ComputerSystemsNewsletter_1979_Sep15_49pages_OCR

ComputerSystemsNewsletter_1979_Sep15_49pages_OCR

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Vol. 4, No. 21

Sept. 15, 1979

HP 3000

Computer Systems

A family of compatible business systems for distributed data processing in the '80s.

a

Processor

DSl3000 on Series 30, 33, 111

RJEl3000 on Series 30, 33, 111 a '

PLUS

Volume 4, Number 21, September 15, 1979

MPE Ill enhancements

MRJEl3000 enhancements

MTSl3000 enhancements

FOR I:INITERNIAL USE ONLY

BOISE NEWS

Product News

Happy Birthday 2608A!.

. .

. . . . . . . . . .

S. RichardsonIBoise

[

31

W-2 Forms on the 2608A.

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

D. MelinIBoise

[

31

12-Inch Forms Capability for the

2630 Family..

. . .

.

. .

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

S. DavisIBoise

[

41

HP 250 and 300 Printer

Configurations..

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

.

J. BrusseauIBoise

[

41

Division News

2608A Printer Forms Handling

Application Note..

. . . . . . . . .

.

.

. . . .

. . . . . . .

S. BraultlBoise

[

51

CSD NEWS

Division News

Logistics Support -

Well Equipped

. . .

.

. .

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

B. HarperlCSD

[

61

Support Profile Project

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B. ParkhurstlCSD

[

81

Sales Aids

SRO? -

Nearest SRO?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

. . . . . . .

C. KryzanlCSD

[

81

Interdiscipline Customer Support

Services Agreements

. . . . . .

.

. . .

. . . .

. .

.

. .

0. MorainlCSD

[

81

DSD NEWS

Product News

RTE-Ill Support Services Extended to Include

Software Update 1940

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P. EbersoleIDSD

[

91

Free Software Updates Continued

. . . . . .

J. KoskinenIDSD

[ l o ]

Datacapture

Connecting the HP 1000 to the HP 3000 in

CAM Applications

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B. BeckerIDSD

[I

11

May the Force Be with You

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

M. FenziIDSD [12]

Sales Aids

Whose Updates Get Installed?

. . . . . . . . .

.

B. SenskelDSD [12]

Announcing the Formation of an International

HP 1000 User's Group

. . . . . .

.

.

.

. .

.

. . . .

P. EbersoleIDSD [13]

VIS

-

Price

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

D. S. Fields IIIIDSD [14]

NPT Videotapes Available

.

.

. . . . . . . .

M. Fox-RytandIDSD [15]

Automated Measurement News

HP ATS Wins Over TI & GEN RAD for Hybrid Board Test

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

D. KlineIDSD [16]

ATS Configuration Guide Update

. .

. . . . . .

D. MabeylDSD [17]

New Memory Requirements for

HP-ATS Systems..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

D. MabeylDSD [18]

HP 1205A Fiber Optic HP-IB Link Ordering

Update..

. .

. .

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

D. HannebrinkIDSD [18]

New Packaging for 2240A Test Fixtures &

Extension Boards

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

H. BainIDSD [19]

DTD NEWS

Product News

A 2621NP Current-Loop Converter?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

E. GrandjeanfDTD [20]

Sales Aids

ANEWDATATERMINAL

PRICEGUIDE

. .

. .

.

.

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

E. GrandjeanfDTD [20]

The 2647A Interest Increases

. . . . . . . . .

R. FergusonIDTD [21]

Division News

DTD Sales Development Grows..

. . . . . . . . .

C. FlockIDTD [22]

Terminal "Ahoy"

. . . . . . .

.

.

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

K. LouisIDTD [23]

Volume 4, Number 21, September 15, 1979

Easterner Supports Eastern

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

K. LouidDTD [23]

Yet Another!

. . . . .

.

. . .

. .

.

.

.

. . . . . . . .

. .

D. GoodreauIDTD [23]

DTD's New Communication Center

. . . .

R. FergusonIDTD [23]

HPG NEWS

Sales Aids

DS11000, a Guide for New Users,

French Version..

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . J.

Pierre BonnevilleIHPG [24]

3075N3076A on PDP 11/34

. . .

. . . . . . . . .

S. DaoustlDTD [24]

R-h

1

GSD NEWS

Product News

The HP 3000 Family..

. . .

F. Gibbons & R. EdwardslGSD [25]

Accelerating the HP 3000 Family's

Sales Momentum

. .

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F. GibbonslGSD [26]

Introducing the KOALA

HP 3000 Series 30

. . .

The New

. .

.

. . .

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

C. ChenglGSD [26]

Series 30

System..

. . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

C. ChenglGSD [27]

Series 30

-

OEM System

. . . . . .

. . . . . . .

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . .

C. ChenglGSD [28]

Series 30 -

Station in a Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

. . .

.

C. ChenglGSD [28]

The Series 30

Business System

HP KOALATY..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

. . . .

C. ChenglGSD [29]

.

. . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

B. B. BearlGSD [29]

New GSD Data Communications Capabilities for the HP 3000 Family

. . . . .

. .

.

. . . .

. . . . .

L. HartgelGSD [30]

GSD Announces the Intelligent Network

Processor for the HP 3000

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

T. BlackIGSD [31]

rS

DSl3000 Welcomes the Series 30 and

Series 33 to HP-DSN

. . . . . . . . . . .

.

. . . . .

S. ZalewskilGSD [32]

RJEl3000 on the Series 30 and 33!

.

.

. .

J. ChisholmlGSD [34]

,.

r)

MRJE Now Works with .IES 3 and ASP!.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

J. ChisholmlGSD [34]

Major Enhancements Are Made to

MTSl3000

. . . . . . . .

. .

. .

.

.

.

. . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

T. BlackIGSD [35]

Sales Aids

High KOALATY HP 3000 Sales

Literature

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . .

. . . .

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

R. EdwarddGSD [36]

Slide Presentations as HP 3000

Sales Twls

.

.

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

R. ClarkIGSD [38]

Something NEW in the HP 3000

Field Sales Notebook

. . .

.

.

. . . .

. .

.

. . . . . . . .

G. MillerlGSD [40]

Customer Reference Database Gets

Upgraded!

. . . . . . .

.

. . .

. .

. .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

R. FanellilGSD [40]

307513076 Demo on

HP 3000

. . . . .

.

. . . . .

. .

. .

. . . . .

T. Black & S. DaoustlDSD [41]

Merging Test with Data on the

HP 300..

.

.

. . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J. WhiteselVGSD [41]

An Example of How to Merge Text with

Data on the HP 300

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

J. WhitesellIGSD [41]

How to Reorganize Your HP 300

KSAM File

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. .

.

S. WilkIGSD [42]

HP 300 Supports 4000-Foot Hardwired

Terminals

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

.

. .

C. GowanlGSD [42]

HP Joumal on HP 300

. . . . . .

.

.

. . . . . .

.

.

B. BowdenlGSD [43]

New HP 300 Pricelconfiguration Guide

. .

C. GowanfGSD [43] r,

Does Your OEM Ship 300's

Outside the U.S.?

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B. SmithIGSD [43]

General News

Coordinated Shipments for Ordering HP 3000's

.

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

R. EdwarddGSD [44]

Index continued on page 48

FOR 1:lLVTERNAL USE ONLY

C O M P U T E R S V S T E M S N E W S L E T T E R

Happy Birthday 2608A!

By: Steve RichaidsonlBoise

September 15 marks the first year since the 2608A has been introduced. In this short year, thanks to your efforts, the

2608A has become a very successful product.

Sales to date have been over 1800 units; that's almost as many 2608A's in one year as 2613A's plus 2617A's in the last three years.

a

As successful as the 2608A is, we feel that it must constantly be improved to continue its superior performance. The following list shows the major milestones which the 2608A has achieved over the last year, all aimed at improving the

2608A.

September 1978

November 1978

January 1979

April 1979

June 1979

July 1979

August 1979

2608A announced

3000 llllll support announced

First volume shipments start

1906 M.I.T. software released to support 2608A on 3000 llllll

Patched 1906 available to prevent VFC reset between jobs

DSD releases new GRAPHICS11000 software that improves 2608A graphics output

New tractors into production to improve left margin; availability drops to 12 weeks

Improved platen design into production to aid forms handling

These are only the major milestones which have taken place over the past year, there are many, many minor improvements which have also helped improve the reliability and usefullness of the 2608A.

It doesn't stor, here thouqh. We are continuinq to improve the 2608A and its systemsoftware. The 191 8

GT

up all known

2608N300O

software bugs.

Efforts are underway to improve the reliability, the print quality, and the forms handling (paper stacking, paper jam detection) of the 2608A.

The 2608A is a successful product today and we expect that with our efforts to continually improve it, it will be an even more successful product in the future.

THANKS FOR THE GOOD FIRST YEAR. I HOPE

YOU ALL JOIN US IN WISHING THE 2608A

A HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

By: Dave MelinlBoise

After examining several of the 1979 W-2 tax forms that are available, the following column alignment problem was discovered:

PROBLEM:

When using the "two-wide" type form, there's a good chance the 2608A will not be able to print in all 132 form-designated print spaces.

FORM LINE

J

b-

132 Char Print Width

*

-1

(f

Difference

=

1 Character Width

The problem being that the 2608A's 132-character field width cannot be shifted to the right quite far enough. With the tractors all the way to the left the first column prints on the form line itself, effectively making 131 print positions available for form use. Please note that the existence or severity of the problem depends on the vendor of the form.

SOLUTION:

IUotify relevant customers of this problem and encourage them to order "one-wide" forms.

Please contact your Regional Sales Development Engineer for Specific Test information.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

HP Computer Museum www.hpmuseum.net

For research and education purposes only.

C Z C I M I P U T E R SYSTEMS NEWSLETTER

12-Inch Forms Capability for the 2630 Family

By: Steve DavisIBoise

HP 250 and 300 Printer Configurations

By: Jim BrusseauIBoise

This is the final section of the three-part series of HP printers and system configurations. This issue features the Small Business systems. In the future watch for new printerlsystem configurations in the Boise Section of the CS Newsletter.

Interface: STD

From: GSD

(STD wl250)

**

ORDER

**

DOT MATRIX SYSTENI PRINTER

Cable: STD

From: GSD

Interface: HP-IB

From: Boise

(STD wlHP250) (wloption 250)

*+

RECEIVE

**

2631A

#250

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$3,350 180 Cps Dot Matrix Printer

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 50 HP-IB Interface In 2631 A

26098A

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 275 Pedestal

#001

#002

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

15 Casters

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 50 Paper Shelf

26090A

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 100 Sound Cover

**

FOR

** **

SEE APPENDIX

**

Family Literature List

Special Character Sets

Longer Cables

Special Drums

Print Samples

250

Interface: 31262A

From: GSD

(STD wlHP300)

DOT MATRIX SYSTEM PRINTER

Cable: 31389-60002

From: Boise

(wloption 330)

Interface: HP-IB

From: Boise

(wloption 330)

**

ORDER

** **

RECEIVE

**

2631 A

#330

. . . .

.:

. . . . . . . . . . $3,350 180 Cps Dot Matrix Printer

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 290 HP-IB Interface in 2631A

2 Meter Cable

Documentation

26098A

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 275 Pedestal

#001

#002

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 15 Casters

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 50 Paper Shelf

26090A

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

100 Sound Cover

**

FOR

**

Family Literature List

Special Character Sets

Longer Cables

Special Drums

Print Samples

**

SEE APPENDIX

**

A

B

C

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

FOR INITERNAL USE ONLY

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S NEWSLETTER!

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

"EwLErr#mc-RD

P E R I P I i E R n L

I/F Channel

2608A Printer Forms Handling Application

Note

By: Sue BraultIBoise

If you've been working with special forms on the 2608A

-

Boise Division's 2608A application note is important for you.

The HP 2608A Printer Forms Handling Application Note

# 403 illustrates the forms handling features of the 2608A with an actual size print sample showing margin sizes and print area dimensions. The 2608A can print on most types of special forms. This application note will help you to determine the best solution for your customer's printing needs.

The HP 2608A Printer Forms Handling Application Note 403 is available through the Corporate Literature Distribution center-publication number 5952-9452.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

5

FOR IINTERiYAL USE ONILV

Logistics Support

-

Well Equipped

By: Bill HarperICSD

Trying to deliver a standard service product to a customer without equipping the CE properly is like sending an NFL linebacker into a game without helmet or pads. He may survive one play, but the odds are against him, and there's no chance of long term success. Our activities in Logistics

Support can be likened to a football teams' equipment manager in that our responsibility is to make certain that our team, the CEs, are properly equipped to maintain and repair

CSG products in the field. It is our intention to acquaint the field sales force with what CSD Marketing is doing to address this issue and the Logistics Support people involved in taking up the challenge. We want you to be able to discuss delivery of the standard service product with your customer knowing that action is being taken to ensure that his account CE is properly equipped.

Logistics Support is the only department in the newly formed

CSD Marketing organization that does not have an exact counterpart in the other CSG divisions. Our closest relative and primary contact is the technical support group in the

Manufacturing Divisions, and communication wit:) the field operations is normally through the area CE Support

Managers. Our primary objective is to support the CE organization by ensuring the timely availability of the correct service materials so that materials will not be a limiting factor on the efficiency or performance of the CE.

In organizing to meet this ambitious objective, we have divided our activities into two areas of responsibility. In the

Product Support area we are concerned with service material support for specific products during their entire life cycle. In the Materials Information area we are focusing on providing information and reports to assist the field operations in making local support materials decisions.

In describing the activities and individual responsibilities in

Product Support, I would like to relate it to the normal life cycle of a division's product. First, of course, there is the introductory phase which starts well before the initial

Volume 4, Number 21, September 15, 1979 production run and carries on to the point where there has been wide disbursement of the product and the production volume has stabilized. This second or mature phase continues until such time as the product is replaced or for whatever reason, removed from productlon The flnal or dlscontlnued phase continues for a mlnlmum of 5 years following date of the last productlon run We have organ~zed to support those three phases - mature and discontinued

C)

KI Haden are responsible for new product lntroductlons forecasts, establlshlng procedures to ensure that CSD coordination wlth materlal flow models for differing requirements of hlgh volume (I e terminals) and those wlth a lower volume

(I e

,

3000 serles) Andree and KI s involvement wlth product continues from 6 months to a year following lnitlal shlpments

Our major activity as it relates to mature products is ensuring that the technical quality of support material is maintained.

Harry Albert's responsibility is to coordinate with the product divisions, CSD production engineering and materials purchasing in reviewing all production changes in product upgrades that require modification to existing field service inventory. He coordinates the additional stocking quantity required by CSD to initiate the update or recall, and reviews the effect of our ongoing FSI requirements. Harry is currently developing procedures for announcing required changes to the field, advising them of the implementation time requirements and closing the loop by ensuring that the modifications have been completed.

0

The end of a products' production is the beginning of Paul

Gearhart's involvement with the product support. He is responsible for developing a strategy for managing headquarters and field operations service materials from the time a product is discontinued from manufacture to the end of its support life. His responsibilities include taking steps to ensure the availability of centralized materials support for low volume and declining products, as well as informing field operations of any changes in service materials availability that could impact their ability to support a discontinued product.

FOR UNTERNAL USE ONLY

Cynthia McCulley and E d Martinez are responsible for developing and implementing the CSD materials packaging strategy. There are two primary objectives. First, to provide standard packaging for individual exchange assemblies that are as small and light as possible while providing adequate protection as it flows through the materials distribution system. And second, develop packages for the transportation of field service inventory that optimizes the CE usage. The latter objective covers cases for product support packages and kits, as well as the vehicles being utilized by field CE operations. information and quotations to field operations and customers. In addition to maintaining this data base, Herb provides assistance in developing support lists for specific field office or customer needs.

Clio Geyer is responsible for coordinating the product support program with CSD's Order Processing. This activity is primarily concerned with introductory products and FSI updates and customer recalls. She is also currently acting as the primary contact for field CE Support Managers to ensure that special or emergency requirements are responded to.

The primary objective of the Materials lnformation area is to provide the field with information that is not available from their own local data bases. Fred Emmert, in addition to supervising the activities of the personnel assigned to

Materials Information, is responsible for three projects. First, using all available data bases, generate recommended support lists for all CSG products in current production. He is currently establishing procedures for reviewing these lists with the responsible product division and field operations product specialists Second, until such time as the FlCS system is operational in all offices, Fred will supply reports to the CE Support Managers relating to parts usage and inventory levels. And third, providing a number of specialized reports to assist the CE Support Manager in

Field operations. We are particularly enthused with the progress that has been made with the recommended spares lists and within the next month or two plan to spend time with each of the product divisions to review the program.

George Stoyko has been involved with the definition and development of an exchange control system. The objective of this program is to provide better traceability of exchange transactions between CSD Cupertino and the field offices.

The end result should be quicker turnaround of repaired assemblies and reduction in the quantity of boards required for pipeline inventory.

Maria Turner is responsible for the department's data entry and retrieval requirements. She is in charge of breaking down and distributing all of the reports generated in the

Materials lnformation section.

Sue Kimerer is the department secretary. In addition to providing the department with the normal secretarial support, she has been helpful in coordinating several seminars and a number of special projects.

Herb Lepley is responsible for maintaining our information

PSP change, it will still carry the same part number but there will be a resultant change in the price. Because of this, it is important that we maintain accurate records for supplying

I hope this has given you a better idea of what we do in

Logistics Support at CSD and in the months ahead we hope to make more visible to you our programs that have a direct bearing on CSD's ability to deliver the standard service product.

COMPUTER SUPPORT DIVISION (CSD)

MARKETING DEPARTMENT

Manager

Bill Harper product Support

t

Harry Albert

FSI Updates/Recalls

t

Andree Driskell

New Product Introductions

Kinard Haden

(7-79)

Van PrograrnlNew Pdt. Intros.

Paul Gearhart

Discontinued Products

Ed Martinez

PSP DefinitionIPackaging

Cynthia McCulley

(8-79)

PSP/FSI packaging

Volume 4, Number

21,

September

15, 1979

Materials Information

Fred Emmert

Supervisor

Herb Lepley

PSP Data Base

E

Clio Geyer

New Product Support

Order Coordination

George Stoyko

Exchange Control

Maria Turner

Data Entry

FOR I:INIUERNIAL USE ONILV

Support Profile Project

By: Bill ParkhurstlCSD

In Sales Development, we are frequently questioned about

CSD's support capabilities in ICON countries where practical limitations for support exist.

Currently, we must call the offices in question to determine supportability of a given system configuration.

In order to make our job easier and to more accurately and quickly answer inquiries, we are implementing a data base on CSD's 3000, which will provide us an office by office profile of Software and Hardware support capability.

We have sent forms to our ICON CSD District CE managers which will give us detailed information about services offered and products serviced by each office. This information will then be entered into our data base.

With this data base, we will be able to quickly determine our present support capabilities which will point out where special attention must be devoted towards rounding out the support plan for our major accounts.

This project is just another way in which we are making our support throughout the world uniform for our major accounts

Interdiscipline Customer Support

Services Agreements

By: Olen ~ o r a i n k ' ~ ~

The Customer Support Services Agreement has a prerequisite that only products listed on the configuration guide for the basic system may be included on the agreement. This prerequisite is necessary in that the agreement assumes a support plan is available for on-site maintenance of the product. This on-site service requires such items as a CPU to peripheral diagnostic, documentation and exchange assemblies to assure on-site correction of a malfunction.

On the other hand, many of our other disciplines manufacture products compatible with our systems.

Voltmeters, counters, oscilloscopes, plotters, oscillators, etc., are specific examples.

In many Instances our customers will purchase these items and connect them together as a system developing the~r own software In addition, they ask for a maintenance agreement on the "system".

0

In such cases we must recognize that our Customer Support

Services Agreement defines a support plan and HP's products. For example CE's are not trained or equipped to repair a voltmeter on site. In fact the basic maintenance strategy for many HP products

IS to return the products to a designated HP offlce for bench repar

!

f

SRo?

SRO?

-

-

By: Chris KryzanlCSD

No need to keep on lugging out a 100-pound atlas to locate the nearest SRO to a customer site! CSD's Sales

Development Team has developed an on-line package for just this purpose designed to aid us in serving you.

A simple call to Sales Development will let you obtain the necessary information in a matter of minutes. We enter the city, state, and country of any site in the world and leave the rest up to the computer. Seconds later, out pours the results:

Location of the nearest HP SRO, distance in miles to the customer site, and the applicable zone.

Wait, you say! What if there's no support in the given country

Or the SRO the necessary

No problem. It's a simple matter to run acheck and obtain a list of all neighboring SRO's and work from there.

Next time you need to find the nearest SRO to a customer, don't waste precious time thumbing through page after page of maps. Call us instead. The program is just another means of helping us help you.

For these reasons when you are asked to accept a maintenance agreement on products not on the configuration guide you must: a) Work with the appropriate discipline manager to assure support is available and the limitations. b) Get agreement from the discipline manager that he will support the equipment and his responsibilities. Who iso- lates the malfunction, who repairs, where will repairs be accomplished, what turnaround time, etc. c) Discuss the plan with the customer to assure it meets his needs. d) Establish the price and method of billing. [email protected])

The process is quite involved, but necessary, if we are to assure long-term satisfaction to a customer. Arrangements to train a person for a "special" generally result in a problem downstream when this "special" talent gets promoted.

Should you need assistance in establishing these support programs, contact CSD Sales Development.

Volume 4, Number 21, September

15, 1979

FOR UhJTERNIAL USE ONLY

RTE-Ill Support Services Extended to Include Software Update 1940

By:

Phil EbersoIeiDSD

The following letter discussing support for the RTE-Ill Operating System (HP Product Number 920608) is being distributed to all

R-TE-Illsupport services customers as part of the 1926 update to RTE-Ill:

DA

7A S Y S T E M S

IlLX70 Wolfe Road C u w r t m o Cal,lorn8a 95014 Telephone 4W 257 7DW. TWX 91a338-0221

Dear RTE-111 s u p p o r t s e r v i c e s customer:

The HP 1000 S o f t w a r e Update N o t i c e f o r s o f t w a r e r e v i s i o n 1926 i n d i c a t e s t h a t t h e RTE-111 o p e r a t i n g s y s t e m p r o d u c t has been r e c l a s s i f i e d f r o m t h e "mature" c a t e g o r y t o t h e " o b s o l e t e " c a t e g o r y . T h i s r e f l e c t s t h e f a c t t n a t t h e RTE-111 o p e r a t i n g system p r o d u c t i s no l o n g e r b e i n g s o l d , h a v i n g been r e p l a c e d i n o u r p r o d u c t l i n e b y o u r newer o p e r a t i n g system p r o d u c t s , RTE-IV and RTE-IVB/Session M o n i t o r .

N o r m a l l y , r e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i n t o t h e o b s o l e t e c a t e g o r y i m p l i e s t h a t no f u r t h e r r e v i s i o n s w i l l be pade t o t h e p r o d u c t .

However, we a r e c u r - r e n t l y r e e v a l u a t i n g o u r s u p p o r t p o l i c i e s f o r o b s o l e t e p r o d u c t s . There- f o r e , u n t i l a p r o c e d u r e has been f i n a l i z e d . HP w i l l c o n t i n u e t o d i s t r i - b u t e r e v i s i o n s f o r t h e RTE-111 o p e r a t i n g system p r o d u c t i f any a r e a v a i l a b l e .

S p e c i f i c a l l y , an update t o UTE-111 w i l l be made i n s o f t w a r e r e v i s i o n

1940, and t h i s r e v i s i o n w i l l b e d i s t r i b u t e d i n a p p r o x i m a t e l y t h r e e months.

I f y o u w o u l d l i k e t o r e c e i v e t h i s u p d a t e t o keep y o u r system c u r r e n t , and c o n t i n u e t o r e c e i v e t h e o t h e r b e n e f i t s o f y o u r s o f t w a r e s u p p o r t s e r v i c e (e.g., Communicator. S o f t w a r e S t a t u s B u l l e t i n s , e t c . ) , y o u s h o u l d c o n t a c t y o u r l o c a l HP r e p r e s e n t a t i v e t o e n s u r e t h a t y o u have purchased s u p p o r t up t o and i n c l u d i n g t h e month o f Decenber, 1979.

Ye hope t o have f i n a l i z e d o u r s u p p o r t p l a n f o r o b s o l e t e s o f t w a r e b y t h e t i m e t h e n e x t u p d a t e i s made. More i n f o n n a t i o n w i l l b e d i s t r i b u t e d a l o n g w i t h t h a t update.

We hope t h a t y o u w i l l f i n d t h i s i n t e r i m s o l u t i o n s a t i s f a c t o r y .

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

9

FOR INTERNAL LEE OkJkF'

Obsolete Software Support Being Reevaluated

DSD and GSD are currently reevaluating their support policies for older software products. The goal is to develop a single, consistent policy that applies to all CSG software products. As soon as the new policy is adopted and approved at the Group level, we'll let you know.

In the meantime, we need to deal with the problem of RTE-Ill, which was just obsoleted in July.

In anticipation that a new support policy for older software products will be adopted, and in order not to miss an update, there will definitely be a 1940 update to RTE-Ill. This will be distributed in the November-December time frame.

Customers desiring to receive the 1940 update to RTE-Ill should purchase support services up to and including

December, 1979.

However, since the RTE-Ill support products are no longer on the prlce Ilst, RTE-Ill support must be ordered via a

92060T (RTE-Ill CSS)

As soon as the new support policies are finalized, (hopefully within the next three months) the RTE-Ill support products will be put back on the price list.

If you have any questions, just give me a call at X2063 at

DSD.

Free Software Updates Continued

By: John KoskinenIDSD

Three cheers for all you folks out there selling the HP full service concept! Customers are getting on the CSS and SSS program in record numbers. As a benefit for you to sell and a feature for your customers, we are extending the life of the 9206811 Option

002 to the life of the product UTE-IVB. Essentially we are following through with the idea that software updates to customers on

HP service should be easy to obtain.

RTE-IVBISESSION MONITOR UPGRADEILIPDATE PATHS

C)

RTE-IV

21 7 6 N B 21 7 7 N B

92067A

r-

RTE-I I

RTE-Ill

RTE-M

SUPPORT SERVICE

92067SlT

.

NO

SERVICE

92068A

Opt. Oo2

+

MEDIA

$5000

<5000>

GETS

-----

------------

r )

7

92068A

$5000

>

MEDIA

$0

-

$800

----I

RTE-IVB u

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

Connecting the HP 1000 to the HP 3000 in

CAM Applications

By: Bill BeckerlDSD

30220A CABLE KIT

STD: 7.6m

001: 30.48m

002: 76m

003: 152m

004: 304.8m

005: 609.6m

With the advent of DATACAPl1000, the necessity of communication between HP 1000 and HP 3000 systems has become more pronounced than ever. Primarily this is due to the CAM applications where DATACAP is being u s e d In a manufacturing organization, the data is collected and verified at remote systems on the production floor. The processing of the data on these data capture systems may be minimal. The bulk of the value is gained by the transport and processing by a central system(s) performing the EDP functions of the operation.

A good example is the basic concept of labor collection.

Using DATACAP11000 and a 307X terminal, a worker will enter identification information, the job helshe has worked on, and the length of time. The final storage destination in many cases will be an HP 3000 system in the EDP center.

Here the labor informatiop collected on the HP 1000 can be used by a number of EDP systems: (1) Payroll System to determine the hours worked for each employee,

(2)

Inventory System to track the location and quantity of inventory in production and FGI, and (3) Materials Control

System through production. These commercial applications

a

may be on one or more HP 3000's.

The task of getting this information from and to HP 1000's and HP 3000's can be done in avariety of ways. Past history of data collection has given us punched cards for input and mag tapes andlor punched cards for output.These methods of data transfer were very prone to errors from key punch operators and system operators. The use of DS11000 and

DSl3000 can replace these methods and provide more flexibility.

In reviewing capabilities of DSl1000 and DSl3000, we first need to look at the physical method connection. Currently, the only method of communication is by way of hardwire link.

This means that the two systems must be cabled together directly. The following diagram shows the hardware connection required.

With this hardware configuration, the communication is done via the DSl1000 software, 91 740NB and 91 740A, along with the 32190A DSl3000 software. There are currently two main methods of communication available. The first is Program- to-Program (PTOP). Here, in a master-slave configuration, a program in one system can call a program in another system for the purpose of exhanging data buffers. The programs are user written software modules. Data buffers between an HP

1000 and HP 3000 can be up to 1 Kbyte in size. The data transfer rate is a maximum of 4 KBytes per second. The other method of communication is by way of Remote File

Access (RFA). This capability allows access to files in both an HP 1000 and HP 3000 by use of operator commands and by program calls. Again, this operation depends on user written programs.

With these capabilities in DSl100013000, development programmers have the ability to collect the data at the

HP 1000 using DATACAP11000, log the information into an

IMAGE11000 database andlor a log file on the HP 1000, and pass this information to a HP 3000 using PTOP or RFA.

Today, many data collection requirements can be done without user programming using DATACAP11 000. However, the DS programs (100013000) require programming both at the HP 1000 and HP 3000.

Enough of the review, now for some previews. On the hardware side, new capabilities for communication protocol will enhance speed and methods of communication.

FOR URIUERNIAL USE ONLY

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

I

1

/

i

1 i

1 j

:

On the software side, for many manufacturing customers, the programming staff may be commercially or technically oriented, probably not both. This leads to difficulties for completing the data collection network. To overcome these difficulties, there are some projects in the offering:

1. The DSD Lab is working on enhancements to the

DSl1000 products that will provide two programs, one in the HP 1000 and one in the HP 3000, that will do file-to-file transfers of data. These programs can be scheduled from either system. This will provide the ease of RFA with the speed of PTOP without user programming.

2. Applications Development at DSD is developing an

Application Note(s) to aid in the programming between

HP 1000 and HP 3000's. a) A COBOL program for the HP 3000 to move

IMAGE13000 data to an IMAGE11 000 database, and vice-versa. b) A FORTRAN program for the HP 1000 to move

IMAGE13000 data to an IMAGE11000 database, and vice-versa. c) COBOL and FORTRAN PROGRAMS to transfer a file between the two types of systems and load the data into an IMAGE13000 database.

Besides the application Note(s), we will be contributing the software to the contributed library during the first quarter of

FY80.

Data capture is an exciting capability for you to sell to your customers and we at DSD are working hard to make you successful. Any inputs that you might have will be more than welcome. package of DATACAP11000 Thls one manual should get you speedlly up

REFERENCE

ACCOUNTS

SE ON-LINE

SUPPORT: ltored as potentla1 reference accounts

Millo Fenzi (x 3122) and Sharon

Jacobs (x 2645) in DSD Sales Develop- ment are the people to contact with information concerning new sales situations.

SE's TAKE NOTE! Gary Lim (x 3385) has responsibility for supporting

DATACAP in the on-line support group.

TRAINING

COURSES:

Technical marketing is concentrating on developing DATACAP training classes for SE's, FE's, and customers.

HP 1000-HP 3000 Bill Becker is hard at work on his

LINK: application note which will describe some of the considerations raised in establishing an HP 1000-HP 3000 link.

0

In addition the Force has weekly discussions about the last

DATACAP issues. If you have any relevant inputs regarding

DATACAP, call Sharon or Millo. They will mention them during our weekly meetings and the Force will determine which factory resources to mobilize to help you sell and support DATACAP.

GO OUT AND SELL DATACAP11000

AND REMEMBER, THE FORCE IS WITH YOU

May the Force Be with You

By: Millo FenzilDSD

DSD has mobilized!!! A Data Collection Task Force, composed of individuals from the lab and various marketing departments, has been created. The Force's charter is to identify and take action on the issues related to marketing

DATACAPl1000. Current activities of the Force include the following:

PERFORMANCE

The lab is simulating varying loads of

DATA: different transactions running on 307X's under DATACAP. Preliminary results look good and specifics will be pub- lished in the next issue of the

CS Newsletter.

CONFIGURATION Coming with the new DATACAPllOOO

GUIDE:

(92080A) is a new manual

-

DATACAP Configuration Guide. We are collecting all the information you need to install a DATACAP system.

This includes configuration and instal- lation information as well as notes about bringing up the terminals which have previously been found only in the

Datacapture Terminal or Multipoint

Manuals. The part number for this new manual will be 92080-90003 and it will be available as part of the release

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

12

Whose Updates Get Installed?

By: Bill SenskelDSD

The Way It Is Today

As you may have noticed, the group software services contracts and sales literature for SSS and CSS are not definitive about the installation of updates. The reason

IS that the services differ by product (SSS and CSS) and product line (DSD, GSD).

Software Subscription Service (SSS)

The Software Subscription Service is intended to be a "mail" only service. Therefore, the HP 1000, HP 300 and HP 250 firmware and software updates are delivered by mail.

Currently, however, all HP 3000 software and firmware updates are delivered in person by a CE or SE.

r)

It is GSD's intent to modify the updating procedures so that in the near future the customer will be responsible for installing all firmware and software updates provided under the Software Subscription Service

Customer Support Service (CSS)

The Customer Support Service is intended to provide a higher level of support than SSS.

FOR IINITERNAL USE ONLY

delivery and installation of all software and firmware updates bv an HP SE or CE. However, due to the nature of the HP

1600 software updating process, most HP 1000 customers prefer to do their own.

With this in mind HP 1000 CSS was

NOT priced to include software update installation. On the other hand DSD designed the FEM (Firmware Expansion Module) to simplify the installation of ROM updates. This has made it possible for the CE to install firmware updates for a CSS customer for no extra charge when out doing normal PM's. Unfortunately the BMMC's for the firmware products do not include this installation if no FEM has been purchased. Your customer will be required to pay an additional fee to install ROM updates on the FAB (Firmware Accessory Board). You are encouraged to sell FEM's. It will save your customer hundreds of dollars and hours of delays.

a

The following table summarizes the delivery and installation policies for CSSISSS for all CSG divisions:

HP 1000 HP 3000 HP 300 HP 250

How Are Firmware

8

Software Updates

Delivered?

CSS

SSS

Who Installs Software

Updates?

CSS

SSS

Who Installs Firmware

Updates?

CSS

SSS

Mail

Mail

Cust.

Cust.

SE

SE1

SE

SE1

Mail

Mail

Mail

Mail

Cust. Cust.

Cust. Cust.

C E2

Cust.

CE

CEl

N/A

NIA

N/A

NIA

(NIA

NOTES:

1. On the HP 3000, HP will deliver in person and install SSS updates only until GSD has an opportunity to document the process for the customer. At that point it will be the customer's responsibility to install HP 3000 software and firmware updates.

2. Assumes the system is covered under BMMC and the customer has purchased the FEM (Firmware Expansion

Module). Otherwise an additional charge must be made.

Note that SSS does not include installation of firmware updates. This is a feature of CSS only.

Announcing the Formation of an

International HP 1000 User's Group

By: Phil EbersolelDSD

On August 23 and 24, a two-day user workshop was held at

DSD to lay the foundation for an International HP 1000 User's

Group. Fifteen HP 1000 customers from the U.S., Canada and Europe were in attendance. These participants included the presidents of almost every local HP 1000 user's group in existence today (there are nine worldwide), plus representa- tives from other major geographical areas. Each customer paid their own expenses to travel to California, which is just one indication of how much interest there is in setting up such a user group.

The meeting was a complete success! The users estab- lished a formal purpose for the group, decided on the ac- tivities they will pursue, elected an interim board of directors and committee leaders and set up an action plan for starting up the group. Some specifics are given below:

User Group Charter

The meeting participants felt that the emphasis of the group should be on "users helping users" to become more pro- ductive with their HP 1000 computer. Thus, the purposes of the group which were adopted are:

1. To provide a forum for sharing information among

HP 1000 users.

2. To increase the effective use of HP 1000 systems.

3. To reduce redundant development effort for software1 firmware and systems.

4. To provide a formal communication channel between members and HP.

5. To operate as a non-profit corporation

User Group Activities

In order to accomplish the purposes listed above, the group decided to concentrate on the following activities at first:

1. User Library of Contributed Software.

2. Newsletter.

3. Technical Journal.

4. lnternatlonal meetings incorporating technical and tuto- rial presentations.

5. Vendor and user communications.

6. Encourage local user groups.

7. Create special interest groups as necessary.

Most of these articles are self-explanatory, Note that the

User's Group will be taking over the contributed library after it is revised and updated by DSD in November.

Interim Officers

The group felt that an appropriate governing body for an international user group would be a board of directors, with a president, treasurer, etc., as part of the board. Until a formal election could be held among the members, the attendees at the August meeting elected an interim board of directors, officers, and committee leaders, as follows:

Board of Directors:

President Stu Troop General Electric

Bridgeport, Conn

Vice-President Bert Todtenkopf Factory Mutual Engineering,

Norwood, Mass

Secretary Paul Miller Corporate Computer Systems

Aberdeen, N.J.

FOR LINIUERNAL USE ONLY

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

f

I

Treasurer

At Large

At Large

At Large

Marvin Mclnnis

Barry Perlman

Ron Townsen

Ed Holtzrnan

Mclnnis

8

Oklahoma City, OK

RCA Labs, Princeton, N.J.

Naval Ocean System Center,

San Diego, CA..

Atmospheric Environment

Service, Downsview Ontario,

Canada

Commitee Leaders:

Start-up

Business Plan

Library

Publications

Convention

European

By-Laws

Nominating

Joe Getkin

Paul Miller

Chris Goodey

Dick Martin

Glen Mortensen

Albert van Putten

Bert Todtenkopf

Ron Townsen

Ford Motor Co, Dearborn,

Michigan, Corp. Computer

Systyems, Alberdeen, N.J.

Becton-Dickinson, Salt Lake

City, Utah

Naval Ocean System Center,

San Diego, CA.

Intermountain Technologies

Inc., lndaho Falls, Id.

Institute for Public Health

The Netherlands.

Factory Mutual Engineering,

Norwood, Mass.

Naval Ocean System Center,

San Diego, CA.

What You Can Do To Help

We need your help to ensure a successful start up of the

User Group. Here are some ways you can pitch in.

1. If one of your customers is on the interim board of directors, (or a committee leader), give them a call to congratulate them, encourage them, and offer help in locating volunteers to work with the group. Remember that the user group is a volunteer organization, and its success will depend on well-motivated leaders.

2. If there is a local user group in your area, take an active part in its success by offering speakers and demos, letting new customers know about the group, etc.

3. If no user group exists in your area, try to get one started.

Our experience in the international group suggests that there is a lot of interest all over the world in user groups.

4. Point out the benefits of membership in the international group to all of your customers. By mid-October, you should have a brand new user group brochure and application forms to make this job easy.

Remember, however, that the emphasis of the group is on

"users helping users". Thus HP's support should avoid a

"take-charge" attitude and instead concentrate on providing assistance in helping the users organize themselves.

Our goal

IS to have over 1500 members In the International

HP 1000 User's Group by January 1, 1980. You can be part of thls new venture for the HP 1000 by encouraging and helplng the user group leaders In your area

Please give me a call if you have any suggestions or if you know of any users who would like to help out. My extension is

2063 at DSD.

VIS

-

Price

By: Davis S. Fields lll1DSD

This article on the Vector Instruction Set appeared in the July

OEM Newsletter. The importance of matrix processing in any engineering or scientific application should not be underestimated VIS is a big plus for HP in those areas, where customers need number-crunching capabilities and lots of matrix processing power.

3

The Vector Instruction Set (VIS) is a set of FORTRAN and

Assembler-callable routines for performing matrix algebra operations. VIS gives the HP 1000 F-Series the matrix processing power of computers many times its price.

Array processing plays an integral role in many scientific and engineering disciplines, including operations research, simulation, electrical and mechanical design, image processing, three-dimensional graphics, process optimization, scientific problem-solving, and linear programming.

Some applications programs spend up to ninety percent of their execution time processing matrices. A program of this type may realize a tenfold performance improvement solely though the use of VIS.

VIS is implemented in microcode, just like the HP 1000 base instruction set. It utilizes the HP 1000 Floating Point

Processor to take advantage of parallel processing. In effect, VIS tells the HP 1000 it is working with vectors and not scalars, and can thus eliminate much of the overhead involved in addressing array elements.

In a FORTRAN program, VIS instructions are used to replace

FORTRAN DO loops which perform array manipulations. For example, the FORTRAN DO loop:

IL)

Benefits for HP

A well established International HP 1000 User Group will significantly benefit HP in the areas of getting more leverage from user developed software, improving customer satisfaction, providing expanded avenues for introducing new products and establishing a convenient means to obtain market data for use in new product design.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September 15,

1979 is replaced by the single VIS statement:

,

,

,

I , I .

.

I .

1

which executes over four times faster

;

In the case of matrix addition, two 100 x 100 matrices A and

B may be added, with the result stored in matrix C, by the

a

following FORTRAN instructions:

DO

2 0 J

Dl]

30

=

1 ,

1 0 0

I

=

1 , 1

I10

=

E

c.'

1

,,

J

:I

fi

1:

1

>

,!

j

3

I]

1:11tlT I t4LlE

+

1: :

<:

,,

,!

2 0 C O N T I N U E

;I

VIS expresses the same series of operations with the single instruction:

C A L L VSUM (1 SIJM, r i , 1 .,

N

5

and performs them over nine times faster!

The VIS instruction which performs this same operation is:

C A L L

El:

1 , 1 .i, 1 : Ci: 1.- 1

j..

which executes over ten times faster.

The FORTRAN statement for finding the element of an array with the largest absolute value are:

The Vector lnstruction Set gives the HP 1000 computational power never previously never found on a 16-bit minicomputer. It was designed to speed up matrix processing capabilities but its power may be used in a variety of ways. Together with EMA, VIS on the HP 1000 will provide a much more efficient and less expensive solution to applications now requiring much larger computers. In short, for some applications, VIS provides the power of a mainframe at a minicomputer price!

NPT Videotapes Available

By: Melanie Fox-RytandiDSD which sets IMAX to the index of the element. The equivalent

VIS instruction is:

You asked for them, now you can get them! The

DATACAP11000 and Vector lnstruction Set demo tapes that you saw on the July NPT Tour are now available for you to show to your customers.

a

and it executes over four times faster for an array of 10,000 elements.

Order through a HEART (COCHISE) 12 order to Video

Products, Product Line 95, Supplying Division 0700,

Palo Alto.

Altogether VIS includes nineteen basic vector operations which can be used on either single or double precision floating point numbers.

VIS provides impressive new computing power, especially when used in conjunction with EMA (Extended Memory

Access). EMA allows arrays to be as large as the physical memory on your computer.

In this example, FORTRAN is used to find the sum of all the elements of a 30,000 element array A:

This tape illustrates the capability to easily design a unique data capture system using an HP 1000 with DATACAP software and the new Grenoble terminals. A transaction is interactively designed at the system console ( a 264X terminal), and that transaction is then executed on a 3075 data capture terminal.

1 0

SUtI

=

SLIM

CONTINUE

+

AC

1 j

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

VECTOR INSTRUCTION SET 9091

52

-

$30.00

This tape demonstrates the use of the new Vector lnstruction

Set to do matrix operations. A set of cubes is first rotated in

3-D graphics using conventional software routines and then rotated again showing a dramatic increase in the speed of rotation through the use of the new VIS firmware.

FOR LINTERRIAL USE ORILV

VOL. 2 c-?-

MEASUREMENT

CONTROL l k

Automated

4&

CONTROL PROCESSORS FROM DATA SYSTEMS DIVISION

SEPTEMBER 1979 NO. 8

7

HP ATS WINS OVER TI & GEN RAD FOR HYBRID BOARD TEST

By: Dave Kline

The HP ATS system shown below i n DSD f i n a l t e s t was s e l e c t e d o v e r TI and GEN RAD f o r h y b r i d (combined d i g i t a l and a n a l o g ) board t e s t by a major e a s t e r n t e l e p h o n e equipment p r o d u c e r . The r e a s o n f o r s e l e c t i n g HP was, a s i s o f t e n t h e c a s e , t h e power o f t h e System 1000 mini computer c o n t r o l l e r . T h i s customer wanted t h e f u t u r e expansion c a p a b i l i t y t o do m u l t i t e r m i n a l o p e r a t i o n and u s e a d a t a b a s e management system, b o t h o f which a r e a v a i l a b l e w i t h t h e HP System 1000.

Here i s t h e system t h i s customer c h o s e .

ATS C07 BLOCK DIAGRAM

3.32%

FUWCTlOW

G E l E R l T O R ( 2 )

COWTROUER

.

-

M l l A

M l 4 A

W T R l X s w l r c n

-

I O l I A

SERIAL DATA

-

COUWTER

-

D V M

M O Z A

-

D C.P S. 161

pq

PRIWTLR v

-

M9

*nn

covlnrr m w r o

Many o f y o u r c u s t o m e r s , w e ' r e s u r e , have needs f o r more and b e t t e r t e s t i n g a t lower c o s t i n t h e i r p r o d u c t i o n p l a n t s .

When c o n s i d e r i n g what HP p r o d u c t s t o o f f e r d o n ' t o v e r l o o k t h e growth and c o n p e t i t i v e b e n e f i t s o f an HP ATS c o n t r o l l e d by t h e v e r s i t i l e

HP

System

1000!

FOR HP INTERNAL USE ONLY

FOE3 IIBdERRBk USE

CN4L=v

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

16

ATS CONFIGURATION GUIDE UPDATE

By: Dawson Mabey

T h i s adds s e v e r a l new HP i n s t r u m e n t s , t h e 3582A, 16lOB, and 8170A, and summarizes a l l i n s t r u m e n t s t h a t have been added t o t h e HP-ATS C o n f i g u r a t i o n Guide s i n c e

Addendum A (4-25-78). With t h i s l i s t and a copy of Addendum A ( a v a i l a b l e from yolrDSD c o n t a c t ) you have a complete l i s t o f a l l new a d d i t i o n s s i n c e p u b l i s h i n g t h e ATS C o n f i g u r a t i o n Guide.

HP 5342A Microwave Counter

-011 HP-IB

Instrument

Racking/Cabling

003 EU

1 2

Conf/Tes t

EU

5

0 0 0 HP 86635A Phase/FM Mod. P l u g - i n

May be s u b s t i t u t e d f o r 86633A i n 8660AIC

HP 3044A Spectrum Analyzer (13MHz)

-110 S t d . 3571A

-120 50R 3330B

Option 121 (75R 3330B) may be s u b s t i t u t e d f o r o p t i o n 120. Does n o t i n c l u d e conver- s i o n o f c a l c u l a t o r s o f t w a r e t o 1000/BASIC.

HP 8018A S e r i a l Word G e n e r a t o r

-001 HP-IB

HP 3585A Spectrum Analyzer (40MHz)

Device s u b r o u t i n e n o t r e q u i r e d .

HP 8566A Spectrum Analyzer (18GHz)

Device s u b r o u t i n e n o t r e q u i r e d .

HP

1610B Logic Analyzer

-003 HP-IB

Not r a c k mounted.

HP

8170A Logic P a t t e r n G e n e r a t o r

-001 A d d i t i o n a l 24K memory.

HP 3582A Spectrum Analyzer (25KHz)

Device s u b r o u t i n e d n o t r e q u i r e d .

1 5 10

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

NEW MEMORY REQUIREMENTS FOR HP-ATS SYSTEMS

By: Dawson Mabey

Based on o u r e x p e r i e n c e w i t h a number o f HP-ATS systems o v e r t h e l a s t y e a r , i t ' s a p p a r e n t t h a t 64K word memory (128KB) i s n o t s u f f i c i e n t i n most c a s e s t o p r o v i d e r e a s o n a b l e system performance f o r t h e u s e r . E f f e c t i v e i m m e d i a t e l y , t h e minimum memory r e q u i r e d i n a l l HP 1000 systems o r d e r e d w i t h ATS I n t e g r a t i o n S e r v i c e s i s

128K words (256KB). Your customers w i l l f i n d t h e a d d i t i o n a l $2,000 c o s t ( s t d . p e r f . ) i s e a s i l y o f f s e t by g r e a t l y improved HP 1000 performance.

For t h e same r e a s o n s , t h e minimum r e q u i r e d memory t o e x e c u t e d HP 92111A ATLAS/1000

S o f t w a r e Compilation System i s now 256K words (512KB).

ATLAS systems w i t h l a r g e numbers of i n s t r u m e n t s (4-5 bays) s h o u l d c o n s i d e r even more memory f o r b e t t e r performance.

F o r s y s t e m s t h a t have r e c e n t l y been o r d e r e d w i t h o n l y 64K words (128KB) we s t r o n g l y recommend y o u r customer c o n s i d e r a d d i n g memory. P l e a s e c o n t a c t DSD S a l e s Development t o i n s u r e t h a t t h e r e w i l l be no added c h a r g e ( i n a d d i t i o n t o t h e memory) and d e l i v e r y impact b e f o r e making commitments t o your c u s t o m e r .

HP 12050A FIBER OPTIC HP-IB LINK ORDERING UPDATE

By: Dave Hannebrink

E a r l y f i e l d i n d i c a t i o n s show t h a t F i b e r O p t i c HP-IB Link i n t e r e s t

i s

r u n n i n g h i g h .

H e r e ' s t h e l a t e s t news c o n c e r n i n g a v a i l a b i l i t y o f t h i s e x c i t i n g p r o d u c t :

1. 12050A a v a i l a b i l i t y s h o u l d be q u o t e d a s 16 weeks. We i n t e n d t o improve a v a i l a b i l i t y d u r i n g t h e n e x t c o u p l e o f months.

2.

I f you have a need f o r 12050A u n i t s f o r demo p u r p o s e s , c o n t a c t S a l e s

Development. We have u n i t s a v a i l a b l e now f o r f i e l d demos and shows.

3 . For f i b e r o p t i c s c a b l e o r d e r p r o c e s s i n g q u e s t i o n s , c o n t a c t S h i r l e y B a l t z e r a t OED.

4 .

F o r i i b e r o p t i c c a b l e t e c h n i c a l q u e s t i o n s , c o n t a c t e i t h e r DSD S a l e s Dev- elopment o r J o e Bagley a t OED.

Remember, 1979

i s

t h e YEAR OF THE LINK!

Volume 4, Number

21,

September

15, 1979

18

FOR DNTEA%AL USE ONL'Y

- * .-

' V t *

NEW PACKAGING FOR 2240A TEST FIXTURES

&

EXTENSION BOARDS

By: Howard Bain

E f f e c t i v e September 1, 1979, t h e 2240A T e s t F i x t u r e s

E

E x t e n d e r Boards have been r e p a c k e d and renumbered.

Here i s a summary o f t h e changes:

Old O r d e r Numbers

22909A

22910A

Name

V e r i f i c a t i o n K i t

E x t e n d e r K i t

I n c l u d e d

T e s t F i x t u r e

F u n c t i o n Card E x t e n d e r Board and Power Supply E x t e n d e r Board

New O r d e r Numbers

22909B

22910B

I n c l u d e s

T e s t F i x t u r e and

F u n c t i o n Card

E x t e n d e r Board

Power S u p p l y E x t e n d e r

Board

L i s t P r i c e

$ 800

300

P l e a s e recommend t h a t y o u r c u s t o m e r s p u r c h a s e a t l e a s t one 22909B p e r f a c i l i t y , s i n c e i t i s n e c e s s a r y f o r i n s t a l l a t i o n . The 22910B i s recommended i f y o u r c u s t o m e r d o e s n o t have a maintenance c o n t r a c t .

O r d e r s f o r t h e "A" t e s t f i x t u r e s and e x t e n d e r board w i l l be a c c e p t e d u n t i l

September 30, 1979. The "B" p r o d u c t numbers w i l l be on t h e C o r p o r a t e P r i c e List from O c t o b e r

1,

1979, and c a n b e o r d e r e d v i a a HEART o v e r r i d e from September 1, 1979.

A v a i l a b i l i t y f o r t h e "B" p r o d u c t numbers i s f i v e weeks.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

m

19

FOR INTERNAL USE ONILV

1 i i

2621AIP

Current-Loop Converter?

-

By: Eric GrandjeanlDTD

First shipments are scheduled for early January 1980.

Orders are accepted now

v

SELL I

=

RTERMINALS

ANEWDATATERMINALPRICEGUIDE

By: Eric GrandjeanlDTD

A new revision of the DTD Price Guide is in the mail! This time the cover is blue, you can't miss it.

The 13266A is a new accessory for the 2621A and P. It provides a 20 mA current-loop communications capability, very much like what we already have on the 264XX family

(132608 extended communications interface).

The 262XX current loop converter is a stylish, compact box a 50-pin connector which fits into the 262XX "Data Comm" back panel receptacle. Power is supplied from the 2621 AIP.

The other side of the 20 mA is a 7-wide terminal strip to

The 13266A data sheet is not yet available. The highlights of the current-loop pod are the following:

RS-232C 20 mA current-loop

Configurable to accommodate passive or active devices

Lightning and short circuit protection

Isolated driver and receiver in passive configurations

Balanced line for noise immunity

Ground isolation

Compact 125 x 160 x 28 mm size

I

Like the February edition it replaces, the September DTD

Price Guide contains a W-I-D-E selection of personal peripherals made by DTD, GRE, SDD, DCD and Boise, as you know, an ever-growing family of smart compatibles.

All related supplies (paper, tapes, etc.) can be found in the

Computer Supplies Catalogue (PIN 5953-2450D).

Go to it.

Sell Terminals!

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

P.S. Please make the following correction on pages 4 and 7

New

004

13266A

13296A

048

For 2645K Katakana

Current Loop Converter for 262XX Series

Shared Peripherals liF (HP-IB Cable 10631 B included)

2648A Raster Dump Firmware (1 81 8-0746)

@

The 2647A Interest Increases

By: Rich FergusoniDTD

Here is another humble example of the power of the 2647A. This program calculates the nominal interest rate for an investment.

Sell the 2647A - best interest of all.

1 0 REM

2 0 REM

3 0 HEM

~ f ~ $ ~ $ t f $ $ $ X X $ $ $ * $ 1 * * X * * f * * * * * * * * X * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* ' T I i I S PROGRAM C A L C U L - A T E 5 THE N O M I N A L I N T E R E S T R A T E FOR A

*KNOWN I N I T I A L I N V E S T M E N T TO A KNOWN F U T U R E V A L U E I N A

4 0 REM

5 0 REM

*:;PECIITIED P E R I O D OF T I M E .

..............................................................

6 0 P R I N T " N O M I N A L I N T E H E S T R A T E ON I N V E S T M E N T S "

7 0 P R I N T

" "

8 0 R E M - - - - - - - - - S T A T E M E N T S 3 0 TO 1 0 0 REQUEST USER I N P U T

9 0 I N P U T " I N I T I A L I N V E S T M E N T $ " , P

1 0 0 P R I N T

" "

1 1 0 I N P U T "FLITURE V A L U E $ " , T

1 2 0 P R I N T

" "

1 3 0 I N P U T "NUMBER - O F COMPOUNDING P E R I O D S PER YEAR

1 4 0 P R I N T

" "

"

, N

1 5 0 INPU'T "NUMBER OF YEARS " , Y

1 6 0 P R I N T

" "

1 7 0 R E M - - - - - - - - C A L C U L A T E N O M I N A L I N T E R E S T R A T E - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

2 0 0 1 2 y N X ( ( T / P ) ' ' ( l / ( N * Y ) ) - 1 ) * 1 0 0

2 2 0 P R I N T

" "

2 3 0 P R I N T " T H E N O M I N A L I N T E R E S T R A T E I S " i 1 2 , " % "

2 4 0 P R I N T

" "

2 5 0 P R I N T

" "

2 6 0 I N P U T "MORE D A T A 7 ( Y OR N ) " , A $

2 7 0 I F U P C $ ( A $ ) = " Y " T H E N GOT0 3 0

2 8 0 P R I N T

" "

2 3 0 I N P U T "DO YOU W I S H G R A P H I C OUTPUT FOR P R E V I O U S D A T A ? ( Y OR N ) " , A %

3 0 0 I F A$-."t.lW TI4E't.I GOTO 7 1 0

3 1 0 I N P U T "DO YOU W I S H P E N P L O T T E R O U T P U T ? ( Y OR N ) " , A $

3 2 0 A $ = U P C % ( A $ )

530 I F G O - " Y " THEN GOTO 4 0 0

S 4 0 GOTO 4 3 0

3 5 0 REM

3 6 0 REM

3 7 0 REM.

. . . . . . . . .

DRAW P L O T ON SCREEN OR P L O T T E R W I T H I N P U T P A R A M E T E R S . .

3 8 0 REM

3 9 0 REM

4 0 0 P R I N T "OUTPUT W I L L B E D I R E C T E D TO H P I P ADDRESS

5 "

4 1 0 PLOTR ( 5 . 1 )

4 2 0 GOT0 4 4 0

4 3 0 PLOTR

4 4 0 I N P U T " P L E A S E S P E C I F Y M I N I M U M X " , X i

4 5 0 I N P U T

4 6 0 I N P U T

"

"

M A X I M U M X " , X 2 t4It.IIMtJM Y " , Y i

4 7 0 I t 4 F U T

"

MAXIMIJM Y " , Y 2

4 8 0 I N P U T

4 9 0 ItqPIJT

5 Q d I N P U T

5 1 0 I N P U T

5 2 0 I N P U T

"

"

X - T I C S P A C I N G " , X t

Y - . T I C S P h C I N G " , Y t

"

V A L U E S BETWEEN X - L A B E L S " , X 1

"

V A L U E S BETWEEN Y - L A B E L S " , Y 1

"

X - O R I G I N " , X o

5 3 0 I t d P u r u

5 4 0

F X D ( O ) \ G C L R

5 5 0 L O C A T E ( 6 0 , 1 7 5 , 1 8 , 7 0 )

5 h 0 S C A L E ( X I , X 2 , Y i , Y 2 )

Y-ORIGIN

",,YO

S?U E s c $ = C t { R $ ( 2 7 ) \ P R I N T E s c $ " * d F "

5 8 0 L G R I D ( - X t , Y t , X o , Y o , I N T ( X I / X t ) , I t . l T ( Y l / Y t ) )

5 3 0 FRAME \ P E N

( 2 )

6 0 0 C S I Z E ( l ) \ S E T G U \MOVE ( 6 0 , 7 1 ) \ P R I N T # O i l ' $ D O L L A R S " \ M O V E ( 1 3 0 , s )

!4

1:

*

FOR IINTERNAL USE ONLY

Volume 4, Number

2 1 ,

September

1 5 ,

1979

h i 0 P R I N T #O, "YEARSn\SETULJ

6 2 0 HOVE ( 0 , P )

6 3 0 1.-ORG

( 5 )

6 4 0 FOR X=O TO Y STEP Y / i O O

6 4 5

I = I 2 / N / i O O

1 5 0 T = P Y ( S + I ) * ( N * X ) hbO F v ~ : I t . I T ( T t i 0 0 + . 5 ) / S O O

6 7 0 PLOT ( X , F v )

680 NEXT X

6 9 0 SETGU \LORG ( 4 ) \ H O V E ( 3 0 , 7 5 ) ' \ P R I N T $ O i U T H E N O M I N A L M \ P R I N T # O i " I N T E R E S T " ;

7 0 0 P R I N T S O j "RATEn'\ F R I f d T $ 0 , " I 3

"

; I 2 ; " % "

710 END

2

5

0

2 2

;,

1

T H C

H K I i i I

N l i L

P G T E

1 3

.

9

4:;

'3

-.

10130

1 7 5 0

1 S l j i l

1 2 5 0

1 ililil

5 0 0

D'TD Sales Development Grows

By: Carl FlockIDTD

Norm Choy has accepted a position as Sales Development Manager for Midwest and Southern Sales regions. Congratulations

Norm! The new organization is as follows:

Peter Moulds

-

NSR-N

Bruce Miller

- NSR-s

Bob Lin

TBH

SALES DEVELOPMENT

Carl Flock

Beni Gennochio

t

Ed Washington

-

MSR

Tom Kupec

1

Dave Goodreau

Mary Chin

- ESR-C

(Manhattan, Paramus, Woodbury)

Jill Glashow

-

ESR-N

Dave Williams

-

ESR-C

1

F

(KOP, New Brunswick)

Eric Grandjean

- ICON

FOR UhUUE3NAL

USE ONLY

.

- . ,

Volume 4, Number 21, September 15, 1979

22

Terminal "Ahoy"

By: Kalli LouislDTD

Yet Another!

By: Dave GoodreaulDTD

@

It's so easy to call Data Terminals

-

DTD is proud to have "aboard" a new Sales Development

Engineer, Dave Williams. Dave comes to us from the United

States Navy where he spent four years as a Naval Flight

Officer. He graduated from the United States Naval

Acadamy in

1974 with a BS in Business Administration.

Dave will be supporting the King of Prussia and New welcome him on board.

A new member to the DTD Sales Development team supporting the Eastern (Baltimore, Rockville) Sales Region is

Andy Zaremba. Andy, an Easterner from Lung Guyland

(1V.Y.) comes to DTD with four years HP experience at the

SRD Technology Center and the IC Labs. Give Andy a call and see if his "I see . . .

" background can't help you.

DTD's New Communication Center

By: Rich FergusonlDTD

Easterner Supports Eastern

By: Kalli LouislDTD

Let's all welcome Jill Glashow to DTD Sales Development.

Jill is fresh out of the University of Vermont where she earned a BS in computer science. Being born and raised in Rhode

Island, we felt it only natural for Jill to support the Northern

Jill will be covering the following offices: Lexington,

Rockville, Syracuse, Albany and Wallingford. So, if you need the finest support in CSG, call Jill and say "Hi"!

If you have had trouble getting hold of your very favorite DTD

Sales Development person lately, it's because we've had start-up problems with our new-improved phone system.

However, don't dispare, it's computer controlled, hmmm. For your visual delight, please refer to the picture of our communications center console. Note the ease at which calls can be transferred, or in the case of Eric Grandjean, swallowed whole. Yes folks, only the best for our sales effort.

If you hear bubbling sounds or smacking of lips next time you call DTD, it's because our console also doubles as the coffee stand.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

3

FOR

IINTERNAL USE ONLY

DS/1000, a Guide for New Users,

French Version

By: Jean- Pierre BonnevilleiHPG

3075N3076A on PDP 11/34

By: Serge DaoustlDTD

Yes folks, ~t

IS poss~ble Not only can you sell your super also sell them on non-HP systems with no specials requlred

To hardwire connect in point-to-point mode a 3075 data capture terminal at 2400 baud to a PDP 11134 you must:

1. Set the DIP switches at the rear of the terminal as follows:

BANK I : 0000001 0

BANK ll : 01110110

BANK Ill

:

00000000

Where "0" indicates the switch being down;

And "1" indicates the switch being up.

2. The DEC operating system must be confined to receive 8 data bits (7 ASCII bits

+ parity).

3. The communication interface card in the PDP 11134 must be the DEC 11W interface. (The 11E interface will not work.)

"GRENOBLE CONNECTS"

r )

A Guide

Although a mailing was made to CE's at publication time, early this year, some of you may not know yet that a French version of the DSi1000, A GUIDE FOR NEW USERS is available.

If you are interested in a copy, get in touch with the traffic department in Orsay, France.

I

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September 15, 1979

24

FOR OhJIL?f

CZOMPLJTER S Y S T E M S N E W S L E T T E R

The HP

3000 Family

By: Fred Gibbons & Rich EdwardsiGSD

With KOALA (Series 30) now joining the HP 3000 Series 33 and Series Ill systems, the HP 3000 family is now the NUMBER ONE

- business systems family Your literature carries a new theme on every cover to help position the 3000 fam~ly:

HP

3000

Computer Systems

A

family of compatible business systems for distributed data processing.

.

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

25

L?OR IIhW'E?J&%l= [email protected] ONLY

.

What's behind the new tagline? There are four major components, each of which is easy to explain:

A FAMILY

.

.

.

The HP3000 family consists of three systems

- level Series 30, the mid-range Series 33, and the highest performance Series I I I.

.

.

.

COMPATIBLE

.

.

.

All members of the HP 3000 family feature totally compatible systems software and application programs.

All HP 3000 systems use the MPE Ill operating system, and applications written on any of these HP 3000 systems can be run on any other without reprogramming, recompiling, or relinking.

. . .

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

.

. .

Each HP 3000 is afull-function general purpose business system. Each can handle simultaneous transaction processing, data communications, on-line program development and batch processing in any of 5 languages

(COBOL, BASIC, RPG, FORTRAN, and SPL).

. .

.

FOR DISTRIBUTED PROCESSING.

The HP 3000 distributed data processing concept is to provide processing power where it is needed. Whether it be terminals distributed around a warehouse or systems on opposite ends of the world, HP distributed data processing network be set up that conforms to the way business is done.

THE H P

3000

FAMILY

-

OUTSTANDING FUTURE

Accelerating the HP 3000 Family's Sales

Momentum

By:

Fred GibbonslGSD

For the past several years General Systems Division, lead by the HP 3000 sales force, has been forging Hewlett-

Packard's entry into commercial data processing. During this period we sharpened our product aim and focused the

HP 3000 toward on-line transaction processing and now distributed data processing, the fastest growing segment in the commercial market. The results achieved by the HP 3000

Field Sales team have been outstanding. Sales have grown an average of 80% per year.

Your sales efforts have placed HP 3000's in both large and small companies showing that Hewlett-Packard's concept of distributed data processing means placing computing power where the work is done in any size firm. With the introduction of the Series 30 coupled with DSl3000, available on all HP 3000's, and the Intelligent Network Processor. you'll have an even broader and stronger product family to penetrate these accounts.

The HP 3000 product family is presented in the accompanying articles. Full details will be found in two new

Product Tour: HP 3000 Business Systems and Distributed

Data Processing.

All of us in 3000 Marketing wish you great success in the coming year.

Introducing the KOALA

HP 3000 Series 30

.

. .

'The New

By

Chosen ChengiGSD

Palo Alto, California, September 14, 1979

Hewlett-Packard Company today announced a new computer system as the third member of its HP 3000 family of business computers. Named the Series 30, this new system offers the same features and capability as its predecessors, the Series 33 and Series Ill. All HP 3000 systems feature totally compatible systems software and application programs. All systems are full function genera purpose computers with virtual memory and true multiprogramming and multilingual capabilities. Each HP

3000 can simultaneously handle transaction processing, data communications, on-line program development, and batch operations in any of five high-level programming languages. Systems differ only on performance and expandability.

The HP 3000 Series 30 is an HP 3000 system packaged within a small cabinet measuring only 24" by 30" by 1 8 . The cabinet is accompanied by a separately packaged systemlmaintenance console and system disc: The system requires no special air-conditioned room and runs on singl phase 120V power with only minimal requirements for dedicated power requirements of the system are made possible by use of HP's proprietary Silicon-on-Sapphire

(SOS) technology. The attractive and compact Series 30 computer system maintains the functional capabilities of larger Series 33 or Series Ill systems: transaction processing, data communications, on-line program

,development, and batch processing.

I

The Series 30 is fully software compatible with the larger members of the HP 3000 family, the Series 33 and Series

111.

All HP 3000s use the MPE Ill operating system, and applications written on any of these HP 3000 systems can b run on any other without reprogramming, recompiling, or relinking.

The Series 30 incorporates an innovative system self-test

'feature and Remote System Verification Program (R.S.V.P.) to enable Hewlett-Packard Service personnel to provide a high level of service and support at the customer site and from remote locations. The capability to control the system from an authorized remote system console by simply initiating the RSVP facility over a dial-up phone line is particularly important in a distributed data processing environment with many remote stations.

I

According to Robert T. Bond, HP 3000 Marketing Manager,

"The HP 3000 Series 30 is a unique product in terms of the capabilities available, in such a small package, and at a low cost. The Series 30 offers an attractive entry-level HP 3000 svstem for standalone business data processing applica- tions. But its compact size, ease of

installation.^^

3000

I

I' capabilities make it especially suited as an economical n

I

r)

3

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15,

1979

Cc'MPUTER S Y S T E M S

NEWSLETTER

HP 3000 station in a network of HP 3000 systems, where the aim is to provide cost-effective computing power to several sites. With HP 3000 capability it is easy to share applications software throughout the user's organization and exercise centralized control, as required."

Hewlett-Packard's RJEl3000 communications product is also available on the Series 30 and Series 33, extending

HP DSN capabilities to IBM mainframes as well.

All communications are handled by the new Intelligent

Network Processor (INP), Hewlett-Packard's front-end communications processor, which also employs HP's SO technology. The INP is a computer in its own right, providing the capability of off-loading communications control from the,

CPU. This enables high performance levels of local transaction processing during concurrent data communications to other systems.

A minimum system configuration for the Series 30 includes

256 Kb error-correcting semiconductor memory, CPU, 1 Mb flexible disc, four asynchronous terminal ports, systemlmaintenance console, 20 Mb system disc, and eight

110 expansion slots. A maximum configuration would contain

1024 Kb memory, 960 Mb high-speed disc storage, up to 32 terminal ports, with 4 magnetic tape drives, and 2 line printers. Up to 2 communication lines can be added, with each line replacing 4 terminal ports. The entry-level system, priced at $49,750 complements the mid-range Series 33 and the general purpose Series Ill distributed data processing systems. Availability of the Series 30 is quoted at

14 weeks. First shipment are scheduled for October 1979!!!

With these announcements, Hewlett-Packard has set a new standard for the 1980's with its HP 3000 family of compatible

Series 30

-

HP 3000 System

By: Chosen ChenglGSD

The Series 30 makes an unbeatable contribution to customer needs for an entry level business computer

New entry-level HP 3000 system offers a third alternative

"THE ONE COMPUTER

FOR THE ONE COMPUTER COMPANY"

New low entry price for full HP 3000 capability

Fundamental operating software includes data entry and data management software

Substantial expandability

Memory

Disc

Terminals

Magnetic Tape

Line Printers

- U p to 960 Mb

-

-

-

A single vendor solution

This is Good News for an even wider business community where minimum cost and flexibility of configuration and installation are major concerns. Sell the Series 30 to your horizontal prospects!

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

FOR INTERNAL

USE ONLY

Series 30

-

OEM System

By: Chosen ChenglGSD

Each Series 30 adds 3 functional units to the Purchase

Agreement Discount Schedule for multiple system purchases.

GSD casts a bigger net for qualified OEM's with the announcement of the HP 3000 Series 30. Complementing the current HP 250 and HP 300 offerings for business

OEM's, the Series 30 lowers the price barrier for OEM's wanting to join the HP 3000 family. Key KOALA (Series 30) features appealing to OEM's include:

MPE runs on all HP 3000 systems and applications software is totally compatible from one HP 3000 to another. Existing applications for the Series Ill don't need to be modified in any way to run on the lowest cost HP

3000, the Series 30!

The Series 30

IS eligible for discounts under the Demo

Development Program.

In all your discussions with business OEM's, put the

Series 30 into HP business systems product perspective: complementing the low cost HP 250 and the technically innovative HP 300.

I

SELL OEM's

-

THE EVEN BROADER GSD

PRODUCT LINE!!

Series 30

By Chosen ChenglGSD

Several key features make KOALA especially well-suited for use as a distributed data processing station in a network of

HP 3000 systems.

Remote controllmaintenance, data communications, and "execute-only" facility, small size and low priced entry level configuration made KOALA the choice as a cost-effective station in a distributed data processing network.

The facts speak for themselves. KOALA is the product your major account customers have been waiting for!

DSl3000 and RJEl3000 capabilities are available and employ the new Intelligent Network Processor (INP) to offload from the

CPU communications protocol handling. This enables high performance levels of local transaction processing during concurrent communications to other systems.

The facility to execute compiled code without the language compiler enables a distributed data processing station to be an execute-only station with the application being "downloaded" from the central system via DSl3000, magnetic tape, or private volumes. even in remote locations. processing network. (NOTE: This duplicate hardware console capability is even more powerful than MPE's new distributed console capability.) Computer power is located where the work is done, with central control exercised in tandem with local operator control as needed.

- -

r )

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

28

!$OR

INITE8gAL U k E ObilkV

C2OMPUTER

S V S T E M S

NEWSLETTER

The Series 30

-

Business System

High Performance

By: Chosen C ~ ~ ~ ~ I G S D

Not only does the Series 30 (KOALA) offer the same capabilities of on-line transaction processing, program development, batch processing, and data communications as other HP 3000 Series 33 and Series Ill systems,

. .

.

Not only does KOALA run the MPE Ill Operating System,

Not only does KOALA support the board range of HP manufactured peripherals that is available on the Series

33,

.

.

.

KOALA does it all at the same high level of performance as that of the Series 33 system. Because the Series 30 shares a common CPU and memory and 110 boards with the Series 33, the results of performance testing done for the Series 33 in the Performance brochure (5953-0556) apply to Koala.

The Series 30 offers a lot of performance in a small package. For example, in a recent General Systems

HP KOALATY

BY: B. B. BearlGSD

Division demonstration, a Series 30 simultaneously controlled eight on-line terminals performing transaction processing, a program development terminal, a DSl3000 link to a Series Ill and an RJEi3000 link to a mainframe

(both communication lines used separate Intelligent

Network Processors). How many small business systems under $50,000 have that broad a range of functional caoabilities and performance?

This kind of performance at the low entry level price of the

Series 30 complements the added 110 expansion potential of the Series 33 (up to 7 synchronous data communications lines). These systems offer a range of pricelperformance that complements the highest performance member of the HP 3000 family -

Ill, with about twice the performance of the Series 30 and

Series 33.

For more discussion on HP 3000 systems performance refer to the HP 3000 Field Sales Notebook. In the meantime when you think of the Series 30 (and Series

33)

THINK FULL HP 3000 CAPABILITY AND HlGH

PERFORMANCE. When you think of the HP 3000 Family

THINK OF FULL HP 3000 CAPABII-ITIES RANGING

FROM THE HlGH PERFORMANCE SERIES 30 'r0 THE

HIGHEST PERFORMANCE SERIES Ill.

-

QUERY to check the pedigree of a young

KOALA. with me," 8.8. was overheard to say

It's now out of the bag! What, you wonder? Why the new KOALA

- mailbags of HP KOALATY (quality - o f course) buttons are out of the bag and proudly adorning HP people in the field as well as at GSD. As you sell the number one business systems family

-

Have Pride in the family quality; in short:

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

New GSD Data Communications

Capabilities for the HP 3000 Family

By: Larry HartgelGSD

MRJEl3000 now runs with even more job entry systems

RJV3000 now runs on Series 30 and 33

All of these data communication products are part of

Hewlett-Packard's Distributed Systems Network HP-DSN - the high level, user-oriented network architecture that allows

HP computers to communicate in distributed processing networks. With these NPT introductions HP now offers the broadest family of compatible business systems for DDP.

And all of these systems afford completely compatible data communications. elegantly simple DDPsolutions that reflect their organization and its needs.

INTERCONNECTION OVERVIEW

- the large number of communications products now available and the correspondingly large number of computer systems, one could get confused as to what connects or works with what.

The following two matrices, show at a glance what can be connected to what for differing capabilities.

PRODUCT INTRODUCTIONS

- communications capabilities for the DDP marketplace are

SOS microprocessor technology powers a hot new communication interface (the INP)

Fully compatible DSi3000 now on Series 30 and 33. an Enhanced MTSl3000

1

HP 3000 Communications Subsystems

I

DS13000

1

RJEi3000

- Remote Job Entry (278013780)

MRJEl3000

1

MTSi3000

-

Multipoint Terminal Software

HP SYSTEM TO HP SYSTEM LlNKS

\

LlNKS

\

HP 3000\ \

I

I

, - -

I

- - n

\

.

\

SERIES 30133 SERIES 111111 HP 1000

-

HP 300 l

I

I

SERIES 30133

;:;;

DSIC

DSIM

NO

LINKS

NO

LINKS

DESKTOP

HP 250 COMPUTERS

TF

-rF

DSiC

DSIM

DSIC

DSIM

DSIC

NO

LINKS

TF

TF

TF

DS/C

DSIM

SERIES llilll

- the non-3000 system appears as a Terminal to the HP 3000 and Files can be passed between systems

-

DS capabilities over Modem links

bjsls

o,$ii":-

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15,

1979

30

The complementary HP to IBM communications capabilities for the HP 3000 family are delineated in the following matrix.

HP 3000 TO IBM SYSTEM COMMLlNlCATlON

RJE

SERIES 30133 SERIES IIIIII

MRJE

L

Note: RJE can be used to communicate to other non-HP systems. Refer to the RJEIMRJE Field Training Manual in the

DDP Binder for details.

GSD Announces the Intelligent Network

Processor for the HP 3000

By: Tom

BlackiGSD

Introduction

The Intelligent Network Processor, INP, is a major new data communication enhancement for the HP 3000 computers.

It's a computer system in it's own right extending data communications capability to the Series 30 and 33, and also offering significant performance enhancements for the

@ . for all of our new and existing data communications subsystems.

The INPoffers major benefits to HP 3000 customers who use data communications. These are:

The operating software is downloaded from the CPU into

RAM on the INP. This is the same type of Ram as is used for

HP 3000 main for data buffering. Since the operating software is downloaded, new data communications subsystems can be accommodated in software rather than hardware, giving tremendous inherent flexibility for future growth. The operating software performs most of the data communication protocol manipulation including adding and stripping protocol words.

Extensive use has been made of large scale integration for the INP. Examples are the data communication controllers and DMA controller. These improve performance and reliability while remaining cost effective. For example, the

BISYNC chip performs serial to parallel conversion, bit ar.d character synchronization, and indicates the start and end of data block.

Major components of Series 30 and 33 INP

The SOS microprocessor is the heart of the INP. It uses the latest HP SOS technology, has a 16 bit word, and executes between 500,000 and 700,000 instructions per second. Most of the data communications protocol handling is carried out by the INP, and thus this load is removed from the CPU.

The INP operates at up to 56 Kbps in half or full duplex mode. Modem and hardwired interfaces are standard and

RS-232C and V.35* interfaces can be used. A comprehensive self test facility simplifies maintenance and trouble-shooting, and buffered data is protected during a power failure.

*V.35 is a modem interface frequently used instead of

1

RS-232C for speeds above 19.2 Kbps.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

INP FeaturesIBenefits

Feature

Offloads data protocol handling from CPU

Compatible with Series 30 and 33

SOS microprocessor and

LSI circuiting

Downloaded software

Built-in diagnostic and self test

Self-test operates under

MPE

Modem and hardwired interfaces up to

Battery back-up

56 Kbps

Benefit

Reduced CPU ovemead and improved system performance

Provide datacommunications capability for the first time

Fast, reliable, and cost effective performance

Provides growth path for future data communications products

Simplified maintenance and troubleshooting

Tests do not interfere with non-communications portions of the applications.

Improved data transfer rates over the SSLC

Buffered data is protected during a power failure

Series II and Ill

INP

SSLC

HSI

INP

SSLC SSLC

SSLC

Series

30 and

33

INP INP Not Not

Available Available

A very common question is "Can I improve performance by scrapping my existing SSLC and replacing it with an INP?"

The answer is YES if the system is CPU bound.

A reduction in CPU load will allow other activities more access to the

CPU, which will improve performance. However, if the system is memory bound or 110 bound, offloading the CPU will have only a marginal effect on performance and in this case the INP will not help. Before recommending that an existing (UC) customer replace the SSLC with an ILIP have your SE performance specialist make an evaluation at current CPU loading to determine if the INP is a worthwhile investment.

The HSI should be used in certain situations. It operates at the extremely high data rate of 2.5 Mbps and is effective when very large files are to be transferred. It also is used for interfacing with HP 1000 computers.

Performance

CPU Overhead

CPU overhead tests show the contribution of the INP in reducing the load from data communications on the CPU versus the SSLC. The tests were run on the Series Ill.

Because the INP does part of the communications activities itself, there is less use of the CPU; CPU overhead is decreased. On a system that is heavily CPU board, this will result in lower response times.

DSl3000 Welcomes the Series 30 and

Series 33 to HP-DSN

By: Steve Za/ewski!GSD

The two newest members of the HP 3000 famlly of are now members of Hewlett-Packard s Dlstrlbuted Systems r)

'7

H P

3000

SERIES Ill SYSTEM O V E R H E A I D \

DSl3000 on such a broad range of compat~ble buslness systems Your customers can solve the~r d~str~buted processing

4800

HALF

DPX

DATA RATE

9600

FULL

DPX

56.M)O

DIRECT

CONNECT

J

Where to Sell the INP

In most cases the INP

I S the preferred Interface for DSl3000 or RLIE/3000 communications. It offers potential performance improvements on the Series II and Ill, and provides agrowth path because it will be used for all future data communications subsystems. A support matrix is shown below. price range of from $49,500 to $250 000 from which to choose

Present customers can expand their networks using Series

30 and Series 33 computers without changing their distributed processing applications. Since all HP 3000 systems are software compatible, the same DSl3000 application running presently on their network of Series II

Series 30's and Series 33's.

33 computers In their network as "execute only" systems An

"execute only" system is a computer where no program development is done. The computer is equipped to only execute already compiled programs. The HP 3000 is perfect

Volume

4,

Number 21, September

15,

1979

FOR INTERNAL USE ONLV

3

for this environment. Programs can be written and debugged on one HP 3000 and "downloaded" to "execute only" HP 3000 computers using the remote file access capability of DSl3000. Compilers are not needed on the execute only systems since the fundamental operating software (FOS) contains program run time libraries. FOS also includes the subsystems needed by the user's applications:

IMAGEl3000, QUERYl3000, and VIEWl3000. The Series 30 and 33 are especially attractive for "execute only" systems because of their low prices.

The price of DSl3000 will remain at $3000 regardless for which HP 3000 system it is purchased. Present DSl3000 users receive the ability to communicate with Series 30 and

Series 33 systems without any additional cost. DSl3000 gives users the capability to do:

1. Remote command execution,

2.

Remote file access,

3. Remote peripheral access,

4.

Remote database access, and

5. Program-to-program communications.

The key to communications on the Series 30 and Series 33 is the Intelligent Network Processor (INP), HP's new hardware interface board. The INP uses HP's Silicon-on-Sapphire

(SOS) technology to lower customer's communications overhead and give added flexibility. The llVP offloads the

CPU by performing some of the protocol handling directly on the INP using an HP proprietary SOS microprocessor.

Customers also get added flexibility in configuring their network connections. The INP can connect to another INP over modems or directly (hardwired). The INP can also connect to your customer's present Synchronous Single Line

Controller (SSLC) over modems or directly using a modem eliminator cable. The INP cannot connect to a hardwired serial interface (HSI). With the INP, data can be transferred at up to 56,000 bitslsec data rate.

All new communications products that we support in the future will be designed with the INP as the interface.

Presently, there are no connections between a Series 30 or

Series 33 and an HP 1000.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

-

15, 1979

33

FOR INTERNAL USE ONILV

RJEl3000 on the Series 30 and 33!

By: John ChisholmlGSD

RJE is Versatile!

Don't forget that RJE can also be used for communicating

(passing files) with many vendors' systems

-

See the RJEIMRJE Field Training Manual for details.

3

Pass Files

Back & Forth

RJEl3000

Emulating

278013780

With the introduction of RJEl3000 (Remote Job Entry or

278013780 emulation) on the Series 30 and 33, RJEl3000 has been made available on EVERY MAKE, EVERY MODEL, and EVERY SHAPE of HP 3000 THE WORLD HAS EVER

KNOWN!!

SELL RJE

-

or Ill!!

MRJE Now Works with JES 3 and ASP!

By: John ChisholmlGSD

HP 300

Series Ill

Unlike MRJE, which is only available on the Series I I or Ill,

YOU CAN SELL RJE WITHOUT EVEN WORRYING about what model HP 3000 your customer has! Also unlike MRJE, which is compatible with mainframes using only certain job entry subsystems, RJE can be used with ANY IBM mainframe that supports real 278013780 devices.

RJE on the INP:

Better Performance and Higher Speed

MRJEl3000 (Multileaving Remote Job Entry) is now compatible with IBM mainframes using JES 3 and ASP job entry subsystems! This means that you can sell Series Ill's where customers need MRJE capability in more mainframe environments than you could before.

WHOA! What's this JES 3 and ASP Jazz?

,IES 3 (prounounced "jezz 3';) and ASP are job entry systems. A job entry subsystem is software on a mainframe

("host") computer that receives, spools. and schedules jobs for execution, and sends job output to the appropriate device.

On the Series 30 and 33, RJE uses the new Intelligent

Network Processor (INP) as a hardware interface. The INP off-loads communications overhead from the HP 3000 CPU, and provides communication at speeds up to 19.2 Kbits per second (TWICE as fast as the SSLC!)

Up to now, MRJE has been compatible with HASP II and ,IES

2, the most widely used job entry systems. Now, it is also

On the Series IIiIII, you can use either the INP or SSLC for

RJE. The INP is generally recommended for better performance and greater flexibility. See the INP performance data in the RJEIMRJE Field Train~ng

- in the DDP Binder distributed during NPT Tour time.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

34

large, service bureau environments. ASP is used on the larger IBM 360's, such as the 360165. JES 3 is found on larger 370's or 303X's, like the IBM 37011 68 or 3033. You will encounter ASP less often than JES 3, because there are fewer large 360's out there than 370's.

L%X?i IhVUEL3NAL USE

~~~~

Different job entry systems are used with different IBM mainframe operating systems. For example, JES 2 and

JES 3 are used with OSIVS2 (MVS). ASP is used with

-

So There are now FOUR different

That's right!! They are: HASP II

JES 2

JES 3 (NEW!)

ASP (NEW!)

Excluding smaller IBM mainframes running DOS-type operating systems, most models of the IBM 360, 370, 303X, or 4300 use one of these job entry subsystems (before you sell MRJE, be sure to inquire what job entry system is being used on the mainframe.) In addition, MRJE can be used with

Itel, Amdahl, and other mainframes that use the same operating software as the IBM mainframes!

Then How Come MRJE is called "HASP Workstation"

Capability?

Because multileaving remote job entry workstations are most widely used with the HASP II job entry system. But MRJE is not restricted to HASP I I !

What's So great about MRJE?

Plenty:

*

Automatic Job Output Routing

*

MRJE Manager to maintain "Law and Order"

*

Joblog file keeps record of all jobs transmitted

*

Can prepare jobs during the day and have them transmitted automatically during the night

*

Friendly, easy-to-use commands

*

ANY terminal can be used by MRJE manager to issue commands to the mainframe

WOW!! MRJE IS a pretty neat product!!

SELL MRJE

-

make an

Major Enhancements Are Made to

MTSl3000

By:

Tom BlacklGSD

The MTSl3000 communications subsystem (Multipoint

Terminal Software) is a major element in the HP 3000 data communications strategy. It can offer significant advantages over point-to-point communications both in terms of communication costs and system performance. MTSl3000 has been enhanced to provide even more customer features. Specifically, the enhancements are:

In addition to being supported in point-to-point mode,

HP 3075, 3076, and 3077 factory data collection terminals are now supported with MTSi3000. They can be mixed with 264X terminals on the same line, giving you the flexibility needed to sell complete MULTIPOINT factory solutions.

The data link terminal connection mode is now supported.

This provides a new lower cost alternative for configuring hardwired multipoint terminals. The data link is particularly suited to factory environments.

The System Manager has much more control over the operating characteristics of MTSl3000. For example, the

System Manager can now control the order and frequency which each terminal or group of terminals is polled, thus providing the ability to give priority to certain applications on the line.

The diagnostic program MPTEST has been greatly expanded to perform a thorough test of the multipoint configuration and terminals in order to diagnose errors in line configuration before they become service problems.

The impact of non-responding or busy terminals on the rest of the terminals on the line has been significantly reduced.

The net of these enhancements is a more powerful and flexible MTSi3000 product, Remember, in the proper situations, MTSi3000 can significantly reduce both installation and monthly costs for customers while at the same time increasing their performance. Read the following pages to get the details on how and where to sell MTSi3000.

Then team it with your Series Ill systems to provide complete

MULTIPOINT SOLUTIONS for your customers.

Features and Benefits

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

Feature Benefits

Test program locates Reduces service calls by configuration errors and allowing the customer to tests individual terminals. checkout and verify his configuration.

Flexible operator control Allows lines to be tailored to over polling sequence specific customer needs. and frequency.

Fully Integrated with

MPE-Ill.

Easier applications program conversions to make.

MTSl3000 software is compatible with

HP VIEW13000

Existing HP VIEW13000 users have no program commands to make.

FOR [INTERNAL USE ONLY

Operator has control over Allows terminals to be which terminals are on or moved or powered down off -line. without affecting other terminals on the line.

307X and 264X terminals

Makes it easier to set up can be put on the same complete factory data hardwired line. collection and processing networks.

Multiple terminals can share a single line.

MTS substantially reduces communications costs for the customer.

Up to 9600 bps trans- mission speed.

Full page mode operation.

Hardwired asynchronous

9600 bps terminals may be up to 2000 feet apart.

Automatic error checking and retransmission.

Greater throughput for a given communications line and/or reduce transmission costs.

More effective use of CPU and communications line.

Flexibility in placing terminals.

Allows high speed trans- mission while ensuring integrity of data.

3

High KOALATY HP 3000 Sales Literature

By: Rich Edwards!GSD

HP 3000 Computer Syslems

wswLcrT&

,. p

- * *

+

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY

GSD's strategy is to merchandise the HP 3000 family in a common set of sales literature -one HP 3000 Price/Configuration from scratch for use on or after October 1, 1979. Each piece is designed to amplify the new HP 3000 "tagline":

A FAMILY OF COMPATIBLE BUSINESS SYSTEMS

FOR DISTRIBUTED DATA PROCESSING

The following pieces of sales literature will be available for the HP 3000 on October

1

Name Description

HP 3000 Computer Systems:

SYSTEMS OVERVIEW

New 4-color 6 page flyer with 3 page fold-out poster of Series

30, 33,

111 systems. Hang one up on your wall today! Use for seminars and mailings.

HP 3000 Computer Systems:

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY

New 4-color 24 page management introduction to HP 3000 systems. Topics discussed emphasize selecting HP as the prospect's business systems supplier and the key features, advantages and benefits of the HP 3000. Use this with managers to give them a high level introduction to the

HP 3000 Family.

Part Number

5953-0583

5953-0582

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September 15, 1979

FOR IINUERNAL USE ONILY

HP 3000 Computer Systems:

DATA SHEET

HP3000 PRICE!

CONFIGURATION GUlDE

HP 3000 UPGRADE

PRODUCTS PRICE!

CONFIGURATION GUlDE

HP 3000 GENERAL

INFORMATION MANUAL

HP 3000 SYSTEMS

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Have your customers been looking for a single sheet with a summary of the HP 3000 technical data? You now have just what they need in a compact format. Line drawings of the systems (Selies 30,33, and Ill) with minimum and maximum configurations complement a page of technical data. Use in conjunction with the HP 3000 posterlflyer for additional technical details.

Totally revised to be even more readable and illustrative!

Sections include: HP 3000 product family; Configuration overview, configuration guides; ordering examples and pricing of Series 30, 33 and Ill systems; HP 3000 software;

HP terminals and modems; HP 3000 systems communica- tions products; and HP 3000 training, documentation and site preparation data.

Also totally revised to be more comprehensive, readable and illustrative. This P!C Guide includes maximum configuration diagrams for all older HP 3000 systems. A new section has been added on software and software support for Pre-Series

II systems.

Totally revised to add the Series 30, Intelligent Network

Processor (INP), Software and Hardware Support services.

This is the one piece of sales literature that fully describes the HP 3000 and all hardwarelsoftware subsystems. Use the

GIM with the technical specifier.

Performance tests are underway to expand this brochure this fall. The current edition is still valid since the Series 30 and

Series 33 have the same ~erformance.

5953-0585

5953-0579

5953-0584

5953-0556

The following chart summarizes the

HP 3000 sales literature:

SALES PURPOSE

HP 3000 BUSINESS SYSTEMS

MANAGEMENT AUDIENCE

LEAD GENERATION

QUALIFICATION

SYSTEMS OVERVIEW (flyerlposter)

HP 3000 DATA SHEET

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY (4-color brochure)

EVALUATION

CLOSE

HP 3000 GIM

HP 3000 SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE GUlDE

PRICEICONFIGURATION GUIDE ORDER

The following pieces of sales literature, while not written exclusively about the HP 3000 family, will be valuable sales tools:

Name Description Part Number

A WORKING PARTNER-

SHIP: Hewlett-Packard's practical, proven approach to meeting your long-term computer needs

HP DISTRIBUTED

PROCESSING SOLUTIONS

FOR BUSINESS AND

INDUSTRY

An introduction to Hewlett-Packard as a supplier of calcu- lators and computers. The cover is a photograph of the

HP 3000 Series 33.

'TECHNICAL AUDIENCE

An introduction to HP's distributed systems solutions.

5952-0077

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

FOR

IINUERNAL USE ONLY

IMAGE: INFORMATION

MANAGEMENT USING HP

BUSINESS SYSTEMS

HP COMPUTER SYSTEMS

SOFTWARE SUPPORT

SERVICES DATA SHEET

HP COMPUTER SYSTEMS

CUSTOMER SERVICES

DATA BOOK

New 4 color 16 page management introduction to the bene- fits of HP's IMAGE data base management system. Several applications are included.

Name

MFGl3000 GENERAL

INFORMA'I-ION MANUAL

MFGl3000 APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE SALES LITERATURE:

Description

A management oriented manual that describes the benefits, operation and use of each of the MFGl3000 products:

Engineering Data Control (EDC/3000), Standard Product

Costing (SPC/3000), Inventory and Order Status (IOSl3000) and Material Requirement Planning (MRP13000). It also describes the benefits of a standard application product including training, documentation, consulting, and support.

MFGl3000 MANUFACTUR-

ING SYSTEMS DATA

SHEET (EDCl3000, IOSI

3000, MRPl3000)

ING SYSTEMS DATA

SHEET (SPCl3000)

A description of the specific features of EDCl3000, IOSl3000, and MRP/3000. It also defines and specifies product re- lated training, documentation, consulting, and support.

Ordering information is also included.

A description of the specific features of SPCl3000. It also defines and specifies related training, documentation, con- sulting, and support. Ordering information is also included.

Slide Presentations as HP 3000 Sales Tools

By:

Rudann ClarklGSD

GIVE'EM THE

OLD'SOFTS

HOE'

Part Number

5953-0576

5953-0573

HP 3000 orientation, others incorporate all of the business systems product lines, or even the full range of products prpduced by the Computer Systems Group. All are listed below with the part numbers and U.S. prices needed for ordering.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

38

FOR IINTERNAL UkSE ONLY

sr

:,\'\

;bcT

LG~ k21

yrq

.z

Y$bflsLELTT?

EXCLUSIVELY HP 3000 PRESENTATIONS

Topic

Description

35mm

Slide Kit

(English language)

Overhead

Slide Kit

(English language)

HP 3000 SYSTEMS

OVERVIEW

MPE OVERVIEW

Totally revised introduction to HP 3000 family of compatible 30000-60007 30000-60008 business systems for distributed data processing. Includes

Series 30, 33 and 111 (51 slides).

$50 $75

Overview of the MPE Operating System and Utilities (Editor, 30000-60013 30000-60014

FCOPY, Sort-Merge) (25 slides) $25 $40

DSl3000 OVERVIEW Customer slides and instructor guide (technical presenta- Not Available 30000-90128 tion $130

DDP BENEFITS OVERVIEW Management introduction to the benefits of DDP; non- product

- specific (27 slides)

30000-60006 30000-901 27

$30 $40

PRESENTATIONS INCORPORATING THE HP 3000 FAMILY

35mm

Slide Kit

(English

Topic Description language)

@

HP IN THE COMPUTER

Management perspective on HP in the computer business

30000-60009

BUSINESS, 1979 (data through FY 78) (23 slides). $25

OR

CSG OVERVIEW

Overhead

Slide Kit

(English language)

30000-6001 0

$450

(4-color overheads)

DATA BASE MANAGEMENT Management introduction to data base management systems on HP business systems; features IMAGE

(50 slides)

30000-60023

$50

DlSTRlBU TED Management introduction to issues associated with imple- 30000-60021

PROCESSING OVERVIEW menting distributed processing within their organizations; $105 concepts, products, and succ.ess stories (105 slides).

MFGl3000 MANAGEMENT

SEMINAR

Management introduction to interactive materials planning and control from HP (71 slides).

5955-1722

$70

SPECIFY

35mm

SLIDES ON

ORDER

5955-1 722

$1 05

SPECIFY

OVER-

HEADS ON

ORDER

All of these presentations, except the DSi3000 Overview (30000-90128) and CSG Overview (30000-60009i60010), have already been distributed worldwide or are scheduled for such distribution in late Septemberwhen the necessary 125 sets have been produced. If you find that your office needs additional presentation kits after the automatic distribution is completed, you can order the required slide sets, complete with script and Xerox hardcopy, by transmitting an internal order (10s) to Louise

Watkins in the Manual Distribution group at GSD. Please specify supplying division 47 to expedite your order.

NOTE: Additional slide presentations which focus exclusively on the HP 3000 and HP 250 are also available. Watch for a complete list of all orderable slide presentations in a later issue of the

CS

Newsletter.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September

15, 1979

1

Something NEW in the HP 3000 Field Sales Notebook

By: Gwen MillerlGSD

INTEGRATED ACCESS

TO ALL SYSTEM RESOURCES

makes MPE the only operating system you'll ever need

Inquiry and Update

Communications

4 program

Development

Batch

All simulta,neously

b

As you read through your 1980 HP 3000 Field Sales Notebook, you will see a NEW chapter - helpful to refresh your memory on the direct benefits of MPE to customers, since it is the operating system that largely defines the character of the entire HP 3000 family. The Notebook chapter organizes MPE's benefits into five main areas, followed by a more complete description of the individual features mentioned and a chronology of all the MIT enhancements since MPE Ill was introduced. Also, don't overlook the competitive section - based on specific advantages of MPE over their operating systems! So be sure to read this chapter

- sell the HP 3000!

Customer Reference Database Gets

Upgraded!

By: Regina FanellilGSD

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

40

Good news for you reference lovers Those of you who have used our customer reference database service with success will be happy to know that it's now better than ever. And for the rest of you who didn't even know we had one

-

Jeff Hartman, Sales Development Support for the Eastern region, has been working diligently on improving the structure of the database such that it will now provide more information items, speedier response, and easier update capabilities. At the present time, the database contains information on HP 3000 systems shipped out the door from

I the beginning of time (circa 1973) through January, 1979.

Some of the key points a given customer file would cover are: the customer's market area, applications, sales rep, configuration of system, software purchased, peripherals, competition on the sale, whether the HP system replaced another existing one (e.g. System13 replacement), and many other detailed bits of information. Since this new, improved version of the database is just about completed, we plan not only to add on the remaining systems which have been shipped massive update of the existing files.

3

FOR [MNlIEL%NEA LK%!, CINILV

This Customer Reference Database is for you, but without your help it will not succeed. When the update forms come across your desk, please fill them out as completely as possible and return them promptly to me. Just this little bit of effort reaps great benefits. When you are in dire need of a few good reference accounts to present to your prospective customers, all you have to do is pick up the phone and call me, Regina Fanelli, Sales Development, on x3097, and I will query the database for your specific request. You may get either a few good leads immediately over the phone, or I can send you a formatted report listing every qualified entry for your request. An excellent example of our own award-winning product, IMAGEl3000, at work for you.

Keep those calls coming in and

GOOD SELLING

307513076

Demo on HP

3000

By: Tom BlacklGSD & Serge DaoustlDTD

Don't wait any longer. You can now demo the 3075 and 3076 data capture terminals on the HP 3000. And it's SUUUPER!!

Refer to the Grenoble News section of the August 1 issue of the CS Newsletter for more details on this demo application and how to obtain your personal copy.

DATA CAPTURE TERMINALS AND HP 3000

A "GENERAL" FEELING OF WELL BEING

@

Merging Test with Data on the HP

300

By: John WhiteselliGSD

Have you ever had a prospect ask, "When will I be able to do both data processing and text editing on the same computer system, and in fact be able to combine the two?"

The answer is "You can do it today on the HP 300!"

The following article describes how you yourself can sit down at an HP 300 IDS Console or HP 300 Workstation. with little or no specialized training on the product, and actually develop some text, combine it with some data, and print out the resulting report yourself.

Who would want to do this sort of thing? Normally those people who regularly generate reports or letters where the text stays pretty much the same but the data frequently changes

- think of a number of cases where this situation exists within their organizations. Such areas as order reporting, financial reporting, and warranty analysis are likely candidates.

By the way, if you have a prospective customerwho wants to be able to print hislher report on a letter-quality printer, and this requirement means the difference between your getting and not getting the order, then call your friendly HP 300

a

sales development contact.

-

Remember, HP's office computer system of the 1980's can do some amazing - things today!

Regina Fanelli

composing

a

report on the

HP

300.

Let's suppose we want to issue a report or letter that contains a table of several columns of data, imbedded within some text. Here's an example of what can be done at the IDS or at an HP300 Workstation, to create andlor edit the text as well as process the data and incorporate it into our report.

(Depending on your familiarity with the HP 300, you may want to keep handy a copy of the Console Operations

Manual, Typist Reference Manual, andlor on-line HELP facility .)

1. First process the data as desired and put it in a sequential, KSAM, or relative file. Let's name the file

DOLLARS.

(One way to do this without writing a program is to enter the TYPIST environment, key in the data, and copy this document of data to your file by pressing the

COMMANDICOMPOSE softkey to enter the COMMAND mode and typing the command COPY TO

UNNUMBERED FILE DOLLARS.)

(Alternatively you could use an already existing sequential, KSAM, or relative file, such as IIVVRPT in the

DEMO domain. This file can be viewed before using by typing the command VIEW INVRPT. After viewing, be sure to enter the command CLEAR LOWER (or CL L) to close the file.)

2. Enter the TYPIST environment, by typing the command

TYPIST, and writeledit the MODULE MAIN (you're automatically there) all the text that will precede the table of data.

(Remember, in HP 3000 Typist you're not constrained to

80 characters per line. You can easily create and edit up to 160 characters per line of text and data at the IDS, so you can print textual information that is wider than 8-'/2 inches.)

3. lVow enter another module of TYPIST, say Module Three, by pressing the COMMANDICOMPOSE softkey and typing the command EDIT MOD THREE. Then press the

COMMANDICOMPOSE key to return to COMPOSE mode and writeledit the remainder of the text.

FOR IINTERNAL USE OR:lLV

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

An Example of How to Merge Text with

Data on the HP

300

By: John WhiteselllGSD

4. Now type the command EDlT MOD TWO to create an additional module. Then type the command COPY

UNNUMBERED FlLE DOLLARS. (This command automatically provides the TYPIST sequence numbers that will come in handy later on.) Observe that our table of data now resides in text module Two.

5. Return to Module Main by typing the Command EDlT

MOD MAIN. Now enter the Commands COPY ALL OF

MODULE TWO and COPY ALL OF MODULE THREE. We have now combined all the modules into one.

6. To print our report on either the 2631 A or 2608A, just type the command PRINT. (To print just a portion of the report, type PRINT LILIES XXIYY, where XX specifies the beginning line to be printed and YY specifies the last line to be printed. For even fancier capabilities, please refer to the TYPIST reference manual,)

7. To stop the system, press the EXIT TYPIST softkey and then type in the command STOP SYSTEM.

It's as easy as that!

How to Reorganize

Your HP 300 KSAM File

By: Steve WilklGSD

Here's a quick way to improve response time of your heavily used KSAM files without having to write a program to unload

I

commands, a KSAM File can be reorganized. This is what you do:

1. Create a Direct File with the same key attributes as your

KSAM file, using the system hashing and one home block. example CREATE DIRECT FlLE REORGFIL

2. Copy the KSAM file "KFILE" to the created file example COPY FlLE KFILE TO REORGFIL

3. Purge your KSAM file example PURGE FlLE KFILE

4. Create your KSAM file with same file attributes as before example CREATE KEY FlLE KFILE

5. Copy the Direct file to the newly-created KSAM file example COPY FlLE REORGFIL TO KFILE

,9

i

HP 300 Supports 4000-Foot Hardwired Terminals

By: Curt GowanIGSD

Need to install a hardwired terminal up to 4000 feet (1200 meters) from the HP 300? A fully-supported 9600 Baud all-HP solution is now available via a pair of HP 30037A Asynchronous Repeaters.

What to order:

1. Instruments:

2 ea HP 30037AAsynchronous Repeaters

2. Cables: either

(a) several HP 13232R cables. 100 feet (30 meters)

- or

(b) 1 ea HP 5061-2401 connector kit (provides both ends) and up to 4000 feet of HP 8120-2305 shielded cable (75 ohm, 22-gauge, four twisted pairs

-

3. Labor: either

(a) time for HP CE to install connectors as described In 30037A Installation and Service Manual

(part no. 30037-90003) or (b) customer may elect to install connectors

What to watch for:

Installing the cable itself is customer's responsibility

Warranty on HP cable covers indoor use only; service contract does not cover cable; warranty and service contract on

Repeater do not cover lightning damage.

HP 300.

The block diagram shows all of the supported HP 300 terminal connections: hardwired to 50 feet ( I 5 meters) at 9600 baud via Asynchronous Repeaters to 4000 feet (1200 meters) at 9600 baud via Bell 1 13C, 11 3D, 103J modems at 300 Baud via Bell 212A modems at 300 and 1200 Baud

As you can see, the HP 300 offers a broad range of terminal alternatives

Volume 4, Number

21,

September

15, 1979

FOR

ADCC

4 pons

5.10m

1-

I

I > t

13222W

Termlnal 2621kP

31390A

5m

4 5m

31390A

5m

Termlnal

26408

2645A

2647A

13222M

13232M

Termlnal

26408

2645A

2647A

2MBA

I

1.D.

RS-232 extension cable

31391N8 (opt~onal)

I

Extender

5.1 Om b ,

Arynch. l ~ ~ ~ m

Asynch.

Repeater

1

1

I

Y

13222M

1

I

RS-232 exlenslon cable

I

!

I la

4

Termlnal 2621NP

5m

Q5mrI

132Q2M

Termlnal

;E:i l

264BA

L ~ a x l m u m lenglh 12mm Made up of

13232R (30m) cables or customer- fabrocated cables (see Ordering pan numbers)

HP Journal on HP 300

By: Bob BowdeniGSD

New HP 300 Pricelconfiguration Guide

By: Curt GowaniGSD

Bulk copies of the revised HP 300 Priceiconfiguration Guide now available. The Guide covers: new products new software and software prices bundling of IMAGE into system price reduction on 128 Kb Memory Array boards

(formerly $4,000; now $2,500)

As you've seen by now, the complete issues of both the June and July HP Journal are dedicated to the HP 300 Computer

System - have been devoted to a single major product!!

Additional copies of these Journals are now available in limited quantity from the corporate literature distribution center and can be ordered by requesting the June 1979 HP

Journal for the HP 300 andior the Julv 1979 HP Journal for

d

the Also HP 300. of the HP 300 Poster (an X-ray view of the product showing key features) are now available and can be ordered with literature number 5953-3706.

Does Your OEM Ship 300's

Outside the U.S.?

By: Bea SmithiGSD

If your OEM customer plans to export a 300 to Europe or to an ICON country, he probably will want quality HP support there.

To make sure his expectations are met, DO NOT FAIL TO

DO THE FOLLOWING:

1. Contact one of the following

Peter Rosenbladt, 300 Product Mgr. Boeblingen, or

Larry Amsden, Latin America Area Mgr. Palo Alto

(ICON), or

Tony Abbis, Far East Area Mgr. Palo Alto (ICON).

2. Negotiate the level of support which will meet the customer's expectations.

FOR IINIUERNAL USE ONLY

Volume

4,

Number 21, September

15,

1979

Coordinated Shipments

-

By: Rich EdwardsIGSD w

HP

3000 Series 30 Minimum Configuration

Beginning October 1, 1979, HP 3000 systems will be ordered with system peripherals shipped from the HP manufacturing division rather than from GSD. 'This new procedure has been implemented to eliminate double shipping peripherals to GSD and then to the customer. Eliminating double inventory will mean reduced costs and greater profit sharing for us all. Each division will throughly test all peripherals before shipping. Customer Engineers will perform additional system verification tests to ensure the continuation of our high level of customer satisfaction with the HP 3000 hardware.

Ordering HP 3000 systems is simple: customers can now order the system processor unit from GSD and the required system peripherals as line items:

Volume 4, Number 21, September 15, 1979

44

FOR3 I I ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ ~ L

TO ORDER A STANDARD HP 3000 SYSTEM, ORDER:

SER l ES 30

SERIES 33

SERIES I l l

I

ONE SYSTEM

PROCESSOR

UNIT

324308 60HZ

32435B 60HZ

1

ONE SYSTEM

DISC

-

7906M, 7920M,

7925M WlTH

OPTION 102

ONE SYSTEM

CONSOLE

7906M. 7920M,

7925M WlTH

OPTION 102

AND 015

2649E WlTH

OPTION 015

7906M. 7920M,

7925M WlTH

OPTION 102

7906M, 7920M,

7925M WlTH

OPTION 102

AND 015

-

2649E WlTH

OPTION 015

7920M17925M

262x+CAB LE

263x (CABLE

STANDARD)

264x+CABLE

a a

With 7906M disc no extra peripherals are required.

With a 7920M or 7925M disc, an additional serial storage device is required

-

either a magnetic tape drive (7970El or serial disc (7920s or 7925s)

-

for system backup.

* *

For Series 111 systems, order option 015 for the system and each peripheral for 2 3 0 VAC, 5 0 Hz, single phase operation.

See the HP 3000 Price/Configuration guide for the new

HP 3000 configuration guides and ordering examples.

OTHER

REQUIRED

PERIPHERA

7970E.

7970B

WlTH

OPT 324

a a

--

The Enhancement That Isn't

By: Len CroleylGSD

Issue 21 of Communicator 3000 mistakenly refers to an enhancement that is not yet available. The mistake, which is on p. 41, is Fix Number 552, module name Spooling, module number 79, and it reads "allows Remote Spooling." This is not true for the 191

8 version of MPE nor are there any firm plans to offer this capability.

Volume

4,

Number 21, September 15, 1979

45

HP 3000 Backlog Conversion

By: Rich Edwards & Tim FullerlGSD

Good news! With the introduction of KOALA (the Series 30) and the new "B" versions of the HP 3000 Series 33 and

Series Ill, THERE IS NO BACKLOG CONVERSION. All orders in the backlog will be shipped with the system peripherals supplied from GSD.

If you place any change orders to Series 33 or Series Ill systems after November 1 (the date the "A" product

FOR IINIUERNIAL USE ONLY

numbers will be off the Corporate Price List), you must override HEARTICOCHISE and retransmit the order as an

"A" version product number.

Some customers may consider converting an existing Series

33 order into an order for a Series 30. If you change a Series

33 order to a Series 30, remember to order all of the following

(the customer needs to place a new purchase order because the product numbers are new):

System Processor Unit

Add Console Table Option 201

SystemlMaintenance Console 2649E*

System Disc (20Mb) 7906M-102*

425

6,350

14,875

Add 4 ports (ADCC Extender) 3001 9A-030 1,600

TOTAL $5 1,775

*order option 015 for 230 VAC, 50 Hz operation

Be sure to inform the customer that a Series 30 doesn't contain an isolation transformer. The customer

IS responsible for providing "clean" power to the system; an external isolation transformer may be required at the customer's expense. Specification details are in both the

HP 3000 PricelConfiguration Guide and the Series 30 Site

Preparation Manual.

1980

HP

300 SE Training Schedule

By: Mariann Tymn OsoskielGSD

During 1980 User Services will offer each of the three phases of the HP 300 Training Program in two week modules at GSD, Cupertino, Bldg. 47.

The starting dates for the modules are as follows:

SE I

SEll

SElll

Jan. 21

Apr. 21

Sept. 8

Mar. 10

June 2

Oct. 20

June 16

Dec. 1

Contact Roxanne Hetzel, COMSYS Code 5000, for registration.

Streamer and Spooler added to the HP 300

SE Contributed Library

By: Walter UtzlGSD

The ability to run a job stream consisting of previously selected programs, and spool output files to a printer, has been provided in BASIC programs for the HP 300. The lob stream can include any mix of programs wrltten in BASIC,

RPG, or SU300. The output files will be printed with or without carriage control, as specified. In addition, the spooler can be invoked directly from a running program which makes it possible to select output files dynamically.

The spooler acquires the printer when it has output files to print, and releases the printer when it

IS in the WAIT state.

This permits other programs to use the printer in the course of a normal days operation. Each printed file is Identified with a time and date stamped title page to permit easy separa- tion of the printed reports.

The streamer and spooler are separate BASIC programs which communicate via memory files. The programs take

HP 300, and they can be run concurrently with other programs or program development. The programs will be added to the HP 300 SE contributed library. If you wish additional information. or an advance copy of the programs, contact Walter Utz, GSD Cupertino, 408 725-81 11 ext.

371 2.

f-7

SU300 Customer Course

By: Sallie YoungiGSD

Announcing an encore of the SU300 three day seminar!

User Servlces will be offering a Systems Language course for the HP 300 on October 22 through October 24, 1979.

Systems Language1300 is a machine-independent procedure oriented, high level implementation language which is block structured in design. The course is designed for programmers who will be developing applications using

SU300. Students attending this course should have knowledge or some familiarity with another language such as ALGOL, PL1, or SPL and should have already attended the Systems Programming course ( a two week course designed to introduce the operation and features of the HP

300. The course will be offered October 1 through October

12, 1979). Topics covered include a brief discussion of each of the SU300 programming constructs, 110 with SU300, and developing SU300 procedures that can be called from other languages.

The semlnar is priced at $300.00 for three days. To register for this class, submit a HEART order with the following information:

Product Description

Product Number

Required Date

Product Line

Price

Sales Force

Marketing Division

Sup. D~vlsion

Special Instruction

SU300

31364A

Programming

October 22, 1979

62

$300.00

02

4 7

4762

ATTN: John Holden

Name of Attendee:

-

Further Information can be obtained through Sallie

YoungIGSD, extension 3705.

Volume

4,

Number

21,

September 15, 1979

FOR ONITERNAL USE ONILY

CCWIPUTER S Y S T E M S N E W S L E T T E R

New HP Mini Data Cartridge Certified

100%

Error Free

By:

Fran JeffriesICSO

HP has a new minicartridge, certified 100 percent error free, as introduced by Desktop Computer Division. The new Model

98200A, which is a package of 5 mini data cartridges, offers reliable data storage for Series 9800 desktop computers and 264X series display terminals.

The 982004 five-pack replaces existing single cartridge number 9162-0061 which is no bngeisoldas o f September 1st.

Tightly-controlled tolerances

set for the finished surface of the

HP

tape guides are one example of the rigid specifica- tions applied to the cartridge's makeup

-

less than one mil- lionth of an inch variation

-

to maintain long tape life and re- liability.

Corner-fixed rollers eliminate

distracting noise and early

part wear caused by any float ing part vibrations.

The metal baseplate construction helps insure accurate alignment to tape guides and other internal parts, while providing a ground-

l /

the cartridge's internal parts is

ing surface to protect the car-

evident in the cartridge quide- tridge from the effects of static pins. These pins must be within electricitv.

1/1000

of an inch of perpendicular.

Volume 4, Number

21,

September 15, 1979

47

The heart of the

HP

cartridge is the belt which features custom- designed elasticity properties that assure balanced tape tension

and drive force critical to proper

tape to head contact.

LgW2

!l$dER&!AL dSE (C%V!LV

: S V S T E > ? S

NEWSLETTER

The new minicartridge is completely manufactured and tested b y Hewlett-Packard. After assembly, each cartridge is certified over its entire tape length. This involves testing by recording and reading back data with a 1,600-bit-per-inch density at a critical threshold level. Only cartridges reading all the data with zero errors earn acceptance and certification.

Model 98200A is supplied as a package of five cartridges each individually boxed and shrinkwrapped. The price is

$90 for the package (same price as for five of the

91 62-0061). For volume purchases, there are substantial discounts as follows:

98200A (Package of 5 cartridges)

1

2 - 4

5 - 1 9

20 - 99

100

+

%

Discount Price

-

10%

20%

30%

4 0

'10

$90

$8 1

$72

$63

$54

7 -

INFORMATION CHANGE NOTIFICATION

Type of Change: Add

NAME:

EMPLOYEE NUMBER ( 5 digits):

OFFICE/DIVISION:

REGIONIOFFICE NUMBER

HOME TELEPHONE NUMBER (optional):

JOB TITLE:

PRODUCT SPECIALTIES

(1.e.:

264X, 3000):

MANAGER'S NAME:

Modify Delete

OR DIVISION

If you have changed jobs, location, or product specialty and have not updated the CSG Literature

Distribution database, just fill out thiscard and mail to:

f7

CSG Lit. Distribution c/o Carol McKay - 40

1 1000 Wolfe Road

Cupertino, CA 95014

In This Issue.

. .

Cont.

The Enhancement That Isn't . . . . . . . . . . . . . L. CroleyIGSD [45]

HP 3000 Backlog

Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R.

Edwards

&

T. FullerlGSD [45]

Streamer and Spooler added to the HP 300

SE Contributed Library

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W.

UtzlGSD [46]

1980 HP 300 SE Training Schedule

. . . . M. OsoskieIGSD [46]

SU300 Customer Course..

S. YoungIGSD [46]

I

CSG NEWS

Computer Supplies News

New HP Mini Data Cartridge Certified

100°/~ Error Free

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

F. JeffrieslCSO [47]

b)

Volume 4, Number

21,

September 15, 1979

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