Zebra Cameo 3 User`s manual

Zebra Cameo 3 User`s manual
Bluetooth Connectivity
Zebra Mobile Printers
Rev 2.1
Page 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
1. What is Bluetooth?
2. What specification does the Zebra Bluetooth radio comply with?
3. What range does Bluetooth connectivity have in Zebra Mobile
Printers?
4. What devices can communicate with Zebra Bluetooth Printers?
5. What information can be transmitted via Bluetooth to Zebra Mobile
Printers?
6. What type of security does Bluetooth support?
7. What is the Friendly Name?
8. What are the configurable Bluetooth settings in my printer?
9. How do I configure the Bluetooth settings in my printer?
10. What is the transmitting rate through a Bluetooth connection?
11. What is Device and Service Discovery?
12. What is Zebra Print Active X control?
13. Can 802.11b and Bluetooth coexist in the same environment?
II.
Authentication
III. Encryption
IV.
Connecting Zebra Bluetooth Printers with Handheld
Computers
A. Copying the Files to your PPC Handheld Device.
B. Printing Labels Using the Anycom CF card in your
PPC device.
C. Printing Labels Using the “Socket communications”
CF card in your PPC device.
D. Printing Labels Using the brainboxes CF card in your
PPC device.
E. Printing Labels Using the iPAQ 3870 with embedded
Bluetooth.
V.
Rev 2.1
Bluetooth Definitions
Page 2
I. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):
1. What is Bluetooth?
Bluetooth is a global standard for a small radio module to be plugged into
computers, printers, mobile phones, etc. A Bluetooth radio is designed to
replace cables by taking the information normally carried by the cable, and
transmitting it over radio frequency in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz frequencies to a
receiver Bluetooth radio chip.
2. What specification does the Zebra Bluetooth radio comply with?
The Bluetooth (BT) radio inside Zebra Mobile printers complies with BT
Specification 1.1 and supports the Serial Port Profile (SPP). All print jobs send
to the printer will be done through the SPP, which is nothing else than a BT
emulation of a RS-232 serial communication.
3. What range does Bluetooth connectivity have in Zebra Mobile
Printers?
The ZBR (Zebra Bluetooth Radio) has a nominal 30-ft (10 m) range in
accordance with the Bluetooth Specification 1.1 for 0dBm power output. Range
will depend greatly on the environment in which the equipment operates.
4. What devices can communicate with Zebra Bluetooth Printers?
Any computer or handheld that has a Bluetooth radio inside and supports the
Serial Port Profile (SPP) of the Bluetooth specification can communicate with
Zebra mobile BT printers. However, due to their mobility, handheld computers
are the devices of choice. Handheld computers can be Bluetooth enabled
through Bluetooth Radios in the form of Compact Flash (CF) cards, or they can
have an embedded Bluetooth radio installed when manufactured. Zebra
Technologies also makes the Bluetooth ZPR to enable Symbol Terminals SPT
1700/1800 and PPT 2700/2800 with Bluetooth connectivity.
5. What information can be transmitted via Bluetooth to Zebra
Mobile Printers?
Most data that can be sent over a serial cable to a Zebra Mobile Printer can be
transmitted via Bluetooth to a Printer. The practical and intended uses are data
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that has been formatted for printing of receipts, labels and barcodes in media up
to 4 inches wide, depending on the printer model. Zebra provides a label
creation utility called “Label Vista” to facilitate the formatting of labels or text. A
Programming Manual is also available.
6. What type of security does Bluetooth support?
The Bluetooth specification supports authentication and encryption. For the
authentication algorithm, the size of the key used is always 128 bits. For the
encryption algorithm, the key size may vary between 1and 16 octets (8-128 bits).
7. What is the Friendly Name?
The Friendly Name is part of the printer local name (a combination of the printer
model name and an alpha-numeric string of characters). The alpha-numeric
string of characters is the “Friendly Name” of the device. This is the name
provided by the printer during service discovery. The Friendly Name is a string of
up to 20 characters long that is intended to be unique to each printer; it will
default to the printer serial number if not changed by the user. The Friendly
Name is used by the Zebra authentication algorithm.
8. What are the configurable Bluetooth settings in my printer?
Authentication
Discoverable Mode
Friendly Name
9. How do I configure the Bluetooth settings in my printer?
By default a Zebra Bluetooth printer comes with the following settings:
Authentication turned OFF, discoverable turned ON, and the “Friendly Name” of
the printer will be the printer serial number. Also, the Bluetooth radio in the
printer will always be a “slave device”. In other words, the printer will never be
able to look for other Bluetooth devices to connect to, and will never start the link
itself. Those are “master” device functions. (Handheld computers will be the
master devices). As the printer is a server, it is appropriate that it be a slave.
The settings that can be changed by the user are: Turn Authentication ON or
OFF, turn Discoverable Mode ON or OFF, and change the Friendly Name of the
printer to some other unique alpha-numeric string (like an asset tracking
number).
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To change these settings the user can use “Label Vista” or send printer
programming language commands to do so. Either way the printer needs to be
connected to a PC through a serial cable P/N BL11757-000. For programming
commands please refer to the “Mobile Printing Systems Programming Manual”
section: Bluetooth Parameters.
10. What is the transmitting rate through a Bluetooth connection?
According to Bluetooth Specification, the over the air transmission rate is 1 Mbps.
This is the raw data rate; the actual data rate will be somewhat less depending
on a variety of factors (basically how much traffic is present on the Bluetooth
piconet).
Note: The internal Bluetooth module in the printer has a UART interface to the
printer processor set at 57600 baud. This rate is totally independent from the
over the air transmission rate.
11. What is Device and Service Discovery?
A handheld with Bluetooth will have a Bluetooth manager or “user interface
program” to manage the BT radio functionality. One of the functions of the
Bluetooth manager program is the capability to send inquiries over the air to
discover what other Bluetooth devices are in the vicinity (this is a Bluetooth
master or client seeking to discover what Bluetooth servers are available). Once
a server device is found another inquiry poll is sent to discover what service the
device is providing. In Zebra’s case the service provided by the printers is Serial
Port Profile (SPP) printing.
12. What is Zebra Print Active X control?
The Zebra Print Active X control is a set of code that provides a simple interface
to Zebra Mobile Printers. It currently supports 4 connection methods: serial
(COM Port), infrared (IrDa), TCP and Bluetooth. Bluetooth is supported via a
simulated serial/modem connection.
After the Zebra Print Active X control is installed on the target Windows Pocket
PC, or CE device, it can be used from within any HTML document using
Microsoft’s Jscript web scripting language. The control can also be used from
within any other programming language that supports Active X, such as Visual
Basic or Visual C++. This control is available to users/developers of applications
using the Bluetooth Mobile printers.
13. Can 802.11b and Bluetooth coexist in the same environment?
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Bluetooth and 802.11b share the same spectral band (2.4GHz). Therefore, cross
interference will be inevitable. The results can be a reduction in throughput. In
general Bluetooth devices are less susceptible to coexistence problems because
of the following reasons:
• Bluetooth is a Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum technology (FHSS)
which means that if a channel is busy, Bluetooth will immediately hop to a
different channel to transmit the packet of information.
802.11b is a
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) technology.
• Shorter packets – Bluetooth packets are typically fraction of a millisecond
long compared with a few milliseconds for 802.11b. This reduces their
collision susceptibility.
• Bluetooth is less considerate. An 802.11b station first waits for silence
and only then transmits. A Bluetooth, in the other hand, is inconsiderate
of surrounding transmissions – it simply “barges in” whenever has
something to transmit.
In summary, these technologies can coexist. However, if the number of
Bluetooth devices is very large around a wireless network (802.11b) most likely
the throughput of the 802.11b devices will be affected.
The Bluetooth Organization SIG is working in a MAC level switching solution.
This means switching functionality at the baseband level of the technologies that
most likely will be part of future revisions of the specification. Also, eventually a
likely future scenario is that 802.11 will migrate from 2.4 GHz to 5 GHz (upgrade
to 801.11a) while Bluetooth will remain using 2.4 GHz.
II.
Authentication
Authentication is part of the security system included in the Bluetooth standard.
Authentication can be set to “ON” or “OFF” in the printer. By default
authentication is set to “OFF” when the printer is manufactured. To turn
authentication “ON” in Zebra Mobile Printers with the Bluetooth connectivity
option, you can use the label creation software called: Label Vista. This software
can be downloaded from Zebra’s web site. Once you have Label Vista, you need
to connect the printer to your PC using the serial cable P/N BL11757-000. Make
sure the printer port baud rate matches the PC’s serial port baud rate. (See
printer’s User’s Manual). In Label Vista main menu, at the top of the screen,
select: Printer / Utilities / Bluetooth Settings. A window with the default settings
will pop up to allow you to change the settings.
Another way to change authentication settings is by sending the command: ! U1
setvar “bluetooth.authentication” “on”. (See Bluetooth parameters P14-7 in the
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Programming Manual) A serial connection from your PC to the printer and a
communications utility such as Label Vista, MS HyperTerminal or ProComm is
needed.
With Authentication turned on: When a handheld computer discovers the printer
and tries to establish a communication link between them, the printer will request
a passkey.
Zebra printers use an algorithm to generate the passkey based on the Friendly
Name of the printer. (By default the friendly name is the serial number, however it
can be changed to whatever name the user desires). The handheld computer
seeking to connect to the printer must be able to generate the same passkey.
The Friendly Name of the printer is available to the handheld computer within the
information obtained from the printer during discovery. The passkey algorithm
can be provided to end users (developers) by Zebra.
Also, an executable demo program for Pocket PC called ZebraBTPrintUtility.exe
is available to create the passkey by entering the friendly name in the dialog box
that requires it. This program is also useful to be able to select a label format
(previously saved in your handheld) and send it to be printed via Bluetooth.
Please see section called: “ Connecting Zebra Bluetooth Printers with Handheld
Computers”.
III. Encryption
The Bluetooth standard uses a 128 bit encryption key which is consider a secure
encryption key. The algorithm that Bluetooth uses to encrypt data is the SAFER+
algorithm developed by Cylink. www.cylink.com
Zebra printers use this encryption system by simply turning “on” authentication
on the printer and turning “on” encryption on the master device/terminal. All data
transferred between the devices will be encrypted.
The connection procedure which involves establishing the encryption key
involves the following steps:
1) Authentication: The first step of the security process is
authentication. When a terminal attempts to start a
connection, the terminal will be prompted to enter a
“passkey” or a “PIN”. Once you enter the PIN, the
printer verifies whether the PIN you entered is correct
using a secure “challenge/response” system. If the
PIN is correct, then the 128 bit “link key” is securely
exchange.
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2) Encryption: If encryption is enabled in the terminal,
then the link key is used to securely negotiate a 128
bit encryption key, which is used to encrypt all
subsequent data passing back and forth from the
printer.
The Encryption key changes on every connection that is made with the device
and calculated using the link key and a random number.
Zebra has selected to calculate the PIN with a proprietary hashing function
generated from the printer’s friendly name. However, if a customer prefers a
different method to generate the PIN, Zebra’s software developers will work with
the customer’s programmer to come up with a custom PIN generation scheme.
IV.
Connecting Zebra Bluetooth Printers with Handheld Computers
The purpose of this section is to show how a handheld computer enabled with
Bluetooth via a CF card (available in the market) can talk to Zebra Bluetooth
printers. This document makes reference to software files that will be provided or
attached to this document by Zebra.
The Bluetooth (BT) radio inside Zebra Mobile printers complies with BT
Specification 1.1 and supports the Serial Port Profile (SPP). All print jobs send
to the printer will be done through the SPP, which is nothing more than a BT
emulation of a RS-232 serial communication.
The demonstration uses a print utility called “ZebraBTPrintUtility.exe”, which is a
program written in C++ for Win CE Pocket PC (PPC) that allows the user to
select labels previously made with Label Vista and saved in your PPC device.
The objective is to prove interoperability of Zebra BT printers with other BT
devices. For custom applications the user must develop their own application for
the appropriate OS of their handheld device.
Needed for this demonstration:
1) A Zebra mobile printer purchased with the Bluetooth option.
2) The following software files: ZebraBTprintUtility.exe (compiled for the
processor of your handheld computer) the versions available are for the
following processors: MIPS, SH3 and ARM. A file called: “pwrdll.dll” for
the corresponding processor. And some sample labels to be send to the
printer. Notice that if you have a 2-inch printer, the labels should be made
for that size, 3 inch printer can take a 2 and 3 inch label, but not a 4-inch
label, and so on.
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3) A handheld computer with Windows CE, Pocket PC (PPC) operating
system, equipped with a Compact Flash (CF) card slot.
4) A Bluetooth CF card to enable your handheld with Bluetooth capabilities,
and the software that comes with the card. Zebra has worked and tested
interoperability of CF cards manufactured/sold by: Anycom, and Socket
Communications.
A. Copying the Files to your PPC Handheld Device
Download or get the following files from Zebra: ZebraBTprintUtility.exe, pwrdll.dll
and label files with the extension .lbl to your PC or Laptop. Then copy the files to
your handheld by doing the following.
1) Utilize the cable/cradle provided with your handheld (HH) and Microsoft
Active Sync to connect your HH with your PC or laptop.
2) Using the Explore button of the Active Sync connection, go to My Pocket
PC / windows /start menu.
Then locate the previously saved
ZebraBTPrintUtility.exe in your PC and copy the file in the start menu of
your PPC.
Make sure you are using the version of the Print Utility
compiled for the processor of your handheld.
3) Copy the powerdll.dll file in the “Windows folder” of your PPC device.
4) Copy the label files in the business folder of your PPC device. Label files
are the files with the .lbl extension.
Zebra has tested interoperability between Zebra Mobile Printers and Handheld
terminals (Win CE, Pocket PC) enabled with Bluetooth through the use of the
following Bluetooth Compact Flash cards:
“Anycom”, Model CF-2000
http://www.anycom.com/products/cfcard.html/
“Socket Communications” Bluetooth Card Product Number BL4508-309.
http://www.socketcom.com/product/bluetoothcard.htm/
brainboxes CompactFlash Bluetooth card BL-565
http://www.brainboxes.com/
Follow their directions to install the software that comes with the card in your
PPC device. Once you have installed the software/drivers that come with the
card in your Pocket PC handheld device follow the directions below.
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B. Printing Labels Using the Anycom CF card in your PPC device.
1) Tap on Start / Programs / Bluetooth Wizard /in your PPC device.
2) Tap on Serial Port Connection and then tap next.
3) Follow the directions on the screen. – Select a local port to setup or click new
to create a new virtual port - If you select an existing COM port tap on it and then
click next. Other wise add a new port and then tap on it and then click “next”.
4) Again continue following the directions on the screen – Tap “search again”,
then OK to the message warning you to start the printer (you must start the
printer at this point if it is not “on” already). The software will discover the printer
and its services, which will be described as “modem” in the PPC screen.
5) Select the Zebra Printer showed in the screen and then click next.
6) Click Finish and it will take you to the home-Bluetooth Wizard screen- Close
the wizard.
7) Tap the upper bar on the screen of the PPC device and select
“ZebraBTPrintUtility” from the drop down “start menu”.
8) Using the pop-up keyboard, change the name of the Serial Port to match the
serial port that you selected in the Anycom Bluetooth Wizard. A message
saying, “port was changed” will come up. Click OK.
9) Tap file name and select one of the labels that you previously copied to the
business folder.
10) Tap “open port” and then tap “send/print file”. After a few seconds the label
will be printed.
C. Printing Labels Using the “Socket communications” CF card in your
PPC device
These instructions are written for Socket Device Manager, version 2.0-00 Drakar
Bluetooth Stack version 1.3.0.5
Discover Zebra BT printer by doing the following:
1) After your PPC has been turn on and the Socket BT card has initialized, a
BT icon will come up at the bottom of the screen. Tap on it and go to
advanced features / Bluetooth devices.
You can also access this program by using the file explorer function to
locate the Bluetooth devices folder in your PPC.
2) Click on the set of eyes icon and follow the device discovery wizard, by
clicking “next” twice. The Zebra printer will be discovered with its serial
number as part of its name. Device class will be “printer”.
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3) Check the box next to the printer name and tap next. The service that the
printer provides is found. Click finish.
4) Click “Device” in the lower menu bar, and then click on “My Bluetooth
Device”. Go to the COM Ports tab. Make sure that the box for Bluetooth
Com Port is selected and write down the port number. If you are unable to
select the box for “Bluetooth COM Port” then de-select some of the other
boxes and then select the “Bluetooth COM Port Box”. Only 4 boxes can
be selected at any given time. Then click OK to return to the device
name screen.
5) Tap on the upper most bar of the screen to bring the start menu up, and
select “ZebraPrintUtilityBT”.
6) Make sure that the Serial Port box has COMX: where X represents the
COM port that Socket Communications assigned to the “Bluetooth COM
Port” and you wrote down in step 4 above
7) Click on “file name” and select a previously saved label in the Business
folder of your PPC.
8) Tap on “open port”. This will bring you to a screen where you can select
the Zebra printer previously discovered. Tap on the printer you want and
then click select. It will bring you back to the ZebraPrintUtility window.
9) Tap on the Send/Print button and the label will print.
D. Printing Labels Using the brainboxes Bluetooth CF card in your PPC
device.
1) Once the BT software is installed in the PPC terminal, click on the BT
icon on the bottom of the screen and then on the Bluetooth Manager
link.
2) You will be on the Bluetooth “My shortcuts” screen. Click on the bottom
BT icon on the bottom of the screen again. Select Explore a Bluetooth
device and tap next. You can also get here by selecting “New” and
then connect.
3) Tap on the selection box “Select a Bluetooth device” to discover the
printer. A list of discovered devices will come up.
4) Follow the screen directions to discover the services provided by the
printer. Modem will come up. Select modem and tap finish.
5) Tap on the top Start menu bar to select “ZebraPrintutilityBT”
6) Change the Serial Port to COM 4: since the brainboxes card uses
COM port 4.
7) Click on “file name” and select a previously saved label in the Business
folder of your PPC.
8) Tap on “open port”. This will bring you to a screen where you can
select the Zebra printer previously discovered. Tap on the printer you
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want and then click select. It will bring you back to the ZebraPrintUtility
window.
9) Tap on the Send/Print button and the label will print.
E. Printing Labels Using the iPAQ 3870 with embedded Bluetooth.
In order to print labels from the iPAQ 3870 (with embedded Bluetooth) the user
needs to establish a link from the IPAQ to the printer. In addition he needs to
download the files: ZebraBTPrintUtility.exe and pwrdll.dll (compiled for the ARM
processor) into the iPAQ and a few label files to print. (Labels are files that have
the .lbl extension)
All the files should have been provided with this document. If you don’t have
these files, download them from Zebra website or contact customer support to
obtain them. Make sure you use the files compiled for the ARM processor since
the iPAQ uses the ARM processor.
With the help of Microsoft Active Sync, Copy the ZebraBTPrintUtilityARM.exe in
the windows\Start folder of the IPAQ and the pwrdll.dll in the windows folder of
the IPAQ. Also copy the sample labels in My device/ My Documents/ Business
folder of the IPAQ.
To establish a link, turn the Zebra BT printer ON, click the Bluetooth icon in the
bottom status bar of the screen and click on “Bluetooth Manager”. Note at the
time that these instructions were written, the IPAQ 3870 has the “Bluetooth
Security Manager Version 1.0.12 (SP1)”. Make sure the time out on the printer
is set to at least 1200 seconds. Time out in Zebra BT printers by default is set to
1200 seconds, but if it needs to be changed please consult the printer user's
manual.
1) Click the Bluetooth Manager sign on the bottom task bar in the iPAQ
2) Make sure the radio is turn on by selecting "Turn radio on"
3) On Bluetooth Manager, Click on "search" to find the Zebra BT printer (The
printer must be turned on to be discovered)
4) Select the box next to the device found and click "save"
5) Save the device in the "all devices" group and click OK
6) Click OK to get out of this screen
7) A screen showing the Zebra device with the status "available" should be
shown. If you only see icons go to “view” and select list.
8) Select the device by clicking on it and a service discovery routine will run
9) click on "Actions" at the bottom task bar
10) click on "connect to modem" and then OK. The screen with the BT printer
should show under the status bar "connected"
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11) click on the upper most task bar to bring the dropdown menu and select/open
"ZebraBTPrintUtilityARM".
12) In the Serial Port Box Change to COM8: using the pop up keyboard. This
iPAQ uses COM8 to communicate through serial port emulation (see IPAQ
manual).
13) Click on the "file name" box and select one of the labels that you loaded
previously.
14) Click send file and a label should print.
The above is just to prove the connectivity of the IPAQ with Bluetooth to a Zebra
Bluetooth printer. For a specific application and integrator with knowledge of Win
CE, Visual Basic and/or C, should write an application.
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V. Bluetooth Definitions
•
Bluetooth: Bluetooth is a specification for short-range wireless
communications based on low power 2.4 GHz frequency hopping RF
technology. Although Bluetooth has approximately the same power level
as our SRRF radios, both the radios themselves and the protocol they use
are far more complex.
•
Piconet: Bluetooth allows up to 8 devices to link together creating a
piconet.
•
Master: The frequency hopping nature of Bluetooth radios requires that
each piconet have a master device. The master selects which hopping
sequence the piconet will use. All of the other devices in the piconet
synchronize themselves to the master.
•
Slave: All of the other devices in the piconet are slaves. Slaves may only
communicate with the master, never with each other. In this procedure we
will only set up simple piconets with one master (the terminal) and one
slave (the printer).
•
Client: The master device is usually also a client device. The master seeks
a service from the slave. Any terminal that talks to a Zebra printer is a
client device.
•
Server: The slave device is usually also a server device. The slave
provides a service to the master. A Zebra printer is always a server
device.
•
Discoverable: A Bluetooth server (slave) enters Inquiry Scan mode to
announce it’s presence and make itself known to potential clients. When in
Inquiry Scan mode the server is said to be discoverable – it is
broadcasting it’s Bluetooth address. A client can then connect with a
discoverable server to form a piconet. Only in Inquiry Scan mode is a
server discoverable.
•
Connectable: A Bluetooth server (slave) enters Page Scan mode to
become connectable with potential clients. Only in Page Scan mode can a
client link to a server.
•
Authentication: The Bluetooth specification includes authentication as an
option. A server device may allow itself to connect to any potential client,
or it may restrict itself to a subset of potential clients. The server restricts
itself by requiring the client to authenticate. This means that the client
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must know the right password to access the server. A client without the
password is not “authentic” and will not be serviced.
•
Rev 2.1
Standard Password: Zebra has defined a standard password for use in
authentication. This password is based on the WRF protocol address
generation algorithm. This algorithm generates a unique WRF address
based on the serial number of the printer. We are using this unique WRF
address as our standard password.
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