COM fall06 cred sched
COLLEGE of
INSIDE
New courses, page 11
Indian Valley Campus
Class Listings, page 12
Students going above
and beyond, page 4
ON THE COVER
Giovanna Mazzei
ASCOM President, page 4
REGISTRATION
page 6
CLASSES BEGIN
August 21
CREDIT
CL ASSES
FALL 06
AUG 21 – DEC 16
Letter from the President
Dear Students, Prospective Students, and Community Members
Accreditation
College of Marin is accredited
by the Accrediting Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges
of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges,
10 Commercial Blvd., Novato,
CA 94949, (415) 506-0234), an
institutional accrediting body
recognized by the Commission
on Recognition of Postsecondary
Accreditation and the U.S.
Department of Education.
Our Legacy
College of Marin has been
providing exceptional educational
opportunities since 1926. The
College has earned a reputation
as a quality educational ­institution
that provides a pathway for
achievement and success
for students of all ages and
­backgrounds.
Outstanding Faculty
College of Marin faculty are
recognized for their excellence
in the classroom. Our instructors
have degrees from such
institutions as Stanford, Harvard,
Yale, Columbia, UC Berkeley,
California College of Arts & Crafts,
SFSU, Royal College of Music,
London and many other top
educational institutions.
Welcome to fall semester 2006. Featured in this class schedule are
several of our students who are going above and beyond in pursuit
of their higher education. You can read more about these exceptional
individuals and their activities on page 4 and the inside back cover. We
are very proud of all of our students and their commitment to making a
positive difference in their lives and in our community. We are also very
proud of the high quality of our classes and the dedicated faculty who
teach them.
I encourage you to take a few moments and look at the wide variety
of courses that College of Marin offers. Whether you want to complete
your associate or baccalaureate degree, develop new skills, or start a new
career, College of Marin is an excellent place to start or continue your
education.
College of Marin is fully accredited by the Accrediting Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools
and Colleges. The majority of our courses are transferable to four-year
colleges and universities. By attending College of Marin for the first two
years of your higher education, you will save thousands of dollars over
the cost of attending a four-year university.
We also offer occupational certificate and workforce preparation
programs in a variety of areas, including business, multimedia, court
reporting, medical assisting, accounting, and more. Whether your goal
is career advancement or a new career, we have programs to help you
succeed.
You should apply early so that you have your first choice of classes. An
application form is included on pages 87 to 89, or you can apply online
at www.marin.cc.ca.us. I hope that you will join us this fall semester at
College of Marin.
Sincerely,
College of Marin
835 College Avenue
Kentfield CA 94904-2590
415.457.8811
www.marin.cc.ca.us
Dr. Frances White
Superintendent/President
Contents
Course Listings
Important Dates
Academic Information ...............................90
Administration Of Justice........................... 18
American Sign Language........................... 18
Anthropology.............................................. 18
Architecture................................................ 19
Art...............................................................20
Astronomy.................................................. 24
Automotive Collision Repair Technology... 24
Automotive Technology............................. 24
Behavioral Science...................................... 25
Biology........................................................ 25
Business...................................................... 27
Business Office Systems............................. 28
Chemistry....................................................30
Chinese.......................................................30
Communications......................................... 31
Computer Courses..................................... 31
Computer Information Systems................. 31
Computer Science......................................33
Counseling..................................................34
Court Reporting..........................................34
Dance.......................................................... 37
Dental Assisting: Registered...................... 39
Directed Study............................................40
Drama..........................................................40
Early Childhood Education......................... 42
Economics...................................................43
Education....................................................43
Engineering.................................................44
English.........................................................44
English as a Second Language................... 49
Environmental Landscaping....................... 51
Ethnic Studies............................................. 52
Film.............................................................. 52
Fire Technology..........................................53
French.........................................................53
Geography..................................................54
Geology......................................................54
Health Education........................................ 55
History......................................................... 55
Humanities..................................................56
Italian...........................................................56
Japanese.....................................................56
Journalism................................................... 57
Library......................................................... 57
Machine and Metals Technology............... 58
Mathematics............................................... 58
Medical Assisting........................................ 62
Multimedia Studies.....................................63
Music...........................................................64
Nursing: Registered (R.n.).......................... 67
Philosophy................................................... 69
Physical Education...................................... 69
Physics......................................................... 73
Political Science.......................................... 73
Psychology.................................................. 74
Real Estate.................................................. 75
San Francisco State University
Courses at Com..................................... 95
Social Science............................................. 75
Sociology.................................................... 76
Spanish........................................................ 76
Speech........................................................ 77
Statistics...................................................... 77
Study Skills.................................................. 77
Welding Technology................................... 78
Work Experience........................................ 78
Fall 2006 Credit Program: Monday,
August 21 – December 16
Adding and Dropping Classes..................... 7
Admissions Application.............................. 87
Admissions Information................................ 8
College of Marin Foundation.....................86
College Policies ....................................... 105
Course Listings........................................... 18
Directory of Phone & Office Numbers..... 106
Directory of Student Services.................. 102
Distance Learning....................................... 79
Driving Directions . .................................. 110
Equal Opportunity.................................... 105
Fees, Fee Exemptions, and Waivers............ 9
Final Exams December 11–16..................... 91
Financial Aid.............................................100
First Class Meeting..................................... 10
Formas de Costear la Educación
Universitaria............................................ 97
Graduation/Transfer Information............... 92
Holistic Health Program
San Francisco State University............... 55
Important Dates............................................ 3
Indian Valley Campus Classes.................... 12
Indian Valley Campus Map and
Directory............................................... 108
Kentfield Campus Map and Directory..... 107
Late-Starting Classes Start Dates............... 16
Late Registration:
August 21 – September 1........................ 5
Letter from the President............................. 2
Los Nuevos Estudiantes se pueden
matricular mediante el internet o por
correo en cua­tro pasos simples .............. 5
New Courses............................................... 11
New Student Success Workshops.............. 98
New Students Register Online or
By Mail in Four Easy Steps....................... 5
Open Enrollment Policy............................ 105
Oportunidades Educativas......................... 96
Parking...................................................... 109
Refund Policy ............................................. 10
Registration Information............................... 6
San Francisco State University
Courses at COM..................................... 95
Short Term Classes Drop Dates.................84
Skills Certificates ....................................... 17
Smart Start.................................................... 5
Student Activities Program...................... 101
Students Going Above and Beyond............ 4
Tax Credit.................................................... 17
Transfer Information................................... 92
Weekend Classes........................................ 11
5/15 Continuing Students begin to
register, according to priority. Web
Registration: https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/
StudentPortal, Touchtone 415.883.3220 or
In Person.
5/15 Success Workshop Registration
begins for New & Returning Students. Web
Registration: https://www.marin cc.ca.us/
StudentPortal, Touchtone 415.883.3220 or
In Person. Students may also view the new
on-line orientation instead.
5/29 & 7/4 Holidays – Campuses
Closed, In Person registration closed, but
Web Registration thru Student Portal &
Touchtone available
7/13 New & Returning Students register
for classes. Web Registration: https://www.
marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal, Touchtone
415.883.3220 or In Person.
8/17 Last day to pre-enroll for classes
8/21 CREDIT CLASSES BEGIN
8/21 Late-starting classes registration
continues. Web Registration: https://
www.marin cc.ca.us/StudentPortal,
Touchtone 415.883.3220 or In Person.
9/1 Last day to add full-semester class
(with instructor signature)
9/1 Last day to request fee refunds for fullsemester classes
9/1 Last day for Dismissed Students to file
a Petition to Return
9/11 – 10/31 File application for fall
graduation
9/4 Holiday – campuses closed
9/15 Last day to drop a full-semester class
without a “W” grade. Date equivalent to
30% of term for short term classes.
9/22 Last day to request “CR/NC” grade
11/3 Midterm grades available at
415.883.1523
11/10 Holiday – campuses closed
11/17 Last day to drop a full-semester
class with a “W” grade. Date equivalent to
75% of term for short term classes.
11/23, 24, 25 Holiday – campuses closed
12/9 Last day of classes before final exams
12/11-16 Final examinations
1/16/07 Final grades available by Web:
https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal
or Touchtone 415.883.1523
Students Going Above and Beyond
Giovanna Mazzei, ASCOM President,
Models Going Above and Beyond
Featured on the cover of this ­semester’s
Class Schedule, Giovanna Mazzei is
a psychology major and the 2005‑06
P resident of the
Associ­ated ­Stu­dents
at College of Marin
(ASCOM). As Presi­
dent, Mazzei has
been a ­ passionate
advocate for under­
represented individuals and broadening
our educational community. She has been
enrolled at College of
Marin since graduating from Redwood High School in 2002.
She plans to transfer to a four-year university in spring 2007.
Mazzei says that College of Marin
has given her the opportunity to pursue
her dream of earning a college degree.
In part, she attributes her academic
success to active participation in student government. Her various roles in
student organizations have allowed her
to develop leadership skills, expand
her social network, and make a positive contribution to the college and the
community. In addition to various positions she has held on the ASCOM
Board of Directors, she is also a member of the Alpha Gamma Sigma Honor
Society, and was formerly active in the
Environmental Action Club.
Three years ago, Mazzei and ASCOM
partnered with a Marin-based non-profit organization, Community Violence
Solutions, as part of the National
Clothes­line Project to raise awareness
of sexual assaults. At that time, Mazzei
organized the first annual Clothesline
Project at COM. Under her leadership
the Clothesline Project has become an
annual event, helping to raise understanding about the occurrence and prevention of sexual violence in our community. She is also a volunteer advocate
and crisis counselor for survivors
of sexual assault.
Mazzei’s exper­
ience at College of
Marin has ­given
her the ­confidence
to achieve her
career and academic goals. “I’ve
made some good
friends here,
through active
participation in ASCOM and student
senate activities,” she says. “COM offers
many opportunities for transfer students. The instructors are knowledgeable, the classes are small, and you get
lots of personal attention.”
“COM offers many
opportunities for transfer
students. The instructors
are knowledgeable, the
classes are small, and
you get lots of personal
attention,” says Mazzei.
Hoa-Long Tam serves as the ASCOM
Director of Student Services.
He participates in college governance, coordinates other students’ participation in the college’s Modernization
program, and at 15 is one of COM’s
youngest, concurrently enrolled, home
schooled high school students. Over the
past two semesters, while enrolled almost full-time and maintaining a 4.0
average, Tam has taken such challenging courses as Chinese, algebra, biology,
and history.
He is looking forward to transferring to Reed College and majoring in
­international comparative policy studies. Tam’s experience at COM has inspired him to work in higher education,
either as a teacher or as an administrator. “I’ve learned a great deal about
how the college operates and how higher education works at the community
­college ­level. It is a great experience,”
says Tam.
continued on inside back cover
•
FALL 2006
New Students Register Online or
By Mail in Four Easy Steps
Step 1 Complete your application online at www.marin.cc.ca.us. Application may
be mailed, or faxed to 415.460.0773.
Step 2 Beginning May 30, and five working days after submitting your applica-
tion, call 415.883.3220 or web register thru Student Portal at
https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal to enroll in a Success Workshop. Students
also have the option of viewing the on-line orientation on the College of Marin website. See page 98 for details. (Students who have completed 15 college units or are
registering for classes not requiring reading, writing and math, skip to Step 4.)
Step 3 Attend workshop or view online orientation and make a counseling appointment.
Step 4 Beginning July 13 and five working days after submitting your application, web register or call 415.883.3220 to register for classes.
Los Nuevos Estudiantes se pueden matricular mediante el internet o por correo en cua­
tro pasos simples
Primer paso Complete su solicitud por Internet en www.marin.cc.ca.us. La solicitud puede ser enviada por correo o por fax al 415-460-0773.
Segundo paso A partir del 30 de mayo y cinco días laborales después de pre-
sentar su solicitud, llame al 415-883-3220, o matricúlese por Internet entrando por
Student Portal en https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal para matricularse en
un Success Workshop. Los estudiantes tienen también la opción de recibir orienta­
ción por Internet en el sitio de College of Marin. Ver la página 98 para más detalles.
(Los estudiantes que han completado 15 unidades en el college o que se matriculan
en clases que no requieren lectura, escritura y matemáticas, pueden ir directamente
al Cuarto paso.)
Tercer paso Asista al taller o reciba la orientación por Internet y concierte una
cita con un consejero.
Smart Start
This orientation is for adults coming
to College of Marin for the first time
or returning after an absence. Starting
college classes can be challenging if you
haven’t been in school for a while. Right
away you’ll be asked to take notes, read
textbooks, write papers and manage
your time in new ways. Often re-entry
students have concerns about how their
age, finances, skills, work and family
responsibilities will integrate into a
college atmosphere. Parents in particular
worry about juggling the needs of their
kids and the demands of their classes.
We encourage you to join us to find
out just how possible and rewarding
returning to school can be.
Thursday, August 17, 2006
12 noon – 2:30 PM
Student Services Conference
Room A & B
This important information session will
include:
• A
dvice and tips from successful
re-entry students.
• Updated study skills to help keep
you on track.
• Campus resources that every student
should know.
• Time and stress management
techniques.
• Optional Sessions (2:30 – 3:30):
Campus Tour and CalWORKS
Information Session.
Please call the Re-entry/CalWORKS
office at 415.485.9640 to reserve your
space. Make this your first step on
your road to success!
Cuarto paso A partir del 13 de julio y cinco días laborales después de presen-
tar su solicitud, matricúlese por Internet o llame al 415-883-3220 para matricularse
para las clases.
Late Registration: August 21 – September 1
Last Day to Add a Full-Semester
Class is September 1
If you did not pre-enroll in a class or
classes by August 17, you may attend
the first class meeting to see if space
is available. Instructors may admit
students by signing their Enrollment
Cards.
To complete late enrollment, file
Enrollment Cards for full-semester
courses with the Office of Admissions
and Records no later than September 1.
Students who have difficulty coming in
person may fax enrollment cards with
a credit card number and instructor
signature to 415.460.0773. Enrollment
cards may be mailed with a check or
credit card number to: College of
Marin Credit Registration, 835
College Ave., Kentfield, CA 94904, or
deposited in the drop boxes in the Office
of Admissions and Records at either
campus when the office is closed.
Success Workshop
Registration Begins May 15,
or Students May View
Online Orientation
Class Registration
For New & Returning Students
Begins July 13
Web Register
https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/
StudentPortal
Touch-tone Register
at 415.883.3220
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
Registration Information
New Students & Returning
Students Registration
If you are enrolling in College of Marin
credit classes after an absence of a
year or more, or if you have never registered for credit classes at the Kentfield
Campus or Indian Valley Campus, follow these steps.
Step 1
Application
Complete the Application for Admission
online at https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/
admissions/creditapp. Application may
be submitted in person, or mailed to:
dmissions & Records
A
College of Marin
835 College Avenue
Kentfield, CA 94904
You may also fax the completed application to 415.460.0773.
Step 2
Workshop Registration
Five working days after mailing, faxing, or e-mailing your Application for
Admission you may register for your
Success Work­shop online at https://www.
marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal, or by
touch-tone 415.883.3220 beginning May
15 (not required if you have already completed 15 college units). Students also
have the option of viewing the online orientation on the College of Marin website.
See page 98 for details.
• H
ave your social security number
ready.
• Have ready the 4-digit number of
the Student Success Workshop (see
page 99) in which you wish to register, together with alternate section
numbers in case your first choice is
­unavailable.
Step 3
fore they call. After initial registration,
students may use touch-tone or web
register to add classes to their program
until August 17 at 7 pm. Late-starting
classes may con­tinue to be added online, or by touch-tone, or web register
beginning August 21 until the business
day before the class begins.
• Y
ou may charge your fees with
Mastercard/Visa or debit card.
• Please have your card number and
expiration date ready.
• A ll fees must be paid at the time of
registration.
Confirmation of Enrollment
A confirmation of enrollment postcard
will be mailed to you if you registered,
or by touch-tone within five working
days, or a receipt will be given to you if
you register in ­person.
If you do not receive your confirmation, or if you experience any problems,
please contact the Office of Admissions
and Records immediately.
If you lose your confirmation, you can
log on to web register at www.marin.
cc.ca.us to see your list of classes or
hear a list of your classes by phoning
415.883.3220.
Student Identification Number
Social security numbers are used as
the Student Identification Number at
College of Marin. Students who do not
wish to use their social security number will be assigned another number by
the Office of Admissions and Records.
Please note that students who elect to
use an assigned number will not have
their social security number printed on
their 1098T tax credit form.
Attend Success Workshop or view
the online orientation and schedule a
counseling appointment
Beginning July 13 and five working
days after submitting an application,
students may use web registration or
call touch-tone 415.883.3220 24 hours
after completing the Workshop and
Counseling appointment. Most students find it helpful to complete the
Registration Worksheet on page 7 be-
Students Who Must ­Register
In Person
If you are a nonresident student, international student, concurrently enrolled
high school student, dismissed student
or an encumbered student, you must
register in person. Other students may
also register in person.
Continuing Students Priority
Registration For Classes
Begins May 15
program until August 17 at 7 pm.
Beginning August 21, late-starting
classes may be added by web register,
or touch-tone until the business day before the class ­begins.
If you register early, you will have
a better chance of receiving your first
choice of classes. If you misplace your
priority registration letter, or have
not yet received it, you can obtain
your date through the StudentPortal,
or by calling touch-tone registration: 415.883.3220.
If you are a continuing student, but
are a nonresident student, international
student, encumbered student, concurrently enrolled high school student, or
a dismissed student, you must register
in person. Other students may also register in person according to the date on
their priority letter.
Please note all fees are due at the
time of registration.
Students who have enrolled in credit
classes during the past year should
watch for their priority letter giving them an early registration date.
(Summer session does not count for semesters completed.)
After initial registration students
may use web register or touch-tone
to add full-semester classes to their
•
FALL 2006
Step 4
Register for Classes online at https://
www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal, or by
touch-tone 415.883.3220
*If you have a spam blocker, it may block your e-mailed
confirmation. If you do not receive a response within
five working days, you can verify your enrollment
through the Student Portal or by touchtone.
Adding and Dropping Classes Deadline: September 1
Students may add a class by completing
an Enrollment Card and filing it in person with the Office of Admissions and
Records no later than Sept 1.
Students may also add classes by web
registration thru student portal https://
www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal,
or by calling touch-tone registration—
415.883.3220. After August 17, students
need to have their Enrollment Card
signed by the instructor, unless the class
begins after the first week of the session.
Students may continue to use web
registration, or touch-tone registration
to add a “late starting” class beginning
August 21 until the business day before
the class begins.
Students who add and drop after the
­refund deadline (see page 10) will be required to pay for both classes. Students
who have outstanding obligations at
the College need to pay them before
­registering.
Course Repetitions
Generally, students may enroll in a
course only one time. Check the college
catalog for exceptions. Specific activity
courses may be taken only four times.
Students may not register or be placed
on the waiting list for more than one
section of any non-repeatable course.
Students who previously received a D,
F, or NC grade in a non-repeatable class
may enroll in the class one more time.
If the student receives a C/CR or better
grade, the student may file a petition to
line our the D, F, or NC grade. If the student drops the class and is issued a W
grade, the student may enroll in the class
again. No student may register and receive a grade or units in a non-repeatable
class after the fourth enrollment.
Open College
Some College of Marin credit courses
have seats designated for Community
Education students. A listing of these
classes available for advance registration can be viewed on the Community
Education page of the College of Marin
website (http://www.marin.cc.ca.us).
In addition, students may request to
register in other credit classes as a
Community Education student by attending the class and requesting the
instructor to obtain a Community
Education section number. Not all
classes will be available for Community
Education students and first priority
goes to credit students. After receiving a Community Education section
number, a student must register and
pay fees with the Office of Admissions
and Records by the next class meeting.
Students who register in credit classes
as Community Education students do
not receive units or grades and are not
eligible for a refund after the class has
begun.
Please note: Once a student has enrolled in an
Open College section they may not transfer their
registration and fees to the credit program. All
funds received from Open College enrollments go
to the College’s General Fund.
Closed Classes
Classes are closed when they reach the
enrollment limit. You may be placed on
a waiting list or register for only one
section of a nonrepeatable course. If you
register for more than one section, the
computer will drop one of the sections.
Course Conflicts
Due to state regulations, the College is
not able to register students into courses which conflict with the days or times
of other courses in which the student
has already enrolled.
Dropping Classes
Students may drop a class by completing
a Drop Card and filing it in person with
the Office of Admissions and Records.
Drop cards may also be processed by Web
Registration thru Student Portal: https://
www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal,
faxed to 415.460.0773 or mailed to the
Office of Admissions. Faxed or mailed
drop cards must be received by the deadlines. If you drop a full-session class by
September 15, you will not receive a “W”
grade. If you drop a full-session class between September 16 and Nov. 17, you will
receive a “W” grade. You may not drop
full-­session classes ­after Nov. 17.
Short-term classes have different
drop deadlines. See page 84.
Not attending a class does not con-­
stitute a drop.
You are also responsible for any
outstanding fees for courses you don‘t
attend unless a Drop Card and Refund
Request Form are submitted by the
refund ­deadline.
Use this form to plan your class schedule.
Section #
Course #
Course Title
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
Units
College of Marin
•
Admissions Information
Residence Requirements
In general, to be considered a resident
for tuition purposes, a student must
have lived continuously in California
for one year immediately preceding the
residence determination date.
The student must also provide
evidence (as defined by California
Education Code) proving the student’s
intention to make California the student’s permanent home. Documented
intent must start at least one year before the residency determination date.
The residency determination date is the
day before the semester ­begins.
Non-US Citizens on certain visas are
ineligible to enroll in credit classes.
High School Students Advanced Scholastic and
Vocational Programs
College of Marin has a special program
which allows students in high school to
take college courses in advanced scholastic and vocational programs before
receiving their high school diploma.
Concurrently enrolled students are restricted from physical education classes, and remedial classes (classes numbered below 100).
A new law also requires that concurrently enrolled high school students
have a lower registration priority date.
In Person Registration
Each semester the high school student
must register in person and bring in
a completed College Credit Program
(CCP) Card signed by a parent, high
school counselor, and College counselor.
High school students must pay enrollment fees at the time of registration.
College of Marin Serves
Students of All Ages with or without
a High School Diploma
Anyone 18 years of age or older, with
or without a high school diploma, is
eligible to enroll at College of Marin.
For information concerning enrollment of students under age 18, call the
Office of Admissions and Records or the
Counseling Department.
•
FALL 2006
International Students
All documents must be received by the
stipulated deadlines.
Admission International students seeking admission to the credit program must provide
the following:
• E
vidence of completion of a high
school education, or equivalent.
• T ranscripts of all U.S. colleges and
universities attended.
• A score of 500 or higher on the Test
of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL).
• Documentation verifying adequate financial support for housing, food, tuition, and medical care.
• Completed International Student
­Application.
Tuition
International students are subject to
nonresident tuition of $185 per unit, an
$26 per unit enrollment fee, a $50 application fee, and a $15 health fee. Fees
must be paid at the time of registration. Credit F1 students are required
to maintain enrollment in at least 12
units.
Medical Insurance
Medical insurance is required and payable with class registration. The cost of
annual medical insurance will be approximately $755. A refund, less a service fee, of the medical insurance will
be issued for students who withdraw
from the college through the second
week of the semester as long as no benefits were used.
Intensive English
For information regarding the Inter­
national Student noncredit Intensive
English Program, phone 415.457.8811,
ext. 8822 or e-mail foster@marin.cc.ca.us.
Admissions & Records
Registration Hours
(College offices are closed Fridays
June 9 – Aug 4)
Web Registration
https://www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal
Touch-tone Registration
24 hours a day,
7 days a week May 15 – August 17
Continuing August 21 for
late-starting classes
Walk-in Registration
Closed:
Fridays June 9 – Aug 4
May 29, July 4
Kentfield Campus
Student Services Cntr.
M-Th 8am – 4:30 pm
Fri 8am – Noon
Closed evenings June 26 – Aug 4
Indian Valley Campus
Student Services Bldg.
M-Th 8am – 4:30 pm
Fri 8am – Noon
Closed evenings June 26 – Aug 4
For information about expanded hours
during heavy registration phone
415.457.8811, ext. 8822.
Take the gamble out
of Admission to
University of California
at Davis, Irvine, Riverside, Santa
Barbara, & Santa Cruz
Make a planning appointment to see a
College of Marin counselor now!
Call 415.485.9432.
Guaranteed admission! TAA with each
of the above universities.
Fees, Fee Exemptions, and Waivers
Tax Credit For tax credit information, see page 17.
Costs of College The enrollment and special fees you pay
to attend College of Marin and other
community colleges in the State are set
by the California State Legislature. All
fees over $500 must be paid by money order or cashiers check at the time
you register. Fees may also be paid by
Mastercard/Visa or debit card.
Registration Fees All fees must be paid at the time of
registration.
*Enrollment Fee.......................... $26/unit
*Health Fee.......................................... $15
International Student Appln. Fee
(nonrefundable)...............................$50
Materials Fee................................. varies
Nonresident, U.S. Citizen
Tuition Fee............................ $175/unit
Nonresident, Non-U.S. Citizen
Tuition Fee ...........................$185/unit
Student Representation Fee................ $1
*Exemptions are granted to students in accordance
with criteria listed herein.
Fees for Other Services Career Assessment
Administration Fee............................$40
Credit by Exam.......................... $26/unit
Document/Verification Fee..................$6
GED Test Administration..................$85
($10 to retake one test)
Library Replacement
Card Fee............................................$2
Parking Fee......... $3/daily, $50/semester
Returned Checks/Declined
VISA/Mastercard or debit card Fee$15
Rush Transcript Fee
(next business day).......................... $15
Service Fee (for processing refunds &
deferred fees for dropped classes).. $10
Service Fee for refund of
Nonresident tuition........................$50
Transcript Fee (first 2 copies free)......$6
In addition to the above fees, students
must purchase their own books and
­supplies.
Delinquent Deferred Fees
Interest at the rate of 7% may be
charged on all delinquent deferred fees
beginning the second week of classes.
All fees are nonrefundable and subject
to change without notice except as indicated below.
Returned Checks A $15 service fee will be charged for all
checks or credit card charges returned
to the college for account difficulties. If
your check or credit card charge is returned, you will be notified by mail.
Registration and transcripts will
be delayed until all delinquencies are
cleared. Returned check/credit card delinquencies may not be paid with another personal check, but must be cleared
with cash, money order, or cashier’s
check.
Student Representation Fee Money collected for the Student Repre­
sentation Fee shall be expended to provide support for students or representatives who may be stating their positions
and viewpoints before city, county and
District government and before offices
and agencies of the state and federal
government.
Students have the right to refuse to
pay the fee for religious, political, ­moral
or financial reasons. A written statement to this effect must be presented
to Admissions and Records staff at the
time of registration.
Fees Paid by an Agency If an agency or program is to pay your
fees, a voucher or “authorization to bill”
must be provided at the time of registration. Remember to keep a copy of the
voucher or authorization. You will need
to bring a copy of the original voucher
with each adjustment to your schedule.
College of Marin will invoice the agency or program within the appropriate
timelines.
Military Fee Exemption Dependents of deceased/disabled veterans (with an eligibility letter) will only
be charged materials fees.
AB 540
Students not otherwise eligible for
resident status who have attended a
California high school for 3 years and
graduated may apply for an AB 540
fee exemption. Students must complete
the California Nonresident Exemption
Request form and have their high
school fax or mail an official transcript
to College of Marin. Hand-carried transcripts are not considered official.
Enrollment Fee Waivers Board of Governors
Students required to pay out-ofstate fees or who receive an AB 540
fee exemption are not eligible. The
California Community Colleges Board
of Governors provides a waiver of enrollment fees for students who are residents of the State of California and
meet one or more of the following criteria:
1. S
tudent or student’s family receives
TANF, SSI or General Assistance
­benefits.
2. Income for 2005 was below the limits identified in the table.
3. Student files Financial Aid
Application and is determined eligible by the Financial Aid Office.
Financial Aid and Fee Waiver information is available in Spanish. All
Financial Aid Students are still required to pay any materials fees and
the health fee. Contact the Financial
Aid Office at 415.485.9409 for additional information.
The above information is subject to
change in the event of new federal or
state regulations.
2006/2007 Income Standards*
for BOGFW Part B Eligibility
Family Size
2005 Income
1
$14,355
2
$19,245
3
$24,135
4
$29,025
5
$33,915
6
$38,805
7
$43,695
8
$48,585
For each additional
family member
Add $4,890
*These standards are based upon the federal poverty guidelines as published each year by the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Serivces. Per
Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, the
Income Standards for the bogfw program equal 150%
of the federal poverty guidelines for the base year.
Additional information on the poverty guidelines can
be ­obtained from:
http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/00poverty.htm
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
Refund Policy Refund Service Fee A $10 per semester Service Fee and any
outstanding balance due the College will
be deducted from all resident refunds.
A $50 Service Fee and any outstanding balance will be deducted from any
non-resident refunds. No Service Fee is
charged if the class is cancelled by the
College. The Service Fee also applies
to students who drop classes.
Short-term Classes In accordance with State law, refund
requests for short-term classes will be
­g ranted if the class is dropped before
completion of 10% of the course. See
drop dates for short term classes on
page 84.
Materials Fees Provided that no materials have been
used, refund of materials fees will be
granted through Friday of the second week of classes; or, for short-term
classes, before completion of 10% of the
course. Please note that Financial
Aid Fee Waivers do not cover health
or materials fees.
Financial Aid Students
Prior to refunding any enrollment fee
or tuition, the District may determine
if the student received federal Title IV
funds during the term of enrollment. If
funds were received, the refund may be
held up to 30 days while the District determines if any institutional or student
return to the federal Title IV programs
is due ­under Section 485 of the Higher
Education Amendments of 1998, P.L.
105-244.
If a return is deemed to be required,
the amount of enrollment fee refund
may first be used to meet any return
obligation of the District and, if an
amount of enrollment fee refund remains after the District obligation has
been met, that amount may be used to
meet any return obligation of the student.
If an enrollment fee refund amount
remains after all return obligations
have been met, the student shall receive
the ­remainder.
Nonresident Tuition Refunds The College cannot give refunds after
the second week of instruction. Refunds
for short-term classes will be pro-rated
­accordingly. There will be a $50 Service
Fee applied to all nonresident tuition
­refunds.
Outstanding Debts
Students will not be allowed to register until all outstanding debts to the
College have been paid.
Refund Request Deadlines Refund Request Forms must be filed in
the Office of Admissions and Records
not later than Friday of the second
week of classes, one week after the class
has been cancelled, or before completion
of 10% of a short-term class. See drop
dates for short term classes on page 84.
Refund request forms may also be
faxed by the deadline to 415.460.0773.
Unfortunately, there are no “hardship”
considerations in the law.
Pursuant to law, students who drop
and add a class will be charged for the
add beginning the third week of the
term or after the refund deadine.
First Class Meeting
Attend classes which begin
Monday, August 21.
Failure to attend class does not consti­
tute an automatic drop. You must file a
Drop Card by the refund deadline or the
State requires fees be assessed. If you
cannot attend the first class meeting,
you may ask if your place can be held in
the class by completing and mailing the
notification form to the right.
Please note that instructors are generally not on campus between sessions.
For registered students and for students on the waiting list, instructors
take roll at the first class meeting.
By attending the first class meeting
on time, students may avoid losing their
place to another student on the waiting list.
If you do not wish to continue in a
full-­semester class, you must file a
Drop Card in person in the Office of
Admissions and Records by the deadline even if you do not attend (see calendar) to avoid fees and a penalty grade.
10
•
FALL 2006
If you cannot attend the first class meeting, you may use this form.
Reproduce as many copies as needed.

To (Instructor’s Name): __________________________________________________________
Semester: Fall Spring Summer 20_____________________________________
I will not be able to attend the first class meeting. Please save my space in class.
Student’s Name__________________________________________________________________
Social Security #_________________________________________________________________
Course Title_ __________________________________________ Section #__________________
Please note that this is a request. There is no guarantee that you will be kept in the class.
Mail this form to: (Instructor’s Name), College of Marin, 835 College Avenue,
Kentfield, CA 94904
New Courses
For detailed descriptions, prerequisites,
times, dates, and section numbers, see
class listings on pages 18–78.
ARCH 140 – 2D Computer Graphics
for Architecture
AUTO 139F – Bar 2007 Smog Check
Technician Update Training Course
COMM 108AE – Pre-Code Films:
Dangerous Men
COMM 145 – Developing Ideas for
Film, Multimedia and Video Projects
DRAM 137 – Stage Combat
ETST 154 - Native American
Literature
MATH 103G – Mathematics in the
World
NE 135 – Nursing I: Fundamentals of
Nursing
NE 135L – Nursing I: Clinical
Laboratory
NE 138 – Introduction to
Pharmacology and Medication
Administration for Nurses
PHIL 139D – Philosophy and
Psychoanalysis
POLS 203 – Understanding Terrorism
SPAN 203HB – Intermediate Spanish
for Heritage and Bilingual Speakers
Weekend Classes
Some of our most popular courses are
given on weekends for the convenience
of employed students who cannot attend
during traditional school hours. These
courses are listed under their department headings on pages 18–78 with
their course description, class times,
and section ­numbers.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
AUTO 139E – Bureau of Auto Repair
Update 2005-2006 Training
Sat/Sun 8:10-5pm (11/4 and 5)
BUSINESS
BUS 112A – Financial Accounting IA
Sat 9:10-1:00pm plus 1 hr/wk TBA (8/2610/21)
BUS 112B – Financial Accounting IB
Sat 9:10-1:30pm plus 1.1 hrs/wk TBA
(10/28-12/16)
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 110 – Chemistry for Allied
Health Sciences
Fri 6:10pm-9pm, Sat 10am–2pm
COMMUNICATIONS
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
COMM 108AE – Film: Pre-Code Films:
Dangerous Men
Sat/Sun 9:10-6:00pm (10/21, 22)
ECE 100 - Licensing and Permits: Intro
to Childcare Programs
Sat 8:40-5pm (9/16)
COMM 108W – Film: Women Directors
Sat/Sun 9:10-6:00pm (9/16, 17)
ECE 132 – Planning and Leading Circle
Time
Sat 8:30-2:30pm (8/26, 9/9, 9/23)
COMM 240 – Advanced Production
Projects
Sat/Sun 9:10-6:00pm (9/9, 10; 10/7, 8;
11/4, 5; 12/2, 3)
COMPUTER INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
CIS 101 – Introduction to Personal
Computers and Operating Systems
Sat 9:10-11:00am plus 3 hrs/wk TBA
(8/26-10/21)
CIS 118 – Introduction to Spreadsheet
Design
Sat 9:10-11:20am plus 3 hrs/wk TBA
(10/28-12/16)
ECE 223 – Music Activities for Young
Children
Sat 8:30-2:30pm (9/30; 10/14, 10/28)
ECE 224 – Working with Parents in
Early Childhood Programs
Sat 8:30-3pm (10/7, 21; 11/4, 18; 12/2)
GEOLOGY
GEOL 101 – Geological Field
Excursions to National Parks
Sat TBA
GEOL 128 – Marin Field Studies, Pt
Reyes
Sat TBA
DANCE
JAPANESE
DANC 122 – Jazz Dance I
Sat 9:10-12noon
JPNS 108 – Japanese Conversation
Through the Movies
Sat 10:10-12:00noon (8/26 - 10/21)
DANC 123 – Jazz Dance II
Sat 9:10-12noon
REAL ESTATE
REAL 115 – Real Estate Principles
Sat 9:10-12:00noon
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
11
Indian Valley Campus Classes
Sect
0017
4004
Class
ARCH 100
ART
129
Description
History of Architecture I
Materials and Techniques
4011
ACRT 167
4012
ACRT 171
Joining and Fastening
Processes I
Dent and Damage Repair
4013
ACRT 177
Maintenance and Detailing
4014
ACRT 178
4015
ACRT 180
Intro to Welding for
Auto Body Repair
Panel Replacement
4020
ACRT 273
Painting and Refinishing
4022
AUTO 113
4023
AUTO 114
4025
AUTO 118
Specialized Electronics
Training
Auto Basic Fuel Systems
4028
Brake Alignment and
Suspension
AUTO 139E S/T: Bureau/Repair 05/06
AUTO 139F S/T: BAR 2007 Smog Check
Update Training Course
AUTO 228 Auto Computer Controls
4029
AUTO 229
4026
4027
4043
Auto Systems,
Troubleshooting and
Diagnosis
AUTO 235 Auto Air Conditioning
AUTO 283 Engine Performance Diagnosis
and Repair – A8 Alternative
BUS
112A Financial Accounting IA
BUS
112B Financial Accounting IB
BUS
144 Business Communication
CHEM 105 Chemistry in the Human
Environment
CIS
101 Intro to Personal Computers
and Operating Systems
CIS
110 Intro to Computer Info Systems
CIS
150 PC Server and Workstation
Operating Systems
CIS
153 Directory Services
Infrastructure PC Server
CIS
155 Designing Security for a PC
Server Operating System
CIS
161 Intro to Computer System
Hardware
CIS
162 Computer Operating Systems
4050
COUR 110
4052
COUR 115F Beg Shorthand: 4-Voice
4030
4034
4035
4036
0214
0242
4038
0291
4039
4040
4041
4042
12
•
FALL 2006
Theory Machine Shorthand
Day
Time
See Distance Learning Page
F
10:10-1pm
F
2:10-5pm
M
6:10-7:00pm
M
7:10-10pm
T
6:10-7pm
T
7:10-10pm
Th
6:10-7pm
Th
7:10-10pm
Th
6:10-7pm
Th
7:10-10pm
W
6:10-7pm
W
7:10-10pm
Th
11:40-1:30pm
Th
1:40-5pm
Sat
8:10-5pm
MW
6:10-7pm
MW
7:10-9:30pm
TTh
1:10-2pm
TTh
2:10-5pm
Sat
8:10-5pm
MWF
1:10-2pm
MWF
2:10-5pm
Sat/Sun
8:10-5pm
Th
6:10-10pm
Sat
8:10-5pm
MW
8:10-9am
MW
9:10-12noon
Sat
8:10-5pm
ThF
8:10-9am
ThF
9:10-12noon
Sat
8:10-5pm
M
6:10-9:30pm
W
6:10-8pm
W
8:10-9pm
MW
6:10-8pm
MW
6:10-8pm
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
Th
6:10-8pm
Th
6:10-8pm
See Distance Learning Page
T
6:10-9pm
T
6:10-9pm
T
3:40-5:30pm
T
3:40-5:30pm
Th
6:10-8pm
Th
6:10-8pm
F
10:10-3pm
F
10:10-3pm
F
10:10-3:20pm
F
10:10-3:20pm
TWF
11:40-2pm
M
11:40-2pm
MTWF
10:48-11:25am
Dates
9/9, 23; 10/7,
10/21; 11/4
8/22/-12/05
One Sat 12/2
11/4-11/5
One Th 10/19
One Sat 10/21
8/21-12/04
One Sat 10/28
8/24-12/07
One Sat 11/18
8/21-10/16
10/23-12/13
8/24-10/12
10/17-12/05
8/22-10/10
10/19-12/14
8/25-10/13
10/20-12/15
Instructor
G. Clements
C. Arnold
C. Arnold
S. Brady
S. Brady
T. Behr
T. Behr
T. Behr
T. Behr
J. Owen
J. Owen
S. Brady
S. Brady
R. Palmer
R. Palmer
R. Palmer
Room
Web Based
MW
120
MW
122
PM
152
PM
140
PM
152
PM
140
PM
152
PM
140
PM
111
PM
167
PM
152
PM
140
PM
152
PM
140
PM
140
R. Palmer
R. Palmer
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
R. Palmer
G. Hritz
R. Willits
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
G. Hritz
R. Willits
R. Willits
R. Willits
S. Forsyth
S. Forsyth
B. Wilson
E. Dunmire
PM
255
PM
214
PM
254
PM
127
PM
127
PM
254
PM
127
PM
254
PM
254
PM
254
PM
254
PM
127
PM
127
PM
254
PM
127
PM
127
PM
251
PM
254
PM
127
OL
158
OL
158
Web Based
Web Based
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
M. Ransom
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
J. Hinds
T. Holub
K. Acredolo
Barr/Holub
OL
123
OL
103
Web Based
OL
123
OL
103
OL
123
OL
103
OL
123
OL
103
OL
123
OL
103
OL
123
OL
103
OL
211
OL
211
OL
211
Indian Valley Campus Classes
Sect
4054
4056
4058
4060
4062
4064
4066
4068
Class
COUR
COUR
COUR
COUR
COUR
COUR
COUR
COUR
4070
COUR 150J Inter Shorthand: Jury Charge
4072
COUR 150S Inter Shorthand: Literary
4074
COUR 150T Inter Shorthand: 2-Voice
4076
4078
4080
4082
4084
4086
4088
COUR 166 Law Library Skills
COUR 167 Ethics for Court Reporters
COUR 169B Transcript
Preparation/Formatting
COUR 169C Rapid Data Entry
COUR 169D Stenocaptioning I
COUR 170 Microtranscription
COUR 175F Inter Shorthand: 4-Voice
4090
COUR 175J Inter Shorthand: Jury Charge
4092
COUR 175S Inter Shorthand: Literary
4094
COUR 175T Inter Shorthand: 2-Voice
4096
COUR 200J Adv Shorthand: Jury Charge
4098
COUR 200T Adv Shorthand: 2-Voice
4100
COUR 210A Advanced Shorthand:
5-Min 4-Voice
COUR 210B Advanced Shorthand:
7.5 Min 4-Voice
COUR 210C Advanced Shorthand:
10-Min 4-Voice
COUR 225J Advanced Shorthand:
5-Min Jury Charge
COUR 225S Advanced Shorthand:
5-Min Literary
COUR 225T Advanced Shorthand:
5-Min 2-Voice
COUR 282 CSR/RPR Exam Preparation
4102
4104
4106
4108
4110
4116
115J
115S
115T
125F
125J
125S
125T
150F
Description
Beg Shorthand : Jury Charge
Beg Shorthand : Literary
Beg Shorthand: 2-Voice
Inter Shorthand: 4-Voice
Inter Shorthand: Jury Charge
Inter Shorthand: Literary
Inter Shorthand: 2-Voice
Inter Shorthand: 4-Voice
Day
MTWF
MTWF
MTWF
MTWF
MTWF
MTWF
MTWF
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
T
T
W
Time
10:10-10:48am
10:48-11:25am
10:10-10:48am
9:18-9:55am
8:40-9:18am
9:18-9:55am
8:40-9:18am
12:18-12:55pm
12:18-12:55pm
12:18-12:55pm
11:40-12:18pm
11:40-12:18pm
11:40-12:18pm
12:18-12:55pm
12:18-12:55pm
12:18-12:55pm
11:40-12:18pm
11:40-12:18pm
11:40-12:18pm
2:10-5pm
2:10-4pm
1:10-2pm
Th
Th
Th
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MW
T
F
MF
TW
MF
TW
MF
TW
MF
TW
MF
TW
MF
TW
T
9:10-10am
10:10-11am
8:10-9am
10:48:11:25am
10:48:11:25am
10:48:11:25am
10:10-10:48am
10:10-10:48am
10:10-10:48am
10:48:11:25am
10:48:11:25am
10:48:11:25am
10:10-10:48am
10:10-10:48am
10:10-10:48am
8:40-9:18am
8:40-9:18am
8:40-9:18am
9:18-9:55am
9:18-9:55am
9:18-9:55am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
9:10-11:30am
1:10-3pm
Dates
8/22-10/10
10/17-12/05
8/24-10/12
8/22-10/10
Instructor
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
Barr/Holub
E. Boero
C. Barr
L. Jimenez
E. Boero
C. Barr
L. Jimenez
E. Boero
C. Barr
L. Jimenez
E. Boero
C. Barr
L. Jimenez
R. Dowling
T. Holub
E. Boero
Room
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
211
211
211
211
211
211
211
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
200
211
123
T. Holub
T. Holub
T. Holub
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
E. Boero
L. Jimenez
C. Barr
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
L. Jimenez
K. Acredolo
C. Barr
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
123
123
120
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
215
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
214
215
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
13
Indian Valley Campus Classes
Sect
4117
4118
Sect
4119
4123
4124
4125
4126
4127
4128
4129
4130
4131
4132
4133
4134
4135
4136
4137
0479
Class
DANC
DANC
Class
DANC
ECE
ECE
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
0480
ENGL 120
0493
0494
0504
0505
0518
4138
0597
4140
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
FIRE
H ED
MACH
4142
MACH 121
Machine Technology II
4143
MACH 130
Welding I
4144
MACH 130
Welding I
4145
MACH 130
Welding I
4146
MACH 130
Welding I
4148
MACH 131
Welding II
4150
MACH 140
Machine Tool Processes
4151
4152
4154
MACH 145
MACH 165
MACH 230
CNC Machining/Mill
Blueprint Reading
Advanced Welding
4159
MACH 250
4160
0657
4161
0666
0682
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
Applications Machine
Technology
Elementary Algebra
Elementary Algebra
Intermediate Algebra
Intermediate Algebra
Probability & Statistics
14
•
123
224
225
101
208
71
72
73
74
77
78
79
95
96
97
98A
98B
98C
120
150
150
151
151
223
112
130
120
101
101
103
103
115
FALL 2006
Description
Jazz Dance II
Jazz Dance III
Description
Jazz Dance IV
Intro to Child Development
Cultural Diversity, ECE
Spelling I
Spelling II
Vocabulary I
Vocabulary II
Independent Reading
Special Interest Workshop
Grammar View
Advanced Spelling
Advanced Vocabulary
Critical Reading
Grammar & Usage
Sentences & Punctuation
Paragraph & Short Essay
Intro to College Reading and
Composition II
Intro to College Reading and
Composition II
Reading and Composition (1A)
Reading and Composition (1A)
Reading and Composition (1B)
Reading and Composition (1B)
English Literature II
Emergency Medical Tech I
Contemporary Health Issues
Machine Technology I
Day
Time
Th
6:10-9pm
Th
6:10-9pm
Day
Time
Th
6:10-9pm
T
6:40-9:30pm
T
6:40-9:30pm
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Main Listing for Time Chart
See Distance Learning Page
Dates
Instructor
A. Scofield
A. Scofield
Instructor
A. Scofield
M. Dodge
S. Edwards
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
L. Tjernell
I. Schreck
Room
MW
170
MW
170
Room
MW
170
OL
158
OL
104
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
PM
180
Web Based
See Distance Learning Page
I. Schreck
Web Based
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
MW
6:10-10pm
See Distance Learning Page
TTh
7:40-8:30pm
TTh
8:40-10pm
TTh
7:40-8:30pm
TTh
8:40-9:30pm
Th
8:10-9am
Th
9:10-12noon
T
8:10-9am
T
9:10-12noon
M
6:10-7pm
M
7:10-10pm
W
6:10-7pm
W
7:10-10pm
T
6:10-7pm
T
7:10-10pm
M
5:40-7:30pm
TWTh
5:40-7:30pm
W
7:40-10:30pm
M
7:40-9:30pm
T
6:10-7pm
T
7:10-10pm
TWTh
5:40-7:30pm
I. Schreck
I. Schreck
D. Rollison
D. Rollison
D. Rollison
D. Florence
K. Smyth
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
J. Owen
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
A. Lutz
J. Owen
J. Owen
A. Lutz
Web Based
Web Based
Web Based
Web Based
Web Based
PM
188
Web Based
PM
110
PM
160
PM
111
PM
160
PM
111
PM
167
PM
111
PM
167
PM
111
PM
167
PM
111
PM
167
PM
111
PM
167
PM
254
PM
160
PM
255
PM
254
PM
111
PM
167
PM
160
TTh
12:10-2:30pm
See Distance Learning Page
TTh
6:10-8:30pm
See Distance Learning Page
See Distance Learning Page
A. Wang
M. Allen
B. Blackburn
M. Allen
I. Lansing
PM
251
Web Based
PM
255
Web Based
Web Based
Dates
Indian Valley Campus Classes
Sect
4166
4167
4168
4169
4170
4171
Class
MEDA
MEDA
MEDA
MEDA
MEDA
MEDA
4172
4173
MEDA 135 Clinical Procedures I
MEDA 135L Clinical Procedure I Lab
4174
MEDA 135L Clinical Procedure I Lab
4175
MEDA 150
4180
4181
4182
4183
4184
MMST
MMST
MMST
MMST
MMST
110
111
112
123
124
4185
4186
4187
4188
MMST
MMST
MMST
MMST
131
143
150
154
4189
4193
0822
MMST 200
PE
70
PE
120
4196
4197
4198
4199
4203
4205
4206
4208
4210
4211
0799
4215
4219
4226
4228
4230
4231
4232
4233
4234
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PE
PHIL
REAL
SPAN
WE
WE
WE
WE
WE
WE
WE
110
110L
120
121
125
125L
156
156
156
156
156
156
156
156
187
193A
110
117
110
298A
298B
298C
298D
299A
299B
299C
Description
Admin Medical Office
Admin Medical Office Lab
Medical Terminology I
Medical Terminology II
Financial Procedures
Financial Procedures Lab
Pharmacology/Medical
Assistant
Intro to Multimedia
Multimedia Production
Multimedia Interface Design
Intro to Multimedia Design
3-D Modeling and Animation
Multimedia Web Authoring
Video Production
Digital Imaging Production
Software Application/Digital
Media Authoring
Portfolio Development
Adapted Aquatics
Intro to Sport and Exercise
Psychology
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Instructional Lap Swim
Water Polo
Swimming Theory I
Intro to Philosophy
Legal Aspects of Real Estate
Spanish Conversation I
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Occupational Work Experience
Day
M
T
M
W
T
T
W
W
Th
Th
F
F
W
Time
10:10-12noon
9:10-12noon
2:10-5pm
2:10-5pm
1:10-2pm
2:10-3pm
11:10-1pm
8:40-10:30am
9:10-11:30am
1:10-3pm
9:10-11:30am
1:10-3pm
5:40-7pm
Instructor
C. Lacy
C. Lacy
J. Miller
J. Miller
B. Muller
B. Muller
B. Muller
C. Lacy
C. Lacy
C. Lacy
C. Lacy
C. Lacy
J. Chang
Room
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
J. Gonzalez
J. Gonzalez
D. Wilson
D. Wilson
J. Abouaf
J. Abouaf
J. Gonzalez
K. Sutherland
D. Wilson
J. Gonzalez
PM
199
PM
192
PM
199
PM
192
PM
190
PM
199
Web Based
PM
192
PM
192
PM
192
W
4:10-7pm
TTh
1:40-2:30pm
See Distance Learning Page
J. Gonzalez
R. Robles
C. Goldman
PM
199
POOL
Web Based
Call 892-4545 for Days/Time
MW
12:10-1:30pm
TTh
12:10-1:30pm
MW
1:40-3pm
MTWTh
12:10-1:30pm
MW
6:10-7:30pm
TTh
6:10-7:30pm
MTWTh
6:10-7:30pm
MTWThF
3:10-5pm
TBA
TBA
See Distance Learning Page
W
6:40-9:30pm
W
6:10-9pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
T
4:40-6:30 pm
J. Haley
Staff
W. Lager
W. Lager
W. Lager
J. Haley
J. Haley
J. Haley
W. Lager
W. Lager
J. Marmysz
G. Oswald
M. Koorhan
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
L. Hlavachek
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
POOL
Web Based
OL
103
OL
153
PM
251
PM
251
PM
251
PM
251
PM
251
PM
251
PM
251
T
9:10-12noon
M
11:10-4pm
Th
7:10-10pm
TTh
4:40-7pm
F
10:10-3:30pm
F
10:10-3:30pm
See Distance Learning Page
MW
7:10-9:30pm
TTh
1:10-3:30pm
W
12:10-4pm
Dates
8/23-10/11
255
255
255
255
255
255
255
255
255
252
252
251
251
Please note: Some classes have additional hours to be arranged. See main listing.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
15
Late-Starting Classes Start Dates
All classes listed below begin after the first week of classes, and are of varying lengths. Please see course listings on pages 18–78
for complete information. The dates given are the start dates. See page 84-85 for Refund/Drop Dates for late starting classes.
ANTH 102
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
9/09
DANC 156
Production Workshop III
9/15
ASTR 101
Intro to Astronomy
9/09
DANC 160
Intro to Dance Performance Skills
9/15
AUTO 139E
S/T: Bureau of Automotive Repair Update
2005/2006
11/04
DANC 160
Intro to Dance Performance Skills
9/15
Bar 2007 Smog Check Technician Update
Training Course
9/15
10/19
DANC
241ABCD
Dance Company
AUTO 139F
DRAM 129
Voice for the Stage
10/23
BIOL 99
General Science
9/20
DRAM 245
Rehearsal & Performance
10/16
BOS 114
Beginning Word Processing
10/23
DRAM 254
Rehearsal and Performance
10/16
BOS 115
Intermediate Word Processing
10/23
BUS 112B
Financial Accounting IB
10/17
ECE 100
Licensing and Permits: Introduction to
Childcare Programs
9/16
BUS 112B
Financial Accounting IB
10/28
BUS 112B
Financial Accounting IB
10/17
ECE 134
Understanding Young Children's
Temperaments
8/30
BUS 112B
Financial Accounting IB
10/23
ECE 223
Music Activities for Young Children
9/30
BUS 114
Beginning Computer Accounting
10/17
ECE 224
10/07
BUS 114
Beginning Computer Accounting
10/18
Working with Parents in Early Childhood
Programs
BUS 127
Create a Business Plan
10/17
ENGG 150B
Programming in the MATHLAB for
Engineers
10/16
BUS 135
Managing Change and Innovation
10/23
ENGL 12
College Skills: Reading & Thinking in Math
9/05
10/21
ENGL 12
College Skills: Reading & Thinking in Math
10/24
ENGL 117
Speed Reading
9/09
ENGL 214
The Popular Novel
9/09
ENGL 218
The American Short Story
9/09
ELND 110B
Intro to Environmental Landscaping
10/16
ELND 154B
Plant Materials I
10/19
ELND 210B
Insect Identification and Control
9/21
ELND 210C
Integrated Pest Management of Plant
Diseases and Weeds
11/02
ESL 58B
Pronunciation II
10/16
GEOL 99
General Science
9/20
HIST 100
Survey of American History
9/09
HIST 103
Science, Technology and Civilization
9/09
COMM
108AE
Film: Pre-Code Films:Dangerous Men
COMM
108W
Film: Women Directors
COMM 145
Developing Ideas for Film Multimedia and
Video Projects
9/16
9/06
COMM 160
Images of Women and Minorities in
American Media
9/05
COMM 240
Advanced Production Projects
9/09
COMP 150B
Programming in the MATHLAB for
Engineers
10/16
CIS 101
Intro to Personal Computers/Operating
Systems
10/23
CIS 113
Presentations and Publications
10/17
CIS 117
Intro to Database Design/Programming
10/23
CIS 118
Intro to Spreadsheet Design
10/28
JOUN 160
Images of Women and Minorities in
American Media
9/05
CIS 126
Introduction to Windows
10/19
LIBR 110
Intro to Library Resources
10/30
CIS 127
Int. Database Design
10/17
MATH 90
Math Skills Open Lab
9/05
CIS 128
Int. Spreadsheet Design
10/19
MATH 90
Math Skills Open Lab
10/10
CIS 141
Intro to HTML Programming
10/18
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
9/09
CIS 150
Personal Computer Server and Workstation
Operating Systems
10/17
MUS 191
Music Production: Orchestra
10/08
Designing Security for a PC Server
Operating System
MUS 193
Music Production: Cast
10/08
CIS 155
10/19
MUS 193
Music Production: Cast
10/08
10/20
NE 90
Intro to Nursing Education
9/07
Nursing Role: Mental/Endocrine
10/16
CIS 162
Computer Operating Systems
CIS 241
Intro to XML Programming
10/23
NE 232
COUN 125
How to Study Effectively
8/29
NE 232L
Nursing Role: Mental/Endocrine Practicum
10/17
8/30
NE 234
Nursing Role: Neurological
10/16
Nursing Role: Neurological Practicum
10/17
COUN 125
How to Study Effectively
COUN 133B
Career Exploration
10/12
NE 234L
COUR 167
Ethics for Court Reporter
10/17
NE 236
Nursing Role: Oxygen F&E
10/16
DANC 108
Dance History: Art of Movement
9/09
NE 236L
Oxygenation F&E Practicum
10/17
9/15
POLS 101
United States Government
9/09
9/15
SPCH 128
Intercultural Communication
9/06
DANC 154
DANC 155
16
•
Production Workshop I
Production Workshop II
FALL 2006
Skills Certificates
Tax Credit
Less Than 18 Unit
Credit Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates may be part of a
“ladder” of skills, beginning with job
entry skills and leading to a full Career
Certificate Program or may constitute
a skill set that enables a student to upgrade or advance in an existing career
Skills Certificates are shorter in duration and narrower in scope than the
Career Certificate that provides full
preparation for employment in a career.
Contact the specific department for detailed ­information.
Automotive Technology
Automotive Service Advisor, 13 units
Brakes and Suspension, 13 units
Drive Trains, 15 units
Electrical/Performance, 17 units
Emissions, 12.5 units
Engine Repair, 11 units
Heating and Air Conditioning, 9.5 units
Business and Information Systems
Department Skills Certificates
Multimedia Animation, 9 units
Multimedia Audio Production, 9 units
Multimedia Production, 9 units
Multimedia Video Design, 9 units
Multimedia Visualization Design, 9 units
Multimedia Web Authoring, 9 units
Business/Business Office Systems
Administrative Assistant, 5 units
Management and Supervision, 9 units
Medical Transcriber, 8 units
Computer Information Systems
Desktop A+ Centered, 7.5 units
Microsoft Office Database
Specialist, 6.5 units
Microsoft Office Specialist, 6.0 units
Network Security, 7.5 units
Print Production, 5 units
Web Programming, 6 units
Real Estate
Real Estate Appraisal, 9 units
Real Estate Finance, 9 units
Real Estate Law, 9 units
Real Estate Property Management, 9 units
Career Education Department Skills
Certificates
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
Mechanical and Electrical Components, 17.5 units
Nonstructural Damage Repair, 16 units
Painting and Refinishing, 15 units
Structural Damage Repair, 17 units
Environmental Landscaping
Design, 15 units
Fine and Visual Arts Department
Skills Certificates
Health Sciences Department
Skills Certificates
Early Childhood Education Core, 12 units
IV Insertion: Demonstrated competency
and completion of NE 204
Medical Terminology, 6 units
Medisoft, 5.5 units
Phlebotomy, 4 units
Eligibility
In accordance with federal tax credit
legislation, College of Marin will mail
a verification 1098T form at the end of
January to each student registered at
least half-time on census day and who
has paid their registration fees.
Please check with your tax preparer
to determine if you are eligible to take
advantage of this credit.
Current Address
If you are entitled to this deduction it
is important that the College have your
current address. If you have moved,
you need to complete a green change
form with the Office of Admissions and
Records.
Social Security Numbers
The social security numbers of students
who have chosen an assigned identification number will not be printed on the
1098T.
If you wish to change from an assigned identification number to your
social security number you may also
do this by completing the green change
form with the Office of Admissions and
Records.
Physical Education Department
Skills Certificates
Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Cert., 17.5 units
Social Science Department
Skills Certificates
Education, 9 units
Cooperative Agencies
Resources for Education
CARE
Are you a single head of
household with a
child under 14?
Are you TANF/Calworks?
Do you need help with your
education costs?
Call EOPS at
415.485.9605 or
Come to LC 160 on the
Kentfield Campus
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
17
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
ANTHROPOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
Course Listings
AMERICAN SIGN
LANGUAGE
ADMINISTRATION OF
JUSTICE
ASL 1015.0 units
Elementary American Sign Language I
An introductory course that emphasizes
visual readiness skills for recognition
and expression of appropriate facial expression and body movements, response
to commands, communicative functions,
vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the deaf community.
AJ 110
3.0 units
Intro to the Administration of Justice
The history and philosophy of administration of justice in America.
0001 Boyd S
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DL12
AJ 111
3.0 units
Criminal Law
Historical development, philosophy of
law, and definitions of the elements of
crimes.
0002Berberian E
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/OH108
AJ 220
3.0 units
Vice, Narcotics, and Organized Crime
A study of organized crime, white collar
crime, drugs, and vice operations from a
sociological perspective.
0003Kosta W
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/PE23
Taught concurrently with SOC 220.
Students may register for AJ 220
or SOC 220. Credit is given for
only one course.
Struggling?
Frustrated?
Need Help?
0133Sirianni P
TTh 4:10-6pm, KTD/HC129
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0134Leighton J
MW 4:10-6pm, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0135Leighton J
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC127
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
ASL 1025.0 units
Elementary American Sign
Language II
Prerequisite: ASL 101
ASL 101 continuation. Everyday communication in ASL; exchanging information,
identifying others, making requests, giving reasons, options, simple directions,
and asking for clarification. Discussions
revolve around classes, the campus,
home, work and transportation, physical
descriptions of people and objects, general conversation skills, and visual perception and specific specialization skills,
and the continuation of the cultural
study of the deaf community.
0136Sirianni P
TTh 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC126
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
FREE TUTORING
All COM students welcome
Sign up in the Tutoring Center
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9620
18
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ANTH 101
3.0 units
Intro to Physical/Biological
Anthropology
The study of human evolution, variation,
nonhuman primates, genetics, advances
in the genome study, fossil record, scientific inquiry, archeological methodology,
and the fallacy of race. Students will
learn about primates including behavior and anatomy, plus how to interpret
selected features of the skeletal system.
The nature of scientific discoveries and
the changing nature of the field will expose students to new information as well
as what has been learned from prior research. The department has an extensive collection of fossil casts that will
enable students to view materials that
few community colleges can offer. This
course fulfills continuing education requirements for registered nurses.
0004Valkenier L
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH102
0005Kassebaum P
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH102
0006Kassebaum P
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/DH102
0007Kassebaum P
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH102
ANTH 101L
1.0 unit
Physical/Biological Anthropology Lab
Prerequisite: ANTH 101/CNCUR ENROL
A hands-on study with laboratory exercises in the fields of genetics, nonhuman
primates, human skeletons, forensics,
scientific method, research design, fossils related to human evolution, primate
skeletons, and behavior. This course
is designed to give students an idea of
some of the activities, skills, and techniques that are employed by physical
and biological anthropologists. Field
trips may be arranged. This course is
supplemental to Anthropology 101.
0008Goerke E
B F 9:40-12:30pm, KTD/DH102
0009Valkenier L
J M 12:40-3:30pm, KTD/DH102
ANTH 102
3.0 units
Intro to Cultural Anthropology
A survey of human behavior using a
cross-cultural perspective looking at belief systems, customs, socialization, and
related topics with an emphasis upon
non-Western societies both contemporary and traditional.
0010 9/09-12/16 Kassebaum P
Television Course, 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
0011 Kassebaum P
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH102
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ARCHITECTURE
ANTH 204
3.0 units
Native American Cultures
This course will explore the culture
and history of Native peoples of the
hemisphere using information gathered through archeology, history, ethnographic research, and contemporary
sources including tribal and indigenous
groups, nongovernment organizations,
and the literature of social anthropology
and area studies.
0012 Spires W
C MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/FH110
ANTH 208
3.0 units
Magic, Folklore and Healing
A survey course which will examine belief systems and practices in society covering magic, witchcraft, shamanistic traditions, healers, and folkloric traditions.
A cross-cultural approach will be used
with an anthropological perspective.
0013Spires W
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH102
ARCHITECTURE
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ARCH 100
3.0 units
History of Architecture I
This class traces the development of
architecture and cities throughout the
world from the earliest permanent settlements at the end of the Ice Age to the
1100’s C.E. Emphasis is on the evolution
of architectural ideas and the connection
between architecture and culture. ($2
material fee)
0017 Clements G
Web Based Course, 3 hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
The class is taught entirely via the
Internet, no on-campus attendance is
required. Students must have access to a
computer with a connection to the internet, and an e-mail address. Illustrated
lectures will be posted regularly.
Communication will be via the class web
site and will include class e-mail and
online discussion groups, which students
can participate in on their own schedule. Tests will be taken online and will be
available any time over a period of several days. Students will be expected to participate in discussion groups and chats
and to create a term paper for posting to
the class web site. Some familiarity
with the Internet will be useful, however
instructions for accessing the class web
site and using its features will be provided. ADMISSION TO THE CLASS: Once
students have officially enrolled in this
section, or been placed on the waiting list,
they must send an e-mail message to the
instructor at: gene.clements@marin.cc.ca.
us by 8/21/06 to verify their enrollment
in the class. Instructions for accessing
the class will be e-mailed to students who
have verified their enrollment on or before the first day of the semester. In order
to be admitted to the class, students must
log on to the class web site, or send an
e-mail message to the instructor if they
have a problem logging on, by the third
day of semester.
ARCH 1104.0 units
Beginning Architectural Design
This design course explores fundamental principles and issues of architectural
design through the use of abstract design projects. Students interested in architecture, interior design, landscape
design, engineering, building construction, gallery or theatre design, sculpture
and other fine arts create their own design solutions, moving from beginning
sketches, through development, to final
models. Students learn to develop architectural “vocabulary” and thinking in a
group studio environment, and address
formal, symbolic and contextual concepts of architecture.
0018 Goldberg G
K TTh 8:10-11am, KTD/FA151
ARCH 1114.0 units
Intermediate Architectural Design
Prerequisite: ARCH 110 AND 120
This design course explores local urban
and rural architectural design projects
through the use of lectures, design projects, site visits, individual and group
critiques, model building and drawings. Human needs, social factors, public/private issues, contexture, historic
precedent, and aesthetic perception
will be emphasized. Students will learn
about design methodology, site and program analysis and presentation techniques. Students further address formal, symbolic and contextual issues of
­architecture.
0019 Goldberg G
K TTh 8:10-11am, KTD/FA151
ARCH 1204.0 units
Beginning Architectural Drafting
This course will introduce students
interested in interior design, architecture, engineering, building construction,
landscape architecture and other design related fields to the fundamentals
of architectural and freehand drawing.
Students will learn hard-line drafting
skills and architectural conventions.
They will learn the appropriate applications for the following architectural
drawings: plan, section, elevation, paraline, and perspective. Emphasis will be
placed on the importance of drawings in
the communication between designers,
clients and builders, and on the relationship between three-dimensional form
and its two-dimensional representation
on paper. ($10 material fee)
0020 Gorrell M
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA151
ARCH 1214.0 units
Intermediate Architectural Drafting
Prerequisite: ARCH 120
A continuation of Architecture 120, involving working drawings for a small
wood frame building. Emphasis is on the
development, organization and execution of contract development. Portfolio of
blueprints is required at the end of semester. ($10 material fee)
0021 Gorrell M
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA151
ARCH 1404.0 units
2-D Computer Graphics for
Architecture
Prerequisite: ARCH 120 ADVISED
Students will learn the basic skills
needed to produce 2-D presentation and
construction drawings for architecture
and similar disciplines using the computer. The class will be taught using
Vectorworks software. The basic concepts and skills apply generally to all
CAD applications.
0022 Clements G, Gorrell M
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA225
ARCH 2204.0 units
Advanced Architectural Drafting
Prerequisite: ARCH 120 AND 121
Course includes study of wood frame
structures and development of working
drawings. Semester devoted to producing working drawings for a small wood
frame building designed by the student.
Portfolio of working drawings required
at semester end. ($10 material fee)
0023 Gorrell M
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA151
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
19
ART
ART
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
ART 102
3.0 units
History of European Art
This course surveys the visual creations
of a variety of European cultures from
1100 to the mid-nineteenth century.
Emphasis will be placed on enhancing
the student’s ability to observe and describe visual works, and to understand
them in their social and historical context. ($2 material fee)
0025 Loft D
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/FA120
0026 Loft D
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FA120
ART 103
3.0 units
History of Modern Art
This course is a survey of art and visual
culture from the mid-nineteenth century
to the present. (For focus on recent art,
see ART 105.) Emphasis will be placed
on enhancing the student’s ability to observe and describe visual works, and to
understand them in their social and historical context. ($2 material fee)
0027 Loft D
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FA120
0028 Loft D
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/FA120
ART 104
3.0 units
History of Asian Art
This course is a comparative study of art
and visual culture in the Far East, including India, China, Japan, Korea, and
Southeast Asia. Visual expression will
be considered in relation to its social
and religious contexts. ($2 material fee)
0029Phillips K
MW 6:40-8pm, KTD/FA120
ART 105
3.0 units
Contemporary Art
This course covers art since 1945, focusing on art of the last thirty years.
Emphasis is on new concepts and techniques by a diverse selection of artists.
The visual and social issues raised by
contemporary art will be considered.
There will be several field trips to art
galleries or other points of interest. ($2
material fee)
0030Loft D
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/FA120
20
•
ART 1124.0 units
2-D Art Fundamentals
An introductory level studio course that
encourages students to express themselves by using and understanding the
elements of 2-D art: line, shape, texture, value, color, perspective and space.
Principles of composition such as balance, repetition, variation and proportion will be explored using a wide variety of media that may include ink, pencil,
charcoal, painting, collage, printmaking,
papier-mâché, and found material mixed
media. This course is required for art
majors and highly recommended for all
art students. ($10 material fee)
0031 Aten D
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA153
0032 Wagner K
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA153
0033 Unterseher C
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA153
ART 1134.0 units
3-D Art Fundamentals
An introductory level studio course that
encourages students to express themselves by using and understanding the
elements of 3-D art: line, plane, volume, mass, surface treatment, light and
shadow. Principles of composition such
as balance, repetition, variation and
proportion will be explored using a wide
variety of materials that may include
wire, cardboard, plaster, clay, papiermâché, and mixed media. This course is
required for art majors and highly recommended for all art students. ($10 material fee)
0034 Wagner K
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA153
INTERIOR DESIGN I, II, III
(ART 114, 115, 214)
ART 114 introduction to interior design,
theory and practice; contemporary architecture and furniture design, color theory and application, construction methods,
materials and terminology, introduction
to drafting practices. Discussion/lecture,
slides, design materials and projects,
field trips, and guest lecturers. ART 115,
period design in the Western world from
antiquity through the Victorian era.
Discussion/lecture, slides, visual projects, and field trips. ART 214 is a seminar class format in residential design
for advanced students. Creative projects
include space planning, drafting, architectural lettering, color, furnishings/
equipment selection, budget specifications, and presentation. Fall only. ($10
material fee)
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ART 1144.0 units
Interior Design I
0035 Ruder B, Aten D
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA151
ART 1154.0 units
Interior Design II
0037 Ruder B, Aten D
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA151
ART 2144.0 units
Interior Design III
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
0089Ruder B, Aten D
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA151
DO YOU WANT TO
RECEIVE AN A.S. DEGREE
IN INTERIOR DESIGN?
DO YOU
WANT TO
STUDY
INTERIOR
DESIGN?
Register for
ART 114, ART 115, ART 214.
Instructors: Bonnie Ruder, Duane Aten
JEWELRY DESIGN I, II, III, IV
(ART 116, 117, 216, 217)
ART 116 involves the design and creation of jewelry utilizing basic construction and casting techniques. ART 117,
advanced design and creation of jewelry
with emphasis on developing technical,
functional, conceptual, and aesthetic aspects of metal object designing. ART 216,
advanced design and creation of jewelry,
exploring advanced forming techniques
as well as further developing conceptual
and aesthetic ideas into metalwork. ART
217, advanced proficiency with various
types of construction skills and stone
setting skills. Concentration on individual projects that illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic understanding. ($20
material fee)
ART 1164.0 units
Jewelry Design I
0038 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA15
0039 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA15
ART 1174.0 units
Jewelry Design II
Prerequisite: ART 116
0040Chaille M, Widenhofer A
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA15
0041 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA15
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ART
ART 2164.0 units
Jewelry Design III
Prerequisite: ART 117
0091 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA15
0092 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA15
ART 2174.0 units
Jewelry Design IV
Prerequisite: ART 216
0093 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA15
0094 Chaille M, Widenhofer A
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA15
ART GALLERY DESIGN AND
MANAGEMENT I, II
(ART 118, 119)
ART 118, introductory class, selection
of art works, publicity, design and installation of exhibits at COM Kentfield
Campus Fine Arts Gallery, field trips
to galleries, museums, and art studios
in the Bay Area. ART 119, advanced
continuation of ART 118. This class will
design exhibits, handle publicity, construct props, and install exhibits. Meets
6 hours plus a 1-hour lunch break.
ART 1184.0 units
Gallery Design and Management I
0042 Antonaccio A
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/FA120
and F 1:10-4pm, KTD/Gallery
ART 1194.0 units
Gallery Design and Management II
Prerequisite: ART 118
0043Antonaccio A
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/FA120
and F 1:10-4pm, KTD/Gallery
ART 1294.0 units
Materials and Techniques
Prerequisite: ART 140
Designed to enrich the painter’s means
of expression by expanding the potential
use of both materials and techniques;
includes work with collage, acrylic, oil,
mixed media, etc. ($15 material fee)
4004 Arnold C
C F 10:10-1pm, IVC/MW120
and F 2:10-5pm, IVC/MW122
ART 1304.0 units
Drawing and Composition I
The development of drawing skills, perspective, form and composition, exploration of graphic materials; both traditional and experimental means of expression
will be examined. Required of all art
majors. A nonobligatory donation of $20
will be requested at the first meeting to
help pay model fees. ($10 material fee)
0044Scott J, Unterseher C
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA201
0045 Abright W
K TTh 8:10-11am, KTD/FA201
0046Lefkowitz C, Goldberg G
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
ART 1314.0 units
Drawing and Composition II
Prerequisite: ART 130
The development of drawing skills, perspective, form and composition, exploration of graphic materials; both traditional and experimental means of expression
will be examined. A nonobligatory donation of $20 will be requested at the first
meeting to help pay model fees. ($10 material fee)
0047 Scott J, Unterseher C
M MW 8:10-11am, KTD/FA201
0048Lefkowitz C, Goldberg G
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
LIFE DRAWING I, II, III, IV
(ART 134, 135, 234, 235)
ART 134-135, study of the anatomy,
proportion and structure of the human
figure in various drawing media and
techniques. ART 234-235, drawing from
undraped models stressing expressive
qualities of figure, drawing accurately,
sensitively; various media. ($10 material fee)
ART 1344.0 units
Life Drawing I
Prerequisite: ART 130
0049 Bykle T, Goldberg G
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
0050Wagner K
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA201
ART 1354.0 units
Life Drawing II
Prerequisite: ART 134
0051 Bykle T, Goldberg G
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
0052Wagner K
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA201
ART 2344.0 units
Life Drawing III
Prerequisite: ART 135
0095 Bykle T, Goldberg G
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
0096Wagner K
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA201
ART 2354.0 units
Life Drawing IV
Prerequisite: ART 234
0097 Bykle T, Goldberg G
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA201
0098Wagner K
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA201
ART 138
1.0 unit
Advanced Critique
A monthly critique/seminar designed
for intermediate to advanced students
of painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, jewelry, and mixed media to have their
work reviewed and participate in the
review from a variety of perspectives.
“Advanced” means that the student has
taken a number of courses in art or is
a working artist not enrolled here who
wants feedback on his/her work.
00538/23-12/06 Wagner K
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA153
Class meets W 8/23; 9/6, 27; 10/18;
11/15; 12/6.
ART 139BC4.0 units
Selected Topic: Textile Surface Design:
Cross Cultural Techniques
This course will explore the surface
design process of dyeing, painting and
printing on cotton, linen, silk and wool
as found around the world. ($20 material fee)
0054Hampton K
R F 9:10-4pm, KTD/FA201
PAINTING I, II, III, IV
(ART 140, 141, 240, 241)
ART 140, introductory course in which
painting materials and techniques will
be explored; both objective and subjective means of expression will be examined in oil, acrylic, and mixed media.
ART 141, 240-241, emphasis on developing individual concepts, personal style
and means of expression in various techniques and media. ($15 material fee)
ART 1404.0 units
Painting I
Prerequisite: ART 112 OR 130
0055 Scott J
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA226
Meets 6 hours plus a 1-hour lunch
break.
0056Arnold C
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
0057Arnold C
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA226
ART 1414.0 units
Painting II
Prerequisite: ART 140
0058 Scott J
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA226
Meets 6 hours plus a 1-hour lunch
break.
0059 Arnold C
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
0060Arnold C
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA226
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
21
ART
ART 2404.0 units
Painting III
Prerequisite: ART 141
0099Scott J
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA226
Meets 6 hours plus a 1-hour lunch
break.
0100 Arnold C
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
0101Arnold C
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA226
ART 2414.0 units
Painting IV
Prerequisite: ART 240
0102 Scott J
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA226
Meets 6 hours plus a 1-hour lunch
break.
0103 Arnold C
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
0104Arnold C
TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA226
WATERCOLOR I, II, III, IV
(ART 144, 145, 244, 245)
ART 144-145, exploring watercolor techniques and materials; emphasis on developing concepts, drawing and composition and various means of handling color.
ART 244-245, advanced experimentation, extension of palette and techniques,
on a larger scale and with a greater variety. A nonobligatory donation of $20 will
be requested at the first meeting to help
pay model fees. ($10 material fee)
ART 1444.0 units
Watercolor I
0061 Lefkowitz C
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA201
ART 1454.0 units
Watercolor II
Prerequisite: ART 144
0062 Lefkowitz C
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA201
ART 2444.0 units
Watercolor III
Prerequisite: ART 145
LIFE PAINTING I, II, III, IV
(ART 146, 147, 246, 247)
ART 146-147, individualized instruction in portraiture or the full figure;
subject selection and arrangement,
color application, concept development,
composition and style will be examined. ART 246-247, offers advanced instruction in painting the human figure.
Experimentation in new techniques is
encouraged. ($15 material fee)
ART 1464.0 units
Life Painting I
Prerequisite: ART 140 & (112 OR 130)
0063Wilson B
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
ART 1474.0 units
Life Painting II
Prerequisite: ART 146
0064Wilson B
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
ART 2464.0 units
Life Painting III
Prerequisite: ART 147
0107 Wilson B
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
ART 2474.0 units
Life Painting IV
Prerequisite: ART 246
0108 Wilson B
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA226
PRINTMAKING I, II, III, IV
(ART 152, 153, 252, 253)
ART 152-153, introductory course in basic concepts and techniques. Instruction
and studio work includes intaglio (etching, dry point, and engraving), relief
(linocut and woodcut), collagraph and
monotype methods. ART 252-253, an
in-depth continuation of ART 152-153
exploring lithography, environmentally
friendly photo etching, digital imaging,
advanced monotype/monoprinting techniques and other experimental processes.
Emphasis is on personal expression and
professional presentation of work. ($15
material fee)
0105 Lefkowitz C
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA201
ART 1524.0 units
Printmaking I
ART 2454.0 units
Watercolor IV
Prerequisite: ART 130
Prerequisite: ART 244
0065 Bykle T
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA202
0106 Lefkowitz C
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA201
ART 1534.0 units
Printmaking II
Prerequisite: ART 152
0066Bykle T
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA202
ART 2524.0 units
Printmaking III
Prerequisite: ART 153
0115 Bykle T
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA202
ART 2534.0 units
Printmaking IV
Prerequisite: ART 252
0116 Bykle T
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA202
FIBER SCULPTURE I, II, III, IV
(ART 165, 166, 265, 266)
ART 165, construction processes involved with interworking of flexible elements by such techniques as layering,
bonding, plaiting, stitching, and weaving, in a scale that may range from personal object to installation. ART 166,
open to all art disciplines including
textiles, who seek to integrate construction with sculpture, painting, and crafts,
etc. An exploration of flexible, fragile, or
fibrous materials such as cloth, paper,
plastic, reed, wire, and threads. ART
265, experimental media in the textile
construction field encourage ideas not
bound by a vast history and lend themselves to fresh and spontaneous ways
of working with surface and structure.
Application of skills and personal direction to advanced level work. Emphasis
on developing individual concepts and
expression. ART 266, emphasis will
be placed on the design process, and
development of a personal strategy for
problem solving. Problems pertaining
to perception, use of the imagination
and expanding imagery will be given in
areas of construction technique as well
as dyeing and surface treatment. These
are all-day, 6-hour classes plus a 1-hour
lunch break. ($15 material fee)
ART 1654.0 units
Fiber Sculpture I
0067 Beadle C
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA153
ART 1664.0 units
Fiber Sculpture II
Prerequisite: ART 165 ADVISED
0068Beadle C
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA153
ART 2654.0 units
Fiber Sculpture III
Prerequisite: ART 166 ADVISED
0117 Beadle C
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA153
ART 2664.0 units
Fiber Sculpture IV
Prerequisite: ART 265 ADVISED
0118 Beadle C
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA153
22
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ART
CERAMICS I, II, III, IV
(ART 170, 171, 270, 271)
ART 170, introductory course involving
the student in technical, functional, and
aesthetic aspects of clay object designing. Basic wheel throwing, hand building, and glazing. ART 171, a second semester beginning ceramics course for
those who wish to continue developing
the basic techniques of wheel throwing
and slab building methods with an emphasis on increasingly advanced projects.
Direct participation in glaze preparation and kiln firing. It is expected that
students will produce work reflecting an
intermediate understanding of ceramic
design and explore individual project
resolutions through drawings and group
discussion. ART 270-271, advanced and
in-depth interpretation of the common
class project with greater expectations
of further technical and conceptual
development. Mentoring of beginning
students, lab assistance in glaze preparation, kiln loading and firing. ($35 material fee)
ART 170
4.0 units
Ceramics I
0069 Abright W
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
0070 Wood L
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
0071 Widenhofer A
MW 6:10-9pm, KTD/FA10
ART 171
Ceramics II
4.0 units
Prerequisite: ART 170: 112 ADVISED
0072
L
0073
H
0074
Abright W
TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Wood L
MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Widenhofer A
MW 6:10-9pm, KTD/FA10
ART 270
Ceramics III
4.0 units
Abright W
TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Wood L
MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Widenhofer A
MW 6:10-9pm, KTD/FA10
ART 271
Ceramics IV
Prerequisite: ART 270
0122
L
0123
H
0124
Abright W
TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Wood L
MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA10
Widenhofer A
MW 6:10-9pm, KTD/FA10
ART 278F
4.0 units
Large Scale Ceramics: Figurative
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course is intended for the intermediate and advanced ceramic student
who is already well grounded in basic
clay working skills and glazing methods.
This is an opportunity to enlarge the
scale of individual work as well as participate in the design, creation and installation of public art. Emphasis on the
freestanding figure as primary subject
matter. ($35 material fee)
0125 Abright W
R F 9:10-12noon/1:10-4pm,
KTD/FA10
This is an all-day, 6-hour class plus
a 1-hour lunch break.
SCULPTURE
ART 180-281
Explore the
formal and expressive
possibilities of sculpture
in a variety of media,
including steel.
Instructor: Marianna Goodheart
Prerequisite: ART 171
0119
L
0120
H
0121
SPECIALIZED CERAMICS COURSE
(ART 278F)
Art 278F is a specialized ceramics
course that provides advanced study in a
particular area of concentration or focus
in ceramics.
4.0 units
SCULPTURE I, II, III, IV
(ART 180, 181, 280, 281)
ART 180-181, in an intensively equipped
facility, participants are invited to explore various materials and processes
that may include clay, plaster, stone,
wood, wax, and metal. Emphasis on development of the individual as an artist.
Group discussions, historical surveys,
and visiting artists. ART 280-281, further investigation directed toward finding personal images within the formal
class structure. ($40 material fee)
ART 180
4.0 units
Sculpture I
0075 Hall R
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA51
0076 Goodheart M
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
0077 Hall R
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
ART 181
4.0 units
Sculpture II
0078 Hall R
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA51
0079 Goodheart M
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
0080 Hall R
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
ART 280
4.0 units
Sculpture III
0126 Hall R
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA51
0127 Goodheart M
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
0128 Hall R
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
ART 281
4.0 units
Sculpture IV
0129 Hall R
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA51
0130 Goodheart M
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
0131 Hall R
L TTh 2:10-5pm, KTD/FA51
BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY I,
II, III, IV (ART 190, 191, 192, 290)
A basic 35mm adjustable camera and
lens is required for all levels. ART 190,
an introduction to black and white photography, including camera basics, and
darkroom use. This course includes film
and print development, awareness of
light and composition, and a brief overview of major photographers. ART 191,
designed to help photography students
gain control over technique as well as
improve aesthetics. Explore new methods of film exposure and printing techniques. We will look at a number of different photographers’ works as well as
discuss their philosophies. Bring your
previous course work. Art 192, develop
visual skills, refine your techniques. A
personal exploration of photographic
concepts and goals. Begin or complete a
body of work during the semester. Bring
your 2nd semester portfolio to the first
class meeting. Medium format (120mm)
is encouraged but you supply the camera.
ART 290, projects in creative photography with emphasis on photographic philosophy and trends in contemporary photography. Bring your portfolio to class.
($20 material fee)
ART 190
4.0 units
Black and White Photography I
0081 Weston J
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FH16/FH111
0082 Steinmetz P
D TTh 11:10-2pm, KTD/FH16/FH111
ART 191
4.0 units
Black and White Photography II
Prerequisite: ART 190
0083 Steinmetz P
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FH16/FH111
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
COLLEGE OF MARIN
•
23
ART
ART 1924.0 units
Black and White Photography III
0085Steinmetz P
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FH16/FH111
0142 Chavez R
J MW 12:40-1:30pm, KTD/SC101
and W 1:40-2:30pm, KTD/SC120
0143Staff
T 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC101
ACRT 178
2.0 units
Intro to Welding for Automotive Body
Repair
A basic course in welding as it applies to
auto body repair.
ART 2904.0 units
Black and White Photography IV
ASTR 117L
Intro to Astronomy Lab
4014 Owen J
Th 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM111
and Th 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM167
Prerequisite: ART 191
Prerequisite: ART 192
0132 Steinmetz P
H MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/FH16/FH111
ART 1934.0 units
Beginning Digital Imaging for the
Photographer
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
The exploration of digital imaging techniques as applied to the art of photography. Emphasis is placed on the creative
process while exploring electronic image
making as an effective mode of communication used by photographers, artists,
and designers today. ($10 material fee)
0087 Steinmetz P
F MW 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA225
For a similar course please see
MMST 150.
LEARN
ADOBE
PHOTOSHOP
CS2
ART 193
Improve your photographs
Instructor: Polly Steinmetz
ASTRONOMY
ASTR 101
3.0 units
Intro to Astronomy
This course is a nonmathematical description of the universe designed especially for the nonscience student. Topics
include the sky and its apparent motion,
the law of gravity, the nature of light,
the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and cosmology, and life in
the universe.
0138 9/09-12/16 Chavez R
Television Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
0140 Grist G
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/SC101
0141 Chavez R
J MW 12:40-1:30pm, KTD/SC101
and M 1:40-2:30pm, KTD/SC120
24
•
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course is an introduction to some of
the techniques astronomers use to observe and investigate the universe, including experimentation, data gathering
and interpretation, telescopes and astrophotography.
0145Staff
W 5:10-8pm, KTD/SC120
0146Pevyhouse A
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC120
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION
REPAIR TECHNOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
ACRT 167
2.0 units
Joining and Fastening Processes I
Study of body sheet metal and structural strength; body design and sheet metal
working characteristics. This course will
be primarily concerned with the various methods and techniques of fastening
and joining of metals and various metal
parts as they relate to the vehicle body
and frame.
4011 Brady S
M 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM152
and M 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM140
ACRT 171
2.0 units
Dent and Damage Repair
This course is designed for the beginning student in auto body repair.
Manipulative skills in welding, metal
bumping, metal finishing and plastic
filling. Analysis of minor body and fender damages, involving sequence and procedure essential in proper metal damage
repair.
4012 Behr T
T 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM152
and T 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM140
ACRT 177
2.0 units
Maintenance and Detailing
This course covers complete body care
and maintenance including buffing, rubbing, polishing. Provides the student
with sufficient skills and knowledge to
deliver a professional quality job of detailing a car.
4013 Behr T
Th 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM152
and Th 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM140
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ACRT 180
2.0 units
Panel Replacement
Vehicle design, construction and theory
with emphasis on safety and decision
making between repair, complete replacement and splicing of panels or sections installed at factory.
4015 Brady S
W 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM152
and W 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM140
ACRT 2734.0 units
Painting and Refinishing
Introduction to automobile spray painting. Study of materials, supplies and
equipment. Experience in feather edging and application of base coats; spray
techniques in spot blending and panel
refinishing.
4020 Palmer R
D Th 11:40-1:30pm, IVC/PM152
and Th 1:40-5pm, IVC/PM140
and Sat 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM140
Class meets every Thursday plus
five Saturdays: 9/9, 23; 10/7, 21;
11/4.
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
AUTO 1135.0 units
Specialized Electronics Training
To introduce principles, terminology,
and measurement of electrical circuits
and electronic systems used on current
automotive vehicles.
4022Palmer R
MW 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM255
and MW 7:10-9:30pm, IVC/PM214
AUTO 1144.0 units
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
An intensive study of modern fuel systems. Current diagnostic tools will be
used.
4023 8/22-12/05 Hritz G
TTh 1:10-2pm, IVC/PM254
and TTh 2:10-5pm, IVC/PM127
and Sat 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM127
Meets TTh and one Sat, 12/2 from
8:10-5pm. Final Exam 12/5.
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
BIOLOGY
AUTO 118
6.0 units
Brakes, Alignment, and Suspension
Become proficient in operating aligners,
balancers. Repair and service drum and
disc brakes and anti-lock brake systems.
Diagnosing and troubleshooting these
systems.
4025 Palmer R, Hritz G
B MWF 1:10-2pm, IVC/PM254
and MWF 2:10-5pm, IVC/PM127
AUTO 139E
1.0 unit
Selected Topic: Bureau of Automotive
Repair Update 2005-2006 Training
Course
Bureau of Automotive Repair “2005
Update Training Course” must be completed by all licensed smog check technicians whose license expires after
January 1, 2005 prior to renewing their
license.
4026 One Sat/Sun 11/4, 5
Willits R
Sat/Sun 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM254
AUTO 139F
0.5 unit
Selected Topic: Bar 2007 Smog Check
Technician Update Training Course
All licensed Smog Check technicians,
whose licenses expire after December 31,
2006, must complete the 2007 Update
Training Course prior to applying to
renew their licenses. Individuals applying for initial licenses (received by BAR)
after December 31, 2006 must have completed this course to be eligible for the
licensing examination.
402710/19-10/21 Hritz G
Th 6:10-10pm, IVC/PM254
and Sat 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM254
One Th and one Sat, 10/19 and
10/21
AUTO 2284.0 units
Automotive Computer Controls
An intensive study of automotive computer control systems. The course covers
scan tools, digital multimeters, and digital storage oscilloscopes.
4028 8/21-12/04 Hritz G
MW 8:10-9am, IVC/PM254
and MW 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM127
and Sat 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM127
Meets MW and one Sat, 10/28
from 8:10-5pm. Final exam on 12/4.
AUTO 2294.0 units
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting,
and Diagnosis
This course covers the diagnostic thought
process used to test and repair automotive electric and electronic systems.
sues from psychological, social, cultural, and biological perspectives. Fulfills
continuing education requirements for
nurses. Maximum credit allowed for
Behavioral Science 103 and Biology
108A is one course.
4029 8/24-12/07 Hritz G
ThF 8:10-9am, IVC/PM254
and ThF 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM127
and Sat 8:10-5pm, IVC/PM127
Meets ThF and one Sat, 11/18 from
8:10-5pm. Final exam on 12/7.
0147 Coad V
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH113
0148 Coad V
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/FH120
0149 Finley C
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH30
0150Finley C
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH113
AUTO 235
2.5 units
Automotive Air Conditioning
An intensive study of automotive heating, cooling, and air conditioning systems. Earning Refrigerant Recovery and
Recycling certification is a part of this
course.
4030Willits R
M 6:10-9:30pm, IVC/PM251
BEHS 252
3.0 units
Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
Students actively participate at a community organization and are supervised
by employees of the social agency, school,
or youth group. May also be taken as
PSY 252. Students receive credit for only
one course.
AUTO 283
2.0 units
Engine Performance, Diagnosis and
Repair - A8 Alternative
This course is designed to satisfy the
professional certification prerequisites
when applying to take a Smog Check
Technician Licensing Exam. This course
is also useful for students wishing to
gain knowledge and experience in repairing engine performance malfunctions.
0154 Martin D
G T 12:40-2pm, KTD/FH110
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA
0155Russell M
W 4:40-6pm, KTD/DH113
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA
4034Willits R
W 6:10-8pm, IVC/PM254
and W 8:10-9pm, IVC/PM127
BIOL 99
3.0 units
General Science
Many students feel unprepared to take
college level science courses. This is an
introductory course designed for students who have not taken or were previously unsuccessful in other science
courses, and for students who have been
away from school for an extended period
of time. The class covers basic scientific
principles and concepts of the physical
and life sciences and prepares students
to move into other science classes with
the information, understanding, and
skills required to succeed. Introductory
topics in biology, chemistry, geography,
geology, meteorology, and physics are
discussed. This course also provides an
excellent overview of the most important
topics in science today for anyone interested in learning more about the natural
world.
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
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BEHS 103
3.0 units
Human Sexuality
This course will cover topics in human
sexuality such as sexual functions, behavioral attitudes, development, health
problems, and contemporary sexual is-
BIOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
01579/20-12/13 Bero D
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC166
and 1hr/wk TBA
Late start. Meets 13 weeks.
May also be taken as GEOL 99.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
25
BIOLOGY
BIOL 100
3.0 units
Nutrition
An in-depth study of the basic principles
of nutrition in health and disease. Topics
include nutrients, vitamins, digestion,
metabolism, food safety, diets, eating
disorders, and changing nutritional
needs throughout life. This course is a
general education course recommended
for anyone curious or concerned about
nutrition.
0158 Agudelo-Silva F
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC101
0159Richards S
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC133
BIOL 104
3.0 units
Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Through the study of microorganisms
and their ecology, students will gain
an understanding of the distribution,
spread, and control of infectious diseases, including past and current epidemics
such as: Lyme disease, plague, malaria,
Ebola, and hanta virus disease. This
course will enable students to understand the difficulties surrounding infectious disease control, the controversies
surrounding vaccination programs, and
the impact of infectious diseases on the
human experience. It will also provide a
solid foundation for those students wishing to pursue careers in microbiology,
public health, biomedical science, or urban planning.
0160Staff
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC191
BIOL 107
3.0 units
Human Biology
This course is designed to provide nonbiology major students with an introduction to the structure, function and development of the human body. The course
will give students the foundational concepts to explore personal and societal
issues involving human biology as well
as cover anatomy and physiology concepts useful in preparing for careers in
wellness-related fields such as personal
training, group fitness instruction, and
massage therapy.
0161 Williams J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC133
May be taken for credit as BIOL
107 or PE 107. Students receive
credit for only one course.
26
•
BIOL 108A
3.0 units
Human Sexuality
This course will cover topics in human
sexuality such as sexual functions, behavioral attitudes, development, health
problems, and contemporary sexual issues from psychological, social, cultural, and biological perspectives. Fulfills
continuing education requirements for
nurses.
0162 Mueller J
TTh 11:40-1pm, KTD/SC101
Maximum credit allowed for
Biology 108A and Behavioral
Science 103 is one course.
BIOL 110
Intro to Biology
3.0 units
Prerequisite: TAKE W/110L ADVISED
An introduction to the science of biology for nonmajors as well as a prerequisite course for major’s courses in biology.
Subjects include ecology, human ecology, evolution, molecular, cell biology,
­genetics, life kingdoms review, and human physiology.
0163 Mueller J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC101
0164 da Silva P
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/SC101
0165 McDonald M
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/SC133
0166Agudelo-Silva F
Th 5:40-8:30pm, KTD/SC101
BIOL 110L
Intro to Biology Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BIOL 110/CNCUR ENROL
An introduction to biology experimentation for nonmajors. Experiments and
field studies are selected from ecology,
molecular, cell biology, genetics, plant
anatomy and identification, and human
physiology topics.
0167 McDonald M
E T 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC184
0168 McDonald M
D Th 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC184
0169 Lenarz W
F M 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC184
0170 Hartman F
G W 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC184
0171 da Silva P
H M 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC184
0172 Williams J
K Th 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC184
0173 Williams J
L T 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC184
0174 Staff
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC184
0175 Cunningham J
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC184
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
BIOL 1155.0 units
Principles of Biology
Prerequisite: BIOL110,110L,CHEM131
This is an introductory course for biology majors covering the fundamentals
of molecular and cell biology, genetics,
DNA technology, evolution, and ecology.
It is a lecture/laboratory-based course in
which students incorporate lecture concepts into laboratory experiments, which
they design, carry out, analyze, and report.
Note: BIOL 115 is NOT a prerequisite
for BIOL 116. Since BIOL 115 has a
CHEM 131 prerequisite and BIOL 116
does not, students may wish to register
for BIOL 116 and CHEM 131 during the
same semester.
0176 Williams J
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm/1:10-4pm,
KTD/SC191
Includes two 8-hour field trips.
BIOL 1165.0 units
Animal and Plant Diversity
Prerequisite: BIOL 110, 110L
A course for biology majors to study the
evolution of organisms from Monera to
higher plants and animals. Emphasis
will be placed on taxonomy, comparative
morphology, and ecology of plants and
animals.
Note: Biol 115 is NOT a prerequisite for
Biol 116. Since Biol 115 has a Chem 131
prerequisite and Biol 116 does not, students may wish to register for Biol 116
and Chem 131 during the same semester.
0177 Mueller J, Hartman F
G TTh 1:10-5:30pm, KTD/SC190
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
BUSINESS
BIOL 1205.0 units
Human Anatomy
Prerequisite: BIOL 110, 110L
Study of structural orientation of the
human body; includes functions of major
organ systems. Laboratory includes demonstrations, movies, models, and dissection of animal material. Appropriate for
students going into allied health fields,
anthropology, and art.
0178 Chinn J
TTh 8:40-1pm, KTD/SC176
0179 Gamal A
J MW 12:40-5pm, KTD/SC176
0180Brown B
TTh 5:40-10pm, KTD/SC176
0181Messana B
MW 5:40-10pm, KTD/SC176
BIOL 138
3.0 units
Intro to Environmental Science
This course identifies the environmental problems of our modern world, offers
solutions compatible with humankind’s
need for natural resources, and strikes
the balance requisite for humankind’s
survival, the maintenance of a sustained environment.
0182Mueller J
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC101
May also be taken as GEOL 138.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
BIOL 142
3.0 units
Environmental Policy and Planning
This course is a study of federal, state,
and local environmental legislation. It is
a chronology of America’s awakening to
environmental issues and a study of our
efforts to resolve these issues through
the planning process. An understanding
of the content of this course is vital for
environmental scientists, planners, and
developers.
0183Bailey B
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC191
May also be taken as GEOL 142.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
BIOL 143
3.0 units
Stewardship of Marin Parks and
Open Space
This course provides information necessary for understanding and fulfilling our
responsibility to preserve and enhance
the best qualities of Marin parkland and
open space. It includes background material, interviews with management personnel and visits to parkland and open
space areas of special interest.
0184da Silva P
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC190
Plus 32 hours in field trips TBA
BIOL 162
General Ecology
designed for biology and health science
majors. This course covers the fundamentals of microbial taxonomy, ecology,
anatomy, physiology, genetics, and biotechnology. Emphasis is on the role that
microorganisms play in human health
and disease.
0190 Deneris J
K TTh 8:40-10am, KTD/SC130
and TTh 10:10-1pm, KTD/SC185
0191Deneris J
TTh 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/SC102
and TTh 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/SC185
3.0 units
Prerequisite: BIOL 110 ADVISED
Introduction to the study of the interrelationships between living organisms
and their environment. Emphasis is on
global, regional, and local environmental issues. Local biotic communities will
be studied on field trips.
0185 Agudelo-Silva F
E T 1:10-5pm, KTD/SC133
Plus 16 hours in field trips TBA
BIOL 169
Intro to Ornithology
3.0 units
Prerequisite: BIOL 110 ADVISED
The anatomy, ecology, behavior, and
identification of birds will be explored
through lectures, laboratories, slide presentations and field trips. The biology of
Marin County birds will be emphasized.
0186Mueller J
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC190
Plus 32 hours field experience TBA.
BIOL 2245.0 units
Human Physiology
Prerequisite: BIOL110,110L,CHEM110
Emphasis is on physicochemical processes and homeostatic mechanisms in the
human body. Laboratory and technical
writing skills are introduced.
0187 Brown B
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/SC101
and MW 9:40-12:30pm, KTD/
SC185
0188 Staff
C MW 10:40-12noon, KTD/SC176
and MW 12:40-3:30pm, KTD/
SC185
0189Waldman L
MW 5:40-10pm, KTD/SC185
BIOL 2405.0 units
Microbiology
Prerequisite: BIOL110,110L;CHEM110
Microorganisms are key to life on the entire planet; a few cause devastating illnesses in both plants and animals. This
is a lecture/laboratory-based course
BUSINESS
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
BUS 101
3.0 units
Intro to Business
This course surveys the evolution of our
capitalist system and the environment
in which business operates focusing on
globalization, management, marketing,
accounting, and finance. The course includes a management/economic computer simulation component designed to provide students with experience operating
a simulated business. ($2 material fee)
0195 Pacula N, Kennedy R
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0196 Pacula N
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0197 Pacula N
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0198Pacula N, Whitescarver S
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
BUS 107
3.0 units
Business Law
Study the law of contracts, negotiable
instruments, real property and partnerships. Fulfills California Department of
Real Estate requirements for salesperson/broker license.
0199Willet N
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC171
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
27
BUSINESS
BUS 112A
2.0 units
Financial Accounting IA
Fundamental accounting concepts including financial statements, internal
control, elements of the accounting cycles for merchandising and service enterprises, assets, and liabilities. The course
includes a computer-based tutorial. This
course is designed to be the first course
in accounting for transfer business students, vocational bookkeeping students,
as well as small business owners and
managers. ($2 material fee)
0200 8/22-10/12 Steiner L, Kennedy R
TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/OH105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0201 8/26-10/21 Forsyth S, Kennedy R
Sat 9:10-1pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
No class meeting 9/2.
02028/22-10/12 Steiner L, Kennedy R
TTh 6:10-8pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
40358/21-10/16 Forsyth S
MW 6:10-8pm, IVC/OL158
1hr/wk TBA, IVC/OL123
BUS 112B
Financial Accounting IB
2.0 units
Prerequisite: BUS 112A ADVISED
Fundamental accounting concepts including financial statements, internal
control, elements of the accounting cycles for merchandising and service enterprises, assets, and liabilities. ($2 material fee)
0203 10/17-12/12 Steiner L, Kennedy R
TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/OH105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0204 10/28-12/16 Forsyth S, Staff
Sat 9:10-1:30pm, KTD/BC105
1.1hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
No class meeting 11/25.
020510/17-12/12 Steiner L, Kennedy R
TTh 6:10-8pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
403610/23-12/13 Forsyth S
MW 6:10-8pm, IVC/OL158
1hr/wk TBA, IVC/OL123
BUS 1135.0 units
Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite: BUS 112A & 112B
Managerial cost concepts, cost accounting systems, cost profit relationships,
budgeting, and standard costs analysis.
0206 Steiner L
E TTh 1:10-3:30pm, KTD/LC39
BUS 114
1.5 units
Beginning Computer Accounting
Prerequisite: BUS 112A ADVISED
A first course in the operation of the
computerized accounting software,
QuickBooks. This course is designed
for business entrepreneurs who will be
28
•
­ sing a computerized accounting sysu
tem in their business as well as students
training to be professional accountants.
Subjects will include an overview of the
software, setting up a company, entering,
working with lists, setting up inventory,
paying bills, payroll, and preparation of
reports and graphs. ($4 material fee)
0207 10/17-12/12 Steiner L
TTh 12:10-1pm, KTD/LC39
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC102
020810/18-12/06 Steiner L
W 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC39
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC102
BUS 121
3.0 units
New Venture Creation
This course focuses on the entrepreneur
and the concepts, skills, know-how, information, attitudes, alternatives, and
resources that are relevant for success
in starting, operating, and managing a
new venture. Covers the environment,
resources, business plan, accounting,
financing, marketing, management,
and legal aspects. This course includes
industry and market research and requires students (teams) to write a business plan.
0209 Kennedy R, Pacula N
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/BC105
1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
BUS 127
1.5 units
Create a Business Plan
This course guides students through the
process of actually writing a business
plan. This is accomplished by a series of
lectures and discussions, research assignments, the utilization of computer
software and individual consultation by
the instructor.
0210 10/17-12/12 Staff
TTh 11:40-12:30pm, KTD/BC105
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
BUS 131
1.5 units
Elements of Supervision and
Management
A course for anyone wishing to learn the
essentials of management and supervision, especially as they relate to the
management of people in all types of
organizations.
02118/21-10/16 Boyd S
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC171
BUS 135
1.5 units
Managing Change and Innovation
A course for everyone who needs to learn
how to manage change and innovation
within a dynamic, complex, and often
unpredictable work environment.
021210/23-12/11 Boyd S
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC171
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
BUS 137
1.5 units
Managing Groups and Teams
A course for those who need to learn how
to successfully lead and facilitate work
groups and teams in the workplace.
02138/23-10/11 Boyd S
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC171
BUS 144
Business Communication
3.0 units
Prerequisite: BUS 97 ADVISED
Students will learn to write letters,
memoranda, resumes, reports, and other
business documents easily and effectively.
0214 Wilson B
Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
In this online course, students will need
access to a computer with Internet and
e-mail capability. There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this
course except for a final exam. Students
should register, using the four- digit section number. Once students have officially registered, they MUST also send
an e-mail message to the instructor that
verifies the student’s e-mail address by
the first day of class to AVOID BEING
DROPPED. The instructor’s address is
brian.wilson@marin.cc.ca.us. For more
information visit: http://www.marin.
cc.ca.us/buscom or phone (415) 485-9322.
BUSINESS OFFICE
SYSTEMS
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
WORD PROCESSING CLASSES
(BOS 114, 115)
It is advised that students be able to
keyboard by touch when they enroll in
the following word processing classes.
Word processing classes are taught in
the lecture/lab format. Need keyboarding skills? See BOS 120 in this section
of classes.
BOS 114
Beginning Word Processing
1.5 units
Prerequisite: KEYBRD ABILITY ADVIS
Microsoft Word for Windows is used in
this eight-week course designed to develop competency in the production of
a variety of business and personal-use
documents, such as letters, memos, reports, tables, and mail merge. Students
learn basic WORD features while creating realistic and useful documents.
This course is Microsoft certified and
provides the student with material
needed to pass the Microsoft Office
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS
User Specialist core exam in Microsoft
WORD. ($2 material fee)
0224 10/23-12/11 Wilson B
M 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC165
02258/21-10/16 Wilson B
M 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC165
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC102
BOS 115
1.5 units
Intermediate Word Processing
Prerequisite: BOS 114 ADVISED
Intermediate and advanced features of
Word are featured in this course that
emphasizes the production of a variety of business and personal projects
such as template letters and memos, resumes, tables, reports, newsletters, and
charts. Topics include formatting with
styles, working with and sharing long
documents, working with desktop publishing features and graphics, creating
and using forms, and customizing Word.
This course is Microsoft certified and
together with BOS 114 provides the student with material needed to pass the
Microsoft Office User Specialist Exam
in Word at the Expert level. ($2 material fee)
022610/23-12/11 Wilson B
M 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC165
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC102
BOS 35
1.0 unit
Web Quest: Beginning Internet
Learn how to use the Internet to research projects and develop basic information literacy skills. ($4 material fee)
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS SUPERVISED OPEN LAB -- KENTFIELD CAMPUS
The following individualized and self-paced courses provide students with both foundation skills needed for employment in office support occupations, as well as skills
valuable for academic and personal use. Courses may be added through September 1.
Students may complete work during any of the open lab hours posted on the door of BC
102, and also work with the instructor during the lab hours listed in the chart below.
You must attend one of the REQUIRED orientation sessions listed below to avoid being
dropped on the first day:
Orientation dates and times for KTD/BC 102:
T
8/22
11:00 a.m.
Wilson
W
8/23
5:30 p.m.
Wilson
Th 8/24
11:00 a.m.
Wilson
Plan to spend 3 hours per week for each unit taken.
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS INSTRUCTOR HOURS
Fall 2006—KTD/BC 102/104
TIME
MONDAY
TUESDAY
11-12:30pm
Closed
12:30-2pm
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
B Wilson
B Wilson
Closed
Closed
B Wilson
B Wilson
Closed
3:00-5:30pm
Closed
B Wilson
B Wilson
Closed
5:30-8:30pm
Closed
BOS 120
Computer Keyboarding
($4 material fee)
BOS 44
1.0 unit
Skill Building for Keyboarders
BOS 122B
Machine Transcription B
Prerequisite: TOUCH-TYPING ADVISED
Prerequisite: BOS 122A ADVISED
($4 material fee)
($4 material fee)
0220 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
0229 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 70A
1.0 unit
Spelling
0221 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 122C
Machine Transcription C
0223 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
1.0 unit
Closed
BOS 163C
1.0 unit
Travel and Conference Arrangements
0233 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 230A
Medical Terminology A
($2 material fee)
1.0 unit
0234 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
($4 material fee)
0228 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 76
1.0 unit
Electronic 10-Key Calculating
Machines
($2 material fee)
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 121A ADVISED
0219 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 70B
1.0 unit
Vocabulary Building
0222 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
B Wilson
0227 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 122A
Machine Transcription A
WEDNESDAY
BOS 230B
Medical Terminology B
1.0 unit
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 230A ADVISED
($2 material fee)
0235 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 231A
Medical Transcription A
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 122B ADVISED
($4 material fee)
0230 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 163A
1.0 unit
Professional Office Procedures
0231 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 163B
1.0 unit
Records Management
0232 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 120A ADVISED
($2 material fee)
0236 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 231B
Medical Transcription B
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 231A ADVISED
($2 material fee)
0237 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
BOS 231C
Medical Transcription C
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: BOS 231B ADVISED
($2 material fee)
0238 Wilson B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BC104
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
29
CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
CHEM 105
3.0 units
Chemistry in the Human Environment
A one-semester non-mathematical
course for liberal arts and non-science
majors, with or without lab (CHEM
105L), to fulfill G.E. requirements in
physical sciences. Stresses a humanistic
approach to chemistry, introducing concepts via important social and environmental contexts.
0242 Dunmire E
Web Based Course, 3 hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
The content and requirements of this
class will be similar to CHEM 105 taught
in the traditional lecture format; however,
there will be no on-campus attendance
requirements for this section. In addition
to a traditional textbook, the distance
course utilizes modern multimedia tools,
including digital video mini-lectures,
demonstrations, animations, at-home
experiments, and interactive tutorials, in
order to enhance learning in a distance
environment. Students must have access
to a computer with a CD-ROM drive and
Internet connection, an e-mail address,
and sufficient Internet experience to visit various sites. For more information
visit the Course Information link on the
College of Marin Course Listings Page
at http://marin.cc.ca.us/webct. After enrollment, students must e-mail instructor (erik.dunmire@marin.cc.ca.us) by the
first day of classes to receive instructions
for accessing the course Web site.
$
Chemistry
Concepts
Come Alive
Chemistry in the
Human Environment
Lab
CHEM 105L
CHEM 105L
1.0 unit
Chemistry in the Human Environment
Lab
Prerequisite: CHEM 105/CNCUR ENROL
Optional lab to accompany CHEM 105.
This course includes experimental examination of some chemical materials
and consumer products. Satisfies general education requirement in physical sciences with a laboratory component.
CHEM 1105.0 units
Chemistry for Allied Health Sciences
CHEM 1325.0 units
General Chemistry II
Prerequisite: MATH 95B
Prerequisite: CHEM 131
This course is designed to meet admissions requirements for the A.S. degree
in Registered Nursing and other allied
health sciences. It also fulfills a general
elective requirement in physical sciences.
Second semester of the one-year college
chemistry course for science and engineering majors.
0245 Subramanian M
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC104
and T 1:10-2pm, KTD/SC102
and T 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC155
0246 Subramanian M, Namnath J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC104
and Th 1:10-2pm, KTD/SC102
and Th 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC158
0247Staff
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC130
and Th 6:10-7pm, KTD/SC130
and Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC158
0248Meyers M
F 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC130
and Sat 10:10-11am, KTD/SC130
and Sat 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC158
CHEM 1145.0 units
Intro to Chemistry
Prerequisite: MATH 101 OR 101R
One semester of basic principles of inorganic chemistry designed to prepare
the student for CHEM 115 or CHEM 131.
CHEM 114/115 represent one year of
chemistry for health occupations.
0249 Kelly P
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC130
and Th 1:10-2pm, KTD/SC124
and Th 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC155
0250 Staff
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC125
and W 1:10-2pm, KTD/SC125
and W 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC158
0252Namnath J
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC177
and M 6:10-7pm, KTD/SC177
and M 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC155
CHEM 1315.0 units
General Chemistry I
Prerequisite: CHEM 114 & MATH 103
First semester of the one-year college
chemistry course for science and engineering majors.
0254 Loeser J
F WF 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC124
and W 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC155
and F 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC124
0255 Dunmire E
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/SC125
and T 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC158
and Th 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC125
0256Michaely W
MW 5:40-7pm, KTD/SC130
and M 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC158
and W 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC130
0257Loeser J
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC177
and Th 6:10-7pm, KTD/SC177
and Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC155
CHEM 132E
3.0 units
General Chemistry II/Lecture Only
Prerequisite: CHEM 131
Lecture material of the second semester
of the one-year college chemistry course
for some engineering majors.
0258Loeser J
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC177
CHEM 2315.0 units
Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisite: CHEM 132. A college-level
English course is advised.
First semester of a one-year organic
chemistry course for chemistry, chemical engineering, biology, and pre-professional majors.
0260Kelly P
MW 5:40-7pm, KTD/SC104
and MW 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC154
0261Kelly P
MW 5:40-7pm, KTD/SC104
and MW 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC154
CHINESE
CHIN 1025.0 units
Elementary Chinese Mandarin II
Prerequisite: CHIN 101
Continued practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Chinese
Mandarin. Further reinforcement of pronunciation and Chinese characters, and
explanation of Chinese culture.
0265Lu S
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/OH107
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
CHIN 1104.0 units
Chinese Conversation Mandarin
Designed for those students who wish
to acquire skills of the spoken language
in modern colloquial Mandarin Chinese.
Oral practice in speaking and understanding Chinese related to everyday activities and business transactions.
0266Liu S
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/OH107
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0243Meyers M
M 4:10-7pm, KTD/SC158
30
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
COMMUNICATIONS
See Film heading for additional communications classes.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
COMM 110
3.0 units
Intro to Mass Communication
Prerequisite: S SC 125 ADVISED
A critical historical survey of mass media including print (newspapers, magazines, books), broadcast (radio and television), film, audio recording, images,
news gathering and reporting, public relations, advertising, media rights and responsibilities, media ethics and impact,
audience and feedback, cyber media, and
global media. Designed for general education, career exploration, and consumer
understanding of the interaction and influences among and between media and
our culture.
0272Dougan M
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC165
May be taken for credit as COMM
110 or JOUN 110. Students receive
credit for only one course.
COMM 160
3.0 units
Images of Women and Minorities in
American Media
The principle goal of this course is to
help students understand how culture, gender, ethnicity, and race affect
the portrayal of women and minorities
in American media and, in turn, how
their portrayal in media affects their
perceptions and images of these groups.
Students will explore various aspects
of women and minorities in American
media. The major focus will be on studying how women and minorities are portrayed and portray themselves in movies radio, recorded music, and television.
This is a general course that also will
meet the American cultures requirement at the University of California,
Berkeley. May be taken for credit as
COMM 160 or JOUN 160. Students receive credit for only one course.
0277 9/05-12/07 Dougan M
TTh 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC165
Late start. Meets for 14 weeks.
0278Borenstein B
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC165
Struggling?
Frustrated?
Need Help?
FREE TUTORING
All COM students welcome
Sign up in the Tutoring Center
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9620
COMPUTER COURSES
Credit courses that provide training in
computer usage and various software applications are listed under the following
discipline headings: Art, Architecture,
Business, Business Office Systems,
Computer Information Systems,
Computer Science, and Multimedia
Studies.
COMPUTER
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
To add late starting classes AFTER the
semester begins, see Michael Ransom
(Office LC 26) for KTD classes, or John
Hinds (Office OL 131) for IVC classes.
Computer Certification Programs
The Computer Information Systems program provides courses to prepare students for the following certifications.
1) Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA): CIS 150, 158, and 151
or 159 leading to COMPTIA Security
Plus certification, or 161, 162, 163,
164 leading to COMPTIA A+ certification.
Competencies
The following competencies are advised
for successful completion of CIS 113, 117,
118, 122, 126, 141 and 150.
1. Use the mouse and keyboard to interact with the operating system of a
microcomputer.
2. Understand the basic use of the Windows file management system and
the My Computer/Windows Explorer
program. The student should be able
to access, load, save, and delete files
on the computer.
3. Understand the basic hardware
­components and their relationships for
a PC.
4. Perform the tasks of inserting a disk,
CD, or thumb drive in the computer,
formatting it (as needed), and accessing data.
5. Use at least one software application
to prepare some output and print it.
6. Understand the use of menus, dialog
boxes and icons to interact with application software.
7. Understand the basic concepts of a local area network and be able to log on
to the network and access ­applications.
8. Understand the file concept including
naming and accessing files and the
relationship of files to application
­software.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
CIS 101
1.5 units
Intro to Personal Computers and
Operating Systems
Introduction to the hardware, operating systems, and application software
environment of the personal computer
for students with little or no previous
experience with microcomputers. Uses
Windows XP on the IBM PC. ($2 material fee)
2) Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
(MCSE): CIS 150, 151, 153, 154, 155,
158, 159 leading to COMPTIA Security Plus certification.
0287 8/26-10/21 Staff
Sat 9:10-11am, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
No class meeting 9/4.
3) CompTIA A+ Computer Technician:
CIS 161, 162, 163, and 164.
0288 8/21-10/16 Staff
MW 11:10-12noon, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0289 10/23-12/13 Staff
MW 11:10-12noon, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
02908/24-10/12 Ritchie A
Th 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
40388/24-10/12 Hinds J
Th 6:10-8pm, IVC/OL123/OL103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/OL154
4) New Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician: CIS 110, 117, 122,
126, 150, 162, and 164.
5) Microsoft Office Specialist: (Varies for
Master, Expert, and Core certification) CIS 117, 127, or CIS 118, 128, or
BOS 114, 115.
Certification testing is available at the
KTD and IVC campuses.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
31
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CIS 110
3.0 units
Introduction to Computer Information
Systems
A general introduction to computers and
information processing for all students,
this transfer level course will allow students to work with personal computers
using application software for word processing, spreadsheets, and databases.
($3 material fee)
0292 Ransom M
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/LC38
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0293 Ransom M
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/LC38
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0294Ritchie A
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/LC38
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
0291 Ransom M
**Web Based Course, 4 hrs/wk
TBA, KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning Page.
**The section marked with a double asterisk requires students to have an email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to use a Web browser to fill out forms,
download files and navigate Web sites.
There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this course except for a
final exam. Communication is by e-mail,
online conferencing and phone. Once
students have officially enrolled in this
section, they must send an e-mail message to the instructor at ransom@marin.
cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to verify their enrollment in the class and their e-mail address, and to avoid being dropped. For
more information visit: http://cis.marin.
cc.ca.us/online or phone (415) 485-9579.
CIS 113
1.5 units
Presentations and Publications
CIS 117
Intro to Database Design
1.5 units
1.5 units
Prerequisite: CIS 116 ADVISED
Prerequisite: CIS 116 ADVISED
Use of the personal computer database
software program Access, to design, create, access, query, and create reports
for typical business applications. This
course is Microsoft certified and together with CIS 127 provides the student with the material needed to pass
the certification test for Microsoft Office
Specialist, Access Expert User Exam in
Microsoft Access. Uses Access 2003. ($2
material fee)
This course provides an introduction to
Windows. Includes topics on Windows
environment, menus and dialog boxes, folder management, Explorer, disk
maintenance, and other Windows tools.
($1.50 material fee)
0296 10/23-12/13 Ritchie A
MW 11:10-12noon, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
02978/22-10/10 Ritchie A
T 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
CIS 118
1.5 units
Intro to Spreadsheet Design
Prerequisite: CIS 110 OR 116 ADVSD
Use of a personal computer spreadsheet software program, EXCEL to design, create and use spreadsheets for
accounting and other database applications. This course is Microsoft certified
and provides the student with the material needed to pass the Microsoft Office
Specialist - Excel Core Exam. Uses
Excel 2003. ($2 material fee)
0298 10/28-12/16 Staff
Sat 9:10-11:20am, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
No class meeting 11/25.
02998/24-10/12 Kennedy R
Th 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
CIS 122
Networking Essentials
1.5 units
Prerequisite: CIS 116 ADVISED
Prerequisite: CIS 116 ADVISED
This course introduces the fundamental
design and layout requirements for the
creation of effective computer-generated
presentations and printed documents for
business and other professions. ($2 material fee)
This class will cover the basic concepts of Networks through a case study.
Topics covered will include: LAN hardware, Network operating systems, and
Network applications. This course meets
the requirements for the Network+
Certification Exam.
029510/17-12/05 Tjernell L
T 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
CIS 126
Intro to Windows
03008/21-10/16 Hinds J
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/LC39
030110/19-12/14 Ritchie A
Th 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
Uses Windows XP.
CIS 127
1.5 units
Intermediate Database Design
Prerequisite: CIS 117
This course is a continuation of CIS 117.
It provides the foundation necessary to
develop database applications for business and the Internet. The advanced
features of Access for Windows, such as
macros and VBA, will be used to design
and implement database applications.
This course is Microsoft certified and
provides the student with the material
needed to pass the certification test for
Microsoft Office User Specialist, Access
Expert User Exam in Microsoft Access.
($2 material fee)
030210/17-12/05 Ritchie A
T 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC38
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
Uses Access 2003.
CIS 128
1.5 units
Intermediate Spreadsheet Design
Prerequisite: CIS 118 ADVISED
Techniques of designing business-oriented spreadsheets, requirements of
programming for custom applications.
This course is Microsoft certified and
prepares the student for the Microsoft
Office User Specialist Exam in Microsoft
EXCEL. ($2 material fee)
030310/19-12/14 Kennedy R
Th 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
Uses Excel 2003.
CIS 141
1.5 units
Intro to HTML Programming
Prerequisite: CIS 110 OR 116 ADVIS
Students will learn how to design,
code, and implement Web pages using
Hypertext Markup Language. The focus
of this beginning class will be creating
pages with textual and limited inline
image data and links for both Internet
and Local Area Network intranet applications.
030410/18-12/06 Hinds J
W 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC20
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
32
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CIS 150
2.0 units
Personal Computer Server and
Workstation Operating Systems
CIS 155
1.5 units
Designing Security for a Personal
Computer Server Operating System
CIS 200
Software Certification Test
Preparation
Prerequisite: CIS 122
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This is a course designed to prepare the
student to install, configure, test and
maintain a personal computer network
operating system on both workstations
and servers. The course will provide
the student with the material to pursue
appropriate certification in server and
workstation operating systems. ($5 material fee)
A course for students who will design
and implement a security system to
meet the business requirements of a
network server operating system infrastructure. This course includes analysis
of security system requirements, auditing access to resources, authenticating
users and encryption. This course will
provide the student with the material
to pursue appropriate certification in a
server operating system infrastructure
administration and maintenance. ($5
material fee)
Students use computerized testing,
evaluation, and remediation software to
prepare for Microsoft Office Specialist
(MOS) certification test. ($15 material
fee)
403910/17-12/05 Hinds J
T 6:10-9pm, IVC/OL123/OL103
3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/OL103
This course uses Microsoft
Windows 2003 Server and prepares the student for the Microsoft
Certification Test 70-290.
CIS 153
1.5 units
Implementing and Administering a
Directory Services Infrastructure for a
Personal Computer Server Operating
System
Prerequisite: CIS 150
This is a course designed to prepare the
student to install, configure, test and
maintain directory services components.
The student will work with DNS and
Active Directory interoperability. The
student will develop a working knowledge of Active Directory and related
security issues. The student will also
work with Directory Services database
management and design. Installation
of DHCP, DNS, and users/groups will
be explored by students using personal
computers in a network server-based
operating environment. This course will
provide the student with the material
to pursue appropriate certification in a
server operating system infrastructure,
administration, and maintenance.($5
material fee)
4040 8/22-10/10 Hinds J
T 3:40-5:30pm, IVC/OL123
and 3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/OL103
EOPS
Extended Opportunity
Programs and Services
Eligible students may receive:
• Book Grants
• Academic, Career, Personal and
Vocational Counseling
• Help transferring to a 4-year college
404110/19-12/14 Hinds J
Th 6:10-8pm, IVC/OL123/OL103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/OL103
This course uses Microsoft
Windows 2003 Server and prepares the student for the Microsoft
Certification Test 70-220.
CIS 161
1.5 units
Intro to Computer System Hardware
This course teaches students, through
lectures, discussions, demonstrations,
and exercises, the skills and knowledge
necessary for A+ certification. It is a
study of the computer—its hardware
and software—from its earliest beginnings, through the advent of mainframe
and personal computers, up to the latest
class of microprocessor-based machines.
($3 material fee)
4042 8/25-10/13 Hinds J
F 10:10-3pm, IVC/OL123/OL103
This course prepares the student
for the COMPTIA A+ Exam.
CIS 162
1.5 units
Computer Operating Systems
This course teaches students, through
lectures, discussions, demonstrations,
and exercises, the skills and knowledge
necessary for A+ certification. It is a
study of computer operating systems
exploring Windows 98, 2000 and XP operating systems. Topics include how the
operating system functions, the structure for managing files and directories,
how programs are read and executed,
and the basics of installing and configuring the operating system. ($3 material
fee)
4043 10/20-12/15 Hinds J
F 10:10-3:20pm, IVC/OL123
and 3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/OL103
This course prepares the student
for the COMPTIA A+ Exam.
0.5 unit
0305 8/21-12/16 Staff
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC27
Contact instructor at 485-9598 by
9/1.
CIS 215
Visual BASIC Programming
3.5 units
Prerequisite: CIS 110 ADVISED
This course is an introduction to Visual
BASIC.NET for Windows, an object-oriented event-driven language for the development of Windows-based programs.
($3 material fee)
0306Ritchie A
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/LC38
and 2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
Uses Visual BASIC.NET
CIS 241
Intro to XML Programming
1.5 units
Prerequisite: CIS 141, 142 ADVISED
Students will learn XML techniques
such as using document type definitions (DTD), schemas, and extensible
style language (XSL/XSLT). The use of
Extensible Hypertext Markup Language
(XHTML-the refinement of HTML into
an XML application) will also be addressed. ($2 material fee)
030710/23-12/11 Ransom M
M 6:10-8pm, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC35
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
COMP 1354.0 units
Intro to Programming in JAVA
Prerequisite: MATH 103/103XY
JAVA applications that solve real-world
problems, and applets that can be deployed on a Web page. Primitive data
types and operations, control statements,
arrays, strings, methods, objects, and
classes, with graphics programming,
graphical user interfaces, event-driven
programming, and exception handling,
and simple file input/output.
0311 Schmitt F
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC133
and Th 2:10-5pm, KTD/SC144
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9605
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
33
COMPUTER SCIENCE
COMP 150A
2.0 units
Intro to Computers for Scientists and
Engineers
Prerequisite: MATH 104 & MATH 105
This course introduces students to computer tools and techniques useful for
data analysis and problem-solving operations typical in science/engineering
coursework and professional activities.
Using spreadsheet software (such as
Microsoft Excel) and the MATLAB programming language, students learn to
perform routine data analysis, including
use of mathematical equations, statistical analysis, graphing, and curve fitting,
as well as basic programming structures
and a variety of problem-solving techniques involving algebraic and trigonometric equations.
0312 8/21-10/11 Schmitt F
MW 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC144
Meets 8 weeks.
COMP 150B
2.0 units
Programming in MATLAB for
Engineers
Prerequisite: COMP 150A & MATH 123
This course is designed to meet computer programming requirements for engineering transfer students, when combined with the prerequisite COMP 150A
course. Students outline, write, test, and
debug computer programs in MATLAB
to solve problems and display results,
using common examples and applications from physics and engineering.
0313 10/16-12/06 Schmitt F
MW 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC144
Late start. Meets 8 weeks.
COMP 160
3.0 units
Computer Organization: An Assembly
Language Perspective
Prerequisite: COMP 130/140/230
Digital computers from hardware point
of view. Memory registers, the central
processing unit, peripheral devices, control and data paths, machine and assembly languages.
0314 Schmitt F
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/SC130
Struggling
with your
textbooks?
Tests make you
anxious?
Can’t find enough
time?
Need to improve
your listening?
Need a plan?
COMP 230
Programming in C
3.0 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Advanced techniques in programming,
introducing the C language for: writing
functions and linking libraries of functions, pointers and structures, input and
output, bit manipulation, and interfacing with UNIX.
0316 Schmitt F
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC130
COUNSELING
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
COUN 114B
3.0 units
Student Success Seminar
This course is designed to support transfer students and will focus on academic
and career planning, study skills, team
development, and self-understanding.
Take Charge
of Your Future
COUN 114B
Student Success Seminar
What you need to know to transfer
successfully to any UC, CSU, or private
college.
UC and CSU credit - 3 Units
For more info call 415.485.9432
Students will function as an interdependent group, supporting each other on a
broad range of educational and personal
issues. Faculty from a variety of disciplines will do presentations designed to
assist students in their academic and
career planning.
0320 Furuya B
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/OH105
COUN 115B
1.0 unit
Planning for Success in College
This course will focus on how to successfully prepare to transfer to UC, CSU,
and private universities and colleges.
Topics will include developing an educational plan and selecting courses for
transfer, admission criteria and the review process, choosing a college major,
developing an effective personal statement, completing applications, and use
of Internet resources.
0321 8/22-10/12 Furuya B
TTh 1-1:50pm, KTD/TB119
Emphasis is for student athletes.
COUN 125
1.0 unit
How to Study Effectively
Proven study techniques, time budgeting for maximum output, listening, lecture note taking, efficient textbook reading, preparing for exams, improving
concentration and memory.
0323 8/29-10/19 Olsen M
TTh 11:10-12noon, KTD/TB119
Late start
03248/30-10/18 Olsen M
W 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/TB119
Late start
COUN 133B
1.0 unit
Career Exploration
This course provides the student with a
practical approach to making career and
educational decisions. Self-assessment
inventories and assignments will help
students discover their interests, values,
skills, and personality style. Students
will learn to make career decisions that
are compatible with their unique personality and interests. ($40 material fee)
032610/12-11/09 Scott J
Th 5:30-8:40pm, KTD/SSA&B
Five Th’s: 10/12, 19, 26; 11/2, 9
COURT REPORTING
Arrangement must be made for the rental or purchase of a shorthand machine
at the student’s expense prior to the
first class meeting. Acquisition of a machine will be discussed at the orientation
meeting listed below.
ORIENTATION MEETING FOR NEW
AND TRANSFER STUDENTS:
Indian Valley Campus, Bldg 19
W Aug. 16, 6-8pm Room: OL 211
In order for a person to qualify from a
school to take the state licensing examination, the person shall complete
a program at a recognized school. For
information concerning the minimum
requirements that a court reporting
program must meet in order to be recognized, contact: The Court Reporters
Board of California; 2535 Capitol Oaks
Dr., Suite 230, Sacramento, CA 95833;
(916) 263-3660.
The College of Marin Court Reporting
Program is recognized by the Court
Reporters Board of California.
A MINIMUM OF EIGHT UNITS
OF MACHINE SHORTHAND IS A
REQUIRED COREQUISITE FOR
ALL OF THE COURT REPORTING
CLASSES OFFERED THIS FALL.
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
COUN 125
How to Study Effectively is for you.
CSU Credit
34
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
COURT REPORTING
COUR 110
8.0 units
Theory of Machine Shorthand
Prerequisite: TYPE 30 WAM
Goal: 60 wam on three-minute Literary
test with at least 90% accuracy; develop
stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
Students will arrange for the rental or
purchase of a stenotype machine at the
student’s expense prior to the first class
meeting. ($4 material fee)
4050 Holub T, Acredolo K
F MTWF 11:40-2pm, IVC/OL211
and 4hrs/wk TBA
BEGINNING MACHINE SHORTHAND:
LEVEL II (COUR 115FJST)
COUR 115F
2.0 units
Beginning Machine Shorthand: FourVoice
Prerequisite: COUR 112;TOTAL 8UNIT
Goal: 100 wam on four-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least 90% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4052 Barr C, Holub T
C MTWF 10:48-11:25am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 115J
2.0 units
Beginning Machine Shorthand: Jury
Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 110
Goal: 100 wam on three-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 90% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($1 material fee)
4054 Barr C, Holub T
C MTWF 10:10-10:48am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 115S
2.0 units
Beginning Machine Shorthand:
Literary
Prerequisite: COUR 112
Goal: 100 wam on four-minute unfamiliar Literary tests with at least 92.5% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4056 Barr C, Holub T
C MTWF 10:48-11:25am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 115T
2.0 units
Beginning Machine Shorthand:
Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 110
Goal: 100 wam on three-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 90% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
($1 material fee)
4058 Barr C, Holub T
C MTWF 10:10-10:48am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
INTERMEDIATE MACHINE
SHORTHAND: LEVEL III
(COUR 125FJST)
COUR 125F
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Four-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 115F
Goal: 125 wam on five-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4060 Barr C, Holub T
R MTWF 9:18-9:55am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 125J
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Jury Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 115J
Goal: 125 wam on five-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($1 material fee)
4062 Barr C, Holub T
M MTWF 8:40-9:18am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 125S
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Literary
Prerequisite: COUR 115S
Goal: 125 wam on five-minute unfamiliar Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4064 Barr C, Holub T
R MTWF 9:18-9:55am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 125T
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 115T
Goal: 125 wam on five-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and
the ability to read stenotype notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4066 Barr C, Holub T
M MTWF 8:40-9:18am, IVC/OL211
and 1hr/wk TBA
INTERMEDIATE MACHINE
SHORTHAND: LEVEL IV
(COUR 150FJST)
COUR 150F
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Four-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 125F
Goal: 150 wam on seven and one-halfminute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at
least 97.5% accuracy; develop stenotype
machine dexterity, and the ability to
read stenotypes fluently. ($1 material
fee)
4068 Boero E, Barr C, Jimenez L
J MTWF 12:18-12:55pm, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 150J
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Jury Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 125J
Goal: 150 wam on five-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($1 material fee)
4070 Boero E, Barr C, Jimenez L
F MTWF 11:40-12:18pm, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 150S
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Literary
Prerequisite: COUR 125S
Goal: 150 wam on five-minute unfamiliar Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4072 Boero E, Barr C, Jimenez L
J MTWF 12:18-12:55pm, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 150T
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 125T
Goal: 150 wam on five-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and
the ability to read stenotype notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4074 Boero E, Barr C, Jimenez L
F MTWF 11:40-12:18pm, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
35
COURT REPORTING
COUR 166
1.5 units
Law Library Skills
Introduction to law library as a resource,
forms of court case reports, judicial decisions, state, federal, local legislation,
legal encyclopedias, periodicals, summaries, field trips to the Law Library, and
may include field trips to Courthouses,
Jails and Prisons.
4076 8/22-10/10 Dowling R
T 2:10-5pm, IVC/OL200
COUR 167
1.0 unit
Ethics for Court Reporters
Fulfills the California Court Reporter’s
Board requirement in the study of procedures and ethics for court reporters.
4078 10/17-12/05 Holub T
T 2:10-4pm, IVC/OL211
COUR 169B
1.0 unit
Transcript Preparation/Formatting
COUR 170
Microtranscription
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE W/COUR 169A/B/C
Goal: Demonstrate the basic features
of court reporting computer-translation
and editing software. Apply appropriate style and format to computer-generated transcripts from stenotype notes.
Develop and refine personal stenotypeto-English translation dictionary in order to improve translation percentage.
4086 Holub T
K Th 8:10-9am, IVC/OL120
and 2hrs/wk TBA
INTERMEDIATE MACHINE
SHORTHAND: LEVEL V (COUR
175FJST)
COUR 175F
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Four-Voice
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH COUR 170
Prerequisite: COUR 150F
Develop knowledge and skill in the production of verbatim transcripts of depositions, hearings, and judicial proceedings
with the word processing software. ($5
material fee)
Goal: 175 wam on ten-minute unfamiliar 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4080 Boero E
B W 1:10-2pm, IVC/OL123
4088 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
C MTWF 10:48-11:25am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 169C
Rapid Data Entry
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: COUR 169A;TAKE W/170
Prepare to do computer-data entry at
140+ words a minute. Develop proficiency in the use of rapid-data-entry software, using the stenotype keyboard as
the input and editing device. ($2 material fee)
4082 8/24-10/12 Holub T
Th 9:10-10am, IVC/OL123
COUR 169D
Stenocaptioning I
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: COUR 169A AND 169C
This course will develop the knowledge
and skill to write with accuracy while
dealing with conflict resolutions. ($5 material fee)
4084 Holub T
A Th 10:10-11am, IVC/OL123
and 2hrs/wk TBA
36
•
COUR 175J
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Jury Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 150J
Goal: 175 wam on five-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($1 material fee)
4090 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
C MTWF 10:10-10:48am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 175S
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Literary
COUR 175T
2.0 units
Intermediate Machine Shorthand:
Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 150T
Goal: 175 wam on five-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and
the ability to read stenotype notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4094 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
C MTWF 10:10-10:48am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
ADVANCED MACHINE SHORTHAND:
LEVEL VI (COUR 200JT)
COUR 200J
2.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Jury
Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 175J
Goal: 200 wam on five-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($1 material fee)
4096 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
M MTWF 8:40-9:18am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
COUR 200T
2.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand:
Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 175T
Goal: 200 wam on five-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 98.2% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and
the ability to read stenotype notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
4098 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
R MTWF 9:18-9:55am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
ADVANCED MACHINE SHORTHAND:
LEVEL VII (COUR 210ABC)
COUR 210A
8.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Five
Minute Four-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 150S
Prerequisite: COUR 175F
Goal: 175 wam on five-minute unfamiliar Literary tests with at least 95% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype
notes fluently. ($1 material fee)
Goal: 200 wam on five-minute 4-Voice
tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
($4 material fee)
4092 Boero E, Jimenez L, Barr C
C MTWF 10:48-11:25am, IVC/OL215
and 1hr/wk TBA
4100 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DANCE
COUR 210B
8.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Seven
and One-Half Minute Four-Voice
COUR 225T
8.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Five
Minute Two-Voice
Prerequisite: COUR 210A
Prerequisite: COUR 210C
Goal: 200 wam on seven and one-halfminute 4-Voice tests with at least 97.5%
accuracy; develop stenotype machine
dexterity, and the ability to read stenotype notes fluently. ($4 material fee)
Goal: 225 wam on five-minute 2-Voice
tests with at least 95% accuracy; develop
stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
($4 material fee)
4102 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
4110 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
COUR 210C
8.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Ten
Minute Four-Voice
COUR 282
CSR/RPR Exam Preparation
Prerequisite: COUR 210B
Goal: 200 wam on ten-minute 4-Voice
tests with at least 97.5% accuracy; develop stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
($4 material fee)
4104 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
ADVANCED MACHINE SHORTHAND:
LEVEL VIII (COUR 225JST)
COUR 225J
8.0 units
Advanced Machine Shorthand: Five
Minute Jury Charge
Prerequisite: COUR 200J
Goal: 225 wam on ten-minute Jury
Charge tests with at least 95% accuracy;
develop stenotype machine dexterity,
and the ability to read stenotype notes
fluently. ($4 material fee)
4106 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
COUR 225S
8.0 units
Advanced Shorthand: Five Minute
Literary
1.0 unit
DANC 112
1.5 units
Dancing in America (HIP HOP)
“Dancing in America” is an introduction
to the basic skills of a variety of dance
styles indigenous to America, to be selected from such forms as street dance,
ballroom, movement games, jazz, and
tap. Two or three of these forms will be
selected per semester, for examination of
their historical and sociocultural backgrounds, movement theory, and execution of technique and style.
0337Weldon S
MW 5:25-6:45pm, KTD/DL101
(HIP HOP emphasized)
Prerequisite: COUR 175 AND 175L
A comprehensive review of legal terminology, professional practices, and applicable code sections in preparation for
the Registered Professional Reporters
and the Certified Shorthand Reporter
examinations.
4116 8/22-10/10 Barr C
T 1:10-3pm, IVC/OL215
DANCE
Please refer to the DANCE repeatability
policy in the catalog for requirements
and limitations to repeat these courses.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
Dancercise
Dance 117/118
DANC 108
3.0 units
Dance History: Art of Movement
Dancing probes the traditions of dance
in communities around the world in an
attempt to understand the oldest and
most compelling family of languages,
the art of communication called dance.
DANCERCISE, DANCERCISE II (DANC
117, 118)
Total fitness through rhythmic movement, aerobics, strengthening, and relaxation exercises.
0336 9/09-12/16 Rollison S
Videocassette Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
DANC 117
1.5 units
Dancercise
0338 Weldon S
J MW 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/DL101
Prerequisite: COUR 175S
DANC 118
1.5 units
Dancercise II
0339 Weldon S
J MW 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/DL101
Goal: 200 wam on ten-minute Literary
tests with at least 95% accuracy; develop
stenotype machine dexterity, and the
ability to read stenotype notes fluently.
($4 material fee)
DANC 121
1.5 units
Popular Dance Styles
A beginning level dance class focusing
on the exploration of a variety of popular dance styles of the twentieth century.
(HIP HOP emphasized)
4108 Jimenez L, Acredolo K
R MTWF 9:10-11:30am, IVC/OL214
and 4hrs/wk TBA
Hip Hop Dance 112
All Ages! All Levels!
0340Jones D
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/DL101
0341Jones D
T 7:10-10pm, KTD/DL101
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
37
DANCE
JAZZ DANCE I, II, III, IV (DANC 122,
123, 224, 225)
DANC 122, students will learn rhythmic
exercises, sequences, isolations, turns,
combinations, and polyrhythmic movement. DANC 123, enhances the development of intermediate level jazz dance
technique. Students will learn intermediate level jazz choreography. DANC 224,
enhances the development of advanced
level jazz dance technique. Students will
learn advanced level jazz choreography.
DANC 225, emphasis on the development of high-level advanced jazz dance
technique. Students will learn professional level jazz choreography.
DANC 122
1.5 units
Jazz Dance I
0342 Jones D
Sat 9:10-12noon, KTD/DL101
0343Jones D
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/DL101
DANC 123
Jazz Dance II
1.5 units
Prerequisite: DANC 122 ADVISED
0344 Jones D
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/DL101
0345 Jones D
Sat 9:10-12noon, KTD/DL101
0346Jones D
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/DL101
4117 Scofield A
Th 6:10-9pm, IVC/MW170
DANC 224
Jazz Dance III
1.5 units
Prerequisite: DANC 123 ADVISED
0360 Jones D
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/DL101
4118 Scofield A
Th 6:10-9pm, IVC/MW170
DANC 225
Jazz Dance IV
1.5 units
Prerequisite: DANC 224 ADVISED
0361 Jones D
R F 9:10-12noon, KTD/DL101
4119 Scofield A
Th 6:10-9pm, IVC/MW170
BALLET I, II, III, IV
(DANC 126, 127AB, 228AB, 229AB)
DANC 126, introduction to classical ballet for beginners. Students learn the vocabulary and movements of elementary
barre and center work with emphasis on
proper body alignment, increased flexibility, and fluidity of movement. DANC
127AB, intermediate ballet technique
with emphasis on alignment, placement,
leg articulation, strength, and flexibility.
DANC 228A, principles of ballet movement covered in DANC 127 are carried
into advanced technique and vocabulary.
Emphasis on fluidity of movement and
on integration of the physical, mental,
and emotional skills which create the
total dancer. DANC 228B, additional
38
•
technical work, as well as exploration of
major ballet styles (romantic, classical,
contemporary) will be covered through
videotape, discussion, and practice of
ballet variations. DANC 229AB, a continuation of skills developed in Danc
228AB. Emphasis on integrating the
dancers’ physical skills of equilibrium,
extension, elevation, and endurance
with the intellectual and emotional
skills that create the artistry of the advanced dancer.
DANC 126
1.5 units
Ballet I
0347 Tanner S
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DL101
0348 Tanner S
H MW 4-5:20pm, KTD/DL101
DANC 127B
Ballet II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DANC 126 ADVISED
0349Kuhn K, Rollison S
TTh 5:10-7pm, KTD/DL101
DANC 228B
Ballet III
2.0 units
Tap Dance 142
DANC 131A
Modern Dance II
1.5 units
Prerequisite: DANC 130A OR B ADVIS
0351Scofield A
F 4:10-7pm, KTD/DL101/DL102
(Limon Technique emphasized)
DANC 131B
Modern Dance II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DANC 130A OR B ADVIS
0362Kuhn K
TTh 5:10-7pm, KTD/DL101
0352 Kuhn K
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/DL101
(Hawkins Technique emphasized)
DANC 229B
Ballet IV
DANC 232
Modern Dance III
Prerequisite: DANC 127A OR B ADVIS
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DANC 228A OR B ADVIS
0363Kuhn K
TTh 5:10-7pm, KTD/DL101
MODERN DANCE I, II, III, IV
(DANC 130A, 131AB, 232, 240)
DANC 130A, development of proficiency
in the beginning level of modern dance
technique — positioning, alignment,
centering and balance as applied to
turns, falls, extensions and movement
in and through space. DANC 131A/B,
development of proficiency in the intermediate level of modern dance technique.
DANC 232, skills and training in advanced modern technique, learning technical control as it relates to anatomical
structure. Attention given to student as
performer and to the uniqueness of his/
her movement expression. DANC 240,
Skills and training in semiprofessional
modern technique, learning technical
control as it relates to anatomical structure. Attention given to development of
technically and artistically proficient
­performers.
DANC 130A
1.5 units
Modern Dance I
0350 Kuhn K
B MW 9:10-10:30am, KTD/DL101
(Hawkins Technique emphasized)
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DANC 131 ADVISED
0364 Kuhn K
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/DL101
(Hawkins Technique emphasized)
DANC 240
Modern Dance IV
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DANC 232 ADVISED
0365 Kuhn K
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/DL101
(Hawkins Technique emphasized)
DANC 142
1.5 units
Beginning Tap
This course will familiarize the student
with the technique, terminology and history of a variety of tap dance styles such
as Latin, Soft Shoe, Rhythm Tap, Irish,
American (or Musical Theatre Style) and
Buck and Wing. The course will include
basic footwork, warm up sequences and
progressions developed into dances.
0353Weldon S
TTh 5:25-6:45pm, KTD/DL102
PRODUCTION WORKSHOP I, II, III
(DANC 154, 155, 156)
Designed to give students the opportunity to take part in the planning and
execution of a dance performance. Late
start 9/15.
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DENTAL ASSISTING: REGISTERED
DENTAL ASSISTING:
REGISTERED
DANC 154
1.0 unit
Production Workshop I
0354 9/15-12/16 Jones D
2.9hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
DENT 1724.0 units
Dental Science I
DANC 155
2.0 units
Production Workshop II
0355 9/15-12/16 Kuhn K
5.8hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DENT 176
The study of the control of pathogenic
microorganism through sterilization
and disinfectants according to OSHA
standards. Study of head and neck anatomy as it relates to dentistry.
DANC 156
3.0 units
Production Workshop III
0356 9/15-12/16 Weldon S
8.7hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
DANC 160
1.0 unit
Intro to Dance Performance Skills
Basic skills of rehearsal and performance. Development of projection, stage
presence, mastering stage space and
artistic expression. Students perform
in and/or choreograph for group, small
groups, duet or solo pieces that are presented in a studio venue. Late start 9/15.
0357 9/15-12/16 Weldon S
3.6hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
Musical Theatre Cabaret show is
TBA.
0358 9/15-12/16 Rollison S
3.6hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
“Works and Works-in-Progress.”
For further information, consult
any dance faculty member, or call
485-9315. Performance: F 12/8/06
at 12 noon, DL 101.
DANC 161
1.5 units
Ballroom Dance, Beginning
Introduction to ballroom dance for beginners. Students will learn the vocabulary and movements for the elementary
level of partner dances such as the waltz,
the cha cha, the fox trot, and the swing.
Historical perspective of these dances
will be considered as well as their relationship to the dance world in general.
No partner necessary.
0359Weldon S
F 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DL101
Ballroom Dance 161
DANCE COMPANY (DANC 241ABCD)
Students rehearse and perform faculty choreography in a formal concert
(predetermined number of scheduled
performances). Focus on technique, choreographic phrasing, artistry and performance presence. Audition required, to
be held F 9/1, 6pm and Sat 9/2, 12noon
DL101. (Attend one audition only.)
Rehearsals are TBA. For dancers at intermediate level and above in modern,
ballet, jazz or musical theater styles.
(Please refer to the DANCE repeatability policy in the catalog for requirements
and limitations to repeat this course.)
Performances F’s & Sat’s; 11/3, 4, 10,
11 at 8pm in the Fine Arts Theater,
Kentfield. For further information call
485-9315. Late start 9/15.
DANC 241A
Dance Company
3.0 units
Prerequisite: AUDITION
0366 9/15-12/16 Jones D
9.2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
DANC 241B4.0 units
Dance Company
Prerequisite: AUDITION
0367
9/15-12/16
Faculty
Dance
12.3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
DANC 241C5.0 units
Dance Company
Become a Performer
WORKS/WORKS IN PROGRESS
Dance 160
Intro to Performance Skills
Learn the Art/Craft of the Stage
Perform/Choreograph solo/
small group dances
Low Tech/Highly Supportive Studio Venue
Contact: sheri@marin.cc.ca.us
415.485.9315
Prerequisite: AUDITION
0368
9/15-12/16
Faculty
Dance
15.3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
DANC 241D
Dance Company
0374 Wilgis M
M F 8:10-12noon, KTD/HC156
DENT 174
Materials Applications
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DENT 176;TAKE W/174L
Introduction to the physical and chemical properties of dental materials with
emphasis on the assistant’s role in preparation, manipulation, and delivery during dental procedures.
0375 Hom G
F W 11:40-1:30pm, KTD/HC156
Students must take one DENT 174L
(lab) with this course.
DENT 174L
Materials Application Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DENT 174
This course provides hands-on experience in the manipulation of dental materials in its preparation and delivery. It
prepares the student for registered dental assistant legal functions as listed in
the State Dental Practice Act. ($55 material fee)
0376 Hom G
H W 8:10-11am, KTD/HC156
0377 Hom G
B W 1:40-4:30pm, KTD/HC156
DENT 176
2.0 units
Dental Morphology, Histology and
Recordings
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Study of the form and structure of teeth
and the oral cavity. Learn methods of
gathering data and recording the patient’s medical and dental existing conditions.
0378 Rooney K
J M 8:10-10am, KTD/HC156
Students must take DENT 176L
(lab) with this course.
6.0 units
Prerequisite: AUDITION
0369 9/15-12/16 Jones D
18.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DL101
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
39
DENTAL ASSISTING: REGISTERED
Dentists Need
$ENTISTS.EED2EGISTERED
Registered Dental
Assistants
•
•
•
•
•
Career mobility
Jobs
Financial Aid
Child Care
Complete the program in
10 or 19 months
Call Grace Hom at 415.485.9327 for
an appointment.
ghom@marin.cc.ca.us
DENT 176L
1.0 unit
Dental Morphology, Histology, and
Recordings Lab
DENT 182L
Dental Radiology Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DENT 182
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
Learn to expose, mount, and evaluate
radiograph for diagnostic reasons. Learn
use of dental radiology equipment, darkroom techniques, patient management,
methods of radiographic evaluation, and
radiation safety. ($50 material fee)
DRAM 110
3.0 units
Intro to Theatre
A survey course designed to develop an
appreciation of theatre for majors and
nonmajors.
0384 Hom G
K Th 8:10-11am, KTD/HC156
0385 Hom G
G Th 12:40-3:30pm, KTD/HC156
0386 Staff
N F 12:40-3:30pm, KTD/HC156
0387 Hom G
B M 1:10-4pm, KTD/HC156
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DENT 176
DIRECTED STUDY
The student will perform oral examinations, studying tooth morphology, histology, and methods of recording findings.
($25 material fee)
Offered for one to three units. Limit to
Enrollment: one course in the discipline
and/or prerequisite(s) determined by the
appropriate discipline. Three laboratory
hours weekly per unit.
0379 Rooney K
C M 10:10-1pm, KTD/HC156
DENT 180
Chairside I
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DENT 176;TAKE W/180L
Preparation for chairside assisting in a
clinical setting.
0380 Staff
D T 11:40-1:30pm, KTD/HC156
Students must take one DENT
180L (lab) with this course.
DENT 180L
Chairside I Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DENT 180
Hands-on experience of instrument
transferring, tray set-ups, oral examination, and chair positioning. This course
demonstrates intra oral technique of
rubber dam placement and removal,
dental matrix systems, and topical anesthetic placement. ($25 material fee)
0381 Staff
R T 8:10-11am, KTD/HC156
0382 Staff
E T 1:40-4:30pm, KTD/HC156
DENT 182
Dental Radiology
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: DENT 176;TAKE W/182L
Learn principles of photons, equipment,
biological effects, safety, and legal aspects for dental radiology.
0383 Hom G
L Th 11:10-12noon, KTD/HC156
Students must take one DENT 182L
(lab) with this course.
DRAMA
Directed study courses are offered in
most disciplines and are designed to
give students an opportunity to participate in independent study and in
enriched academic experiences not covered within the scope of the curriculum
offerings as described in the general
catalog. Students plan and execute a
project under an instructor’s direction.
Students interested in registering for
Directed Study should contact the discipline instructor to obtain an Application
for Directed Study (instructor contract).
The completed Application for Directed
Study and an Add Card must then be
submitted to the Office of Admissions
prior
 to
the census
 
and Records
date.
Directed study courses may be taken
more than once for credit provided the
same topic is not repeated. Students are
limited to four enrollments of Directed
Study per discipline (maximum of 12
units per discipline).
     
 
  
 
0388 Taylor A
D T 11:10-2pm, KTD/FA134
DRAM 126
3.0 units
Improvisation for the Theatre
A participatory class in which students
practice improvisational techniques
designed to support live performances.
The class will focus on relaxation, concentration, spontaneity, and honesty. It
will culminate in a series of live performances.
0389Zilbersmith C
T 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA32
DRAM 127
Improvisation Performance
2.0 units
Prerequisite: DRAM 126 ADVISED
This course is designed for students to
rehearse as an ensemble, develop performance skills, and perform on a weekly or
bi-weekly basis.
0390Zilbersmith C, Killam P
T 4:10-6pm, KTD/FA32
and 3hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 129
Voice for the Stage
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: DRAMA 131
This class teaches students how to control the instrument that is their voice.
It is recommended for all actors and required for all drama majors.
039110/26-12/14 Noble M
Th 5:10-7pm, KTD/FA134
DRAM 130
3.0 units
Theory and Practice in Acting I
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH DRAM 134
This course includes exercises in characterization, pantomime, improvisation,
voice projection, and body movement.
Attendance at the first class meeting is
mandatory.
0392 Taylor A
B W 1:10-4pm, KTD/FA134
and 1hr/wk TBA
 
 
DRAM 134
1.0 unit
Acting for Directors Workshop
This course involves audition, rehearsal
and performance in scenes from DRAM
240.
    
 
   
0393 Taylor A
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA134
First meeting Th 8/24, 12-1pm in
FA 134.
      
40
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DRAMA
DRAM 137
0.5 unit
Stage Combat
This class will cover the theory and practice of recreating fights for the stage.
Students will learn a controlled simulated approach to performing choreographed
combat. Recommended for drama majors.
03948/21-10/16 Staff
M 5:10-7pm, KTD/FA32
and 1hr/wk TBA
DRAM 143
3.0 units
Storytelling and Personal Narratives
This class gives students an opportunity
to create and perform original stories in
a workshop setting. Stories can be personal narrative, mythical, or stories for
children.
0395Taylor A
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA134
DRAM 160
1.0 unit
Stage Production
Participate in backstage production work
for current college drama production.
03978/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 161
1.0 unit
Prep and Crew: Sets and Properties
Participate in the construction of scenery and properties for a production;
backstage crew assignment during the
performances of a production.
03988/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
03998/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 162
1.0 unit
Costume Preparation
Participate in the construction of costumes for a production. Involves backstage crew assignment during the run of
a production.
04018/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
04028/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 163
1.0 unit
Light and Sound Production
Participate in preproduction preparation of lighting and sound and crew work
during the run of a production.
04048/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
04058/21-10/16 Polen P
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA150
and 3hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 237
Techniques of Audition
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: DRAM 131 & AUDITION
This course will cover techniques of
audition, how to prepare and memorize monologues as well as the interview process and resume preparation.
This course is recommended for drama
     
­majors.
04078/21-10/16 Bihr J
M 7:10-9pm, KTD/FA32
and 1hr/wk TBA
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
    
DRAM 240
Stage Direction
Black Box Theatre Festival
Author: Various
Produced by: Carla Zilbersmith
#0409 DRAM 245
Rehearsal and Performance
Auditions:
Mon. Oct. 16, 7pm, FA 32 (Studio Theatre)
Callbacks:
Sat. Oct. 21, 10am, FA 32 (Studio Theatre)
Rehearsals Begin:
Mon. Oct. 23, 6:30pm, FA 32 (Studio Theatre)
Performances:
(Dates) Dec. 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17
(Location) Studio Theatre (FA 32)
Born Yesterday
Author: Garson Kanin
Directed by: Jeffrey Bihr
#0410 DRAM 246
Rehearsal and Performance of a
Modern Comedy
Auditions:
Mon. Aug. 21, 7pm, FA 150
Callbacks: Sat. Aug. 26, 10am, FA 150
Rehearsals Begin:
Mon. Aug. 28, 6:30pm, FA 150
Performances:
(Dates) Oct.6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22
(Location) Fine Arts Theatre, FA 150
FOR INFO CALL THE DRAMA
DEPARTMENT 415 485-9555
3.0 units
Prerequisite: DRAM 110,130,134 ADV
This course includes transferring from
script to live action on stage, auditions,
casting, rehearsal, fundamentals of compositions, movement characterization,
and interpersonal relationships in play
production.
0408Taylor A
E Th 1:10-4pm, KTD/FA134
and 2hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 2454.0 units
Rehearsal and Performance
Prerequisite: AUDITION,TAKE W/160
This course includes acting in the scheduled production of plays, preproduction
work in sets, lights, or costumes.
0409 10/16-12/17 Zilbersmith C
24hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA32
DRAM 2464.0 units
Rehearsal and Performance of a
Modern Comedy
Prerequisite: AUDITION,TAKE W/160
Acting in the scheduled production of
plays, preproduction work in sets, lights,
or costumes.
SEMINAR AND FIELDWORK
EXPERIENCE (DRAM 252ABC)
Students work at a theater or production company of their choice and are supervised by employees of that theater. A
variable credit class with one seminar
hour per week.
DRAM 252A
2.0 units
Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
Prerequisite: DRAM 131OR 150OR 168
0414 Taylor A
L T 3:10-4pm, KTD/FA134
and 4hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 252B
3.0 units
Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
Prerequisite: DRAM 131OR 150OR 168
0415 Taylor A
L T 3:10-4pm, KTD/FA134
and 8hrs/wk TBA
DRAM 252C4.0 units
Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
Prerequisite: DRAM 131OR 150OR 168
0416 Taylor A
L T 3:10-4pm, KTD/FA134
and 12hrs/wk TBA
0410 8/21-10/22 Bihr J, Zilbersmith C
26.3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA150
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
41
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION
PSY 455 – San Francisco State Class
Cross-Cultural Perspectives in
Psychology
(3 units SFSU upper division credit)
Prerequisites: None stated
Cross-cultural behavior, developmental,
cognitive, and social data and research
of psychological phenomena as they are
differentially affected by culture and
sub-culture. Emphasis on the diversity
of parent-child relations, role of women
and men, adult personality and beliefs,
attitudes and values. Core course in
child and adolescent development major
at sfsu.
Instructor: Elizabeth Weinbaum
Day: Wednesday
Time: 7-10pm
Location: College of Marin, Indian Valley
Campus, Ohlone 104, Novato
Fall 2006 Semester:
August 28 - December 22, 2006
Fee: $75 per course. Restrictions apply.
Registration: Go to http://www.cel.sfsu.
edu/marin/register.cfm
Registration questions:
Karen Maguire
SFSU Campus
kjmac@sfsu.edu (email preferred)
415.405.3532
Additional courses in the Child and
Adolescent major may be offered in the
Fall 2006 term at College of Marin/IVC.
For the most current and complete information, go to:
http://www.sfsu.edu/~apd/marin.htm.
For information on the Child and
Adolescent Development major, call
415.405.7772.
ECE 100
0.5 unit
ECE Licensing and Permits
This course provides information about
licensing and Child Development permits. Coursework requirements for
an Associate in Science degree and
Certificate of Achievement are also
reviewed. It is required for majors in
early childhood education and is recommended for providers already working in
the field and for people wishing to learn
more about career options in early childhood education.
0417 One Sat: 9/16
Dodge M
Sat 8:40-5pm, KTD/HC165
ECE 101
3.0 units
Intro to Child Development
Ages and stages of development from
birth to adolescence describing physical, intellectual, social and emotional
growth. Emphasis on practical application of principles and adult role in supporting optimal growth. This course
meets Department of Social Services licensing requirements for coursework in
early childhood education. It also meets
requirements for all levels of the Child
Development Permits. (D.S. #1)
4123 Dodge M
T 6:40-9:30pm, IVC/OL158
ECE 101
3.0 unit
Introduccion al Desarrollo del Nino
3 unidades. 3 Horas del Lectura por
Semana. Las edades y etapas del desarrollo desde el nacimiento hasta la adolescencia, describiendo el crecimiento fisico,
intelectual, emocional y social. El enfoque es en la aplicacion practica de los
principios y en el papel del adulto apoyando el desarrollo optimo. Este curso
satisface los requisitos de entrenamiento
en la educacion temprana por parte del
Departamento de Servicios Sociales
para la licencia de la educacion temprana, y tambien esta requerido para todos
los niveles del permiso de los centros de
ninos (D.S. #1)
0418Willetts H
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DL11
This section will be taught in
Spanish. Se ensena esta clase EN
ESPANOL.
ECE 110
3.0 units
Human Development I
The physical, social-emotional, cognitive and language development of children from conception to adolescence are
explained in this course. This course is
required by the Department of Social
Services to satisfy licensing requirements for coursework in early childhood
education and for a Child Development
Permit. (D.S. #1)
0419 Dodge M
M M 8:10-11am, KTD/LC39
ECE 112
3.0 units
Child, Family, and Community
Explores the impact of many aspects
of society on young children and their
families. Topics include different family structures, parenting styles, cultural
diversity, the effects of school, media,
and public policies on children and their
families. (D.S. #2)
0420 Edwards S
J W 8:10-11am, KTD/LC39
42
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ECE 114
3.0 units
Intro to Early Childhood Education
This course is intended as an introduction to the field and study of early childhood education. It includes a survey of
various types of early childhood programs and the different career paths in
this field, an examination of leading philosophies of early childhood education,
and an overview of the domains of child
development. Students will also learn
group management techniques to use in
a classroom setting, why play is so important in the early childhood curriculum, and how to observe children and
write child observations. This course
also offers an exploration of the roles
and challenges associated with being a
teacher of young children. (D.S. #3)
0421Edwards S
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DL12
ECE 132
1.0 unit
Planning and Leading Circle Times
with Young Children
Approaches for planning, leading and
guiding circle times for preschoolers,
toddlers, school-agers and mixed age
groups. Ideas for materials, songs and
activities for large group times; strategies for managing groups and guiding young children during circle times.
(D.S. #3)
0422 Three Sats: 8/26; 9/9, 23Edwards S
Sat 8:40-2:30pm, KTD/PE23
ECE 134
1.0 unit
Understanding Young Children’s
Temperaments
This course provides information about
how to understand, recognize and work
successfully with children of different
temperamental traits in group care and
classroom settings.
04238/30-11/08 Dodge M
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/HC165
Meets six Wed’s: 8/30; 9/13, 27;
10/11, 25; 11/8.
ECE 135
2.0 units
Working with Children’s Challenging
Behavior
In this course students will learn strategies and methods for working with
young children’s challenging behavior
in early childhood classroom settings.
Methods for working with parents whose
child might display challenging behavior and for locating outside help are also
included. (D.S.#3)
04248/21-11/13 Staff
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/HC166
Meets for twelve weeks.
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
EDUCATION
ECE 208
3.0 units
Exploring Cultural Diversity in the
Early Childhood Education Classroom
This course focuses on the concepts of
cultural competency in the early childhood classroom, and culturally sensitive/ competent approaches to working
with diverse populations for children
and their families. Ideas and examples
for creating culturally diverse classroom
materials and activities are features. An
in-depth exploration of the anti-bias curriculum and strategies for implementing
it in the early childhood classroom are
also included in this course.
4124 Edwards S
T 6:40-9:30pm, IVC/OL104
ECE 218
3.0 units
Caring for the Infant and Toddler
This course offers approaches, techniques, and materials to use in caring
for infants and toddlers in a program
setting. Ideas for curriculum planning
and room arrangements for infant-toddler programs are included. (D.S. #4)
0425Dodge M
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/SC133
ECE 220A
3.0 units
Early Childhood Administration A
An overview of preschool programs;
methods for staffing and budgeting and
for setting up preschool environments.
Licensing requirements, the role of an
administrator, and planning for children are also covered. Course can be
applied both toward licensing requirements in ECE administration and the
administration course requirement for
the Children’s Center Supervisor permit.
(D.S. #6)
0426Edwards S
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/FH110
ECE 223
1.0 unit
Music Activities for Young Children
This course offers a survey of teaching
methods and hands-on music activities
which enable students to develop a rich
and enjoyable classroom music program
for young children. (D.S. #3)
0427 Three Sats: 9/30; 10/14, 28
Sat 8:40-2:30pm, KTD/PE23
Staff
ECE 224
2.0 units
Working with Parents in Early
Childhood Programs
In this course students learn approaches
and techniques for working with parents
in infant, toddler, preschool, and extended day programs. It includes strategies
for planning and leading parent-teacher conferences, effective techniques for
communicating with parents, and ideas
for parent involvement in early childhood programs.
0428 10/07-12/02 Edwards S
Sat 8:40-3pm, KTD/HC165
Meets five Sat’s: 10/7, 21; 11/4, 18;
12/2.
ECE 2804.5 units
Early Childhood Education Fieldwork
and Seminar I
Prerequisite: ECE 115; 114 ADVISED
Students receive advanced training
and experience in student teaching
in the campus children’s center or in
early childhood programs off campus.
Training includes developing effective
classroom management and child guidance techniques, as well as planning
and leading activities in all areas of the
early childhood curriculum. A seminar
is included in this course in which students will learn about and discuss teaching strategies and techniques to be used
at an advanced level of student teaching.
Students interested in enrolling in this
course are to arrange a meeting with
the Early Childhood Education Program
coordinator prior to beginning their student teaching placements to complete
paperwork and plans for teaching placements. (D.S. #3)
0429Dodge M
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/HC165
Meets W’s 8/23; 9/6, 20; 10/4, 18;
11/1, 15, 29; 12/13.
ECONOMICS
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ECON 101
Macroeconomics
3.0 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
An introduction to macroeconomic analysis. A study of the determinants of GDP,
employment, income, savings, and investment. ECON 102 may be taken before ECON 101.
ECON 102
Microeconomics
3.0 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
An introduction to microeconomic analysis. The study of scarcity, demand, supply, equilibrium price, and the allocation of resources in market structures.
ECON 101 and 102 may be taken in either order.
0433 Kennedy R
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/HC165
ECON 125
3.0 units
Research Methods and Term Papers in
the Social Sciences
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Introduction to college level research
papers and critical thinking in social
sciences and related fields. Term papers
required for other classes may be developed in this course. (See also S SC 125,
ETST 125, HIST 125, and POLS 125.)
0434 Adams L
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH111
ECON 215
3.0 units
Current Events and Issues
An opportunity to critically examine and
discuss significant world developments
and to attempt to understand the sources of those developments. Each student
will have an opportunity to focus on issues of particular interest and to share
that information with the group. May
be taken for credit as ECON 215, POLS
215, and S SC 215. Students may receive
credit for only one course.
0435 Bellisimo Y
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH103
EDUCATION
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
EDUC 111
3.0 units
Foundations of Teaching
This course provides students with the
tools and information necessary to explore teaching as a career. Practical perspectives for meeting the challenges of
teaching will provide students with a
well-rounded view of the teaching profession.
0437 Boyd S
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH103
0430 Pacula N
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/BC105
0431 Pacula N
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/BC105
0432Kennedy R
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/BC105
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
43
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING
ENGLISH
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ESL classes are listed under English as
a Second Language.
ENGG 110
1.0 unit
Careers in Engineering and
Technology
This course provides an overview of engineering fields. It helps students develop personal career goals and academic
plans, including transfer objectives. It
describes the academic skills necessary
for success in engineering and related
technologies.
The College of Marin offers an English
assessment testing service to provide
prospective students with information to
make informed decisions when enrolling
in English courses. Students are provided with their own individual test scores.
Students, who need help in interpreting
their individual placement test scores
and/or in deciding whether to register
for or remain enrolled in an English
course, may seek assistance from a counselor or their English instructor.
04398/23-10/11 Dunmire E
W 5:10-7pm, KTD/SC111
ENGG 1254.0 units
Intro to Engineering Graphics
This course is an introduction to graphics for engineers, architects, and other
technical majors. Students learn to communicate engineering information using projection standards, auxiliary and
section views, and dimensioning. This
course includes five weeks of descriptive
geometry, and introduces CAD systems.
0441Banos R, Staff
TTh 6:10-7pm, KTD/SC125
and TTh 7:10-10pm, KTD/SC144
ENGG 150B
2.0 units
Programming in MATLAB for
Engineers
Prerequisite: COMP 150A & MATH 123
This course is designed to meet computer programming requirements for engineering transfer students, when combined with the prerequisite COMP 150A
course. Students outline, write, test, and
debug computer programs in MATLAB
to solve problems and display results,
using common examples and applications from physics and engineering.
0442 10/16-12/06 Schmitt F
MW 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC144
Late start. Meets 8 weeks. Cross
listed as COMP 150B.
ENGG 235
Statics
3.0 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Theory and mathematical analysis of
external forces and moments acting on
points, rigid bodies and structures, internal shear and moments in beams,
friction, work, and products of inertia.
For information about the English
Assessment Test, please call the Testing
Office at 485-9469 (located in the
Student Services Center, Room 238,
Kentfield Campus) for test information
on both campuses.
Some English skills courses are offered
as individualized, self-paced instruction
in the English Skills Lab (LC120/KTD
or PM180/IVC).
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
ENGL 12
1.0 unit
College Skills: Reading and
Thinking in Math
This course will give students a good
start toward math success by focusing
on the language and concepts behind
math rules. Problem-solving techniques,
estimating skills, and symbol recognition will be covered. Most importantly,
students will learn that math can make
sense. Late start. Meets approximately
six weeks.
0447 9/05-10/12 Timmel M
TTh 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/HC129
0448 10/24-12/05 Timmel M
TTh 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/HC129
ENGL 625.0 units
Developmental Reading and Writing
Prerequisite: TAKE W/ENGL 62L
Students will learn how to understand
academic reading, and how to write correct sentences and paragraphs.
0449 Timmel M
N TTh 9:40-12noon, KTD/HC129
0443 Dunmire E
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC111
44
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ENGL 62L
Developmental Reading and
Writing Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH ENGL 62
This lab component will reinforce and
extend the reading and writing skills
learned in English 62.
0450 Timmel M
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC120
ENGL 925.0 units
Reading and Writing Skills
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH ENGL 92L
Students will develop their ability to
analyze and respond to reading material
in a variety of disciplines, and to write
paragraphs using correct grammar and
sentence structure.
0461 Koenig K
N TTh 9:40-12noon, KTD/OH102
0462 Woodlief B
R MW 9:40-12noon, KTD/HC129
0463 Pasquel A
R MW 9:40-12noon, KTD/OH101
0464 Saligman I
N TTh 9:40-12noon, KTD/LC36
0465 Cavalier C
G TTh 12:40-3pm, KTD/HC169
0466Donlan K
MW 7:10-9:30pm, KTD/HC129
ENGL 92L
1.0 unit
Reading and Writing Skills Lab
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH ENGL 92
Students practice and extend the reading, grammar, and writing skills introduced in ENGL 92, and receive personal
help with their assignments.
0467 Timmel M
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC120
.COM
DiD you know? you can get free
online writing tutoring with
experienceD coM tutors.
an online writing center at the
college of Marin
http://Marin.cc.ca.us/services/owc.htM
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ENGLISH
ENGLISH SKILLS LAB – KENTFIELD CAMPUS
These courses are designed to help students develop the reading and writing skills
necessary for success and confidence in their college experience. Classes taught in the
lab are individualized and self-paced. Diagnostic tests are available to guide students
in their choice of course. Classes may be started and ended any time during the semester, or started one semester and completed the next. Each class requires approximately 48 hours per semester. Students work at their own pace during any supervised time
listed on the time chart. Students should plan to spend three hours weekly during the
hours listed to complete a unit in one semester.
ORIENTATION: Students should come to the English Skills Lab in LC 120 during the
first week of classes for orientation. Call 485-9363 for more information.
To avoid confusion, please see a Basic Skills Lab instructor before buying your books.
ENGLISH SKILLS LAB TIME CHART – KENTFIELD CAMPUS, LC 120
For Self-paced Minicourses and Lab Component of ENGL 62 and 92
Fall 2006
ENGLISH SKILLS LAB – INDIAN
VALLEY CAMPUS
ORIENTATION: Students should come
to the English Skills Lab in PM 180 during the first week of classes for orientation. Call 883-2211, ext. 8326 for more
information.
To avoid confusion, please see the Basic
Skills Lab instructor before buying your
books.
ENGLISH SKILLS LAB TIME CHART
INDIAN VALLEY CAMPUS, PM 180
For Self-paced Minicourses
Fall 2006
DAY
TIME
INSTRUCTOR
11:30am - 3:30pm
Tjernell
11:30am – 3:30pm
Tjernell
TIME
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
Thurs
Fri
9-10am
Timmel
Pasquel
Timmel
Pasquel
Bonander
10-11am
Timmel
Pasquel
Timmel
Pasquel
Bonander
11-12noon
Timmel
Pasquel
Timmel
Cavalier
Bonander
12-1pm
Timmel
Handsher
Timmel
Hansher
Bonander
1-2pm
Timmel
Handsher
Timmel
Hansher
Bonander
2-3pm
Woodlief
Hansher/
Borenstein
Woodlief
Hansher/
Borenstein
Closed
3-4pm
Woodlief
Borenstein
Woodlief
Borenstein
Closed
4-5pm
Woodlief
Borenstein
Woodlief
Borenstein
Closed
5-6pm
Carlson
Closed
Carlson
Closed
Closed
6-7pm
Carlson
Closed
Carlson
Closed
Closed
ENGL 70
1.0 unit
Phonics
0451 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 75
1.0 unit
Reading Improvement
0456 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 71
1.0 unit
Spelling I
0452 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 76
1.0 unit
Reading Comprehension
0457 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 72
1.0 unit
Spelling II
0453 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 77
1.0 unit
Independent Reading
0458 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 73
1.0 unit
Vocabulary I
0454 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 78
1.0 unit
Special Interest Workshop
0459 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 74
1.0 unit
Vocabulary II
0455 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 79
1.0 unit
Grammar Review
0460 Lab Instructor
Self-paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/LC120
ENGL 71
Spelling I
1.0 unit
4125 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 72
1.0 unit
Spelling II
4126 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 73
1.0 unit
Vocabulary I
4127 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 74
1.0 unit
Vocabulary II
4128 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 77
1.0 unit
Independent Reading
4129 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 78
1.0 unit
Special Interest Workshop
4130 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 79
1.0 unit
Grammar Review
4131 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
45
ENGLISH
ENGL 95
Advanced Spelling
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: ENGL 71 OR72 ADVISED
4132 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 96
Advanced Vocabulary
Prerequisite: ENGL 73 OR74 ADVISED
4133 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: ENGL 76 ADVISED
4134 Tjernell L
Self paced, 3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
KTD WRITING CENTER LAB:
FALL 2006
(Please note that the Writing Center
Lab starts the second week of classes.)
Students enrolled in English 98, 98SL or
English 120, 120SL will be required to
attend one hour of writing center lab per
week at their convenience during ANY
of the times listed in the chart.
Students enrolled in critical thinking
courses (English 151, 155) may seek assistance with papers and other tasks in
labs supervised by the following instructors: Cavender, Douglass, Mackintosh,
Rollison and Salem.
WRITING CENTER LAB
LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER
KTD/LC110 (Library Bldg.)—Fall 2006
DAY
TIME
INSTRUCTOR
MON
8:00 - 9:30am
C. Cavalier
9:30 – 11:00am
L Tjernell
TUES
WEDS
THURS
FRI
ENGL 98C
Paragraph and Short Essay
11:00 - 1:00pm
D Rollison
1:00 - 2:30pm
S Douglass
Students will practice reading, writing,
and critical thinking to improve reading
comprehension and to develop composing
techniques for effective academic writing. Course is designed to prepare students for college level academic reading
and writing and requires one hour weekly of Writing Center’s guided practice.
0468 Tjernell L
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/TB101
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0469 Douglass S
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC170
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0470 Staff
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/OH108
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0471 Tjernell L
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC169
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0472 Douglass S
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/TB101
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0473 Staff
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/HC169
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0474Robertson N
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/TB101
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
ENGL 98A
Grammar and Usage
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 85/ESL89
Review of the eight parts of speech,
their function in sentences, and common
usage problems.
4135 Tjernell L
Self-paced 1.3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
2:30 - 7:00pm
W Cottle
8:00 – 9:30am
C. Cavalier
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 85/ESL89
Review of sentence parts and types; sentence combining; identifying and correcting common errors in sentences; and
review of punctuation.
9:30 - 11:30am
V. Ariano
S Douglass
12:30 - 4:00pm
N Cavender
4:00 – 6:00pm
N Cavender
8:00 - 9:30am
V. Ariano
9:30 - 11:00am
L Tjernell
11:00 – 12:30pm
V Ariano
12:30 - 3:00pm
S Douglass
3:00 - 5:30pm
N Cavender
8:00 - 9:30am
C. Cavalier
9:30 – 11:00pm
W Cottle
11:00 – 12:30pm
S Douglass
12:30 – 2:00pm
B Woodlief
2:00 - 5:00pm
S Douglass
Closed
Closed
4136 Tjernell L
Self-paced 1.3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
Review of concepts in composition; practice in writing paragraphs and short
essays.
4137 Tjernell L
Self-paced 1.3hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/PM180
ENGL 98SL
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition I for Non-Native English
Speakers
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 83/ESL 89A/
TEST
Designed for non-native English speakers. Students practice reading, writing
and critical thinking to improve reading
comprehension and develop academic
writing skills. Prepares students for success in college-level reading and writing
tasks and requires one hour weekly of
guided practice in the ESL Lab and/or
Writing Center Lab.
0475 Fitzpatrick M
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DL11
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/
HC128
0476Fitzpatrick M
MW 6:40-8pm, KTD/LC36
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/
HC128
ENGL 116
3.0 units
College Reading
Develop and improve reading skills,
comprehension, reading rate, critical
reading skills, and vocabulary development.
0477 Koenig K
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/HC166
ENGL 98B
Sentences and Punctuation
11:30 – 12:30PM
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 85/ESL89
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 85/89A/TEST
1.0 unit
ENGL 97
Critical Reading
ENGL 98
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition I
1.0 unit
ENGL 117
1.0 unit
Speed Reading
In this individualized course students
will learn efficient reading techniques
that will help them double or triple their
present reading rate with increased concentration, comprehension, and retention.
0478 9/09-12/16 Saligman I
Videocassette Course, 1hr/wk TBA,
KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
ADDITIONAL TUTOR HOURS LOCATED
IN HC 218
46
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ENGLISH
.COM
DiD you know? you can get free
online writing tutoring with
experienceD coM tutors.
an online writing center at the
college of Marin
http://Marin.cc.ca.us/services/owc.htM
ENGL 120
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition II
Prerequisite: ENGL 98/98SL/TEST
Students sharpen their skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques for effective
academic writing. Course is designed to
prepare the students for success in college level academic reading and writing,
emphasis being placed upon thinking
clearly and logically and upon the construction of cogent arguments. Requires
one hour weekly of guided practice in
the Writing Center.
* Please note: English classes scheduled
in BC 101, the Computer Writing Center,
are conducted using computers as a primary mode. Writing, editing, collaborating, researching, and other activities involve computer use on a regular basis. No
special skills with computers are required
for enrollment.
0481 Robertson N
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC173
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0482 Douglass S
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC170
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0483 Steinberg C
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/HC169
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0484 Woodlief B
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/HC170
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0485 Miller T
C MW 10:10-11:30am, KTD/TB119
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0486 Staff
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC170
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0487 Cottle W
E TTh 1:10-2:30pm, KTD/BC101*/
HC161
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0488 Cottle W
L T 3:10-6pm, KTD/BC101*/HC170
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0489Schreck I
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/BC101*
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0490Schreck I
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/BC101*
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110
0479 Schreck I
** Web Based Course, 4hrs/wk
TBA, KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
0480 Schreck I
** Web Based Course, 4hrs/wk
TBA, KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
**The two sections marked with a double asterisk require students to have an
email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. There are no oncampus requirements for these sections.
Communication is by e-mail, online conferencing and phone. Once students have
officially enrolled in a section, they must
e-mail the instructor at ingrid.schreck@
marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to verify their
enrollment in a class and their e-mail address to avoid being dropped. All enrolled
students, all students on the Wait List
and all students who wish to add should
visit http://marin.cc.ca.us/homepages/
IngridSchreck/120info.html for further
instructions.
ENGL 120SL
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition II for Non-Native English
Speakers
Prerequisite: ENGL 98/98SL/TEST
This course is for non-native English
speakers. Students sharpen their skills
in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension
and skills needed for effective academic
writing. Course prepares students for
success in college level academic reading
and writing. Requires one hour weekly
of guided practice in the ESL Lab and/or
Writing Center lab.
0491 Woodlief B
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH111
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/
HC128
0492Cady J
TTh 7:10-8:30pm, KTD/LC36
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/
HC128
ENGL 150
3.0 units
Reading and Composition (1A)
Prerequisite: ENGL 120 OR 120SL. Please
note students with an APT score of 3 or an
old SAT score of 600 or a new SAT score of
680 will be eligible for Engl 150.
This course is intended to develop and
refine writing, reading, and critical
thinking abilities. Various works will be
read and discussed. The student’s writing is principally expository and argumentative.
* Please note: English classes scheduled
in BC 101, the Computer Writing Center,
are conducted using computers as a primary mode. Writing, editing, collaborating, researching, and other activities
involve computer use on a regular basis.
No special skills with computers are required for enrollment.
0495 Staff
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC169
0496 Steinberg C
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC129
0497 Douglass S
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/HC169
0498 Bowsher J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/TB101
0499 Cottle W
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/BC101*/
HC170
0500Bowsher J
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC169
0501 Mackintosh J
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC166
0502 Cottle W
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/BC101*/HC127
0503Salem H
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC170
0493 Schreck I
**Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
0494 Schreck I
**Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
**The two sections marked with a double
asterisk require students to have an email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. There are no oncampus requirements for these sections.
Communication is by e-mail, online conferencing and phone. Once students have
officially enrolled in a section, they must
e-mail the instructor at: ingrid.schreck@
marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to verify their
enrollment in a class and their e-mail address to avoid being dropped. All enrolled
students, all students on the Wait List
and all students who wish to add should
visit http://marin.cc.ca.us/homepages/
IngridSchreck/150info.html for further
instructions
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
47
ENGLISH
ENGL 1514.0 units
Reading and Composition (1B)
ENGL 1554.0 units
Critical Thinking/Composition
Prerequisite: ENGL 150
Prerequisite: ENGL 150. Please note students with an APT score of 4 will be eligible
for Engl 155.
This is a course in critical thinking and
composition which applies the skills
and vocabulary of critical thinking to
works of the imagination, as well as to
traditional argument and persuasion.
Students develop skills in analysis, interpretation and reasoning, exploring
texts that range from straight forward
pro and con argument or subtler, more
emotional discourse where views may be
implied or even masked. These texts will
be viewed from multiple perspectives,
such as psychological, historical, or philosophical. Students will write essays of
various lengths reflecting their own arguments and analysis and incorporating,
through research, the views of others.
* Please note: English classes scheduled
in BC 101, the Computer Writing Center,
are conducted using computers as a primary mode. Writing, editing, collaborating, researching, and other activities involve computer use on a regular basis. No
special skills with computers are required
for enrollment.
0506 Mackintosh J
R MW 9:10-11am, KTD/HC166
0507 Mackintosh J
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/HC166
0508 Rollison D
D TTh 11:10-1pm, KTD/BC101
0509 Cavender N
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/HC170
0510Salem H
T 6:10-10pm, KTD/HC161
0504 Rollison D
**Web Based Course 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
0505 Rollison D
**Web Based Course 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
**The two sections marked with a double
asterisk require students to have an email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. There are no oncampus attendance requirements for
these sections. Students need information from the instructor before registering at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/­
pcmedia/marinmll/. Communication is
by e-mail, online conferencing and phone.
Once students have officially enrolled in
a section, they must e-mail the instructor
at davidr@marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to
verify their e-mail address to avoid being
dropped.
48
•
This course helps students reason cogently, write clearly and persuasively,
and develop understanding and insight
into written texts. Students study informal logic concepts, including the structure of arguments, logical fallacies, impediments to critical thinking, drawing
from literary texts for examples and
illustrations. Students also examine
world views, ethical questions, current
debates, and the uses of language as a
way to deepen thinking and understanding. Student essays will be expected to
present complex ideas in a clearly reasoned, coherent manner, aptly supported
by convincing evidence.
0511 Douglass S
R MW 9:40-11:30am, KTD/OH107
0512 Cavender N
C MW 10:10-12noon, KTD/DL11
ENGL 202
Creative Writing I
3.0 units
This reading and writing course engages eligible students in both the study
and the practice of the craft of fiction,
poetry, or drama.
0513Tipton J
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/HC170
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
This reading and writing course engages eligible students in both the study
and practice of the craft of fiction, poetry,
or drama.
0514Tipton J
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/HC170
ENGL 212
Intro to Poetry
0516 9/09-12/16 Cavender N
Videocassette Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
ENGL 218
3.0 units
The American Short Story
A videocassette course based on the
PBS series, The American Short Story.
Students view film productions of the
stories they read and work at their own
pace throughout the semester.
0517 9/09-12/16 Rollison D
Videocassette Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
ENGL 223
English Literature II
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
ENGL 203
Creative Writing II
ENGL 214
3.0 units
The Popular Novel
This videocassette course examines
twentieth century American novels
that have been very successful in the
market place. Students read works by
Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Capote, Roth
and Tan, among others, and they view
corresponding videotapes from an outstanding selection of films.
3.0 units
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
This class will read and discuss important works of English literature from
the mid-seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.
0518 Rollison D
Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
Students need information from the instructor before registering at http://www.
pearsoncustom.com/pcmedia/­marinmll/.
Communication is by email, online conferencing and phone. Once students have
officially enrolled in this section, they
must send an e-mail message to the instructor at davidr@marin.cc.ca.us by
8/21/06 to verify their e-mail address to
avoid being dropped.
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
This course invites students to examine poetry as a major art form and the
historical, cultural, and literary factors
which have influenced its development.
0515Tipton J
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/HC169
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
ENGL 235
Women in Literature
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
An examination of the representation
of women and of the writing of women
in Western culture, from the Greeks
through the modern period, with particular emphasis on American authors and
cultures.
0519 Mackintosh J
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC161
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ENGLISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE
The College of Marin offers an English as a Second Language assessment testing service to provide students with information to make informed decisions when enrolling
in English as a Second Language courses. The students are provided with their own
individual test scores. Students who need help in interpreting their placement test
scores and/or in deciding whether to register for, or remain enrolled in, English as a
Second Language courses can seek assistance from a counselor or their English as a
Second Language instructor.
For information about the English as a Second Language Assessment Test, students
can call the Testing Office at 485-9469 (located in the Student Services Center, Room
238, Kentfield Campus) for test information on both campuses.
Credit English as a Second Language courses have the same goals as do classes for
native English speakers but will provide students with special help regarding the difficulties of learning English.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE LAB TIME CHART—KTD/HC128—FALL 2006
TIME
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
9-10am
Patel
Koffman
Lavin
Koffman
Closed
10-11am
Dill
Koffman
Reisinger
Bonander
Closed
11-12noon
Dill
Koffman
Reisinger
Bonander
Closed
12-1pm
Lavin
Walsh
Lavin
Walsh
Closed
1-2pm
Lavin
Walsh
Lavin
Walsh
Closed
2-3pm
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
3-4pm
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
4-5pm
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
5-6pm
Cady
Dill
Fitzpatrick
Lieberman
Closed
6-7pm
Cady to
6:30pm
Dill
Fitzpatrick to
6:30pm
Lieberman/
Reisinger
Closed
ESL 40L0.5-1 unit
Low Intermediate ESL Skills Lab
Low intermediate students will improve
their English skills in this ESL computer lab.
0534 Koffman L
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
0535 Koffman L
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
Offered for 1.0 student unit.
ESL 534.0 units
Intermediate ESL: Writing and
Grammar
Prerequisite: PLACEMNT TEST ADVISD
Introduces the conventions of standard
written English to non-native English
speakers and reviews basic grammar
structures. Emphasis is placed on sentence structure and the correct use of
tenses. Requires one hour weekly to be
arranged in the ESL lab.
0536 Bonander B
F MW 11:40-1:30pm, KTD/OH107
and 1hr/wk TBA, HC128
0537Koffman L
TTh 6:10-8pm, KTD/HC127
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
ESL 564.0 units
Intermediate ESL: Words I
Prerequisite: PLACEMNT TEST ADVISD
Designed to improve the reading comprehension and vocabulary usage of nonnative speakers of English. This course
will include reading skills, study skills,
and short writing exercises.
ESL 58B
Pronunciation II
2.0 units
Prerequisite:
Students will practice stress and intonation patterns of American English to
improve their pronunciation.
0541 10/16-12/06 Walsh W
MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC126
Late start. Meets 8 weeks.
ESL 60
3.0 units
Intermediate ESL: Listening and
Speaking
Prerequisite: TEST OR ESL 47 ADVIS
This is an intermediate course in listening and speaking recommended for
nonnative speakers taking 50-level or
60-level ESL courses. Oral practice in
speaking and understanding English
through the use of videos, audiocassettes, and other materials related to
class work. Emphasis on small group
communication.
0542 Lieberman L
G TTh 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/HC126
ESL 634.0 units
High Intermediate ESL: Writing and
Grammar
Prerequisite: TEST/ESL53/54/55 ADV
This course is designed to improve the
writing skills for high intermediate nonnative English speakers. There is an emphasis on grammatical accuracy and on
writing a logical sequence of sentences
in organized paragraphs. Completion of
all 50-level ESL courses is recommended. Requires one hour weekly to be arranged in the ESL lab.
0538 Walsh W
R MW 9:40-11:30am, KTD/HC126
0539Cady J
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC126
0543 Bonander B
K TTh 8:10-10am, KTD/HC161
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
0544Lieberman L
TTh 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC172
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
ESL 58A
Pronunciation I
ESL 664.0 units
High Intermediate ESL: Words II
2.0 units
Prerequisite:
Prerequisite: TEST/ESL46/56 ADVISD
Students will practice the sound system
and the rhythm of American English to
improve their pronunciation.
Designed to improve the reading comprehension and vocabulary usage of nonnative speakers of English. Students
will read stories and short novels, newspapers and other informational articles.
Students will gain library and dictionary skills. Completion of all 50-level ESL
classes is recommended.
0540 8/21-10/11 Walsh W
MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC126
Meets 8 weeks.
0545 Walsh W
A TTh 10:10-12noon, KTD/HC126
0546Dent C
MW 7:10-9pm, KTD/OH103
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
49
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Learn English!
New grammar/writing ESL
classes! Intermediate and
advanced levels!
ESL 80
3.0 units
Advanced ESL: Listening and Speaking
Prerequisite: TEST ORESL60/67 ADVD
This course in listening and speaking
is recommended for low-advanced to
advanced non-native English speakers.
This course will help students improve
oral skills necessary in social, academic
and workplace situations. Students will
practice listening and note taking skills,
conduct interviews, give presentations,
and lead discussion sessions.
0551 Reisinger J
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/LC36
ESL 834.0 units
Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
ESL 734.0 units
Low Advanced ESL: Writing and
Grammar
Prerequisite: TEST/ESL63/64/65 ADV
In this course, students improve their
writing skills, including writing effective paragraphs and short composition
Intermediate and advanced grammar
structures and punctuation are reviewed. Completion of all 60-level ESL
courses is recommended. Requires one
hour weekly to be arranged in the ESL
lab.
0547 Bonander B
M MW 8:10-10am, KTD/HC127
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
0548Dent C
TTh 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC129
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
ESL 764.0 units
Low Advanced ESL: Words III
Prerequisite: TEST OR ESL 66 ADVSD
Designed to help low advanced ESL students improve reading comprehension
and to develop academic vocabulary. In
this course students will read and discuss novels and participate in a group library research project. Completion of all
60-level ESL courses is recommended.
Prerequisite: TEST/ESL73/74/75 ADV
This ESL course is suitable for the advance student with a strong foundation
in English grammar and writing. This
course is designed to review and build
upon grammar and writing skills, enabling the student to function in academic courses and write short papers
with a controlling idea. Completion of
all 70-level ESL courses is recommended. Requires one hour weekly to be arranged in the ESL lab.
0552 Lavin R
G TTh 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC127
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
0553Reisinger J
TTh 7:10-9pm, KTD/OH102
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/HC128
ESL 864.0 units
Advanced ESL Words IV
Prerequisite: TEST OR ESL 76 ADV
Designed to help advanced ESL students improve textbook reading skills,
comprehension, critical thinking, and
academic vocabulary.
0554 Lavin R
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/HC127
0555Dill R
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/DH103
ENGL 98SL
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition I for Non-Native English
Speakers
Prerequisite: ENGL 92/ESL 83/ESL 89A/
TEST
Designed for non-native English speakers. Students practice reading, writing
and critical thinking to improve reading
comprehension and develop academic
writing skills. Prepares students for success in college-level reading and writing
tasks and requires one hour weekly of
guided practice in the ESL Lab and/or
Writing Center Lab.
0475 Fitzpatrick M
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DL11
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/HC128
0476Fitzpatrick M
MW 6:40-8pm, KTD/LC36
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/HC128
ENGL 120SL
3.0 units
Intro to College Reading and
Composition II for Non-Native English
Speakers
Prerequisite: ENGL 98/98SL/TEST
This course is for non-native English
speakers. Students sharpen their skills
in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension
and skills needed for effective academic
writing. Course prepares students for
success in college level academic reading
and writing. Requires one hour weekly
of guided practice in the ESL Lab and/or
Writing Center lab.
0491 Woodlief B
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH111
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/
HC128
0492Cady J
TTh 7:10-8:30pm, KTD/LC36
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/LC110/HC128
0549 Lavin R
C MW 10:10-12noon, KTD/HC127
0550Patel B
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/OH108
50
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING
ENVIRONMENTAL
LANDSCAPING
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ELND 110A
1.5 units
Intro to Environmental Landscaping
A foundation class for anyone interested
in plants as a career or a hobby. This
short course covers environmentally
sound principles fundamental for gardening or landscaping. Class addresses
career paths in the landscape field, basic
plant structure, physiology and identification, principles of soil structure and
function. This short class is the first half
of a two-part sequence. Students are
advised to take the continuation course:
ELND 110B.
05238/21-10/09 Agudelo-Silva F
M 5:10-8pm, KTD/DL12
ELND 110B
1.5 units
Intro to Environmental Landscaping
This course covers basic environmentally sound principles fundamental for
gardening or landscaping. Class covers topics on garden and landscape design, plant establishment, ecologically
integrated methods to manage insects,
mites and plant diseases, and pruning
principles.
052410/16-12/04 Agudelo-Silva F
M 5:10-8pm, KTD/DL12
Late start. Meets 8 weeks.
ELND 154A
1.5 units
Plant Materials I
Identification, habits of growth, cultural
and environmental requirements, and
use of woody and herbaceous plants
grown in the landscape. Plants will be
studied during the time of the year when
they are of significant interest in the
landscape. (Covers plants that are attractive in the summer and fall.) This
is a short course of eight weeks and
the first part of the plant identification
course, Plant Materials I.
05258/24-10/12 Ellis Q
Th 4:40-8:30pm, KTD/DL11
ELND 154B
1.5 units
Plant Materials I
Identification, habits of growth, cultural
and environmental requirements, and
use of woody and herbaceous plants
grown in the landscape. Plants will be
studied during the time of the year when
they are of significant interest in the
landscape. (Covers plants that are attractive in the winter and spring.) This
is a short course of eight weeks and the
second part of the plant identification
course, Plant Materials I.
052610/19-12/07 Ellis Q
Th 4:40-8:30pm, KTD/DL11
ELND 157
3.0 units
Principles of Landscape Design
Prerequisite: ARCH 120
This course covers the history of landscape design, as well as basic site analysis and the fundamentals of producing
an actual design.
0527Alley T
M 5:10-10pm, KTD/FA153
and Sat 10:10-2pm, KTD/FA153
Meets 12 M’s 5:10-10pm on 8/21,
28; 9/11, 18, 25; 10/9, 16, 23; 11/6,
27; 12/4, 11, and one M 5:10-9pm
on 10/2. Meets four Sat’s 10:102pm on 8/26; 9/30; 10/28; 11/11.
ELND 158
3.0 units
Landscape Materials and Construction
This course will introduce various landscape materials and the techniques required to install them correctly. The
course will also provide information
necessary for the California Landscape
Contractors examination.
0528Ellis Q
W 4:40-9:30pm, KTD/DL11
and Sat 10:10-4pm, KTD/DL11
Meets 12 W’s 4:40-9:30pm on 8/23,
30; 9/6, 13, 20, 27; 10/4, 11, 18, 25;
11/1, 8, and four W’s 4:40-6:30pm
on 11/15, 22, 29; 12/6. Meets two
Sat’s 10:10-4pm on 9/9, 16.
INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT
(ELND 210ABC)
A series of three one-unit courses offered
in integrated pest management.
ELND 210A
1.0 unit
Integrated Pest Management
A class essential for anyone interested
in ecologically- sound management of
insects, microbes and weeds in gardens
and landscapes. This short course covers principles and process to establish
an IPM plan. Class addresses concepts
about the ecological basis for IPM, factors to consider in IPM and the process
to establish and IPM plan for gardens
or landscapes. The information provided in this class may be applicable to
earn units for Pest Control Advisers in
California. Students are advised to take
the continuation course: ELND210B.
0529 8/24-9/14 Agudelo-Silva F
Th 1:10-4:30pm, KTD/DL12
ELND 210B
1.0 unit
Insect Identification and Management
A foundation class essential for anyone interested in the ecologically sound
management of arthropods in gardens
and landscape. This course covers identification of common insects, mites, spiders and other arthropods found in
gardens and landscapes and strategies,
methods and tools for their management. This includes biological, chemical
and cultural approaches. The information provided in this class may be applicable to earn units for Pest Control
Advisers in California. Students are
advised to take the continuation course:
ELND210C.
0530 9/21-10/26 Agudelo-Silva F
Th 1:10-4:30pm, KTD/DL12
ELND 210C
1.0 unit
Integrated Pest Management of Plant
Diseases and Weeds
A foundation class for anyone interested
in ecologically sound gardening or landscaping. This course covers principles
and methods to identify diseases and
weeds found in gardens and landscapes
and strategies, methods and tools for
their management. This includes biological, chemical and cultural approaches.
The information provided in this class
may be applicable to earn units for Pest
Control Advisers in California.
0531 11/02-12/07 Agudelo-Silva F
Th 1:10-4:30pm, KTD/DL12
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
51
ETHNIC STUDIES
ETHNIC STUDIES
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES
FULFILL US HISTORY REQUIREMENTS
Ethnic Studies 151
Native American History
Ethnic Studies 121
History of La Raza
Ethnic Studies 111/112
History of Black Americans
UC & CSU Transferable
ETST 111
3.0 units
Black American History A
A chronological survey of the African/
African American experience designed
to provide an understanding of the
African/African American experience in
the context of American History.
0556 Turner W
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH30
ETST 112
3.0 units
Black American History B
A chronological survey of the African
experience since 1870 designed to provide an understanding of the African
American experience in the context of
American History.
0557 Turner W
B MW 1:10-2:30pm, KTD/FH120
ETST 121
3.0 units
History of La Raza in United States
A chronological survey of the La Raza
experience in North America from preColumbian beginnings to the contemporary era.
0558Rivera R
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DH111
ETST 125
3.0 units
Research Methods and Term Papers in
the Social Sciences
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
ETST 151
3.0 units
Native American History
A chronological survey of the Native
American experience in North America
from pre-European interactions through
to the contemporary period.
0560 BigEagle N
L Th 3:10-6pm, KTD/DH30
0561BigEagle N
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/OH108
ETST 154
3.0 units
Native American Literature
This course will be an introduction to
Native American literature, both poetry
and fiction, and will give students an
overview of selected Native American
authors and their work. It will also introduce students to creative writing and
develop cross-cultural understanding.
0562 BigEagle N
H M 3:10-6pm, KTD/DH30
FILM
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
CINEMA STUDIES
COMM 108AE
1.0 unit
Film: Precode Film - Dangerous Men
A companion course to “Complicated
Women” of the Pre-code Period,
“Dangerous Men” is an exploration of
the men of pre-code films and the turbulent society that created them. Precode films’ portrayal of gangsters who
tried to beat the system, wisecracking
journalists, sensitive nonconformists
and confident freaks helped create the
modern man. These men were fascinating characters, simultaneously vulnerable and tough in their struggles with
war, poverty and the myriad complexities of a new, faster age. The daring “precode” period in Hollywood— five short
years from 1929 to 1934 -ended with
the Hollywood Production Code which
limited how films could treat sexuality,
crimes against the law, language and
costumes.
0267 One Sat/Sun: 10/21 & 10/22
Handsher S
Sat/Sun 9:10-6pm, KTD/FA72
Introduction to college level research
papers and critical thinking in social
sciences and related fields. Term papers
required for other classes may be developed in this course. (See also S SC 125,
ECON 125, HIST 125, and POLS 125.)
COMM 108I
1.0 unit
Film: Independent Films
A guided tour of American independent
cinema of the 1980s and 1990s, this
course looks at how and why “indie films”
resist the Hollywood system in order to
experiment in both content and style.
Indie directors give audiences openeyed looks at modern life that establishment Hollywood dares not to see but
later imitates. Directors like Spike Lee,
Michael Moore, Richard Linklater, Ang
Lee, Rose Troche provide us long-gazes
at nonwhite and off-white lives, gay issues, anti-corporate politics, and slacker
lifestyles.
02688/24-12/07 Crosby F
Th 6:40-10pm, KTD/LC86
Meets Th’s: 8/24, 9/7, 10/5, 11/2,
12/7.
COMM 108W
1.0 unit
Film: Women Directors
This course focuses on ground-breaking films made by women directors.
Innovations (the first film story) and
contributions (boom microphone) of female directors will be traced. The history of the equal presence of women directors before the use of sound and the
disappearance of women in positions
of power during the studio period will
be examined. Films screened in class
will span film history from the earliest
silents (such as the comedies of Alice
Guy Blache and the political films for
women’s vote) to the first sound films
(Dorothy Arzner discovered Katharine
Hepburn), to recent films directed by
women.
0269 One Sat/Sun: 9/16 & 9/17.
Crosby F
Sat/Sun 9:10-6pm, KTD/FA72
COMM 109A4.0 units
Film History: Beginning to 1950
This course offers a chronological survey
of narrative film as art, business, technology, and politics from the beginning
of the movies in the 1890s to post World
War II. Classroom screenings of representative films. Taught concurrently
with HUM 109A. Students may register
for COMM 109A or HUM 109A and receive credit for only one course.
0270Handsher S
M 6:10-10pm, KTD/FH120
0559 Adams L
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH111
52
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
FRENCH
COMM 109B4.0 units
Film History: 1950 to Present
This course offers a chronological survey
of narrative film as art, business, technology, and politics from post World War
II to the present. Classroom screenings
of representative films. for COMM 109B
or HUM 109B and receive credit for only
one course.
0271Marmysz J
Th 6:10-10pm, KTD/OH96
FILM PRODUCTION
COMM 140
3.0 units
Film Direction
Functions of the director in relation to
cast and crew; process of casting, script
breakdown, blocking, dramatic and
cinematic interpretation of scripted
material; practice in crew functions following the professional model. We will
explore how the director and crew operate in a variety of genres, i.e. Theatrical,
Documentary, Commercial, Training,
etc.
0273 Crosby F
C MW 10:10-12:30pm, KTD/LC86
COMM 145
2.0 units
Developing Ideas for Film, Multimedia,
and Video Projects
This introductory class is appropriate
for anyone who needs to gain basic skills
needed to create a script for short media
projects. Students will learn how to develop scripts for documentary, narrative,
music, experimental, interview, multimedia, personal and promotional film
and video projects.
02749/06-11/15 Crosby F
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/LC86
COMM 1504.0 units
Intro to Filmmaking
In this class students learn the basics of
film production. This introductory class
is appropriate for anyone who is considering a career in cinema or who wants to
take a filmmaking class for fun and personal enrichment. ($7 material fee)
0275 Crosby F
B MW 1:10-4pm, KTD/LC86
0276Kennell G
TTh 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/LC86
COMM 240
3.0 units
Advanced Production Projects
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This class is an advanced level production workshop where students, working
in groups or individually, complete their
second-year films. In addition, students
have the option of working as crew or in
some area of postproduction on another
students’ project in lieu of a project of
their own.
0280 9/09-12/03 Crosby F
Sat/Sun 9:10-3:30pm, KTD/LC86
Meets Sat/Sun’s: 9/9, 10; 10/7, 8;
11/4, 5; 12/2, 3.
SCREENWRITING
COMM 161
3.0 units
Film and TV Writing
Fundamentals of plotting and structuring stories for TV and feature films from
story idea to finished screenplay. ($5
material fee)
0279 Crosby F
L T 2:10-5pm, KTD/LC86
FIRE TECHNOLOGY
FIRE 112
6.0 units
Emergency Medical Technician I
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course is for people who will be responding to the sick or injured and will
work in the capacity of basic life support
providers. This can include, but not limited to, firefighters, police, nurses, trainers, and industrial safety personnel. ($73
material fee)
4138 Florence D
MW 6:10-10pm, IVC/PM188
Ten additional hours TBA for ambulance/hospital/observation.
FRENCH
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
FREN 1015.0 units
Elementary French I
Speaking, understanding, reading, and
writing French. Introduction to French
culture. Labs, audiovisual materials.
0565 Goff-Tuttle M
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/OH103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0566Buquen K
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/OH102
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
FREN 1025.0 units
Elementary French II
Prerequisite: FREN 101
Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.
Further explanation of French culture.
Use of labs and audiovisual materials.
0567 Vieira V
R MW 9:10-11am, KTD/OH102
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
FREN 1104.0 units
French Conversation I
Use of modern colloquial French in conversation with elementary grammar.
Designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken language with
a minimum of formal grammar through
interaction and role-playing. Oral practice in speaking and understanding
French through the use of videos, audiocassettes, and other audiovisual packages related to class work. Use of audio
materials depicting everyday situations
for improving fluency and accuracy in
pronunciation.
0568 Levin D
G T 12:10-3pm, KTD/OH105
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
FREN 2035.0 units
Intermediate French III
Prerequisite: FREN 102
Grammar review, speaking, reading,
composition, and exploration of French
culture. Use of tapes and audiovisual
materials for fluency and accuracy.
0569 Vieira V
F MW 11:10-1pm, KTD/OH103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
53
GEOGRAPHY
GEOGRAPHY
GEOLOGY
GEOG 101
3.0 units
Physical Environment
A survey of the matter, processes, and
interrelationships which develop the
land, air, water, and natural vegetation
patterns of the earth.
GEOL 99
3.0 units
General Science
Many students feel unprepared to take
college level science courses. This is an
introductory course designed for students who have not taken or were previously unsuccessful in other science
courses, and for students who have been
away from school for an extended period
of time. The class covers basic scientific
principles and concepts of the physical
and life sciences and prepares students
to move into other science classes with
the information, understanding, and
skills required to succeed. Introductory
topics in biology, chemistry, geography,
geology, meteorology, and physics are
discussed. This course also provides an
excellent overview of the most important
topics in science today for anyone interested in learning more about the natural
world.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
0573 Foss D
D Th 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC159
GEOG 101L
Physical Environment Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: GEOG 101 OR CNCR ENR
The geographic grid, atlases, topographic maps, rocks, and tectonic activity;
weather and climate; natural vegetation,
and soils are studied. Meets at various
locations in Marin County. Students
must provide their own transportation.
0574 Foss D
L Th 2:40-5:30pm, KTD/SC159
GEOG 102
3.0 units
Human Environment
The interrelationships of mankind
and the environment. Populations, migrations, cultural innovations. Note:
Courses offered by the Social Science
Department may require research papers, reports, or related activities. Social
Science 125 may be taken concurrently
with this course and will provide direct
assistance in these assignments.
0575 Minasian V
J W 12:10-3pm, KTD/OH108
GEOG 125
1.5 units
Intro to Geographic Information
Systems
Prerequisite: CIS/COMP 110 ADVISED
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Geographic Information
Systems and provides instruction
and training in the use of Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) software
that supports acquisition, storage, integration, and analysis of geographic
data. The course introduces the student to GIS, the use of ArcGIS software
and prepares the student for applying
ArcGIS in a successive course that involves the completion of a project related
to their disciplinary interest.
05768/22-10/12 Salcedo N
MW 6:10-8:30pm, KTD/SC144
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
05809/20-12/13 Bero D
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC166
and 1hr/wk TBA
Late start. Meets 13 weeks.
May also be taken as BIOL 99.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
GEOL 101
1.0 unit
Geological Field Excursions to
National Parks
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH GEOL 102
A study of geologic environments of selected national parks in California.
0581 Bero D
50 hrs to be arranged. Student
must also register for Geol 102.
Dates of fieldtrips will be announced in Geol 102 (three 2-day
weekends).
GEOL 102
2.0 units
Geologic Setting of the National
Parks
Designed for students’ enrichment of the
natural environment of national parks,
with emphasis on parks of the Western
hemisphere.
0582Bero D
M 6:10-8pm, KTD/SC159
GEOL 120
3.0 units
Physical Geology
A study of the basic principles of geology
and the processes responsible for the formation of rocks, minerals, and the natural landforms of the Earth.
0584 Foss D
E T 11:10-2pm, KTD/SC159
0585Foss D
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/SC159
GEOL 120L
Physical Geology Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: GEOL 120 OR CNCR ENR
A hands-on study of minerals, rocks,
maps, and geologic field problems. Skills
that will enable students to interpret
the geologic condition of their surroundings. Field trips to be arranged.
0586 Foss D
L T 2:40-5:30pm, KTD/SC166
0587Foss D
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/SC166
GEOL 128
2.0 units
Geologic Studies of Pt. Reyes and the
San Andreas Fault
Via field observation and lecture this
course acquaints both general interest
students and geology majors to the geological features and history of the Point
Reyes Peninsula and the San Andreas
Fault. Fresh air and moderate hiking
exercise are included for no additional
fee.
0588 Locke J
Orientation meeting Sat, 8/26,
10‑12noon in SC 159. Five 8-hour
field trips to be arranged.
GEOL 138
3.0 units
Intro to Environmental Science
This course identifies the environmental problems of our modern world, offers
solutions compatible with humankind’s
need for natural resources and strikes
the balance requisite for humankind’s
survival, the maintenance of a sustained environment.
0589Mueller J
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC101
May also be taken as BIOL 138.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
GEOL 109
3.0 units
General Oceanography
A general survey course in ocean science.
0583 Locke J
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/SC159
54
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
HISTORY
GEOL 142
3.0 units
Environmental Policy and Planning
This course is a study of federal, state,
and local environmental legislation. It is
a chronology of America’s awakening to
environmental issues and a study of our
efforts to resolve these issues through
the planning process. An understanding
of the content of this course is vital for
environmental scientists, planners, and
developers.
0590Bailey B
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC191
May also be taken as BIOL 142.
Students receive credit for only
one course.
HEALTH EDUCATION
HOLISTIC HEALTH PROGRAM
SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY
Courses in Holistic Health may be offered in the Fall 2006 term at College of
Marin/IVC. For the most current and
complete information, go to http://www.
sfsu.edu/~apd/marin.htm. For information on the Holistic Health program,
contact Richard Kay, at 415.405.7772 or
send an email to rkay@sfsu.edu.
H ED 112
3.0 units
Drugs and Society
Factual and unbiased information about
legal and illegal drugs and their use and
abuse in society. Material presented in a
manner that can be understood without
a background in biology or chemistry.
0594 Webster J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/PE23
0595 Webster J
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/PE23
H ED 115
3.0 units
Weight Control, Exercise and
Nutrition
This class is designed to provide the student with the nutrition and physiological
information to develop a healthier lifestyle and weight control.
0596Goldman C
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/PE22
H ED 130
3.0 units
Web Based Course Contemporary
Health Issues
This course will provide the individual
with the latest research, recommendations, and information on the prevention
of illness and the achievement of holistic
health for body, mind and spirit.
0597 Smyth K
Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
This course requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. There are no
on-campus attendance requirements for
this course. Communication is by e-mail,
online conferencing and phone. Once
students have officially enrolled in this
course, they must send an e-mail to the
instructor at ksmyth@marin.cc.ca.us by
8/21/06 to verify their enrollment in the
class and their e-mail address to avoid
being dropped.
HISTORY
NOTE: Please read complete catalog descriptions and recommendations before
enrolling in History 100, 117 or 118.
Courses offered by the Social Science
Department may require research papers, reports, or related activities. Social
Science 125, “Research Methods and
Term Papers in Social Sciences,” may
be taken concurrently with the following courses and will provide direct assistance in these assignments.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
HIST 100
3.0 units
Survey of American History
History of the United States from its
Native American and colonial background to the present. Social, economic,
and political institutions and developments are examined. History 117 and
118 are recommended or required for
majors and minors in history, teaching,
social science, prelegal, and certain other areas.
0598 9/09-12/16 Minasian V
Television Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
0599 Bellisimo Y
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH111
0600Helgren J
W 6:40-9pm, KTD/DH111
HIST 1014.0 units
World History I: Origins of the Major
Traditions
Investigations of early Near-Eastern,
Indian, Chinese, Graeco-Roman, SubSaharan, Pre-Columbian and Medieval
traditions; their rise, expansion and
transformations through the fifteenth
century.
0601Minasian V
T 6:10-10pm, KTD/DH101
HIST 103
3.0 units
Science, Technology and Civilization
This course is a nontechnical introduction to the history of science and technology, examining their impact upon
civilization, including significant social,
religious, ethical, and political issues
resulting from scientific and technological advances. It may also be offered as a
self-paced distance learning course with
students viewing videocassettes at their
convenience.
0602 9/09-12/16 Minasian V
Videocassette Course, 3hrs/wk
TBA, KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
HIST 110
3.0 units
Western Civilization I
Western civilization from Middle
Eastern origins through classical Greek
and Roman civilizations and the Middle
Ages.
0603 Minasian V
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FH120
HIST 111
3.0 units
Western Civilization II
Western Civilization during the
Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the
French Revolution and the Napoleon
era, and concluding with the Congress
of Vienna.
0604 Fearnley H
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH30
HIST 112
3.0 units
Western Civilization III
Nineteenth-twentieth centuries, growth
of industrial civilization, nationalism,
imperialism, the World Wars, and the
West’s interaction with the non-Western
world.
0605 Minasian V
E TTh 1:40-3pm, KTD/DH111
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
55
HISTORY
HIST 117
3.0 units
United States History I
An economic, political, social, and cultural survey of the United States from
its pre-Columbian beginnings through
the Civil War.
0606 Turner W
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH30
0607 Bellisimo Y
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH111
HIST 118
3.0 units
United States History II
An economic, political, social, and cultural survey of the United States from
1865 to the present.
0608 Turner W
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH30
0609 Turner W
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH30
0610 Bellisimo Y
B MW 1:10-2:30pm, KTD/DH101
HIST 125
3.0 units
Research Methods and Term Papers in
the Social Sciences
HUM 109B4.0 units
Film History: 1950 to the Present
This course offers a chronological survey
of narrative film as art, business, technology, and politics from post World War
II to the present. Classroom screenings
of representative films. Taught concurrently with COMM 109B. Students may
register for HUM 109B or COMM 109B
and receive credit for only one course.
JAPANESE
0616 Marmysz J
Th 6:10-10pm, KTD/OH96
0628Prince K
TTh 4:10-6pm, KTD/HC165
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
ITALIAN
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
ITAL 1015.0 units
Elementary Italian I
Speaking, understanding, reading, and
writing Italian. An introduction to
Italian culture and realities. Labs and
audiovisual materials.
Introduction to college level research
papers and critical thinking in social
sciences and related fields. Term papers
required for other classes may be developed in this course. (See also S SC 125,
ECON 125, ETST 125, POLS 125.)
0620 Freschi K
R MW 9:10-11am, KTD/OH103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0621 Freschi K
A TTh 10:10-12noon, KTD/OH107
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0622Labriola C
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC161
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0611 Adams L
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH111
ITAL 1025.0 units
Elementary Italian II
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Prerequisite: ITAL 101
HUMANITIES
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Italian.
Further exploration of Italian culture.
Use of labs and audiovisual materials.
HUM 109A4.0 units
Film History: Beginning to 1950
This course offers a chronological survey
of narrative film as art, business, technology, and politics from the beginning
of the movies in the 1890s to post World
War II. Classroom screenings of representative films. Taught concurrently
with COMM 109A. Students may register for HUM 109A or COMM 109A and
receive credit for only one course
0623Smith D
TTh 4:10-6pm, KTD/HC171
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0615 Handsher S
M 6:10-10pm, KTD/FH120
0624 Freschi K
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/OH104
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
56
•
ITAL 2035.0 units
Intermediate Italian III
Prerequisite: ITAL 102
Grammar review, speaking, reading,
composition, and exploration of Italian
culture. Use of tapes and audiovisual
materials for fluency and accuracy.
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
JPNS 1015.0 units
Elementary Japanese I
Speaking, understanding, reading, and
writing Japanese. Understanding aspects of Japanese culture and realities.
Use of labs and audiovisual materials.
JPNS 1025.0 units
Elementary Japanese II
Prerequisite: JPNS 101
Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Japanese.
Further explanation of Japanese culture.
Use of labs and audiovisual materials.
0629Shiota K
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/HC172
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
JPNS 108
1.0 unit
Japanese Conversation through the
Movies
Prerequisite: JPNS 101
This course will present selected works
of certain Japanese directors, such as
Akira Kurosawa, Kon Ichikawa, and
Masaki Shuo. Students will read a selection of the original novels or the script
from the movie.
0630 8/26-10/21 Shiota K
Sat 10:10-12noon, KTD/FA120
JPNS 1104.0 units
Japanese Conversation I
Use of modern colloquial Japanese in
conversation and the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students
who wish to acquire skills of the spoken
language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Oral practice in speaking and
understanding Japanese through the
use of videos, audio cassettes, and other
audiovisual packages. Use of audio materials improves accuracy and fluency in
pronunciation.
0631Shiota K
TTh 6:40-8pm, KTD/HC169
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
LIBRARY
JPNS 2035.0 units
Intermediate Japanese III
Prerequisite: JPNS 102
Understanding, speaking, reading and
writing in modern Japanese, covering
basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary, along with an exploration of cultural aspects of Japan and the Japanese.
0632Prince K
TTh 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/OH103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
Let’s Learn Japanese
NIHONGO? CULTURE?
LITERATURE? HISTORY?
MARTIAL ARTS?
MOVIES? ANIME?
MANGA? VIDEO GAME?
Contact
kazuko.shiota@marin.cc.ca.us
JOURNALISM
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
JOUN 110
3.0 units
Intro to Mass Communication
Prerequisite: S SC 125 ADVISED
A critical historical survey of mass media including print (newspapers, magazines, books), broadcast (radio and television), film, audio recording, images,
news gathering and reporting, public relations, advertising, media rights and responsibilities, media ethics and impact,
audience and feedback, cyber media, and
global media. Designed for general education, career exploration, and consumer
understanding of the interacting and influences among and between media and
our culture.
0636Dougan M
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC165
May be taken as JOUN 110 or
COMM 110. Students receive
credit for only one course.
JOUN 115
3.0 units
News Reporting and Writing
Students will gain knowledge about
writing and reporting for modern media, including newspapers, wire services,
television, radio, magazines, public relations, advertising and photojournalism.
The principal focus will be on writing
and reporting for newspapers, and will
include story-writing assignments for
the student newspaper or other media.
0637 Dougan M
B MW 1:10-2:30pm, KTD/LC36
JOUN 122
2.5 units
Newspaper Production, Writing
Students will gain practical experience in producing the student newspaper. They will apply their knowledge in
news reporting and writing, and develop
their knowledge and skills in the fundamentals of headlines, text, photos and
cutlines; story design; page design for
a tabloid format; photos and art; packaging; special effects; and infographics. Students in this course serve as the
editorial board of the school newspaper.
Together with students in “Newspaper
Production,” they produce the student
newspaper.
0638 Dougan M
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/LC32
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC32
JOUN 123
2.5 units
Newspaper Production
Students will gain practical experience
in producing the student newspaper.
They will develop knowledge and skills
in a variety of nonwriting functions relating to newspaper production: advertising, circulation, graphics, photography,
desktop publishing, and word processing. They also will gain knowledge and
skills in all aspects of newspaper design
including fundamentals of headlines,
text, photos, and cutlines; story design;
page design for a tabloid format; photos
and art; packaging; special effects; and
infographics. Together with students in
“Newspaper Production, Writing,” they
produce the student newspaper.
0639 Dougan M
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/LC32
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC32
JOUN 160
3.0 units
Images of Women and Minorities in
American Media
The principal goal of this course is to
help students understand how culture,
gender, ethnicity, and race affect the
portrayal of women and minorities in
American media and, in turn, how
their portrayal in media affects their
perceptions and images of these groups.
Students will explore various aspects
of women and minorities in American
media. The major focus will be on
studying how women and minorities
are portrayed and portray themselves
in movies, radio, recorded music, and
television. This is a general education
course that also will meet the American
cultures requirement at the University
of California, Berkeley. May be taken
for credit as JOUN 160 or COMM 160.
Students receive credit for only one
course.
0640 9/05-12/08 Dougan M
TTh 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC165
Late start. Meets for 14 weeks.
0641Borenstein B
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC165
LIBRARY
LIBR 110 teaches access to both print
and electronic resources (including the
World Wide Web).
LIBR 110
1.0 unit
Intro to Library Resources
Learn the basic skills of library research
in this self-directed, transferable course
that allows you to work on assignments
whenever the college library is open.
No class meetings. Students must attend one orientation meeting. Contact
instructor to confirm your registration
during the first week of class.
0645 8/21-9/29 Staff
Approx. 24 self directed hours
TBA, KTD/LREF
Orientation: M 8/21, 6-7pm,
KTD/Library reference area
0646 10/30-12/08 Staff
Approx. 24 self directed hours
TBA, KTD/LREF
Orientation: M 10/30, 6-7pm,
KTD/Library reference area
Become a
good
researcher
Take LIBR 110
Learn the basic techniques of effective,
efficient, and relevant searching when using
both print and electronic resources.
• 1 Unit
• Self-directed
• No class meetings
• Inquire in the Library
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
57
MACHINE AND METALS TECHNOLOGY
MACHINE AND METALS
TECHNOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
MACH 120
3.0 units
Machine Technology I
Practice on drilling machines, lathes,
milling machines, grinders, bench operations, and precision measurements.
4140 Lutz A
TTh 7:40-8:30pm, IVC/PM111
and TTh 8:40-10pm, IVC/PM160
MACH 121
Machine Technology II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MACH 120
Develop advanced skills in machining
techniques utilizing lathes, milling and
drilling machines, and grinders.
4142 Lutz A
TTh 7:40-8:30pm, IVC/PM111
and TTh 8:40-9:30pm, IVC/PM160
MACH 130
2.0 units
Welding I
Introduction to oxy-fuel welding and cutting; basic arc welding.
4143 Owen J
K Th 8:10-9am, IVC/PM111
and Th 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM167
4144 Owen J
D T 8:10-9am, IVC/PM111
and T 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM167
4145 Owen J
M 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM111
and M 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM167
4146 Owen J
W 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM111
and W 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM167
WELDING II, ADVANCED WELDING
(MACH 131, 230)
Welding skill advancement and continued practice toward employment in industry.
MACH 131
Welding II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MACH 130
4148 Owen J
T 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM111
and T 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM167
MACH 230
Advanced Welding
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MACH 131
4154 Owen J
T 6:10-7pm, IVC/PM111
and T 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM167
MACH 1404.0 units
Intermediate Machine Tool Processes
Prerequisite: MACH 120 ADVISED
This is a course in theory and practice of
machine tool technology, with emphasis
on lathes, mills, grinders, and drilling
machines.
4150 Lutz A
M 5:40-7:30pm, IVC/PM254
and TWTh 5:40-7:30pm, IVC/
PM160
MACH 145
3.0 units
Computer Numerical Control
Machining/Mill
Learn to do Computer Numerical
Control (CNC) operations on the milling
machine utilizing machine tool principles with CAD-CAM principles.
4151 Lutz A
W 7:40-10:30pm, IVC/PM255
MACH 165
2.0 units
Blueprint Reading
This is a basic course in blueprint reading for the machine trades.
4152 Lutz A
M 7:40-9:30pm, IVC/PM254
EOPS
Extended Opportunity
Programs and Services
Eligible students may receive:
• Book Grants
• Academic, Career, Personal and
Vocational Counseling
• Help transferring to a 4-year college
MACH 250
2.0 units
Applications of Machine Tool
Technology
Laboratory for advanced techniques in
machine tool technology.
4159 Lutz A
TWTh 5:40-7:30pm, IVC/PM160
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9605
MATHEMATICS
Letter grade or credit/no credit — All
courses.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
NOTICE TO MATHEMATICS
STUDENTS
Students who enroll in mathematics
courses may be asked to provide evidence that prerequisites are satisfied in
order to maximize their chances for success. The prerequisite course must have
been passed with a grade of “C,” “CR,”
or higher. Students who have received a
“NC,” “D,” or “F” in a prerequisite course
at COM must subsequently complete
that course with a grade of “C” or higher
prior to enrolling in the course for which
it is a prerequisite.
The COM counselors can provide valuable help in choosing the appropriate
mathematics course. For testing appointments, call (415) 485-9469. For
counseling appointments call (415) 4859432.
Note: Some precalculus level mathematics courses are offered in two modes of
instruction — traditional lecture, and
self-paced in the Math Learning Lab.
Except for the mode of instruction, such
courses are equivalent. Traditional lecture courses have days and times listed.
The following class may also be of interest to Math students.
ENGL 12
1.0 unit
College Skills: Reading and Thinking
in Math
This course will give students a good
start toward math success by focusing
on the language and concepts behind
math rules. Problem-solving techniques,
estimating skills, and symbol recognition will be covered. Most importantly,
students will learn that math can make
sense.
0447 9/05-10/12 Timmel M
TTh 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/HC129
Late start
0448 10/24-12/05 Timmel M
TTh 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/HC129
Late start
MATH 25
0.5 unit
Coping with Math Anxiety
A four-week course designed to help all
students from all areas confront and
deal with their fears and anxieties with
mathematics.
0647 8/22-9/14
Lansing I
TTh 11:10-12noon, KTD/SC177
58
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
MATHEMATICS
ENTRY INTO THE MATH PROGRAM
VIA ASSESSMENT
Algebra
Readiness
Test
below 27
➤
27-4
5
➤
➤
above 45
➤
below 15
above 45
27
-4
5
below 15
➤
Intermediate
Algebra
Test
➤ MATH 102G,
7 ➤ 103, & 103S
2
5
1
2840
➤
➪
above 40
➤
➤
below 13
4
13-2 ➤
➪
MATH 101
21-26 ➤ MATH 101R
➤
➪
Elementary
Algebra
Test
0 ➤
-2
15
MATH 95
MATH 104,
105, 114,
115, & 121
Precalculus
Test
25-40
➤
Trigonometry
Test
18 ➤
below
18-40
➤
MATH 104
MATH 123
& 122*
*Must have taken 121.
MATH 90
Math Skills Open Lab
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: TAK W/ANY MATH COURS
In this open laboratory, students will
develop skills necessary to support work
in such courses as Math 95, 95AB, 101,
101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103XY, 115,
with particular emphasis on operations
with fractions and solving word problems.
0648 9/05-10/26 Wang A
MW 9:40-11am, KTD/SC130
Late start
0649 10/10-11/30 Wang A
MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/TB101
Late start
MATH 95
2.0 units
Basic and Intermediate Math
Reinforcement of basic prealgebra arithmetic skills.
0650 Armendariz J
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/SC133
0651 Armendariz J
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/SC133
0652 Allen M
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/OH108
0653Armendariz J
Th 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC104
MATH 101
Elementary Algebra
3.0 units
MATH 1035.0 units
Intermediate Algebra
Prerequisite: MATH 95 OR 95B
Prerequisite: MATH 101 OR 101XY
Elementary algebra through quadratic
equations.
This course is an extension of many of
the concepts introduced in elementary
algebra. New topics include algebraic,
logarithmic and exponential functions
and their graphs, linear systems and applications.
0658 Lansing I
R MTWThF 9:10-10am, KTD/SC102
0659 Jacob J
C MWF 10:10-11:40am, KTD/SC102
0660 Golitzin G
G TTh 12:10-2:30pm, KTD/SC104
0661 Ordin L
H MW 3:10-5:30pm, KTD/SC104
4160 Wang A
G TTh 12:10-2:30pm, IVC/PM251
0662Zimmerman M
MW 6:10-8:30pm, KTD/SC102
0657 Allen M
Web Based Course, 5hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
This section requires students to have an
e-mail address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. For more information visit http://maulaallen.com/com/
math/web/101/ There are no on-campus
attendance requirements for this section.
Communication is by postal mail, e-mail,
and online conferencing. Students must
send an e-mail message to the instructor
at maula.allen@marin.cc.ca.us as soon
as they register for this course.
MATH 101A
Elementary Algebra I
1.5 units
Prerequisite: MATH 95 OR 95B
The first course in a one-year sequence
of elementary algebra through linear
systems. Taken with Math 101B this
course is equivalent to Math 101. It is
designed for the student who wishes
to take more time to learn elementary
­algebra.
0663 Roderick I
F MW 11:10-1:30pm, KTD/SC177
Conquer Math Anxieties
in Four Weeks!
Enroll in MATH 25, Coping with
Math Anxiety, and learn to
become more confident in all
math courses.
Designed to help students from
all areas confront and deal with
their fears about mathematics.
Ira Lansing, Instructor
0667 Ordin L
M MTWTh 7:55-9am, KTD/SC102
0668 Monteith A
C MWF 10:10-11:40am, KTD/SC133
0669 Jacob J
J MWF 12:10-1:40pm, KTD/TB119
0670 Golitzin G
L TTh 2:40-5pm, KTD/SC104
0671Russakovskii Y
MW 6:10-8:30pm, KTD/SC133
4161 Blackburn B
TTh 6:10-8:30pm, IVC/PM255
0666 Allen M
Web Based Course, 5hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
This section requires students to have an
email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. For more information visit http://maulaallen.com/com/
math/web/103/. There are no on-campus
attendance requirements for this section.
Communication is by postal mail, e-mail,
and online conferencing. Students must
send an e-mail message to the instructor
at maula.allen@marin.cc.ca.us as soon
as they register for this course.
MATH 103G5.0 units
Mathematics in the World
Prerequisite: MATH 101/AB/XYorTEST
This course is intended for students
majoring in social science, behavioral
science, liberal arts, fine arts or performing arts who need an equivalency
for Intermediate Algebra. The topics
are drawn from many different areas of
mathematics with a focus on relevancy in today’s world. Satisfies the prerequisite for Math 110 or Math 115 or
Statistics 115.
0672 Armendariz J
A TTh 10:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC124
MATH 104
Plane Trigonometry
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MATH 103/103XY/TEST
Trigonometric functions including graphs, equations, identities, applications and DeMoivre’s Theorem.
Calculator with trig keys required.
0675 Monteith A
R MWF 9:10-10am, KTD/SC125
0676Jaeschke S
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC125
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
59
MATHEMATICS
MATH 1154.0 units
Probability and Statistics
THE CURRICULUM FOR MATH AND PHYSICAL
SCIENCES LEADING TO THE CALCULUS
123, 124, 223, 224 SERIES
➤
MATH 101
Elementary Algebra
➤
MATH 95 or 95AB
Basic
Arithmetic
MATH 95 AND 95E
Math for Technical
Occupations
➤
➤
➤
MATH 103S
Intermediate
Algebra for Stat.
MATH 103
Intermediate
Algebra
MATH 102G
Geometry
➤
➤
➤
MATH 115
Probability & Stat.
MATH 104*
Trigonometry
➤
*These two courses,
MATH 104 & MATH
105, may be taken in
either order or even
concurrently.
MATH 105*
College Algebra
➤
MATH 123
Calculus and
Analytic Geometry I
➤
➤
➤
MATH 116**
Linear Algebra
MATH 124
Calculus and
Analytic Geometry II
MATH 117,
COMP 117
Discrete Math
➤
**Fall only. Advice:
Take after MATH 124
MATH 223
Calculus and
Analytic Geometry III
➤
Prerequisite: MATH 103 OR 103XY
A foundations course for the precalculus
student. Topics to include functions and
their inverses, roots of equations, graphing, the binomial theorem, series, conic
sections, exponential and logarithmic
functions.
0679 Roderick I
R MWF 9:40-10:50am, KTD/SC104
0680Goodale J
TTh 7:10-9pm, KTD/SC124
60
•
Descriptive statistics, probability distributions, data sampling, estimation, and
hypothesis testing.
0681 9/9-12/16
Psomas N
Television Course, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
For more information, visit
http://www.marin.cc.ca.us/
~npsomas.
0683 Allen M
A TTh 10:10-12noon, KTD/SC102
Statistics calculator required.
0684 Lansing I
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/SC102
Statistics calculator required.
0685Jabloner S
MW 6:10-8pm, KTD/TB101
Statistics calculator required.
0682 Lansing I
Web Based Course, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning Page.
This section requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. For more information visit http://www.marin.cc.ca.
us/~lansing/math/InternetStatistics
Course. There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this section.
Communication is by postal mail, e-mail
and online conferencing. Students must
send an e-mail message to the instructor
at lansing@marin.cc.ca.us AFTER registering for the course. For a similar course
with on-campus availability see the
Television Course/ Distance Learning
section of Math 115
MATH 116
Linear Algebra
MATH 224
Differential Equations
& Vector Analysis
MATH 1054.0 units
College Algebra
Prerequisite: MATH 103/103G/103XY
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MATH 123
Struggling?
Frustrated?
Need Help?
Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, and eigenvalue problems with applications.
0686 Monteith A
B MWF 1:10-2pm, KTD/SC130
FREE TUTORING
All COM students welcome
Sign up in the Tutoring Center
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9620
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
MATHEMATICS
EOPS
Extended Opportunity
Programs and Services
Eligible students may receive:
• Book Grants
• Academic, Career, Personal and
Vocational Counseling
• Help transferring to a 4-year college
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
STUDENTS WHO PRE-REGISTER FOR A COURSE IN THIS PROGRAM MUST
CHECK IN WITH AN INSTRUCTOR OR INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT DURING
THE FIRST WEEK OF THE SEMESTER TO AVOID BEING DROPPED.
SELF-PACED COURSES:
The MATH 95A,B sequence is equivalent to MATH 95; the MATH 101X,Y sequence is
equivalent to MATH 101; the MATH 103X,Y sequence is equivalent to MATH 103; and
the MATH 104X,Y sequence is equivalent to MATH 104.
415.485.9605
MATH 121
Calculus I with Applications
THE INDIVIDUALIZED MATHEMATICS PROGRAM—KENTFIELD CAMPUS
These courses are individualized and self-paced. Repeat testing is used. Attendance
is very important. Failure to meet required hours will affect a student’s grade.
Instructors and tutors are available to help students. All of the courses are open-entry
and open-exit classes. All classes are in the Math Lab in the Austin Science Building,
Room SC 115.
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MATH 103/103XY/TEST
Graphing functions; limits, derivatives,
integrals of functions; exponential, logarithmic functions; applications.
0687 Ordin L
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC104
0688Jaeschke S
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/SC104
MATH 1235.0 units
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Introduction to analytic geometry and
differential and integral calculus of
functions of one real variable.
0689 Lansing I
M MTWTh 7:55-9am, KTD/SC104
0690Kostyrko J
MW 7:10-9:30pm, KTD/SC124
MATH 1245.0 units
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Prerequisite: MATH 123
A continuation of MATH 123 with emphasis on the calculus of transcendental
functions, introduction to first order ordinary differential equations, sequences,
series and power series functions.
0691 Roderick I
M MWF 8-9:30am, KTD/SC124
MATH 199
2.0 units
Seminar for Tutors
Special training for all new math tutors.
0692 Monteith A
J F 12:10-1pm, KTD/SC115
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/SC115
MATH 2235.0 units
Analytic Geometry and Calculus III
Prerequisite: MATH 124
Each unit of the MATH 95A,B,G sequence requires an average of four hours weekly
in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is completed. MATH 101X, 101Y,
103X, and 103Y each require an average of six hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight
weeks or until the sequence is completed. MATH 104X and 104Y each require an average of four hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the sequence is
completed. For example, if the student plans to enroll and earn three units of MATH
101X,Y by the end of the semester, then the student must attend an average of six
hours per week until the course work is completed. For MATH 103X,Y it is also an average of six hours per week. A student may add one or more units any time prior to the
last three weeks of the semester.
Class hours required may be selected from any combination of the supervised times
listed on the time chart.
MATH TIME CHART OF SUPERVISED HOURS
Kentfield Campus, Math Lab, SC 115—Fall 2006
TIME
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
10-11am
Jabloner
Ordin
Goodale
Ordin
Blackburn
11-12noon
Jabloner
Ordin
Goodale
Golitzin
Blackburn/
Roderick
12-1pm
Armendariz
Ordin
Goodale
Ordin
Roderick
1-2pm
Armendariz
Jabloner
Armendariz
Ordin
Roderick
2-3pm
Roderick
Armendariz
Roderick
Armendariz
Closed
3-4pm
Jabloner
Armendariz
Jabloner
Armendariz
Closed
4-6pm
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
6-9pm
Closed
Golitzin
Closed
Golitzin
Closed
Please note: Final exams for all self-paced math classes are held in the Math Lab and
can be taken either on: M 12/11, 6-9pm or W 12/13, 11-2pm
MATH 95A
1.0 unit
Basic Math Skills
0654 Roderick I
Self-paced, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
MATH 95G
1.0 unit
Medical Assisting Applications
0656 Roderick I
Self-paced, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
MATH 95B
Intermediate Math Skills
MATH 101X
Elementary Algebra
1.0 unit
1.5 units
Prerequisite: MATH 95A OR TEST
Prerequisite: MATH95 OR95B OR TEST
0655 Roderick I
Self-paced, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
0664 Roderick I
Self-paced, 6hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
Includes solid analytic geometry, vector
functions, partial derivatives, multiple
integrals, and vector analysis.
0693 Jacob J
M MWF 8-9:30am, KTD/SC130
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
61
MATHEMATICS
MATH 101Y
Elementary Algebra
1.5 units
THE CURRICULUM FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND LIFE
SCIENCES LEADING TO THE CALCULUS 121, 122 SERIES
Prerequisite: MATH101X/CNCUR ENROL
0665 Roderick I
Self-paced, 6hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
2.0 units
➤
MATH 103X
Intermediate Algebra
MATH 95 or 95AB
Basic Arithmetic
Prerequisite: MATH 101/101XY/TEST
0673 Roderick I
Self-paced, 6hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
0674 Roderick I
Self-paced, 6hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
MATH 103
Intermediate Algebra
MATH 102G
Geometry
➤
MATH 115
ECON 115
Probability & Stat.
(not same course)
MATH 104*
Trigonometry
➤
0677 Roderick I
Self-paced, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
➤
1.5 units
Prerequisite: MATH 103/103XY/TEST
MATH 104Y
Plane Trigonometry
MATH 103S
Intermediate
Algebra for Stat.
➤
MATH 104X
Plane Trigonometry
➤
Prerequisite: MATH103X/CNCUR ENROL
➤
3.0 units
➤
MATH 103Y
Intermediate Algebra
MATH 101
Elementary Algebra
MATH 121*
Calculus with
Applications I
1.5 units
➤
Prerequisite: MATH104X/CNCUR ENROL
0678 Roderick I
Self-paced, 4hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/SC115
MEDICAL ASSISTING
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
MEDA 110
2.0 units
Administrative Medical Office
Procedures
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 110L
This course introduces the student to
the medical office and medical front
office procedures common to clinical
­practice.
4166 Lacy C
C M 10:10-12noon, IVC/PM255
MEDA 110L
1.0 unit
Administrative Medical Office
Procedures Lab
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 110
MATH 122
Calculus with
Applications II
MEDA 120
3.0 units
Medical Terminology I
Learn to speak, spell, and write the
language of medicine. The fundamental
language necessary for those seeking to
enter a health care or legal field. May be
taken before or after MEDA 121.
4168 Miller J
H M 2:10-5pm, IVC/PM255
MEDA 121
3.0 units
Medical Terminology II
This is a course in medical word building, with special emphasis upon spelling, and anatomical, diagnostic, surgical,
and pathological terminology.
4169 Miller J
J W 2:10-5pm, IVC/PM255
This laboratory course will provide practical exercises for the student to develop
administrative medical front office skills.
4167 Lacy C
N T 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM255
62
•
*These two courses,
Math 104 and Math
121, may be taken in
either order or even
concurrently.
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
➤
MATH 117
COMP 117
Discrete Math
(same course)
MEDA 125
Financial Procedures
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 125L
This theory course will examine the basic financial procedures of a medical office including bookkeeping, health insurance systems, procedural and diagnostic
coding, and health insurance claim management.
4170 Muller B
E T 1:10-2pm, IVC/PM255
MEDA 125L
Financial Procedures Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 125
This laboratory course will provide the
basic skills to manage patient financial
accounts including posting transactions,
coding procedures and diagnoses, and
completing insurance forms.
4171 Muller B
L T 2:10-3pm, IVC/PM255
and W 11:10-1pm, IVC/PM255
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
MEDA 135
Clinical Procedures I
2.0 units
MMST 111
Multimedia Production
3.0 units
MMST 131
Multimedia Web Authoring
3.0 units
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 135L
Prerequisite: CIS 110 ADVISED
Prerequisite: CIS 140 ADVISED
This course covers theory of common
clinical procedures necessary to medical
back-office assisting in family practice.
Students will be introduced to team development and production schedules as
they learn the basic tools and methods
for developing graphics, sound, video,
and authored environments that simulate real-life projects. ($5 material fee)
This online course covers the basic design and development practices for the
production of multimedia-rich Web sites.
Students will use professional development tools to build and publish interactive Web sites containing text, graphics, animation, and audio. This section
requires students to have an e-mail
address, Internet access and sufficient
experience with a web browser to access the course web site. There are no
on-campus attendance requirements for
this section. Communication is through
e-mail and online conferencing.
4172 Lacy C
M W 8:40-10:30am, IVC/PM255
MEDA 135L
Clinical Procedure I Lab
1.5 units
Prerequisite: TAKE WITH MEDA 135
This laboratory course will prepare
the student to perform selected clinical
skills required of an entry-level, clinical
medical assistant for a family practice
office. ($5 material fee)
4173
K
4174
R
Lacy C
Th 9:10-11:30am, IVC/PM251
and Th 1:10-3pm, IVC/PM252
Lacy C
F 9:10-11:30am, IVC/PM252
and F 1:10-3pm, IVC/PM251
MEDA 150
1.5 units
Pharmacology for Medical Assistants
This course introduces the student to
common drugs/medications used in outpatient medical care and their simple
mathematical computations.
4175 Chang J
W 5:40-7pm, IVC/PM251
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
Directed study courses are offered at the
IVC campus. See page PPP.
MMST 110
3.0 units
Intro to Multimedia
Multimedia is the new and exciting synthesis of art, video, sound, and animation. This class will explore the important components and issues in designing
and producing multimedia including
markets, content, and phases of production. Through lecture and demonstration,
students will gain an understanding of
the process of building multimedia as
well as insight into its aesthetic and historical frameworks.
4180 Gonzalez J
N T 9:10-12noon, IVC/PM199
Entry Level Course about
Multimedia Projects
4181 Gonzalez J
F M 11:10-4pm, IVC/PM192
Software: Flash 8, PhotoShop CS2
MMST 112
3.0 units
Multimedia Interface Design
In this lecture course, students will acquire a broad knowledge of interface design theory and applications.
4182 Wilson D
Th 7:10-10pm, IVC/PM199
Topics include Visual Design for
web sites, print and games.
MMST 123
Intro to Multimedia Design
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ART 112 ADVISED
Use of current digital tools to develop
effective concepts, illustrations, and
designs for multimedia based projects.
This is a foundation Multimedia Studies
course. ($5 material fee)
4183 Wilson D
TTh 4:40-7pm, IVC/PM192
Software: Illustrator CS2 and
PhotoShop CS2
MMST 124
3.0 units
3-D Modeling and Animation
This course will introduce students to
their own ability in creating three-dimensional objects and environments
from their own imagination. Modeling
will teach students how to construct objects and environments while animation
teaches how to bring them to life. ($5
material fee)
4184 Abouaf J
C F 10:10-3:30pm, IVC/PM190/
PM199
Software: Beginning 3D Studio
Max 8
4185 Gonzalez J
Web Based Course, 5hrs/wk TBA,
IVC/KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
Instructor available in lab TBA.
Software: Dreamweaver 8,
Fireworks 8
E-mail instructor gonzalez@marin.
cc.ca.us prior to class starting
date. For more information visit:
http://multimedia.marin.cc.ca.
us/mmst131/
MMST 143
3.0 units
Video Production
This course explores all the basic aspects of video production for multimedia
including preproduction planning, recording, digitizing, and digital editing.
This course also includes specific techniques for delivering video on the World
Wide Web. ($5 material fee)
4186 Sutherland K
MW 7:10-9:30pm, IVC/PM192
Software: Final Cut Express, Final
Cut ProHD, AVID
MMST 144
3.0 units
Audio Production
This course is an introduction to the
audio design and production processes
specific to integrating sound with other
digital media. This course also includes
specific techniques for delivering audio
on the World Wide Web. ($5 material fee)
0697 Martin K
J F 12:10-5pm, KTD/FA225
Software: Bias Peak, Garageband
and ProTools
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
63
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
MMST 150
Digital Imaging Production
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MMST 123 ADVISED
Use of current digital tools to develop
accurate output, optimize for production
and the Internet by developing advanced
skills and techniques for multimedia
and print-based projects. ($5 material
fee)
4187 Wilson D
E TTh 1:10-3:30pm, IVC/PM192
Software: Advanced PhotoShop
CS2 Techniques
MMST 151
3.0 units
Digital Illustration and Animation
Prerequisite: MMST 123 ADVISED
Current digital tools will be used to create original, illustrative, and interactive
content for multimedia and print-based
projects. ($5 material fee)
0698 Wilson D
K TTh 8:40-11am, KTD/FA225
Software: Illustrator CS2 and
Flash 8
MMST 154
1.5 units
Software Applications for Multimedia:
Digital Media Authoring
Prerequisite: MMST 131 OR CONCUR
This course will provide specific knowledge and hands-on experience in the latest commercial authoring applications
for multimedia. ($2 material fee)
4188
8/23-10/11 Gonzalez J
W 12:10-4pm, IVC/PM192
and 1hr/wk TBA, IVC/PM192
Software: Introduction to Flash 8
Action Scripting
MMST 200
3.0 units
Portfolio Development
Through lecture, research and critiques,
students will develop a professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills
and career goals.
4189 Gonzalez J
W 4:10-7pm, IVC/PM199
MUSIC
NOTE: To take Music Placement Test,
contact Test Center at 485-9469. Major
performing ensembles are Music 162,
163, 165, 167, 168 and 169. Members
of the community are welcome to take
credit music classes for which they
qualify on a noncredit basis. Please see
Community Education Fall 2006 schedule for more information.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
MUS 101
3.0 units
Intro to Classical Music
Appreciate and enjoy classical music; a
study of elements, musical forms, vocal
and instrumental styles and the lives
and music of great composers.
0699 Delaney D
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/FA72
and 2hrs/wk TBA
MUS 105
3.0 units
Rock, Pop and Jazz
A multicultural study of the evolution of
American musical styles, including blues,
salsa, samba, rock, jazz, pop, rhythm
and blues, country, and folk.
0700Schleeter R
T 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
MUS 106
Music Fundamentals
MUS 121
Ear Training I
2.0 units
Prerequisite: READ SIMPLE MUSIC
Ear training, rhythmic and melodic
sight-reading, harmonic aural perceptions. Students are to select one music
lab from the following list at the first
class meeting. See LABS listed below.
0704 Noble Brown L, Staff
R MW 9:10-10am, KTD/FA177
and F 9:10-10am, KTD/FA177
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/FA177/
FA225
EAR TRAINING LABS:
Noble Brown, Staff
F 11:10-12noon in FA 177
F 11:10-12noon in FA 225
MUS 122
Ear Training II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 121
Ear training, rhythmic and melodic
sight reading: harmonic aural perception. Students are to select one music
lab from the list above at the first class
meeting. See LABS listed above.
0705 Noble Brown L, Staff
R MW 9:10-10am, KTD/FA177
and F 9:10-10am, KTD/FA177
and 1hr/wk TBA, KTD/FA177/
FA225
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 163 ADVISED
Includes basic study of the rudiments of
music, musical notation and terminology,
elementary harmony and introduction to
the piano keyboard.
WOODWINDS!
0701Flandreau T
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA178/FA188
MUS 1114.0 units
Theory I
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Beginning music theory. Scales, intervals, triads, and harmonic progressions
using primary triads.
0702 Delaney D
C MWF 10:10-11am, KTD/FA177
and 3hrs/wk TBA
MUSIC
173
&
176
MUS 116
3.0 units
Desktop Musician I
Basic concepts of acoustics, techniques
and history of electronic music; recording and mixing with digital audio; recording to CD; MIDI (sequencing).
0703Schleeter R
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA225
and 2hrs/wk TBA
64
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
MUSIC
MUS 162
Band
1.0 unit
MUS 168
Community Symphonic Band
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Daytime concert band for intermediate
and advanced players. Students must
participate in a performance Thurs 12/7
at 8pm.
This course is an advanced ensemble for
wind and percussion players. Public performance. Students must participate in a
performance Th 11/30 at 7:30pm.
0706 Delaney D
MWF 11:10-12noon, KTD/FA75
0707 Delaney D
MWF 11:10-12noon, KTD/FA75
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0707 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
0712Delaney D
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA75
0713Delaney D
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA75
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0713 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 163
1.0 unit
College Chorus
The rehearsal and performance of a variety of choral music. Techniques of choral singing are emphasized.
MUS 169
Community Chorus
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Rehearsal and performance of masterpieces of choral literature, usually with
orchestral accompaniment. Public performance required.
0708 Jarrell B
MW 12:10-1:30pm, KTD/FA72
Students must participate in a
performance Th 12/7 at 7pm.
Students who need special attention with pitch matching will
be advised to take a pitch master
tutorial.
0714Jarrell B
W 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
Students must participate in a
performance Sat 12/9 at 8pm.
MUS 165
Piano Ensemble
Prerequisite: READ SIMPLE MUSIC
2.0 units
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Study, rehearsal and performance of
music for piano ensemble. Music majors
who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing ensemble
with this course.
0709 Smith P
W 12:10-2pm, KTD/FA75
and 4hrs/wk TBA
Students must participate in performances Th 11/16 at 12 noon
MUS 167
1.0 unit
Community Symphony Orchestra
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Symphony orchestra and chamber orchestra, performing music from a wide
selection of musical periods and styles.
Students must participate in a performance Sat 11/18 at 8pm.
0710Flandreau T, Staff
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA75
0711 Flandreau T, Staff
M 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA75
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0711 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 171
Piano I
2.0 units
Develop mental and physical skills, musicianship, and habits leading to keyboard competence and foundation for
further music studies.
0715 Smith P
A TTh 10:10-11am, KTD/FA188
and 4hrs/wk TBA
New piano students: see Paul
Smith W 8/16 or Th 8/17, 1112:30pm, in room FA 188 for appropriate piano class level.
MUS 172
Piano II
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 171
Develop mental and physical skills, musicianship, and habits leading to keyboard competence and foundation for
further music studies.
MUS 173
1.0 unit
Beginning Band
A beginning band for those who want
to learn or relearn a wind or percussion
instrument while playing music with
others.
0717 Masonson N
A TTh 10:10-11am, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
0718 Masonson N
A TTh 10:10-11am, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0718 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 176
Intermediate Band
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: MUS173 OR 174 OR 175
A rehearsal band for people who wish
to return to playing or have a limited
amount of experience. There is no audition and no required public performance.
0719 Masonson N
A TTh 10:10-11am, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
0720 Masonson N
A TTh 10:10-11am, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0720 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 177
Jazz Ensemble
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG. Must
be taken at the same time as a major performing ensemble.
Ensemble and some solo experience in
the jazz idiom. Students must participate in a performance M 12/4 at 7:30pm.
0721 Delaney D
TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FA75
0722 Delaney D
TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FA75
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0722 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
0716 Smith P
D TTh 11:10-12noon, KTD/FA188
and 4hrs/wk TBA
New piano students: see Paul
Smith W 8/16 or Th 8/17, 1112:30pm, in room FA 188 for appropriate piano class level.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
65
MUSIC
Study a
Stringed Instrument
MUSIC
178
MUS 180B
2.0 units
Chamber Music Ensemble II
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION. Must
be taken at the same time as a major performing ensemble.
0727Flandreau T, Smith P
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
and 3hrs/wk TBA
0728Flandreau T, Smith P
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
and 3hrs/wk TBA
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0728 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 181
Voice I
2.0 units
Prerequisite: READ SIMPLE MUSIC
MUS 178
Instruction in Strings
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: READ SIMPLE MUSIC
Beginning instruction on the violin, viola, cello, or string bass.
0723 Staff
B MF 1:10-2pm, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
0724 Staff
B MF 1:10-2pm, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0724 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
CHAMBER MUSIC ENSEMBLE I AND II
(MUS 180A, 180B)
Rehearse and perform with a small
chamber ensemble. All instruments welcome; vocal students may be admitted,
repertoire permitting. Students must
participate in performance(s) F 12/1
and/or Sat 12/2 at 8pm.
MUS 180A
Chamber Music Ensemble I
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION. Must
be taken at the same time as a major performing ensemble.
0725Flandreau T, Smith P
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
0726Flandreau T, Smith P
Th 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA72
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0726 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
66
•
Learn the fundamentals of singing,
principles of tone production, voice development, and techniques of song learning.
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 181
Learn the fundamentals of singing,
principles of tone production, voice development, and techniques of song learning.
0730 Noble Brown L
H MW 2:10-3pm, KTD/FA72
and 4hrs/wk TBA
MUS 183
Chamber Singers
2.0 units
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION. Must
be taken with MUS 163.
A small select choir of mixed voices performing music written for small choral
ensembles. Participation in a public performance is required.
0731Jarrell B
T 7:10-10pm, KTD/FA75
and 3hrs/wk TBA
Students must participate in a
performance Th 12/7 at 7pm.
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: MUS 179
An orchestra of mostly stringed instruments, designed for the player who has
basic skills but needs experience playing
orchestral music and developing his/her
technique before playing in the community symphony orchestra.
0732 Staff
MF 1:10-2pm, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
0733 Staff
MF 1:10-2pm, KTD/FA75
and 1hr/wk TBA
Students using college instruments
please enroll in section number
#0733 and pay a $25 fee for rental.
MUS 191
1.0 unit
Musical Production: Orchestra
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
0729 Noble Brown L
H MW 2:10-3pm, KTD/FA72
and 4hrs/wk TBA
MUS 182
Voice II
MUS 187
Chamber Orchestra
Rehearsal and performance of orchestral accompaniment to staged musical
productions. Public performance required. Call 485-9668 for orchestra audition information and appointment.
0734 10/08-12/16 Smith P
4.8hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA75
Directed by Paul Smith. Most
rehearsals Sun and M evenings
beginning 10/15 at 6pm in FA72.
Auditions are on Sun 10/8 at 6pm.
For additional information contact
Paul Smith at pianosmith@aol.com
or 485-9460. Performances are
12/15 at 7:30pm, 12/16 at 1:30pm,
and additional performances 12/16
(eve) and 12/17 TBA.
MUS 193
Musical Production: Cast
1-2 units
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
Rehearse and perform all vocal music
aspects of staged musical production.
Public performance required. Directed
by Paul Smith. Most rehearsals Sun and
M evenings beginning 10/15 at 6pm in
FA72. Auditions are on Sun 10/8 at 6pm.
For additional information contact Paul
Smith at pianosmith@aol.com or 4859460. Performances are 12/15 at 7:30pm,
12/16 at 1:30pm, and additional performances 12/16 (eve) and 12/17 TBA.
0735 10/08-12/17 Smith P
4.8hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA72
Offered for one student unit.
0736 10/08-12/16 Smith P
9.6hrs/wk TBA, KTD/FA72
Offered for two student units.
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
NURSING: REGISTERED
MUS 2114.0 units
Theory III
MUS 262A
Large Ensemble Techniques
Prerequisite: MUS 112 AND 122. Must be
taken at the same time as a major performing ensemble.
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
The use of secondary dominants, diminished sevenths, etc., to chromatically enrich diatonic harmonies.
0737 Flandreau T
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/FA178
and 3hrs/wk TBA
MUS 221
Ear Training III
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 122
A continuation of Music 121 and 122.
See LAB listed below:
0738 Flandreau T
D TTh 11:10-12noon/1:10-2pm,
KTD/FA178
and 1hr/wk TBA
EAR TRAINING LAB:
Flandreau T
TTh 1:10-2pm in FA 178
TTh 1:10-2pm in FA 225
SMALL ENSEMBLE TECHNIQUES
(MUS 261A, 261B)
This is the study of small ensemble literature with the opportunity to play or
sing it in an available group.
MUS 261A
Small Ensemble Techniques
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
0742 Delaney D
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0743 Smith P
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0744 Staff
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0745 Flandreau T
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0746 Jarrell B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0747 Noble Brown L
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
MUS 261B
Small Ensemble Techniques
This is the study of large ensemble literature with the opportunity to play or
sing it in an available group.
0749 Flandreau T
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0750 Jarrell B
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
0751 Delaney D
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
MUS 271
Piano III
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 172
A continuation of Music 172. Further development of functional musical knowledge. Structure, melody, rhythm, harmony, and form.
0752 Smith P
G TTh 12:10-1pm, KTD/FA188
and 4hrs/wk TBA
New piano students: see Paul
Smith W 8/16 or Th 8/17, 1112:30pm, in room FA 188 for appropriate piano class level.
MUS 272
Piano IV
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 271
Further development of functional musical knowledge. Structure, melody,
rhythm, harmony, and form.
0753 Smith P
E TTh 1:10-2pm, KTD/FA188
and 4hrs/wk TBA
New piano students: see Paul
Smith W 8/16 or Th 8/17, 1112:30pm, in room FA 188 for appropriate piano class level.
MUS 281
Voice III
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 182
2.0 units
Prerequisite: STANDARD AUDITION
0748 Smith P
6hrs/wk TBA, KTD
1.0 unit
A continuation of MUS 182, Voice II.
Fundamentals, principles of tone production, and voice development.
0754 Noble Brown L
F MW 11:10-12noon, KTD/FA72
and 4hrs/wk TBA
MUS 282
Voice IV
2.0 units
Prerequisite: MUS 281
A continuation of MUS 281, Voice III.
Fundamentals, principles of tone production, and voice development.
NURSING: REGISTERED
(R.N.)
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
NE 90 1.0 unit
Intro to Nursing Education
This course presents the role of the
Associate degree nurse within the various settings in today’s health care systems and is a required course for all applicants to the nursing program. This
course is designed to help the prospective nursing student succeed in the
College of Marin Registered Nursing
Program.
0757Two Ths & Sats: 9/7, 9, 14, 16
Langinger J
Th 5:40-8pm, KTD/FH120
and Sat 9:10-3pm, KTD/FH120
Purchase N E 90 syllabus in the
COM, Kentfield Campus bookstore.
NE 95 1.0 unit
Effective Strategies for Success in R N
Program
This course focuses on the College of
Marin Registered Nursing Critical
Thinking Model, test taking strategies,
and tips to survive and enjoy nursing
school. It is highly recommended for the
beginning nursing student.
0758 One WThF: 8/16, 17, 18.
Zeller C
WThF 8:40-12noon/1:10-3:30pm,
KTD/HC165
NE 101
Level I Nursing Skills Lab
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE W/NE 135,NE 138
Learn and practice the basic assessment and technical skills required for
Registered Nursing. Emphasis is placed
on developing communication and clinical reasoning skills through the use of
clinical simulations and case scenarios.
Note: Students must contact Nursing
Department for their assigned section.
($75 material fee)
0759 Staff
R W 9:10-12noon, KTD/HC174
0760 Ridley D
G Th 12:40-3:30pm, KTD/HC174
0761 Hannah E
B M 1:10-4pm, KTD/HC174
0763 Staff
J W 1:10-4pm, KTD/HC174
0755 Noble Brown L
F MW 11:10-12noon, KTD/FA72
and 4hrs/wk TBA
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
67
NURSING: REGISTERED
NE 103
Open Skills Lab
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: TAKE W/101,102,150L
This course provides additional opportunities for students to learn and practice
clinical skills required for the registered
nurse. Students may enroll in NE 103
concurrent with other nursing skills
labs during the fall and spring semesters of the first year of the nursing program.
0764 Pieper-Warren M
C F 10:40-12noon, KTD/HC174
NE 1354.0 units
Nursing I: Fundamentals
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course presents concepts related
to clients within the context of their environments, to the health care delivery
system, and to the theory and practice
of nursing. Students learn to perform
an age-specific health assessment and
basic physical examination, to recognize
alterations in these assessments, and to
engage in therapeutic interventions that
promote and maintain clients’ health.
0765 Driscoll J, Carrouche C
R MTh 9:10-11am, KTD/OH96
NE 135L
Nursing I: Clinical Lab
2.5 units
Prerequisite: TAKE W/NE 101,NE 135
This course is the clinical laboratory
for NE 135. Students learn to perform
an age-specific health assessment and a
basic physical examination, to recognize
alterations in these assessments, and
to engage in activities that promote and
maintain clients’ health.
0766 Langinger J
K T 8:10-4pm, KTD/HC174
or T 7:15-2:45pm, Hospital
0767 Ridley D
K T 8:10-4pm, KTD/HC174
or T 6:30-2pm, Hospital
0768 Langinger J
M W 8:10-4pm, KTD/HC172
or W 7:15-2:45pm, Hospital
0769 Ridley D
M W 8:10-4pm, KTD/LC20
or W 6:30-2pm, Hospital
0770 Carrouche C, Driscoll J
K T 8:10-4pm, KTD/HC172
or T 7-2:30pm, Hospital
0771 Carrouche C, Hemphill P
M W 8:10-4pm, KTD/HC172
or W 7-2:30pm, Hospital
68
•
NE 138
1.0 unit
Intro to Pharmacology and Medication
Administration for Nurses
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course focuses on basic pharmacology principles, legal and ethical considerations, and the registered nurse’s role
in administering medications safely to
clients across the lifespan. Drug dosage
calculation is emphasized.
0772 Ridley D
K Th 8:10-9am, KTD/OH96
NE 203
Nursing Skills Lab
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Learn and practice clinical skills required for the Registered Nurse.
0773 Ridley D, Pieper-Warren M
M M 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC174
and Th 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC174
Note: This section is for students
enrolled in N E 236 (1st 8wks) and
N E 234 (2nd 8wks). Students must
contact Nursing Dept. for their assigned section. Final exam: TBA
0774 Pieper-Warren M, Ridley D
D Th 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC163
and M 8:10-9:30am, KTD/HC163
Note: This section is for students
enrolled in N E 234 (1st 8wks) and
N E 236 (2nd 8wks). Final exam:
TBA.
0775 Driscoll J, Staff
F W 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH103
and M 9:40-11am, KTD/HC174
Note: This section is for students
enrolled in N E 230 (1st 8 wks) and
N E 232 (2nd 8wks). Class is held
W 11:10-12:30 from 8/23-10/11 and
changes to M 9:40- 11am from
10/16-12/4.
NE 230
Nursing Role: Perinatal
2.0 units
Prerequisite: NE 133
The nursing process and Adaptation
Model of Nursing Practice are applied
to the care of individuals and families
in obstetric, gynecologic, and pediatric
settings.
0776 8/21-10/11 Driscoll J
M 1:10-3pm, KTD/HC172
and W 9:10-11am, KTD/HC161
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
NE 230L
Perinatal Practicum
2.5 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Application of theory content of N E 230
related to care of individuals and families in obstetric, gynecologic, and pediatric settings. ($5 material fee)
0777 8/22-10/12 Driscoll J, Staff
T 6:30-2pm, Hospital
and Th 2-9:30pm, Hospital
The first T and Th meetings are
held on campus T 9-4:30pm, and
Th 8-11am and 12noon-4pm.
NE 232
2.0 units
Nursing Role: Mental/Endocrine
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This theory course has two components
- the nursing role in mental health and
the nursing role in providing care for
individuals with adaptation problems in
endocrine function. Concepts from the
Adaptation Model of Nursing Practice
are applied to the care of individuals
with mental disorders and individuals
with adaptation problems in endocrine
function.
0779 10/16-12/07 Carrouche C
MTh 1:10-3pm, KTD/LC20
Final exam: TBA
NE 232L
2.5 units
Mental Endocrine Practicum
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Concepts from the Adaptation Model of
Nursing Practice are applied to the care
of individuals with mental disorders and
individuals with adaptation problems in
endocrine function. ($34 material fee)
0781 10/17-12/06 Carrouche C
TW 7:30-3pm, Hospital
NE 234
Nursing Role: Neurological
2.0 units
Prerequisite: N E 133
This course focuses on the nursing care
of individuals across the life span with
adaptation problems in the physiological
and psychosocial modes including activity/rest, the senses, the neurological function, cancer, and loss and grief.
0784 8/21-10/12 Lefkowitz S
M 9:10-11am, KTD/HC172
and Th 1:10-3pm, KTD/LC38
Final exam: TBA
0785 10/16-12/07 Lefkowitz S
M 9:10-11am, KTD/HC171
and Th 1:10-3pm, KTD/LC38
Final exam: TBA
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
NE 234L
Neurological Practicum
2.5 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course focuses on the nursing care
of individuals across the life span with
adaptation problems in the physiological
and psychosocial modes including activity/rest, the senses, the neurological
function, cancer, and loss and grief. ($34
material fee)
0786 8/22-10/11 Lefkowitz S
TW 6:30-2pm, Hospital
Class meets at UCSF Medical
Center.
0787 10/17-12/06 Lefkowitz S
TW 6:30-2pm, Hospital
Class meets at UCSF Medical
Center.
NE 236
2.0 units
Nursing Role: Oxygenation, Fluid, and
Electrolytes
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This theory course focuses on the nursing care of individuals across the life
span with adaptation problems in the
physiological mode: oxygenation, fluid
and electrolytes and urinary elimination. It is designed to integrate previous
science and nursing course theory.
0789 8/21-10/12 Ruddle J
MTh 1:10-3pm, KTD/LC20
0790 10/16-12/07 Ruddle J
MTh 1:10-3pm, KTD/HC172
Final exam: TBA
NE 236L
2.5 units
Oxygenation, Fluid, and Electrolytes
Practicum
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This clinical practicum focuses on the
nursing care of individuals across the
life span with adaptation problems in
the physiological mode: oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte and urinary elimination. It is designed to integrate previous
science and nursing course theory and
practice. ($20 material fee)
0791 8/22-10/11 Ruddle J
TW 6:45-2:15pm, Hospital
0792 10/17-12/06 Ruddle J
TW 6:45-2:15pm, Hospital
NE 250B
Pharmacology in Nursing
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PHILOSOPHY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
PHIL 110
Intro to Philosophy
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ENGL 98
An introduction to major thinkers, movements and ideas in the western philosophical tradition.
0798 Marmysz J
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/OH96
0799 Marmysz J
*Web Based Course, 3 hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning page.
*The section marked with an asterisk
requires students to have an email address, Internet connection, and sufficient
Internet experience to be able to visit various sites, engage in chatroom discussions,
submit papers and take online exams.
There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this section. Students can
communicate by phone, email, and online
conferences. Once students have registered, they must also send an e-mail message to John.Marmysz@marin.cc.ca.us
to verify their enrollment and their email
address to avoid being dropped.
PHIL 111
Intro to Philosophy
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 120
An introduction to ethical thinking in
the western philosophical tradition.
0800Marmysz J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/HC171
PHIL 112
Intro to Logic
3.0 units
Prerequisite: ELIGIBLE ENGL 150
Introduces students to the formal study
of logic, the discipline that establishes
the validity of arguments.
Prerequisite: N E 150
Pharmacological agents that affect the
psychological and physiological systems
are studied by using the Adaptation
Model of Nursing Practice in planning
care for individuals receiving medication
therapy.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD and IVC campuses. See page PPP.
REHABILITATION FITNESS
(P E 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 79, 80)
A complete fitness program for disabled
emphasizing coordination, mental, emotional and social attitudes for improving healthy, independent, daily living
functions. Physician’s recommendation
required. No pre-registration for first
time students; call Disabled Students
(415-485-9406). KTD class hours can be
selected from the following times:
TIME CHART FOR
KENTFIELD CAMPUS
P E 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 79, 80
P E 70
MTWTh
2:10-3pm
P E 71
MWTh
10:10-11am
P E 72
MTWTh
9:10-11am
12:10-3pm
P E 74
MTWTh
11:10-12noon
P E 74
MW
12:10-1pm
P E 75
T Th
9:10-10am
P E 79
T Th
1:10-2pm
P E 80
T
10:10-12noon
PE 70 0.5 unit
Adapted Aquatics
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
Aquatic activity with emphasis on developing strength, endurance, flexibility,
increased independence, and personal
safety. Recommended for students with
physical disabilities.
0806Gray M
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/POOL2
4193 Robles R
E TTh 1:40-2:30pm, IVC/POOL
0801 Marmysz J
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/OH104
PE 71 Adapted Aerobics
PHIL 139D
3.0 units
Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
Prerequisite: ENGL 98
1.0 unit
NOTE: All P E courses are COED unless
otherwise noted.
This course explores the philosophical
foundations of psychoanalysis. It focuses on the ontological, epistemological, cultural and therapeutic aspects of
both pre- and post-Freudian thinking as
found in the writings of Schopenhauer,
Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Marcuse,
Lacan and Zizek.
0.5 unit
A group aerobic activity for students
with physical disabilities. Students can
participate sitting or standing.
0808Naythons J
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
0802 Marmysz J, Mackintosh J
B M 1:10-4pm, KTD/HC166
0797 8/21-11/13 Langinger J
M 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FH110
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
69
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 72 0.5 unit
Adapted General Conditioning
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
This is a general fitness class, designed
to meet the overall fitness needs of students with disabilities.
0809Naythons J, Gray M, Staff
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE40
PE 74 Adapted Yoga
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
This course is a gentle stretching and
relaxation class for the physically disabled adult. Emphasis on breathing,
mind/body connection, and increasing
strength and flexibility.
0810 Naythons J
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE60
0811 Naythons J
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE60
PE 75 Adapted Tai Chi
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
A Tai Chi class designed for physically disabled adults. Movements will be
adapted, so that all students may participate successfully.
0812 Naythons J
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
PE 79 0.5 unit
Adapted Awareness Through
Movement
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE
A gentle, easy and beneficial movement
class for the physically and neurologically disabled adult. Emphasis will be on
improving functioning and awareness,
full breathing, relaxation and relieving
pain.
0813 Pepitone K
2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE60
PE 80 Feldenkrais Integration
0.5 unit
Prerequisite: PHYSICIAN’S RELEASE.
Concurrent enrollment in another adapted
PE class.
A gentle, hands-on class that will help
improve function and reduce pain.
Designed for students with physical disabilities.
0814 Naythons J
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
PE 107
3.0 units
Human Biology
This course is designed to provide nonbiology major students with an introduction to the structure, function, and development of the human body. The course
will give students the foundational concepts to explore personal and societal
70
•
issues involving human biology as well
as cover anatomy and physiology concepts useful in preparing for careers in
wellness-related fields such as personal
training, group fitness instruction, and
massage therapy.
0815 Williams J
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC133
May be taken for credit as PE 107
or BIOL 107. Students receive
credit for only one course.
PE 116
3.0 units
Career Opportunities in Wellness and
Fitness
This course is designed to introduce
various career options in the field of
wellness and fitness through overview
lectures and interaction with working
professionals. Formulating a realistic career goal will be emphasized.
0817 Goldman C
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/PE22
PE 117A
1.0 unit
Basketball, Beginning
An introduction to fundamental basketball skills. Individual offensive and defensive skills will be stressed.
0818 Bierly J
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/PE30
PE 117B
Basketball, Intermediate
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Introduction to team concepts. Emphasis
on one-on-one and zone defense. Team
play will be stressed.
0821 Bierly J
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/PE30
PE 120
3.0 units
Intro to Sport and Exercise
Psychology
This course provides an introduction
to the theoretical and applied aspects
of psychology in sport and exercise settings.
0822 Goldman C
Web Based Course, 3 hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please See Distance Learning Page.
This course requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. There are no
on-campus attendance requirements for
this course. Communication is by e-mail,
online conferencing and phone. Once
students have officially enrolled in this
course, they must send an e-mail to the
instructor at cheryl.goldman@marin.
cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to verify their enrollment in the class and their e-mail address to avoid being dropped.
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
PE 121
3.5 units
Personal Trainer Certification Course
Prerequisite: BIOL 107/PE107 ADVSD
This course is designed to prepare students to meet the stringent certification standards set forth by the National
Council of Strength and Fitness (NCSF).
Through a variety of health and fitness
training and evaluation techniques, students engage in an assortment of practical experiences, while developing a
thorough understanding of core exercise
concepts and principles. Optional NCSF
certification exam will be administered
at the completion of the course (additional $150 fee will be charged.)
0825 Smyth K
G TTh 12:40-2:45pm, KTD/PE22
PE 124
2.0 units
Athletic Coach Education
This course is designed to prepare students to meet certification standards set
forth by the Positive Coaching Alliance
(PCA) and will help students build professional and career coaching capabilities, better leadership skills, better functioning teams, and more change-capable
organizations. The most up-to-date
research-based strategies, tools and
techniques in Positive Coaching will be
taught.
0826Goldman C
T 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/PE22
PE 125C
1-2 units
Aerobic Fitness
A class in aerobic techniques derived
from dance, yoga, and body awareness.
0828 Goldman C
H MW 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/PE60
0829 Goldman C
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/PE60
0831 Goldman C
H MTWTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/PE60
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0832Harp M
TTh 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/PE60
PE 125D
1.0 unit
Fitness, Intercollegiate
A course designed for student athletes
who wish to develop a preseason training program for their sport or activity.
0833 Bierly J
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
For information on the first class
meeting, please call 485-9585.
Emphasizes fitness related to football.
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 125H
1.0 unit
Fitness, Cross Training
Cardiovascular fitness, strength and
flexibility, and performance will be improved through a variety of training
programs. Students will have the option
to participate in swimming, running,
weight lifting, and stretching activities
when designing a program. Basic fitness
and training principles will be introduced.
0834 Powers A
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE23
For information on days and times,
please call the instructor at 4859586.
PE 129A
1-2 units
Golf, Beginning
Instruction in the basic fundamentals of
golf. Emphasis is on the grip, setup, and
swing. For all sections: Attend first class
meeting in PE 30.
0837 Limm P
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
0838 Limm P
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
0840 Limm P
R MTWTh 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 129B
Golf, Intermediate
1-2 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
This course is designed to provide the
student instruction in the areas of swing
mechanics, course strategy, match and
medal play, the handicap system, and
equipment. For all sections: Attend first
class meeting in PE 30.
0842 Limm P
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
0843 Limm P
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
0845 Limm P
R MTWTh 9:40-11am, KTD/AUXFLD
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 132
1-2 units
Directed P E Activities
Setting individual goals in a variety of
physical activities. Enroll in P E 132,
Directed P E Activities, and see the instructor for information and instructions.
Students who have registered will be admitted to the class. It is the responsibility of students to drop the class, if they do
not attend either orientation meeting. If
you have any questions, please call the
department secretary at 485-9580.
This class is only recommended for students who cannot take a regular physical education class. For KTD sections
of PE 132: Enroll and see instructor
for information and instructions. KTD
STUDENTS MUST ATTEND A GROUP
ORIENTATION MEETING SAT 8/26
AT 9AM IN PE 22. If you have any questions, please call 485-9580.
0846 Adams G
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
Offered for 1.0 student unit.
0847 Smyth K
6hrs/wk TBA, KTD
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 147A
1-2 units
Soccer, Beginning
Introduction to the rules and customs
of soccer, basic skills, general patterns,
tactics, and methods. Attend first class
meeting in PE 30.
0849 Adams G
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/AUXFLD
0850 Adams G
H MW 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/AUXFLD
0851 Adams G
H MTWTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/
AUXFLD
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 147B
1-2 units
Soccer, Intermediate
Continued skill development in soccer.
Emphasizing theory and implementation of defensive tactical principles.
Attend first class meeting in PE 30.
0853 Adams G
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/AUXFLD
0854 Adams G
H MW 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/AUXFLD
0855 Adams G
H MTWTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/
AUXFLD
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 156
1-2 units
Instructional Lap Swimming
Prerequisite: EFFICIENT SWIM SKILL
Designed to provide stroke and cardiovascular development for students
at all swimming levels. U.S. Master’s
Swimming Program will be available for
those interested in the competitive aspects of swimming. For all KTD sections:
Attend first class meeting in PE 30.
0858 Powers A
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/POOL2
0859 Harp M
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/POOL2
0860 Harp M
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/POOL2
0861 Goldman C
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/POOL2
0862 Goldman C
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/POOL2
0865 Harp M
F MTWTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/
POOL2
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0866 Goldman C
J MTWTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/POOL2
Offered for 2.0 student units.
4196 Haley J
3hrs/wk TBA, IVC/POOL
Please call instructor for days and
times at 892-4545.
4197 Staff
J MW 12:10-1:30pm, IVC/POOL
4198 Lager W
G TTh 12:10-1:30pm, IVC/POOL
4199 Lager W
B MW 1:40-3pm, IVC/POOL
4203 Lager W
J MTWTh 12:10-1:30pm, IVC/POOL
Offered for 2.0 student units.
4205Haley J
MW 6:10-7:30pm, IVC/POOL
4206Haley J
TTh 6:10-7:30pm, IVC/POOL
4208Haley J
MTWTh 6:10-7:30pm, IVC/POOL
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 160A
1.0 unit
Tennis, Beginning
This course is designed to introduce beginning basic tennis skills. For all KTD
sections: Attend first class meeting in
PE 30.
0868 Powers A, Shaver R
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/COURTS
0869 Powers A, Shaver R
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/COURTS
PE 160B
1.0 unit
Tennis, Intermediate
This course is designed to provide the
student with intermediate tennis skills
introducing competitive play and game
strategy. For all KTD sections: Attend
first class meeting in PE 30.
0871 Powers A, Shaver R
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/COURTS
0872 Powers A, Shaver R
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/COURTS
PE 167
1.0 unit
Volleyball
This is a course for beginning volleyball
covering rules, strategy, and fundamental skills while emphasizing team play.
0874Smyth K
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/PE30
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
71
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 169
1-2 units
Weight Training
Weight training will introduce students
to the basics of strength and endurance
training. An emphasis will be placed on
safety, flexibility, and the development of
a personal training program.
0877 Smyth K
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE20
0878 Smyth K
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE20
0879 Smyth K
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/PE20
0880Smyth K
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/PE20
0881 Adams G
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/PE20
0882 Adams G
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/PE20
0883 Adams G
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/PE20
0884 Adams G
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/PE20
0887 Smyth K
M MTWTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE20
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0888 Smyth K
R MTWTh 9:40-11am, KTD/PE20
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0889 Adams G
F MTWTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/PE20
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0890 Adams G
J MTWTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/PE20
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0891Adams G
MW 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/PE20
0892Adams G
TTh 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/PE20
0893Adams G
MTWTh 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/PE20
Offered for 2.0 student units.
PE 173A
1-2 units
Yoga, Beginning
A class in the physical aspects of yoga
with emphasis on building flexibility,
strength, and endurance.
0896 Rocky A
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE60
0897 Rocky A
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE60
0898 Fredrick D
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/PE60
0899 Fredrick D
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/PE60
0900Rocky A
M MTWTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/PE60
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0901 Fredrick D
R MTWTh 9:40-11am, KTD/PE60
Offered for 2.0 student units.
0902Rocky A
MW 5:10-6:30pm, KTD/PE60
Struggling?
Frustrated?
Need Help?
FREE TUTORING
All COM students welcome
Sign up in the Tutoring Center
Kentfield Campus, LC 160
415.485.9620
PE 180
Soccer
Prerequisite: TEAM MEMBER
A course designed to teach the skills
that comprise the game of soccer, covering the fundamental skills for each position. First class meeting M 8/21 at 3pm
in PE 22. For information, please call
485-9584.
0909 Coffey K
H MTWThF 3:10-5pm, KTD/SCFLD
(MEN)
0911 Staff
H MTWThF 3:10-5pm, KTD/AUXFLD
(WOMEN)
PE 187
Water Polo
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
(TEAM MEMBERS ONLY)
PE 176
Basketball
2.0 units
Prerequisite: TEAM MEMBER
A class that develops an understanding
of the mechanics, rules, and principles of
competitive basketball and physical conditioning.
0904 Webster J
10hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
(MEN)
0905 Staff
10hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
(WOMEN)
PE 178
Football
2.0 units
Prerequisite: TEAM MEMBER
This course will teach skills that comprise the game of football and work to
develop sportsmanship and leadership,
with an emphasis on teaching the rules
that govern the game of football and promote physical fitness.
0907 Finley K, Staff
H MTWThF 3:10-5pm, KTD/FBFLD
Practice will begin before the start
of the Fall semester. For information please call 485-9585. Class
meets on the football field.
2.0 units
2.0 units
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
A course designed to develop an understanding of the mechanics and rules of
water polo, with an emphasis on techniques that will improve a student’s competitive level.
4210 Lager W
H MTWThF 3:10-5pm, IVC/POOL
PE 190A
2.0 units
Baseball Theory I
How to develop a baseball program: philosophy, season guidelines, preseason
guidelines, preseason programs, and
drills; classroom and fieldwork will be
included.
0912 Berringer S
4hrs/wk TBA, KTD/BBFLD
Orientation meeting: M 8/21 at
3pm in PE 22. For information,
please call 485-9589.
PE 192B
2.0 units
Basketball Theory II
Designed to give a comprehensive study
of the offensive and defensive aspects of
basketball.
0913 Webster J
4hrs/wk TBA, KTD/PE30
PE 193A
2.0 units
Swimming Theory I
A comprehensive class designed for
the student interested in participating or coaching the sport of swimming. Classroom and pool work will be
­included.
4211 Lager W
4hrs/wk TBA, IVC/POOL
PE 195A
2.0 units
Football Theory Offensive
Designed to develop an understanding of
offensive football and the kicking game.
0915 Staff
H MTWTh 2:40-3:30pm, KTD/PE23
72
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PHYSICS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PHYS 108A5.0 units
General Physics I
Courses offered by the Social Science
Department may require research papers, reports, or related activities. Social
Science 125, “Research Methods and
Term Papers in Social Sciences,” may
be taken concurrently with the following courses and will provide direct assistance in these assignments.
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
Prerequisite: MATH 104; ADVISE 121
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat, sound, and the
properties of matter. Required for biology, pre-med, architecture and other
majors.
0920 Pevyhouse A
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/SC104
and M 3:10-5pm, KTD/SC120
and 2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/SC120
PHYS 108AC
1.0 unit
General Physics I/Calculus Supplement
Prerequisite: MATH121;PHYS108A/CNC
An introduction to the fundamental
concepts with calculus of mechanics,
heat, sound and the properties of matter.
Required for biology and other majors.
0921 Yassa S
F M 11:40-12:30pm, KTD/SC120
PHYS 110
3.0 units
Introductory Physics
A survey of the fundamental concepts
of physics including motion, energy and
the physics of atoms. Additional topics
will be selected from electricity, magnetism, light, sound, relativity, atomic and
nuclear physics. Intended for liberal arts
majors.
0922Chavez R
TTh 6:10-7:30pm, KTD/SC120
PHYS 207A5.0 units
Mechanics and Properties of Matter
Prerequisite: MATH 123&(124
CONCURRENT)
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of mechanics and the properties of
matter. Calculus is used in problem solving. Required for engineering, physics,
chemistry, and other majors.
0924 Grist G, Chavez R
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/SC125
and T 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC120
and 2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/SC120
PHYS 207B5.0 units
Electricity and Magnetism
Prerequisite: PHYS207A&(MATH223CE)
Calculus-based introduction to fields,
circuits, EM radiation. For physics, engineering, physical science majors and
others.
0926 Chavez R
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/SC125
and Th 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC120
and 2hrs/wk TBA, KTD/SC120
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
POLS 100
3.0 units
American Political Institutions
This course is the study of American politics with an emphasis on political power,
political values, and current events.
0930 Fearnley H
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/TB101
0931 Fearnley H
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH101
POLS 101
3.0 units
United States Government
This course is an introduction to political science with focus on American government. Emphasis is given to political
culture, political institutions, political
behavior, and public policy.
0932 9/09-12/16 Fearnley H
Television Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD
Please see Distance Learning page.
0933 Bellisimo Y
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/DH113
0934Adams L
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DH111
POLS 102
3.0 units
Comparative Political Systems
An introduction to comparative politics
using the methods of political science to
compare foreign governments.
0935 Bellisimo Y
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH103
Struggling
with your
textbooks?
POLS 125
3.0 units
Research Methods and Term Papers in
the Social Sciences
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Introduction to college level research
papers and critical thinking in social
sciences and related fields. Term papers
required for other classes may be developed in this course. (See also S SC l25,
ECON 125, ETST 125, and HIST 125.)
0936 Adams L
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH111
POLS 203
3.0 units
Understanding Terrorism
Using lecture, discussion, video, and
guest speakers, this course is a multidimensional exploration of terrorism, providing a broad spectrum of understanding of terrorism from historical, political,
ideological, religious, and psychological
perspectives.
0937Fearnley H
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DH30
POLS 215
3.0 units
Current Events and Issues
An opportunity to critically examine and
discuss significant world developments
and to attempt to understand the sources of those developments. Each student
will have the opportunity to focus on issues of particular interest and to share
that information with the group. May
be taken for credit as ECON 215, POLS
215 and S SC 215. Students may receive
credit for only one course.
0938 Bellisimo Y
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH103
POLS 220
3.0 units
American Foreign Policy
A survey of the forces involved in the formation of American foreign policy since
World War II. United States relations
with the Soviet Union, China, Europe,
Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and
other nations will be explored, with special emphasis on contemporary problems.
0939 Fearnley H
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/FH120
Tests make you
anxious?
Can’t find enough
time?
Need to improve
your listening?
Need a plan?
COUN 125
How to Study Effectively is for you.
CSU Credit
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
73
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCHOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
PSY 110
3.0 units
Intro to Psychology
This course is a scientific overview of basic topics in psychology, including development, personality, abnormality, learning, cognition, perception, motivation,
and brain functioning.
0943 Martin D
M MW 8:10-9:30am, KTD/FH110
0944 Martin D
K TTh 8:10-9:30am, KTD/FH110
0945 Martin D
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/FH110
0946 Brailoff M
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/FH120
0947 Russell M
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH113
0948 Russell M
G TTh 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH113
0949 Vanecke Y
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/FH110
0950Brailoff M
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH30
0951Broderick D
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/FH110
PSY 111
3.0 units
Personality Dynamics
This course will emphasize the current
perspectives on personality description,
development, dynamics, and change.
The focus of this course is on the individual and will include such issues as
self-concept, self-esteem, identity, social
and cultural influences, coping mechanisms, personality change, relationships,
and mental health. The material is presented through a combination of lecture,
discussion, and activities.
0952 Martin D
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/FH110
PSY 112
3.0 units
Child and Adolescent Psychology
The understanding of children and adolescents through the study of psychological and developmental changes. Prenatal
development will also be covered.
PSY 114
3.0 units
Psychology of Human Development:
Lifespan
Physical, intellectual, social, and personality development from conception
through old age.
0957Vanecke Y
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH113
0956 Vanecke Y
*Web Based Course, 3hrs/wk TBA,
KTD/IVC
Please see Distance Learning Page.
*The section marked with an asterisk
requires students to have an email address, Internet connection, and sufficient
Internet experiences to be able to visit
various sites, engage in chatroom discussions, submit papers and take online exams. There are no on-campus attendance
requirements for this section. Students
should be prepared to communicate by
phone, email, and online conferences.
Students should also be able to rent or
purchase assigned video material for independent viewing and online discussion.
Students must email the instructor at
yvanecke@marin.cc.ca.us AFTER registering for the course.
Visit http://cvc.webct.com for additional
information.
PSY 116
3.0 units
Theories of Personality
A survey of the major theories of personality.
0958 Martin D
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FH110
PSY 125
3.0 units
Psychology of Violence
What is violence, what are its causes,
and how can violence be prevented? This
course will examine the psychology of violent acts including self-mutilation, suicide, domestic violence, child and elder
abuse, sexual assault, violence in schools
and in the workplace, and hate crimes.
0959Broderick D
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/FH110
0953 Russell M
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH113
0954 Russell M
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH113
0955Russell M
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/DH113
74
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
PSY 204
Abnormal Psychology
3.0 units
Prerequisite: PSY 110 ADVISED
A survey of the major diagnostic disorders and theories of causes of mental illness; psychotherapeutic methods.
0960 Brailoff M
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH103
PSY 230
3.0 units
Social Psychology
This is an interdisciplinary course covering altruism; attitude formation and
attitude change; conformity; person
perception and social labeling; reference groups; social conflict and conflict
resolution; human aggression; intergroup processes; intragroup processes;
interpersonal attraction; social networks, statuses and roles; and the social
development of the self. This course may
be taken as a psychology or a sociology
course but not both.
0961 Christensen P
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH101
0962Brailoff M
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/FH110
PSY 252
3.0 units
Fieldwork and Seminar Experience
Students actively participate at a community organization and are supervised
by employees of the social agency, school,
or youth group. May also be taken as
BEHS 252. Students receive credit for
only one course.
0966 Martin D
G T 12:40-2pm, KTD/FH110
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA
0967Russell M
W 4:40-6pm, KTD/DH113
and 4.5hrs/wk TBA
%ARNAND,EARN
5NITSFORWORKINGIN
PLACEMENTSIN
COMMUNITYSERVICE
CENTERSSUCHAS
CRISISINTERVENTION
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SCHOOLS4HISISA
VALUABLEWAYTOLEARN
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"%(3039&IELDWORK%XPERIENCE
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
SOCIAL SCIENCE
REAL ESTATE
SOCIAL SCIENCE
The following courses meet educational requirements described by the
California Department of Real Estate
for sales and broker’s license and renewal. For general license information
from the California Department of Real
Estate, call (916) 227-0931; for salesperson exam information, (916) 227-0900;
for broker exam information, (916) 2270899; for appraisal license or certification information, call (916) 552-9000.
REAL 115
3.0 units
Real Estate Principles
This fundamental real estate course emphasizes the basic understanding, background, and terminology necessary for
advanced study in specialized courses of
real estate. This course is required for
those preparing for the real estate salesperson license examination, will apply
toward the California Department of
Real Estate’s educational requirements
for the broker’s examination and may
also count toward the 75-hour course requirement for the California Real Estate
Appraisers’ license.
0969 Rusting J
Sat 9:10-12noon, KTD/FH110
No class meeting 9/2 & 11/25.
0970Rollins C
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/OH96
REAL 116
Real Estate Practice
3.0 units
Prerequisite: REAL 115 ADVISED
This course provides an opportunity to
practice the basic skills necessary to
work as a real estate agent. The areas
covered include, amongst others, the listing and selling of real estate, the management of real property, and the listening and negotiating skills necessary for
a successful career in real estate. It is a
required course for all licensees within
their first 18 months of licensing.
0971Fowler K
T 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/FH120
REAL 117
3.0 units
Legal Aspects of Real Estate
Prerequisite: REAL 115 ADVISED
A study of California real estate law
covering agency, contracts, disclosures,
landlord/tenant disputes, development
and the environment, property taxes,
common interest subdivisions, escrow
and title insurance, boundary disputes
and the effects of trusts and bankruptcy
one of those required for completion of
sales license provisional status and is required for application of brokers’ license
examination.
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3OCIAL3CIENCES
)NTRODUCTIONTOWRITINGRESEARCH
ANDCRITICALTHINKINGFORCOLLEGELEVEL
RESEARCHPAPERS
REAL 210
Real Estate Finance
3.0 units
Prerequisite: REAL 115 ADVISED
Emphasizing real estate finance, this
course includes lending policies and
problems in financing transactions in
residential, apartment, commercial, construction, and special purpose properties. Methods of financing properties are
studied. This course applies toward the
California Department of Real Estate’s
educational requirements for the real
estate broker’s license examination and
the sales license provisional 18-month
requirement.
0972Rusting J
W 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/FH120
REAL 219
Escrows
3.0 units
Prerequisite: REAL 115
This course explores the escrow process both historically and as currently
practiced. Title search and escrow procedures are studied closely. This class is
suitable for agents as well as those interested or involved in an escrow or title insurance career. Competency is needed by
real estate salespersons to initiate and
help complete the escrow process and
title reports; one of the often overlooked
elements in a real estate transaction.
0973Rollins C
Th 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/SC102
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
Courses offered by the Social Science
Department may require research papers, reports, or related activities. Social
Science 125, “Research Methods and
Term Papers in Social Sciences,” may be
taken concurrently with those courses
and will provide direct assistance in
those assignments.
S SC 115
1.0 unit
Leadership and Governance
Develop knowledge about leadership
styles and skills in governance and implementation of these principles in college organizations and committees.
0974 Staff
H W 3:10-4pm, KTD/SSA
LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE
LABS (S SC 115AL, BL)
A learning laboratory for students working in leadership and governance
on the college campuses.
S SC 115AL
1.0 unit
Leadership and Governance Lab
Prerequisite: SSC 115 OR CONCURRENT
0975 Staff
3hrs/wk TBA, KTD
S SC 115BL
2.0 units
Leadership and Governance Lab
Prerequisite: SSC 115 OR CONCURRENT
0976 Staff
6hrs/wk TBA, KTD
S SC 125
3.0 units
Research Methods and Term Papers in
the Social Sciences
Prerequisite: PLEASE SEE CATALOG
Introduction to college level research
papers and critical thinking in social
sciences and related fields. Term papers required for other classes may be
developed in this course. Meets the
CSU Critical Thinking requirement.
Competence in written language skills
comparable to eligibility for English 150
is strongly advised for this course. Note:
ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, and
POLS 125 are designed for students who
want the research and term paper skills,
but are not working for satisfaction of
the CSU requirement.
0977 Adams L
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/DH111
4215 Oswald G
W 6:40-9:30pm, IVC/OL103
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
75
SOCIAL SCIENCE
S SC 215
3.0 units
Current Events and Issues
An opportunity to critically examine and
discuss significant world developments
and to attempt to understand the sources of those developments. Each student
will have an opportunity to focus on issues of particular interest and share information with the group. May be taken
for credit as ECON 215, POLS 215, and
S SC 215. Students may receive credit
for only one course.
0978 Bellisimo Y
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH103
SOCIOLOGY
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
SOC 110
3.0 units
Introductory Sociology
This course will explore the relationship
between sociological explanations of human behavior and the methods and results of sociological inquiry when used to
examine behavior.
0983 Costello P
R MW 9:40-11am, KTD/DH101
0984 Brailoff M
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/FH120
0985 Christensen P
L TTh 2:10-3:30pm, KTD/DH101
0986Christensen P
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/DH101
SOC 112
3.0 units
Deviance and Social Problems
This is the study of atypical behavior labeled deviant or problematic by members
of a community and/or society — e.g. sex,
drugs, crime, and violence.
0987 Christensen P
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/DH101
SOC 220
3.0 units
Vice, Narcotics, and Organized Crime
A study of organized crime, white collar
crime, drugs, and vice operations from a
sociological perspective.
0988Kosta W
M 6:40-9:30pm, KTD/PE23
Taught concurrently with A J 220.
Students may register for SOC 220
or A J 220. Credit is given for only
one course.
SOC 230
3.0 units
Social Psychology
This is an interdisciplinary course covering altruism; attitude formation and
attitude change; conformity; person
perception and social labeling; reference groups; social conflict and conflict
resolution; human aggression; intergroup processes; intragroup processes;
interpersonal attraction; social networks, statuses and roles; and the social
development of the self. This course may
be taken as a sociology or psychology
course but not both.
0989 Christensen P
N TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/DH101
0990Brailoff M
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/FH110
SPANISH
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD. See page PPP.
SPAN 1015.0 units
Elementary Spanish I
This course involves speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish
with an introduction to Hispanic culture.
Labs and audiovisual materials are included.
0994 Portello R
C MW 10:10-12noon, KTD/OH105
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0995 Martinisi M
D TTh 11:10-1pm, KTD/OH109
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0996 Llanes J
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/HC161
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0997DePierris M
TTh 4:10-6pm, KTD/OH103
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
0998Richardson C
MW 6:40-8:30pm, KTD/OH106
and 3hrs/wk, KTD/LC150
SPAN 1025.0 units
Elementary Spanish II
Prerequisite: SPAN 101
Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.
Further explanation of Hispanic culture.
Use of labs and audiovisual materials.
0999 Pagani Magnone R
N TTh 9:10-11am, KTD/OH106
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
1000 Pagani Magnone R
C MW 10:10-12noon, KTD/OH106
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
1001 Martinisi M
TTh 4:10-6pm, KTD/OH105
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
SPANISH CONVERSATION I, II
(SPAN 110, 112)
Use of modern colloquial Spanish in
conversation with elementary grammar.
Designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken language with
a minimum of formal grammar. Oral
practice in speaking and understanding
Spanish through the use of videos, audiocassettes, and other audiovisual packages related to class work. Use of audio
materials depicting everyday situations
for improving fluency and accuracy in
pronunciation.
SPAN 1104.0 units
Spanish Conversation I
1002 Pagani Magnone R
D TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/OH106
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
1003 Vieira V
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/OH105
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
4219 Koorhan M
W 6:10-9pm, IVC/OL153
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
SPAN 1124.0 units
Spanish Conversation II
Prerequisite: SPAN 110
1004 DePierris M
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/OH101
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
SPAN 1144.0 units
Spanish Conversation III
Prerequisite: SPAN 112
1005 Pagani Magnone R
E T 1:10-4pm, KTD/OH106
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
SPAN 2035.0 units
Intermediate Spanish III
Prerequisite: SPAN 102
Grammar review, speaking, reading,
composition, and exploration of Hispanic
culture. Use of tapes and audiovisual
materials for fluency and accuracy.
1006 Mendez J
A TTh 10:10-12noon, KTD/LC39
and 3hrs/wk TBA, KTD/LC150
SPAN 203HB4.0 units
Intermediate Spanish for Heritage and
Bilingual Speakers
Prerequisite: ORAL FLUENCY SPANISH
An intermediate course tailored to the
needs of bilingual students who have
had little formal study of the Spanish
language. This course focuses on reading, writing, and vocabulary as well as
cultural aspects of all Spanish-speaking
countries.
1007 Pagani Magnone R
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/OH102
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Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
STUDY SKILLS
SPAN 2044.0 units
Intermediate Spanish IV
Prerequisite: SPAN 203
Continued grammar review, conversation, composition, reading. History and
culture of the Spanish-speaking world.
1008 Portello R
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/OH106
SPAN 225
Advanced Spanish I
3.0 units
Prerequisite: SPAN 204
Expand knowledge through study of the
literature and press with emphasis on
present-day Hispanic world.
1009 Portello R
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/OH106
SPAN 226
Advanced Spanish II
3.0 units
Prerequisite: SPAN 225
Expand knowledge through study of the
literature and press with emphasis on
present-day Hispanic world.
1010 Portello R
J MW 12:10-2pm, KTD/OH106
SPEECH
Directed study courses are offered at the
KTD campus. See page PPP.
SPCH 110
3.0 units
Intro to Speech Communication
This survey course introduces practical
verbal communication skills with an emphasis on speech performance.
1014 O’Keefe P
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC173
1015 O’Keefe P
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/HC173
1016 Epperson V
M 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC173
SPCH 120
3.0 units
Interpersonal Communication
This course introduces principles of effective communication in interpersonal
relationships. It is the study of verbal
and nonverbal communication, person
perception, conflict resolution, listening,
and communication barriers. Students
will learn to identify communication
behaviors and patterns in interpersonal
relationships, both theirs and others.
1017 Gaiz R
F MW 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC171
1018 Gaiz R
J MW 12:40-2pm, KTD/HC171
1019 Borenstein B
W 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC173
1020 Borenstein B
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC166
SPCH 122
3.0 units
Public Speaking
A survey course designed to introduce
students to three specific areas of public
speaking: informative speaking, persuasive speaking and small group speaking.
Emphasis is on effective research and
outline methods, critical listening, providing effective listener feedback to the
speaker and on effective verbal and nonverbal delivery skills.
1021 Epperson V
B MW 9:40-11am, KTD/HC173
SPCH 128
3.0 units
Intercultural Communication
Students will study a number of theories describing the cultural, sociocultural, psychocultural, gender and environmental influences on communication.
Students will compare and contrast
the cultures of European Americans,
African Americans, Asian Americans,
and Latino Americans through a diversity of readings and film. Students will
identify and practice practical means to
affect positive interaction with people
from different cultures.
1022
R
1023
D
1024
Borenstein B
F 9:10-12noon, KTD/HC173
Gaiz R
TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC171
9/06-12/06 Gaiz R
MW 3:10-5pm, KTD/HC171
Late start. Meets for 14 weeks.
SPCH 132
3.0 units
Argumentation and Persuasion
Increase critical thinking abilities by
using sound reasoning and persuasive
techniques.
1025
N
1026
D
O’Keefe P
TTh 9:40-11am, KTD/HC173
O’Keefe P
TTh 11:10-12:30pm, KTD/HC173
SPCH 140
3.0 units
Oral Interpretation of Literature I
The study of literature through oral performance of poetry, prose, fiction, nonfiction and drama.
1027 O’Keefe P
T 6:10-9pm, KTD/HC173
STATISTICS
STAT 1154.0 units
Intro to Statistics
Prerequisite: MATH 103,103G,103XY
An introduction to statistics for students
in social science and business. Students
will be instructed in the use of computer
spreadsheet software to solve statistical
and data analysis problems taken from
the various social sciences and from
business. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis
testing, linear and multiple regression,
correlation, sampling, statistical inference and time series analysis. Also see
Mathematics 115. Please note that students may receive credit for STAT 115 or
MATH 115, but not both courses.
1031 Monteith A, Kennedy R
H MW 2:10-4pm, KTD/SC133/BC102
R Kennedy teaches in BC102
during first four weeks of classes,
8/21-9/13.
STUDY SKILLS
STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOP
(STSK 70 and 76)
Lab providing students with individual testing and remediation of academic skills. Each 0.5 unit requires
one and one‑half hours of lab per week.
Registration for STSK 70 and 76 must
be done through the Disabled Students
Program. For further information,
please call 415-485-9406. Class hours
can be selected from any of the following
times:
STUDY SKILLS 70 AND 76 SCHEDULE
M
10:10-3pm
T
10:10-3pm
W 10:10-3pm
Th 9:10-12noon
STSK 70
0.5 unit
Workshop: Evaluation
Registration must be done through the
Disabled Students Program at (415)4859406.
Rouda F, Tollen E
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DS102
STSK 76
0.5 unit
Workshop: Study Techniques
Registration must be done through the
Disabled Students Program at (415)4859406.
Rouda F, Tollen E
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DS102
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
77
STUDY SKILLS
ADAPTED COMPUTER LEARNING
(STSK 77)
Individualized adapted computer learning program for learning how to learn,
remediation of cognitive processes such
as memory, attention, concentration, and
perception; retraining of concrete and
abstract thinking skills, development of
compensatory strategies for strengthening cognitive skills, and appropriate
use of adapted computers. Class hours
can be selected from any of the following
times:
STUDY SKILLS 77 SCHEDULE
MW 9:10-12noon, 12:40-5pm
TTH 9:10-12noon, 12:40-3:30pm
STSK 77
0.5 unit
Adapted Computer Learning
Prerequisite: DISABLED STUDENT
($10 material fee)
1034 Eskildsen H
1.5hrs/wk TBA, KTD/DS103
New students must first meet with a
Disabled Students Program and services counselor, and then make an appointment to meet with the instructor of
the High Tech Center before registering
for the class. Please call (415)485-9406
to make an appointment to speak with
a counselor; (415) 457-8811, ext 7701 to
speak with the instructor of the High
Tech Center.
STSK 161
2.0 units
Seminar for Tutors
Special training for tutors in Center for
Independent Study.
1035 Coad V
4hrs/wk TBA, KTD
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
See Machine and Metals Technology
WORK EXPERIENCE
OCCUPATIONAL AND GENERAL
WORK EXPERIENCE (W E 298ABCD,
299ABC)
College of Marin recognizes and awards
credit for on-the-job learning experiences. Units earned may be used as electives toward a certificate or a degree.
Students must be enrolled for a minimum of seven units including work experience.
VETERANS: VA Regulations may affect
your receiving benefits for these courses.
Check with the Veterans’ Office for latest information.
Enroll in Occupational Work Experience
(W E 298) if your job (paid or unpaid)
relates to your major or intended
course of study. Enroll in General Work
Experience (W E 299) if your job does
NOT relate to your major.
Instructors:
Boyd S, KTD
Hlavachek L, IVC
CLASS MEETINGS:
Kentfield Campus
Monday 4:00-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
Indian Valley Campus
Tuesday 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM 251
W E 298A
1.0 unit
Occupational Work Experience
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 5hrs/wk.
1047 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4226Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 298C
3.0 units
Occupational Work Experience
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 15hrs/wk.
1050 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4230Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 298D4.0 units
Occupational Work Experience
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 20hrs/wk.
1052 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4231Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 299A
General Work Experience
1.0 unit
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 5hrs/wk.
1053 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4232Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 299B
General Work Experience
2.0 units
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 10hrs/wk.
1054 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4233Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 299C
General Work Experience
3.0 units
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 15hrs/wk.
1056 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4234Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
W E 298B
2.0 units
Occupational Work Experience
Prerequisite: Enrolled in 7 units and employed for 10hrs/wk.
1048 Boyd S
M 4-5:50pm, KTD/FH110
4228Hlavachek L
T 4:40-6:30pm, IVC/PM251
78
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DISTANCE LEARNING
Distance Learning
You Can Choose
Televised Courses
• Televised Courses
College courses on television are
scheduled on local cable and Public
Broadcasting Service (PBS) channels.
These courses also include some oncampus meetings, readings, student assignments, and some form of evaluation.
Dates and times of telecasts are subject to change. Enrollments will remain
open for the first two weeks of the semester. Orientation for late enrollees
will be arranged.
For convenience, the programs are
also available for viewing on videocassette at the Kentfield Campus
Media Center. Students may rent a
complete set of televised course cassettes for a one-semester period. The
charge is a nonrefundable $55.00 per
course plus shipping charges. Orders
will be accepted by toll-free telephone
(1.800.745.5480). and cassettes will be
mailed directly to your home. It will
take an estimated five to seven business days to receive your order. Express
­options are also available for an additional cost. Credit cards (MasterCard
and Visa) are accepted. Save time: order
online at http://www.remimedia.com.
• Videocassette Courses
• Web Based Courses
Innovative Education
The Latest Technology
The College of Marin is using the latest
technology to help you realize your educational goals. Now you can use your
television or computer to get the courses you need to finish that certificate or
degree.
Beyond the Traditional Classroom
Our Distance Learning program reaches beyond the traditional classroom
in order to fill the educational and career needs of people who are not being
served by more conventional approaches. Distance Learning courses provide
an excellent alternative for students
who are unable to attend classes during regular hours, or who would like to
take additional units in a time-efficient
manner.
High Academic Standards
Different college level courses are available in a variety of convenient formats. All
courses maintain the high academic standards of the College, and most are transferable. See your counselor for details.
ASTR 101
3.0 units
Televised Course
Universe: The Infinite Frontier
Universe: The Infinite Frontier is an introductory astronomy course where students can explore the planets, the stars,
and all that lies beyond. It is composed
of four major content areas: Exploring
the Sky, The Stars, The Universe of
Galaxies, and Planets in Perspective.
The television programs incorporate
footage from NASA, the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory, the European Space Agency,
the Hubble Space Telescope, and observatories around the world. Original
state-of-the-art animation and computer graphics are used to illustrate
fundamental principles and concepts of
astronomy. There are also interviews
with leading astronomers that provide
informed and provocative insights into
current astronomical and planetary research. Access to email is recommended
for communication with the Instructor.
KTD Section 0138
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 9:30-10:30 am, KTD/SC101
R. Chavez
Telecasts begin: 9/16: Sa 4-5pm
Marin COMCAST 26
Novato COMCAST 26
ANTH 102
3.0 units
Televised Course
Cultural Anthropology: Faces of
Culture
A survey of human behavior using a
cross-cultural perspective looking at belief systems, customs, socializations and
related topics with an emphasis upon
non-Western societies, both contemporary and traditional.
KTD Section 0010
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 12:30-1:30 pm, SC 102
P. Kassebaum
Telecasts begin: 9/16 Wed 4-5 pm
Marin COMCAST 26
Novato COMCAST 26
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
79
DISTANCE LEARNING
HIST 100
3.0 units
Televised Course
The Unfinished Nation (Survey of
American History)
History of the United States from its
Native American and colonial background to the present. Social, economic,
and political institutions and developments are examined. History 117 and 118
are recommended or required for majors
and minors in history, teaching, social
science, prelegal and certain other areas.
A survey of American History using a new televised (video) program
series entitled The Unfinished Nation.
This course is for nonmajors and meets
general education and graduation requirements for University of California,
California State Universities, and
Community Colleges. Students may proceed at their own pace, completing the
course as rapidly as they wish.
KTD Section 0598
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 10:30 - 11:30 am, KTD/SC101
V. Minaisian
Telecasts begin: 9/14 Th 4-5pm
Note Not airing Friday, November 24
(Thanksgiving Holiday) Those
episodes will air on Saturday,
November 25 at 1:00pm
Marin COMCAST 26,
Novato COMCAST 26
MATH 1154.0 units
Televised Course
Against All Odds: Probability &
Statistics
Prerequisite: MATH 103 or 103S or 103XY or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test
Against All Odds is an introductory statistics course. It teaches concepts of data
analysis by focusing on the practice of
statistics. Formulas and techniques are
presented which enable the student to
analyze and solve real everyday problems that occur in a wide variety of applied fields. Each of the 26 programs is
organized around particular applications
80
•
of data analysis. They include mini-documentary segments shot on location with
practitioners who put statistics to work.
A graphing calculator is required.
There is a requirement that you have an
email address. For more information:
http://www.marin.cc.ca.us/~npsomas.
KTD Section 0681
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 11:30 - 12:30 pm, KTD/SC101;
N. Psomas
Telecasts begin: 9/13 Wed 4-5pm
Marin COMCAST 26
Novato COMCAST 26
POLS 101
3.0 units
Televised Course
Framework for Democracy: United
States Government
An introduction to political science
with focus on American government.
Emphasis is given to political culture,
political Institutions, political behavior and public policy. Framework for
Democracy is a one-semester telecourse
for those who want to learn about United
States government and politics. It addresses the principles on which our country was founded, the institutions of government that represents us as citizens,
and the rights guaranteed us by the U.S.
Constitution. The development of the
course involves many political scientists,
politicians, political activists, lobbyist,
and attorneys, each of whom provide his
or her unique insights into the operation
of the American system of government.
KTD Section 0932
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 9:30-10:30 am, KTD/SC102;
H. Fearnley
Telecasts begin: 9/15 Fri 4-5pm
Notes Not airing Friday, November 24
(Thanksgiving Holiday) Those
episodes will air on Saturday,
November 25 at 2:00pm
Marin COMCAST 26
Novato COMCAST 26
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Videocassette Courses
These courses are offered on videocassettes available for viewing on the
Kentfield Campus. Certain videocassette courses are also available for
checkout from the Kentfield Campus
Media Center at 415.485.9645 so you
can view them at home. In addition to
the videocassettes, each course will
include some scheduled on-campus
meetings, readings, student assignments, and some form of evaluation.
Enrollment in most courses will remain
open through the first two weeks of the
semester. Orientation for late enrollees
will be ­arranged.
DANC 108
3.0 units
Videocassette Course
History of Dance: Art of Movement
This course probes the traditions of
dance in communities around the world
in an attempt to understand the oldest and most compelling family of languages: the art of communication called
dance. Videocassettes for this course
will be available only in the Kentfield
Campus Media Center.
KTD Section 0336
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 11 am-noon, KTD/SC133;
S. Rollison
ENGL 117
1.0 unit
Videocassette Course
Speed Reading
This course will enable students to read
two to five times faster with equal or
greater comprehension. It includes the
techniques of columnar reading, textbook reading, skimming and scanning,
and recall. It’s enjoyable and a good investment that can save a lot of time in
the future. Videocassettes are available
only at the KTD Campus Media Center.
Call instructor for late enrollment at
415.485.9323.
KTD Section 0478
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 10-11 am, KTD/SC133
I. Saligman
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DISTANCE LEARNING
ENGL 214
3.0 units
Videocassette Course
The Popular Novel
This videocassette course examines
twentieth century American novels
that have been very successful in the
market place. Students read works by
Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Capote, Roth,
and Tan, among others, and they view
corresponding videotapes from an outstanding selection of films.
KTD Section 0516
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 9-10 am, KTD/SC133
N. Cavender
ENGL 218
3.0 units
Videocassette Course
American Short Story
This video course introduces the student to the works of leading American
short story writers of the nineteenth and
twentieth centuries. Included are Mark
Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Updike,
and Ring Lardner. The stories vary from
humorous to tragic tales, and while they
are all intended to entertain, they differ
widely in style. They will be examined
through viewing video dramatizations,
reading of the stories and the study of
supplementary materials.
KTD Section 0517
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 10:30-11:30 am, KTD/SC102
D. Rollison
HIST 103
3.0 units
Videocassette Course
Science, Technology, and Civilization
This course is a non-technical introduction to the history of science, technology,
examining their impact upon civilization, including significant social, religious, ethical, and political issues resulting from scientific and technological
advances. This course is for nonmajors
and meets general education and graduation requirements for University of
California, California State Universities,
and Community Colleges. Students may
proceed at their own pace, completing
the course as rapidly as they wish.
KTD Section 0602
Orientation Meeting:
Sa 9/9, 11:30-12:30 am, KTD/SC102
V. Minasian
Web Based Courses
Now you can unleash the educational
power of your computer. If you have a
computer and an Internet connection,
you can take selected College of Marin
courses anywhere, anytime. There are
a limited number of slots for some Web
based courses.
You Must Verify Enrollment
After registering for your web course,
e‑mail the instructor with current
e‑mail contact information on or before
the first day of class to verify enrollment and to receive class login instructions. If this is not completed by the
first day of -classes, you will not be officially registered for the course this semester. After the first day of the semester students must obtain a signature or
e-mail authorization and present it with
their enrollment card to register.
ARCH 100
3.0 units
Web Based Course
History of Architecture I
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the
world from the earliest permanent settlements at the end of the Ice Age to the
1100’s C.E. Emphasis is on the evolution
of architectural ideas and the connection
between architecture and culture.
The class is taught entirely via the
Internet, no on-campus attendance
is required. Students must have access to a computer with a connection
to the Internet, and an e-mail address.
Illustrated lectures will be posted regularly. Communication will be via the
class web site and will include class
e‑mail and online discussion groups,
which students can participate in on
their own schedule. Tests will be taken
online and will be available anytime over
a period of several days.
Students will be expected to participate in discussion groups and chats and
to create a term paper for posting to the
class web site. Some familiarity with
the Internet will be useful, however
Instructions for accessing the class web
site and using its features will be provided. Once students have officially enrolled
in this section, or have been placed on
the waiting list, they must send at email
to the Instructor at: gene.clements@
marin.cc.ca.us. by 8/21/06 to verify their
enrollment in the class. Instructions for
accessing the class will be e-mailed to
students who have verified their enrollment on or before the first day of the semester. In order to be admitted to the
class, students must log on to the class
web site, or send an e-mail to the instructor If they have a problem logging
on, by the third day of the semester. ($2
material fee)
KTD Section 0017
G. Clements
BUS 144
Web Based Course
Business Communication
3.0 units
Prerequisite: BUS 97 Advised
Students will learn to write letters,
memoranda, resumes, reports, and other business documents easily and effectively, then submit assignments to
the instructor via e-mail. In this Web
based course, students will need access
to a computer with Internet and e-mail
­capability.
There are no on-campus attendance
requirements for this course except for
a final exam. Students should register,
using the four-digit section number below, and then send a message confirming their email address to the instructor:
brian.wilson@marin.cc.ca.us.
For more information visit: http://
marin.cc.ca.us/buscom, or phone
415.485.9322.
KTD Section 0214
B. Wilson
CHEM 105
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Chemistry in the Human Environment
A one-semester non-mathematical course
for liberal arts and non-science majors,
with or without lab (CHEM 105L), to
fulfill G.E. requirements in physical sciences. Stresses a humanistic approach
to chemistry, introducing concepts via
important social and environmental
­contexts In addition to a traditional
textbook, this Web based course utilizes
modern multimedia tools, including digital video mini-lectures, demonstrations,
animations, at-home experiments, and
interactive tutorials, in order to enhance
learning in a distance environment.
Students must have access to a
computer with a CD-ROM drive and
Internet connection, an e-mail address,
and sufficient Internet experience to
visit various sites. For more information
please visit http://marin.cc.ca.us/webct.
After enrollment, students must send an
e‑mail to the instructor: erik.dunmire@
marin.cc.ca.us by the first day of classes
to receive instructions for accessing the
course Web site.
KTD Section 0242
E. Dunmire
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
81
DISTANCE LEARNING
CIS 110
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Introduction to Computer Information
Systems
A general Introduction to computers and
Information processing for all students,
this transfer level course will allow students to work with personal computers
using application software for word processing, spreadsheets, and databases.
This section requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection and sufficient Internet experience
to be able to use a Web browser to fill
out forms, download files and navigate
Web sites. There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this course
except for a final exam. Communication
is by e-mail, online conferencing and
phone. Once students have officially enrolled in this section, they must e-mail
the instructor at ransom@marin.cc.ca.
us by 8/21/06 to verify their enrollment
in the class and their e-mail address to
avoid being dropped. For more information visit: http://cis.marin.cc.ca.us/online
or phone 415.485.9579. ($3 materials fee)
KTD Section 0291
4 hrs/wk TBA
M Ransom
ENGL 120
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Introduction to College Reading and
Composition II
Prerequisite: ENG 98/98SL/Test
Students sharpen their skills in reading,
writing and critical thinking to improve
reading comprehension and to develop
composing techniques for effective academic writing. Course is designed to prepare the students for success in college
level academic reading and writing, emphasis being placed on thinking clearly
and logically and upon the construction
of cogent arguments. Requires one hour
weekly of guided practice in the Writing
center.
Students are required to have an
email address, Internet connection and
sufficient Internet experience to be able
to visit various sites. There are no oncampus requirements for this section.
Communication is by e-mail, online
conferencing and phone. Once students
have officially enrolled in this section;
they must send an e-mail to the instructor: ingrid.schreck@marin.cc.ca.us by
8/21/06 to verify their enrollment in the
class and their e-mail address to avoid
being dropped. All enrolled students, all
students on the Wait list and all students
who wish to add should visit http://marin.
cc.ca.us/homepages/IngridSchreck/
120info.html for further instructions.
ENGL 150
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Reading and Composition (1A)
ENGL 223
Web Based Course
English Literature II
Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL
Prerequisite: Eligible for ENG 150
This course is intended to develop and
refine writing, reading, and critical
thinking abilities. Various works will be
read and discussed. The student’s writing is principally expository and argumentative. Students to have an e-mail
address, Internet connection and sufficient Internet experience to be able to
visit various sites.
There are no on campus attendance requirements for these sections.
Communication is by e-mail, online
conferencing and phone. Once students
have officially enrolled in a section,
they must e-mail the instructor: Ingrid.
Schreck@marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to
verify their enrollment in the class and
their e-mail address or they may be
dropped from the course. All enrolled
students, all students on the Wait List
and all students who wish to add should
visit: http://marin.cc.ca.us/homepages/
IngridSchreck/150info.html for further
Instructions.
Online lecture and discussion. This
course is a survey of work by British
authors from the late 18th Century
through the Victorian age and the beginning of the 20th Century. Read the
work of Romantic revolutionaries, writers and thinkers who the changed the
world: includes Mary Shelley’s novel,
Frankenstein. Subjects include the innovative graphic arts of Blake, Constable
Turner, and Rossetti and texts of
Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats,
Darwin, Wilde, and others.
Students need information from the
Instructor before registering at http://
www.pearsoncustom.com/pcmedia/
marinmll/. Communication is by email,
online conferencing and phone. Once
students have officially enrolled in this
section, they must send an e-mail to the
instructor at davidr@marin.cc.ca.us by
8/21/06 to verify their e-mail address to
avoid being dropped.
KTD Section 0493 or 0494
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
I. Schreck
ENGL 1514.0 units
Web Based Course
Reading and Composition (1B)
Prerequisite: English 150
This is a course in critical thinking
and composition that applies the skills
and vocabulary of critical thinking to
works of the imagination, as well as to
traditional argument and persuasion.
Students must have access to a computer
with a connection to the Internet, and
an e-mail address. Students may need
Information from the instructor before
registering at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/pcmedia/marinmll/. Please
send an e-mail to the Instructor:
davidr@marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06.
KTD Section 0504 or KTD Section 0505
4.0 hrs/wk TBA
D. Rollison
3.0 units
KTD Section 0518
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
D. Rollison
H ED 130
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Contemporary Health Issues
This course will provide the individual
with the latest research, recommendations and information on the prevention of illness and the achievement of
holistic health for body, mind and spirit.
This course requires students to have
an e-mail address. Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. There are no
on-campus attendance requirements for
this course. Communication is by e-mail,
online conferencing and phone. Once
students have officially enrolled in this
course, they must send an e-mail to the
instructor at ksmyth@marin.cc.ca.us by
8/21/06 to verify their enrollment in the
class and their e-mail address to avoid
being dropped.
Meets Nursing Relicensure requirements and earns 42 continuing education hours. (Provider No. 007241)
KTD Section 0597
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
K. Smyth
KTD Section 0479 and Section 0480
4 hrs/wk TBA
I. Schreck
82
•
Credit Class COURSE LISTINGS FALL 2006
Evening sections are in bold and shaded
DISTANCE LEARNING
MATH 101
Web Based Course
Elementary Algebra
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MATH 95 or 95B
Elementary algebra through quadratic
equations. This section requires students
to have an e-mail address, Internet
connection and sufficient Internet experience to be able to visit various
sites. There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this section.
Communication is by postal mail, e-mail,
and online conferencing. Students must
send an e-mail to the instructor at maula.allen@marin.cc.ca.us AFTER registering for the course. For more information
visit: http://maulaallen.com/com/math/
web/101/.
Once students have officially enrolled
in this section they must send an e-mail
to the instructor (lansing@marin.cc.ca.
us) their e-mail address. For a similar
course with on campus availability see
the Television Course/Distance Learning
section of MATH 115 in the course listings.
KTD Section 0682
4.0 hrs/wk TBA
I. Lansing
This course is an extension of many of
the concepts introduced in elementary
algebra. New topics include algebraic,
logarithmic and exponential functions
and their graphs, linear systems and
applications. Students must send an email to the instructor at maula.allen@
marin.cc.ca.us as soon as they register for this class For more information
visit: http://maulaallen.com/com/math/
web/103/.
MMST 131
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Multimedia Web Authoring
Advisory: CIS 140
This Web based course covers the basic
design and development practices for the
production of multimedia-rich Web sites.
Students will use professional development tools to build and publish interactive Web sites containing text, graphics, animation, and audio. This section
requires students to have an e-mail address, Internet connection and sufficient
Internet experience to be able to visit a
variety of Web sites. For more information visit: multimedia.marin.cc.ca.us/
mmst131/.
There are no on-campus attendance requirements for this section.
Communication is through e-mail and
online conferencing. Once students have
officially enrolled they must send an email to the instructor (Gonzalez@marin.
cc.ca.us) with an e-mail contact address.
Additional information will be sent to
this address.
KTD Section 0666
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
M. Allen
IVC Section 4185
5.0 hrs/wk TBA
J. Gonzalez
MATH 1154.0 units
Web Based Course
Probability & Statistics
PE 120
3.0 units
Web Based Course
Introduction to Sport and
Exercise Psychology
This course will examine the psychological theories and techniques that
are applies to sport, exercise and other
achievement-related situations. This
course will emphasize the enhancement
of performance and personal growth of
athletes, coaches, and exercise participants. Students will also learn mental
skills that they will be able to transfer
from sport and exercise settings to their
everyday lives.
This course requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. There are no
on-campus attendance requirements for
this course. Communication is by e-mail,
online conferencing and phone.
KTD Section 0657
5.0 hrs/wk TBA
M. Allen
MATH 103
Web Based Course
Intermediate Algebra
3.0 units
Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 101XY
Prerequisites: Math 103 or 103S or 103XY or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test
Descriptive statistics, probability, probability data distributions, data sampling,
central limit theorem, estimation and
hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression and an introduction to
analysis of variance.
This section requires students to have
an e-mail address, Internet connection
and sufficient Internet experience to be
able to visit various sites. For more information visit:
http://marin.cc.ca.us/~lansing/math/­
InternetStatisticsCourse.
There are no on-campus ­attendance
requirements for this section. Com­
munication is by postal mail, e-mail and
online conferencing.
Once students have officially enrolled in
this course, they must send an e-mail
to their instructor at: cheryl.goldman@
marin.cc.ca.us by 8/21/06 to verify their
enrollment in the class and their e-mail
address to avoid being dropped.
KTD Section 0822
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
C. Goldman
PHIL 110
3.0 Units
Web Based Course
Philosophy 110: Introduction to
Philosophy
Prerequisite: English 98
This course is an online introduction to
major thinkers, movements and ideas
in the western philosophical tradition.
When enrolled, send an email to the
instructor at: John.Marmysz@marin.
cc.ca.us.
KTD Section 0799
3.0 hrs/wk TBA
J.Marmysz
PSY 114
3.0 Units
Web Based Course
Lifespan Development Psychology
Prerequisite: None
This web-based course provides an overview of psychological development across
the lifespan, focusing on physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes that
occur from the prenatal period through
old age. In addition, current research
findings and their applicability to ongoing developmental issues are explored.
This section requires students to have
an email address, Internet connection,
and sufficient Internet experiences to be
able to visit various sites, engage in chat
room discussions, submit papers and
take online exams. There are no on campus attendance requirements for this
section. Students should also be able to
rent or purchase assigned video material
for independent viewing and online discussion. Students must send an email to
the instructor at yvanecke@marin.cc.ca.
us AFTER registering for the course.
KTD Section 0956
3.0 hrs/wk TB
Y. Van Ecke
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
83
Short Term Classes Drop Dates
Section
Refund
Date
Last Day
to Add
1st Drop
Date
2nd Drop
Date
ANTH 102
0010
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
CIS 153
4040
8/25
8/25
9/6
9/28
ART 138
0053
9/1
9/1
9/25
11/10
CIS 155
4041
10/24
10/24
11/6
11/30
ASTR 101
0138
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
CIS 161
4042
8/28
8/28
9/11
10/2
AUTO 114
4023
8/26
8/26
9/25
11/9
CIS 162
4043
10/24
10/24
11/6
12/1
Title
Title
Section
Refund
Date
Last Day
to Add
1st Drop
Date
2nd Drop
Date
AUTO 139E
4026
11/3
11/3
11/6
11/6
CIS 241
0307
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/29
AUTO 139F
4027
10/19
10/19
10/20
10/23
0267
10/20
10/20
10/23
10/23
AUTO 228
4028
9/5
8/23
9/22
11/8
COMM
108AE
AUTO 229
4029
9/5
9/1
9/25
11/13
COMM 108I
0268
9/1
9/1
9/25
11/13
BIOL 99
0157
9/22
9/25
10/16
11/22
COMM
108W
0269
9/18
9/18
9/18
9/18
BOS 114
0224
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/29
COMM 145
0274
9/8
9/8
9/27
10/30
BOS 114
0225
8/25
8/25
9/7
10/2
COMM 160
0277
9/8
9/8
10/3
11/14
BOS 115
0226
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/29
COMM 240
0280
9/13
9/13
10/5
11/13
BUS 112A
0200
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
COMP 150A
0312
8/23
8/23
9/5
9/28
0313
10/19
9/8
10/31
11/23
BUS 112A
0201
8/31
8/29
9/12
10/9
COMP 150B
BUS 112A
0202
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
COUN 115B
0321
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
BUS 112B
0203
10/20
10/20
11/3
11/28
COUN 125
0322
8/31
9/1
9/13
10/6
BUS 112B
0204
11/2
11/2
11/13
12/4
COUN 125
0323
8/31
9/1
9/13
10/6
BUS 112B
0205
10/19
10/19
11/3
11/28
COUN 125
0324
9/1
9/1
9/14
10/6
BUS 112B
4036
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/30
COUN 133B
0325
10/16
10/16
10/20
11/2
BUS 114
0207
10/20
10/20
11/3
11/28
COUN 133B
0326
10/16
10/16
10/20
11/2
BUS 114
0208
10/20
10/20
11/2
11/24
COUR 166
4075
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/28
BUS 127
0210
10/20
10/20
11/3
11/28
COUR 166
4076
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/28
BUS 131
0211
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
COUR 167
4077
10/19
10/19
11/1
11/23
BUS 135
0212
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/29
COUR 167
4078
10/19
10/19
11/1
11/23
BUS 137
0213
8/25
8/25
9/7
9/29
COUR 169C
4081
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
CIS 101
0287
8/29
8/29
9/12
10/9
COUR 169C
4082
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
CIS 101
0288
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
COUR 249C
4114
10/18
10/18
11/1
11/27
CIS 101
0289
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/30
COUR 282
4115
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/28
CIS 101
0290
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
COUR 282
4116
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/28
CIS 101
4038
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
DANC 108
0336
9/22
9/22
10/9
11/22
CIS 113
0295
10/20
10/20
11/1
11/23
DANC 154
0354
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 117
0296
10/27
10/27
11/7
11/30
DANC 155
0355
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 117
0297
8/25
8/25
9/6
9/28
DANC 156
0356
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 118
0298
11/2
11/2
11/13
12/4
DANC 160
0357
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
0358
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 118
0299
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
DANC 160
CIS 122
0300
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
DANC 241A
0366
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 126
0301
10/24
10/24
11/6
11/30
DANC 241B
0367
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 127
0302
10/20
10/20
11/1
11/23
DANC 241C
0368
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 128
0303
10/24
10/24
11/6
11/30
DANC 241D
0369
9/22
9/22
10/13
11/23
CIS 141
0304
10/20
10/20
11/2
11/24
DRAM 129
0391
10/30
10/30
9/7
10/2
CIS 150
4039
10/20
10/20
11/1
11/23
DRAM 137
0394
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
84
•
FALL 2006
Short Term Classes Drop Dates
Section
Refund
Date
Last Day
to Add
1st Drop
Date
2nd Drop
Date
Section
Refund
Date
Last Day
to Add
1st Drop
Date
DRAM 160
0396
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
DRAM 160
0397
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
HIST 100
0598
9/15
9/15
10/9
1/22
HIST 103
0602
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
DRAM 161
0398
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
JOUN 160
0640
9/7
9/7
10/3
11/15
DRAM 161
0399
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
JPNS 108
0630
8/29
8/29
9/12
10/9
DRAM 161
0400
8/23
DRAM 162
0401
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
LIBR 110
0645
8/23
8/23
9/4
9/19
8/23
9/7
10/2
LIBR 110
0646
11/1
11/1
11/13
11/28
DRAM 162
0402
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MATH 25
0647
8/24
8/24
8/29
9/8
DRAM 162
0403
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MATH 90
0648
9/7
9/7
9/20
10/13
DRAM 163
0404
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MATH 90
0649
10/12
10/12
10/25
11/17
DRAM 163
0405
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MATH 115
4162
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
DRAM 163
0406
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MMST 154
4188
8/25
8/25
9/7
9/29
DRAM 237
0407
8/23
8/23
9/7
10/2
MUS 191
0734
10/10
10/10
10/30
11/29
DRAM 245
0409
10/18
10/18
11/6
12/4
MUS 193
0735
10/10
10/10
10/30
11/30
DRAM 246
0410
8/23
8/23
9/11
10/9
MUS 193
0736
10/10
10/10
10/30
11/29
ECE 100
0417
9/18
9/18
9/18
9/18
NE 90
0756
9/8
9/8
9/11
9/14
ECE 132
0422
8/29
8/29
9/4
9/18
NE 90
0757
9/8
9/8
9/11
9/14
ECE 134
0423
9/1
9/1
9/20
10/23
NE 95
0758
8/16
8/16
8/17
8/18
ECE 135
0424
8/23
8/23
6/15
10/23
NE 230
0776
8/23
8/23
9/5
9/28
ECE 223
0427
9/30
9/30
10/9
10/23
NE 230L
0777
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
ECE 224
0428
10/9
10/10
10/24
11/20
NE 232
0778
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ELND 110A
0523
8/23
8/23
9/5
9/27
NE 232
0779
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ELND 110B
0524
10/18
10/18
10/31
11/22
NE 232L
0780
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ELND 154A
0525
8/28
8/28
9/8
10/2
NE 232L
0781
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ELND 154B
0526
10/23
10/23
11/3
11/27
NE 234
0782
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
ELND 210A
0529
8/28
8/25
8/30
9/11
NE 234
0783
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ELND 210B
0530
9/25
9/25
10/2
10/17
NE 234
0784
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
ELND 210C
0531
11/3
11/6
11/13
11/28
NE 234
0785
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ENGG 110
0439
8/25
8/23
9/7
9/29
NE 234L
0786
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
ENGG 150B
0441
10/18
10/18
10/31
11/23
NE 234L
0787
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
0788
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
Title
Title
2nd Drop
Date
ENGL 12
0447
9/7
9/7
9/18
10/3
NE 236
ENGL 12
0448
10/28
10/28
11/6
11/27
NE 236
0789
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
ENGL 117
0478
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
NE 236
0790
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ENGL 214
0516
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
NE 236L
0791
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
0792
10/17
10/17
11/1
11/24
ENGL 218
0517
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
NE 236L
ESL 58A
0540
8/23
8/23
9/5
9/28
NE 250B
0797
8/23
8/23
9/15
10/23
ESL 58B
0541
10/18
10/18
10/31
11/23
POLS 101
0932
9/15
9/15
10/9
11/22
GEOG 125
0576
8/24
8/24
9/6
9/29
PSY 252
0968
10/11
10/11
10/27
11/23
GEOL 99
0580
9/22
9/22
10/16
11/22
SPCH 128
1024
9/8
9/8
10/3
11/13
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
85
Creating Partnerships
between College of Marin
and the Community
The College of Marin Foundation helps thousands of students fulfill their dreams
and reach their educational goals. Recently, the Foundation has dramatically
expanded fundraising efforts. In addition to providing scholarships for students
with limited financial means, the Foundation now supports many College of Marin
programs, including performing and fine arts.
Help ensure student success at College of Marin. Make a contribution to the
Dan Bavosa Student Aid Fund today. Contact the College of Marin Foundation for
more information.
College of Marin Foundation / P.O. Box 446 / Kentfield CA 94914
415.485.9382 / www.comf.org
86
•
FALL 2006
oFFIcE USE onLY
PLEaSE cHEcK::
❐ Fall 20____
❐ KTD
❐ Spring 20____
❐ IVC
❐ Summer 20____
1)
Credit Class Application
❐
❐
❐
❐
Resident
Non-Resident
CCP Card
RQ
❐ ASCPET
❐ Visa Verif.
❐ Readmitted
on probation
Entered by: _____________________
SOCIAL SECURITY #
(STUDENT I.D. #: Item 1 will be used in reports to the California Community Colleges. Refer to the College catalog.)
2)
LAST NAME
3)
FIRST NAME
4)
MIDDLE INITIAL ALL PREVIOUS NAMES
5)
MAILING ADDRESS
NUMBER & STREET
6)
CITY
7)
STATE 8) ZIP 9) DAY PHONE
9a) E-mail _________________________________
10) GENDER:
Male = 1
AREA CODE
Female = 2.......................................................
11) BIRTHDATE (Use numbers.) ...........................................................................................................
MO DAY YR 12) ETHNIC GROUP (for compliance with the Federal 1964 Civil Rights Act) ........................................................................
Samoan .................... = 10
Asian ........................ = 01
Hispanic ................... = 07
Filipino ..................... = 04
White........................ = 11
Asian/Indian ............. = 02
Indian ....................... = 08
Guamanian............... = 05
Other........................ = 12
Black......................... = 03
Pacific Islander ......... = 09
Hawaiian................... = 06
13a) CITIZENSHIP (enter appropriate number) .......................
oFFIcE USE onLY
U.S. Citizen .......................................................................... = 1
A Permanent Residence Card ............................................. = 2
Refugee (Parolee) Visa......................................................... = 4
A Student Visa (special application required)...................... = 5
Other ______________________________________________= 6
PLEASE INDICATE
Visa type unknown .............................................................. = 9
13b) PRIMARY LANGUAGE
14)
Staff
Verification
INS Status
Date of
Documents
Non-U.S. citizens are required to show verification of their
U.S. Immigration status.
English = 1 Not English = 2.......................................................................................................
MILITARY STATUS (If 1, 2, or 3, an additional form is required.)............................................................................................
On Active Duty in Military..................................................= 1
A dependent of a person on Active Duty ..........................= 2
Discharged from Military within the last two years ............= 3
None of the above.............................................................= 4
15a) Have you lived continuously in California for two years prior to the first day of classes for the semester of application? If you
are under 19 and never married, answer for your parents. California law requires students have a year of physical
presence in the state and a year of documented intent to be considered a student for tuition purposes. Yes = 1 No = 2
15b) If NO, give date of moving to or last returning to
California, and previous residence.
MO DAY YR STATE OR COUNTRY
15c) For residency purposes, a California resident cannot have done any of the following in the last two years:
Enter 1, if you do meet the California
a) maintained voter registration or voted in another state
residency requirements. ................................
b) petitioned for divorce in another state
c) attended an out-of-state school as a resident of that state
Enter 2, if you do not meet the California
d) declared non-residence for California State income tax purposes
residency requirement...................................
16)
ADMISSIONS STATUS (enter appropriate number) ...............................................................................................................
new Student: never attended credit classes at any college......................................................................................... = 1
new transfer: Attended another college, but never credit classes at College of Marin (Kentfield
Campus or Indian Valley Campus)................................................................................................................................ = 2
Returning transfer: Previously attended credit classes at College of Marin (Kentfield Campus
or Indian Valley Campus), but attended a different college before applying this semester ........................................ = 3
Returning: Attended credit classes at College of Marin (Kentfield Campus or Indian Valley
Campus), but not last semester.................................................................................................................................... = 4
85_Cr_Apln_03_06
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
87
17)
If under 22 years of age, enter code number for last high school
attended. See Code Sheet, Section I. If 22 or older, enter NONE ................................................
18)
HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................
High School Diploma ....................................................................................................................................................... = 1
G.E.D. or H.S. Cert. of Equivalency/Completion (If not 18 years old, proof of G.E.D. must
accompany application) ............................................................................................................................................... = 2
Certificate of California High School Proficiency Examination (If not 18 years old, proof of
C.H.S.P.E. must accompany application)...................................................................................................................... = 3
Foreign Secondary School Diploma or Certificate of Graduation ................................................................................... = 4
No Certificate or Diploma................................................................................................................................................ = 5
19)
Year of high school graduation. If currently enrolled, check here ❑ and indicate year
of high school graduation. If Certificate of Completion received, indicate year ............................................
High School students must complete a “College Credit Program Card” with application.
20)
If you were dismissed or placed on probation in your last semester of college attendance, please enter
appropriate number...............................................................................................................................................................
Academic dismissal/probation......................................... = 1
Progress dismissal/probation ........................................... = 2
Both.................................................................................. = 3
If you were not on probation or dismissed ...................... = 0
21a) STUDENT LEVEL (enter appropriate number) .......................................................................................................................
Enrolling in College while still attending
high school.............................................................= 1
Completed 0-14 college semester units .........................= 2
Completed 15-29 college semester units .......................= 3
Completed 30-59 college semester units .......................= 4
Completed 60 or more college semester units...............= 5
21b) Enter last college attended, see Code Sheet, Section IV-VIII ........................................................
21c) Completed AA/AS Degree; enter year ...........................................................................................................
21d) Completed BA/BS Degree or higher; enter year............................................................................................
22)
Where do you plan to transfer? Enter code number from Section IV-VIII of the Code
Sheet. If not known, enter NONE. .................................................................................................
23)
Number of semesters (excluding summer) previously completed at College of Marin
(either Kentfield or Indian Valley Campus)......................................................................................................................
24)
Major at College of Marin. Enter code number from Section III of
the Code Sheet. If not listed enter 490100. ..................................................................................
25)
Please indicate your most important goal from the following (students must
have a degree or certificate goal—A thru E—to qualify for financial aid):.............................................................................
Obtain a Bachelor Degree after completion of an
Associate Degree ........................................................ = A
Obtain a Bachelor Degree without completing
an Associate Degree ....................................................= B
Obtain a 2 year Associate Degree
without transfer ........................................................... = C
Obtain a 2 year Vocational Degree
without transfer ........................................................... = D
Obtain a Vocational Certificate without transfer ..............= E
26)
Prepare for a new career (acquire job skills) ......................... = G
Advance in current job/career (update job skills) ................. = H
Maintain certificate or license, e.g. Nursing, Real Estate .......... = I
Educational development (intellectual/cultural) ................... = J
Improve basic skills in English, reading or math................... = K
Complete credits for high school diploma or G.E.D ........... . = L
Undecided on goal............................................................... = M
Enter the number which most closely matches the number of hours you plan to work per week during the
academic term. (Include all paid hours of work.) ...................................................................................................................
None ............................................................................... = 1
1-9 hours ......................................................................... = 2
10-19 hours ..................................................................... = 3
27)
Discover/Formulate career interests, plans, goals................ = F
20-29 hours ..................................................................... = 4
30-39 hours ..................................................................... = 5
40 or more hours ............................................................. = 6
Please circle those services which would be of interest to you:
Financial Aid ........................... = 01
Child Care............................... = 02
Disabled Student Services...... = 03
Transfer Assistance ................. = 04
Employment Assistance ......... = 05
Basic Skills Instruction............. = 06
Tutoring ................................................ = 07
English as a Second Language............. = 08
Extended Opportunity Program.......... = 09
Career Planning .................................... = 10
Health Services ..................................... = 11
Testing Services .................................... = 12
Re-Entry Services.............................. = 13
Veterans Benefits.............................. = 15
Intercollegiate Athletics
Competition ............................ = 16
None of the above ........................... = 99
CERTIFICATION: I hereby swear under the possible penalty of perjury that the information submitted on this document is complete
and accurate. I further agree that any information I am asked to update in the future will also be complete and accurate. I do not wish
any directory or other information released from my records except in accordance with the College’s Family Rights & Privacy Policy,
unless I provide written authorization.
Signature
88
•
FALL 2006
Date
College
Marin
College of of
Marin
CodeCode
Sheet Sheet
85Codes03/03
I. MARIN COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS
214008
213020
214021
214029
214023
213006
214006
214015
214013
214007
214011
213325
Arena High School
Bayview High School
Better Way Learning Center
Branson School, The
Creative Christian Ed. Service
Creekside
Flying Machine
Good News High School
Hillwood Center
Independent Learning School
Jesus Learning Center, Inc.
Madrone
214002
214196
213005
213226
213001
214001
214020
213004
213227
213003
214016
214014
Marin Academy
Marin Catholic High School
Marin Foundation
Marin Oaks High School
Mewah Mountain High School
Mt. Tamalpais School
Nance Private School
Nova
Novato High School
Oracle Independent Study
Pacific Schooling
Pied Piper
213258
214019
213441
214103
214012
213305
213320
213002
213326
214332
214004
214000
Redwood High School
Ross Valley Christian School
San Andreas High
San Domenico
San Francisco School of the Arts
San Marin High School
San Rafael Adult Education Center
San Rafael Alternative II (LAG NAF)
San Rafael High School
San Rafael Military
School of Arts and Sciences
Shasta School
310000
320000
330000
340000
350000
360000
370000
380000
390000
400000
Placer
Plumas
Riverside
Sacramento
San Benito
San Bernardino
San Diego
San Francisco
San Joaquin
San Luis Obispo
213134
214274
606618
213363
213369
214017
213007
213400
052498
214415
213431
214018
Sir Francis Drake
St. Peter Channel Seminary
Sunny Hills
Tamalpais Adult Evening
Tamalpais High School
Tam Creek
Tamiscal
Terra Linda High School
The Marin School
Three R School
Tomales High School
Trinity High School
II. COUNTY/STATE/COUNTRY
010000
020000
030000
040000
050000
060000
070000
080000
090000
100000
Alameda
Alpine
Amador
Butte
Calavaras
Colusa
Contra Costa
Del Norte
El Dorado
Fresno
110000
120000
130000
140000
150000
160000
170000
180000
190000
200000
Glenn
Humboldt
Imperial
Inyo
Kern
Kings
Lake
Lassen
Los Angeles
Madera
210000
220000
230000
240000
250000
260000
270000
280000
290000
300000
Marin
Mariposa
Mendocino
Merced
Modoc
Mono
Monterey
Napa
Nevada
Orange
410000
420000
430000
440000
450000
460000
470000
480000
490000
500000
San Mateo
Santa Barbara
Santa Clara
Santa Cruz
Shasta
Sierra
Siskiyou
Solano
Sonoma
Stanislaus
510000
520000
530000
540000
550000
560000
570000
580000
600000
800000
Sutter
Tehama
Trinity
Tulare
Tuolumne
Ventura
Yolo
Yuba
Out of State
Out of Country
III. COLLEGE OF MARIN (if major not listed, enter 490100.)
210500
220200
020100
100200
191100
094820
094800
210400
040110
050200
050100
050200
Administration of Justice
Anthropology
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Automotive Body & Fender
Automotive Technology
Behavioral Science
Biology
Business/Accounting
Business Administration
Business/Applied
Accounting Option
050100 Business, General/
Bookkeeping Option
051402 Business Clerical, Studies
050600 Business/Management
051400 Business/Office Studies,
Legal Option/Medical
Transcriber Option
051100 Business/Real Estate
050900 Business/Retail Marketing
050600 Business/Small
Business Management
190500 Chemistry
060100 Communications/Filmmaking/Mass Communications/Screenwriting
060300 Communications, Television Production Option
070300 Computer Information Systems/Programmer/Microcomputer Option Area
Network Operations
070100 Computer Science
051430 Court Reporting
100800 Dance
120410 Dental Assisting,
Registered
100900 Design, Applied/Design,
Applied Interior
020100 Design, Architectural
100700 Drama
130510 Early Childhood
Education
220400 Economics
093400 Electronics Technology/
Telecommunications
Option
090100 Engineering
092500 Engineering Technology
150100 English
220210 Ethnic Studies
213300
110100
110200
220600
191400
110300
220500
490300
060200
010900
Fire Science
Foreign Language, Gen.
French
Geography
Geology
German
History
Humanities
Journalism
Landscape/Construction
Option/Maintenance/
Management/Nursery
Management Option
490100 Liberal Arts & Sciences
095630 Machine & Metals
Technology
040100 Marine Environmental
Technology
170100
120370
079900
100400
490200
120300
150900
083500
190100
190200
220700
200100
220100
220800
110500
150600
490100
Mathematics
Medical Assisting
Multimedia Studies
Music
Natural Science
Nursing, Registered
Philosophy
Physical Education &
Health
Physical Science
Physics
Political Science
Pyschology
Social Science
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
University transfer
IV. CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGES
015257
425213
345023
195020
155050
365074
045115
445076
415062
195175
195154
155001
015235
015001
365210
195177
305001
555055
Alameda
Allan Hancock
American River
Antelope Valley
Bakersfield
Barstow
Butte
Cabrillo
Canada
Canyons
Cerritos
Cerro Coso
Chabot Hayward
Chabot Hayward
Livermore
Chaffey
Citrus
Coastline
Columbia
195196
075190
345124
365211
405650
375250
305191
435184
335125
075268
195217
195225
435217
325225
435227
105240
305240
435263
195257
Compton
Contra Costa
Cosumnes River
Crafton Hills
Cuesta
Cuyamaca
Cypress
DeAnza
Desert
Diablo Valley
East Los Angeles
El Camino
Evergreen
Feather River
Foothill
Fresno City
Fullerton
Gavilan
Glendale
305282
275249
275129
135570
215001
305580
105523
095001
015450
185420
195337
195346
195365
195000
195953
Golden West
Grossmont
Hartnell
Imperial Valley
Indian Valley
Irvine Valley
King River
Lake Tahoe
Laney
Lassen
Long Beach City
Los Angeles City
Los Angeles Harbor
Los Angeles ITV
Los Angeles
Mission
195384 Los Angeles Pierce
195387 Los Angeles
Southwest
195390 Los Angeles
Trade-Tech
195396 Los Angeles Valley
075269 Los Medanos
215060 Marin
235001 Mendocino
245475 Merced
015570 Merritt
375509 Mira Costa
435861 Mission
505500 Modesto
275270 Monterey Peninsula
565320 Moorpark
195475 Mt. San Antonio
335403 Mt. San Jacinto
285540 Napa
015610 Ohlone
305525 Orange
565321 Oxnard
335565
375542
195575
545364
305609
125140
195658
335687
345740
305579
365594
196140
346760
366184
376720
196770 San Fernando
Valley
386796 San Francisco
436727 San Jose
375663
375693
375300
385092
395670
435680
415151
Palo Verde
Palomar
Pasadena City
Porterville
Rancho Santiago
Redwoods
Rio Hondo
Riverside City
Sacramento City
Saddleback
San Bernardino
Valley
San Diego City
San Diego Mesa
San Diego Miramar
San Francisco City
San Joaquin Delta
San Jose City
San Mateo
425560
195825
495690
545071
455695
315730
475200
415711
485825
375807
155580
565741
365790
015236
105131
195952
435860
585925
Santa Barbara City
Santa Monica City
Santa Rosa
Sequoias
Shasta
Sierra
Siskiyou
Skyline
Solano
Southwestern
Taft
Ventura
Victor Valley
Vista
West Hills
West Los Angeles
West Valley
Yuba
406145
376820
496710
506730
San Luis Obispo
San Marcos
Sonoma
Stanislaus
V. CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
156250
046242
196135
106260
Bakersfield
Chico
Dominguez Hills
Fresno
306106
016178
126450
196131
Fullerton
Hayward
Humboldt
Long Beach
196133
486150
276001
196770
Los Angeles
Maritime
Monterey Bay
Northridge
Pomona
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Diego
VI. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
017846 Berkeley
577750 Davis
307240 Hastings College of Law
307781 Irvine
197887 Los Angeles
377797 Riverside
377837 San Diego
387876 San Francisco Med. Cntr.
427677 Santa Barbara
447765 Santa Cruz
388893
198518
288620
198670
198625
078624
388716
218289 San Francisco
Theological Seminary
388892 San Francisco,
University of
438830 Santa Clara University
388896 Saybrook Institute
198850 Scripps College
388812 Simpson College
438792 Stanford University
428708 Westmont College
198972 Whittier College
218009 World College West
VII. CALIFORNIA INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
388005 Academy of Art College
388004 American Conservatory
Theatre Foundation
010809 Armstrong College
388901 Bay City College of
Dental-Medical
Assistants
018153 California College of
Arts and Crafts
388903 California College of
Podiatric Medicine
388895 California Institute of
Integral Studies
198122 California Institute of
Technology
030148 Chapman College
198185 Claremont McKenna
College
388108 Cogswell College
218097 Dominican College
498004 Empire College School
of Law
218165 Golden Gate Baptist
Theological Seminary
388192 Golden Gate University
198481 Harvey Mudd College
388260 Healds Business College
018388 Healds Business
College-Oakland
018261 Holy Names College
388329 Lone Mountain College
388058 Louise Salinger
Academy of Fashion
198405 Loyola Marymount
University
198426 Marymount College
418397 Menlo College
018518 Mills College
900757 Mt. St. Mary’s College
New College of California
Occidental College
Pacific Union College
Pepperdine University
Pomona College
St. Mary’s College
San Francisco Art
Institute
388748 San Francisco College
of Mortuary Science
388780 San Francisco
Conservatory of Music
388007 San Francisco Law School
VIII. OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
900000 Other California Colleges & Universities
600000 Out of State Colleges & Universities
800000 Out of Country Colleges & Universities
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
89
Academic Information Catalog
Although this schedule contains a summary of important policies and procedures, students are encouraged to review the College catalog. The current
catalog is available on-line at www.
marin.cc.ca.us.
Graduation Deadlines
Apply for Fall 2006
Degree/Certificate
September 11 – October 31
Students who have met the degree/
certificate requirements, and have filed an
Application for Graduation/Certificate by
the deadline date will be eligible to receive
an Associate in Arts/Science Degree or a
Certificate of Completion. Information is
available in the Counseling Office.
Prerequisites, Corequisites
& Advisories
Prerequisite A prerequisite is a condition of enrollment that a student is required to meet
in order to demonstrate current readiness for enrollment in a particular
course or program.
The College requires students to complete prerequisite courses with a grade
of C, CR, or higher prior to registering
in the course requiring the prerequisites. Examples of courses which may
require prerequisites:
• Courses for which specific prerequisites have been justified by content review, the appropriate level of scrutiny
and any other validation procedures
required by law (Title 5, 55201 a-f).
• Sequential courses in a degree-applicable program.
• Courses requiring a prerequisite to
transfer to a four-year college.
• Courses requiring preparation to protect health and safety.
• Technical or vocational courses
or programs that require special
­preparation.
90
•
FALL 2006
Equivalent Course Work
Some prerequisites may be satisfied by equivalent course work from
an accredited institution other than
College of Marin. Before enrolling in
classes, please contact a counselor at
415.485.9432 for more ­information.
Prerequisite Challenges
Students have the right to challenge
prerequisites on certain, specified
grounds and following necessary procedures. Please see the College catalog or contact the Challenge Office at
415.485.9431 for more information.
Prerequisite Challenge Deadline
Prerequisite challenges must be initiated no later than 4 pm, Thursday, Jan
12, 2006 for the Spring Semester.
Corequisite A corequisite is a condition of enrollment consisting of a course that a student is required to take simultaneously
in order to enroll in another course.
Students must register in all coreq-­
uisite courses prior to the start of
the semester. Courses which may require corequisites include: courses that
are part of a closely related lecture-laboratory pairing requiring concurrent
enrollment.
Advisory
An advisory is a condition of enrollment
that a student is advised, but not required, to meet before or in conjunction
with enrollment in a course or educational program.
Other Limitations Other limitations on enrollment may
­include:
• Courses that require public performance or competition.
• Blocks of courses for which enrollment is limited in order to create a cohort of students.
Directed Study Students are limited to 12 units or 4
enrollments of Directed Study per discipline, which must be taught by a fulltime instructor, credentialed in the
­discipline.
Probation & Dismissal Standards For Probation A student who has enrolled in at least
12 units or 2 semesters and has a cumulative GPA (grade point average) of
less than 2.0 will be subject to probation. A student who has enrolled in at
least 12 units or 2 semesters and has
a cumulative NPG (nonprogress grade
of NC, I, or W) of 50% or more will be
subject to probation. A student who was
dismissed or on probation at their last
school of attendance will enter College
of Marin on a probationary status.
Standards During A
Semester of Probation Academic:
A student who does not have at least a
2.0 semester GPA during a semester of
probation (including summer) will be
dismissed.
Progress
A student who has a 50% or more semester NPG during a semester of probation (including summer) will be dismissed.
All probationary students are required to meet with a counselor
and complete or update a Student
Educational Plan. Probationary students may not register in more than 12
units.
Standards for Dismissal Academic
A student who has less than a cumulative GPA of 1.75 in 3 consecutive semesters (not including summer) will be
dismissed. A student who does not have
at least a 2.0 semester GPA during a semester of probation (including summer)
will be dismissed.
Progress
A student who has 50% or more NPG in
3 consecutive semesters (not including
summer) will be dismissed. A student
who has a 50% or more semester NPG
during a semester of probation (including summer) will be dismissed.
Readmission after Dismissal To be considered for readmission, dismissed students must file a Petition to
Return by the deadline (forms available in the Office of Admissions and
Records). Students seeking readmission must complete or update a Student
Educational Plan, and it is recommended that they meet with a counselor at least twice during the semester.
Students seeking readmission may be
required to make an appointment with
the Academic Standards Committee.
Readmitted students may generally not
enroll in more than 12 units and may
be limited to fewer units. Other restrictions may also be imposed.
Honor List Students will be placed on a semester
honor list when their semester GPA is
3.0 or higher. These students may not
be on probation or have any “I”, “NC”,
or “F” grades, and must be enrolled in
12 units of letter-graded classes at the
College.
grade assigned by the instructor. The
­enrollment fee will be charged for reenrollment.
Incomplete Grades
Students who received an Incomplete
grade last semester do not re-enroll this
semester to make up the work.
Credit/No Credit Option In those courses which permit a student
to be evaluated either on a CR/NC or a
letter graded basis, a student must select the CR/NC option no later than the
last day of the fifth week of instruction
for a semester length course or, for a
short-term course, no later than the day
which marks completion of 30% of the
term. Once a student has made a selection, the option cannot be changed.
Grading Midterm & Final Grades Midterm and final grades will be
available by touch-tone phone at
415.883.1523. Check the calendar on
page 3 for dates. If you do not wish
your grades to be available by touchtone phone, please advise the Office of
Admissions and Records in writing.
In Progress Grades Students who receive an IP grade must
re-enroll in the subsequent semester or they will receive the alternative
Transcripts During busy periods, transcripts can
take up to 20 working days. Please order your transcripts early. Students
may receive 2 copies of their transcripts
for free. Additional copies are $6 per
copy. A next business day transcript
is $15 per copy. Transcript requests
may be faxed. For instructions, please
call 415.457.8811, ext. 8822 or go to
the College website: http://www.marin.
cc.ca.us/admissions/transcript.html.
Student Appeals & Grievances Appeals and Grievances in the following areas should be directed to
the Office of the Dean of Enrollment
Services, Development & Special
Programs: Academic/Progress
Dismissal, Admission, Attendance,
Financial Aid, Grades, Graduation,
Fee Payment/Refund Residence
Determination, and Student Records.
Detailed information can be obtained
from the Admissions and Records counters. Guidelines for filing an Academic
Grievance (excluding grades) or a student complaint against another student are available from the Dean of
Enrollment Services, Development &
Special Programs.
In cases of sexual harassment/discrimination/unsafe assignments, the
student should report the incident immediately to the appropriate Dean.
Final Exams December 11–16
Day Credit Classes
Final exams are arranged as indicated by the exam letter for each daytime class listed in this schedule which has regular meeting hours. If no
letter code is indicated, ask your instructor for information about your final exam.
After selecting your courses, plan your examination week schedule by using the table. Unless your instructor informs you of a change,
exams will be held in your regular classroom. Please avoid selecting two classes with the same letter.
Day
Date
8-11 a.m.
11-2 p.m.
2-5 p.m.
M
12/11
A
B
C
T
12/12
D
E
F
W
12/13
G
H
J
Th
12/14
K
L
M
F
12/15
N
P
R
Evening Credit Classes Saturday Credit Classes Exams will be given in the regular classroom at the time class
normally meets. For example, evening classes that meet:
Examinations will be given on December 16 in the regular classroom
at the time class normally meets.
•
•
•
•
M or M/W eves take exam M 12/11
T or T/Th eves take exam T 12/12
W eves take exam W 12/13
Th eves take exam Th 12/14
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
91
Graduation/Transfer Information
Transfer Admission Support
As a means to support transfer admissions, College of Marin participates
in guaranteed admissions to specific
University of California campuses,
California State Universities, and private universities. College of Marin
also offers “cross enrollment” at UC
Berkeley to qualified students. Contact
the COM Counseling Office for more
information. In addition, the counseling Department oversees the Transfer
Center, staffed for the purpose of helping students research transfer and admissions requirements.
A.A./A.S. Graduation
Requirements
The Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree or Associate
in Science (A.S.) degree will be awarded to any
student upon satisfactory completion of all of the
following seven requirements:
1. U
nits—The Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree
and the Associate in Science (A.S.) degree require a minimum of 60 lower division units to
include all the requirements indicated below
and any additional elective units needed to
satisfy the 60 unit minimum. Courses numbered 0‑99 are not applicable to the Associate
degree.
2. Major Requirement—At least 18 units
must be taken in a single discipline or related
disciplines as indicated in the COM Catalog.
An alternative way to meet this requirement
is by full certification of the California State
University General Education Requirements
or full certification of the Intersegmental
General Education Transfer Curriculum
(I.G.E.T.C) and thus be eligible for a
University Transfer A.A. degree.
3. Scholarship—An overall grade point average
(G.P.A.) of 2.0 (“C” average) in all degree‑applicable courses (numbered 100 and above)
taken at COM and in all acceptable lower division courses transferred from other colleges.
4. R
esidence—Successfully complete at least
12 units in the major requirements at COM.
5. M
athematics Proficiency—One of the following options:
(a) A satisfactory score on the Math
Assessment Test, i.e. eligibility for
Intermediate Algebra (Math 103) or
(b) Completion of Elementary Algebra (Math
101 or Math 101A plus 101B or Math 101X
plus 101Y) with a grade of “C” or higher.
6. G
eneral Education—A minimum of 19
units of general education is required for the
A.A. or A.S. degree. See the following general
education categories and course listings.
7. Application for Graduation—It is the student’s responsibility to submit an “Application
for Graduation” by making an appointment with a counselor in the Counseling
Department. All official transcripts from other
colleges must be available in the Counseling
Office by the application deadline date. All
petitions and waivers must be attached to the
application form by the deadline date.
92
•
FALL 2006
General Education Courses
Please note that one of the general education
courses must be a cross-cultural studies course.
Most cross-cultural studies courses will satisfy
the Cross-Cultural Studies Requirement and
one other general education requirement. If a
cross‑cultural studies course is not found in another general education category, then additional
units of general education are needed to meet
the A.A. or A.S. degree. Likewise courses counted for two general education requirements may
not be used to fulfill a major requirement. One
course from each category is required for graduation (19 units minimum).
A. Natural Sciences
Three units minimum—select one course.
Geography 109 may be used to satisfy Category
A or Category B, but not both.
Natural Science credit is awarded for only one
course in the following groups
Astronomy 105, Biology 105, Geology 105
Astronomy 117F, Astronomy 117L
Biology 107, Physical Education 107
Anthropology 101, 101L
Astronomy 101, 105, 117F, 117L
Biology 100, 101, 105, 107, 108A, 109, 110, 110L,
115, 116, 120, 159, 162, 224, 224A, 235, 240
Chemistry 105, 105L, 110, 114, 131
Geography 101, 101L, 109, 112
Geology 103, 105, 109, 110, 114, 120, 120L, 121
Physical Education 107
Physics 108A, 110, 207A
B. Social and Behavioral Sciences
Three units minimum—select one
course.
The following courses may be used to satisfy
Category B or Category F, but not both:
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151; ­History 100,
117, 118; Political Science 100, 101.
Geography 109 may be used to satisfy Category
A or Category B, but not both.
Psychology 205 and Sociology 205 may be used
to satisfy Category B or Category E, but not
both.
Social and Behavioral Science credit is awarded
for only one course in each of the following sets:
Behaviroral Science 201, Economics 201, or
Political Science 201
Health Education 142 or Psychology 142
Psychology 111 or Psychology 116
Psychology 112 or Psychology 114
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Psychology 205 or Sociology 205
Psychology 230 or Sociology 230
Anthropology 102, 103, 110, 204, 215
Behavioral Science 103, 201
Business 101
Early Childhood Education 110, 111, 112
Economics 101, 102, 201
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151
Geography 102, 109
Health Education 142
History 100, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112,
117, 118, 119, 120, 122, 124, 206, 214, 215, 216,
226, 238
Political Science 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 201,
203, 220
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, 120, 140, 142,
145, 204, 205, 230
Sociology 110, 112, 140, 205, 230, 250
C. Humanities
Three units minimum—select one course.
English 151 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Humanities credit is awarded for only one course
in each of the following sets:
Art 108, Ethnic Studies 108, ­or ­Humanities 108
Biology 145 or Geology 145
Communications 109A or Humanities 109A
Communications 109B or Humanities 109B
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
Communications 160 or Journalism 160
English 242 or Humanities 242
Speech 128 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
American Sign Language 101, 102, 110, 203, 204
Architecture 100, 101, 102
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108
Biology 145
Chinese 101, 102
Communications 108 (3 units), 109A, 109B, 110,
160
Dance 105A, 105B, 107, 108
Drama 110, 116, 117, 119
English 151, 204, 208, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215,
218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B, 222, 223, 224, 225,
230, 235, 237, 240, 242
Ethnic Studies 108, 154
French 101, 102, 108, 108B, 203, 204, 225, 226
Geology 145
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107, 108, 109A, 109B,
114, 118, 121, 125, 242
Italian 101, 102, 108 (3 units), 203, 204, 225, 226
Japanese 101, 102, 108 (3 units), 203, 204
Journalism 110, 160
Music 101, 102, 105, 106
Philosophy 110, 111, 115, 116, 117
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 203HB, 204, 225, 226,
230A
Speech 128, 140, 141
D. Composition, Written Three units minimum—select one course.
The English course required for the Associate
degree is determined by the major. If English
150 is not specifically mentioned for the major,
then English 120, 120SL, or 150 will satisfy the
­requirement.
English 150 is the first level course in college freshman English that is transferable to
the University of California and the California
State University. English 120SL transfers
as an elective to the University of California
and California State University. English 120
transfers as an elective to the California State
University.
English 120 or 120SL, or 150 must be completed with a grade of “C” or higher.
E. Communication & Analytical
Thinking Three units minimum—select one course.
English 151 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Psychology 205 and Sociology 205 may be used
to satisfy Category B or Category E, but not
both. Credit is awarded for only one course.
Speech 128 may be used to satisfy Category C or
Category E, but not both.
Computer Information Systems 215
Computer Science 130, 135, 140, 200, 230, 232
English 130, 151, 155
Mathematics 103, 103G, 103x and 103y, 104,
104x and 104y, 105, 110, 114, 115, 116, 121, 123,
124
Philosophy 112
Psychology 205
Sociology 205
Speech 110, 120, 128, 130, 132
Statistics 115
F. American Institutions
Three units minimum—select one course.
All courses listed in Category F may be used to
satisfy Category B or Category F, but not both.
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
History 100, 117, 118
Political Science 100, 101
G. Cross-Cultural Studies Three units minimum—select one course.
Cross-cultural studies courses which are listed
in other general education ­categories will satisfy
both the Cross-Cultural Studies Requirement
and the requirement of one other category.
American Sign Language 110
Anthropology 204, 215
Art 108
Communications 160
English 235, 237
Ethnic Studies 108, 110, 111, 112, 121, 151, 154
History 109
Humanities 108
Journalism 160
Music 105
Psychology 120
Speech 128
H. Physical Activity One unit minimum—select one course.
This requirement may be satisfied by degree‑applicable activity courses in physical education
or dance.
California State University
­General Education Pattern Students should be aware that this list is subject
to change and does not apply to the University of
California System.
CSU General Education Certification Approximately 124 semester units are required
for a baccalaureate degree at a California State
University, of which 48 units must be in general
education within a prescribed pattern. Thirtynine units may be completed and certified
in whole or in part at College of Marin. The
remaining nine units must be taken as upper
division courses after transfer to the four year
university.
Community colleges may certify no more than
30 units of general education from Subject Areas
B, C, and D combined. The remaining units may
be taken from Areas A and/or E.
Completion of 39 units of general education
for the California State University System is not
a requirement for admission. However, it is rec-
ommended that these units be completed during
the first two years of college.
Students must make a request for certification prior to attending California State
University by completing two forms: 1. A
Request for Transcript; 2. A Request for General
Education Certification.
CSU United States History,
Constitution, and American Ideals
Requirement
In addition to general education, state universities and colleges also require United States
History, and Constitution and American Ideals
for graduation. Courses at College of Marin that
fulfill the two‑course requirement are:
1. One course in United States History to be chosen from the following: Ethnic Studies 111 or
112 or 121 or 151; History 100 or 117 or 118.
2. One course in Constitution and American
Ideals to be chosen from the following:
Political Science 100 or 101.
Area A—Communication In The
English Language And Critical
Thinking Nine units—Select one course from A1, A2, and
A3.
Speech 132 may be used for A1 or A3, but not
both.
A1—Oral Communication
Speech 110, 120, 122, 132
A2—Written Communication
English 150
A3—Critical Thinking
English 130, 151, 155
Philosophy 112
Social Science 125
Speech 132
Area B—Natural Sciences And
Mathematics Nine units—Select one course from B1, B2, B4.
A laboratory course marked by an asterisk (*) in
B1 and B2 will satisfy B3.
Astronomy 105, Biology 105, or Geology 105 may
be used in B1 or B2, but not both.
Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Astronomy 105, Biology 105 or Geology 105
Biology 107 or Physical Education 107
Biology 138 or Geology 138
Computer Science 117, Math 117
B1—Physical Sciences
Astronomy 101, 105, 117F*, 117L*
Biology 105, 138
Chemistry 105, 105L*, 110*, 114*, 131*
Geography 101, 101L*, 112
Geology 105, 109, 110, 120, 120L*, 121*, 138
Physics 108A*, 108AC, 110, 207A*
B3—Laboratory Activity
Laboratory courses marked with an asterisk (*)
are included in B1 and B2 and will satisfy B3.
B4—Mathematics/Quantitative
Reasoning
Computer Science 117
Math 104 or 104XY, 105, 110, 114, 115, 116, 117,
121, 123, 124, 223, 224
Statistics 115
Area C—Arts, Literature, Philosophy,
And Foreign Languages Nine units. Select three courses to include at least
one course each from C-1 and C-2.
Asterisk (*) indicates a performance or activity
course. Limit of three units.
Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Art 108, Ethnic Studies 108 or ­Humanities 108
Communications 109A or Humanities 109A
Communications 109B or Humanities 109B
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
Communications 160 or Journalism 160
Humanities 114 or Humanities 118
American Sign Language 110 may be used for C2 or D-1, but not both.
C1—Arts (Art, Dance, Music,
Theatre)
Architecture 100, 101, 102
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 112*,
113*, 114*, 116*, 118*, 130*, 134*, 140*, 144*,
146*, 148*, 152*, 161*, 165*, 170*, 180*, 185*,
190*, 293*
Communications 109, 109A, 109B, 111*
Dance 105A, 105B, 107, 108, 110*, 113*, 119*,
121*, 122*, 126*, 130AB*, 132*, 133*, 135*, 136*,
230*
Drama 110, 130*, 150, 160*, 161*, 245*, 260*
Ethnic Studies 108
Humanities 108, 109, 109A, 109B
Music 101, 102, 105, 106
C2—Humanities (Literature,
Philosophy, and Foreign Language)
American Sign Language 101, 102, 110, 203
Communications 160
Drama 116, 117
English 204, 208, 212, 213,
214, 215, 218, 219, 220, 221A, 221B, 222, 223,
224, 225, 230, 235, 237, 240
French 101, 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Humanities 100A, 100B, 114, 118, 121, 125
Italian 101, 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Japanese 101, 102
Journalism 160
Philosophy 110, 111, 115, 116, 117
Spanish 101, 102, 203, 203HB, 204, 225, 226,
228
Speech 140, 141
B2—Life Science (Biological)
Anthropology 101, 101L*
Astronomy 105
Biology 105, 107, 109, 110, 110L*, 115*, 116*,
120*, 162*, 224*, 235*, 240*
Geology 105
Physical Education 107
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
93
Area D—Social, Political, And
Economic Institutions And Behavior
And Their Historical Background Nine units—Select three courses from three different groups.
Credit is given in Area D or Area E, but not
both for the following courses: Behavioral
Science 103, 114; Biology 108A; Psychology 110;
Psychology 111; Psychology 112; Psychology 140;
Sociology 140
Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Behavioral Science 103 or Biology 108A
Behaviroal Science 201, Ecnomics 201, or
Political Science 201
Communications 110 or Journalism 110
Psychology 111 or Psychology 116
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Psychology 205 or Sociology 205
Psychology 230 or Sociology 230
See catalog description for Psychology 112 credit
limitation.
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151 may be used
for D3 or D6, but not both.
History 103 may be used for D3 or D7, but not
both.
American Sign Language 110 may be used for D1 or C-2, but not for both.
D1—Anthropology and Archeology
American Sign Language 110
Anthropology 102, 103, 110, 204
D2—Economics
Economics 101, 102
D3—Ethnic Studies
Ethnic Studies 110, 111, 112, 121, 151
D5—Geography
Geography 102, 109
D6—History
Ethnic Studies 111, 112, 121, 151
History 100, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112,
117, 118, 119, 120, 122, 206, 214, 215, 216, 226,
238
D7—Interdisciplinary Social or
Behavioral Science
Behavioral Science 103, 114, 201
Biology 108A
Business 101
Communications 110
Early Childhood Education 110, 111, 112
Economics 201
History 103
Journalism 110
Political Science 201
Psychology 140, 230
Sociology 140, 230
Speech 128
D8—Political Science, Government,
and Legal Institutions
Political Science 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 220
D9—Psychology
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 116, 204, 205
D0—Sociology and Criminology
Sociology 110, 112, 205, 250
94
•
FALL 2006
Area E—Lifelong Understanding And
Self-development
Three units—Select one course.
Credit is given is Area D or Area E, but not both
for the following courses: Behavioral Science
103, Behavioral Science 114, Biology 108A,
Psychology 110, Psychology 111, Psychology 112,
Psychology 140, Sociology 140.
See catalog description for Psychology 114 credit
limitation.
Credit is given for only one course in each of the
following sets:
Behavioral Science 103 or Biology 108A
Health Education 142 or Psychology 142
Psychology 140 or Sociology 140
Behavioral Science 103, 114
Biology 100, 108A
Health Education 112, 130, 142
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 114, 140, 142
Sociology 140
Transfer Curriculum for the
­University of California and
California State University The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) is a program that College
of Marin transfer students can use to fulfill
lower division general education requirements
at both the University of California and the
California State University. There are other options that fulfill general education requirements,
but none of the options cover both the University
of California and California State University.
The IGETC will permit a student to transfer
from College of Marin to a campus in either the
University of California or the California State
University System without the need, after transfer, to take additional courses to satisfy campus
lower division general education requirements.
The IGETC is not an admission requirement
to the University of California or California
State University. Existing campus specific admission requirements for transfer students remain unchanged.
It is not advisable for all transfer students to
follow the IGETC. Some students may be better
served by taking courses that fulfill the California
State University general education breadth requirements or those of the University of California
campus to which they plan to transfer. Contact a
College of Marin counselor for further information
regarding University of California or California
State University schools where completion of the
IGETC is not recommended.
IGETC Certification
All course work applicable to the IGETC must
be completed and certified in its entirety prior to transfer in order to be accepted by the
University of California or California State
University. Certification indicates that all lower division general education requirements for
the University of Caliofrnia or California State
University have been met. Courses certified for
IGETC must be completed with a grade of “C”
or higher. It shall be the students’ responsibility
to request certification when requesting the last
transcript from College of Marin prior to entering the University of California or California
State University system. Students should contact the counseling department to initiate
IGETC certification.
In addition to the course requirements for
each subject area, full certification for California
State University must include completion of
the Oral Communication Requirement. For the
University of California, Oral Communication is
not required, but the certification must include
satisfactory completion of a Language Other
Than English Requirement.
Courses taken at other institutions may be
used to fulfill the IGETC. Students should be
aware, however, that placement of courses within IGETC subject areas may vary from college to
college. Placement of a course will be based on
the college of attendance and its IGETC pattern
at the time the course was completed.
Completion of the IGETC program will be certified by the last community college that the student
attends. As a general rule, IGETC can be certified
for California community college transfer students
who have completed transfer units at a University
of California, California State University, or independent college provided that the student has
completed most of the transfer units at one or more
California community colleges.
Advanced Placement Test
Advanced Placement Test (APT) scores can
be used to satisfy certain areas under IGETC.
An APT score of four in English Language
and Composition will satisfy Area 1, Group A.
However, there is no equivalent AP exam for
Area 1, Group B Critical Thinking/English
Composition. An APT score of four or five in
Mathematics Calculus AB or BC will satisfy
Area 2, Mathematical Concepts. An APT score
of three or higher in United States History will
satisfy three units under Area 4. An APT score
of three or higher in Chemistry will satisfy the
Physical Science with lab for five units under
Area 5.
IGETC Program
Students should be aware that this course list is
subject to change.
Symbols:
(+) Indicates that either the University of
California or the California State University
or both will limit transfer credit. Please
refer to “Courses from College of Marin
Acceptable at the University of California
(All Campuses)” in the catalog, or consult a
counselor.
(*) Indicates that a course may be listed in more
than one area, but shall not be certified in
more than one area.
(o) Media version must be taken for a letter
grade to receive transfer credit from the
University of California.
Area 1—English Communication
Students transferring to the University of
California must complete one course from Group
A and one course from Group B.
Students transferring to the California State
University must complete one course each from
Groups A, B, and C.
Group A—English Composition
English 150o
Group B—Critical Thinking/English
Composition
English 151o, 155
Group C—Oral Communication (CSU
Requirement Only)
Speech 110, 120, 122, 130, 132
Area 2—Mathematical Concepts And
Quantitative Reasoning
Three semester units—select one course.
Computer Science 117
Math 105, 114, 115+o, 116, 117, 121+, 123+,
124+, 223, 224
Statistics 115+
Area 3—Arts And Humanities
Nine semester units—select three courses.
Include at least one course from Group A
and one course from Group B.
Group A—Arts
Architecture 100+, 101+, 102+
Art 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108+
Communications 109+*, 109A+, 109B+
Dance 105A, 105Bo, 107, 108o
Drama 110
Ethnic Studies 108+
Humanities 108+, 109+*, 109A+, 109B+
Music 101, 102, 105
Group B—Humanities
American Sign Language 102
Communications 160+, 109+*
Drama 116, 117
English 204o, 208, 212, 213, 214o, 215, 218o,
221A, 221B, 222, 223, 224, 225, 230, 235, 237,
240, 242
French 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Humanities 100A, 100B, 107o, 109+*, 114+o,
118+, 121, 125
Italian 102, 203, 204, 225, 226
Japanese 102, 204
Journalism 160+
Philosophy 110, 111, 115, 116, 117
Spanish 102o+, 203+, 203HB, 204+, 225, 226,
230A
Speech 128
Area 4—Social & Behavioral Sciences Nine semester units—select three courses.
Courses must be selected from at least two
disciplines.
Anthropology 102+o, 103+, 110, 204
Behavioral Science 103+, 201+
Biology 108A
Communications 110+
Early Childhood Education 110, 111
Economics 101, 102, 201+
Ethnic Studies 110, 111*, 112*, 121*, 151
Geography 102, 109
Health Education 142+
History 100+*o, 101, 102, 109, 110, 111, 112,
117+*, 118+*, 119+o, 120+, 206, 214, 215, 216o,
226
Journalism 110+
Political Science 100+*, 101+*o, 102, 103, 104,
201+, 220
Psychology 110, 111, 112, 116, 140+, 142+, 204,
205+, 230+
Sociology 110o, 112, 140+, 205+, 230+
Area 5—Physical & Biological
Sciences Seven to nine semester units—select one
course from Group A and one course from
Group B. At least one of the courses select-­
ed must include a laboratory. Courses that
are labs or have a lab component are un-­
derlined.
Group A—Physical Sciences
Astronomy 101, 105+, 117F, 117L
Biology 138+*
Chemistry 105+o, 107 105L, 114+, 131
Geography 101, 101L, 112
Geology 105+, 109, 110+, 114, 120+, 120L, 121,
138+*
Physics 108A, 110+, 207A+
Group B—Biological Sciences
Anthropology 101, 101L
Biology 105+, 107, 109, 110+, 110L+, 115, 116,
120, 138**, 162, 224, 235, 240
Geology 138**
Physical Education 107
Language Other Than
English
University of California Requirement only
May be met by one of the following:
Two years of one language other than English in
high school with a grade of “C” or higher.
Completion of one of the following ­courses:
American Sign Language 101, Chinese 101,
French 101, Italian 101o, Japanese 101o,
Spanish 101+o
California State University
Graduation Requirement in
United States History,
Constitution, and American
­Ideals This is not a part of the IGETC, but may be completed prior to transfer.
Select one course from Group A and one course
from Group B.
San francisco
state university
courses at COM
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
PSY 455 – San Francisco State Class
Cross-Cultural Perspectives in
Psychology
(3 units SFSU upper division credit)
Prerequisites: None stated
Cross-cultural behavior, developmental, cognitive, and social data and
research of psychological phenomena
as they are differentially affected by
culture and sub-culture. Emphasis on
the diversity of parent-child relations,
role of women and men, adult personality and beliefs, attitudes and values.
Core course in child and adolescent
development major at sfsu.
Instructor: Elizabeth Weinbaum
Day: Wednesday
Time: 7-10pm
Location: College of Marin, Indian
Valley Campus, Ohlone 104,
Novato
Fall 2006 Semester:
August 28 - December 22, 2006
Fee: $75 per course. Restrictions apply.
Registration: Go to http://www.cel.
sfsu.edu/marin/register.cfm
Registration questions:
Karen Maguire
SFSU Campus
kjmac@sfsu.edu (email preferred)
415.405.3532
Additional courses in the Child and
Adolescent major may be offered
in the Fall 2006 term at College of
Marin/IVC. For the most current and
complete information, go to: http://
www.sfsu.edu/~apd/marin.htm.
Group A—United States History
For information on the Child and
Adolescent Development major, call
415.405.7772.
Group B—Constitution and
American Ideals
HOLISTIC HEALTH PROGRAM
SAN FRANCISCO STATE
UNIVERSITY
Courses in Holistic Health may be offered in the Fall 2006 term at College
of Marin/IVC. For the most current and complete information, go
to http://www.sfsu.edu/~apd/marin.
htm. For information on the Holistic
Health program, contact Richard Kay,
at 415.405.7772 or send an email to
rkay@sfsu.edu.
Ethnic Studies 111*, 112*, 121*
History 100+*, 117+*, 118+*
Political Science 100+*, 101+*
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
95
Oportunidades Educativas
College of Marin fue fundado en 1926
y ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad de obtener el título de Asociado
en Artes (AA), de transferir créditos
académicos a las Universidades de
California (UC) o a las Universidades
Estatales de California (CSU) y también a cualquier otra universidad. El colegio ofrece certificados vocacionales en
varios programas. College of Marin está
dispuesto a servir a todos los habitantes
que viven en el distrito del colegio.
Matrícula abierta para todos
Discriminación positiva
De conformidad con el Título IX de las
Enmiendas de Educación de 1972, la
Ley de Igualdad de Oportunidades en
el Empleo de 1972 (Título VII de la Ley
de Derechos Civiles de 1964 como ha
sido enmendada), la Ley de Derechos
de 1991 y la Apartado 504 de la Ley
de Rehabilitación de 1974 y la Ley de
Americanos con Discapacidades, es
norma del Marin Community College
District no discriminar contra ninguna
persona basándose en su raza, color, religión, edad, sexo, ascendencia, orientación sexual, nacionalidad de origen,
estado civil, afección (cáncer), discapacidad física o mental, o condición de veterano de la era Vietnam en todos sus
programas y actividades educativas y
de empleo, sus normas, prácticas y procedimientos. Los estudiantes tienen
derecho a presentar una queja interna
o una queja a la Oficina de Derechos
Civiles.
College of Marin, de conformidad con
la Ley de Igualdad de Revelación en
Deportes, ofrece información concerniente el funcionamiento de su programa
intercolegial de deportes.
En la Oficina de Ingresos y
Expedientes, la Biblioteca y el
Departamento de Deportes está disponible un informe completo para la
consideración del público. La norma
5.004 de College of Marin prohibe el
acoso verbal, físico, vis aplicar una discriminación positiva a todos sus programas y a todos los aspectos del empleo para asegurar igualdad de oportunidades y el logro de una presentación proporcional de miembros idóneos
de grupos históricamente insuficientemente representados. La falta de dominio del idioma inglés no será obstáculo para la admisión y participación en
los programas de orientación educativa.
Pueden producirse cambios
sin previo aviso
Las normas, directrices, disposiciones,
procedimientos, honorarios, cursos,
horarios y servicios de los estudiantes
descritos en esta publicación están sujetos a cambio en cualquier momento
sin previo aviso. El Colegio se reserva el
derecho de modificar los honorarios, declaraciones y procedimientos contenidos
en la presente. Los honorarios y procedimientos están sujetos a cambio en
cualquier momento por la Legislatura
Estatal y el Consejo de Administración.
Es responsabilidad de los estudiantes
cumplir con los requisitos del Colegio y
mantenerse informados de los mismos.
Cuando se produzcan cambios, los mismos estarán incluidos en la siguiente
publicación habitual del Catálogo u
Horario de Clases.
Coordinador de Título IX/
Coordinador ADA/Ejecutivo de
Discriminación
Positiva/Cumplimiento:
Linda Beam, AC 107/KTD 415.485.9504
Coordinador de Apartado 504
(Discapacidad):
Stacey Cook, SS 251/KTD
415.485.9375
Coordinador de Género, Equidad:
David Cook, SS 263/KTD
415.485.9409
96
•
FALL 2006
Política de Matrícula abierta
Es norma del College of Marin que a
menos que sea específicamente exento
por ley, todos los cursos, parte de un
curso o clase, cuya asistencia debe ser
comunicada para ayuda estatal, estarán completamente abiertos para
matrícula y participación de cualquier persona que haya sido admitida al
Colegio y que reúna los requisitos esenciales según se hayan establecido con
arreglo al Capítulo II, División 2, Parte
VI, Título 5 del Código de California.
Números de Teléfono ­Importantes Solicite una persona que hable es-­
pañol Ingresos y récord457-8811, ext. 8822
Orientación con un
Consejero Académico485.9432
Inglés como Segunda
Lengua (ESL)...... 485.9642
Policía (emergencia)..911
Asistencia económica para
estudiantes
Todos los estudiantes matriculados y
aquellos que deseen matricularse en un
programa académico o vocacional del
College of Marin pueden solicitar ayuda
económica. Los estudiantes que reúnen
los requisitos económicos, así como otras
condiciones, reciben fondos que provienen
de varios programas federales, estatales
y de la propia comunidad, que ayudan a
cubrir el costo de los estudios y los gastos
necesarios para vivir. El College of Marin
ofrece a los estudiantes fondos de los
siguientes programas:
Fechas límite para la presentación de
solicitudes
1 de marzo—Para los semestres del
otoño de 2005 y primavera del 2006 los
estudiantes que soliciten subvenciones de Cal Grants y becas del Marin
Education Fund y College of Marin
Foundation necesitan presentar la solicitud de asistencia federal para estudiantes (llamado Federal Student Aid
Application) y los formularios suplementarios antes del 1 de marzo.
Formas de Costear la Educación Universitaria
Programas de ayuda
económica
Préstamos federales para
estudiantes Subvenciones y becas Los préstamos para estudiantes se
tienen que reembolsar: Antes de considerar un préstamo estudiantil, es importante haber planeado una estrategia
financiera para la carrera universitaria,
que tome en cuenta el monto total de la
deuda que el individuo podrá ser capaz de
afrontar cuando termine de estudiar.
Becas Federales Pell: Conceden entre $400 y $4050 por año, según el caso
individual
Becas SEOG (Federal
Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants): Subvenciones
de entre $400 y $2000 para los estudiantes más necesitados económicamente,
que además califiquen para Pell Grants
Becas EOPS (Extended
Opportunity Programs & Services
Grants): Este programa proporciona
fondos para libros así como servicios
de orientación para aquellos estudiantes que califiquen. (Para mayor información, ver la página 103.)
Becas BOGG (Board of Governors
Fee Waivers): Los residentes de
California que califiquen no tienen que
pagar las tarifas de matriculación y de
salud. (Encontrará información adicional en la página 9.)
Cal Grants: El estado de California
concede subvenciones que oscilan entre
$530 y $1500 por año a estudiantes que
califiquen.
Becas MEF (Marin Education
Fund Grants): Los residents del
Condado de Marin pueden solicitar
subvenciones MEF, que conceden entre
$400 y $4,000 por año.
Becas College of Marin
Foundation: La fundación benéfica del
College of Marin recauda fondos dentro
de la propia comunidad para conceder
becas a estudiantes que reúnan los requisitos académicos y económicos. Las becas oscilan entre $250 y $1000 por año y
están disponibles tanto para los estudiantes que se transfieran a una institución
de cuatro años de estudios como para los
que prosigan en el College of Marin.
Préstamos para estudiantes
Stafford con subsidios (Subsidized
Stafford Student loans): Los estudiantes que reúnen los requisitos de necesidad económica pueden tomar prestado
hasta $2635 para el primer año de estudios y hasta $3500 para el segundo. La
tasa de interés es variable. El reembolso del principal y el interés se posterga
hasta que hayan transcurrido seis meses a partir del último día de matriculación como estudiante a medio tiempo
(o más) en un programa educativo.
Préstamos para estudiantes
Stafford sin subsidios (Unsubsidized
Stafford Student loans): Los estudiantes
que no reúnen los requisitos de necesidad
económica para un Préstamo Stafford sin
subsidios, o que necesiten otros préstamos
adicionales, pueden tomar prestada toda o
parte de la cantidad que necesiten a través
del Programa de préstamos para estudiantes Stafford sin subsidios. El interés es
pagadero al recibirse el préstamo. El reembolso del principal se posterga hasta que
hayan transcurrido seis meses desde el último día de matriculación como estudiante
a medio tiempo (como mínimo) en un programa educativo.
Programas de trabajo Programa federal de trabajo com-­
binado con estudios universitarios:
Hay fondos federales para proporcionar
un número limitado de trabajos a tiempo parcial dentro de los campus de la
universidad para estudiantes que califiquen, así como algunos trabajos fuera
de la universidad. Los estudiantes trabajan hasta 25 horas por semana durante el año lectivo y a tiempo completo
durante el verano.
Oficina de colocaciones (Job
Placement Office): Esta oficina ofrece
a los estudiantes información sobre una
gran variedad de empleos disponibles a
través de toda la comunidad.
Experiencia laboral (Work
Experience):
Los estudiantes se pueden matricular en una clase llamada “Work
Experience” para obtener crédito lectivo
por el trabajo que desempeñen durante
el mismo ­semestre.
Ayuda económica adicional Préstamos de emergencia del
College of Marin: ASCOM y la fundación benéfica del College of Marin
han donado fondos para el programa de
préstamos de emergencia de la universidad. Se puede solicitar un préstamo a
30 días por un máximo de $100.
Subsidio para estacionamiento:
Los estudiantes que califiquen para
ayuda económica califican además para
un ­descuento del 50% en las tarifas de
­estacionamiento.
Procedimiento para presentar la
solicitud El estudiante tiene que presentar una
solicitud (Free Application for Federal
Student Aid). Ciertos programas, por
ejemplo MEG, las becas de la fundación
benéfica, las Cal Grants y los programas
de préstamos) pueden tener formularios
de solicitud adicionales. Una vez que se
haya presentado la solicitud, la Oficina de
Ayuda Económica (Financial Aid Office)
solicitará los formularios adicionales y
la documentación de prueba. Los formularios de solicitud están disponibles en la
Oficina de Ayuda Económica. Los formularios para el año lectivo siguiente se pueden pedir en enero.
Información adicional Para formularios de solicitud e información adicional, comuníquese con la
Oficina de Ayuda Económica de los campus de Kentfield o de Indian Valley.
Talleres de trabajo para aprender a
presentar solicitudes Cada año durante el mes de febrero la
Oficina de Ayuda Económica ofrece una
serie de talleres de trabajo para aprender a solicitar becas y subsidios. Para
determinar las fechas y horas de los
talleres, comuníquese con la Oficina de
Ayuda Económica
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
97
New Student Success Workshops
Educational Planning for
New Students College of Marin has joined with all
­other California Community Colleges in
offering expanded orientation, assessment and counseling services to new students. We want you to succeed in college.
In order to help you reach your educational goal, we have established the
Student Success Workshop. The purpose
of the workshop is to help prepare you to
be successful at College of Marin.
The workshop has three components:
Orientation to College programs and
services, administration of placement
tests in math and English, and an individualized counseling appointment.
Scheduled In Person Workshops
The workshop will last approximately four
and a half hours. Students will then be
scheduled for a half-hour individual counseling appointment at a convenient time
soon after the workshop. See workshop
dates and times on facing page.
Online Orientation
You may participate in the College of
Marin Online Orientation. To locate the
link to the Online Orientation, go to our
website, www.marin.cc.ca.us.
The Online Orientation meets a state
education code mandated requirement.
It does not satisfy the assessment testing requirement. You must sign up for
the Success Workshop where you will
only need to attend the assessment
­portion.
See workshop dates and times on
facing page. The assessment portion
begins one hour after the start of the
workshop.
98
•
FALL 2006
Students Not Required to ­
Attend Workshop
1. S
tudents who have completed 15 or
more semester units at College of
Marin or another college (or have an
AA degree or higher).
2. S
tudents planning to enroll in courses that require no reading, writing or math. (A list of these classes is available from the Offices of
Counseling or Admissions on both
campuses.)
3. S
tudents who present sufficient
evidence demonstrating that their
prior learning is equivalent to No.1
above, or equivalent to the Success
Workshop as described above.
(Contact Pamela Mize-Kurzman,
Dean of Enrollment Services,
Development & Special Programs,
for information regarding workshop
waivers at 415.485.9431.)
All other new, returning, or transfer
students are required to participate
in the Success Workshop. It is option-­
al, but encouraged for all others.
Success Workshop
Registration Beginning May 15, you may register
online, by touchtone, or in person. See
workshop dates and times on facing
page.
Web Registration
You may register for your Success
Workshop by web registration (https://
www.marin.cc.ca.us/StudentPortal) 5
days after submitting your on-line application for admission. (See Workshop
Registration on pages 6 for detailed information.)
Register Early for
Your Success Workshop
Web Register or Touch-tone
415.883.3220 Touch-Tone Workshop Registration
You may register for your Success Work­
shop by touch-tone telephone registration (415.883.3220) 5 working days after mailing in your application for admission. (See registration on page 6 for
detailed information.)
In Person Workshop Registration
You can register in person for the
Success Workshop at the Admissions
Counter at either campus. Check the
Admissions Office hours on page 8.
After the Success Workshop, Register for Your Classes You will not be able to register for classes until Wednesday, July 13, which is
the first day of new student registration.
Touch-Tone Class Registration You may use touch-tone after 10 am
of the day following your counseling
­appointment.
In Person Class Registration
You may register at the Admissions
Counter on either campus after your
counseling appointment. (See page 102
for office hours.)
Web Registration
You may web register after 10 am of the
day following your counseling appointment. (See Registration on page 6 for
detailed information.)
Concerned About
­Assessment?
A number of students express concern
about the assessment testing. The purpose of the tests is to provide you with
information about your skill levels in
both math and English, so that you can
be appropriately advised.
Your assessment scores are important, but are only one factor in developing your education plan. Your counselor
will help you interpret the results and
advise you in class selection.
Test Results Will Not Prevent You
from Enrolling
College of Marin is an open-access institution. You may register for any course
for which you have met the prerequisites. Prerequisites may be met by taking a specific course or by placement in
a course through an assessment process.
Sample Math Problems &
English Questions
A packet of sample math problems and
English questions is available to students wishing a review prior to taking the assessment tests. For students
who have been away from school for a
period of time this may be particularly
helpful. These materials are available
in Administrative Services, Rm 136 at
the Indian Valley Campus and in the
Student Services Center, Rm 238 at the
Kentfield Campus. These materials are
free of charge.
Test Results from Other Colleges
College of Marin’s assessment procedure is designed to meet the needs of
our students; therefore, we will be unable to accept test results from other
colleges.
Confidentiality
All test results and educational plans
are confidential and protected under
the Family Rights Privacy Act. (Consult
College catalog for details.)
Success Workshop Schedule Register starting Monday, May 15 by Touch-Tone Telephone at 415.883.3220,
In person or web register
Kentfield Campus
SECTION #
DAY
DATE
TIME
PLACE
1036
T
7/11
5-9:30pm
FH 110
1037
W
7/19
9am-1:30pm
FH 120
1038
M
7/24
5-9:30pm
FH 120
1039
Sa
7/29
9am-1:30pm
FH 120
1040
T
8/8
9am-1:30pm
FH 120
1041
T
8/22
5-9:30pm
DH 113
SECTION #
DAY
DATE
TIME
PLACE
4223
Sa
7/22
9am-1:30pm
OL 156
4224
F
8/11
9am-1:30pm
OL 156
Indian Valley Campus
ESL Success Workshop Schedule
The English as a Second Language workshops are for new students whose native
language is not English and who wish to enroll in classes. During the workshop,
students will have their English level assessed, be introduced to the College and its
ESL programs, and receive assistance in registering for classes appropriate for their
language levels. Students will be advised to enroll in ESL classes appropriate for
their language levels.
All new ESL students need to complete an application for admission, and may also
need to complete a residency form before enrolling in a workshop. You may pick up
these forms at the Office of Admissions and Records. When you return the completed forms, you can register for a Success Workshop. If you have questions about ESL
classes, please call 415.485.9642.
Kentfield Campus Only
SECTION #
DAY
DATE
TIME
PLACE
1042
Th
7/20
9am-12:30pm
FH 120
1043
Sa
8/5
9am-12:30pm
FH 120
1044
W
8/9
5-8:30pm
FH 120
1045
W
8/16
9am-12:30pm
FH 120
1046
M
8/21
5-8:30pm
OH 109
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
99
Financial Aid
Need help with enrollment fees?
Contact the College of Marin Financial
Aid Office for additional information on fee waivers and other financial
aid programs. Call 415.485.9409 or
415.883.2211 ext 8118. or e-mail
financial.aid@marin.cc.ca.us
Student Financial Assistance All students enrolling or wishing to enroll in an academic or vocational program at College of Marin may apply for
financial assistance. Students meeting
financial and other eligibility requirements receive funds from a variety of
federal, state and community programs
to help cover school and living expenses. College of Marin offers students
funding from the following programs.
Financial Aid
Application Deadlines
March 2
Students applying for Cal Grants,
Marin Education Fund and College
of Marin Foundation scholarships
must submit a Federal Student Aid
Application and supplemental forms
prior to March 2 for Spring 2007
­semester.
Financial Aid Programs Grants and Scholarships Federal Pell Grants
Grants range from $400 to $4050 per
year depending on eligibility.
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants (SEOG)
Grants range from $400 to 2,000 per
year for students with the highest financial need who also qualify for Pell
Grants.
Extended Opportunity Programs &
Services Grants (EOPS)
This program provides book grants
and counseling services to students
who qualify. (See p. 103 for additional
­information.)
100
•
FALL 2006
Board of Governors Fee Waivers
(BOGW)
Eligible California residents receive a
waiver of enrollment. See additional information on page 9.
Cal Grants
The State of California provides grants
ranging from $530 to $1550 per year for
eligible students.
Marin Education Fund Grants (MEF)
Residents of Marin County may apply
for MEF grants ranging from $400 to
$4,000 per year.
College of Marin Foundation
Scholarships
The College of Marin Foundation solicits funding from the community for
scholarships that are awarded to students who meet need and academic criteria. Scholarships range from $250 to
$1000 per year and are available to students who are transferring to a 4‑year
institution or continuing at COM.
Federal Student Loans Student Loans Must Be Repaid
Before considering a student loan, it is
important to develop a financing plan
for your education that takes into account the total amount of debt that you
will be able to afford to repay when you
reach your final educational goal.
Subsidized Stafford Student Loans
Students who qualify on the basis of financial need may borrow up to $2625
per year for freshman year and up to
$3500 per year for sophomore year at
a variable interest rate. Principle and
interest are deferred until 6 months after the last day of enrollment as at least
a half-time student in an educational
­program.
Unsubsidized Stafford Student loans
Independent students who do not meet
financial need criteria for a Subsidized
Stafford Loan or need additional loan
assistance may borrow all or part of
that amount under the Unsubsidized
Stafford Loan Program up to $4,000
per year. Interest becomes due when
the loan is borrowed. Principle is deferred until 6 months after the student
ceases to be enrolled at least half-time
in an educational program.
Work Programs Federal College Work-Study Program
Federal funds provide a limited number
of part-time jobs on campus for students
who qualify. Some jobs are available off
campus. Students work up to 25 hours
per week.
Job Placement Office
The Job Placement Office provides students with information on a large number of jobs that are available throughout the community.
Work Experience
Students may enroll in Work
Experience classes to obtain credit for
current employment.
Additional Financial
Assistance Application Procedures Students must file a Federal Student
Aid Application (Free Application for
Federal Student Aid). Some programs
(MEF, Foundation Scholarships, Cal
Grants, loan programs) may have additional application forms. Once the
initial form is filed, the Financial Aid
Office may request additional forms and
verifying documentation. Applications
are available from the Financial Aid
Office. Forms for the next academic
year are available in January.
Additional Information For application forms and additional information, please contact the Financial
Aid Office at either the Kentfield
Campus or the Indian Valley Campus.
College of Marin Emergency Loans
ASCOM and the College of Marin
Foundation have provided funds for
the College’s emergency loan program.
Thirty-day loans are available for up to
$100.
Tax Credit For tax credit information, see page 17.
Student Activities Program
Meet new people, share ideas,
have fun
Beyond the classroom, the College encourages students to initiate and join in
activities and programs which develop
leadership ability, interpersonal skills,
and community involvement.
Through involvement with student
associations or College clubs, you can
participate in a “hands-on” curriculum
designed for your personal and professional development. Learn how to
run effective meetings, work successfully with others, manage your time
and commitments, assume or delegate
responsibility, turn conflict into cooperation, gain self-confidence and much
more.
Social Science 115 is a leadership
course offered for credit during the fall
semester. Lab courses are offered with
Social Science 115 that allow students
to complete projects that benefit the
campus community. The course and lab
are open to all students interested in
developing effective leadership skills.
If you wish to take advantage of this
unique aspect of the college curriculum,
contact your student association or the
Student Affairs Office for more information about the following programs
and activities.
• Student Associations
• Student Senate
• Student Senate appointments to
College Governance committees
• Clubs/Organizations
• InterClub Council
• Student Project Funding
• Student Association Events and
Forums
Voter Registration
College of Marin students are
encouraged to ­exercise their
constitutional right to vote. Voter
registration materials are available
in the Offices of Admissions and
Records or by calling the toll-free
voter registration hotline
1.800.345.VOTE.
ASCOM Student I.D. Card
Your student I.D. card also entitles
you to discounts from many local business, arts, and entertainment groups.
These groups include Midas Muffler,
Mill Valley Art & Paper, Marin
Wellness Center, Able Tire and Brake,
Village Peddler, United Studios of
Self Defense, Wolf Camera, Odyssey
Bookstore, Jamba Juice in Greenbrae,
Barnes and Noble bookstore at COM,
San Francisco Exploratorium, San
Francisco Symphony, COM Drama
Department, San Francisco Museum
of Art, Willie’s Café, and many others.
Call 415.456.7042 for more details.
Associated Students
Kentfield Campus
Student Services Bldg. 241
415.485.9390
Office of Student Affairs
Kentfield Campus
Student Services Bldg 250
415.485.9376
Associated Students
Emeritus College
Kentfield Campus
Student Services Bldg. 148
415.485.9652
Indian Valley Campus
Administrative Center 140
415.457.8322
List or find services on ­Information Boards
Sponsored by The
Associated Students
For information to post or for posting approval, contact the Student
Affairs Office, KTD/SS Center 250,
415.485.9376.
On the Kentfield Campus • Student/Faculty Events Board
• Club News Board
Expand your educational
horizons!
Check out the clubs and ­activities
happening at ­College of Marin
Clubs reflect a wide diversity of interests and focuses for student activity,
involvement, and development. They
provide a forum for learning beyond the
classroom, and hands-on experience for
gaining interpersonal and professional skills. Students at College of Marin
have the opportunity to join existing
clubs or create new clubs in order to explore a particular area of interest. For
more information about clubs or student government, contact the Office of
Student Affairs at 415.485.9376 or the
ASCOM office on the Kentfield Campus
at 415.456.9390.
Student Clubs & Organizations
The following is a list of organizations
at College of Marin.
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Alpha Gamma Sigma Honor Society
Artist Honor Society
Baha’i Club—Baha’i Faith
Black Student Union
Break Dance
Challenged Student Club
Cinema League
CIS Computer Club
COMET—Journalism Club, Echo Times
Dancer’s Guild
Dental Assisting Club
Drama Club
Entrepreneur Club
Environmental Action Club
Enviromental Landscape Club
Inky Fingers—Printmakers Club
International Students Club
Islamic Association
IVC Car Club
Latino Student Union (LSU)
Life Drawing
Luke’s Guild—Painting
Math and Science Club
Med Heads—Health Care Students
Meditation Club
Rainbow Alliance—Gay & Lesbian Support
R.O.A.R.—Christian Campus
Fellowship
Sailing Team
Sculpture Club
Spanish Club—Tertulia
Student Art Association
Student Nurses Association
Students for Social Responsibility
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
101
Directory of Student Services
College Offices are closed Fridays,
June 9 – August 4
Admissions & Records
Offices
Kentfield Campus
SS Center 254; 415.457.8811, ext. 8822
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–Th 8am–4:30pm
F 9am–Noon
Evenings: W,Th 4:30pm–7pm
Indian Valley Campus
AS Complex; 415.457.8811, ext. 8822
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–Th 8am–4:30pm
F 9am–Noon
Evenings: M,T 4:30pm–7pm
Check with Admissions for expanded
hours during registration. Contact
Admissions and Records for information regarding admission, registration,
academic records, verifications, transcripts, class adds/drops, student petitions, name/address/SS number changes, and refunds. It is the student’s re-­
sponsibility to keep the College in-­
formed of changes in address and/
or telephone number. Fill out a green
change card available in the lobby of
the Offices of Admissions and Records
when such changes occur.
Assessment &
Testing Offices
Kentfield Campus
SS Center 238; 415.485.9469
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov
10, 11, Nov 23, 24, 25 (or as otherwise
posted)
• Open:
M,T,Th 9am–12noon & 1pm-4pm;
W 9am-12noon & 1pm–7pm
The Testing Office provides a wide variety of services:
• P
lacement testing in math, English,
and chemistry
• Career and interest assessment tests
For placement test schedules or
other assessment information, call
415.485.9469. Testing is by appoint-­
ment only and picture identifica-­
tion is required.
102
•
FALL 2006
Bookstore Kentfield Campus
LC, First Floor; 415.485.9394
• Open:M-Th 8am‑7pm; F 8am‑2pm (or
as otherwise posted)
Indian Valley Campus
Please call for hours: 415.485.9394
Textbooks, the College catalog, supplies,
art materials, snacks, College clothing and memorabilia are sold in the
Bookstore.
Children’s Centers Kentfield Campus Center
Downstairs Administrative Center
Bldg; 415.485.9468
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4,
Nov 10, 11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M-Th 7:45am‑5pm,
F 7:45am-3pm*
Indian Valley Campus Center
Bookstore Bldg; 415.457.8811, ext. 8170
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open M-Th 7:45am‑5pm;
F 7:45am-3pm*
*Closing hours may vary according to
enrollment and budget considerations.
Children’s Centers Office:
Indian Valley Campus, Ohlone 148;
415.457.8811, ext. 8221 (Office)
The Children’s Centers provide quality
family-centered care for preschool children, ages 2 years 9 months to 5 years.
Admission is based on California State
Department of Education guidelines,
with priority given to low‑income students. Fees are charged on a sliding scale
to parents not eligible for free child care.
Preliminary applications for each
semester are accepted throughout
the previous semester. Applicants are
placed on a waiting list according to income and date received. Applications
are available at the Children’s Centers
on both campuses or by calling the
Children’s Centers Office.
Counseling and Advising Services Kentfield Campus
SS Center 212; 415.485.9432
Messages: 415.485.9430
Email: kdodele@marin.cc.ca.us
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–F 9am–4pm
If you need help in planning your educational goals, you are urged to make
an appointment with a counselor.
A counseling appointment can
be made by calling 415.485.9432,
Monday‑Friday. Some evening coun­
seling is available from 5-7 pm. Please
note: The Counseling Office is closed
11-12:30 pm every first Thursday of the
month for a Counseling Department
meeting.
Counselors’ hours and schedules
vary throughout the year.
There are also a limited number of
counselors available on a “drop‑in” basis. These drop‑in sessions are designed
to be brief and should not be viewed as
full counseling sessions. Please check at
the Kentfield Counseling Office for the
current drop‑in schedule.
Disabled Students Program
Kentfield Campus
DS Center; 415.485.9406
M–F 8:30am–4:30pm
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4,
Nov 10, 11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
The Disabled Students Program provides services for students with learning, physical, communicative and
psychological disabilities. Services
include academic, vocational, career
and personal counseling as well as diagnostic testing/remediation for the
learning disabled. The Program also
offers accommodations such as readers, note‑takers and interpreters, and
provides adaptive equipment loan, and
special classes. Please call for information on Adapted Physical Education,
Study Skills and other special classes,
as well as ­services at the Indian Valley
Campus.
ESL—English as a Second
Language For more than twenty years, College of
Marin has been addressing the needs
of English learners through its high
quality English as a Second Language
(ESL) Programs. The College has
helped countless Marin residents and
international students from more than
50 countries fulfill their educational,
career, and personal goals.
College of Marin offers three ESL programs depending on students’ academic
goals and language levels:
1. Noncredit ESL—This program provides morning, ­evening and Saturday
classes, on and off the Kentfield
Campus, for students at beginning levels of English. There is NO FEE for
noncredit ESL classes. Classes are
open-entry/open-exit throughout the semester. For more information on classes
or registration call 415.485.9642.
2. Credit ESL—These courses are
for intermediate to advanced English
speakers. Prior to enrollment, students
have their English level assessed to
provide them with information to make
informed decisions when enrolling in
credit ESL courses. For more information see page 36 of this schedule or call
415.485.9642.
3. Intensive English Program (ESL)
This program is fee-based with high
quality classes in academic English on
the Indian Valley Campus for international students and others who already
live in the U.S. and desire to improve
their English skills for college, work or
general communication. Full program
meets Tuesday through Friday, 9:00
a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Part-time programs
are also available. Tuition (from $750
up, depending on program) and application fee ($50 for F-1 students, $25 for
others) are payable before classes start.
For more information, call 415.883.2211
ext. 8579.
EOPS—Extened
­Opportunity ­Programs &
Services Kentfield Campus
LC 160; 415.485.9605
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–F 9am–4:30pm
EOPS offers assistance to students who
meet the EOPS state guidelines for eligibility. Support services may include
counseling (academic, personal and career to ­assist EOPS students in planning their educational or career goals),
tutoring, book grants, and peer advisement.
CARE is an additional support program for EOPS eligible students who
are also TANF/CalWORKs parents. For
students who qualify for CARE, CARE
grants may be available for books,
transportation and childcare.
Financial Aid Offices
Kentfield Campus
SS Center 236; 415.485.9409
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: MTW 9am-4pm; Th 9am-7pm;
F 9am-noon
Indian Valley Campus
AS Complex 110; 415-457-8811,
ext. 8118
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M-Th 9:30am-3pm
Students enrolled in degree, transfer
or certificate programs may apply for
financial aid. Assistance for school and
living expenses is available through
a ­variety of federal and state loans,
grants and work programs awarded to
students who meet eligibility and financial need ­requirements.
Application Procedures
Students must file a Federal Student
Aid Application (Free Application for
Federal Student Aid). Some programs
(MEG, Foundation Scholarships, Cal
Grants, loan programs) may have additional application forms. Once the
initial form is filed, the Financial Aid
Office may request additional forms and
verifying documentation. Applications
are available from the Financial Aid
Office, or online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
Forms for the next academic year are
available in January. Some programs
have a March 1 deadline.
The Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) and information
on the application procedure is available from the Financial Aid Office.
Application Deadline
Applications are still being accepted for
this Semester. Apply for Spring 2007 online, or applications are available at the
Financial Aid Office at both campuses.
Food Service
Kentfield Campus
SS Center; 415.456.7661
• Open:Fall & Spring Semesters:
M–Th 7:30am-8pm; F 7:30am-1pm
Summer Session: M–Th 7:30am–8pm
The Student Services Center also has
vending machines.
Indian Valley Campus
Miwok Cluster 180; 415.457.8811,
ext. 8331
• M-F 8:45am–2:30pm (hours subject
to change)
• Summer Session: Closed
Vending machines are available in Pomo
189, Ohlone 105, Admissions & Records
Lobby, AS Complex, and at the pool.
Health Center
Kentfield Campus
DH 118; 415.485.9458
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M-F 8:30am-3pm
The Student Health Center is available
to all currently registered students during the semester. We provide first aid,
health education, care and treatment
for short-term medical concerns, OTC
and some prescription medications, immunizations, TB testing, voluntary
insurance plans, physical exams for
COM programs and college entrance,
anonymous HIV testing, flu shots, physician appointments and more. Personal
counseling is available through our
Counseling Department by calling
415.485.9432 for an appointment.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
103
Job Placement/Housing Media Center/Language Lab Reentry Services/CalWorks Kentfield Campus
SS Center 232; 415.485.9410
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Drop-in hours for job referrals:
M–Th 10:30am–4pm; F 9am-noon
Kentfield Campus
Kentfield Campus
SS Center, Rm 206; 415.485.9641
The Job Placement Office helps students find temporary, part-time, fulltime and permanent employment in
the community and in the Bay Area.
Temporary employment for winter
break and summer can also be found
through Job Placement. The Kentfield
Campus Job Placement Center
also maintains self-service housing
­information.
Employers may now list job opportunities online, and students may access the
job listings online. Information may also
be faxed in, fax 415.457.3896. To register,
go to www.ecampusrecruiter.com/marin.
Libraries Kentfield Campus
LRC 2nd floor; 415.457.8811, ext 7756
• Open: M-Th 8am-9pm; F 8am-4pm
Library is closed to patrons during winter break
(12/18/06, 12/22/06, 1/02/07, 1/19/07, 12/22/06
and 1/02/07). During these times, however staff is
available to process fines and fees. Please call 4578811 x 7756 to make arrangements.
Library is closed and is not staffed for winter holiday 12/22/06 to 1/02/07.
The Library has an online catalog and
many electronic databases accessible
both on and off campus. Our online
databases provide quick and easy access to full-text magazine, journal and
newspaper articles, and to many other
reference resources. Some textbooks are
placed on reserve at the loan desk for
students enrolled in particular courses.
Registered students may obtain a
library card which entitles them to
check out circulating books at either
the Kentfield Campus or Indian Valley
Campus, and to access the electronic
databases off campus. Coin operated
copiers, a microfilm reader-printer, and
20+ internet computers are available
for student use.
To improve your research skills, consider enrolling in Library 110, a self
paced, one unit course on research
skills. Reference librarians are available to teach students how to do library
research and to use the collection.
Indian Valley Campus
For all library related questions call
415.485.9475.
104
•
FALL 2006
LC 120 (Upstairs); 415.485.9645
• Open: M‑Th 8am‑9pm; F 8am‑4pm
The Media Center/Language Lab is a
listening and viewing area where students have access to a variety of media materials, including audiotapes for
modern language courses and videocassettes for media courses. Also available for student use are IBM compatible computers with CD-ROM burners.
These computers have software installed on them to meet course needs. A
printer is available for student use.
Police Campus Services
Lost and Found
Kentfield Campus
TB-1; 415.485.9455
Indian Valley Campus
C3; 415-883‑3179
In case of emergency dial 911
At either campus, if you wish to have
an officer contact you, call dispatcher at
415.485.9696
The College Board of Trustees and
the Administration are committed to
maintaining a safe campus environment. Professional and highly trained
police officers are employed to patrol
our campuses 24 hours each day. They
provide crime prevention education,
respond to medical emergencies, and
all other incidents requiring police
­assistance.
The Department also sponsors a
Police Cadet Program to assist with
traffic related matters and to provide
concerned students with an escort to
and from the parking lots when available. These services can be arranged
by contacting the Police Department at
415.485.9455.
Appointments: M–Th 9am–3pm
Call for information or appointments.
This program assists students who
are entering college after a break in
their education. Academic, personal,
and career counseling is available by
appointment to students who are interested in College of Marin’s programs.
Staff members provide information
and referrals for emergency needs,
child care, financial aid, health and legal concerns, and campus resources.
Additional services and resources are
available for CalWORKs recipients.
Student Affairs Office
Kentfield Campus
SS Center 250; 415.485.9376
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–F 8am–4pm
A complete description of student clubs
and activities is listed separately in this
Schedule on page 92.
Transfer/Career Center Kentfield Campus
SS Center, Rm 202; 415.485.9671
• Open: Call for current hours.
The Transfer/Career Center provides information and counseling support to all
students intending to transfer to a 4‑year
college or university and those interested
in investigating career options. An extensive library of college catalogs is maintained as well as computerized career information. No appointment is needed.
Tutoring Center Kentfield Campus
LC 160; 415.485.9620
• Closed: May 29, July 4, Sept 4, Nov 10,
11, Nov 23, 24, 25
F’s June 9 – Aug 4
• Open: M–F 8am–4pm
The Tutoring Center offers free drop‑in
group tutoring for College of Marin students in nearly all disciplines.
Veterans Office 415.457.8811, ext. 8822
The Veterans Office certifies students eligible for Veteran Assistance
benefits. The VA toll‑free number is
1.800.827‑1000.
College Policies
Philosophy
The Marin Community College District has long
recognized that an academic community is harmed
in many ways by the abuse of alcohol and the use of
other drugs. This high risk behavior is exemplified by
decreased productivity of members of the community,
serious health problems, strained social interactions
as well as forms of vandalism. The process of education and learning are especially impaired by alcohol
abuse and the use of illicit drugs.
T he College of Marin subscribes to the basic philosophy of the Network of Colleges and Universities
Committed to the Elimination of Drug and Alcohol
Abuse, which states:
•The institutional establishment enforces clear policies that promote an educational environment free
from the abuse of alcohol and other drugs.
•The institution will provide education for its members for the purpose of preventing alcohol and other
drug abuse as well as educating them about the use
of legal drugs in ways that are not harmful to self or
others.
•College of Marin will create an environment that
promotes and reinforces healthy responsible living;
respect for community laws; campus standards and
regulations; the individual’s responsibility within the
community; and the intellectual, social, emotional,
spiritual or ethical, and physical well being of its community members.
•R eferral to services for drug and alcohol treatment
can be made by the Health Center or Counseling
Office.
T he foundation of the philosophy concerning alcohol and drug abuse for College of Marin is the firm
commitment to an educational program which provides the adequate information and referral to help
all members of the academic community to make informed and responsible decisions concerning the use
of any controlled substance.
The institution is committed to a healthy environment for learning and living.
Smoking Policy
In order to provide a safe learning and working environment for students and employees, smoking is
prohibited in all indoor locations and within 20 feet
of any building, including covered walkways, courtyards, ramps or entrances to buildings. Violation of
this policy could lead to disciplinary action under
usual disciplinary procedures. For a complete copy of
the Smoking Policy and Guidelines, or a copy of the
Student Discipline Procedure, contact the Director of
Student Affairs and Health Center, Rm SS 251. Phone
415.485.9375.
Drug and Alcohol Policy—Employees It is the policy of the Marin Community College
District to maintain a drug and alcohol-free workplace for employees.
•T he unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing,
possession or use of controlled substances or alcoholic
beverages are prohibited on any District property.
The term “controlled substance” is defined in Health
and Safety Code 11007. An exception to the above is
when alcoholic beverages are produced in connection
with an authorized class.
•Employees who violate these prohibitions on controlled substances will be subject to termination of
employment in addition to criminal prosecution. The
District may choose to require such employees to participate in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation
program approved for such purposes by a Federal,
State or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency.
•It shall be the employee’s responsibility to notify the
Human Resources Office if he or she is convicted of a
criminal drug violation occurring on District property. This notification must be made within five days of
the conviction. Failure to notify the Human Resources
Office will subject the employee to disciplinary action.
•T he District will notify the U.S. Office of Education
within 10 days of the conviction notification in the
above paragraph.
D isciplinary actions will be taken against employees
in accordance with appropriate collective bargaining agreements and the California Education Code.
The District will establish and maintain a Drug- and
Alcohol-Free Awareness Program. The program will
include distribution of information on the dangers of
drug and alcohol abuse, and resources for counseling
and rehabilitation dealing with drug abuse and alcohol problems. The program will also include furnishing a copy of this policy to all employees.
Drug and Alcohol Policy—Students
The College of Marin does not permit or condone the
consumption of alcoholic beverages by any individual.
All local, state and federal laws concerning the possession or use of any controlled substance are enforced. The institution is committed to a healthy environment for learning and living.
Students are specifically reminded that they are guided by the Student Conduct Policy which states the following to be incompatible with an institution of higher
education:
•T he use, possession, sale or distribution of narcotics or other dangerous or illegal drugs (as defined in
California statutes) on college property or at any function sponsored or supervised by the ­College.
•T he possession or use of alcoholic beverages on college property, or at any function sponsored or supervised by the College.
Legal Sanctions—Illicit
Drugs and Alcohol
Students and employees are reminded that state, and
federal laws provide for a variety of legal sanctions
and penalties for the unlawful possession, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. These sanctions
include but are not limited to incarceration and monetary fines. All reports of suspected violations will be
thoroughly investigated and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.
T he Federal Controlled Substances Act provides penalties of up to fifteen (15) years imprisonment and
fines of up to $25,000 for unlawful distribution or possession with the intent to distribute narcotics. For unlawful possession of a controlled substance, a person
is subject to up to one year of imprisonment and fines
up to $5,000. Any person who unlawfully distributes
a controlled substance to a person under twenty-one
years of age may be punished by up to twice the term
of imprisonment and fine otherwise authorized by law.
California law provides that any person who violates
the criminal statutes on controlled substances by possessing, offering for sale, distributing, or manufacturing narcotics such as cocaine or heroin shall be guilty
of a felony. Upon conviction the court may sentence a
person to serve a term in the state prison and/or pay
a fine. Possession of less than one ounce of marijuana
is a misdemeanor violation that is punishable by a
fine of not more than $100. Possession of more than
one ounce of marijuana can either be a misdemeanor
or felony violation depending on the circumstances.
This violation may be punishable by imprisonment
in the country jail not to exceed one year, or a fine of
not more than $500, or by both such fine and imprisonment, or shall be punished by imprisonment in the
state prison.
California law prohibits any person from acquiring
possessing, or using any alcoholic beverage in or on
an, public college or grounds thereof. Upon conviction,
a person is punishable by imprisonment in the county
jail not exceeding six months, or by fine not exceeding $1000, or by, both such imprisonment and fine.
(Business and Professions Code Section 25608)
F urther information on these state and federal
statutes will be maintained in the College Police
Department and The Office of Student Special
Services. Copies will be made available to students
and employees.
Equal Opportunity In compliance with Title IX of the 1972 Education
Amendment, the Equal Employment Opportunity
Act of 1972 (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 as amended), the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974, and the
Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the policy of the
Marin Community College District not to discriminate against any person on the basis of, or perception
of, race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, color,
religion, age, sex, national origin, sexual orientation,
physical disability, mental disability, gender, marital
status, medical condition (cancer, genetic characteristics, or pregnancy), and status as a Vietnam-era
veteran in all of its educational and employment programs and activities, its policies, practices and procedures. Students have the right to file an internal complaint or a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights.
College of Marin, under the Equity in Athletics
Disclosure Act of 1994, provides information concerning the operation of its intercollegiate athletics program. A completed report is available in the
Admissions and Records Office, the Library, and the
Athletic Department for public review. College of
Marin policy 5.004 prohibits verbal, physical, visual,
and sexual harassment of any applicant, employee,
or student by any District employee on the basis of,
or perception of, race, ethnic group identification, ancestry, color, religion, age, sex, national origin, sexual
orientation, physical disability, mental disability,
gender, marital status, medical condition (cancer, genetic characteristics, or pregnancy), and status as a
Vietnam-era veteran in all of its educational and employment programs and activities, it policies, practices and procedures. Conduct of nonemployees while on
the District property is also expected to follow these
­g uidelines.
It is further the policy of this District to insure equal
opportunity in all of its programs and in all aspects
of employment. The lack of English skills will not be a
barrier to admission to and participation in vocational education ­programs.
Open Enrollment Policy
It is the policy of College of Marin that unless specifically, exempted by statute, every course, course section or class the attendance of which is to be reported
for State aid, shall be fully open to enrollment and
participation by any person who has been admitted to
the College and who meets such prerequisites as may
be established pursuant to Chapter II, Division 2,
Part VI, Title V of the California Code.
Changes May Occur
Without Notice College of Marin has made every reasonable effort
to determine that information stated in its publication is accurate, but the College reserves the right
to alter fees, statements and procedures contained
herein without notice. Fees and procedures are subject to change at anytime by the State Legislature
and the College Board of Trustees. It is the student’s
responsibility to meet and remain informed of College
requirements. When changes occur, they will be
printed in the next regular publication of the catalog
or ­schedule.
EEO/ADA Compliance Officer
Title IX Coordinator
Executive Dean
Human Resources and Labor Relations
Linda Beam (or Designee)
Administrative Center, Kentfield Campus
415.485.9400
Gender, Equity Coordinator
David Cook
Student Services Center, Rm 263
Kentfield Campus
415.485.9409
Section 504 (Disability) Coordinator
Linda Beam
Administrative Center, Kentfield Campus
415.485.9400
Title IX Coordinator
David Cook
Student Services Center, Rm 263
Kentfield Campus
415.485.9409
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
105
Directory of Phone & Office Numbers
Kentfield Campus (KTD) Inside calls to Kentfield Campus from IVC or KTD Campus, dial 7 plus the last
three digits of the direct number. Calls from outside the Campus dial the switchboard at 415.457.8811 or the direct number as listed below.
Admissions &
Records, SS 254
457-8811, ext. 8822
English as a Second
Language (ESL), HC123
485.9642
English/Humanities Office,
HC 101
485.9348
Assessment & Testing, SS238 485.9469
EOPS, LC 160
485.9605
Associated Students:
ASCOM, SS 241
ASEC, SS 147
485.9390
485.9652
Equal Opportunity/
Compliance Officer
485.9504
Behavioral Science
Office, FH 101
Financial Aid Office, SS 236
485.9409
485.9630
Biology/Geology
Office, SC 137
485.9510
Bookstore, LC downstairs
485.9394
Business & Information
Systems Office, FH 101
485.9610
Cafeteria, SS downstairs
456-7661
Alumni Association
485.9686
Arts & Sciences, AC 104
485.9506
Child Care Center,
AC downstairs
485.9468
Communications Office,
HC 101
485.9348
Counseling, SS 212
485.9432
Executive Dean,
Human Resources, and
Labor Relations, AC 107
Dean of Arts & Humanities
AC 104
485.9504
485.9655
Dean of Enrollment Services,
Development &
Special Programs, SS 252
485.9417
Dean of Math, Sciences and
Learning Technology, LC 133
485.9506
Director of Financial Aid,
SS 236
485.9405
Director of Student Affairs and
Health Center, SS 251
485.9375
Disabled Students
Program, DS
Indian Valley Campus (IVC)
Calls to IVC from outside the IVC or
Kentfield Campus, dial 415.457.8811
plus the extension.
Admissions &
Records, AS 136
ext. 8822
Assessment & Testing Office,
KTD/SS 238
485.9469
Bookstore, KTD
485.9394
Career Education Office
AS 134
ext. 8108
Child Care Center,
CS 105
ext. 8221, 8222 or 883.4034
Fine/Visual Arts Office, FA 102 485.9480
College Operations
ext. 8100 & 8101
Health Center, DH 118
485.9458
Counseling, AS
Appointments, KTD/SS 212
485.9432
Health Sciences Office,
HC 111
485.9319
Human Resources
485.9340
Job Placement, SS 232
485.9410
Dean of Workforce
Development and
College & Community
Partnerships ext. 8108
Library, LC upstairs
485.9656
Disabled Students
Program, KTD/DS 1
485.9406
Lost and Found, TB1
485.9455
Math Office, SC 137
485.9510
Echo Times Newspaper,
KTD/LC 36
485.9690
Media Center/Language
Lab, LC 120
485.9645
Modern Languages Office,
HC 101
485.9348
Parking Permit Purchase—
Bookstore, LC downstairs
485.9394
Food Vending Machines,
PM 189, OL 105, AS 130 & Pool
Emeritus College, KTD/SS 147 485.9368
Financial Aid Office, AS 135
ext. 8118
Fiscal Services
ext. 8160
Food Service/Deli, MW 180
ext. 8331
Performing Arts Office, FA 77 485.9460
Health Center, AS 121
ext. 8126
PE/Athletics Office, PE10
485.9580
Job Placement, KTD/SS 232
485.9410
Physical Sciences Office,
SC 137
485.9510
Learning Center
English, PM 180
ext. 8326
Police, Campus, TB 1
485.9455
Reentry Services, SS 206
485.9641
Learning Center
Math, PM 180
ext. 8510
Social Sciences Office, FH 101 485.9630
Lost & Found/Campus Police,
C-B
883.3179
Student Affairs, SS 250
485.9376
Media Services IVC
485.9606
Swimming Pool, PE
485.9587
Police, Campus, C-B
883.3179
Transfer/Career Center, SS 202 485.9671
Reentry Services, KTD/SS 206 485.9641
Echo Times Newspaper, LC 32 485.9690
Tutoring Center, LC 160
Student Affairs, AS 140
Emeritus College, SS147
Veterans Office
106
•
FALL 2006
485.9406
485.9368
485.9620
457-8811, ext. 8822
Swimming Pool
ext. 8322
457-8811, ext. 8262
Transfer/Career Center,
KTD/SS 202
485.9671
Veterans Office, AS 136
ext. 8822
Kentfield Campus Map and Directory
Police Phone Numbers
Emergency: 911 or, from a Campus
extension, 9-911.
Urgent: 415.485.9696
Kentfield Police Business:
415.485.9455
Parking
Vehicles on campus are subject to parking
and traffic regulations by the Board of
Trustees, Marin Community College
District.
All cars must have a parking sticker, or
display a daily parking permit which may
be purchased from the parking ticket
dispensers located in parking lots.
Parking permits are required at all times,
except Saturdays, Sundays and school
Holidays, and in Lot 13.
AC
M1
Administrative Center
Children’s Center
Maintenance Office
BC
SWINERTON OFFICE
Business and Management Center
DL
Dance Center
Landscape Management Center
MS3
OH
Olney Hall and Auditorium
PE
Disabled Students
Physical Education Center
Gymnasium
Pools
DH
SC
Dickson Hall
Health Center
Science Center
FA
Student Services Center
Registration
Cafeteria
Emeritus
DS
Fine Arts Center
Art Gallery
Box Office
Theatre
FH
Fusselman Hall
HC
Harlan Center
Community Education
ESL
LC
SS
TB–1
Temporary Building
Campus Police
Handicapped Entrance
Handicapped Pickup/Drop Off
Directories
Indicates
accessible route
Learning Resources Center
Library
Bookstore
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
107
Indian Valley Campus Map and Directory
Emergency: 911 or 9-911 from
Campus Extension
Urgent: 415.485.9696
IVC Police Business Phone:
415.883.3179
Motorcycle and handicap
parking available
Vehicles on campus are subject to parking
and traffic regulations by the Board of
Trustees, Marin Community College
District.
All cars must have a parking sticker, or
display a daily parking permit which may
be purchased from the parking ticket
dispenser.
Parking permits are required at all times,
except Saturdays, Sundays and school
holidays.
POMO (PM)
BUILDING #17
1. Auto Body and Fender
2. Auto Technology Lab
3. General Classrooms/Labs/Offices/
Medical Assisting lab
4. Machine & Metals Tech
5. Math/English Lab/Food Vending
6. General Classrooms/Labs/Offices/
Geology/Geography/Chemistry/Biology
7. Multi Media Lab & Offices
17. Marin School of Arts & Technology
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES (AS)
8. Student Services
9. Administrative Services
10. Emeritus Meeting Room/
Swinerton Office
11. Information Systems Center
12. Board Meeting Room/
Child Care Center (CS)
MIWOK (MW)
13. Art Labs/Art Gallery/Marin School of
Arts & Technology
14. Marin School of Arts and Technology
15. Studio Theatre/Student Lounge/Deli
16. Marin School of Arts & Technology
108
•
FALL 2006
OHLONE (OL)
18. Computer Labs/Offices/Court
Reporting Labs
19. General Classrooms/Labs/
Offices/Office Occupations/Court
Reporting/Computer Labs/
Intensive English Program
20. Food Vending/P.E./Classrooms/
Multi Media
21. Pool/Shower-Locker Bldg.
22. Campus Police/Corporation Yard
Parking
Parking Information
Parking permits are required at all
times, including evenings (except
Saturdays, Sundays and school holidays). Be sure to read the signs at the
entrances to parking lots. The signs
explain what type of permit is allowed
in the lot (staff or student), and include
any additional parking regulations. For
student parking lot locations, see the
campus maps.
Daily permits and semester permits are valid at either campus. All
California Vehicle Codes can be enforced in campus parking lots. Obey all
signs and markings. All vehicles improperly parked will be ­cited, and may
be towed.
Daily Parking Permits
You may purchase a daily parking permit from dispensers located in several
student parking lots. In the event of a
dispenser malfunction, you must purchase a daily permit from a different
machine. Please report all malfunctions
to the campus police at 415.485.9696.
The cost for a daily permit is $3.00
(subject to change). Daily permits must
be visible on the dashboard.
Semester Parking Stickers
A semester permit is much more convenient, and will save you money, compared to a daily permit. The semester permit may be purchased for $50
(subject to change) in the Kentfield
Campus Bookstore or at the Admissions
& Records Office at the Indian Valley
Campus. Proof of enrollment and valid
identification are required. (only one
permit per person). Summer session
permits are $25 (subject to change).
Semester permits must be attached inside the vehicle on the lower left corner
of the front windshield. Lost or stolen
permits are not replaced.
Disabled Students Parking
No parking permits are required for
disabled students. A disabled placard
or license plate issued by the State
of California Department of Motor
Vehicles must be displayed.
Financial Aid Students
Parking
Students receiving Financial Aid are
permitted to purchase parking stickers
at half price.

College of Marin Student Parking Permit Application
NAME: _ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MAKE OF VEHICLE: _ _______________________________________________________________________________________________
LICENSE PLATE: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
STREET ADDRESS: _ ________________________________________________________________________________________________
CITY: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
STATE & ZIP: __________________________________PHONE: _____________________________________________________________
AMOUNT ENCLOSED: $50 per semester. $25 for summer session. Please note: fees for parking permits are nonrefundable.
Permit fees subject to change. You must include proof of enrollment (i.e. copy of your registration and class schedule).
Make checks payable to College of Marin, and mail to:
Semester Permits, POB 521, Kentfield, CA 94914.
For the latest schedule register online at www.marin.cc.ca.us
College of Marin
•
109
Driving Directions
Kentfield Campus Area
Directions from Highway 101
To Kentfield Campus
From Highway 101, take the San
Anselmo exit (northbound) or the
Sir Francis Drake Blvd. exit (southbound) and follow Sir Francis Drake
Blvd. to College Ave. (seventh stoplight). For the Physical Education complex, the Science Center, the Learning
Resources Center (library) and the
Student Services Center (Admissions &
Records), turn left on College Ave. For
Harlan Center, stay on Drake Blvd.,
crossing the College Ave. intersection,
and turn right on Maple Ave. to parking lot. For the Fine Arts Building,
Fusselman Hall and Dickson Hall, stay
on Drake Blvd., turning left on Laurel
Ave. Park in college parking lots.
Indian Valley Campus Area
To Indian Valley Campus
From Highway 101, take Ignacio Blvd.
exit and continue on Ignacio Blvd. (approx. two miles) to the Indian Valley
Campus. For Admissions & Records,
park in Visitor’s space (watch for flag
pole); for the Ohlone Cluster park in lot
#6 and for the pool, in lot #7.
Public Transportation
­Directions
Golden Gate Transit (GGT) provides
bus service to Sonoma, Marin and San
Francisco Counties. For more detailed
information than that given below, visit
the GGT web site at www.goldengate.
org, call 415.455.2000 (Marin County),
707.541.2000 (Sonoma County), or
415.923.2000 (San Francisco),
You may also pick up a copy of their
Transit Guide and Map from any GGT
bus.
To Kentfield Campus
The Kentfield campus of College of
Marin is served by GGT Routes 18, 21,
22, 24, 28 and 29.
To Indian Valley Campus
The Indian Valley College Campus is
served by GGT Route 55.
110
•
FALL 2006
Bay Area
Students Going Above and Beyond continued from page 4
“I like the progressive
­attitudes of the instructors and other students,”
Sandfort says. “This is
one of the great centers of
our community—a place
for people that live here to
come together.”
When Carlos Peña graduated from
San Rafael High School in 2003 he
was accepted at San Francisco State
University, but his real dream was to
attend UC Berkeley where, he says, many
of his mentors graduated from.
Teaching and learning can be an exciting
lifelong endeavor, especially for Erika
Harkins. Erika is President of COM’s
Emeritus College.
She is also a faculty member teaching non-credit classes in the history of French literature through the
COM Community Education program.
She enjoys the eclectic, intellectual
­atmosphere at COM. In her opinion,
Emeritus College is one of Marin’s
best-kept secrets, offering a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities and ­activities for adults of all ages.
Emeritus College membership is only
$12 per year.
Emeritus College sponsors a variety
of low cost Community Education classes. Members have the benefit of participating in a number of educational
clubs and activities, including the Great
Books Discussion Group, Classical
Music Club, Philosophy Club, Rumi
Poetry and Classic Cinema. For more
information about Emeritus College call
415.777.7257.
“Emeritus College is
one of Marin’s best-kept
­secrets, offering a wide
variety of lifelong learning opportunities and
­activities for adults of
all ages,” says Harkins.
Peña heard through his counselors
and peers that College of Marin had
excellent transfer rates to UC Berkeley.
He enrolled at COM in fall 2004 and
plans to transfer to UC Berkeley or
UCLA in fall 2007.
Kelea Sandfort, a re-entry student and
mother of an active toddler, wants to
make a difference in her community.
Her goal someday is to start a nonprofit organization that promotes diversity, human rights, and dignity. She
is the Vice President of the Students
for Social Responsibility Club and the
President of the COM Internet Radio
Station Club.
Sandfort is planning on majoring
in Development Studies and transferring to U.C. Berkeley. Raised in Marin
County, she says that COM feels like an
extension of home, especially because
of its unique location nestled in a beautiful physical environment at the base
of Mt. Tamalpais. Her involvement in
extracurricular activities has helped
her develop a greater sense of community. “I like the progressive attitudes
of the instructors and other students,”
Sandfort says. This is one of the great
centers of our community — a place for
people that live here to come together.”
“The COM faculty and
counselors offer a lot of
help. The teachers have
always given me the extra
time that I need to help
me succeed in my classes,”
Peña says.
Peña is the Vice President of the
COM Latino Student Union (LSU).
The LSU helped him access a variety
of support services, including scholarships, academic counseling, financial
aid, and transfer. Peña is glad that he
decided to enroll at COM. “The faculty
and counselors offer a lot of help. The
teachers have always given me the extra time that I need to help me succeed
in my classes,” Peña says. “I like the diverse students here. I am surrounded
by peers.”
marin community
college district
835 college avenue
kentfield ca 94904-2590
NON-PROFIT
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
MARIN COMMUNITY
COLLEGE DISTRICT
ECRWSS
residential customer
Try our NEW Weekend Edition of CHEM 110!
(Chemistry for Allied Health Sciences)
Thought you’d never have time to complete the chemistry
prerequisite to the COM nursing program? Now you can!
Friday 6:10 – 9PM, KTD/SC 130 &
Saturday 10:10AM – 2PM, KTD/SC 130 & 158
Multimedia 112 Interface Design
Learn how to use current digital tools to develop effective
concepts, illustrations, and designs for multimedia-based
projects.
Thursday, 7:10 – 10PM, IVC, Pomo 199
Coming … COM Study Abroad in Summer 2007
A non-traditional, five-week course combining classroom
learning and cultural immersion. Courses to be taught in part
on-site in native countries — the best language lab possible!
• C
hange your attitude towards global relationships
• G
ain in grammar skills, cultural understanding and life
experience
• Classes available to credit and non-credit students
• C
areer-minded students can acquire international knowledge
and experience
• S
ites to be announced in Spring 2007 Schedule and on the
COM Web Site
• C
OM commits to offering high quality and low cost Study
Abroad programs
Please contact Kathryn.freschi@marin.cc.ca.us or call
415.485.9356 for more information.
www.marin.cc.ca.us
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