- Manhattan Products
WIRELESS
ROUTER
USER MANUAL
MODELS 525459, 525466,
525480, 525541
1200AC Model 525480
MH-525459/525466/525480/525541-UM-1114-02
Thank you for purchasing this Manhattan Wireless Router.
®
The latest in wireless networking, these Wireless Routers serve multiple purposes —
an access point for your wireless network, a four-port router for hard-wiring Ethernet
devices — and bring it all together so that the devices can access a high-speed
Internet connection.
Package Contents
• Wireless Router
• Quick install guide, plus user manual on CD
• Power adapter
• Ethernet Cat5 RJ45 cable: 1.0 m (3 ft.)
NOTE: Some screen images have been modified to fit the format of this manual.
Hardware sections 1.1 and 1.2 feature images of the 150N Router: Displays and
components for the other models are similar.
For specifications, refer to each model’s datasheet at manhattanproducts.com.
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
section page
1HARDWARE............................................5
1.1 Front Panel Display...........................5
1.2 Back Panel Display...........................5
2 SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP..............6
2.1 Connecting the Router......................6
2.2 Connecting with Windows.................6
Mac OS and Linux
2.3 Quick Setup......................................7
2.3.1 Cable Modem.............................8
2.3.2 Fixed IP xDSL (Static IP)............9
2.3.3 PPPoE xDSL............................ 10
2.3.4 PPPTP xDSL............................ 10
2.3.5 L2TP xDSL............................... 12
2.3.6 Telstra BigPond........................ 12
2.4 Basic Setup..................................... 13
2.4.1 Time Zone / Auto-Synch........... 14
2.4.2 Changing Mngmt. Password..... 14
2.4.3 Remote Management............... 15
2.5 WAN Setup..................................... 16
2.5.1 Dynamic IP............................... 17
2.5.2 Static IP.................................... 17
2.5.3 PPPoE...................................... 18
2.5.4 PPPTP...................................... 18
2.5.5 L2TP......................................... 19
2.5.6 Telstra BigPond........................20.
2.5.7 DNS..........................................20.
2.5.8 DDNS....................................... 21
2.6 LAN Configuration..........................22
2.6.1 LAN IP......................................22
2.6.2 DHCP Server............................23
2.6.3 Static DHCP Leases Table....... 24
2.7 WLAN Configuration....................... 24
2.7.1 Basic Wireless Settings............ 25
2.7.2 Advanced Wireless Settings.....26
2.7.3 Wireless Security...................... 27.
section page
2.7.4 Wireless Access Control........... 31.
2.7.5 WPS.........................................32
2.7.6 Security Tips.............................33
3 ADVANCED FUNCTIONS.....................35
3.1 QoS.................................................35
3.1.1 Basic QoS Settings...................35.
3.1.2 Adding a new QoS Rule...........36.
3.2 NAT................................................. 37
3.2.1 Port Forwarding........................38.
3.2.2 Virtual Server............................39.
3.2.3 Port Mapping............................40.
3.2.4 UPnP........................................ 41.
3.2.5 ALG.......................................... 41.
3.3 Firewall............................................ 42
3.3.1 Access Control......................... 42
3.3.2 Add PC.....................................44
3.3.3 URL Blocking............................45
3.3.4 DoS Attack Prevention.............46
3.3.5 DMZ.......................................... 47
4 ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS...................49
4.1 Status..............................................49
4.1.1 Internet Connections................49
4.1.2 Device Status...........................50
4.1.3 System Log...............................50
4.1.4 Security Log.............................50
4.1.5 Active DHCP Client.................. 51
4.1.6 Statistics................................... 51
4.2 Tools............................................... 51
4.2.1 Configuration Tools................... 51
4.2.2 Firmware Upgrade.................... 52
4.2.3 Reset........................................53
5 TROUBLESHOOTING...........................54
6 GLOSSARY...........................................56
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3
SAFETY GUIDELINES
For the protection of equipment users and connected devices, follow these safety
guidelines:
1. This router is designed for indoor use only; do not place this router outdoors.
2. Do not place this router in hot or humid environments.
3. Do not yank any connected cables.
4. Firmly secure this device if it’s placed at any significant height.
5. Router accessories such as the antenna and power supply should be considered
dangerous when handled by children under the age of 3. Keep this device out
of the reach of children.
6. The router will become hot when used for long time. This is normal and is not a
malfunction, but keep the router away from paper, cloth and other flammable
materials.
7. There are no user-serviceable parts inside the router. If the router is not working
properly, contact your dealer (place of purchase) and ask for help. Do not
disassemble the router, as doing so will void the warranty.
8. If the router falls into water while it’s powered on, do not pick it up with your
hands. Disconnect the power before you do anything, or contact an
experienced technician for help.
9. If you smell something strange, or if you see some smoke coming from the
router or power supply, remove the power supply or switch the electrical power
off immediately and call the dealer for help.
4
SAFETY GUIDELINES
1 HARDWARE
1.1 Front Panel Display
150N / 300N
LED PWR WLAN
WAN / WAN LNK/ACT
LAN (1-4)
LAN LNK/ACT
2.4G
5G
1200AC
Status On On Flashing On Flashing On Flashing On Flashing
On Flashing
Description
Router is powered on.
Wireless network is switched on or WPS mode is on.
Wireless LAN activity (transferring or receiving data).
WAN port is connected.
WAN activity (transferring or receiving data).
LAN port is connected.
LAN activity (transferring or receiving data).
2.4GHz Wireless WPS function is enabled.
Wireless LAN activity (transferring or receiving data).
5GHz Wireless WPS function is enabled.
Wireless LAN activity (transferring or receiving data).
1.2 Back Panel Display
150N / 300N
4
3
2
1
5VDC WPS
WAN
RADIO
1200AC
WPS
Feature
Radio Reset/ WPS 1-4 WAN 5VDC 4
3
2
1
WAN
5VDC
Description
Activate or deactivate the wireless function with this ON/OFF switch.
Reset the router to factory default settings (clear all settings) or start the
WPS function. Press and hold for 10 seconds to restore all settings to
factory defaults; press for less than 5 seconds to start WPS.
Local Area Network (LAN) ports 1 to 4.
Wide Area Network (WAN/Internet) port.
Connects tthe A/C power adapter (5 VDC).
HARDWARE
5
2 SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
2.1 Connecting the Router
1.Connect your DSL or cable modem to the WAN port of the router using the
provided RJ45 Ethernet cable. NOTE: Standard modems provided by Internet
service providers come with at least one LAN/Ethernet port, which connects to
the WAN port of the router.
Example: 150N
2
1
3
2.Connect all your computers and network devices (network-enabled components
like game consoles, network media players, network storage units or LAN
switches) to the LAN ports (1-4) of the router.
3. Connect the A/C power adapter to the wall socket, and then connect it to the
power jack of the router.
4. Check all LEDs on the front panel. The PWR LED should be on, and the WAN
and LAN LEDs should be on if the computer or network device connected to the
corresponding router port(s) is powered on and correctly connected.
2.2 Connecting with Windows, Mac OS and Linux
Before you can use your Manhattan router to connect to the Internet, you need to
perform the Quick Setup, which will guide you through the setup procedure.
1.With your computer connected to a
LAN port on the router, start your
Web browser and open
http://192.168.2.1 to display a login
window (right).
2.Enter “admin” as the username and
“1234” as the password, then click
“OK.”
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
2.3 Quick Setup
The Quick Setup procedure lets you configure all the settings required for quick
Internet access.
.
The initial Quick Setup screen presents time settings.
Set Time Zone — Use the drop-down menu to select your time zone.
Time Server Address — Enter the IP address/hostname of the time server. This
isn’t normally required, but if the default time server (NTP) should go offline, you
can obtain a new NTP server from the list at http://www.ntp.org.
Daylight Savings — If your locale uses Daylight Saving, activate “Enable Function”
and select the duration using the drop-down menus.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
7
Click “Next” to continue to the next screen of the Quick Setup procedure, where
you select the broadband (Internet connection) type you use.
On all screens, click “Apply” (if such button appears at the bottom) to submit any
option or configuration changes. Click “Back” to return to the previous screen.
Click “Cancel” to undo any changes you’ve made on that screen. Click “Next” or
“OK” to proceed to the next screen.
There are six types of Internet connections available, as explained below: Cable
Modem, Fixed IP xDSL, PPPoE xDSL, PPTP xDSL, L2TP xDSL and Telstra
BigPond. Cable Modem and PPPoE xDSL are the most common, but if you’re not
sure which type of service you have, simply contact your Internet service provider
(ISP) to find out. You won’t be able to connect to the Internet if you choose the
wrong type during the router setup. NOTE: DSL Internet Service Providers
normally operate using the PPPoE protocol; thus, PPPoE xDSL should be the
broadband type. However, in recent years more DSL ISPs provide customers with
DSL modems that handle the PPPoE portion of Internet access automatically. In
such cases, you need to select Cable Modem as your broadband type even if you
have a DSL service.
2.3.1 Setup Procedure for Cable Modem (Dynamic IP)
Host Name — Input the host name of your computer. This is optional, and is only
required if your service provider asks you to do so.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
MAC address — Enter the MAC address of your computer here if your service
provider only permits a computer with a certain MAC address to access the
Internet. If you’re using a computer used to connect to the Internet via cable
modem, you can simply click “Clone Mac address” to fill in the MAC address
field with the MAC address of your computer.
2.3.2 Setup Procedure for Fixed IP xDSL (Static IP)
IP address — Enter the IP address assigned by your ISP.
Subnet Mask — Enter the subnet mask assigned by your ISP.
DNS address — Enter the IP address of the DNS server provided by your ISP.
Service Provider Gateway Address — Enter the gateway IP address provided by
your ISP.
NOTE: You can choose this Internet connection method if your service provider
assigns a fixed IP address (also know as a static address) to you, and doesn’t use
DHCP or PPPoE protocol. Contact your service provider for further information.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
9
2.3.3 Setup Procedure for PPPoE xDSL
User Name — Enter the username assigned by your ISP.
Password — Enter the password assigned by your ISP.
Service Name — Provide a name for this Internet service. (optional)
MTU — Enter the MTU value of your network connection. NOTE: Use the default
value unless your ISP specifies otherwise.
Connection Type — Select one of the three connection types in the drop-down
menu:
• “Continuous” keeps the Internet connection alive and does not disconnect.
.This is the preferred choice for always-on / flat-rate Internet services.
• “Connect on Demand” only connects to the Internet when there’s a connect
attempt. This is the preferred choice for all users who have paid-per-minute
or per-transferred-data Internet service.
• “Manual” only connects to the Internet when “Connect” is selected, and
disconnects when “Disconnect” is selected.
Idle Time Out — Specify the time to shut down the Internet connection after no
Internet activity is detected. This option is only available when the connection
type is Connect on Demand.
2.3.4 Setup Procedure for PPTP xDSL
PPTP xDSL requires two groups of settings: the WAN interface settings (to set up
IP address) and PPTP settings (PPTP username and password).
In the WAN Interface Settings panel, select how you obtain an IP address from
your service provider: “Obtain an IP address automatically” or “Use the following
IP address” (i.e., a static IP address). The WAN interface settings must be
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
correctly entered; otherwise, the Internet connection will fail even if the PPTP
settings are correct. Contact your ISP if you don’t know how you should fill in
these fields.
The PPTP Settings panel presents these options:
User Name — Enter the username assigned by your ISP.
Password — Enter the password provided by your ISP.
PPTP Gateway — Enter the IP address of PPTP gateway assigned by your ISP.
Connection ID — Enter the connection ID. (optional)
MTU — Enter the MTU value of your network connection. NOTE: Use the default
value unless your ISP specifies otherwise.
Connection Type — Select one of the three connection types in the drop-down
menu (see PPPoE above):
Idle Time Out — Specify the time to shut down the Internet connection after no
Internet activity is detected. This option is only available when the connection
type is Connect on Demand.
NOTE: Enable BEZEQ-ISRAEL only if you’re using that network provider.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
11
2.3.5 Setup Procedure for L2TP xDSL
L2TP is another popular connection method for xDSL and other Internet connection
types, and all required setting items are the same as the PPTP connection (see
section 2.3.4 above).
2.3.6 Setup Procedure for Telstra BigPond
This procedure is only for the Telstra BigPond network service in Australia.
User Name — Enter the username assigned by Telstra.
Password — Enter the password assigned by Telstra.
Assign login server manually — Select to choose the login server by yourself.
Server IP Address — Enter the IP address of the login server.
When all settings are
finished (and after you
click “OK”), you’ll see
this message (right)
on your Web browser.
Click “Apply” to restart the
router. You’ll see a second
restart message (right).
Wait for about 30 seconds, then click “OK.” You’ll be forwarded to the router’s Web
management interface. The router is now running with the new settings, and, if all
information entered is correct, you can now access the Internet.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
NOTE TO DSL USERS
While PPPoE is the most common way to connect to DSL Internet service, it still
may be necessary to enable “Cable Modem” in the Broadband settings. Below are
examples for using Cable Modem instead of xDSL PPPoE, even if your Internet
service is a DSL service.
•Your ISP has given you a so-called “modem-router” instead of a simple modem.
• Your ISP has not given you a username and password for PPPoE login (implying
that it is not required).
• When your computer is connected directly to the modem, the computer obtains
an IP address which is in the private IP network range (192.168.xxx.yyy, 10.xxx.yyy,
172.16.xxx.yyy).
• You can connect to the Internet with your computer connected directly to the
modem without using a dialer program asking for a username and password.
• If attempts to utilize PPPoE xDSL fail repeatedly, you should activate “Cable
Modem” as a troubleshooting step.
2.4 Basic Setup
This section explains how to change the time zone, password and remote
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
13
management settings. Start your Web browser and log on to the router’s Web
management interface by opening http://manhattanrouter, then click the “General
Setup” button on the left.
2.4.1 Time Zone and Time Auto-Synchronization
Click the “System” menu on the left of the Web management interface, then click
“Time Zone.” You’ll be prompted to select a time zone from the “Set time zone”
drop-down menu and enter the IP address or host name of the time server. If you
want to enable the Daylight Saving setting, check the “Enable Function” box and
set the duration of Daylight Saving.
Click “Apply” and this message
will display. Click “Continue” to
save the settings and make
additional changes; click
“Apply” to save the settings and
restart the router so the
settings will take effect after it reboots.
2.4.2 Changing the Management Password
The default password of this router is 1234, and it’s displayed on the login prompt
when accessed from the Web browser. There’s a security risk if you don’t change
the default password, since everyone can see it. This is very important when you
have the wireless function enabled. To change the password, click the “System”
menu on the left of the Web management interface, then click “Password
Settings.”
Current Password — Enter the current password (for example, 1234).
New Password — Enter the new password.
Confirm Password — Enter the new password again.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
If the passwords entered in the “New Password”
and “Confirmed Password” fields aren’t the same,
you’ll see the message at right. Re-enter the new
password.
If you see the error message at right, it means the
content in the “Current Password” field is
wrong. Click “OK” to go back to the previous
menu, and try entering the current password
again. If the current and new passwords are
correctly entered, click “Apply” and you’ll be prompted to log in again. Enter the
new password and enter “admin” for the username.
2.4.3 Remote Management
This router by default does not allow management access from the Internet to
prevent possible security risks (especially when you have defined a weak password
or didn’t change the default password). However, you can still manage this router
from a specific IP address by enabling the Remote Management function.
Click the “System” menu on the left of Web management interface, then click
“Remote Management.” The screen below will display on your Web browser.
Host Address — Enter the IP address of the remote host you want to initiate
management access..
Port — You can define the port number through which this router should expect an
incoming request. If you’re providing a Web service (default port number is 80),
you should try to use another port number. You can use the default port setting
(8080) or something like 32245 or 1429 (any integer between 1 and 65534)..
Enabled — Select the field to start the configuration.
Click “Apply,” then either click “Continue” to save the settings and make additional
changes or click “Apply” again to save the settings and restart the router so the
settings will take effect after it reboots.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
15
NOTE: To manage this router from another computer on the Internet, you need to
input the IP address and port number of this router. If your Internet service provider
assigns you a static IP address, it will not be a problem; but if the IP address your
service provider assigns will vary every time you establish an Internet connection,
this will be a problem. Either ask your ISP to give you a static IP address, or use
a dynamic DNS service like DDNS. (See section 2.5.8 DDNS Client below for
details.)
NOTE: The default port number the Web browser will use is 80. If the “Port” setting
on this page is not 80, you need to assign the port number in the address bar of
the Web browser manually. For example, if the IP address of this router is 1.2.3.4,
and the port number you set is 8888, you need to enter http://1.2.3.4:8888 in the
address bar of the Web browser.
2.5 Setting Up an Internet Connection (WAN Setup)
The Internet connection setup can be done by using the Quick Setup menu
described in section 2-3. However, you can set the WAN connections up by using
the WAN configuration menu. You can also program advanced functions like DDNS
(Dynamic DNS) here.
Click the “WAN” menu on the left of the Web management interface, then select
an Internet connection method based on the type of connection you’re using. You
can either click the connection method in the left-side menu or select it from the
main panel in the center (which requires that you then click “More Configuration”
to continue).
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
2.5.1 Setup Procedure for Dynamic IP
Host Name — Enter the host name of your computer. (This is optional and is only
required if your service provider asks you to do so.)
MAC Address — Enter the MAC address of your computer if your service provider
only permits a computer with a certain MAC address to access the Internet. If
you’re using the computer to connect to the Internet via cable modem, you can
simply click “Clone MAC” to fill the “MAC Address” field with the MAC address
of your computer.
2.5.2 Setup Procedure for Static IP
IP Address — Enter the IP address assigned by your service provider.
Subnet Mask — Enter the subnet mask assigned by your service provider.
Default Gateway — Enter the IP address of the gateway server assigned by your
service provider.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
17
2.5.3 Setup Procedure for PPPoE
User Name — Enter the user name assigned by your Internet service provider.
Password — Enter the password assigned by your Internet service provider.
Service Name — Enter a name for this Internet service. (optional)
MTU — Enter the MTU value of your network connection. NOTE: Use the default
value unless your ISP specifies otherwise.
Connection Type — Select one of the three connection types in the drop-down menu:
• “Continuous” keeps the Internet connection alive and does not disconnect.
.This is the preferred choice for always-on / flat-rate Internet services.
• “Connect on Demand” only connects to the Internet when there’s a connect
attempt. This is the preferred choice for all users who have paid-per-minute
or per-transferred-data Internet service.
• “Manual” only connects to the Internet when “Connect” is selected, and
disconnects when “Disconnect” is selected.
Idle Time Out — Specify the time to shut down the Internet connection after no
Internet activity is detected. This option is only available when the connection
type is Connect on Demand.
2.5.4 Setup Procedure for PPTP
PPTP requires two groups of settings: the WAN interface settings (to set up the IP
address) and PPTP settings (PPTP username and password).
In the WAN Interface Settings panel, select how you obtain an IP address from
your service provider: “Obtain an IP address automatically” or “Use the following
IP address” (i.e., a static IP address). The WAN interface settings must be correctly
18
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
entered; otherwise, the Internet connection will fail even if the PPTP settings are
correct. Contact your ISP if you don’t know how you should fill in these fields.
The PPTP Settings panel presents these options:
User Name — Enter the username assigned by your ISP.
Password — Enter the password provided by your ISP.
PPTP Gateway — Enter the IP address of PPTP gateway assigned by your ISP.
Connection ID — Enter the connection ID. (optional)
MTU — Enter the MTU value of your network connection. NOTE: Use the default
value unless your ISP specifies otherwise.
Connection Type — Select one of the three connection types in the drop-down
menu (see PPPoE above):
Idle Time Out — Specify the time to shut down the Internet connection after no
Internet activity is detected. This option is only available when the connection
type is Connect on Demand.
NOTE: Enable BEZEQ-ISRAEL only if you’re using that network provider.
2.5.5 Setup Procedure for L2TP
L2TP settings are the same as the PPTP connection (see section 2.5.4 above).
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
19
2.5.6 Setup Procedure for Telstra BigPond
This procedure is only for the Telstra BigPond network service in Australia.
User Name — Enter the username assigned by Telstra.
Password — Enter the password assigned by Telstra.
Assign login server manually — Select to choose the login server by yourself.
Server IP Address — Enter the IP address of the login server.
2.5.7 Setup Procedure for DNS
If you select Dynamic IP or PPPoE as the Internet connection method, the ISP
typically assigns the DNS server information to the router. However, if you have a
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
preferred DNS server or use a static IP address, or if your service provider didn’t
assign the IP address of the DNS server for any reason, you can input the IP
address of the DNS server here.
Primary DNS — Enter the IP address of the DNS server provided by your ISP.
Secondary DNS — Enter the IP address of the secondary DNS server provided
by your ISP. (optional)
NOTE: Only an IP address can be entered here; do not use the hostname of the
DNS server! (Only numeric characters and periods are accepted; for example,
10.20.30.40 would be acceptable, but dns.serviceprovider.com would not be.)
2.5.8 Setup Procedure for DDNS
DDNS (Dynamic DNS) is an IP-to-hostname mapping service for Internet users who
don’t have a static (fixed) IP address. It will be a problem when a user wants to
provide services to other users on the Internet because their IP addresses will vary
every time they connect, and they will not be able to know the IP address they’re
using at any certain time.
This router supports the DDNS service of several service providers; for example:
DynDNS (http://www.dyndns.org) and TZO (http://www.tzo.com). You can go to
one of these DDNS service provider’s Web sites and get a free DDNS account by
following their instructions.
Dynamic DNS — Select “Enable” or “Disable.”
Provider — Select your DDNS provider from the drop-down menu.
Domain Name — Enter the domain name you’ve obtained from the DDNS service
provider.
Account — Enter the user account of your DDNS registration.
Password/Key — Enter the DDNS service password or key.
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
21
2.6 LAN Configuration
This section explains the IP address settings of the local network. Normally, there
is no need to make any changes here: The default values work fine for most
applications, and you could just go directly to section 2.7 WLAN Configuration.
There are two ways to assign IP addresses to computers: static IP address (set the
IP address for every computer manually) and dynamic IP address (the IP address
of computers will be assigned by the router automatically). It’s recommended for
most of the computers to use a dynamic IP address, as it will save a lot of time
when setting IP addresses for every computer, especially when there are a lot
of computers in your network. For servers and network devices that will provide
services to other computers and users that come from the Internet, a static IP
address should be used so other computers can locate the server.
SUGGESTIONS FOR AN IP ADDRESS NUMBERING PLAN
If you have no idea how to define an IP address plan for your network, here are
some suggestions.
•A valid IP address has four fields: a.b.c.d. For most home and company users, it’s
suggested to use 192.168.c.d, where c is an integer between 0 and 254, and d is
an integer between 1 and 254. This router is able to work with up to 253 clients, so
you can set the “d” field of the router’s IP address as 1 or 254 (or any number
between 1 and 254), and pick a number between 0 and 254 for field “c.”
• In most cases, you should use 255.255.255.0 as the subnet mask, which allows
up to 253 clients. (This also meets the router’s capability of working with up to
253 clients.)
• For all servers and network devices that will provide services to other people (like
Internet service, print service and file service), use a static IP address. Give each
of them a unique number between 1 and 253, and maintain a list, so everyone
can locate those servers easily.
• For computers not dedicated to providing specific service to others, use a
dynamic IP address.
NOTE: Recommended setup values are provided in the sections that follow in
order to provide further clarification.
Click the “LAN” menu on the left of the Web management interface. There are
three setup groups presented (as explained below): LAN IP, DHCP Server and
Static DHCP Leases Table.
2.6.1 LAN IP
IP address — Enter the IP address of this router.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
Subnet Mask — Enter the subnet mask for this network.
802.1d Spanning Tree — Select “Enable” or “Disable” from the drop-down menu.
DHCP Server — Select “Enable” or “Disable” from the drop-down menu.
RECOMMENDED VALUES
IP Address: 192.168.2.1
802.1d Spanning Tree: Disabled
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Server: Enabled
2.6.2 DHCP Server
These settings are only available when “DHCP Server” in the LAN IP section is
enabled, but will also affect wireless clients.
Lease Time — Choose a lease time (the duration that every computer can keep a
specific IP address) from the drop-down menu of every IP address assigned by
this router.
Start IP — Enter the start IP address of the IP range.
End IP — Enter the end IP address of the IP range.
Domain Name— Enter a domain name for your network. (optional)
NOTE: The number of the last field (the “d” field) of “End IP” must be greater than
“Start IP” and can’t be the same as the router’s IP address. Also, the first three
fields of the IP address of “Start IP,” “End IP” and “IP Address” in the LAN IP
section (the “a,” “b” and “c” fields) should be the same.
RECOMMENDED VALUES
Lease Time: Two Weeks (or “Forever” if End IP: 192.168.2.200
you have fewer than 20 computers)
Domain Name: (leave it blank)
Start IP: 192.168.2.100
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
23
2.6.3 Static DHCP Leases Table
This function allows you to assign a static IP address to a specific computer forever,
so you don’t need to set the IP address for a computer to enjoy the benefit of using
a DHCP server. A maximum of 16 static IP addresses can be assigned here.
NOTE: If you set “Lease Time” to “Forever” in the DHCP Server section, you can
also assign an IP address to a specific computer permanently; however, you won’t
be able to assign a certain IP address to a specific computer, since IP addresses
will be assigned in random order this way.
Enable Static DHCP Leases — Select to enable; de-select to disable.
MAC Address — Enter the MAC address of the computer or network device (a
total of 12 characters, with numerals from 0 to 9 and characters from a to f,
such as 001122aabbcc).
IP Address — Enter the IP address you want to assign to this computer or device.
Click “Add” to include a MAC address and IP address pair into the Static DHCP
Leases table (below). Click “Clear” to remove characters entered in a text field.
To delete a specific item, check the “Select” box of a MAC address and IP address
mapping, then click “Delete Selected.” To delete all mappings, click “Delete All.” To
deselect all mappings, click “Reset.”
2.7 Wireless LAN Configuration
NOTE: Depending on your router, you may only see one menu called “Wireless”
instead of “Wireless 2.4GHz” and “Wireless 5GHz,” which are exclusive to DualBand Wireless routers. Dual-Band routers allow you to control both wireless
radios independently, hence the two menus. If your computer, PDA, game console
or other network device is equipped with a wireless network interface, you can use
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
the wireless function of this router to connect to the Internet and share resources
with other computers on your network. It’s strongly recommended that you use the
built-in security functions to protect your network from intruders.
Click the “Wireless” menu on the left of the Web management interface to open the
wireless settings page. Remeber to click “Apply” to save your settings.
2.7.1 Basic Wireless Settings
Band — Select one of the options from the drop-down .menu:
• “2.4 GHz (B)” only allows an 802.11b wireless network client to connect to this
router (maximum transfer rate of 11 Mbps).
• “2.4 GHz (N)” only allows an 802.11n wireless network client to connect to this
router (maximum transfer rate of 300 Mbps).
• “2.4 GHz (B+G)” only allows a802.11b and 802.11g wireless network clients to
connect to this router (maximum transfer rate of 11 Mbps for 802.11b clients;
maximum 54 Mbps for 802.11g clients).
• “2.4 GHz (G)” only allows an 802.11g wireless network client to connect to
this router (maximum transfer rate of 54 Mbps).
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25
• “2.4 GHz (B+G+N)” allows 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11n wireless network
clients to connect to this router (maximum transfer rate of 11 Mbps for 802.11b
clients; maximum of 54 Mbps for 802.11g clients; maximum of 300 Mbps for
802.11n clients.
NOTE: For optimal compatibility with wireless clients, select “2.4 GHz (B+G+N).”
ESSID — Enter the name for your wireless network. You may choose to use the
default value, but you can adjust the value to make identification in areas with
different wireless networks easier; e.g., to differentiate your wireless network from
that of your neighbors.
Channel Number — Select a channel from the drop-down menu: 1-13 for Europe;
1-11 for the U.S.
Associated Clients — Click “Show Active Clients” to see the status of all active
wireless stations connected to the access point.
You can try to change the channel number if you think the data transfer rate is too
slow. There could be interference from other wireless networks in the area using
the same channel, and the cross-talk between the two networks can reduce the
wireless data transfer rate. Ideally, you want to set your channel to a value which
leaves at least two channels spaced between the two networks.
Example: If your neighbor’s wireless network runs on channel 3, set your channel
to 6 or higher. Even a handheld phone in your household can cause interference
with the wireless signal, and changing the channel by two or three numbers often
resolves the problem.
2.7.2 Advanced Wireless Settings
Normally, there is no need to make any changes here. Unless you know that your
network requires special settings, you can proceed to 2.7.3 Wireless Security.
Fragment Threshold — Set the fragment threshold of the wireless radio. NOTE: If
you aren’t sure what this should be set to, leave it as the default value of 2346.
RTS Threshold — Set the RTS (return to sender) threshold of the wireless radio.
NOTE: If unsure what this should be set to, leave it as the default value of 2347.
Beacon Interval — Set the beacon interval of the wireless radio. NOTE: If you
aren’t sure what this should be set to, leave it as the default value of 100.
DTIM Period — Set the DTIM (delivery traffic indication message) period of the
wireless radio. NOTE: If .you aren’t sure what this should be set to, leave it as the
default value of 3.
Data Rate — Set the wireless data transfer rate to a specific value. Since most
wireless devices will negotiate with each other and pick a proper data transfer
rate automatically, it’s not necessary to change this value unless you know what
will happen after modification.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
N Data Rate — Same as above, but only for 802.11n clients.
Channel Width — Set the channel width of the wireless radio. NOTE: If you aren’t
sure what this should be set to, leave it as the default setting (“Auto 20/40 MHz”).
Preamble Type — Set the preamble type. NOTE: If you aren’t sure what this should
be set to, leave it as the default setting (“Short Preamble”).
Broadcast ESSID — Decide if the wireless router will broadcast its own ESSID. You
can hide the ESSID of your wireless router (select “Disable”) so only people who
know the ESSID of your wireless router can connect to it.
CTS Protect — Enabling this function reduces the chance of radio signal collisions
between 802.11b and 802.11g/n wireless access points. NOTE: The recommended
setting is either “Auto” or “Always.”
Tx Power — Set the output power of the wireless radio. Unless you’re using this
router in a really big space, you may not need to set this to “100%.”
WMM — Set WMM (Wi-Fi Multimedia, which enhances the data transfer
performance of multimedia content sent over a wireless network) to “Enable” or
leave it as the default (“Disable”).
2.7.3 Wireless Security
Unlike the Advanced Wireless Settings options, these settings are critical: If not done
properly, freeloaders can use your Internet connection without your knowledge
and hackers could gain access to your network and steal vital data such as credit
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
27
card information or bank records. Click the “Security Settings” menu on the left of
the Web management interface to select one of the four encryption methods from
the drop-down menu (see image below).
2.7.3.1 Disable Wireless Security
When you select this mode, data encryption is disabled and every wireless device
in proximity will be able to connect your wireless router if no other security measure
is enabled (like using MAC address access control disabling ESSID broadcast).
NOTE: Only use this option when you want to allow everyone to use your wireless
router and you don’t care if someone reads the data you transfer over the network
without your consent.
2.7.3.2 Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP)
WEP encryption is an outdated method to secure your network, as it doesn’t meet
the security standards of modern data encryption. Thus, it’s not recommended that
you use WEP,unless you use WLAN adapters or WLAN networking devices that
don’t support WPA/WPA2 encryption. If your WLAN card supports WPA/WPA2,
you can proceed to section 2.7.3.3 Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA).
Key Length — There are two types of WEP key length: 64-bit and 128-bit. Selecting
“128-bit” is safer than “64-bit,” but will reduce some data transfer performance.
Key Format — There are two types of key format: ASCII and hexadecimal, or “hex.”
When you select a key format, the number of characters in the key will be displayed.
For example, if you select “64-bit” as the key length and “Hex” as the key format,
you’ll see the message to the right of “Key Format” is “Hex (10 characters),” which
means the length of the WEP key is 10 characters.
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Default Tx Key — You can set up to four sets of WEP keys, and you can designate
one as the default here. NOTE: If you don’t know which one you should use,
select “Key 1.”
Encryption Key 1-4 — Enter WEP key characters here. The number of characters
must be the same as the number displayed n the “Key Format” field. You can
use any alphanumerical characters (0-9, a-z and A-Z) if you select “ASCII” for
the key format. If you select “Hex” as key the format, you can use 0-9, a-f and
A-F. You must enter at least one encryption key here; if you enter multiple WEP
keys, they should not be same.
Enable 802.1x Authentication — IEEE 802.1x is an authentication protocol. Every
user must use a valid account to log in to this router before accessing the wireless
LAN. The authentication is processed by a RADIUS server. This mode
authenticates the user by IEEE 802.1x, but it does not encrypt the data during
communication. If there is a RADIUS server in your environment, enable this
function. Check this box and another sub-menu will appear:
RADIUS Server IP address — Enter the IP address of the RADIUS server.
RADIUS Server Port — Enter the port number of the RADIUS server.
RADIUS Server Password — Enter the password of the RADIUS server.
EXAMPLES OF A WEP KEY
Obviously, you don’t want to copy these examples:
•
•
•
•
ASCII (5 characters): daisy
ASCII (13 characters): digitalFAMILY
Hex (10 characters): 287d2aa732
Hex (26 characters): 9284bcda8427c9e036f7abcd84
To improve the security level, don’t use words found in a dictionary or that are too
easily remembered. (“daisy” is a bad example and is just intended to show how a
WEP key looks). Wireless clients will remember the WEP key, so you only need to
input the WEP key for a wireless client once. It’s worth using a complicated WEP
key to improve the security level. Once you enter your WEP key and save the
settings, all wireless clients will need to enter that identical character configuration
in order to gain access to your wireless network. NOTE: 128-bit encryption and
ASCII key format are recommended.
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29
2.7.3.3 Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) Pre-Shared Key
WPA Unicast Cipher Suite — Once you select one of the three ciper options —
“WPA (TKIP),” “WPA2 (AES)” or “WPA2 Mixed” — make sure your wireless
clients support it.
Pre-shared Key Format — Select the type of pre-shared key from the drop-down
menu: “Passphrase” (8 or more alphanumerical characters, up to 63) or “Hex”
(64 characters of 0-9 and a-f).
Pre-shared Key — Enter the WPA passphrase. NOTE: As mentioned earlier, try to
avoid common terms or character combinations.
Some wireless devices (especially those manufactured before 2003) only support
the WEP or WPA (TKIP) cipher. A driver upgrade would be needed for them to be
able to use WPA and WPA2 encryption.
2.7.3.4 WPA RADIUS
If you have a RADIUS server, this router can work with it and provide even safer
wireless authentication.
WPA Unicast Cipher Suite — Once you select one of the three ciper options —
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
“WPA (TKIP),” “WPA2 (AES)” or “WPA2 Mixed” — make sure your wireless
clients support it.
RADIUS Server IP address — Enter the IP address of the RADIUS server.
RADIUS Server Port — Enter the port number of the RADIUS server.
RADIUS Server Password — Enter the password of the RADIUS server.
2.7.4 Wireless Access Control
This function helps to prevent unauthorized users from connecting to your router:
Only those wireless devices that have the MAC address you assign here can gain
access. The MAC address is a unique hardware identification number that every
network adapter carries. You can use this function in combination with data
encryption (WPA, WPA2 or WEP) to create an additional layer of security for your
wireless network.
Up to 20 MAC addresses can be assigned using this function. Click the “Wireless”
menu on the left of the Web management interface, then click “Access Control.”
NOTE: As explained below, all allowed MAC address will display in the MAC
Address Filtering table.
Delete — To delete a specific MAC address entry, check the “Select” box of the
MAC address you want to delete, then click “Delete Selected.” (You can select
more than one MAC address at a time.)
Delete All — Click to delete all MAC addresses listed.
Enable Access Control — Select to enforce MAC address filtering. The router will
not filter the MAC addresses of wireless clients if this is left unchecked.
MAC Address — Enter the MAC addresses of your wireless devices here without
special characters. If the MAC address label of your wireless device indicates
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31
“aa-bb-cc-dd-ee-ff” or “aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff,” just enter “aabbccddeeff” (without the
quote marks).
Comment — This is optional and can be left blank, but it’s recommended that you
enter something (such as “My Desktop,” as shown) that will help you identify an
address later.
Add — Click to add the MAC address and associated comment to the MAC Address
Filtering table.
Clear — Click to remove whatever you entered in the “MAC Address” or “Comment”
fields.
2.7.5 Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS)
Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) is the simplest way to build a connection between
wireless network clients and this router. You don’t need to select an encryption
mode and input a long encryption passphrase every time you need to set up a
wireless client: You only need to press a button on a wireless device/client and
this wireless router, and the WPS will do the rest for you.
This router supports two types of WPS: Push-Button Configuration (PBC) and PIN
code. To use PBC, you need to push a specific button on the wireless client to start
the WPS mode and switch this router to WPS mode. You can push the Reset/WPS
button of this router, or click “Start PBC” in the Web configuration interface to do
this. To use PIN code, you need to know the PIN code of the wireless client and
switch it to WPS mode, then provide the PIN code of the wireless client you want
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
to connect to this wireless router.
Click the “Wireless” menu on the left of the Web management interface, then click
“WPS.”
Enable WPS Settings — Check the box to enable the function; uncheck to disable.
Enable WPS Proxy — Check the box to enable the function; uncheck to disable.
When enabled, it allows another access point to serve as an “intermediary” device
for the connection between wireless network clients and the router.
WPS Status — “Configured” is displayed if the wireless security (encryption) function
of this wireless router is properly set. “Not configured” is shown if the WPS
function has not been configured correctly.
PinCode Self — This is the WPS PIN code of this wireless router, which is useful
when you need to build a wireless connection by WPS with other WPS-enabled
wireless devices.
SSID — As it defines this router.
Authentication Mode — If you don’t enable the security function of the router before
WPS is activated, the router will auto-set the security to WPA (AES) and generate
a set of passphrase keys for WPS connection.
Passphrase Key — As it was configured.
Config Mode — There are “Registrar” and “Enrollee” modes as options for the WPS
connection. When “Registrar” is enabled, wireless clients will follow the router’s
wireless settings for a WPS connection. When “Enrolle” mode is enabled, the
router will follow the wireless settings of wireless client for a WPS connection.
Configure by Push Button — Click “Start PBC” to start a Push-Button-style WPS
setup procedure. This wireless router will wait for WPS requests from wireless
clients for two minutes. The WLAN LED on the wireless router will be on for two
minutes when this wireless router is waiting for an incoming WPS request.
Configure by Client PinCode — Enter the PIN code of the wireless client you want
to connect, and click “Start PIN.” The WLAN LED on the wireless router will be
on when this wireless router is waiting for an incoming WPS request.
2.7.6 Security Tips for Wireless Networks
Below are five reminders that will help you maintain a higher level of security for
your wireless network.
• Never use simple words for the WPA/WEP encryption passphrase. A good
password cannot be found in the dictionary and consists of a combination of
characters, symbols and numbers. You should also refrain from using passwords
that carry a personal meaning — names of pets, names or birthdays of a spouse,
and such — as these can easily be guessed by unauthorized users.
• Use WPA versus WEP whenever possible: WPA encryption and (even more so)
WPA2 encryption are much stronger. If your wireless network adapters support
SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
33
WPA or WPA2, you should abandon WEP entirely.
• You can hide the ESSID of this router by setting the “Broadcast ESSID” option
(refer to section 2.7.2.Advanced Wireless Settings) to “Disable.” Once this
option is disabled, the router will no longer broadcast the SSID; thus, wireless
clients in the area will not be able to see the wireless network in the list of
available WLAN networks. Keep in mind that hiding the SSID will make it more
difficult for wireless clients to join the network — and that is basically the idea.
Instead of selecting the wireless network from the list, the user now must
manually enter the wireless SSID, which will be difficult without knowing what it
is. While this option offers additional protection, you should never rely on this
mechanism as your only means of protection. A WPA encryption key is still
highly recommended. Hiding the SSID of your access point is simply one
additional step you can take.
• Use the Access Control function (section 2.7.4) so people who are not on your
list will not be able to connect to your network. If you don’t have guest traffic, you
normally know which computers access your network, and you can specifically
allow those computers and deny all the others.
• Utilizing all three mechanisms (encryption, no SSID broadcast and MAC address
filtering) offers the best protection against unauthorized access.
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SYSTEM & NETWORK SETUP
3 ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
3.1 Quality of Service (QoS)
Quality of service provides an efficient way for computers on the network to share
the Internet bandwidth with a promised quality of Internet service. Without QoS,
all computers and devices on the network compete with each other to get Internet
bandwidth, and some applications which require guaranteed bandwidth (like video
streaming and network telephone) are affected negatively, resulting in an interruption
of video/audio transfers. QoS allows you to limit the maximum bandwidth or grant
a guaranteed bandwidth for a specific computer or network service port.
3.1.1 Basic QoS Settings
Click “QoS” on the left of the Web management interface.
Enable QoS— Check to enable the function; uncheck if you prefer not to enforce
QoS bandwidth limitations.
Total Download Bandwidth — You can set the limit of total download bandwidth in
kilobits. To disable the download bandwidth limitation, enter “0.”
Total Upload Bandwidth — You can set the limit of total upload bandwidth in kilobits.
To disable the upload bandwidth limitation, enter “0.” NOTE: Both Total Download
and Total Upload bandwidths should be specified according to the maximum
performance of your Internet service. If you’re not sure about these numbers,
contact your ISP. QoS can only be effective if accurate information is provided.
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
35
Current QoS Table — All existing QoS rules are shown here.
Add — Click to add new QoS rules (see section 3.1.2 Adding a New QoS Rule).
Edit — To modify the content of a specific rule, check the “Select” box of that rule,
then click “Edit.” NOTE: Only one rule should be selected at a time. If you didn’t
select a rule before clicking “Edit,” you’ll be prompted to add a new rule.
Delete — You can select one or more rules to delete by checking the “Select” box of
the rule(s) you want to delete, then clicking “Delete.” If the QoS table is empty, this
button is inaccessible.
Delete All — Click to delete all rules in the QoS table. If the QoS table is empty,
this button is inaccessible.
Move Up — Click to raise the priority of the selected QoS rule.
Move Down — Click to lower the priority of the selected QoS rule.
3.1.2 Adding a New QoS Rule
After you click “Add” on the QoS screen, you’ll have these options.
Rule Name — Enter a name for the QoS rule (up to 15 alphanumerical characters;
e.g, “VoIP Phone”).
Bandwidth — Set the bandwidth amount of the QoS rule. You need to select the
data direction of this rule (Upload or Download) and the speed of the bandwidth
limitation in kbps, then select the type of QoS: “Guarantee” (guaranteed usable
bandwidth for this rule) or “Max” (set the maximum bandwidth for the application
allowed by this rule).
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
Local IP Address — Specify the local (source) IP address that will be affected by
this rule. Enter the starting IP address in the left field, and enter the end address
in the right field to define a range of IP addresses; or just enter the IP address in
the left field to define a single IP address.
Local Port Range — Enter the range of local (source) port numbers that should be
affected by this rule. To apply this rule on ports 80 to 90, enter “80-90”; to apply
this rule only to a single port, just enter the port number, such as “80.”
Remote IP Address — Specify the remote (destination) IP address that should be
affected by this rule. Enter the starting IP address in the left field, and enter the
end address in the right field to define a range of IP addresses; or just enter the
IP address in the left field to define a single IP address.
Remote Port Range — Enter the range of remote (destination) port numbers that
should be affected by this rule. To apply this rule on ports 80 to 90, enter “80-90”;
to apply this rule only to a single port, just enter the port number, such as “80.”
If the remote (destination) IP address and/or port number is universal, just leave
it blank.
Traffic Type — Select the traffic type of this rule from the drop-down menu: “None,”
“SMTP,” “HTTP,” “POP3” or “FTP.” To make this rule an IP address-based rule
(to apply the limitation on all traffic from/to the specified IP address or port
number), select “None.”
Protocol — Select the protocol type of this rulefrom the drop-down menu: “TCP” or
“UDP.” If you don’t know what protocol your application uses, try “TCP” first and
switch to “UDP” if this rule doesn’t seem to work.
Click “Save” to add the new rule. It will appear in the current QoS table. Should an
error message show up after you click “Save,” you can try again, but fixing the
problem first and then clicking “Save” will have a better chance of working.
To erase all values you’ve entered, click “Reset.”
3.2 Network Address Translation (NAT)
Network Address Translation (NAT, also known as Network Masquerading, Native
Address Translation or IP Masquerading) is a technique of transceiving network
traffic through a router that involves re-writing the source and/or destination IP
addresses and usually the TCP/UDP port numbers of IP packets as they pass
through. Checksums (both IP and TCP/UDP) must also be rewritten to take account
of the changes. Most systems using NAT do so in order to enable multiple hosts
on a private network to access the Internet using a single public IP address (see
gateway). Many network administrators find NAT a convenient technique and use
it widely. Simply put: The router’s NAT function allows the connection of multiple
computers to one Internet line.
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
37
Click the “NAT” menu on the left of the Web management interface. NAT is enabled
by default, and there is normally no need to change this.
3.2.1 Port Forwarding
With this function, you can tell the router to forward incoming connections bound to
a specific port or port range to an IP address on your local network. Many online
games, game consoles with Internet service, remote access applications and
special network devices such as network cameras require you to open and forward
ports, often referred to as port mapping.
With port forwarding, the external and internal ports are always the same. If you
need to redirect an incoming request on public port A to internal port B, you need
to use the Virtual Server function (see section 3.2.2 Virtual Server).
Enable Port Forwarding — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
Private IP — Enter the IP address of the computer on the local network that provides
Internet service.
Computer Name — With all the computers connected to the router listed in this
drop-down menu, you can select a name without checking its IP address.
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
Type — Select the type of connection from the drop-down menu: “TCP,” “UDP” or
“Both.” If you’re not sure which to use, select “Both.”
Port Range — Enter the starting port number in the left field and enter the ending
port number in the right field. To redirect a single port number, just enter the port
number in the left field.
Comment — Enter text to describe this mapping, using up to 16 alphanumerical
characters; e.g., “camera web port.”
Add — Add the mapping to the Current Port Forwarding Table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries.
Current Port Forwarding Table — Shows all existing port forwarding rules (port
mapping).
Delete — Select a port forwarding mapping by checking the “Select” box of the
mapping, then clicking “Delete.” If there’s no existing mapping, this button will be
grayed out.
Delete All — Click to delete all existing port mappings.
Reset — Click to unselect all mappings.
3.2.2 Virtual Server
This function is very similar to Port Forwarding. The difference is that Virtual Server
only allows you to specify one port. On the other hand, it enables you to redirect
a public port to a different private port (e.g., public port 80 redirects to private port
85). This makes Virtual Server the obvious choice for hosting public Web services
(such as a Web server) on a computer connected to one of the router LAN ports.
Enable Virtual Server — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
39
Private IP — Enter the IP address of the computer on the local network that provides
Internet service.
Computer Name — With all the computers connected to the router listed in this
drop-down menu, you can select a name without checking its IP address.
Private Port — Enter the port number of the IP address that provides Internet
service.
Type — Select the type of connection from the drop-down menu: “TCP,” “UDP” or
“Both.” If you’re not sure which to use, select “Both.”
Public Port — Select the port number of Internet IP address that will be redirected
to the port number of the local IP address defined above.
Comment — Enter text to describe this mapping, using up to 16 alphanumerical
characters; e.g., “FTP Server.”
Add — Add the mapping to the Virtual Server Table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries.
Current Virtual Server Table — Shows all existing virtual server mappings.
Delete — Select a virtual server mapping by checking the “Select” box of the
mapping, then clicking “Delete.” If there’s no existing mapping, this button will be
grayed out.
Delete All — Click to delete all existing virtual server mappings.
Reset — Click to unselect all mappings.
3.2.3 Port Mapping for Special Applications
Some applications require more than one connection a time. This function allows
these applications to work when they won’t work with simple NAT rules.
Enable Special Applications — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
IP Address — Enter the IP address of the computer where you want to open the
ports.
Computer Name — With all the computers connected to the router listed in this
drop-down menu, you can select a name without checking its IP address.
TCP Port to Open — This is the outgoing (outbound) range of TCP port numbers
for this particular application.
UDP Port to Open — This is the outgoing (outbound) range of UDP port numbers
for this particular application.
Comment — Enter a description for this setting.
Popular Applications — The drop-down menu lists some popular applications that
require multiple connections. To save one to the Current Trigger-Port Table,
select it and click “Add.”
Add — Click to add a selection to the Current Trigger-Port Table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries.
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
Current Trigger-Port Table — All the settings for the specifal applications are listed
here.
Delete — To remove a Special Application setting from the Current Trigger-Port
Table, select the setting and click “Delete.”
Delete All — Click to delete all existing specifal application settings.
3.2.4 UPnP
This function enables network auto-configuration for peer-to-peer communications.
With this function, network devices will be able to communicate with other UPnPenabled devices directly and learn about other devices. Many network devices and
applications rely on UPnP function nowadays.
UPnP Module — There is nothing to .configure for UPnP. Just select “Enable” or
“Disable.”
3.2.5 ALG
Application Layer Gateway (ALG) is a special function of this router. It includes
many preset routing rules for numerous applications (as shown below) that require
special support to work with the NAT architecture. Check “Enable” next to the
listing and click “Apply.”
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
41
3.3 Firewall
In addition to the NAT feature, this router provides firewall functionality to block
malicious intruders from accessing the computers on your local network. Click the
“Firewall” menu on the left of the Web management interface.
Firewall Module — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
3.3.1 Access Control
This function allows or denies computers with a specific MAC address — or a
specific IP address, protocol or port — access to the network.
Enable MAC Filtering — Check this box to enable MAC address-based filtering,
and select “Deny” or “Allow” to determine the behavior of the MAC filtering table.
If you select “Deny,” all MAC addresses listed in the filtering table will be denied
access to the network; if you select “Allow,” only MAC addresses listed in the
filtering table will be able to connect to the network, and all other network devices
will be rejected.
Client PC MAC address — Enter the MAC address of the computer or network
device. Dashes (–) or colons ( : ) are not required. For example, if the MAC
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
address label of your device reads “aa-bb-cc-dd-ee-ff” or “aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff,” just
enter “aabbccddeeff” (without the quote marks).
Computer Name — With all the computers connected to the router listed in this
drop-down menu, you can select a name without checking its IP address.
Comment — Enter up to 16 alphanumerical characters to identify the MAC address,
such as “Room 2A Computer.” This is optional, and you can leave it blank.
Add — Click to add the MAC address and associated comment to the MAC address
filtering table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries (in either panel).
Current MAC Filtering Table — All existing MAC addresses in the filtering table.
Delete — You can select one or more MAC addresses to delete by checking the
“Select” box of .those you want to delete, then clicking “Delete.”
Delete All — Click to delete all MAC addresses listed.
Enable IP Filtering — Check this box to enable IP address-based filtering, and
select “Deny” or “Allow” to determine the behavior of the IP filtering table. If you
select “Deny,” all IP addresses listed in the filtering table will be denied access
to the network; if you select “Allow,” only IP addresses listed in the filtering table
will be able to connect to the network; all other network devices will be rejected.
Add PC — Click to add a new IP address to the IP filtering table. Up to 20
addresses can be added. (Refer to section 3.3.1.1 Add PC below.)
Delete — You can select one or more IP addresses to delete by checking the “Select”
box of those you want to delete, then clicking “Delete.”
Delete All — Click to delete all IP addresses listed.
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
43
3.3.2 Add PC
Clicking “Add PC” on the Access Control screen will display this page.
Client PC Description — Enter up to 16 alphanumerical characters to describe this
IP address.
Client PC IP Address — Enter the starting IP address in the left field and the end
IP address in the right field to define a range of IP addresses, or just input the IP
address in the left field to define a single IP address.
Client PC Service — Select all services you want to allow or deny through this IP
address.
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
Protocol — If the service you need is not listed, you can create a new service
yourself. Select “TCP” or “UDP” from the drop-down menu and follow the Port
Range instructions below. If you’re not sure .which Protocol to use, select “Both.”
Port Range — Enter the port range of the new service. To specify ports 80 to 90,
enter “80-90”; to apply this rule to a single port, just enter the port number.
Add — Click to save the settings. You’ll be re-directed to the previous menu, and
the rule you just set will appear in the IP Filtering Table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries.
3.3.3 URL Blocking
To prevent computers in the local network from accessing certain Web sites, you
can define the Web sites, IP addresses or keywords here. This function is useful
for parents and company managers: The former can protect children from
inappropriate contents on the Internet; the latter can protect employees from
losing their jobs.
You can block full Web site URLs, such as “www.microsoft.com”; IP addresses,
such as “207.46.232.182”; or just a part of a URL. For example, if you enter the
keyword “downloads,” the computer can connect to “www.microsoft.com” but not
“www.microsoft.com/downloads.”
Enable URL Blocking — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
URL/Keyword — Enter the URL (host name or IP address of a Web site, such as
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
45
“http://www.blocked-site.com” or “http://11.22.33.44”), or a keyword contained in
a URL (like “pornography,” “sex,” “banner advertisement,” etc).
Add — Click to add the URL/keyword to the URL/Keyword Filtering Table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries in the “URL/Keyword” text field.
Current URL Blocking Table — All existing URL/keywords in the filtering table.
Delete — Select a URL/keyword by checking the “Select” box of the entry, then
clicking “Delete.”
Delete All — Click to delete all existing URL/keyword entries.
3.3.4 DoS Attack Prevention
A denial-of-service (DoS) attack is an attempt to make a computer resource
unavailable to its intended users. DoS attacks generally consist of the concerted,
malevolent efforts of a person or persons to prevent an Internet site or service from
functioning efficiently or at all, temporarily or indefinitely. One common method of
attack involves saturating the target (victim) machine, in this case the router, with
external communications requests, such that it cannot respond to legitimate traffic
or responds so slowly as to be rendered effectively unavailable.
This router has a built-in DoS attack prevention mechanism to prevent DoS attacks
from succeeding. Activating all options is recommended.
Ping of Death — Ping of Death is a special
packet, and it will cause certain computers
to stop responding. Check this box and the
router will filter out this kind of packet.
Discard Ping From WAN — Ping is a common
and useful tool for knowing the connection
status of a specified remote network device,
but some malicious intruder could try to fill
your network bandwidth with a lot of PING
request data packets to make your Internet
connection become very slow — even
unusable. Check this box and the router will
ignore all inbound PING requests. NOTE:
Unfortunately, when you activate this function, you will not be able to ping your
own router from the Internet, either.
Port Scan — An intruder could try to use a port scanner to determine how many
ports of your Internet IP address are open, through which they can collect a lot
of valuable information. Check this box and the router will block all traffic that’s
involved in trying to scan your Internet IP address.
Sync Flood — Another kind of attack, this one uses a lot of fake connection requests
to consume the memory of your server, rendering it unusable. Check this box
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ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
and the router will filter this kind of traffic out.
Advanced Settings — Click to set advanced settings of the DoS prevention method
listed above. (See section 3.3.4.1 DoS – Advanced Settings below.)
3.3.4.1 DoS – Advanced Settings
Clicking “Advanced Settings” on the first DoS Module screen will display this page.
Ping of Death — Set the threshold of when this DoS prevention mechanism will be
activated. Check the box for Ping of Death and enter the frequency of threshold
(how many packets per second, minute or hour). You can also enter the “Burst”
value: When this number of Ping of Death packets is received within a very
short timeframe, this DoS prevention mechanism will be activated.
Discard Ping From WAN — Check the box to activate this mechanism.
Port Scan — A number of port scan methods are listed here. Check one or more
DoS attack methods you want to prevent.
Sync Flood — As with Ping of Death, you can set the threshold for when this DoS
prevention mechanism will be activated.
3.3.5 Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)
With NAT and the firewall, this router protects all connected computers in your local
network. Sometimes, however, you may want to expose a computer or network
device to the Internet intentionally for various reasons; e.g., troubleshooting of
network problems. Placing a computer in the DMZ puts it at great risk because the
protection mechanisms of the router no longer apply.
So, unless you know what you are doing, you should not use this function at all.
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
47
Enable DMZ — Check to enable this function; uncheck to disable.
Public IP — Select “Dynamic IP” or “Static IP.” If you select “Dynamic IP,” you need
to select an Internet connection session from the drop-down menu; if you select
“Static IP,” enter the IP address that you want to map to a specific private IP
address.
Client PC IP Address — Enter the private IP address that the Internet IP address
will be mapped to. That is the computer you want to bypass the firewall and NAT.
Computer Name — With all the computers connected to the router listed in this
drop-down menu, you can select a name without checking its IP address.
Add — Click to add the public IP address and associated private IP address to the
DMZ table.
Reset — Click to remove all entries (in either panel).
Current DMZ Table — All existing public/private IP address mappings.
Delete — Select one or more DMZ entries to delete by checking the “Select” box of
those you want to delete, then clicking “Delete.”
Delete All — Click to delete all DMZ entries.
48
ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
4 ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS/FEATURES
4.1 Status
This screen and the submenus that can be accessed from here show information
about the firmware version of the router, the Internet connection, IP address
information, log files and more. Click the “Status” link at the upper-right corner of
the Web management interface.
In case you experience technical difficulties with the router and need to contact
technical support, you should write down the Boot Code Version and Runtime Code
Version shown on your screen (which may vary from the example shown here). It
is very likely that you would be asked to provide these numbers by the technical
support representative.
4.1.1 Internet Connection
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS
49
This screen shows IP address information the router has obtained. If you experience
problems with your Internet connection, open this page and check the contents.
Values for IP address, default gateway and primary DNS should always be filled.
If they’re missing, it indicates that there is a connection problem preventing the
router from accessing the Internet.
4.1.2 Device Status
This screen shows information about the wireless configuration as well as the
LAN configuration, including information about the encryption and IP address
settings of the router.
4.1.3 System Log
All important system events are logged here.
Save — Click to save the current event log to a text file.
Clear — Click to delete all event log messages displayed.
Refresh — Click to refresh the view to display the most current event log messages.
4.1.4 Security Log
You can keep an eye on intruders here.
Save — Click to save the current event log to a text file.
Clear — Click to delete all event log messages displayed.
Refresh — Click to refresh the view to display the most current event log messages.
50
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS
4.1.5 Active DHCP Client
If you’re using the DHCP server function of this router, you can use this function to
check all active DHCP leases issued by this router.
4.1.6 Statistics
Statistics of the wireless LAN, wired LAN and WAN interface of the router are
shown on this screen.
Refresh — Click to display the latest information. NOTE: The information is
accumulative and is only reset after the router is restarted.
4.2 Tools
This screen and the submenus that can be accessed from here provide options
and information helpful in managing files and router information. Click the “Tools”
link at the upper-right corner of the Web management interface
4.2.1 Configuration Tools
This screen lets you back up the configuration of the router to a file so you can
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS
51
reload it at a later time. You can save different configurations, each with unique
settings, and reload them as needed.
Backup Settings — Click “Save...” and you’ll be prompted to download the
configuration as a file (the default filename is “default.bin”). Remember to save it
as another filename each time you back up for easier retrieval of information..
Restore Settings — Click “Browse…” to select a saved configuration file from your
computer, then click “Upload” to transfer the configuration file to the router. After
the configuration is uploaded, the router’s current configuration will be replaced
by the file you just uploaded.
Restore to Factory Default — Click to reset all settings of the router to the factory
default values.
4.2.2 Firmware Upgrade
The firmware of the router is like the operating system on your computer. Firmware
upgrades for this router may be available at manhattan-products.com. If you
experience technical difficulties, you should first check if any updated firmware is
available for the router and install it using this firmware upgrade function.
Next — Click to proceed to the upgrade procedure screen.
52
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS
Browse — Click to locate the firmware file you’ve downloaded. If the file is in Zip
(compressed archive) format, you need to uncompress .it prior to the upgrade.
Apply — Click to start the firmware upgrade process.
Never interrupt the upgrade process by closing the Web browser or by physically
disconnecting your computer from the router. If the upgrade process is interrupted
by a network problem or a power failure, the router will cease to function. Damages
resulting from improperly performed firmware upgrades are excluded from the
product warranty!
4.2.3 Reset
This screen lets you restart the router without disconnecting the power from the
unit. A restart (or system reset) may be necessary if the router responds slowly, if
your Internet connection speed has dropped or if the router behaves in an unusual
manner.
Apply — Click to reset the router. It will be operational again after a few minutes.
NOTE: This function does not change any settings you have made. It simply restarts
(reboots) the router — just as Start / Shut Down / Restart reboots your computer —
freeing up memory and system resources for more stable operation.
ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS
53
5 TROUBLESHOOTING
This section helps you troubleshoot problems you may be experiencing with the
router. Before you contact your dealer for help, you should perform the following
troubleshooting steps as they apply to your situation.
The router is not responding when I want to access it with the Web browser.
• Check the power connection and the connection of the network cable. All cords
and cables should be correctly and firmly inserted into the router.
• If all LEDs on the router are off, check the status of the A/C power adapter, and
make sure it’s correctly plugged into your power outlet.
• Verify the IP address you connect to. The router’s default IP address is
192.168.2.1, but you may have changed it. Always use the address
http://manhattanrouter to access the Web Administrator interface.
• Are you using a MAC or an IP address filter? Try to connect to the router with
another computer and see if it works; if not, restore the router’s factory default
settings by pressing the Reset button on the back panel of the router for at least
10 seconds.
• Set your computer to obtain an IP address automatically (DHCP) and check if
your computer gets an IP address.
• If you did a firmware upgrade before the problem started, contact your dealer
for assistance.
I can’t get connected to the Internet.
• Go to Status / Internet Connection and check the Internet connection status.
• Be patient — sometimes the Internet is just slow.
• Connect a computer directly to the DSL or cable modem to see if you can
access the Internet that way. If you can, check the WAN connection settings of
the router to make sure they are set up correctly.
• Check the PPPoE / L2TP / PPTP user ID and password again.
• Call your Internet service provider and ask if there’s something wrong with their
service.
• If you just can’t connect to one or more Web sites but you can still use other
Internet services, check the URL/keyword filter to make sure that you are not
trying to access a blocked Web site.
• Restart your modem and the router.
• Reset the device provided by your Internet service provider.
• Try to use an IP address instead of a hostname. If you can use an IP address to
communicate with a remote server but can’t use a hostname, check the DNS
settings.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
My wireless notebook cannot see or connect to the wireless network.
• Check if Broadcast ESSID is off. Remember that you need to input the ESSID
on your wireless client manually if the ESSID broadcast is disabled.
• Check that you’ve securely attached the antenna(s).
• Make sure that you’re not too far away from the router.
I can’t log on to the Web management interface: The password is wrong.
• Make sure you’re connecting to the correct IP address of the router.
• The password is case-sensitive. Make sure the Caps Lock feature isn’t on.
• If you’ve simply forgotten your password, do a hardware reset using the Reset
button on the back panel of the router.
The router becomes hot.
• It’s normal for the router to heat up during operation, and this is usually nothing
to worry about. If, however, the router gets too hot to touch, or if you smell
something burning or see smoke coming from the router or A/C power adapter,
immediately disconnect the router and adapter from the utility power — making sure it’s safe to do this — and call your dealer for help.
The date and time of all the event logs are wrong.
• Adjust the internal clock of the router.
TROUBLESHOOTING
55
6 GLOSSARY
Default Gateway (Router): Every non-router IP device needs to configure a default
gateway’s IP address. When the device sends out an IP packet, if the destination is
not on the same network, the device has to send the packet to its default gateway,
which will then send it out toward the destination.
DHCP: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. This protocol automatically gives
every computer on your home network an IP address.
DNS Server IP Address: DNS stands for Domain Name System, which allows
Internet servers to have a domain name (such as www.Broadbandrouter.com) and
one or more IP addresses (such as 192.34.45.8). A DNS server keeps a database
of Internet servers and their respective domain names and IP addresses, so that
when a domain name is requested (as in typing “Broadbandrouter.com” into your
Internet browser), the user is sent to the proper IP address. The DNS server IP
address used by the computers on your home network is the location of the DNS
server your ISP has assigned to you.
DSL Modem: DSL stands for Digital Subscriber Line. A DSL modem uses your
existing phone lines to transmit data at high speeds.
Idle Timeout: Idle Timeout is designed so that after there is no traffic to the
Internet for a pre-configured amount of time, the connection will be disconnected.
IP Address and Network (Subnet) Mask: An Internet Protocol address consists
of a series of four numbers separated by periods, which identifies a single, unique
Internet computer host in an IP network. Example: 192.168.2.1 consists of two
portions: the IP network address and the host identifier. The IP address is a 32-bit
binary pattern that can be represented as four cascaded decimal numbers separated
by “.”: aaa.aaa.aaa.aaa, where each “aaa” can be anything from 000 to 255; or as
four cascaded binary numbers separated by “.”: bbbbbbbb.bbbbbbbb.bbbbbbbb.
bbbbbbbb, where each “b” can either be 0 or 1. A network mask is also a 32-bit
binary pattern, and consists of consecutive leading 1’s followed by consecutive
trailing 0’s, such as 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000. Therefore, sometimes
a network mask can also be described simply as “x” number of leading 1’s. When
both are represented side by side in their binary forms, all bits in the IP address
that correspond to 1’s in the network mask become part of the IP network address,
and the remaining bits correspond to the host ID. For example, if the IP address
for a device is, in its binary form, 11011001.10110000.10010000.00000111, and if
its network mask is 11111111.11111111.11110000.00000000 it means the device’s
network address is 11011001.10110000.10010000.00000000, and its host ID is
00000000.00000000.00000000.00000111. This is a convenient and efficient method
for routers to route IP packets to their destination.
56
GLOSSARY
ISP: Internet Service Provider. An ISP is a business that provides connectivity to
the Internet for individuals and other businesses or organizations.
LAN: Local Area Network. A LAN is a group of computers and devices connected
together in a relatively small area (such as a house or an office). Your home network
is considered a LAN.
MAC Address: MAC stands for Media Access Control. A MAC address is the
hardware address of a device connected to a network, and is a unique identifier for
a device with an Ethernet interface. It is composed of two parts: three bytes of data
that corresponds to the Manufacturer ID (unique for each manufacturer), and three
bytes that are often used as the product’s serial number.
NAT: Network Address Translation. This process allows all of the computers on your
home network to use one IP address. Using the broadband router’s NAT capability,
you can access the Internet from any computer on your home network without
having to purchase more IP addresses from your ISP.
PPPoE: Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet. Point-to-Point Protocol is a secure
data transmission method originally created for dial-up connections; PPPoE is for
Ethernet connections. PPPoE relies on two widely accepted standards, Ethernet
and the Point-to-Point Protocol. It is a communications protocol for transmitting
information over Ethernet between different manufacturers.
Protocol: A protocol is a set of rules for interaction agreed upon between multiple
parties so that when they interface with each other based on such a protocol, the
interpretation of their behavior is well-defined and can be made objectively, without
confusion or misunderstanding.
Router: A router is an intelligent network device that forwards packets between
different networks based on network layer address information such as IP addresses.
Subnet Mask: A subnet mask, which may be a part of the TCP/IP information
provided by your ISP, is a set of four numbers (e.g., 255.255.255.0) configured like
an IP address. It’s used to create IP address numbers used only within a particular
network (as opposed to valid IP address numbers recognized by the Internet,
which must be assigned by InterNIC).
TCP/IP, UDP: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol and Unreliable
Datagram Protocol are the standard protocols for data transmission over the Internet.
Both TCP and UDP are transport layer protocols. TCP performs proper error
detection and error recovery, and thus is reliable. UDP, on the other hand, is not
reliable. They both run on top of the IP (Internet Protocol), a network layer protocol.
WAN: A Wide Area Network connects computers located in geographically
separate areas (e.g., different buildings, cities, countries). The Internet is a wide
area network.
GLOSSARY
57
manhattanproducts.com
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