Film Media Handbook 2015

Film Media Handbook 2015
UNIVERSITY OF
STIRLING
Division of Communications, Media & Culture
Film & Media Handbook
2015-16
Available online at:
Division of Communications, Media & Culture
General Contact Details
Divisional Office J2 (Pathfoot)
Office Hours Monday-Friday,
9am-12.30pm & 1.30-5pm
Telephone + 44 (0) 1786 467520
Email [email protected]
Website www.fmj.stir.ac.uk
Divisional Administrator Louise
Womersley
Email: [email protected]
Louise is responsible for much of the day-to-day administration
of the Division. Louise can be contacted in the main office on
Extension 8420 (or 01786 467520).
Divisional Administrative Assistant
Marie O'Brien
Email: [email protected]
Marie provides secretarial support to undergraduate
students. Marie can be contacted in the main office on
01786 467520.
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Overview of handbook
This handbook explains the aims and objectives of our Film & Media course, how it is structured, and what is
taught. It is intended to act as a brief guide through what may appear to be a complicated array of modules,
rules and regulations, and to smooth the path towards your successful completion of a Film & Media degree.
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Session Dates 2015-16
AUTUMN SEMESTER:
Monday 14 September – Monday 21 December
Teaching starts:
Monday 14 September
Mid-semester reading period:
Monday 26 October – Friday 30 October (inclusive)
Teaching ends:
Friday 4 December
Examination period begins:
Friday 18 December
SPRING SEMESTER:
Monday 18 January – Friday 27 May
Teaching starts:
Monday 18 January
Mid-semester reading period:
Monday 22 February – Friday 26 February (inclusive)
Teaching ends:
Friday 8 April
Spring examination period:
Monday 25 April – Friday 13 May
Autumn resit/deferred exams:
Monday 16 May – Friday 20 May
No teaching:
Good Friday 25 March, Easter Monday 28 March
http://www.stir.ac.uk/registry/studentinformation/semesterdates/
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Table of Contents
Section 1: Divisional Information ................................................................................................. 7
1.1 Welcome from Professor Matthew Hibberd, Head of Division of Communications, Media &
Culture ....................................................................................................................................... 7
1.2 About the Division ................................................................................................................ 7
1.3 Teaching Staff ...................................................................................................................... 8
1.4 Divisional Advisers and Personal Tutor ................................................................................ 9
1.5 Divisional staff/student communications………………………………………………………………….. 10
1.6 Succeed ............................................................................................................................. 10
1.7 Attendance Requirements/compulsory classes/notification of absence ........................... 11
1.8 Health & Safety ................................................................................................................. 11
1.9 Divisional Module Registration & Enrolment ...................................................................... 12
Section 2 Programme & Module Information .............................................................................. 13
2.1 Programme Structure and Aims ……………………………………………………………………………… 13
2.2 Modules (core/optional) ................................................................................................... 13
2.3 Intended Learning Outcomes ............................................................................................ 18
2.5 Summer Academic Programme ......................................................................................... 19
2.6 Divisional Exchange Programmes ..................................................................................... 19
2.7 Divisional Prizes ................................................................................................................ 19
Section 3 Assessment ................................................................................................................. 20
3.1 Submission of Assessments .............................................................................................. 20
3.2 Divisional assessment criteria ………………………………………………………………………………… 20
3.3 Honours degree classification …………………………………………………………………………………. 21
3.4 Essay Writing & Referencing ............................................................................................. 21
3.5 Essay extensions/late submission .................................................................................... 24
3.6 Guidance on group presentation ....................................................................................... 25
3.7 Examination regulations …………...…………………………………………………………………………… 25
3.8 Examination timetable …………………………………………………………………………………………… 25
3.9 Resit/Deferred Exams ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
3.10 Academic Misconduct …………………………………………………………………………………………… 26
3.11 Leave of Absence............................................................................................................. 26
3.12 Repeat of First Year ......................................................................................................... 26
3.13 Transfer between Full-Time & Part-Time ......................................................................... 26
3.14 Withdrawal from Module .………….……………………………………………………………………………26
3.15 Withdrawal from University ............................................................................................ 26
3.16 Extenuating Circumstances ............................................................................................. 26
Section 4 Student Participation and Feedback ............................................................................ 27
4.1 Student Questionnaires ..................................................................................................... 27
4.2 Student Staff Consultative Committee ............................................................................... 27
Section 5 Sources of Academic and Technical Information and Support ..................................... 28
5.1 Divisional Media Production/Technical Support ……………………………………………………….. 28
5.2 Student Matriculation & Records Office Registry) ………………………………………………………28
5.3 Student Programmes Office............................................................................................... 28
5.4 University Calendar ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 28
5.5 Information Services Library & IT Services including Training) ………………………………….. 28
5.6 Printing ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29
5.7 Student Learning Services ………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
5.8 Complaints/Appeals……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29
5.9 Audio recording policy……………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
Section 6 Sources of Personal Support and Information. ............................................................ 30
6.1 General Student Services Contacts .................................................................................... 30
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6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
Students' Union ................................................................................................................. 30
International Students……………………………………………………………………………………………. 30
English Language Support …………………………………………………………………………………….. 30
Student Development and Support ………………………………………………………………………… 30
Disability Support .............................................................................................................. 30
Counselling and Wellbeing …………………………………………………………………………………….. 31
Financial Support Loan Scheme/Hardship Funds) ……………………………………………………… 31
Careers Development Centre …………………………………………………………………………………… 31
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Section 1: Divisional Information
1.1 Welcome from Professor Matthew Hibberd,
Head of Division of Communications, Media & Culture
Welcome!
The Division of Communications, Media & Culture welcomes you to Film & Media at Stirling.
I'm glad you decided to join us and become part of an exciting and dynamic community. We offer
an interactive learning environment designed to develop your academic knowledge and skills and
hope that you participate fully and make the most of the opportunities open to you throughout
your studies.
I hope you enjoy your time with us!
Again, a warm welcome.
Professor Matthew Hibberd
Head of Division of Communications, Media & Culture
1.2 About the Division
The media play a central and ever increasing role in contemporary societies. Throughout the twenty-first
century they have expanded in range and influence and now affect many aspects of our lives. Recognising the
importance of studying the media, the University of Stirling was early into the field. In 1978, it established a
department dedicated to teaching and researching media issues in all their complexity. Today Film & Media at
Stirling is a well-established and popular course, with an international reputation.
The Division of Communications, Media & Culture (CMC) currently has 24 academic members of staff. It offers
a wide range of undergraduate teaching and is actively engaged in a variety of research activities. Within
Communications, Media & Culture, the Stirling Media Research Institute is the home for externally funded
research projects and specialised seminars. It enjoys an international reputation for the quality of its work,
attracting many overseas visitors. The Institute has a purpose-built research facility for the use of its members.
There are also a substantial number of postgraduate research students within the Division. Communications,
Media & Culture offers an MRes in Media Research, an MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies, an MLitt/Dip in Film
Studies, an MSc/Dip in Media Management, an MSc in Strategic Communication & Public Relations (Joint
Degree with Pompeu Fabra University) an MSc in Strategic Public Relations (Double Degree with Lund
University) and an MSc/Dip in Strategic Public Relations & Communication Management, which can be done
full-time or by online distance learning.
You should find that the Division of Communications, Media & Culture provides a generally stimulating,
supportive and friendly environment in which to learn. However, if you have problems or difficulties about any
aspect of your course, please tell us
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1.3 Teaching Staff
Dr. Idrees Ahmad, Lecturer, Room G11.
email: [email protected]
Suzy Angus, Senior Teaching Fellow (part-time). Room D2A.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Eddy Borges-Rey, Lecturer, Study Abroad Officer, Room G11A.
email: [email protected]
Prof. Karen Boyle, Director of Postgraduate Studies, Co-director of Centre for Gender & Feminist Studies,
Director of MSc/MLitt Gender Studies (Applied), Room J6.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Susan Berridge, Lecturer, Room J2A.
email: [email protected]
Dr Margot Buchanan, Teaching Fellow, Room J13.
email: [email protected]
Prof. Tom Collins, Honorary Professor, Room J13.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Marina Dekavalla, Lecturer, Director of Journalism Studies, Room G9A.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Will Dinan, Lecturer, Learning & Teaching Officer, Director of MSc/Dip Strategic in Public Relations &
Communication Management; MSc Strategic Public Relations (Double Degree with Lund University), Room G9.
email: [email protected]
Tina Gonzales, Teaching Fellow, Room D2A.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Adrian Hadland, Senior Lecturer, Room G13.
email: [email protected]
Prof. Richard Haynes, Room J8.
email: [email protected]
Prof. Matthew Hibberd, Head of Division, Co-director MSc Media Management in Vietnam. Room J4.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Derek Hodge, Teaching Fellow, Room G7.
email: [email protected]
Prof. John Izod, Professor Emeritus. Room J12.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Alenka Jelen, Lecturer, Director of MSc Strategic Communication & Public Relations (Joint Degree) and
Taught Postgraduate Programme Director (for CMC). Room J9.
email: [email protected]
Prof. Richard Kilborn, Honorary Professor, Senior Lecturer Emeritus. Room J12.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Katharina Lindner. Lecturer. Programme Director of Film & Media. Room J7.
email: [email protected]
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Dr. Philippa Lovatt, Lecturer, Chief Examiner. Room D25.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Pietari Kaapa, Lecturer. Director of MSc in Media Management, Room D21.
email: [email protected]
Janieann McCracken, Teaching Fellow, D2A.
email: [email protected]
Prof. John, McLellan, Honorary Professor, Room J13.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Sarah Neely, Senior Lecturer. Room J12.
email: [email protected]
Dr. David Rolinson, Lecturer, Recruitment and Admissions Officer, Advisor of Studies. Room J5.
email: [email protected]
Dr. Simon Rowberry, Lecturer, Room B1.
email: [email protected]
Dario Sinforiani, Senior Teaching Fellow, Head of Production Teaching. Careers and Employability Officer,
Room D15. email: [email protected]
Dr. Greg Singh, Lecturer, Director of BA Digital Media (with Forth Valley College). Room J1.
email: [email protected]
Research Students
Research students may be contacted through the main office. The Stirling Media Research Institute is a major
focus for postgraduate media studies in Britain and an international point of attraction. It has a thriving
postgraduate culture. In recent years it has attracted overseas research students from South Africa, Germany,
Greece, India, Japan, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, Canada, the USA and Zimbabwe.
1.4 Divisional Advisers and Personal Tutors
Advisers and Personal Tutors can help you with making choices about your degree programme. Before seeing
him or her, please ensure you have familiarised yourself with relevant sections of the University Calendar, as
it is you who is responsible for the programme chosen. A Personal Tutor is also there to give advice on
non-academic matters, which may include contacting other support bodies on your behalf.
Overseas Study Adviser (for both outgoing/incoming students) across all years: David Rolinson
Advisor of Studies: David Rolinson
Further information can be found at http://www.quality.stir.ac.uk/ad-study/index.php
Personal Tutors:
Every student is allocated a personal tutor (you can find the name and details of your personal tutor on the
Portal). The first meeting with your personal tutor should take place within the first six weeks of semester.
Personal tutors will:
• be the first point of contact for students seeking advice;
• provide a pastoral role and to advise students of the relevant support services available to them;
• provide broad advice on academic problems.
Further information can be found at http://www.stir.ac.uk/education/welcome/personal-tutors/
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1.5 Divisional staff/student communications
Good communications between students and staff, and vice-versa, are particularly important to maintain a
pleasant and productive working environment. Please make sure that when necessary you make full use of the
channels available to you. If you want help or advice, or have a grievance, make sure you make contact!
All teaching staff put notices on their office doors saying when they are available for consultation (office hours).
Staff office hours are also advertised on the CMC notice board in J corridor. You may additionally be able to
arrange to meet staff outwith those times by making an appointment
To enable staff to get in touch with you, it's important that you leave your current Stirling and home address
with Louise Womersley in the CMC Office. Normally, you will be asked for these when you register for your
modules at the beginning of semester, but please check if you're not sure whether we have this information.
Student Portal
The Student Portal provides a wide-range of important information relating to your studies. It is the main point
of access for student email and Succeed. Please remember to check the Portal regularly to keep up-to-date with
news items and announcements.
Student Email
Staff will contact you from time to time using your university email account, so make sure you check this
regularly. If you want messages to be forwarded to your own account (e.g. Hotmail), you can arrange this
through Information Services.
Email can be a useful way to keep in touch with lecturers and tutors; however, in order to aid communication
please consider the following:
• check that the answer to your question is not in the course documentation or posted on Succeed
• remember that complex questions (especially around assignments and grasping key concepts) are best
dealt with face-to-face, either in the office hours or, time permitting, at the end of seminars.
• CMC operates an email calming policy and staff do not respond to email outside of the hours 7am-7pm
Monday-Friday. We will try to respond to emails within three working days wherever possible. Do remember
that all staff also have office hours when they are available for consultation by phone or in person.
Social Media
The Division also hosts a Vimeo channel https://vimeo.com/stirlinguniproduction, Facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Film-Media-Journalism-at-Stirling/158433947527564?ref=hl and blog
http://www.cmcstir.org/. You can follow us on Twitter @stirjournalism, @stirproduction and @GenderStir.
The Audio Seen, the CMC radio site, showcases student production work as well as news and
features. http://www.cmcstir.org/theaudioseen/
1.6 Succeed
Succeed is the name of the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This is a web-based interface that
allows you to access module information such as lecture notes, reading lists, supplementary materials and
other content, as well as post to discussion groups. Many modules have significant resources on Succeed and
you are advised to become acquainted with it. Help and guidance is available here:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/is/student/it/software/succeed/
You can directly access the Succeed learning environment at
http://succeed.stir.ac.uk/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp or through the student portal.
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1.7 Attendance Requirements/compulsory classes/notification of absence
Seminars/workshops are prescribed classes and missing more than three (without good reason*) will mean
that your mark for the module will be capped at 40%. It is your responsibility to make sure that your
attendance is recorded. [*You should have a good reason for missing any class. It is not OK to miss two or three
classes and then find that you fall foul of the attendance requirements because of (for example) illness.]
More information regarding the attendance policy is available here:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/handbook/attendanceandengagement/
1.8 Health & Safety
Students are responsible for:
• Adopting safe work and study practices.
• Reporting all accidents, hazards and injuries to their supervisor.
• Not wilfully or recklessly interfering with or misusing anything provided in the interests of health, safety or
welfare at the University.
1.8.1 University Health and safety Policy
The University of Stirling is committed to providing a safe and healthy place of work where staff and students
are confident that their health, safety and welfare are considered to be of the utmost importance at all times.
The University is also committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for others who may be affected
by its activities such as contractors and visitors to the University. In satisfying this commitment the University
will:
• Ensure that managers and senior University personnel are fully aware of their responsibilities for safety
and show strong and active leadership on safety management, in particular to establish safety objectives,
ensure good risk control and to monitor performance
• Establish effective communication systems and arrangements for safety, integrating good health and
safety management with the strategic planning processes and business decisions.
• Ensure, through a robust system of performance monitoring and audit, that the University is complying
with current health and safety law and where practicable aim to achieve higher standards and continual
improvement in safety performance.
• Provide appropriate training, information, instruction and supervision to secure the competence of all staff
and students.
• Adopt a collaborative approach between Trade Unions and staff safety representatives and University
management on health and safety issues.
• Allocate adequate resources to health and safety at all levels.
• Ensure that the University has access to competent specialist advice for health and safety. The University
also expects all staff and students to show high standards with regard to health and safety. All staff should
be aware that they have statutory duties to take reasonable care for their own safety and the safety of
others who may be affected by their actions, and that they must cooperate with the University's
arrangements for Health and Safety.
Full details of the University's Health and Safety Policy and Procedures can be found here:
http://www.she.stir.ac.uk/SafetyPolicyandProcedures2012.swf
1.8.2 School of Arts and Humanities Health and Safety Policy
The School of Arts and Humanities recognises that, while overall responsibility for Health and Safety is held by
the University Court, part of this responsibility is devolved to the Head of this School. The School is therefore
committed to do all that is reasonably practicable to provide a safe and healthy environment for employees, and
for others who may be affected by its activities such as students, contractors and visitors to the University. The
full School Health and safety Policy can be found at (add link)
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1.8.3 Emergency Procedures
• Action on discovering a fire:
• Activate the fire alarm system by operation the nearest call point (break glass).
• From an internal telephone dial 2222 (or from a mobile dial 01786 467999) and give the location and type
of fire
• Only tackle a fire with hand held extinguishers if you feel confident to do so - you must ensure you have
an adequate means of escape. Do not take risks.
• Leave the building by the nearest safe exit. Do not stop to collect personal belongings or re- enter the
building.
• Close any door you pass through to contain the spread of fire.
• Do not use lifts.
• Make your way to the nearest assembly point
• Do not re-enter the building until you are instructed that it is safe to do so by the University's security
team.
• Action on hearing the fire alarm:
• Leave the building by the nearest safe exit. Do not stop to collect personal belongings or re- enter the
building.
• Close any door you pass through to contain the spread of fire.
• Do not use lifts.
• Make your way to the nearest assembly point
• Do not re-enter the building until you are instructed that it is safe to do so by the University's security
team.
Full details on the University's Emergency Procedures can be found here
http://www.she.stir.ac.uk/documents/EmergProceFeb2011.pdf
(Please note: the fire alarm is tested in Pathfoot every Tuesday between 8.15 and 9 am).
1.8.4 University Smoke Free policy
The University of Stirling recognises its duty to seek to ensure that employees, students, customers and visitors
to the University can work, study or visit in air free of tobacco smoke. Smoking is prohibited throughout all
University buildings, around entrances to buildings, within internal courtyards or in any University vehicle.
Cigarette bins are located a reasonable distance from entrances and indicate the point beyond which smoking
is not permitted when entering a building.
The full smoke free policy can be found here:
http://www.she.stir.ac.uk/documents/smokefreepolicyforweb2011.doc
1.9 Divisional Module Registration & Enrolment
To help plan teaching schedules in advance, and to ensure courses are not overloaded, the University operates
a system of online registration. This takes place at the end of the semester via the Portal and requires you to
decide which modules you wish to study the following academic year.
For further details please
http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/adviserofstudiesscheme/sectiontwostudentregistrationandenrolment/
Should a module already be full, you will be asked to make an alternative choice. Anyone who fails to
register may not be able to take modules of his/her choice and may instead be allocated to one of
the available modules.
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Section 2 Programme & Module Information
2.1 Programme Structure and Aims
Film & Media at Stirling can be taken at General, Bachelor's and Honours degree level, the latter either as Single
Honours or combined with one of a range of other subjects offered by the University. As with other subjects, the
Film & Media course comprises a series of modules. Some modules are compulsory, and others optional. The
modules studied will depend on the particular degree being taken.
The University operates a system of levels and credit points in accordance with the Scottish Credit and
Qualifications Framework (SCQF). This means that each module you pass will give you SCQF credits,
counting towards your final degree (most modules are worth 20 credits each). SCQF levels: semesters 1-3
modules = level 8; semester 4 modules = level 9; and semesters 5-8 modules = level 10. You should check
carefully as you progress through your degree to ensure that you achieve the right number of credits at the
right level to graduate.
2.2 Modules (core/optional)
The approved sequence of semester modules is:
FMSU9M1 Film & Media: Representation, Meaning and Identity
FMSU9M2 The Moving Image
FMSU9M3 Reading Film & Television
Entry to each level 10 module in Film & Media normally requires a student to have completed satisfactorily the
first three semester modules in the subject. Thereafter, the approved sequences of advanced modules are
arranged according to the prerequisites for entry into modules taught after the fourth semester.
The Calendar is the official document listing all the available courses within the University, their various
combinations, the variety of module options available to you and requirements for entry to courses. It is
available on the student Portal and you are strongly advised to study the Calendar, as the wrong decision taken
about your choice of study may damage your University career.
Core Modules
Film & Media: Representation, Meaning and Identity (FMSU9M1)
This module provides an introduction to key concepts and debates in film & media. It looks at how different
media forms create meaning, how they are consumed and the ways they work to structure forms of identity,
introducing students to related critical debates in the field. Topics include communities and identities,
promotional and celebrity cultures, global connections, film and fictional representations. Workshop activities
and assignments are designed to develop skills in group work, engagement with critical thinking, original
research and academic writing.
The Moving Image (FMSU9M2)
Prerequisite: FMUS9M1
This module develops students' core skills in the analysis of film and television texts by considering elements of
form such as camera, lighting, editing, sound and CGI. Lectures and readings provide an introductory toolkit to
enable students to bring the accurate observation and creative reading of form into their analysis of texts, while
being aware of the issues and debates raised by those analytical methods. These academic skills are explored
through weekly screenings, seminar discussions, an essay and a small group video exercise.
Reading Film and Television (FMSU9M3)
Prerequisite: FMSU9M2
This module further develops students' core skills in the analysis of film and television texts by covering
theoretical approaches. The module's focus on theory builds on skills in close analysis learned on The Moving
Image - this combination of form and content develops analytical skills that will be useful on many subsequent
Film and Media modules. Weekly lectures provide an introduction to key debates, themed around different
theoretical perspectives. Weekly screenings and set readings form the basis of seminars in which students will
be encouraged to develop the analytical skills requires to become competent readers of texts.
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Digital Media and Culture (FMSU9A4)
Prerequisite: FMSU9M3
This module explores some of the major developments in the contemporary media environment. It introduces
learners to some of the key debates surrounding the shift to digital media and its implications for users.
Students will contribute to social media and open source platforms (such as blogs and wikis) and reflect
critically upon these contributions in assignments.
Understanding Audiences (FMSU9U4)
Prerequisite: FMSU9M3
This module will examine explanations for audience engagements with a range of media forms by analysing the
different positions of "the audience" in the distinct, but inter-related, disciplines which make up Film & Media,
and Journalism Studies. It will provide students with a range of specific examples of media audience research
and enable them to identify how particular strands of thinking have developed historically.
Level 10 Modules
1. Media and cultural theory and analysis
Advertising (FMSU9AJ)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module will introduce students to the theory and practice of advertising, and will combine a study of the
industry itself with analysis of its products. Topics covered will include arguments for and against advertising
(both economic and social), the structure of the advertising industry in the United Kingdom, theories of how
advertising works, issues of regulation, how advertising creates meaning, and global branding.
Cultural Theory & Media Practice (FMSU9CT)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
The module will enable students to understand the role played by cultural theory in Film & Media Studies. On
completion of the module, students should be able to explain the significance of key cultural theorists (including
Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Pierre Bourdieu, Stuart Hall and Donna Haraway) and
understand how their work has informed the discipline. Topics that will be explored include the role of culture
industries, ideology, the politics of the popular, the politics of taste, questions surrounding power and the body,
as well as class, gender and sexuality. Over the course of the module the emphasis will be on developing the
skills needed to read original texts (rather then relying on second-hand commentaries), and students will be
encouraged to apply theory to examples drawn from their own media engagement and consumption.
Gender & Representation (FMSU9AS)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module begins with an overview of gender theory, with a particular focus on interrogating common-sense
assumptions about the differences between men and women. It then moves on to consider the ways in which
gender is represented in a range of media, including news, magazines, film and television. The module draws
on historical and contemporary examples from popular culture, and will cover femininity, masculinity and
transgender.
Public Relations (FMSU9AX)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module aims to introduce students to the role and scope of public relations practice and issues.
Sport, the Media and Popular Culture (FMSU9AN)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module, preferably FMSU9M3.
This module examines the position of sport in its relationship with the media in contemporary popular culture.
The media's transformation of sport as a cultural form is examined as are both the politics and political economy
of media sport. In addition the role of sport in the constitution of ethnic, gender and national identities is
investigated.
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2. Film and broadcast theory and analysis
The Body in Screen Culture (FMSU9SC)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module engages with a range of media forms and technologies by using the body and the senses as
organising principles. It explores the ways in which the construction of different kinds of bodies within
representation feeds into larger socio-cultural understandings of gendered, raced and classed identities. It also
accounts for the ways in which different media forms and technologies engage our body and our senses in
different ways, producing different kinds of affect.
Defining the Nation: British Cinema from the 1930s to the Present (FMSU9AP)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module considers the relationship between British cinema and national identity. It examines key debates
within British film through a number of detailed case studies, such as the struggle to build a national cinema;
wartime propaganda and national unity; class and social realism; crime and disorder; alternatives to British
realism; Hammer horror; cinema and Thatcherism.
Experimental Cinema (FMSU9EC)
This module provides a chronological survey of the history of experimental cinema, exploring key historical
movements and their relationship to contemporary practice. A range of genres will be considered including the
filmpoem, ethnography and documentary, the diary film, surrealism, and also video art. Attention will also be
given to the importance of exhibition contexts.
The Poetic Eye: Documentary Film and Television (FMSU9AD)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module introduces students to documentary forms, practitioners and theorists from different periods and
countries. As well as building upon their skills in textual analysis gained on earlier modules in order to study the
artistry of documentary, students gain a critical understanding of concepts in documentary studies. Topics
covered include performativity, ethics, reflexivity, historiography and hybrid forms (such as animated
documentaries, docudramas, docu-musicals and mock-docs).
Scriptwriting (FMSU9SW)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module.
This module will provide students with an introduction to the basic principles of screenwriting and will provide
a foundation for developing fiction-based projects in later modules. Throughout the semester, the function and
application of dialogue, character and three-act structure will be explored and illustrated through the analysis
of existing scripts and films.
Small Nations on Screen (FMSU9SW)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module
The purpose of the course is to study the relation between questions of nationality and culture, and film and
television representations of small nations (e.g. Scotland, Ireland, Finland and Denmark). It will examine how
small nations are represented structurally - through film and television institutions, policy and economics - and
how they are represented symbolically -through the images on film and television screens.
Television Drama (FMSU9AB)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module
This module introduces students to British television drama, covering various forms, practitioners and theorists
from the 1950s to the present day. We analyse a range of series and plays from different authors and genres
in order to explore core issues such as form, aesthetics, the role of institutions and specificity (that is, whether
television's methods and our methods in studying them can be specific to television rather than merely
imported from other disciplines).
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Terrorism in the Media (FMSU9TM)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module
This module analyses the media's depiction of terrorism, counter-terrorism and related issues. It focuses on
film and television fiction but also cross-references news and current affairs reporting, and places textual
analysis in the context of institutions and criticism. Texts range from popular drama series, action movies and
science fiction to radical drama, drama documentary, documentary and news reports transmitted during the
module.
3. Audiovisual Production
Production modules are available from semester five and are delivered in a particular order so that skills and
knowledge can be gained progressively. They are arranged so you may specialise in either fact or fiction
pathways through the modules, or mix elements of both. FMSU9A5 acts as a prerequisite for all subsequent
FMS production modules. Because resources are limited, numbers on all production modules are strictly
capped.
Please note that the nature of the group work done on these courses prevents students taking more than one
production module per semester.
Digital Journalism (JOUU9DJ)
Prerequisite: FMSU9A5.
Semester 7 students only
This is a practical and hands-on module aims which will allow students to understand some of the conventions
and processes involved in producing web-based digital journalism and its audiovisual components. It provides
insight into the techniques, routines and other factors which determine the production of digital journalism in
online environments.
This is a Journalism module but is also available to Film and Media Students.
Introduction to Audio and Video Production (FMSU9A5)
This module is an introductory unit designed to provide students with a grounding in fundamental principles and
practices in audio and video production. The emphasis throughout will be on narrative and communicative
aspects of production. Technical teaching will support you in achieving narrative goals.
Radio Feature Production (FMSU9D6)
Prerequisite: FMSU9A5.
Semester 6 students only
A production module which builds on FMSU9A5 to develop, through practical experience, an understanding of
research skills, information gathering and programme production, according to established broadcast practice
in radio.
Radio Drama Production (FMSU9C7)
Prerequisite: FMSU9A5.
Semester 7 students only
This module builds on the audio skills learned in FMSU9A5. Students learn techniques of producing a radio play,
including plot construction, characterisation, dialogue and script development. Combining dialogue, sound
effects and music students produce original dramas for radio.
Documentary Production (FMSU9B8)
Prerequisite: FMSU9A5.
Available only to semester 8 students
Students learn how to research, script, shoot and produce either video or radio documentary.
Production: Content Development and Research (FMSU9CD)
This module will be an introduction to the development process in television, and the research that
accompanies and follows the development phase of production. This is a crucial area in media production, and
the experience of writing up a number of ideas in response to a brief, researching contributors and locations,
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producing taster material and pitching programme ideas will give students on the course invaluable experience
of generating ideas to deadline, writing in a range of styles, production processes and practical shooting and
editing techniques.
In addition, students work both as individuals and as part of production teams, and critically reflect on their own
performance and that of the team in responding to the assessment tasks.
Production: Editing and Workflow (FMSU9EW)
This module will cover the principles and practice of video post production, through analysis, critical reflection
and practical editing work. Students will work with media from a range of sources across different genres and
create edited sequences to different briefs, using industry standard software and hardware.
4. Research
Researching Media and Culture (FMSU9A7)
Prerequisite: One semester 4 advanced module
This module provides an introduction to a range of methods used in Film & Media research. The module is
designed specifically to prepare students for FMSU9A8 Dissertation (see below) and is also of relevance to
anyone considering postgraduate study.
Dissertation (FMSU9A8)
Prerequisite: FMSU9A7
Available only to semester 8 students not opting for FMSU9B8
Students in semester 8 have the option (subject to approval) of undertaking an original research project and
submitting it in the form of a 13,000-word dissertation. Students taking the dissertation are allocated a
supervisor with expertise in the subject of the research to guide them through the planning, execution and
presentation of the project. Students will also submit, alongside their dissertation, a learning log (which will
take the form of records of meetings with the supervisor). This will provide the student with the opportunity to
chart and reflect upon their learning experience on the module, and encourage them to articulate the
transferable skills developed through their dissertation research in terms of research skills, communication and
organisational skills, and managing the relationship with the supervisor.
Prerequisites
You will not be able to enrol on a number of Film & Media modules unless you have first completed certain other
modules, known as prerequisites. The description of the modules gives details of prerequisites for each module,
as does the Calendar. However, please bear in mind that the popularity of some modules means that demand
can outstrip supply, requiring limits to be placed on entry. Therefore, successful completion of modules
such as FMSU9A4 and FMSU9A5 does not guarantee admission to later modules for which they are
prerequisites.
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2.3 Intended Learning Outcomes
The Film & Media course contains theoretical, analytical and practical elements. We believe this mixture of
approaches is important both for those who intend to use their degree to make a career in the media industries
and for those with more general interests in the subject.
First, we aim to provide students with an understanding of the social, economic, and political roles of the media
in contemporary industrialised societies. While this theoretical work focuses on the United Kingdom, as is
appropriate for a British university, issues of international relevance are also addressed. Members of faculty
jointly possess a wide range of expertise in the media systems of other countries, including Norway, Australia,
Italy, Latin America and the USA.
The second broad aim of the course is to enable students to develop the skills and methods required for the
analysis of media texts. Films, television and radio programmes, newspapers, magazines and advertisements
are all subject to detailed analysis at various points in the course.
Third, we aim to give students an insight into the creation, dissemination and consumption of media output.
One aspect of this is the optional practical element of the course, in which students are introduced to production
techniques employed in electronic and print media. These practical elements of the course are not intended to
substitute for specialist postgraduate and professional on-the-job training. They do, however, form a useful
basis for further study and for employment in the media industries.
Fourth, the course aims to develop the general skills of written and oral communication, logical reasoning,
conceptual analysis, study skills and group work.
Throughout the course, the emphasis is on your own activity. You will be responsible for organising your own
timetable of the private study necessary to write essays, participate in tutorials/seminars, and pass
examinations. You'll need to read a lot of material to stay on top of the course; not just the set books on reading
lists, but also other relevant books and articles. And you will need to keep yourself well informed; regular
reading of newspapers and magazines, watching television, listening to the radio and visiting the cinema should
all be regarded as aspects of your study.
Teaching and Learning
Teaching is mainly by lecture, seminar and presentation. A large part of the teaching involves looking,
discussing and analysing but the more traditional lecture remains important. All sessions start at five minutes
past the hour and end at five minutes to the hour. This is to allow ten minutes to get to and from classes.
Lectures
Lectures are approximately one to two hours long. You shouldn't think of them as saying everything that can be
said about a subject: it's best to regard them as providing broad insights into particular areas of study, or as
dealing in some depth with a more narrow aspect of a particular topic. In both cases they provide a basis for
your own reading. Go over your notes shortly after the lecture to make sure they make sense. If they don't,
never be afraid to ask a member of staff (your tutor, for example) to help clarify a point. Staff are here to help.
Seminars and Workshops
Seminars and workshops provide a forum in which the emphasis is on discussion and class exercises, allowing
you to examine topics in some depth. Importantly, they also give you an opportunity to develop your skills in
oral communication, argument and analysis. Sometimes particular material will be encountered in the seminar
for detailed analysis. We may examine the front page of a newspaper, watch a film clip, or listen to part of a
radio broadcast for example. Here the emphasis is still on contributions from students. We may also ask you to
prepare class presentations in advance.
An important concern in seminars is that they should be enjoyable, engaging and stimulating. This requires
some effort on your part. Without some knowledge of the subject, discussion will not be as worthwhile as it
could be. Therefore it is important that you prepare properly for each session. And while everyone is likely to be
anxious to some extent in a group situation, developing good oral communication skills is as important as
developing good writing skills.
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Audiovisual Production Modules
Audio-visual production modules, which are available from semester five, supply a basic level of practical skills
and knowledge. They are not intended as vocational training; instead they allow you to develop and test
theoretical ideas against the practice of media production. Teaching is by workshops and lectures. Students will
be expected to put in a lot of work outwith class time.
2.5 Summer Academic Programme
Each summer the University of Stirling offers the opportunity for undergraduate students to take additional
credit in the Summer Academic Programme. The Summer Academic Programme is an accelerated semester for
full-time or part-time students, delivered during June and July. Summer programme modules carry either 10 or
20 SCQF credits, and are delivered over a shorter period than a standard semester. For more information
contact [email protected]
2.6 Divisional Exchange Programmes
Studying abroad offers a unique opportunity for both academic and personal development. The Division of
Communciations, Media & Culture encourages and supports students who wish to spend a part of their degree
studying overseas. We have excellent links with universities worldwide and a number of places are available for
Single and Combined Honours students in semesters 5 and 6 to study at a wide variety of institutions in the
United States, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong. An exchange programme is also available at the
Autonomous University of Barcelona for students fluent in Spanish. Together with the Study Abroad Office we
oversee every stage of the process, ensuring you choose the right programme, maintaining contact with you
while you are away and aiding your smooth reintegration into fourth year on your return.
2.7 Divisional Prizes
The following prizes are offered each year to graduating students whose work has been of an exceptionally high
standard.
The Thomas and Joyce Dunn Prize awarded for the best academic performance by a graduating student.
Tommy Dunn was the first professor of English Studies at Stirling and played a significant role in the
establishment of Film & Media at the University.
The Dee Amy-Chinn Prize is awarded for the best undergraduate dissertation in the School of Arts and
Humanities in the area of gender or feminist studies (single or combined honours). This prize is named for our
recently retired colleague, Dee Amy-Chinn, one of the founders of our Gender Studies Masters programme, in
lasting recognition of all Dee's wonderful work as a feminist researcher and teacher.
The Jonathan Witchell Prize for Best Radio Features Production is a memorial prize, donated by the family of
former student Jonathan Witchell who died suddenly in 2007. Jonathan was a graduate of the MSc in Media
Management (1997). After graduating, Jonathan began a career in radio and worked for the BBC for nearly a
decade.
The Mediaspec Radio Prize, which is awarded to the best individual student of radio in 4th year.
The BBC Radio Scotland Award for Best Radio Drama is awarded to the group who have written, directed
and produced the best original drama as part of the 4th year module FMSU9C7.
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Section 3 Assessment
3.1 Submission of Assessments
You should post written work in the essay box adjacent to the CMC notice board by 12 noon at the latest on the
day of your deadline. They are date-stamped on receipt. All assignments must include a cover sheet/essay
submission form. These are available from Succeed and outside the CMC essay box.
If a student fails to submit a piece of coursework on time, work will be accepted up to seven calendar days after
the submission date (or expiry of any agreed extension) but the mark will be lowered by three marks per day
or part thereof. After seven calendar days, the piece of work will be deemed a non-submission and will be given
a mark of 0 (zero).
Essays should be as close to the set word limit as possible: an essay that is very much longer than this is as bad
as one that is very much shorter, and will usually be penalised in the marking. The general limit for essay length
is plus or minus 10% of the set word count.
3.2 Divisional assessment criteria
Three sets of criteria are assessed in essays: reading and research, argument and analysis, and writing and
structure. Within each of these criteria, markers are looking for the following:

Reading and research: evidence of critical engagement with set materials; evidence of independent
reading of appropriate academic material (which may include books, journals, Internet, audiovisual
resources and archives, depending on topic).
You are expected to reference a number of academic sources in your essays. Although criteria and
penalties may vary.
N.B. 3rd and 4th years students are eligible to order reading materials through the library's document
delivery service. This allows you to borrow from other libraries in the UK and abroad. For more
information see http://www.stir.ac.uk/is/staff/library/dds/

Argument and analysis: well-articulated and well-supported argument; evidence of critical thinking
(through taking a position in relation to key ideas from the module, and supporting this position);
evidence of relational thinking (through making connections between key ideas from the module and
wider literature, and supporting these connections); evidence of independent critical ability.

Writing and structure: clear writing; clear and coherent structure; accuracy in referencing.
90+ (Pass - First Class): Meets all the requirements to attain 80 - 89 but in addition demonstrates an
exceptional degree of originality and exceptional analytical, problem-solving and/or creative skills.
80 – 89 (Pass – First Class): Meets all the requirements to attain 70 - 79 but in addition demonstrates an
exceptional degree of originality and exceptional analytical, problem-solving and/or creative skills
70-79 (Pass - First Class): Excellent range and depth of attainment of intended learning outcomes, secured
by discriminating command of a comprehensive range of relevant materials and analyses, and by deployment
of considered judgement relating to key issues, concepts or procedures.
60-69 (Pass - Upper Second): Attainment of virtually all intended learning outcomes, clearly grounded on
close familiarity with a wide range of supporting evidence, constructively utilised to reveal appreciable depth of
understanding.
50-59 (Pass - Lower Second): Attainment of most of the intended learning outcomes, some more securely
grasped than others, resting on a circumscribed range of evidence and displaying a variable depth of
understanding.
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40-49 (Pass - Third): Acceptable attainment of most intended learning outcomes, displaying a qualified
familiarity with a minimally sufficient range of relevant materials, and a grasp of the analytical issues and
concepts which is generally reasonable, albeit insecure.
30-39 (Marginal Fail): Appreciable deficiencies in the attainment of intended learning outcomes, perhaps
lacking a secure basis in relevant factual or analytical dimensions.
0-29 (Fail - Clear): No convincing evidence of attainment of intended learning outcomes, such treatment of
the subject as is in evidence being directionless and fragmentary.
See also: http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/handbook/assessment/#q-5
Marking and Returning Essays
The marking and returning of essays are done as promptly as possible. These can be collected from the CMC
Office (J2). Please bear in mind that there are often large numbers of essays to mark, so there may be some
delay.
Marked essays must be returned to the CMC Office (J2) by the end of semester, as they may be
referred to the external examiners for confirmation of grades.
3.3 Honours degree classification
All of your assessed work is given a grade. Grades are averaged to give an overall grade for each module.
Module grades determine your final degree classification using a University-wide formula. Details of the formula
can be found here: http://www.stir.ac.uk/regulations/undergrad/assessmentandawardofcredit/#q-5
3.4 Essay Writing & Referencing
Some Guidelines for Writing Essays
The following are some general pointers to help you think about writing essays. However, you are strongly
urged to read Coles (1995) A Student's Guide to Coursework Writing, Stirling: University of Stirling. This is an
accessible and manageable book which deals with the main points of good essay writing clearly and concisely.
1. This may sound rather obvious, but make sure you answer the question. It does sometimes happen that
students get hold of the wrong end of the stick when reading essay titles, so make sure you understand exactly
what you are being asked to do. Ask your tutor if you're unsure.
2. Prepare thoroughly: read, make notes, and think about the subject well in advance.
3. Try to structure your essay so that everything you say takes its place in an overall developing argument or
discussion. Random, disconnected points generally don't add up and don't convince the reader that you have
much of a grasp of the topic. Try to give the reader a smoothly flowing journey through your essay, rather than
a bumpy ride full of sudden swerves and messy crashes. To help do this it's always a good idea to plan the
structure of your essay before you write it.
It's also a good idea to inform the reader of what you're doing and why you're doing it. This is called
signposting: a brief introduction will map out the direction you intend to take and what you intend to achieve,
and signposts along the way will guide the reader through your argument. A short concluding paragraph is also
helpful in summing up what you have written and stating what conclusion you have reached.
4. Try to be concise and to the point. Think of the most economical way of putting every point across.
5. Similarly, try to be as clear as possible. If you don't understand what you have written, the chances are that
nobody else will either. There is nothing more frustrating for the person marking the essay than trying to work
out what somebody is getting at when they are not actually saying it. This is a good reason for avoiding using
jargon unless you are sure what it means.
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6. Following on from this, try to put things in your own terms. There is no sense in regurgitating chunks of
books that you clearly don't understand, and this in any case carries the risk of the serious offence of
plagiarism. Nobody wants to see that you have merely read the books; you need to show that you have
understood them. A good essay demonstrates both an understanding of relevant readings and independent
thought about a topic.
7. Illustrative examples and quotes may make what you have to say more vivid, immediate and obvious.
Relating an abstract argument to something concrete, perhaps in your own experience, can bring an idea alive
and convince the reader that you know what you are talking about.
Similarly a well-chosen quote can often clarify and enliven a point you are trying to make and can demonstrate
that you have grasped the essence of a reading. Don't use too many quotes, though - the essay is meant to be
your own work, after all - and don't use quotes if they add nothing to your argument. If a point you are making
is clearly derived from a published source, and when quoting from published sources, you must acknowledge
this.
8. Ask yourself whether your essay is interesting? Do the points you make hold the reader's attention? Have
you got something to say, a point of view, an interesting approach to the question? The acid test is whether you
are interested in reading it yourself.
9. Include a complete bibliography of sources used, in proper bibliographical form (In the library's referencing
system, RefWorks, use APA 6th ed. style - see section on Referencing in this handbook).
10. Finally, review what you have written to check that it makes sense. No matter how good your
ideas are, if they are poorly expressed your grade will be lowered. Check your spelling, grammar
and punctuation and make sure that no mistakes have slipped through. This process takes only
minutes but can make a difference to your grade.
Essays should be typed on one side only of A4 paper, 1.5 line spacing. Paragraphs should be clearly marked off
by leaving a line between them or by indenting the first line of each paragraph five spaces.
Referencing Your Work
Why reference?
For the student, there are many simple reasons why you should take care in referencing. It offers evidence of
reading, it helps organize your ideas, it helps support your arguments, it guards against possible accusations of
plagiarism — and you will lose marks if you don't. There are also broader ethical and cultural reasons why
referencing the sources of ideas or words used in your work is important — it acknowledges the work of others
and it helps others build new knowledge.
Which system should I use?
This one. All essays submitted to the Division of Communications, Media & Culture should use the system
outlined below. There are two parts to this system — individual in-text references and a compiled list of these
references at the end of the essay.
What goes in the text of the essay?
Whenever you use ideas, information or words drawn from someone else's work, you should acknowledge this
in the text of your essay. Each time, you should give the family name of the author or originator, and the year
of publication. If you are referring to a specific point in the text, or are quoting the author directly, you should
also include the relevant page number(s). Long quotes of more than four lines or 40 words should be indented
as a separate block paragraph. All other bibliographical details go at the end of the essay in the list of references
(see below).
Examples
Print has been implicated in the development of national consciousness (Anderson, 1991).
According to Anderson, the nation is an 'imagined political community' (1991: 6).
The nation can be thought of as an 'imagined political community' (Anderson, 1991: 6).
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What goes in the list of references?
Your list of references should contain every source you have referred to in the essay and nothing else. Present
these as a single, alphabetical list — don't provide separate lists of books, articles, websites and so on.
The names of books, journals, newspapers, films, websites and other major works go in italics. The names of
articles, chapters or other minor works or sections go in 'inverted commas'.
If you are reading a book by John Hartley, and he quotes something by Henry Jenkins which you want to cite
in the essay, your reference is to Hartley. Only include Jenkins in the reference list if you have read him
yourself.
Here are some examples, covering key types of text you will want to cite. Note the different conventions for
print and audiovisual texts, and note the punctuation. If you want to cite a kind of text not included here, the
important thing is to adhere to the same basic principles. These are: identify the text and its author or
originator; locate it in time (date) and space (place of publication); and identify the publisher (e.g. Routledge,
the New York Times, YouTube). Always provide enough detail for the reader to find your source easily.
Examples of entries for reference list
Authored book
Lessig, Lawrence (2008) Remix, London: Bloomsbury. Edited
book
Tumber, Howard (ed.) (1999) News: A Reader, London: Oxford University Press. Chapter in
edited book
Livingstone, Sonia (2005) 'Media Audiences, Interpreters and Users' in Marie Gillespie (ed.) Media Audiences,
Maidenhead: Open University Press, pp. 9-50.
Journal article
Thompson, John (2005) 'The New Visibility', Theory, Culture & Society, 22 (6), pp. 31-51. News article where
author is identified
Jarvis, Jeff (2008) 'In Mumbai, Witnesses are Writing the News', Guardian, 1 December, p. 8. News article
where author is not identified
New York Post (1983) 'Headless Body in Topless Bar', 15 April, p. 1. Film
The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, Warner Brothers, USA, 1945) TV
programme
Coronation Street (Granada, 1961 — )
Government publication
Department for Culture, Media and Sport (2001) Creative Industries: Mapping Document 2001. London:
Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
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What about citing online material?
The same principles apply, except that you should add the date on which you accessed the material, as things
online can change. Note that it is not enough to provide a URL, but that you must also include the same amount
of detail as for other references, including author and date.
Use the name of the author or originator in the in-text reference; the URL goes in the list of references, not in
the body of the essay.
Examples
Daily Mail (2010) 'Thumb That Fell From Sky into Car Park Belongs to Missing Kebab Store Worker', 26 March,
<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1260800/Thumb-fell-sky-car-park-belongs-missing-kebab-storeworker.html>, accessed 15 April 2010.
Rosen, Jay (2006) 'The People Formerly Known as the Audience', PressThink, 27 June,
<http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2006/06/27/ppl_frmr_p.html>, accessed 6 January
2010.
Wesch, Michael (2007) 'Web 2.0 — The Machine is Us/ing Us', YouTube,
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLlGopyXT_g>, accessed 6 January 2010.
Example Essay and List of References
Here is a sample paragraph from an essay, with the appropriate list of references.
An important concept in understanding digital media is convergence (Rice 1999, Jenkins 2006a, Deuze 2010).
The coming together of telecommunications, media content and computing in multiple platforms, coupled with
ongoing processes of industry merger, acquisition and alliance, have made possible a new digital media
environment that operates in real-time on a global scale (McNair 2006). The convergence of industries and
technologies makes possible certain other forms of convergence, discussed in more detail below. Each of these
manifests different kinds of behaviour by those whom Jay Rosen (2006) has now famously termed 'the people
formerly known as the audience'. The former audience have new options — they can access, organise, create,
remix and share media content in powerful new ways (Jenkins 2006b, Wesch 2007).
References
Deuze, Mark (2010) 'Journalism and Convergence Culture' in Stuart Allan (ed.) The Routledge Companion to
News and Journalism, London: Routledge, pp. 267-76.
Jenkins, Henry (2006a) Convergence Culture, New York: New York University Press.
——— (2006b) Fans, Bloggers & Gamers, New York: New York University Press.
McNair, Brian (2006) Cultural Chaos, London: Routledge.
Rice, Ronald E. (1999) 'Artifacts and Paradoxes in New Media', New Media & Society, 1 (1), pp.
24-32.
Rosen, Jay (2006) 'The People Formerly Known as the Audience', PressThink, 27 June,
<http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2006/06/27/ppl_frmr_p.html>, accessed 6 January
2010.
Wesch, Michael (2007) 'Web 2.0 — The Machine is Us/ing Us', YouTube,
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLlGopyXT_g>, accessed 6 January 2010.
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3.5 Essay extensions/late submission
Deadlines are also important. When essay or project assignments are given to you, they will be accompanied
by a date and time for submission of the work. To ensure fairness, all students are expected to abide by these
deadlines, and there are penalties for failing to do so.
If you are unable to submit your coursework because of exceptional circumstances, please contact your tutor
as soon as possible to apply for an extension.
To see if your circumstances qualify as 'exceptional', please consult the university guidelines
http://www.quality.stir.ac.uk/ac-policy/assessment1.php
If you have not received an extension, but submitted your coursework late, the following guidelines will apply:
If a student fails to submit a piece of coursework on time, work will be accepted up to seven calendar days after
the submission date (or expiry of any agreed extension) but the mark will be lowered by three marks per day
or part thereof. After seven calendar days, the piece of work will be deemed a non-submission and will be given
a mark of 0 (zero).
3.6 Guidance on group presentations
Group work is seen as a very important part of the degree in Film & Media. From the first semester, you will be
expected to work within small groups in seminars and workshops. You will also occasionally be asked to present
work as a group. These presentations are not always part of your formal assessment, but they should always
be taken seriously for the role they play in the development of valuable key skills. When working in groups it is
important to allow each member to participate. It is also a good idea to assign specific tasks to each member
early on in the planning stages. This helps to ensure that each member of the group will carry their share of the
workload. It isn't always necessary for each member of the group to speak during a group presentation. You
may prefer to have one member of the group speak on behalf of the group. However, it's always worth checking
with tutors in advance to ensure that you are meeting the requirements for that particular assessment.
3.7 Examination regulations
Many people become nervous before and during exams. While staff may make some allowance for exam nerves
when marking scripts, there is no substitute for knowing the material thoroughly before you enter the
examination room. It will help if you don't leave revision till the last minute.
You should also familiarise yourself with the University's exam regulations, details of which can be found here
http://www.stir.ac.uk/registry/studentinformation/exams/
The use of dictionaries in exams is limited to bilingual dictionaries for those students who are not native
speakers of English. Dictionaries specifically concerned with film, television or other media are not allowed.
3.8 Examination timetable
The draft examination timetable will be available in October 2015, via this link
http://www.stir.ac.uk/registry/studentinformation/exams/examtimetables/
You are advised against basing travel arrangements, holidays, etc. on the draft timetable as it is subject to
change.
3.9 Resit/Deferred Exams
If there is a genuine reason for not being able to sit an exam (illness, for example) it may be possible to arrange
a deferred examination. You can find information on applying for a deferred examination here:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/registry/studentinformation/exams/deferredexams/
You should refer to the University Regulations on examinations in order to be clear about issues such as what
may happen if you miss an exam.
25
You can find information regarding resit examinations and other assessment issues here:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/handbook/assessment/
3.10 Academic Misconduct
For details on the University policy on plagiarism and general academic misconduct please visit:
http://www.quality.stir.ac.uk/ac-policy/Misconduct.php
To plagiarise is to represent as one's own the intellectual property of another. The Oxford English Dictionary
definition of plagiarism is 'the wrongful appropriation or purloining, and publication as one's own, of the ideas,
or the expression of the ideas ... of another'.
You must duly acknowledge all sources in your work in accordance with the University's plagiarism policy.
3.11 Leave of Absence
Students require approval to take official leave of absence and should write to the Student Programmes Office
in the first instance. Students on leave of absence remain matriculated students of the University and may not
qualify for Jobseeker's Allowance.
Also, make sure you inform one of your Advisers of Studies and your course tutors of any illness or other
difficulties which may affect your ability to sit an examination or submit coursework.
3.12 Repeat of First Year
Any student who wishes to repeat first year should contact the Student Programmes Office in the first instance.
3.13 Transfer between Full-Time & Part-Time
Students may transfer between full-time and part-time study with the permission of the Student Programmes
Office. Such transfers should normally only occur in September and January. Part-time students are required to
pass 2 modules (40 credits) before applying to transfer to full-time. You should speak to your year adviser in
the first instance.
3.14 Withdrawal from Module
Students are permitted by Academic Council to withdraw from modules no later than three weeks from the start
of teaching. Requests to withdraw must be submitted by email to the Student Programmes Office. Students
failing to complete a module thereafter will be awarded 0% for the module.
3.15 Withdrawal from University
If you are considering withdrawing from University you should contact your divisional adviser for advice. You
should also contact Student Programmes who will be able to offer further guidance and support. For more
information see http://www.stir.ac.uk/registry/studentinformation/thinkingaboutleaving/withdrawalofstudies/
3.16 Extenuating Circumstances
If you feel that any medical or other personal circumstances have prevented you from performing to your
expected standard, you may wish to make them known to the Chief Examiner (Philippa Lovatt) in order for your
module grades to be considered in light of the extenuating circumstances. For more information see
http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/handbook/assessment/
26
Section 4 Student Participation and Feedback
4.1 Student Questionnaires
Make sure you fill out a Module Evaluation Questionnaire for each of the modules you take. They are entirely
confidential and allow you to tell the staff how effective the courses are. They are evaluated by staff and taken
very seriously.
If you have problems or difficulties about any aspect of your course, please tell us.
4.2 Student Staff Consultative Committee
There is a Staff/Student Consultative Committee which deals formally with matters relevant to staff/student
relations within the Division. At least two student representatives from each module are elected to the
committee, which meets twice every semester. It is of vital importance that you know who your student reps
are, and inform them well in advance of any items you would like dealt with at meetings. You should also make
sure that your representatives report back to you, so that you are kept fully informed about decisions which
may affect you in the Division of Communications, Media & Culture.
27
Section 5 Sources of Academic and Technical Information and
Support
5.1 Divisional Media Production/Technical Support
Michael McDonald, Room D17.
email: [email protected]
Michael is the Technical Resources Manager for the School of Arts and Humanities, with responsibility for
Production and Journalism resourcing in CMC. He has responsibility for digital audio and video equipment,
software and facilities. This includes application support for Avid Media Composer, Pro Tools and the Adobe
suite.
William Crosgray, Room D8.
Email: [email protected]
Billy is the Digital Technologies Coordinator within Journalism Studies, where he has responsibility for idevices
and DSLRs, the Newsroom facility, web and server administration and application support with the Adobe
Creative suite.
Stephen Sinclair, Room D8.
Email: [email protected]
Stephen is the Post Production Coordinator within the Production Section, where has has responsibility for
audio and video equipment, post production facilities, media management and application support for Avid
Media Composer and Pro Tools
5.2 Student Matriculation & Records Office (Registry)
The Student Matriculation & Records Office is located in the 2Z area of Cottrell. They can be contacted with
queries relating to enrolment, fees and/or student loans. Email [email protected] or call +44 (0)1786
466654
5.3 Student Programmes Office
The Student Programmes Office, also located in the 2Z area of Cottrell, can be contacted with queries relating
to module registration, academic progression and academic awards. Email [email protected]
or call + 44 (0) 1786 466685
5.4 University Calendar
The University Calendar contains full details of undergraduate programme structures, rules and regulations
and can be found at http://www.calendar.stir.ac.uk/
5.5 Information Services (Library & IT Services including Training)
It goes without saying that a thorough knowledge of the Library is essential. You should make sure you
familiarise yourself with this as soon as you can by attending one of the Library's introductory seminars that
run in the first week of semester. Additionally, there will be a talk on using the Library at the beginning of your
first course module. Be sure to acquaint yourself with the Library's comprehensive selection of information
leaflets, and note the location of the Information Desk. Also get the hang of the computer database catalogue
as soon as possible. It's very simple to use. More information at: http://www.stir.ac.uk/is/
28
5.6 Printing
The printing facilities in Pathfoot are located in G10. For further information on the University's printing
facilities please refer to http://www.stir.ac.uk/is/student/it/printcopy/
5.7 Student Learning Services
Student Learning Services, located in the 4B corridor of Cottrell, are available to provide support for students
who wish to develop their academic skills. They offer tutorials, online support and a range of workshops
throughout the year, on subjects like oral presentation skills, essay writing, and exam techniques. To find out
more visit http://www.stir.ac.uk/campus-life/learning-support/student-learning-services/
or email [email protected]
5.8 Complaints/Appeals
If, after reading your tutor's written comments, you are unhappy with a grade for an assignment, please speak
to him or her about it in the first instance.
Samples of student work from all modules, including examination scripts, are second marked by another tutor,
and a sample of work from every module is seen by an External Examiner, who moderates module grades.
If you are still not satisfied that you have been treated fairly, you can find more information on your right to
appeal here:
http://www.quality.stir.ac.uk/ac-policy/StudentGuide.php
5.9 Audio recording policy
Students are allowed to make audio recordings of lectures for private use/personal study. Please refer to the
university regulations for further information
http://www.stir.ac.uk/academicpolicy/handbook/learning-support
29
Section 6 Sources of Personal Support and Information
6.1 General Student Services Contacts
Student Matriculation and Records Office
2Z Cottrell Ext 6654
Student Programmes Office
2Z Cottrell Ext 6685
Cash Office
2Z Cottrell Ext 7122
Residential Services
Geddes Court, Ext 7060
Information Services
Library Building, Ext 7250
Student Development and Support Services
4Y4 Cottrell, Ext 7080
Career Development Centre
3A1 Cottrell, Ext 7070
Car Parking Office
4Z2 Cottrell, Ext 6065
6.2 Students' Union
Main website for the Stirling Students' Union, including links to Air3 radio and The Brig, the Stirling student
newspaper: http://stirlingstudentsunion.com/
6.3 International Students
The international student handbook is useful for overseas students to read to help with the adjustment to life
as a student in the UK and is available to download here http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/handbook/
6.4 English Language Support
CELT, the Centre for English Language Teaching, provides up to 20 hours of language support free-of-charge
to full-fee-paying international students. For more information Email:[email protected]
6.5 Student Development and Support
Student Development and Support provide a range of services that aim to help students prepare for graduation
(from financial advice and help with job applications to counselling and support with emotional and mental
health). For more information please visit their website at http://www.student-support.stir.ac.uk/index.php
6.6 Disability Support
The University is committed to supporting all its students and to taking all reasonable steps to meet their
needs. It seeks to foster an inclusive community and to prevent anyone from being marginalised or unable to
realise their potential. To this end, it has in place a number of ways to assist students who, because of a
disability, may need special arrangements to enable them to study, research and revise, to complete
coursework, or to take examinations.
Often, these meet students' needs as a matter of course (for example, audio aids in lecture theatres).
However, there are occasions when the right support can be offered only if the University is aware of a
student's particular situation. For this reason, students are encouraged to disclose any disability to the
University. This can be done by contacting the University's Disability Adviser (external tel. 01786 466612;
internal tel. 6612; email: [email protected]) who is a member of the Student Development
and Support Service team.
30
They are located in room 2A1 in the Cottrell building. The Disability Adviser will then arrange a confidential
one-to-one meeting to discuss the best way forward. If the student then decides that they would rather keep
their circumstances private, the matter will go no further. If a student prefers, they may speak to any member
of staff with whom they feel comfortable, and again the matter will remain confidential unless the student
decides that disclosure is in their best interest. In that case, the Disability Adviser would be informed by the
member of staff.
6.7 Counselling and Wellbeing
The University's counselling services are available to all students, offering a range of services from general
counselling to help with exam stress. To make an appointment call 01786 467 080 or Email:
[email protected]
6.8 Financial Support (Loan Scheme/Hardship Funds)
If you are experiencing financial hardship, Student Support Services offer are a range of services that may
help. They provide a drop-in service where advisers can offer advice about local services and support that
might be available to you. You may also be eligible for the Universitly's Hardship Fund. For more information
contact [email protected]
6.9 Careers Development Centre
For general career advice on everything from job interviews and applications, to gaining work experience,
self-employment, and postgraduate study, contact Career Development Services in 3A1 of the Cottrell
building. Tel + 44 (0) 1786 467070/73 Email [email protected]
Stay in Touch!
It may seem a long way off, but when you leave University, make sure we have your current address
(especially your email address) as job opportunities may arise through CMC.
More information on the Division of Communications, Media & Culture can be found at:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/arts-humanities/about/communications-media-culture/
We hope you have found this handbook useful. If you have any suggestions for improvements or alterations
to it, please let us know.
31
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES
WELCOME FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL
Welcome to the School of Arts and Humanities. For those with an interest in Arts and Humanities the University of Stirling
is a great place to be. Our staff and students are drawn from all over the globe and come together to experience a friendly
but challenging intellectual environment. We teach and research in a wide range of disciplines and are committed to multi
and inter-disciplinary study. We have a strong postgraduate community and our undergraduate programmes facilitate
progression to postgraduate study. The School of Arts and Humanities is very much a happening place where we regularly
stage all manner of exhibitions, events and conferences. The culture is rich and vibrant. We believe that University life is
about much more than the passing of exams and encourage staff and students to participate in all aspects of University life.
We have strong links to the local community and see ourselves as an active player in that community.
Within the School of Arts and Humanities, our students have the desire to explore, to innovate and to create. One of the
largest Schools in the University, our subject areas are renowned for international and world leading research. Our work is
well represented in national and international journals, at academic conferences around the world and in the media.
We offer students a broad range of subjects to study in an exciting, research led and highly interdisciplinary environment.
Our teaching is regarded as innovative and the levels of student satisfaction are consistently high. A vibrant intellectual
community is constantly enriched and renewed by the contribution of visiting scholars and practitioners.
The School encompasses four divisions Communications, Media and Culture; History and Politics; Law and Philosophy and
Literature and Languages.
Professor Richard Oram
Head of School
INFORMATION ABOUT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Welcome to Graduate Studies in the School of Arts and Humanities, this is the administrative centre for our vibrant
postgraduate community. With the growth in postgraduate numbers, the School has centralised the administration and
management of its programmes to provide a coherent and supportive environment for our diverse postgraduate
community. In many ways, our Graduate Studies office acts as the hub for this community, servicing the needs of students
and staff across a range of disciplines and programmes, with the implicit aim of ensuring we provide a rewarding and
enjoyable student experience
Whether you are a taught or research student, studying full-time or part-time, from the UK or from overseas, we will
provide you with a supportive and intellectually enriching environment in which to pursue your educational development.
Our taught programmes reflect the academic excellence of our research and are targeted at the needs of our students to
develop the knowledge and skills required to face the challenges of their future careers. Whether you are interested in the
linguistic, literary, philosophical, political or historic, or want to learn the practice of law, publishing, communications or
film, we have a diverse range of provision and expertise to suit your needs.
The Graduate Studies office is located in room E16, Pathfoot and our staff are:
Director. Professor Kirstie Blair E-mail: [email protected]
Dr Scott Hames, Deputy Director (Research Postgraduate)
Email: [email protected] Tel: 01786
Dr Andrew Hass, Deputy Director (BGP2)
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 466240 Pathfoot Room E35
Dr Emma Macleod, Deputy Director (Taught Postgraduate)
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 467573 Pathfoot Room A70
Dr Colin Nicolson, Deputy Director (Arts Research Training)
Email: [email protected] Tel: 01786 467963 Pathfoot Room A83
Sheilah Greig, Graduate Studies Administrator
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 467592 Pathfoot Room E14.
Jane Campbell, Programme Administrator
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 468400 Pathfoot Room E16
Lesley McIntosh, Programme Administrator
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 466220 Pathfoot Room E16
Alison Scott, Programme Administrator
E-mail: [email protected] Tel: 01786 467510 Pathfoot Room E16
Research students can draw on the expertise of our academic staff, all of whom have national and international
reputations in their respective fields. We understand that the needs of research students are increasingly multi-disciplinary,
and we encourage collaborative learning and research wherever possible. We have developed dedicated research training
for all our research students, and we continue to seek innovative ways of delivering the research skills and training required
for the 21st century.
For more information please view our video podcasts, with messages from our programme directors. You may also find
up-to-date information from our newsletter, which is published three times a year in November, March and May. A
welcome event for all postgraduate students in the School will take place in early October.
We hope you can join our postgraduate community and share our passion for the arts and humanities.
Professor Kirstie Blair Director of
Graduate Studies
WELCOME MESSAGE FROM DIRECTOR OF LEARNING AND TEACHING
Congratulation on gaining a place to study here at Stirling University. I am delighted to welcome you to Stirling where you
will become part of a thriving community, not only for your time with us but also after you have graduated - you will always
be a Stirling graduate and part of our community here. I expect you may be excited but also a little apprehensive about
what lies ahead.
The core benefit of the university experience is the opportunity to learn in a research active environment. In the School of
Arts and Humanities, learning and research are complimentary at all levels, from the first year of our undergraduate
programmes, to the support we provide for advanced level postgraduate study. Teaching staff in the four divisions of the
School of Arts and Humanities actively research in their specialisms, and many bring relevant professional experience to the
lecture and seminar room. This is complemented by extensive range of resources available through the University's
attractive Library, many of which are available online.
Your time at Stirling will fly by. In the Arts and Humanities we place a lot of emphasis on proactive learning by students.
Your lecturers, tutors and supervisors will encourage you to set a realistic pace for your studies. There are also lots of
interesting activities and excellent facilities for students at Stirling, not least superb sport provision. I would encourage you
to take the opportunity to widen your interests and skills through these opportunities. Being at university should be fun as
well as hard work at times. However, a word of caution, you need to keep a balance to ensure you dedicate enough time to
your studies. Find that balance quickly and make the most of your academic opportunities, as well as your chance to be
part of a wide and cosmopolitan community.
A word or two about feedback. Take every opportunity to receive feedback from staff and your peers on your work and
performance and reflect and use it to improve. This is key to developing during your time here. Staff are available to
students throughout the semester to discuss feedback deal with queries. We also look for feedback from you on how to
improve and develop. We take this very seriously and are constantly in a cycle of review and improvement. Please help us
to improve by giving feedback, we do listen and act on it where possible. Students are also actively involved in the School in
developing policy through class representatives and our School Officers.
Finally, if you need help - ask. We are all here to help. I look forward to meeting many of you, and I wish you all the very
best in your course of study.
Alison Green
Director of Learning and Teaching
INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
If you are in receipt of a Tier 4 Visa then it is essential that you comply with the UK immigration regulations during your
stay in the UK. Following your enrolment you would have been sent a message to your University email account which
details the University's formal points of contact during your studies and also your immigration responsibilities. In addition
to these, the School will also outline the required academic contact points for the successful completion of each module.
The School will report any concerns about your attendance and participation to the Enrolment and Records Team- for
example if you have failed to submit coursework or if you have missed required classes.
You should familiarise yourself with the agreed points of contact and your Tier 4 responsibilities (available at
http://www.aro.stir.ac.uk/reg-enrol/PointsofContact.php). You will be withdrawn from the University and reported to the
Home Office (UK Visas and Immigration) should you fail to comply with them.
The University expects that students will attend all classes. The University expects that all students engage fully with the
learning and teaching to be undertaken for each module studied, and with the programme of study or research for which
they are registered. Students are not permitted to be absent from their studies without the authorisation of the University.
The normal expectation is that students on a Tier 4 Visa will remain at the University for the duration of their studies,
including the dissertation period. If you wish to return home early or to conduct dissertation fieldwork away from the
University for a period of more than 14 days then you will need to get permission from the Programme Director and then
complete an 'Application to Apply for Fieldwork or to Return Home Early' form. See
http://www.aro.stir.ac.uk/reg-enrol/FieldworkortoReturnHomeEarly.php for further information.
If you plan to undertake a work placement during your studies then you should notify [email protected] You
should submit the name of the company where you will be based, their location and the start and end date of the
placement.
You should contact [email protected] should you have any questions regarding your Tier 4 Visa responsibilities
or other matters relating to your Tier 4 Visa.
INFORMATION ON EMPLOYABILITY AND CAREERS
Why you need work or volunteering experience
Getting into paid employment without relevant work experience can be very difficult, especially as more and more
students are entering the graduate labour market. Some people are fortunate in obtaining a part-time job or work
placement in the career area they are interested in. Although in many cases this is not possible, it is important to recognise
that all work experience is valuable.
Whatever way you gain experience, you'll be gaining and further developing transferable skills that employers are looking
for, as well as helping you decide what you would like (or not like to do) in the future. Adding this work experience to your
CV, in addition to your degree, will help you stand out from the crowd.
Work experience
Work experience enables you to gain the necessary experience often required for entry to future careers, such as
journalism, environmental work or social work. It gives you the opportunity to put your theoretical knowledge into
practice, and also lets you research and try out potential future career areas to confirm or reject your ideas. At the same
time you could be better off financially while increasing your awareness of workplace culture. It will also help you build a
network of contacts which could be useful in the future or with your dissertation or class projects.
Students are expected to be aware of their own study commitments and not to take employment that will adversely affect
their academic work. A maximum of 15 hours work in term time is strongly recommended.
Finding Work Experience in the UK:
Contact the Job Shop for local casual/part-time work and volunteering during semester or vacation:
www.stir.ac.uk/careers
Apply for summer internship programmes organised by big employers.
These are very competitive and require early application, usually by an online application form, some before Christmas.
For many employers, these placements are an extended interview to help them decide if they want to take you on after
graduation.
Organise your own work experience by contacting employers directly.
Send a CV and covering letter to organisations you are interested in and follow up with a phone call. Networking is another
way of finding local opportunities. Go to events where you are likely to meet people in the field of work you are interested
in and try and speak to them. Make sure you contact organisations a few months before you want to start work.
Consider contacting people about work shadowing
Make the most of any opportunity you can to shadow a professional working in a career area of interest to increase your
understanding and build up a useful network of contacts.
You may know someone who works in the field you are interested in. There is no harm in contacting them. Alternatively,
send your CV and a covering letter to organisations you would like to work for, and follow this up with a phone call.
Volunteering
Voluntary work enables you to gain an insight into a career area of interest in order to help you decide if it is definitely for
you. It can also help you gain specific practical experience that is required to get into a particular career area, e.g.
developing fieldwork skills for environmental jobs. Volunteering also helps develop transferable skills that may be useful in
a wide variety of career areas, e.g. organisational, team working, interpersonal and presentation skills.
There are a number of ways in which you can volunteer right here on campus that will look great on your CV, including:
Become a Student Ambassador - assisting students and their relatives/friends on campus during open days, applicant
days, visit afternoons and individual tours.
Become a Student Mentor - providing peer support for undergraduate students in their first year of study.
Volunteer as a Class Representative - represent your fellow students at meetings with academic staff.
Get involved in the Student's Union - including clubs and societies, student representation, committee membership,
coaching and the international student buddy scheme.
The Career Development Centre offers a full accredited Work Experience Module (PDM9AL) which allows you to gain at
least 30 hours of graduate-level work experience
http://www.stir.ac.uk/careers/modules/wemodules/
with a local charitable or voluntary organisation:
Useful Resources
Careers Information Room (Cottrell 3A1):
Holds a selection of reference books and files on vacation work, working overseas, taking a year out and volunteering. Also
available are leaflets on work experience and volunteering opportunities.
Get Advice:
If you would like to discuss work experience, or your career plans, you can drop in to the Career Development Centre
(Cottrell 3A1) and speak to a Career Development Adviser from Monday to Thursday between 11am and 3pm. You can also
make a longer guidance appointment by calling 01786 467070.
Career Development Centre Website links:
Work experience and volunteering:
http://www.stir.ac.uk/careers/students/work experience and volunteering/ Vacancies
& opportunities: http://stir.prospects.ac.uk/
Accredited work experience modules: http://www.stir.ac.uk/careers/modules/wemodules/
International students: http://www.stir.ac.uk/careers/students/international/working/
Pamela Crawford/Lesley Grayburn
Joint Heads of the Career Development Centre
INFORMATION ON STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES
There are two options for study abroad open to students in the School of Arts & Humanities.
1)
University Exchange Programme
For more information: http://www.stir.ac.uk/exchange/ When do
I apply? : autumn of second year/semester 3
When do I go on study abroad? : autumn and/or spring semester(s) of third year/semesters 5 and/or
6
2)
Erasmus Exchange Programme
For more information: http://www.stir.ac.uk/exchange/erasmus-exchanges/
When to apply? : depends on your degree programme, normally in semester 4
When do I go on study abroad? : autumn and/or spring semester(s) of third year/semesters 5 and/or
6 (though there may be options to go in semesters 4 or 7)
Interested students are encouraged to attend the Study Abroad Fair on Wednesday, 2 October 2013. More details will be
posted at http://www.stir.ac.uk/exchange/.
INFORMATION ON STUDENT OFFICER ROLE
Representation and Shaping Your Learning Experience
Being at University, you may think it is all just about studying, partying and hopefully passing the exams, but there are also
some great opportunities available to you to shape your degree. Within the School of Arts and Humanities students have
the opportunity to become Course Representatives and Student Officers for their modules and division. These roles make
sure that the student voice is part of all the decisions which affect your learning and improve your experience at Stirling.
Course Representatives
Course reps volunteer at the beginning of each semester to act as a voice for students on their module. Course Reps take
forward any issues or concerns students have about their modules to School staff as well as views and opinions on where
academic staff are doing really amazing things.
Course reps are offered professional training in their role and are supported by their division's School Officer. Reps attend
the Schools Student Staff Consultative Committee twice each semester to discuss developments with module staff and to
resolve any issues. This role is a great way to get involved in your degree and a brilliant way of getting to know the staff in
the school a little bit more. To become a rep, listen out for the role in your first few lectures and put yourself forward.
More info on the role can be found at www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/creps
School Officer
Each division has a School Officer for undergraduate and postgraduate students paired to a senior member of staff to look
at how students are experiencing their studies. This can be anything from student employability, assessment and feedback,
lecturing, modules, research and so on.
The officers help support course reps for each module and take forward any issues or commendations they have about
their courses. The Officers act as a liaison with the course reps for their division, providing them with training and support
on their roles and provide a connection to senior decision makers within the University. School Officers ensure that staff
know what students want and aim to continually improve the learning experience.
The current School Officer for the school of Arts and Humanities can be found below:
Shumela Ahmed
Hollie Cameron
Orsolya Keri
Paul Conlan
Communications Media & Culture
History and Politics
Literature and Languages
Philosophy and Law
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
If you are interested in more information about the role or if you are thinking of running for a post look out for the
recruitment emails in March next year. Remember that being at University is not just about sitting in the classroom and
reading in the library, it's an opportunity to be an active part of your learning and make decisions that can change how
your degree is delivered.
Role Description - School Officer School of Arts and Humanities
Open to any student entering second, third or fourth year or studying on a taught postgraduate programme.
Purpose
The role of School Officer exists to provide student representation and input within the academic schools and play a key
coordinating and support role within the course representative network.
Remuneration
The School Officer is an important one and can take up to 40 hours a semester to fulfil. However, the University
acknowledges that this is a substantial commitment and pays an honorarium of £150 per semester.
Duties
School Officers would be requires to complete the following in order to be awarded the honorarium per semester.
Monitoring of these duties and responsibilities would be the responsibility of the School and the Union to collate and
record.
Meetings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Attend initial Induction/Training meeting with the Union and School
Attend School Officer Training
Attend Fortnightly School Officer meetings with Union VP Education & Engagement
Attend Student Staff Consultative Committees (SSCC)
Attend School Divisional Committee Meetings as required
Attend specific School Learning and Teaching Committees
Attend a support appraisal at the start of semester 2
Responsibilities
• Report regularly to the School on the work of the School Officer team
• Work with the designated Learning and Teaching Officers within the School on learning, teaching and
student engagement
• Aid in the recruitment of Course Representatives
• Contribute to Course Representative training
• Coordinate regular meetings with Course Representatives
• Meet regularly with other School Officers in the School and across other School's
• Actively promote Union activities in Learning & Teaching (such as RATE Awards) within the School
• Promote mechanisms to improve Learning and Teaching (such as the National Student Survey)
Opportunities
• Attend and contribute to the University's Learning and Teaching Conference (EduFair) Benefits of Applying
What will you get out of being a School Officer?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Extensive training and development of essential transferable skills; including meeting skills, policy
development, negotiation, team working and communication skills.
Be part of a team that works closely together and has extensive support from the Union and the Schools
Be one of the first to find out what is going on in your School and Division.
Become familiar with senior University staff.
Help to makes things better for your fellow classmates and students in general.
Being part of the decision making processes of the Union and in particular helping to shape the policies on
academic issues
Candidates who are unsuccessful will get application and interview experience
If you are interested in more information about the role or if you are thinking of running for a post look out for the
recruitment emails in March next year. Remember that being at University is not just about sitting in the classroom and
reading in the library, it's an opportunity to be an active part of your learning and make decisions that can change how
your degree is delivered.
Person Specification
Criteria
Able to communicate with varied audiences on varied topics
Essential
x
Demonstrate good time keeping and organisational skills
x
Able to process information and present clear arguments
x
Show commitment to the role and to gaining a better understanding of current issues in
higher education
Good time management and organisational skills
x
The ability to use basic Microsoft Office Software (email, word)
x
Desirable
x
Able to coordinate groups of individuals
x
Able to collate information and provide both verbal and written updates
x
Application and Selection
There are four School Officers posts available, one per academic division at Undergraduate Level. These are
Communications Media & Culture, History & Politics, Literature & Languages, and Philosophy & Law. Applications will open
for Undergraduate Officers in March 2013 and for Postgraduate in September of each Academic Session. For more
information contact the Students Union on [email protected]
THE STUDENTS UNION
The Union is there to make your time as a student the very best it can be! The Union runs a whole host of campaigns and
activities each year to promote the student voice and get your views and opinions on the national stage, ensuring that any
decision which affects you will do so in a beneficial way. The Union supports the school in running the School Officer
Programme and collaborates with staff and students studying within the School to get the most out of their degree that
they can. For instance the Union facilitates a number of different student societies to run events and activities alongside
offering students skills and experiences to compliment their degrees. Over the last few years the Law Society and
Philosophy Society have each ran a number of seminars and Moot courts which students have not only thoroughly
enjoyed, but also gained some great experiences for their CVs. The Union is always looking for some enthusiastic students
to start up a new society and if you have an interest in the arts then get in touch with them to discuss further. The Union
also offer some great recreational activities through the Sports Union which supports over 40 different sports clubs as well
as having a bar and Starbucks Coffee shop on campus. For more info on the Students Union checkout their website at
www.stirlingstudentsunion.com
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