Using the Node Management Services NMS Utilities

Using the Node Management Services NMS Utilities
Using the Node Management Services
(NMS) Utilities
HP e3000 MPE/iX Computer Systems
Edition 8
Manufacturing Part Number: 32022-90054
E0801
U.S.A. August 2001
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change
without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this
material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard
shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for direct, indirect,
special, incidental or consequential damages in connection with the
furnishing or use of this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of
its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by
copyright. All rights reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation
without prior written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under
the copyright laws.
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
Rights for non-DOD U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are
as set forth in FAR 52.227-19 (c) (1,2).
Acknowledgments
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
Hewlett-Packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, CA 94304 U.S.A.
© Copyright 1988–1990, 1992, 1994, 1998, 2000 and 2001 by
Hewlett-Packard Company
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Contents
1. Introduction
NMMGR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backup Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NMMAINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NMDUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tracing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NMMGRVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NMMGRVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2. Basics of NMMGR
NMMGR Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Screen Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Name and Version Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Screen Number and Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Command Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Path Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Fields and Menu Choices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration File Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prior Screen Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help Key. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Save Data Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
“Go To” Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Next Page/Prev Page Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refreshing the Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving Between Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving with Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Branching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct Path Branching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brother Branching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting Help on Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Contents
Entering Help Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Getting Help on Specific Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Getting Help with Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Error Information Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
NMMGR Error Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
3. Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Before You Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Starting NMMGR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Opening a Configuration or Directory File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Creating a New Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Copying a Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Changing the Backup File Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Opening an Existing Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Creating a Network Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Opening an Existing Network Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Selecting a Configuration Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Configuring Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Configuring NS 3000/iX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Guided Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Unguided Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Configuring HP-IBM Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
4. Using NMMGR Utility Screens
The Utility Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Output Configuration File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Display Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Print Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Print Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Print Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Print Subtree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Compress Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Validate Configuration File Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
5. Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
Using Maintenance Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Entering Maintenance Mode from Screen Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Running Maintenance Mode from a Batch Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Updating Remote Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
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Maintenance Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
ADDCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
ADDLDEV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
ADDLU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
ADDNODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
ADDVC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
CARDCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
COMPRESSCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
COPYCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
DELETECONF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
DELETENODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
EXITVALIDATE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
EXITWARN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
EXPANDDIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
HELP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
LISTLDEV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
LISTDIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
LISTLU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
MAKESTREAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
MERGEDIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
NICONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
OPENCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
OPENDIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
PAGECONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
PASSWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
PATHCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
PURGECONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
PURGELDEV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
PURGELU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
PURGENI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
PURGEVC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
READALLCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
READCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
SUMMARYCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
UPDATECONF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
VALIDATECONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
VERSIONCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
WRITECONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
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6. NMMAINT
Software Version ID Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Getting Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Running NMMAINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
NMMAINT Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Explanation of NMMAINT Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Running NMMAINT With Subsystem ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
7. NMDUMP
Running NMDUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Formatting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Link Subsystem Formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
8. NMMGRVER
Using the Conversion Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Converting MPE XL to MPE/iX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
A. NMS Error Messages
Resolving Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Invalid Software Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Version Incompatibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Insufficient MPE Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Corrupt Configuration Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
File System Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Submitting a CR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
NMCN Error and Warning Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
NM Error Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
NMFS Error and Warning Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
NMGR Error and Warning Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .273
ND Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .288
FMT Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Index
6
Figures
Figure 2-1. Common Screen Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Figure 2-2. Error Information Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Figure 3-1. Open Configuration/Directory File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Figure 3-2. Main Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Figure 3-3. Host Configuration Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Figure 3-4. NS Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Figure 3-5. Network Transport Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Figure 3-6. Unguided Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Figure 3-7. HP-IBM Configuration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Figure 4-1. Utility Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Figure 4-2. Output Configuration File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Figure 4-3. Display Tree Listing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Figure 4-4. Print Data Output Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Figure 4-5. Sample Page of Critical Summary Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Figure 4-6. Compress Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Figure 4-7. Validate Configuration File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Figure 4-8. Validate Configuration File Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Figure 4-9. Specified Subtree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Figure 4-10. Results of Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Figure 7-1. NMDUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7
Figures
8
Tables
Table 2-1. NMMGR Screen Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Table 5-1. NMMGR Maintenance Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Table 7-1. General Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Table 7-2. Log Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Table 7-3. X.25 Trace Formatter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Table 7-4. Trace Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Table 7-5. Filter Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Table A-1. Subsystem Numbers for NMCNERR Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
9
Tables
10
Preface
This is the reference manual for users of the Node Management
Services Utilities. These utilities are:
• The Node Management Services Configuration Manager (NMMGR).
• The Node Management Maintenance Utility (NMMAINT).
• The Node Management Services Trace/Log File Analyzer
(NMDUMP).
• The Node Management Services Conversion Utility (NMMGRVER).
• The Node Management Services Validation Utility (NMMGRVAL).
The major part of this manual covers the NMMGR program. It includes
information common to all the subsystems that use NMMGR to create
or modify a configuration file. Information that is subsystem-specific is
located in the manuals for that subsystem. NMMGR is used to
configure any or all of the following subsystems on a network:
• SNA (for HP e3000-IBM data communications)
• BSC (for HP e3000-IBM data communications)
• NS 3000/iX (for HP e3000-HP e3000 data communications)
• Distributed terminal subsystem (for HP e3000-terminal
communications)
11
Special Note
MPE/iX, Multiprogramming Executive with Integrated POSIX, is the
latest in a series of forward-compatible operating systems for the
HP 3000 line of computers.
In HP documentation and in talking with HP e3000 users, you will
encounter references to MPE XL, the direct predecessor of MPE/iX.
MPE/iX is a superset of MPE XL. All programs written for MPE XL will
run without change under MPE/iX. You can continue to use MPE XL
system documentation, although it may not refer to features added to
the operating system to support POSIX (for example, hierarchical
directories).
Chapter 1 , “Introduction,” provides a brief description of each of the
NMS utilities.
Chapter 2 , “Basics of NMMGR,” describes the basic functions of the
Node Management Configuration Manager (NMMGR) in detail. Use
this chapter to gain an understanding of how NMMGR works and how
to navigate through NMMGR screens.
Chapter 3 , “Using NMMGR in Screen Mode,” tells you how to use
NMMGR’s screen mode interface to begin the configuration process for
your system’s terminal connections or networking products. It includes
step-by-step instructions for getting started in NMMGR and for
navigating the top-level screens.
Chapter 4 , “Using NMMGR Utility Screens,” describes how to use the
NMMGR utility screens to list, maintain, and validate configuration
files.
Chapter 5 , “Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode,” tells you how to
use NMMGR’s maintenance mode interface to manage network
directory and configuration files and to generate stream jobs to update
remote network directory and configuration files. Each command is
described along with its purpose, syntax, parameters, and an example.
Chapter 6 , “NMMAINT,” describes the Node Management Services
Maintenance Utility (NMMAINT), used to display version numbers for
software modules.
Chapter 7 , “NMDUMP,” describes the Node Management Services
Trace/Log File Analyzer, which provides a means of decoding and
formatting logging records and trace messages. Information on running
NMDUMP is included.
Chapter 8 , “NMMGRVER,” describes the Node Management Services
Conversion Utility (NMMGRVER), which enables earlier versions of
subsystems to be used with the current version of NMMGR.
Appendix A , “NMS Error Messages,” provides a listing of error
messages that may be returned while running NMMGR. Each message
includes probable causes and actions.
12
Related Publications
The following manuals may be of interest to you when working with
products that use the Node Management Services.
For the Distributed Terminal Subsystem
Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial Devices
Troubleshooting Terminals, Printers, and Serial Device Connections
Customizing Terminal and Printer Type Files With the Workstation
Configurator
Using HP OpenView DTC Manager
For NS 3000/iX Links and Services
HP e3000/iX Network Planning and Configuration Guide
NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual
NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual
Using NS 3000/iX Network Services
NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual
NetIPC 3000/XL Programmer’s Reference Manual
LAN Cable and Accessories Installation Manual
Central Bus Programmable Serial Interface Installation and Reference
Manual
13
14
1
Introduction
This chapter introduces you to the Node Management Services Utilities
for MPE/iX systems. These programs, installed on your HP e3000
system as part of the fundamental operating system (FOS), allow
you to perform various functions related to the configuration of
networking and terminal communications.
A brief overview of each of the following is provided in this chapter:
• The Node Management Configuration Manager (NMMGR), used to
create or modify configuration and network directory files for a
system.
• NMMAINT, used to list individual modules and version numbers of
networking software
• NMDUMP, used to format log and trace files.
• NMMGRVER, used to upgrade a configuration file for use with a
later version of the operating system.
• NMMGRVAL, used to check if the configuration file has been
validated.
15
Introduction
NMMGR
NMMGR
The Node Management Configuration Manager (NMMGR) is the
utility used to create or update configuration and network directory
files. These files define the configuration for terminal and serial printer
connections and networked connections for HP e3000 computers. Use
NMMGR to configure each of the following subsystems:
• The distributed terminal subsystem (DTS), which defines
connections for terminals, printers, and other serial devices that will
be able to communicate with the system.
• The Network Services (NS) subsystem, which defines the operation
of NS links and services between HP e3000 systems.
• The BSC subsystem, which defines BSC communication links
between HP e3000 and IBM systems.
• The SNA subsystem, which defines SNA communication links
between HP e3000 and IBM systems.
Configuration File
NMMGR stores configuration information in a special MPE
configuration file that contains the data needed by the system for
networking and terminal-to-system communications. The file has the
MPE file code NCONF and may contain three kinds of data:
• Standard software operating parameters, such as limits on using
MPE resources.
• Node-specific information, such as the name of the local computer
and its network address.
• Information needed by the network software in order to
communicate with other nodes to which the local node is connected.
The configuration file must be named NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS in order to be
recognized and used by the system. You may, however, create a
configuration file using any valid MPE file name and rename it as
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS when you are ready for the system to use the
configuration information it contains.
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS must reside on LDEV1 in order to be recognized.
The system does not have access to other LDEVs at startup and the
configuration file is needed at that time.
With a few exceptions, the changes you make to the NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
file take effect only when the system is rebooted. In most cases, you
should avoid making changes to an active configuration file (one that
the system is currently using). There are some changes, however, that
may be made while the network is operating. Refer to the
16
Chapter 1
Introduction
NMMGR
product-specific manuals for details on changes that can be made
online.
Backup Configuration File
Specify a backup configuration file name whenever you open or create a
configuration file. The default backup configuration file name is
NMCBACK.group.account, where group and account are the logon
group and account. Change the name of the file by typing a new name
in place of the default. The backup file also has the file type NCONF.
Each time a subsystem is successfully validated, the backup file is
automatically updated with the configuration information. In the event
that something should occur to cause the active configuration file to be
corrupted, rename the backup file and avoid having to recreate
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS from scratch.
Sample Configuration File
Hewlett-Packard provides a sample configuration file with every
HP e3000 system. This file contains some basic configuration
information for the link, NRJE, SNANODE, IMF, DTS and logging
subsystems. It can be used as a template to help you when creating a
new system configuration. The sample file is named NMSAMP1.PUB.SYS.
To use the sample file, make sure you copy it to a new name, then run
NMMGR and modify the copy that was just created so that it contains
your system’s configuration information.
NOTE
Check “Copying a Configuration File” in Chapter 3 , “Using NMMGR in
Screen Mode,” for important information about this procedure.
Network Directory File
NMMGR stores network directory information for the NS subsystem in
a second special file called the network directory file. This file, of file
type NDIR, contains information required for one node to communicate
with another node in an internetwork (network of networks).
The network directory file must be named NSDIR.NET.SYS but, like the
configuration file, you may create a directory file under another name
and rename it when you are ready for the system to use the directory
information it contains.
NOTE
A network directory uses a KSAM file pair. Therefore, if copying a
directory, be sure to copy both the data file and the key file. If the file
name you create is NSDIR.NET.SYS, the KSAM pair of the file will be
named NSDIRK.NET.SYS, and its file type will be KSAMK.
Chapter 1
17
Introduction
NMMGR
Operating Modes
NMMGR includes two interfaces thatcan be used to enter or modify
data:
• The screen interface, a VPLUS block-mode interface, presents a
series of screens that you can use to display or modify existing
configuration data or enter new data. When using this interface, you
are operating NMMGR in screen mode.
• The maintenance interface, a character interface, is used
primarily from within batch jobs to update configuration data. This
interface may also be run interactively from within NMMGR. The
maintenance interface includes commands that let you manage
network directories and configuration files. When using this
interface to run NMMGR, you are operating in maintenance mode.
18
Chapter 1
Introduction
NMMAINT
NMMAINT
The Node Management Services Maintenance Utility
(NMMAINT), lists individual modules and version numbers of the NS
and SNA links and services installed on the HP e3000 system on which
it is run.
Each software module within a subsystem has its own version ID
number. If the version, update, and fix levels of these modules do not
match, the subsystem will not work correctly. NMMAINT helps
diagnose system problems by detecting missing or invalid software
modules. The information provided by NMMAINT must be included in
any change request (CR) submitted to HP.
See Chapter 6 , “NMMAINT,” of this manual for details on the function
and use of NMMAINT.
Chapter 1
19
Introduction
NMDUMP
NMDUMP
The Node Management Services Trace/Log File Analyzer
(NMDUMP) is the NMS utility that you use to format files created by
the logging and tracing facilities. NMDUMP translates the log and
trace files into a format that is easier to read.
Logging and tracing are diagnostic and debugging services provided by
NMS.
Tracing
Tracing records subsystem calls and/or the sequences of module
execution. Tracing is provided at both the user level and at an internal
level. User-level tracing provides a record of data communications
subsystem intrinsic calls. Internal level tracing records internal state
transitions and the sequences of module execution within data
communications subsystems. It should only be used on the
recommendation of an HP service representative.
Logging
Logging records subsystem events for all data communications links. It
records the usage of the communications network resources and serves
as a tool in resolving network problems.
Logging can be performed at three levels: network logging, event
logging, and link level logging. You choose the level of logging for a
particular system through the NMMGR configuration for that system.
For information on using logging and tracing for NS 3000/iX products,
see the NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual.
For information on using logging and tracing for HP-to-IBM products,
see the Node Manager’s Guide for each product. For more information
on NMDUMP, see Chapter 7 , “NMDUMP,” of this manual.
20
Chapter 1
Introduction
NMMGRVER
NMMGRVER
The Node Management Services Conversion Utility
(NMMGRVER) is a program that converts configuration files created
with NMMGR from an earlier version to the latest format.
NMMGRVER helps provide a migration path for configuration files
developed using one version of the software so that you can more easily
move to a later version. The ability to convert the major part of network
configuration files eliminates the need for you to reenter sometimes
complex configuration and network directory values.
See Chapter 8 , “NMMGRVER,” of this manual for more information on
NMMGRVER and its use in the migration process.
Chapter 1
21
Introduction
NMMGRVAL
NMMGRVAL
This utility checks to see if the configuration file has been validated. It
can be included in a shutdown UDC or command script to check
whether the DTC subsystem has been validated before attempting to
shut down the system.
The syntax is:
:run nmmgrval;parm=1
END OF PROGRAM
:showjcw
VALDTS = 0
VALNETXPORT = 0
VALIBM = 0
VALOSI = 0
:
22
Chapter 1
2
Basics of NMMGR
This chapter describes the basic functions of the Node Management
Configuration Manager (NMMGR) in detail. Use this chapter to gain an
understanding of how the utility works and how to navigate through
NMMGR screens.
The following topics are discussed:
• NMMGR screens, including a discussion of common screen elements
and function keys.
• Moving between screens in NMMGR.
• Getting help about the function of NMMGR, the use of individual
screens, or the specific configuration values to be entered at a
particular screen.
• Getting information about error messages generated by the
NMMGR utility.
23
Basics of NMMGR
NMMGR Screens
NMMGR Screens
Each NMMGR screen may have multiple purposes. Some screens
provide menus of items for selecting a subbranch of screens that you
will be moving through. Some screens present a selection of configured
items and allow you to either choose items you want to modify or add
new items to the list. Still other NMMGR screens allow you to enter
data to define configuration values for a selected item. If running the
latest version of NMMGR, some screens serve more than one of these
purposes.
It is not important that you be able to distinguish one type of screen
from another. There are, however, certain basic elements that are
common to all screens that it is helpful to understand.
24
Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
Common Screen Elements
The screen shown in Figure 2-1 illustrates the common elements found
in NMMGR screens. Each of these elements are described here.
Figure 2-1
Common Screen Elements
Header
The screen header is located at the top of the screen (the top three
lines), and contains five elements, each of which is described here. The
five elements are:
• Program name (NMMGR/3000) and version number
• Screen number and title
• Data flag
• Message field
• Command window
Program Name and Version Number
The program name and version number are always displayed in a
protected field at the top of the screen. (Protected means that
information cannot be typed into the field.)
Chapter 2
25
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
Screen Number and Title
To the right of the program name and version number is the screen
number followed by the screen title. Each screen number is unique for
that screen. There is no significance to the order of the numbers. They
are strictly for convenience in referencing information about a screen in
various reference documents.
Screen titles are also unique for each screen and will generally indicate
the purpose and content of the screen.
Data Flag
The data flag is a Yes or No indicator located in the upper-right corner
of screens that contain data entry fields. The data flag indicates
whether or not a data record has already been created for the screen.
The data flag is an important indicator in cases where default
information is supplied in the fields of a screen when a new
configuration file is created. The information in the fields has not yet
been saved, even though it may appear that the information on the
screen is complete. If you want the information on the screen to become
a part of the configuration, you must press the [Save Data] function key
to create the actual data record. The data flag will change from N to Y,
verifying that the data has been made part of the configuration file.
Once a data record has been created for a screen, the data flag is set to
Y whenever you return that screen.
Message Field
The message field is the second line of the header and may contain one
of two types of information:
• The action that this screen requires
• An NMMGR error message
This line is a full-bright inverse video line that is used only for
displaying information. You can obtain more information about the
errors that may appear in this field by using the Error Information
screen, which is described later in this chapter.
Command Window
Each screen includes a field labeled Command: that is located below the
message field. This field, called the command window, accepts
commands rather than accepting data. This is an unprotected field and
is displayed in half-bright inverse video. You can enter the following
types of commands in this window:
• NMMGR commands. The valid screen mode commands and their
meanings are shown in Table 2-1. You can enter each command
using the full command name or you can abbreviate the command by
26
Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
entering only the portion to the left of the bracket as shown in the
table.
• MPE commands.
• NMMGR path commands. Direct path branching and brother
branching are described in this chapter.
To enter a command, position the cursor at the Command: window by
pressing the [Home] key (the key on your terminal with the diagonal
arrow or the word “Home” on it). You can also use the [TAB] or cursor
(arrow) keys to move the cursor to the command window. Once you are
there, type in the command and press [ENTER].
NOTE
You must press [ENTER], not [RETURN], to execute the command.
When there is a command in the command window, pressing [ENTER]
executes only the command in the window. It will not send other data
on the screen to the computer.
Some NMMGR commands transfer you directly to other screens.
The NMMGR command set includes the colon (:). You can execute any
programmatically executable MPE command from the command
window by prefacing it with a colon. For example, you could type
:LISTF and press [ENTER]. When MPE is finished processing your
command, it prompts you to press [RETURN] to return to the screen
interface.
You can process only one command in the command window at a time.
Table 2-1
NMMGR Screen Mode Commands
NMMGR Command
Action
@path
Branches to the screen whose path name is given in path.
:MPECommand
Executes MPECommand. MPECommand must be a
programmatically executable MPE command.
COM[PRESS]
Transfer to the Compress screen.
CON[FIGURATION]
or @
Transfers to the Main screen.
COP[YSUB]
Transfers to the Configuration Subtree Copy screen.
ER[RORS]
Displays the Error Information screen.
EX[IT]
Exits from NMMGR (same as QUIT).
H[ELP] or ?
Calls up help function. (See “Getting Help” in this chapter.)
M[AIN]
Transfers to the Main screen.
Chapter 2
27
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
Table 2-1
NMMGR Screen Mode Commands
NMMGR Command
Action
NET[DIR](NS Only)
Transfers to the Network Directory Main screen. (You must already
have opened the network directory file.) Refer to the NS manuals for
more information.
NEX[T]
Transfers to a brother screen. (See “Branching” in this chapter.)
NIG[UIDE] (NS Only)
Transfers to the Guided HP Configuration screen. Refer to the NS
manuals for more information.
NIU[PDATE] (NS Only)
Transfers to the Guided HP Configuration screen. Refer to the NS
manuals for more information.
NM[MGRCMD]
Transfers to the maintenance mode interface.
OP[EN]
Transfers to the Open Configuration/Directory File screen.
OU[TPUT]
Transfers to the Output Configuration File screen.
P[RIOR]
Returns to the previous screen. Same as pressing [Prior Screen].
Q[UIT]
Exits from NMMGR (same as EXIT).
R[EFRESH]
Refreshes the current screen.
ST[OP]
Stops the guided configuration process.
SU[BGUIDE] (NS Only)
Transfers to the Guided HP Configuration screen. Refer to the NS
manuals for more information.
U[TILITY]
Transfers to the Utility screen.
VA[LIDATE]
Transfers to the Validate Configuration File screen.
VE[RSION]
Displays version information.
Main Window
The major portion of each screen lists menu choices, displays
information and selection choices, and presents fields for entering or
displaying information. With the exception of data entry fields, the
information on the screen is protected against modification.
Path Name
On most screens that can be reached by direct path branching, the
path name used to reach the screen is displayed in the upper-left
corner of the main screen window. The path name consists of all the
screen names between the root (top of the structure) and the current
screen, with the names separated by periods.
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Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
Data Fields and Menu Choices
Data can be entered only into unprotected fields. For screens with more
than one unprotected field, the cursor automatically moves to the next
unprotected field when you reach the end of the present field or if you
press [TAB].
Generally, the [TAB] key is used to step through the fields from the top
of the screen to the bottom. If you need to back up to a previous field,
use the [SHIFT][TAB] key combination. For more information, consult
you Terminal Reference Manual.
When menu choices are presented on the screen, they are usually
associated with one of the function keys at the bottom of the screen. To
select the menu item, press the function key that corresponds to the
item.
Other screens, sometimes referred to as select screens, present a list
of configured items in protected data fields. They also contain a data
entry field into which you can type the name of one of the configured
items and select it for modification. Alternatively, you can type in a new
name for an item to be added to the list. Press a function key that lets
you perform an action on the selected item (add, modify, delete,
rename). Pressing the function key will cause the action to be
performed and often will cause a new screen to be displayed, allowing
you to modify or define the selected item.
Configuration File Name
NMMGR displays the name of the configuration file that you are
working on in the area called File: at the bottom of each screen. This
name is shown as filename.group.acct in Figure 2-1. On an actual
screen, the name of the file you created or opened at the Open
Configuration/Directory File screen is displayed at this location on the
screen. The file name is not an input field; to change the working file,
use the Open Configuration/Directory File screen.
Function Keys
Each NMMGR screen has a set of eight softkeys, or function keys,
which vary in function from screen to screen. Some screens may use
only a few function keys, while others have functions assigned to all
eight keys. The [Prior Screen] and [Help] function keys are present in
nearly all screens. Other softkeys are also present, depending on the
purpose of the screen you are viewing. Some of the more common
function keys are described here. For many screens, you can find
information on that screen’s function keys in the Help information
associated with the screen.
Chapter 2
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Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
Prior Screen Key
Except for a limited number of screens, such as the Error Information
screen and the Guided Configuration screen, the [Prior Screen] key is
the right-most function key, [f8].
With a few exceptions (as listed), the screen displayed when
[Prior Screen] is pressed will always be the screen most recently visited
prior to the current screen, regardless of the manner in which you
reached the current screen. In order to show the correct screen,
NMMGR maintains a prior screen list, which is a sequential list of
the screens that have been displayed. Pressing [Prior Screen] displays
the most recent screen in the prior screen list and removes that screen
from the list.
The most recent screen in the list is the screen that was visited just
prior to the current screen, with five exceptions:
• When you display the Error Information screen, NMMGR does not
put this screen in your prior screen list. Thus, pressing [Prior Screen]
never transfers you to the Error Information screen, even if it was
the latest screen you displayed.
• After reaching the Validate screen in guided configuration, the prior
screen becomes the screen with which you began the guided
configuration.
• If you use the command window to return to a screen already visited,
NMMGR drops any screens visited after this screen from the prior
screen list.
• If you use the [Help] key to display a help information screen, the
help screen will not appear in the prior screen list.
• Using the NEXT command does not update the prior screen list.
Help Key
Most NMMGR screens have a [Help] key as the second key from the
right. Pressing this key displays a help information screen. The help
information relates specifically to the screen from which you pressed
the [Help] key. It describes screen usage, parameters, and function key
operation for that screen. See “Getting Help” in this chapter for more
information on the NMMGR Help system.
Save Data Key
Screens with data entry fields have a [Save Data] key, usually as the
third key from the right-hand side. Pressing this key creates or modifies
the data record and causes the data entered in the screen to be
transferred to the configuration file. If the Data Flag is “N”, pressing
[Save Data] will cause the Data Flag to change to “Y”.
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Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Common Screen Elements
“Go To” Keys
Some keys take you to a specific screen. There may be one or more keys
on the screen that tell NMMGR to “go to” a new screen. For example,
the [Go to OUTPUT] key on the Utility screen takes you directly to the
Output Configuration File screen.
Next Page/Prev Page Keys
Some NMMGR screens contain data or display sets of items that will
not fit in a single screen. When this occurs, the screen data is continued
on one or more “pages”. The screens will include function keys that
allow you to move back and forth between the pages of the screen.
[Next Page] moves you to the subsequent page of data. [Prev Page] moves
you to the prior page of data. Some multiple page screens also include
[First Page] and [Last Page] keys, that take you to the first or last page of
the data.
Refreshing the Screen
If you have entered data or changed values on a data screen and decide
not to make the changes before you have entered them into the
configuration file, you can refresh the screen to return it to the state it
was in before you made the changes. Simply enter REFRESH (or the
abbreviation R) in the command window and press [ENTER]. NMMGR
will warn you that the screen has changed since you last updated it.
Enter REFRESH again; NMMGR refreshes the screen and shows its
current configuration file data. In addition, refreshing the screen resets
the terminal strap settings.
You can also use the REFRESH command to “clean up” the screen after a
“TELL” message or other interference has appeared on the screen.
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Basics of NMMGR
Entering Data
Entering Data
Enter data into NMMGR by typing the appropriate information in the
data entry fields on a screen and pressing the [Save Data] key. (The
[ENTER] key can be used, if the command window is blank.) This causes
the data in the fields to be included in the configuration file, as a data
record. NMMGR confirms that you have updated the configuration file
by printing the following message in the message field:
Configuration data updated.
NOTE
The data from the screen is immediately included into the configuration
file. NMMGR does not wait until you exit the program to save the new
information. You should be very careful to change only certain
information in an active configuration file.
If you enter data in a field and then try to transfer to another screen (by
pressing a function key or by using the command window) before saving
the data, NMMGR will print the following message:
Warning: Screen changed. Use UPDATE to save data. (NMGRWARN7)
This warning cautions you against unintentionally leaving a data
screen before you have updated the configuration file. If you decide you
do not want to update the configuration file with the data on the screen,
you can ignore the warning and repeat the action to transfer to another
screen.
If you enter the wrong type of data in any field and try to update the
configuration file, NMMGR prints an error message that corresponds to
the first field with invalid data. NMMGR highlights and underlines the
fields with invalid data and positions the cursor at the first field with
invalid data. For example, suppose you enter an alphabetic character in
a location that must contain an integer. When you try to update the file,
NMMGR may print:
The field can contain only digits.
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Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Moving Between Screens
Moving Between Screens
There are two ways to move from one NMMGR screen to another. One
way is to use the function keys present on one screen to select and move
to another screen in a progression. The second way is to enter a path
name in the command window to move directly to a specified screen.
Moving with Function Keys
When creating a configuration file, you will generally traverse
downward on one of the configuration branches until you have
completed configuration for a subsystem.
Normally, you will make selections or enter data into the lowest level
data screens of a branch before moving to another branch. You may
need to transfer only to screens directly above or below your current
screen in the structure. This is generally accomplished by pressing the
appropriate function key.
Branching
Branching is a method you can use to go directly to a particular
screen, rather than traveling through every screen in a branch to get to
that screen.
Direct Path Branching
Use direct path branching to transfer from any NMMGR screen to
any screen having a path name in one of the subsystem branches. To
use this feature, you must be familiar with the tree structure of the
configuration file. You enter @pathname in the command window to
cause NMMGR to transfer you to the screen at the end of the specified
path name. For example, when configuring SNA, you could enter
@SNANODE.PU3000E in the command window to see the LUs configured
for the node PU3000E. The path name for each subsystem
configuration screen is displayed in the Path field of each screen.
Brother Branching
Screens that share a common parent screen are referred to as brothers.
If you are working in a screen with one or more brothers, you can use
the NEXT command to transfer to the next brother screen. This feature
is called brother branching.
For example, the unguided NS configuration screen called NETXPORT
Configuration has three subscreens, or children, referred to here by
their path names:
NETXPORT.GLOBAL,
Chapter 2
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Basics of NMMGR
Moving Between Screens
NETXPORT.GPROT, and
NETXPORT.NI.
These three screens are brothers. To transfer directly from one of
these screens to its brother without going back through the parent
screen you would simply type NEXT in the command window and press
[ENTER].
The command would look like this:
Command: NEXT
The screens are visited in the order their names appear on the parent
screen. Typing NEXT in the command window will transfer you to the
next brother as long as one exists. When the last brother screen is
reached, typing NEXT will transfer you to the first brother screen.
Typing NEXT has no effect on the prior screen list.
34
Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Getting Help
Getting Help
Help is available for many of the NMMGR screens you will be using. It
is available for all unguided NS configuration screens. It is also
available for the screens used to configure the distributed terminal
subsystem and those used for guided NS configuration. You can also get
help on general topics and NMMGR commands.
Getting Help on Screens
The simplest way to use the help facility is to press the [Help] function
key while at the screen for which you need information. (Entering HELP
in the command window also presents you with the help information for
the current screen.) You will immediately be presented with text that
describes the screen, each parameter configured using the screen, and
the operation associated with each of the screen’s function keys.
Help messages are provided as an aid to configuration and are not
intended to be a complete reference. They provide only the information
that is immediately needed to understand how to use a screen. If you
need more detailed information than is provided by a help message,
refer to the configuration guide for the link you are configuring.
Entering Help Mode
You can also access the NMMGR help system by entering a ? in the
command window. This puts you into help mode, and presents you with
a list of available help topics. One of these topics, Index, provides a list
of parameters and the screens on which they are configured. Path
branching information is included where appropriate. You can browse
through the topics until you terminate help mode by typing end, exit,
or :. Terminating help mode returns you to the screen where you
entered help mode.
Getting Help on Specific Topics
You can use the HELP command followed by a keyword to get help on a
list of specific topics. The following are the available help keywords:
• Enter HELP OVERVIEW to see a brief explanation of the operation of
NMMGR.
• Enter HELP ROADMAP to see a map of the screen structure of
NMMGR. You will also receive a list of additional keywords,
consisting of the subsystems supported by NMMGR. Each of these
subsystem names, such as LINKCONF, can be used as a help message
qualifier to obtain a map of the screens pertaining to the listed
subsystem. A qualifier, which also is considered a keyword, must
follow the main keyword with a comma separating the two
Chapter 2
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Basics of NMMGR
Getting Help
keywords. For example, if you wanted to see a map of LINKCONF
screens, you would enter HELP ROADMAP,LINKCONF in the command
window. Every screen name shown in these screen maps is also a
keyword and can be used with the HELP command and the FIELDS
qualifier. For example, if you wanted to see field descriptions for the
screen called LAN, you would enter HELP LAN,FIELDS in the
command window.
• Enter HELP COMMANDS to obtain a list of commands available from
within the screen interface. For information about a specific
command, enter the name of the command as a keyword following
the word HELP in the command window.
• Enter HELP MAINT to see a list of commands available within
maintenance mode. For information about a specific command, enter
the name of the command as a keyword following the word HELP in
the command window. When you obtain information about a specific
command, the help text will list any qualifiers, such as PARMS,
OPERATION, EXAMPLE, and ALL. You then could enter the command
again, this time followed by a comma and a qualifier, to obtain even
more information.
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Chapter 2
Basics of NMMGR
Getting Help with Errors
Getting Help with Errors
When NMMGR encounters an error, it displays a brief message in the
message field of the current screen. In most cases, these messages
provide enough information for you to correct the error and continue
operation. Occasionally, however, you may encounter a more serious
error or the cause of an error may not be readily apparent. You may
then need additional information to understand the cause of the error.
Error Information Screen
The Error Information screen displays the latest error that NMMGR
encountered and associated error messages, if any. To display the Error
Information screen, type ERRORS in the command window of any screen
and press [ENTER].
Note that as many as five levels of error messages can be displayed in
the Error Information screen, depending on where the error occurred in
the software. However, it does not display the prompts that are a result
of entering invalid data types in fields.
Figure 2-2 shows an example of the error messages displayed on the
Error Information screen. In this case, a user who was not the creator of
the configuration file, tried to compress the file. This action is not
allowed. Note the hierarchy of the errors returned as shown in the
example. The top level is the NMMGR error message; the other levels
come from software accessed by NMMGR.
Chapter 2
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Basics of NMMGR
Getting Help with Errors
Figure 2-2
Error Information Screen
NMMGR Error Messages
Error messages associated with the NMMGR program are listed in
Appendix A , “NMS Error Messages,” of this manual. Each error
message is listed with at least one possible cause and a recommended
action for each cause. You also may need to refer to the MPE file system
and operating system manuals for explanations of any MPE error
messages that may appear on the Error Information screen.
38
Chapter 2
3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
This chapter tells you how to use NMMGR’s screen mode interface to
begin the configuration process for your system’s terminal connections
or networking products. It includes step-by-step instructions for getting
started in NMMGR and for navigating the top-level screens. Those
screens are described here along with their purpose.
This chapter describes the following topics in detail:
• What you need before you start NMMGR.
• How to start NMMGR in screen mode.
• How to open or create a configuration file or a directory file.
• How to choose a subsystem for configuration from the Main screen,
NMMGR’s top-level menu. An overview of the configuration tasks
performed for each subsystem is included.
NOTE
This chapter does not take you through the configuration process. For
detailed information on configuring a specific subsystem, refer to the
configuration guide for that subsystem. For detailed information on the
unguided configuration screens for the Network Services subsystem,
refer to the NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual.
39
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Before You Start
Before You Start
There are a number of requirements that you need to be aware of before
you attempt to run NMMGR:
• You must have MPE Node Manager (NM) or Network Administrator
(NA) capability to run NMMGR.
• Your terminal must have block mode capability to run NMMGR in
screen mode. All terminals supported by MPE/iX have this
capability.
• An NMMGR screen is 24 lines long. If your terminal screen is longer
than 24 lines, the NMMGR function key labels on some (older)
screens appear to be four lines tall with blank labels on the bottom
two lines. These lines are blank because the functions assigned by
NMMGR clear any existing functions, although blank labels may
still appear on the screen. The function keys on more recently added
NMMGR screens, which store their function key information in a
different way, will appear as normal softkeys, on two lines.
40
Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Starting NMMGR
Starting NMMGR
To start NMMGR’s screen mode interface, enter the following command
at the MPE prompt:
:RUN NMMGR.PUB.SYS
After MPE accepts the run command, NMMGR displays the following
banner:
NM Configuration Manager 32098-20016 V.uu.ff (C) Hewlett
Packard Co. 1994
NMMGR then clears the terminal screen and displays the Open
Configuration/Directory File screen.
Chapter 3
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Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Opening a Configuration or Directory File
Opening a Configuration or Directory File
The Open Configuration/Directory File screen shown in Figure 3-1 is
the first screen you see when you start NMMGR in screen mode.
Figure 3-1
Open Configuration/Directory File Screen
From this screen you can:
• Create a new configuration file
• Open an existing configuration file
• Create a new network directory file
• Open an existing network directory file
• Specify a name for the backup configuration file
The instructions that follow describe how to do each of these tasks. See
Chapter 1 , “Introduction,” for more information about configuration
files and network directory files.
Creating a New Configuration File
If you want to create a new configuration file (one that does not exist),
follow these steps. At the Open Configuration/Directory File screen:
Step 1. Enter the name of the file you want to create in the Configuration file
name field.
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Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Opening a Configuration or Directory File
The name must be a valid MPE file name. If you do not specify a group
or account, NMMGR will qualify the file name with your logon group
and account.
The default file name is NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. You may use the default if
no NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS file currently exists.
Step 2. If a write access password has been assigned, you must enter the
password in the Write access password field in order to create a new
file. If no write access password has been enabled, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Config] key. NMMGR will ask you to press the key
again to verify that you want to create a new file. Press the key again.
The Main screen will appear and you can proceed with subsystem
configuration.
NOTE
Instead of creating a new, and therefore empty, configuration file, you
may want to use the sample configuration file provided by
Hewlett-Packard for use as a configuration template. Refer to the
instructions for “Copying a Configuration File”.
Copying a Configuration Files
Most new configuration files are created from existing ones, rather than
from scratch. You can copy an existing file from the same system or
from a different system on your network. Note that if you are copying
the file to NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS there are certain rules which must be
followed or the new file may not be found or run when the system is
booted.
The steps that follow show how to copy the sample configuration file
provided by Hewlett-Packard, NMSAMP1.PUB.SYS, to
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. The sample file is provided for use as a template
when you are configuring a system with no existing configuration.
1. Purge or rename any existing NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. (Take care when
doing this that you do not destroy useful configuration information.)
2. Create a file equation similar to the following example:
:FILE CONFIG = NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS; DEV = 1; DISC = 2048,1,1
The configuration file must reside on LDEV1, because the system
does not have access to other LDEVs at startup and the
configuration file is needed at that time. Only one file extent is
allowed.
3. Copy the appropriate sample file into the empty CONFIG file. The
following is a sample “copy” command:
FCOPY FROM = NMSAMP1.PUB.SYS; TO = *CONFIG; NEW; NOUSER
LABELS
Chapter 3
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Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Opening a Configuration or Directory File
4. When you are ready to proceed with configuration, run NMMGR and
open the configuration file you just created. Refer to the instructions
for “Opening a Configuration File.”
You may choose to copy your source file to a name other than
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS first, modify that file using NMMGR, then rename
the file as NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS when you are ready for it to be used by
the system.
Changing the Backup File Name
NMMGR automatically generates a backup configuration file that is
updated each time the configuration is successfully validated. By
default, the backup file name is NMCBACK.group.account. You can
change the name that will be used for the backup file by typing a new
name in the Backup configuration file name field on the Open
Configuration/Directory File screen.
The file name you enter must be a valid MPE file name. If you do not
enter a group or account name, NMMGR will qualify the file name with
your logon group and account.
It is a good idea to change the name that will be used for the backup file
if you are modifying an alternate configuration or one that will be used
on a different system. By changing the backup file name you can avoid
writing over a backup file that you want to maintain.
Opening an Existing Configuration File
If you want to open an existing configuration file to modify the
configuration, follow these steps.
At the Open Configuration/Directory File screen:
Step 1. Enter the name of the file you want to open in the Configuration file
name field.
In most cases, you want to make sure that the file you plan to open is
not the active configuration file.
If you do not specify a group or account, NMMGR will assume that the
file resides in your logon group and account.
Step 2. If a write access password has been assigned, you must enter the
password in the Write access password field in order to open the file in
write mode. (If you do not enter an assigned password, you can still
access the file in read-only mode.) If no write access password has been
enabled, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Config] key. The Main screen will appear and you can
proceed with subsystem configuration. The fields on each screen show
the values currently entered for the configuration file you opened.
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Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Opening a Configuration or Directory File
Creating a Network Directory File
If you want to create a new network directory file (one that does not
exist), follow these steps.
At the Open Configuration/Directory File screen:
Step 1. Enter the name of the file you want to create in the Network directory
file name field.
The name must be a valid MPE file name. If you do not specify a group
or account, NMMGR will qualify the file name with your logon group
and account.
The default file name is NSDIR.NET.SYS. You may use the default if no
NSDIR.NET.SYS file currently exists.
Step 2. If a write access password has been assigned, you must enter the
password in the Write access password field in order to create a new
file. If no write access password has been enabled, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Directry] key. NMMGR will ask you to press the key
again to verify that you want to create a new file. Press the key again.
The Network Directory Main screen displays and you can proceed with
directory configuration. (See the Configuration Guide for the subsystem
you are configuring for more information on configuring the network
directory.)
Opening an Existing Network Directory
If you want to open an existing network directory file to modify its
directory information, follow these steps.
At the Open Configuration/Directory File screen:
Step 1. Enter the name of the file you want to open in the Network directory
file name field. If you do not specify a group or account, NMMGR will
assume that the file resides in your logon group and account.
Step 2. If a write access password has been assigned, you must enter the
password in the Write access password field in order to open the file in
write mode. (If you do not enter an assigned password, you can still
access the file in read-only mode.) If no write access password has been
enabled, leave this field blank.
Step 3. Press the [Open Directry] key. The Network Directory Main screen
appears and you can proceed to modify the network directory
information. The fields on each screen will show the values currently
entered for the network directory file you have opened. (See the
Configuration Guide for the subsystem you are configuring for more
information on configuring the network directory.)
Chapter 3
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Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Selecting a Configuration Path
Once a configuration file is successfully opened or created, NMMGR
displays the Main screen, shown in Figure 3-2. This screen presents a
menu from which you select the group of NMMGR screens you need to
configure the appropriate subsystem.
Figure 3-2
Main Screen
The main screen also contains three data fields that must be completed
in order to configure the local node name and determine which type of
network configuration is appropriate for the node.
The following steps describe the action that should be taken at the
Main screen:
Step 1. Enter the node name of the system you are configuring in the local node
name field (if it is not already present).
Step 2. In the field next to the question Are you using OpenView DTC
Manager?, enter a “Y” if you are using PC-based network management
for this node, enter an “N” if you are using host-based network
management. If you are using PC-based network management, an
OpenView workstation must be present on the network.
Step 3. In the field next to the question Do you have X.25 system-to-system
or PAD connections?, enter a “Y” to indicate you will be configuring a
DTC/X.25 Network Access card for this node, otherwise, enter an “N”.
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Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Step 4. Press the [Save Data] key to save the node name in the configuration file
(create the data record). The Data flag will be set to “Y” when the data
record exists.
Step 5. Proceed to one of the NMMGR configuration subbranches by pressing
the appropriate function key.
Each of the configuration subbranches are described.
Configuring Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial
Devices
Terminals, printers, and other serial devices are connected to HP e3000
computers through a device called the Datacommunications and
Terminal Controller (DTC). In order to connect to a device, the system’s
configuration file must contain information that makes it possible for
the DTC, as well as the devices attached to the DTC, to establish
communications with the system. DTCs and their devices are
configured through NMMGR’s distributed terminal subsystem (DTS)
configuration.
If you press the key labeled [DTS] at the Main screen, you will be taken
to the Host Configuration screen (Figure 3-3), the first screen in a
progression that lets you configure DTS for Host-based network
management only. The PC-based management screen will vary slightly.
Figure 3-3
Host Configuration Screen
Chapter 3
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Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
You will perform a number of tasks using these screens, including the
following:
• Define the DTS link configuration for the system.
• Define connection capabilities for terminals, printers, and other
serial devices that will be able to communicate with the system.
• Define terminal, printer, and other serial device profiles specifying
sets of characteristics that can be applied to various terminals,
printers, or other serial devices connected to the system and
associate the profiles with individual devices. The screen in Figure
3-4 reflects PC-based network management only. The Host-based
management screen will vary slightly.
See the following manuals for more information on configuring DTCs
and serial devices:
• Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial
Devices.
• (Host-based X.25 configuration only) Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links.
• (PC-based configuration only) Using the OpenView DTC Manager.
Configuring NS 3000/iX
The NS 3000/iX product consists of NS 3000/iX Network Services and
NS 3000/iX links. NS 3000/iX Network Services contain software that
allows you to access data, initiate processes, and exchange information
between all the systems on a network. NS 3000/iX links provide
connections between systems (either HP e3000s or personal computers)
in a network. To use NS 3000/iX Network Services, the systems must be
connected by an NS 3000/iX link and each link must be properly
configured through NMMGR.
If you press the key labeled [NS] at the Main screen, you are taken to
the NS Configuration screen (Figure 3-4), the first screen in a
progression that lets you configure NS.
48
Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Figure 3-4
NS Configuration Screen
NMMGR provides two methods of creating or updating configuration
information for an NS link. The methods are referred to as Guided
Configuration and Unguided Configuration respectively. You
determine which method you will use by making a choice at the NS
Configuration screen.
You also use this screen to configure a domain name for the node you
are configuring if using domain names for network access. To configure
a domain name, replace the local node name in the field at the bottom of
the screen and press the [Save Data] key. (If you are not using domain
names, leave the local node name as is.)
• To perform guided configuration, press the key labeled
[Guided Config] and refer to the HP e3000/iX Network Planning and
Configuration Guide for information.
• To perform unguided (manual) configuration, press the key labeled
[Unguided Config] and refer to the NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens
Reference Manual for information.
NOTE
Hewlett-Packard strongly recommends using guided configuration
whenever you need to initially configure a network interface. You can
also take advantage of its convenience later for most network
maintenance and updating. Guided configuration supplies many
default values for your configuration and requires that you visit a
minimal number of screens. Use unguided configuration only if you
need to modify configuration values that are not available on the guided
screens.
Chapter 3
49
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Guided Configuration
If you press the key labeled [Guided Config] at the NS Configuration
screen, you will be taken to the Network Transport Configuration
screen shown in Figure 3-5. From this screen, you choose the specific
task you want to perform using guided NS configuration. These tasks
include configuring or modifying a network interface, modifying logging
parameters, and fine tuning global or network transport configuration
parameters.
Figure 3-5
Network Transport Configuration Screen
Guided configuration is a procedure that automates part of the
configuration process. It “guides” you through the configuration screens
for a specific task. It assumes and supplies default values wherever
possible to furnish most of the configuration file’s data.
When you run guided configuration, you use only a minimal number of
configuration screens. You will normally use fewer screens than you
would if you were performing the same task using unguided
configuration. Many of these screens are different from those used for
unguided configuration.
50
Chapter 3
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Unguided Configuration
If you press the key labeled [Unguided Config] at the NS Configuration
screen (#166), you will be taken to the Unguided Configuration screen
shown in Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-6
Unguided Configuration Screen
From this screen, you can move to the screens that let you:
• Configure or modify a network interface.
• Configure or modify an NS link.
• Configure or modify logging parameters.
• Configure or modify a network interface.
If you choose to create or modify an NS configuration using unguided
(manual) configuration, you must take care that you know which
screens you need to use to completely create or modify a configuration.
The unguided nature of manual configuration makes it possible to get
“lost” or to miss some necessary screens entirely.
Under most circumstances, HP recommends that you use guided
configuration. Unguided configuration can be useful, however, if you
only need to use a few screens and you know exactly which screens you
need.
Refer to the NS 3000/iX Screens Reference Manual for information on
the unguided NS configuration screens.
Chapter 3
51
Using NMMGR in Screen Mode
Selecting a Configuration Path
Configuring HP-IBM Connections
Hewlett-Packard provides a number of networking products that make
it possible to establish communication links between HP e3000 and
IBM mainframe computers.
If you press the key labeled [IBM] at the Main screen, you are sent to the
HP-IBM Configuration screen shown in Figure 3-7.
Figure 3-7
HP-IBM Configuration Screen
From this screen, you can choose any of the IBM subsystems for
configuration by pressing the appropriate function key. You can also
choose to configure logging for all of the IBM subsystems, or you can
choose SNANODE configuration (SNA node, SDLC link, X.25 link, and
token ring link).
The HP-IBM Configuration screen presents you with more choices than
there are available function keys. For this reason, the screen includes a
[Next Key Labels] function key that lets you toggle between two sets of
function key choices. If the choice you want does not currently appear
on any of the [Go to] function keys, press the [Next Key Labels] key. You
can then make the choice you need to configure the HP-IBM subsystem
you want to configure.
For more information on configuring any of the HP-IBM products, see
the Node Manager’s Guide for that product. For information on HP-IBM
subsystem logging or SNANODE configuration, see the SNA Link/iX
Node Manager’s Guide.
52
Chapter 3
4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
This chapter describes how to use the NMMGR utility screens to list,
maintain, and validate configuration files. The following topics are
discussed in detail:
• Displaying or printing the configuration file tree structure or the
data screens associated with a configuration file using the Output
screen.
• Compressing or expanding a configuration file using the Compress
screen.
• Validating a configuration file using the Validate screen.
• Copying a configuration subtree using the Configuration Subtree
Copy screen.
53
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
The Utility Screen
The Utility Screen
The Utility screen shown in Figure 4-1 lets you select the utility
function that you want to perform. To display the Utility screen, press
[Go To Utility] from the Main screen or type UTILITY in the command
window of any screen and press [ENTER].
Figure 4-1
Utility Screen
Select the utility function you want to perform and press the
corresponding function key.
54
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Output Configuration File Screen
Output Configuration File Screen
The Output Configuration File screen shown in Figure 4-2 allows you to
list or print the configuration file tree structure, to print the NMMGR
data screens associated with a configuration file, and to print a critical
summary of the configuration file data. You reach this screen by
pressing [Go To OUTPUT] at the Utility screen.
Figure 4-2
Output Configuration File Screen
By default, the printed output for each of this screen’s print functions is
sent directly to the line printer. You may want to redirect the output by
issuing a file equation for the output file FORMLIST (the formal file
designator of the output file). You can do so by entering the file equation
in the command window of the screen. For example, you could type the
following:
:FILE FORMLIST;DEV=PP
and then press [ENTER]
If you then pressed [Print Data], the output would be sent to the device
PP.
If you wanted to send the output to a disk file, you could enter:
:FILE FORMLIST;DEV=DISC;SAVE
If you then pressed [Print Data], the output would be stored on disk
under the file name FORMLIST.
Chapter 4
55
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Output Configuration File Screen
Display Tree
If you press the [Display Tree] key, NMMGR will display the tree
structure of the configuration file at your terminal. Figure 4-3 shows a
section of a listing obtained by pressing [Display Tree] at the Output
Configuration File screen.
The tree structure shows the identifiers for each screen that contains
configured data but does not show any of the actual data that is
configured. The level of each screen (how far down it is in the tree
structure) is printed on the left, in square brackets. The listing shows
the names of the screens and items configured, indented according to
their level in the tree structure.
This listing is useful for finding out which identifiers are already
configured in a file. You can also refer to it for guidance in direct path
branching.
To generate a printout of the actual data screens, use the [Print Data] or
the [Print Summary] key to print just a listing of all the data. Both are
described later in this chapter.
56
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Output Configuration File Screen
Figure 4-3
Display Tree Listing
NM Configuration Manager 32022-20016 V.uu.ff (C) Hewlett Packard Co. 1990
MON, APR 9, 1990, 3:48 PM
CONFIGURATION FILE NAME: NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
[1]
[2]
[2]
[1]
.
.
.
[1]
[2]
[2]
[1]
.
.
.
[1]
[2]
[2]
[1]
[1]
[1]
[1]
[1]
[1]
[2]
[3]
[3]
[2]
[3]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[5]
[5]
[4]
[5]
.
LINK
DTSLINK
LANLINK
LOGGING
SNADS
CLUSTER
MAPPER
LOGGING
SNADS
CLUSTER
MAPPER
SNANODE
IMF
DHCF
APPC
NODENAME
NETXPORT
GPROT
PXP
TCP
NI
LOOP
LANNI
PROTOCOL
IP
PROBE
ARP
LINK
LANLINK
Print Tree
The [Print Tree] key generates a printed listing of the tree structure as
displayed by the [Display Tree] key (Figure 4-3). By default, output is
sent to the device LP. You can redirect the output by using a file
equation for the formal file designator FORMLIST.
Print Data
The [Print Data] key generates a printed copy of the data screens
associated with the configuration file. By default, output is sent to the
device LP. You can redirect the output by using a file equation for the
formal file designator FORMLIST.
You can select the data screens you want to list by entering one or more
selections in the print data subsystem selection fields on the Output
Chapter 4
57
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Output Configuration File Screen
Configuration File screen. These are four data entry fields that allow
you to enter a number corresponding to the configurable subsystems, as
listed on the screen (see Figure 4-2).
For example, to obtain a printed listing of the configured screens for
both logging and for NETXPORT configuration, enter a 2 (for logging) in
one of the fields and a 3 (for NETXPORT) in another of the fields. If these
are the only screens you want printed, leave the other two fields blank.
When you have made your selections, press the [Print Data] key.
If you want all screens to print, enter a 0 in one of the selection fields
(the default).
Figure 4-4 is an example of a data screen as printed by the [Print Data]
key. Because data has been entered for this screen in the configuration
file, the actual data is shown and the data flag is set to Y. If no data had
been entered, the printout would show the default values and the data
flag would be set to N.
Figure 4-4
Print Data Output Example
NM Configuration Manager 32098-20016 B.07.00 (C) Hewlett Packard Co. 1992
WED, MAR 28, 2001, 11:20 PM CONFIGURATION FILE NAME: NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
Subsystems: [1] LINK
NMMGR/3000 (V.uu.ff) #306 100BaseT Link Configuration Data: Y Command:
Path: LINK.BTLINK
Physical path of device adapter [0/0/0/0 ]
Use factory-configured local station address? [Y] (Y/N) Local station address
[FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF] (Hex)
When auto-negotiation is enabled, the system can only properly configure the link if
the hub also auto-negotiates. Use auto-negotiation to determine link settings? [Y]
(Y/N) If ‘N’: Link speed [100 ] (100 or 10 MBits/sec) Full Duplex mode [N] (Y/N;
N=Half)
Trace at startup? [N] (Y/N) Note : Trace reduces Trace filename [ ] performance.
File: NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
Save Help Prior Data Screen
Print Summary
The [Print Summary] key allows you to print all the configuration data
for the chosen subsystem on the Output Configuration File menu. This
is a listing of information that is contained in your configuration file. By
default, output is sent to the device LP. You can redirect the output by
using a file equation for the formal file designator FORMLIST.
To print a critical summary, choose the number corresponding to the
subsystem for which you want the report. Enter the number in the field
58
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Output Configuration File Screen
to the right of “Print Summary” and press the [Print Summary] key. (The
numbers for the subsystems are the same as those that you would use
to select subsystems for the [Print Data] key.)
The example shown in Figure 4-5 is the first part of a critical summary
for a full-gateway node that has been configured with a point-to-point
(router) network interface (NI) and a LAN NI.
Figure 4-5
Sample Page of Critical Summary Report
NM Configuration Manager 32098-20016 V.uu.ff (C) Hewlett Packard Co. 1990
CRITICAL SUMMARY - NETXPORT CONFIGURATION
TUE, APR 10, 1990, 11:07 AM
CONFIGURATION FILE NAME: NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
NODE NAME: FLAGSTAFF.ROUTE66.USA
TRANSPORT GLOBAL CONFIGURATION:
name Search Method: 1. Probe
2. Probe Proxy
3. Network Directory
Maximum Directly Connected Nodes: 1024
Maximum Outbound Destinations:
360
Maximum Inbound Destinations:
360
PACKET EXCHANGE PROTOCOL (PXP) CONFIGURATION:
Retransmission Interval (Secs):
10
Maximum Retransmissions Per Request: 4
TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL (TCP) CONFIGURATION:
Maximum Numbre of Connections:
Retransmission Interval Upper Bound (Secs):
Retransmission Interval Lower Bound (Secs):
Initial Retransmission Interval:
Maximum Number of Retransmissions:
Connection Assurance Interval:
Maximum Connection Assurance Retransmissions:
.
.
.
128
180
4
5
4
600
4
Print Subtree
The [Print Subtree] key allows you to print the NMMGR data screens for
a specified subtree. By default, output is sent to the device LP. You can
redirect the output by using a file equation for the formal file designator
FORMLIST.
To define the subset of screens that you want to print, enter the path
name of the topmost screen of the subtree you are selecting in the field
provided under “Print Subtree.” Press the [Print Subtree] key.
Chapter 4
59
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Compress Screen
Compress Screen
The Compress screen shown in Figure 4-6 allows you to compress or
expand the configuration file. To perform these functions, you must be
the creator of the file. (You can also use the COMPRESSCONF maintenance
mode command to perform these functions. See Chapter 5 , “Using
NMMGR in Maintenance Mode,” for more information on maintenance
mode commands.)
You reach this screen by pressing the [Go To Compress] key at the
Utility screen.
Figure 4-6
Compress Screen
60
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Compress Screen
Description
As your configuration grows, you may find it necessary to compress or
expand your configuration file.
Configuration files initially contain 2,048 32-byte records. As you
configure items in a file, records are used sequentially from the
beginning of the file. As the file size increases, the number of free
records at the end of the file decreases.
If you delete items from a configuration file, the records are not
immediately recovered, so the middle of your file may contain some
unused records. Unused records in the middle of the file are not
reflected in the number of free records count and are not available for
reuse. By compressing the file, you cause all data to be stored in a
contiguous block of records and all unused records to be located at the
end of the file. Thus, compressing a file enables you to determine the
actual number of free records in a file before adding or deleting records.
To compress a file, enter a 0 in the Number of Additional Records field
and press [Compress File]
You can also use this function to add records to the file or to delete
unused records from the file. To do so, enter a number in the Number of
Additional Records field. A positive number causes records to be added
(up to the file size limit of 65,535 records). A negative number causes
that number of free records to be deleted from the file. After you have
entered the number of records to be added or deleted, press the
[Compress File] key.
When you press [Compress File], NMMGR begins compressing the file
immediately. The terminal is locked to indicate that NMMGR is not
available until finished. When the compression is completed, NMMGR
prints the following message in the message field:
Configuration file compressed.
NOTE
Compress time depends on the number of entries in the file. For a file
that contains a small amount of data, compression usually takes fewer
than 30 seconds. However, compressing a file that contains a lot of data
can take several minutes.
Fields
Current File Size
(Display only.) Size of the file, in 32-byte records.
Number of Free Records
(Display only.) Number of free records at the end of the
configuration file.
Chapter 4
61
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Compress Screen
Number of Additional Records
Enter the number of records that you want to add to the
file (positive integer) or the number of unused records
that you want to delete from the file (negative integer).
To simply compress the file, enter 0 (zero). If you are
adding records, the file cannot end up containing more
than 65,535 records.
62
Default:
0
Range:
-32768 to 32767
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Validate Configuration File Screen
Validate Configuration File Screen
The Validate Configuration File screen shown in Figure 4-7 allows you
to test the validity of a specified subsystem configuration. (The
VALIDATECONF maintenance mode command can be used to perform
this function. See Chapter 5 , “Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode,”
for more information on the maintenance mode commands.)
This screen can be reached by pressing the [Go To VALIDATE] key at the
Utility screen.
Figure 4-7
Validate Configuration File Screen
The purpose of the validation process is to ensure that your
configuration data is syntactically and logically correct before you
activate the node.
NOTE
The distributed terminal subsystem (DTS) cannot be brought up and
configured unless validation is complete. The link configuration must
be complete before you attempt to validate the network transport
configuration. This is because the network transport validation process
uses link configuration data.
To begin validation for a subsystem, press the function key that
corresponds to the subsystem you wish to validate. For example, to
validate your NS network transport configuration, press the
[Validate NETXPORT] function key. After checking various aspects of your
Chapter 4
63
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Validate Configuration File Screen
configuration, the validation process creates a listing of error messages
to help you pinpoint invalid items. One possible message, for instance,
states that a phone number has not been configured for a dial-type link
in your NS configuration.
When you press one of the validation function keys, you enter character
mode. Any validation error messages are listed at your terminal. If you
want the error message listing to be sent to a device in addition to your
terminal, enter a Y in the box next to “Output to line printer or
FORMLIST in addition to terminal” on the Validate Configuration File
screen. You can have the listing sent to disk or a printer by setting a file
equation or you can have it routed to the default device, which is
$STDLIST.
After viewing the validation messages, if any, press [RETURN] to return
to the Validate Configuration File screen. The message in the message
line of the screen tells you if the validation process completed and, if so,
whether the configuration is valid. You must see the following message
to be sure that your configuration file is valid:
Validation completed; configuration of the selected subsystem
is valid.
When validated, the contents of the configuration are automatically
copied to the backup file specified on the open screen.
If a message other than the one above appears, refer to the MPE/iX
Error Messages Manual (for DTS errors) or to the manual that contains
error messages for the subsystem you are configuring or the
Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers and Other Serial Devices
Manual for DTS errors. If you encounter errors that you cannot resolve,
notify your HP representative.
64
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
The Configuration Subtree Copy screen in Figure 4-8 allows you to copy
specified parts of a configuration subtree into either the same
configuration file or a different configuration file. This feature can save
you a lot of time when you are configuring multiple nodes or
subsystems in the same way. Note that the source or target file can be
on a remote node in the network. (You can also use the COPYCONF
maintenance mode command to perform this function. See Chapter 5 ,
“Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode,” for more information on the
maintenance mode commands.)
This screen can be reached by pressing the [Go To COPY SUB] key at the
Utility screen.
Figure 4-8
Validate Configuration File Screen
Chapter 4
65
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
Description
Use the Configuration Subtree Copy screen to copy a contiguous set of
screens called a subtree from one configuration file to another or within
the same configuration file. To copy a subtree, enter the name of the
source file and path and the destination file and path in the fields
provided and press the [Subtree Copy] key.
The source file is the name of the file that the data will be copied from.
If you are copying a subtree from the current configuration file to
another location within the same file, you can leave both the Source file
and the Destination file fields blank.
The source path specifies the path name of the topmost screen in the
subtree that you want to copy. All screens below the top screen will be
copied.
The destination file is the name of the file that data will be copied to.
This can be the same file that you are copying from, which provides a
convenient way to configure two links that are very similar. After
configuring the first link, you can simply copy all the screens in the
link’s configuration and modify the new link configuration as needed.
The destination path specifies the point in the destination file below
which the copied screens will be added.
Fields
Source file
This field contains the name of the file that
configuration data will be copied from. If left blank, the
current configuration file is assumed.
If the file is on a remote node, you must use a file
equation and prefix the file name with an asterisk (*).
You may use an MPE command from the command
window to set a file equation without having to leave
NMMGR.
Source path
(Required field.) The source path contains the path
name associated with the topmost screen in the subtree
being copied. The field is composed of eight NMMGR
path identifier slots. Enter one path identifier in each
slot, leaving blanks at the end of each identifier. Leave
any unused identifier slots empty. For example, the
source path “NETXPORT.NI.LAN1.INTERNET” would be
entered as:
NETXPORT.NI
.
.
66
.LAN1
.INTERNET.
.
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
Destination file
This field contains the name of the file the
configuration data will be copied to. If this field is left
blank, the current configuration file is assumed.
If the file is on a remote node, you must use a file
equation and prefix the file name with an asterisk (*).
Destination path
Like the source path, the destination path is composed
of eight path identifiers. You need to enter only those
identifiers that are different from the source path. To
copy data from the source file to the identical location
in the destination file, leave this field blank. If, for
example, you wish to change the fifth path identifier,
then the fifth slot in the destination path should
contain data. Only those parts of the path name that
were designated by the user can differ among
corresponding identifiers in the source and destination
paths. User-selected types must match. For example, if
the source file includes a direct connect link, the
corresponding identifier in the destination path must
also be a direct connect link.
Overwrite existing subtree
(Required field.) This field indicates whether or not
existing data in the destination configuration file is to
be overwritten when the copy is performed. A Y will
purge all the existing data in the destination subtree
and insert the data from the source subtree; an N will
not allow the copy to continue if data exists where the
destination subtree starts. The default is N.
In this example, a subtree copy is being performed from node A to
node B. Since the copy is being made to a remote node, the user must
make a DSLINE connection to node B and set up a file equation to
represent node B’s configuration file. This is done by entering the
commands shown below:
Example
:REMOTE HELLO MGR.PUB.SYS;DSLINE=B
:FILE CONFIG=NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS;B,OLD
The source file and path on node A are entered into the source file and
Source path fields. They appear here:
Source file:
[NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS]
Source path:
.
.
NETXPORT.NI
.LAN1
.INTERNET.
.
The diagram in Figure 4-9 shows the subtree specified by this path.
Chapter 4
67
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
Figure 4-9
Specified Subtree
SOURCE: before and after copy (node A)
NETXPORT
NI
LAN1
LINK
INTERNET
LINKABC
GATE 1
GATE 2
For this copy, the destination file and path were specified as:
Destination file:
Destination path:
.
.
[*CONFIG
.
]
.LAN2
.
<~> .
.
The diagram in Figure 4-10 illustrates the results of the copy.
68
Chapter 4
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
Figure 4-10
Results of Copy
SOURCE: before copy (node B)
SOURCE: after copy (node B)
NETXPORT
NETXPORT
NI
NI
LAN1
LAN1
LINK
INTERNET
LINKABC
LINK
INTERNET
LINKABC
GATE 1
NOTE
GATE 2
When subtrees contain several records, copies that occur over DSLINE
connections will take considerably longer than copies between two local
configuration files. It is several times faster to DSCOPY the configuration
file to the destination node, then perform the subtree copy between two
local configuration files.
Chapter 4
69
Using NMMGR Utility Screens
Configuration Subtree Copy Screen
70
Chapter 4
5
Using NMMGR in Maintenance
Mode
This chapter tells you how to use NMMGR’s maintenance mode
interface to manage network directory and configuration files. It allows
you to also generate stream jobs to update remote network directory
and configuration files. It includes descriptions of the following:
• Entering NMMGR maintenance mode from the screen mode
interface or from a batch job.
• Each of the maintenance mode commands, including:
— The purpose and syntax of the command.
— A description of each of the command’s parameters.
— An example of using the command.
71
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
Using Maintenance Mode
Using Maintenance Mode
NMMGR’s maintenance mode is a character mode interface used to
manage both network directory and configuration files. It can be used
interactively, from within the screen mode interface, or as a set of
commands entered via a batch job.
Maintenance mode can generate a job stream to sequentially update
directories on a list of NS nodes. This feature saves you from manually
changing the network directory files of every node on a network when
you make a configuration change. You define the list of nodes to be
updated by this automated process. Additionally, the process provides
logging information and is recoverable.
Maintenance mode commands are read from the formal file designator
NMMGRCMD, which defaults to $STDINX. You can redirect the input to
come from a standard ASCII file by using a file equation for NMMGRCMD.
Entering Maintenance Mode from Screen Mode
You can access maintenance mode from within screen mode, execute
one or more maintenance mode commands, and return to screen mode.
There are two methods you can use to enter the maintenance interface
from screen mode. The two methods are as follows:
• Enter the screen mode command NM[MGRCMD] in the command
window of any screen and press [ENTER].
• Press the [Maint Mode] function key from the Network Directory
Main screen.
When you use either method, a screen appears with the maintenance
mode prompt:
NMMGR>
When you enter maintenance mode from screen mode the interface is
interactive. You can enter any appropriate maintenance mode
commands at the prompt. In some cases, a command will prompt you
for additional input which you can enter by typing a response to the
new command prompt. When each command has completed execution,
you will be returned to the maintenance mode prompt shown above.
When you are finished entering maintenance mode commands, type
EXIT at the prompt to leave the maintenance mode interface and return
to screen mode.
Running Maintenance Mode from a Batch Job
You can also access maintenance mode directly from a batch job by
running NMMGR from a stream job or by running NMMGR with a file
72
Chapter 5
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
Using Maintenance Mode
equation for the formal designator NMMGRCMD set to a command file. An
example of such an equation is:
:FILE NMMGRCMD=CMDFILE
Command input is echoed to $STDLIST if you are running NMMGR
from within a stream job or when the input is read from a command
file.
You can run NMMGR in the maintenance mode interactively. Enter the
file equation NMMGRCMD= $STDINX. You will get the banner for NMMGR
and the prompt: MMGR>
You can create a command file using any editor that is capable of
generating straight ASCII output. Blank command lines may be
entered freely.
Updating Remote Directories
You can use the maintenance mode MAKESTREAM command to generate a
stream job that, when executed, logs on to a list of selected nodes and
executes the set of commands contained in a command file. In this way,
you can update the network directory of every node in a network
without having to manually log on to every node and run NMMGR.
Two files must be generated before using the MAKESTREAM command.
One is a list of node names of the nodes to be updated, the other is a list
of commands to be executed. Both can be generated with any ASCII
text editor.
As NMMGR logs onto each node named in the node list and applies the
commands contained in the command file, the success or failure status
of each nodal update is recorded in the node list file, along with the date
and time of the event. The node list “control” file may be used again to
retry updates of failed nodes, after the source of the failure has been
determined and corrected.
In order for NMMGR maintenance mode to log onto each remote node,
the local node’s network directory must contain an entry for the node
whose directory you wish to update. Without an entry, it is not possible
to log on to the remote node because there is no connection information
for the node. For this reason, the MAKESTREAM process is generally used
for updating directories on existing nodes rather than to create a
directory on a new node. However, it is possible to use these commands
to create a new directory. To accomplish this, the node manager of the
new node would have to verbally notify you of the node’s existence. You
then would have to enter the new node’s connection information into
your network directory. Once this information is entered into your
directory, you will be able to log on to the new node and merge your
entire directory to create a version of this directory on the new node.
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Maintenance Mode Commands
Maintenance Mode Commands
Table 5-1 lists the NMMGR maintenance mode commands and the
actions they perform. Each of these commands is described in detail
later in this chapter.
Table 5-1
NMMGR Maintenance Mode Commands
Command
Action
:MPECommand
Executes MPECommand. MPECommand must be a
programmatically executable MPE command.
ADDCONF
Adds subtree of empty records to the configuration file.
ADDLDEV
Adds LDEVs to a DTC card.
ADDLU
Adds LUs to the SNA node transport screen.
ADDNODE
Adds or updates a node in the current network directory.
ADDVC
Adds a virtual circuit address key to the network
directory and to the configuration file.
CARDCONF
Sets the current DTC card number for the
READALLCONF, READCONF, UPDATECONF, and
WRITECONF commands.
COMPRESSCONF
Compresses or expands the current configuration file.
CONTINUE
Prevents NMMGR from terminating in a job because of a
maintenance mode error
COPYCONF
Copies a configuration subtree.
DELETECONF
Deletes a subtree from the current configuration file.
DELETENODE
Deletes an entry from the network directory.
EXIT
Exits from maintenance mode.
EXITVALIDATE
Validates a subsystem’s configuration, if needed, when
exiting from NMMGR.
EXITWARN
Warns the user that a subsystem needs to be validated
before exiting NMMGR.
EXPANDDIR
Increases the capacity of a network directory file.
HELP
Calls up the help function.
LISTDIR
Lists the contents of a network directory.
LISTLDEV
Lists LDEVs for a DTC card in a format compatible with
ADDLDEV.
LISTLU
Lists LUs in a format compatible with ADDLU.
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Maintenance Mode Commands
Table 5-1
NMMGR Maintenance Mode Commands
Command
Action
MAKESTREAM
Creates a job stream used to perform network directory
or configuration file updates on remote nodes.
MERGEDIR
Merges entries from another network directory or
configuration file into the current network directory.
NICONF
Sets up paths to add or update NETXPORT NI
configurations.
OPENCONF
Opens a nodal configuration file and makes it the current
configuration file.
OPENDIR
Opens a network directory file and makes it the current
directory.
PAGECONF
Sets the page number for multipage data screens.
PASSWORD
Sets the password. Validates the NETXPORT subsystem
configuration. Changes the password to allow write
access on the OPEN screen.
PATHCONF
Sets the current path in the current configuration file.
PURGECONF
Deletes the subtrees of records from the configuration
file.
PURGELDEV
Purges LDEVs from the DTC card.
PURGELU
Purges LUs from the SNA node transport screen
PURGENI
Purges a network interface from the configuration file
and performs cleanup.
PURGEVC
Deletes a virtual circuit address key from the network
directory and the configuration file.
READALLCONF
Reads all data from the current configuration record.
READCONF
Reads selected data from the current configuration
record.
SUMMARYCONF
Prints a report for one or more communications
subsystems.
UPDATECONF
Updates the current path in the configuration file.
VALIDATECONF
Validates subsystem configuration.
VERSIONCONF
Checks whether the specified version number matches
NMMGR’s current version number.
WRITECONF
Writes data to individual fields of the current path in the
configuration file.
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Maintenance Mode Commands
NOTE
Subsystem break ([CTRL]Y) may be used to interrupt the operation of
the COPYCONF, DELETENODE, HELP, LISTDIR, MAKESTREAM and MERGEDIR
commands. The EXPANDDIR command cannot be interrupted.
The VERSIONCONF command must be used before the PATHCONF
command, which must be used before the READCONF, READALLCONF,
WRITECONF, and UPDATECONF commands to define the current path.
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ADDCONF
ADDCONF
Adds subtree of empty records to the configuration file.
Syntax
ADDCONF pathname [type]
Parameters
pathname
The name of a path in the configuration file that
describes the location of the desired subtree. It is
composed of one to eight path identifiers separated by
periods. The format for the pathname is:
pathid.pathid.pathid...
The last pathid specified must not exist in the
configuration file. The second to last pathid must exist.
type
Description
A one to eight character path type identifier. This
identifier must match one of the selections on the “type
select” screen for the “pathname”. For example, the
type “LAN” is a valid choice for the path
“NETXPORT.NI.MYLAN”.
ADDCONF is used to add a tree of empty records to the configuration file.
It is used in conjunction with PATHCONF, WRITECONF, and UPDATECONF to
create and update configuration records. ADDCONF functions exactly like
the ADD function key on screens (like the NETXPORT.NI screen) which
allow you to select or create a configuration subtree, then take you to
the top screen for that subtree. Note that ADDCONF sets the current
record to the root node (named by the supplied pathname) of the tree it
creates. A PATHCONF command to modify this record immediately after
the ADDCONF is not required.
See also READCONF, READALLCONF, PURGECONF, VERSIONCONF,
WRITECONF, and UPDATECONF.
Example
NMMGR> ADDCONF netxport.ni.newname lan
NMMGR> WRITECONF outbuf,256
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
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ADDLDEV
ADDLDEV
Adds LDEVs to a DTC card.
Syntax
{dtcname}
ADDLDEV
{dtc-nodename}
[filename]
{station-address}
Parameters
dtcname
The NMMGR nametag for the DTC
being accessed. The nametag is the last
name in the pathname of the DTC. For
example, the dtcname is DTC01 in the
pathname DTS.DTC.SELECT.DTC01.
The dtcname in a one to eight character
alphanumeric string.
dtc-nodename
The nodename of the DTC that has
been configured at the DTC nametag
path. The name must conform to the
NODENAME.ORGANIZATION.DOMAIN
format. The name is a five to fifty
character alphanumeric string.
station-address
The hexadecimal station of the DTC
being accessed.
filename
A text file that contains the LDEVs to
be added or purged. The file name’s
format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified.
The contents of the file must be
formatted as described here.
Description
This command adds LDEVs to the cards in the DTC’s configuration.
The first DTC found that matches the selection criteria will be operated
on. For example, this could occur if more than one DTC is configured
with the same station-address.
LDEVs for one of more cards can be entered on each invocation of this
command. If the filename is not specified you will be prompted with the
ADDLDEV> prompt. The format for each entry depends on the card type.
The formats for these card types are as follows:
• For direct connect or modem cards:
LDEV[,] cardno[,] portno[,] profilename[,]
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ADDLDEV
• For X.25 PAD cards:
LDEV[,] cardno[,] profilename[,] device-name[,] x25address[,] [CUG] [;]
All text following the number sign “#” will be interpreted as a comment.
For X.25 cards the LDEV will be added to the first available line on the
first available page of LDEVs shown on the PAD screen mode.
See also LISTLDEV and PURGELDEV.
Example
NMMGR> ADDLDEV dtc01.ind.hp
Enter LDEVs;
For M or D type cards: ldev#, card#, port#, profile#;
For x type cards: ldev#, card#, profile, device, address [, CUG];
ADDLDEV> 100, 1, 1, tr10d96;
#jack’s terminal
ADDLDEV> 101, 1, 2, tr10d96;
#jill’s terminal
ADDLDEV> 102, 1, 3, tr10d96
#building 43U,R6
ADDLDEV> 201, 2, tr10d96, pad1, 123456789012301
#building 41U,A7
NMMGR>
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ADDLU
ADDLU
Adds LUs to the SNA node transport screen.
Syntax
ADDLU SNAnodename [filename]
Parameters
SNAnodename A one to eight character alphanumeric name that
identifies the SNA node to be modified.
filename
A text file that contains the LU name and number for
each LU to be added to the configuration file. The file
name’s format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
If the filename is not specified you will be prompted with the ADDLU>
prompt. The format for each interactive or filename is:
LUName [,] [[LUNumber]] [;]
The LUName is a one to eight character alphanumeric name that must
be unique for the SNA node.
The LUNumber must be a number from 1–256 as defined on the SNA
node screen. The LUNumber must be left blank if the SNA node is a type
2.1 node. If specified, the LUNumber must be unique.
See also LISTLU and PURGELU.
Example
NMMGR> ADDLU SNAnode1
Enter LU names (luname [, lunumber]:)
ADDLU> lu1,1;
ADDLU> lu2,2;
ADDLU> lu3,3;
ADDLU> lu4,4;
ADDLU>
NMMGR>
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ADDNODE
ADDNODE
Adds or updates a node in the current network directory.
Syntax
ADDNODE [filename]
Parameters
filename
The name of a text file that contains node name and
address information for each node to be added or
updated in the network directory. The format for the
file name is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described here.
Description
ADDNODE adds or updates nodes in the network directory. New nodes
are automatically created when they are entered. New path reports (IP
address/additional address pairs) can be added to new or existing
nodes. Path reports on existing nodes can be modified.
The directory file must be opened either via the Open
Configuration/Directory File screen or via the OPENDIR maintenance
mode command before ADDNODE can be used.
This command can be run interactively, by entering maintenance mode
from screen mode and typing the command, or it can be run from a
batch job.
When the command is run interactively and no filename is specified,
you are prompted to enter parameters for each node. When the
command is run interactively and a filename is specified, or when the
command is run from a job, parameters for each node name entry are
formatted as follows:
nodename[,] “IP address”[,] [additional address type[,][additional address]]
[;]
The description of each parameter that must be defined when the
command is run from a job or with a filename specified is as follows:
nodename
The name of a node to be added or updated with new
path report data. The format is:
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
If the nodename does not exist, it will be created. If it
does exist, the IP address and additional address (if
any) will be added to its path report list in the directory.
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ADDNODE
IP address
The IP address of the remote node. A node may have
several IP addresses, one for each path report. The
format of the address is the same as the IP address in
the Network Directory Data screen. It must be enclosed
in quotes (“ ”) if it is not entered interactively.
additional address type
The numerical type associated with each type of
additional address on the Network Directory Data
screen. If there is no additional address associated with
the node you are adding, enter a 1 (the default). If there
is an additional address, enter the number
corresponding to the type of the address. The types are
as follows:
1
No additional address (default, IP
address only)
2
LAN/IEEE802.3
3
X.25
4
NS/SNA
5
LAN/ETHERNET
additional address
The additional address, if any, to be associated with the
IP address specified for the node name. If the address is
of type LAN/IEEE802.3 or LAN/ETHERNET, then the
additional address is an IEEE802.3 or ETHERNET
address with the format xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx, where x
is a hexadecimal digit (0–9, or A–F). If the address type
is X.25, then an X.25 address key name must be
specified here.
Example
To interactively add a path report for the node named
NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG (user input is italicized):
NMMGR> OPENDIR NSDIR.NET.SYS
NMMGR> ADDNODE
Enter node name (or press return to exit):
ADDNODE> NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG
Enter IP address:
ADDNODE> C 192.000.001 002
Enter additional address type,
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ADDNODE
(1-IP, 2-LAN/IEEE802.3, 3-X.25, 4-NS/SNA, 5-LAN/ETHERNET,
(default is 1):
ADDNODE> 2
Enter additional address:
ADDNODE> 11-22-33-44-55-66
NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG saved.
Enter node name (or press return to exit):
ADDNODE> [RETURN]
NMMGR>
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ADDVC
ADDVC
Adds an X.25 virtual circuit address key to the network directory and to
the configuration file.
Syntax
ADDVC [filename]
Parameters
filename
The name of a text file that contains X.25 address
information for each remote node to be added to the
configuration file and directory. The format for the file
name is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
ADDVC updates both the local network directory and the configuration
file with X.25 address information. It uses the address key specified for
the network directory to relate the remote node name to an IP address,
local NI name, and an X.25 address.
The directory and configuration files must be opened either via the
Open Configuration/Directory File screen or via the OPENDIR and
OPENCONF maintenance mode command before ADDVC is invoked.
This command can be run interactively, by entering maintenance mode
from screen mode and typing the command, or it can be run from a
batch job.
When ADDVC is used interactively and no filename is specified, the user
is prompted to enter address parameters for each remote node. When
ADDVC is run interactively and a filename is specified, or when the
command is run from a job, each entry is defined as a set of positional
parameters delimited by spaces or a comma. An unspecified parameter
must be delimited by a comma, or by a semicolon if it occurs at the end
of the entry.
For switched virtual circuits, the format is:
nodename[,] “IP address”[,] address key[,] NI name[,] Y[,] svc address[,]
[facility set][,] [security class][;]
For permanent virtual circuits, the format is:
nodename[,] “IP address”[,] address key[,] NI name[,] N[,] circuit number[;]
The description of each parameter that must be defined when the
command is run from a job or with a filename specified is as follows:
nodename
84
The name of a node to which the address key is to be
added. The format is:
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ADDVC
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
If the nodename does not exist, it will be created. If it
does exist, the IP address and additional address (if
any) will be added to its path report list in the directory.
IP address
The IP address of the remote node whose X.25 address
is to be added to the configuration. The format of the
address is the same as the IP address in the Network
Directory Data screen. It must be enclosed in quotes
(“ ”) if it is not entered interactively.
address key The name tag used to relate a node name and IP
address from the network directory, with a switched or
permanent virtual circuit address, configured under an
X.25 NI in the local configuration file. The name may
contain a maximum of eight alphanumeric characters.
NI name
The name of the local X.25 NI. The name may contain a
maximum of eight alphanumeric characters.
Y or N
A Y or an N must be entered after the NI name
parameter to indicated whether the virtual circuit
being added is a switched virtual circuit (Y) or a
permanent virtual circuit (N).
svc address The address associated with an X.25 node. The address
can be a maximum of 15 digits and is supplied with the
network subscription or assigned by the network
administrator.
facility set
The name of the facility set to be used when the
switched virtual circuit connection is created with the
remote node. The name may contain a maximum of
eight alphanumeric characters. The default is
STDSFSET, which is supplied when the NI is created
using NS guided configuration.
security class
The security class to be associated with switched
virtual circuit connections established with the remote
node. The choices are:
Chapter 5
IO
Initiate outbound and accept inbound
connections.
IN
Accept inbound connections only.
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ADDVC
OU
Initiate outbound connections only.
LK
Do not permit inbound or outbound
connections (placeholder entry).
circuit number
The permanent virtual circuit number supplied with
your network subscription or assigned by your network
administrator.
Example
To interactively add a switched virtual circuit for the node named
NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG to the NI named X25 (user input is italicized):
NMMGR> OPENCONF NMCONFIG
NMMGR> OPENDIR NSDIR.NET.SYS
NMMGR> ADDVC
Enter node name (or press return to exit):
ADDVC> NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG
Enter IP address:
ADDVC> C 192.000.001 001
Enter address key:
ADDVC> NODE1
Enter NI name:
ADDVC> X25
Is the X.25 address a switch VC (Y/N)?
ADDVC> Y
Enter X.25 address:
ADDVC> 123456789O12345
Enter facility set name (press return for STDSFSET):
ADDVC> [RETURN]
Enter security class (IO,IN,OU,LK):
ADDVC> IO
Address key NODE1 added.
Enter node name (or press return to exit):
ADDVC> [RETURN]
NMMGR>
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CARDCONF
CARDCONF
Sets the current DTC card number so that the correct card is displayed
or updated by the READALLCONF, READCONF, UPDATECONF, and
WRITECONF commands.
Syntax
CARDCONF cardno
Parameters
cardno
Description
CARDCONF sets the current card number for a path referencing a DTC
card screen. If the current path identifies a DTC configuration, the
commands READALLCONF, READCONF, UPDATECONF, and WRITECONF
operate on data associated with a specific card in the DTC, as identified
by the CARDCONF command.
A number corresponding to the slot number of the DTC
that contains the DTC card to be acted on. The number
must be between 0 and 5.
The CARDCONF command must be specified before a PATHCONF command
for a DTC card screen.
Example
NMMGR> CARDCONF 1
(Sets the current DTC card number to 1.)
NMMGR> PATHCONF DTS.DTCPC.SELECT.DTC01.CARD012
(Sets the current path to the data screen that contains data for cards 0,
1, and 2 of DTC01.)
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COMPRESSCONF
COMPRESSCONF
Compresses or expands the current configuration file.
Syntax
COMPRESSCONF numrecs
Parameters
numrecs
Description
COMPRESSCONF increases or decreases the capacity of the currently
opened configuration file and regains unused but not “free” records.
(You can also compress a configuration file and alter the file’s capacity
using the NMMGR Compress screen in screen mode.)
Example
NMMGR> COMPRESSCONF 500
The number of additional records to be added to or
subtracted from the configuration file. A positive value
causes records to be added and a negative value causes
records to be subtracted. The value must be from
-32768 to 32767. A zero will remove unused records
(compress them down to 0 bytes).
(Increases the current configuration file by 500 records.)
NMMGR> COMPRESSCONF -500
(Decreases the current configuration file by 500 records.)
NMMGR> COMPRESSCONF 0
(Compresses the current configuration without affecting its size.)
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CONTINUE
CONTINUE
Prevents NMMGR from terminating in a job because of a maintenance
mode error.
Syntax
CONTINUE [ON or OFF]
Parameters
ON
Turn on continue so the NMMGR will not terminate for
the rest of this job if a maintenance mode command
returns a bad status.
OFF
Turn off continue mode.
Description
Stops NMMGR from terminating abnormally in a job because a single
maintenance mode command terminated with an error. If no
parameters are provided, the CONTINUE will be in effect for the next
command only.
Example
NMMGR> ADDCONFnetxport.ni.newname lan
NMMGR> WRITECONF outbuf,256
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
NMMGR> CONTINUE
NMMGR> PURGECONF netxport.ni.oldname
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COPYCONF
COPYCONF
Copies a configuration subtree.
Syntax
COPYCONF srcpath[:srcfile][,[destpath][:destfile]] [;KEEP][;NOVERS]
Parameters
srcpath
The name of a configuration path in the source file that
describes the location of the subtree to copy (source
path). It is composed of one to eight path identifiers
separated by periods:
pathid.pathid.pathid...
srcfile
The name of an NMMGR configuration file (NCONF
file) that contains the subtree to be copied (source file).
The format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. A file equation
may be employed through explicit use of the
back-reference:
*DESIGNATOR
destpath
The name of the path that describes where the subtree
is to be placed in the destination file (destination path),
in the same format as srcpath. Select and type-select
path identifiers may be changed from the
corresponding identifier in srcpath as long as the new
identifier is type-compatible. If this parameter is not
specified, the destination path is assumed to be the
same as the path specified in srcpath.
destfile
The name of an NMMGR configuration file that is to
receive the copied data (destination file). The format is
the same as srcfile. This file name may be the same
as that specified in srcfile, which allows you to copy
data from one location within a file to another location
in the same file. If this parameter is not specified, the
destination file is assumed to be the same as the source
file.
KEEP
Designates that if the destpath already exists in
destfile, the operation will not be performed. The
default (when KEEP is not specified) is to replace the
destination subtree with the source path.
NOVERS
Designates that no version check will be performed on
the source or destination paths. The default is to
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COPYCONF
perform version checks.
Description
COPYCONF allows data to be copied from one configuration file into
another file, or into the same file in a different location. Source and
destination paths are used to direct where a subtree is to come from
and where it is to be copied to. (You can also copy a configuration
subtree using the NMMGR Configuration Subtree Copy screen in
screen mode.)
Example
To copy data from one file into another file using the same path (the
command must be entered in one line):
NMMGR> COPYCONF NETXPORT.NI.LAN1.INTERNET:FILEA,NETXPORT.NI.LAN1.INTERNET;FILEB
To copy data to a different path in the same file:
NMMGR> COPYCONF LINKCONF.LINK1:FILEA, LINKCONF.LINK2:FILEA
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DELETECONF
DELETECONF
Deletes a subtree from the current configuration file.
Syntax
DELETECONF path
Parameters
path
The name of a configuration path in the configuration
file that describes the location of the subtree to delete.
It is composed of one to eight path identifiers separated
by periods, as follows:
pathid.pathid.pathid...
The last identifier in the path must be a select or type
select identifier.
Description
DELETECONF deletes the subtree of the specified path. All
configuration records in the subtrees below the specified path are
deleted. The configuration record identified by the specified path is also
deleted.
Example
To delete all configuration records in the NETXPORT.NI.LAN subtree:
NMMGR> DELETECONF NETXPORT.NI.LAN
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DELETENODE
DELETENODE
Deletes an entry from the network directory.
Syntax
DELETENODE [nodename] [;LOCAL]
[;GLOBAL]
Parameters
nodename
The name of a node to delete from the directory in the
format:
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
If omitted, then all entries of the selected class in the
directory will be deleted.
LOCAL
Designates that only local entries in the directory are to
be deleted.
GLOBAL
Designates that only global entries in the directory are
to be deleted. This is the default class if neither
keyword is specified.
Description
DELETENODE deletes a single entry or all entries from the currently
opened network directory. If you issue this command from a session,
and do not specify nodename, then you are prompted with a delete
confirmation message and a yes/no response is solicited to verify that
you really want to delete all entries from the directory.
Example
To delete a single node entry:
NMMGR> DELETENODE NODE2.XLNET.ACCTG ;LOCAL
To delete all global entries from a directory:
NMMGR> [RETURN]
Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
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EXIT
EXIT
Exits from maintenance mode.
Syntax
EXIT
Parameters
None.
Description
If you are running maintenance mode interactively, type EXIT at the
NMMGR> prompt to return to screen mode. If you are running
maintenance mode from a job, EXIT terminates the job.
Example
NMMGR> EXIT
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EXITVALIDATE
EXITVALIDATE
Validates a subsystem’s configuration, if needed, upon exit from
NMMGR.
Syntax
EXITVALIDATE subsystem
Parameters
subsystem
Description
[ON or OFF]
The name of a configuration subsystem that is to be
validated. Currently NETXPORT, DTS, or IBM is
allowed.
ON
This is the default and need not be
specified. It indicates that exit
validation is to be enabled for the
specified subsystem.
OFF
Indicates that exit validation is to be
disabled for the specified subsystem.
Automatically validates the selected configuration (if needed) when you
attempt to exit NMMGR. NMMGR will note that validation is needed
whenever a configuration is changed without being validated. Output is
directed to the formal designator FORMLIST, which defaults to
$STDLIST.
If the configuration is not valid NMMGR will return you back to screen
mode instead of exiting. If you want to exit, use the EXIT command or
press the [EXIT] function key (on the OPEN screen) again.
By default, exit validation is enabled for the DTS subsystem.
Example
NMMGR> EXITVALIDATE DTS
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EXITWARN
EXITWARN
Warns that a subsystem needs to be validated before exiting NMMGR.
Syntax
EXITWARN subsystem
Parameters
subsystem
Description
[ON or OFF]
The name of a configuration subsystem to which
messages will be issued. Currently NETXPORT, DTS,
or IBM is allowed.
ON
This is the default and need not be
specified. It indicates that an exit
message is to be enabled for the
specified subsystem.
OFF
Indicates that an exit message is to be
disabled for the specified subsystem.
Automatically warns you that validation needs to be performed for the
selected subsystem(s) when you attempt to exit NMMGR. NMMGR will
note that validation is needed whenever a configuration is changed
without being validated. Output is directed to the formal designator
FORMLIST, which defaults to $STDLIST.
If the configuration is not validated, NMMGR will return you back to
screen mode instead of exiting. If you want to exit, use the EXIT
command or press the [EXIT] function key (on the OPEN screen) again.
By default, exit warning is enabled for the all subsystems.
Example
NMMGR> EXITWARN DTS
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EXPANDDIR
EXPANDDIR
Increases the capacity of a network directory file.
Syntax
EXPANDDIR numrecs
Parameters
numrecs
Description
EXPANDDIR increases the capacity of the currently opened directory
file to allow additional entries to be added. Each entry in the directory
requires one record, plus one for each network address referenced in
the entry.
NOTE
You can use the EXPANDDIR command only if you have exclusive access
to the network directory. Therefore, the network transport must be shut
down. In addition, to enter this command you must be logged onto the
same account where the directory file resides.
Example
To increase the current directory file by 500 records:
The number of additional records to be added to the
directory. The value must be from 0 through 32767.
NMMGR> EXPANDDIR 500
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HELP
HELP
Calls up the help function.
Syntax
HELP [keyword]
Parameters
keyword
The NMMGR topic about which you are seeking help
information. Help is available on the following topics:
COMMANDS
A list of the commands available.
MAINT
General help on the maintenance mode
interface.
OVERVIEW
Overview of NMMGR operation.
ROADMAP
A map of NMMGR screens.
INDEX
An index of configuration parameters
ALL
All NMMGR help topics.
Description
If you are running maintenance mode interactively, type HELP to enter
the NMMGR help mode. If you entered a keyword, you will be
presented with the help information for that keyword. If you did not
enter a keyword, you will be presented with the list of available help
topics and allowed to select a topic. You can browse through the topics
until you terminate help mode by typing end, exit, or :.
Example
To get an overview of NMMGR operation:
NMMGR> HELP OVERVIEW
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LISTLDEV
LISTLDEV
Lists LDEVs for a DTC card in a format compatible with ADDLDEV.
Syntax
(dtcname)
LISTLDEV
(dtc-nodename)
[filename]
(station-address)
Parameters
dtcname
The NMMGR nametag for the DTC being accessed. The
nametag is the last name in the pathname of the DTC.
For example, the dtcname is DTC01 in the pathname
DTS.DTC.SELECT.DTC01. The dtcname in a one to eight
character alphanumeric string.
dtc-nodename The nodename of the DTC that has been configured at
the DTC nametag path. The name must conform to the
NODENAME.ORGANIZATION.DOMAIN format. The name is
a five to fifty character alphanumeric string.
station-address The hexadecimal station of the DTC being
accessed.
filename
A text file that contains the LDEVs to be listed. The file
name’s format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
If the filename parameter is specified, the file is created and opened. If
the file exists, its contents are purged before it is opened. When the
filename is supplied, the file is updated with a list of all the LDEVs
configured for the selected DTC in a format compatible with ADDLDEV. If
the filename parameter is not supplied, the LDEVs are printed on the
$STDLIST.
See also ADDLDEV and PURGELDEV.
Example
NMMGR> LISTLDEV dtc01.ind.hp
LISTLDEV> 100, 1, 1, tr10d96;
LISTLDEV> 101, 1, 2, tr10d96;
LISTLDEV> 102, 1, 3, tr10d96;
LISTLDEV> 201, 2, tr10d96, pad1, 123456789012301
NMMGR>
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LISTDIR
LISTDIR
Lists the contents of a network directory.
Syntax
LISTDIR [nodename]
Parameters
nodename
The name of a node to display from the directory in the
format:
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
If omitted, then all entries in the directory will be
listed.
When both global and local entries exist with the same
name, both will be listed.
Description
LISTDIR displays zero or more entries in the current network directory.
A summary of information about the directory file itself is listed first,
followed by individual entry listings sorted alphabetically by node
name within entry class. Local entries precede global entries.
The summary includes the name of the network directory file, the date
and time of last modification, the number of records available and used,
and the directory’s capacity shown as a percentage.
For each entry listed, the node name and classification is shown
(LOCAL entries are followed by “(L)”). Next is a list of one to eight
network addresses associated with the entry. For each network address,
the type, additional address, and transport services (TCP, TCP
Checksum setting, PXP) are shown where applicable.
The list file is directed to the formal designator FORMLIST, which
defaults to $STDLIST.
Example
NMMGR> LISTDIR
GLOBAL NETWORK DIRECTORY INFORMATION
100
Directory File:
NSDIR.PUB.SYS
Modification Date:
FRI, APR 20, 1990, 10:04 AM
Modification Node:
CECIL.DCL.IND
Records Used:
9
Records Available:
991
Capacity:
1% full
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LISTDIR
Node Name
IP Address
POGO.DCL.IND (L)
C 194.107.213 017 IP X
NONE
ASTRO.MKTG.IND
C 194.107.213 009 IP
NONE
X
X
VENUS.FIN.IND
C 194.107.213 017 IP
NONE
X
X X
B 145.140 062.193 IP/IEEE802.3 F1-B3-58-73-A3-09
X
X X
C 194.107.213 086 IP
X
X
ZIGGY.LAB.IND
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Net Type
Additional Addr
NONE
T
C
P
C P
H X
X P
X
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LISTLU
LISTLU
Lists LUs in a format compatible with ADDLU.
Syntax
LISTLU SNAnodename [filename]
Parameters
SNAnodename A one to eight character alphanumeric name that
identifies the SNA node to be listed.
filename
A text file that contains the LU name and number for
each LU to be read from the configuration file. The file
name’s format is:
filename[.groupname[accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
If the filename parameter is specified, the file is created and opened. If
the file exists, its contents are purged before it is opened. If the filename
is not specified the data will be printed to the $STDLIST.
See also ADDLU and PURGELU.
Example
NMMGR> LISTLU SNAnode1
LISTLU> lu1,1;
LISTLU> lu2,2;
LISTLU> lu3,3;
LISTLU> lu4,4;
LISTLU>
NMMGR>
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MAKESTREAM
MAKESTREAM
Creates a job stream that can then be used to perform network
directory or configuration file updates on remote nodes.
Syntax
MAKESTREAM streamfile, nodefile, commandfile
Parameters
streamfile
The name of a file to be created that will contain the job
stream commands. The format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
The file must not already exist. The default allocation
of 5000 variable length records may be overridden
through a file equation.
nodefile
The name of the file that contains a list of nodes to be
updated. The format is the same as that for
streamfile. This file may be generated by redirecting
the output of the LISTDIR command into a file, which
may then be submitted directly to MAKESTREAM or edited
with a text editor such as TDP/3000. All node name
entries must begin with an alphabetic character.
commandfile The name of a file that contains NMMGR maintenance
mode commands. The format is the same as that for
streamfile. The commands in this file are applied to
each node listed in nodefile.
Description
MAKESTREAM generates a text file of job stream commands suitable
for updating a group of nodes. The job stream is created based on a list
of nodenames contained in the nodefile supplied. The nodefile acts
as a control file. The update status of each node is recorded for review in
the event of update failures such as transport problems or a network
being inaccessible.
The standard logon is NETADMIN.SYS,PUB. Progress messages are sent
to OPERATOR.SYS. These and other parts of the job stream may be
customized using a text editor once the stream file is created. The
commands executed on each node in the nodefile are taken from
commandfile. Commands may be any NMMGR maintenance mode
commands and are executed on the remote side of the connection
established for each node being updated.
Only lines that begin with an alphabetic character in column one of the
nodefile are considered node name entries.
Example
nodefile NLIST contains the following:
ASTRO.MKT.IND
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MAKESTREAM
POGO.DCL.IND
commandfile CMDS contains the following:
OPENDIR NSDIR.PUB.SYS
:FILE SRCDIR=NSDIR.PUB.SYS:$BACK
MERGEDIR *SRCDIR;NOKEEP
LISTDIR
EXIT
To generate and run a job stream, use the following commands:
NMMGR> MAKESTREAM SFILE, NLIST, CMDS
Generating job statements for node ASTRO.MKT.IND
Generating job statements for node POGO.DCL.IND
NMMGR> :STREAM SFILE
#J1072
After job completion, file NLIST contains the following:
104
ASTRO.MKT.IND
UPDATED
04/20/90 11:09 AM
POGO.DCL.IND
UPDATED
04/20/90 11:14 AM
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MERGEDIR
MERGEDIR
Merges entries from another network directory or configuration file into
the current network directory.
Syntax
{otherdir
MERGEDIR {configfile
[,nodename]} [;LOCAL] [;KEEP
}
[;NOKEEP
]
]
[;GLOBAL][;TIMESTAMP ]
Parameters
otherdir
The name of another network directory file to merge
one or more entries from. The format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified.
nodename
The name of a single node entry to merge when the
source file is a network directory. This parameter may
not be specified if the source is a configuration file. The
format is:
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
configfile
The name of an NMMGR configuration file (NCONF file)
from which a single entry is to be extracted. The format
of this filename is the same as that for otherdir.
LOCAL
When the source file is a network directory, LOCAL
indicates that only those entries classified as “local”
will be merged into the current directory.
When the source is a configuration file, LOCAL specifies
that the extracted entry will be classified as “local” in
the current directory.
GLOBAL
When the source file is a network directory, GLOBAL
indicates that only those entries classified as “global”
will be merged into the current directory.
When the source is a configuration file, GLOBAL specifies
that the extracted entry will be classified as “global” in
the current directory.
GLOBAL is the default classification when neither LOCAL
nor GLOBAL is specified.
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MERGEDIR
KEEP
Indicates that entries in the current directory are to be
retained when duplicate entries exist in the source
directory.
This keyword is not applicable when the source is a
configuration file.
NOKEEP
Indicates that entries in the current directory are to be
overwritten with duplicate entries found in the source
directory.
This keyword is not applicable when the source is a
configuration file.
TIMESTAMP
Indicates that duplicate entries found in both
directories are to be compared, and the one that was
created most recently will be stored in the current
directory.
This is the default action taken when neither KEEP,
NOKEEP, nor TIMESTAMP is specified.
This keyword is not applicable when the source is a
configuration file.
Description
MERGEDIR takes entries from either another network directory or an
NMMGR configuration file and merges them into the current directory.
Entries that do not exist in the current directory are unconditionally
added to the current directory. Duplicate entries are handled differently
depending upon the source file type. If the source file is a network
directory, then duplicate entries are either ignored or replaced in the
current directory depending on the KEEP, NOKEEP, or TIMESTAMP
keyword used. If the source file is an NMMGR configuration file, then
the duplicate entry is replaced in the current directory.
Example
To merge an entry from the system configuration file and store it as a
local entry, enter the following command:
NMMGR> MERGEDIR NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS ;LOCAL
To merge all global entries from another network directory, overwriting
any duplicates in the current directory, enter the following command:
NMMGR> MERGEDIR RMOTEDIR ;NOKEEP
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NICONF
NICONF
Sets up paths to add or update NETXPORT NI configurations.
Syntax
NICONF niname [nitype]
Parameters
niname
A one to eight alphanumeric character name that
identifies the network interface to be added or modified.
nitype
The type of the network interface to be added. Valid
types are: LAN, TOKEN, X25, SNA, GATEHALF, or ROUTER.
Description
NICONF is used in place of the PATHCONF command to set up internal
data structures in NMMGR. Subsequent WRITECONF, READCONF,
READALLCONF, and UPDATECONF commands will access the configuration
file in a similar way to the guided configuration screen corresponding to
the NI type for the NI name.
Example
NMMGR> NICONF lanni
NMMGR> WRITECONF ipaddress, “C 192.001.001.001”
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
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OPENCONF
OPENCONF
Opens a nodal configuration file and makes it the current configuration
file.
Syntax
OPENCONF fileref
Parameters
fileref
The name of a configuration file to access in the format:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified.
Description
OPENCONF closes any previously opened configuration file and opens
the file named in fileref for shared, read/write access. If the
configuration file does not exist, then a new file is created and opened.
Example
NMMGR> OPENCONF NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
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OPENDIR
OPENDIR
Opens a network directory file and makes it the current directory.
Syntax
OPENDIR fileref
Parameters
fileref
The name of a network directory file to access in the
format:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified.
Description
OPENDIR closes any previously opened directory and opens the
directory file named in fileref for shared, read/write access. If the
directory file does not exist, than a new directory is created and opened.
Example
NMMGR> OPENDIR NSDIR.PUB.SYS
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PAGECONF
PAGECONF
Sets the page number for multipage data screens.
Syntax
PAGECONF pageno
Parameters
pageno
Description
PAGECONF sets the current page number for a path referencing a
multipaged data screen. A multipaged data screen is used to store lists
of data that cannot be entered on a single screen. If the current path
identifies a multipaged data screen, the commands READCONF,
READALLCONF, WRITECONF, and UPDATECONF operate on data in the
current page, as set by the PAGECONF command. Otherwise, the page
number is ignored.
A positive integer identifying the page number to be
accessed when the screen being accessed is a multipage
data screen.
The current page number is set to 1 when maintenance mode is
entered.
The PAGECONF command may be specified before or after a PATHCONF
command for a multipaged data screen.
Example
NMMGR> PAGECONF 9
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PASSWORD
PASSWORD
Changes the password to allow write access on the OPEN screen.
Validates the NETXPORT subsystem configuration.
Syntax
PASSWORD [password]
Parameters
password
Description
The password you supply on the OPEN screen is compared with the
password string supplied here (or the default if no password command
has been issued). If the user password does not match, you are only
permitted to access the network directory or configuration file in
BROWSE MODE.
Example
NMMGR> PASSWORD guess
Chapter 5
This sets a password. You must supply a maximum 16
alphanumeric character string on the OPEN screen to
gain write access. When no password is supplied, the
default is the null string. If a password is set up before
the configuration file, you will need to enter the
password at the open screen or you won’t be able to
create (write to) the configuration file.
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PATHCONF
PATHCONF
Sets the current path in the current configuration file.
Syntax
PATHCONF[=]path
Parameters
path
The name of a path in the configuration file that
describes the location of the desired record. It is
composed of one to eight path identifiers separated by
periods:
pathid.pathid.pathid...
The last identifier in the path must be a data identifier
(must refer to a data screen).
Description
PATHCONF sets the current path in the configuration file; that is, it
points to the specified configuration record. The current data in the
current path is operated on by the READCONF, READALLCONF, WRITECONF,
and UPDATECONF commands. You must call the VERSIONCONF command
before using this command. The VERSIONCONF command needs to be
called only once in a session.
Example
To set the current path in the configuration file to NETXPORT.NI.niname
where niname=LANNI:
NMMGR> PATHCONF NETXPORT.NI.LANNI
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PURGECONF
PURGECONF
Deletes subtrees of records from the configuration file.
Syntax
PURGECONF [pathname]
Parameters
pathname
The name of a path in the configuration file that
describes the location of the desired subtree. It is
composed of one to eight path identifiers separated by
periods. The format for the pathname is:
pathid.pathid.pathid...
The last pathid specified must not exist in the
configuration file. The second to last pathid must exist.
Description
PURGECONF purges records from the configuration file. It functions in
the same way as the DELETE function key on screens (like the
NETXPORT.NI screen) that require you to delete, rename, add, or modify
a configuration subtree. Note that the subtree will be purged whether
or not it contains data.
See also ADDCONF, READCONF, READALLCONF, VERSIONCONF, WRITECONF,
and UPDATECONF.
Example
NMMGR> ADDCONF netxport.ni.newname lan
NMMGR> WRITECONF outbuf,256
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
NMMGR> PURGECONF netxport.ni.oldname
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PURGELDEV
PURGELDEV
Purges LDEVs from a DTC card.
Syntax
{dtcname}
PURGELDEV
{dtc-nodename}
[filename]
{station-address}
Parameters
dtcname
The NMMGR nametag for the DTC being accessed. The
nametag is the last name in the pathname of the DTC.
For example, the dtcname is DTC01 in the pathname
DTS.DTC.SELECT.DTC01. The dtcname in a one to eight
character alphanumeric string.
dtc-nodename The nodename of the DTC that has been configured at
the DTC nametag path. The name must conform to the
NODENAME.ORGANIZATION.DOMAIN format. The name is
a five to fifty character alphanumeric string.
station-address The hexadecimal station of the DTC being
accessed.
filename
A text file that contains the LDEVs to be added or
purged. The file name’s format is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
This command purges the selected LDEVs from the cards in the DTC’s
configuration. The first DTC found that matches the selection criteria
will be operated on. For example, this could occur if more that one DTC
is configured with the same station-address.
LDEVs for one of more cards can be entered on each invocation of this
command. If you don’t specify a filename you will be prompted with the
ADDLDEV> prompt. The format or each entry depends on the card type.
The format for each entry is:
LDEV[,] cardno[,] [# my comment ]
All text following the options number sign “#” will be interpreted as a
comment.
See also ADDLDEV and LISTLDEV.
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PURGELDEV
Example
NMMGR> PURGELDEV dtc01.ind.hp
Enter LDEVs; (ldev, cardno)
PURGELDEV> 100, 1,;
PURGELDEV> 101, 1;
PURGELDEV> 102, 1;
PURGELDEV> 201, 2,
NMMGR>
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PURGELU
PURGELU
Purges LUs from the SNA node transport screen.
Syntax
PURGELU SNAnodename [filename]
Parameters
SNAnodename A one to eight character alphanumeric name that
identifies the SNA node to be purged.
filename
A text file that contains the LU names to be purged
from the configuration file. The file name’s format is:
filename[.groupname[accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described here.
Description
If the filename is not specified you will be prompted with the PURGELU>
prompt. The format for each interactive or filename is:
LUName [;]
The SNA node name must be a one to eight character alphanumeric
name. It identifies the SNA node to be purged. If SNA node name is not
specified the current (last used) name will be used. If no current name
exists then the first name configured will be selected.
The LUName is a one to eight character alphanumeric name that must
be unique for the SNA node.
See also ADDLU and LISTLU.
Example
NMMGR> PURGELU SNAnode1
Enter LU names (luname [;]):
PURGELU> lu1;
PURGELU> lu2;
PURGELU> lu3;
PURGELU>
NMMGR>
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PURGENI
PURGENI
Purges a network interface from the configuration file and performs
cleanup.
Syntax
PURGENI [niname]
Parameters
niname
Description
Purges a network interface from the configuration file and purges all
the links it refers to from under the LINK path.
Example
NMMGR> PURGENI lanni
Chapter 5
A one to eight character alphanumeric name that
identifies the network interface to be purged.
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PURGEVC
PURGEVC
Purges an X.25 virtual circuit address key from the network directory
and the configuration file.
Syntax
PURGEVC [filename]
Parameters
filename
The name of a text file that contains X.25 address
information for each remote node to be deleted from the
configuration file and directory. The format for the file
name is:
filename[.groupname[.accountname]]
A file lockword may not be specified. The contents of the
file must be formatted as described below.
Description
PURGEVC removes an address key from both the local network directory
and the configuration file. If there are multiple occurrences of the same
address key under a single NI, all occurrences are purged. The
directory node associated with the address key to be purged will be
purged itself if it contains no other addresses.
The directory and configuration files must be opened either via the
Open Configuration/Directory File screen or via the OPENDIR and
OPENCONF maintenance mode command before ADDVC is invoked.
PURGEVC can be run interactively, by entering maintenance mode from
screen mode and typing the command, or it can be run from a batch job.
When PURGEVC is used interactively and no filename is specified, the
user is prompted to enter address parameters for each remote node.
When PURGEVC is run interactively and a filename is specified, or when
the command is run from a job, entries must be made in the following
format:
nodename[,] address key[,] NI name [;]
The description of each address key parameter is as follows:
nodename
The name of a node for which the address key is to be
purged. The format is:
nodename.domain.organization
Each of the three names may be from one to sixteen
characters long, must begin with a letter, and may
contain letters, digits, underscores, or dashes.
address key The name tag used to relate a node name and IP
address from the network directory with a switched or
permanent virtual circuit address configured under an
X.25 NI in the local configuration file. The name may
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PURGEVC
contain a maximum of eight alphanumeric characters.
NI name
Example
The network interface name. The name of the local
X.25 NI, (configured under the path NETXPORT.NI). The
name may contain a maximum of eight alphanumeric
characters.
To purge a virtual circuit associated with the NI named X25 for the
node named NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG:
NMMGR> OPENCONF NMCONFIG
NMMGR> OPENDIR NSDIR.NET.SYS
NMMGR> PURGEVC
Enter the node name (or press return to exit):
PURGEVC> NODE1.XLNET.ACCTG
Enter address key:
PURGEVC> NODE1
Enter NI name:
PURGEVC> X25
Address key NODE1 deleted.
Enter node name (or press return to exit):
NMMGR>
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READALLCONF
READALLCONF
Reads all data from the current configuration record.
Syntax
READALLCONF [;FORMAT]
Parameters
FORMAT
Description
READALLCONF reads and displays all the fields in the configuration
record identified by the current path. If the current path is associated
with a multipaged data screen, then all the pages of data associated
with the screen are displayed, unless PAGECONF was used to set the
current page.
Designates output formatting. Output is formatted in a
WRITECONF format so that it can be re-entered into
NMMGR’s maintenance mode. If the format option is
omitted, data will be formatted with one field per line
when writing to a file.
Output is directed to the file defined in the file equation FORMLIST. If
FORMLIST is not defined, output is sent to $STDLIST.
You must enter the CARDCONF, then the PATHCONF command before
using the READALLCONF command. This defines the pathname of the
record from which the data will be read. If you want READALLCONF to
display the data written in the previous WRITECONF commands, you
must first enter the UPDATECONF command.
If you are referencing a DTC card screen, you must use the CARDCONF
command to set the current card number before issuing the
READALLCONF command.
Example
To display all the fields in the NETXPORT.NI.GLOBAL screen:
NMMGR> PATHCONF NETXPORT.GLOBAL
(Sets the path to the screen.)
NMMGR> READALLCONF
Displays all the fields in the screen.)
NMMGR> PATHCONF NETXPORT.GLOBAL
(Sets the path to the screen.)
NMMGR> READALLCONF;FORMAT
(Displays all the fields in the screen.)
PATHCONF NETXPORT.GLOBAL
WRITECONF
WRITECONF
120
HOMENET,
F,
“NETNAME”
“2”
Chapter 5
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
READALLCONF
WRITECONF
G,
“3”
WRITECONF
H,
“1”
WRITECONF
INBUF,
“256”
UPDATECONF
NMMGR
Chapter 5
121
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
READCONF
READCONF
Reads selected data from the current configuration record.
Syntax
READCONF fieldname [;FORMAT]
Parameters
fieldname
The field name associated with the current path.
Use READALLCONF;FORMAT to find the fieldnames in the
current path.
FORMAT
Description
Designates output formatting. Output is formatted in a
WRITECONF format so that it can be re-entered into
NMMGR’s maintenance mode. If the format option is
omitted, data will be formatted with one field per line
when writing to a file.
READCONF reads and displays the selected field in the configuration
record identified by the current path. If the current path is associated
with a multipaged data screen, then the displayed value is from the
current page set by PAGECONF.
You must enter the CARDCONF, then the PATHCONF command before
using the READCONF command. This defines the pathname of the record
from which the data will be read. If you want READCONF to display the
data written in the previous WRITECONF commands, you must first enter
the UPDATECONF command.
If you are referencing a DTC card screen, you must use the CARDCONF
command to set the current card number before issuing the READCONF
command.
Output is directed to the file defined in the file equation FORMLIST. If
FORMLIST is not defined, output is sent to $STDLIST.
CAUTION
The output should first be sent to a file, then the entire file should be
printed. Otherwise, if output is sent directly to a printer, each READCONF
command will generate a separate spool file, resulting in only one field
printed per page.
Example
To display the first field in the NETXPORT.NI.GLOBAL screen:
NMMGR> PATHCONF NETXPORT.GLOBAL
(Sets the path to the screen.)
NMMGR> READCONF HOMENET;FORMAT
(Reads and displays the named field.)
WRITECONF
nmmgr
122
homenet,
“netname”
Chapter 5
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
SUMMARYCONF
SUMMARYCONF
Prints a summary report for one or more communications subsystems.
Syntax
SUMMARYCONF subsystem[, subsystem[, ...]]
Parameters
subsystem
Description
SUMMARYCONF displays a summary report for a particular
subsystem. This command is identical to the Print Summary function
in the NMMGR Output Configuration screen.
The name of the subsystem(s) for which the report will
be generated. If more than one subsystem is entered, a
report will be printed for each subsystem in the order
given. If ALL is entered, a report will be printed for
every subsystem. Valid entries are ALL, DTS, NETXPORT,
SNANODE, NRJE, IMF, DHCF, APPC, and RJE.
Output is directed to the file defined in the file equation FORMLIST. If
FORMLIST is not defined, output is sent to $STDLIST.
When you use SUMMARYCONF to print a summary report for the
distributed terminal subsystem (DTS), you can also specify a summary
option to designate additional items in the DTS subsystem you wish to
have reported. You do so in one of two ways. The first way is to enter the
option on the same line as the command. For example:
SUMMARYCONF DTS,LINK
will cause a report to be generated for the DTS link configuration. You
can use this method regardless of whether you entered maintenance
mode from screen mode you are running a job to generate output.
You can use the second way to specify a summary option for the DTS
subsystem only if you have entered maintenance mode from screen
mode. This method is to enter SUMMARYCONF DTS at the NMMGR
maintenance mode prompt, with no option specified. A new prompt will
appear, as follows:
DTS Summary>
You can enter the DTS print option at this prompt. If you do not want to
generate any additional DTS reports, enter E[XIT] at the prompt. You
will be returned to the maintenance mode prompt.
The following DTS print summary options are available:
ALL
Displays all DTS configuration information.
DTC [dtcname]
Displays the configuration for all DTCs or for the DTC
whose name is specified in dtcname.
Chapter 5
123
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
SUMMARYCONF
DTS
Displays the DTS subsystem configuration parameters.
E[XIT]
Leaves DTS Summary and returns you to the
maintenance mode prompt.
HELP
Displays the available DTS summary options.
LDEV [ldev[/ldev]]
Displays the configuration for all ldevs (logical devices),
a single ldev, or a range of ldevs.
LINK
Displays the link configuration for the DTS.
PORT [dtcname [card [port]]]
Displays the configuration for all configured ports, all
ports on a specified DTC, all ports on a specified DTC
and card, or for a specific DTC, card, and port.
PROFILE [profile]
Displays the configuration for all profiles or for a
specified profile.
X.25 Card [card#[,option]]
Displays the information about the Host-Based X.25
Card configuration.
OPTIONS:
Example
-LEVEL12
Display the level 1 and 2 configuration.
-LEVEL14
Display the level 3 configuration miscellaneous
configuration data.
-PAD
Display the Nailed PAD data.
-SEC
Display the PAD security data.
-SYS
Display the System to System configuration data.
To display the summary report for NETXPORT:
NMMGR> SUMMARYCONF NETXPORT
To display the summary report for profiles defined in the DTS
subsystem:
NMMGR> SUMMARYCONF DTS,PROFILE
Or:
NMMGR> SUMMARYCONF DTS
DTS Summary> PROFILE
124
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UPDATECONF
UPDATECONF
Updates the current path in the configuration file.
Syntax
UPDATECONF
Parameters
No parameters.
Description
UPDATECONF updates the current page of data for the current path
in the configuration file. Data entered via previous WRITECONF
commands is checked for VPLUS field edit errors. If all fields are correct,
the data is stored.
The CARDCONF then the PATHCONF command must be issued before
UPDATECONF to define the current path.
If you are referencing a DTC card screen, you must use the CARDCONF
command to set the current card number before issuing the
UPDATECONF command.
Example
NMMGR> OPENCONF NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
(Opens the configuration file.)
NMMGR> VERSIONCONF OVERRIDE
(Checks the version number of NMMGR.)
NMMGR> PATHCONF NETXPORT.NODE.NAME
(Sets the path to the screen.)
NMMGR> WRITECONF 1, MY.LOCL.NODE
(Enters the data into the field.)
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
(Updates the configuration file.)
Chapter 5
125
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
VALIDATECONF
VALIDATECONF
Validates subsystem configuration.
Syntax
VALIDATECONF subsystem
Parameters
subsystem
The name of a configuration subsystem to be validated.
Valid subsystem names are:
NETXPORT
DTS/LINK
HP-IBM
Description
Validates the subsystem configuration. Output is directed to the formal
designator FORMLIST, which defaults to $STDLIST.
Example
To validate the NETXPORT subsystem configuration:
NMMGR> VALIDATECONF NETXPORT
126
Chapter 5
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
VERSIONCONF
VERSIONCONF
Checks whether the specified version number matches NMMGR’s
current version number.
Syntax
VERSIONCONF version
Parameters
version
Description
VERSIONCONF matches the specified version number with the
current number for NMMGR. NMMGR’s version number is displayed in
the banner line on the first line of the screen and when NMMGR is
started. This command is required only if the user is also planning to
issue a PATHCONF command. However, VERSIONCONF must be issued
prior to PATHCONF.
Example
NMMGR> VERSIONCONF B.04.07
Chapter 5
The NMMGR version number that you are checking
against the current version of NMMGR. The version
string may be enclosed in double quotes (“ ”). The value
“OVERRIDE” matches any version of NMMGR.
127
Using NMMGR in Maintenance Mode
WRITECONF
WRITECONF
Writes data to individual fields of the current path in the configuration
file.
Syntax
WRITECONF fieldname, data
Parameters
fieldname
The field name associated with the current path.
data
The data to be written to the field. If the data contains
embedded blanks, it must be enclosed in double quotes
(“ ”).
Description
WRITECONF writes data to an internal buffer that initially contains
the data associated with the current page of the current path in the
configuration file. The file is updated when the UPDATECONF command is
performed.
The CARDCONF command (used to set the current card values) must be
specified before a PATHCONF command for any DTC card screen.
Once these commands are specified, the WRITECONF and UPDATECONF
commands can be performed.
Example
To update the value of field 1 for the current path:
NMMGR> OPENCONF NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
(Opens the configuration file.)
NMMGR> VERSIONCONF V.uu.ff
(Checks the version number of NMMGR.)
NMMGR> PATHCONF NODENAME
(Sets the path to the screen.)
NMMGR> WRITECONF NODENAME, “MY.LOCAL.NODE”
(Enters the data into the field.)
NMMGR> UPDATECONF
(Updates the configuration file.)
128
Chapter 5
6
NMMAINT
This chapter describes the Node Management Services Maintenance
Utility (NMMAINT). NMMAINT is a utility (optional) program you can
use to display the individual and overall version numbers for the
software modules and network link products configured through the
node management services.
The following information is included in this chapter:
• An explanation of version numbers and how they work.
• How to run the NMMAINT utility.
• An example of the output provided by NMMAINT.
• An explanation of the features of the output provided by NMMAINT.
129
NMMAINT
Software Version ID Numbers
Software Version ID Numbers
Each data communications product consists of a variety of software
modules. Each software module has an individual version number.
The software modules of all HP data communications products use a
standard version stamp. This stamp has the format:
vuuffiii
where values represent the following:
v
The version number of the software. This corresponds
to a major revision or a version for a new or revised
system environment.
u
The update level of the software. This corresponds to a
significant revision in product functionality.
f
The fix level of the software. This corresponds to a new,
supported revision of the software.
i
The internal fix level of the software. This is for
differentiating special releases of software that do not
correspond to a normal release cycle. Under normal
circumstances, you do not need to concern yourself with
this field when you are determining the compatibility of
a product.
A subsystem is a grouping of software modules. The software modules
within each subsystem usually have a common or similar function.
Each software module within a subsystem has its own version ID
number. If the version, update, and fix levels of these modules do not
match, the subsystem will not work correctly. You can use NMMAINT
to determine if your software installation is valid. The information
provided by NMMAINT must be included in any service request
submitted to HP. Refer to the NS 3000/iX Error Message and Recovery
Manual or to the Node Manager’s Guide for any HP-IBM product for
information about submitting change requests (CRs).
130
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Getting Help
Getting Help
To get HELP on NMMAINT.
:NMMAINT;info=help
NMMAINT responds with the following:
NMS Maintenance Utility
32098-20014 v.uu.ff
TUE, JUL 25, 2006,
(C) Hewlett Packard Co. 1984
2:30 PM
- HELP
WARNING
The SHUTDOWN, RESTART, and other INFO of the NMMAINT
program are unsupported interfaces designed for use by
Hewlett Packard Support personnel only.
HP IS NOT LIABLE FOR DAMAGES RESULTING FROM
UNAUTHORIZED USE
:RUN NMMAINT [;PARM=n]
Print version id’s [subsys n].
:NMMAINT BUILDVERS [;PARM=n] Same, allows file equates.
or
:RUN NMMAINT;INFO='BUILDVERS';PAMR=n
:NMMAINT SHUTDOWN
NMMON sends shutdown requests.
or
:RUN NMMAINT;INFO='SHUTDOWN'
:NMMAINT RESTART
Send NMMON a restart request.
:NMMAINT RESTARTNOVERS
Same, but no NMS version check .
:NMMAINT CATSHUT; PARM=n Have NMCONSOL close msg catalog n.
:NMMAINT DEBUG
Call DEBUG at console.
:NMMAINT VERSION
Not used, for NMS version check.
:NMMAINT HELP
Print this display.
:NMMAINT,-1
For SUBSYSTEMID CHART.
Chapter 6
131
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
To run NMMAINT, enter the command:
:RUN NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
NMMAINT responds with the following:
NMS Maintenance Utility 32099-11018v.uu.ff (C) Hewlett Packard Co. 1984
NMMAINT then lists the version identification numbers for each
software module and information for each subsystem. As shown in the
example below, the NMMAINT utility displays version information for
the subsystems of the products actually installed on your system. The
node management services, link services, and network transport
subsystems are displayed if an NS 3000/iX link product is installed.
The Network Services subsystem is displayed if the NS 3000/iX services
product is installed. The SNA Transport, SNA NRJE, RJE, SNA DHCF,
APPC, HP SNADS, SNA/X.25, NS Over SNA, HP SNADS, and SNA IMF
subsystems are displayed if the appropriate HP-to-IBM data
communications products are installed on your system. PCI LAPB, PCI
SDLC, LINK COMMON, PCI 100BASE-T LINK subsystems are displayed if
appropriate PCI link products are installed on your system.
NMMAINT Output
This example of NMMAINT output shows a system with NS 3000/iX
services and an IEEE 802.3 link installed. (The IPCVERSION module is
port software. This is not part of the Network IPC user service, nor does
it form a subsystem, but its individual version ID number is displayed
by NMMAINT for your information.)
Notice that version ID numbers include version, update, fix levels, and
an internal fix level in the format vuuffiii. For NMVERS00, the version
ID number is B0011001. B is the version level, the next two digits 00
represent the update level, and the next two digits 11 are the fix level.
The remaining numbers, 001, show the internal fix level, which is used
only within Hewlett-Packard.
NOTE
The version numbers shown in this example are not intended to be the
same as the version numbers of your software.
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Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Example
:RUN
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
NMS Maintenance Utility 32098-20014B.00.08
(C) Hewlett Packard Co.
TUE, JUL 25, 2006, 2:30 PM
Datacom products build version: N.63.01
Subsystem version IDs:
Subsystem Number : 0
MPE/XL Node Management Services 32098-20014
module versions:
SL procedure:
NMVERS00
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMVERSCSL
Version:
B0010001
SL procedure:
NMVERS01
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMLOGSLVERS
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMLOGDATAVERS
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMVERS04
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMWRITEVERS
Version:
B0010000
NM program file: NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010001
CM program file: NMFILE.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
CM program file: NMTRCMON.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
NM program file: NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
NM program file: NMCONSOL.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
CM program file: NMINIT.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
CM program file: NMDUMP.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
Catalog file:
Version:
B0010000
NM program file: NMLOGICS.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
SUBSYS0FMTVERS
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
NMINTERVERS
Version:
B0010000
SL procedure:
BFM'MOD'54'VERS
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
BMGR_MOD_51_VERS
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
BMGR_MOD_52_VERS
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
BMGR_MOD_53_VERS
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
NMVERS30
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
NMVERS33
Version:
B0010000
NL procedure:
NMVERS34
Version:
B0010001
NMCAT.PUB.SYS
Chapter 6
133
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
NL procedure:
NMVERS32
Version:
MPE/XL Node Management Services 32098-20014
B0010000
overall version = B.00.10
Subsystem Number : 3
NS 3000/XL Transport 32098-20033
module versions:
NM program file: NETCP.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600001
Catalog file:
NMCAT3.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_CF_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_IPC_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_IPC_VERS2
Version:
B0600001
NL procedure:
NET_IPC_VERS3
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_IPC_VERS4
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
PIVERS
Version:
B0600001
NL procedure:
SIVERS
Version:
B0600001
Catalog file:
SOCKCAT.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
CM program file: SOCKREG.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NWTMVERS
Version:
B0600002
NL procedure:
TI_T1_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NM program file: PT2PNSTN.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
NM program file: SOCKINFO.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600001
CM program file: IPCINT.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
Catalog file:
NETMSG.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'UI'VERS
Version:
B0600004
SL procedure:
NET'SL'VERS
Version:
B0600001
NL procedure:
NET_NI_VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'PROBE'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_ARP_VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'DIAL'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NM program file: TCPSIP.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'STUB'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_TCP_VERS
Version:
B0600004
134
Chapter 6
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Running NMMAINT
NL procedure:
NET_UDP_VERS
Version:
B0600003
NL procedure:
NET_DICT_VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'PXP0'VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'PXP1'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_IP_VERS
Version:
B0600001
NL procedure:
NET_IPU_VERS
Version:
B0600002
SL procedure:
NET'IPU'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_X25_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
NM program file: X25STAT.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600001
CM program file: X25CHECK.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
CM program file: X25SERVR.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'PD'VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_PD_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_MAP_VERS
Version:
B0600001
NL procedure:
NET_GLBL_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_REG_VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
NET'REG'CM'VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
DCLDM_FMT_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
DCLDM_PS_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
DCLDM_CONF_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NSLOPENLINK_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
RLM_SERVER_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
NL procedure:
RLM_CONFIG_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
NL procedure:
RLM_LOAD_TABLE_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
SL procedure:
RLM_FMT_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
NET_FC_VERS
Version:
B0600001
SL procedure:
SOCKIOVERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
SOCKACCESSVERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
SOCKMISC1VERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
SUBSYS3FMTVERS
Version:
B0600000
SL procedure:
SUBSYS5FMTVERS
Version:
B0600000
NL procedure:
LEVEL2_RESOLVE_VERS
Version:
B0600000
NM program file: ICMPSERV.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600000
NM program file: NETTOOL.NET.SYS
Version:
B0600003
Chapter 6
135
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
NL procedure:
NETTMRVERS
NS 3000/XL Transport 32098-20033
Version:
B0600000
overall version = B.06.00
Subsystem Number : 6
Network Services individual module versions:
NM Program:
DSDAD.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300043
SL procedure:
ASCXVERS
Version:
B0300051
SL procedure:
ASBUFVERS
Version:
B0300014
SL procedure:
ASENVVERS
Version:
B0300050
SL procedure:
DSUTILVERS
Version:
B0300003
SL procedure:
SUBSYS6FMTVERS
Version:
B0300015
Catalog file:
ASCAT.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300027
SL procedure:
VTSRVTVER
Version:
B0300003
NL procedure:
VTS_LDMVER
Version:
B0300020
NL procedure:
VTS_UTILVER
Version:
B0300020
CM Program:
LOOPBACK.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300012
CM Program:
LOOPINIT.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300012
CM Program:
NSSTATUS.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300013
NL procedure:
NSSTATUSNMVERS
Version:
B0300014
NL procedure:
NSINFONMVERS
Version:
B0300017
CM Program:
CONFPROG.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300012
CM Program:
MASTMAKE.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300012
NL procedure:
VTS_SMVER
Version:
B0300020
NL procedure:
NSUTILNMVERS
Version:
B0300003
NL procedure:
ASCXNMVERS
Version:
B0300011
NL procedure:
ASENVNMVERS
Version:
B0300014
NM Program:
RASERVER.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300034
NM Program:
VTSERVER.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300022
CM Program:
DSSERVER.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300013
SL procedure:
ASRFAVERS
** MODULE ERROR **
SL procedure:
ASPTOPVERS
Version:
136
B0300015
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
CM Program:
NFT.NET.SYS
Version:
NL procedure:
NFTNMVERS
** MODULE ERROR **
Catalog file:
NFTCAT2.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300005
SL procedure:
ASRPMVERS
Version:
B0300038
NL procedure:
RPMNMVERS
Version:
B0300012
CM Program:
RPMDAD.NET.SYS
Version:
B0300002
NL procedure:
RFANMVERS
** MODULE ERROR **
Network Services overall subsystem version:
NS 3000/XL SERVICES:
B0300009
B.03.00
36920B
Subsystem Number : 18
MPE/XL Link Support Services 32098-20015 module versions:
NL procedure:
TRACE_INT_VERS
Version:
C0300000
NM program file: TRACEMGR.PUB.SYS
Version:
C0300000
NL procedure:
TVPGEN00VERS
Version:
C0300000
SL procedure:
SUBSYS18FMTVERS
Version:
C0300000
XL procedure:
LSSLINKCONTROLVERS
Version:
C0300000
XL procedure:
LSSLINKCONTROLVERS01
Version:
C0300000
NL procedure:
LSSLKTBLVERS
Version:
C0300000
SL procedure:
LSSVERS00
Version:
C0300000
NL procedure:
DCC_VERSION
Version:
C0300001
NL procedure:
DCC_VALID
Version:
C0300002
MPE/XL Link Support Services 32098-20015 overall version = C.03.00
Subsystem Number : 24
MPE XL Node Management Configurator 32098-20016
module versions:
SL procedure:
NMCVERS
Version:
B0601000
SL procedure:
NMVERS06
Version:
B0601000
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137
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Running NMMAINT
SL procedure:
NETDIRVERS
Version:
B0601000
NL procedure:
NMNETDIRVERS
Version:
B0601000
NM program file: NMMGR.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
CM program file: NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
CM program file: NMMGRVAL.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601000
CM program file: NMSIG.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601000
V+ forms file:
NMMGRF.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
Catalog file:
NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
Catalog file:
NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
NM conf file:
NMSAMP1.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601000
NM conf file:
NMAUX1.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601001
NM conf file:
NMNOVA.PUB.SYS
Version:
B0601000
MPE XL Node Management Configurator 32098-20016
overall version = B.06.
01
Subsystem Number : 25
HP LAN / Console Driver
32098-20028
module versions:
NL procedure:
LAN_CONSOLE_DRIVER_VER
Version:
A0060002
NL procedure:
LAN_8023_WRITE_VER
Version:
A0060001
NL procedure:
LAN_STATION_ADDR_VER
Version:
A0060001
NL procedure:
LAN_MC_VER
Version:
A0060001
NL procedure:
IEEE_MULTICAST_VER
Version:
A0060002
SL procedure:
IEEE'MCAST'CM'VER
Version:
A0060001
XL procedure:
SUBSYS_25_FMT_VER
Version:
A0060002
NL procedure:
LAN_LINKCONTROL_VER
Version:
A0060001
HP LAN / Console Driver
32098-20028
overall version = A.00.60
Subsystem Number : 26
DTC Code Download Files
138
module versions:
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Download:
DTCCNF02.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWA02.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWB02.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCNPS02.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWC04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWD04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWE04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWF04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCCNF04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWG04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWH04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWI04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWJ04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWK04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWL04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWM04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
Download:
DTCSWN04.PUB.SYS
Version:
A1440000
DTC Code Download Files
overall version = A.14.40
DTC ROM Code Files
module versions:
Download:
DTCROM72.DTS0000.TELESUP
Version:
A1400E00
Download:
DTCROM16.DTS0000.TELESUP
Version:
A1400E00
DTC ROM Code Files
overall version = A.14.00
MPE XL Terminal I/O 32022B
module versions:
NM program file: TERMDSM.DIAG.SYS
Version:
C0200000
CM program file: TTUTIL.PUB.SYS
Version:
C0200000
NL procedure:
TIO_ATSM_VER
Version:
C0200008
NL procedure:
TIO_APSM_VER
Version:
C0200001
Chapter 6
139
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
NL procedure:
TIO_TLDM_VER
Version:
C0200001
NL procedure:
TIO_FIOM_VER
Version:
C0200021
NL procedure:
TIO_DIOM_VER
Version:
C0200057
NL procedure:
TIO_IIOM_VER
Version:
C0200016
NL procedure:
TIO_COMMON_VER
Version:
C0200026
NL procedure:
TIO_TRANSPORT_VER
Version:
C0200027
NL procedure:
TIO_NDM_VER
Version:
C0200505
NL procedure:
TIO_INF_VER
Version:
C0200100
NL procedure:
TIO_DTCM_VER
Version:
C0200504
XL procedure:
TIO_DTF_VER
Version:
C0200002
NL procedure:
TIO_DTSM_VER
Version:
C0200307
NL procedure:
TIO_WSCM_VER
Version:
C0200002
XL procedure:
TIO_X25FMT_VER
Version:
C0200001
NL procedure:
TIO_TERMTRC_VER
Version:
C0200002
MPE XL Terminal I/O 32022B
overall version = C.02.00
Subsystem Number : 41
MPE/XL System Console
NL procedure:
32098-20063
module versions:
TMUX_VERSION_ID
MPE/XL System Console
AVersion:
32098-20063
A0001011
overall version = A.00.01
Subsystem Number : 50
HP FTP/XL
HP36957 module versions:
XL procedure:
HPFTP_COMMON
Version:
A0009001
XL procedure:
HPFTP_UTIL
Version:
A0009001
NM program file: FTP.ARPA.SYS
Version:
A0009001
NM program file: FTPSRVR.ARPA.SYS
Version:
A0009001
Catalog file:
Version:
A0009001
FTPC000.ARPA.SYS
140
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Catalog file:
FTPHELP.ARPA.SYS
Version:
A0009001
HP FTP/XL
HP36957 overall version = A.00.09
Subsystem Number : 55
NIO System Console DM
NL procedure:
32098-20078
module versions:
CDM_CONSOLE_DM_VERSION
NIO System Console DM
32098-20078
Version:
A0001015
overall version = A.00.01
Subsystem Number : 57
HP SNMP/XL
SNMP module versions:
NM program file: SNMP.NET.SYS
Version:
A0400001
NM program file: SNMPUTIL.NET.SYS
Version:
A0400001
NM program file: SNMPSYMB.NET.SYS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_OMI_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_API_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_TRAP_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_UTIL_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_INIT_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SNMP_LGTR_VERS
Version:
A0400001
XL procedure:
SUBSYS57FMTVERS
Version:
A0400001
NL procedure:
SNMP_IOCOMP_VERS
Version:
A0400001
Catalog file:
SNMPC000.NET.SYS
Version:
A0400001
HP SNMP/XL
SNMP overall version = A.04.00
SNMP/XL (c) Copyright 1991 Hewlett-Packard Company
SNMP/XL (c) Copyright 1988 by Carnegie Mellon University
SNMP/XL (c) Copyright 1988, 1989, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chapter 6
141
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Subsystem Number : 63
HP NSR/XL
HP32098-20084 module versions:
RL procedure:
NSR_GETHOST
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_GETNET
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_GETPROTO
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_GETSERV
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_HPGETHOST
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_INET_ADDR
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_INET_NETWORK
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_INET_NTOA
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_BINDUP
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_COMP
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_DEBUG
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_INIT
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_MKQUERY
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_QUERY
Version:
A0006000
XL procedure:
NSR_RES_SEND
Version:
A0006000
HP NSR/XL
HP32098-20084 overall version = A.00.06
Subsystem Number : 65
HP SOCKET/XL C LIB module versions:
RL procedure:
SOCK_CLIB_VERS
Version:
B05090H0
HP SOCKET/XL C LIB overall version = B.05.09
Subsystem Number : 67
HP FDDI LAN Driver
142
32098-20093
module versions:
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
NL procedure:
FDDI_DRIVER_VER
Version:
A0060002
XL procedure:
FDDI_LINKCONTROL_VER
Version:
A0060000
Download:
FDDIDNLD.PUB.SYS
Version:
A0060000
HP FDDI LAN Driver
32098-20093
overall version = A.00.60
Subsystem Number : 68
HP Streams/iX module versions:
NL procedure:
streams_vers
Version:
A0060000
NL procedure:
streams_type_mgr_vers
Version:
A0060000
NL procedure:
streams_intrinsics_vers
Version:
A0060000
NL procedure:
dlpi_vers
Version:
A0060001
XL procedure:
TLI_vers
Version:
A0060000
RL procedure:
Libstr_vers
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: AUTOPUSH.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: STRACE.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: STRCLEAN.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: STRCNTL.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: STRDB.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
NM program file: STRERR.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
Catalog file:
STRCAT.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
Catalog file:
STRDBCAT.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060000
HP Streams/iX overall version = A.00.60
Subsystem Number : 69
DCE Core Services
XL procedure:
module versions:
mpedce_nmsseg_vers
DCE Core Services
Version:
A0101001
overall version = A.01.01
Chapter 6
143
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Subsystem Number : 72
HP TELNET/iX Subsystem HP32040A module versions:
NM program file: TELNET.ARPA.SYS
Version:
A6000000
NL procedure:
PTD_SM_VER
Version:
A6000001
NL procedure:
PTD_HANDLER_VER
Version:
A6000002
NL procedure:
PTD_PTID_VER
Version:
A6000002
NL procedure:
PTD_PTOD_VER
Version:
A6000002
NL procedure:
PTD_COMMON_VER
Version:
A6000001
HP TELNET/iX Subsystem HP32040A overall version = A.60.00
Subsystem Number : 73
Internet Services for the HP e3000 module versions:
NM program file: INETD.NET.SYS
Version:
B0001003
NM program file: BOOTPD.NET.SYS
Version:
B0001003
NM program file: BOOTPQRY.NET.SYS
Version:
B0001002
NM program file: TFTPD.NET.SYS
Version:
B0001002
NM program file: REMSH.NET.SYS
Version:
B0001003
XL procedure:
INSVXL_SECURE_VERS
Version:
B0001004
XL procedure:
INSVXL_IPCSEC_VERS
Version:
B0001002
XL procedure:
INSVXL_NSRW_VERS
Version:
B0001003
XL procedure:
INSVXL_NETOF_VERS
Version:
B0001002
XL procedure:
INSVXL_SYSLOG_VERS
Version:
B0001003
XL procedure:
INSVXL_SIGNAL_VERS
Version:
B0001002
XL procedure:
INSVXL_GETTIME_VERS
Version:
B0001003
Internet Services for the HP e3000 overall version = B.00.01
144
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Subsystem Number : 74
HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN driver B5426AA
module versions:
NL procedure:
VG_NL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
XL procedure:
VG_XL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
NL procedure:
LAN_100_NL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
XL procedure:
LAN_100_XL_VERS
Version:
A0060004
XL procedure:
SUBSYS_74_FMT_VER
Version:
A0060004
Catalog file:
NMCAT74.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060004
NL procedure:
LAN_STATION_ADDR_VER
Version:
A0060001
NL procedure:
IEEE_MULTICAST_VER
Version:
A0060002
NL procedure:
WANDMPSURRVERS
Version:
A0060001
HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN driver B5426AA
overall version = A.00.60
Subsystem Number : 77
HP-PB 100Base-T Fast Ethernet driver B5427AA
module versions:
NL procedure:
BT_NL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
XL procedure:
BT_XL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
NL procedure:
LAN_100_NL_VERS
** NOT INSTALLED
**
XL procedure:
LAN_100_XL_VERS
Version:
A0060004
XL procedure:
SUBSYS_77_FMT_VER
Version:
A0060004
Catalog file:
NMCAT77.NET.SYS
Version:
A0060004
NL procedure:
LAN_STATION_ADDR_VER
Version:
A0060001
NL procedure:
IEEE_MULTICAST_VER
Version:
A0060002
NL procedure:
WANDMPSURRVERS
Version:
A0060001
HP-PB 100Base-T Fast Ethernet driver B5427AA
Chapter 6
overall version = A.00.60
145
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Explanation of NMMAINT Output
The first group of numbers in the above example are the version ID
numbers of the modules of the Node Management Services subsystem.
Notice that the first five characters of the version for each module listed
in this group are the same. This means that all the software modules in
the subsystem match. It is necessary for all the modules of a given
subsystem to be the same version. If a subsystem module does not
match, NMMAINT prints the following error message:
Program file:
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
** MODULE ERROR **
ONE OR MORE SUBSYSTEM MODULES ARE INVALID.
(NMERR 105)
This message indicates that the modules of the subsystem are not
compatible.
Because the module version ID numbers match, NMMAINT displays
the overall subsystem version number for the node management
services; for the above example, it is B.00.10. The rest of the
subsystems are handled in a similar fashion.
NMMAINT also checks that all the modules that belong with a
particular subsystem are present. If a module is missing, NMMAINT
displays the name of the module with the following error message in
place of the version number.
SL procedure:
NMVERS01
**
REQ’D MODULE MISSING **
ONE OR MORE REQUIRED SUBSYSTEM MODULES ARE MISSING.
(NMERR 104)
If an optional module is not present, NMMAINT displays a message
similar to the following:
Program file:
NMDUMP.PUB.SYS
**NOT INSTALLED**
If the modules were correct when installed, only unusual circumstances
such as a reload, a disk problem, or a system failure would result in
missing or invalid modules. Restore a known valid version of the
modules in error.
Question marks displayed for the overall version number indicate that
the fix levels of the individual modules do not match. Remember that
the internal fix level, represented by the last three numbers of the
version ID, does not need to match between modules for the software to
be compatible. Fix numbers are requested in service requests for HP to
use when troubleshooting.
As each subsystem is displayed, NMMAINT checks that all the modules
are present and compatible. However, NMMAINT does not perform any
cross-subsystem version verification. When a system has HP-to-IBM
products as well as HP-to-HP products installed, the Node
Management Services, link services and the port software are used by
both types of data communications products. Therefore, it is important
to check that the version numbers of these common subsystems and
146
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
port software module are correct. It is possible for the HP-to-IBM
products to use previous versions of the common software that are not
compatible with the HP-to-HP products.
NMMAINT displays information on only the subsystems for the
products installed on your system. In the example above, none of the
HP-IBM products were installed, so their subsystems were not
displayed.
NMMAINT displays the subsystem number just before it prints
versions of that module.
Subsystem Number : 74
Then it starts printing the versions of that module (HP-PB
100VG-AnyLAN driver B5426AA).
How to get SUBSYSTEM ID list ??
:NMMAINT,-1
This will display the subsystem ID list and it helps to get the particular
subsystem module versions by just keying :NMMAINT,n where n is the
subsytem ID. For more information, refer to “Running NMMAINT”
with subsystem ID).
ID
SUBSYSTEM
--
------------
1
SNA Transport
2
NRJE
3
NS Transport
5
NETIPC
6
NS Services
11
SNA IMF
16
APPC
18
Link Support Services
20
DHCF
24
NMMGR
25
HP-PB 802.3 Thinlan Link
26
Termio
27
HP-PB SDLC Link
28
HP-PB LAPB Link
33
OSI/XL
35
X.400
37
HP-PB RJE/Bisync Link
38
SNA X.25
Chapter 6
147
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
NOTE
41
Terminal Mux Driver
42
Multiple Connection Module
46
SNADS
48
Lan Manager
50
FTP/iX
55
HP-PB Console DM
57
SNMP
61
HP-PB 802.5 Token Ring Link
63
Domain Name Service
65
Socket C Library
66
NCS
67
HP-PB FDDI Link
68
Streams/iX
69
DCE Core
70
Appletalk
71
Netware/iX
72
Telnet
73
Internet Services
74
HP-PB 100VG Link
77
HP-PB 100Base-T Link
78
PCI 100Base-T Link
80
Link Common
81
PCI SDLC Synchronous Mux Link
82
PCI LAPB Synchronous Mux Link
10000
NMS Common Services
It is not necessary that your system is loaded with all the subsystems
shown in the preceding list.
148
Chapter 6
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT With Subsystem ID
NMMAINT can also be executed to display the version information for
just one subsystem, by entering a command: NMMAINT, Subsystem
number, where the subsystem number can be obtained from running
NMDUMP.
For example, NMMAINT,3 displays the version information for Network
Transport 32098-20033.
The only exception for using the subsystem number found from running
NMDUMP is for the NMS, Node Management Services, which would be 0.
Use NMMAINT, 10000 to display NMS version information.
Chapter 6
149
NMMAINT
Running NMMAINT
150
Chapter 6
7
NMDUMP
This chapter describes the Node Management Services Trace/Log File
Analyzer, commonly known as NMDUMP. NMDUMP allows you to decode
and format the logging records and trace messages that are created in
coded form.
The following describes information contained in this chapter.
• Running the NMS Trace/Log File Analyzer (NMDUMP).
• General options.
These options include two, ? and 0, that are used for menu display
and are provided on all menus. Options 1–4 reflect the common
structure of log and trace files.
• 802.3, 802.5, SDLC, LAP-B, RJE/BSC, NETXPORT, NetIPC, and
Network Services logging options.
These options are log options and the number varies according to the
subsystem used.
• 802.3, 802.5, NETXPORT, NetIPC, Network Services, SDLC, LAP-B,
and RJE/BSC trace options.
These options are trace options and the number used relates to the
subsystem used.
• SDLC, LAP-B, and RJE Filter sets.
Some of the options allow you to also add additional filters to make
more precise selections for formatting.
For information on using logging and tracing for NS 3000/iX products,
see the NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual.
For information on using logging and tracing for HP-to-IBM products,
see the Node Manager’s Guide for each product.
See the flow for NMDUMP in Figure 7-1.
151
NMDUMP
Figure 7-1
NMDUMP
NMDUMP
RUN
NMDUMP.PUB.SYS
1
LOG OR TRACE?
2
WHAT
SUBSYSTEM?
3
DO YOU WANT TO
CHANGE OPTIONS?
4
FOR WHAT
SUBSYSTEM?
ENTER INPUT
FILE NAME
5
ENTER OUTPUT
FILE NAME
6
ENTER START + X MINUTES
OR
ACTUAL TIME TO
DO YO WANT TO
CHANGE THE TIME
RANGE?
7
START OR FINISH
PRESS [CTRL] Y
8
SPECIFICATIONS NOW FORMAT
AND PRINT TO FILE OR
DO YOU WANT TO MODIFY
ENTERED VALUES?
152
9
Chapter 7
NMDUMP
Running NMDUMP
Running NMDUMP
Step 1. Type
:RUN NMDUMP.PUB.SYS
Step 2. Enter either (1) logging or (2) tracing.
Step 3. Enter the ID number for each subsystem you want to format. Use a
comma to separate each number. (Default = ALL.)
NOTE
ID numbers can be used as parameters with NMMAINT.
Step 4. Change the default (NO) to (YES) if you would like to enter subsystem
options. (NMDUMP will set the default options if (NO) is entered.)
a. Enter the subsystem ID for the options you want to change.
b. Enter the number of the option or <CR> to select the current options.
Step 5. Enter the input log or trace file name. (Must already exist on the
system.)
FILENAME.GROUP.ACCOUNT
Step 6. Enter the output log or trace file name. Default = $STDLIST. (Must
not yet exist on the system.)
FILENAME.GROUP.ACCOUNT
Step 7. Change the default (NO) to (YES) if you want to specify a time range.
a. Enter the starting time.
Respond Y or N if the displayed time is correct.
b. Enter the finishing time.
Respond Y or N if the displayed time is correct.
Step 8. Press [CTRL]Y when you have completed your responses. (NMDUMP will
then give you a chance to re-enter the values.)
Step 9. Use the default (NO) if you are satisfied with your entered values.
NMDUMP then formats the logging or tracing information you specified.
Chapter 7
153
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
Formatting Options
NMDUMP allows you to modify formatting options for specified
subsystem IDs. There are three ways to change the formatting menu
options.
1. Most options toggle between two possible values, like YES or NO and
ON or OFF.
2. Some require you to enter an option number which then displays an
additional menu and prompt.
3. Several options prompt you to enter the numbers of certain items.
The following tables show the options for logging and tracing. Some
logging and tracing options also have filters you can specify.
You may type // at any of the main NMDUMP prompts to exit the
program. If NMDUMP is displaying a subsystem menu, you must press
[RETURN] to exit the menu and return to the main NMDUMP prompt
before typing // to exit the program.
You may also type “Help” at any of the main NMDUMP prompts for help
text.
See Table 7-1 for a description of general options.
Table 7-1
General Options
Subsystem
Option
Meaning
Description
802.3, 802.5,
SDLC, LAP-B,
RJE/BSC, FDDI.
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T, X25
?
Redisplay
Options
Displays current options. Additional input OK.
0
Set
Defaults
Set all options back to default values.
NETXPORT,
NetIPC,
Network Services
1
ASCII ON
or OFF
ON = ASCII representation of data (OCTAL).
OFF = Hexadecimal representation. Default =
ON.
2
Output
Format
Automatically changes output format to HEX if
currently in OCTAL or OCTAL if currently in
HEX.
3
Maximum
Number
Allows a limit to the amount of data printed in the
information and data sections by reducing the
number of bytes per record to output.
4
Verbosity
LOW = Summary, gives the formatted header and
raw messages only. HIGH = Detail. Automatically
changes LOW to HIGH or HIGH to LOW.
154
Chapter 7
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
See Table 7-2 for a description of logging options.
Table 7-2
Log Options
Subsystem
Option
Meaning
Description
802.3, 802.5,
FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T
1
Linknames
Select logging options by Linknames. @ = ALL
2
Excluded
Linknames
Select Linkname to be excluded from logging.
3
Log Classes
Error message options (ERRORS, WARNINGS,
INFO, ALL)
4
Set Output
Level
Toggle between Terse and Verbose. Verbose =
Detail report, Terse = Summary.
SDLC, LAP-B,
RJE/BSC
1
Linknames
Select logging options by Linknames. @ = ALL
2
Class
Selection
10 = Errors, 12 = Informational, 99 = ALL
NetIPC,
Network Services,
NETXPORT
5
Class
Selection
Show LOG formatter memo with LOG classes
configured within NMMGR.
6
Entity or
Module
Select specific entities (NETXPORT) or modules
(NS) to format for logging.
7
Event or PIN
Select event (NETXPORT) or PIN (NetIPC, NS)
where error occurred.
8
Port ID or PIN
Select a Port ID or PIN in hexadecimal format.
Default = OFF.
9
Display
Summary
Output
Allows a summary report of log entries either in
additions to or instead of the normal formatting
of log entries. Default = OFF.
10
Save or Use
Filter File
Allows saving of the filter option definitions to a
file for later use or using previously saved filter
file. 1= Use filter file, 2= Save filter file.
NETXPORT Only
Link
No options
Chapter 7
155
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
See Table 7-3 for information on the trace formatter options.
Table 7-3
X.25 Trace Formatter
Options
Actual Settings
0
– Set Default Values
3
– Display Mode
Terse or Lab
4
– Layer
Level2_3 or Level 2 or Level 3
5
– Dump Packet
No or Yes
6
– Full or Header
Header Only or Full Packet with Data
8
– Packet Type
All, or Select Combination of 9 Level or Packet
Types
9
– Full or Header
Header or Full Packet with Data
10
– Display Length
Amount of Data to Display
11
– Q bit
Both, or Value of Q-bit 0, 1, or Both
12
– VC Number
All, or Select Virtual Circuit Number
13
– Packet Type
All, o Select From 17 Level 3 Packet Types in
any Combination
Level 2:
Level 3:
Enter the number or <CR> to select the current option: packet types in any combination.
156
Chapter 7
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
See Table 7-4 for a description of trace options.
Table 7-4
Trace Options
Subsystem
Option
Meaning
Description
802.3, 802.5,
FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T
1
Change Filters
Allows definition of what characters
each packet must match before it will be
formatted.
2
Change Output Flags
Allows reduction of output by selecting
which parts of filtered packets to format
NETXPORT,
NetIPC,
Network Services
5
Type or Descriptor
Format events for a particular type
(NETXPORT) or descriptor number
(NetIPC, NS).
6
Entity or Service
Format events for a particular entity
(NETXPORT) or service (NS).
7
Event or PIN
Format events for a particular event
(NETXPORT) or PIN (NetIPC, NS).
Call for network services displayed.
8
Port ID or PIN
Select a Port ID or PIN in hexadecimal
format. Default = OFF.
9
Display Summary
Output
Allows a summary report of log entries
either in additions to or instead of the
normal formatting of log entries.
Default = OFF.
10
Save or Use Filter
File
Allows saving of the filter option
definitions to a file for later use or using
previously saved filter file. 1= Use filter
file, 2= Save filter file.
11
Source IP Address
Allows specification of a source IP
address for header trace messages.
Default = OFF.
12
Destination IP
Address
Allows specification of a destination IP
address for header trace messages.
13
Source TCP Port
Allows specification of a source TCP
address for header trace messages.
14
Destination IPC Port
NS Messages
Allows specification of a destination
TCP address for header trace messages.
ON = NS messages displayed. OFF =
NetIPC intrinsic calls for Network
services displayed.
8
Format NS Messages
Only
Toggle ON and OFF. ON = Only Display
NS Protocols, (VT, NFT, RFA, PTOP)
OFF = Also Display NetIPC Intrinsic
Level Activity
Network Services
Only
Chapter 7
157
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
Table 7-4
Trace Options
Subsystem
Option
Meaning
Description
SDLC, LAP-B,
RJE/BSC 802.3,
802.5, FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T
1
Output Limit
Allow input of maximum bytes in
line-data frames to reduce the amount
of formatted data. Affects only
line-data-frames.
2
Filter Sets
Allows selection of filters for output
data. All filter sets are displayed when
selected.
3
Show Raw Data
Allows printing of unformatted trace
data along with the same data in
decoded form. Default = YES.
4
Show Decoded Data
Used with option 3, will disable printing
of decoded data. (Prints only raw data.)
Default = YES.
LAP-B, SDLC
7
Data Representation
Tells formatter what type of bit
encoding is used. (ASCII or EBCDIC)
LAP-B Only
8
MODOLO Count
Tells formatter whether frame data in
trace file was a modolo-128 format
rather than default modolo-8 format.
802.3, 802.5
5
Select Linknames
FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T
6
Exclude Linknames
7
Select Character
Representation
Toggle between ASCII and EBCDIC
representation.
802.3, 802.5,
FDDI
9
Filter ON Station
Address
Select MAC or station address for
filtering Source and Destination.
10
Filter ON SAP
Select filtering for both SSAP and
BSAP.
11
Generate HP-UX
Trace Site
Create trace output file or format, that
8.0 HP-UX formatter can use.
8
Filter ON Station
Address
Select MAC or station address for
filtering Source and Destination.
9
Filter ON SAP
Select filtering for both SSAP and
BSAP.
100VG-AnyLAN,
100Base-T
158
Chapter 7
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Formatting Options
See Table 7-5 for a description of filter sets.
Table 7-5
Filter Sets
Subsystem
Number
Filter
Description
SDLC
1
Data frames
sent/rcvd
Enables printing of frames sent and frames received
on the datacomm link.
2
Driver
message
sent/rcvd
Enables printing of all port messages sent to the
driver by SNA Transport and other entities, or sent
to them by the driver.
3
Driver
state-change
s
Enables printing of changes in internal state within
the SDLC driver modules.
4
Driver
intervals
Enables printing of details related to internal
processing of internal driver requests, mainly those
related to utility functions (not datacomm I/O).
55
Card
footprint
Enables printing of large blocks of footprint
information from the downloaded SDLC firmware.
99
ALL
Produces a full trace.
0
Errors Only
Disables all filter sets and produces a listing of error
only.
0
Set Defaults
Set all options back to default.
1
VC Number
Select Virtual Circuit numbers
2
Packet Type
Select Packet types.
3
Q-Bit
Toggles between ON and OFF selection of Q-bit
(Control bit)
X25
Chapter 7
159
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
Table 7-5
Filter Sets
Subsystem
Number
Filter
Description
LAP-B
2
Driver
messages
sent/rcvd
Enables printing of all port messages sent to the
driver by NS Transport and other entities, or sent to
them by the driver.
3
Driver
state-change
s
Enables printing of changes in internals state
within the LAP-B driver modules.
4
Driver
internals
Enables printing of details related to internal
processing of internal driver requests, mainly those
related to utility functions (not datacomm I/O).
51
Card frames
sent/rcvd
Enables printing of frames sent and frames received
on the datacomm link.
53
Card
state-change
s
Enables printing of the individual state changes
traced by the downloaded LAP-B firmware.
99
ALL
Produces a full trace.
0
Errors
Disables all filter sets and produces a listing of error
only.
RJE
1
Enables printing of frames sent and frames received
on the datacomm line.
2
Enables printing of all port messages sent to the
driver by the RJERCS intrinsics and other entities,
or sent to them by the driver.
3
Enables printing of changes in internal state within
the RJE driver modules.
4
Enables printing of details related to internal
processing of internal driver requests, mainly those
related to utility functions (not datacomm I/O).
5
Enables printing of all calls to all RJERCS
intrinsics (such as ROPEN) and all buffer data
written to or read from the RJE driver.
51
Enables printing of frames sent and frames received
on the datacomm link.
52
Enables printing of all state changes not already
shown under set 51, and any other information
traced by the downloaded Bisync firmware.
99
Produces a full trace.
0
Disables all filter sets and produces a listing of error
only.
160
Chapter 7
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Formatting Options
Link Subsystem Formatting
The link manager subsystem does not call any menus. NMDUMP formats
logging messages only. The first line labels the error as a link manager
error, and shows whether it is fatal or non-fatal. The next line contains
the time and date of the event. This line is followed by the log message,
the requestor ID, the link name, and the logical device (LDEV) of the
link.
The requestor ID is for internal use only. Any underlying errors are
reported below the LDEV field. Many messages correspond to NMERR
messages that are documented in Appendix A , “NMS Error Messages,”
of this manual.
Chapter 7
161
NMDUMP
Formatting Options
162
Chapter 7
8
NMMGRVER
This chapter describes NMMGRVER, a conversion program that
enables earlier versions of subsystems to be used with the current
version of NMMGR.
This version of NMMGRVER will convert configuration files from
previous versions of MPE/iX to the current MPE/iX release format.
This chapter includes discussions of the following:
• Using the NMMGRVER conversion program.
• Converting configuration files from previous versions of MPE XL
format to the current version of MPE/iX format.
163
NMMGRVER
Using the Conversion Program
Using the Conversion Program
You need to convert files if you open an existing configuration file while
using NMMGR and receive this message:
Version mismatch found on specified subsystem. Please run NMMGRVER.
(NMGRERR 53)
You also need to convert files if you are performing NETCONTROL and
receive the following class 2 logging message at the console:
Bad CONFIG File Version
NMMGRVER will create backup copies of your configuration files for
you, and will name them NMBACKA, NMBACKB, NMBACKC, and so on.
Therefore, you can go back to a source file if necessary.
Converting MPE XL to MPE/iX
Step 1. Execute NMMGRVER by entering:
:RUN NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS
After displaying a banner, the system prompts you for the name of the
configuration file to be converted.
Fileset to be scanned?
Step 2. Enter one of the following filesets, or press the [RETURN] key to end the
conversion program.
filename[.groupname[.acctname]]
file [email protected][.groupname[.acctname]]
@[.groupname[.acctname]]
@@[email protected][.acctname]
@@[email protected]@
NOTE
When converting from an earlier release of MPE XL to the current
version of MPE/iX, the configuration file can have any valid MPE file
name. If you have used another name instead of NMCONFIG, NMMGRVER
will use that name as the final name for your conversion file. For
example, if your configuration file is called MYCONFIG, NMMGRVER will
convert it and save it under the same name, overwriting the original
MYCONFIG. When the conversion is finished, you must rename or purge
the existing NMCONFIG and then rename MYCONFIG to NMCONFIG,
replacing the old NMCONFIG.
Step 3. NMMGRVER searches for files of type NCONF in the specified fileset. For
each file found, it asks:
OK to convert filename.groupname.acctname?
164
Chapter 8
NMMGRVER
Using the Conversion Program
where filename.groupname.acctname is the name of a configuration
file. Enter Y for yes or either N or [RETURN] for no.
Step 4. NMMGRVER checks the configuration file to determine if it is an
MPE/iX configuration file, then the conversion proceeds without further
user input.
After each file is converted NMMGRVER will display the following
message:
Conversion Completed Successfully (NMMGRVERMSG 0)
Step 5. Continue to enter either Y, N, or [RETURN] until you have converted all
files.
Step 6. Run NMMGR and modify any of the configuration files, as needed.
Chapter 8
165
NMMGRVER
Using the Conversion Program
166
Chapter 8
A
NMS Error Messages
This appendix includes listings of Node Management Services error
messages, grouped in sets as shown below. The error messages in each
set are listed numerically. Each error message listed includes at least
one possible cause of the error and a recommended action for each
cause.
Some of the messages, as shown in this manual, include an exclamation
point (!), which is a substitution character that represents variable
information. When the actual message is displayed, this substitution
character will be replaced by appropriate information.
The following sets of messages are included in this appendix:
Message Set
Message Code
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR
NMCNWARN
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPERR
NMDUMPWARN
NM Error Messages
NMERR
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFSERR
NMFSWARN
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR
NMGRWARN
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERMSG
NMMGRVERERR
NMMGRVERWARN
ND Error Messages
NDIERR
FMT Error Messages
FMTERR
167
NMS Error Messages
Resolving Problems
Resolving Problems
There are problems that are common to many situations, such as
invalid software installation, version incompatibilities, insufficient
MPE resources, corrupt configuration files, and file system errors. This
section describes some of the resolutions for these problems. In many
cases, you can use these descriptions to help you resolve these problems
yourself. In addition, if you are running NMMGR, you can use the Error
Information screen to help determine what the problem is. See Chapter
2 , “Basics of NMMGR,” of this manual for more information on the
Error Information screen.
Note that you may get an error which is caused by an internal
procedure. Some internal errors can be remedied only by qualified HP
representatives. The causes and actions listed with the error messages
will tell you which ones these are. In such cases, you should file a
Change Request (CR) to get help. To enable HP to solve you problem in
an efficient manner, please follow the guidelines listed on the following
pages.
Invalid Software Installation
A software installation may be invalid. Run NMMAINT to get a listing
of all software modules and their version IDs. Check that all required
modules are present and that the first five characters of the version ID
numbers of these modules are the same within each subsystem (these
are the v.uu.ff fields). Finally, check these version ID numbers with the
System Status Bulletin or other HP source to be sure the versions of
software you have are supported with the version of MPE you have. If
there is a problem found with any of these checks, you have an incorrect
software version installed. Locate a known valid version of the suspect
software (perhaps from one of your system backup tapes) and install it
correctly.
Version Incompatibilities
There may be version incompatibilities between NMS software and
other subsystem software. Run NMMAINT to get a listing of version ID
numbers for NMS and for all of the NMS-dependent subsystems. Locate
the overall version ID numbers for NMS and for each subsystem.
Compare the first five characters of these version ID numbers with
those listed as compatible with each other in the System Status Bulletin
or other HP sources. If a discrepancy is found, locate a known set of
compatible software and install it.
168
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
Resolving Problems
Insufficient MPE Resources
There may be insufficient MPE resources, such as configured table
sizes. Check if the MPE configuration has enough DST and PCB entries
configured. (If possible, use the HP Glance/XL product to check MPE
table utilization.) Reconfigure MPE to fix any problems found and
restart the system.
Corrupt Configuration Files
The configuration file is possibly corrupt. If the error persists, use
NMMGR to manually check the configuration file (if possible). If bad
records seem to be localized to a particular item, delete that item and
reconfigure it. If necessary, restore a backup copy of the file.
File System Errors
An NM and/or MPE file system error (NMFSERR, NMFSWARN, FSERR) may
have occurred while attempting to access the configuration file. Try to
access the configuration file under the same user ID using NMMGR.
Use the NMMGR Error Information screen to find out what the
underlying error is. Correct the problem and try again.
Appendix A
169
NMS Error Messages
Submitting a CR
Submitting a CR
The messages that refer you to this section can indicate an internal
error. For further assistance from HP, submit an CR (Change Request).
Include the following information where applicable:
• A characterization of the problem. Describe the events leading up to
and including the problem. Attempt to describe the source of the
problem. Describe the symptoms of the problem.
• Your characterization should include: MPE commands,
communication subsystem commands, job streams, result codes and
messages, and data that can reproduce the problem.
• Illustrate as clearly as possible the context of any message(s).
Prepare copies of information displayed at the system console and
user terminal.
• Obtain the version, update and fix information for all software. Use
NMMAINT to obtain this information for NS, DTS, NRJE, SNA and
Node Management. This allows Hewlett-Packard to determine if the
problem is already known and if the correct software is installed at
your site.
• Record all result messages and numbers that appear at the user
terminal and the system console.
• Run NMDUMP to format the NM log file (NMGLnnnn.PUB.SYS) that
was active when the problem occurred. You may need to issue the
MPE command SWITCHNMLOG to free the NM log file.
Using NMDUMP, format the log file for your NMS subsystem
information. Inspect the formatted output and try to locate errors.
Prepare the formatted output and a copy of the log file for your
Hewlett-Packard representative to further analyze.
• Prepare a listing of the configuration file and the MPE configuration
you are using for your Hewlett-Packard representative to further
analyze. Inspect the output and try to locate errors.
• Try to determine the general area within the software where you
think the problem exists. If you think the problem is caused by an
NMS subsystem, refer to the manual(s) for that subsystem and try
to resolve the problem by following the information-gathering
guidelines in those manuals.
• Issue the LINKCONTROLlinkname;STATUS= command for each link.
Retain the output for your Hewlett-Packard representative to
further analyze.
170
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
Submitting a CR
• Document your interim, or “workaround” solution. The cause of the
problem can sometimes be found by comparing the circumstances in
which it occurs with the circumstances in which it does not occur.
• Create copies of any trace files that were active when the problem
occurred for your Hewlett-Packard representative to analyze.
• In the event of a system failure, a full memory dump must be
taken. Always send the unformatted memory dump, a listing of the
configuration file, a copy of the file LOADMAP.PUB.SYS, and the I/O
configuration.
Appendix A
171
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
The first seven NMCNERR messages are written to the console by the
NMMON process. The remainder of NMCNERR messages are written
by one of the NMLOGMON processes to the console. “NM log Monitor”
messages are returned by the “Main type Log Monitor:” this is the first
NMLOGMON process created and later handles most tracing. “NM Log
Process” messages are returned by the “Log type Monitor,” which is the
NMLOGMON process that handles logging.
NMCNERR 1
MESSAGE: NMMON: Unable to allocate area for port table.
(NMCNERR 1)
CAUSE: NMMON is unable to expand the DL-DB area in its stack.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 2
MESSAGE: NMMON: Unable to obtain port data segment.
(NMCNERR 2)
CAUSE: INITPORTDST returned a DST number of 0. The system is
unable to allocate any extra data segments.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 3
MESSAGE: NMMON: Unable to create port in data segment.
(NMCNERR 3)
CAUSE: CREATEPORT returned a PORTID of 0.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 4
MESSAGE: NMMON: Unable to add port dictionary entry.
(NMCNERR 4)
CAUSE: DICTADD returned a nonzero result.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CRSubmitting a CR” at the beginning of
this appendix.
NMCNERR 5
MESSAGE: NMMON: CREATEPROCESS error n on NMFILE.PUB.SYS.
(NMCNERR 5)
CAUSE: CREATEPROCESS failed for NMFILE. The NMFILE.PUB.SYS
program file might not be present, or might not be Load-able. This
could happen if the NMS software is not correctly installed, or if there
is a mismatch between NMFILE and SL module versions. Also, there
could be other MPE limitations such as insufficient table space.
ACTION: Look up the CREATEPROCESS error number in the
Intrinsics Reference Manual. Correct this error. See also “Invalid
Software Installation” and “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the
beginning of this appendix.
172
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR 6
MESSAGE: NMMON: CREATEPROCESS error n on
NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS. (NMCNERR 6)
CAUSE: CREATEPROCESS failed for NMLOGMON. The
NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS program file might not be present, or might not be
Load-able. This could happen if the NMS software is not correctly
installed, or if there is a mismatch between NMLOGMON and SL
module versions. Also, there could be other MPE limitations such as
insufficient table space.
ACTION: Look up the CREATEPROCESS error number in the
Intrinsics Reference Manual. Correct this error. See also “Invalid
Software Installation” and “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 7
MESSAGE: NMMON: NMS version mismatch. NMS-based datacomm
unavailable. (NMCNERR 7)
CAUSE: Version mismatch detected in the Node Management Services
subsystem software modules installed on the system.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 8
MESSAGE: NMMON: Restart request rejected; not in proper state [!].
(NMCNERR 8)
CAUSE: User attempted to perform an unsupported function.
ACTION: Use method supported by Hewlett Packard to achieve your
goal. If uncertain, contact your HP representative.
NMCNERR 9
MESSAGE: NMMON: Programmatic shutdown request rejected; not in
proper state [!]. (NMCNERR 9)
CAUSE: User attempted to perform an unsupported function.
ACTION: Use method supported by Hewlett Packard to achieve your
goal. If uncertain, contact your HP representative.
NMCNERR 11
MESSAGE: NMMON: CREATEPROCESS error n on NMINIT.PUB.SYS.
(NMCNERR 11)
CAUSE: CREATEPROCESS failed for NMINIT. The NMINIT.PUB.SYS
program file might not be present, or might not be Load-able. This
could happen if the NMS software is not correctly installed, or if there
is a mismatch between NMFILE and SL module versions. Also, there
could be other MPE limitations such as insufficient table space.
ACTION: Look up the CREATEPROCESS error number in the
Intrinsics Reference Manual. Correct this error. See also “Invalid
Software Installation” and “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the
beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
173
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR 16
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Another MainLogMonitor exists. This
one terminating. (NMCNERR 16)
CAUSE: A Main Log Monitor process has found its entry already exists
in the port dictionary.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 17
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to obtain port data segment.
(NMCNERR 17)
CAUSE: INITPORTDST returned a DST number of 0. The system is
unable to allocate any extra data segments.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 18
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to create port in data segment.
(NMCNERR 18)
CAUSE: CREATEPORT returned a PORTID of 0.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 19
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to add port in dictionary entry.
(NMCNERR 19)
CAUSE: DICTADD returned a nonzero result.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 20
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to add to NM Monitor port table.
(NMCNERR 20)
CAUSE: NMMONADDID failed for MainLogMonitor.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 21
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to create user logging data
segment. (NMCNERR 21)
CAUSE: Main Log Monitor is unable to acquire an extra data segment.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 22
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Unable to create trace dictionary data
segment. (NMCNERR 22)
CAUSE: Main Log Monitor is unable to acquire an extra data segment.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 23
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Input/Output error in accessing the
system disc cold load area. (NMCNERR 23)
CAUSE: An error occurred trying to access the area of disk where the
next NMLGnnnn, and NMTCnnnn, file name numbers are stored. Check for
174
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
other error indications that may affect the system disks, including I/O
errors.
ACTION: Correct any situation that may cause disk I/O errors. If the
problem persists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 24
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: Illegal parameter passed; create failed.
(NMCNERR 24)
CAUSE: The user has attempted to enter a parameter which is not valid.
ACTION: Check input parameters and try again.
NMCNERR 25
MESSAGE: NM Log Monitor: CREATEPROCESS error n on
NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS. (NMCNERR 25)
CAUSE: CREATEPROCESS failed for NMLOGMON. The
NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS program file might not be present, or might not be
Load-able. This could happen if the NMS software is not correctly
installed, or if there is a mismatch between NMLOGMON and SL
module versions. Also, there could be other MPE limitations such as
insufficient table space.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 26
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Internal error trying to set up NMS
logging. (NMCNERR 26)
CAUSE: An unexpected error has occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 30
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to obtain port data segment.
(NMCNERR 30)
CAUSE: INITPORTDST returned a DST number of 0. The system is
unable to allocate any extra data segments.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 31
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to create port data segment.
(NMCNERR 31)
CAUSE: CREATEPORT returned a PORTID of 0.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 32
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to add port dictionary entry.
(NMCNERR 32)
CAUSE: DICTADD returned a nonzero result.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
175
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR 33
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to add to NM Monitor port table.
(NMCNERR 33)
CAUSE: NMMONADDID failed for MainLogMonitor.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNERR 34
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to create logging buffer data
segment. (NMCNERR 34)
CAUSE: NM Log Process is unable to acquire an extra data segment.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 36
MESSAGE: NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #nnn. NM LOGGING
STOPPED. (NMCNERR 36)
CAUSE: If the error number is greater than 1, this is the file system
error that occurred when accessing file NMLGnnnn, where nnnn is the file
number specified. If the error number is 1, then see the comments to
NMCNERR 23.
ACTION: Correct this problem, then type RESUMENMLOG.
NMCNERR 38
MESSAGE: NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #nnn. NM LOGGING
SUSPENDED. (NMCNERR 38)
CAUSE: If the error number is greater than 1, this is the file system
error that occurred when accessing file NMLGnnnn, where nnnn is the file
number specified. If the error number is 1, refer to message
NMCNERR 23.
ACTION: Correct this problem, then type RESUMENMLOG.
NMCNERR 42
MESSAGE: UNABLE TO ACCESS NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn.
(NMCNERR 42)
CAUSE: The log buffer indicates the logging state is normal or
suspended, but it contains a current file number of zero, or FFILEINFO
returned a < > condition on the file.
ACTION: Try typing RESUMENMLOG. If SHOWNMLOG after this gives this
message again, try rebooting the system to force logging to open a new
NMLGnnnn file.
NMCNERR 44
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Unable to create log dictionary data
segment. (NMCNERR 44)
CAUSE: NM Log Process is unable to acquire an extra data segment.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
176
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR 45
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Cannot format log msg. Cannot access
formatter for subsystem !. Encountered LOADPROC error !.
(NMCNERR 45)
CAUSE: A request to write a formatted log message specifies an NMS
subsystem number where formatter Log Process was unable to
LOADPROC.
ACTION: The SUBSYSnLOGFORMA procedure, where n is the subsystem
number specified in the message, either did not exist in SL.PUB.SYS or
could not be loaded when NM Log Process started. Look up the
LOADPROC error number in the MPE Intrinsics Reference Manual.
Correct this error. Check that NMS subsystem n is completely, correctly
installed. See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Insufficient MPE
Resources” at the beginning of this appendix.
Table A-1
Subsystem Numbers for NMCNERR Messages
NMCNERR 46
nn
Subsystem
0
Node Management Services (30299-11017)
1
SNA Transport (32099-11015)
2
SNA/NRJE (Product #30245)
3
Network Transport (Product #30242)
4
Port Translator (30299-11017)
5
Sockets
6
Network Services (Product #32344)
7
Buffer Manager (30299-11016)
8
Link Manager (part of Node Management Services)
9
Reserved for future use
10
Reserved for future use
11
SNA/IMF
12/15
Reserved for future use
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Cannot format log msg. Unknown
subsystem nn. (NMCNERR 46)
CAUSE: A request to write a formatted log message specifies an
unknown NMS subsystem number.
ACTION: This is an internal error. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
177
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
NMCNERR 47
MESSAGE: NMLG FILES mmmm THRU nnnn SKIPPED. (NMCNERR 47)
CAUSE: NM log files mmmm through nnnn were skipped over when NMS
Logging tried to open a new disk log file. Files NMLGmmmm.PUB.SYS
through NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS already exist. This is an information
message only; no error occurred.
ACTION: None.
NMCNERR 48
MESSAGE: NMLG FILES 0000 THRU 9999 ALL USED, NONE
AVAILALBLE FOR NEXT LOGFILE. (NMCNERR 48)
CAUSE: NMS Logging finds that files NMLG0000 through NMLG9999 all
already exist. It is more likely that a directory problem or an internal
problem exists.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMCNMSG 49
MESSAGE: MainLogMon: NMGLOBAL file found, purged (not needed
for this version). (NMCNMSG 49)
CAUSE: Privileged file NMGLOBAL.PUB.SYS was found. This file is not
needed in this version of NMS software. The file information is
transferred to the Cold Load area of disk, and the file is purged.
ACTION: None. Informative message.
NMCNERR 50
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Cannot access NMCAT.PUB.SYS to
format a log msg. (NMCNERR 50)
CAUSE: NM Log Process could not open the message catalog and so
could not format a logging message.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMCNERR 51
MESSAGE: NM Log Process: Logging class ! not configured for
subsystem ! in !. (NMCNERR 51)
CAUSE: A logging message was received from NMS subsystem m that
specified log class n. However, log class n is not configured. The log
message is discarded.
ACTION: Use NMMGR to configure logging class n under subsystem m
in the specified configuration file. The NMMGR subtree is LOGGING.
SUBmmmm.CLASnnnn, where mmmm is the subsystem number m with
leading zeros, and nnnn is the class number n with leading zeros.
NMCNWARN 70
MESSAGE: Link Manager unable to open NM logging.
(NMCNWARN 70)
CAUSE: A Link Manager process encountered an error from
NMOPENLOG.
ACTION: The specific NMERR will be reported in a console message
immediately following this message. The Link Manager process will
178
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMCN Error and Warning Messages
continue to execute, but will be unable to log any errors, including I/O
errors.
NMCNWARN 71
MESSAGE: Trace Manager unable to open NM logging.
(NMCNWARN 71)
CAUSE: NMCONFIG does not have logging subsystem 18 configured.
ACTION: None required.
NMCNERR 80
MESSAGE: Linkname Table creation error, subsys=! info=!.
(NMCNERR 80)
CAUSE: System call failure.
ACTION: Reboot the system.
Appendix A
179
NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPERR 0
MESSAGE: Unable to retrieve text of message #! of set #! from the
message catalog. (NMDUMPERR 0)
CAUSE: This message is actually not returned by the message catalog,
but by the program, if the error message requested to be returned
cannot be retrieved by the program. It will be displayed when there is
no message catalog, NMCAT.PUB.SYS, or the message catalog is not valid
(corrupt).
ACTION: Verify that the message catalog exists and is valid.
CAUSE: The version of the NMS message catalog on the system is not
compatible with the current NMS software.
ACTION: Verify that the version of NMCAT.PUB.SYS on the system is
compatible with the current NMS software.
CAUSE: File system error, a problem accessing and retrieving
information from message catalog, or an internal error in the
NMDUMP program.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMDUMPERR 1
MESSAGE: Data type must be 1 or 2. (NMDUMPERR 1)
CAUSE: User responded incorrectly to prompt for data type.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 2
MESSAGE: Invalid subsystem ID entered. (NMDUMPERR 2)
CAUSE: User responded incorrectly to prompt for subsystem ID.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 3
MESSAGE: Input must be YES or NO. (NMDUMPERR 3)
CAUSE: User responded incorrectly to a prompt requiring a Y or N
answer. “Y”, “YES”, “y”, or “yes” are allowed for Y. “N”, “NO”, “n”, or “no”
are allowed for N.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 4
MESSAGE: Error — File is not of log type. (NMDUMPERR 4)
CAUSE: User specified that he wanted to format a log file, but the input
file specified was not type NLOG.
ACTION: Check spelling of filename. Check file’s type code. Correct
input and reenter.
180
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NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPERR 5
MESSAGE: Error — File is not of trace type. (NMDUMPERR 5)
CAUSE: User specified that he wanted to format a trace file, but the
input file specified was not type NTRAC.
ACTION: Check spelling of filename. Check file’s type code. Correct
input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 6
MESSAGE: Invalid date and time string entered. (NMDUMPERR 6)
CAUSE: User entered an invalid date and/or time. User entered the date
and/or time in improper format. Type “Help” for a list of allowed
formats.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 7
MESSAGE: Time not within time range of file. (NMDUMPERR 7)
CAUSE: User entered a date and/or time that is beyond the time range
of the input file.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPERR 8
MESSAGE: Finishing time earlier than starting time. (NMDUMPERR 8)
CAUSE: User entered a finishing date and time that was earlier than
the starting date and time.
ACTION: Correct input and reenter.
NMDUMPWARN
9
MESSAGE: LOADPROC failed on procedure !, LOADPROC error !. Will
output this subsystemid’s entries in dump format. (NMDUMPWARN 9)
CAUSE: NMDUMP was unable to LOADPROC (via MODCAL ADDR
function) the trace or log formatter procedure for the specified
subsystemid number. The procedure name is SUBSYSnLOGFORMAT
or SUBSYSnTRACEFORMAT, for log or trace files, for subsystemid = n.
NMDUMP will continue and will print out data for this subsystemid,
but it will be in a raw dump (hex and ASCII) format. The procedure is
not in an SL accessible to NMDUMP. Normally it should be present in
SL.PUB.SYS on those systems that have installed the NMS software.
Either the initial installation of these procedures was faulty, or these
procedures have been deleted since their initial installation.
ACTION: Get a known good copy of these procedures and install them in
SL.PUB.SYS.
NMDUMPWARN
13
MESSAGE: LOADPROC failed on procedure !, LOADPROC error !.
Default formatting options will be assumed for this subsystemid.
(NMDUMPWARN 13)
CAUSE: Similar to NMDUMPWARN 9, except the procedure that failed
to load was a menu procedure.
ACTION: Get a known good copy of these procedures and install them in
SL.PUB.SYS.
Appendix A
181
NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPERR 20 MESSAGE: Error — unexpected end of input data file.
(NMDUMPERR 20)
CAUSE: There was a system failure while tracing/logging was enabled
and the file was closed improperly.
ACTION: Attempt to relog or retrace the error situation.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace/log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the trace or log file.
NMDUMPERR 21 MESSAGE: Error occurred during output of file header.
(NMDUMPERR 21)
CAUSE: A file system error occurred.
ACTION: Attempt to find out what file system error occurred: Rerun
NMDUMP and see if error occurs.
CAUSE: An internal error in NMWRITE.
ACTION: Rerun NMDUMP. File a CR (Change Request) if the same
problem occurs. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMDUMPWARN
22
MESSAGE: No data records, from the subsystems selected, were
found in the input file. (NMDUMPWARN 22)
CAUSE: No records were logged/traced to the file from the selected
subsystems.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: If the input file is a log file, logging for the subsystems selected
may not be enabled.
ACTION: Check the logging configuration portion of NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
to ensure that logging to disk is enabled for the subsystem(s) and log
class(es) desired. If it is not, make the appropriate changes to the
configuration file through NMMGR.PUB.SYS.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace/log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
182
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NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPWARN
23
MESSAGE: No data records, from the subsystems selected, were
found within the time selected. (NMDUMPWARN 23)
CAUSE: No records were logged/traced to the file from the selected
subsystems during the time range specified.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: If the input file is a log file, logging for the subsystems selected
may not be enabled.
ACTION: Check the logging configuration portion of NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
to ensure that logging to disk is enabled for the subsystem(s) and log
class(es) desired. If it is not, make the appropriate changes to the
configuration file through NMMGR.PUB.SYS.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace/log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMDUMPERR 24 MESSAGE: Error — invalid data record in trace file. (NMDUMPERR 24)
CAUSE: There was a system failure while tracing was enabled and the
file was closed improperly.
ACTION: Attempt to retrace the error situation.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the trace file.
NMDUMPERR 25 MESSAGE: Error — invalid data record in log file. (NMDUMPERR 25)
CAUSE: There was a system failure while logging was enabled and the
file was closed improperly.
ACTION: Attempt to retrace the error situation.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the logfile.
Appendix A
183
NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPERR 26 MESSAGE: Error — invalid trace data file. (NMDUMPERR 26)
CAUSE: There was a system failure while tracing was enabled and the
file was closed improperly.
ACTION: Attempt to retrace the error situation.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the trace file.
NMDUMPERR 27 MESSAGE: Error — invalid log data file. (NMDUMPERR 27)
CAUSE: There was a system failure while logging was enabled and the
file was closed improperly.
ACTION: Attempt to retrace the error situation.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the log file.
NMDUMPWARN
28
MESSAGE: EOF was reached on the output file. The output listing is
incomplete. (NMDUMPWARN 28)
CAUSE: The output disk file was not built large enough to hold the full
dump listing.
ACTION: Redirect the output to a nondisk file, or increase the number of
records in the output file with a FILE equation or BUILD command.
NMDUMPERR 29 MESSAGE: Error occurred during output of formatted data record.
(NMDUMPERR 29)
CAUSE: A file system error occurred when NMWRITE was trying to
write to the output file. (A probable file system error in this case would
be “out of disk space.”)
ACTION: Verify that the system is at least not “out of space”: Rerun
NMDUMP and see if the same error occurs.
CAUSE: An internal error in NMWRITE.
ACTION: Rerun NMDUMP. File a CR (Change Request) if the same
problem occurs. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
184
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
NMDUMPWARN
30
MESSAGE: Invalid trace destination specified in global header.
Reassigned according to file characteristics. (NMDUMPWARN 30)
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace facility which caused bad
data to be written to the data file.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, an CR may be filed against the trace
facility. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, you may attempt to recreate the data
file.
NMDUMPWARN
31
MESSAGE: No data records are in the input file. (NMDUMPWARN 31)
CAUSE: No data records were logged/traced to the data file.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace/log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the data file.
NMDUMPWARN
32
MESSAGE: No additional data records are in the input file.
(NMDUMPWARN 32)
CAUSE: It is the end of the file.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace/log facility or the NMDUMP
facility.
ACTION: File a CR (Change Request). Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: Attempt to recreate the data file.
NMDUMPWARN
33
MESSAGE: An out-of-range block length was found. It was
reassigned the maximum allowable value, 1024. (NMDUMPWARN 33)
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS log facility which caused bad data
to be written to the log data file.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, an CR may be filed against the log
facility. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
185
NMS Error Messages
NMDUMP Error and Warning Messages
CAUSE: Log data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, you may attempt to recreate the data
file.
NMDUMPWARN
34
MESSAGE: An out-of-range data record length was found. It was
reassigned the maximum allowable value, 2046. (NMDUMPWARN 34)
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS log facility which caused bad data
to be written to the log data file.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, an CR may be filed against the log
facility. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Log data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, you may attempt to recreate the data
file.
NMDUMPWARN
35
MESSAGE: An out-of-range start data record length was found. It was
reassigned the maximum allowable value, 8192. (NMDUMPWARN 34)
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace facility which caused bad
data to be written to the trace data file.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, an CR may be filed against the log
facility. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Trace data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, you may attempt to recreate the data
file.
NMDUMPWARN
36
MESSAGE: An out-of-range continuation data record length was
found. It was reassigned the maximum allowable value.
(NMDUMPWARN 36)
CAUSE: An internal error in the NMS trace facility which caused bad
data to be written to the trace data file.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, an CR may be filed against the log
facility. Refer to “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Trace data file has become corrupt.
ACTION: No action is actually needed. NMDUMP recovers from such an
error in the data file. However, you may attempt to recreate the data
file.
186
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 1
MESSAGE: Invalid parameter specified. (NMERR 1)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure has passed an invalid value for
one or more of the parameters.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 2
MESSAGE: Invalid SubsystemID parameter. (NMERR 2)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure has passed an invalid value for
the parameter SubsystemID. Returned by NMOPENTRACE,
NMOPENLOG, NMGETTRACEID, NMVERSCHECK. This is usually
an internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 3
MESSAGE: Invalid UserID parameter. (NMERR 3)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure has passed an invalid value for
the parameter UserID. Returned by NMOPENTRACE,
NMGETTRACEID. This is usually an internal error in the calling
subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 5
MESSAGE: Invalid TraceElement parameter. (NMERR 5)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
TraceElement parameter. Returned by NMOPENTRACE,
NMGETTRACE. This is usually an internal error in the calling
subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 6
MESSAGE: Invalid Dest parameter. (NMERR 6)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
Dest parameter. Returned by NMOPENTRACE. This is usually an
internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 7
MESSAGE: Invalid TraceID parameter. (NMERR 7)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
TraceID parameter. Returned by NMWRITETRACE,
NMCLOSETRACE. This is usually an internal error in the calling
subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
187
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 8
MESSAGE: Invalid InfoMode parameter. (NMERR 8)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
InfoMode parameter. Returned by NMWRITETRACE. This is usually
an internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 9
MESSAGE: Invalid Mode parameter. (NMERR 9)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
Mode parameter. Returned by NMWRITETRACE, NMCLOSETRACE,
NMOPENLOG, NMWRITELOG, NMCLOSELOG. This is usually an
internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 10
MESSAGE: Invalid FileName, RecordSize, and/or FileSize parameter.
(NMERR 10)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
FileName, RecordSize, and/or FileSize parameters. Returned by
NMOPENTRACE, NMCONFOPEN. An invalid file name, record size,
or filesize was specified by the user in a CI command, subsystem
command, or NMMGR screen or in a configuration file.
ACTION: Correct and retry.
CAUSE: One or more of these parameters are being passed incorrectly
by the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 11
MESSAGE: Invalid LogID parameter. (NMERR 11)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
LogID parameter. Returned by NMWRITELOG, NMCLOSELOG. This
is usually an internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 12
MESSAGE: Invalid LogClass parameter. (NMERR 12)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
LogClass parameter. Returned by NMWRITELOG. This is usually an
internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 13
MESSAGE: Invalid LogDataMode parameter. (NMERR 13)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMS procedure passed an invalid value to the
LogDataMode parameter. Returned by NMWriteLog. This is usually an
internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
188
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 15
MESSAGE: Unable to create new datafile. (NMERR 15)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFOPEN. NMCONFOPEN detected an
error on MIDASOPEN, attempted on the user’s stack, on a new file that
was to be created. A File System error occurred. (Normal File System
restrictions apply when creating NM files.)
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 16
MESSAGE: Unable to open the datafile. (NMERR 16)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFOPEN. A File System error occurred.
(Normal File System restrictions apply when accessing NM files.)
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 17
MESSAGE: Unable to close the datafile. (NMERR 17)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFCLOSE. NMFILE detected an error on
MIDASCLOSE.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 18
MESSAGE: Unable to write to datafile. (NMERR 18)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFGETDATA, NMCONFUPDATEDATA.
NMFILE detected an error on MIDASGETDATA, besides NMFSERR 9
or 18.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENTRACE, NMWRITETRACE,
NMCLOSETRACE, NMWRITELOG, and NMCLOSELOG. NMS
Tracing or Logging could not write to a trace or log file. Check for File
System errors such as out of file, group, account, or system disk space,
or I/O errors.
ACTION: If error persists and no File System error is detectable, then
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 19
MESSAGE: Unable to read from datafile. (NMERR 19)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFGETDATA. NMFILE detected an error
on MIDASGETDATA, besides NMFSERR 9 or NMFSERR 18. A File
System error occurred. (Normal File System restrictions apply when
accessing NM files.)
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
189
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 20
MESSAGE: Unable to obtain data segment for tracing. (NMERR 20)
CAUSE: Main NMLogMon was unable to get an extra data segment, or if
internal tracing was specified, was unable to lock the extra data
segment it did get.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 21
MESSAGE: Must have 1 <= data length <= 8192 bytes. (NMERR 21)
CAUSE: A call to NMCONFadddata or NMCONFupdatedata cannot
send more than 8192 bytes of data. This is probably an internal error in
the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 25
MESSAGE: Multiple accesses to a trace entity are not supported.
(NMERR 25)
CAUSE: The trace entity passed to NMOPENTRACE is a duplicate trace
entry. NMS tracing will not support multiple NMOPENTRACE calls for
the same trace entity. A trace entity is a unique combination of the
parameters SubSystemID, TraceElement, and TraceType. A user
entered a command requesting a particular kind of trace when this
trace is already active.
ACTION: Do not request a trace when that trace is already active.
CAUSE: An internal error has occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 26
MESSAGE: Trace entity is not currently being traced. (NMERR 26)
CAUSE: A request was made for the TraceID of a trace entity that is not
currently active. Returned by NMGETTRACEID. (A trace entity is
composed of a SubSystemID, TraceElement, and TraceType).
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 27
MESSAGE: Request can not be completed immediately. (NMERR 27)
CAUSE: A nowait type request cannot be processed immediately.
Returned by some of the NMnnTRACE and NMnnLOG procedures
when the MODE parameter is set to 1 (nowait mode) and NMS Tracing or
NMS Logging cannot process the request immediately.
ACTION: Normally this is not an error condition.
NMERR 28
MESSAGE: Subsystem not configured in logging configuration.
(NMERR 28)
CAUSE: The SubSystemID passed to NMOPENLOG cannot be found in
the LOGGING subtree of the NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS configuration file. The
subsystem has not been configured for logging, or the entry is spelled
wrong, or the configuration file has been corrupted.
190
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
ACTION: Manually check the configuration using NMMGR and ensure
the logging entry for that subsystem is configured properly. Refer to the
appropriate reference manual for assistance.
NMERR 29
MESSAGE: LogClass not configured in configuration file.
(NMERR 29)
CAUSE: NMS logging cannot find the specified log class in the
configuration file NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. Returned by NMWRITELOG.
The log class specified for the calling subsystem is not configured
correctly in NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Use NMMGR to manually check and correct the logging
configuration in CONFIG.PUB.SYS. Make sure that the class name is
spelled correctly. Refer to the appropriate reference manual for
assistance.
NMERR 31
MESSAGE: Unable to repetition trace to beginning of file. (NMERR 31)
CAUSE: FCONTROL 5 failed.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 32
MESSAGE: This program may not be run as a user process.
(NMERR 32)
CAUSE: User attempted to :RUN one of the NMS program files that are
not allowed to be :RUN. These program files include LINKMGR.PUB.SYS,
NMFILE.PUB.SYS, NMLOGMON.PUB.SYS, PCMANAGE.PUB.SYS,
NMLOGICS.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: None.
NMERR 33
MESSAGE: Unable to access logging configuration file. (NMERR 33)
CAUSE: An unexpected error occurred while NMS logging was trying to
read the logging configuration data in NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. Returned by
NMOPENLOG.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 34
MESSAGE: Invalid reference parameter specified. (NMERR 34)
CAUSE: Condition code “>” returned from an internal data segment
move routine. One of the parameters, passed by reference, would cause
a bounds violation if written to. This message is returned if a bad
condition code is received after call of one of the move routines between
data segments: MBFDS, MFDS, MBTDS, MTDS. This is an internal
error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
191
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 35
MESSAGE: Internal error: Invalid data segment number. (NMERR 35)
CAUSE: Condition code “>” returned from an internal data segment
move routine. An invalid DST number was specified. This message is
returned if a bad condition code is received after call of one of the move
routines between data segments: MBFDS, MFDS, MBTDS. This is an
internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 36
MESSAGE: Unable to find port for NM Monitor process. (NMERR 36)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONADDID and NMMONMAINTREQ.
NMMON does not have an entry in Port Dictionary. Cause: internal
problem, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Version Incompatibilities” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 37
MESSAGE: Calls from split stack are not supported. (NMERR 37)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONADDID, NMMONSTARTREQ,
NMMONMAINTREQ, NMOPENLINK, NMCLOSELINK,
NMMANAGELINK, NMLINKINFO and NMLINKDIAL. Attempt to
call above procedures in Split stack. Caused by an internal problem, or
bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 38
MESSAGE: Parameter length out of range. (NMERR 38)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONSTARTREQ, NMOPENLINK, and
NMOPENLOG2. Length given for string parameter negative or too
long. Caused by an internal problem, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 39
MESSAGE: System shutdown in progress. Can’t complete request.
(NMERR 39)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONADDID, NMMONSTARTREQ,
NMMONMAINTREQ, NMOPENLINK, NMCLOSELINK,
NMMANAGELINK, NMLINKINFO and NMLINKDIAL. NMMON and
Link Manager are in the process of shutting down.
ACTION: This is normally not an error condition.
NMERR 40
MESSAGE: Port table full. Unable to expand capacity. (NMERR 40)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONADDID. NMMON cannot expand its DL
DB area. Caused by an internal problem, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR”’ at
the beginning of this appendix.
192
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 41
MESSAGE: Port identifier not found in port table. (NMERR 41)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONDELETEID. Port ID to be deleted does
not exist in NMMON’s table, NMMONADDID was not called for this
ID. Caused by an internal problem, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR”’ at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 42
MESSAGE: Unable to create specified system process. (NMERR 42)
CAUSE: Returned by NMMONSTARTREQ. Error calling
CREATEPROCESS intrinsic. Caused by not enough MPE resources in
system, an internal error, a loader error, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources,” “Invalid Software
Installation,” and “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 43
MESSAGE: Unable to obtain data segment for port. (NMERR 43)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Link Manager found an error
calling procedure INITPORTDST.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources,” “Invalid Software
Installation,” and “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 44
MESSAGE: Unable to create IPC port. (NMERR 44)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Link Manager found an error
calling CREATEPORT.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR’” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 45
MESSAGE: Add to NM Monitor port table failed. (NMERR 45)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Error calling procedure
NMMONADDID (see message NMERR 40). Caused by an internal
error, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 46
MESSAGE: Add to port dictionary failed. (NMERR 46)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Error calling procedure
DICTADD to add Link Manager in Port Dictionary. Caused by an
internal error, or bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 47
MESSAGE: Unable to access message catalog NMCAT.PUB.SYS.
(NMERR 47)
CAUSE: Returned by Version Checking Routines. Unable to FOPEN file
NMCAT.PUB.SYS. Caused by a bad software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
Appendix A
193
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
appendix.
NMERR 48
MESSAGE: Unable to open $STDIN for process. (NMERR 48)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Unable to FOPEN $STDIN for
Link Manager process. Caused by an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 49
MESSAGE: Unable to open $STDLIST for process. (NMERR 49)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Unable to FOPEN $STDIN for
Link Manager process. Caused by an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 50
MESSAGE: Unable to find port for Link Manager process. (NMERR 50)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK. Link Manager does not have an
entry in Port Dictionary. Caused by an internal problem, or bad
software installation.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 51
MESSAGE: Length of data to be logged not in range 1 <= logDataSize
<= max allowed (ICS, =58 bytes; non-ICS =2034 bytes. (NMERR 51)
CAUSE: Caller of NMWRITELOG has requested either too much or too
little data to be logged.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 53
MESSAGE: Invalid NMCONF pathname. Non-printable characters not
allowed. (NMERR 53)
CAUSE: Returned by most NMCONF intrinsics. Caller has sent
NMCONF intrinsic a pathname with non-printable character(s). May
be a subsystem problem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 54
MESSAGE: Invalid transaction number. (NMERR 54)
CAUSE: Returned by most of the NMCONF procedures.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 55
MESSAGE: NMTC FILES 0000 THRU 9999 ALL USED, NONE
AVAILABLE FOR NEXT TRACEFILE. (NMERR 55)
CAUSE: NMS Trace finds that files NMTC0000 through NMTC9999 all
already exist. It is more likely that a directory problem or an internal
problem exists.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
194
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 56
MESSAGE: Invalid infolen, must be in range: 1 <= infolen <= 8.
(NMERR 56)
CAUSE: Returned by: NMCONFFILEINFO.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 57
MESSAGE: Duplicate identifier already exists. (NMERR 57)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFADDPATH, NMCONFRENAMEPATH.
NMFILE detected NMFSERR 21 on MIDASADDPATH. User of
configuration program entered erroneous information.
ACTION: Enter correct data specifications.
CAUSE: Configuration database has internal error.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: Internal software error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 58
MESSAGE: Unable to find identifier in path name. (NMERR 58)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFGETDATA, NMCONFADDPATH,
NMCONFPURGEPATH, NMCONFNEXTPATH, NMCONFADDDATA,
NMCONFUPDATEDATA NMCONFDATALENGTH,
NMCONFRENAMEPATH, NMCONFPURGEDATA. NMFILE detected
message NMFSERR 9. User of configuration program or caller of
procedure entered erroneous pathname.
ACTION: Enter correct pathname.
CAUSE: Configuration file internal error.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 59
MESSAGE: Path depth < minimum or > maximum allowed.
(NMERR 59)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFNEXTPATH. Procedure received a path
depth < 0, or > 256. Returned by: NMCONFADDDATA,
NMCONFUPDATEDATA, NMCONFGETDATA,
NMCONFDATALENGTH, NMCONFPURGEDATA,
NMCONFRENAMEPATH, NMCONFPURGEPATH,
NMCONFADDPATH. Procedure received a path depth < 1, or > 256.
Internal error in the calling program
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
195
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 60
MESSAGE: Unable to find NM Log Monitor. (NMERR 60)
CAUSE: An NM Trace or Logging procedure is unable to locate the
server trace or log process (NMLogMon). Returned by
NMOPENTRACE, NMGETTRACEID, NMCLOSETRACE,
NMOPENLOG, NMCLOSELOG, and by the SHOWNMLOG CI
command. The trace or log server process creation failed at system
startup due to a bad software installation, a loader error, or an internal
error.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An =SHUTDOWN or NMMAINT,SHUTDOWN has been
executed prior to the Trace or Logging procedure call. The server
process has already shut down. This is not an error condition.
ACTION: None.
NMERR 61
MESSAGE: DB register at absolute. (NMERR 61)
CAUSE: Caller’s DB register is at an absolute DB location
(WHERES’DB returned a < condition code). This is not allowed in the
called procedure. Returned by those trace and log procedures that can
otherwise be called in split stack mode. This is probably an internal
error by the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 62
MESSAGE: NM trace dictionary table is full. (NMERR 62)
CAUSE: An unexpectedly large number of NMOPENTRACE calls have
been made, each specifying a different combination of SubSystemID,
TraceType, and TraceElement. If this is being done by user request,
turn off some of the traces, then retry. If this is not being done by user
request, then this is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 63
MESSAGE: NM log table is full. (NMERR 63)
CAUSE: An unexpectedly large number of NMOPENTRACE calls have
been made, each specifying internal memory tracing or a different
destination filename. If this is being done by user request, turn off some
of the traces, then retry. If this is not being done by user request, then
this is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 64
MESSAGE: Specified file is a system file. (NMERR 64)
CAUSE: The file name FileName parameter of the NMOPENTRACE
procedure contains a system file name (the first ASCII character is “$”).
User specified an incorrect filename either in the command that starts
tracing, or in the configuration file.
196
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
ACTION: Specify a valid file name and retry.
NMERR 65
MESSAGE: Specified file is a back reference file. (NMERR 65)
CAUSE: The file name FileName parameter of the NMOPENTRACE
procedure contains a back referenced file name (the first ASCII
character is “*”). User specified an incorrect filename either in the
command that starts trace for that subsystem, or in the configuration
file for that subsystem.
ACTION: Specify a valid file name and retry.
NMERR 67
MESSAGE: User logging entries are not available. (NMERR 67)
CAUSE: The LogBuf XDS used for a particular NMS trace file or for
NMS logging has no more available entries to add one more user. An
additional entry is used for tracing whenever additional traces are
requested to go to an existing open trace file. An additional entry is
used for logging whenever a subsystem opens a log file. The user has
requested an unexpectedly large number of concurrent traces to go to
the same trace file.
ACTION: Turn off some of the traces and retry.
CAUSE: An internal error has occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 69
MESSAGE: Unable to create the trace process. (NMERR 69)
CAUSE: The tracing subsystem is unable to create a trace server process
for the NMOPENTRACE request (NMMONSTARTREQ failed).
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation,” “Insufficient MPE
Resources,” and “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 70
MESSAGE: Unable to initialize the trace process. (NMERR 70)
CAUSE: The tracing subsystem is unable to initialize the trace server
process for the NMOPENTRACE request (unable to create a port or
acquire a data segment).
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation,” “Insufficient MPE
Resources,” and “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 71
MESSAGE: Logging has stopped. (NMERR 71)
CAUSE: An I/O error or File System error occurred earlier and logging is
not currently taking place. Returned by NMOPENLOG.
ACTION: Enter the SHOWLOG command to find out the status of the log
file and the type of error. Correct the error, and restart logging with a
RESUMENMLOG or a SWITCHNMLOG command. Then retry the action that
led to this error.
Appendix A
197
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 72
MESSAGE: This command has no parameter. (NMERR 72)
CAUSE: Parameters were specified for an NMS command that does not
require any parameters. Returned by SHOWNMLOG,
RESUMENMLOG, and SWITCHNMLOG. User entered parameters for
an NMS CI command SHOWNMLOG, SWITCHNMLOG, or RESUMENMLOG.
ACTION: Enter the command name alone without any other text on the
$STDIN or $STDINX record.
NMERR 73
MESSAGE: Invalid logging configuration file. (NMERR 73)
CAUSE: NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS contains invalid logging configuration data.
Returned by NMOPENLOG, NMWRITELOG.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 74
MESSAGE: NM Log dictionary table is full. (NMERR 74)
CAUSE: Network management logging facility has a log dictionary table
with a fixed number of available entries. If no free entries are available
to complete the caller request this error message is returned.
Incompatible software versions installed.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” and “Version
Incompatibilities” at the beginning of this appendix. If this does not
resolve the problem, then see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of
this appendix.
NMERR 75
MESSAGE: Data is already associated with this identifier. (NMERR 75)
CAUSE: Returned by: NMCONFADDDATA. NMFILE detected
NMFSERR 12. User attempted to add data to a path location where
data already exists. This may not necessarily be an error if the calling
program is trying to determine if data already exists at that location.
This could also be caused by database corruption, or by an internal
error.
ACTION: If data base corruption is suspected, then see “File System
Error” at the beginning of this appendix. If an internal error is
suspected, then see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 76
MESSAGE: File associated with this transaction is not locked.
(NMERR 76)
CAUSE: Returned by: NMCONFUNLOCKFILE. NMFILE determined
that an NMCONFUNLOCKFILE was attempted on a transaction
without a corresponding NMCONFLOCKFILE. This is not necessarily
an error if the intent of the caller was to determine the lock status of
the file. This could also be caused by an internal error.
ACTION: If an internal error is suspected, see “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
198
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 77
MESSAGE: File associated with this transaction is locked.
(NMERR 77)
CAUSE: Returned by: NMCONFADDDATA, NMCONFUPDATEDATA,
NMCONFPURGEDATA, NMCONFADDPATH,
NMCONFPURGEPATH, NMCONFRENAMEPATH. Some other
process has the NMCONF type file locked.
ACTION: Wait until the file is unlocked by the other user(s) before
proceeding.
NMERR 78
MESSAGE: No data associated with this identifier. (NMERR 78)
CAUSE: Returned by: NMCONFGETDATA, NMCONFDATALENGTH,
NMCONFPURGEDATA, NMCONFUPDATEDATA. NMFILE detected
NMFSERR 18. This may not be an error if the call to these procedures
was using this return to test if data was associated with the identifier.
If it was an error, it could be due to corruption of the database.
ACTION: If file corruption is suspected, see “Corrupt Configuration File”
at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 82
MESSAGE: Buffer length parameter out of allowable range.
(NMERR 82)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFGETDATA. Length parameter is longer
than 8192 or less than 7. Probable internal error by caller.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 83
MESSAGE: Transaction table is full. (NMERR 83)
CAUSE: Returned if the maximum number of transactions via
NMCONF are already opened, and a call to NMCONFOPEN is made.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 85
MESSAGE: Data structures internal error in NMFILE. (NMERR 85)
CAUSE: Returned by most NMCONF procedures.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 86
MESSAGE: Switch to CM failed. (NMERR 86)
CAUSE: Returned by native mode NMS procedures if an error is
returned by SWITCH.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 87
MESSAGE: CM data segment improperly mapped to NM object.
(NMERR 87)
CAUSE: Returned by native mode NMWRITETRACE if an error is
returned by wrap-dst.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
199
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 88
MESSAGE: Parameter not aligned properly. (NMERR 88)
CAUSE: Internal error by the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 90
MESSAGE: Invalid path type value, must be 1 or 2. (NMERR 90)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFNEXTPATH. NMCONFNEXTPATH
detected invalid path type value. Internal error by the calling
subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 92
MESSAGE: Unable to purge datafile. (NMERR 92)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFPURGE NMOPENTRACE. File system
error.
ACTION: Try to purge the file from a CI session, and note the error.
Correct this and retry.
NMERR 94
MESSAGE: No identifiers beyond this point in datafile. (NMERR 94)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFNEXTPATH. NMFILE detected warning
NMFSWARN 23, in MIDASNEXTPATH. This may not be an error if
the caller’s intention is to search the data file. Otherwise it might
indicate corruption of the file.
ACTION: If file corruption is suspected, see “Corrupt Configuration File”
at the beginning of this appendix. If this is not a problem, it may be due
to incompatible software modules, or an internal error by the calling
subsystem. See “Version Incompatibilities” and “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 95
MESSAGE: Read truncated to capacity of buffer. (NMERR 95)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFGETDATA. NMFILE detected
NMFWARN 19 on MIDASGETDATA. This is probably an internal error
by the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 96
MESSAGE: File code mismatch. (NMERR 96)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFOPEN. NMFILE detected
NMFSWARN 6 on MIDASOPEN. The file is not a valid configuration
file.
ACTION: Type LISTF <filename>, 1 on the file. The file type should be
type NCONF.
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
200
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 97
MESSAGE: Unable to find port for NMFILE process. (NMERR 97)
CAUSE: Returned by all NMCONF procedures. Error detected on
DICTSEND.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 100
MESSAGE: Subsystem does not support version checking.
(NMERR 100)
CAUSE: Returned by NMVERSCHECK. Coding error by caller of
NMVERSCHECK. The SUBSYSID parameter must refer to a subsystem
number that has a second level version cross check routine.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 101
MESSAGE: Fix levels differ in one or more modules. (NMERR 101)
CAUSE: There is a version mismatch between the various modules of
the subsystem. Incorrect installation of the subsystem software.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 102
MESSAGE: Update levels differ in one or more modules. (NMERR 102)
CAUSE: There is a version mismatch between the various modules of
the subsystem. Incorrect installation of the subsystem software.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 103
MESSAGE: Version levels differ in one or more modules.
(NMERR 103)
CAUSE: There is a version mismatch between the various modules of
the subsystem. Incorrect installation of the subsystem.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 104
MESSAGE: One or more subsystem modules are missing.
(NMERR 104)
CAUSE: A module required for normal operation of the subsystem is
missing.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 105
MESSAGE: One or more subsystem modules are invalid.
(NMERR 105)
CAUSE: An error has occurred trying to read the version ID of one or
more of the subsystem’s modules. An I/O error, disk error, or similar has
prevented reading the version stamp correctly.
Appendix A
201
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
ACTION: Correct this problem and retry. If necessary see “Invalid
Software Installation” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: Some of the program files and data files have the version stamp
located in the last user label record. Perhaps the file was copied without
copying its user label records properly.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 106
MESSAGE: MODULE FLAGS parameter invalid. (NMERR 106).
CAUSE: The MODULE FLAGS MODE field (bits 7:6) is not in the range
0 to 5, or the TYPE field (bits 13:3) is not in the range 0 to 2. Returned
by NMSUBSYSVERS, SUBSYSOVERS, and other subsystem level 2
version check procedures. Probable internal error by caller.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 107
MESSAGE: FLAGS options are incompatible. (NMERR 107)
CAUSE: Some mutually incompatible option bits were set in the FLAGS
parameter. Returned by NMSUBSYSVERS, SUBSYSOVERS, and
other subsystem level 2 version check procedures.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 130
MESSAGE: Unable to create the link manager process. (NMERR 130)
CAUSE: A nonzero result code was returned by NMMONSTARTREQ to
NMOPENLINK.
Returned by NMOPENLINK. Loader error trying to load
LINKMGR.PUB.SYS program file.
ACTION: Try to ALLOCATE LINKMGR.PUB.SYS. If this fails, correct the
problem according to the error messages given. If this succeeds, retry
the action that led to the problem. If this error occurs again, this is not
the problem.
CAUSE: Out of MPE resources.
ACTION: See “Insufficient MPE Resources” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: A nonzero result code was returned by NMMONSTARTREQ to
NMOPENLINK. Returned by NMOPENLINK. Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 131
MESSAGE: Invalid item detected in configuration record.
(NMERR 131)
CAUSE: Error reading and/or interpreting data from configuration file.
Returned by NMOPENLINK.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
202
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 132
MESSAGE: Link in exclusive use by another subsystem.
(NMERR 132)
CAUSE: Link has already been opened by another process. Returned by
NMOPENLINK. Another process has this link opened.
ACTION: Shut down the other process to free the link.
CAUSE: A LINKMGR process which had this link previously did not
close it when expected. This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix. If
possible, include a memory dump with the CR.
NMERR 133
MESSAGE: Startparm length error in Link Manager. (NMERR 133)
CAUSE: Either a software version mismatch, or an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 134
MESSAGE: A successful NMOPENLINK for this link must occur
before executing this function. (NMERR 134)
CAUSE: NMOPENLINK has not yet been called successfully. Returned
by NMCLOSELINK, NMMANAGELINK, NMLINKINFO, and
NMLINKDIAL. This is usually an internal error in the calling
subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 135
MESSAGE: Required items missing in configuration record.
(NMERR 135)
CAUSE: Error reading data from configuration file. Returned by
NMOPENLINK. Configuration file is not valid.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 136
MESSAGE: Parameter information exceeds permissible length.
(NMERR 136)
CAUSE: Information buffer given by caller exceeds 128 words in length.
Returned by NMMANAGELINK and NMLINKDIAL. This is usually
an internal error in the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 137
MESSAGE: A successful NMOPENLINK for this link must occur
before executing this function. (NMERR 137)
CAUSE: NMOPENLINK has not been executed successfully for this
link. Returned by NMCLOSELINK, NMMANAGELINK,
NMLINKINFO and NMLINKDIAL. This is usually an internal error in
the calling subsystem.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
203
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 138
MESSAGE: Unable to find DC/LDM in system I/O tables. (NMERR 138)
CAUSE: The NSLINK ldev was not configured for the link in
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS when the system was started.
ACTION: Ensure the NSLINK ldev is configured for the link used by NS,
and reboot. More information may be found in the NMLG log file.
NMERR 139
MESSAGE: Unable to find the specified linkname in system I/O tables.
(NMERR 139)
CAUSE: The specified linkname is not configured in the LINK subtree of
the configuration file.
ACTION: Check that the linkname specified to the subsystem has a
matching linkname configured under the LINK configuration subtree.
NMERR 142
MESSAGE: Status request to communication board failed.
(NMERR 142)
CAUSE: Call to procedure TRAN’GETINFO failed. Returned by
NMLINKINFO and LINKCONTROL. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 146
MESSAGE: User specified buffer inadequate for request.
(NMERR 146)
CAUSE: Caller did not supply a buffer large enough for returned data.
Returned by NMLINKINFO. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 147
MESSAGE: Link manager buffer area inadequate for request.
(NMERR 147)
CAUSE: Link Manager’s internal buffer is not large enough to handle
this request. Returned by NMLINKINFO. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
204
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 148
MESSAGE: Specified item code is out of range. (NMERR 148)
CAUSE: No information item corresponds to the given item code.
Returned by NMLINKINFO. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 149
MESSAGE: Dial request to communication board failed. (NMERR 149)
CAUSE: Error calling procedure TRAN’CONFIGDIAL. Returned by
NMLINKDIAL. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 154
MESSAGE: Dial facility is not supported. (NMERR 154)
CAUSE: Call to LINKDIALREQ failed. Returned by NMLINKDIAL.
Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 155
MESSAGE: Multicast address downloading is not supported.
(NMERR 155)
CAUSE: Call to NMLINKDOWNMC is not supported. Bad software
installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 156
MESSAGE: Invalid ParmArray code. (NMERR 156)
CAUSE: The caller of an NMOPENLINK2 procedure has passed an
invalid item code in the parameter ParmArray.
ACTION: Returned by NMOPENLINK2.
Appendix A
205
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 157
MESSAGE: DS/LDM open request failed. (NMERR 157)
CAUSE: The request to open the DC/LDM failed. Returned by
NMOPENLINK. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 158
MESSAGE: DS/LDM close request failed. (NMERR 158)
CAUSE: The request to close the DC/LDM failed. Returned by
NMCLOSELINK. Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software and port
translator software are compatible. See “Invalid Software Installation”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 159
MESSAGE: Unable to lock the Link Manager port DST. (NMERR 159)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLINK.
ACTION: Call to procedure failed.
CAUSE: Bad software installation.
ACTION: Make sure that the versions of NMS software are compatible.
CAUSE: An internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 160
MESSAGE: Number of parameters exceeds maximum of 20.
(NMERR 160)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Check the parameters against the LINKCONTROL syntax. Try
again.
NMERR 161
MESSAGE: Expects link name parameter. (NMERR 161)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Specify the link name parameter and try again.
206
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NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 162
MESSAGE: Expects a name from one to eight characters long.
(NMERR 162)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Check the spelling and try again.
NMERR 163
MESSAGE: Expects alphanumeric name starting with alphabetic.
(NMERR 163)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Check the spelling and try again.
NMERR 164
MESSAGE: Expects a semicolon after link name parameter.
(NMERR 164)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Check the spelling and try again.
NMERR 165
MESSAGE: Expects TRACE keyword. (NMERR 165)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Specify keyword and try again.
NMERR 166
MESSAGE: Expects an equals sign after keyword. (NMERR 166)
CAUSE: Returned after entering LINKCONTROL command incorrectly.
ACTION: Correct and try again.
NMERR 171
MESSAGE: Specified linkname is not an active datacomm device.
(NMERR 171)
CAUSE: The specified linkname does not exist.
ACTION: Check the spelling of your entry and try again.
CAUSE: The device specified is not configured.
ACTION: Check the list of configured devices and try again.
NMERR 172
MESSAGE: Specified pathname is not a datacomm device.
(NMERR 172)
CAUSE: The specified pathname is not a valid datacomm device address.
ACTION: Check the pathname in the configuration file and reenter.
NMERR 175
MESSAGE: Unexpected internal error accessing configuration data.
(NMERR 175)
CAUSE: An unexpected error has occurred.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
207
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 177
MESSAGE: Locked(!) HW Recover(!) HW Sick(!) HW Dead(!)
Resource(!). Run diagnostics for more information. (NMERR 177)
CAUSE: This message is likely caused by a hardware problem, and is a
generic status request to the I/O manager returned with the specified
bits set. One particular example is that the user has entered the
LINKCONTROL command while the system is in power fail recovery.
ACTION: Correct the problem and try again.
NMERR 178
MESSAGE: Link H/W device indicates self test failure. Run
diagnostics for more information. (NMERR 178)
CAUSE: A failure has occurred in the datacomm hardware.
ACTION: Run diagnostics and replace the defective hardware as
necessary.
NMERR 179
MESSAGE: Unexpected internal error accessing I/O manager.
(NMMERR 179)
CAUSE: The I/O Manager is an unknown state.
ACTION: Run diagnostics for more information.
NMERR 181
MESSAGE: Trace buffer size must be in the range 1 to 16.
(NMERR 181)
CAUSE: The user has entered a number that is not in the acceptable
range. The current buffer sizes supported are within the ranges of 1K to
16K. Returned by the LINKCONTROL command parsing routine.
ACTION: Enter a valid number (1 through 16).
NMERR 182
MESSAGE: HPE status : info =!, subsystem ID = !. (NMERR 182)
CAUSE: Status information reported by each individual module.
ACTION: Look at “DHPESTAT.HPESTD.OFFICIAL” for the definitions
of subsystem constants. Find out the error information by checking the
status reporting file for that particular module.
NMERR 185
MESSAGE: Only the LANIC link is supported. (NMERR 185)
CAUSE: No link other than LAN is currently supported.
ACTION: Specify only the LANIC for this application.
NMERR 186
MESSAGE: Trace request for linkname failed due to : HPE status:
INFO = ! subsystem ID = !.
CAUSE: You attempted to start or stop tracing, but tracing was already
enabled or disabled.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: An improper value was specified in the LINKCONTROL command.
ACTION: Reissue the LINKCONTROL command with the correct value.
208
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NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
CAUSE: An error occurred while accessing the specific I/O manager.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 187
MESSAGE: Trace for linkname has been initiated with some
exceptions : HPE status: INFO = ! subsystem ID = !.
CAUSE: This error is often returned even though tracing has been
enabled.
ACTION: None. If this error occurs frequently, submit an CR. See
“Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 189
MESSAGE: Invalid length for a trace file name.
CAUSE: MPE/iX trace file names are in the format of
filename.group.account and must contain a maximum of eight
characters in the filename, group, and account fields.
ACTION: Reissue the command using a valid trace file name which
contains no more than eight characters in the filename, group, and
account field.
NMERR 193
MESSAGE: Trace buffer size for a LAPB, SDLC or RJE link must be
between 5 & 16. (NMERR 193)
CAUSE: The current buffer sizes supported for LAPB and SDLC are 5K
to 16K.
ACTION: Configure values in the correct range.
NMERR 200
MESSAGE: Unable to access ! subsystem message catalog !.
(NMERR 200)
CAUSE: The first parameter is the subsystem name or subsysid. The
second parameter is the message catalog file name. This is returned by
a datacomm subsystem message-generating routine. The specified
subsystem encountered an error trying to access an error message in
the specified message catalog file.
ACTION: Something is wrong with the specified message catalog file.
Either it does not exist, or is the wrong version, or is inaccessible due to
someone else either storing it or accessing it exclusively, or some other
I/O error has occurred. Correct the problem with the message catalog
and retry.
NMERR 201
MESSAGE: Error accessing NMCAT.PUB.SYS set=! msg=!.
(NMERR 201)
CAUSE: Returned by NMPRINTERRMSG and usually followed by one
or more of messages 202 through 205 below, which further clarifies the
error. NOTE: This message is actually hardcoded in
NMPRINTERRMSG and is included here only for documentation
purposes.
Appendix A
209
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
ACTION: Look for one or more of NMERR 202 through 205 following
this message, and take the remedial action as suggested. Read the text
and comments for the original message specified in the message, and
take the suggested actions.
NMERR 202
MESSAGE: OPEN FSERR ! on NMCAT.PUB.SYS. (NMERR 202)
CAUSE: Returned by NMPRINTERRMSG and usually followed by the
text of the FSError message.
ACTION: Correct the FOPEN problem and retry.
NMERR 203
MESSAGE: Encountered GENMESSAGE error !. (NMERR 203)
CAUSE: Returned by NMPRINTERRMSG. If error number is 1 or 2,
NMERR 204 follows with a further description. Otherwise the error is
described in the MPE Intrinsics Manual under GENMESSAGE.
ACTION: If the error number is 1 or 2, see the NMERR 204 message and
comments. If the error number is not 1 or 2, look up the error number in
the MPE Intrinsics Manual under GENMESSAGE. It is likely the
problem is due to a bad software installation. If this is consistent with
the GENMESSAGE error, see “Getting Help” at the beginning of this
appendix. Otherwise, correct the problem causing the GENMESSAGE
error and try again.
NMERR 204
MESSAGE: GENMESSAGE encountered FSERR !. (NMERR 204)
CAUSE: Returned by NMPRINTERRMSG. This message follows
NMERR 203 message, and is usually followed with the text of the
FSError message as well.
ACTION: Correct the File System error and retry.
NMERR 205
MESSAGE: FCLOSE FSERR ! NMCAT.PUB.SYS. (NMERR 205)
CAUSE: Returned by NMPRINTERRMSG after printing a message
from NMCAT.PUB.SYS. The FCLOSE of NMCAT.PUB.SYS failed.
ACTION: Correct the File System error and retry.
NMERR 206
MESSAGE: !: Error trying to access ! msgnum ! setnum !.
(NMERR 206)
CAUSE: Returned by a subsystem message-generating routine when it
was unable to access the specified message catalog. The first parameter
is the Subsys (module) name. The second parameter is the Subsys
message catalog name. The third parameter is the message number.
The fourth parameter is the set number. Note that this message is
usually followed by one or more of messages NMERR 207 through 210.
ACTION: Check to see that the names entered actually exist and are
spelled correctly. Read any other error messages which are also
displayed, and take the action(s) recommended to correct the
problem(s) described by those messages.
210
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NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 207
MESSAGE: Encountered FOPEN FSERR ! on !. (NMERR 207)
CAUSE: Returned by a subsystem message-generating routine when it
was unable to FOPEN the specified message catalog. The first
parameter is the FSERR number. The second parameter is the message
catalog name. This message is usually preceded by message
NMERR 206.
ACTION: Correct the FOPEN error and retry.
NMERR 208
MESSAGE: Encountered GENMESSAGE error !. (NMERR 208)
CAUSE: Returned by a subsystem message-generating routine, usually
following NMERR 206. The parameter is the GENMESSAGE errnum. If
the error number is 1 or 2, NMERR 209 follows with a further
description. Otherwise, the error is described in the MPE Intrinsics
Manual under GENMESSAGE.
ACTION: If the error number is 1 or 2, see message NMERR 209. If the
error number is not 1 or 2, look up the error number in the
MPE Intrinsics Manual under GENMESSAGE. It is likely the problem
is due to a bad software installation. If this is consistent with the
GENMESSAGE error, the configuration file may be corrupted. Run
NMMGR and verify that the configuration file is okay. Otherwise,
correct the problem causing the GENMESSAGE error and try again.
NMERR 209
MESSAGE: GENMESSAGE encountered FSERR !. (NMERR 209)
CAUSE: Returned by a subsystem message-generating routine. The
parm is the FSERR number. This message usually follows NMERR 208,
and is usually followed with the text of the FSError message as well (by
calling the intrinsic FErrMsg).
ACTION: Correct the FS error and retry.
NMERR 210
MESSAGE: Encountered FCLOSE FSERR ! on !. (NMERR 210)
CAUSE: Returned by a subsystem message-generating routine after
reading a message from the specified message catalog. The first
parameter is the FSERR number. The second parameter is the message
catalog name. The FCLOSE of the message catalog failed.
ACTION: Correct the File System error and retry.
NMERR 220
MESSAGE: Config file internal error detected and recovery failed.
(NMERR 220)
CAUSE: The configuration file is possibly corrupted.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration Files” at the beginning of this
appendix.
Appendix A
211
NMS Error Messages
NM Error Messages
NMERR 221
MESSAGE: Total data length too large to return as integer.
(NMERR 221)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFSONINFO. The total data length
associated with the path name and all its first level sons was greater
than 32767 and could not be returned to caller. It is possible that the
configuration file is corrupt. It is also possible that there is no error at
all. It is theoretically possible, although unlikely, to have more than
32767 bytes of data associated with a path and its first level sons.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration Files” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: Possible internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 222
MESSAGE: Son count too large to return as integer. (NMERR 222)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCONFSONINFO. The number of first level
sons linked to the path name sent by the calling subsystem exceeds
32767. It is possible that the configuration file is corrupt. It is also
possible that an internal error occurred.
ACTION: See “Getting Help” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMERR 223
MESSAGE: Request type out of bounds — error in port msg to
NMFILE. (NMERR 223)
CAUSE: Returned if NMFILE receives a request type that it does not
recognize as being a valid NMCONF intrinsic request on its NMCONF
subqueue.
ACTION: Internal error. See “Getting Help” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMERR 301
MESSAGE: Will use LOGGING configuration for this subsystem that
is already active. (NMERR 301)
CAUSE: Returned by NMOPENLOG, NMOPENLOG2. The open log was
successful and logging may proceed. Note that there is another openlog
outstanding for the same subsystem id, so the configuration
information already in use will continue to be used. This result code is
returned as a negative number (-301) to indicate it is not an error and
that the openlog was in fact successful.
ACTION: None.
212
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFSERR and NMFSWARN messages are produced by the NMS File
Server (NMFILE.PUB.SYS). In most cases, they are accompanied by
other messages (NMGRERRs or MPE File System errors). You should
take the action recommended for the accompanying messages first.
NMFSERR 1
MESSAGE: Unable to create new datafile. (NMFSERR 1)
CAUSE: This error occurs when NMFILE cannot create a new file that is
requested by a call to NMCONFOPEN, because of an error in an
FOPEN. It could be due to a faulty call to NMCONFOPEN or an error
due to specific problems on the system itself, such as insufficient disk
space or an I/O error on the file label.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 2
MESSAGE: Unable to write root directory entry to datafile.
(NMFSERR 2)
CAUSE: This error occurs when NMFILE calls MIDASBUILDROOT
when processing an NMCONFOPEN.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 3
MESSAGE: Unable to close datafile. (NMFSERR 3)
CAUSE: FCLOSE failure in MIDASCLOSE, called by NMFILE when
processing an NMCONFCLOSE or NMCONFPURGE.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 4
MESSAGE: Unable to open datafile. (NMFSERR 4)
CAUSE: FOPEN failure in MIDASOPEN called by NMFILE when
processing an NMCONFOPEN, or an FOPEN failure in
MIDASCOMPRESS. File does not exist.
ACTION: Create file first.
CAUSE: FOPEN failure in MIDASOPEN called by NMFILE when
processing an NMCONFOPEN, or an FOPEN failure in
MIDASCOMPRESS. File system error.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 5
MESSAGE: Unable to retrieve filecode from datafile. (NMFSERR 5)
CAUSE: This error occurs when NMFILE calls MIDASOPEN which fails
on FGETINFO after an NMCONFOPEN was called. This may indicate
that the file label has been corrupted.
Appendix A
213
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSWARN 6
MESSAGE: Datafile does not match user specified filecode.
(NMFSWARN 6)
CAUSE: This warning occurs when a caller of NMCONFOPEN tries to
open a file that does not have a CONF file code either because the data
file specified is not a configuration file (most likely), or because the data
file label has been corrupted in some way.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 7
MESSAGE: Unable to read root directory entry in datafile.
(NMFSERR 7)
CAUSE: NMFILE called MIDASFILEINFO which failed on FREADDIR
after NMCONFFILEINFO was called; or MIDASFINDENTRY was
called by NMFILE, and FREADDIR failed. Most NMCONF procedures
result in a call to MIDASFINDENTRY.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Corrupt Configuration File” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 8
MESSAGE: Unable to find root directory entry in datafile.
(NMFSERR 8)
CAUSE: This error occurs when the root of the file cannot be found in
either MIDASFILEINFO or MIDASFINDENTRY. The first is called as
a result of a call to NMCONFFILEINFO. The latter is called by many
other MIDAS procedures.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Corrupt Configuration File” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 9
MESSAGE: Unable to find identifier in pathname. (NMFSERR 9)
CAUSE: This error happens when MIDASFINDENTRY cannot find an
entry with the given path name. This procedure is called internally by
several MIDAS procedures. It also results for the same reason in
MIDASCRRENAMEPATH (from a call to NMCONFRENAMEPATH)
and MIDASPURGEPATH (from a call to NMCONFPURGEPATH). This
is a user error. Make sure the pathname requested was previously
entered into the file.
ACTION: Check spelling.
CAUSE: This error happens when MIDASFINDENTRY cannot find an
entry with the given path name. This procedure is called internally by
several MIDAS procedures. It also results for the same reason in
MIDASRENAMEPATH (from a call to NMCONFRENAMEPATH) and
MIDASPURGEPATH (from a call to NMCONFPURGEPATH). The file
might be corrupt
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix
214
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFSERR 10
MESSAGE: Directory linkage error in datafile. (NMFSERR 10)
CAUSE: This error occurs when there is a failure in an FREADDIR in
the MIDAS procedures shown in the table when the next link or the
root cannot be found. Specifically, an unexpected end of file was found.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMFSERR 11
MESSAGE: Unable to read directory entry in datafile. (NMFSERR 11)
CAUSE: This error is similar to message NMFSERR 10 except that the
end of file was not the error when FREADDIR was called.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Corrupt Configuration File” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 12
MESSAGE: Data is already associated with this identifier.
(NMFSERR 12)
CAUSE: This error is returned by MIDASADDDATA when data already
exists at the location where it was to be added.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File,” “Invalid Software
Installation,” and “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 13
MESSAGE: Unable to retrieve freespace pointer from datafile.
(NMFSERR 13)
CAUSE: This error is returned by the MIDAS procedures listed in the
table when there is an FGETINFO to find the last record and there is a
failure of that call.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Corrupt Configuration” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 14
MESSAGE: Filespace exhausted. Unable to add entry. (NMFSERR 14)
CAUSE: This is caused when FGETINFO returns insufficient file space
left for an additional entry in the configuration file.
ACTION: Compress configuration file. If this does not resolve the error,
add records to the configuration file.
NMFSERR 15
MESSAGE: Unable to write data record to datafile. (NMFSERR 15)
CAUSE: This is due to an FWRITEDIR failure.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 16
MESSAGE: Unable to write directory entry to datafile. (NMFSERR 16)
CAUSE: This is due to an FWRITEDIR failure.
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
215
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFSERR 18
MESSAGE: No data associated with this identifier. (NMFSERR 18)
CAUSE: In all MIDAS procedures returning this, there is a failure of
MIDASFINDENTRY.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Corrupt Configuration File” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSWARN 19
MESSAGE: Read truncated to capacity of data buffer.
(NMFSWARN 19)
CAUSE: This error occurs when caller of NMCONFGETDATA specifies a
buffer length smaller than the actual data entry size.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 20
MESSAGE: Unable to read data record from datafile. (NMFSERR 20)
CAUSE: This error results from a failure of FREADDIR in those MIDAS
procedures that call it. (The failure is not an end-of-file found.)
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 21
MESSAGE: Duplicate identifier already exists. (NMFSERR 21)
CAUSE: This error is returned when trying to add a path that already
exists.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 22
MESSAGE: Resultant file size beyond permissible range.
(NMFSERR 22)
CAUSE: This error results in MIDASCOMPRESS when the spacebias +
maximum file size is greater than 64K. Check the spacebias of
MIDASCOMPRESS call in user interface. The file might also be too
large or the file label might be corrupt.
ACTION: See “File System Error” and “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMFSWARN 23
MESSAGE: No identifiers exist beyond this path. (NMFSWARN 23)
CAUSE: This happens when NMCONFnextpath is called and no further
path identifiers exist. This may not be an error. Applications calling
NMCONFnextpath may use this to find the end of a data branch.
Otherwise, it may indicate file corruption.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 24
MESSAGE: Pathname exceeds user specified maximum depth.
(NMFSERR 24)
CAUSE: This is returned by MIDASPARSEPATH when the user
specified pathname is longer than the path depth. No NMCONF
procedure calls this intrinsic.
216
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 25
MESSAGE: Identifier exceeds maximum permissible length.
(NMFSERR 25)
CAUSE: This is returned by MIDASPARSEPATH when the pathname is
too long. No NMCONF procedure calls this intrinsic.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 26
MESSAGE: Pathname length exhausted user specified buffer.
(NMFSERR 26)
CAUSE: This is returned by MIDASTRAVERSE when the maxlevel
parameter is exceeded by the pathlevel parameter. This is probably
caused by an excessive pathdepth parameter in NMCONF procedure
calls.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 27
MESSAGE: Unable to rename old datafile prior to replacement.
(NMFSERR 27)
CAUSE: This is caused by an FRENAME failure in MIDASCOMPRESS,
and is currently only returned by the user interface.
ACTION: See “File System Error” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSWARN 28
MESSAGE: Unable to purge old datafile prior to replacement.
(NMFSWARN 28)
CAUSE: This is due to an FCLOSE failure in MIDAScompress, and is
currently returned only by the user interface.
ACTION: See “Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMFSWARN 29
MESSAGE: Datafile is empty. (NMFSWARN 29)
CAUSE: This is returned by MIDAScompress when existing data file has
no data in it. This might not be an error if compress is called from the
user interface but no data was put into the file.
ACTION: If you suspect that there should have been data, then see
“Corrupt Configuration File” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMFSERR 30
MESSAGE: Parameter out of range. (NMFSERR 30)
CAUSE: This is a generic error returned from several MIDAS
procedures. Check parameters in calls to NMCONF procedures to see if
they are in permissible range.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
217
NMS Error Messages
NMFS Error and Warning Messages
NMFSERR 31
MESSAGE: Unable to open message catalog NMCAT.PUB.SYS.
(NMFSERR 31)
CAUSE: Returned by MIDASERRMSG if there is a failure to open
NMCAT.PUB.SYS. See if this file is on the system. If it is, it might be
corrupt.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMFSERR 32
MESSAGE: Unable to read message catalog NMCAT.PUB.SYS.
(NMFSERR 32)
CAUSE: Returned by MIDASERRMSG. The file might be corrupted.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMFSERR 33
MESSAGE: Unable to close message catalog NMCAT.PUB.SYS.
(NMFSERR 33)
CAUSE: Returned by MIDASERRMSG. FCLOSE failure on the file.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
218
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 1
MESSAGE: Terminal is of incorrect type or cannot be opened.
(NMGRERR 1)
CAUSE: The user’s terminal is not a block mode terminal supported by
VPLUS/3000.
ACTION: Check the terminal type and strap settings.
CAUSE: The user is attempting to run NMMGR from a batch job. Batch
operation is not supported.
ACTION: None.
CAUSE: A terminal I/O or internal VPLUS/3000 error occurred.
ACTION: Check the version of VPLUS/3000 and repeat VPLUS/3000
installation if necessary.
NMGRERR 2
MESSAGE: Form file is missing or cannot be opened. (NMGRERR 2)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to open the forms file NMMGRF.PUB.SYS at
program startup. The file NMMGRF.PUB.SYS is missing.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: A file equation exists for NMMGRF.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Check for file equations using LISTEQ5.PUB.SYS and RESET if
necessary.
CAUSE: File NMMGRF.PUB.SYS is not a valid VFAST or VFORM forms
file, or it has become corrupted.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of NMMGRF.PUB.SYS.
CAUSE: An internal VPLUS/3000 error occurred.
ACTION: Check the version of VPLUS/3000 and repeat VPLUS/3000
installation if necessary.
NMGRERR 3
MESSAGE: That type is not defined for this class of items.
(NMGRERR 3)
CAUSE: The user entered a type name in the TYPE field of a
typed-select screen that is not defined for this screen.
ACTION: Check the subsystem manual for correct type names and try
again.
Appendix A
219
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 4
MESSAGE: That function is not implemented. (NMGRERR 4)
CAUSE: The user pressed an invalid function key (with a blank label), or
pressed the [ENTER] in a screen without a command window (currently
only the OPEN FILE screen).
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 5
MESSAGE: Not a valid <NMMGR cmd> or @<pathname or :
<MPE cmd>. (NMGRERR 5)
CAUSE: The user typed an unrecognizable command in the command
window and pressed [ENTER].
ACTION: Check the spelling of the command, and check the list of valid
commands in your subsystem node management or configuration
manual.
NMGRERR 6
MESSAGE: End of file on $STDINX. Cannot accept further input.
(NMGRERR 6)
CAUSE: The user typed :EOF or :EOD in response to the prompt:
“Press Return when done viewing screen contents.”
ACTION: This error is irrecoverable since the terminal is closed for
further input. Run NMMGR again to continue configuration.
NMGRWARN 7
MESSAGE: Warning: Screen changed. Use Save Data key to save
data. (NMGRWARN 7)
CAUSE: The user changed information on a data screen and pressed a
key other than UPDATE. This warning prevents accidental exit from
the screen without saving changes.
ACTION: The user may ignore the warning by pressing a key other than
UPDATE, or may save changes by pressing UPDATE.
NMGRWARN 8
MESSAGE: There are no entries at this level to display.
(NMGRWARN 8)
CAUSE: The user pressed the PREV PAGE or NEXT PAGE key in a
selection screen when there are no items to be displayed on this select
screen. Scrolling with these keys is only necessary when there are
already items configured.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 9
MESSAGE: Internal NM configuration file error. (NMGRERR 9)
CAUSE: NMMGR has encountered an unexpected condition in the
configuration file.
ACTION: Check the NMCONF error (if one is reported) for further
information.
CAUSE: NMMGR has encountered an unexpected condition in the
configuration file. Two or more users are updating the same
220
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
configuration file concurrently, and one renames or deletes a path which
another is configuring.
ACTION: Coordinate activity between users.
CAUSE: NMMGR has encountered an unexpected condition in the
configuration file. An internal error occurred. Submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
ACTION: Check the version of NMCONF.
NMGRERR 10
MESSAGE: Unexpected type: NM config file corrupt or bad version.
(NMGRERR 10)
CAUSE: NMMGR has encountered a link data record with a type code
(word #1) that is not currently supported. The configuration file may
have been corrupted by a file system or disk error.
ACTION: Restore an old version of the configuration file if possible, or
delete and reconstruct the corrupt link data record.
NMGRERR 11
MESSAGE: Type must be present. (NMGRERR 11)
CAUSE: The user attempted to add a new LINK without specifying a
link type.
ACTION: The type for a new link must be specified.
NMGRERR 12
MESSAGE: Unexpected data: NM config file corrupt or bad version.
(NMGRERR 12)
CAUSE: NMMGR has encountered unrecognizable data in the
configuration file. A file system or disc error may have corrupted the
configuration file. Possible situations which may cause this error
include: 1) A data record does not match the expected format. 2) A link
data record has an unexpected type code (word #1). 3) A link exists
without a data record to indicate its type.
ACTION: Restore an old version of the configuration file if possible, or
delete and reconstruct the corrupt link data record.
NMGRERR 13
MESSAGE: Maximum number of allowed items already configured.
(NMGRERR 13)
CAUSE: The user attempted to add more items than the maximum
allowed at this level.
ACTION: Check the NMMGR manual for these maximum values.
NMGRERR 14
MESSAGE: Cannot build command table; NMCAT.PUB.SYS corrupt.
(NMGRERR 14)
CAUSE: The file NMCAT.PUB.SYS is not a valid message file, does not
exist, or is corrupt.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
Appendix A
221
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
CAUSE: A file equation exists for NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Check for file equations using LISTEQ2.PUB.SYS and RESET if
necessary.
CAUSE: The table of commands in the NM catalog file NMCAT.PUB.SYS is
corrupt or missing. File NMCAT.PUB.SYS is not a valid catalog file, or it
has become corrupted.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of NMMGRF.PUB.SYS.
CAUSE: The table of commands in the NM catalog file NMCAT.PUB.SYS is
corrupt or missing. Set 7 of NMCAT.PUB.SYS (the command set) is
missing, or some commands have been deleted from this set.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of NMMGRF.PUB.SYS.
NMGRERR 15
MESSAGE: Missing data: NM config file corrupt or bad version.
(NMGRERR 15)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to locate type code in data record.
ACTION: Restore an old version of the configuration file if possible, or
delete and reconstruct the corrupt link data record.
NMGRERR 16
MESSAGE: Cannot set up form for next screen. (NMGRERR 16)
CAUSE: The forms file NMMGRF.PUB.SYS may be missing or corrupt.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check any other errors which are
displayed. See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: A terminal I/O error may have occurred. A user may have
entered :EOF or :EOD in response to the prompt “Press RETURN when
done viewing contents,” thereby closing the terminal for further input.
ACTION: Check the state of the terminal. Run NMMGR again if the
terminal is closed for input.
CAUSE: A data record may be corrupted, making it impossible for
NMMGR to display it.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check any other errors which are
displayed. See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to display the form for the screen which
the user selected. An internal VPLUS/3000 or NMCONF error may
have occurred.
ACTION: Check the version of VPLUS/3000 and NMCONF and restore
backup copies if necessary.
222
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRWARN 17
MESSAGE: No errors have yet occurred. (NMGRWARN 17)
CAUSE: The user has gone to the ERRORS screen to check the last
error, but no errors have occurred.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 19
MESSAGE: MPE command error. (NMGRERR 19)
CAUSE: The user executed an MPE command (by entering the command
preceded by a colon and pressing ENTER), and the command
terminated in an error state.
ACTION: Use the Error Information screen and check the Command
Interpreter error for further information.
NMGRERR 20
MESSAGE: Item does not exist: use the ADD key to create a new item.
(NMGRERR 20)
CAUSE: The user tried to DELETE, RENAME, or UPDATE an item in a
select screen, but the item does not exist in the configuration file.
ACTION: Use the ADD key if you intend to add the new item; otherwise
check the spelling of the item name.
NMGRERR 21
MESSAGE: Item already exists. (NMGRERR 21)
CAUSE: The user tried to ADD an item in a select screen, but the item
already exists.
ACTION: Check the spelling of the item name.
NMGRERR 22
MESSAGE: Cannot open NM configuration file. (NMGRERR 22)
CAUSE: A file system error occurred.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for a file system error
(FSERR). Correct the error and try again.
CAUSE: The NMFILE.PUB.SYS process of the Node Management
Services is not running.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for FSERR 97. If this error
occurred, the problem may be due to a version mismatch in the NMS
subsystem. See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 23
MESSAGE: Cannot reopen NM configuration file. (NMGRERR 23)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to reopen the configuration file after
closing it for compression.
ACTION: Check the NMCONF or File System error (if one is reported)
for further information. This error is fatal and cannot be recovered
except by running NMMGR again. See message NMGRERR 22.
Appendix A
223
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 24
MESSAGE: Cannot compress NM configuration file. (NMGRERR 24)
CAUSE: A file system error occurred.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for a file system error
(FSERR). Correct the error and try again.
CAUSE: You are not the creator of the configuration file.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for FSERR 94. If this error
occurred, you can copy the file and then compress it, or ask the creator
to compress the file.
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to compress the configuration file because
at least one other user is currently accessing the file.
ACTION: COMPRESS requires exclusive access to the configuration file.
Use LISTF,2 to check whether other users are accessing this file. Wait
until the file is not being accessed and try again.
CAUSE: The absolute value of the number of records to add or remove is
too large. The resulting file would not have been able to contain all the
records in the file, or, if a positive number was specified, the resulting
file would have exceeded the 64,000 record limit.
ACTION: Enter a different value.
NMGRERR 25
MESSAGE: NA or NM capability is needed to run NMMGR.
(NMGRERR 25)
CAUSE: The user does not have the Node Manager or Network
Administrator capability required to run NMMGR.
ACTION: Check user capability with program LISTDIR5.PUB.SYS, and
contact the account manager or system manager if an additional
capability is needed.
NMGRERR 26
MESSAGE: File already exists. Use OPEN FILE (f1). (NMGRERR 26)
CAUSE: The user tried to CREATE a file in the OPEN FILE screen
when the file already exists.
ACTION: Delete the file to create a new, empty configuration file, or use
the OPEN key to open an existing file.
NMGRERR 27
MESSAGE: Must specify new name for rename. (NMGRERR 27)
CAUSE: The user tried to RENAME an item in a select screen without
specifying the new name.
ACTION: Enter a name in the rename field and try again.
NMGRERR 28
MESSAGE: File does not exist. Use CREATE FILE (f2). (NMGRERR 28)
CAUSE: The user tried to OPEN a file in the OPEN FILE screen when
the file does not exist.
ACTION: Use the CREATE key to create a new file.
224
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 31
MESSAGE: That command is ambiguous — use more letters.
(NMGRERR 31)
CAUSE: The user typed an ambiguous command prefix in the command
window and hit ENTER.
ACTION: Make the prefix unambiguous by using more letters of the
command. Check the NMMGR manual for unambiguous command
prefixes.
NMGRERR 32
MESSAGE: Maximum path depth exceeded. (NMGRERR 32)
CAUSE: This error in an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR has created a
path whose depth exceeds the maximum allowable depth for paths.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 33
MESSAGE: Path name format is invalid. (NMGRERR 33)
CAUSE: NMMGR encountered a path name whose format is not
recognized. A possible situation which may cause this error is that the
user has entered an incorrect path name in the command window.
ACTION: Check your subsystem node management or configuration
manual for correct format of a path name and check the subsystem
manual for valid paths.
CAUSE: An internal NMMGR error has occurred.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 34
MESSAGE: Error occurred while listing configuration file.
(NMGRERR 34)
CAUSE: An error occurred during output of the tree structure or data
records of a configuration file.
ACTION: Check the NMCONF or File System error to determine the
specific error.
CAUSE: The configuration file may have corrupt data records or invalid
paths.
ACTION: Delete and reconstruct the corrupt link data record, or restore
a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER
again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See
“Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: If the file FORMLIST is equated to a disk file, the file may be
too small to accommodate the output listing.
ACTION: Check the size of the file and change the file size specification
if necessary.
Appendix A
225
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 36
MESSAGE: Invalid syntax for file name. (NMGRERR 36)
CAUSE: The user attempted to OPEN or CREATE a configuration file
with an invalid file name.
ACTION: Check the spelling and syntax of the file name.
NMGRERR 37
MESSAGE: ENTER executes commands: the command field is blank.
(NMGRERR 37)
CAUSE: The user pressed [ENTER] without putting a command in the
command window. NMMGR uses [ENTER] ONLY for commands.
Modifications to the configuration file are all made using function keys.
ACTION: Make modifications to the configuration file by using the
function keys.
NMGRERR 38
MESSAGE: MPE command warning. (NMGRERR 38)
CAUSE: The user executed an MPE command (by entering the command
preceded by a colon and pressing ENTER), and the command
terminated in a warning state.
ACTION: Use the Error Information screen and check the Command
Interpreter error for further information.
NMGRERR 39
MESSAGE: Unable to set termination trap handler. (NMGRERR 39)
CAUSE: The termination trap handling procedure for program aborts
cannot be set. This error indicates an internal MPE problem in the
procedure XDSNTRAP, which places a termination procedure PLABEL
in the process context for use by MPE during process termination.
ACTION: Check the MPE installation to see that XDSNTRAP is present
and working.
NMGRERR 40
MESSAGE: Must open a file before using this command.
(NMGRERR 40)
CAUSE: The user is trying to view a configuration screen without first
opening a configuration file.
ACTION: Open the configuration file and enter the command again.
NMGRERR 41
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unexpected screen length. (NMGRERR 41)
CAUSE: The configuration file is corrupted.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: The forms file is corrupted or is a bad version.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
226
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 42
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unexpected screen contents.
(NMGRERR 42)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR has encountered
unexpected data from the screen.
ACTION: Check to see that the correct version of NMMGR is installed.
See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 43
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unexpected data record length.
(NMGRERR 43)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot properly
create a data record from the input from the screen.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 44
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unexpected data record contents.
(NMGRERR 44)
CAUSE: NMMGR cannot properly display a data field in the
configuration file on the screen. The configuration file is corrupted.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible.
NMGRERR 45
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unexpected status code from procedure.
(NMGRERR 45)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. An unknown status code is
returned from a procedure.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 46
MESSAGE: Specified path is not in this configuration file.
(NMGRERR 46)
CAUSE: The user has entered a path name in the command field that is
not in the configuration file.
ACTION: Check the path name entered and try again.
NMGRERR 47
MESSAGE: Internal error: No child with this type is in schema.
(NMGRERR 47)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot match a
path name and a type code to an internal table.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 48
MESSAGE: Internal error: Can’t find this path in the schema.
(NMGRERR 48)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot match a
path name to an internal table.
Appendix A
227
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 49
MESSAGE: Internal error: The root node has parent node.
(NMGRERR 49)
CAUSE: This is an NMMGR internal error. NMMGR is scanning the
configuration file off the boundary.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 50
MESSAGE: Internal error: The schema has an invalid format.
(NMGRERR 50)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot locate a
node in an internal table describing the configuration file structure.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 51
MESSAGE: No screen for this path. (NMGRERR 51)
CAUSE: There is no screen to display that is associated with this path
name. A path exists in the configuration file but is not recognized by
NMMGR.
ACTION: This path is for internal use only. Check the pathname and try
again.
NMGRERR 52
MESSAGE: Internal error: Cannot create version stamps.
(NMGRERR 52)
CAUSE: NMMGR creates version stamps for each subsystem in
configuration file at file creation time, and in some cases at file open
time. This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot create version
stamps in the configuration file due to an NMCONF error. Check the
NMCONF error number for detail.
ACTION: Purge this new file and try to recreate it. If an error still
occurs, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 53
MESSAGE: Version mismatch found on specified subsystem. Please
run NMMGRVER. (NMGRERR 53)
CAUSE: NMMGR checks version stamps of each subsystem in the
configuration file at file open time. Version checking results show that
there is configuration data for at least one subsystem in the
configuration file that is not supported by this version of NMMGR.
ACTION: Run the version control program NMMGRVER to update the
file, or open another file, or create a new file.
228
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 54
MESSAGE: Internal error: Version checking routine failed.
(NMGRERR 54)
CAUSE: NMMGR checks version stamps of each subsystem in the
configuration file at file open time. An error has occurred in the version
checking routine. The configuration file may have corrupt data records
or invalid paths.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible.
NMGRERR 55
MESSAGE: Internal error: Version-flag checking failed.
(NMGRERR 55)
CAUSE: An internal NMMGR error has occurred: unable to get vsflag
status. The possible causes include: internal error in
vsflag_check_driver, or the parameters file_num, file_type_column,
or vsflag_path do not match those stored in vsflag array at open time.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 56
MESSAGE: Version mismatch found on specified subsystem.
(NMGRERR 56)
CAUSE: NMMGR checks version stamps of each subsystem in the
configuration file at accessing time. The version checking result shows
that the specified subsystem has a mismatched version stamp in the
configuration file that is not supported by this version of NMMGR.
ACTION: Since this version stamp is greater than what NMMGR
supports, use NMMGR to create a new file. In this case, the
NMMGRVER conversion utility will not help.
NMGRERR 70
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unable to get info on VPLUS field.
(NMGRERR 70)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to retrieve information on the screen field
via VPLUS utilities.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check the VPLUS error message
to determine the specific error. Correct the error and try again.
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to retrieve information on the screen field
via VPLUS utilities. The forms file NMMGRF.PUB.SYS and NMMGR are
different versions, or the forms file is corrupt.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 71
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unable to get info on VPLUS form.
(NMGRERR 71)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to retrieve information on the screen field
via VPLUS utilities.
Appendix A
229
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check the VPLUS error messages
to determine the specific error. Correct the error and try again.
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to retrieve information on the screen field
via VPLUS utilities. The forms file NMMGRF.PUB.SYS and NMMGR are
different versions, or the forms file is corrupt.
ACTION: See “Invalid Software Installation” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 72
MESSAGE: Internal error: Data field alignment error. (NMGRERR 72)
CAUSE: This is an NMMGR internal conversion table error.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 73
MESSAGE: Internal error: Data field extraction is out of bounds.
(NMGRERR 73)
CAUSE: This is an NMMGR internal conversion table error. NMMGR
cannot locate data for a field to display on this screen.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 74
MESSAGE: Internal error: Conversion code not yet implemented.
(NMGRERR 74)
CAUSE: This is an NMMGR internal conversion table error. NMMGR
encountered an unknown conversion code.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 75
MESSAGE: Internal error: String overflow. (NMGRERR 75)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. A character string passed to
one of the conversion routines is too long.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 76
MESSAGE: Internal error: Screen conversion ptr is out of bounds.
(NMGRERR 76)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for a VPLUS error message
to determine the specific error. Correct any errors and try again.
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. The forms file
NMMGRF.PUB.SYS and NMMGR are not the same version, or the forms
file is corrupt.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of NMMGRF.PUB.SYS.
230
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 77
MESSAGE: Internal error: Data conversion ptr is out of bounds.
(NMGRERR 77)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR conversion table error.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 78
MESSAGE: Internal error: Missing description for this screen.
(NMGRERR 78)
CAUSE: This is an NMMGR internal table error. The screen name is not
in an internal conversion table.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 79
MESSAGE: Internal error: Invalid scr field position from VPLUS.
(NMGRERR 79)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. NMMGR cannot properly
locate field data from this screen.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 80
MESSAGE: Internal error: Data field not on proper unit boundary.
(NMGRERR 80)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMGRR conversion table error.
ACTION: Submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 81
MESSAGE: Cannot lock NM configuration file. (NMGRERR 81)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to successfully lock the configuration file.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for any NMERR or FSERR
error messages to determine the specific error. Correct the error and try
again. If necessary, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 82
MESSAGE: Cannot unlock NM configuration file. (NMGRERR 82)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to successfully unlock the configuration
file.
ACTION: Go to the Errors screen and check for any NMERR or FSERR
error messages to determine the specific error. Correct the error and try
again. If necessary, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 83
MESSAGE: Press Delete again to confirm deletion. (NMGRERR 83)
CAUSE: The Delete key needs to be pressed twice to accomplish the
deletion.
Appendix A
231
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Press the Delete key a second time to confirm the deletion.
NMGRERR 84
MESSAGE: Cannot access the NMMGR help catalog. (NMGRERR 84)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to open the NMMGR help catalog,
NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Restore the NMMGR help catalog.
NMGRERR 85
MESSAGE: Incomplete summary printed. (NMGRERR 85)
CAUSE: Some configuration data could not be found or printed in the
summary.
ACTION: Check the summary to ensure that all required fields are
configured.
CAUSE: The data that could not be found or printed is replaced with
asterisks in the summary printout.
ACTION: Check the summary to ensure that all required fields are
configured.
NMGRERR 86
MESSAGE: Cannot invoke subsystem summary routine.
(NMGRERR 86)
CAUSE: The subsystem summary output routine cannot be load
processed from the group, account, or system SL.
ACTION: Stream the install job I00INMAC.NMA.HPPL87 to add the
routine to system SL.
NMGRERR 87
MESSAGE: Invalid SNA LU Name Format. Must be
XXXXXXXX.XXXXXXXX. (NMGRERR 87)
CAUSE: The additional address in the Network Directory data screen
must be in the format of AXXXXXXX.AXXXXXXX, where A is any
alpha char and X is any alphanumeric character.
ACTION: Use correct format.
NMGRERR 88
MESSAGE: Error in NMMGR help catalog. (NMGRERR 88)
CAUSE: The MPE HELP subsystem could not use the help file
NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Make sure that the file NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS is properly
formatted (RUN MAKECAT.PUB.SYS,HELP).
CAUSE: The MPE HELP subsystem could not use the help file
NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: RESTORE the file NMMGRHLP.PUB.SYS.
232
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGREWARN 89 MESSAGE: Warning: Incompatible selection. Press key again to
confirm. (NMGRWARN 89)
CAUSE: The user pressed a GO TO type function key on the DTS screen
that was not compatible with the type of DTS subsystem specified on
that screen.
ACTION: Press the correct key or, to force selection of the incompatible
subsystem, press the incompatible key a second time.
NMGRERR 90
MESSAGE: Invalid IP Address; press Help for more information.
(NMGRERR 90)
CAUSE: The user entered an IP address that failed IP address edits
(address was invalid).
ACTION: Enter a valid IP address; check the class letter (A, B, C, or E
accepted). (Press the Help key for more information on entering a valid
IP address.)
NMGRERR 91
MESSAGE: Must be xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx where x is a hex number.
(NMGRERR 91)
CAUSE: The user entered a LAN station address that failed station
address edits (address was invalid).
ACTION: Enter a valid LAN station address; must be six pairs of hex
digits. (Press the Help key for more information on entering a valid
LAN station address.)
NMGRERR 92
MESSAGE: Reachable Net IP Addr can’t be the same as the Gateway
IP Addr. (NMGRERR 92)
CAUSE: A reachable network IP address is the same as the gateway IP
address. The network portion of these addresses must be different.
ACTION: Correct either the reachable network IP address or the
gateway IP address and reenter.
NMGRERR 93
MESSAGE: Enter the required Reachable Net IP Address with Hops.
(NMGRERR 93)
CAUSE: User attempted to update information without entering
required data. At least one Reachable Net IP Address/Hop pair is
required on page 1 of the Reachable Networks screen.
ACTION: Enter the required information and continue.
NMGRERR 94
MESSAGE: Maximum page count exceeded. (NMGRERR 94)
CAUSE: User attempted to go to next page at the maximum page count
(256).
ACTION: Use CONDENSE PAGE.
CAUSE: User attempted to do “LAST PAGE” or “CONDENSE PAGE”.
The configuration file may have Reachable Network paths in excess of
Appendix A
233
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
the maximum page count.
ACTION: Restore the configuration file with Reachable Network paths
within the maximum page count.
NMGRERR 95
MESSAGE: You must enter a configuration file name to open or
create. (NMGRERR 95)
CAUSE: The user pressed “Open Config” or “Create Config” but did not
enter the configuration file name on the OPEN screen.
ACTION: Supply the configuration file name.
NMGRERR 96
MESSAGE: You must enter a directory file name to open or create.
(NMGRERR 96)
CAUSE: The user pressed “Open Directory” or “Create Directory”, but
did not fill in the Network Directory File Name field on the OPEN
screen.
ACTION: Supply the network directory file name.
NMGRERR 97
MESSAGE: You must enter a directory file name to open or create.
(NMGRERR 97)
CAUSE: The user entered the NEXT command but there is no next
screen.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 98
MESSAGE: There is no entry to be condensed. (NMGRERR 98)
CAUSE: No reachable networks exist in the file to be condensed.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 99
MESSAGE: Condense Page function failed. (NMGRERR 99)
CAUSE: Error occurs during “CONDENSE PAGE” while doing an
“nmconfgetdata” or “nmconfrenamepath”. It can be caused by a
corrupted configuration file. Another possibility is that an internal
error is occurring with NMCONF intrinsics.
ACTION: Restore a back up copy of the configuration file and try again.
If the error still occurs, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 100
MESSAGE: Internal error: Nmconf file number not in file table.
(NMGRERR 100)
CAUSE: The file number was changed in NMMGR but not entered in the
table.
ACTION: Exit NMMGR, then rerun it and try to observe what damage
has been done. Repair if possible or restore the configuration file.
CAUSE: The file number was changed in NMMGR but not entered in the
table.
234
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 101
MESSAGE: Internal error: Midas file number not in file table.
(NMGRERR 101)
CAUSE: The file number was not located in a search through the table.
It is likely that a file number was changed in NMMGR but not entered
in the table.
ACTION: Exit NMMGR, and rerun NMMGR and try to observe what
damage has been done. Repair if possible or restore the configuration
file. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning
of this appendix.
NMGRERR 102
MESSAGE: Internal error: Unable to remove closed file from file table.
(NMGRERR 102)
CAUSE: An attempt to clear the file table of a closed file failed.
ACTION: Exit NMMGR. It is possible that no damage occurred. Rerun
NMMGR. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 103
MESSAGE: Internal error: NMMGR file table inconsistent.
(NMGRERR 103)
CAUSE: On trying to access the file table, an error was found in the
table. This will happen at open time if an attempt is made to put a file
into the file table and if the slot in the table is already occupied.
ACTION: Exit NMMGR. It is possible that no damage occurred. Rerun
NMMGR. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 104
MESSAGE: Netxport has locked the file; cannot begin guided task;
wait. (NMGRERR 104)
CAUSE: The network transport is being started using the file that
NMMGR has open as the active configuration file. A guided dynamic
update cannot be started until the transport has been started.
ACTION: Wait until the transport is started and then try again.
NMGRERR 105
MESSAGE: The file has been locked; type ‘STOP’ to abort, or wait.
(NMGRERR 105)
CAUSE: Either the transport is being started using the file NMMGR has
open as the active configuration file, or NMMGR is processing a guided
dynamic update which cannot continue until the transport has been
started.
ACTION: Wait until the transport is started and then try again.
Appendix A
235
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 106
MESSAGE: The file has been locked; cannot begin guided task.
(NMGRERR 106)
CAUSE: The transport is using the file NMMGR has open as the active
configuration file. Guided configuration cannot be performed on an
active configuration file (only guided dynamic updates can).
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 107
MESSAGE: The file has been locked; Type ‘STOP’ to abort.
(NMGRERR 107)
CAUSE: The transport is being started using the file NMMGR has open
as the active configuration file. NMMGR is performing a guided
configuration which cannot continue while the transport is up. The file
cannot be modified except with guided dynamic updates until the
transport is brought down.
ACTION: Type ‘STOP’ in the command window and press ENTER to stop
guided configuration.
NMGRERR 108
MESSAGE: The file has been locked; cannot make any modifications.
(NMGRERR 108)
CAUSE: Transport is using the file NMMGR has open as the active
configuration file. The file cannot be changed except with guided
configuration.
ACTION: Enter guided configuration to perform this function.
NMGRERR 109
MESSAGE: This file has been locked; subtree copy aborted.
(NMGRERR 109)
CAUSE: The transport is being initiated using the file that NMMGR has
open as the active configuration file, and NMMGR was in the middle of
a subtree copy.
ACTION: When the transport is no longer running, purge the subtree
you were copying into and restart the subtree copy.
NMGRERR 110
MESSAGE: Internal error: Cannot check file lock status; data not
saved. (NMGRERR 110)
CAUSE: NMMGR cannot determine whether or not the transport is
using this file.
ACTION: If the transport is being started or shut down, wait until it is
finished and then try again. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting
a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 111
MESSAGE: NETXPORT not validated. Type exit again to leave
NMMGR. (NMGRERR 111)
CAUSE: Data in the NETXPORT subsystem was changed and
NETXPORT was not successfully validated afterwords.
236
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Go to the validation screen and validate NETXPORT or type
exit again, this leaves the file unvalidated.
NMGRERR 112
MESSAGE: DTS/LINK not validated. Type exit again to leave NMMGR.
(NMGRERR 112)
CAUSE: Data in the DTS or LINK subsystems was changed and
DTS/LINK was not successfully validated afterwords.
ACTION: Go to the validation screen and validate DTS/LINK or type
exit again, this leaves the file unvalidated.
NMGRERR 113
MESSAGE: HP-IBM not validated. Type exit again to leave NMMGR.
(NMGRERR 113)
CAUSE: Data in the SNANODE, NRJE, or IMF subsystems was
changed and HP-IBM was not successfully validated afterwards.
ACTION: The user can go to the validation screen and validate HP-IBM.
The user can type exit again and leave the file unvalidated.
NMGRERR 114
MESSAGE: Cannot find validation program NMMGRVAL.PUB.SYS.
(NMGRERR 114)
CAUSE: File does not exist.
ACTION: Check to see what happened to the file NMMGRVAL.PUB.SYS. If
it has been inadvertently purged, try restoring it from a backup tape.
NMGRERR 115
MESSAGE: Cannot send mail to validation program. (NMGRERR 115)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: Contact your Hewlett-Packard representative.
NMGRERR 116
MESSAGE: Cannot activate validation program
NMMGRVAL.PUB.SYS. (NMGRERR 116)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: Contact your Hewlett-Packard representative.
NMGRERR 117
MESSAGE: Cannot receive mail from validation program.
(NMGRERR 117)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: Contact your Hewlett-Packard representative.
NMGRERR 118
MESSAGE: LU Number “!” on page ! is a duplicate. (NMGRERR 118)
CAUSE: The user entered two LU’s with the same LU Numbers. The
duplicate numbers may be on the same page of LU data, or one may be
on page 1 of LU data and the other on page 2 of LU data.
ACTION: Make sure all LU’s have unique numbers.
Appendix A
237
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 119
MESSAGE: LU Number “!” on page ! is a duplicate. (NMGRERR 119)
CAUSE: You have entered two LUs with the same LU name. These
names may be on the same page (1 or 2) of LU data, or one name may
be on page 1 and the other on page 2.
ACTION: Make sure all LUs have unique names.
NMGRERR 120
MESSAGE: If the Node Type is “2.0”, then the LU # is required.
(NMGRERR 120)
CAUSE: The user entered an LU Number out of the acceptable range of
1–255.
ACTION: Enter an LU Number that is in the range 1–255.
NMGRERR 121
MESSAGE: IP Address with node portion of zeros is reserved for
broadcast. (NMGRERR 121)
CAUSE: You entered an IP address with the node portion of the IP
address equal to zero.
ACTION: Modify the node portion of the IP address to a valid IP
address.
NMGRERR 122
MESSAGE: LU Name must be a letter followed by letters for digits.
(NMGRERR 122)
CAUSE: The user entered a string that contained some non
alpha-numeric characters.
ACTION: Reenter the string with alpha-numeric characters only.
NMGRERR 123
MESSAGE: IP Mask can only contain digits separated by periods or
spaces. (NMGRERR 123)
CAUSE: The IP mask was entered incorrectly. Each octet (XXX) can only
contain digits. The octets can be separated by periods or blank spaces.
ACTION: Enter a mask in the correct format.
NMGRERR 124
MESSAGE: IP Mask octets can only contain values between 0 and
255. (NMGRERR 124)
CAUSE: One or more of the octets entered in the IP mask contains a
number less than 0 or greater than 255.
ACTION: Enter a mask with octets within the range 0 to 255.
NMGRERR 125
MESSAGE: IP Mask must contain exactly four octets. (NMGRERR 125)
CAUSE: More or less than four octets (XXX) were entered.
ACTION: Reenter the mask with exactly four octets.
238
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 126
MESSAGE: IP Subnet Mask of 255.255.255 is not allowed.
(NMGRERR 126)
CAUSE: An IP Subnet Mask of 255.255.255 was entered. This is not a
legal mask.
ACTION: Reenter the mask with a different value.
NMGRERR 127
MESSAGE: If Node 2.1 Dependent LU Support, then LU #’s must be
blank. (NMGRERR 127)
CAUSE: If the PU Type is 2.1 and the PU Dependent Support is N, then
there cannot be any LU Numbers associated with the LU names.
ACTION: Make all the LU Numbers blank and try again.
NMGRERR 128
MESSAGE: Invalid SNA LU Name Format. Must be
XXXXXXXX.XXXXXXXX. (NMGRERR 128)
CAUSE: The user entered an invalid SNA LU name. The SNA LU Name
must be in the format of AXXXXXXX.AXXXXXXX, where A is any alpha
character and X in any alphanumeric character.
ACTION: Make all the LU Numbers blank and try again.
NMGRERR 130
MESSAGE: No previous page. (NMGRERR 130)
CAUSE: The user pressed the PREV PAGE function key on a paged data
screen and there was no previous page of data.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 131
MESSAGE: Ldev of ! is not valid. Valid range is -1 to 4679.
(NMGRERR 131)
CAUSE: The user entered an Ldev that is out of range.
ACTION: Reenter an Ldev within the allowed range.
NMGRERR 132
MESSAGE: Names can only be 16 characters long. (NMGRERR 132)
CAUSE: The user entered a name in a field that allows more characters
than a valid name allows. This field is usually used for more than one
type of entry. The program believes that the user is trying to store a
name that is too long.
ACTION: Enter a new name 16 characters or shorter.
NMGRERR 133
MESSAGE: Allowed name chars are “A”..“Z”, “0”..“9”, “_” and “-”.
(NMGRERR 133)
CAUSE: The user has tried to enter a name with invalid characters in it.
ACTION: Enter a name with valid characters.
NMGRERR 134
MESSAGE: IP Address with node portion of zero’s reserved.
(NMGRERR 134)
CAUSE: The node portion of the IP address is all zeros.
Appendix A
239
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Check the IP address and make sure that the node portion is
not all zeros. Enter a valid IP address. (Press the Help key for more
information on entering a valid IP address.)
NMGRERR 135
MESSAGE: IP Address with network portion of zero’s reserved.
(NMGRERR 135)
CAUSE: The network portion of the IP address is all zeros.
ACTION: Check the IP address and make sure that the network portion
is not all zeros. Enter a valid IP address. (Press the Help key for more
information on entering a valid IP address.)
NMGRERR 136
MESSAGE: IP Address A 127 XXX.XXX.XXX is reserved for Loopback.
(NMGRERR 136)
CAUSE: The IP address entered has a network address of 127. This
network address with any node address is reserved for loopback.
ACTION: Check the IP address and make sure that the network address
is not 127. Enter a valid IP address. (Press the Help key for more
information on entering a valid IP address.)
NMGRERR 137
MESSAGE: IP Address E 255.255.255.255 is reserved for Broadcast.
(NMGRERR 137)
CAUSE: The IP address the user entered is a reserved address.
ACTION: Enter a different IP address. (Press the Help key for more
information on entering a valid IP address.)
NMGRERR 138
MESSAGE: Bad LAN address. Format is xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx; x is 0–9 or
A–F. (NMGRERR 138)
CAUSE: The user entered an invalid LAN address on a screen or in a
maintenance mode command.
ACTION: Correct the LAN address and repeat the last command or
action. (Press the Help key for more information on entering a valid
LAN address.)
NMGRERR 139
MESSAGE: Invalid response. you must enter ON or OFF.
(NMGRERR 139)
CAUSE: The user, while using the DTSDYNCONF command in
maintenance mode, entered an invalid character The only valid
response is either ON or OFF.
ACTION: Enter either ON or OFF.
NMGRERR 140
MESSAGE: SNA/DS not validated. Type exit again to leave NMMGR.
(NMGRERR 140)
CAUSE: Data in the SNA.DS subsystem was changed and SNA/DS was
not successfully validated afterwords.
240
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Go to the validation screen and validate SNA/DS or type exit
again to leave the file unvalidated.
NMGRERR 141
MESSAGE: Subsystem(s) are not validated. Type ERR for more
information. (NMGRERR 141)
CAUSE: One or more of the subsystems in NMMGR have not been
validated.
ACTION: To see which subsystems have not been validated, type ERRORS
in the command line and press the Enter key. Go to the validation screen
to validate the unvalidated subsystems or type exit again to leave the
file unvalidated.
NMGRERR 200
MESSAGE: Error in build statement table. (NMGRERR 200)
CAUSE: This is an internal NMMGR error. The number of statements in
an internal table does not match the number expected by NMMGR.
ACTION: Restore the file NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS. Then run
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS to make sure the version of NMMGR is correct.
NMGRERR 201
MESSAGE: Internal error in Guided config scanner. (NMGRERR 201)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error caused by a
corrupt NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS file.
ACTION: Restore NMMGRCAT and retry. If this fails see “Submitting a
CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 202
MESSAGE: Aux NCONF file already open. (NMGRERR 202)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error caused when
more than one NMCONF file is opened by the guided configuration
open statement.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 203
MESSAGE: Cannot open source, destination, or Aux NCONF file.
(NMGRERR 203)
CAUSE: This is caused when the source/destination file or the file
NMAUX1.PUB.SYS is either missing, is the wrong version, is locked for
exclusive access, or was corrupted during a subtree copy.
ACTION: If doing a subtree copy, check to see that the source and
destination files really exist. If performing a guided configuration task,
copy NMAUX1.PUB.SYS from backup tape, and run NMMAINT.PUB.SYS to
make sure that you have the correct version.
NMGRERR 204
MESSAGE: Aux NCONF file not opened. (NMGRERR 204)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error caused when data
is copied from the auxiliary file to the user file and the auxiliary file was
not opened.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
241
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 205
MESSAGE: Aux file does not contain specified path. (NMGRERR 205)
CAUSE: This is a guided configuration error caused when NMMGRCAT
specifies a path in the auxiliary file that does not exist.
ACTION: Copy NMAUX1.PUB.SYS from backup tape, and run
NMAINT.PUB.SYS to make sure that the version of NMAUX1 is the same
as the version of NMMGR.
NMGRERR 206
MESSAGE: Path to subtree in user file does not exist.
(NMGRERR 206)
CAUSE: This problem could be caused by a corrupt file or by an old
configuration file that needs to be updated.
ACTION: Run NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS. If needed, restore a known good
configuration file from a backup tape, or create a new configuration file
with NMMGR.
NMGRERR 207
MESSAGE: Internal error; Guided token overflow. (NMGRERR 207)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: Restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If this fails
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 208
MESSAGE: Unexpected Guided Config error. (NMGRERR 208)
CAUSE: An unexpected or internal guided configuration error occurred.
ACTION: Type the ERROR command after this message is displayed for
clarification of the error(s). A PC value is specified at the end of this
error message. If unable to include the value problem, submit a CR
(Change Request). See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix. Be sure to include the value of the PC with the CR.
NMGRERR 209
MESSAGE: Cannot Stop Guided Configuration. (NMGRERR 209)
CAUSE: The STOP command is allowed only on screens which contain a
“path.” This is most likely to occur when the user types the command
STOP on the errors screen during guided configuration.
ACTION: Move to a screen which contains a “path” at the top of the
menu and retype the stop command.
NMGRERR 211
MESSAGE: Cannot perform NEXT function. (NMGRERR 211)
CAUSE: This error occurs when the user attempts to use the NEXT
command when no selection screen has been encountered.
ACTION: There is no need to use this function at this time.
NMGRERR 214
MESSAGE: Function is not allowed during Guided configuration.
(NMGRERR 214)
CAUSE: The user has pressed a function key that is not allowed during
guided configuration. If the user is on a data screen, it is possible to
advance by pressing the Update function key.
242
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Press a labeled function key.
NMGRERR 215
MESSAGE: Illegal vplus field specified in Guided config.
(NMGRERR 215)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error that is caused by
missing information in the forms file.
ACTION: Restore NMMGRF.PUB.SYS from backup tape, and run
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS. If this fails see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning
of this appendix.
NMGRERR 216
MESSAGE: Illegal Guided config variable name. (NMGRERR 216)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 217
MESSAGE: Illegal path iden name in Guide config. (NMGRERR 217)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 218
MESSAGE: Max num of items that can be put to a screen exceeded.
(NMGRERR 218)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 219
MESSAGE: String overflow. (NMGRERR 219)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 220
MESSAGE: Boolean logic error. (NMGRERR 220)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 221
MESSAGE: Missing ENDIF statement. (NMGRERR 221)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 222
MESSAGE: Select loops nested too deep. (NMGRERR 222)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 223
MESSAGE: Select stack underflow probably missing SELECT.
(NMGRERR 223)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
243
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 224
MESSAGE: Missing ENDSELECT statement. (NMGRERR 224)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 226
MESSAGE: Unknown statement in Guided Configuration driver.
(NMGRERR 226)
CAUSE: This is an internal guided configuration error.
ACTION: Restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from backup tape. If this fails see
“Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 227
MESSAGE: Command not allowed on error or version screen.
(NMGRERR 227)
CAUSE: Certain commands are only allowed on states which contain a
path. This is likely to occur when the user types STOP on the errors
screen or the version screen during guided configuration.
ACTION: Move to a state which contains a path and retype the stop
command.
NMGRERR 228
MESSAGE: The network interface data and the topology key must
match. (NMGRERR 228)
CAUSE: The type of the network interface does not match the topology
key which you selected.
ACTION: Make sure you pressed the correct topology key and have the
correct network interface name. Check the type of the network interface
name by going to NEXPORT.NI (do a direct branch).
NMGRERR 229
MESSAGE: The Network interface must of type POINT-TO-POINT.
(NMGRERR 229)
CAUSE: The Network Interface must be of type POINT-TO-POINT.
ACTION: Check the type of the network interface name by going to
NETXPORT.NI (do a direct branch).
NMGRERR 230
MESSAGE: The Network interface may not be of type LOOPBACK.
(NMGRERR 230)
CAUSE: There is no Internet data to configure under the loopback
network interface.
ACTION: Do not use this function with loopback.
NMGRERR 231
MESSAGE: No network interface found, or unknown type.
(NMGRERR 231)
CAUSE: You may have spelled the name incorrectly.
ACTION: Check the spelling and reenter.
CAUSE: The type may be unknown.
244
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Check the type of the network interface name by going to
NETXPORT.NI (do a direct branch). File a CR (Change Request) if the
type is labeled as UNKNOWN. (See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning
of this appendix). Delete the unknown type and retry.
NMGRERR 232
MESSAGE: Unable to open source NCONF file for copy.
(NMGRERR 232)
CAUSE: File does not exist or is the wrong version.
ACTION: If in guided configuration, then NMAUXI.PUB.SYS could not be
opened. If performing a copy subtree, check the source file to make sure
it exists and is the correct version.
NMGRERR 233
MESSAGE: Unable to open destination NCONF file for copy.
(NMGRERR 233)
CAUSE: File does not exist or is the wrong version.
ACTION: If in guided configuration, then NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS or the user
file does not exist, or is corrupt. You may check the version by running
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS. You may also run NMMGRVER to determine if your
file is corrupt.
If performing a copy subtree, check the destination file to make sure it
exists. Check the version and check to see if the file is corrupt (as
above).
NMGRERR 234
MESSAGE: No PC return value is on the Gosub stack.
(NMGRERR 234)
CAUSE: There is an internal G-code error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 235
MESSAGE: Illegal PC value specified in statement. (NMGRERR 235)
CAUSE: There is an internal G-code error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 236
MESSAGE: The Gosub stack is full. (NMGRERR 236)
CAUSE: There is an internal G-code error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 237
MESSAGE: The Network interface must be of type X.25.
(NMGRERR 237)
CAUSE: The operation is illegal if the NI is not an X.25 link.
ACTION: Check to make sure that the NI is an X.25 link.
Appendix A
245
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 240
MESSAGE: Data must be entered and Saved before continuing.
(NMGRERR 240)
CAUSE: While running guided configuration, the user tried to press Next
Screen without first pressing Update Data while at the path
SNANODE.nodename.
ACTION: Enter the correct data and press Update Data.
NMGRERR 250
MESSAGE: The NI Name must be specified. (NMGRERR 250)
CAUSE: At the Guided HP Configuration screen, the user attempted to
fine tune the parameters for an NI configuration without specifying the
NI name in the NI Name field.
ACTION: Enter a valid NI name in the NI Name field and press the
FineTune Parms key again.
NMGRERR 251
MESSAGE: The NI Name does not exist in the configuration file.
(NMGRERR 251)
CAUSE: The user attempted to perform an operation on an nonexistent
NI. Either the NI is not configured or the specified NI name is incorrect.
ACTION: Specify the correct NI name of a configured NI and try again.
NMGRERR 253
MESSAGE: The NI Name already exists and is of another type.
(NMGRERR 253)
CAUSE: The user attempted to create an NI using an NI name that has
already been configured for another NI of a different type.
ACTION: Specify an NI name that has not already been used and try
again.
NMGRERR 254
MESSAGE: This link name is used by another NI; select another
name. (NMGRERR 254)
CAUSE: While configuring an NI, the user specified a link name that has
already been configured for a different NI and cannot be shared.
ACTION: Specify a different link name and try again.
NMGRERR 255
MESSAGE: A link name must be entered. (NMGRERR 255)
CAUSE: The user attempted to update the configuration file without
specifying a link name, which is required for this screen.
ACTION: Enter a link name in the Link name field and try again.
NMGRERR 256
MESSAGE: This link cannot be renamed. It is used by another NI.
(NMGRERR 256)
CAUSE: The user attempted to change the name of a link that is used by
more than one NI.
ACTION: Leave the link name as it is or reconfigure one or the other of
the NIs to use a different link.
246
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 257
MESSAGE: The NI name does not exist. Please specify a type to
create it. (NMGRERR 257)
CAUSE: At the Guided HP Configuration screen, the user entered a new
NI name and pressed the Config Network key without specifying a type
in the NI type field. The type must be specified if the NI does not
already exist.
ACTION: If you are configuring a new NI, enter the type of the new NI
in the NI type field and press Config Network. If you are updating an
existing NI and entered the wrong name in the NI name field, enter the
correct NI name and press Config Network.
NMGRERR 258
MESSAGE: Data saved, but profile doesn’t exist. Use GoToProfiles
command to create it. (NMGRERR 258)
CAUSE: At the DTS Configuration screen or at one of the DTC card
configuration screens, the user specified the name of a profile that is not
configured and then pressed the save data key.
ACTION: Press the Go To Profiles key if one exists for the screen. If not,
type GoToProfiles in the command line and press Enter. This will take
you to the profile configuration screens. Configure the nonexisting
profile(s) and save the information in the configuration file. When you
are finished, press the Prior Screen key until NMMGR returns you to
the screen you were at when you originally entered the nonexisting
profile name. There is no need to reenter the data on this screen, since
it has already been saved. Continue with the next configuration task.
NMGRERR 259
MESSAGE: A DTC name must be specified. (NMGRERR 259)
CAUSE: At the DTC Configuration screen, the user pressed the Read
DTC function key without specifying a DTC name.
ACTION: Enter a valid DTC name and try again.
NMGRERR 260
MESSAGE: The DTC name does not exist; enter data and press Save
Data to create it. (NMGRERR 260)
CAUSE: At the DTC Configuration screen, the user specified a
nonexisting DTC name and pressed either the Config Card key or the
Read DTC key.
ACTION: If an incorrect DTC name was entered, enter the correct DTC
name and try again. If the DTC name is correct but the DTC has not yet
been configured, enter the information for the DTC and press the Save
Data key, then try again.
NMGRERR 261
MESSAGE: The DTS Link does not exist. Enter a Link name and press
Sate Data. (NMGRERR 261)
CAUSE: At the DTS Configuration screen, the user entered a
nonexisting link name and pressed the Tune DTS Link key.
Appendix A
247
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: If an incorrect link name was entered, enter the correct link
name and try again. If the link name is correct but the link has not yet
been configured, enter the information for the link and press the Save
Data key, then try again.
NMGRERR 262
MESSAGE: Must be a number from 0 to 5. (NMGRERR 262)
CAUSE: At the DTC Configuration screen, the user entered an invalid
character in the field specifying the card to be configured and pressed
the Config Card key.
ACTION: Enter the number of the card to be configured and press Config
Card again. The number must be between 0 and 5 and must correspond
to the DTC slot number of the card being configured.
NMGRERR 263
MESSAGE: Data saved, but the home Network Interface does not
exist. (NMGRERR 263)
CAUSE: The user specified a nonexisting NI name as the home network
interface and saved the data on the screen.
ACTION: If an incorrect NI name was specified, correct the NI name and
press Save Data again. If the NI name is correct but the NI has not yet
been configured, configure the NI. There is no need to reenter the
information on the current screen since it has already been saved.
NMGRERR 264
MESSAGE: Data saved, but the SNA does not exist. (NMGRERR 264)
CAUSE: The user specified a nonexisting SNA node and saved the data
on the screen.
ACTION: If an incorrect SNA node was specified, correct the SNA node
name and press Save Data again. If the SNA node name is correct but
the SNA node has not yet been configured, configure the SNA node.
There is no need to reenter the information on the current screen since
it has already been saved.
NMGRERR 265
MESSAGE: This link name does not exist for this router NI.
(NMGRERR 265)
CAUSE: The user entered a nonexisting link name and pressed the Link
Routing key.
ACTION: If an incorrect link name was specified, correct the link name
and try again. If link name is correct but the link has not yet been
configured, configure the link.
NMGRERR 266
MESSAGE: The path report for the node is full; no new address can
be added. (NMGRERR 266)
CAUSE: The user attempted to add an address to the network directory
for a node whose path report is already full. No additional addresses
can be added.
ACTION: Go to the Network Directory Data screen for the node and
delete some of the addresses assigned to the node name.
248
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 267
MESSAGE: The node name must be configured first. (NMGRERR 267)
CAUSE: The node name was not configured.
ACTION: Go to the Main screen and configure the node name.
NMGRERR 268
MESSAGE: Missing IP address. (NMGRERR 268)
CAUSE: The user neglected to enter the IP address in the appropriate
field.
ACTION: Enter the IP address and try again.
NMGRERR 269
MESSAGE: You must enter a backup configuration file name.
(NMGRERR 269)
CAUSE: The user pressed the Open Config or Create Config key with no
file name specified in the backup configuration file name field.
ACTION: Enter a valid file name in the backup configuration file name
field and press Open Config or Create Config again.
NMGRERR 270
MESSAGE: Cannot open node information file for ADDVC or
PURGEVC. (NMGRERR 270)
CAUSE: NMMGR was unable to open the file whose name was specified
in the ADDVC or PURGEVC command, either because the file does not exist
or because a more serious file system error occurred.
ACTION: 1. The file name specified may not exist. Try the command
again with a file that exists.
ACTION: 2. A more serious file system error may have occurred. See the
accompanying file system error message for resolution.
NMGRERR 271
MESSAGE: You must open the configuration and directory files first.
(NMGRERR 271)
CAUSE: The user attempted to perform an ADDVC or PURGEVC command
without first opening the configuration and/or directory files.
ACTION: Open a configuration file with the OPENCONF command and a
directory file with the OPENDIR command.
NMGRERR 272
MESSAGE: The link exists, but its type is not correct for this NI.
(NMGRERR 272)
CAUSE: The user specified an existing link name on one of the custom
NI update screens. The selected link’s type was not correct; that is, a
LAPB type link was specified for an X.25 NI.
ACTION: Enter the name of a link with the correct type or delete the
link configuration.
Appendix A
249
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 273
MESSAGE: The selected card number is not configured with a card
type. (NMGRERR 273)
CAUSE: At the DTC Configuration screen, the user selected a card
number and pressed the Config Card key. No type was entered in the
Type field associated with the selected card.
ACTION: Fill in a card type in the Type field for the selected card and
press the Save Data key. Type must be “D” for direct connect, “M” for
modem, or “P” for PAD. Once the data has been saved, select the card
and press the Config Card key again.
NMGRERR 274
MESSAGE: The config is valid, but could not be backed up; Type ERR
for info. (NMGRERR 274)
CAUSE: The user pressed the validate key and the configuration
validated correctly, but NMMGR could not back up the configuration
file because an error occurred while writing the backup file.
ACTION: Type ERR on the command line and view the errors that
occurred. After correcting the errors, retry the validate operation.
NMGRERR 275
MESSAGE: You must specify either a switched or permanent virtual
circuit address. (NMGRERR 275)
CAUSE: The user failed to enter either a valid switched virtual circuit
address or a valid permanent virtual circuit address. One or the other
must be entered.
ACTION: Enter a valid address as appropriate for the VC, either
switched or permanent.
NMGRERR 276
MESSAGE: The NI name exists, but its type is not X.25.
(NMGRERR 276)
CAUSE: The user entered the name of an existing NI and specified the
type as X.25. The NI exists but its type is not X.25.
ACTION: If you are updating an existing NI, enter the correct NI name
and the correct type and try again. If you are configuring a new NI,
enter a name that has not already been used and try again.
NMGRERR 277
MESSAGE: Duplicate address key; it must be unique for the X.25 NI.
(NMGRERR 277)
CAUSE: The user specified an address key that was not unique for the
NI specified at the VC Configuration screen or through the ADDVC
command.
ACTION: Go to the SVC and PVC paths screens for the NI to see the
names that are already configured. Choose an address key that is not
used in either of these screens.
250
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 278
MESSAGE: Missing quote; the IP address must be enclosed in
quotes. (NMGRERR 278)
CAUSE: While using the ADDVC command in maintenance mode, the
user forgot to enter the IP address with either an opening or a closing
quote.
ACTION: Reissue the command with the correct IP address enclosed in
quotes.
NMGRERR 280
MESSAGE: The source path was not found. (NMGRERR 280)
CAUSE: The path to the subtree to copy was not found.
ACTION: Check to make sure you have the correct file and check the
source path spelling.
NMGRERR 281
MESSAGE: The destination path was not found. (NMGRERR 281)
CAUSE: The destination path, which is created by substituting any
destination IDs into the source path, was not accessible. The path in the
file was not an exact match, or the destination path was missing.
ACTION: Check the source and destination path spelling and make sure
you have the correct file.
NMGRERR 282
MESSAGE: The destination path exists. Use the overwrite option to
replace. (NMGRERR 282)
CAUSE: The destination path already exists in the file.
ACTION: Enter “Y” in the overwrite option.
NMGRERR 283
MESSAGE: Source and destination do not map with each other
correctly. (NMGRERR 283)
CAUSE: The source and destination paths must start at the same spot in
the NMMGR schema. Most likely the user attempted to change the
name of an item in the destination of a subtree copy.
ACTION: Check to see if the item that was changed was a select or type
select identifier. If not, that will cause the subcopy to fail.
Check to make sure that any destination type select items, if changed,
were changed to items of the same type (as in LAN to LAN, instead of
LAN to router).
NMGRERR 284
MESSAGE: Internal ERROR in subtree copy. (NMGRERR 284)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 285
MESSAGE: A non select screen id was changed in the destination
path. (NMGRERR 285)
CAUSE: Incorrect IDs in the destination path.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
251
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 286
MESSAGE: Illegal path name identifier in destination path name.
(NMGRERR 286)
CAUSE:A path ID in the destination pathname is not legal.
ACTION: Check the destination path id for typing mistakes.
NMGRERR 287
MESSAGE: Invalid destination path — path too long. (NMGRERR 287)
CAUSE: The source and destination paths must be the same length.
When entering data on the subtree copy screen, the source path may
appear longer, but should this be the case, the destination path uses
IDs from the source path. This error is generated in the other case
when the destination path is longer than the source path.
ACTION: Check to make sure that you are not missing path ids in the
source path.
NMGRERR 288
MESSAGE: Source path contains empty path identifiers.
(NMGRERR 288)
CAUSE: This occurs when the user leaves path IDs empty in the middle
of the source path field on the copy subtree screen.
ACTION: Check the source path, and fix the path, so that none of the
source path IDs in the middle of the source path are blank.
NMGRERR 289
MESSAGE: The source and destination may not be the same file and
path. (NMGRERR 289)
CAUSE: The user is attempting to copy over the source data, which is
not allowed.
ACTION: Select another file or path to copy into.
NMGRERR 290
MESSAGE: The file does not exist or cannot be opened.
(NMGRERR 290)
CAUSE: An NMCONF file to be opened for a copy could not be accessed.
ACTION: Check the spelling of the filename. Do a “listf <filename>” to
see if file exists.
NMGRERR 291
MESSAGE: Source path is not allowed to be copied. (NMGRERR 291)
CAUSE: The source path is not permitted to be copied by the subtree
command.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 300
MESSAGE: Internal NMMGR error: cannot close current Network
Directory. (NMGRERR 300)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
252
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 301
MESSAGE: Internal NMMGR error: corrupt file likely. (NMGRERR 301)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: The directory file is probably corrupt and should be replaced
by a copy from a backup tape. Restore both data and key files. See
“Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 302
MESSAGE: No next page of node names. (NMGRERR 302)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
hits NEXT PAGE and there are no subsequent names in the directory, or
when the name supplied does not exist.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 303
MESSAGE: No previous page of node names. (NMGRERR 303)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
hits PREV PAGE and there are none, or when the name supplied does
not exist.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 304
MESSAGE: A node with the same name and global/local setting
already exists. (NMGRERR 304)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
tries to add a node name that already exists into the directory. The
name is probably misspelled, or the wrong global/local setting was
given.
ACTION: Correct the node name, the global/local setting, the type,
and/or the enable flag.
NMGRWARN 305 MESSAGE: Cannot find a node with this name and global/local
setting. (NMGRWARN 305)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
tries to delete or update a node name that does not exist. The name is
probably misspelled, or the wrong global/local setting was given.
ACTION: Correct the node name, the global/local setting, the type,
and/or the enable flag.
NMGRERR 306
MESSAGE: RENAME requires a new node name and/or new
global/local setting. (NMGRERR 306)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
tries to rename a node name (global/local setting), but both the new
node name and new global/local setting were omitted.
ACTION: Specify the missing information.
Appendix A
253
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 307
MESSAGE: The current node name entry has been deleted by another
user. (NMGRERR 307)
CAUSE: The user attempted to delete or update a network address, or
path data, but another user who is modifying the same directory file
has just deleted the entry.
ACTION: Coordinate update activities with other user(s).
NMGRERR 308
MESSAGE: Duplicate IP address. (NMGRERR 308)
CAUSE: The user attempted to add a network address that already
exists in the current path report.
ACTION: Either choose a different network address, or make sure you
are updating the correct node name global/local setting.
NMGRERR 321
MESSAGE: Not enough room in the path report list for this addition.
(NMGRERR 321)
CAUSE: This is an informative message that is issued when the user
attempts to add or update a path in a very large path report list. This
can happen only on very large gateway nodes, such as a node with more
than 15 network addresses.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
(Request an expansion on the limit on path reports.)
NMGRERR 322
MESSAGE: Internal NMMGR error — corrupt path report list data.
(NMGRERR 322)
CAUSE: Severe error indicating an internal logic error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 323
MESSAGE: No directory file open. (NMGRERR 323)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An informative message that is
issued when a user gives a command prior to completing a successful
OPENDIR command.
ACTION: Open or create a directory file using OPENDIR, then reissue the
command.
NMGRWARN 324 MESSAGE: Cannot find this entry in the directory. (NMGRWARN 324)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An informative message that is
issued when no directory entry (either global, local, or neither — if no
;GLOBAL or ;LOCAL keyword given) could be found in the directory
matching the specified node name.
ACTION: Correct the node name.
254
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 325
MESSAGE: Cannot open source file / wrong file type. (NMGRERR 325)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An informative message issued
when an invalid file was specified in a MERGEDIR command. Possible
causes are:
• Nonexistent file
• Wrong type of file (not directory or configuration file)
• Security violation
• A system file name was given
• Other file system problem
ACTION: Correct the filename.
NMGRERR 326
MESSAGE: Cannot specify a node name when source is a
configuration file. (NMGRERR 326)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: Informative message issued when
a user specified a node name in conjunction with a configuration file in
a MERGEDIR command.
ACTION: Omit the node name from the command or use a directory file
as the source and retain the node name.
NMGRERR 327
MESSAGE: Local and global entries exist for this node name; choose
one. (NMGRERR 327)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An informative message issued
when the user has given a DELETENODE command, specifying a node
name that is not unique. For example, both a local and global entry
could exist for the node name.
ACTION: Explicitly state the entry to be deleted using ;LOCAL or
;GLOBAL.
NMGRERR 328
MESSAGE: The node name must be of the form NAME.DOMAIN.ORG.
(NMGRERR 328)
CAUSE: A node name was expected, however, the data present did not
conform to the node name format.
ACTION: Correct the node name.
CAUSE: The node name is more than 50 characters long.
ACTION: Correct the node name.
NMGRERR 329
MESSAGE: The catalog file has an error in the Batch Command list.
(NMGRERR 329)
CAUSE: An internal error in NMMGR has occurred.
ACTION: Run NMMAINT.PUB.SYS to make sure that you have the correct
version of NMMGR. If necessary, restore the file NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS
Appendix A
255
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
from a backup tape. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 330
MESSAGE: Extra data was specified for this command.
(NMGRERR 330)
CAUSE: The user specified too much data.
ACTION: Check syntax of command or type “help” for more information.
NMGRERR 332
MESSAGE: A key operator was already specified. (NMGRERR 332)
CAUSE: The user specified both a ;LOCAL and ;GLOBAL key operator.
ACTION: Retype the command with only a ;LOCAL or ;GLOBAL key
operator.
NMGRERR 333
MESSAGE: A merge operator was already specified. (NMGRERR 333)
CAUSE: The user specified more than one merge operator (KEEP,
NOKEEP, TIMESTAMP).
ACTION: Retype the command with only one merge operator.
NMGRERR 334
MESSAGE: Unknown command encountered. (NMGRERR 334)
CAUSE: The user typed in an incorrect command.
ACTION: If the command is an MPE command, the command must start
with a colon “:”. Check the spelling of the command name and reenter
as needed.
NMGRERR 335
MESSAGE: Parameter length overflow. (NMGRERR 335)
CAUSE: A parameter’s length in characters exceeds the maximum
length permitted.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMGRERR 336
MESSAGE: Unexpected semicolon encountered. (NMGRERR 336)
CAUSE: A semicolon was encountered before other expected data was
entered.
OPENDIR: no options (no semicolon) are allowed.
MERGEDIR: no filename was specified.
LISTDIR: no options (no semicolon) are allowed.
EXPANDDIR: no options (no semicolon) are allowed.
ACTION: Check syntax of the command or type “help” for more
information.
NMGRERR 337
MESSAGE: Expected parameter after command. (NMGRERR 337)
CAUSE: A parameter is needed after certain commands. This error
occurs if the user does not specify that parameter. OPENDIR: needs a
filename. MERGEDIR: needs a filename. EXPANDDIR: needs an
integer.
256
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
ACTION: Check syntax of the command or type “help” for more
information.
NMGRERR 338
MESSAGE: Unknown or extra keyword parameter specified.
(NMGRERR 338)
CAUSE: This occurs in DELETENODE or MERGEDIR when the
keyword local, global, keep, nokeep, or timestamp is spelled incorrectly
or you have a duplicate type of keyword. DELETENODE only allows
local or global keywords.
ACTION: Check spelling of keywords. Check for duplicate keyword
types. Type “help” for correct syntax.
NMGRERR 339
MESSAGE: Illegal configuration file name. (NMGRERR 339)
CAUSE: Configuration file name is invalid.
ACTION: Check the file name for validity. Also, make sure the name is
not too long.
NMGRERR 340
MESSAGE: Illegal directory file name. (NMGRERR 340)
CAUSE: Directory name may be too long, or contains illegal characters.
ACTION: Recheck file name specified.
NMGRERR 341
MESSAGE: No keywords are allowed for this command.
(NMGRERR 341)
CAUSE: This command does not allow keywords.
ACTION: Check syntax of the command or type “help” for more
information.
NMGRERR 342
MESSAGE: Node Name length must be from 5 to 50 chars in length.
(NMGRERR 342)
CAUSE: The node name length is wrong.
ACTION: Check the length of each segment in the node name. Each
segment (name,domain,org) must be 1–16 characters in length.
NMGRERR 343
MESSAGE: Name segment in node name must be from 1 to 16 chars
in length. (NMGRERR 343)
CAUSE: The name portion of the node name is the incorrect length.
ACTION: Fix the length of the name in NAME.domain.org.
NMGRERR 344
MESSAGE: Domain segment in node name must be from 1 to 16 chars
in length. (NMGRERR 344)
CAUSE: The domain portion of the node name is the incorrect length.
ACTION: Fix the length of the domain in name.DOMAIN.org.
Appendix A
257
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 345
MESSAGE: org segment in node name must be from 1 to 16 chars in
length. (NMGRERR 345)
CAUSE: The org portion of the node name is the incorrect length.
ACTION: Fix the length of the org in name.domain.org.
NMGRERR 346
MESSAGE: Each segment in the node name must begin with an
alphabetic char. (NMGRERR 346)
CAUSE: Each segment in node name (name,domain, and org) must
begin with an alphabetic character.
ACTION: Check to see that the first char in each segment is in the set
[“A” .. “Z”].
NMGRERR 347
MESSAGE: Node names may only be composed of alpha, numeric
and _, “-”. (NMGRERR 347)
CAUSE: Illegal character specified.
ACTION: Check each segment for an illegal character.
NMGRERR 348
MESSAGE: Expected the destination path anf file to be formatted as
PATH:FILE. (NMGRERR 348)
CAUSE: Incorrect format specified.
ACTION: Check to make sure that the three components — path, colon,
and file are present.
NMGRERR 349
MESSAGE: Expected three filename parameters : streamfile, nodefile,
cmdfile. (NMGRERR 349)
CAUSE: Incorrect format specified.
ACTION: File name parameters incorrectly specified.
NMGRERR 350
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid source file name. (NMGRERR 350)
CAUSE: Missing or invalid source file name specified.
ACTION: Check to make sure that an MPE file name was specified after
the : delimiter to the copyconf command.
NMGRERR 351
MESSAGE: Missing comma. (NMGRERR 351)
CAUSE: The syntax of the command requires a comma.
ACTION: Reissue the command using a comma.
NMGRERR 352
MESSAGE: Need to save data on previous screen before adding
domain name. (NMGRERR 352)
CAUSE: Data was not updated for this node.
ACTION: Update the data for this node.
258
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 353
MESSAGE: The path specified does not point to a paged data screen.
(NMGRERR 353)
CAUSE: You did not access a paged data screen which has only one page.
ACTION: Check the path specified in the PATHCONF command.
NMGRERR 354
MESSAGE: Entry selected is empty. (NMGRERR 354)
CAUSE: User selected an empty selection from the entry selection
window.
ACTION: Select an existing entry.
NMGRERR 355
MESSAGE: Domain labels can only end in an alphabetic character or
digit. (NMGRERR 355)
CAUSE: User entered a name which contained a label that terminated
with an invalid character. Valid terminating characters are A..Z..,a..z,
or 0..9.
ACTION: Enter the name correctly.
NMGRERR 356
MESSAGE: Domain labels can only begin with an alphabetic
character. (NMGRERR 356)
CAUSE: User entered a domain name which began with an invalid
character. Domain name labels can only begin with an alphabetic
character.
ACTION: Enter the name correctly.
NMGRERR 357
MESSAGE: Domain labels can only consist of A..Z, a..z, 0..9, or -.
(NMGRERR 357)
CAUSE: User entered an invalid domain name. Valid characters consist
of A..Z, a..z, 0..9 or -.
ACTION: Enter the name correctly.
NMGRERR 358
MESSAGE: Domain label lengths cannot exceed 63 characters.
(NMGRERR 358)
CAUSE: Valid label length is 1 to 63 characters. User entered more than
63 characters.
ACTION: Enter the name correctly.
NMGRERR 359
MESSAGE: Domain name is empty. (NMGRERR 359)
CAUSE: The user selected an operation which required a domain, yet
neglected to enter a domain.
ACTION: Reenter the information with the domain name specified.
Appendix A
259
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 360
MESSAGE: Domain screen can be accessed only after an NS
nodename addition. (NMGRERR 360)
CAUSE: User can access the domain screen only after using the add
function key to add an NS nodename.
ACTION: Follow the instructions in “Cause.”
NMGRERR 361
MESSAGE: Select an entry between 1 and 8, or enter the full node
name. (NMGRERR 361)
CAUSE: User pressed a key which required that an entry selection be
provided.
ACTION: User must either select an entry via the entry field, or enter
the full node name in the nodename field.
NMGRERR 362
MESSAGE: User cannot add a domain name to a record already
containing one.
CAUSE: User attempted to go to the domain screen after having just
added a domain entry.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 363
MESSAGE: Entry field must contain a value between 1 and 8.
(NMGRERR 363)
CAUSE: The entry field was empty or contained a value not in the range
1 to 8.
ACTION: Enter a value in the correct range.
NMGRERR 364
MESSAGE: Nodename too long. Max for NS is 50; Max for Domain
name is 255. (NMGRERR 364)
CAUSE: User entered a name that exceeded 255 characters for DDN
name, or user entered a name that exceeded 50 characters for NS name.
ACTION: Reenter the name correctly.
NMGRERR 365
MESSAGE: File name entered is invalid; max length is 36 characters.
(NMGRERR 365)
CAUSE: User entered a file name that exceeded 36 characters.
ACTION: Enter a filename of correct length.
NMGRERR 366
MESSAGE: Domain name entered already exists. (NMGRERR 366)
CAUSE: User entered a domain name that already existed in the
directory.
ACTION: None.
260
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 367
MESSAGE: User is not allowed to merge individual domain entries.
(NMGRERR 367)
CAUSE: The MERGEDIR command not permit the merging of a single
domain entry. However, you can merge domain entries as a group, such
as all the global domains or all the local domains.
ACTION: None.
NMGRERR 368
MESSAGE: User must enter: Node Name, Type, Global, and Enable
settings. (NMGRERR 368)
CAUSE: User has selected a function that needs the above information.
ACTION: Enter the above information.
NMGRERR 369
MESSAGE: User cannot select using both Entry Name Field and
Name Field. (NMGRERR 369)
CAUSE: User has entered a name into the node name field and data into
the entry number field. User can only specify one at a time for the
operation selected (update, delete).
ACTION: Retry with the correct information.
NMGRERR 370
MESSAGE: The options when merging from a config file are LOCAL
and GLOBAL. (NMGRERR 370)
CAUSE: The user is using the merged command and is attempting to
merge from a configuration file. In this case, the only valid options that
can be specified are LOCAL and GLOBAL.
ACTION: Specify correct options.
NMGRERR 371
MESSAGE: User must save data prior to using NEXT function.
(NMGRERR 371)
CAUSE: User is on the directory data screen and wants to use NEXT
branching. User cannot do so until the current data is updated.
ACTION: Press UPDATE; then NEXT can be used.
NMGRERR 380
MESSAGE: Problem accessing the existing directory file.
(NMGRERR 380)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An operation on the existing
directory file could not be performed. The possible operations are:
FOPEN the file as a KSAM file exclusively, FGETINFO and
FGETKEYINFO on the file, or FCLOSE the file with the delete option.
ACTION: Check the accompanying file system error for more
information. If the error reflects an exclusive access violation, correct
the multiple access and/or the user capabilities.
Appendix A
261
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 381
MESSAGE: Problem accessing the new (expanded) directory file.
(NMGRERR 381)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An operation on a COPY of the
existing directory file could not be performed. The possible operations
are:
• FOPEN the file (new) as a KSAM file (opened with a temporary file
name “ZTMPxxxx”).
• FWRITE to the file.
• FCLOSE with the save option on.
• FOPEN the data file in copy mode.
• FREADLABEL the data file.
• FWRITELABEL the data file.
• FOPEN the key file in copy mode.
• FREAD from the key file.
• FUPDATE the key file.
• FCLOSE the key file.
ACTION: Check the accompanying file system error for more
information. If the error reflects a security violation, then you are most
likely (a) trying to access a file for read/write access for which you do
not have adequate capabilities, or (b) trying to expand the file in a
different account than your logon account.Since the expand operation
involves a RENAME, you MUST be logged into the same account as the
directory file that you are trying to expand. If the original directory file
does not exist, but the temporary files (“ZTMPxxxx” and “ZTMPxxxK”)
do exist, then the directory can be recovered by building a new KSAM
file manually (use KSAMUTIL) with attributes identical to that of the
original file. Use FCOPY to copy the data and key files SEPARATELY
into the newly built KSAM data and key files. Be sure to use the
“;NOKSAM” option of FCOPY. If the temporary files do not exist, then
the original directory must be restored from a backup tape.
NMGRERR 382
MESSAGE: Incompatible version of KSAM for file rename operation.
(NMGRERR 382)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: The location of internal KSAM
data and key information has changed and thus cannot be updated with
this version of the NMC software.
ACTION: For an intermediate solution, use KSAMUTIL to build a
larger (expanded) file and use FCOPY to copy the directory to the new
file. If the problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning
of this appendix.
262
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 383
MESSAGE: Cannot specify a negative number for expansion.
(NMGRERR 383)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: The user gave a negative number
of records to expand the file.
ACTION: Supply a positive number of records.
NMGRERR 384
MESSAGE: Cannot open command file “NMMGRCMD”.
(NMGRERR 384)
CAUSE: The command file NMMGRCMD could not be opened.
ACTION: Check for any file equations set for “NMMGRCMD”. See the
accompanying file system error message for problem resolution.
NMGRERR 385
MESSAGE: An NMMGR configuration file name must be specified.
(NMGRERR 385)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An error message is issued when
the configuration file argument for the OPENCONF command is missing.
ACTION: Reissue the command with the configuration file name.
NMGRERR 386
MESSAGE: Invalid subsystem name, enter valid name
(i.e., NETXPORT, SNANODE). (NMGRERR 386)
CAUSE: Maintenance mode interface: An error message is issued when
an invalid subsystem name is entered.
ACTION: Reissue the command with a correct subsystem name.
NMGRERR 387
MESSAGE: Unable to OPEN, and unable to CREATE config file.
(NMGRERR 387)
CAUSE: File system error.
ACTION: Check to see if user is allowed to access file. Check to see if
user and account capabilities of NA or NM are set.
NMGRERR 388
MESSAGE: Attempted to access non data or page data screen with
PATHCONF. (NMGRERR 388)
CAUSE: Incorrect use of PATHCONF command.
ACTION: Make sure that the screen you are trying to access is data or
paged data. This can be checked by looking at the screen and seeing if
there is a data flag in the upper right corner of the screen. If not, you
are trying to access a screen which has no data fields.
NMGRERR 389
MESSAGE: Attempt to access field which does not exist.
(NMGRERR 389)
CAUSE: You are trying to access a field N+k when there are only N fields
on the form.
ACTION: Use NMMGR to go to the path which you specified in the
PATHCONF command. Make sure that your field count matches the field
Appendix A
263
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
number you are trying to access. Make sure you are not trying to use
Vplus field numbers to access the field.
NMGRERR 390
MESSAGE: Path not specified, or path specified does not exist.
(NMGRERR 390)
CAUSE: PATHCONF was not previously issued.
ACTION: Check to see if you set the path with the PATHCONF command.
Check to see if the path that you specified exists in the configuration file
NMGRERR 391
MESSAGE: Version stamp in VERSIONCONF does not match NMMGR
version. (NMGRERR 391)
CAUSE: Version stamp must match NMMGR version.
ACTION: Change the version stamp in your batch file to match the
version displayed on the NMMGR banner line.
NMGRERR 392
MESSAGE: VERSIONCONF must be called before this command may
be called. (NMGRERR 392)
CAUSE: Tried to perform OPENCONF before VERSIONCONF.
ACTION: Call VERSIONCONF with the version stamp which NMMGR
displays on the banner line.
NMGRERR 393
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid destination path name. (NMGRERR 393)
CAUSE: The copyconf command will not operate without a valid
destination path.
ACTION: Check to make sure an NMCONF path name was specified for
the copyconf command.
NMGRERR 394
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid destination file name. (NMGRERR 394)
CAUSE: The copyconf command will not operate without a valid
destination file name.
ACTION: Check to make sure that an MPE file name was specified after
the colon (:) delimiter in the copyconf command.
NMGRERR 395
MESSAGE: Invalid option specified for copyconf command.
(NMGRERR 395)
CAUSE: An option other than KEEP was specified.
ACTION: Retry with valid option.
NMGRERR 400
MESSAGE: Cannot open the nodelist file. (NMGRERR 400)
CAUSE: The nodelist file could not be opened for read/write access.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
264
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 401
MESSAGE: Record size of nodelist file too small; must be
>= 80 bytes. (NMGRERR 401)
CAUSE: The record size of the nodelist file is too small to be used.
ACTION: If creating the nodelist file using the LISTDIR command, then
do not include a ;REC= parameter in the file equation. Copy the nodelist
file into a file with a larger record width.
NMGRERR 402
MESSAGE: Filecode of nodelist file non zero. (NMGRERR 402)
CAUSE: The nodelist file supplied did not have a 0 filecode — it was not
a standard EDITOR-type file.
ACTION: If creating the nodelist file using the LISTDIR command, then
do not include a ;CODE= parameter in the file equation. Copy the
nodelist file into a file created with no file code.
NMGRERR 403
MESSAGE: FREADDIR failed trying to read from nodelist file.
(NMGRERR 403)
CAUSE: Could not issue a directed read to the nodelist file. The file most
likely has a variable-length record structure.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 404
MESSAGE: FWRITEDIR failed trying to write to nodelist file.
(NMGRERR 404)
CAUSE: Could not issue a directed write against the nodelist file.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 405
MESSAGE: Cannot close nodelist file. (NMGRERR 405)
CAUSE: Could not close the nodelist file.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 406
MESSAGE: FCONTROL failed trying to set EOF marker on nodelist
file. (NMGRERR 406)
CAUSE: Internal error.
NMGRERR 407
MESSAGE: FPOINT failed on nodelist file. (NMGRERR 407)
CAUSE: Could not set the record pointer in the nodelist file.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 408
MESSAGE: FGETINFO failed on nodelist file. (NMGRERR 408)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
265
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 409
MESSAGE: FREAD failed trying to read from nodelist file.
(NMGRERR 409)
CAUSE: Could not read sequentially from the nodelist file.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 410
MESSAGE: Cannot gain access to the stream file. (NMGRERR 410)
CAUSE: A check to verify that the stream file does not already exist
could not be completed.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 411
MESSAGE: The stream file already exists; choose another name.
(NMGRERR 411)
CAUSE: The stream file given already exists as a permanent file. The
MAKESTREAM command requires that this file not exist.
ACTION: Choose another file name or rename the existing file to
another name.
NMGRERR 412
MESSAGE: Cannot gain access to the command file. (NMGRERR 412)
CAUSE: A check to verify that the command file does exist could not be
completed.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 413
MESSAGE: The command file does not exist. (NMGRERR 413)
CAUSE: The command file given does not exist.
ACTION: Supply the name of an existing command file.
NMGRERR 414
MESSAGE: Internal catalog error: job text identifier table overflow.
(NMGRERR 414)
CAUSE: Message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS is incorrect.
ACTION: RESTORE NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If the
problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 415
MESSAGE: Internal catalog error: incorrect format for job text ID
entry. (NMGRERR 414)
CAUSE: Message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS is incorrect.
ACTION: RESTORE NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If the
problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
266
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 416
MESSAGE: Error converting a catalog entry into a numeric value.
(NMGRERR 416)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: RESTORE NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If the
problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 417
MESSAGE: Catalog entry value not in range -32768..32767.
(NMGRERR 417)
CAUSE: Message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS is incorrect.
ACTION: RESTORE NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If the
problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 418
MESSAGE: Cannot read an entry from the message catalog.
(NMGRERR 418)
CAUSE: Message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS is incorrect.
ACTION: RESTORE NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape. If the
problem still exists, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMGRERR 419
MESSAGE: Cannot open the stream file. (NMGRERR 419)
CAUSE: The stream file could not be opened.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
NMGRERR 420
MESSAGE: FWRITE failed trying to write to the stream file.
(NMGRERR 420)
CAUSE: Could not write to the stream file. Most likely, the end-of-file
has been reached and the file is full.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution. If end-of-file has been reached, issue a file equation for the
stream file: FILE yourfile;DISC=nnnn,32,1 where “yourfile” is the name
of the stream file, and “nnnn” is the number of records needed in the
file. Approximately 150 records should be allocated for each node in the
nodelist file. Note that the stream file is created as a variable-length
file, so fewer records should be required per node. The file is opened
with a default of 5000 records. Retry the MAKESTREAM command with
the new file equation.
NMGRERR 421
MESSAGE: Cannot close the stream file. (NMGRERR 421)
CAUSE: The stream file could not be closed.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for
resolution.
Appendix A
267
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 500
MESSAGE: Missing equal sign. (NMGRERR 500)
CAUSE: An equal sign was missing in the command syntax.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the proper syntax.
NMGRERR 501
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid pathname parameter. (NMGRERR 501)
CAUSE: The syntax of the command requires a pathname parameter.
ACTION: Check pathname and reissue the command.
NMGRERR 502
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid field number. (NMGRERR 502)
CAUSE: Either the field number parameter was not specified or the field
number was not terminated with a comma.
ACTION: Check the field number on the screen.
NMGRERR 503
MESSAGE: Missing data. Data follows a comma. (NMGRERR 503)
CAUSE: WRITECONF command did not list data to be stored.
ACTION: The syntax of the command requires a data parameter. The
data may be enclosed in quotes.
NMGRERR 504
MESSAGE: Invalid option specified. (NMGRERR 504)
CAUSE: An invalid option was specified for the command.
ACTION: Use help to enter correct option.
NMGRERR 505
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid version string. (NMGRERR 505)
CAUSE: Did not specify version correctly.
ACTION: The syntax of the command requires a valid version string
parameter.
NMGRERR 506
MESSAGE: Missing or invalid page number. (NMGRERR 506)
CAUSE: The syntax of the command requires a page number.
ACTION: The page number must be a positive integer.
NMGRERR 507
MESSAGE: Invalid path, a select or type select path is required.
(NMGRERR 507)
CAUSE: The path must be for a select or type select screen.
ACTION: Check the path and reissue.
NMGRERR 508
MESSAGE: Unable to open Formlist as OLD or NEW. (NMGRERR 508)
CAUSE: File system error.
ACTION: Check the file equation. See if the file is locked open or cannot
be accessed. Check to see if there is disk space.
268
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 509
MESSAGE: The new data is larger than the field size. (NMGRERR 509)
CAUSE: WRITECONF error.
ACTION: Check to see that you are accessing the correct field, or reduce
the size of the data you are entering.
NMGRERR 510
MESSAGE: There are Vplus field edit errors. (NMGRERR 510)
CAUSE: UPDATECONF error.
ACTION: Examine all WRITECONF statements before the screen
associated with the UPDATECONF which caused the error. One or
more of these fields does not match the edits which are associated with
this field. Go to the NMMGR screen which corresponds to the path for
further explanation of the Vplus error.
NMGRERR 511
MESSAGE: Field number must be a positive integer. (NMGRERR 511)
CAUSE: A READCONF or WRITECONF error occurred.
ACTION: Check to see if the field number entered is greater than zero.
NMGRERR 512
MESSAGE: Missing closing quote. (NMGRERR 512)
CAUSE: A closing quote is needed.
ACTION: Retype the erroneous string with a closing quote.
NMGRERR 514
MESSAGE: Must open config file before executing this command.
(NMGRERR 514)
CAUSE: The user tried to perform some maint mode command like
SUMMARYCONF, COMPRESSCONF, PATHCONF, etc. that requires an open file.
ACTION: Open a config file with the OPENCONF command first.
NMGRERR 550
MESSAGE: Unexpected parameter encountered. (NMGRERR 550)
CAUSE: You specified an invalid LDEV range while using the
SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical summary report on a
range of logical devices.
ACTION: Reenter the SUMMARYCONF command with a correctly specified
LDEV range. The LDEV range must be separated by a slash. (Example:
SUMMARYCONF DTS,LDEV 35/83)
NMGRERR 551
MESSAGE: The parameters for this command must be an integer.
(NMGRERR 551)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report, you specified one or more of the parameters as a
noninteger. The correct format for the LDEV specification is LDEV
[xxx[/yyy]], where xxx and yyy are integers.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the parameters specified as
integers.
Appendix A
269
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 552
MESSAGE: Extra data was specified in the command line.
(NMGRERR 552)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report on a range of logical devices, you entered more data
than was expected in the command line.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the parameters specified in the
correct format (LDEV [xxx[/yyy]], where xxx and yyy are integers).
NMGRERR 553
MESSAGE: The lower LDev # must be less than the upper LDev #.
(NMGRERR 553)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report on a range of logical devices, the first LDEV number
you specified was higher than the second LDEV number you specified.
This is an invalid range specification.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the LDEV range specified
correctly, with the first number in the range lower than the second
number in the range.
NMGRERR 554
MESSAGE: There are no LDevs within the specified range.
(NMGRERR 554)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report on a range of logical devices, you specified a valid
range; however, there are no LDEVs within that range.
ACTION: Reenter the command with a correct range of logical devices
specified (one that includes LDEVS).
NMGRERR 555
MESSAGE: The DTC Name specified is not configured.
(NMGRERR 555)
CAUSE: You specified an incorrect DTC name while using the
SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical summary report on a
specific DTC. Either the DTC does not exist or no data has been
configured for that DTC.
ACTION: If the name was entered incorrectly, reenter the SUMMARYCONF
command with the correct DTC name specified. If the DTC exists but is
not correctly configured, use NMMGR to configure the data for the
DTC, then reenter the SUMMARYCONF command.
NMGRERR 556
MESSAGE: The Card specified is not configured in the specified DTC.
(NMGRERR 556)
CAUSE: You specified an incorrect card number while using the
SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical summary report on a
specific DTC. Either the DTC does not exist or the card specified is not
configured for that DTC.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the correct card number and DTC
specified. If the card exists but is not properly configured, use NMMGR
270
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
to correct the card configuration, then reenter the SUMMARYCONF
command.
NMGRERR 557
MESSAGE: That Port is not configured in the DTC and Card specified.
(NMGRERR 557)
CAUSE: You specified an incorrect port number while using the
SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical summary report on a
specific card in a specific DTC. Either the DTC does not exist, the card
specified is not configured for that DTC, or the port is not configured for
that card.
ACTION: Reenter the command with the correct port number, card
number, and DTC specified. If the port exists but is not properly
configured, use NMMGR to correct the configuration, then reenter the
SUMMARYCONF command.
NMGRERR 558
MESSAGE: The DTC subsystem has not been configured.
(NMGRERR 558)
CAUSE: You entered a SUMMARYCONF DTS command on a system
where no distributed terminal subsystem is configured (the HOST/PC
flag has not been set).
ACTION: Configure the distributed terminal subsystem, then reenter
the SUMMARYCONF DTS command.
NMGRERR 559
MESSAGE: Illegal delimiter given. Type HELP for command syntax.
(NMGRERR 559)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report, you entered an illegal delimiter.
ACTION: Type HELP at the prompt to access the HELP messages for the
SUMMARYCONF command. Study these messages to determine the proper
syntax to obtain the desired information. Reenter the command using
the correct delimiters.
NMGRERR 560
MESSAGE: The card number must be an integer from 0 to 5.
(NMGRERR 560)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report on a specific card in a DTC, you entered an invalid card
number. Card numbers must be entered as integers, from 0 to 5.
ACTION: Reenter the command with a card number specified in the
valid range, 0 through 5.
Appendix A
271
NMS Error Messages
NMGR Error and Warning Messages
NMGRERR 561
MESSAGE: The port number must be an integer from 0 to 7.
(NMGRERR 561)
CAUSE: While using the SUMMARYCONF command to obtain a DTS critical
summary report on a specific port, you entered an invalid port number.
Port numbers must be entered as integers, from 0 to 7.
ACTION: Reenter the command with a port number specified in the
valid range, 0 through 7.
NMGRERR 562
MESSAGE: Expected a parameter after the delimiter. (NMGRERR 562)
CAUSE: You entered a SUMMARYCONF DTS command that ended in a
delimiter when another parameter could have been entered. For
example, you may have entered “LDEV 23/” instead of “LDEV 23”.
ACTION: Reenter the command correctly. Type HELP to access the help
messages if you do not know the correct syntax for the command you
are trying to enter.
NMGRERR 563
MESSAGE: Cannot end a command with a delimiter. (NMGRERR 563)
CAUSE: You entered a SUMMARYCONF DTS command that ended in a
delimiter (“,”, “/”, etc.)
ACTION: Reenter the command correctly. Type HELP to access the help
messages if you do not know the correct syntax for the command you
are trying to enter.
272
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
The following messages may be returned from the NMMGRVER utility
(n represents the message number). Note that NMMGRVER may also
provide you with messages which tell you that the operation has
completed successfully.
(NMMGRVERWARN n) messages are displayed when conversion failed and
the file is not changed.
(NMMGRVERERR n) messages are displayed when conversion has failed
and the file may be changed. These warning messages are listed and
described together at the end of the following error messages.
NMMGRVERMSG MESSAGE: CONVERSION completed successfully.
0
(NMMGRVERMSG 0)
CAUSE: Successful completion.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVERMSG MESSAGE: NO NEED TO CONVERT. (NMMGRVERMSG 1)
1
CAUSE: Configuration file version is correct; file does not require
conversion.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVER
WARN 2
MESSAGE: OPEN FILE ERROR: Cannot convert file.
(NMMGRVERWARN 2)
CAUSE: NMMGRVER was unable to open the configuration file during
conversion. More than one user is accessing the file.
ACTION: Execute the LISTDIR5 subsystem and type LISTF to check
whether other users are accessing or storing this file. NMMGERVER
needs exclusive access to the configuration file. Run NMMGRVER when file
is freed.
CAUSE: Internal file system unable to LOCK and OPEN the file with
write access due to file system security.
ACTION: Resolve the MPE security restriction and retry. Run LISTDIR5
and type LISTSEC configFileName to determine the security
restrictions of the file.
CAUSE: Internal file system unable to OPEN the file if incorrect
LOCKWORD was provided.
ACTION: Rerun NMMGRVER with correct LOCKWORD.
CAUSE: Another internal error has occurred when opening the file.
ACTION: An internal file system error has occurred. See “Submitting a
CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
273
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVER
WARN 3
MESSAGE: INTERNAL ERROR: cannot convert file.
(NMMGRVERWARN 3)
CAUSE: The configuration file is corrupted. One or more of the following
situations were detected in the file.
• Paths are missing.
• Version stamps are missing or are incorrect.
• A LINKCONF detail data record has unexpected record length.
NOTE: This corrupted configuration file is not changed.
ACTION: Restore an old configuration file if possible and rerun
NMMGRVER. If the error still occurs, see “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: FILE CORRUPT: Conversion Failed, file might be changed.
4
(NMMGRVERERR 4).
CAUSE: NMMGRVER was unable to complete the configuration file
conversion because a LINKCONF detail data record has the incorrect
item identification number. Note: The configuration file may have been
changed.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: NMMGRVER was unable to complete the configuration file
conversion because a data record has incorrect record length.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: NRJE has the wrong previous version stamp. Note that the
configuration file may have been changed.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: INTERNAL ERROR: Conversion Failed, file might be
5
changed. (NMMGRVERERR 5).
CAUSE: Disk file space is used up.
ACTION: Purge unnecessary files from disk to recover some space.
Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and run
NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change Request.
See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
274
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
CAUSE: An internal error occurred with intrinsics, midasgetdata,
midasnextpath, midasupdatedata, or midasaddpath.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: An unexpected internal error has occurred.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: CLOSE FILE ERROR: File may have been changed.
6
(NMMGRVERERR 6).
CAUSE: An internal NMMGRVER error has occurred when attempting
to close the configuration file.
ACTION: Note that the configuration file may have been changed.
Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and run
NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change Request.
See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVER
WARN 7
MESSAGE: User has Insufficient Capability to Run NMMGRVER.
(NMMGRVERWARN 7)
CAUSE: The user is required to have NM or NA capability to run
NMMGRVER. However, the current user does not have sufficient capability.
ACTION: Check user capability with program LISTDIR5.PUB.SYS, and
modify the capability list. Contact the account manager or system
manager, if needed.
NMMGRVER
WARN 8
MESSAGE: ACCESS VIOLATION: Cannot convert file.
(NMMGRVERWARN 8)
CAUSE: NMMGRVER was unable to write (update or add data) to the
existing configuration file due to inconsistent access type (FSERR 40).
Usually occurs when updating a file across account boundary. The
WRITE, SAVE access types of the GROUP or ACCOUNT for this
configuration file are limited to ACCOUNT only. The file is SECURED.
NOTE: The configuration file is not changed.
ACTION: Release file security and rerun NMMGRVER, or run NMMGRVER in
the GROUP and ACCOUNT where the configuration file is stored.
NMMGRVER
WARN 9
MESSAGE: Config File Version Is Newer than NMMGRVER can
support (NMMGRVERWARN 9).
CAUSE: At least one version stamp of the configuration file is newer
than NMMGRVER can support. NMMGRVER cannot convert this file. This
configuration file is not changed.
ACTION: Check the module version of NMMGRVER and overall NMC.
Appendix A
275
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
Install the newer version of NMC and run the newer NMMGRVER if
needed or, restore an old configuration file if possible and rerun
NMMGRVER.
NMMGRVER
WARN 12
MESSAGE: File NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS couldn’t be opened.
(NMMGRVERWARN 12)
CAUSE: NMCONFIG was already open for exclusive access, or
MIDASOPEN detected an error.
ACTION: Check NMCONFIG and retry.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
13
Error during merge of configuration files.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 13)
CAUSE: There is an error in one of the cells in the file hierarchy. This
error has been detected as an error in the configuration file.
ACTION: Check the midasstat value to determine what the problem is.
It may be necessary to use some other tool to determine which cell has
the problem. If possible, manually edit the data in this cell and verify it
manually. If this is not possible, delete the cell and run NMMGRVER
again.
CAUSE: The configuration file is corrupted.
ACTION: Since the destination file has been changed, recovery is not
possible. Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
14
Path not found in the config file.
Path: !
(NMMGRVERERR 14)
CAUSE: This may be a normal condition if the user does not have NS on
the system. However, it may also indicate that you are trying to convert
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS on a non-XL system, when you should actually be
converting an NSCONF-like file.
ACTION: The conversion will operate correctly. The user is being
warned to be sure that the correct file is being converted.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
15
Invalid data length.
Path: !
Length: !
(NMMGRVERERR 15)
CAUSE: The length of the data array which was read from the cell was
276
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
incorrect. This could indicate that an incorrect cell was accessed or that
the user is trying to convert an invalid configuration file. The cell is not
converted.
ACTION: Verify that the original file was a valid version. Using another
tool, examine the cell data and verify the data. Since the cell was not
touched, the data may have to be entered manually.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
16
Conversion failure.
PATH: !
MIDASSTAT: !
(NMMGRVERERR 16)
CAUSE: This is a generic message which allows the path name and
status to be output.
ACTION: Depends on status and user needs.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
17
Path not allowed for this version. Path purged.
Path: !
(NMMGRVERERR 17)
CAUSE: Certain paths are not supported on the current version of the
configuration file, even though they were supported on previous
versions.
ACTION: None necessary. You may want to verify which paths have
been deleted.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: File type has not been defined. (NMMGRVERERR 18)
18
CAUSE: Internal error. User entered valid data but it somehow has been
corrupted. The type of the file passed to NMMGRVER is not within the
valid range of: 1= MPE V NSCONF type; 2= MPE V NMCONF type.
ACTION: Run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a
Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMMGRVER
ERR 19
MESSAGE: Unable to create LINK subtree (NMMGRERR 19)
CAUSE: You specified that the configuration file was an MPE V file.
Therefore, NMMGRVER checked to make sure the LINK subtree did
not exist. Since it did not exist, NM tried to create it because iX
configuration files need it. However, the NM intrinsic failed during this
process. One possible reason for this is that the configuration file may
be full.
ACTION: Run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a
Service ReRun NMMGR and expand the size of the configuration file.
Then run NMMGRVER again.
Appendix A
277
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Unable to purge LINKCONF subtree (NMMGRVERERR 20)
20
CAUSE: Internal error. File has been converted. However, in the attempt
to purge the subtree LINKCONF, the NM intrinsic failed.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this
appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Error accessing NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS set=! msg=!.
21
(NMMGRVERERR 21)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCPRINTERRMSG. Usually followed by one or
more of messages 22 through 25 below, which further clarifies the error.
ACTION: Look for one or more of NMMGRVERERR 22 through 25
following this message, and take the remedial action suggested below.
Look up the text and comments for the original message specified in the
message, and take the suggested actions.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: FOPEN FSERR ! on NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS.
22
(NMMGRVERERR 22)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCPRINTERRMSG and usually followed by the
text of the FSError message.
ACTION: If the error number is 1 or 2, NMMGRVERERR 24 will also be
displayed. See the NMMGRVERERR 24 causes and actions for further
information. Returned by NMCPRINTERRMSG.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Encountered GENMESSAGE error !. (NMMGRVERERR 23)
23
CAUSE: Possible bad software installation (NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS).
ACTION: If the error number is not 1 or 2, look up the error number in
the MPE Intrinsics Manual under GENMESSAGE. The problem may
be due to a corrupt NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS. Restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS
and run NMMGRVER again. Otherwise, correct the problem causing
the GENMESSAGE error and run NMMGRVER again.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: GENMESSAGE encountered FSERR !.
24
(NMMGRVERERR 24)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCPRINTERRMSG. This message follows
NMMGRVERERR 23 message, and is usually followed with the text of
the file system error message as well.
ACTION: Correct the file system error and run NMMGRVER again.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: FCLOSE FSERR ! on NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS.
25
(NMMGRVERERR 25)
CAUSE: Returned by NMCPRINTERRMSG after printing a message
from NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS. The FCLOSE of NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS failed.
ACTION: Correct the file system error and run NMMGRVER again.
278
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NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Merge failed. Error in NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
26
(NMMGRVERR 26)
CAUSE: During the merge of NMCONFIG and the file to be converted,
an error was found in one of the paths in NMCONFIG.
ACTION: The configuration file may have been changed. Restore a
backup copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER
again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See
“Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
CAUSE: The file NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS is not valid.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix
CAUSE: Depth of paths exceed max_path_depth.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVER
WARN 27
MESSAGE: File full; no conversion done. (NMMGRVERWARN 27)
CAUSE: The configuration file to be converted is full. There must be at
least two (and possibly more than two) records available in the
configuration file to do a conversion.
ACTION: Go to the Compress utility screen in NMMGR and expand the
file.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Cannot copy configuration file to NMTEMP; no conversion
40
done. (NMMGRVERR 40)
CAUSE: The configuration file could not be copied to NMTEMPa.
ACTION: Check if there is any disk space left on LDEV 1.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Could not rename config file; no conversion done.
41
(NMMGRVERR 41)
CAUSE: Could not rename or copy the configuration file to NMMGBAK,
or could not rename or copy NMMGRTMP to the configuration file.
ACTION: Check if there is any disc space left on LDEV 1.
NMMGRVERMSG MESSAGE: File not converted NMMGRVERMSG 56.
56
CAUSE: You selected the skip option when asked for a file type during
the configuration file conversion.
ACTION: None. This is an informative message.
Appendix A
279
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
60
Unable to add path.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 60)
CAUSE: An internal error occurred while adding the displayed path.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
61
Unable to add data.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 61)
CAUSE: Internal error occurred while adding data to the displayed path.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
62
Unable to purge path.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 62)
CAUSE: Internal error occurred while purging displayed path.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
63
Unable to purge data.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 63)
CAUSE: Internal error occurred while purging data at displayed path.
280
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
64
Unable to get son path.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 64)
CAUSE: Internal error, could not get the son of the displayed path.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
65
Unable to get data.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 65)
CAUSE: Internal error occurred while attempting to get data from the
displayed path.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
66
Unable to get brother path.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 66)
CAUSE: Internal problem accessing path in the configuration file.
Brother of displayed path could not be obtained.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
Appendix A
281
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
67
Unable to update data.
Path: !
Midasstat = !
(NMMGRVERERR 67)
CAUSE: Internal problem updating data in configuration file.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible and
run NMMGRVER again. If the error still occurs, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Note: not user solvable. A qualified HP representative should check the
midasstat value to determine what the problem is and take appropriate
action.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Error in MPE-V Phase I file. (NMMGRVERR 70)
70
CAUSE: An error occurred in the converting of the file from MPE V
phase I to MPE V phase II. The process of converting an MPE V
configuration file to an MPE/iX file includes checking whether the file is
NS I or NS II. If the file is NS I, NMMGR first converts it to NS II and
then to MPE/iX. This error message was generated because NMMGR
detected an error during the conversion from NS I to NS II.
ACTION: The configuration file may be corrupted. Restore a backup
copy of the configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If
the error still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR”
at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: ** Converting MPE V Nsconf file to MPE/iX file **
72
CAUSE: This is an informative message.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: ** Converting MPE V Nmconfig file to MPE/iX file **
73
CAUSE: This is an informative message.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: ** Converting MPE/iX config file **
74
CAUSE: This is an informative message.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE:
75
Invalid path found in source file.
Path: !
(NMMGRVERERR 75)
CAUSE: An invalid path was found in the source configuration file. The
path may have been created by an unofficial NMMGR tool. Conversion
282
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
will continue if possible. NMMGRVERERR 76 will usually be displayed
along with this message.
ACTION: Note that the configuration file may have been changed.
Depending on which subsystem is involved, the invalid path may or
may not be deleted from the converted file. Restore a backup copy of the
configuration file if possible and run NMMGRVER again. If the error
still occurs, submit a Change Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the
beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Attempting to continue conversion. (NMMGRVERERR 76)
76
CAUSE: This is used to inform the user that NMMGRVER is continuing
the conversion process.
ACTION: None.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: The default NS LINK physical path is 6/4.2; User
77
modification may be needed. (NMMGRVERERR 77)
CAUSE: The default physical path has been set to 6/4.2.
ACTION: Confirm that this value is correct for your system and modify
it with NMMGR if needed.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: The default DTS LINK physical path is 2/4.2; User
78
modification may be needed. (NMMGRVERERR 78)
CAUSE: The default physical path has been set to 2/4.2.
ACTION: Confirm that this value is correct for your system and modify
it with NMMGR if needed.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during LINKCONF CONVERSION.
80
(NMMGRVERERR 80)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the LINKCONF part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during IMF CONVERSION.
81
(NMMGRVERERR 81)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the IMF part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
Appendix A
283
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during SNA CONVERSION.
82
(NMMGRVERERR 82)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the SNA part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during NRJE CONVERSION.
83
(NMMGRVERERR 83)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the NRJE part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during LOGGING CONVERSION.
84
(NMMGRVERERR 84)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the LOGGING part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
284
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during NETXPORT CONVERSION.
85
(NMMGRVERERR 85)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the NETXPORT part of the
conversion process. The actual error is listed in an error message which
should be displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during LAPB LINK CONVERSION.
86
(NMMGRVERERR 86)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the LAPB LINK part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during DTS CONVERSION.
87
(NMMGRVERERR 87)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the DTS part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during LAN LINK CONVERSION.
88
(NMMGRVERERR 88)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the LAN LINK part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
Appendix A
285
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Duplicate host luname (!) found in node !.
89
(NMMGRVERERR 89)
CAUSE: The configuration file contains an SNANODE that contains two
or more lus that have the same name. Only the first lu found is
converted. The other names are skipped, and the conversion will
continue.
ACTION: Use the same version of NMMGR that created it to modify the
unconverted configuration file. Delete the duplicate lu names or change
them to unique names and then convert the configuration file.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: Can’t find host luname. Nau = !, Node = !.
90
(NMMGRVERERR 90)
CAUSE: The host luname is not configured in the configuration file.
Therefore, this nau is not converted.
ACTION: Use the same version of NMMGR that created it to modify the
unconverted configuration file. Either delete the host luname or add the
host lu and then convert the configuration file.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during LINK CONVERSION.
91
(NMMGRVERERR 91)
CAUSE: An error occurred during the LINK part of the conversion
process. The actual error is listed in an error message which should be
displayed along with this one.
ACTION: Restore a backup copy of the configuration file if possible. Use
the version of NMMGR that created the configuration file to make sure
that each data screen in the configuration file has data associated with
it and that its data flag is set to Y. Run NMMGRVER again. If the same
error occurs again, check any accompanying error message and take the
action listed for it in this appendix. If this fails, submit a Change
Request. See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: The default SNA/SDLC LINK physical path is 24; User
92
modification may be needed. (NMMGRVERERR 92)
CAUSE: The default physical path has been set to 24, which may be
correct for the given system.
ACTION: Run NMMGR, confirm this value, and modify it as needed.
286
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
NMMGRVER Messages, Errors and Warnings
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: The default LAPB LINK physical path is 24; User
93
modification may be needed. (NMMGRVERERR 93)
CAUSE: The default physical path has been set to 24, which may be
correct for the given system.
ACTION: Run NMMGR, confirm this value, and modify it as needed.
NMMGRVERERR MESSAGE: An error has occurred during APPC CONVERSION.
94
(NMMGRVERERR 94)
CAUSE: During the APPC conversion process an error occurred.
ACTION: User should restore file with backup copy and use the version
of NMMGR that had created it to confirm that each data screen has
data associated with it. Each data screen should have its data flag set to
Y. If this does not solve the problem, consult your Hewlett-Packard
representative.
Appendix A
287
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR messages are produced by errors from the Network Directory
intrinsics. In most cases, they are accompanied by other messages
(NMGRERRs or MPE File System errors). You should take the action
recommended for the accompanying messages first.
NDIERR 001
MESSAGE: Directory file not open. (NDIERR 001)
CAUSE: No directory file was opened.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 002
MESSAGE: Directory is not open for write access. (NDIERR 002)
CAUSE: The currently opened directory was not opened with write
access.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 003
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 003)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 004
MESSAGE: Requires Network Administrator capability. (NDIERR 004)
CAUSE: User does not have network Administrator capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 006
MESSAGE: Not enough room in directory for new entry. (NDIERR 006)
CAUSE: The directory file is full.
ACTION: Expand the directory file capacity using the NMMGR
maintenance mode EXPANDDIR command.
NDIERR 007
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 007)
CAUSE: The directory file is full.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 008
MESSAGE: Name type invalid; must be 1 (NS node name).
(NDIERR 008)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 009
MESSAGE: Name length invalid for name type. (NDIERR 009)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
288
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 010
MESSAGE: Path report list length cannot be negative. (NDIERR 010)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 011
MESSAGE: Path report list length > than ND’CREATE maximum.
(NDIERR 011)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 012
MESSAGE: Duplicate node name in directory — cannot add new
entry. (NDIERR 012)
CAUSE: An entry with the same node name and global/local flag setting
already exists in the directory.
ACTION: Supply a different node name and/or global/local setting.
NDIERR 013
MESSAGE: FFINDBYKEY failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 013)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 020
MESSAGE: Directory file not open. (NDIERR 020)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 021
MESSAGE: Cannot close directory file — internal error. (NDIERR 021)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 022
MESSAGE: Requires Node Manager or Network Administrator
capability. (NDIERR 022)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 040
MESSAGE: Directory size too small; must be > 0. (NDIERR 040)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 041
MESSAGE: Directory size too large; must be <= 10,000 records.
(NDIERR 041)
CAUSE: Directory size parameter too large.
ACTION: If a larger file is really desired, create one at the maximum
size, then use NMMGR maintenance mode EXPANDDIR command to
Appendix A
289
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
increase the file to desired size. If this fails, see “Submitting a CR” at
the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 042
MESSAGE: Maximum path report list length negative; must be > 0.
(NDIERR 042)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 043
MESSAGE: Maximum path report list length too large; must be
<= 500. (NDIERR 043)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 044
MESSAGE: Cannot create directory file. (NDIERR 044)
CAUSE: The network directory file could not be opened.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message for problem
resolution.
NDIERR 045
MESSAGE: FWRITE of header record failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 045)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 046
MESSAGE: FCLOSE failed — internal error. (NDIERR 046)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 047
MESSAGE: Directory name cannot contain a lockword. (NDIERR 047)
CAUSE: Directory file names may not be lockword protected.
ACTION: Resubmit the file name with no lockword or a null lockword.
NDIERR 048
MESSAGE: Requires Network Administrator capability. (NDIERR 048)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 060
MESSAGE: ND’FSERR called when no file system error had occurred.
(NDIERR 060)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
290
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 080
MESSAGE: Directory file not open. (NDIERR 080)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 081
MESSAGE: Item number invalid; must be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6.
(NDIERR 081)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 082
MESSAGE: Requires Node Manager or Network Administrator
capability. (NDIERR 082)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 083
MESSAGE: FGETINFO failed — internal error. (NDIERR 083)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 084
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 084)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 085
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 085)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 100
MESSAGE: Cannot open directory file. (NDIERR 100)
CAUSE: Could not open the directory file due to various MPE file system
errors.
ACTION: Consult accompanying file system error message for problem
resolution.
NDIERR 101
MESSAGE: FGETINFO failed — internal error. (NDIERR 101)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 102
MESSAGE: Wrong filecode for directory file; expected 1211.
(NDIERR 102)
CAUSE: The file name specified is not a network directory file.
ACTION: Correct filename to refer to a network directory file.
Appendix A
291
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 103
MESSAGE: Access mode invalid; must be 0 or 1. (NDIERR 103)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 104
MESSAGE: Share option invalid; must be 0, 1, 2 or 3. (NDIERR 104)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 105
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 105)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 106
MESSAGE: Incompatible directory version — outdated directory.
(NDIERR 106)
CAUSE: The current level of software does not support the format of the
directory file.
ACTION: Install correct versions of NMC software or restore correct
version of the network directory file.
NDIERR 107
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 107)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 108
MESSAGE: FCLOSE failed — internal error. (NDIERR 108)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 109
MESSAGE: Directory name cannot contain a lockword. (NDIERR 109)
CAUSE: The network directory file cannot be lockword protected.
ACTION: Remove the lockword from the filename, or replace it with a
null lockword.
NDIERR 110
MESSAGE: Requires Node Manager or Network Administrator
capability. (NDIERR 110)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 111
MESSAGE: File is not a Network Directory. (NDIERR 111)
CAUSE: User calling ND’OPEN passed a file that is not a network
directory file. The most likely CAUSE is that the file is not a KSAM file.
ACTION: Correct the filename.
292
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 120
MESSAGE: One or more required parameters are missing.
(NDIERR 120)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 121
MESSAGE: Directory file not open. (NDIERR 121)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 122
MESSAGE: Relop parameter invalid; must be 0, 1 or 2. (NDIERR 122)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 123
MESSAGE: Name type invalid; must be 1 (NS node name).
(NDIERR 123)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 124
MESSAGE: Name length invalid for name type. (NDIERR 124)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 125
MESSAGE: FFINDBYKEY failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 125)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 126
MESSAGE: Cannot find a matching node name in the directory.
(NDIERR 126)
CAUSE: In the directory, no entry could be found with the requested
nodename and global/local flag setting, or a partial nodename (generic
key) was requested and no match could be found.
ACTION: Supply the nodename of an existing entry, or a generic key to
satisfy the match.
NDIERR 127
MESSAGE: FREAD failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 127)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 128
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 128)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
293
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 129
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 129)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 130
MESSAGE: Requires Node Manager or Network Administrator
capability. (NDIERR 130)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 131
MESSAGE: Select parameter invalid; must be 0, 1 or 2. (NDIERR 131)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 132
MESSAGE: FSPACE failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 132)
CAUSE: Probable corrupt directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 140
MESSAGE: Directory is not open. (NDIERR 140)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 141
MESSAGE: Directory is not open for write access. (NDIERR 141)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 142
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 142)
CAUSE: Internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 143
MESSAGE: Cannot remove node name — internal error. (NDIERR 143)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 144
MESSAGE: Requires Network Administrator capability. (NDIERR 144)
CAUSE: User does not have Network Administrator capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
294
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 145
MESSAGE: FREAD failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 145)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 146
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 146)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 147
MESSAGE: Name type invalid; must be 1 (NS node name).
(NDIERR 147)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 148
MESSAGE: Name length invalid for name type. (NDIERR 148)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 149
MESSAGE: FFINDBYKEY failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 149)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 150
MESSAGE: No such name in directory — cannot remove it.
(NDIERR 150)
CAUSE: The name does not exist in the directory file.
ACTION: Correct the nodename and/or global/local setting.
NDIERR 160
MESSAGE: Directory file not open. (NDIERR 160)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 161
MESSAGE: Requires Node Manager or Network Administrator
capability. (NDIERR 161)
CAUSE: User does not have Node Manager or Network Administrator
capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 162
MESSAGE: Request parameter invalid; must be 1 or 2. (NDIERR 162)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
295
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 163
MESSAGE: FREADBYKEY failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 163)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 164
MESSAGE: FREAD failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 164)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 165
MESSAGE: FLOCK failed — internal error. (NDIERR 165)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 166
MESSAGE: FCONTROL/FUNLOCK failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 166)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 167
MESSAGE: Cannot read node name backreference record — corrupt
file likely. (NDIERR 167)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 180
MESSAGE: FOPEN of message catalog failed. (NDIERR 180)
CAUSE: The message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS could not be opened.
Possible CAUSEs and solutions include incorrect software installation,
insufficient user access rights to the file, or incorrect version of
software.
ACTION: Restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape, increase
user’s access rights, or reinstall the product.
NDIERR 181
MESSAGE: GENMESSAGE failed. (NDIERR 181)
CAUSE: A message could not be read from the message catalog. A
possible CAUSE is incorrect version of the software.
ACTION: Reinstall the product.
NDIERR 190
MESSAGE: Error in NMCONF Intrinsic; check for error status.
(NDIERR 190)
CAUSE: A problem was encountered when calling an NMCONF
procedure.
ACTION: Refer to the accompanying NMCONF error message.
296
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 191
MESSAGE: Error in Network Directory intrinsic; check for error
status. (NDIERR 191)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: Refer to the accompanying NMCONF error message. If the
associated error is number 58, then the configuration file to merge from
does not have any directory data in it. The file must first be read by the
network transport by bringing up the transport in order to extract the
directory data.
NDIERR 192
MESSAGE: Requires Network Administrator capability. (NDIERR 192)
CAUSE: User does not have Network Administrator capabilities.
ACTION: Change user capabilities.
NDIERR 200
MESSAGE: File recovery: cannot open message catalog.
(NDIERR 200)
CAUSE: The message catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS could not be opened.
Possible CAUSEs include: improper product installation, insufficient
user access rights to the catalog file, or an incorrect version of the
software installed.
ACTION: Reinstall the product, increase the user’s access rights, or
restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS from a backup tape.
NDIERR 201
MESSAGE: File recovery: FOPEN of temporary command file failed.
(NDIERR 201)
CAUSE: MPE could not open a scratch file to write file recovery
commands into. This could be CAUSEd by one or more of the following
reasons:
• Duplicate file name. BeCAUSE the file name generated is random,
this CAUSE is very unlikely.
• User does not have Save Files capability.
• Other file system error.
ACTION: 1. Consult the associated file system error for problem
resolution.
ACTION: 2. Attempt manual recovery of the directory file using
KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS.
NDIERR 202
MESSAGE: File recovery: GEMMESSAGE failed. (NDIERR 202)
CAUSE: Could not read a message from the catalog NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS.
A possible CAUSE is that an incorrect version of the software is
installed.
ACTION: Reinstall the product, restore NMMGRCAT.PUB.SYS, or attempt
manual recovery of the directory file using KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS.
Appendix A
297
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 203
MESSAGE: File recovery: FWRITE to temporary command file failed.
(NDIERR 203)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 204
MESSAGE: File recovery: FCLOSE of temporary command file failed.
(NDIERR 204)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 205
MESSAGE: File recovery: CREATEPROCESS of KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS
failed. (NDIERR 205)
CAUSE: Problem encountered trying to create a son process to run
KSAM.PUB.SYS. It is possible that the program file
KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS is missing.
ACTION: Restore KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS
CAUSE: Out of some type of system resource — check SYSDUMP
configuration.
ACTION: Consult CREATEPROCESS errors in the MPE Intrinsics
Reference Manual.
NDIERR 206
MESSAGE: File recovery: cannot open directory file exclusively.
(NDIERR 206)
CAUSE: The network directory file could not be opened exclusively in
order to recover the file.
ACTION: See the accompanying file system error message. If
FSERR 192 is displayed, recover the network directory file.
NDIERR 207
MESSAGE: File recovery: FCLOSE failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 207)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 208
MESSAGE: File recovery: FFINDBYKEY failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 208)
CAUSE: Network directory file is irrecoverable.
ACTION: Attempt manual recovery of the file using KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS
or restore the data and key files from a backup tape.
NDIERR 209
MESSAGE: File recovery: FREAD failed — internal error.
(NDIERR 209)
CAUSE: Network directory file is irrecoverable.
298
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
ACTION: Attempt manual recovery of the file using KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS
or restore the data and key files from a backup tape.
NDIERR 220
MESSAGE: FPOINT to header record failed — corrupt file likely.
(NDIERR 220)
CAUSE: The file is corrupt, empty, or is not a network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape.
NDIERR 221
MESSAGE: FREADC of header record failed — corrupt file likely.
(NDIERR 221)
CAUSE: The file is not a KSAM file (and thus not a network directory
file), or is a corrupt network directory.
ACTION: Restore the proper KSAM file from a backup tape (data and
key files) or attempt manual recovery on the file using
KSAMUTIL.PUB.SYS.
NDIERR 222
MESSAGE: Length of header record incorrect — corrupt file likely.
(NDIERR 222)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 230
MESSAGE: FPOINT to header record failed. (NDIERR 230)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 231
MESSAGE: FUPDATE of header record failed. (NDIERR 231)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 240
MESSAGE: FUPDATE of existing record failed. (NDIERR 240)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 241
MESSAGE: FWRITE of new record failed. (NDIERR 241)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 250
MESSAGE: Actual path report list length differs from passed length.
(NDIERR 250)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
299
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 251
MESSAGE: Path report list length too small to support minimal
report. (NDIERR 251)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 252
MESSAGE: Domain report in path report list too short (< 6 bytes).
(NDIERR 252)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 253
MESSAGE: Version of domain report in path report list <> 0.
(NDIERR 253)
CAUSE: The version number (1st octet) of a domain indicates an
unsupported version.
ACTION: Possible version mismatch; reinstall the product. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 254
MESSAGE: Domain number of domain report in path report list 1.
(NDIERR 254)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 260
MESSAGE: Cannot read a node name back reference record —
corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 260)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 261
MESSAGE: A required node name record is not in dir — corrupt file
likely. (NDIERR 261)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 262
MESSAGE: FUPDATE failed — internal error. (NDIERR 262)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 270
MESSAGE: FGETINFO failed — internal error. (NDIERR 270)
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: See “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
300
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
ND Error Messages
NDIERR 271
MESSAGE: FFINDBYKEY failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 271)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
NDIERR 272
MESSAGE: FREAD failed — corrupt file likely. (NDIERR 272)
CAUSE: Possible corrupt network directory file.
ACTION: Restore the data and key files from a backup tape. If this fails,
see “Submitting a CR” at the beginning of this appendix.
Appendix A
301
NMS Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
Listed are the messages that are generated by the Link Trace
Formatter. They are displayed on the user terminal when running
NMDUMP.
If you must submit a CR or call your HP representative, please copy the
error exactly as it appears on the terminal; it will make determining the
CAUSE of the problem easier. These messages are not logged.
The messages are listed in numerical order according to the error
number.
FMTERR 995
MESSAGE: SUBSYSxxTRACEFORMAT CM STUB ERROR (nnn,sss)
FROM HPLOADNMPROC
UNABLE TO CALL NM TRACE FORMATTER ROUTINE (FMTERR 995)
CAUSE: The CM Stub could not load an NM WAN Trace Formatter
routine for subsystem “xx” from the system library XL.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Incorrect software installation to run Native-Mode Trace
Formatters. The SWITCH error number is “nnn” and the subsystem
reporting the error is “sss”. Call your HP representative.
FMTERR 996
MESSAGE: SUBSYSTEM_xx_MENU CM STUB ERROR (nnn,sss)
FROM HPSWTONMNAME
UNABLE TO CALL NM MENU ROUTINE (FMTERR 996)
CAUSE: The CM Stub could not call the named NM WAN Trace
Formatter options menu routine for subsystem “xx” from the system
library XL.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Incorrect software installation to run Native-Mode Trace
Formatters. This could also be caused by incorrect privilege levels. The
SWITCH error number is “nnn” and the subsystem reporting the error
is “sss”. Call your HP representative.
FMTERR 998
MESSAGE: SUBSYSxxTRACEFORMAT CM STUB ERROR (nnn,sss)
FROM HPSWTONMPLABEL
UNABLE TO CALL NM TRACE FORMATTER ROUTINE (FMTERR 998)
CAUSE: The CM stub successfully loaded the NM WAN Trace Formatter
routine for subsystem “xx” from the system library XL.PUB.SYS, but
could not call it.
ACTION: Incorrect software installation to run Native-Mode Trace
Formatters. This could also be caused by incorrect privilege levels or a
bug in the NM WAN Trace Formatter CM Stub. The SWITCH error
number is “nnn” and the subsystem reporting the error is “sss”. Call
your HP representative.
302
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
FMTERR 999
MESSAGE: SUBSYSxxTRACEFORMAT CM STUB ERROR (nnn,sss)
FROM HPSWTONMNAME
UNABLE TO CALL NM TRACE FORMATTER ROUTINE (FMTERR 999)
CAUSE: The CM Stub could not call the named NM WAN Trace
Formatter routine for subsystem “xx” in the system library
XL.PUB.SYS.
ACTION: Incorrect software installation to run Native-Mode Trace
Formatters. This could also be caused by incorrect privilege levels. The
SWITCH error number is “nnn” and the subsystem reporting the error
is “sss”. Call your HP representative.
4024
MESSAGE: ALL overrides other selections entered at the same time
CAUSE: Among the filter-set numbers you entered, you also specified
the number for ALL. This is a warning.
ACTION: Check your input. Unless you mistyped one of the other set
numbers, it does not make sense to specify ALL along with other items,
because ALL would include the other sets anyway. To retype the input
after this warning, you must first return to the filter-set selection menu.
4025
MESSAGE: Warning: Errors always print; for Errors only don’t include
other sets
CAUSE: Among the filter-set numbers you entered, you also specified
the number for ERRORS-ONLY. This is a warning.
ACTION: Check your input. Unless you mistyped one of the other set
numbers, it does not make sense to specify ERRORS-ONLY along with
other items, because including the other items would defeat the
meaning of ERRORS-ONLY. To retype your input after this warning
you must first return to the filter-set selection menu.
4026
MESSAGE: Input truncated to 80 characters
CAUSE: The input file to the user menu was given more than
80 characters of input, but the menu can only accept 80. This is a
warning.
ACTION: If the extra characters are just extra blanks, ignore this
message or reduce the width of the input file. But if the extra
characters are nonblank, you must edit the input file, finding a way to
reduce the width of the input data to no more than 80 characters.
4027
MESSAGE: Extra input ignored
CAUSE: Only one number was expected, but you entered more than one,
and the extra number(s) were ignored. This is a warning.
ACTION: Check your input and, if necessary, return to that prompt and
retype the input.
Appendix A
303
NMS Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
4028
MESSAGE: Range error at position shown; other values accepted if
allowed
CAUSE: One of the numbers you entered was out of range; a “^^”
indicator appears below the illegal number. The number entered was
probably much too large.
ACTION: The bad value was not accepted. Press the Return key to keep
the other values on the same line, or else retype the entire input using
only legal values.
4029
MESSAGE: Syntax error at position shown; other values accepted if
allowed
CAUSE: Some of the numbers on the input line contained illegal
characters, or were separated by illegal characters. Legal inputs are
digits 0–9 and the question mark “?”. Legal separators for a list are the
comma “,” and the blank “ ”.
ACTION: Retype the input.
4030
MESSAGE: Invalid set number NN; reenter all or hit RETURN to keep
others
CAUSE: One of the filter-set numbers you selected is not one of the valid
filter sets for this formatter.
ACTION: Check your input against the available sets shown in the
menu. Press the Return key to keep the other number(s) you entered on
the same line, or you may retype the entire input. You may also return
to the main menu and “set all options back to their default values.”
4031
MESSAGE: Output limit out of range; enter another number or hit
RETURN
CAUSE: You have selected a value which is less than the lower output
limit or greater than the upper output limit.
ACTION: The value you selected was not accepted. Reenter a value
which is within the range shown in the prompt. The prompt is meant as
a reminder; values up to 4096 are also legal.
4032
MESSAGE: Invalid option number NN ignored; others accepted
CAUSE: One of the option numbers you selected at the main menu was
not a valid option number for this formatter.
ACTION: The illegal option number was ignored, but any other options
on the same line were executed. Check your input and retype if
necessary.
304
Appendix A
NMS Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
4033
MESSAGE: Number of inputs exceeds storage capacity, rest ignored
CAUSE: Bug in Trace Formatter numeric input processing. The
formatter could not process all the numbers entered by the user.
ACTION: Check your input and retype if necessary. If the problem
continues to occur, submit an HP Change Request form against the
Trace Formatter, specifying the input you tried and the subsystem you
were trying to format. A temporary solution might be to type fewer
numbers.
4034
MESSAGE: CIERROR NNNN while executing MPE command
CAUSE: The MPE command you tried encountered an error. MPE
returned error number NNNN to the Formatter (MPE warnings are
ignored).
ACTION: Check your input. If necessary, retype the MPE command.
You may look up the Command Interpreter error number in the
NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual.
4035
MESSAGE: MISSING OPT EXECUTOR #NN; PLEASE SUBMIT HP
CHANGE REQUEST
CAUSE: Bug in Trace Formatter option execution processing. The
formatter recognized an option you typed, but could not find processing
for the option.
ACTION: Submit an HP Change Request form against the Formatter,
specifying what input you typed and what subsystem you were trying to
format.
none
MESSAGE: MISSING MESSAGE #NNNN
CAUSE: Bug in Trace Formatter error message processing. The
explanatory text for error number NNNN is missing from the formatter.
ACTION: Submit an HP Change Request form against the Formatter,
specifying what input you typed and what subsystem you were trying to
format.
Appendix A
305
NMS Error Messages
FMT Error Messages
306
Appendix A
Index
A
abbreviations for screen mode commands, 27
ADDCONF command, 77
adding records to a file, 61
ADDLDEV command, 78
ADDLU command, 80
ADDNODE command, 81
ADDVC command, 84
B
backup configuration file, 17
block mode, 40
branching, 33
brother branching, 33
brother screens, 33
brothers, 34
BSC subsystem, 16
C
capabilities required, 40
CARDCONF command, 87
changing the backup file name, 44
command
ADDCONF, 77
ADDLDEV, 78
ADDLU, 80
ADDNODE, 81
ADDVC, 84
CARDCONF, 87
COMPRESS, 27
COMPRESSCONF, 88
CONFIGURATION, 27
CONTINUE, 89
COPYCONF, 90
COPYSUB, 27
DELETECONF, 92
DELETENODE, 93
ERRORS, 27
EXIT, 27, 94
EXITVALIDATE, 95
EXITWARN, 96
EXPANDDIR, 97
HELP, 27, 35, 98
LISTDIR, 100
LISTLDEV, 99
LISTLU, 102
MAIN, 27
MAKESTREAM, 73, 103
MERGEDIR, 105
NETDIR, 28
NEXT, 28, 33
Index
NICONF, 107
NIGUIDE, 28
NIUPDATE, 28
NMMGRCMD, 28
OPEN, 28
OPENCONF, 108
OPENDIR, 109
OUTPUT, 28
PAGECONF, 110
PASSWORD, 111
PATHCONF, 112
PRIOR, 28
PURGECONF, 113
PURGELDEV, 114
PURGELU, 116
PURGENI, 117
PURGEVC, 118
QUIT, 28
READALLCONF, 120
READCONF, 122
REFRESH, 28, 31
STOP, 28
SUBGUIDE, 28
SUMMARYCONF, 123
UPDATECONF, 125
UTILITY, 28
VALIDATE, 28
VALIDATECONF, 126
VERSION, 28
VERSIONCONF, 127
WRITECONF, 128
command list, 73
command window, 26
common screen elements, 25
COMPRESS command, 27
Compress screen, 60
COMPRESSCONF command, 88
compressing a file, 61, 88
configuration
DTS, 47
guided, 50
HP-IBM, 52
NS3000/iX, 48
printing data, 55
terminals and printers, 47
unguided, 51
CONFIGURATION command, 27
configuration file, 16
configuration file name, 29, 42, 44
Configuration Subtree Copy screen, 65
configuring HP-IBM connections, 52
configuring NS3000/iX, 48
307
Index
CONTINUE command, 89
COPYCONF command, 90
copying a configuration subtree, 65, 90
COPYSUB command, 27
creating a configuration file, 42
creating a directory on a remote node, 73
creating a network directory file, 45
D
data fields, 29
data flag, 26
data record, 32
Datacommunications and Terminal Controller,
47
default configuration file name, 43
default network directory file name, 45
DELETECONF command, 92
DELETENODE command, 93
deleting a configuration subtree, 92
deleting a node from the directory, 93
deleting records from a file, 61
direct path branching, 27, 33
display tree, 56
distributed terminal subsystem, 16, 47
DTC, 47
DTC configuration, 47
DTS, 16, 47
E
entering maintenance mode from a batch job, 73
entering maintenance mode from screen mode,
72
Error Information screen, 37
error messages, 26
ERRORS command, 27
executing commands, 27
executing MPE commands, 27
EXIT command, 27, 94
exiting maintenance mode, 94
exiting validation, 95
EXITVALIDATE command, 95
EXITVWARN command, 96
EXPANDDIR command, 97
expanding a network directory file, 97
F
file name
backup configuration file, 44
configuration, 29
network directory file, 45
FOS, 15
308
function key labels, 40
function keys
definition of, 29
labels, 40
fundamental operating system, 15
G
getting help, 35
go to keys, 31
guided configuration, 50
guided HP configuration, 49
H
HELP command, 27, 35, 98
help facility, 35, 98
Help key, 30
help mode, 35, 98
home key, 27
HP-IBM configuration, 52
L
LISTDIR command, 100
listing directory contents, 100
LISTLDEV command, 99
LISTLU command, 102
local node name, 46
logging, 20
M
MAIN command, 27
Main screen, 46
maintenance interface, 18, 72
transferring to, 28, 72
maintenance mode, 18, 72
entering, 28, 72, 73
maintenance mode commands, 74
MAKESTREAM command, 73, 103
manual configuration, 51
menu choices, 29
MERGEDIR command, 105
merging directory entries, 105
message field, 26
moving between screens, 33
MPE commands
entering, 27, 74
N
NETDIR command, 28
network directory file, 17, 45
network directory file name, 45
Index
Index
Network Services, 16
NEXT command, 28, 33
next key labels, 52
Next Page key, 31
NICONF command, 107
NIGUIDE command, 28
NIUPDATE command, 28
NMDUMP
definition of, 20
NMMAINT
definition of, 19
output, 132, 146
running, 132
NMMGR, 15
definition of, 16
entering data, 32
getting help, 35
operating modes, 18
requirements for running, 40
running, 41
screens, 24
tree structure, 56
NMMGR commands
entering, 27
maintenance mode, 74
screen mode, 27
NMMGR screens, 24
NMMGRCMD command, 28
NMMGRVAL
definition of, 22
NMMGRVER, 21
definition of, 21
node list, 73
Node Management Configuration Manager, 15
Node Management Services Conversion Utility,
21
Node Management Services Maintenance
Utility, 19
Node Management Services Trace/Log
Formatter, 20
non-guided configuration, 51
NS subsystem, 16
NS3000/iX configuration, 48
number
screen, 26
O
OPEN command, 28
Open Configuration/Directory File screen, 42
OPENCONF command, 108
OPENDIR command, 109
opening a configuration file
Index
maintenance mode, 108
screen mode, 44
opening a network directory file
maintenance mode, 109
screen mode, 45
operating modes, 18
OUTPUT command, 28
Output Configuration File screen, 55
P
PAGECONF command, 110
PASSWORD command, 111
path commands
entering, 27
path name, 28
PATHCONF command, 112
Prev Page key, 31
print data, 57
print data screens, 58
print subtree, 59
print summary, 58
print tree, 57
printer configuration, 47
printing configuration data, 55
PRIOR command, 28
Prior Screen key, 30
prior screen list, 30
program name, 25
protected field, 25
PURGECONF command, 113
PURGELDEV command, 114
PURGELU command, 116
PURGENI command, 117
PURGEVC command, 118
Q
QUIT command, 28
R
READALLCONF command, 120
READCONF command, 122
redirecting printed output, 55
REFRESH command, 28, 31
refreshing the screen, 31
running maintenance mode from a batch job, 73
running NMMAINT, 132
running NMMGR, 41
running NMMGRVER, 164
309
Index
S
sample configuration file, 43
Save Data key, 30
screen
Compress, 60
Error Information, 37
Open Configuration/Directory File, 42
Output Configuration File, 55
Utility, 54
Validate Configuration File, 63
screen interface, 18
screen mode, 18
screen number, 26
screen title, 26
screens, 24
select screens, 29
selecting a configuration path, 46
selecting data screens to print, 58
selecting menu items, 29
serial device configuration, 47
service request, 19, 130
SNA subsystem, 16
softkeys, 29
software version ID number, 130
SR, 19, 130
starting NMMGR, 41
STOP command, 28
SUBGUIDE command, 28
subsystem
definition of, 130
SUMMARYCONF command, 123
V
VALIDATE command, 28
Validate Configuration File screen, 63
VALIDATECONF command, 126
validating a configuration, 63
validation messages, 64
verifying a configuration, 63
VERSION command, 28
version ID number, 130
version number, 25
version stamp, 130
VERSIONCONF command, 127
W
WRITECONF command, 128
T
terminal configuration, 47
terminal requirements, 40
title
screen, 26
tracing, 20
tree structure, 56
U
unguided configuration, 51
unguided HP configuration, 49
UPDATECONF command, 125
updating directories in maintenance mode, 73
updating remote directories, 73
UTILITY command, 28
Utility screen, 54
310
Index
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