pip consultation on aids and appliances easy read

pip consultation on aids and appliances easy read
Personal Independence Payment
How we take account of aids and appliances
for daily living
Tell us what you think
December 2015
Important
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In this easy-read booklet we sometimes explain what words
mean.
The first time we mention any of these words, it is in bold
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box. If any of the words are used later in the booklet, we show
them in normal green writing.
These words and what they mean are also in a Word list at the
back of the booklet.
Tell us what you think
Contents
What this booklet is about . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Aids and appliances and the daily living part
of Personal Independence Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
How the system works now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Option 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
About Option 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Option 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
About Option 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Option 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
About Option 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Option 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
About Option 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Option 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
About Option 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
About the questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
How we will use the replies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Our view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
The questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Question 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Question 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Question 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Question 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Question 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Question 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Question 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
What happens next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
And finally, thank you . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Word list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
4
Tell us what you think
What this booklet is about
The last government changed Disability Living Allowance for
people aged 16 to 64 years old to a benefit called Personal
Independence Payment.
Disability Living Allowance
This is money that someone with a disability or a health
condition may be able to get to help them pay for the extra
costs of being disabled.
Personal Independence Payment
This is a new benefit to help disabled people live full, active
and independent lives. Disabled people who can get the
benefit will get money to help them pay for the extra costs
of being disabled.
5
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
The Department for Work and Pensions works out how people
get Personal Independence Payment. This is done using an
assessment.
Assessment
This is a method the Department for Work and Pensions use to
work out if a person can get Personal Independence Payment.
It looks at 12 everyday activities, and points are given based
on how well a person can or cannot do the activities.
10 of the activities are about daily living and 2 are about how
well you can move. We are only looking at the 10 daily living
activities.
Payment of Personal Independence Payment and how much
a person receives depends on the number of points they get in
the assessment.
The Personal Independence Payment also takes account of a
person’s need to use aids and appliances to carry out most
of the activities in the assessment. This was not done for
Disability Living Allowance.
Aids or appliances
Aids help a person do something. For example if someone
is walking or reading, their aid may be a walking stick or a
magnifier.
Appliances are things that give a person something they are
missing. For example, a false arm or leg.
6
Tell us what you think
For most activities, using an aid or appliance scores 2 points.
This is the lowest level. This is because many aids and
appliances are used a lot. They are usually easy to use and do
not cost a lot of money.
Also, people who use aids and appliances usually have lower
barriers than people who cannot carry out the 10 daily living
activities at all or who need help from other people to carry out
the 10 daily living activities.
Barriers
These are things that stop disabled people living like other
people. For example, finding it hard to bend or stand.
A lot of people are being given the daily living part of the
Personal Independence Payment just because they may do
better using aids and appliances for some of the 10 daily living
activities used in the assessment.
7
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Some judges have decided that things like beds and chairs are
aids and appliances. This makes it hard for us to work out the
extra costs people have because of their disability.
Because of these things we have decided to have a
consultation about how aids and appliances are taken into
account when we work out if a person can get the daily living
part of Personal Independence Payment. We are not looking at
the mobility part of Personal Independence Payment.
Consulting or consultation
This is when the government asks people what they think about
their plans, and for ideas about the best ways of doing things.
8
Tell us what you think
Aids and appliances and the
daily living part of Personal
Independence Payment
In April 2014, 11 people out of every 100 scored all their points
using aids and appliances and were given the daily living part
of Personal Independence Payment.
In September 2015, 35 people out of every 100 scored all their
points using aids and appliances and were given the daily living
part of Personal Independence Payment.
This has mainly increased because more people are using aids
and appliances for these things.
• Preparing food.
• Washing and bathing.
• Dressing and undressing.
• Managing incontinence and using the toilet.
Around 75 out of every 100 people who score all their points
by using aids and appliances only get the lowest number of
points needed to get the standard rate of the daily living part of
Personal Independence Payment.
9
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
We looked at 105 cases where people scored most or all of
their daily living points because they used aids and appliances.
Only about 7 people were thought to have moderate needs
and moderate extra costs. Most people only had low needs and
low costs.
If people did need low-cost aids and appliances there would be
the cost of buying the item. But in the cases we looked at there
would be very little ongoing extra costs to do with daily living.
In 19 of the 105 cases we looked at, people did not seem to
have any extra costs to do with daily living at all.
In many of the cases we looked at, it is likely that the aids and
appliances for which points were given were low-cost items like
electric tin openers or lightweight pans.
Some aids and appliances can be got for free from places like
the National Health Service and Adult Social Care. These are
items like perching stools and grab rails.
In some cases, even though people were helped by using an
aid or appliance, they did not need the aid or appliance.
This means that in the cases we looked at where people scored
all their points from using aids or appliances, a person’s score
does not really show if they have extra costs to do with their
disability. But Personal Independence Payment was made to
help people who have extra costs.
So we have decided to ask people if we should change the way
we take aids and appliances into account when we work out
the daily living part of Personal Independence Payment.
10
Tell us what you think
If we do make changes we have thought of 5 ways of doing
this. We would like to know what people think about them.
If we do make changes, anyone who is given daily living points
for aids and appliances could be affected. People who already
get Personal Independence Payment would not be affected
until it is time for them to have another assessment.
11
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
How the system works now
A monthly payment is made to people who can get the daily
living part of Personal Independence Payment.
In most activities 2 points are given for using aids and
appliances.
This means a person can get the daily living part of Personal
Independence Payment just because they score points for
using aids and appliances.
12
Tell us what you think
Option 1
We would make a lump sum payment to people who reach or
go over the number of points they need to get the daily living
part of Personal Independence Payment. But scored all their
points from using aids and appliances.
The amount of the lump sum payment could be less than the
amount of money a person gets monthly over a period of time
And it could be paid with vouchers.
The amount of the lump sum payment could be a set amount
or it could change depending on people’s different needs.
People getting the lump sum would not automatically get
other benefits or premiums, like other people who get Personal
Independence Payment. They would also be affected by the
Benefit Cap.
Benefit Cap
This is a limit on the total amount of benefits someone
can claim. It does not apply to people who get Personal
Independence Payment.
People who get at least some points for other parts of the
Personal Independence Payment assessment would get paid
at the weekly rate, in the same way they do now.
13
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
About Option 1
Many people who score all of their points from using aids and
appliances may have to make a low or moderate one-off
payment to buy the aids or appliances. They would have small
ongoing costs or no costs at all.
Option 1 would help people buy the aids and appliances they
need straight away instead of making them save up their
monthly payments.
If vouchers were used, this could help the Department for Work
and Pensions to get better prices.
The lump sum payment could be made more than once as
people may need to repair or replace their aids and appliances.
14
Tell us what you think
Option 2
We would make a monthly payment to people who reach or go
over the number of points they need to get the daily living part
of Personal Independence Payment. But score all their points
from using aids and appliances.
The amount of the payment would be less than the weekly rate
that is paid now.
People getting the lower rate would not automatically get
other benefits or premiums, like other people who get Personal
Independence Payment. They would also be affected by the
Benefit Cap.
People who get at least some points for other parts of the
Personal Independence Payment assessment would get paid
at the weekly rate in the same way they do now.
About Option 2
Option 2 is close to the way the system works now. People
would get monthly payments. This would help people who
have some ongoing costs or who would find it hard to look
after their money if they had a lump sum payment.
This would be a set amount of money for everyone who got it.
The lower rate of money would show that these people’s costs
are likely to be lower than others.
15
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Option 3
We would make a new rule that says that people must
score some points in the Personal Independence Payment
assessment that are not for aids and appliances.
This would mean that people do not get the daily living part
of Personal Independence Payment if they get all their points
from using aids and appliances.
People who get at least some points for the other parts of the
Personal Independence Payment assessment would get paid
at the weekly rate in the same way they do now.
About Option 3
Option 3 would mean only people with moderate to high
ongoing costs would get the benefit.
For people who got it, it would be like the system now. They
would get a monthly payment for the same amount each
month. They could spend it on what they want.
16
Tell us what you think
Option 4
We would change the meaning of aids and appliances for the
daily living part of Personal Independence Payment.
Aids or appliances that are low cost or free, or that are often
used by non-disabled people may not score points.
People who use aids and appliances that show they have extra
costs because of their disability would get paid at the weekly
rate in the same way they do now.
About Option 4
Option 4 would mean that only people who use aids and
appliances that show they have extra costs would get the
benefit.
For people who got it, it would be like the system now. They
would get a monthly payment for the same amount each
month. They could spend it on what they want.
17
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Option 5
We would change the number of points that are given for using
aids and appliances for some or all of the daily living activities.
For most of the activities the points would change from 2 to 1.
People who score at least some of their points from using
aids and appliances could stop getting the daily living part of
Personal Independence Payment.
People who get all their points from other parts of the Personal
Independence Payment assessment would get paid at the
weekly rate in the same way they do now.
About Option 5
Option 5 would mean that people cannot get the benefit
unless they score enough points in other parts of the Personal
Independence Payment assessment.
For people who can get this money, it would be like the system
now. They would get a monthly payment for the same amount
each month. They could spend it on what they want.
18
Tell us what you think
About the questions
On the next pages there are some questions on 5 options that
we would like you to give us your answers to.
If you need more space for your answers, please use a separate
piece of paper.
This consultation starts on 10 December 2015 and will end on
29 January 2016.
Send your replies to
PIP Policy Team
Department for Work and Pensions
Ground Floor, Caxton House
Tothill Street
London
SW1H 9NA
Or you can email your reply to
[email protected]
When you send us your answers please tell us if you are
answering for yourself or if you are answering for a group or
organisation.
If you are answering for a group or organisation please tell us
who they are. And how you got their views.
We will let you know that we have had your reply. We may get
in touch with you to ask about what you have said. If you do
not want us to do this, please tell us when you send your reply
to us.
19
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
How we will use the replies
Information that you tell us about you, like your name
and address, may need to be passed to other workers in
the Department for Work and Pensions, so we can do the
consultation.
The answers you give to the consultation may be put in a
report, put on our website, or given to other people who ask
for it. We will take out any information about you before we
do this, so that people reading your answer will not know who
wrote it.
Our view
We have not yet decided whether or not to make any changes
or, if we do, which of the 5 options we think is best.
20
Tell us what you think
The questions
Question 1
What do you think about the way the system works now?
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare the system now to Options 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• Getting a payment for the same amount of money
each month.
• Saving money each month.
• Saving money to pay for aids and appliances.
• People being able to spend the benefit in the way they want
to. But they may not be able to buy as much as they could
with vouchers.
21
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Question 2
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare Option 1 to the way the system works now and to
Options 2, 3, 4 and 5?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• People getting a lump sum payment which could be less than
the amount the monthly payments would add up to over
a period of time.
• Whether the lump sum should be a set amount of money or
should change depending on what the person needs.
• People getting the lump sum not automatically getting other
benefits or premiums like other people who get Personal
Independence Payment. And, that it would not stop people
being affected by the Benefit Cap.
• People being able to buy aids and appliances straight away.
• People getting vouchers which may mean we can get a
better deal on aids and appliances.
• A payment being made more than once because aids and
appliances may need to be mended or replaced?
22
Tell us what you think
Question 3
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare Option 2 to the way the system works now and
to Options 1, 3, 4 and 5?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• People getting a lower rate of benefit than is paid now.
• People getting a set amount of money.
• People getting the lump sum not automatically getting other
benefits or premiums like other people who get Personal
Independence Payment. And, that it would not stop people
being affected by the Benefit Cap.
• People being able to spend the money on any item they
need, but possibly being able to buy less than they could
if they used vouchers.
23
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Question 4
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare Option 3 to the way the system works now and
to Options 1, 2, 4 and 5?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• People who score all their points from aids and appliances
not getting the benefit.
• There being a limit on the points for aids and appliances.
24
Tell us what you think
Question 5
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare Option 4 to the way the system works now and
to Options 1, 2, 3 and 5?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• Not taking account of aids and appliances that do not show
if the person has extra costs because of their disability.
•Which aids and appliances you think show that a person has
extra costs because of their disability.
25
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Question 6
What are the good things and the bad things when you
compare Option 5 to the way the system works now and
to Options 1, 2, 3 and 4?
We would like to know what you think about these things.
• Changing the number of points that are given for using aids
and appliances for some or all of the daily living activities. For
most of the activities the points would change from 2 to 1.
• Getting a set payment of money.
• People having to save to buy aids and appliances.
• People having to manage money monthly.
• People being able to spend the money on any item they
need, but possibly being able to buy less than they could
if they used vouchers.
26
Tell us what you think
Question 7
Do you have any other ideas about how the system could
be changed?
Do you have anything else to say?
27
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
What happens next?
When the consultation has finished we will look at all the
replies that have been sent to us.
Before we decide what to do we will think about how any
changes that we make will affect people.
We will also look at how many people are likely to get
Personal Independence Payment.
We will then write a report saying what replies we had
and what we have decided to do.
And finally, thank you
Thank you for taking the time to look at this booklet and taking
part in the consultation.
28
Tell us what you think
Word list
Assessment
This is a method the Department for Work and Pensions
use to work out if a person can get Personal Independence
Payment. It looks at 12 everyday activities, and points are
given based on how well a person can or cannot do the
activities.
10 of the activities are about daily living and 2 are about
how well you can move. We are only looking at the 10
daily living activities.. ............................................................................6
Aids or appliances
Aids help a person do something. For example if someone
is walking or reading, their aid may be a walking stick or a
magnifier.
Appliances are things that give a person something they
are missing. For example, a false arm or leg...................................6
Barriers
These are things that stop disabled people living like other
people. For example, finding it hard to bend or stand. . . . . . . . . 7
29
Personal Independence Payment – aids and appliances
Benefit Cap
This is a limit on the total amount of benefits someone
can claim. It does not apply to people who get Personal
Independence Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Consulting or consultation
This is when the government asks people what they think
about their plans, and for ideas about the best ways of
doing things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Disability Living Allowance
This is money that someone with a disability or a health
condition may be able to get to help them pay for the
extra costs of being disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Personal Independence Payment
This is a new benefit to help disabled people live full,
active and independent lives. Disabled people who can
get the benefit will get money to help them pay for the
extra costs of being disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
30
© Crown copyright 2015
You may use the words in this booklet in any way you want
to as long as you make sure you use them correctly.
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The only thing you cannot use are the logos.
If you want to know a bit more about the Open Government
Licence or if you need some help to understand what we
have said, the website which tells you more about the Open
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www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence
Or you can write to
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Kew
London
TW9 4DU
Or email your questions to [email protected]
If you need more of these easy-read reports, please contact us.
Our address is shown below. Easy-read reports are free.
If you want to look at the full report written in English, you
can see it on our website at www.gov.uk/government/
uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/484217/pipconsultation-on-aids-and-appliances.pdf
A copy of this easy-read report is also on this website. We did
not put the easy-read report on the website until one week
after the consultation started. If this has made it difficult for
you to respond in time please tell us using the contact details
below.
Copies of the full report can be made available in other formats
on request. Our contact details are shown below.
PIP Policy Team
Department for Work and Pensions
Ground Floor, Caxton House
Tothill Street
London
SW1H 9NA
Email: [email protected]
Please contact us if you have any other problems getting the
report.
© Crown Copyright 2015
Published by the Department for Work and Pensions
December 2015
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