MAC50-MAC90_UserManual_MA00019D.

MAC50-MAC90_UserManual_MA00019D.
Manual MAC 50/MTA-250, MAC 90/ MTA-G1
Foreword
This manual covers installation, use and technical data for
MAC 50/MTA-250 and MAC 90/MTA-G1.
The terminal is used for the MELSEC PLC system.
The following additional manuals are also available:
– FX0/FX0S/FX0N/FX series, Programming manual
– FX0S series, Hardware manual
– FX series, Hardware manual
– FX0/FX0N series, Hardware manual
– A-serien, Programming manual
– AnU-CPU, Users manual
– AnA-CPU, Users manual
– AnN-CPU, Users manual
– AnS/AnAS, Users manual
– MAC Programmer, Manual
– MAC Programmer+, Manual
© G & L Beijer Electronics AB 1997
All examples in this manual are used solely to promote understanding of
how the equipment works and its operation. G & L Beijer Electronics AB take
no responsibility if these examples are used in real applications.
Because of the great many application areas for this equipment, the user
himself must acquire the appropriate knowledge needed to use the equipment correctly for particular applications.
G & L Beijer Electronics AB absolves itself of all responsabilities for damage
and injuries that may occur during installation or use of this equipment.
G & L Beijer Electronics AB absolves itself of all responsibilities for any type
of modification made to the equipment.
If you have any comment or recommendations about the manual, please fill out this form to help us improve. Send or fax this
page, or a copy of it to our address below.
Comment on the manual MA-00019 rev D
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Fax to the Marketing department, G & L Beijer Electronics AB,
+46 40 93 23 01 or send it by mail to Marketing department,
G & L Beijer Electronics AB, Box 325, S-201 23 MALMÖ.
Safety precautions
Safety precautions
General
– Check the delivery for transport damage. If damage is found, advise
your supplier.
– The product fulfils the requirements of article 4 of EMC directive
89/336/EEC.
– Do not use the product in an explosive environment.
– Modifications, changes and additions to the product are forbidden.
– Use only spare parts approved by G & L Beijer Electronics AB.
– Read the user instructions carefully before use.
– This equipment should only be operated by qualified personnel.
At installation
– The product is constructed for stationary installation.
– Install the product according to the accompanying installation instructions.
– The product must be grounded according to the accompanying installation instructions.
– This equipment must be installed by qualified personnel.
– High voltage-, signal- and supply cables must be separated.
– The product should not be mounted in direct sunlight.
In use
– Keep the equipment clean.
– Emergency stop- and other safety functions should not be controlled
from the terminal.
– Do not touch the keys, displays, etc. with sharp objects.
I
Safety precautions
Service and maintenance
– The agreed guarantee applies.
– Clean the display and face with a soft cloth and mild detergent.
– Use batteries specified by G & L Beijer Electronics AB. Batteries should
be changed by qualified personnel. The person changing the batteries
should be grounded during the operation; e.g. with a grounded wrist
strap.
– Repairs should be made by qualified personnel.
At disassembly and scrapping
– Local regulations apply concerning recycling of products or part.
– Please note that the electrolyte condenser and display contain hazardous substances.
II
Contents
Contents
1 Introduction ...........................................................................................1
2 Function overview .................................................................................3
2.1 Basic functions ..................................................................................3
2.2 Modes ................................................................................................7
2.3 Keyboard ...........................................................................................7
2.4 Menu system ...................................................................................10
3 Installing terminals..............................................................................13
3.1 Connecting to the PLC system........................................................13
3.2 Settings ............................................................................................22
4 Basics ....................................................................................................25
4.1 Method for programming an application .......................................25
4.2 Menu structure ...............................................................................25
4.3 Block ................................................................................................26
4.4 A small example .............................................................................27
5 Communication ....................................................................................39
5.1 Terminal in transparent mode ........................................................39
5.2 Multidrop communication .............................................................43
5.3 Network communication ................................................................46
5.4 No protocol mode ...........................................................................49
5.5 Transfer trend data and databuffer ................................................57
5.6 Remote control of the terminal via modem ....................................59
6 Reference instructions .........................................................................61
6.1 Basic editing functions ....................................................................61
6.2 Signal format ...................................................................................62
6.3 Setup mode .....................................................................................66
6.4 Programming mode ........................................................................79
6.5 Run-time mode .............................................................................108
I
Contents
7 Overview ............................................................................................ 117
7.1 Modes ........................................................................................... 117
7.2 Keys .............................................................................................. 121
7.3 Character settings ......................................................................... 125
7.4 Technical data............................................................................... 134
Index ......................................................................................................... I
Drawings .............................................................................................. A-1
II
Introduction
1
Introduction
This manual describes the operator terminals MAC 50/MTA 250 and
MAC 90/MTA G1. Hereafter these products are referred to as the terminal.
To separate the products we name MAC 50/MTA 250 text terminal and
MAC 90/MTA G1 graphics terminal. In the manual we refer to the software
packages MAC Programmer/SW-MTA for DOS and
MAC Programmer+/SW-MTA-WIN for Windows. Hereafter these products are referred to as the PC software.
The operator terminals are included in a family of terminals developed to
satisfy the demands made for human-machine communication. The functions in the terminals provide the possibility to display text and graphics
(graphics terminal only) with dynamic display, control, alarm display, report printouts, function keys and time channels. Furthermore, the graphics terminal is used for data and recipe storage as well as trend display.
The terminals are programmed directly from the built-in keyboard or
from a PC using the PC software. The programmed project is stored in the
terminal.
The terminals work mainly in an object orientated way, that is you start
with an object and then choose the function you want the object to have.
All types of signals are defined according to this principle.
1
Introduction
2
Function overview
2
Function overview
2.1 Basic functions
Textblock
Textblock is used to build up dialogs and reports. A textblock can consist
of an arbitrary number of text lines. The text terminal can display 4 lines
à 20 characters and the graphics terminal 16 rows à 30 characters. Each
row can be 120 characters long if the textblock is only to be used for printout on a printer.
Static text
Static text is text written in textblock which is not changed when executing
the program.
Dynamic objects
Dynamic objects are objects which are linked to the signals in the PLC system. There are seven types of dynamic object: digital, analog, jump, date/
time, bar graph, multi-choice object and text object.
3
Function overview
Graphblocks
Graphics terminal
Graphblocks are only available in the graphics terminal and are used to
create graphic pictures. There are static and dynamic graphics.
0
10
Static graphics
Static graphics form the background graphics such as lines, circles, symbols and texts in various sizes.
Dynamic graphics
Dynamic graphics are graphics which are linked to signals in the PLC system. Examples of dynamic graphics are bar graphs, trend curves, analog
and digital clocks, VU meters etc.
Alarm
In certain cases events can occur in the process which require immediate
attention. To meet this requirement there is the possibility in the terminals
of linking the signals to an alarm message. The alarm with time stamp is
stored in the alarm list in run-time.
4
Function overview
Time channels
The time channels make it possible to set and reset digital signals with the
real time clock, the so-called seven-day clock.
LED
The graphics terminal has 8 LEDs which can assume 4 positions, off, yellow, red and green. The light diodes are controlled by the data register in
the PLC system.
Function keys
The function keys are linked to the digital signals which are set when the
function key is pressed and reset when released in run-time mode. Some
function keys in the graphics terminal have predefined functions such as
[ALARM LIST], [MAIN MENU], [INFO].
5
Function overview
Data logging/recipe
A part of the project memory in the graphics terminal is set aside for logging data or storing menus.
Communication
The terminals can be used in several communication configurations: transparent mode, multidrop, network and no protocol mode.
6
Function overview
2.2 Modes
The terminals have three different modes:
– Setup mode
– Programming mode
– Run-time mode
The Setup mode is used for basic settings for such things as choice of PLC
system, menu language, character set, format for date and time presentation. Settings apply until changed. The Setup mode is entered as follows:
Set the mode switch to the PROG position. You automatically come into
the Programming mode. To change to the Setup mode press [LEAVE]
twice quickly, that is [F3] (text terminal) or [F8] (graphics terminal).
The Programming mode is the mode where the application is built up.
You can create text and graphblocks, define time channels, alarm and
function keys. The Programming mode is entered automatically when the
mode switch is set to PROG. The terminals can also be programmed with
the PC software.
Block 0 must be defined in the project to run the application.
The application is monitored and run in the Run-time mode. You can see
how the different objects change and also maneuver certain objects.
The Run-time mode is entered automatically when the mode switch is set
to RUN.
2.3 Keyboard
The terminals have compact keyboards where each key has several functions. There are four further characters, one in each corner of all the
number key and the keys [-], [.] and the [ALARM ACK] (text terminal)
and [INC] (graphics terminal) keys. To write these in the text terminal use
one of the function keys. [F1] for the character in the upper left corner, [F2]
for the upper right. [F4] for lower left and [F5] for the lower right. Hold
the function key pressed while pressing the required key. In the graphics
terminal you use [F10] for the character in the upper left corner, [F11] for
the upper right, [F12] for lower left and [F13] for the lower right. Hold the
function key pressed while pressing the required key. The codes C1-C8
stand for the character codes specific for your own language.
7
Function overview
Key functions in the text terminal
F1
F2
LEAVE
7
8
9
CLEAR
A
E
I
M
Q
U
F4
F5
NEXT
4
5
6
ALARM
ACK
ALARM
LIST
↑
MAIN
MENU
1
2
3
i
Y
C1
C5
←
↓
→
-
0
.
ENTER
+
(
!
Key functions
F2
F5
‘
Key functions with [F1] pressed.
B
F
J
N
R
V
Z
C2
=
)
C
G
K
O
S
W
C6
°
C3
C7
?
*
<
—
´
Key functions with [F2] pressed.
D
H
L
P
T
X
%
C4
C8
>
#
/
Key functions with [F5] pressed.
8
F1
F4
Key functions with [F4] pressed.
,
:
Function overview
Key functions in the graphics terminal
LEAVE
NEXT
7
8
9
CLEAR
4
5
6
INC
1
2
3
DEC
-
0
.
ENTER
FIND
OBJ
MOVE
SIZE
MAIN
MENU
-
.
Key functions
F10
A
E
I
DEL
SEL
M
Q
U
‘
Y
C1
C5
ALL
MEM
LEFT
UPPER
DEL
+
(
!
NEW
LINE
INS
LOWER
Key functions with [F10] pressed.
F11
B
F
J
N
R
V
Z
C2
C6
=
)
?
´
MOVE
RESIZE
Key functions with [F11] pressed.
F12
C
G
K
O
S
W
°
C3 C7
*
<
:
—
Key functions with [F12] pressed.
9
Function overview
F13
D
H
L
P
T
X
%
C4
C8
/
>
#
,
Key functions with [F13] pressed.
2.4 Menu system
The terminals are designed with a menu system which makes it easy for
the user to enter information and monitor his system. There is a general
rule when choosing from the menus: Point out the function you require by
moving the cursor to the right line with the arrow keys. Then press
[NEXT]. If several alternatives exist than there is room for on the display,
you can scroll the text with the arrow keys. Press [LEAVE] to exit from a
menu.
[LEAVE]
>
[NEXT]
10
Function overview
Choosing maneuverable objects in the run-time mode
Graphics terminal
You can jump between maneuverable objects in the run-time mode with
the arrow keys. Choice of object takes place according to the following
principle: The cursor’s position is assumed to be the center of a cross.
Press the right arrow then the first object found in area A in the diagram
below is chosen. If the system does not find an object in the narrow field
on the right, it searches for it in area a. Arrow down looks for objects in
areas B and b, left arrow in areas C and c and arrow up in areas D and d.
c
D
d
A
C
b
The position of
the cursor
B
a
11
Function overview
12
Installing terminals
3
Installing terminals
3.1 Connecting to the PLC system
Contents of the packet
The terminal packet includes:
– Text terminal or graphics terminal
– Installation instructions
System requirements
The terminals are connected to the PLC system's CPU port or the
A series communications ports. The terminals work with programmable
control systems of the MELSEC type.
MAC 50
MTA-250
MAC 90
MTA-G1
F
F1
F2
FX0
FX0S
FX0N
FX
AnS
AnN
AnA
A2C AnU
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
If you use a PLC system such as an F-20 or F-40 you need an F-20GC or
F-40GC system memory respectively. Changes of PLC signal (maneuvering) do not work with both these types of PLC.
Power requirements
The terminal are powered by a +24 VDC supply. Connections are made
on the connection block marked 0 V or +24 V on the back of the terminal.
Use the shielded power cable provided. The terminal must be grounded.
13
Installing terminals
Battery check
The terminals have built-in lithium batteries for the project memory, configuration settings and the real-time clock. The battery voltage for these is
continually checked. Should the voltage go below the permitted value,
3.21 V (>3.45 V and <2.96 V) BAT.LOW is shown in the display’s upper left
corner. When this shows the battery should be changed. See the section
Technical data.
Connecting to the PLC system’s CPU port.
Use the cable provided. The 15 pin male contact is connected to the outlet
marked RS-422 on the back of the terminal. The 25 pin male contact is connected to the CPU port.
A F2-20GF1 adaptor is required for connection to the F1/F2 series.
The F2-20GF1 should be set to a speed of 19200 baud as well as the factory
setting.
If the terminal is to be connected to an FX0 system, a MAC-FX0-CAB or
MAC-CAB cable together with an FX-20P-CADP must be used.
The maximum cable length between a terminal and a PLC system is 15
meters. Should a longer distance between the terminal and the CPU be required use an SC-04.
A-CPU
+
Connection to A-CPU.
14
Installing terminals
FX
+
Connection to FX.
MAC
MAC-CAB
15-pol D-sub male
CTS+ 10
MELSEC CPU
25-pol D-sub male
5
CTS- 9
18
RXD+ 4
3
RXD- 3
16
RTS+ 6
4
RTS- 5
17
TXD+ 2
2
TXD- 1
15
GND 8
7 GND
8 GND
Connect shield to
D-sub cover
Shield
20 GND
21 RXD
enable
Connect shield
to D-sub
Cable configuration for MAC-CAB.
15
Installing terminals
FX0
+
Connection to FX0.
MAC
MAC-FX0-CAB
15-pol D-sub male
TXD
RXD
FX0
Mini-DIN male
2
2
1
1
4
7
3
4
RXD
TXD
5 +5V
NC
3 GND
GND 8
Skärm
Mini-DIN cover
D-sub mover
Cable configuration for MAC-FX0-CAB.
Note!
Text terminals connected to F, F1 or F2
Digital objects to be run from the terminal must be included in the PLC program as OUT
instructions. Remember that forced settings, function keys etc. only control those digital objects for one program cycle, afterwards the PLC program takes over. The following circuits is therefore useful in many cases:
Signal
(e.g. Y430)
Signal
(e.g. Y430)
(
)
The functions described in the section Connecting to MELSEC MEDOC as well as Communication do not work together with these types of PLC. For these PLC types are only
functions corresponding to the text terminal version 2.30 valid.
16
Installing terminals
Connection to an AJ71C24/AJ71UC24
The terminal is connected to the RS-422 port on the AJ71C24.
The switches on the AJ71C24 should be set as follows:
Station number:
00
Mode:
A
Transmission switches:
11, 12, 14, 15, 21 and 22 ON, remainder OFF
Note!
The switches on the AJ71UC24 should be set as above. Furthermore switch 23 should
be ON.
The settings result in 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity.
The parameters in Setup mode under Port parameters, PLC, in the terminal should be set in the same way.
Connection to an A1SJ71C24-R4
The terminals are connected to the RS-422 port on the A1SJ71C24-R4.
The switches on the AJS71C24-R4 should be set as follows:
Station number:
00
Mode:
5
Transmission switches:
2, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 12 ON, remainder OFF
The settings result in 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity.
The parameters in Setup mode under Port parameters, PLC, in the terminal should be set in the same way.
17
Installing terminals
Connection to an A1SJ71C24-R2
The terminals are connected to the RS-232 port on the A1SJ71C24-R2.
The PLC system is connected to the RS-232 port or via an RS-232/RS-422
convertor for example an SC04 to the RS-422 port on the terminal.
The switches on the A1SJ71C24-R2 should be set as follows:
Station number:
00
Mode:
1
Transmission switches:
4, 6, 7, 8 and 12 ON, remainder OFF
The settings result in 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity.
The parameters in Setup mode under Port parameters, PLC, in the terminal should be set in the same way.
C24
+
Connection to C24.
MAC
SDA
RXD- 3
SDB
TXD+ 2
RDA
TXD- 1
RDB
GND 8
SG
Connect shield to
D-sub cover
Cable configuration for the cable between the terminal and AJ71C24.
18
C24
15-pol D-sub male
RXD+ 4
Installing terminals
Connection to an A2CCPUC24
Note!
The terminal can also be connected to the CPU port, see the section Connecting to the
PLC system’s CPU port.
The terminal is connected to the Computer Link port on the A2CCPUC24.
The switches on the Computer Link port should be set as follows:
Station number:
00
Mode:
Transmission switches:
A
12, 13, 14, 18, 19 and 20 ON, remainder OFF
The settings result in 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity.
The parameters in Setup mode under Port parameters, PLC, in the terminal should be set in the same way.
Connection to a printer
The printer should have a serial interface and be equipped with IBM character set (850). For graphics printout the printer must be set to emulate EPSON FX-80. The printer is connected to the 9-pin male connector on the
back of the terminal. Transmission speed, bit parameters etc are set under
Prt/Transp/No prot in the Port parameters menu. Refer to the printer
manual for the correct configuration.
MAC RS-232 PORT
TXD- 2
RXD- 3
GND- 5
CTS- 7
RTS- 8
+5 V 9
1
+
Connection to a printer.
19
Installing terminals
Connection to MELSEC MEDOC
If the terminal is connected to the FX CPU port, the A series CPU port or
the A series communications ports (AJ71C24, AJ71UC24, A1SJ71C24-R2,
A1SJ71C24-R4 and the Computer Link port on the A2CCPUC24),
MELSEC MEDOC can be connected to the terminal’s programming/
printer port for the so-called transparent mode.
MELSEC MEDOC is used just as if it were directly connected to the PLC
system.
For it to function the following settings must be made to the terminal and
MELSEC MEDOC.
Terminal settings
The Prt/Transp/NoProt parameters are set under the menu choice
Port parameters in the Setup mode.
The parameters should be RS-232 port, 9600 baud, 7 data bits, 1 stop bit,
even parity and station 0 if the terminal is connected to an FX system.
The parameters should be RS-232 port, 9600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit,
odd parity and station 0 if the terminal is connected to one of the
A series CPU ports.
The parameters should be RS-232 port, 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit,
no parity and station 0 if the terminal is connected to an xxxC24.
20
Installing terminals
MELSEC MEDOC settings
The transmission parameters should not be changed in MELSEC MEDOC
for FX projects.
The transmission parameters should not be changed in MELSEC MEDOC
if the terminal is connected to one of the A series CPU ports (use the basic
settings; 9600 baud, 8 data bits, odd parity and 1 stop bit).
The transmision parameters should be changed to 19200 baud, 8 data bits,
1 stop bit and no parity if the terminal is connected to xxxC24.
This is carried out under Transmit in Setup Interface should be changed
from CPU to AJ71 under Transmit.
PLC
MAC-CAB
MAC-FX0-CAB
MAC
MAC-PROG/9-CAB
Computer
21
Installing terminals
3.2 Settings
Choice of Setup mode
All the basic settings are made in the Setup mode. Set the switch to PROG.
You automatically enter the programming mode. To change mode to the
Setup mode press [LEAVE] twice quickly.
--- SETUP -->PLC choice
System signal
Index register
Language
Character set
Date/time format
Port parameters
Erase memory
On-line settings
Terminal settings
Alarm settings
Printer settings
Contrast settings
Data buffer settings
Disk settings
Contrast settings and data buffer settings are only available in graphics
terminal.
22
Installing terminals
Choice of PLC system
You must state in the terminal to which PLC system the terminal is to be
connected. The setting is made in the Setup mode.
Move the cursor, >, to the PLC choice line and press [NEXT]. The system
choice menu is now shown. Move the cursor to the required PLC system
and press [ENTER].
>FX
A-CPU
C24 protocol 1
For the text terminal you also have the alternative F1/F2.
Exit from the menu by pressing [LEAVE].
Choice of language and character set
You can choose between different languages for the menus. The choice of
language for the menus is carried out in the Setup mode.
Move the cursor, >, to the Language line and press [NEXT]. The Language
choice menu is now shown. Move to the required language, for example,
English and press [ENTER]. The menu language will now be English.
British English
German
Swedish
RAM
American English
From now on we will assume that English has been chosen as the menu
language in diagrams and text.
Press [LEAVE] to exit from the menu.
23
Installing terminals
Many languages have characters specific to that language, ü and ß in German, ñ and í in Spanish, ê and ç in French, å and ä in Swedish, ø and æ in
Norwegian and Danish, most with their equivalents in capitals. Using the
menu choice Character set, you can set which of the character codes C1C8 corresponds to which character. The following menu is shown after selecting the Character set in the Setup menu.
>Swedish
English
French
Spanish
Italian
Nor/Dan
Katakana
Cyrillic
Katakana and Cyrillic are the Japanese and Russian characters respectively.
The terminals can use Katakana and Cyrillic characters according to the
following table.
Terminal
Character set
MAC 50/ML
MTA-250/ML
KATAKANA
MAC 50/MV
MTA-250/MV
KATAKANA and CYRILLIC
MAC 90/MTA-G1
-
Character editing for setting up Katakana and Cyrillic takes place in the
terminal. This means that the PC software can only be used for back-up
copies.
24
Basics
4
Basics
This chapter describes how the terminals are constructed and gives a simple example to allow you quickly to be able to start using the terminal.
4.1 Method for programming an application
When the terminal is installed you must carry out the basic settings according to the conditions of the plant. Settings, choice of PLC system for
example, are carried out in the Setup mode. You then switch to the programming mode to program the application. Start by planning and structuring the application so you know which block you are going to define,
what type of block you are going to use as well as the order they are to be
defined.
You have the possibility to test the whole or part of the application in the
run-time mode before it is used run-time.
4.2 Menu structure
The terminal is divided into three modes (function areas), Setup, programming and run-time. There are a number of levels in each mode depending on the function. Each level consists of a menu where you make a
choice or state parameters to proceed to the next level (menu).
The application is built up of blocks, Textblocks or Graphblocks (graphics
terminal only). The values from the PLC system are shown and altered in
the block. The terminal is object oriented which means that a block can
contain all the signals linked to the object for controlling and monitoring
a pump for example.
Furthermore there are separate functions for alarm, time channels, function keys and LEDs.
25
Basics
Setup mode
Programming mode
Run-time mode
Block 0
Transfer
Cassette
Block list
Edit
System signals
Index register
Language
PLC choice
Level 1
Block
Alarm
Function keys
LED
Time channels
Level 2
Block n
Graphic blodk
Level 3
4.3 Block
A block header is defined for each block. You state the block number, type
of block, status word, password etc in the block header (see Reference description).
Note!
The block type cannot be changed for a defined block.
The alarm, time channels, function keys and LED functions can also be
called up as blocks. These are called system blocks.
To get a well structured application the blocks should be created in a hierarchy conforming to an organization natural for the machine operator.
26
Basics
4.4 A small example
To start creating applications quickly, the following section gives a small
example. The example we are going to simulate is the monitoring of a water tank and the time control of a fan. The first example is for the
text terminal and then for the graphics terminal.
Text terminal
Switch on the terminal and put the mode switch on the back in the PROG
position. After a short period the programming menu is shown where the
Edit alternative is already marked:
-- PROGRAMMING ->Edit
Block list
Transfer
Press [NEXT] to enter the Editing menu:
>Textblock
Alarm
Time channel
Function keys
Then press [NEXT] to edit your textblock:
BLOCK NUMBER: 0
Display signal:
Printer signal:
Ensure that the number on the textblock is 0 and press [NEXT] to enter the
text editor. An empty screen with the cursor in the top left-hand corner is
shown. The first step is to enter static text. To find the letters on the keyboard use the shift keys [F1][F2][F4][F5]. Enter ’LEVEL:’.
The next step is to make a dynamic object to show the level in the water
tank. To display the menu for dynamic objects press:
#
[F5][.]
27
Basics
Go down to Analog with the arrow key and press [NEXT]. The list for an
analog object is now displayed. We assume that the level in the water tank
is stored in the D0 register and therefore enter D0 next to A.Obj.
The object must be made maneuverable to be able to simulate the level in
the water tank. Go down to the Maneuver line and change to Yes by
pressing the [INFO] key. The level is assumed to be able to vary between
0 and 100. Enter 0 for Min and 100 for Max. (To erase values already there
press [F1][←].)
Ensure that the following values are entered:
A.Obj.:
Position:
Decimals:
Maneuver:
Min:
Max:
Offset:
Gain:
D0
5
0
Yes
0
100
0
1
Exit from the list with [LEAVE] and you return to your textblock. You can
see how the dynamic object is represented by ’#---’.
We shall now make a dynamic object which illustrates the level graphically. Press [ENTER] to come down the beginning of the next line and then
press # to display a menu for the dynamic object. Go down with the arrow
keys and select Bar graph by pressing [NEXT]. Enter D0 next to A.Obj, 0
for Min and 100 for Max.
Ensure that the following values are entered:
A.Obj.:
Position:
Direction:
Min:
Max:
Offset:
Gain:
D0
20
Right
0
100
0
1
Exit from the list with [LEAVE] and you return to your Textblock.
28
Basics
We shall now show the state of the fan. (How it is time controlled is shown
a little later). Press [ENTER] so that the cursor is in the bottom left-hand
corner of the screen and enter the text ’FAN:’. Press # and select Digital to
create a dynamic object showing the fan’s state. We assume that the fan is
controlled via the M0 memory cell.
Enter M0 next to D.Object and then enter the text ’OFF’ next to Text 0 and
’ON’ next to Text 1.
Ensure that the following values are entered:
D.Obj.:
Text 0:
Text 1:
Maneuver:
M0
OFF
ON
NO
Exit from the list with [LEAVE]. The screen now has the following display:
LEVEL:#--#-------------------FAN:
#---
We shall now make an alarm object which warns when there is a risk for
the water tank overflowing. Go back with [LEAVE] and select Alarm in
the Editing menu.
Textblock
>Alarm
Time channel
Function keys
Enter the text in the alarm editor which will be shown in the alarm list
when an alarm occurs in run-time. Enter the following:
>TANK FULL
29
Basics
Then press [NEXT] to define the parameters in the alarm object.
We assume that overflow sensor goes to input X0. Enter X0 next to Signal
and do not change the other parameters:
Signal:
X0
Printer:
NO
Acknowledge:YES
History:
YES
Ack Sign:
We shall now make a time channel for controlling the fan. Go back with
[LEAVE] and select Time channels in the Editing menu:
Textblock
Alarm
>Time channels
Function keys
You can enter the text in the time channel editor which identifies the time
channel:
>FAN
Then press [NEXT] to define the parameters in the time channel.
We assume that the fan is controlled via the M0 memory cell. Enter M0
next to Signal. Then enter the time intervals during which the fan will operate. A maximum of four intervals can be stated but we shall just give
one:
Signal:M0
1:
Mo-Fr 0800-1700
2:
3:
4:
Press [LEAVE] twice to exit from the time channel editor.
Now you can test our example. Set the mode switch on the back to RUN.
After a short time the Textblock 0 is shown automatically
LEVEL:0
. . . . . . . .
FAN:
30
ON
Basics
Press the right arrow to come to the field for Level. Then enter 50 and
press [ENTER]. The bar will now be half full.
Switch X0 on to get an alarm. The text ALARM is shown in the top righthand corner. Press [ALARM LIST] to enter the alarm list then
[ALARM ACK] to acknowledge the alarm. Press [ALARM LIST] to return
to the Textblock you came from.
The status of the fan will show ON Monday to Friday, 08.00 to 17.00 and
OFF the rest of the time.
Graphics terminal
Switch on the terminal and put the mode switch on the back in the PROG
position. After a short period the programming menu is shown where the
Edit alternative is already marked:
>Edit
Block list
Transfer
Press [NEXT] (key [F9]) to enter the Editing menu:
>Block
Alarm
Time channel
Function keys
LEDs
Then press [NEXT] to edit your block:
BLOCK NUMBER: 0
Graphics/Text:Graphics
.
.
31
Basics
Ensure that the number on the block is 0 and press [NEXT] to enter the
graphblock editor. An empty screen with cross hairs in the middle is
shown. The first step is to enter text. Move the cross hairs to the upper lefthand corner and press [MAIN MENU]. A menu of available objects is
shown on the screen. Go down to Text with the arrow key:
Line
Rectangle...
Ellipse...
Curve
>Text
Symbol
.
.
Then press [NEXT]. A cursor now appears on the screen. To find the letters on the keyboard use the shift keys [F10][F11][F12][F13]. Enter ’LEVEL:’ and press LEAVE (key [F8]) twice.
32
Basics
The next step is to make a dynamic object to show the level in the water
tank. Place the cross hairs to the right of the text ’LEVEL:’ and press
[MAIN MENU] to get the object menu. Select Analog and then Numeric.
The list for an analog numerical object is now displayed. We assume that
the level in the water tank is stored in the D0 register and therefore enter
D0 next to A.Signal. The object must be made maneuverable to be able to
simulate the level in the water tank. Go down to the Maneuver line and
change to YES by pressing the [INFO] key. The level is assumed to be able
to vary between 0 and 100. Enter 0 for Min and 100 for Max. (To erase values already there press [F10][→]).
Ensure that the following values are entered:
A.Signal:
Position:
Decimals:
0-fill:
Adjust:
Maneuver:
Min:
Max:
Offset:
Gain:
Frame:
D0
5
0
NO
Left
Yes
0
100
0
1
NO
Press [LEAVE] twice to return to your block. You can see how the dynamic object is represented by ’___0’.
33
Basics
We shall now make a dynamic object which illustrates the level graphically. Move the cross hairs under the text ’LEVEL:’ Press [MAIN MENU] and
select Analog and then Bar. Enter D0 next to A.Signal.
Ensure that the following values are entered:
A.Signal:
D0
Min:
0
Max:
100
Direction:
UP
Scale:
YES
Box:
YES
Indicator:
NONE
Scale spacing: 20
Scale division: 10
Fill pattern:
Offset:
0
Gain:
1
Frame:
NO
Press [LEAVE] twice to return to your block. Your screen should now look
like this:
34
Basics
We shall now show the state of the fan (how it is time controlled is shown
later). Move the cross hairs to the right of ’____0’ and enter the text ’FAN’
in the same way as the text ’LEVEL’ earlier. Then place the cross hairs under the text ’LEVEL’ and press [MAIN MENU] select Digital and then
Symbol. We assume that the fan is controlled via the M0 memory cell. Enter M0 next to D.Signal. Then go down a line and press [INFO] by Symbol 0. Select rocker0 and press [ENTER]. In the same way select rocker1
next to Symbol 1.
Ensure that the following values are entered:
D.Signal.:
Symbol 0:
Symbol 1:
Maneuver:
M0
rocker0
rocker1
NO
Press [LEAVE] twice to return to your block. Your screen should now look
like this:
We shall now make an alarm object which warns when there is a risk for
the water tank overflowing. Go back with [LEAVE] and select Alarm in
the Editing menu.
Block
>Alarm
Time channel
Function keys
LEDs
35
Basics
Enter the text in the alarm editor which will be shown in the alarm list
when an alarm occurs in run-time. Enter the following:
TANK FULL
Then press [NEXT] to define the parameters in the alarm object. We assume that the overflow sensor goes to input X0. Enter X0 next to Signal
and do not touch the other parameters:
Signal:
Printer:
Acknowledge:
History:
Ack Sign:
X0
NO
YES
YES
We shall now make a time channel for controlling the fan. Go back with
[LEAVE] and select Time channels in the Editing menu:
Textblock
Alarm
>Time channels
Function keys
LEDs
You can enter the text in the time channel editor which identifies the time
channel:
>FAN
Then press [NEXT] to define the parameters in the time channel.
We assume that the fan is controlled via the M0 memory cell. Enter M0
next to Signal. Then enter the time intervals during which the fan will operate. A maximum of four intervals can be stated but we shall just give
one:
Signal:
1:
2:
3:
4:
M0
Mo-Fr 0800-1700
Press [LEAVE] twice to exit from the time channel editor.
36
Basics
Now you can test our example. Set the mode switch on the back to RUN.
After a short time the block 0 is shown automatically. Enter 50 next to
LEVEL and press [ENTER]. The bar will now be half full.
Switch X0 on to get an alarm. The text ALARM is shown in the top righthand corner. Press [ALARM LIST] to enter the alarm list and then
[ALARM ACK] to acknowledge the alarm. Press [ALARM LIST] to return
to the block you came from.
The status of the fan will show the 1 button Monday to Friday, 08.00 to
17.00 and the 0 button the rest of the time.
37
Basics
38
Communication
5
Communication
This chapter describes the different communication configurations that
the terminal can be used in. The terminal has two serial ports, one RS-232
port and one RS-422 port.
IFC 50 is an RS-232/RS-422-converter which can either be connected to
the RS-232 or RS-422 port on the terminal. The converter is attached to the
battery cover at the back of the terminal. IFC 50 gives a RS-422/RS-485 interface, which is galvanically isolated from the terminal.
See the IFC 50 manual for correct connection.
5.1 Terminal in transparent mode
In this mode the programming/printer port on the terminal is used to
connect a parallel working unit to the PLC system. This unit can be another terminal or a PC with, for example, the programming tool MELSEC
MEDOC or a supervisory operator system.
Transparent mode works together with the FX CPU port, A-CPU port and
A series communications ports (AJ71C24, A1SJ71C24-R4, A0J2-C214 and
the RS-422 port on A2CCPUC24).
Connecting two terminals
With two terminals connected the IFC 50 is used as a RS-232/RS-422
converter between the terminals.
If the connection between terminals is less than 15 meters long the RS-232
can be used. The other terminal’s PLC communication is directed to the
RS-232 in the communications set-up for the PLC system.
Terminal
MAC with IFC 50
AJ71C24
A System
RS-422
RS-422
PLC system with two terminals.
39
Communication
When connecting two terminals to an FX system or an A-CPU port the
first terminal is connected using the enclosed standard cable in the normal
manner. The second terminal is connected to the IFC50 on the back of the
first terminal.
When connecting two terminals to the A-series communication ports the
first terminal is connected as described in the Installation chapter.
The second terminal is connected to the IFC50 on the back of the first terminal.
Settings for two terminals
For transparent mode to work, the following settings should be made in
the terminals.
The first terminal
In Setup mode, set printer parameters at the menu choice
Port parameters. Baud rate can vary between 600-38400 baud for the text
terminal and 600-57600 baud for the graphics terminal. Other parameters
should be 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity. It is recommended that the
highest transmission speed is used between the terminals to achieve the
best performance. If a text terminal and a graphics terminal are used together, the highest transmission speed is 19200 baud.
Between the terminals there should always be 8-bit communication.
The second terminal
In Setup mode, set PLC parameters at the menu choice Port parameters.
Baud rate and other parameters should be the same as the printer parameters for the first terminal.
See the chapter Overview for the cable configuration.
40
Communication
Connecting PCs or other computer systems
PCs with the MELSEC MEDOC programming tool or other computer systems are connected directly to the terminal’s programming/printer port.
The terminal is connected as described below.
Terminal
MELSEC MEDOC
AJ71C24
A System
RS-422
RS-232
Terminal with MELSEC MEDOC connected to the programming/printer port.
Settings in the terminal and MELSEC MEDOC
For transparent mode to work, the following settings must be made in the
terminal and MELSEC MEDOC.
The terminal
In Setup mode, set printer parameters at the menu choice Port parameters.
If the terminal is connected to an FX system the parameters should be 9600
baud, 7 data bits, 1 stop bit and even parity.
If the terminal is connected to one of the A-series communications modules the parameters should be 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no
parity.
If the terminal is connected to an A-CPU the parameters should be 9600
baud, 8 data bitas, 1 stop bit and odd parity.
41
Communication
MELSEC MEDOC
For transmission via the A-series communication ports (C24) the transmission parameters should be changed to 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop
bit and no parity. This is done at “Transfer” in “Setup”. At “Transfer”, also
“Interface” is changed from CPU to AJ71.
For other projects, the transmission parameters should not be changed in
MELSEC MEDOC. See the Appendix for cable configuration.
The settings are also valid for other PC based supervision systems e.g.
SCADA.
Limitations and advice
The communication throughput drops as the number of connected terminals increases, according to the following table.
Access time to PLC
Terminal 1
100%
50%
50%
50%
Terminal 2
-
50%
25%
25%
Terminal 3
-
-
25%
12,5%
Terminal 4
-
-
-
12,5%
In the terminal connected to the PLC system you should define the BR
command on the command line (line at the bottom) in the System signal
menu at Setup.
42
Communication
5.2 Multidrop communication
The terminal can be used in multidrop communication. Multidrop communication is used if you want a central program support station for backup copying or central PLC programming with MELSEC MEDOC, and
central supervision and data storing. Multidrop communication also
works via modem, for remote supervision and/or remote programming
of the PLC system.
Connection example
A multidrop network can appear as follows.
RS-232
RS-422
IFC 50
MELSEC A
IFC 50
MELSEC FX
IFC 50
MELSEC FX0
Multidrop communication
43
Communication
Settings in the terminal
Make the settings under Port parameters. For multidrop communication
you should choose Prt/Transp/No prot under port parameters.
The following menu appears:
Port:
Baudrate:
Databits:
Stopbits:
Parity:
Station:
RS232
9600
8
1
NONE
0
Make the settings according to the configuration you will use.
Station number can be 1-32. Station number 0 means no multidrop communication is used.
Connecting from an external unit
The external unit “calls up” the terminal/PLC system according to the following protocol. Subsequent communication between the computer and
PLC system runs according to the communication protocol in the PLC system. That is, normal transparent mode is used for communication between Master and PLC system.
Communication
according to the
protocol for
current PLC
system
Star t
Station no. 1
Computer
01
41
Check
sum
PLC
06
Terminal
Stn.
nr.
ACK
Multidrop, setting of the external unit.
44
Communication
The Master must specify the PLC system which communication is directed towards by sending the following message. This message is interpreted
by connected terminals. The terminal programmed with the desired station number answers with an ACK message and then opens for transparent mode to the PLC system. It remains open until the next connection
sequence occurs.
Start character
01 Hex
Identification character
Station number + 40 Hex (bit six set)
Check sum
Start charater + Identification character
The terminal answers as follows:
ACK
06 Hex
Identity
Station number + 40 Hex (bit six set)
Example:
To select station 4, the external unit sends as follows:
Start character
01 Hex
Identification character
44 Hex
Check sum
45 Hex
Note!
If you switch from RUN to PROG on the terminal, communication is broken and a new
connection must be made.
Limitations and advice
All teminals must have the same parameter settings except station
number, which is always unique for each terminal.
A maximum of 32 terminals can be connected in a multidrop net.
If the Master can manage different protocols it is possible to use different
MELSEC-PLC systems in the same net. For example FX-system and Asystem.
The PC software diskette contains a PC-program (HOST.EXE) which will
link a terminal to a multidrop net.
45
Communication
5.3 Network communication
Network communication is used if you want to connect more than two
terminals to a PLC system and simultaneously maintain a good performance, for example for production lines where you want a terminal at each
work station. A network can comprise one master and up to seven slaves.
The terminal connected to the PLC system must be the Master.
Master
Slav 1
Slav 2
RS-485
PLC
IFC 50
IFC 50
IFC 50
Network communication
Setting the terminals
After start-up, select the PLC system. In the Setup menu select
Port parameters. Select Network.
Under Network you can define the following parameters according to
your needs.
Port:
Baudrate:
Databits:
Stop bits:
Parity:
Station:
RS422
38400
8
1
NONE
NONE
It is recommended that the highest transmission speed is used in the network to achieve the best performance. If both text terminal and
graphics terminal are used in the same network, the highest transmission
speed is 19200 baud.
At station, select MASTER for the terminal connected to the PLC-system,
and SLAVE 1 to 7 for the other terminals in the network.
46
Communication
When all terminals are set, create a text- or graphblock in each respective
terminal. Switch the terminals to RUN mode. Start with the slaves, and
take the master last. Following is the display at switchover to RUN mode.
In the example, the master has found slaves 1, 3 and 4. It can vary depending on the application.
Network startup
Stn
1 2 3 4
Found X
X X
Seek
5
6
7
Limitations and advice
The network is controlled by events, that is to say data is transmitted
when a change occurs in one of the systems in the network.
To achieve the best performance, you should think about minimizing the
number of signals and to use the minimum possible number of signals
which change the state often.
The total number of alarms, display signals and printer signals cannot exceed 1024.
A sum total of 512 digital objects can be displayed on all terminals at any
one time.
A sum total of 180 analog objects can be displayed on all terminals at any
one time.
Transparent mode and No protocol mode and data storage are not usable
in network.
Use I/O in consecutive sequence for optimum performance. Collect alarm
signals in one area, display signals in a second and printer signals in a
third.
To show a 32-bit counter in a FX system you must use double data registers.
Graphics terminal only
The application in the master terminal should not hold large symbols.
47
Communication
Clock synchronization
The terminals’ clocks synchronize at start-up and thereafter once each
minute. Note that the Master’s clock takes precedence. All slaves will use
their own clocks, while the Master can choose between its own and the
clock in the PLC system. Slaves may not pass their clock status to the PLC
system.
Note!
Make sure that the grounding is completed according to the installation instructions.
48
Communication
5.4 No protocol mode
No protocol mode is used to connect different PLC systems, and to connect external units such as bar code readers, weighing scales or phone modems to the PLC system. The PLC system controls what is to be
transmitted to the communication port. Data received at the communication port is copied into PLC register. Communication proceeds with transmission of the data register area according to the following control block.
49
Communication
Register
Descriptioon
Dn0
Start register for transmit data buffer. First register in buffer contains total bytes which will be transferred. Max buffer is 127 register = 254 bytes. The following registers contain data which will be
transferred.
Dn1
Command register for transmit. Changed to 1 by the PLC system
when transfer is desired. Changed to 0 by the terminal when transfer
is complete.
Dn2
Start register for receive data buffer. First register in buffer contains
total received bytes. Max buffer is 127 register = 254 bytes. Following contain received data.
Dn3
Command register for receiving.
- Set to 0 by the PLC system when it is ready to receive.
- Set to 1 by the terminal when the message is available.
- Set to -1 (FFFF) in the event of a faulty message (e.g. too short).
- Set to 2 by the PLC system to request clearing.
- Set to 3 by the terminal when the port buffer is cleared.
Port buffer clears automatically at start-up and at switchover
between transparent mode and no protocol mode; i.e. the register
gets the value ’3’.
Dn4
End code (1 or 2 bytes) on received messages.
Dn5
Length of received message. If 0, end codes is used.
In the Setup menu at System signals you define which register will be the
first control register in the transmission area. This and the five following
registers are used as control registers. If no register is specified, the terminal runs in transparent mode.
50
Communication
During Run-time mode the PLC system can shift between “no protocol
mode” and “transparent/printer mode”. See command NP in System signals.
&RQWUROEORFN
Dn0
Dn1
Dt0
Dr0
Dn2
Dn3
7UDQVPLWEXIIHU
5HFHLYHEXIIHU
Dt0 Number of bytes
Dt1
Data
Dt2
Dr0
Number of bytes
Dr1
Dr2
Data
Examples of use of no protocol mode
The following examples describe the use of no protocol mode for a weighing system. The illustration below shows connection and a “three-step
block plan” of communication.
0
Wait state
Transmission start
M100
Queriens curret
weight
1
Transmission completed
M11
2
Await current
weight
Receiving complete
51
Communication
The terminal works as a master for the weighing system, i.e. it continually
queries the weighing system about the current weight. Connection between the PLC system, terminal and the scale looks like this.
PLC
system
Terminal
Scale
52
Communication
The protocol looks like this.
Terminal
|STX|?|CR|LF|
Weighing system
|STX|Weight in kg|CR|LF|
53
Communication
54
Communication
55
Communication
56
Communication
5.5 Transfer trend data and databuffer
Graphics terminal
Trend data and databuffer can be transferred to a PC via a device driver.
The device driver MACMTA.SYS is delivered on the PC software diskette.
The function is used to transfer trend data and data log values for statistical calculations and other types of presentation and storage.
The terminal and the PC communicate via the serial port. The device drive
enables the PC to handle the terminal as if it was a drive e.g. E:. The driver
is named automatically.
On this drive the trend data and data log are stored in ASCII files with the
extension stated in the Setup, Disk settings. The files can be opened,
viewed, copied, printed etc. using the normal DOS commands or by using
the File Manager in Windows. Trend files and datalog values can be di®
rectly opened from within Microsoft Excel for statistical calculations.
You can also change the values and transfer the changed values to the terminal by simply copying or saving the file to the drive.
Install the device driver
Put the file MACMTA.SYS in your CONFIG.SYS file e.g.
Device=C:\driverdirectory\MACMTA.SYS 1 19200 128
1 is the port, 19200 is the baud rate and 128 is the disk size in bytes. Disk
size must be the same as defined disk size in the menu Disk settings. Port
can be 1 or 2. The baud rate must be the same as in Prt/Transp/No prot,
Port parameters. Other settings must be 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity.
57
Communication
Trend files
The names of the trend files are assigned for each trend when defining the
trend object. The file is assigned the extension .SKV if nothing else is entered in the Disk settings. The format for each line in the trend file is:
YY-MM-DD;HH:MM:SS;AAAAA;BBBBB
YY-MM-DD
HH:MM:SS
AAAAA
BBBBB
Date format stated in the setup
Time format stated in the setup.
Trend curve 1
Trend curve 2 (if defined).
The oldest value appears on the first line in the file, the most recents on the
last line. The format .SKV is directly importable in Microsoft Excel. Within
Excel you can use the diagram manager to create statistical diagrams.
Databuffer file
The file is named DATABUFF.SKV. It contains the current content of the
databuffer area, starting from index 0 and upwards. The file contains 10
values on each line. The values can be changed in, for example, Microsoft
Excel or a text editor and then you can save the file on the drive.
Example
The application consists of two trend objects called ’TEMP’ and ’PRESSURE’. A databuffer is also used. The device driver has been loaded as
drive letter ’E’. By using the DOS command ’DIR E:’ the following will appear on the screen.
Volume in drive E is MAC/MTA
Directory of E:
TEMP SKV
1024 95-01-03
PRESSURE SKV
8065 95-01-03
DATABUFF SKV
420
95-01-02
3 file(s) 9509 bytes
58
14.12
12.18
13.55
Communication
5.6 Remote control of the terminal via modem
Graphics terminal
MP-project transfer
PLC-project transfer
Remote control of terminal
Statistic report fetch
Trend data/data buffer up/download
The function remote control is used to transfer project programmed in the
PC software to and from unmanned stations. The units communicate via
a serial cable or via modem (for longer distance).
By sending a control string to the terminal’s transparent port, you can
force the terminal to enter Terminal mode. When in Terminal mode you
can enter commands using a standard terminal program.
The Mode switch on the terminal must be in PROG position. Changing between PROG and RUN should be performed with the button combination
[ALARMACK]+[ALARMLIST].
This function can be used in conjuntion with the multidrop mode and the
file transfer mode.
59
Communication
Control string
The string contains Start character, Identity character and Check Sum. The
string can be sent from a standard terminal program, for example by using
a macro.
Start character
01 Hex
Identity character
Station number + 80 Hex (bit seven set)
Check sum
Start character + Identity character
The selected unit will display its help screen when connection is established.
Example
To select station 4 send the control string (hexadecimal): 01 84 85
If multidrop is not enabled, use 00 as station number.
Terminal commands
When connection is established the help screen will be displayed and the
terminal is ready to accept commands. The following commands are
available:
Command
60
Description
PROG
Forces the terminal to enter Programming mode.
RUN
Forces the terminal to enter the Run-time mode.
SETUP
Forces the terminal to enter the Setup mode.
VIEW
Shows the content of the terminal’s text display. Graphblocks cannot be displayed.
TRANS
Forces the terminal to enter the Transfer mode. To do this, the terminal must be in Programming mode.
MODE
Queries the terminal for current mode, terminal type and version
number.
BLOCK n
Force the terminal to display block number n in Run-time mode.
LOGOUT
Causes the terminal to leave Terminal mode.
KEY n
Enter terminal key. Key can be: any ASCII-character, LEAVE, NEXT,
ENTER, UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT, ALARM LIST, ALARM ACK, INFO,
INC, DEC, MAIN, PGUP, PGDN, CLEAR.
HELP
Shows help screen.
Reference instructions
6
Reference instructions
This chapter firstly describes the general editing functions then allowable
signal formats etc and finally each function. The description of functions
is brief and assumes that the user is well acquainted with the use and principles of the terminal.
6.1 Basic editing functions
There are certain basic rules when programming the terminal.
The keyboard is compact and each key has several functions.
Key functions
The arrow keys are used to move the cursor in a menu or dialog.
The [INFO] key is used to switch alternatives for an entry field or to copy
previous settings. Furthermore, it is used to show choice lists.
The [ENTER] key is used to confirm settings and proceed to the next line.
The [NEXT] key is used to proceed to the next level. Settings entered are
saved.
The [LEAVE] key returns you to the previous level.
The # symbol in the text terminal and the [MAIN MENU] key in the
graphics terminal are used to show choice lists for dynamic objects.
Any special functions for the keys are described under the respective
function.
Switch between programming mode and run-time mode
When the mode switch is in the PROG position you can enter the run-time
mode by pressing [ALARM ACK] + [ALARM LIST]. Return to the programming mode by pressing [ALARM ACK] + [ALARM LIST] again.
61
Reference instructions
Editing graphic objects
Graphics terminal
The arrow keys are used to alter size or move objects in 8 pixel steps when
editing graphic objects. Sizing/moving occurs pixelwise by holding [F12]
pressed at the same time as pressing one of the arrow keys.
You can go through all the objects stepwise in the editing mode by pressing the [ALARM LIST] key. The marked object is shown with one or several * and parts of its definition are shown in a square on the right of the
screen. You can press [ENTER] when an object is marked to edit the object’s parameters, [F10][CLEAR] to erase the object or [LEAVE] to exit
from the editing mode. Mark an object, press [ENTER] and then [NEXT]
if you want to move or alter the size of the object.
You switch between MOVE and SIZE, that is between moving and altering the size of a graphic object with the [INFO] key.
6.2 Signal format
Digital signals
The terminals can cope with digital signals of the following types:
Signal
62
Description
A series
FX series
X
Input
•
•
Y
Output
•
•
M
Memory cell
•
•
B
Link memory cell (MELSEC NET)
•
F
Fault memory cell
•
S
Sequence memory cell
T
Timer
•
•
C
Counter
•
•
•
Reference instructions
Analog signals
The terminals can cope with analog signals of the following types:
Signal
Description
A series
FX series
•
D
Data register
•
W
Link register (MELSEC NET)
•
R
File register
•
T
Timer
•
•
C
Counter
•
•
Suffix
You can present double registers, decimal numbers and/or just positive
values by providing an analog signal with a suffix.
Note!
Decimal values or scaled values are stored internally as floating point numbers with seven digit accuracy. To avoid rounding errors for several figures accurancy you must use
numbers without decimals or scaling. These are stored internally as integers.
Code
Format type
Range
Dn
Simple whole number
-32768 – +32767
Dn+
Simple (positive only)
0 – +65535
DnL
Double whole number
-214783648 – +214783647
Dn+L
Double (positive only)
0 – +4294967295
DnRB
BCD floating number
-9999.9999 – 9999.9999
DnRF
Floating number
±3.4E38 Numbers larger than
1,000,000 are shown with exponent.
The Decimals parameter has no function
for this type of format.
DnIn
Indexing
See section on Index addressing.
In the above table n is the number on the register, for exampls n=100 corresponds to D100. If D100L+ is given this means that the D100 and D101
registers are read as positive whole numbers.
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Reference instructions
Either the preset value or the current value can be displayed for timers
and counters, the following possibilities are available:
Symbol
Display
T50
T50 current value
T50L
T50 and T51 current value
T50PRE
T50 preset value (F1/F2 only)
T50LF
T50 and T51 preset value (F1/F2 only)
Index addressing
Index addressing makes it possible to use the same block; for example, for
the control of several motors. In the example below the torques are linked
to the D100I1 register. The torque is shown for one of the three motors depending on the value in the index register, in this case the value in D0. The
value in D0 decides for which motor the torque is shown. The content of
the index register is added to the address and the result forms the address
which is shown. Generally it can be said that:
ShownValue=content(DataRegisterAddress+content[Indexdataregister])
02725
Torque in D101
02725
Torque in D102
Motor #Speed.:#---m/s
Torque.:#---Nm
02725
Torque in D103
Index register
I1: D0
I2:
I3:
In the example D0
contains the values 1, 2
and 3 depending on for
which motor the torque
shall be displayed.
D100I1
The index register is given as a suffix to the address. It is still possible to
add other suffixes after the index definition. For example, D100I1L is given for the double register. The index register will not be counted twice if
the suffix L is given. I1 to I8 are linked to the data register in the Setup
menu if the PC software is used or in the Setup mode via the terminal.
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Reference instructions
Scaling
The Offset and Gain parameters for an object are used to rescale the register value to a displayed value according to the following equation:
DisplayValue = Offset + Gain*RegisterValue
As the object is altered from the terminal in the run-time mode, the displayed value is rescaled according to the following equation:
RegisterValue = (DisplayValue - Offset)/Gain
Scaling does not affect defined max or min values or the number of decimal places.
Reserved characters
The following ASCII codes are reserved for the terminal’s internal functions and may not be used.
ASCII code:
Hex
Dec
Character
01
01
SOH
02
02
STX
03
03
ETX
04
04
EOT
05
05
ENQ
06
06
ACK
07
07
BEL
15
21
§
23
35
#
(textblock only)
ASCII code
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Reference instructions
6.3 Setup mode
This chapter describes the Setup mode functions in alphabetical order.
The global parameters for the terminal are set in the Setup mode. The Setup mode is selected by setting the mode switch to PROG and pressing any
key when the start-up screen is displayed.
Alarm settings
Description
General settings for the alarm list. In the graphics terminal
the alarm list are stored in the project memory. Each line
occupies eight bytes. Maximum 64 kbytes can be used for
the alarm list. Inactive and acknowledged alarms can be
deleted from the alarm list with the key [CLEAR].
Note!
In the terminal we differentiate between the alarm list and the alarm
definitions. The alarm list contains alarms that occur during run-time.
Under alarm definitions (see Alarm in programming mode) you define
the signals which will give an alarm as well as the alarm message for
respective signals.
Parameters
Active sign: States the digital signal which the terminal
will set when an active alarm occurs.
Unack sign: States the digital signal which the terminal
will set when there is an unacknowledged alarm.
Alm symbol: States when ■ALARM■ will be displayed on
the screen.
Choice
nALARMn is shown when
active
unacknowledge
-
-
UNACK
-
X
ACTIVE
X
-
BOTH
X
X
NO
List size: The number of alarms in the alarm list (both active, not active, acknowledged and unacknowledged). The
default setting is 32.
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Reference instructions
List erase signal: (Graphics terminal) States the digital signal which when set will erase the whole alarm list.
Character set
Description
Choice of character set. Eight key codes (C1-C8) have been
reserved for national characters.
MAC 50/ML
MTA-250/
ML
MAC 50/MV
MTA-250/MV
MAC 90
MTA-G1
Swedish
X
X
X
German
X
X
X
French
X
X
X
Character set
Comments
Spanish
X
X
X
Italian
X
X
X
Nor/Dan
X
X
X
Katakana
X
X
-
Cyrillic
-
X
-
Character editing to set up Katakana and Cyrillic takes
place in the terminal. This means that the PC software can
only be used for making back-up copies. You can switch
between the functions for the alphabetical keys (A-Z, a-z)
between ASCII and KATAKANA/CYRILLIC by holding
the [F2] key pressed at the same time as pressing [↑] or [ ↓].
Refer to the Overview to see which character relates to
which key in the various languages.
Note!
The different terminal models do not have compatible character sets
for Katakana and Cyrillic.
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Reference instructions
Contrast settings
Graphics terminal
Description Setting the screencontrast
Parameters
Inc: Makes the display brighter.
Dec: Makes the display darker.
Enter: Closes the function.
Databuffer setting
Graphics terminal
Description Define the memory area for data storage.
Parameter
Ctrl.blk.reg: Gives the first register in the control block.
Buff.size : Gives the size of the data buffer in the terminal
as number of registers. Each register takes up two bytes of
the project memory and is backed up by battery.
Comments
68
For further information see section Data buffer.
Reference instructions
Date/Time format
Description
Setting date and time format
Parameters
Date Form: YY-MM-DD
Y=Year
M=Month
D=Day
Time Form: HH:MM:SS
H=Hour
M=Minutes
S=Seconds
Clock used: The terminal uses the clock built in the terminal. PLC uses the clock in the PLC system.
Clock →PLC: States if the clock in the terminal shall be
transferred to the register in the PLC system.
PLC reg: States start address for storing date/time. Only
used if Clock → PLC is set to YES.
A series
D9025 is default for the A series.
Data register
8 highest bits
8 lowest bits
D9025
year
month
D9026
day
hour
D9027
minute
second
D9028
null set
day of the week
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Reference instructions
FX and FX0N series
D8013 is default for the FX and FX0N series.
Data register
Presentation
D8013
second
D8014
minute
D8015
hour
D8016
day
D8017
month
D8018
year
D8019
day of the week
The terminal also functions together with FX-RTC.
F1/F2 series
D700 is default for the F1/F2 series.
Data register
Presentation
D700
second
D701
minute
D702
hour
D703
day
D704
month
D705
year
D706
day of the week
Update int: Updating interval in seconds.
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Reference instructions
Disk settings
Description
Settings of the drive when using the device drive
MACMTA.SYS.
Parameters
Disk size (kB): The size of the disk in kBytes. Default is 128
kBytes.
File extension: States the extension of the file. Default is
.SKV.
Field sep.code: States a hexadecimal code for field separation. Default is 59 (tab).
Erase Memory
Description
Erasing the terminal’s application memory. That is all
blocks and definitions for alarm, time channels, function
keys and system signals are erased.
Parameter
[ENTER] Memory is erased.
[LEAVE] Return to previous level without erasing the
memory.
Comments
The Setup menu is automatically displayed when erasing
is complete.
Note!
All data stored in the terminal is lost on Erase Memory. The language
choice, character set, PLC choice and the command lines parameters
are not affected. Other parameters are erased or set to the values for
default settings. Historical trend data, battery backed alarms and databuffer content are erased.
Index register
Description
Index addressing of dynamic objects.
Parameters
I1, I2, I3: Data registers which will be defined as internal index registers.
Comments
For more details see section Suffix.
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Reference instructions
Language
Description
Choice of menu language; British English, German, Swedish, RAM or American English.
Comments
The RAM alternative is used for language choice which is
located in the RAM backed-up by battery. This text is down
loaded to the terminal from a PC. (Examples of languages
can be Italian, Spanish, Dutch etc). Access to the PC software package is required to do this. The default setting is
English menu texts.
Online settings
Description
Choice of which changes are possible in run-time.
Parameters
Time channels: Possibility to change which times the signals shall be ON. See section Time channels in Run-time
mode.
Function keys: Possibility to change the signal related to a
function key. See section Run-time mode.
Object: (Textblock only) Possibility to change maneuverable objects’ definition in run-time. See section Run-time
mode.
LED: (graphics terminal only) Possibility to change a signal
related to a light diode. See section Run-time mode.
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Reference instructions
PLC selection
Description
Choose the PLC to which the terminal is to be connected.
The project in the terminal is not erased when you change
PLC system. I/O which are not permitted in the chosen
PLC system remain.
Parameters
Choose the required PLC system. FX, A-CPU, C24 protocol
1 and F1/F2 which only applies to the text terminal.
Comments
C24 protocol 1 should be selected if the terminal is connected to any of the A series’ ports AJ71C24-S(x), A1SJ71C24-R4
or RS-422 ports on the A2CCPUC24. The parameters are set
under Port parameters in the main menu in Setup mode.
Port parameters
Description
Settings for the PLC system, printer, PC software and network communication.
Parameters
PLC: Setting for PLC communication. These are changed
automatically when you make a new PLC selection. (The
parameters below are for FX).
Port:
RS-422
Baud rate: 9600
Data bits: 7
Stop bits: 1
Parity:
EVEN
Station:
0. Same as on the communication module or
0 if CPU.
Prt/Transp/NoProt: Setting for communication in the
transparent mode, no protocol mode and with a printer
Port:
RS-232
Baud rate: 9600
Data bits: 8
Stop bits: 1
Parity:
NONE
Station:
0
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Reference instructions
MP: Setting for communication with the PLC software
Port:
RS-232
Baud rate: 9600
Data bits: 8
Stop bits: 1
Parity:
NONE
Network: Described in the Communication chapter
Comments
For more information see the chapters Communication and
Install terminals.
Printer setting
Description
Setting of page length and characters for line ends when
printing block.
Parameters
Newline char: States line end characters; CR/LF, CR, LF or
none.
Page length: Number of lines to be printed before form
feed. No form feed occurs if page length is set to 0.
Handshake: States if handshaking between printer and terminal takes place with XON/XOFF or CTS/RTS.
Graphic size: State the size of the printout.
Single = 240x128 pixels
Double = 480x256 pixels
Quadruple = 960x512 pixels
Graphic orient: (Graphics terminal only) States if the printout should be portrait or landscape.
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Reference instructions
System signals
Description
Setting of the handshaking signal between the terminal
and the PLC system.
Parameters
Cur.disp. reg: Data register which includes the number of
the block displayed on the screen in run-time mode. The
data register is automatically updated by the terminal on
block change. This register does not affect choice of Textblock.
New disp. reg: The PLC data register that controls which
Textblock is shown on the screen. Take for example D100.
If block 34 is to be shown on the screen, the value 34 is entered in the D100 from the PLC program or the terminal.
Prt busy sign: The address of a digital signal which the terminal sets when printing.
Buzzer signal: Digital signal which when set activates the
terminal’s built-in buzzer.
VF-bright reg: (Text terminal only) Data register which
controls the brightness of the terminal’s screen. Only applies to VF screens. The functions Display switched off and
Screen saver are available for text terminal/ML.
Register content
Brightness
0
Brightness set during terminal setting.
1
25%
2
50%
3
75%
4-FFFD
100%
FFFE
Display switched off.
FFFF
Screen saver.
Screen saver means that the display switches off if no key
is pressed for five minutes. It switches on if a key is
pressed, a new block is shown or an alarm activates.
Backlight signal: (Graphics terminal only) A digital signal
which controls if the display is on or off.
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Reference instructions
Reverse signal: (Graphics terminal only) A digital signal
which controls if the display has black text on a light background (normal) or light text on a black background.
No protocol ctrl: The first control register which is used in
the No protocol mode. The No protocol mode is described
in the Communication chapter.
Cursor ctrl blk: (Graphics terminal) The start register to a
control block which write the current cursor position to
data registers in the PLC system.
Register
Description
Dn0
Current cursor position X (in pixels), 0-239.
Dn1
Current cursor position Y (in pixels), 0-127.
Dn2
Status register
0 Normal
1 The user tried to move down, but no object below.
2 The user tried to move up, but no object above.
3 The user tried to move to the left, but no object to the
left.
4 The user tried to move to the right, but no object to
the right.
The status register can be used for example if a recipe form
is created, where scrolling possibilitiy is wanted. The PLC
program can check when the status register is set to 1, the
scrolling recipe data downwards using index register.
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Reference instructions
Command: The following can be stated in the command
line:
RTSnThe RS-232 port’s RTS is connected to the memory
cell, e.g RTSM100.
Tx Time out in x ms.
SW Converts text with Swedish ASCII (7 bits) characters
to 8 bits IBM PC extended ASCII .
Rx Maximum number of resends. x=number of
attempts.
BR Batch Read - communication with xxxC24, FX and A.
BCx Background characters in bars in textblock are
stated as ASCII characters.
EK Permitted external function keys (IFC 128).
NPn Digital signal to switch between No protocol and
Transparent/printer mode, e.g NPM100. Used to
switch between No protocol mode and Transparent/
printer mode in run-time, for example, to call up a
computer and transmit a message.
NTx Time out in ms. For messages in No protocol mode.
RC Turns off history on communiction alarms.
BWO Turns off the battery low warning.
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Reference instructions
Terminal options
Description
Setting up a terminal
Parameters
Key Beep: States if a terminal shall beep if a key is pressed.
Note that the shift keys do not have a beep sound even if
the parameter is set to YES.
Key Repeat: States if a function will be repeated as long as
the key is pressed.
VF Bright(%): (Text terminal only) Brightness on the terminal with VF screens is adjustable. The setting is given in
percent. Permitted levels are 25, 50, 75 and 100 percent. Setting can also take place via the PLC register, see System signals. It is advisable to select 50% brightness for the text
terminal to increase working life.
VF speed: (Text terminal only) The flashing rate of the cursor is adjustable. With VF Speed: state the frequency in the
range 0-255. Default value is 20.
Display color: (Graphics terminal only) States if the display shall have black text on a light background or light
text on a black background. Default setting is NORMAL
which gives black text on a light background.
Screensave time: (Graphics terminal only) The time in
minutes after the last entry on the screen when the display
will switch off. The default setting is 10 which means that
the display switches off after 10 minutes. We recommend
that you use this function to optimize the lifetime of the
display (defined as 10.000 h).
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Reference instructions
6.4 Programming mode
This chapter describes all functions and menu choices in the programming mode. The terminal is programmed in the programming mode with
the built-in keyboard and projects are transferred between personal computers and the terminal. The programming mode is selected automatically when the terminal is started with the mode switch in PROG.
The upper level in the programming mode contains three functions in the
graphics terminal, Edit, Block list and Transfer and five functions in the
text terminal, Edit, Block list, Transfer, Memory cassette and Documentation.
The following functions are found under Edit: Block, Alarm, Time channels, LED and Function keys.
6.4.1 Block header
A block header must be defined for each block.
Parameters
Block number: States the block number. The defined values will be automatically filled in if a block with allocated
number already exists.
The block which will be the main menu in the application,
that is the one to be shown on the screen when the program
starts, must always have number 0.
Note!
An application project must always have a main menu.
Graph/Text: (Graphics terminal only) States if the block
will be a graphblock or textblock. It is not possible to
change type of a defined block.
Display signal: The digital signal which when activated results in the textblock being shown on the screen. Display
signals in consecutive order should be used to obtain block
changes as rapidly as possible. This field is not filled in if
another block change method is used.
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Reference instructions
Printer signal: The signal which when activated results in
the block being printed out. The Display and Printer signals can be the same. Printer signals should be stated in
consecutive order to print out as rapidly as possible.
Prt Block Type: (Textblock only) States line length when
printing. There are two alternatives 20/30 characters and
the number to EOL, carriage return.
Complet. sign.: (Textblock only) The digital signal which is
affected when the printing of textblock is finished. Normally the signal is activated, enter an R after the signal and it is
reset, e.g. M100R when the printout is finished.
Status word: States the display’s appearance in run-time
mode. Press [INFO] to open the status word menu. Status
word has no function in the system blocks.
Cursor off: (Textblock only) states if the cursor can be
seen in the block in run-time mode.
1st man obj: (Textblock only) states if the cursor shall be
on the 1st maneuverable object in the textblock instead
of in the upper left corner.
Disable MAIN: states if the [MAIN MENU] key shall be
blocked in run-time mode when the block is visible on
the screen.
Disable ALARM: states if the [ALARM LIST] key shall
be blocked in run-time mode when the block is visible
on the screen.
MORE-indicat.: (Textblock only) states if the + character shall be seen at the bottom right and the upper right
corners of the screen when there is more of the block
above and below respectively than that which can be
seen on the screen.
Auto Data Ent.: States if the cursor shall move automatically to the next maneuverable object after an entry. The
cursor can only be placed on maneuverable objects at
this stage.
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Reference instructions
Password: A password can be allocated to a block here. An
entry field is shown where the operator enters the password when a block defined with a password is to be shown
on the screen. The password can be any combination of
max six numbers and/or letters.
Function keys: Definition of local (block specific) functions
for the function keys F1-F5 for the graphics terminal and
F1-F6 for the text terminal. For more information on local
and global function keys see the Function key section.
Note!
Local function keys cannot be defined for system blocks (blocks 990999) in text terminals.
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Reference instructions
6.4.2 Textblock
The following section describes objects for textblock in alphabetical order.
Analog
Description
Object that represent integral or floating numbers.
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions.
Positions: The number of positions used by the object.
Characters such as minus signs or decimal points must also
be counted.
Decimals: The number of decimal places which represent
the object.
Maneuver: States if the object can be altered in run-time.
Only the current value can be altered for A and FX series
timers and counters. Only the preset value can be altered
for F1/F2 series timers and counters.
Min val: The minimum value (-32768) you can enter for an
object. If the value has more than seven positions scrolling
is made horisontally.
Max val: The maximum value (32767) you can enter for an
object. If the value has more than seven positions scrolling
is made horisontally
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See the Basic editing functions section.
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Reference instructions
Bar graph
Description
Object that represent integral or floating point numbers as
bar graphs. The bars are shown horizontally so that the
maximum number of positions are marked when the value
has reached its maximum level.
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions
section.
Positions: The number of positions which the signal uses.
The maximum number of positions is 80 for the text terminal and 30 for the graphics terminal.
Direction: States if the bar shall be presented to the right or
the left.
Min val: The minimum value an object can have.
Max val: The maximum value an object can have.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See the Signal format section.
Date/Time
Description
Object for setting date and time. Date and time objects take
data from the terminal or CPU’s real-time clocks.
Parameters
Day of week: States if the day of the week will be shown.
Requires two positions.
Date: States if the date will be shown. Uses the format given under Date/Time format in the Setup.
Time: States if the time will be shown. Uses the format given under Date/Time format in the Setup.
Maneuver: States if the object can be altered in run-time
mode. The current date and time are altered by entering the
new value and pressing [ENTER] in the run-time mode.
Note!
A maneuverable Date/Time object must be defined to set the clock.
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Reference instructions
Digital
Description
Objects that can have two states, off or on. The maximum
length of the text is seven characters.
Parameters
D.Signal: The signal’s address.
Text 0: The text shown when the signal is off.
Text 1: The text shown when the signal is on.
Maneuver: States if the object can be forcibly set in the runtime mode from the terminal.
Jump
Description
Object that make it possible to build up a menu tree.
Parameters
Cur.block: States the number of the block which is exited.
Jump to: States the number of the block to which the jump
takes place.
Note!
If a jump is generated during run-time to a block that does not exist
the system leaves an error message and restarts after acknowledge.
Comments
84
Jumps to previous textblocks can be made (nine levels
back) by linking the RET function to a function key. See the
section Function keys.
Reference instructions
Multiple choice
Description
Object that can have several states. The object is linked to
three digital signals which together can have eight different states. Text up to seven characters can be linked to each
state.
Parameters
D.Obj.1-D.Obj.3: The signals’ addresses. Three signals are
not necessary be given. If two are given four different states
are shown. Combination 100 means that D.Obj.1 is set, 010
means that D.Obj.2 is set and 001 means that D.Obj.3 is set.
Text 000-Text 111: Those texts which are to be shown for
each state of the object are given below.
State
D.Obj 1
D.Obj 2
D.Obj 3
Text 000
0
0
0
Text 001
0
0
1
Text 010
0
1
0
Text 011
0
1
1
Text 100
1
0
0
Text 101
1
0
1
Text 110
1
1
0
Text 111
1
1
1
Man 000-Man 111: States if it is possible to forcibly set to
this status in run-time mode.
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Reference instructions
Text
Description
Object for handling ASCII strings. The possibility exists to
present texts stored in the CPU’s data register in a text object. The texts should be in ASCII format. The texts can be
changed in run-time from the terminal by opening and
closing the entry field with [ENTER]. While the field is
open for writing, [F1], [F2], [F4] and [F5] for the text terminal and [F10], [F11], [F12] and [F13] for the graphics terminal function as shift keys.
Parameters
A.Signal: States the register where text for the first position
is stored.
Positions: The number of positions the text will occupy on
the screen. Each register contains two characters (occupies
two positions) for A and FX series. For F1/F2 series each
register contains one character. The default setting is eight
positions which corresponds to four registers in A and FX
series and eight registers in F1/F2 series. The maximum
number of positions is 80 for the text terminal and 30 for the
graphics terminal.
Maneuver: States if the object can be altered in the run-time
mode.
Comments
86
The text is converted from Swedish 7 bit ASCII to 8 bit IBM
extended ASCII if SW is stated in the command line in the
System signals.
Reference instructions
6.4.3 Graphblocks
The following section describes objects for graphblocks in alphabetical order and only applies to the graphics terminal.
Arc
Description
Static objects used to create background graphics. If you
are using the PC software the following parameters can be
set:
Start angle: State the start angle for the arc. The value is set
between 0 and 360 degrees.
End angle: State the end angle for the arc. The value is set
between 0 and 360 degrees. The end angle must be larger
than the start angle.
ASCII
Description
Object for handling ASCII strings in graphblocks. It is possible in ASCII objects to present text stored in the CPU’s
data register. The texts must be in ASCII format. While the
field is open for writing in run-time, [F10], [F11], [F12] and
[F13] function as shift keys.
Parameters
A.Signal: The register where the text for the first position
is stored is stated here.
Position: The number of positions which the text will occupy on the screen. Each register contains two characters (occupies two positions).
Adjust: States if the text shall aligned with left margin or
centred.
Maneuver: States if the object can be forcibly set in the runtime mode from the terminal.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object or
not.
Comment
The text can be changed in Run time mode by opening and
closing the entry field with the [ENTER] key. When the
field is open for entering the keys [F10], [F11], [F12], and
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Reference instructions
[F13] are used as shift keys.
88
Reference instructions
Alarm banner
Description
Object for displaying one line in the alarm list.
Parameters
Alarm list line no: The line in the alarm list to get information from (1=first line, 2=second line etc).
Positions: The number of characters to be shown.
Show symbol: States if the symbol should be shown in the
string.
Show day of week: States if day of week should be shown
in the string.
Show date: States if date should be shown in the string.
Show time: States if time should be shown in the string.
Ack possible: States if it should be possible to acknowledge the alarm.
Comments
By using several alarm banner objects it is possible to create
a complete graphical alarm page, replacing the default text
based alarm handler.
89
Reference instructions
Bar
Description
Object that represent integral or floating point numbers as
bar graphs.
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions
section.
Min: The minimum value the object can have.
Max: The maximum value the object can have.
Direction: States if the bar shall be presented to the right,
left, up or down.
Scale: States if the scale is to be shown or not.
Box: States if a box is to be drawn around the bars.
Indicators: States if the maximum and/or minimum values for the signal will be marked on the axis.
Scale Div: States how the scale is to be divided.
Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions
shown.
Fill pattern: States if the filling will be solid or dashed.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See Signal format.
Frame: States if a frame shall be drawn around the object.
90
Reference instructions
Comments
The indicator is reset when the terminal is switched on. Resetting can also be done in run-time mode by moving the
cursor to the object and pressing [ENTER].
Max (100)
Scale division(20)
DisplayValue=Offset+Gain*RegisterValue
Frame
Scale ticks(10)
Min (0)
Diagram
Description
Object used to draw a diagram based on the content of PLC
registers.
Parameters
Reg. pair count: Number of register pairs.
Y signal: First Y coordinate register.
Y Min: The minimum value a Y coordinate can have.
Y Max: The maximum value a Y coordinate can have.
Y Scale Div: States how the scale is to be divided.
Y Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions shown.
X signal: First X coordinate register.
X Min: The minimum value a X coordinate can have.
X Max: The maximum value a X coordinate can have.
X Scale Div: States how the scale is to be divided.
X Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions shown.
Type: States type of diagram, Line or Bar.
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Reference instructions
Comments
It shows two data register banks related to each other. It is
a real time function. The object is normally used for not
time-based presentation. Time based trending with sample
time <1 second can be shown if the PLC system handles the
logging of data.
X2, Y2
X1, Y1
X0, Y0
Digital symbol
Description
Digital object used to switch between two symbols depending on the state of a digital signal.
Parameters
D.Signal: The signal’s address.
Symbol 0: The symbol shown when the signal is off.
Symbol 1: The symbol shown when the signal is on.
Maneuver: States if the object can be forcibly set in the runtime mode from the terminal.
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Reference instructions
Digital text
Description
Text object used for switching between two texts depending on the state of a digital signal. The maximum length of
the text is seven characters.
Parameters
D.Signal: The signal’s address.
Text 0: The text shown when the signal is off.
Text 1: The text shown when the signal is on.
Adjust: States if the entry field shall aligned with left margin or centered.
Maneuver: States if the object can be forcibly set in the runtime mode from the terminal.
Frame: States if a frame will be drawn around the object.
Ellipse
Description
Static object used to create background graphics.
Parameters
Transparent: States if the ellipse will be transparent.
Filled: States if the ellipse will be filled.
Filler
Description
Object used to fill in enclosed areas
Parameter
D.Signal: The signal’s address
Pattern: States if the filling will be solid or checkered.
Maneuver: States if the object can be forcibly set in the runtime mode from the terminal.
Note!
Filling very irregular areas in run-time can cause a system error. Filling
can, in certaincases, make the screen slow.
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Reference instructions
Jump
Description
Object that make it possible to build up a menu tree in the
application.
Parameters
Jump to: States the number of the block to which the jump
shall take place.
Position: The number of positions which the text will occupy.
Text: Optional text for the object. The maximum length of
the text is 18 characters.
Adjust: States if the text shall aligned with left margin or
centered.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object.
Note!
If a jump is generated during run-time to a block that does not exist
the system shows an error message with the possibility to restart.
Comments
Jumps to previous blocks can be made (nine levels back) by
linking the RET function to a function key. See the section
Function keys.
Lines
Description
Static objects used to create background graphics.
Line pattern
Description
Function for setting line thickness and if the line will be solid or dashed for the objects line, rectangle, ellipse and arc.
Parameters
Thickness: States the thickness of the line in number of pixels.
Pattern: States if the line will be solid or dashed.
Comments
94
Dashed lines can only be shown with 1 pixel thickness.
Reference instructions
Multiple choice
Description
Object that can have several states. The object is linked to a
register which can have eight different states. Text of seven
characters can be linked to each state.
Parameters
A.Signal: States the register that determines which text
shall be shown.
Text 000-Text 111: Those texts which are to be shown for
each state of the object.
Man 000-Man 111: States if it is possible to forcibly set to
this status in run-time mode.
Adjust: States if the text shall aligned with left margin or
centered.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object.
Multisymbol
Description
Objects that can show up to eight different symbols depending on the value in a data register.
Parameters
A.Signal: States the register that determines which symbol
will be shown. If the register has the value 1, the symbol 1
is shown and so on.
Move Obj: States the register which contains the X-Y coordinates for the object. The eight lowest bits determine the X
coordinate, permissible values are 0-239. The eight highest
bits determine the Y coordinate, permissible values are 0127.
RegisterValue = Y * 256 + X
Symbol 0-7: Chooses the symbol to be shown.
Comments
The Move Obj. register need only be stated if you wish to
move the object around on the screen with the help of the
PLC program.
95
Reference instructions
Numeric
Description
Object for entering and showing analog values. Used for
example to create entry fields.
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions
section.
Positions: The number of positions with which the entered
value will be stated.
Decimals: The number of decimal places with which the
entered value should be stated.
Zerofill: States if 0 will printed in the empty positions.
Adjust: States if the entry field will be aligned with left
margin or centered.
Maneuver: States if the object can be altered in run-time
mode.
Min val: The minimum value which can be stated.
Max val: The maximum value which can be stated.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See Signal format.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object or
not.
Rectangle
Description
Static object used to create background graphics.
Parameters
Transparent: A transparent rectangle is drawn.
Filled: A filled rectangle is drawn.
96
Reference instructions
S-meter
Description
S-meter is a completed object for a speed indicator.
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions
section.
Min: The minimum value the object can have.
Max: The maximum value the object can have.
Scale Div: States how the scale is to be divided.
Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions
shown.
Angle: States the angle, working area, for the object. 10-360
degrees.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See Signal format.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object or
not.
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Reference instructions
Slide
Description
Objects which make it possible to increase and decrease the
value with the keys [INC] and [DEC].
Parameters
A.Signal: The signal’s address. See Basic editing functions
section.
Note!
The suffixes RB and RF do not function for slide objects.
Min: The minimum value the object can have.
Max: The maximum value the object can have.
Direction: States in which direction the presentation will
take place, upwards or to the right.
Maneuver: States if the object can be altered in the run-time
mode.
Scale div: States how the scale is to be divided.
Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions
shown.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See Signal format.
Frame: States if there will be a frame around the object or
not.
Symbol (static)
Description
98
Static symbol used to create background graphics.
Reference instructions
Symbol maintenance
Description
Function for handling symbols.
Parameters
Directory: Shows a list of symbols in the directory.
Save symbol: Function for saving your own symbol in the
directory. Frame the required symbol and press [LEAVE].
Allocate any name and press [LEAVE]. The symbol is now
stored in the directory.
Delete symbol: Function for erasing symbols from the directory. Select a symbol you want to erase and press
[NEXT].
Text (static)
Description
Static text which is written in the graphblocks. Six different
sizes are available.
Time
Description
There are two types of time object, digital clock and analog
clock.
Parameters
Analog clock:
Seconds: States if the analog clock will have a second hand.
Frame: States if the analog clock shall be shown with a
frame.
Digital clock:
Day of week: States if the day of the week is shown.
Date: States if the date is shown.
Time: States if the time is shown.
Maneuver: States if the clock can be set in run-time mode.
Frame: States if a frame is drawn around the object.
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Reference instructions
Trend
Description
Object to present collected values from analog signals.
Parameters
A.Signal 1-2: States the analog signals for which the object
shall collect and present values. Only 16-bit numbers can
be used.
Y-min: States the minimum value on the Y axis (-32768).
Y-max: States the maximum value on the Y axis (32767).
Y-Value frm: States the format of the curve.
Sample int: States the time interval between collection of
data. Minimum value is 1 second.
Stored samples: States how many values shall be stored.
X-Range: States the time range shown in the trend diagram.
Y-Scale: States which side the Y axis is placed, left, right,
both or off.
Y-Scale Div: States how the Y axis is to be divided.
Y-Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions shown.
X-Scale Div: States how the X axis is to be divided.
X-Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions shown.
A.Signal 1
A.Signal 2
Y-Max (100)
Y-Scale division (20)
Y-Scale ticks (10)
Y-Min (0)
X-Scale ticks
(00:00:30)
100
X-Scale division
(00:01:00)
Reference instructions
VU meter
Description
Object to create a graphic VU meter on the screen.
Parameters
A.Signal: The analog signal to be presented by the VU meter. You can present double registers, floating numbers
and/or just positive values by giving the analog signal a
suffix. See Signal format section.
Min: States the minimum value on the VU meter scale.
Max: States the maximum value on the VU meter scale.
Scale Div: States how the scale is to be divided.
Scale Tics: States the intervals between the scale divisions
shown.
Value form: States the presentation format.
Offset: and Gain: Used to change scale of the register value. See the section Signal format.
Frame: States if a frame shall be drawn around the object.
101
Reference instructions
6.4.4 Function keys
The function keys are linked to a digital signal or function by entering its
address after respective keys. If you press a function key in run-time
mode the digital signal linked to the key is set. When the key is released
the signal is reset.
There are two kinds of function key definitions; global and local. Global
function keys are defined and can be used in the whole application. Local
function keys are defined and used in a block. The global definitions are
valid in all states during run-time mode, conditional on that the block
shown on the display does not have local definitions, in which case these
overrides the globals.
Both local and global function keys can be connected to page scrolling and
return functions. This is done by defining PGUP, PGDN and RET instead
of a signal address. PGUP and PGDN will scroll one page up or down
when you press on the function key. RET takes you back to the previous
displayed block. This works through nine levels. In the graphics terminal
there are predefinied keys for these functions.
F100-F227 are used together with the port interface IFC 128. To enable use
of these the EK command must appear on the command line in system
signals.
Text terminal
The text terminal has six function keys built in, F1-F6. If IFC 128 is used a
further 128 function keys (F100-F227) can be used.
Graphics terminal
The graphics terminal has thirteen function keys built in (F1-F13) plus a
further six (F14-F19) of which five are predefined, [ALARM ACK],
[ALARM LIST], [INFO], [MAIN MENU], [RETURN]. If IFC 128 is used a
further 128 function keys (F100-F227) can be used.
Block jump with function keys
Graphics terminal
This function makes it possible to use function keys for jump to blocks
without having to use the display signal. In the function key editor, local
or global, you enter BLnnn where nnn is desired block number.
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Reference instructions
6.4.5 LEDs
Graphics terminal
The graphics terminal has eight built in LEDs, L1-L8. The LEDs can be
linked to a data register. The contents in the register controls the color of
the light diode as follows.
Register value
(Hex)
Register value
(Dec)
Flashing
frequency (Hz)
Color
00
0
-
None
01
1
-
Green
02
2
-
Red
03
3
-
Yellow
11
17
5
Green
12
18
5
Red
13
19
5
Yellow
21
33
2,5
Green
22
34
2,5
Red
23
35
2,5
Yellow
31
49
1,2
Green
32
50
1,2
Red
33
51
1,2
Yellow
41
65
0,6
Green
42
66
0,6
Red
43
67
0,6
Yellow
103
Reference instructions
6.4.6 Alarm
Alarm editor is shown when alarm is selected. Alarm editor has two cursors, a row cursor, >, and a position cursor, _. The former is moved with
the vertical arrow key and the latter with the horizontal.
An alarm definition can consist of a maximum 18 characters for the
text terminal and 27 characters for the graphics terminal. The number of
alarm definitions is only limited by the terminal’s memory, the practical
limit is around 500. To keep the alarm delay time as short as possible in
the run-time mode, the signals should be in consecutive order, that is M0,
M1, M2 etc.
Parameters
Signal: The digital signal linked to the alarm.
Printer: States if the alarm message shall be printed out directly on changing alarm status.
Acknowledge: States if the alarm shall be acknowledged or
not. YES means that the alarm must be acknowledged
while NO means that the alarm functions as an “event
alarm”, that is to say a form of information. The basic setting is YES.
The alarm can have the following status.
Symbol
Status
*
Active
Not acknowledged
$
Not active Not acknowledged
-
Active
<blank>
Not active Acknowledged
Acknowledged
History: States when the alarm shall be removed from the
alarm list. YES means that the alarm remains in the list until the alarm list is full. NO means that the alarm is removed
from the list when it is acknowledged and is no longer active. If the Acknowledge parameter is set to NO it is removed from the alarm list as soon as it is no longer active.
Ack Action: Digital signal that is affected when the alarm
is acknowledged. Normally the signal is activated. If an R
is entered after the signal it is reset. For example, M100R
means that M100 is reset when the alarm is acknowledged.
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Reference instructions
6.4.7 Time channels
Time channels are a function for setting and resetting digital signals relative to the real time clock. The only thing that limits the number of time
channels is the terminal’s memory.
Parameters
Signal: State here the digital signal which is set during the
given time period. A maximum of four different time periods can be stated per time channel.
The time period is stated as follows:
xx start-stop
xx-yy start-stop
xx yy state the day of the week or the number of days
which are of current interest. It can be one to seven days
long. The days of the week are represented by one digit or
two letters. Either the letters Mo, Tu etc or with numbers
according to the table below.
1
Sunday
2
Monday
3
Tuesday
4
Wednesday
5
Thursday
6
Friday
7
Saturday
Start states the start time
Stop states the stop time
E.g. Mo-Fr 0900-1800
Note!
To set the clock you need to define a manoeuvrable date/time object.
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Reference instructions
6.4.8 Block list
The block list gives a count of (directory) the blocks used in the application. To erase a textblock, place the cursor on a block number and press
[F1][CLEAR] on the text terminal and [F10][CLEAR] on the graphics terminal.
6.4.9 Documentation
Text terminal
Documentation of applications in the terminal on the printer.
Printing starts by pressing [ENTER]. Documentation contains a list of the
textblocks in use with a description of their static and dynamic objects.
Blocks are printed in number order. Then follows a list of alarm definitions, time channels and function tangents.
Remember that a printer must be connected to the terminal to be able to
select Document. How a printer is connected is described in the section
Connecting a printer.
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Reference instructions
6.4.10Memory cassette
An external memory cassette, MMC-4, can be connected to a terminal.
The memory cassette is connected to the expansion outlet on the terminal.
The memory cassette can store applications in a 128 kbytes Flash memory.
The unit can be configured so that the application is loaded automatically
in the terminal when starting up.
Read from cassette means that the application is transferred from the
memory cassette to the terminal. Write without boot means that the application is written on the memory cassette but the automatic loading
function is not used. Write with boot means that the application is written
on the memory cassette and the automatic loading function is used.
The Verify cassette function compares the application in the terminal
with the application in the memory cassette.
Note!
The memory cassette can not be used as an extended memory. It can only be used to
store/load back up copies of the application. The application can not be larger than the
memory capacity in the terminal, 28 kB for the text terminal and 110 kB for the graphics terminal.
6.4.11Transfer
Transferring applications between the terminal and personal computers
with the PC software for DOS.
The software package for programming and documentation of the terminal is available for IBM PC compatible computers.
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Reference instructions
6.5 Run-time mode
The status can be shown and the process controlled from the terminal in
run-time mode. The mode is selected by setting the mode switch to RUN.
The possibility also exists to switch to the run-time mode with the mode
switch in PROG by pressing [ALARM ACK][ALARM LIST]. Block 0 is
shown automatically on the screen when you go over to run-time mode.
An error message is shown on the screen if a communication error should
occur between the terminal and the PLC system. The terminal starts automatically when the communication restarts and the communication error
is automatically entered as an event alarm in the alarm list.
Form feed takes place automatically after 60 lines when printing a textblock if nothing else is stated in the Setup mode under printer settings.
The printer must be IBM compatible and handshaking takes place with
XON/XOFF or CTS/RTS protocol, selected in the Setup mode.
The various functions in run-time are described in this section. These do
not correspond to any menu choice in run-time.
6.5.1 Textblocks
Block consist of lines of text with static and dynamic objects. The graphics
terminal can also handle graphic in blocks. The dynamic objects show the
current status for those signals to which the object is linked.
Certain dynamic data is maneuverable which means that its status and
value can be changed in run-time. To change a manoeuvrable object use
the arrow keys to move the cursor to the correct position so that the object
is marked.
Digital objects
Mark the required object for digital objects and then press [ENTER] to
change the status.
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Reference instructions
Analog objects
Analog and Date/Time objects are maneuvered by marking the right object, entering the new value and then pressing [ENTER].
If you decide not to enter the new value and have still not pressed [ENTER] exit from the field with [↑] or [↓]. The original value then remains.
A text object is changed by moving to the object and pressing [ENTER],
and an entry field is shown. The entry field is either the first or the last line
depending on where the object is located on the screen. Scrolling of the entry field takes place if the text is longer than the screen width.
The function keys act as shift keys when entering text. When the text has
been entered press [ENTER] and the entry field disappears.
Press [F1][ALARM LIST] for the text terminal and [F10][ALARM LIST] for
the graphics terminal if special characters from IBM’s character table are
to be used in the entry field. The entry field for ASCII codes is shown, state
the code for the required character and press [ENTER]. Not all characters
can be handled by the screen in which case ¥ is shown.
A multi-choice object is changed by going with the arrow keys to the object. Press [ENTER] and a choice list with all maneuverable states is shown
on the screen. Go to the required state, press [ENTER] and the three digital
signals linked to this state are forcibly set.
To obtain information in textblock on these dynamic objects in run-time,
place the cursor on the required object and press [INFO]. A line of text is
shown at the bottom or the top of the screen depending where the object
is located. To remove this line of text press [INFO] again. The texts which
are defined for the set or reset states are shown for digital objects and the
min. and max. values for analog objects.
There is a further information level in the run-time mode. A display with
the object's definition is shown at this level. This level is reached by pressing [INFO] while holding [ALARM ACK] pressed. To return to run-time
mode press [INFO]. An object's definition can be changed here if YES has
been selected in Online settings.
Information about dynamic objects in run-time can only be had for textblocks.
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Reference instructions
6.5.2 Graphblocks
Graphics terminal
Move between the maneuverable objects with the arrow keys. The
marked object is shown with a blinking frame.
Digital objects
You change the status of digital objects, text, symbol and filler objects, by
pressing [ENTER]. [INC] sets and [DEC] resets the signals linked to the
object.
Analog objects
You can set the max./min. indicators to the actual value in bar objects by
pressing [ENTER].
Enter the value and press [ENTER] to maneuver numeric objects.
Historic data can be shown in run-time mode with trend curves. Mark the
required trend curve and press [ENTER]. A dialog box is now shown
where the history, time period and date for the data of interest to be presented can be chosen and shown. Close the dialog box with [NEXT].
Exit from the historic presentation by selecting NO for the choice Show
history and press [NEXT].
The slide object is maneuvered with the [INC] and [DEC] keys to go stepwise between the scale divisions.
Press [ENTER] for multiple choice objects and a list of choices for all
maneuverable states is shown on the screen. Move to the required state
and press [ENTER].
Enter the required text for ASCII objects when the object is marked and
finish entering with [ENTER]. Otherwise it functions like a normal text
object.
The digital clock can be altered by marking the object, staring the required
time and pressing [ENTER].
Jump objects are maneuvered by marking the object and pressing [ENTER].
110
Reference instructions
6.5.3 Data buffer
Graphics terminal
This function means that an area of the battery memory is used as an extra
memory bank for the PLC system. The PLC program determines what
shall be read/written as well as when/where it shall be done.
The size of the memory bank is configured in the graphics terminal. The
available buffer area in the graphics terminal depends on how much
project memory is used (max project memory is 110,000 bytes).
The PLC program communicates with the memory bank in the terminal
via a data control block (4 registers) in the PLC system. The position in the
memory area to read from or write to is stated with an index.
Index
Memory bank
0
1
-m
Value 1
Value 2
Value m+1
Configuration in the graphics terminal
The address in the graphics terminal is configured to the first data control
register in the PLC system (see the next section) as is the size of the memory bank (in number of registers, two bytes per register).
The following parameters are defined in Data buffer setting in the Setup
mode.
Parameters
Ctrl.blk.reg: States the first control block register in the
PLC system.
Buff.size: The number of registers.
Example of entering
Ctrl.blk.reg: D10
Buff.size: 1000
111
Reference instructions
Data control block in the PLC system
The data control block consists of 4 registers:
Register
Description
Dn0
Command register.
Dn1
Start index in the memory bank to read from/write to.
Dn2
Number of registers to read/write.
Dn3
Start register in the PLC system to read from/write to. (e.g. if 0
is stated in this register, reading/writing will begin in register D0).
The command register is set in the PLC system and can assume the following values:
1
2
3
Write to memory bank
Read from memory bank
Fill the selected area with the value found in Dn3
The terminal replies in the same register in a similar way to the following:
0
FFFF
112
Reading/writing completed
Error when reading/writing
Reference instructions
6.5.4 Alarm
The alarm is shown by the text ■ALARM ■ in the upper right-hand corner of the screen (can be cancelled in the Setup mode). The alarms are presented in an alarm list with the predefined alarm texts. This contains the
latest alarms and is organized so that the latest is at the top. How many
alarms the list can contain is determined in the Setup mode.
This list is shown on the screen when jumping to alarm block. The status
of the alarm is shown for each alarm.
The alarm can have the following status:
Symbol
Status
*
Active
Not acknowledged
$
Not active Not acknowledged
-
Active
<blank>
Not active Acknowledged
Acknowledged
To reach the alarm block, either press [ALARM LIST] or define in a block
a jump to system 990 or make the PLC system get the list via Display signal for block 990.
To acknowledge an alarm, place the cursor on the line where the alarm is
and press [ALARM ACK]. A text with the alarm number as well as the
day and time it occurred is shown at the bottom. This display can be
switched off by pressing [INFO]. The alarms can be printed out as they
happen or change status if a printer is connected. Alarms are then printed
with date, time, status and alarm text.
The text “Comm error” is placed in as an event alarm in the alarm list if a
communication error occurs between the terminal and the PLC system.
Press [ALARM LIST] to return to the textblock shown before the jump to
alarm block.
The current content of the alarm list can be printed by stating Printer signal for block 990.
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Reference instructions
6.5.5 Time channels
The page with time channels is reached by stating the Display signal in
system block 991 or by jumping there. Move the cursor to the required line
to mark a time channel in order to read it or change its value. Then press
[ENTER]. The time channel’s value can now be read and/or changed.
The digital signal cannot be changed though in run-time. The choice Time
channels in the menu Online settings must be set to YES in the Setup to be
able to change the time channel’s value in run-time. To leave the current
time channels definition, press [LEAVE] or move the cursor to RETURN
and press [ENTER]. Exit from the time channel menu with the [MAIN
MENU] key after which you return to the block from which you jumped
to the time channel block.
The current time channel settings are printed by stating Printer signal for
block 991.
6.5.6 Function keys
Graphics terminal
The digital signal linked to a function key is set when the key is pressed.
The signal is reset when you release the key. In ASCII object the function
keys [F8] - [F13] are used as shift keys. When displaying historic data in
trendcurves the keys [F8] - [F13] are not available as function keys.
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Reference instructions
6.5.7 LEDs
Graphics terminal
Depending on the value in the data register linked to the LED, the LED
will light and flash according to the following tables:
Register value
(Hex)
Register value
(Dec)
Flashing
frequency (Hz)
Color
00
0
-
None
01
1
-
Green
02
2
-
Red
03
3
-
Yellow
11
17
5
Green
12
18
5
Red
13
19
5
Yellow
21
33
2,5
Green
22
34
2,5
Red
23
35
2,5
Yellow
31
49
1,2
Green
32
50
1,2
Red
33
51
1,2
Yellow
41
65
0,6
Green
42
66
0,6
Red
43
67
0,6
Yellow
115
Reference instructions
116
Overview
7
Overview
This chapter describes the modes, dynamic object, system blocks, memory
capacity, character set, character tables and technical data.
7.1 Modes
The terminal has three different modes:
Programming modeSwitch in prog position
Run-time mode
Switch in run position
Setup mode
Switch in prog position
(press any key at initial display)
Dynamic text objects
The following objects can be used in blocks:
Digital
Analog
Bar graph
Multiple choice
Text
Jump
Date/Time
State (two texts)
Presentation of value
Proportional filling of analog object
State (eight texts)
Text string
Jump to block
Date and/or time
Dynamic graph objects
Only the graphics terminal can handle graphic objects. The following
graphic objects can be used in blocks.
ASCII
Filled object
Symbol
Numeric
VU-meter
Bar
Trend
Slide
S-meter
Object for handling ASCII strings
Object for filling in framed areas
Digital object for moving between two symbols
Object for entering and displaying analog values
Object for graphic VU meter
Object for presentation of values as a bar graph
Object for presentation of recorded values
Object for increase/decrease values via keys
Object for a graphic speed indicator
117
Overview
Mutisymbol
Multiple choice
Jump
Digital clock
Analog clock
Alarm banner
Diagram
Object for displaying eight different symbols
Object which can assume eight different states
Object for jumping between blocks in a project
Object for digital clock
Object for analog clock
Object for displaying one line in the alarm list
Object to draw a diagram based on the contents of
PLC registers
System blocks
Certain blocks are reserved for special purposes. The system blocks differ
between the text terminal and the graphics terminal.
Text terminal
0
Main menu
990
Alarm
991
Time channels
992-998 Reserved, not used
999
Function keys
Graphics terminal
0
Main menu
990
Alarm
991
Time channels
992-996 Reserved, not used
997
Contrast settings of LCD display
998
LED
999
Function keys
118
Overview
How much can be stored in a project
Maximum size for a project is 27,900 bytes for text terminal and 110,000
bytes for graphics terminal. These bytes can be freely assigned to different
functions.
The following tables shows how many bytes each function requires:
Object
Text terminal
Graphics terminal
Block
46 bytes
Text in block
20 bytes/row
4 bytes/character
Digital object
25 bytes
28 bytes
Analog object
29 bytes
32 bytes
Jump object
6 bytes
9 bytes
Date/time object
8 bytes
11 bytes
Bar graph object
28 bytes
31 bytes
Multiple choice object
88 bytes
91 bytes
Text object
11 bytes
15 bytes
Time channel
73 bytes
75 bytes
Alarm object
33 bytes
39 bytes
Object
51 bytes
Graphics terminal
ASCII
12 bytes
Digital text
27 bytes
Fyller object
9 bytes
Symbol (digital)
24 bytes
Numeric
30 bytes
VU-meter
39 bytes
Bar graph
43 bytes
Trend
70 + number of defined signals * (number of
stored values*6+2) bytes
Slide
40 bytes
S-meter
39 bytes
Multi symbol
75 bytes
Multiple choice
82 bytes
119
Overview
Object
Graphics terminal
Jump
30 bytes
Digital clock
9 bytes
Analog clock
6 bytes
Alarm banner
13 bytes
Diagram
50 bytes
Rectangle
7 bytes
Filled rectangle
7 bytes
Line
7 bytes
Ellipse
7 bytes
Filled ellipse
7 bytes
Arc
11 bytes
Text
35 bytes
Symbol
35 bytes
User defined symbol
(X*Y)/8+16 bytes
Data buffer
Buffer size*2+5 bytes
When displaying a block in programming mode, press [F1] [INFO] for the
text terminal and [F10] [INFO] for the graphics terminal to see how many
bytes remain available. This value allows you to make a quick estimate of
how much space you have used. For example, an application demands the
following space in the text terminal.
Block
46
One text row
20
Digital object
25
_______________________
total
91 bytes
120
Overview
7.2 Keys
Certain keys have different functions in Programming and Run-time
mode. These keys have the following functions:
Programming mode
F1/
F10
Shift
F2/
F11
Shift
F4/
F12
Shift
F5/
F13
Shift
LEAVE
L
Leave
NEXT
N
Next
Move
Change among alternatives
Show status word menu
CLEAR
ENTER
Erase previous character when entering
Next line
121
Overview
F1/
F10
Erase the character where the cursor is
positonated. Move all characters after the
cursor one step to the left.
Move all characters after the cursor one
step to the right.
F1/
F10
F1/
F10
Insert of characters
F1/
F10
Upper case (capital) letters
F1/
F10
Lower case (small) letters
F2/
F11
Katakana/Cyrillic (if either character set
is chosen).
F2/
F11
Roman (if Roman character set is cholen).
Only valid for the text terminal.
F1/
F10
MAIN
MENU
F1/
F10
F1/
F10
F1/
F10
122
Access to special character table
Number of bytes left.
CLEAR
ENTER
Carriage return (ASCII:0D hex for EOL
textblock).
Erase block in block menu.
Overview
F1/
F10
ALARM
LIST
ALARM
ACK
ALARM
LIST
Possible to type ASCII characters with
numerical code.
Alter between programming and runtime mode (when the switch is in PROG
position).
Page up in programming menus.
Page down in programming menus.
123
Overview
Run-time mode
NEXT
F1
F6
F1
F13
Functions keys in the text terminal.
Function keys in the graphics terminal.
Move between objects.
One line up or down.
Show 0- and 1-texts for digital objects.
Show min and max limit for analog
objects.
ALARM
ACK
Show text block 0.
ALARM
LIST
Show alarm list.
MAIN
MENU
Show textblock 0 (Text terminal only).
ALARM
ACK
Acknowledge one alarm in alarm list.
ENTER
124
Permit jump at jump object.
Finish input analog object.
Force digital object.
Input field text object.
Selection list multiple-choice object.
Overview
CLEAR
F1/
F10
ALARM
ACK
Erase previous character when entering.
ALARM
LIST
ALARM
LIST
Possible to type ASCII characters with
numerical code.
Alters between programming- and runtime mode when the switch is in PROG
position.
INC
Set/increase
DEC
Reset/decrease
Page up in textblock.
Page down in textblock.
RETURN
Return to previous textblock.
7.3 Character settings
In the terminal you will find the following characters:
A-Z
a-z
0-9
’ ‘: , ° % + = - * / ( ) ! ? . # < >
C1-C8 correspond to different characters, depending on the type of character settings chosen in Setup.
125
Overview
Text terminal
Swedish
German
French
Spanish
Dan/Nor
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
C1
Å
å
ü
ü
È
è
ñ
ñ
Å
MV:å
ML:Å
C2
Ä
ä
Ä
ä
É
é
Æ
æ
C3
Ö
ö
Ö
ö
Ê
ê
Ö
Ö
ß
ß
Ø
ø
C4
Graphics terminal
Swedish
German
French
Spanish
Dan/Nor
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
upp.
low.
C1
Å
å
Ü
ü
È
è
Ñ
ñ
Å
å
C2
Ä
ä
Ä
ä
É
é
È
é
Æ
æ
C3
Ö
ö
Ö
ö
Ê
ê
ó
ó
Ö
Ö
ß
ß
á
á
Ø
ø
C4
There are also some special characters available if you press [F1][MAIN
MENU] on the text terminal and [F10] [MAIN MENU] on the graphics terminal.
Text terminal with LCD display:
$& ;@ []^-{}ßε Ωω÷n °α ∞¥
Text terminal with VF display:
$& ;@ []^-{}ßε Ωω:n °α∞Ø
Graphics terminal with LCD display:
All characters corresponding to the codes 128 - 255 according to the IBM
table 850 except 179, 186, 188, 191, 192, 218. Swedish and German character set uses table 437.
126
Overview
Character tables
Text terminal
When you have selected Katakana/Cyrillic character set, the keys’ functions change as follows: 40 Hex is added to the key code; i.e. the character
is displayed four columns to the right in the character table.
Example:
If you press C on the keyboard, the character * appears on the display if
you have a MAC 50MV/MTA-250MV.
Roman and Katakana/Cyrillic characters can be displayed simultaneously. Switch between character sets with the key combination [F2] [↑] or [F2]
[↓]. Use ASCII-code entry, via [F1] [ALARM LIST] for those characters
which can not be entered with the alphanumeric keys.
Note!
Codes should be specified decimally.
127
Overview
Character table for MAC 50ML / MTA-250ML.
128
Overview
Character table for MAC 50MV/ MTA-250MV.
129
Overview
Katakana/Cyrillic character table in the MAC 50MV/MTA-250/MV.
130
Overview
Katakana/Cyrillic character table in the MAC 50/ML / MTA-250/ML.
131
Overview
Graphics terminal
Character table for ASCII-IBM codes (437).
132
Overview
Control codes
133
Overview
7.4 Technical data
Text terminal
Graphics termianl
Front panel
190 x 175 x 3 mm WxHxD.
Black anodized aluminium.
240 x 200 x 3 mm WxHxD.
Black anodized aluminium.
Mounting depth
Exkl. D-sub connector 50
mm. Inkl. D-sub connector
100 mm.
Exkl. D-sub connector 54
mm. Inkl. D-sub connector
105 mm.
Panel cut out
Hole: Width 171 x 156 mm,
4 pcs mounting screws,
M4, C-C 178 x 163 mm.
Max panel thickness 8
mm.
Hole: Width 220 x 180 mm,
8 pcs mounting screws,
M4. Max panel thickness 8
mm.
Front panel seal
IP65
Rear panel seal
Front panel/keyboard
material
Back side material
134
IP20
Membrane keyboard. Overlay film in polyester, AUTOTEX
2 F150, with backside printing. Lifetime: 1 miljon operations.
Black anodised aluminium
Weight
Exkl. D-sub cable 1,1 kg.
Exkl. D-sub cable 1,6 kg.
Serial port RS-422
15-pin D-sub connector, chassis-mounted female with
standard lock screws 4-40 UNC, RS-422 communication.
Serial port RS-232
9-pin D-sub connector, male with standard screw lock
4-40 UNC, RS-232 communication.
Expansion connector
26-pin Header for standard connector.
Cable to PLC system
6-pair cable, shielded, shielded D-sub cover of metallized
plastic. 25-pin D-sub to PLC system and 15-pin D-sub to
RS-422 outlet in the terminal. Locking screws to the PLC
system: M2,5. Locking screws to the terminal 4-40 UNC.
Overview
Text terminal
Graphics termianl
LCD-display (Liquid crystal), 240 x 128 pixel, 16
rows x 30 character. Lifetime: for CFL backlight
10000 hours.
Display
Text terminal /ML:
LCD-display (Liquid crystal), Supertwist 4 rows x
20 characters, 8 mm char.
hight. Viewing angle adjusible with potentiometer
behind battery cover. Lifetime: 50000 timmar.
Text terminal /MV:
VF-display (vaccum flourescent), 4 rows x 20 characters, 5 mm char. hight.
Light intensity software
adjustable. Lifetime:
50000-150000 timmar.
Battery
Battery for real-time clock and CMOS-RAM. Lifetime >5
years. Norm. 10 years. Manufacturing year printed on the
back of the battery cover. Lithium battery 3,6 V, Capacity: 2 Ah. Size AA (ANSI) or R6 (IEC), 14 x 50 mm.
Battery change
Warning at low battery voltage is nominal 3,21 V
(between 2,96 V and 3,45 V). Change battery with supply connected. If the terminal is not connected to supply,
please change within 1 min to avoid loss of information in
CMOS-RAM and temporary stoppage of real-time clock.
Real-time clock
± 10PPM + error because of ambient temperature and
supply voltage. Total max error: 1 min/month = 12 min/
year.
Supply voltage
Nominal +24 VDC. Max 30 V, min 20 V. Max rippel: 3 V
peak to peak.
Supply voltage connection
3-pol screw terminal. Max cable area: 2,5 mm2
Current consumption without expansion unit
LCD display
Nominal approx 80 mA.
Higher at 20 V, lower at
30 V. Power consumption:
approx: ca 2 VA. Dissipation effect: ca 2 W.
VF display
Nominal approx. 250 mA.
Higher at 20 V, lower at
30 V. Power consumption:
approx: 6 VA. Dissipation
effect: 6 W.
Nominal ca 400 mA. higher
at 20 V, lower at 30 V.
Power consumption:
approx: 10 VA. Dissipation
effect: 10 W.
135
Overview
Text terminal
136
Graphics termianl
Internal power
+5 VDC ±5%. Connected to the chassis via 0,1 µF capacitor parallel with 1 Mohms resistance.
Ambient temperature
MAC 50/MTA-250 ML:
0° to +50°C.
MAC 50/MTA-250 MV:
0° to +55°C.
Storage temperature
-20° to +55°C
Relative humidity
Max 90% non-condensing
EMC-test
G & L Beijer Electronics AB confirm that the terminals
conforms with the essential protection requirements in
article four or the directive 89/336/EEC
Noise tested according to: EN50081-1 emission and
50082-2 immunity.
0° to +50°C
Index
Index
A
A series, 13
Alarm banner, 89
Alarm settings, 66
Alarm, 4, 104
Analog signals, 63
Analog, 82
Arc, 87
ASCII, 87
B
Bar graph, 83, 90
Basic editing functions, 61
Basic functions, 3
Battery check, 14
Block header, 26, 79
Block jump, 102
Block list, 106
Block number, 79
Block, 26
C
Character set, 67
Character settings, 125
Character tables, 127
Choice of language and character set, 23
Choice of PLC system, 23
Clock synchtonization, 48
Communication, 6, 39
Multidrop, 43
Network, 46
No protocol mode, 49
Transparent mode, 39
Connecting to the CPU port, 14
Connection to a printer, 19
Connection to an A1SJ71C24R2, 18
Connection to an A1SJ71C24R4, 17
Connection to an A2CCPU-C24,
19
Connection to an AJ71C24/
AJ71UC24, 17
Connection to MELSEC MEDOC, 20
Contrast settings, 68
D
Data logging/Recipe, 6
Databuffer files, 58
Databuffer setting, 68
Date/time format, 69
Date/time, 83
Device driver, 57
Install, 57
Diagram, 91
Digital signals, 62
Digital symbol, 92
Digital text, 93
Digital, 84
Disk settings, 71
Display signal, 79
Documentation, 106
Dynamic graph objects, 117
Dynamic text objects, 117
E
Ellipse, 93
Erase memory, 71
I
Index
F
F1/F2, 13
Filler, 93
Function keys, 5, 102
FX series, 13
G
Gain, 65
Graphblocks, 4
I
Index addressing, 64
Index register, 64, 71
N
Network, 46
No protocol mode, 49
Numeric, 96
O
Offset, 65
Online settings, 72
P
Keyboard, 7
Keys, 121
Password, 81
PLC selection, 73
PLC system, 13
Port parameters, 73
Power requirements, 13
Printer setting 74
Programming mode, 79
L
R
Language, 72
LEDs, 5, 103
Line pattern, 94
Lines, 94
Rectangle, 96
Filled, 96
Transparent, 96
Remote control, 59
Reserved characters, 65
Run-time mode, 108
J
Jump, 84, 94
K
M
MACMTA.SYS, 57
MELSEC MEDOC, 41
Memory cassette, 107
Menu structure, 25
Menu system, 10
Method for programming, 25
Modes, 7, 117
II
Multidrop, 43
Multiple choice, 85, 95
Multisymbol, 95
S
Scaling, 65
Setup mode, 66
Signal format, 62
Slide, 98
S-meter, 97
Index
Status word, 80
Suffix, 63
Switch between PROG and
RUN, 61
Symbol (static), 98
Symbol maintenance, 99
System block, 118
System signals, 75
T
Technical data, 134
Terminal commands, 60
Terminal options, 78
Text (static), 99
Text, 86
Textblock, 3, 82, 108
Time channels, 5, 105
Time, 99
Transfer databuffer, 57
Transfer trend data, 57
Transfer, 107
Transparent mode, 39
Trend files, 58
Trend, 100
V
VU meter, 101
III
Index
IV
Drawings
Drawings
Dimensions for MAC 50/MTA-250
A-1
Drawings
Dimensions for MAC 90/MTA-G1
A-2
Drawings
Installation of MAC 50/MTA-250
A-3
Drawings
Installation of MAC 90/MTA-G1
A-4
Drawings
Shielded cable for power supply
A-5
Drawings
RS-232/RS-485 connection
A-6
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and MELSEC CPU
A-7
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and MELSEC FX0
A-8
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and AJ71C24
A-9
Drawings
RS232 connection between a terminal and AJ71C24
A-10
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and a PC
A-11
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and a printer
A-12
Drawings
Connecting a terminal to a PC and a PLC system
A-13
Drawings
Connection between terminals in transparent mode
A-14
Drawings
Connecting IFC 50 with RS-232 communication
A-15
Drawings
Connecting IFC 50 with RS-485 communication
A-16
Drawings
RS-232 or RS-485 connection between terminals
A-17
Drawings
Connecting CR01 to A-/F-CPU
A-18
Drawings
Connecting CR01 to FX0-CPU
A-19
Drawings
Connection between a terminal and C24 via CR01
A-20
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