2014-2015 Report

2014-2015 Report
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UNIVERSITY OF
WEST FLORIDA
BOT APPROVED 3/01/2016
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM of FLORIDA
Board of Governors
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
p.
p.
p.
p.
DASHBOARD
PERFORMANCE FUNDING METRICS
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS
NARRATIVE
2
5
6
7
DATA TABLES
SECTION
SECTION
SECTION
SECTION
SECTION
SECTION
1. FINANCIAL RESOURCES
2. PERSONNEL
3. ENROLLMENT
4. UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION
5. GRADUATE EDUCATION
6. RESEARCH & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
p. 16
p. 21
p. 22
p. 26
p. 35
p. 37
ED 301ϮϬϭϲ
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
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Dashboard
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485223-4:9
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$5:)2
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TOTAL
12,627
8,383
1,014
1,485
1,745
8,006
4,621
9,691
2,178
100%
66%
8%
12%
14%
63%
37%
77%
17%
0%
-2%
-2%
-5%
22%
-3%
5%
-1%
9%
TOTAL (as of Spring 2015)
Baccalaureate
Master’s
Research Doctorate
Professional Doctorate
6%
-12%
White
Hispanic
Black
Other
Full-Time
Part-Time
Undergraduate
Graduate
Unclassified
758
-/8--!85/8)39 ..-8-,
Faculty
(Fall 2014)
77
49
27
1
0
FullTime
PartTime
Tenure & Ten. Track
331
229
0
0
Non-Tenured Faculty
102
0
TOTAL
)84-/1-2)991.1+):1549
Basic:
Doctoral Universities:
Limited Research Activity
Undergraduate
Instructional Program:
Balanced arts & sciences,
some graduate
Graduate
Instructional Program:
Single doctoral
(education)
Size and Setting:
Four-year, medium,
primarily nonresidential
Community
Engagement:
Yes
DEGREE PRODUCTIVITY AND PROGRAM EFFICIENCY
)+0-2589-/8--9
1,903
)9:-89-/8--9
2,053 1,969
1,924 1,926
563
588
54%
37
780
594
)+0-2589*?85;6
5+:58)2-/8--9
651
27
43%
23
18
13%
12
Pell
2010-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15
2010-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15
2010-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15
8),;):154"):-9*?#:;,-4:$?6-
66%
61%
52%
55%
64%
52%
44%
2011
2012
$
62%
57%
53%
2010-11
2014-15
65.2%
72.8%
75.8%
52%
47%
42%
2013
2014
YEAR COHORT ENDED
"
Black &
Hispanic
)+0-2589-/8--9
'1:05;:>+-995;89
51%
46%
18%
2015
#
PROPORTION OF STUDENTS IN COHORTS ENDING IN 2015
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Dashboard
DEGREES AWARDED IN PROGRAMS OF STRATEGIC EMPHASIS (PSE)
%&
48% 48%
41% 42%
50%
45% 43%
51%
47%
STEM
39%
HEALTH
GAP ANALYSIS
GLOBAL
!
BACHELOR'S
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0
22
43
127
119
90
0
"#
GRADUATE
364
70
EDUCATION
382
97
200
BACHELOR'S
400
600
GRADUATE
RESEARCH AND COMMERCIALIZATION ACTIVITY
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$17.8
$16.2
67%
65%
85%
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
EXTERNAL
$1,000
Licensing Income ($)
$21.7
$19.6
$19.3
88%
89%
2012-13
2013-14
INTERNAL (State & Univ.)
10
$800
$600
8
5
6
$400
4
1
$200
$0
2
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Licensing Income ($)
Licenses Executed
Licenses Executed
#' *$"'(%& #"&
with Percent Funded Externally
0
RESOURCES
$10,599
$2,715
$1,142
$14,328
$12,454
$9,691
$3,261
$914
$9,357
$4,077
$3,891
$820
$855
$6,279
$5,516
$4,610
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
$7,557
2013-14
!
$4,168
$740
$9,421
2014-15
Note: Tuition and Fee revenues include tuition,
tuition differential fee and E&G fees (i.e.,
application, late registration, and library
fees/fines) based on the actual amount
collected (not budget authority) by universities
as reported in their Operating Budget 625
reports. Other local fees that do not support
E&G activities are not included here. Please
note that a portion of the Tuition & Fees is
supported by federal SFA programs (ie, Pell
grants). State-funded Student Financial Aid
amounts include the 11 SFA programs that
OSFA reports annually. State Appropriations
includes General Revenues, Lottery and Other
Trust funds (i.e., Federal Stimulus for 2009-10
and 2010-11 only) that are directly appropriated
to the university as reported in Final
Amendment Package. Student FTE are actual
and based on the standard IPEDS definition of
FTE (equal to 30 credit hours for
undergraduates and 24 for graduates).
This data does not include funds or FTE from
special units (i.e., IFAS, Health-Science Centers
or Medical Schools). Not adjusted for inflation.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Dashboard
POST-GRADUATION METRICS
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59.9%
2010-11
GRADUATES
64.7%
68.2%
2011-12
GRADUATES
2012-13
GRADUATES
Enrolled or Employed (Full-time)
70.2%
57.7%
60.5%
2013-14
GRADUATES
Enrolled or Employed (Earning $25,000+)
&#( '!!$ #+" #%
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$62,400
$59,400
$42,800
$68,300
$64,800
$39,400
$31,000
$31,000
$22,900
$23,000
$44,000
$47,800
$32,900
$34,900
$24,500
$26,300
$16,700
$17,200
$18,100
$19,100
2010-11
GRADUATES
2011-12
GRADUATES
2012-13
GRADUATES
2013-14
GRADUATES
"
Notes: Percentages are based on the
number of recent baccalaureate graduates
who are either employed full-time or
continuing their education in the U.S.
(based on the National Student
Clearinghouse data). Full-time
employment is based on those who
earned more than a full-time (40hrs a
week) worker making minimum wage. Due
to limitations in the data, the continuing
enrollment data includes any enrollment
the following year regardless of whether
the enrollment was post-baccalaureate or
not. BOG staff ‘found’ 90% of UWF’s
2013-14 bachelor’s recipients.
See Table 4O within this report for
additional information about this metric.
Notes: Wage data is based on Florida’s
annualized Unemployment Insurance (UI)
wage data for those graduates who
earned more than a full-time employee
making minimum wage in the fiscal
quarter a full year after graduation. This
UI wage data does not include individuals
who are self-employed, employed out of
state, employed by the military or federal
government, or those without a valid
social security number. In 2013-14, these
data accounted for 46% of the total
graduating class. This wage data
includes graduates who were employed
full-time (regardless of their continuing
enrollment). Wages are provided for 5th,
25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentiles.
Median wages are identified by bolded
values. The interquartile range (shown in
italics) represents 50% of the wage data.
Wages rounded to nearest hundreds.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Performance Based Funding Metrics
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Percent Employed Full-time
or Continuing their Education
Median Wages of Bachelor’s Graduates
Employed Full-time in Florida
Cost per Bachelor’s Degree
Six-Year Graduation Rate for
First-time-in-College (FTIC) Students
Academic Progress Rate
Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded
within Programs of Strategic Emphasis
University Access Rate
Graduate Degrees Awarded
within Programs of Strategic Emphasis
Board of Governors Choice Metric:
Bachelor's Degrees Without Excess Hours
Board of Trustees Choice Metric:
10
Percent of Adult (Aged 25+)
Undergraduates Enrolled
#
2012-13
2013-14
CHANGE
68.24%
70.15%
1.9%pts
2012-13
2013-14
CHANGE
$32,900
$34,900
6.1%
2010-14
2011-15
CHANGE
$31,660
$31,830
0.5%
2008-14
2009-15
CHANGE
50.55%
46.67%
-3.9%pts
2013-14
2014-15
CHANGE
64.4%
6.3%
.%pts
2013-14
2014-15
CHANGE
50.05%
51.14%
1.1%pts
FALL 2013
FALL 2014
CHANGE
40.48%
40.63%
0.1%pts
2013-14
2014-15
CHANGE
46.59%
38.84%
-7.7%pts
2013-14
2014-15
CHANGE
72.78%
75.78%
3.0%pts
FALL 2013
FALL 2014
CHANGE
32.03%
30.85%
-1.2%pts
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Key Achievements
(2014 –2015)
STUDENT AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS
1. Biochemistry major Jini Curry named Student of the Year by The National Collegiate Honors
Council.
2. The Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers Industry Applications Society awarded a team
of UWF engineering students the 2nd place award in the Myron Zucker Student Design Contest.
3. International Studies and Finance major, and 1st generation college student, Joseph Smith, received
the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to fund his spring 2015 semester of study in
Morocco.
FACULTY AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS
1. Dr. Della Scott Ireton, Florida Public Archaeology Network Associate Director, received the 2015
Senator Bob Williams Award for her contribution to exceptional historic preservation in Florida.
2. Dr. Daniel Miller presented the keynote address for the World Federation of Tourist Guide
Associations, XVI Congress in Prague, Czech Republic to 333 participants from 41 countries.
3. Dr. Hedi Salanki-Rubardt was appointed Visiting Professor and Overseas Adviser for China’s
Zinghai Normal University Music Department. Dr. Salanki-Rubart gave lectures, taught master
classes, and played a seven concert tour in China.
PROGRAM AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS
1. UWF tied with Stanford University with the second highest number of American Chemical Society
Scholars in the nation. UWF came in second to Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
2. A team of 7 electrical and computer engineering students from UWF’s Emerald Coast placed 1st
among the Florida SUS institutions at the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers
SoutheastCon Hardware Competition, held April 2015, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
3. The National Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education presented the Most Outstanding
Prevention Program to UWF’s Wellness team for their August 2014 Rock Out the RedZone event.
RESEARCH AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS
1. Dr. John Bratten, Dr. Gregory Cook, and the UWF Archaeology Institute were awarded a $293,134
Special Category Grant from the Florida Division of Historic Resources for archaeological work
associated with the 1559 Emanuel Point 2 Shipwreck.
2. Dr. Debra M. Vinci, Associate Professor in Health Leisure & Exercise Science, received $199,675
from the Florida Department of Health for the project Promoting Physical Activity and Nutrition
Education in Child Care Settings.
3. The Art Gallery (TAG) used a $55,000 grant to bring the first 3D Paintscaping mapping
performance to Pensacola. Produced byTAG, “A Tale of Five Flags,” projected onto the historic
Custom’s House and Post Office building, was a free public event that attracted over 15,000
attendees.
INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS/ACHIEVEMENTS
1. Successful decennial reaffirmation by SACSCOC was earned by UWF.
2. UWF was awarded the Community Engagement Classification by the Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching.
3. UWF was named a "Purple Heart University" by the Military Order of the Purple Heart.
$
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Narrative
Teaching and Learning
STRENGTHEN QUALITY AND REPUTATION OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND UNIVERSITIES
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UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ INCREASE THE NUMBER OF DEGREES AWARDED IN S.T.E.M. AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STRATEGIC
EMPHASIS
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UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Scholarship, Research and Innovation
STRENGTHEN QUALITY AND REPUTATION OF SCHOLARSHIP, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION
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UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ INCREASE COLLABORATION AND EXTERNAL SUPPORT FOR RESEARCH ACTIVITY
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UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ Community and Business Engagement
STRENGTHEN QUALITY AND REPUTATION OF COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY AND BUSINESS
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UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
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#
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
Data Tables
FINANCIAL RESOURCES
Table 1A. Education and General Revenues
Table 1B. Education and General Expenditures
Table 1C. Funding per Student FTE
Table 1D. Cost per Degree [New]
Table 1E. Other Budget Entities
Table 1F. Voluntary Support of Higher Education
PERSONNEL
Table 2A. Personnel Headcount
ENROLLMENT
Table 3A. Headcount Enrollment by Student Type
Table 3B. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Enrollment
Table 3C. Enrollment by Method of Instruction
Table 3D. Headcount Enrollment by Military Status and Student Level
Table 3E. University Access Rate: Undergraduate Enrollment with Pell Grant
UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION
Table 4A. Baccalaureate Degree Program Changes in AY 2014-2015
Table 4B. Retention Rates
Table 4C. First-Time-in-College (FTIC) Six-Year Graduation Rates (Full-time only)
Table 4D. FTIC Graduation Rates (Full- and Part-time)
Table 4E. AA Transfers Graduation Rates
Table 4F. Other Transfers Graduation Rates
Table 4G. Baccalaureate Degrees Awarded
Table 4H. Baccalaureate Degrees Awarded in Areas of Strategic Emphasis
Table 4I. Baccalaureate Degrees Awarded to Underrepresented Groups
Table 4J. Baccalaureate Degrees Without Excess Credit Hours
Table 4K. Undergraduate Course Offerings
Table 4L. Faculty Teaching Undergraduates
Table 4M. Student/Faculty Ratio
Table 4N. Licensure/Certification Exam: Nursing
Table 4O. Post-Graduation Metrics
GRADUATE EDUCATION
Table 5A.
Table 5B.
Table 5C.
Table 5D.
Graduate Degree Program Changes in AY 2014-2015
Graduate Degrees Awarded
Graduate Degrees Awarded in Areas of Strategic Emphasis
Licensure/Certification Exams: Graduate Programs
RESEARCH & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Table 6A. Research and Development Expenditures
Table 6B. Centers of Excellence
$
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A14)4+1)2"-95;8+-9
$%41<-891:?,;+):154)4,-4-8)2"-<-4;-9
2011-12
Actual
2012-13
Actual
2013-14
Actual
$52,322,084
$52,553,848
$67,506,358
$595,446
-$7,694,722
$3,496,375
$11,504,356
$5,876,438
$34,238,538
$37,109,812
$36,968,684
$35,797,519
$36,178,727
Tuition Differential Fee
$4,327,513
$7,846,391
$8,144,616
$7,802,707
$8,156,296
Misc. Fees & Fines
$1,482,352
$1,224,537
$892,387
$1,135,390
$1,463,752
2014-15
Actual
2015-16
Estimates
!"$ #
Recurring State Funds
Non-Recurring State Funds
Tuition
TOTAL
$92,965,933
$95,206,958 $108,346,030
$91,039,866 $117,008,420 $151,446,930 $160,021,243
Recurring State Funds: include general revenue and lottery education & general (E&G) appropriations and any administered funds provided by the state,
including annual adjustments of risk management insurance premiums for the estimated year. This does not include technical adjustments or transfers made
by universities after the appropriation. Please note: 2013-14 revenues include the non-recurring $300 M system budget reduction. Sources: SUS Final
Amendment Packages were used for actual years; and, the Allocation Summary and Workpapers were used for the estimated year. Non-Recurring State
Funds: include general revenue and lottery education & general appropriations and any administered funds provided by the state. This does not include
technical adjustments or transfers made by Universities after the appropriation. Source: non-recurring appropriations section of the annual Allocation Summary
and Workpapers that include all other non-recurring budget amendments allocated later in the fiscal year. Note on Performance Funding: the State
investment piece of performance funding is reported in the ‘Non-Recurring State Funds’ and the Institutional investment piece is reported within ‘Recurring
State Funds’. Tuition: Actual resident & non-resident tuition revenues collected from students, net of fee waivers. Source: Operating Budget, Report 625 –
Schedule I-A. Tuition Differential Fee: Actual tuition differential revenues collected from undergraduate students. Source: Operating Budget, Report 625 –
Schedule I-A. Miscellaneous Fees & Fines: Other revenue collections include items such as application fees, late registration fees, library fines, miscellaneous
revenues. This is the total revenue from Report 625 minus tuition and tuition differential fee revenues. This does not include local fees. Source: Operating
Budget, Report 625 – Schedule I-A. This data is not adjusted for inflation. %
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A14)4+1)2"-95;8+-9 $%41<-891:?,;+):154)4,-4-8)2>6-4,1:;8-9
2010-11
!"$ #
2011-12
2012-13*
2013-14
2014-15
Instruction/Research
$50,364,679
$49,225,756
$59,142,520
$61,133,744
$58,054,654
Administration and Support
$13,539,305
$12,719,166
$16,344,356
$14,450,018
$16,152,232
PO&M
$10,164,228
$10,081,248
$10,053,167
$11,294,737
$10,541,726
Student Services
$6,584,071
$6,895,525
$9,763,065
$11,006,977
$11,319,932
Library/Audio Visual
$3,128,174
$3,045,394
$3,666,847
$3,697,323
$3,650,767
Other
$1,204,803
$1,177,986
$1,287,378
$5,023,810
$41,939,775
$84,985,260
TOTAL
$83,145,075 $100,257,333 $106,606,609 $141,659,086
The table reports the actual and estimated amount of expenditures from revenues appropriated by the legislature for each fiscal year. The expenditures
are classified by Program Component (e.g., Instruction/Research, PO&M, Administration, etc...) for activities directly related to instruction, research and
public service. The table does not include expenditures classified as non-operating expenditures (e.g., to service asset-related debts), and therefore
excludes a small portion of the amount appropriated each year by the legislature. Note*: FY 2012-2013 reflects a change in reporting expenditures from
prior years due to the new carry-forward reporting requirement as reflected in the 2013-2014 SUS Operating Budget Reports. Since these expenditures
will now include carry-forward expenditures, these data are no longer comparable to the current-year revenues reported in table 1A, or prior year
expenditures in table 1B. This data is not adjusted for inflation.
Instruction & Research: Includes expenditures for state services related to the instructional delivery system for advanced and professional education.
Includes functions such as; all activities related to credit instruction that may be applied toward a postsecondary degree or certificate; non-project
research and service performed to maintain professional effectives; individual or project research; academic computing support; academic source or
curriculum development. Source: Operating Budget Summary - Expenditures by Program Activity (or Report 645). Administration & Support Services:
Expenditures related to the executive direction and leadership for university operations and those internal management services which assist and
support the delivery of academic programs. Source: Operating Budget Summary - Expenditures by Program Activity (or Report 645). PO&M: Plant
Operations & Maintenance expenditures related to the cleaning and maintenance of existing grounds, the providing of utility services, and the planning
and design of future plant expansion and modification. Student Services: Includes resources related to physical, psychological, and social well-being
of the student. Includes student service administration, social and cultural development, counseling and career guidance, financial aid, and student
admissions and records. Other: includes Institutes and Research Centers, Radio/TV, Museums and Galleries, Intercollegiate Athletics, Academic
Infrastructure Support Organizations. Source: Operating Budget Summary - Expenditures by Program Activity (or Report 645).
&
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A14)4+1)2"-95;8+-9 $;4,14/6-8;22$13-7;1<)2-4:$#:;,-4:
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
State Appropriation (GR & Lottery)
$6,279
$5,516
$4,610
$7,557
$9,421
Tuition & Fees (State-funded Aid)
$1,142
$914
$855
$820
$740
Tuition & Fees (from Student)
$2,715
$3,261
$3,891
$4,077
$4,168
$462
$0
$0
$0
$0
$10,599
$9,691
$9,357
$12,454
$14,328
Other Trust Funds
TOTAL
Notes:State Appropriations includes General Revenues and Lottery funds that are directly appropriated to the university as reported in Final Amendment
Package. This does not include appropriations for special units (e.g., IFAS, Health Science Centers, and Medical Schools). Tuition and Fee revenues
include tuition and tuition differential fee and E&G fees (e.g., application, late registration, and library fees/fines) as reported on the from the Operating Budget
625 reports. Other local fees that do not support E&G activities are not included here (see Board of Governors Regulation 7.003). To more accurately report
the full contribution from the State, this table reports the state-funded financial aid separately from the tuition and fee payments universities receive from
students (which may include federal financial aid dollars). The state-funded gift aid includes grants and scholarships as reported by universities to Board
during the academic year in the State University Database (SUDS). Other Trust funds (e.g., Federal Stimulus for 2009-10 and 2010-11 only) as reported
in Final Amendment Package. Full-time Equivalent enrollment is based on actual FTE, not funded FTE; and, does not include Health-Science Center
funds or FTE. This data is based on the standard IPEDS definition of FTE, equal to 30 credit hours for undergraduates and 24 for graduates. This data is
not adjusted for inflation.
$59:6-8-/8--
TOTAL
" $ 2007-11
2008-12
2009-13
2010-14
2011-15
$32,160
$30,680
$31,080
$31,660
$31,830
Notes: Full expenditures include direct instructional, research and public service expenditures and the undergraduate portion of indirect expenditures (e.g.,
academic administration, academic advising, student services, libraries, university support, and Plant Operations and Maintenance). For each year, the full
expenditures were divided by undergraduate fundable student credit hours to calculate the full expenditures per credit hour, and then multiplied by 30 credit
hours to represent the annual undergraduate expenditures. The annual undergraduate expenditures for each of the four years was summed to provide an
average undergraduate expenditures per (120 credit) degree. Source: State University Database System (SUDS), Expenditure Analysis: Report IV.
This data is not adjusted for inflation.
'
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A14)4+1)2"-95;8+-9 $%41<-891:? :0-8;,/-:4:1:1-9
2010-11
;>121)8?4:-86819-9
54:8)+:98)4:9
5+)2;4,9
Revenues
Expenditures
Revenues
Expenditures
Revenues
Expenditures
$16,202,669
$14,394,299
$19,619,573
$19,690,176
$78,825,868
$78,409,422
2011-12
$17,541,096
$15,208,040
$18,183,284
$18,355,005
$85,727,233
$84,562,118
2012-13
$20,426,712
$18,233,451
$22,330,521
$21,134,830
$97,604,224
$96,406,954
2013-14
$21,353,837
$21,991,945
$23,159,318
$22,554,489
$97,988,654
$96,777,830
2014-15
$23,558,546
$23,802,127
$21,806,418
$23,146,029
$90,407,750
$90,460,841
Notes: Revenues do not include transfers. Expenditures do not include non-operating expenditures. Auxiliary Enterprises are self-supported
through fees, payments and charges. Examples include housing, food services, bookstores, parking services, health centers. Contract & Grants
resources are received from federal, state or private sources for the purposes of conducting research and public service activities. Local Funds are
associated with student activity (supported by the student activity fee), student financial aid, concessions, intercollegiate athletics, technology fee,
green fee, and student life & services fee. Faculty Practice Plan revenues/receipts are funds generated from faculty practice plan activities. Faculty
Practice Plan expenditures include all expenditures relating to the faculty practice plans, including transfers between other funds and/or entities. This
may result in double counting in information presented within the annual report. Source: Operating Budget, Report 615. This data is not adjusted for
inflation.
$&52;4:)8?#;6658:5.1/0-8,;+):154
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
Endowment Value
$55,688
$47,676
$53,687
$61,824
$60,152
Gifts Received
$2,602
$3,063
$2,911
$4,204
$4,012
3.3%
3.3%
4.1%
3.9%
4.4%
($1000s)
($1000s)
Percentage of
Alumni Donors
Notes: Endowment value at the end of the fiscal year, as reported in the annual NACUBO Endowment Study. Gifts Received as reported in the Council
for Aid to Education’s Voluntary Support of Education (VSE) survey in the section entitled “Gift Income Summary,” this is the sum of the present value of all
gifts (including outright and deferred gifts) received for any purpose and from all sources during the fiscal year, excluding pledges and bequests. (There’s a
deferred gift calculator at www.cae.org/vse.) The present value of non-cash gifts is defined as the tax deduction to the donor as allowed by the IRS.
Percentage of Alumni Donors as reported in the Council for Aid to Education’s Voluntary Support of Education (VSE) survey in the section entitled
“Additional Details,” this is the number of alumni donors divided by the total number of alumni, as of the end of the fiscal year. “Alumni,” as defined in this
survey, include those holding a degree from the institution as well as those who attended the institution but did not earn a degree. This data is not adjusted
for inflation.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A!-89544-2
$!-89544-2-),+5;4:#
Full-time Employees
Tenured Faculty
Tenure-track Faculty
Non-Tenure Track Faculty
Instructors Without Faculty Status
Graduate Assistants/Associates
Non-Instructional Employees
FULL-TIME SUBTOTAL
Part-time Employees
Tenured Faculty
Tenure-track Faculty
Non-Tenure Track Faculty
Instructors Without Faculty Status
Graduate Assistants/Associates
Non-Instructional Employees
PART-TIME SUBTOTAL
TOTAL
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
161
50
100
0
0
740
1,051
164
56
86
0
0
752
1,058
157
70
99
0
0
772
1,098
147
79
98
0
0
806
1,130
150
79
102
0
0
840
1,171
2
0
1
239
361
9
612
0
0
1
244
311
8
564
0
0
0
313
257
265
835
0
0
0
289
253
286
828
0
0
0
279
238
346
863
1,663
1,622
1,933
1,958
2,034
Note: This table is based on the annual IPEDS Human Resources Survey, and provides full- and part-time medical and non-medical staff
by faculty status and primary function/occupational activity. Tenured and Tenure-Track Faculty include those categorized within
instruction, research, or public service. Non-Tenure Track Faculty includes adjunct faculty (on annual and less than annual contracts) and
faculty on multi-year contracts categorized within instruction, research, or public service. Instructors Without Faculty Status includes
postdoctoral research associates, and individuals hired as a staff member primarily to do research on a 3-year contract without tenure
eligibility categorized within instruction, research, or public service. Non-Instructional Employees includes all executive, administrative
and managerial positions regardless of faculty status; as well as, other support and service positions regardless of faculty status. Note: The
universities vary on how they classify adjuncts (some include them as non-tenure track faculty while others do not consider them faculty
and report them as instructors without faculty status) and part-time non-instructional employees.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A485223-4:
$-),+5;4:485223-4:*?#:;,-4:$?6-)4,-<-2
Fall 2010
11,645
Fall 2011
11,990
Fall 2012
12,680
Fall 2013
12,607
Fall 2014
12,627
UNDERGRADUATE
FTIC (Regular Admit)
FTIC (Profile Admit)
AA Transfers
Other Transfers
Subtotal
3,894
178
2,915
2,146
9,133
3,999
361
2,980
2,128
9,468
4,574
527
2,706
2,151
9,958
4,430
501
2,576
2,248
9,755
4,356
526
2,345
2,221
9,448
GRADUATE
Master's
Research Doctoral
Professional Doctoral
Dentistry
Law
Medicine
Nursing Practice
Pharmacy
Physical Therapist
Veterinary Medicine
Other
Subtotal
1,567
189
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,756
1,598
183
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,781
1,744
186
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,930
1,843
147
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,990
2,020
158
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,178
27
729
756
26
715
741
32
760
792
36
826
862
36
965
1,001
TOTAL
UNCLASSIFIED
HS Dual Enrolled
Other
Subtotal
Note: This table reports the number of students enrolled at the university by student type categories. The determination for undergraduate,
graduate and unclassified is based on the institutional class level values. Unclassified refers to a student who has not yet been formally
admitted into a degree program but is enrolled. The student type for undergraduates is based on the Type of Student at Time of Most Recent
Admission. The student type for graduates is based on the degree that is sought and the student CIP code. Students classified by the
university as post-baccalaureate are counted as “other” unclassified for the purposes of this table. This differs from the methodology used to
produce data for the online interactive enrollment tool (on the Board’s website), which includes post-bacs as undergraduates regardless of
degree sought.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A485223-4: $;22$13-7;1<)2-4:$485223-4:1*F3F7G@634>7A@>K2
StateActual
Funded
StateActual
Funded
StateActual
Funded
""#$#
1,886
3,232
599
54
5,771
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD I)
Doctoral (GRAD II)
Subtotal
2,566
3,365
605
64
6,599
.
.
.
.
2,386
3,359
559
51
6,355
.
.
.
.
2,212
3,149
539
37
5,937
.
.
.
.
444
231
267
187
14
699
.
.
.
.
232
260
189
11
691
.
.
.
.
301
392
197
10
900
.
.
.
.
6,215
8,287
2,797
3,631
791
78
7,298
9,730
2,036
3,446
656
77
6,215
8,287
2,618
3,619
748
62
7,046
9,395
2,036
3,446
656
77
6,215
8,287
2,514
3,541
736
46
6,837
9,116
""#$#
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD I)
Doctoral (GRAD II)
Subtotal
$ $$
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD I)
Doctoral (GRAD II)
Total
Total (US Definition)
Notes: Full-time Equivalent (FTE) student is a measure of instructional effort (and student activity) that is based on the number of credit
hours that students enroll by course level. FTE is based on the Florida definition, which divides undergraduate credit hours by 40 and
graduate credit hours by 32 (US definition based on Undergraduate FTE = 30 and Graduate FTE = 24 credit hours). Funded enrollment as
reported in the General Appropriations Act and Board of Governors’ Allocation Summary. In 2013-14, the Florida Legislature chose to no
longer separate funded non-resident FTE from funded resident FTE. Actual enrollment only reports ‘state-fundable’ FTE as reported by
Universities to the Board of Governors in the Student Instruction File (SIF). Totals are actual and may not equal sum of reported student
levels due to rounding of student level FTE. Total FTE are equal in tables 3B and 3C.
!
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A485223-4: $;22$13-7;1<)2-4:$485223-4:*?-:05,5.49:8;+:154
2010-11
$"$ Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
TOTAL
("
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
TOTAL
#$"
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
TOTAL
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
1,128
1,527
194
30
2,879
1,524
1,860
253
37
3,674
1,883
1,876
263
31
4,054
1,582
1,874
256
22
3,734
1,959
2,308
294
23
4,583
852
998
185
23
610
738
139
14
380
424
68
17
490
470
57
12
59
123
23
6
2,058
1,501
888
1,029
212
459
1,133
448
34
2,075
420
1,142
426
32
2,020
535
1,331
460
30
2,356
546
1,275
435
27
2,284
496
1,110
419
17
2,042
2,439
3,658
827
87
7,011
2,553
3,740
818
84
7,195
2,797
3,631
791
78
7,298
2,618
3,619
748
62
7,046
2,514
3,541
736
46
6,837
$ $
Lower-Division
Upper-Division
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
TOTAL
Note: Full-time Equivalent (FTE) student is a measure of instructional effort (and student activity) that is based on the number of credit hours
that students enroll by course level. FTE is based on the Florida definition, which divides undergraduate credit hours by 40 and graduate credit
hours by 32. Distance Learning is a course in which at least 80 percent of the direct instruction of the course is delivered using some form
of technology when the student and instructor are separated by time or space, or both (per 1009.24(17), F.S.). Hybrid is a course where 50%
to 79% of the instruction is delivered using some form of technology, when the student and instructor are separated by time or space, or both
(per SUDS data element 2052). Traditional (and Technology Enhanced) refers to primarily face to face instruction utilizing some form of
technology for delivery of supplemental course materials for no more than 49% of instruction (per SUDS data element 2052). Totals are actual
and may not equal sum of reported student levels due to rounding of student level FTE. Total FTE are equal in tables 3B and 3C.
"
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A485223-4: $-),+5;4: 485223-4:*?121:)8?#:):;9)4,#:;,-4:-<-2
$"(
Unclassified
Undergraduate
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
Subtotal
Fall 2010
38
444
123
9
614
Fall 2011
27
723
185
16
951
Fall 2012
30
792
206
15
1,043
Fall 2013
30
776
160
16
982
Fall 2014
12
398
89
8
507
124
9
1
134
1
218
11
2
232
2
242
19
2
265
3
235
22
1
261
3
455
33
2
493
716
8,567
1,363
251
10,897
11,645
711
8,529
1,342
225
10,807
11,990
760
8,924
1,479
209
11,372
12,680
829
8,744
1,634
157
11,364
12,607
743
8,838
1,882
164
11,627
12,627
!$#
Unclassified
Undergraduate
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
Subtotal
$"(
Unclassified
Undergraduate
Master’s (GRAD 1)
Doctoral (GRAD 2)
Subtotal
TOTAL
Note: This table provides trend data on the number of students enrolled based on their military status. Military includes students who were
classified as Active Duty, Veterans, National Guard, or Reservist.. Eligible Dependents includes students who were classified as eligible
dependents (dependents who received veteran’s benefits). Non-Military includes all other students.
$%41<-891:?++-99"):-
Pell Grant Recipients
Percent with Pell Grant
Fall 2010
3,179
35.29%
Fall 2011
3,576
38.30%
!
Fall 2012
3,916
39.88%
Fall 2013
3,888
40.48%
Fall 2014
3,801
40.6%
Note: This table reports the University’s Access Rate, which is a measure of the percentage of undergraduate students who have received a
federal Pell grant award during a given Fall term. The top row reports the number of students who received a Pell Grant award. The bottom
row provides the percentage of eligible students that received a Pell Grant award. This metric is included in the Board of Governors
Performance Based Funding Model – for more information see: http://www.flbog.edu/about/budget/performance_funding.php.
#
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154
$)++)2);8-):--/8--!85/8)30)4/-914(
Six-digit
CIP
Code
Title of Program
New Programs
Supply Chain Logistics
Management
52.0203
Degree
Level
Bachelors
Date of
UBOT
Action
Starting
or Ending
Term
3/25/2015
FALL 2015
Comments
Terminated Programs
None
Programs Suspended for New Enrollments
Art History, Criticism & Conservation
50.0703
Bachelors
SPRING 2009
French Language and Literature
Junior High/Middle School Education
and Teaching
Sociology
16.0901
Bachelors
SPRING 2009
13.1203
Bachelors
FALL 2012
45.1101
Bachelors
SPRING 2009
Spanish Language and Literature
16.0905
Bachelors
SPRING 2009
New Programs Considered By University But Not Approved
None
Note: This table does not include new majors or concentrations added under an existing degree program CIP Code. This table reports the new and terminated
program changes based on Board action dates between May 5, 2014 and May 4, 2015.
New Programs are proposed new degree programs that have been completely through the approval process at the university and, if appropriate, the Board
of Governors. Does not include new majors or concentrations added under an existing degree program CIP Code.
Terminated Programs are degree programs for which the entire CIP Code has been terminated and removed from the university’s inventory of degree
programs. Does not include majors or concentrations terminated under an existing degree program CIP Code if the code is to remain active on the academic
degree inventory.
Programs Suspended for New Enrollments are degree programs for which enrollments have been temporarily suspended for the entire CIP Code, but
the program CIP Code has not been terminated. Does not include majors or concentrations suspended under an existing degree program CIP Code if the
code is to remain active on the academic degree inventory and new enrollments in any active major will be reported. Programs included in this list may have
been suspended for new enrollments sometime in the past and have continued to be suspended at least one term of this academic year.
New Programs Considered by University But Not Approved includes any programs considered by the university board of trustees, or any committee of
the board, but not approved for implementation. Also include any programs that were returned prior to board consideration by the university administration
for additional development, significant revisions, or re-conceptualization; regardless of whether the proposal was eventually taken to the university board for
approval. Count the returns once per program, not multiple times the proposal was returned for revisions, unless there is a total re-conceptualization that
brings forward a substantially different program in a different CIP Code.
$
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $;22:13-189:$13-14522-/-$"-:-4:154"):-9
2014-15
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
1,212
1,278
1,624
1,315
1,385
% Retained
74%
71%
70%
74%
71%
% Retained
68%
62%
61%
Cohort Size
with Any GPA
with GPA 2.0 or higher
64.4%
6.3%
Notes: Cohorts are based on undergraduate students who enter the institution in the Fall term (or Summer term and continue into the Fall term). Percent
Retained with Any GPA is based on student enrollment in the Fall term following their first year. Percent Retained with GPA Above 2.0 is based on
student enrollment in the Fall term following their first years for those students with a GPA of 2.0 or higher at the end of their first year (Fall, Spring, Summer).
The most recent year of Retention data is based on preliminary data (SIFP file) that is comparable to the final data (SIF file) but may be revised in the
following years based on changes in student cohorts.
Note : Board of Governors and UWF staff do not agree on the number of students from the 2011-12 cohort that were retained in Fall 2012 with at least a
2.0 GPA – BOG staff calculated 797 compared to 799 that UWF staff have determined.
BOG and UWF staff will continue to work together to resolve the discrepancies as soon as possible.
$;22:13-189:$13-14522-/-$#1>(-)88),;):154"):-9
Term of Entry
2005-11
2006-12
2007-13
2008-14
2009-15
829
861
911
1,030
1,153
% Graduated
48%
45%
42%
51%
48%
% Still Enrolled
7%
8%
7%
7%
6%
% Success Rate
55%
53%
50%
59%
54%
Cohort
Size1
Notes: Cohorts are based on FTIC undergraduate students who enter the institution in the Fall term (or Summer term and continue into the Fall term).
Percent Graduated reports the percent of FTICs who graduated from the same institution within six years. This metric does not include students who
enrolled as part-time students (in their first year), or who transfer into the institution. This metric complies with the requirements of the federal Student Right
to Know Act that requires institutions to report the completion status at 150% of normal time (or six years). Success Rate measures the percentage of an
initial cohort of students who have either graduated or are still enrolled at the same university. This data should match the IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey
data that is due in late February. Note 1: UWF staff have indicated discrepancies with cohort counts for the data in red font.
BOG and UWF staff will continue to work together to resolve the discrepancies as soon as possible.
%
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $8),;):154"):-9189:$13-14522-/-$#:;,-4:9
4 – Year Rates
2007-11
2008-12
2009-13
2010-14
2011-15
20%
27%
26%
26%
19%
Other University in SUS
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
Total from System
22%
28%
28%
28%
22%
2005-11
2006-12
2007-13
2008-14
2009-15
46%
44%
42%
50.55%
46.67%
Other University in SUS
6%
6%
8%
5%
5%
Total from System
52%
49%
50%
56%
52%
Cohort Size1
1,027
Same University
6 – Year Rates
Cohort Size1
932
Same University
1,096
996
1,230
1,027
1,273
1,096
1,497
1,230
Notes: Cohorts are based on undergraduate students who enter the institution in the Fall term (or Summer term and continue into the Fall term). First-timein-college (FTIC) cohort is defined as undergraduates entering in fall term (or summer continuing to fall) with fewer than 12 hours earned after high school
graduation. The initial cohorts can be revised to remove students, who have allowable exclusions as defined by IPEDS, from the cohort. FTIC students who
are enrolled in advanced graduate degree programs that do not award a Bachelor’s degree are removed from the cohorts.
Graduates are students in the cohort who have graduated by the summer term in their fourth or sixth year. Degree data often includes 'late degrees' which
are degrees that were awarded in a previous term, but reported to SUDS later; so, the most recent year of data in this table only provides preliminary
graduation rate data that may change with the addition of “late degrees”. Late degrees reported in conjunction with the IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey due
in mid-February will be reflected in the following year.
Same University provides graduation rates for students in the cohort who graduated from the same institution.
Other University in SUS provides graduation rates for students in the cohort who graduated from a different State University System of Florida institution.
These data do not report students in the cohort who did not graduate from the SUS, but did graduate from another institution outside the State University
System of Florida.
Note 1: UWF staff have indicated discrepancies with the cohort counts that BOG staff calculated (shown in red above). According to UWF staff, four-year
rate cohorts should be: 1028, 1099, and 1231. According to UWF, six-year rate cohorts should be: 937, 996, 1028, 1099, and 1231.
BOG and UWF staff will continue to work together to resolve the discrepancies as soon as possible.
&
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $8),;):154"):-9$8)49.-8#:;,-4:9.8532581,)522-/-#?9:-3
2009-11
2010-12
2011-13
2012-14
2013-15
Cohort Size
715
694
707
634
608
Same University
30%
32%
24%
24%
26%
2007-11
2008-12
2009-13
2010-14
2011-15
61%
66%
64%
62%
57%
Two – Year Rates
Four – Year Rates
Cohort Size
Same University
712
662
715
694
707
Notes: AA Transfer cohort is defined as undergraduates entering in the fall term (or summer continuing to fall) and having earned an AA degree from an
institution in the Florida College System. For comparability with FTIC cohorts, AA Transfer cohorts are based on undergraduate students who enter the
institution in the Fall term (or Summer term and continue into the Fall term) and graduate from the same institution within two or four years.
$8),;):154"):-9 :0-8$8)49.-8#:;,-4:9
5 – Year Rates
Cohort Size
Same University
2006-11
2007-12
2008-13
2009-14
2010-15
724
724
654
675
657
55%
52%
52%
53%
52%
Notes: Other Transfer Students includes undergraduate students that transfer into a university who are not FTICs or AA Transfers. Cohorts are based
on undergraduate students who enter the institution in the Fall term (or Summer term and continue into the Fall term) and graduate from the same
institution within five years.
'
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $)++)2);8-):--/8--9=)8,-,
First Majors
Second Majors
TOTAL
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
1,903
2,053
1,969
1,924
1,926
35
29
28
34
41
1,938
2,082
1,997
1,958
1,967
Note: This table reports the number of degrees awarded by academic year. First Majors include the most common scenario of one student earning one
degree in one Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code. In those cases where a student earns a baccalaureate degree under two different degree
CIPs, a distinction is made between “dual degrees” and “dual majors.” Also included in first majors are “dual degrees” which are counted as separate degrees
(e.g., counted twice). In these cases, both degree CIPs receive a “degree fraction” of 1.0. Second Majors include all dual/second majors (e.g., degree CIP
receive a degree fraction that is less than 1). The calculation of degree fractions is made according to each institution’s criteria. The calculation for the number
of second majors rounds each degree CIP’s fraction of a degree up to 1 and then sums the total. Second Majors are typically used when providing degree
information by discipline/CIP, to better conveys the number of graduates who have specific skill sets associated with each discipline.
$)++)2);8-):--/8--914!85/8)39 5.#:8):-/1+360)919 !#
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
STEM
320
336
363
357
382
HEALTH
183
226
251
348
364
GLOBALIZATION
36
35
36
35
43
EDUCATION
269
175
161
153
127
GAP ANALYSIS
118
78
88
87
90
SUBTOTAL
926
850
899
980
1,006
47.78%
40.83%
45.02%
50.05%
51.14%
PSE PERCENT OF TOTAL
Notes: This is a count of baccalaureate majors for specific Programs of Strategic Emphasis, as determined by the Board of Governors staff with consultation
with business and industry groups and input from universities. This is a count of baccalaureate degrees awarded within specific Programs of Strategic
Emphasis, as determined by the Board of Governors staff with consultation with business and industry groups and input from universities – for more
information see: http://www.flbog.edu/pressroom/strategic_emphasis/. The Board of Governors revised the list of Programs of Strategic Emphasis in
November 2013, and the new categories were applied to the historical degrees. A student who has multiple majors in the subset of targeted Classification
of Instruction Program codes will be counted twice (i.e., double-majors are included).
!
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $)++)2);8-):--/8--9=)8,-,:5%4,-88-68-9-4:-,85;69
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
Number of Degrees
157
214
159
181
190
Percentage of Degrees
8%
11%
8%
9%
10%
Number of Degrees
87
104
127
149
147
Percentage of Degrees
5%
5%
7%
8%
8%
Number of Degrees
811
965
956
932
1,017
Percentage of Degrees
43%
48%
50%
49%
54%
Non-Hispanic Black
Hispanic
Pell-Grant Recipients
Note: Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic do not include students classified as Non-Resident Alien or students with a missing race code. Students who earn
two distinct degrees in the same term are counted twice – whether their degrees are from the same six-digit CIP code or different CIP codes. Students who
earn only one degree are counted once – even if they completed multiple majors or tracks. Percentage of Degrees is based on the number of baccalaureate
degrees awarded to non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic students divided by the total degrees awarded - excluding those awarded to non-resident aliens and
unreported.
Pell-Grant recipients are defined as those students who have received a Pell grant from any SUS Institution within six years of graduation - excluding those
awarded to non-resident aliens, who are only eligible for Pell grants in special circumstances. Percentage of Degrees is based on the number of
baccalaureate degrees awarded to Pell recipients, as shown above, divided by the total degrees awarded - excluding those awarded to non-resident aliens.
Notes on Trends: In 2007, the US Department of Education re-classified the taxonomy for self-reported race/ethnicity categories and allowed universities
a two-year phase-in process before all institutions were required to report based on the new categories for the 2011-12 academic year. This reclassification
will impact trends.
!
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $)++)2);8-):--/8--9'1:05;:>+-998-,1:5;89
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13*
2013-14
2014-15
FTIC
55%
60%
50%
66%
69%
AA Transfers
75%
76%
75%
80%
79%
Other Transfers
69%
70%
71%
72%
81%
TOTAL
68%
70%
65.22%
72.78%
75.78%
Notes: This table is based on statute 1009.286 (see link), and excludes certain types of student credits (e.g., accelerated mechanisms, remedial coursework,
non-native credit hours that are not used toward the degree, non-native credit hours from failed, incomplete, withdrawn, or repeated courses, credit hours
from internship programs, credit hours up to 10 foreign language credit hours for transfer students in Florida, and credit hours earned in military science
courses that are part of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program). This metric is not the same as the Excess Hours Surcharge, which has
multiple cohorts with varying fee rates. This table reports the percentage of baccalaureate degrees awarded within 110% of the catalog hours required for a
degree based on the Board of Governors Academic Program Inventory. This calculation is based on Hours To Degree data submitted by universities to the
Board of Governors and excludes recent graduates who have already earned a baccalaureate degree. Note*: Improvements were made to data collection
process beginning with 2012-13 data to better account for high school dual enrolled credits that are exempt from the excess hour calculation.
$%4,-8/8),;):-5;89- ..-814/9
Number of
Course Sections
Fall 2010
Fall 2011
Fall 2012
Fall 2013
Fall 2014
885
915
938
932
1,344
59%
30%
9%
1%
60%
31%
8%
1%
63%
29%
7%
1%
Percentage of Undergraduate Course Sections by Class Size
Fewer than 30 Students
58%
58%
30 to 49 Students
33%
33%
50 to 99 Students
7%
7%
100 or More Students
1%
1%
Notes: This data is based on Common Data Set (CDS) definitions. According to CDS, a “class section is an organized course offered for credit, identified
by discipline and number, meeting at a stated time or times in a classroom or similar setting, and not a subsection such as a laboratory or discussion session.
Undergraduate class sections are defined as any sections in which at least one degree-seeking undergraduate student is enrolled for credit. Exclude distance
learning classes and noncredit classes and individual instruction such as dissertation or thesis research, music instruction, or one-to-one readings. Exclude
students in independent study, co-operative programs, internships, foreign language taped tutor sessions, practicums, and all students in one-on-one classes.
! UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $!-8+-4:)/-5.%4,-8/8),;):-8-,1:5;89$);/0:*?49:8;+:58$?6-
2010-11
64%
27%
5%
3%
Faculty
Adjunct Faculty
Graduate Students
Other Instructors
2011-12
62%
30%
5%
2%
2012-13
62%
32%
5%
2%
2013-14
63%
32%
2%
2%
2014-15
66%
30%
2%
3%
Note: The total number of undergraduate state fundable credit hours taught will be divided by the undergraduate credit hours taught by each instructor type
to create a distribution of the percentage taught by each instructor type. Four instructor types are defined as faculty (pay plans 01, 02, and 22), OPS faculty
(pay plan 06), graduate student instructors (pay plan 05), and others (all other pay plans). If a course has more than one instructor, then the university’s
reported allocation of section effort will determine the allocation of the course’s total credit hours to each instructor. The definition of faculty varies for Tables
4L, 4M and 4N. For Faculty Teaching Undergraduates, the definition of faculty is based on pay plans 01, 02, and 22. $#:;,-4:
)+;2:?"):15
Fall 2010
23
Ratio
Fall 2011
24
Fall 2012
23
Fall 2013
24
Fall 2014
23
Note: This data is based on Common Data Set (CDS) definitions. This is the Fall ratio of full-time equivalent students (full-time plus 1/3 part time) to full-time
equivalent instructional faculty (full time plus 1/3 part time). The ratio calculations exclude both faculty and students in stand-alone graduate or professional
programs such as medicine, law, veterinary, dentistry, social work, business, or public health in which faculty teach virtually only graduate-level students.
Undergraduate or graduate student teaching assistants are not counted as faculty.
$!85.-99154)21+-49;8-
-8:1.1+):154>)39.58%4,-8/8),;):-9
Nursing: National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
First-time Pass Rate
National Benchmark
89%
89%
92%
85%
85%
Examinees
Note: Pass rate for first-time examinees for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) are based on the performance
of graduates of baccalaureate nursing programs. National benchmark data is based on Jan-Dec NCLEX-RN results for first-time examinees from students
in US-educated baccalaureate degree programs as published by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. !!
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A%4,-8/8),;):-,;+):154 $ !59:8),;):154-:81+9
Percent of Bachelor’s Graduates Employed Full-time or Continuing their Education,
One Year After Graduation Enrolled or Employed (Full-time)
Enrolled or Employed (Earned $25,000+)
Number of States included in Search
Percent Found
2010-11
59.90%
2011-12
64.70%
2012-13
68.24%
2013-14
70.15%
.
.
57.72%
60.49%
1
86%
36
87%
38
90%
38
90%
Notes: Enrolled or Employed Full-Time is based on the number of recent baccalaureate graduates who are either employed full-time or continuing their
education within one year after graduation. Full-time employment is based on those who earned at least as much as a full-time (40hrs a week) worker
making minimum wage. Enrolled or Employed (Earning $25,000+) is based on the number of recent baccalaureate graduates who are either employed
and earned at least $25,000 or continuing their education within one year after graduation. The employed data includes non-Florida data that is available
from the Wage Record Interchange System 2 (known as “WRIS 2”) and Federal employee data that is available from the Federal Employment Data
Exchange System (FEDES) initiative. Military employment data was collected by the Board of Governors staff from university staff. Due to limitations in the
data, the continuing enrollment data includes any enrollment the following year regardless of whether the enrollment was post-baccalaureate or not.
Percent Found refers to the percentage of graduates found in the dataset – including those that did not earn wages above the full-time threshold and
those who were found outside of the one-year window.
For more information about the methodology see: http://www.flbog.edu/about/budget/performance_funding.php.
For more information about WRIS2 see: http://www.doleta.gov/performance/wris_2.cfm.
For more information about FEDES see: http://www.ubalt.edu/jfi/fedes/.
Median Wages of Bachelor’s Graduates Employed Full-time in Florida, One Year After Graduation 2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
5th PERCENTILE WAGE
$16,700
$17,200
$18,100
$19,100
25th PERCENTILE WAGE
$22,900
$23,000
$24,500
$26,300
MEDIAN WAGE
$31,000
$31,000
$32,900
$34,900
75th PERCENTILE WAGE
$42,800
$39,400
$44,000
$47,800
95th PERCENTILE WAGE
Percent Found
$62,400
45%
$59,400
46%
$64,800
45%
$68,300
46%
Notes: Median Wage data is based on Florida’s annualized Unemployment Insurance (UI) wage data for those graduates who earned at least as much as
a full-time employee making minimum wage in the fiscal quarter a full year after graduation. This UI wage data does not include individuals who are selfemployed, employed out of state, employed by the military or federal government, or those without a valid social security number. This wage data includes
graduates who were both employed and enrolled. Wages rounded to nearest hundreds. Percent Found refers to the percentage of graduates found in the
dataset – including those that did not earn wages above the full-time threshold and those who were found outside of the one-year window.
!"
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A8),;):-,;+):154
$8),;):--/8--!85/8)30)4/-914(
Six-digit
CIP
Code
Title of Program
Date of
UBOT
Action
Degree
Level
Starting
or Ending
Term
Date of
Board of
Governors
Action
Comments
New Programs
None
Terminated Programs
None
Programs Suspended for New Enrollments
Mathematics Teacher Education
Science Teacher Education,
General
Social Science Teacher Education
13.1311
Masters
FALL 2012
13.1316
Masters
SPRING 2009
13.1317
Masters
SPRING 2009
New Programs Considered By University But Not Approved
None
Note: This table does not include new majors or concentrations added under an existing degree program CIP Code. This table reports the new and terminated
program changes based on Board action dates between May 5, 2014 and May 4, 2015.
New Programs are proposed new degree programs that have been completely through the approval process at the university and, if appropriate, the Board
of Governors. Does not include new majors or concentrations added under an existing degree program CIP Code.
Terminated Programs are degree programs for which the entire CIP Code has been terminated and removed from the university’s inventory of degree
programs. Does not include majors or concentrations terminated under an existing degree program CIP Code if the code is to remain active on the academic
degree inventory.
Programs Suspended for New Enrollments are degree programs for which enrollments have been temporarily suspended for the entire CIP Code, but the
program CIP Code has not been terminated. Does not include majors or concentrations suspended under an existing degree program CIP Code if the code
is to remain active on the academic degree inventory and new enrollments in any active major will be reported. Programs included in this list may have been
suspended for new enrollments sometime in the past and have continued to be suspended at least one term of this academic year.
New Programs Considered by University But Not Approved includes any programs considered by the university board of trustees, or any committee of
the board, but not approved for implementation. Also include any programs that were returned prior to board consideration by the university administration
for additional development, significant revisions, or re-conceptualization; regardless of whether the proposal was eventually taken to the university board for
approval. Count the returns once per program, not multiple times the proposal was returned for revisions, unless there is a total re-conceptualization that
brings forward a substantially different program in a different CIP Code.
!#
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A8),;):-,;+):154 $8),;):--/8--9=)8,-,
2010-11
2011-12
First Majors
Second majors
TOTAL
Masters and Specialist (first majors)
Research Doctoral (first majors)
Professional Doctoral (first majors)
Dentistry
Law
Medicine
Nursing Practice
Pharmacy
Physical Therapist
Veterinary Medicine
Other Professional Doctorate
621
0
621
594
27
0
580
0
580
562
18
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
625
0
625
588
37
0
674
0
674
651
23
0
792
1
793
780
12
0
Note: This table reports the total number of graduate level degrees that were awarded by academic year as well as the number by level. The table provides
a breakout for the Professional Doctoral degrees.
$8),;):--/8--9=)8,-,14!85/8)395.#:8):-/1+360)919!#
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
STEM
100
77
93
97
97
HEALTH
20
23
28
39
70
GLOBALIZATION
0
0
0
0
0
EDUCATION
159
129
121
153
119
GAP ANALYSIS
22
15
29
25
22
SUBTOTAL
301
244
271
314
308
48.47%
42.07%
43.36%
46.59%
38.84%
PSE PERCENT OF TOTAL
Notes: This is a count of graduate degrees awarded within specific Areas of Strategic Emphasis, as determined by the Board of Governors staff with
consultation with business and industry groups and input from universities. This is a count of graduate degrees awarded within specific Programs of
Strategic Emphasis, as determined by the Board of Governors staff with consultation with business and industry groups and input from universities – for
more information see: http://www.flbog.edu/pressroom/strategic_emphasis/. The Board of Governors revised the list of Programs of Strategic Emphasis
in November 2013, and the new categories were applied to the historical degrees. A student who has multiple majors in the subset of targeted
Classification of Instruction Program codes will be counted twice (i.e., double-majors are included). Note: The denominator used in the percentage
includes second majors.
!$
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
ED 301 Ϭϭϲ #-+:154A"-9-)8+0)4,+54531+-<-2563-4:
$"-9-)8+0)4,-<-2563-4:
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Total (S&E and non-S&E)
$17,757
$21,710
$16,221
$19,332
$19,584
Federally Funded
$11,038
$13,156
$12,858
$12,927
$11,598
67%
65%
85%
88%
89%
$82,977
$102,891
$73,732
$85,163
$86,633
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Invention Disclosures
1
3
1
0
0
Licenses & Options Executed
0
5
1
0
0
Licensing Income
Received ($)
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
Number of Start-Up Companies
0
0
0
0
0
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
R&D Expenditures
($ 1,000s)
($ 1,000s)
Percent Funded
From External Sources
Total R&D Expenditures
Per Full-Time, Tenured,
Tenure-Earning Faculty Member ($)
Technology Transfer
U.S. Patents Issued [REVISED]
Notes: R&D Expenditures are based on the National Science Foundation’s annual Survey of R&D Expenditures at Universities and Colleges (data include
Science & Engineering and non-Science & Engineering awards). Percent Funded from External Sources is defined as funds from federal, private
industry and other sources (non-state and non-institutional funds). Total R&D expenditures are divided by fall, full-time tenured/tenure-track faculty as
reported to IPEDS (FGCU includes both tenured/tenure-track and non-tenure/track faculty). The fall faculty year used will align with the beginning of the
fiscal year (e.g., 2007 FY R&D expenditures are divided by fall 2006 faculty). Invention Disclosures reports the number of disclosures made to the
university’s Office of Technology Commercialization to evaluate new technology – as reported on the Association of University Technology Managers
Annual (AUTM) annual Licensing Survey. Licenses & Options Executed that were executed in the year indicated for all technologies – as reported by
AUTM. Licensing Income Received refers to license issue fees, payments under options, annual minimums, running royalties, termination payments,
amount of equity received when cashed-in, and software and biological material end-user license fees of $1,000 or more, but not research funding, patent
expense reimbursement, valuation of equity not cashed-in, software and biological material end-user license fees of less than $1,000, or trademark
licensing royalties from university insignia – as reported on the AUTM survey. Number of Start-up Companies that were dependent upon the licensing of
University technology for initiation – as reported on the Association of University Technology Managers Annual Licensing Survey. REVISED: US Patents
Issued awarded by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) by Calendar year.
!%
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