W Wet and Wild — 2008 June VHF QSO Party Results

W Wet and Wild — 2008 June VHF QSO Party Results
Feature
RADIOSPORT RADIOSPORT RADIOSPORT RADIOSPO
Wet and Wild — 2008 June
VHF QSO Party Results
Were you prepared?
Rick Rosen, K1DS
rick1ds@hotmail.com
NØKE
W
The breakdown of entries included 659
(61%) in the Single-Operator Low-Power
category, 200 (19%) in the Single-Operator
High-Power category, 51 (5%) in the Limited Multi-Operator category, 33 (3%) in the
Unlimited Multi-Operator category, 35 (3%)
in the QRP Portable category, and 96 (9%)
in the three new Rover categories.
hat more fun can a few thousand
VHF+ operators have than a
weekend with plenty of other
stations to work and with propagation enhanced by sporadic-E or “E-skip” (Es) on 50
and 144 MHz? The June 2008 VHF QSO
Party was thoroughly enjoyed by almost all
participants thanks to the substantial hours
of open bands from Es, plus the use of CW
and digital modes, including FSK441 for
meteor scatter and JT65 for EME.
Preparation included checking all the
gear for functionality prior to the contest,
checking the rover schedules of those who
post a route on the various VHF and contesting reflectors, and then having a back-up
plan for managing anything that needs repair
or replacement during the action.
Getting enough sleep prior to the contest
is also useful preparation, as one unnamed
operator manning the four stations of a limited multi-operator station in the wee hours
of the morning was found asleep at 5:30 AM
with all four voice keyers on a continuous
loop calling CQ!
The Bands
“What bands do I need to be active on for
this event?” The answer is you must have
6 m capability. That’s where everyone
will be if that band is open. And since the
band was open for a long time on both
days of the weekend, there was the postcontest complaint on the various reflectors that scores were down on the higher
bands. While it has been suggested that
we should have an event without 6 m, the
Midwesterners responded that without
6 m, there would be no significant activity.
We have the August UHF QSO Party, on
222 MHz and up, for that type of a contest.
For many in the right places, the action
was fantastic on 2 m, as Es was prevalent
throughout the Southeast, Central and
Southwestern parts of the country. Grid
Peanut, Rooster and Steve, NØTU, the “old
goat” on the trail up to Mt Herman (CO)
with a battery-powered FT817 transceiver,
homebrew 6 m dipole, and 5 element 2 m
beam.
totals higher than 50 were achieved by
10 stations across a wide geography and
included a station in each of the single- and
multi-op classes.
The Logs
There were 1075 logs received and
according to the log of W5PR from STX,
operating only 6 m, there were at least
1630 participants as each of them were
in his log! (See Figure 1.)
Almost everyone was happy and excited
to have some 6 m Es, and as reported by
the stations in the Texas and surrounding
Midwest areas, the band was open the
entire contest. There was also an excellent
enhancement on 2 m Sunday morning and
some aurora facilitated QSOs during the
weekend.
Northeast and West Coast contesters
were not as fortunate as those in more
­southern and central US locations, as the
6 m Es QSOs were less available. As a gauge
of the different conditions, we can compare the 6 m results of multi-operator station K5QE, operating from EM13 in Texas,
to the multi-operator W2SZ group in western Massachusetts in FN32. The Texas
group had 1345 6 m QSOs in 245 grids,
QST0002
1200
1000
Number of Logs
Preparation
Conditions
800
600
400
200
0
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
Figure 1 — The trend is good for the June VHF QSO Party, as log submissions were the
highest since the year 2000.
From December 2008 QST © ARRL
Single Operator, Low
Power
K2DRH
328,338
K5RQ
202,384
K3FM
193,817
WB1GQR 191,952
(W1SJ, op)
N4BP
165,870
K4LY
144,826
AF1T
143,550
AA4W
135,740
K4EPS
135,026
KB9TLV
113,960
Single Operator, High
Power
K1TEO
657,815
W5PR
443,360
K1RZ
440,622
KC4PX
392,040
WD5K
365,044
K9MK
305,109
KMØT
304,007
K4SN
261,711
WB9Z
248,940
WA2FGK 242,536
(K2LNS, op)
Single Operator
Portable
KA1LMR
78,078
K9AKS
36,120
K6VCR
35,588
N7IR
35,242
K1ZE
23,534
N8XA
11,658
N3LL
5,850
N3AWS
5,432
KQ6UP
5,088
WA4A
4,600
Limited Multioperator
K5TR
577,638
AA4ZZ
458,136
W3SO
358,154
W4IY
355,100
W4NH
307,515
AE5T
218,400
AB5GU
208,848
WA7JTM
189,750
WØLSD
186,534
W1QK
181,536
Multioperator
W2SZ
1,907,504
K8GP
1,434,157
K5QE
1,122,051
W3CCX
887,415
K3YTL
454,210
WØEEA
396,644
KBØHH
289,250
KØDI
217,404
N2NK
174,167
WØKVA
155,672
Rover
N6NB/R
281,436
AE5P/R
160,398
N5AIU/R
154,364
AH8M/R 136,136
(KD4VRY, op)
VE3NPB/R 111,166
W1RT/R
109,070
WDØACD/R 97,760
K2TER/R
94,677
K2QO/R
74,936
KC3WD/R
67,200
Limited Rover
KG6TOA/R 97,328
W3DHJ/R
36,585
K4GUN/R
24,462
K6EU/R
22,876
AG4V/R
22,134
KK6MC/R
14,016
K6JRA/R
13,824
AF6AV/R
12,172
N4JDB/R
11,502
KR1ST/R
11,480
Unlimited Rover
W6TE/R
385,336
N6MU/R
280,875
N5AC/R
65,230
KRØVER/R 22,035
KR5J/R
20,992
N1MU/R
16,030
W3BC/R
9,760
N3UW/R
5,920
while the Mt Greylock gang logged 889
QSOs in 153 grids on 6 m. The top 24 grid
gatherers on 6 m with 199 through
280 grids were mostly in a band of states
from Florida through New Mexico, plus others from Colorado, Iowa and South Dakota.
Table 1
Section and Division Records Set in 2008
Call
K5RQ
K3FM
K4LY
AA4W
W6ZI
N4QWZ
W9ZRX
CO2OJ
WA3EOQ
W3PAW
W4PJP
XE3N
W5PR
K1RZ
KC4PX
W4WA
XE2WWW
AE5T
KH7Y
K5QE
KØDI
K9AKS
K6VCR
N3LL
N3AWS
WC4V
Cat
SO-LP
SO-LP SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-LP
SO-HP
SO-HP
SO-HP
SO-HP
SO-HP
LIM-MO
LIM-MO
UN-MO
UN-MO
SO-QRP
SO-QRP
SO-QRP
SO-QRP
SO-QRP
Sec
Score
WCF 202384
MS
193817
SC
144826
NFL
135740
OK
99424
TN
95545
NC
89880
CO2
59792
MDC
55977
WPA
54002
GA
49968
XE
38413
STX
443360
MDC 440622
SFL
392040
GA
196605
XE
121218
LA
218400
PAC
270
STX 1122051
LAX
217404
NE
36120
SDG
35588
WCF
5850
MS
5432
KY
1287
QSOs
973
877
544
609
433
380
535
404
272
273
342
359
1630
919
1306
626
681
975
18
1943
726
240
290
90
97
37
From December 2008 QST © ARRL
Mults
208
221
227
220
208
197
168
148
141
134
144
107
272
273
297
257
178
224
15
449
198
140
82
65
56
33
Two meters provided some nice longhaul openings for the central part of the
country on Sunday. Noted on June 15 was
a report of two long-haul 222 MHz contacts
between W5UWB in EL17, Texas, and
NØVZJ in EN35, Minnesota, and between
AA4ZZ from EM96, North Carolina, and
W5DDR in DM84, New Mexico.
Digital modes were again popular for
stations that either made schedules in advance of the contest for some DX grids, or
for those who planned to use EME. Even
without the ability to have elevation, there
were QRO stations workable in random
mode at moonrise and moonset using CW
or WSJT modes.
Record Setting and Breaking
Many operators, recognizing the unique
opportunity on 6 m took full advantage of
running it long and hard. The stations with
favorable 6 m conditions, well aware of the
chances they had to top previous records,
stayed in their seats to milk the last drops of
propagation. Eight division and 26 section
and DX records were set. See Table 1.
A new record was set for the highest
number of 6 m QSOs in a June QSO Party
Single-Op High-Power category: W5PR,
with 1630 contacts. The previous record of
1212 was set by N5HHS 10 years ago. This
previous high-water mark was also topped
this year by WD5K with 1388 QSOs, and
by KC4PX with 1281 QSOs. The Unlimited
Multi-op K5QE team also set a QSO record
for their category this year with 1345 contacts, besting the 2006 W2SZ result of
1168.
Looking at the Single-Op High-Power
grid-multiplier records, KC4PX topped
his previous 6 m record of 263 grids
from 2003 with an extraordinary catch of
280 grids this time. W5PR with 272
grids also topped the old record and WD5K tied it with
263 grids. The Single-Op
Low-Power record set in
Division
2006 by Wisconsin’s K9MU
Southeast
1094 QSOs in 229 grids still
Delta
Roanoke
stands.
Single-Operator
West Gulf
Southeast
Int’l
Delta
West Gulf
There are three single operators who have maintained their
top spots in their respective
categories for several years in a
row. Setting the pace in the lowpower category, Bob, K2DRH in
Illinois led with a score of 328k,
using eight bands through 3 GHz
and scoring 120k more than his
nearest competitor. In somewhat
of an operating contrast, K5RQ
operating from West Central
Florida came in second place using only
6 m and scoring 202k, with a hefty QSO
count of 973 and 208 grid multipliers. K3FM
was 3rd in the low-power category with 198k
points, operating from Mississippi with
6 m and 2 m. Our 4 th place station,
WB1GQR (W1SJ, op) from Vermont scored
191k in a 7-band effort, while in 5th place,
N4BP amassed 166k from south Florida, as
a single-band 6 m op.
In the high-power group, Jeff, K1TEO
managed to accumulate almost 658k points
from his Connecticut QTH to stay in the
top spot for yet another year. With pinpoint
6-digit grid aim, he is able to “run the
bands” with microwave-capable stations. He
added 228 QSOs on 903 MHz through
10 GHz and in the process scored an additional 124 multipliers. Taking second
honors from South Texas, Charles, W5PR
took advantage of the 6 m propagation and
scored a whopping 443k points using a
single band, the greatest number of QSOs
made by any single-op in the contest. In
third place, Dave, K1RZ operating out of
Maryland was only 3k points behind, with
a total of 440k points. Fourth place was
won by KC4PX from South Florida, who
also had a magnificent 6 m total of 1281
QSOs in 280 grids and garnished that with
additional 25 contacts on bands B, C, D,
and E. Our fifth place winner was WD5K
Affiliated Club Competition
Unlimited Club
Society of Midwest Contesters
Entities
Medium Club
Potomac Valley Radio Club
North East Weak Signal Group
Mt Airy VHF Radio Club
Grand Mesa Contesters of Colorado
Florida Contest Group
Florida Weak Signal Society
Northern Lights Radio Society
Carolina DX Assn
North Texas Microwave Society
Yankee Clipper Contest Club
Roadrunners Microwave Group
Contest Club Ontario
Northern California Contest Club
Rochester VHF Group
Pacific Northwest VHF Society
South East Contest Club
Alabama Contest Group
Central Arizona DX Assn
Mad River Radio Club
Frankford Radio Club
Central Texas DX and Contest Club
Oklahoma DX Assn
Raritan Bay Radio Amateurs
Tennessee Contest Group
Bergen ARA
Contest Club Du Quebec
Kentucky Contest Group
North Coast Contesters
Local Club
Nacogdoches ARC
Murgas ARC
Eastern Connecticut ARA
Chippewa Valley VHF Contesters
Badger Contesters
Low Country Contest Club
10-70 Repeater Assn
Portage County Amateur Radio Service
Maritime Contest Club
Steel City ARC
Downey ARC
Meriden ARC
Ashe County ARC 71
Score
1,827,380
35 2,766,272
20 1,407,723
16 1,198,399
12
930,086
11
869,515
11
841,428
17
777,331
6
649,520
11
576,503
15
455,157
6
407,505
18
396,625
21
337,173
6
326,630
23
307,952
6
265,685
5
134,096
7
86,860
6
67,408
4
51,588
4
47,474
3
41,885
10
33,449
9
30,125
7
23,798
4
20,496
4
14,827
3
12,362
5 1,452,607
5
759,705
8
218,447
7
198,055
7
123,485
7
84,911
3
57,051
4
12,672
4
6,595
3
64,255
4
12,868
4
10,831
3
2,559
Midwest Region
(Dakota, Midwest, Rocky
Mountain and West Gulf
Divisions; Manitoba and
Saskatchewan Sections)
Central Region
(Central and Great Lakes
Divisions; Ontario Section)
Northeast Region
(New England, Hudson and
Atlantic Divisions; Maritime and
Quebec Sections)
Southeast Region
(Delta, Roanoke and
Southeastern Divisions)
WB1GQR 191,952
(W1SJ, op)
AF1T
143,550
NN1D
77,616
72,092
WB2SIH
K1KG
61,632
A
K5RQ
K3FM
N4BP
K4LY
AA4W
202,384
193,817
165,870
144,826
135,740
A
A
A
A
A
K2DRH
KB9TLV
W9GKA
KO9A
K8MR
328,338
113,960
64,148
57,023
50,553
A
A
A
A
A
WA5LFD
W6ZI
WB5ZDP
NØPOH
KØMHC
106,505
99,424
98,264
71,360
56,511
A
A
A
A
A
NU6S
WJØF
VA6AN
WE6T
K6XN
77,248
43,146
32,004
29,484
28,260
A
A
A
A
A
K1TEO
K1RZ
WA2FGK (K2LNS, op)
K1TOL
N2GHR
657,815
440,622
242,536
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
248,940
235,036
142,096
112,312
109,720
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
392,040
261,711
238,750
196,605
188,496
WB9Z
K9CT
K8EB
K9EA
K8TQK
148,410
104,622
KC4PX
K4SN
WJ9B
W4WA
W4ZRZ
W5PR
WD5K
K9MK
KMØT
K5AM
443,360
365,044
305,109
304,007
237,072
B
B
B
B
B
K7AED
K6KLY
N6KN
WB6AAG
KI7JA
72,581
66,885
65,130
55,115
53,640
B
B
B
B
B
78,078
23,534
1,872
513
1
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
5,850
5,432
4,600
216
110
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
N8XA
WC4V
VE3/KC8QVO
NF8M
11,658
1,287
990
36
Q
Q
Q
Q
K9AKS
KIØG
NØGSZ
36,120
150
24
Q
Q
Q
W3SO
W1QK
KV1J
KB1DFB
KA2LIM
358,154
181,536
147,630
100,980
98,334
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
K5TR
AB5GU
WØLSD
WDØT
WØVB
577,638
208,848
186,534
180,525
43,134
L
L
L
L
L
Q
Q
Q
Q
Q
L
L
L
L
L
82,654
27,707
14,016
7,326
5,424
35,588
35,242
5,088
4,025
3,648
458,136
355,100
307,515
218,400
62,088
N8ZM
KC8QAE
N9TF
NG9R
K2KW
K6VCR
N7IR
KQ6UP
VE7IHL
N6FD
W2SZ
W3CCX
K3YTL
N2NK
K3EOD
1,907,504
887,415
454,210
174,167
100,637
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
R
1,122,051
396,644
289,250
155,672
102,985
M
M
M
M
M
160,398
154,364
97,760
30,720
11,607
R
R
R
R
R
217,404
77,520
50,061
25,353
24,375
M
M
M
M
M
R
R
R
R
R
AE5P/R
N5AIU/R
WDØACD/R
KCØIYT/R
WRØI/R
KØDI
K6LRG
K7RST
W6YX
KI6MPQ
109,070
94,677
74,936
57,245
45,276
136,136
AH8M/R (KD4VRY, op)
KC3WD/R
67,200
AF4OD/R
14,170
KE5GAQ/R
13,736
N9KS/R
5,187
K5QE
WØEEA
KBØHH
WØKVA
WQØP
L
L
L
L
L
M
M
M
85,824
84,216
80,620
66,015
22,950
189,750
31,374
7,812
6,292
3,128
1,434,157
37,973
26,334
N9UHF
K9SG
VE3WCC
N8KOL
W8PGW
WA7JTM
W7JLC
WB6BFG
K4TRT
K7TM
RL
RL
RL
RL
R
R
R
R
R
80
36,585
14,016
4,400
281,436
18,528
8,772
4,563
2,944
K3IUV/R
W3DHJ/R
KK6MC/R
AC5TS/R
N6NB/R
KE6QR/R
KI6CG/R
KB8VAO/R
NW7O
W3BC/R
N3UW/R
9,760
5,920
RU
RU
N5AC/R
KRØVER/R
KR5J/R
65,230
22,035
20,992
RU
RU
RU
KG6TOA/R
K6EU/R
K6JRA/R
AF6AV/R
AL1VE/R
97,328
22,876
13,824
12,172
11,067
RL
RL
RL
RL
RL
385,336
280,875
RU
RU
KA1LMR
K1ZE
WB2AMU
K2KWK
K1ZK
W1RT/R
K2TER/R
K2QO/R
K3LFO/R
W1AUV/R
A
A
A
A
N3LL
N3AWS
WA4A
WA5ZEK
KC8KSK
AA4ZZ
W4IY
W4NH
AE5T
N4LR
K8GP
W4OZK
W4YCC
K4GUN/R
AG4V/R
N4JDB/R
KR1ST/R
WA4JA/R
24,462 22,134
11,502
11,480 1,998
with another one-band wonder-score on 6 m
from North Texas, putting 1388 calls from
263 grids in his log.
QRP portable participants are a hardy
group. They adhere to a special set of station requirements, and better results are
often achieved from being in a high spot in
a densely populated area and using several
bands. Topping the score list again in this
class, KA1LMR from New Hampshire
doubled the score of his nearest competitor
with an 8-band 78k result. Even with QRP
power, he logged 217 QSOs and 82 grids on
6 m and 92 QSOs on 2 m with 19 grids. In
second place with 36k points, K9AKS operated from the Nebraska plains near a small
airport, which provided a good horizon in
all directions. Here was another adventure
that capitalized on the great 6 m conditions
with 203 QSOs and 111 grids, supplemented
by a few additional contacts on bands B,
C, D and E.
Following in third place with 35.5k
points, K6VCR in San Diego used a
10-band set-up and had multiple contacts
on the microwave bands to boost his score.
From Arizona, N7IR managed to capture the
6 m magic and most of his 35.2k score is
accounted for by his 228 6 m QSOs in 119
grids for fourth place. On the East Coast, in
Connecticut K1ZE scored 23k with a 7-band
effort securing fifth position.
R
R
R
R
VE3NPB/R
VE3SMA/R
WB8BZK/R
K9ILT/R
KF8QL/R
111,166
55,814
54,184
22,230
21,528
R
R
R
R
R
RL
RL
RL
RL
RL
K9ZF/R
K8DOG/R
K9JK/R
VE3RKS/R
VE3AP/R
10,224
9,792
9,776
1,056
45
RL
RL
RL
RL
RL
N1MU/VE3/R
16,030
RU
Multi-operator
Battling it out in the top two Unlimited Multi-operator spots as they have for
many years, W2SZ, the Mount Greylock
Expeditionary Group, bested K8GP, the
Grid Pirates, by having more QSOs, especially the higher point variety from the
microwave bands. Despite the advantage
of K8GP on 6 m and 2 m, the larger W2SZ
group and their rovers were able to add the
enormous number of QSOs and multiplier
grids on the microwaves, even though their
10 GHz gear was visited by Murphy part
way through the fray. Entering the national
top-three circle was the multi-op team from
K5QE. For the past several years this South
Texas group’s activity had posted previous
section records and scored in the 500-600k
range. With the efforts to make this a fixed
contesting superstation, the judicious tracking of rovers, and the addition of excellent
6 m and 2 m propagation, they broke the
1 million-point barrier. The fourth place Mt
Airy VHF Packrats, W3CCX, redesigning
many of their stations this year, were in a
contest rebuilding mode, yet had a respectable 887k total. The K3YTL team continues
to grow in band capability and scooted home
with 5th place.
In the Limited Multi-Operator category,
stations submit a four-band entry. Operation
on additional bands is allowed, but those
West Coast Region
(Pacific, Northwestern and
Southwestern Divisions;
Alberta, British Columbia and
NWT Sections)
W6TE/R
N6MU/R
QSOs are treated as in a check-log. Using
the great advantage of the 6 m conditions
to take first place in this category, again,
are the K5TR multi-ops from South Texas
with 577k points and a huge total of 1344
6 m QSOs in 264 grids. The AA4ZZ team
in North Carolina challenged, but was in
second place in this grouping with 458k
points, building a solid number of QSOs and
grid multipliers across all four lower bands.
The W3SO operation netted third place
scoring 358k from their mountaintop perch
in Western PA. Just behind in fourth place
were the W4IY multi-ops with 355k. The
difference between these two groups was
the number of QSOs made by the W3SO
group on the higher-point bands of 222 and
432 MHz. The W4NH 4-band operation,
also from NC, earned 5th place with 307k.
Rovers — In Three Categories
This is the first June QSO Party with
the three categories of rovers; Classic, with
1-2 operators and all gear and antennas carried in the vehicle; Limited, with the number
of operating bands limited to four; and Unlimited, where the number of participants,
bands and rover tactics have little restriction.
Ninety-five rovers submitted logs for this
event. The overall number of rover entries
is similar to previous years (98 rover entries
in ’07 and 96 rover entries in ’06). A special
From December 2008 QST © ARRL
“Thank You” goes out to Toyota, who as
graciously sponsored all available Rover
plaques this year.
A majority of the stations entering the
Classic Rover category used six bands or
more, with many having 8-10 bands in use.
Eight of the top 10 scorers in this category
had a two-operator entry. Apparently gas
prices were not a serious challenge as the
number of grids covered by the rover bunch
did not seem to change much from previous
years. One wily rover group found a way to
maximize their scores simultaneously in all
three categories. The Classic Rover category
had 61 entries, and N6NB/R was top scorer
with 281k points, covering 15 grids with
a group of similarly-equipped rovers who
operated in a fashion to enhance their scores
and also garner top spots in the Limited and
Unlimited Rover categories. There are further
details of this group’s activity on the Soapbox
Web page under “N6NB/R”, and also on the
N6NB home page (commfaculty.fullerton.
edu/woverbeck/n6nb.htm).
There were 25 entries into the premier
event of the Limited Rover category —
stations who were using four bands of their
choosing with the same power limits as for
Single-Op Low-Power. The intention of developing this category was to allow stations
who were somewhat limited in their gear, or
newcomers to roving with rigs which included 1-4 VHF bands, to compete with each other and not with those stations equipped with
a whole array of VHF-UHF and microwave
bands. Finding a unique opportunity within
this new category, using the four bands from
2.3 GHz through 10 GHz, and moving with
the team of other rovers, KG6TOA/R topped
this category with a score of 97k, traversing
15 grids.
In second place with 36k, W3DHJ/R
took advantage of the great 50 MHz openings in the Midwest and using only two
bands and roving through only four grids,
had a 135-grid multiplier. K4GUN/R with
partner K4LIG copped third with a 10-grid
band-ABCD activity and a 24k score. In
4th place K6EU/R had 22.8k points and a
mere few hundred points behind, AG4V/R,
who maximized his score focusing on 6 m
multiplier grids. The average score in this
group was 13k.
The new Unlimited Rover category allowed stations to use almost any type of
configuration, operator contingent and any
number of QSOs with other rovers, including tandem roving or grid-circling. A total
From December 2008 QST © ARRL
VE3WCC
Grid expedition to FN04xa by members
of the West Carleton ARC of Ottawa.
Operators included Ken, VA3KA; Doug,
VE3XK; Andy, VE3NVK; Barney, VA3BGB;
Dean, VA3CDD; Al, VO1NO and Jeremy.
Complete Results are
on the ARRLWeb
For the complete 2008 June VHF
Contest Results, including scores
for all entries, see www.arrl.org/
contests/. Soapbox comments are
at www.arrl.org/contests/soapbox/.
of eight entries were received in this class,
and these averaged 101k points, with a
top score of 385k by W6TE/R traveling with
partner K6MI. Second place was N6MU/R
with 280k. Each of them carried 10 bands
and roved through 15 grids, apparently
tracking with the other top entries from the
Classic and Limited rover classes. In 3rd was
N5AC/R, who, with W5RSH and KE5BUZ
covered five grids in the NTX area with nine
active bands.
These new categories of contest rovers
will hopefully satisfy many participants.
In time we are sure to see more feedback
on the effects of the new classes; how the
competition can still be managed and scores
maximized in each group with specialized
roving tactics — proudly promoted by some,
and decried by others.
Club Competition
The group of VHF aficionados in the
Midwest grew, as demonstrated by the
Society of Midwest Contesters entry:
71 logs submitted for an aggregate score
of 1.8M points. This is 16 logs and 700k
points greater than their 2007 submission
and has them as the only entry and top spot
in the Unlimited Club category. Will it be
long before we find additional Midwesterners capturing more top categories and
besting some of the scores from stations
on the coasts?
In the Medium Club category there
were 28 entries. Topping the list with
35 logs and 2.7M points, the Potomac Valley
Radio Club, led by the K8GP contribution
takes top honors again. In second place,
moving up one place from last year with
20 logs and 1.4M points, we had the North
East Weak Signal Group. Third honors go
to the Mt Airy VHF RC with 16 logs and
1.2M points. Advancing several rungs up
the club competition ladder, the Grand Mesa
Contesters of Colorado submitted a score of
930k in 12 logs, while the Florida Contest
Group was close behind in fifth place with
869k from 11 logs.
Led by the contribution of multi-op
K5QE’s 1.1M, the Local Club competition
was won by the Nacogdoches ARC (TX)
with only five entries but a huge score of
1.4M points.. In the second spot was the
Murgas ARC (PA) with 759k. The Eastern
Connecticut ARA placed third with 218k.
The club competition encourages participation. Of the 1074 log entries, 435 or
40% entered as a club-affiliated station.
Much of the growth we get in VHF activity is supported by various club activities,
rover development, building projects, club
sponsored conferences, tune-up clinics
and antenna range testing. If you are not
already affiliated with a VHF-active club, go
through the list of clubs on the competition
list and find one that interests you and join
in to share the VHF experience.
VHF-DX
It’s always exciting to have a call in
your log from a DX entity. Thanks to the
participation of many stations in Canada,
Mexico, the Caribbean and even those
across the Atlantic Ocean, DX appeared
in the logs and contest submissions. With
a single-band 6 m entry, CO2OJ had a 60k
score, setting a record for entries from Cuba.
EA8BPX had 27 6 m QSOs in 21 grids in
his log entry. Canada was well represented
with 43 logs from seven provinces in all
operating categories. There were 11 entries
from Mexico, with 10 of them submitting single-band logs, having enjoyed the
6 m enhancements. Tim, NU6S added this
comment, “Never heard so many XE’s on
six.” Notably, Jorge, XE2WWW as a SingleBand high-power single-op scored 121k
with 681 QSOs on 6 m in 178 grids. With
this score, he set a new high-score record for
stations from Mexico and the international
participants. Zalo, XE3N another single-op
in the low-power category, set a record for
Mexico with 38k points, all on 6 m!
Preparing for the Future
It is not too early to prepare for the next
VHF contest and other on-the-air VHF
activities. The next ARRL VHF QSO
Party will be held on June 13-14, 2009,
and like the Boy Scouts, make sure you’re
prepared!
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising