,004

11,004

832

29,853

30,685

7,004

7,004

37,689

47,863

780

-

780

-

-

780

11,784

832

29,853

30,685

7,004

7,004

37,689

47,854

780

-

780

-

-

780

11,784

25 Non-current assets classified as held for sale

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Land 10,590 - 10,590 -

During the 2006 year the University decided to redevelop the Churchlands campus into residential blocks to be sold off in 6 stages. The redevelopment of stages 1 and 2 has now been completed and all blocks are expected to be sold within the next 12 months. The remaining stages are accounted for as property plant and equipment.

26 Other non-financial assets

Current

Accrued income

Advances and prepayments

Total current other non-financial assets

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

3,734

1,735

5,469

174

424

598

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

3,549

1,691

5,240

64

354

418

',,

At 31 December 2006

- Cost

- Valuation

Accumulated depreciation

Net book amount

28,671 - -

- 213,460 395,343

- - -

28,671 213,460 395,343

-

8,823

-

8,823

833

-

(642)

191

-

11,282

22,477

-

(11) (15,442)

11,271 7,035

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

27 Property, plant and equipment

Consolidated

Year ended 31 December 2006

Opening net book amount

Additions/transfers

Disposals/transfers

Accumulated depreciation on disposals

Net foreign currency exchange difference

Revaluation increments

Depreciation

Adjustment to prior year costs

Reclassifications in/(out)

Carrying amount at end of year

Work in progress

$'000

Land

$'000

Buildings

$'000

24,473

44,642

(40,444)

149,445

-

-

322,532

40,444

-

-

-

-

-

-

64,015

-

-

41,764

-

-

-

-

(9,397)

-

- - -

28,671 213,460 395,343

Works of Art

$'000

6,745

90

-

-

-

1,988

-

-

-

8,823

Motor vehicles

$'000

Leasehold improve- ments

$'000

Other equipment and furniture Library

$'000 $'000

Computing equipment

$'000

285

26

(47)

34

-

-

(107)

-

-

191

8,895

14

-

-

2

2,797

(447)

10

-

11,271

7,703

1,964

(58)

10

1

-

(2,582)

(6)

3

7,035

8,194

2,652

-

-

-

-

(2,616)

-

-

8,230

Total

$'000

2,635 530,907

657 90,489

(8) (40,557)

2

-

46

3

- 110,564

(1,489) (16,638)

1 5

(1) 2

1,797 674,821

10,846

-

12,435 75,262

- 628,908

(2,616) (10,638) (29,349)

8,230 1,797 674,821

',.

27 Property, plant and equipment (continued)

Consolidated

Year ended 31 December 2007

Opening net book amount

Additions/transfers

Disposals/transfers

Accumulated depreciation on disposals

Write-offs during the year

Accumulated depreciation on write-offs

Transfers to assets held for sale

Depreciation

Reclassifications in/(out)

Closing net book amount

At 31 December 2007

- Cost

- Valuation

Accumulated depreciation

Accumulated impairment

Net book amount

Work in progress

$'000

Land

$'000

Buildings

$'000

28,671 213,460 395,343

50,232 11,980

(53,130) (25,774)

- -

38,003

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25,773

-

-

(10,590)

-

-

189,076

-

-

-

(10,189)

-

423,157

25,773

-

-

-

- 189,076 433,346

-

-

-

(10,189)

-

25,773 189,076 423,157

Works of Art

$'000

8,823

206

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9,029

-

9,029

-

-

9,029

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Motor vehicles

$'000

Leasehold improve- ments

$'000

Other equipment and furniture Library

$'000 $'000

Computing equipment

$'000

Total

$'000

191

40

(288)

236

-

-

-

(48)

(42)

89

361

-

(272)

-

89

11,271

163

-

-

-

-

-

(616)

-

10,818

-

11,446

7,035

2,364

(1,186)

1,108

(31)

21

-

(2,816)

176

6,671

24,761

-

(628) (18,090)

-

10,818

-

6,671

8,230

2,983

-

-

(2,616)

2,616

-

(2,510)

-

8,703

11,213

-

(2,510)

-

8,703

1,797

1,354

(1,886)

1,864

(60)

56

2,051

10,930

2,051

674,821

107,325

(82,264)

3,208

(2,707)

2,693

- (10,590)

(940) (17,119)

(134) -

675,367

73,038

- 642,897

(8,879) (40,568)

- -

675,367

',/

27 Property, plant and equipment (continued)

Parent

Year ended 31 December 2006

Opening net book amount

Additions/transfers

Disposals/transfers

Accumulated depreciation on disposals

Revaluation increments

Depreciation

Carrying amount at end of year

At 31 December 2006

- Cost

- Valuation

Accumulated depreciation

Net book amount

Work in progress

$'000

Land

$'000

Buildings

$'000

24,473 149,445 322,532

44,642

(40,444)

-

-

-

-

40,444

-

-

-

-

28,671 213,460 395,343

28,671

-

28,671

64,015

-

-

-

213,460

41,764

(9,397)

-

- 213,460 395,343

-

395,343

Works of Art

$'000

6,745

90

-

-

1,988

-

8,823

-

8,823

-

8,823

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Motor vehicles

$'000

Leasehold improve- ments

$'000

Other equipment and furniture Library

$'000 $'000

Computing equipment

$'000

Total

$'000

276

26

(47)

34

-

(103)

186

806

-

(620)

186

8,871

-

-

-

2,797

(444)

11,224

-

11,224

11,224

7,658

1,959

(58)

10

-

(2,570)

6,999

22,377

-

- (15,378)

6,999

8,194

2,652

-

-

-

(2,616)

8,230

2,581

613

(8)

2

530,775

90,426

(40,557)

46

- 110,564

(1,454) (16,584)

1,734 674,670

10,846 12,188 74,888

- - 628,850

(2,616) (10,454) (29,068)

8,230 1,734 674,670

',5

27 Property, plant and equipment (continued)

Parent

Year ended 31 December 2007

Opening net book amount

Additions/transfers

Disposals/transfers

Accumulated depreciation on disposals

Write-offs during the year

Accumulated depreciation on write-offs

Depreciation

Transfers to assets held for sale

Reclassifications in/(out)

Carrying amount at end of year

At 31 December 2007

- Cost

- Valuation

Accumulated depreciation

Net book amount

Work in progress

$'000

-

-

-

-

-

25,773

25,773

-

-

25,773

Land

$'000

-

-

-

(10,590)

-

189,076

-

189,076

-

189,076

Buildings

$'000

28,671 213,460 395,343

50,232 11,980

(53,130) (25,774)

- -

38,003

-

-

-

-

(10,189)

-

-

423,157

-

433,346

(10,189)

423,157

Works of Art

$'000

8,823

206

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9,029

-

9,029

-

9,029

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Motor vehicles

$'000

Leasehold improve- ments

$'000

Other equipment and furniture Library

$'000 $'000

Computing equipment

$'000

Total

$'000

186

38

(288)

236

-

-

(46)

-

(42)

84

333

-

(249)

84

Land and buildings were revalued as at 31st December 2006 by an independent professional valuer. The fair value of all land and buildings has been determined by reference to recent market transactions. Refer to note 2(f) Property plant and equipment. During 2007, the fair valuee were assessed by an independant professional valuer nd it was established that there were no material changes in fair values during the year.

The additions to land of $11,980,000 comprise of redevelopment expenses for conversion of the land into residential blocks on the Churchlands property.

11,224

164

-

-

-

-

(612)

-

-

10,776

6,999

2,363

(1,180)

1,103

(31)

21

(2,810)

-

176

6,641

-

11,388

24,666

-

(612) (18,025)

10,776 6,641

8,230

2,983

-

-

(2,616)

2,616

(2,510)

-

-

8,703

11,213

-

(2,510)

8,703

1,734

1,348

(1,844)

1,822

(60)

56

1,998

10,718

1,998

674,670

107,317

(82,216)

3,161

(2,707)

2,693

(924) (17,091)

- (10,590)

(134) -

675,237

72,703

- 642,839

(8,720) (40,305)

675,237

',+

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

28 Investment property

At fair value

Opening balance at 1 January

Accumulated depreciation at 1 January

Carrying value as at 1 January

Gain on revaluation

Closing balance as at 31 December

Accumulated depreciation at 31 December

Carrying value as at 31 December

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

12,493

-

12,493

-

12,493

12,493

-

12,493

10,561

-

10,561

1,932

12,493

12,493

-

12,493

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

12,493

-

12,493

-

12,493

12,493

-

12,493

10,561

-

10,561

1,932

12,493

12,493

-

12,493

29 Deferred tax assets and liabilities

Deferred tax assets

Deferred tax assets

Total deferred tax assets

Deferred tax asset

The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:

Amounts recognised in profit or loss

Doubtful debts

Employee benefits

Provision for employee on costs

Accrued expenses

Deposits

Other

Tax losses *

Net deferred tax assets

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

303

303

-

58

25

26

52

13

129

303

Consolidated

2006

$'000

All deferred tax asset movements have been credited directly to the income statement.

103

103

-

48

3

8

-

-

44

103

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

-

-

-

-

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

',-

29 Deferred tax assets and liabilities (continued)

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Deferred tax liabilities

Deferred tax liability

Total deferred tax liabilities

118

118

26

26

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

-

-

-

-

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:

Amounts recognised in operating result

Accounts receivable

Accelerated capital allowance

Accrued income

Other

Depreciation and amortisation

Net deferred tax liabilities

73

4

24

16

1

118

22

4

-

-

-

26

All deferred tax liability movements have been charged directly to the income statement.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30 Intangible assets

Consolidated

2007

$'000

:

$'000

Callista student record system

At cost

Accumulated amortisation

Net book amount

Reconciliation

Opening net book amount

Adjustments

Amortisation expense

Closing net book amount

7,149

(7,149)

-

2,834

-

(2,834)

-

7,149

(4,315)

2,834

4,752

-

(1,918)

2,834

The amortization of Callista has been accelerated following revision to its useful life. Refer note 3(g).

Parent

2007

$'000

7,149

(7,149)

-

2006

$'000

7,149

(4,315)

2,834

2,834

-

(2,834)

-

4,752

-

(1,918)

2,834

',0

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

31 Payables

Current

Trade payables

CGS liability to Australian Government

OS-HELP liability to Australian Government

Total current payables

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

4,762

5,248

3

10,013

6,526

8,369

12

14,907

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

4,184

5,248

3

9,435

6,139

8,369

12

14,520

Non-current

DETWA loan

Total non-current payables

Total trade and other payables

427

427

10,440

340

340

15,247

-

-

9,435

-

-

14,520

The fair value of trade and other payables is equal to their carrying value.

Foreign currency risk

The carrying amounts of the University's and parent entity's trade and other payables are denominated in the following currencies:

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Australian Dollars

GB Pounds

NZ Dollar

US Dollar

10,223

191

3

23

10,440

14,796

288

13

150

15,247

9,433

-

-

2

9,435

14,495

-

-

25

14,520

For an analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other payables to foreign currency risk refer to note 47.

',4

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

32 Borrowings

Current - unsecured

WA Treasury Corporation

Total current borrowings

Non-current- unsecured

WA Treasury Corporation

Total non-current borrowings

Total borrowings

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

10,187

10,187

181

181

61,102

61,102

71,289

36,639

36,639

36,820

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

10,187

10,187

181

181

61,102

61,102

71,289

36,639

36,639

36,820

(a) Financing arrangements

Unrestricted access was available at balance date to the following lines of credit:

Notes

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Credit standby arrangements

Total facilities

WA Treasury Corporation

Bank facilities

Total facilities

81,639

19,100

100,739

81,820

19,250

101,070

2007

$'000

Parent

81,639

19,100

100,739

2006

$'000

81,820

19,250

101,070

Used at balance date

WA Treasury Corporation

Bank facility

Total used at balance date

Unused at balance date

WA Treasury Corporation

Unsecured bill acceptance facility

Total unused at balance date

Bank loan facilities

Total facilities

Used at balance date

Unused at balance date

Notes

71,289

2007

$'000

445

71,734

10,350

18,655

29,005

100,739

71,734

29,005

Consolidated

36,820

2006

$'000

4

36,824

45,000

19,246

64,246

101,070

36,824

64,246

71,289

445

71,734

10,350

18,655

29,005

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

100,739

71,734

29,005

36,820

4

36,824

45,000

19,246

64,246

101,070

36,824

64,246

The bank loan facilities comprise of loans from WA Treasury Corporation which may be drawn at any time and may be terminated by any party providing at least 30 days written notice. The WA Treasury Corporation loans may be drawn at any time in Australian dollars and have an average maturity of 4.4 years (2006 - 3.9 years).

The average current interest rate on the used balance of the WA Treasury Corporation loan facility is 6.42% (2006 – 5.83%).

Used bank facilities of $0.445m (2006 - $0.004m) represent credit card outstandings as at year end which are included in trade creditors.

'.(

32 Borrowings (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

(b) Fair value

The carrying amounts and fair values of borrowings at balance date are:

Consolidated

Carrying amount

$'000

2007

2006

Fair value

Carrying amount Fair value

$'000

$'000 $'000

On-balance sheet (i)

Non-traded financial liabilities

WA Treasury Corporation

71,289

71,289

71,289

71,289

36,820

36,820

36,820

36,820

Parent

On-balance sheet (i)

Non-traded financial liabilities

WA Treasury Corporation

Carrying amount

$'000

2007

2006

Fair value

Carrying amount Fair value

$'000

$'000 $'000

71,289

71,289

71,289

71,289

36,820

36,820

36,820

36,820

Other than those classes of borrowings denoted as ''traded'', none of the classes are readily traded on organised markets in standardised form.

(i) On balance sheet

The fair value of current borrowings equals their carrying amount, as the impact of discounting is not significant.

(c) Risk exposures

The exposure of the University's and parent entity's borrowings to interest rate changes and the contractual repricing dates at the balance dates are as follows:

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

6 months or less

6 - 12 months

1 - 5 years

Over 5 years

596

10,101

20,680

39,912

71,289

657

108

30,736

5,319

36,820

596

10,101

20,680

39,912

71,289

657

108

30,736

5,319

36,820

These borrowings are classified as follows:

Current borrowings

Non-current borrowings

10,187

61,102

71,289

181

36,639

36,820

The carrying amounts of the University's borrowings are denominated in Australian Dollars

For an analysis of the sensitivity of borrowings to interest rate risk refer to note 47.

10,187

61,102

71,289

181

36,639

36,820

'.'

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

33 Provisions

Current provisions expected to be settled within 12 months

Employee benefits

Annual leave

Long service leave

Superannuation attributable to GESB

TOIL

Staff bonuses

Superannuation attributable to LSL, AL and TOIL

Provision for Income Tax

Employee on-costs

Subtotal

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

1,909

1,291

3,550

75

635

2,118

29

888

10,495

1,844

1,025

3,128

89

631

1,759

78

605

9,159

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

1,791

1,291

3,550

75

635

2,118

-

888

10,348

Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months*

Employee benefits

Annual Leave

Long service leave

Subtotal

Total current provisions

1,373

8,236

9,609

20,104

1,306

6,744

8,050

17,209

1,373

8,236

9,609

19,957

1,306

6,744

8,050

17,035

Non-current

Employee benefits

Long service leave

Superannuation attributable to GESB

Superannuation attributable to LSL

Employee on-costs

Other

Total non-current provisions

Total provisions

4,038

26,267

656

276

177

31,414

51,518

5,010

29,664

846

314

(66)

35,768

52,977

3,963

26,267

656

276

177

31,339

51,296

*Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months represents a current obligation of the University, however it is the view of the management that they are expected to be settled after more than 12 months.

4,946

29,664

846

314

(66)

35,704

52,739

1,748

1,025

3,128

89

631

1,759

-

605

8,985

'.,

33 Provisions (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

(a) Movements in provisions

Movements in provision during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below:

Employee on-costs

2007

$'000

Employee on-costs

2006

$'000

Consolidated

Current

Carrying amount at start of year

Net additional provisions recognised

Carrying amount at end of year

605

283

888

674

(69)

605

Non-current

Carrying amount at start of year

Net additional provisions recognised

Carrying amount at end of year

Parent

Current

Carrying amount at start of year

Net additional provisions recognised

Carrying amount at end of year

Non-current

Carrying amount at start of year

Net additional provisions recognised

Carrying amount at end of year

314

(38)

276

605

283

888

314

(38)

276

368

(54)

314

674

(69)

605

368

(54)

314

34 Other current liabilities

Financial assistance and fees received in advance

Accrued expenses

Total other current liabilities

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

9,315

11,381

20,696

14,587

13,614

28,201

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

9,060

11,215

20,275

14,492

13,457

27,949

-42-

'..

35 Reserves and retained surplus

(a) Reserves

Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve

Investments revaluation reserve

Foreign currency translation reserve

Movements:

Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve

Balance 1 January

Land

Buildings

Leasehold properties

Works of art

Transfer to retained earnings on disposal of property, plant and equipment

Adjustments to prior year

Transfers

Transfer to retained earnings

Balance 31 December

Investments revaluation reserve

Balance 1 January

Gain/(loss) on revaluation

Transfers

Balance 31 December

Foreign currency translation reserve

Balance 1 January

Currency translation differences arising during the year

Balance 31 December

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

327,133

388

17

327,538

333,072

-

-

-

-

-

-

(5,939)

-

327,133

-

(192)

580

388

19

(2)

17

333,072

-

19

333,091

222,508

64,015

41,764

2,797

1,988

-

-

-

-

333,072

(38)

57

19

-

-

-

-

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

327,133

388

-

327,521

333,072

-

-

-

-

-

-

(5,939)

-

327,133

-

(192)

580

388

-

-

-

333,072

-

-

333,072

222,508

64,015

41,764

2,797

1,988

-

-

-

-

333,072

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(b) Retained surplus

Movements in retained surplus were as follows:

Retained surplus at the beginning of the year

Net operating result attributable to the parent entity

Transfer to/from reserves*

Adjustment to prior year operating result (subsidiary)

Retained surplus at 31 December

297,883

20,325

5,359

-

323,567

286,758

11,119

-

6

297,883

297,359

20,093

5,359

-

322,811

286,559

10,800

-

-

297,359

'./

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

35 Reserves and retained surplus (continued)

(c) Nature and purpose of reserves

(i) Reserves

The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of non-current assets, as described in note 3(f). The balance standing to the credit of the reserve may be used to satisfy the distribution of bonus shares to shareholders and is only available for the payment of cash dividends in limited circumstances as permitted by law.

(ii) Investments revaluation reserve

Changes in the fair value and exchange differences arising on translation of investments, such as equities, classified as available-for-sale financial assets, are taken to the available-for-sale investments revaluation reserve, as described in note

3(p). Amounts are recognised in profit and loss when the associated assets are sold or impaired.

(iii) Foreign currency translation reserve

Exchange differences arising on translation of the foreign controlled branches of the University's subsidiary are taken to the foreign currency translation reserve, as described in note 3(t). The reserve is recognised in profit and loss when the net investment is disposed of.

*Transfer from revaluation reserve of $5,359,000 represents realisation of revaluation surplus on the lots sold from the

Churchlands development.

36 Restricted cash

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Restricted cash

ECU Foundation 4,448 4,017 4,448 4,017

The purpose of the ECU Foundation is to hold funds received from external sources and these funds are appropriated for a variety of educational and research purposes ranging from scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs. The

Foundation was established to aid and promote excellence in educational and research activities by seeking, receiving and administering private gifts for the benefit of the University and its community.

'.5

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

37 Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers

(a) Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority

Names of Persons who were members of the Accountable Authority

For the purposes of the Financial Management Act, the University Council, is the Accountable Authority of the University.

The University’s Council members during 2007 were:

Hon. Hendy Cowan (Chancellor) (term 3yrs end 31/12/10)

Prof Kerry O. Cox (Vice-Chancellor)

Mr Stephen Abbott (Pro-Chancellor) (term 3yrs end 29/8/08, external appt)

Ms Jennifer Ballantyne (term ended 24/6/07)

Mr Serge Walberg (term ended 19/9/07)

Mr Neil Douglas (term ended 17/3/09, co option appt)

Prof Ron Oliver (term 3yrs end 30/9/09, academic staff election)

Ms Karen McDonald (term 3yrs end 6/12/10, external appt)

Mr Kempton Cowan (term 3yrs end 19/12/09, external appt)

Mrs Helen Charlesworth (term 3yrs end 21/12/08, external appt)

Mrs Carol Devitt (resigned Feb 07)

Ms Leslie Chalmers (term 3yrs end 26/4/08, external appt)

Dr Norman Ashton (term 3yrs end 29/8/08, ministerial appt)

Justice Rene Le Miere (term 3yrs end 17/8/08, co-option appt)

Prof Arshad Omari (resigned Sep 07)

Ms Marilyn Beresford (resigned May 07)

Mr Jerry Koh (term ended 4/10/07)

Mr James Pollard (term ended 4/10/07)

Dr Alan Needham (term 2yrs end 30/9/09, academic staff election)

Ms Nerissa Eaton (term 2yrs end 30/9/09, general staff election)

Ms Diana Tan (term 1yr end 17/10/08, enrolled students election)

Ms Natalie Moire (term 1yr end 17/10/08, enrolled students election)

Mr Richard Cairnes (term 3yrs end 19/9/10, Alumni election)

Mr Simon Holthouse (term 3yrs end 11/9/10, co-option appt)

The controlled entity’s (refer to note 38) directors were:

ECU Resources for Learning Ltd.

Mr Geoffrey Sherwin (Chairman)

Mr Bruce Wilson

Mr Greg Robson (appointed Jan 07)

Prof Patrick Garnett (appointed Jan 07)

Mr Stephen Kenneth Procter (resigned Jul 07)

All directors of ECU Resources for Learning are appointed by resolution of the members of the Accountable Authority

(University Council).

'.+

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

37 Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers (continued)

(b) Names and Positions held of Persons who were Senior Officers of the University:

The University’s Senior Officers during 2007 were:

Prof Kerry O. Cox, Vice-Chancellor

Prof Patrick Garnett, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Operations)

Prof John Wood, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Students & Teaching) [resigned]

Prof Arshad Omari, Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Prof Anthony Watson, Executive Dean, Faculty of CHS and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (ICT & Library)

Prof Robyn Quin, Executive Dean, Faculty of EA [resigned]

Prof Brenda Cherednichenko, Executive Dean, Faculty of EA and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity & Indigenous)

Prof Robert Harvey, Executive Dean, Faculty of B&L and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Engagement)

Prof Andrew Taggart, Executive Dean, Faculty of RPS

Mr Warren Snell, Vice-President (Resources) and Chief Financial Officer

Dr Susan King, Executive Director (Governance & Planning)

Mr Ross Bindon, Chief Executive Officer (Subsidiary)

(c) Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers

The number of members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers, whose total fees, salaries, superannuation and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands:

Remuneration of Members of the Accountable

Authority

Nil to $10,000

$10,001 to $20,000

$20,001 to $30,000

$80,001 to $90,000

$90,001 to $100,000

$100,001 to $110,000

$130,001 to $140,000

$140,001 to $150,000

$170,001 to $180,000

$180,001 to $190,000

$190,001 to $200,000

$210,001 to $220,000

$220,001 to $230,000

$340,001 to $350,000

$370,001 to $380,000

$460,001 to $470,000

Aggregate remuneration of members of the

Accountable Authority ('000)

$

Consolidated

2007

18

1

1

1

1

1

-

1

-

1

1

1

-

1

-

1

1,882 $

,((+

24

2

1

-

-

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

1,047 $

2007

Parent

,((+

18

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

1,170 $

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

21

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

1

776

Council Members include University employees who may be ex-officio Members or elected staff Members. No council member has received any remuneration in his/her capacity as a council member.

18 members of the Accountable Authority receive no remuneration, fees, superannuation or benefits.

No members of the accountable authority are members of the Pension Scheme.

'.-

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

37 Remuneration of Members of the Accountable Authority and Senior Officers (continued)

Council Members may also be senior officers of the University. Where this is the case they have been included in the remuneration above but excluded from the remuneration band of the senior officers below

Remuneration of senior officers

$0 to $10,000

$10,001 to $20,000

$90,001 to $100,000

$140,001 to $150,000

$170,001 to $180,000

$200,001 to $210,000

$220,001 to $230,000

$240,001 to $250,000

$250,001 to $260,000

$260,001 to $270,000

$270,001 to $280,000

$290,001 to $300,000

$340,001 to $350,000

Aggregate remuneration of senior officers ('000)

$

1,557 $

2 members of the accountable authority are members of the Pension Scheme.

-

1

1

-

1

-

1

1

-

2

-

1

1

38 Remuneration of auditors

Remuneration to the Auditor General for the financial year is as follows

Consolidated

2007

$

2006

$

Assurance services

Audit services

Auditing the accounts, financial statements and performance indicators 244

The consolidated amounts for remuneration of auditors are indicative only.

189

3

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

1

1

1

1

-

2,271 $

-

1

1

-

1

1

1

1

-

1

-

1

1

1,757 $

2007

$

Parent

2006

$

179 162

3

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

1

-

1

1

1

2,327

'.0

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

39 Contingencies

Contingent liabilities

In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, the University has the following contingent liability:

Native title claims

Native title claims have been made on the University land for which judgement was handed down for on 19 September

2006. It was held that Native Title exists in the area which was the subject of the claim. The existence of these Native Title rights is currently being appealed.

Contaminated sites

During the year ECU reported one known contaminated site and one suspected contaminated sites to DEC. These have yet to be classified. ECU is currently unable to assess the likely outcome of the classification process, and accordingly, it is not practicable to estimate the potential financial effect or to identify the uncertainties relating to the amount or timing of any outflows. Whilst there is no possibility of reimbursement of any future expenses that may be incurred in the remediation of these sites, ECU may apply for funding from the Contaminated Sites Management Account to undertake further investigative work or to meet remediation costs that may be required.

Workers compensation claims

ECU may have some potential liability towards workers compensation claims. The process of defending the claims are still at an early stage, however the claims are not material and sufficient insurance is in place to cover the potential liability against these claims.

40 Commitments

(a) Capital commitments

Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to amounts reported in the financial statements and include amounts for infrastructure, are payable as follows:

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Property, plant and equipment

Payable:

Within one year

Later than one year but not later than five years

Later than five years

14,697

-

-

14,697

2,957

78,209

-

81,166

14,697

-

-

14,697

2,957

78,209

-

81,166

(b) Lease commitments : The University as lessee

(i) Operating leases

Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities, are payable as follows:

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Within one year

Later than one year but not later than five years

Later than five years

Total operating lease commitments

465

384

154

1,003

592

508

211

1,311

398

148

-

546

519

222

-

741

Representing:

Cancellable operating lease 1,003 1,311 546 741

'.4

40 Commitments (continued)

(c) Other expenditure commitments

Commitments in relation to purchase orders, are payable as follows:

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

Within 1 year 5,919 4,000

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

2007

$'000

Parent

5,919

2006

$'000

4,000

41 Related parties

Loans to related parties

Loans advanced to subsidiary

Amortisation of loan advanced to subsidiary

Net loan to related parties

Consolidated

2007

2006

$

$

-

-

-

-

-

-

2007

$

Parent

2006

$

125

(6)

119

125

(14)

111

42 Subsidiaries

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiaries in accordance with the accounting policy described in note 3(b):

Equity holding

Name of entity

Country of incorporation Class of shares 2007

2006

Australian public company limited by guarantee E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL)* Australia 100% 100%

* The principle activities of ECURL is to develop and deliver professional development resources for teaching professions.

The address of ECURL is Edith Cowan University, Churchlands Campus, Pearson Street, Churchlands, WA, 6018

'/(

Reconciliation of operating activities

Cashflow from operating activities

Net cash (outflow) inflow from operating activities

Amount to be allocated

16,506

16,506

-

43,728

43,728

-

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

43 Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities

Consolidated

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Operating result for the period

Non-cash items:

Depreciation and amortisation expense

Revaluation of investment property

Doubtful debts and bad debts written off

Provision for employee benefits

(Increase)/ decrease in fair value of investments

(Profit)/loss on sale of assets

Net loss on asset write-offs

Prepayment of withholding tax to overseas authority

Unrealised foreign exchange loss/(gain)

Subtotal

Change in assets and liabilities

(Increase) / decrease in accrued income

(Increase) / decrease in accounts receivable

(Increase) / decrease in tax assets

(Increase) / decrease in advances and prepayments

(Increase) / decrease in inventories

Increase / (decrease) in accounts payable

Increase / (decrease) increase in fees received in advance

Increase / (decrease) in accrued expenses

Increase / (decrease) in tax liabilities

(Increase) / decrease in GST recoverable/payable

Subtotal of change in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from purchases and sale of discontinued operation

20,325

19,954

-

503

(1,448)

180

(10,701)

14

33

(2)

28,858

(639)

2,281

(200)

(1,313)

258

(5,705)

(5,272)

(2,231)

44

425

(12,352)

11,119

18,553

(1,932)

716

(3,423)

(53)

(40)

-

(28)

26

24,938

49

2,582

10

621

(113)

6,357

4,460

4,635

97

92

18,790

20,093

19,925

-

500

(1,481)

180

(10,702)

14

33

-

28,562

(565)

2,592

-

(1,338)

234

(5,776)

(5,433)

(2,239)

-

406

(12,119)

10,800

18,499

(1,932)

716

(3,420)

(53)

(40)

-

(28)

-

24,542

113

2,471

-

633

(58)

6,451

4,362

4,831

-

92

18,895

Net cash provided by / (used in) operating activities 16,506 43,728 16,443 43,437

16,443

16,443

-

43,437

43,437

-

44 Non-cash investing and financing activities

During the financial year, there were no assets / liabilities transferred / assumed from other entities and therefore not reflected in the cash flow statement.

45 Events occurring after the balance sheet date

No events have occurred since balance sheet date that are likely to have a material impact on the financial statements or notes of the University.

'/'

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

46 Explanatory statement

This statement provides details of any significant variations between estimates and actual results for 2007 and between the actual results for 2006 and 2007. Significant variations are considered to be those greater than 10%

Significant variances between actual and prior year actual revenues and expenditures

9

10

11

6

7

4

5

8

2

3

Ref:

1

Category

Revenue

State Government financial assistance

Investment income

Royalties, trademarks & licenses

Consultancy & contracts

Net gain on disposal of non-current asset

Net gain on revaluation of investment property

Other revenue and income

Expenses

Repairs and maintenance

Impairment of Assets

Finance costs

Other expenses

Ref:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

2007

Actual

$'000

Parent

2006

Actual

$'000

(10,697)

(2,913)

(3,930)

(5,158)

(10,701)

-

(3,410)

(8,959)

(2,644)

(3,379)

(6,176)

(40)

(1,932)

(1,867)

8

9

10

11

6,122

500

2,105

74,755

4,897

716

1,348

66,457

Variance

$'000

(1,738)

(269)

(551)

1,018

(10,661)

1,932

(1,543)

%

19

10

16

(16)

26,653

(100)

83

1,225

(216)

757

8,298

25

(30)

56

12

Commentary

The increase in WA Government financial assistance is due to increased state and local government funded research grants.

The increase in investment income relates to higher returns and growth in the investment portfolio.

The increase in royalties, trademarks and licences relates to additional license fees from Perth Institute of Business and

Technology (PIBT).

Consultancy and contracts income reduces this year due to a lower number of research contracts.

The increase in net gain on the disposal of a portion of the Churchlands redevelopment during 2007.

No gains were recognised in 2007 on revaluation of investment property.

The increase in other revenue from is due to increased donations, refunds and other miscellaneous items.

The increase in repairs and maintenance is due to increased expenditure in the planned maintenance program and computer maintenance.

Impairment of assets reduces this year due to lower bad and doubtful debts.

Finance costs increase due to interest expenditure from further draw downs of the Western Australian Treasury

Corporation (WATC) loan for the campus consolidation project.

The increase in other expenses is due to increases in advertising, professional fees and consulting relating to research and other development projects as well as computer purchases as part of the standard operating environment roll out.

'/,

46 Explanatory statement (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Significant variances between estimate and actual results for the financial year

Ref:

1

7

8

5

6

9

10

2

3

4

Category

Ref:

Revenue

Investment income

Royalties, trademarks & licenses

Consultancy & contracts

Net gain on disposal of non-current assets

Other revenue and income

Deferred Government Superannuation

Contributions

Expenses

Repairs and maintenance 7

Impairment of Assets

Finance costs

8

9

Deferred Employee Benefits for Superannuation 10

1

2

3

4

5

6

2007

Estimate

$'000

Parent

2007

Actual

$'000

(2,284)

(2,617)

(2,918)

(16,927)

(2,051)

-

(2,913)

(3,930)

(5,158)

(10,701)

(3,410)

(2,975)

4,981

-

2,985

-

6,122

500

2,105

2,975

Variance

$'000

629

1,313

2,240

(6,226)

1,359

2,975

%

(22)

(33)

(43)

58

(40)

(100)

(1,141)

(500)

880

(2,975)

(19)

(100)

42

(100)

Commentary

The increase in WA Government financial assistance is due to increased state and local government funded research grants.

The increase in royalties, trademarks and licences relates to additional license fees from Perth Institute of Business and

Technology (PIBT).

The variance in consultancy and contract research is due to a higher than expected Non-Government Industry and

Other Research funding.

The forecasted sales for the Churchlands redevelopment did not all materialise. These will be recognised in 2008 upon sale of remaining stage 1&2 lots.

The increase in other revenue is due to increased donations, refunds and other miscellaneous items.

The revenue for Superannuation - Deferred Government contributions is not budgeted for because there is an offsetting expenditure in employee benefits and on costs.

The variance in repairs & maintenance is due to higher than expected building and computer maintenance.

The non-inclusion of a budget for bad and doubtful debts was due to the expectation that there would be no increase in value in 2007.

The variance in finance costs is due to interest expenditure from delay in draw downs of the Western Australian

Treasury Corporation (WATC) loan.

As per (6) above, the expense for deferred employee benefits for superannuation is not budgeted for because there is an offsetting revenue for the deferred government contribution.

'/.

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

47 Financial risk management

The University and the subsidiary are exposed to the following financial risks as a result of their activities:

(a) Market risk

(i) Foreign exchange risk

Foreign exchange risk arises due to overseas sources of income from the University’s international offshore teaching programs, foreign customers and foreign sourced supplies. The main currencies that the University is exposed to are the US dollar, the UK pound, the Singapore dollar and the Euro. The level of exposure to these currencies is not considered to be material.

(ii) Price risk

The University investment portfolios' are exposed to fluctuations in the prices of equity securities. The University's investment policy provides strategies for minimisation of price risk with the diversification of that risk through a number of investment managers and regular independent expert monitoring to ensure that there is no concentration of risk in any one area.

(iii) Interest rate risk

The interest rate risk arises from market interest rates and their effects on cashflow associated with interest bearing assets.

The University's investment policy provides strategies for minimising the impact from interest rate risk by following a strategy of regular repricing of interest bearing assets to match the benchmarks set by the policy.

The University has no significant variable interest rate bearing liabilities.

(iv) Summarised sensitivity analysis

The following table summarises the sensitivity of the Group’s financial assets and financial liabilities to interest rate risk, foreign exchange risk and other price risk.

Consolidated

31 December 2007

Interest rate risk

-1% +1%

Foreign exchange risk

-10% +10%

Other price risk

-10% +10%

Carrying amount Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 11,792 (118) (118)

Accounts receivable 39,536

AFS investments 30,685

Term deposits

-

-

-

-

17,178 (171) (171)

Financial liabilities

Trade payables 10,440

71,289 Borrowings

Total increase/

(decrease)

-

713

424

118

-

-

171

118 (79) (79)

- (51) (51)

- - -

171 - -

- - -

713 (713) (713)

(22)

-

(22)

-

424 (424) (424) (152) (152)

79

51

-

-

22

-

152

79 - - - -

51 - - - -

- (3,069) (3,069) 3,069 3,069

- - - - -

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

152 (3,069) (3,069) 3,069 3,069

'//

Parent

31 December 2007

Interest rate risk

-1% +1%

Foreign exchange risk

-10% +10%

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Other price risk

-10% +10%

Carrying amount Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets

AFS investments 30,685 - -

Cash and cash equivalents 10,790 (108) (108) 108

Accounts receivable 38,819 - - -

-

108

-

-

Term deposits- HTM 17,169 (171) (171) 171

Financial liabilities

Trade payables 9,435 - - -

Borrowings

Total increase/

(decrease)

71,289 713

434

713 (713) (713)

434 (434)

171

-

(434)

-

(7)

-

-

-

-

(7)

-

(7)

-

-

-

-

(7)

-

7

-

-

-

-

7

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- (3,069) (3,069) 3,069 3,069

- -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 (3,069) (3,069) 3,069 3,069

(b) Credit risk

The consolidated entity, while exposed to credit related losses in the event of non-performance by counterparties does not expect any counterparties to fail to meet their obligations.

(c) Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk to the University of having insufficient capacity to fund increases in assets, or is unable to meet its payment obligations as they fall due, including maturing borrowings. The university has put in place Treasury policies to ensure that

• Prudent liquidity management principles are followed and are compliant with regulations.

• Daily liquidity reporting and scenario analysis is conducted to quantify and meet the university’s payment obligations.

• A portfolio of high quality liquid assets are held to protect against short term adverse conditions and to support day to day operations.

(d) Fair value estimation

The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as available-for-sale securities) is based on quoted market prices at the balance sheet date. The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the University is the current exit price.

The fair value of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market is determined using valuation techniques. The

University uses a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are based on market conditions existing at each balance date.

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of their fair values due to the short-term nature of trade receivables.

'/5

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

48 Write-off's

Consolidated

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

2007

$'000

Parent

2006

$'000

Total write-offs as approved by the Accountable Authority during the financial year

Student debt*

Property plant and equipment

Inventory

Total write-off's

301

14

15

330

566

-

5

571

301

14

15

330

*The vast majority of the student debt write-off's are relating to international debts incurred prior to 2006, which has been identified as irrecoverable.

566

-

5

571

49 Superannuation

(a) Unisuper Limited

Defined Benefit Division (DBD) / Investment Choice (ICP)

The UniSuper Defined Benefit Division (DBD) is a defined benefit plan under Superannuation Law but, as a result of amendments to Clause 34 of UniSuper, is a defined contribution plan under Accounting Standard AASB 119, the employer’s contribution rate into the defined benefit division as at 31st December 2007 varied between 7% and 14% depending on the level of contribution of member employees.

The University complies with the superannuation guarantee legislation and makes contribution of a minimum of 9% upto a maximum of 17% for all eligible staff.

As at 30 June 2007 the assets of the DBD in aggregate were estimated to be $1,683 million in excess of vested benefits.

The vested benefits are benefits which are not conditional upon continued membership (or any factor other than leaving the service of the participating institution) and include the value of CPI indexed pensions being provided by the DBD.

As at 30 June 2007 the assets of the DBD in aggregate were estimated to be $2.587 million in excess of accrued benefits.

The accrued benefits have been calculated as the present value of expected future benefit payments to members and CPI indexed pensioners which arise from membership of UniSuper up to the reporting date.

The vested benefit and accrued benefit liabilities were determined by the Fund’s actuary, Russell Employee Benefits, using the actuarial demographic assumptions outlined in their report dated 13 July 2006 on the actuarial investigation of the DBD as at 31 December 2005. The financial assumptions used were:

Gross of tax investment return

Net of tax investment return

Consumer price index

Inflationary salary increases long term

Inflationary salary increases next 3 years

Vested benefits

7.0% p.a.

6.5% p.a .

2.5% p.a .

3.5% p.a.

5.0% p.a .

Accrued benefits

8.3% p.a.

7.8% p.a.

2.5% p.a.

3.5% p.a.

5.0% p.a.

'/+

49 Superannuation (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

(b) Government Employees Superannuation Board

Unfunded Pension and Unfunded Gold State (Lump sum) Schemes

The University has in its staffing profile a number of employees who are members of the Government Employees

Superannuation Board (GESB) Scheme. As the Employer, the University is required to contribute to the scheme as employees are paid a pension or lump sum pay out. Consequently, an unfunded liability has been created. The

Commonwealth Government is committed to reimbursing the University for payments actually made to the scheme for these emerging costs.

Pension Scheme

Pension Scheme members receive pension benefits on retirement, death or invalidity. The Fund Share of the pension benefit, which is based on the member’s contributions plus investment earnings, may be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

The employers do not bear the cost associated with indexation of any pension arising from the Fund Share. The State

Share of the pension benefit, which is fully employer-financed, cannot be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

Gold State Super (transferred benefits)

Some former Pension Scheme members have transferred to Gold State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the members receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment.

Reconciliation of the assets and liabilities recognised in the balance sheet

Pension Scheme

2007

2006

$'000

$'000

Gold State Super

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Defined benefit obligation

(+) Fair value of assets

Deficit/(surplus)

(-) Unrecognised past service cost

(-) Unrecognised net (gain)/loss

Liability/(asset)

28,509

-

28,509

-

-

28,509

30,742

-

30,742

-

-

30,742

1,308

-

1,308

-

-

1,308

Reconciliation of the present value of the defined benefit obligation

These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no Assets. The employer contributes, as required, to meet the benefits paid.

Pension Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Gold State Super

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2,050

-

2,050

-

-

2,050

Balance at the beginning of the year

Current service cost

Interest cost

Contributions by plan participants

Actuarial (gains) and losses

Benefits paid

Past service cost

Balance of the defined benefit obligation at the end of

the year

30,742

14

1,750

-

(1,128)

(2,869)

-

28,509

32,310

4

1,629

-

(590)

(2,611)

-

30,742

2,050

-

115

-

16

(873)

-

1,308

3,212

-

150

-

157

(1,469)

-

2,050

'/-

49 Superannuation (continued)

Reconciliation of the fair value of scheme assets:

Balance at the beginning of the year

Expected return on plan assets

Actuarial gains and (losses)

Contributions by employers

Contributions by plan participants

Benefits paid

Balance of the fair value of scheme assets at the end

of the year

Supperannuation expense/(income) recognised in the

income statement

Current service cost

Interest cost

Expected return on plan assets

Net actuarial losses (gains) recognised in year

Total included in employee benefits expense

Pension Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

-

-

-

2,869

-

(2,869)

-

Pension Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

14

1,750

-

(1,128)

636

-

-

-

2,611

-

(2,611)

-

4

1,629

-

(590)

1,043

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

Gold State Super

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

-

-

-

873

-

(873)

-

-

-

-

1,469

-

(1,469)

-

Gold State Super

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

-

115

-

16

131

-

150

-

157

307

Scheme Assets

There are no assets in the pension scheme or Gold State Super for current employees to support the transferred benefits.

Hence, there is

• No fair value of Scheme assets;

• No asset allocation of Scheme assets;

• No assets used by the employer;

• No expected return of Scheme assets;

• No actual return on Scheme assets.

The principal actuarial assumptions used were as follows:

Pension Scheme

2007

2006

Gold State Super

2007

2006

Discount rate (active members)

Discount rate (pensioners)

Expected salary increase rates

Expected pension increase rates

6.08%

6.08%

4.50%

2.50%

5.98%

5.98%

4.50%

2.50%

6.08%

6.08%

4.50%

2.50%

5.98%

5.98%

4.50%

2.50%

The discount rate is based on the 10 year Government bond rate at the relevant date. The decrement rates used (eg mortality and retirement rates) are based on those used at the last actuarial valuation for the Schemes.

'/0

49 Superannuation (continued)

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

(c) Historic summary

Historic information

Present value of defined benefit plan obligation

Fair value of scheme assets

(Surplus) / deficit in scheme

Pension scheme

2007

$'000

28,509

-

28,509

Pension scheme

2006

$'000

Gold State

Super

2007

$'000

Gold State

Super

2006

$'000

30,742

-

30,742

1,308

-

1,308

2,050

-

2,050

Experience adjustments (gains)/loss- scheme assets

Experience adjustments (gains)/loss- scheme liabilities

-

790

-

874

-

53

-

223

The experience adjustment for Scheme liabilities represents the actuarial loss (gain) due to a change in the liabilities arising from the Scheme's experience (eg membership movements, unit entitlements) and excludes the effect of the changes in assumptions (eg movements in the bond rate and changes in pensioner mortality assumptions).

'/4

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance

50.1 DEEWR - CGS and Other DEEWR Grants

Commonw'lth Grants

Scheme

Indigenous Support

Fund

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Equity Support

Programme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes) 85,063 90,220

Net accrual adjustments 3,036 (3,313)

Revenue for the period 88,099 86,907

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

- -

88,099 86,907

(88,099) (86,907)

- -

905

-

905

-

905

(905)

-

986

-

986

-

986

(986)

-

217

-

217

-

217

(217)

-

392

-

392

-

392

(392)

-

Disability Support

Programme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Workplace Reform

Programme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Workplace

Productivity

Programme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

42

-

42

-

42

(42)

-

46

-

46

1,144

-

1,144

1,232

-

1,232

352 1,235

1,235 (1,235)

1,587 -

-

46

-

1,144

-

1,232

-

1,587

(46) (1,144) (1,232) (1,587)

- - - -

-

-

-

-

'5(

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

Capital Development

Pool

Superannuation

Programme Total

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

585

-

585

2,129

-

2,129

4,660

-

4,660

3,681 92,968 99,921

-

3,681

4,271

97,239

(4,548)

95,373

-

585

-

2,129

-

4,660

- - -

3,681 97,239 95,373

(124) (2,129) (4,660) (3,681) (96,778) (95,373)

461 - - - 461 -

'5'

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

50.2 Higher Education Loan Programmes

HECS-HELP

(Australian

Government payments only)

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

FEE-HELP

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Total

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes) 48,093 51,531

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

(2,716)

45,377

(6,232)

45,299

4,672

1,278

5,950

5,694 52,765 57,225

(179)

(1,438)

(6,411)

5,515

51,327

50,814

-

45,377

-

45,299

-

5,950

-

- -

5,515

51,327

50,814

(45,377) (45,299) (5,950) (5,515) (51,327) (50,814)

- - - - - -

'5,

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

50.3 Scholarships

Australian

Postgraduate Awards

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

International

Postgraduate

Research

Scholarships

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Commonw'lth

Education Cost

Scholarships

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

873

-

873

261

1,134

(739)

395

874

-

874

123

997

(736)

261

140

-

140

9

149

(121)

28

153

-

153

1,257

-

1,257

(2)

151

-

1,257

(142) (1,257)

9 -

Commonw'lth

Accommodation

Scholarships

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

932

-

932

1,645

-

1,645

1,327

-

1,327

-

932

-

1,645

-

1,327

(932) (1,645) (1,327)

- - -

Indigenous Staff

Scholarships

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

33

-

33

-

33

(33)

-

2007

$'000

Total

2006

$'000

-

-

-

3,948

-

3,948

3,286

-

3,286

-

-

270

4,218

121

3,407

- (3,795) (3,137)

- 423 270

'5.

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

50.4 DEEWR Research

Institutional Grants

Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Research Training

Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Research

Infrastructure Block

Grants

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Implementation

Assistance

Programme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Australian Scheme for

Higher Education

Repositories

Commercialisat'n

Training Scheme

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

1,945

-

1,945

1,825

-

1,825

4,223

-

4,223

4,074

-

4,074

-

1,945

-

1,825

-

4,223

-

4,074

(1,945) (1,825) (4,223) (4,074)

- - - -

544

-

544

-

544

(544)

-

545

-

545

-

545

(545)

-

44

-

44

-

44

(19)

25

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

98

-

98

-

98

(87)

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

-

48

-

48

-

48

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'5/

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

Total

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

6,902

-

6,902

6,444

-

6,444

-

6,902

-

6,444

(6,818) (6,444)

84 -

'55

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

50.5 Australian Research Council Grants

(a) Discovery

Projects

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Total

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

265

(69)

196

137

333

(204)

129

286

73

359

93

452

(315)

137

265

(69)

196

137

333

(204)

129

286

73

359

93

452

(315)

137

'5+

Edith Cowan University

Notes to the Financial Statements

31 December 2007

(continued)

50 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

(b) Linkages

Linkage - Other

2007

$'000

2006

$'000

2007

$'000

Total

2006

$'000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programmes)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

371

45

416

284

700

(490)

210

639

26

665

239

904

(620)

284

371

45

416

284

700

(490)

210

639

26

665

239

904

(620)

284

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Greening ECU

Edith Cowan University is committed to reducing the environmental impact associated with its operations by conducting its activities in a socially and environmentally responsible manner.

This includes implementing strategies and technologies that minimise waste of resources and demonstrate environmentally sensitive development, innovation and continuous improvement.

This brochure is printed using vegetable based inks and includes paper stock that is both chlorine free and made from pulp sourced from plantation grown timber. Both printer and paper manufacturer are certified to ISO 14001, the internationally recognised standard for environmental management.

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