View the Strategic Plan Progress Report for School Year 2006

View the Strategic Plan Progress Report for School Year 2006
Strategic Plan Progress Report
School Year 2006-2007
(Second Year)
Gail McKinzie, Ph.D.
Superintendent
October, 2007
“The Mission of Polk County Public Schools is to ensure rigorous, relevant learning experiences that result in high
achievement for our students.”
Goal 1: Clear School/ District Mission
We will create a professional culture of articulation to accomplish our mission.
Objective 1: We will create a highly professional culture that will foster a tradition of pride and respect.
a) Utilize the district mission statement to create a common theme to be used by all shareholders.
Mean Response
Perceived Level of Staff Utilization and Knowledge of District Mission
Statement
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
3.1
January 2006
3.3
June 2006
3.5
January 2007
3.8
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff. Construct measured with four items
on a scale of one to four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of staff utilization and knowledge of district mission statement has increased slowly over time.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 1 of 101
Goal 1: Clear School/ District Mission
We will create a professional culture of articulation to accomplish our mission.
Objective 1: We will create a highly professional culture that will foster a tradition of pride and respect.
b) Communicate to employees that their individual contributions add to the entire district’s success or failure.
Response to Clear Mission on School Climate Surveys
Percent Responding Favorably
100
88.2 88.1 88.1
95.8 95.6 95.4
85.9
86.3
83.8
75
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
50
25
0
Teachers
Parents
Students
SOURCE: School Climate Survey administered to teachers, parents, and secondary students. Construct measured with four items on a scale of one to five with five being most favorable.
Target for 2007-08: Maintain at least an 85% favorable rating among teachers, parents and students.
Finding: Over the past three years the percent responding favorably to clear mission on the School Climate Survey for teachers has
remained the same but dropped slightly for parents. However, students have decreased by 2.1 percentage points.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 2 of 101
Goal 1: Clear School/ District Mission
We will create a professional culture of articulation to accomplish our mission.
Objective 2: Maintain a keen awareness of how traditions, customs, events, and calendars are impacted by the broad diversity
of a changing community.
a) Promote awareness of multi-cultural events and calendars.
Perceived Level of Staff Awareness of Multi-Cultural Events and
Calendars
Mean Response
3.8
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
2.5
January 2006
2.5
June 2006
2.7
January 2007
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff.
Construct measured with five items on a scale of one to four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of staff awareness of multi-cultural events and calendars has increased slightly over time.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 3 of 101
Goal 1: Clear School/ District Mission
We will create a professional culture of articulation to accomplish our mission.
Objective 2: Maintain a keen awareness of how traditions, customs, events, and calendars are impacted by the broad diversity
of a changing community.
a) Promote awareness of multi-cultural events and calendars.
Number of Multi-cultural Events with Students Impacted
Event Type
African American Awareness Events
2005-2006
Students
Count of Events
Impacted
75
24,929
2006-2007
Students
Count of Events
Impacted
126
6,210
Hispanic Events
89
14,790
71
7,350
Other Cultural Groups’ Events
282
60,281
59
28,148
Minority Parents’ Events
69
10,801
29
5,172
SOURCE: Office of Diversity Management Report. Schools/Departments Reporting in 2005-06 = 77; Schools/Departments Reporting in 2006-07 = 64.
Target for 2007-08: A 3% increase over 2005-06 baseline year.
Finding: The number of multi-cultural events and the number of students impacted for each year does not reflect all the schools in the
district. However, a new system of monthly reporting has been put in place to ensure a complete and thorough report of events
and number of students impacted.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
a) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
2004-05
Population *
2006-07
2005-06
Attendance
Absent 21+ days Count**
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Absent 21+ days Percent
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
6,412
5,703
5,533
14%
12%
12%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
2,350
2,111
2,287
13%
12%
12%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
2,071
2,093
2,267
15%
13%
13%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
2,378
2,250
2,284
21%
20%
20%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
8,729
7,979
8,178
12%
11%
11%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
593
711
783
13%
13%
12%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
10,514
9,518
9,679
14%
12%
12%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
3,755
2,663
2,974
9%
7%
8%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
7,352
7,566
7,488
18%
16%
15%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
5,836
5,449
5,451
14%
13%
12%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
5,271
4,780
5,011
13%
12%
12%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: *Population = Survey 2 and 3 match; therefore, students not present for both Survey 2 and 3 are not included. **Counts are unduplicated counts. ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not
Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: Over the past three years the number of White students in the district has decreased slightly, while the number of Blacks has
increased by 5% and the Hispanic students have increased significantly (32%). Also, the percent of students receiving
free/reduced lunch has increased significantly (21%). However, the percent of students absent 21+ days has decreased for all
sub-groups from the baseline year (2004-05).
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
a) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
Discipline: All Incidents
All Incidents Count *
2004-05** 2005-06**
2006-07
2004-05
Population
2005-06
2006-07
All Incidents Percent *
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
51,273
51,731
43,726
108%
110%
93%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
41,493
44,702
39,980
233%
247%
213%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
15,764
19,698
19,018
115%
125%
105%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
27,687
28,992
26,244
243%
255%
232%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
82,794
89,738
79,458
118%
123%
104%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
2,550
3,748
4,544
57%
68%
67%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
107,931
114,982
101,158
140%
146%
125%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
32,247
32,553
28,210
79%
90%
74%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
78,234
86,177
77,492
191%
180%
156%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
76,257
82,879
73,852
181%
190%
164%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
34,224
35,851
31,850
87%
88%
75%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Population = Survey 2 and 3 match, * Multiple incidents per student are reflected in the counts and percentages (e.g., a percentage of 200 would indicate 2 incidents per student). ** All
Incidents Count for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report. ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner;
F/R = Free/Reduced.
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: While the number of White students has decreased, Blacks and Hispanics have increased, and the percent of all incidents by subgroups has decreased from the baseline year; especially for Blacks and F/R lunch students (20 and 35 percentage points,
respectively).
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 6 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
a) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
Discipline: In-School Suspensions
In-school Suspensions Count *
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
Population
2005-06
2006-07
In-school Suspensions Count *
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
8,041
9,060
7,694
17%
19%
16%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
6,859
8,035
7,026
39%
44%
37%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
2,655
3,141
3,155
19%
20%
17%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
5,895
6,675
5,873
52%
59%
52%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
11,927
13,985
12,499
17%
19%
16%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
405
579
745
9%
10%
11%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
17,417
20,081
17,627
23%
25%
22%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
4,580
5,164
4,399
11%
14%
12%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
13,242
15,496
13,973
32%
32%
28%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
12,643
14,911
12,871
30%
34%
29%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
5,179
5,749
5,501
13%
14%
13%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Population = Survey 2 and 3 match, * Multiple incidents per student are reflected in the counts and percentages (e.g., a percentage of 200 would indicate 2 incidents per student). ESE n/L
= Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced.
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: The number of White students has decreased, Blacks and Hispanics have increased; and the percent of In-school Suspensions
has decreased from the baseline year for White, Black, Hispanic, Non ESE, Not ELL, F/R Lunch and Male sub-groups. ELL and
Non F/R lunch has increased slightly, and both ESE n/L and Female subgroups remained unchanged.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 7 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
a) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
Discipline: Alternative Placement
Alternative Placement Count *
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
Population
2005-06
2006-07
Alternative Placement Percent *
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
338
362
342
1%
1%
1%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
232
269
247
1%
1%
1%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
122
120
160
1%
1%
1%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
87
103
97
1%
1%
1%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
622
657
674
1%
1%
1%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
7
16
29
0.2%
0.3%
0.4%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
702
744
742
1%
1%
1%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
203
232
205
0%
1%
1%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
506
528
566
1%
1%
1%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
502
575
570
1%
1%
1%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
207
185
201
1%
0.5%
0.5%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Population = Survey 2 and 3 match, * Multiple incidents per student are reflected in the counts and percentages (e.g., a percentage of 200 would indicate 2 incidents per student) and
reflect only discipline actions, which are direct results of a referral. They do not include other alternative placements resulting from other causes, such as expulsions and DJJ.
ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced.
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: The number of White students has decreased, while the Blacks and Hispanics have increased, but the percent of alternative
placement by sub-group has remained almost unchanged from the baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 8 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
b) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
Population
Discipline: Out-of-School Suspensions (1 - 3 Days)
Out-of-school Suspensions
Out-of-school Suspensions
Count *
Percent *
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
8,820
8,611
8,409
19%
18%
18%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
8,197
8,601
8,558
46%
47%
46%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
2,877
3,554
3,800
21%
23%
21%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
5,282
5,493
5,623
46%
48%
50%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
14,958
15,751
15,702
21%
22%
21%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
446
743
925
10%
13%
14%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
19,794
25,501
20,400
26%
32%
25%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
4,998
5,500
5,341
12%
15%
14%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
15,242
15,744
15,984
37%
33%
32%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
14,604
15,319
15,481
35%
35%
34%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
5,636
5,925
5,844
14%
15%
14%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Population = Survey 2 and 3 match, * Multiple incidents per student are reflected in the counts and percentages (e.g., a percentage of 200 would indicate 2 incidents per student). ESE n/L
= Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced.
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: The number of White students has decreased, while the Blacks and Hispanics have increased, but the percent of Out-of-School
Suspensions (1 - 3 Days) for Black, Hispanic, Non ESE, and Female subgroups has remained unchanged from the baseline year,
while White, Not ELL, F/R Lunch and Male subgroups have decreased and ESE n/L ELL and Non F/R Lunch have increased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 9 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
a) Assess each school to determine systemic barriers for minority, challenged, and/or economically disadvantaged students.
Population
Discipline: Out-of-School Suspensions (4 - 10 Days)
Out-of-school Suspensions
Out-of-school Suspensions
Count *
Percent *
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
White
47,441
47,201
46,800
1,565
1,608
1,609
3%
3%
3%
Black
17,785
18,122
18,743
1,457
1,476
1,656
8%
8%
9%
Hispanic
13,713
15,710
18,086
605
692
839
4%
4%
5%
ESE n/L
11,377
11,384
11,306
431
534
605
4%
5%
5%
Non-ESE
70,324
72,966
76,255
3,242
3,310
3,599
5%
5%
5%
ELL
4,504
5,538
6,750
86
111
197
2%
2%
3%
Not ELL
77,197
78,812
80,811
3,587
3,733
4,007
5%
5%
5%
Non F/R Lunch
40,845
36,369
37,959
952
1,002
999
2%
3%
3%
F/R Lunch
40,856
47,981
49,602
2,721
2,842
3,205
7%
6%
6%
Male
42,242
43,507
45,131
2,509
2,686
2,886
6%
6%
6%
Female
39,459
40,843
42,430
1,164
1,158
1,318
3%
3%
3%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Population = Survey 2 and 3 match, * Multiple incidents per student are reflected in the counts and percentages (e.g., a percentage of 200 would indicate 2 incidents per student). ESE n/L
= Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced.
Target for 2007-08: The gap between subgroups in each category will be reduced to within 2%.
Finding: While the number of White students has decreased, Blacks and Hispanics have increased, but the percent of Out-of-School
Suspensions (4 - 10 Days) by sub-group has either remained unchanged or increased slightly.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 10 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
b) Develop and implement individual school’s Plan of Action to be included in the School Improvement Plan to eliminate
systemic barriers for all students.
School Year 2005-06:
• 130 Polk County Schools were required to complete a School Improvement Plan.
• 100% have written specific objectives or strategies to reduce the achievement gap by targeting subgroups that did not make
AYP, students scoring Level 1 and 2 on FCAT, or students scoring in the lowest 25% in reading in their school.
School Year 2006-07:
School Level
Elementary
Middle
Senior
Combination
Adult & Career Center
DJJ
Specialized (BEST/MWC/Teen Parent)
Charter
ESE
Alt. Ed. (BDOC/Don Woods
Total*
Number of SIPs
2006-07
62
19
14
6
4
7
4
6
5
2
125
Schools Incorporating Strategies to
Eliminate Systemic Barriers
62
19
14
6
4
7
4
6
5
2
125
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation.
Note: *There were five less SIPs submitted in 06-07 than 05-06 due to closing of four schools/programs: Live Oak Academy, Central Florida Marine Institute, Apple, Haines City
Literacy Learning Academy. Daniel Jenkins Senior, students are accounted for in other senior high FTE counts. Anna Woodbury and Lewis Elementary schools were combined into a
single SIP for 06-07 and Lake Marion Creek Elementary was a new school in 06-07.
Target for 2007-08: At least 75% of the approved School Improvement Plans will contain action steps to eliminate systemic
barriers for all students.
Finding: The schools are incorporating strategies in their School Improvement Plans to help eliminate systemic barriers for all students.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 11 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
c) Develop and implement a Transition Plan to successfully progress students between elementary, middle, and high school.
2005-06
Elementary School to Middle School
• To assist in transition to middle school, fifth grade students visited middle schools during the 2005-06 school year.
• Parent nights were held at middle schools for incoming sixth graders.
• The Senior Director of Middle Schools addressed transitioning to middle school with elementary principals during the 2005-06
school year.
• At some schools, incoming 5th grade students are assigned a 6th grade student “pen pals”, 5th grade students shadow 6th
graders, and articulation meetings are held among administrators and teachers to discuss curriculum continuity from
elementary to middle school.
• A survey was administered to elementary and high school principals to capture data on current transitional practices between
elementary/middle schools and middle/high schools. Data was shared with Sr. Directors at all levels to aid in the planning of
future transition plans.
• Middle schools invite elementary students to attend extra curricular activities and to visit the school sites. Elementary parents
are also invited to attend middle school parent events.
SOURCE: Senior Director Report
2006-07
Elementary School to Middle School
• To assist in transition to middle school, fifth grade students visited middle schools during the 2006-07 school year.
• Parent nights were held at middle schools for incoming sixth graders.
• At some schools, incoming 5th grade students were assigned a 6th grade student “pen pals”, 5th grade students shadowed 6th
graders.
• Articulation meetings were held among administrators and teachers to discuss curriculum continuity from elementary to
middle school.
• Middle schools invited elementary students to attend extra curricular activities and to visit the school sites. Elementary
parents were also invited to attend middle school parent events.
SOURCE: Senior Director Report
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 12 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 1: Detect and eliminate any systemic barriers to minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged students
reaching their academic and personal goals.
c) Develop and implement a Transition Plan to successfully progress students between elementary, middle, and high school.
2005-06
Middle School to High School
• All high schools conducted meetings with their respective feeder pattern middle schools to discuss and disseminate
information relative to scheduling eighth grade students for their ninth grade year.
• College Board Vertical Team Training was conducted by College Board personnel in the areas of math and Language Arts
for several high schools (George Jenkins, Kathleen, Mulberry, Haines City, Ridge Community, Daniel Jenkins and
Auburndale) and their identified feeder middle schools. The training was to initiate articulation efforts in these disciplines
between the high schools and their feeder middle schools to ensure the early identification of potential Advanced Placement
students and to establish a dialogue between the schools relative to expectations, policies and procedures for the AP
program.
• Several high schools have implemented 9th Grade or Freshman Academies as a means of further addressing the unique
needs of their incoming 9th grade students.
• Learning Communities have been established within high schools. These may be in the form of departments, interdisciplinary
or planning period teams, or a combination of these. Topics discussed range from cross-curricular concerns and expectations
to a focused implementation of a specific school improvement strategy or initiative.
• Vertical team meetings to address curriculum and instructional issues between both middle and high school have begun
among some high schools and their feeder schools.
• Articulation meetings were held with K-8 fine arts schools and Harrison School for the Arts. Harrison’s principal discusses
auditions and admissions procedures during visits to all middle schools.
• High school music departments met with prospective students in the 8th grade regarding continued music instruction at their
high school.
2006-07
• Prior to the Winter Break, high school guidance counselors met with 8th grade students in feeder schools. Some high schools
arranged for the 8th graders to visit the high school campus.
• Weekly meetings of teams and curriculum departments were held to discuss curriculum, behavior issues, teacher concerns,
etc. and their findings were brought to the APC and Principal and issues addressed and actions taken accordingly.
• Funding was provided for the high schools to cover subs for 6 teachers for 2 days to teach 8th graders (incoming 9th graders)
2- reading, 2- math, and 2- science teachers.
• 8th grade reading and math teachers moved to 7th grade classes
• 7th grade reading and math teachers moved to 6th grade classes
SOURCE: Senior Director Report
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 13 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 2: Increase student use of effective interpersonal and decision-making skills.
a) Implement an effective curriculum/program/plan for social skills, problem solving, conflict resolution, character education,
and goal setting of students in all grade levels.
Mean Response
Perceived Level of Student Opportunity and School Utilization of
Interpersonal and Decision-Making Curricula/Programs/Plans
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
3.4
January 2006
3.8
3.3
June 2006
3.3
January 2007
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff. Construct measured with
five items on a scale of one to four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of student opportunity and school utilization of interpersonal and decision-making curricula/programs/plans
has remained unchanged for the last two years.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 14 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 2: Increase student use of effective interpersonal and decision-making skills.
a) Implement an effective curriculum/program/plan for social skills, problem solving, conflict resolution, character education,
and goal setting of students in all grade levels.
2005-06
• Student services department has developed and implemented a variety of training programs to assist teachers in promoting
the use of social skills, problem solving, behavior management, etc. in the classroom.
• In addition to school-based training, county-wide social skills workshops were delivered to more than 100 teachers and
administrators during the 2005-06 school year.
• Bullying Prevention (online Black Board course) and Crisis Intervention courses were also developed for roll out during the
2006-07 school year.
SOURCE: Student Services Department
2006-07
• Student Services staff continued training efforts across the district in the areas of behavior management, the use of social
skills, and problem solving for school personnel.
• Approximately 150 teachers (predominantly new teachers) attended social skills training in September, 2006.
• The DOE approved, Keys to Character Curriculum Guide was updated monthly and distributed via e-mail to all staff and
school based personnel.
• The district’s health, substance abuse, and violence prevention curriculum addresses conflict resolution, problem solving and
social skills was implemented in grades K-9.
• Peer mediation training was offered to all schools. Approximately 19 schools participated in the trainer of trainer model.
• “Too Good For Violence,” an evidenced-based, conflict resolution/violence prevention curriculum (9 lessons) was
implemented in ten schools.
SOURCE: Student Services Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 15 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 3: Provide opportunity and support for all students to reach their full academic potential.
a) Develop a rigorous and relevant curriculum that will challenge students at all academic levels.
2005-06
• In Florida public schools, the curriculum is comprised of the Sunshine State Standards. Through the work of Robert Marzano
(2003) and the meta-analysis conducted by the Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) Lab, those
Standards would take a minimum of 21 years to teach effectively. In that regard, Florida is in the process of narrowing the
curriculum, but Polk County educators determined that the multi-year process undertaken by the state will not serve
immediate instructional needs. Therefore, starting in the spring of 2006, over 200 Polk teachers have been engaged in
developing Curriculum Maps.
• Through the mapping process, educators have prioritized the curriculum by determining which standards are taught on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), as well as which standards are critically important for students to master.
• If a standard did not fit in either of these two categories, it was determined to be ranked third in importance, and optional for
teachers to teach.
• Polk’s Curriculum Maps are posted on the district’s web-site, and sample lesson plans are being added periodically to assist
teachers in sharing and accessing “best practices” lessons for their students.
• Throughout the 2006-2007 school year, Curriculum Maps will be field tested to determine if the time allocated to each
Standard is adequate or if adjustments are needed. Those modifications will be done during the summer of 2007.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Learning Division
2006-07
• Teachers continued the development and refinement of the Curriculum Maps.
• Polk’s Curriculum Maps were posted on the district’s web-site, and sample lesson plans were added to assist teachers in
sharing and accessing “best practices” lessons for students.
• Curriculum Maps were implemented and time allocations to each Standard adjusted as needed.
• Kaplan Planning Guide and on-going assessments were implemented in pilot schools as an instructional and monitoring
device to assist optimal learning for students.
• Learning Focused Strategies were implemented during 2006-07 school year in Title I Corrective Action Schools.
• Professional development in Learning Focused Strategies was provided for the instructional staff at those schools.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Learning Division
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 16 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 3: Provide opportunity and support for all students to reach their full academic potential.
b) Provide training in successful differentiated instructional strategies to support student learning.
2005-06
• In 2005-06, the 24 Title I schools identified for Corrective Action planned intensive professional development in Learning
Focused Solutions (Dr. Max Thompson). Learning Focused Solutions provides a model for school improvement and
professional development in research-based successful strategies. The professional development is for classroom teachers,
resource teachers, and school administrators.
• Title I schools identified as being “in need of improvement” are required by federal law to expend a minimum of ten percent of
their Title I allocation for professional development to address areas in which their students are not making Adequate Yearly
Progress. This professional development varies by school and can be for reading, math, or writing.
• The behavioral requirements of differentiated instruction are often an obstacle to effective implementation. Student Services
has developed, in conjunction with the Reading First Reading Coaches, training for teachers that targets the skills necessary
for students to successfully access learning centers while their teacher provides differentiated instruction to other groups.
• Successful implementation of differentiated instruction also requires that teachers identify the specific skill deficits and
requirements of each child. Student services personnel are continuously assisting teachers identify the skill deficits of their at
risk students.
• One “D” school piloted the School Turnaround Program successfully, improving their School Grade to an “A”. School
Turnaround will be considered for Title I Corrective Action schools for the 2006-07 school year.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Title I Office and Office of Student Services
2006-07
• In 2006-07, the 24 Title I schools identified for Corrective Action participated in intensive professional development in
Learning Focused Solutions (Dr. Max Thompson).
• Title I schools identified as being “in need of improvement” were required by federal law to expend a minimum of ten percent
of their Title I allocation for professional development to address areas in which their students did not make Adequate Yearly
Progress. This professional development varied by school for reading, math, and/or writing.
• Fourteen Title I schools participated in the School Turnaround Program. Thirteen were first year schools and one was a
second year school. Most schools made significant progress with the goals set for the program.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Title I Office and Instructional Services
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 3: Provide opportunity and support for all students to reach their full academic potential.
c) Implement differentiated instructional strategies in the classroom.
2005-06
• In the baseline year of 2005-06, when asked to rate the use of differentiated instructional strategies in the classrooms of the
schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 70.4% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four
with four being most favorable.
2006-07
• When asked to rate the use of differentiated instructional strategies in the classrooms of the schools they supervise during
the 2006-07 school year, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 88.0% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four
with four being most favorable.
Target for 2007-08; At least a 95% favorable rating regarding differentiated instruction implementation.
Finding: Differentiated instructional strategies in the classrooms as rated by Senior Directors on the Classroom Walk-Through instrument
has increased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 4: Increase student participation and success in career and technical education.
a) Assess and inform students regarding career and educational opportunities.
Perceived Level of Student Opportunity and School Utilization of Career
Exploration, Assessment, Planning and Preparation
Mean Response
3.8
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
2.9
January 2006
2.7
June 2006
2.9
January 2007
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff. Construct measured with
four items on a scale of one to four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of student opportunity and school utilization of career exploration, assessment, planning and preparation has
returned to the prior year level.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 19 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 4: Increase student participation and success in career and technical education.
b) Assist in planning and preparing for career/educational goals.
2004-05 Enrolled
Count
Percent
Career/Technical Course Enrollment and Pass Rates*
Passed
2005-06 Enrolled
Passed
2006-07 Enrolled
Percent
Count
Percent
Percent
Count
Percent
Passed
Percent
White
9,848
61%
93%
9,845
59%
93%
9,273
55%
94%
Black
3,262
53%
90%
3,503
54%
92%
3,304
48%
91%
Hispanic
1,918
49%
88%
2,255
49%
91%
2,468
46%
91%
ESE n/L
1,855
38%
87%
2,013
40%
88%
1,858
36%
87%
Non-ESE
13,520
61%
93%
13,995
59%
93%
13,625
55%
94%
342
43%
84%
424
42%
88%
494
38%
89%
Not ELL
15,033
57%
92%
15,584
57%
93%
14,989
52%
93%
Non F/R Lunch
10,043
60%
94%
9,690
58%
94%
9,006
54%
95%
F/R Lunch
5,332
52%
88%
6,318
53%
90%
6,477
49%
90%
Male
7,651
54%
91%
8,038
54%
91%
7,701
50%
92%
Female
7,724
60%
94%
7,970
58%
94%
7,782
54%
94%
ELL
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Counts are per course. Students in more than one course are counted multiple times. ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
* All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08; At least a 90% passing rating for all subgroups.
Finding: The percent of students enrolled in career/technical courses has decreased for all sub-groups from the baseline year. In 2006-07,
the State removed the graduation requirement for a practical arts course. However, the percent passed has increased very slightly
or remained unchanged.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 4: Increase student participation and success in career and technical education.
b) Assist in planning and preparing for career/educational goals.
2006-07
Industrial and Technology Education
• Began the process of updating and standardizing all Polk County Drafting and Illustrative Design programs by purchasing
Autodesk Design Academy and new Gateway servers
• Developed an Engineering Academy at Ridge Community High School and a Graphic communications/Marketing Academy at
Lake Region High School with AIM grants
• Opened new middle school Technology Education course at Davenport School of the Arts
• Developed new Technology Education course for the 2007-2008 school year at Mulberry Middle School
• Developed new Automotive Technology Academy at Mulberry High School for the 2007-2008 school year
• Received a CHOICE Grant to implement a construction academy at Kathleen High School for the 2007-2008 school year
• Received a Workforce Innovation Matchmaker Grant to implement a construction academy at Frostproof Middle Senior for the
2007-2008 school year
• 140 Students from 14 middle schools and high schools participated in the annual Florida Technology Student Association (TSA)
State Conference and Competition
• At the 2007 Florida Technology Student Association (TSA) State Conference and Competition, Polk County TSA chapters
placed 1st in 23 events, 2nd in 16 events, and 3rd in 7 events
• The 2007-2008 Florida TSA State Vice President and State Treasurer are from Polk County
• 60 students from 11 middle schools and high schools participated in the annual National Technology Student Association (TSA)
Conference and Competition in Nashville, Tennessee
• At the 2007 National Technology Student Association (TSA) Conference and Competition, Polk County TSA chapters placed 1st
in 3 events, 2nd in 4 events, and were finalists in 14 events
• The 2007-2008 SkillsUSA Region 3 Vice President is from Polk County
Family and Consumer Science
• Plan for new culinary facility at Traviss Career Center to open in January
• Created a Academy of Arts, Design, and Technology at Lakeland High School which includes the Fashion Design program
through a Succeed Grant
• Developed a Early Childhood Education Academy, Academy of Children’s and Educational Studies (ACES) at Haines City High
School through an AIM Grant
• Haines City High School opened the doors to its new Happy Hornet Early Childhood Academy to recruit teachers to the Haines
City area.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
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Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 4: Increase student participation and success in career and technical education.
b) Assist in planning and preparing for career/educational goals.
Family and Consumer Science (Continued)
• George Jenkins High School Early Childhood Program implemented a $25,000 Choice Grant in which a program was developed
with Polk Community College that will eventually offer graduates 12 credits upon graduation.
• Polk County Family Career and Community Leaders of America had 35 state winners.
• Polk County Family Career and Community Leaders of America had 9 students attend the National Leadership Conference, 8
received a gold medal and 1 attended as a Florida State Vice President.
• George Jenkins High School Culinary Students participated in 3 events: Waiter’s Relay, 3rd place, 3 students, 1
alternate; Gourmet Meal, 7th place, 4 students; and the Knowledge Bowl, 4 students at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging
Association Educational Foundation ProStart Culinary Competition.
• Seven teachers attended the FRLA Education Foundation ProStart training at Johnson and Wales University in Miami in June
2007.
• District V State Vice President of FCCLA from Polk County
Health Science Education
• Implemented CHOICE grant at three of five chosen high schools to begin development of Medical Academies: Auburndale High
School, Bartow High School, and George Jenkins High School
• Hired a new Senior Coordinator for the Health Science Education students through a Department of Labor grant in partnership
with Polk Community College
• Increased programs at Auburndale High School and Lake Gibson High School one unit by the end of year
• Planned for new programs at Lake Region High School and Winter Haven High School opened August 2007
• Polk County HOSA students held the first annual HOSA Rally with 60 in attendance.
• Over one hundred Polk County HOSA students participated in the Regional competitions
• Over fifty Polk County HOSA students participated in the State Leadership Conference
• Thirty Polk County HOSA students attended the National Leadership conference with two first place and one third place awards
received.
Business, Marketing and Diversified Education
• Developing Curriculum Maps for each of the Programs
• Held professional development training over the summer for the Business teachers to become MOS and IC3 certified-This
means that the teachers have qualified to certify their students for Industry Certification in these areas.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 22 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 4: Increase student participation and success in career and technical education.
b) Assist in planning and preparing for career/educational goals.
Business, Marketing and Diversified Education (Continued)
• Developed the Polk Academy of Business and Technology (Lake Gibson Senior High)-This is the only Academy that offers CTE
honors courses-Pursuing National Accreditation- Member of the National Career Academy Coalition
• Developed the Academy of Legal Studies (George Jenkins High School)-Pursuing National Accreditation-Member of the National
Career Academy Coalition
• Offers the Academy of Finance (Lake Gibson Senior High) Member of the National Academy of Finance
• Offers the Imagination Inc. Academy (Lake Region High) Member of the National Career Academy Coalition
• Two of our students placed in the National FBLA competition
• Academy of Legal Studies was chosen for the SUCCEED Florida Career Paths Planning Grant
• We have been working on Programs of Study that has articulated credit for each program area
Agriscience, Natural Resources and Public Service Education
• Criminal Justice Academy was implemented at Kathleen Sr. High School using SUCCEED, Perkins AIM grants, and budgeted
funds.
• Partnership was formed with Lakeland Electric to develop and implement a Power Academy at Tenoroc High School.
• Partnership was formed with Division of Environmental Protection for joint use of the Homeland Farm Property.
• Dialog began to establish an Agricultural and Food Science Academy at Tenoroc High School.
• Three high schools jointly submitted and received grant funding from USDA for 07-08 to implement industry certification, teacher
recruitment, and agri-science research projects.
• Students exhibiting projects in the Polk County Youth Fair received $432,084.86 in premiums and sales.
• Over 5500 fourth graders participated in the Agrifest – a joint effort between PCSB and Polk County Farm Bureau.
Tech Prep Accomplishments
• Increased number of Articulation Agreements for all program areas with Polk Community College, Hillsborough Community
College and South Florida Community College
• Changes in reporting procedures have provided the opportunity to track students in Tech Prep Programs. Therefore, the number
of students enrolled in Tech Prep Programs increased overall.
• Professional Development was co-facilitated during the summer in the areas of Curriculum Mapping and End of Year Exams
• Plans to expand the use of Distance Learning in Career and Technical Program courses
• Developmental stages - Creating Marketing materials for all CTE programs
SOURCE: Office of Workforce Education
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 23 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 5: Implement a balanced reading program at every grade level in every school.
a) Provide training and facilitate incorporation of the K-12 Reading Program.
2005-06
• In Florida public schools, the curriculum is comprised of the Sunshine State Standards. Through the work of Robert Marzano
(2003) and the meta-analysis conducted by the Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) Lab, those
Standards would take a minimum of 21 years to teach effectively. In that regard, Florida is in the process of narrowing the
curriculum, but Polk County educators determined that the multi-year process undertaken by the state will not serve
immediate instructional needs. Therefore, starting in the spring of 2006, over 200 Polk teachers have been engaged in
developing Curriculum Maps.
• Through the mapping process, educators have prioritized the curriculum by determining which standards are taught on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), as well as which standards are critically important for students to master.
• If a standard did not fit in either of these two categories, it was determined to be ranked third in importance, and optional for
teachers to teach.
• Curriculum Maps are posted on the district’s web-site, and sample lesson plans are being added periodically to assist
teachers in sharing and accessing “best practices” lessons for their students.
• Throughout the 2006-2007 school year, Curriculum Maps will be field tested to determine if the time allocated to each
Standard is adequate or if adjustments are needed. Those modifications will be done in the summer of 2007.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s K-12 Reading Department.
2006-07
• Through the explicit and systematic work of many teachers the Reading curriculum maps were easily accessible for use by all
teachers of reading. Grade specific maps are currently posted on the district’s website under “Quick Links”. The maps
contain built in recommended time lines for purposeful, explicit, systematic instruction related to the assessed (FCAT)
Sunshine State Standards.
• Many modifications to the maps and the timelines were made based on teacher feedback.
• Components of the curriculum maps were identified in a user friendly curriculum map Overview. Components include: Key
Learning(s), Unit Essential Question(s), Optional Instructional Tools, Concepts, Lesson Essential Questions, and Vocabulary.
• Attachment documents were provided to assist the teachers as content is being taught.
• To ensure that individual teachers had the level of intensity needed for professional growth, based on student achievement
data; professional development activities were individualized.
• The district’s professional development schedule was accessible to teachers on the K-12 Reading website. The focus is on
explicit and systematic reading instruction grounded in the principles of scientifically-based reading research (SBRR).
• All research-based activities were aligned with the Florida Formula for Success.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s K-12 Reading Department.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 24 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 5: Implement a balanced reading program at every grade level in every school.
b) Provide appropriate assessment, placement and reading instruction for students.
2005-06
• Screening, progress monitoring and outcome instruments are being administered and data reported through several tracking
mechanisms.
• Students’ progress is monitored three/four times each year and through data analysis efforts instructional decisions are made
for individual students and groups of students.
• Through progress monitoring efforts the teacher is informed about the students’ progress in learning to read at grade level
throughout the school year. Reports provide specific data showing how students are doing school wide and district wide.
• Data elements also show how students in the district are doing in comparison to the set benchmark for achieving grade-level
reading and addressing gaps in achievement.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s K-12 Reading Department.
2006-07
• The district tracked screening, progress monitoring and outcome measures data through the Progress Monitoring &
Reporting Network, Kaplan, Odyssey and the Student Automated Data Base.
• Progress monitoring of student achievement continued to take place three/four times each year. The data was used to adjust
instruction for whole group and/or small group instruction to meet the individual needs of all students.
• Whole group reading instruction was presented to students at grade level; but small group instruction was differentiated.
• Immediate intensive intervention (iii) was provided to students as determined by progress monitoring and other forms of
assessment.
• Students had access to leveled reading text.
• Content area teachers incorporated the use of instructional strategies that focused on vocabulary and comprehension skills.
• Classroom libraries included an assortment of non-fiction leveled text.
• Tutoring and mentoring activities were linked to reading instruction in the classroom.
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s K-12 Reading Department.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 25 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 6: Enhance the effectiveness of Alternative Education.
a) Identify and secure funding to provide salaries and incentives to attract and retain highly qualified staff, to encourage new
approaches, and to evaluate programs in meeting the needs of students.
Highly Qualified Instructional Personnel at Alternative Education Schools
Applicable Courses
Applicable Courses with Highly Qualified Staff
Percent
2004-05
729
342
46.9%
2005-06*
700
566
80.9%
2006-07*
1,065
893
83.8%
SOURCE: Report Human Resources Department
NOTES: *Excludes Bill Duncan and Don Woods Centers.
Target for 2007-08; Increase the percent of highly qualified staff at alternative education schools to at least 85%.
Finding: The number of applicable courses as well as the number of applicable courses with highly qualified staff has increased significantly
from the baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 26 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 6: Enhance the effectiveness of Alternative Education.
a) Identify and secure funding to provide salaries and incentives to attract and retain highly qualified staff, to encourage new
approaches, and to evaluate programs in meeting the needs of students.
Mean Response
Perceived Level of Student Opportunity and School Utilization of New
and Innovative Approaches to Alternative Education
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
3.0
January 2006
3.0
June 2006
3.0
January 2007
3.2
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff. Construct
measured with four items on a scale of one to four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of student opportunity and school utilization of new and innovative approaches to alternative education has
remained unchanged over time.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 27 of 101
Goal 2: Opportunity to Learn
We will ensure students realize their highest potential.
Objective 7: Implement a bell/transportation schedule for schools that is consistent with optimum student performance research
concerning daily beginning and ending times for students.
a) Develop, implement, and evaluate a research-based bell/transportation schedule for optimum student performance.
2005-06
• After evaluating research-based bell/transportation schedules for optimum student performance, it was determined to be cost
prohibitive under current conditions.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Learning Division.
2006-07
• This objective was not addressed in 2006-07 because of cost.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Learning Division.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 28 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 1: Drive the teaching/learning process based on the goals, objectives, strategies, and evaluations in the School
Improvement Plans.
a) Develop and approve School Improvement Plans according to DOE template and guidelines.
2005-06
• The 2005-06 school year is the baseline year.
• All “F”, “D” and Title I Schools In Need of Improvement (SINI) have incorporated the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) in
their School Improvement Plans.
• While schools are at different levels of implementation, they have all been trained either by the DOE or Mary Barksdale on
the CIM process and are customizing the model to meet the needs of their school.
• School Improvement plans for Non Title I and non “F” schools were approved by the board on July 26, 2005.
• School Improvement Plans for Schools in Need of Improvement were approved by the board on November 8, 2005.
• To improve the quality of School Improvement Plans, a peer review process was developed and implemented in September
2005. It provided feedback to schools regarding each component of their plan as well as training to evaluate plans.
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation.
2006-07
• “D” schools used the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) with the exception of Ridge Community Senior High and Lake
Wales Senior High (Charter School). Ridge Community Senior re-structured the school into four-small learning communities
based upon the benefits supported by research in “An Overview of Smaller Learning Communities in High Schools”,
conducted by the U.S. Department of Education in 2001 which shows that high school students are more successful when
they attend small schools.
• All Title I SINI schools incorporated the Continuous Improvement Model in their School Improvement Plan.
• Every school that used the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) received professional development for the implementation
of CIM.
• The greatest number of School Improvement Plans was approved by the Board of Education on 10/24/06. DJJ and other
specialized programs were approved on 11/21/06.
• A peer review process was used to check each school’s School Improvement Plan and suggestions were offered to make the
plan more complete and efficient.
SOURCE: SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 29 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 1: Drive the teaching/learning process based on the goals, objectives, strategies, and evaluations in the School
Improvement Plans.
b) Use of School Improvement Plans to drive teaching/learning.
2005-06
• In the baseline year of 2005-06, when asked to rate the incorporation of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) in the
School Improvement Plans of the schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded
with a 45.5% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four
with four being most favorable.
2006-07
•
In 2006-07, when asked to rate the incorporation of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) in the School Improvement
Plans of the schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with an 84.1% favorable
rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four
with four being most favorable.
Target for 2007-08; At least a 90% of the schools will receive a favorable rating regarding CIM implementation.
Finding: Incorporation of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) in the School Improvement Plans as rated by Senior Directors on the
Classroom Walk-Through instrument has increased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 30 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 2: Align curriculum that reflects the knowledge and skills students are expected to master at each level, K through 12,
based on Sunshine State Standards.
a) Review, revise, and align a rigorous and relevant curriculum based upon Sunshine State Standards.
2005-06
• A meta-analysis conducted by the Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) Lab revealed that a
guaranteed and viable curriculum ranked first in terms of having the most impact on student achievement.
• Five action steps were recommended to assist school districts in their quest to provide this most critical of assurances for a
quality education.
ƒ Identify and communicate the content considered essential for all students versus that considered supplemental.
ƒ Ensure that the essential content can be addressed in the amount of time available for instruction.
ƒ Sequence and organize the essential contend in such a way that students have ample opportunity to learn it.
ƒ Ensure that teachers address the essential content.
ƒ Protect the instructional time that is available.
• In the spring of 2006, over 200 Polk teachers were engaged in developing Curriculum Maps. These Maps provide a scope
and sequence for the curriculum.
• The revise curriculum will focus the energies of Polk’s teachers into teaching the most important standards in a prioritized
fashion, resulting in a less-fragmented, better defined curriculum.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Learning Division.
2006-07
ƒ Teachers continued the development and refinement of the Curriculum Maps.
• The revised curriculum maps and timelines focused the energies of Polk’s teachers into teaching the most important
standards in a prioritized fashion, resulting in a less-fragmented, better defined curriculum.
• Learning Focused Strategies were implemented during 2006-07 school year in Title I Corrective Action Schools.
• Professional development in Learning Focused Strategies was provided for the instructional staff at those schools.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Learning Division.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 31 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 2: Align curriculum that reflects the knowledge and skills students are expected to master at each level, K through 12,
based on Sunshine State Standards.
b) Monitor and evaluate curriculum based on disaggregated student data.
Group
Students Scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher
% Proficient Reading
% Proficient Math
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
55
58
60
60
61
64
Black
30
33
36
31
33
38
Hispanic
35
38
39
38
40
45
ESE n/L
15
15
16
18
17
19
Non-ESE
52
55
56
56
56
60
ELL
24
20
23
27
23
29
Not ELL
48
50
51
52
53
55
F/R Lunch
39
42
43
40
42
46
Non F/R
57
58
63
64
63
68
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
Target for 2007-08: The gap between the achievement level 3 or higher will decrease by 3 percentage points in each subgroup
over 2004-05 baseline year.
Finding: The percent of proficient students (scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher) for reading has increased steadily for all subgroups; except English Language Learners (ELL). For math, the percent has increased steadily for all sub-groups.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 32 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 2: Align curriculum that reflects the knowledge and skills students are expected to master at each level, K through 12,
based on Sunshine State Standards.
b) Monitor and evaluate curriculum based on disaggregated student data.
2005-06
Utilizing disaggregated student data:
• School Improvement Plans and Charter Accountability Plans were developed with action plans targeting lowest performing
AYP subgroups.
• self-evaluations and reports of progress towards achievement goals among subgroups were produced.
• instructional decisions/changes to address specific subgroups have been made.
• curriculum decisions/modifications have been made.
• the inclusion model was implemented in schools to ensure exposure to standard curriculum for FCAT tested ESE students.
o In 2005-06, 59 schools used inclusive practices.
ƒ 39 elementary, 12 middle, 8 high
• middle school principals and assistant principals participated during their monthly meetings in data desegregation sessions in
the area of reading, writing, and mathematics.
• some of the Title I schools used FCAT Test Maker and Test Tool to monitor the mastery of reading and math benchmarks.
SOURCE: Sr. Directors and Directors Reports
2006-07
Utilizing disaggregated student data:
• School Improvement Plans and Charter Accountability Plans were reviewed/revised/developed with action plans targeting
lowest performing AYP subgroups.
• Progress monitoring towards achievement goals among subgroups was conducted.
• The inclusion model continued to be implemented in schools to ensure exposure to standard curriculum for FCAT tested ESE
students.
o In 2006-07, 70 schools used inclusive practices
ƒ 46 elementary, 13 middle, 1 middle-senior, 10 high
• Teachers in Title I schools were trained to analyze test results to focus instruction on student needs in reading and math,
particularly for subgroups scoring below the proficiency level on FCAT.
SOURCE: Sr. Directors and Directors Reports
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 33 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 2: Align curriculum that reflects the knowledge and skills students are expected to master at each level, K through 12,
based on Sunshine State Standards.
b) Monitor and evaluate curriculum based on disaggregated student data.
ESE
The number of students with disabilities ages 6-21 in regular class, resource room, separate class, and other separate environment,
divided by the total number of students with disabilities ages 6-21 reported in December (survey 9) for 2004-05 and 2005-06 and
October (survey 2) for 2006-07. Regular class includes students who spend 80 percent or more of their school week with non-disabled
peers. Resource room includes students spending between 40 and 80 percent of their school week with non-disabled peers. Separate
class includes students spending less than 40 percent of their week with non-disabled peers. Other separate environment includes
students served in public or private separate schools, residential placements or hospital/homebound placements.
Polk
State
Polk
State
2004-05
1%
49%
2004-05
97%
27%
EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
Regular Class
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
50%
57%
1%
55%
58%
21%
Separate Class
2005-06
31%
22%
2006-07
25%
22%
Resource Room
2005-06
18%
19%
2006-07
18%
18%
Other Separate Environment
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
<1%
<1%
0%
3%
3%
2%
Source: Florida Department of Education 2007 LEA Profile
Target for 2007-08: percentage of integration that is associated with greater integration than state percentages.
Finding: Exceptional student education (ESE) has been integrated into regular classes and resource rooms while the percentage of ESE
students has dropped dramatically in separate classes and environments.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 34 of 101
Goal 3: High Expectations
We will ensure that our instruction and curriculum meet the educational needs of each student.
Objective 3: Establish a formalized inter- and intra-school process of articulation.
a) Schedule and conduct formalized inter- and intra-school meetings and discussions.
2005-06
Inter-school meetings and discussions included:
• Grade level meetings
• Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) meetings
• Vertical teaming
• Faculty meetings
• Various Trainings
Intra-school meetings and discussions included:
• Monthly charter school director’s meetings
• Middle school principals and assistant principals met monthly to discuss curriculum and instruction issues.
• Vertical team data studies
SOURCE: Sr. Directors and Directors Reports
2006-07
Inter-school meetings and discussions continued to include:
• Grade level meetings
• Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) meetings
• Vertical teaming
• Faculty meetings
• Professional development, as needed
• Small learning communities
• New Teacher Meetings (teachers who are new to education and teachers who are new to the school)
Intra-school meetings and discussions continued to include:
• Monthly charter school director’s meetings
• Principals and Assistant Principals met monthly to discuss curriculum and instruction issues on their level.
• Vertical team data studies
• Secondary Curriculum and Issues Committee
SOURCE: Sr. Directors and Directors Reports
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 35 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 1 Increase student proficiency levels to meet the state standards.
Grade
Level
2005
Percent of Students Scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher
Writing+ Essay
Reading
Mathematics
(3.5 and above)
2006
2007
2005
2006
2007
2005
2006
2007
Science
2006
2007
3
64
71
66
63
66
71
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
4
66
59
63
58
60
63
76
79
83
NA
NA
5
59
61
65
50
50
52
NA
NA
NA
28
34
6
48
56
54
36
41
40
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
7
44
54
54
42
44
46
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
8
36
39
42
50
50
55
76
81
83
24
32
9
27
34
33
49
50
52
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
10
26
24
28
55
54
56
77
73
74
NA
NA
11
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
27
26
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
Target for 2007-08; A 9% increase in each area by grade over 2004-05 baseline year.
Findings:
• The percent of proficient students (scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher) for reading has not been consistently
increasing over time for all grades.
• The percent of proficient students (scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher) for math has consistently increased over time
for all grades.
• The percent of students scoring 3.5 and above in FCAT Writing+ Essay has increased over time for grades 4 and 8 but has
decreased for grade 10.
• The percent of proficient students (scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher) for science has increased for grades 5 and 8
but has decreased slightly for grade 10.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 36 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 1 Increase student proficiency levels to meet the state standards.
Grade
Students Scoring At or Above the SAT10 45th National Percentile
Reading
Math
2006-2007
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
1
48.4%
54.7%
57.4%
53.8%
57.4%
56.5%
2
57.1%
60.3%
60.1%
55.2%
56.9%
59.7%
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation.
Target for 2007-08: The median National Percentile rank will increase by 3 percentage points in each area by grade over 200405 baseline year.
Findings:
• The percent of grade 1 and 2 students scoring at or above the 45th National Percentile on the SAT10 for reading has increased
from the baseline year.
• The percent of grade 1 and 2 students scoring at or above the 45th National Percentile on the SAT10 for math has increased from
the baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 37 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 1 Increase student proficiency levels to meet the state standards.
Graduation Rates
100
Percent
80
65.7 69.0
71.6 71.6
70.5 71.9
68.8 71.0
60
Polk
State
40
20
0
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
Target for 2007-08: A 9% increase over 2004-05 baseline year. (Aligned with Polk Vision’s Goal)
Finding: The graduation rate for both the district and the state has decreased from 2004-05 to 2005-06.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 38 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 1 Increase student proficiency levels to meet the state standards.
ESE Standard Diploma Rates
Standard Diploma through
Meeting All Graduation
Requirements
2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
Standard Diploma through
GED Exit Option
Standard Diploma through
FCAT Waiver
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Polk
20%
20%
22%
<1%
2%
<1%
13%
17%
21%
State
42%
41%
38%
1%
2%
1%
14%
15%
18%
Source: Florida Department of Education 2007 LEA Profile
Target for 2007-08: Increase Standard Diploma rates to at least the state percentage.
Finding
Standard Diploma through GED Exit option mirrors the state percentages, Standard Diploma through FCAT Waiver is greater than
the state average, and Standard Diploma through meeting all graduation requirements has increased slightly from the baseline
year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 39 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
Students Scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher
% Proficient Reading
% Proficient Math
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
55
58
60
60
61
64
Black
30
33
36
31
33
38
Hispanic
35
38
39
38
40
45
ESE n/L
15
15
16
18
17
19
Non-ESE
52
55
56
56
56
60
ELL
24
20
23
27
23
29
Not ELL
48
50
51
52
53
55
F/R Lunch
39
42
43
40
42
46
Non F/R
57
58
63
64
63
68
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: Grades 3 – 10 combined; ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
Target for 2007-08: The gap between the achievement level 3 or higher will decrease by 3 percentage points in each subgroup
over 2004-05 baseline year.
Finding: The percent of proficient students (scoring FCAT Achievement Level 3 or Higher) for reading has increased steadily for all subgroups; except English Language Learners (ELL). For math, the percent has increased steadily for all sub-groups.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 40 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
FCAT NRT Median National Percentile Ranks
Median NP Reading
Median NP Math
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
White
60
70
68
65
72
73
Black
38
48
50
44
49
55
Hispanic
41
51
51
49
53
58
ESE n/L
22
25
26
29
28
33
Non-ESE
60
66
66
63
68
71
ELL
21
27
24
31
34
36
Not ELL
59
64
63
64
66
68
F/R Lunch
43
53
54
49
55
61
Non F/R
65
72
75
70
75
80
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: Grades 3 – 10 combined; ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
Target for 2007-08: The gap between the median National Percentile rank will decrease by 3 percentage points in each subgroup
over 2004-05 baseline year.
Finding: The Median National Percentile Ranks in Math have increased for all of the groups over the baseline year (2004-05). However, the
“ELL”, “Not ELL”, and “White” subgroups have all decreased in the Median National Percentile Ranks in Reading from last year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 41 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Students Scoring At or Above the SAT10 45th National Percentile
Group
% Proficient Reading
% Proficient Math
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-07
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-07
White
62
67
68
66
69
71
Black
42
48
54
38
42
43
Hispanic
38
43
46
39
44
46
ESE n/L
25
28
28
34
34
34
Not ESE
56
61
62
57
60
61
ELL
28
32
33
27
33
34
Not ELL
56
61
66
58
61
62
F/RL
44
50
51
47
49
51
Not F/RL
71
75
77
72
74
75
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
NOTE: Grades 1 & 2 combined; ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
Target for 2007-08: The gap between the median National Percentile rank will decrease by 3 percentage points in each subgroup
over 2004-05 baseline year.
Finding: The percentage of students scoring at or above the 45th National Percentile on the SAT 10 increased for all subgroups in reading
and math, except the “ESE n/L” subgroup which remained unchanged.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 42 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
DIBELS Final Oral Reading Fluency Assessment Percent Low Risk
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
2007
2005
2006
2007
2005
2006
2007
2005
2006
White
58.7%
63.0%
69.9%
54.3%
54.4%
52.9%
45.5%
46.4%
61.2%
Black
48.2%
53.5%
64.8%
42.7%
41.8%
40.8%
35.0%
34.9%
50.3%
Hispanic
42.7%
47.2%
54.4%
41.1%
42.3%
41.9%
35.2%
36.4%
49.8%
ESE n/L
25.5%
30.2%
43.4%
22.2%
21.1%
26.3%
15.9%
17.1%
34.2%
Not ESE
56.7%
60.4%
66.9%
52.3%
52.1%
49.6%
43.4%
44.4%
59.2%
LEP
32.6%
35.5%
43.9%
30.2%
30.4%
32.3%
24.2%
23.9%
39.2%
Not LEP
55.7%
60.2%
68.7%
51.6%
56.1%
50.1%
43.1%
44.1%
59.0%
F/R Lunch
46.3%
51.0%
58.7%
41.8%
42.6%
40.8%
34.4%
35.5%
49.7%
Non F/R
69.7%
72.8%
79.6%
64.7%
63.8%
62.7%
56.1%
55.3%
70.3%
SOURCE: FL Center for Reading Research, DIBELS (PMRN) website, District Demographic Report
NOTE: ESE n/L = Exceptional Student Education not Gifted; ELL = English Language Learner; F/R = Free/Reduced
*Based on 3 assessments not 4 assessments.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of low risk students for all sub-groups.
Finding: All subgroups have increased the percent of LOW RISK students in Grades 1 and 3. However, in grade 2 almost all subgroups
have decreased from the baseline year, except ESE n/L and LEP students who have increased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 43 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
School Performance
School Grade
2005
Polk
2005
State
2006
Polk
2006
State
2007
Polk
2007
State
N (%)
N (%)
N (%)
N (%)
N (%)
N (%)
A
42 (37%) 1,254 (45%) 45 (41%) 1,467 (53%) 51 (47%) 1,472 (52%)
B
22 (19%)
589 (21%)
31 (28%)
610 (22%)
22 (20%)
469 (17%)
C
36 (31%)
619 (22%)
28 (25%)
570 (20%)
28 (26%)
588 (21%)
D
9 (8%)
230 (8%)
5 (5%)
121 (5%)
7 (6%)
220 (8%)
F
6 (5%)
78 (3%)
1 (1%)
21 (1%)
1 (1%)
82 (3%)
AYP
Yes
46 (34%) 1,116 (36%) 32 (24%)
No
61 (47%) 1,162 (37%) 54 (40%) 1,041 (33%) 54 (40%) 2,172 (67%)
Provisional
25 (18%)
825 (27%)
916 (28%)
43 (33%) 1,061 (33%)
49 (36%) 1,240 (39%) 35 (27%)
NR*
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: AYP is based on percent of proficient students. Reading and math proficiency for 2005 was 37% and 44% respectively, 44% and 50% for 2006, and 51% and
56% for 2007. NR - Identification of Provisional AYP designation at the State level was reported as “No”.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of A and B schools by 9% and increase the percent of schools meeting AYP by 9%.
Finding: The changes in Grades and AYP status for the district are fairly consistent with the pattern seen in the state data. In 2007, Polk
had an increase in the number of “A“ schools and the percent of “D” and “F” schools was below the State percent for “D/F”
schools. Also, the number of schools who received a “Yes” designation for AYP status has increased from 2006. Polk has the
same percent of schools receiving a “Yes” designation for AYP status as the State.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 44 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
School Performance
School Grades
2005 -2007
Number of Schools
100
76
73
6
8
2006
2007
75
64
50
25
15
0
2005
A and B Schools
D and F Schools
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: AYP is based on percent of proficient students. Reading and math proficiency for 2005 was 37% and 44% respectively, 44% and 50% for 2006, and 51% and 56% for 2007.
NR - Identification of Provisional AYP designation at the State level was reported as “No”.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of A and B schools by 9% and increase the percent of schools meeting AYP by 9%.
Finding: Overall, the number of schools receiving an A or B has increased and the number of schools receiving a D or F has decreased
from the baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 45 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
No Child Left Behind
Adequate Yearly Progress
2007 vs. 2006 vs. 2005
2007
Yes AYP
46 Schools
35%
No AYP
86 Schools
65%
2006
Yes AYP
32 Schools
24%
No AYP
103 Schools
76%
2005
Yes AYP
43 Schools
33%
No AYP
89 Schools
67%
SOURCE: Florida Department of Education
NOTE: AYP is based on percent of proficient students. Reading and math proficiency for 2005 was 37% and 44% respectively,
44% and 50% for 2006, and 51% and 56% for 2007.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of A and B schools by 9% and increase the percent of schools meeting AYP by 9%.
Finding: In 2007, 46 schools (35%) made adequate yearly progress. This is an increase from 32 schools (24%) in 2006. It is a slight
increase from 43 schools (33%) in 2005. In 2007, 86 schools (65%) did not make adequate yearly progress. This is a decrease
from 103 schools (76%) in 2006 and 89 schools (67%) in 2005.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 46 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
2007 School Grades Compared to AYP
A+ Plan
NCLB
2007 School
Grade
Schools
AYP Criteria
Satisfied
Schools
Percent
A
51
90% or more
50
98.0%
B
22
80% or more
18
81.8%
C
28
70% or more
23
82.1%
D
7
60% or more
6
85.7%
F
1
50% or more
1
100.0%
Source: Office of Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of A and B schools by 9% and increase the percent of schools meeting AYP by 9%.
Finding: In 2007, 51 schools earned an “A”, of these “A” schools, 50 satisfied at least 90 percent of the adequate yearly progress criteria.
In 2007, there were 22 “B” schools, of these “B” schools, 18 satisfied at least 80 percent of the adequate yearly progress criteria.
In 2007, there were 28 “C” schools, of these “C” schools, 23 satisfied at least 70 percent of the adequate yearly progress criteria.
In 2007, there were 7 “D” schools, of these “D” schools, 6 satisfied at least 60 percent of the adequate yearly progress criteria. In
2007, there was 1 “F” school; this “F” school satisfied at least 50 percent of the adequate yearly progress criteria.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 47 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
PSAT Mean Scores
Group
Reading
2004-05
2005-06
Math
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
Writing
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
N
Mean
White
3,467
41.6
3,221
42.3
3,545
42.0
3,466
42.4
3,215
43.1
3,542
41.5
3,452
43.8
3,213
43.2
3,531
39.0
Black
1,131
33.3
963
34.5
1,203
34.9
1,131
35.2
962
35.6
1,199
35.3
1,121
38.5
955
37.9
1,185
32.6
737
35.7
808
36.3
1,078
36.1
736
37.6
807
38.0
1,075
36.8
735
39.9
807
39.0
1,073
33.7
Male
2,712
38.0
2,704
38.7
3,033
38.5
2,709
40.7
2,698
41.1
3,021
40.2
2,686
41.2
2,686
40.2
2,999
35.4
Female
3,021
39.9
3,010
40.3
3,279
40.5
3,021
40.0
3,007
40.5
3,278
38.2
3,015
43.1
3,007
42.3
3,266
38.0
Hispanic
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
Target for 2007-08: Increase the number of students taking the PSAT by subgroup.
Finding: The number of students taking the PSAT has increased over the last few years. The PSAT mean scores for Reading had little
change from 2005-06 to 2006-07. The mean PSAT scores in math decreased slightly for all subgroups, and the scores in writing
decreased significantly for all subgroups.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 48 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
Enrolled
2004-05
2004-05
Count
Percent
Passed
2004-05
Percent
AP Course Enrollment & Pass Rates*
Enrolled
Passed
2005-06
2005-06
2005-06
Count
Percent
Percent
Enrolled
2006-07
2006-07
Count
Percent
Passed
2006-07
Percent
White
1,070
7%
98%
1,385
8%
99%
1,479
9%
98%
Black
95
2%
100%
166
3%
98%
227
3%
95%
Hispanic
182
5%
98%
214
5%
98%
289
5%
96%
ESE n/L
14
<1%
100%
21
<1%
100%
25
<1%
89%
Non-ESE
1,428
6%
98%
1,874
8%
99%
2,104
9%
97%
16
2%
100%
23
2%
100%
21
2%
98%
Not ELL
1,426
5%
98%
1,872
7%
99%
2,108
7%
97%
Non F/R
1,233
7%
99%
1,558
9%
99%
1,652
10%
98%
F/R Lunch
209
2%
97%
337
3%
98%
477
4%
95%
Male
608
4%
98%
753
5%
98%
864
6%
97%
Female
841
7%
99%
1,142
8%
99%
1,265
9%
98%
ELL
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing Department.
Note: * All counts and percents have been recalculated for all years based on Equity Act definitions.
Target for 2007-08: A consistent annual increase in the percent of all subgroups participating in AP courses with a 90% passing
rate.
Finding: There has been an increase in the enrollment count for all subgroups from the baseline year. All subgroups, except ESE n/L, have
maintained a passing rate greater than 95%.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 49 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
IB Course Enrollment and Pass Rates*
Enrolled
Passed
Enrolled
Passed
Enrolled
2004-05
2004-05
2005-06
2005-06
2006-07
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
Count
Passed
2006-07
Percent
White
189
98%
217
99%
251
99%
Black
9
92%
9
99%
22
100%
Hispanic
16
99%
21
98%
39
99%
ESE n/L
1
100%
0
0
1
100%
Non-ESE
248
98%
283
99%
358
99%
0
0
0
0
0
0
Not ELL
249
98%
283
99%
359
99%
Non F/R
239
99%
262
99%
309
99%
F/R Lunch
10
93%
21
100%
50
98%
Male
107
98%
111
100%
134
98%
Female
142
99%
172
99%
225
99%
ELL
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing Department.
Note: * All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08: A consistent annual increase in the count of all subgroups participating in IB courses.
Finding: There has been a consistent annual increase in enrollment in IB courses over time, except for ELL.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 50 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 2: Eliminate the achievement gap among all subgroups.
Group
Enrolled
2004-05
2004-05
Count
Percent
Algebra Course Enrollment and Pass Rates
Passed
Enrolled
Passed
Enrolled
2004-05
2005-06
2005-06
2005-06
2006-07
2006-07
Percent
Count
Percent
Percent
Count
Percent
Passed
2006-07
Percent
White
5,028
31%
78%
5,102
30%
77%
5,223
31%
77%
Black
2,229
36%
74%
2,275
35%
75%
2,511
37%
75%
Hispanic
1,418
36%
74%
1,535
34%
73%
2,166
41%
72%
ESE n/L
1,264
26%
72%
1,360
27%
71%
1,515
29%
68%
Non-ESE
7,584
34%
77%
7,780
33%
77%
8,668
35%
76%
325
41%
73%
408
41%
71%
625
48%
70%
Not ELL
8,523
33%
77%
8,732
32%
76%
9,558
33%
76%
Non F/R
4,943
30%
80%
4,780
29%
79%
4,801
29%
79%
F/R Lunch
3,905
38%
72%
4,360
36%
72%
5,382
41%
72%
Male
4,602
33%
74%
4,806
32%
73%
5,365
35%
72%
Female
4,246
33%
80%
4,334
32%
78%
4,818
33%
79%
ELL
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing Department. NOTE: High School Algebra I courses only.
Note: * All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08: A consistent annual increase in the percent enrolled and pass rate of all subgroups participating in Algebra
courses.
Finding: There has been a consistent annual increase in enrollment in Algebra courses over time, except for Non F/R Lunch.
F/R Lunch maintained their passing rate, while all other subgroups decreased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 51 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 3: Conduct on-going progress monitoring of student achievement.
a) Conduct training on progress monitoring assessments, administration and interpretation.
2005-06
Progress monitoring assessments, administration and interpretation training:
• 358 staff members from 115 schools and the district were trained in analysis of student achievement data using IDEAS
during the 2005-2006 school year.
• DIBELS trainings were also conducted.
• CARS and STARS trainings were held for school-based personnel as well.
• 21 Pilot schools received training in Kaplan K-12 Achievement Planner during the 2005-06 school year.
• Principals were provided training on progress monitoring and interpretation of data as well.
• Planning for 2006-07 Data Day was conducted.
• 2006-07 Quarterly Benchmark Assessments (QBA) were planned as well.
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
2006-07
• Progress monitoring assessments, administration and interpretation training continued with QBA’s, DIBELS, Kaplan, etc.
using electronic reporting (PMRN, IDEAS, Odyssey, etc.)
• These results were used to assist with teacher’s professional development (IPGIP) as well as school-based needs
• IDEAS training continued for specialized segments of the instructional population (reading coaches, guidance, etc.)
• Data Day was conducted at the beginning of the school year.
• Decision was made to utilize customized standards-based assessments for grades 1 and 2 constructed by Kaplan in place of
the QBA’s.
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 52 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 3: Conduct on-going progress monitoring of student achievement.
b) Conduct on-going student assessments.
2005-06
During the 2005-06 baseline year research and decisions regarding the following were conducted:
• QBA development and 2006-07 implementation
• Kaplan pilot and 2006-07 implementation
• School Turnaround implementation in the 2006-07 school year
• Various assessments for baseline data to develop and monitor progress on School Improvement and Charter School
Accountability Plans
SOURCE: Sr. Director & Director Reports
Student Services personnel developed and implemented a number of school, teacher and support personnel workshops to interpret test
data, and provide frequent progress monitoring of “at risk” students (Clinical -Educator, Intervention Assistance Team, Progress
Monitoring)
SOURCE: Student Services Department
In the 2005-06 baseline year, when asked to rate the utilization of effective assessment and monitoring of student achievement in the
schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 79.1% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
2006-07
In the 2006-07 year, when asked to rate the utilization of effective assessment and monitoring of student achievement in the schools
they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 91.5% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
• On-going student assessments consisted of QBA’s, DIBELS, and Kaplan.
• Electronic reporting of results was used (PMRN, IDEAS, Odyssey, etc.)
• Quarterly Benchmark Assessments (QBA’s) were administered four times to students in grades 1 through 5 in reading and
mathematics. These were used to assess progress throughout the year and to provide a summative measure that represented
a series of “snapshots” to supplement the ongoing mini-assessments currently used to check for understanding as students
were taught. Each section of the reading and mathematics assessments corresponded with the SSS/Benchmarks that are
assessed on the FCAT
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 53 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 3: Conduct on-going progress monitoring of student achievement.
b) Conduct on-going student assessments.
2006-07 (Continued)
• DIBELS was administered three times a year for grades K –5. It provided data on Initial Sounds Fluency, Letter Naming
Fluency, Phoneme Segmentation Fluency, Nonsense Word Fluency, and Oral Reading Fluency
• These results were used to assist with teacher’s professional development (IPGIP) as well as school-based needs
• Fourteen Title I schools and one non-Title I school participated in the School Turnaround Program. Most schools made
significant progress with the goals set for the program.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Auburndale Central Elementary
Combee Elementary School
Crystal Lake Elementary School
Crystal Lake Middle School
Dixieland Elementary School
Eastside Elementary School
Floral Avenue Elementary School
Kingsford Elementary School
Lake Alfred-Addair Middle School
Lake Shipp Elementary School
Loughman Oaks Elementary School
Sleepy Hill Middle School
Wahneta Elementary School
Winston Elementary School
Kathleen Senior High School (non-Title I)
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 54 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective3: Conduct on-going progress monitoring of student achievement.
b) Conduct on-going student assessments.
2006-07 (Continued)
Kaplan was administered three times a year at the middle and high school levels and some elementary schools.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Auburndale Senior High School
Bartow Middle School
Bartow Senior High School
Ben Hill Griffin Jr Elementary
Berkley Accelerated Middle School
Berkley Elementary School
Chain Of Lakes Elementary School
Clarence Boswell Elementary School
Compass Middle Charter School
Crystal Lake Elementary School
Crystal Lake Middle School
Daniel Jenkins Academy Of Tech Ms
Daniel Jenkins Academy Of Tech Hs
Davenport School Of The Arts (K-8)
Denison Middle School
Discovery Academy/Lake Alfred
Dundee Elementary School
Dundee Ridge Middle School
Eagle Lake Elementary School
Eastside Elementary School
Fort Meade Middle/Senior High (6-12)
Frostproof Middle/Senior High (6-12)
Gause Academy Of Leadership (6-12)
George W. Jenkins Senior High
Gibbons Street Elementary School
Haines City Senior High School
Harrison School For The Arts
International Baccalaureate
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
James W. Sikes Elementary School
Jere L. Stambaugh, Sr Middle
Jewett Middle Academy Magnet
Jewett School Of The Arts (K-8)
Kathleen Middle School
Kathleen Senior High School
Lake Alfred Elementary School
Lake Alfred-Addair Middle School
Lake Gibson Middle School
Lake Gibson Senior High School
Lake Marion Creek Elementary
Lake Region High School
Lake Wales Senior High School
Lakeland Highlands Middle Sch
Lakeland Senior High School
Lawton Chiles Middle Academy
McLaughlin Middle School
Mulberry Middle School
Mulberry Senior High School
Ridge Community High School
Rochelle School Of The Arts (K-8)
Roosevelt Academy (6-12)
Rosabelle W. Blake Academy (K-8)
Sandhill Elementary School
Scott Lake Elementary School
Shelley S. Boone Middle School
Sleepy Hill Middle School
Southwest Middle School
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spook Hill Elementary School
Summerlin Academy
Union Academy
Wahneta Elementary School
Wendell Watson Elementary
Westwood Middle School
Winter Haven Senior High School
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 55 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 4: Provide timely interventions to struggling students.
a) Identify struggling students and provide immediate interventions.
Students with Academic Support Plans (ASP)*
2004-05 2004-05 2005-06 2005-06 2006-07 2006-07
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
White
11,893
22%
21,328
39%
20,711
38%
Black
7,437
37%
11,628
56%
12,354
57%
Hispanic
5,674
34%
9,891
51%
11,116
51%
ESE n/L
2,563
18%
9,110
64%
9,006
65%
Non-ESE
23,083
29%
35,050
42%
36,750
42%
ELL
2,123
44%
3,974
61%
4,930
60%
Not ELL
23,523
27%
40,186
44%
40,826
43%
Non F/R
7,276
18%
13,816
33%
13,782
33%
F/R Lunch
18,370
34%
30,344
53%
31,974
53%
Male
13,432
28%
23,550
46%
24,503
46%
Female
12,214
27%
20,610
44%
21,253
43%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Some students may have an ASP & IEP or an ASP & 504. Students with substantially low academic performance are provided an ASP addressing his/her
individual academic needs.
* All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08:.A consistent pattern of ASP provision across all subgroups.
Finding: The number and percent of students with Academic Support Plans (ASP) has increased substantially over the baseline year for
every subgroup. This can be attributed to changes to ESE service model in 2005-06.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 56 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 4: Provide timely interventions to struggling students.
a) Identify struggling students and provide immediate interventions.
2004-05
Count
Students with Individual Educational Plans (IEP)*
2004-05
2005-06
2005-06
2006-07
Percent
Count
Percent
Count
2006-07
Percent
White
8,273
15%
8,411
15%
7,490
14%
Black
3,941
20%
4,038
19%
3,759
17%
Hispanic
2,255
13%
2,489
13%
2,573
12%
ESE n/L
12,890
91%
13,077
91%
12,697
91%
Non-ESE
1,953
2%
2,327
3%
1,596
2%
513
11%
656
10%
792
10%
Not ELL
14,330
16%
14,748
16%
13,501
14%
Non F/R
5,050
13%
5,403
13%
4,774
11%
F/R Lunch
9,793
18%
10,001
18%
9,519
16%
Male
9,718
20%
10,079
20%
9,489
18%
Female
5,125
11%
5,325
11%
4,804
10%
ELL
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Some students may have an IEP & ASP. IEP’s are required for students with has a disability needing special education and related services.
* All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08: A consistent pattern of IEP provision across all subgroups.
Finding: The number and percent of students with Individual Education Plans has slightly decreased or remained stable over the baseline
year for most subgroups.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 57 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 4: Provide timely interventions to struggling students.
Students with 504 Plans*
2004-05
Count
2004-05
Percent
2005-06
Count
2005-06
Percent
2006-07
Count
White
806
2%
906
2%
1,030
2006-07
Percent
2%
Black
178
1%
198
1%
225
1%
Hispanic
85
1%
100
1%
137
1%
ESE n/L
107
1%
87
1%
82
1%
Non-ESE
987
1%
1,158
1%
1,348
2%
ELL
22
<1%
23
<1%
40
<1%
Not ELL
1072
1%
1,222
1%
1,390
1%
Non F/R
565
1%
646
2%
733
2%
F/R Lunch
529
1%
599
1%
697
1%
Male
731
1%
824
2%
945
2%
Female
363
1%
421
1%
485
1%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Students may have a 504 & ASP. Students with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity are provided an
accommodation plan (504 plan) addressing those needs.
* All Counts and Percents for 2004-05 and 2005-06 have been recalculated based on corrections to report.
Target for 2007-08: A consistent pattern of 504 provision across all subgroups.
Finding: The percent of students with 504 plans remained stable from 2005-06 to 2006-07.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 58 of 101
Goal 4: Monitoring of Student Progress
We will improve student achievement.
Objective 4: Provide timely interventions to struggling students.
2005-06
In the 2005-06 baseline year, when asked to rate the timeliness of interventions provided to struggling students in the schools they
supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 76.2% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
Student Service Personnel have assisted with problem identification and intervention planning through on-going Intervention Assistance
Team (IAT) training, use of the IAT process, and other procedures.
SOURCE: Student Services Department
2006-07
In the 2006-07 year, when asked to rate the timeliness of interventions provided to struggling students in the schools they supervise, Sr.
Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with an 84.1% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) process/procedures continued to be a major area of emphasis for student services personnel. The
federal reauthorization of IDEA and changes from the FLDOE rules and procedures governing the identification and placement of
students in special education changed significantly. Efforts to integrate the Response to Intervention (RtI) model into the Intervention
Assistance Team process were ongoing throughout the year. The RtI model utilizes three tiers of intervention and incorporates existing,
evidenced based interventions (Kaplan, Spell Read, PBS) for low performing and struggling students. RtI includes progress monitoring,
problem solving and timely intervention
• Awareness training was conducted with all student services personnel and school-based administrators.
• A multi-disciplinary committee of student services and ESE personnel was involved in the revision of the district’s IAT manual.
• Procedural training was conducted with all school-based, district office, charter personnel.
SOURCE: Student Services Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 59 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
a) Select strong, highly professional instructional leaders as school based administrators, assess leadership skills, and
provide training, support and mentoring.
Administrative Pools by Race and Gender
As of January 2006
As of November 2006
As of August 2007
Assistant Principal Pool Counts
Black Males
4
4
2
Black Females
13
17
16
Hispanic Males
0
0
1
Hispanic Females
2
1
1
White Males
21
19
19
White Females
81
63
78
Principal Pool Counts
Black Males
8
6
2
Black Females
6
7
8
Hispanic Males
2
2
2
Hispanic Females
0
0
0
White Males
30
18
12
White Females
36
31
35
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
Target for 2007-08: Increase race/gender representation in the administrative pools to reflect the demographic makeup of
district.
Finding: In the administrative pool of Assistant principals, the number of Black Females and Hispanic Males has increased slightly from the
baseline year. In the Principal pool, the number of Black Females has increased slightly, while all other subgroups have
decreased. However, this is the third year with no Hispanic Female candidates in the Principal pool.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 60 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
a) Select strong, highly professional instructional leaders as school based administrators, assess leadership skills, and
provide training, support and mentoring.
School Principals, Directors, Administrators
2005-06
2006-07
Race and Gender
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
Black Female
16
13.1%
14
10.7%
White Female
58
47.5%
62
47.3%
Hispanic Female
0
0.0%
1
0.8%
White Male
39
32.0%
44
33.6%
Black Male
6
4.9%
6
4.6%
Hispanic Male
3
2.5%
4
3.1%
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
Assistant Principals, Assistant Directors
2005-06
2006-07
Race and Gender
Count
Percent
Count
Percent
Black Female
19
12.7%
20
12.7%
White Female
74
49.3%
80
51.0%
Hispanic Female
1
0.7%
1
0.6%
Black Male
14
9.3%
16
10.2%
White Male
42
28.0%
38
24.2%
Hispanic Male
0
0.0%
1
0.6%
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
Target for 2007-08: Increase race/gender representation to reflect the demographic makeup of district.
Finding: The number of Black Females who are School Principals, Directors and Administrators has decreased slightly, while the number of
all other subgroups has increased or remained unchanged. The number of Assistant Principals and Assistant Directors by
subgroup has increased or remained unchanged, except for the number of White Males which decreased.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 61 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
b) Cultivate a professional collegial atmosphere that encourages creative approaches to meet the needs of students and
teachers.
2005-06
In the 2005-06 baseline year, when asked to rate school-based administration’s leadership knowledge and skills in the schools they
supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with an 89% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
2006-07
In the 2006-07 year, when asked to rate school-based administration’s leadership knowledge and skills in the schools they supervise,
Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 94% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 62 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
b) Cultivate a professional collegial atmosphere that encourages creative approaches to meet the needs of students and
teachers.
School Climate Survey Responses to School-based Leadership as
Effective Instructional Leaders
Percent Responding
Favorably
100
95.6 95.2 95.3
78.5 77.8
76.9
85.1 85.2
82.4
80
60
2004-05
40
2005-06
2006-07
20
0
Teachers
Parents
Students
SOURCE: School Climate Survey administered to teachers, parents, and secondary students. Construct measured with four items on a scale of one to five with five being most favorable.
Target for 2007-08: At least an 85% favorable rating among students, parents and teachers.
Finding: Survey responses from teachers, parents and students concerning the School-based Leadership as Effective Instructional Leaders
remained almost unchanged (0.1%) for parents but decreased slightly for teachers and 2.8% for students.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 63 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
b) Cultivate a professional collegial atmosphere that encourages creative approaches to meet the needs of students and
teachers.
Year
Total Turnover
Count Percent
Teacher Turnover
Transferred
Terminated
Count Percent Count Percent
Retired
Count Percent
2004-05
1,670
22.9%
962
13.1%
602
8.2%
106
1.5%
2005-06
1,485
17.9%
640
7.7%
700
8.4%
145
1.7%
2006-07
2,084
29.0%
1,105
15.4%
814
11.3%
165
2.3%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: Counts and percentages based on teachers designated as ’active’ on July 2nd of beginning school year followed to July 1 of next school year.
Active Teacher
Cohort as of 7/2/2004
Count
5,027
Cohort Teachers
Terminated/Left District
Count
Percent
711
14.1%
Retired Cohort
Teachers
Count
Percent
395
7.9%
2004 Teacher Cohort as
of 7/1/2007
Count
Percent
3,921
78.0%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
Active Teacher Cohort as of
7/2/2004 Excluding Retired
Cohort Teachers
Count
4,632
Cohort Teachers
Terminated/Left District
Count
711
Percent
15.4%
2004 Teacher Cohort as of
7/1/2007 Excluding Retired
Cohort Teachers
Count
Percent
3,921
84.7%
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the percent of teachers retained in the district over time.
Finding: Teacher turnover decreased from 2004-05 to 2005-06 and increased in 2006-07. There was a slight increase in number of retirees
in 2006-07 and the increase in number of teachers terminated was consistent with 2004-05 to 2005-06 increase. The number of
teacher transfers decreased by nearly 300 from 2004-05 to 2005-06 and increased nearly 500 from 2005-06 to 2006-07. It is not
clear if 2005-06 was an uncharacteristic year or if the fluctuation over the three years is indicative of unobserved phenomena.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 64 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 1: Provide professional instructional leadership while maintaining a vision, direction and focus for student learning.
b) Cultivate a professional collegial atmosphere that encourages creative approaches to meet the needs of students and
teachers.
PERCENTAGE OF CLASSES NOT TAUGHT BY HIGHLY
QUALIFIED TEACHERS
Year
High Poverty Schools
Low Poverty Schools
2004-05
7.8
5.5
2005-06
12.0
7.7
2006-07
11.3
7.7
SOURCE: FL DOE NCLB Public Accountability Report
Target for 2007-08: Reduction and equity in the percentages of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers.
Finding: The percent of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers has increased from the baseline year. However, it has decreased
from the prior year for high poverty schools and remained the same for low poverty schools during the same timeframe.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 65 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 2: Develop a district-wide culture committed to attracting, hiring and retaining highly qualified, appropriately certified
instructional and administrative personnel that reflects the changing demographics of our diverse community.
a) Develop a comprehensive system of recruitment and retention of highly qualified, diverse instructional and administrative
personnel that includes competitive compensation.
Instructional Personnel Salaries
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$47,212
$44,292
199
-$2,920
-6.6%
2005-06
$48,460
$47,569
203
-$891
-1.9%
2006-07
$51,305
$49,009
218
-$2,296
-4.7%
2004-05
$46,895
$42,861
116
-$4,034
-9.4%
2005-06
$48,505
$45,921
120
-$2,584
-5.6%
2006-07
$51,025
$47,493
121
-$3,532
-7.4%
2004-05
$54,362
$49,717
46
-$4,645
-9.3%
2005-06
$55,504
$52,794
48
-$2,710
-5.1%
2006-07
$58,689
$56,240
48
-$2,449
-4.4%
2004-05
$41,590
$37,436
5,998
-$4,154
-11.1%
2005-06
$42,702
$39,915
6,605
-$2,787
-7.0%
2006-07
$45,298
$41,505
6,992
-$3,793
-9.1%
Position
Guidance
Librarian/Media Specialist
School Psychologist
Teacher
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, the number of Guidance, Librarian/Media Specialists, School
Psychologists and Teachers has increased over the last 3 years, and the salary gap percent difference between the District and
State has been reduced for each group.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 66 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 2: Develop a district-wide culture committed to attracting, hiring and retaining highly qualified, appropriately certified
instructional and administrative personnel that reflects the changing demographics of our diverse community.
a) Develop a comprehensive system of recruitment and retention of highly qualified, diverse instructional and administrative
personnel that includes competitive compensation.
School Personnel Salaries
Position
Principal, High School
Principal, Middle School
Principal, Elem. School
Principal, Other
Year
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$82,916
$64,140
15
-$18,776
-29.3%
2005-06
$85,915
$81,688
16
-$4,227
-5.2%
2006-07
$92,311
$86,020
17
-$6,291
-7.3%
2004-05
$77,061
$63,406
20
-$13,655
-21.5%
2005-06
$80,059
$77,007
19
-$3,052
-4.0%
2006-07
$86,059
$80,557
19
-$5,502
-6.8%
2004-05
$76,398
$64,718
73
-$11,680
-18.0%
2005-06
$79,163
$72,437
73
-$6,726
-9.3%
2006-07
$83,989
$74,875
78
-$9,114
-12.2%
2004-05
$70,479
$67,486
14
-$2,993
-4.4%
2005-06
$70,116
$75,682
13
$5,566
7.4%
2006-07
$81,040
$79,150
13
-$1,890
-2.4%
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data
NOTE: Based solely on base salary, does not include supplements
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, the number of Principals has increased and the salary gap difference
between the District and State has decreased over the last three years.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 67 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 2: Develop a district-wide culture committed to attracting, hiring and retaining highly qualified, appropriately certified
instructional and administrative personnel that reflects the changing demographics of our diverse community.
b) Develop a comprehensive system of recruitment and retention of highly qualified, diverse instructional and administrative
personnel that includes competitive compensation.
Position
Asst. Principal, High School
Asst. Principal, Middle School
Asst. Principal, Elem. School
Asst. Principal, Other
Curriculum Coordinator
Special School Director (Voc/Tech/Adult/ESE)
Year
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
State
Average
$63,460
$65,477
$68,882
$60,084
$62,341
$65,471
$57,162
$59,342
$62,961
$68,696
$69,443
$76,598
$57,621
$60,681
$66,521
$78,559
$79,097
$90,736
Polk
Average
$48,336
$64,982
$68,455
$48,334
$59,459
$63,217
$48,959
$55,868
$59,351
$49,588
$57,379
$60,497
$49,790
$56,266
$58,500
$71,194
$77,373
$77,399
Number
Employed
32
32
34
33
34
36
72
73
81
7
4
6
2
1
1
5
4
5
Salary
Difference
-$15,124
-$495
-$427
-$11,750
-$2,882
-$2,254
-$8,203
-$3,474
-$3,610
-$19,108
-$12,064
-$16,101
-$7,831
-$4,415
-$8,021
-$7,365
-$1,724
-$13,337
Percent
Difference
-31.3%
-0.8%
-0.6%
-24.3%
-4.8%
-3.6%
-16.8%
-6.2%
-6.1%
-38.5%
-21.0%
-26.6%
-15.7%
-7.8%
-13.7%
-10.3%
-2.2%
-17.2%
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data. NOTE: Based solely on base salary, does not include supplements
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, the number of Assistant Principals has increased and the salary gap
difference between the District and State has decreased over the last three years. However, the number of Special School
Directors (Voc/Tech/Adult/ESE) has remained similar to the baseline year but the salary gap difference between the District and
State has increased over the last three years.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 68 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 3: Develop a district-wide culture committed to attracting, hiring and retaining highly qualified, appropriately certified
instructional and administrative personnel that reflects the changing demographics of our diverse community.
a) Develop a comprehensive system of recruitment and retention of highly qualified, diverse instructional and administrative
personnel that includes competitive compensation.
2005-06
In the 2005-06 baseline year, when asked to rate professional development of instructional staff with regards to its link to student needs
in the schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with an 87.2% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
Leadership Development:
• Professional development for school leaders and for those aspiring to that role includes diversity modules.
• The district Professional Development Department is engaged with the Accelerated School Administrators Program [ASAP],
a high quality, online professional development process that focuses on 10 dimensions of leadership, linked to the Florida
Leadership Standards, online modules include Diversity and Ethical Leadership.
• In addition, the district has been granted 60 modules without cost for both Diversity and Ethical Leadership as a part of our
involvement with the Florida Department of Education, William Cecil Golden, DELTA [Developing Educational Leaders for
Tomorrow’s Achievers] initiative.
• Successful completion of those two modules is included as expectations in the professional development process for new
assistant principals.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
2006-07
In the 2006-07 year, when asked to rate professional development of instructional staff with regards to its link to student needs in the
schools they supervise, Sr. Directors with school supervision responsibilities responded with a 95% favorable rating.
SOURCE: Senior Director Classroom Walk-through Survey administered at all schools by district-level staff responsible for school supervision. Construct measured a scale of one to four with four being
most favorable.
Leadership Development:
• Continued professional development for school leaders and those aspiring to leadership positions related to Diversity using
an on-line delivery system linked to the FDOE William Cecil Golden professional Development Program
• Continued use of the Accelerated School Administrators Program [ASAP] which is a high quality internet-based professional
development process focused on Diversity and Ethical leadership, two of the ten Florida leadership Standards
• Inclusion of Diversity content in face-to-face modules as a part of the Quality School Leaders Symposia
Source: Professional Development Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 69 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 4: Ensure an effective Teacher Induction Program.
a) Review and revise new teacher induction program according to researched best practices to increase its effectiveness.
2005-06
Teacher Induction Program Seminar [TIPS]:
• Planning and discussion regarding expanding the district’s Teacher Induction Program Seminar [TIPS] from two days to three
days for the 2006-2007 school year.
• Greater attention to diversity issues will be provided as a part of that additional time. Diversity will be addressed throughout
the three days of TIPS professional development for 2006-07.
• Continued emphasis will be placed on applying diversity concepts related to planning, instructional strategies, assessment
options, and learning environment.
• Research-based practices related to diverse students will be addressed specifically and focus will be placed on district
demographics and effective strategies for working with students from families experiencing poverty-related issues.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
2006-07
Teacher Induction Program Seminar
• Expanded program from two days to three days in order to include more content and time to address Polk demographics and
priority needs linked to the district’s Strategic Plan goals as they related to quality, research-based practices in curriculum
alignment, instruction and assessment strategies
• Incorporated concepts from Ruby Payne’s “Framework for Understanding Poverty”
Source: Professional Development Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 70 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 4: Ensure an effective Teacher Induction Program.
a) Review and revise new teacher induction program according to researched best practices to increase its effectiveness.
Change from 0405
(baseline) to 0607
N
%
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Hired
676
680
826
150
18.2%
Terminated
123
131
204
81
39.7%
Transferred
64
44
101
37
36.6%
Remained in same school
489
505
521
32
6.1%
School Turnover Percent*
27.7%
25.7%
36.9%
District Turnover Percent**
18.2%
19.3%
24.7%
New Teacher Turnover
SOURCE: Report generated by PCSB’s Data Processing department.
NOTE: New teachers hired include only teachers who have never been employed by the Polk County School District. It does not include teachers who have worked for
the district in other capacities or have left and returned. Counts and percentages are based on teachers designated as ’active’ on July 2nd of beginning school year
followed to July 1 of next school year.
*School Turnover Percent (attrition) includes new teachers who transferred schools within the district or terminated employment.
** District Turnover Percent (attrition) includes only those new teachers who terminated employment with the district.
Target for 2007-08: Increase the number of teachers retained in the district.
Finding: The number of new teachers employed in the district has increased, by 18% for 2006-07 as compared to the previous two years.
With the increase in new hires, there were increases in both number terminated and transfers. The number of transfers within the
district increased 36.6% and the number of new employees terminated increased 39.7%. This means that the number of new
teachers who stayed in the school to which they were hired has increased by 16 teachers each year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 71 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 5: Establish a competitive compensation structure for district employee groups.
a) Develop a comprehensive compensation system for recruitment and retention of highly qualified district personnel.
District Personnel Salaries
Position
Superintendent
Deputy/Assoc./Asst./Area
Superintendent
School Board Member
Business/ Finance
Research & Evaluation
Year
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$121,520 $145,000
2
$23,480
16.2%
2005-06
$126,671 $150,760
2
$24,089
16.0%
2006-07
$134,124 $155,548
2
$21,424
13.8%
2004-05
$101,968
$99,701
2
-$2,267
-2.3%
2005-06
$107,094 $109,019
1
$1,925
1.8%
2006-07
$113,328 $114,470
1
$1,142
1.0%
2004-05
$28,694
$35,374
7
$6,680
18.9%
2005-06
$29,928
$36,929
7
$7,001
19.0%
2006-07
$31,047
$36,929
7
$5,882
15.9%
2004-05
$80,605
$72,493
4
-$8,112
-11.2%
2005-06
$83,874
$76,714
5
-$7,160
-9.3%
2006-07
$86,841
$79,900
5
-$6,941
-8.7%
2004-05
$74,831
$58,528
5
-$16,303
-27.9%
2005-06
$77,053
$64,028
5
-$13,025
-20.3%
2006-07
$83,990
$68,019
4
-$15,971
-23.5%
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data,
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these five district level position groups display salary patterns
consistent with the prior year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 72 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 5: Establish a competitive compensation structure for district employee groups.
a) Develop a comprehensive compensation system for recruitment and retention of highly qualified district personnel.
District Personnel Salaries
Position
Management Information
Services
Data Processing
Personnel
Facilities
Transportation
Year
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$73,532
$67,396
3
-$6,136
-9.1%
2005-06
$74,710
$88,847
3
$14,137
15.9%
2006-07
$84,371
$93,164
3
$8,793
9.4%
2004-05
$72,337
$77,461
2
$5,124
6.6%
2005-06
$75,076
$74,560
1
-$516
-0.7%
2006-07
$78,907
$77,969
1
-$938
-1.2%
2004-05
$78,983
$75,968
3
-$3,015
-4.0%
2005-06
$80,956
$81,733
3
$777
1.0%
2006-07
$85,171
$78,530
6
-$6,641
-8.5%
2004-05
$83,075
$73,036
3
-$10,039
-13.7%
2005-06
$86,274
$79,562
3
-$6,712
-8.4%
2006-07
$88,769
$83,712
3
-$5,057
-6.0%
2004-05
$58,715
$62,525
5
$3,810
6.1%
2005-06
$59,683
$63,793
6
$4,110
6.4%
2006-07
$61,620
$66,818
6
$5,198
7.8%
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data,
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these five district level position groups display salary patterns
consistent with the prior year, except Personnel which is consistent with baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 73 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 5: Establish a competitive compensation structure for district employee groups.
a) Develop a comprehensive compensation system for recruitment and retention of highly qualified district personnel.
District Personnel Salaries
Position
Food Service
Vocational/ Adult Ed.
Exceptional Student Ed.
Student Services
Year
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$61,375
$55,562
2
-$5,813
-10.5%
2005-06
$62,420
$50,021
4
-$12,399
-24.8%
2006-07
$65,522
$53,940
4
-$11,582
-21.5%
2004-05
$76,530
$63,869
3
-$12,661
-19.8%
2005-06
$79,154
$61,962
3
-$17,192
-27.7%
2006-07
$84,662
$60,425
1
-$24,237
-40.1%
2004-05
$69,160
$53,551
8
-$15,609
-29.1%
2005-06
$72,311
$59,697
8
-$12,614
-21.1%
2006-07
2004-05
2005-06
$76,597
$72,623
$76,194
$64,369
$63,691
$63,741
8
4
4
-$12,228
-$8,932
-$12,453
-19.0%
-14.0%
-19.5%
2006-07
$80,364
$69,557
3
-$10,807
-15.5%
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data,
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these five district level position groups display salary patterns
consistent with the prior year, except Personnel which is consistent with baseline year.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 74 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Support/Technical Personnel Salaries
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$28,167
$27,895
41
-$272
-1.0%
2005-06
$29,734
$31,174
46
$1,440
4.6%
2006-07
$31,403
$28,594
79
-$2,809
-9.8%
2004-05
$55,371
$47,767
15
-$7,604
-15.9%
2005-06
$55,947
$50,752
17
-$5,195
-10.2%
2006-07
$59,100
$53,262
20
-$5,838
-11.0%
2004-05
$45,865
$38,641
3
-$7,224
-18.7%
2005-06
$46,222
$37,178
5
-$9,044
-24.3%
2006-07
$48,682
$36,879
5
-$11,803
-32.0%
2004-05
$27,539
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
2005-06
$28,285
$21,187
2
-$7,098
-33.5%
2006-07
$29,689
$30,428
2
$739
2.4%
2004-05
$27,862
$20,989
571
-$6,873
-32.7%
2005-06
$29,047
$24,221
591
-$4,826
-19.9%
2006-07
$30,693
$25,293
552
-$5,400
-21.3%
Position
Nurse (LPN/RN)
Computer Systems Analyst
Accountant
Bookkeeper
Secretary
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these five position groups display salary patterns consistent with the
baseline year, except Bookkeeper which was a new position in 2005-06.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 75 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Support/Technical Personnel Salaries
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$21,128
$23,951
123
$2,823
11.8%
2005-06
$21,612
$25,852
127
$4,240
16.4%
2006-07
$22,640
$26,350
130
$3,710
14.1%
2004-05
$24,681
$32,281
6
$7,600
23.5%
2005-06
$25,528
$27,643
9
$2,115
7.7%
2006-07
$26,887
$31,122
8
$4,235
13.6%
2004-05
$44,276
$35,558
25
-$8,718
-24.5%
2005-06
$44,845
$37,272
23
-$7,573
-20.3%
2006-07
$48,198
$38,873
24
-$9,325
-24.0%
2004-05
$38,299
$35,932
27
-$2,367
-6.6%
2005-06
$38,907
$37,685
28
-$1,222
-3.2%
2006-07
$41,645
$39,405
28
-$2,240
-5.7%
2004-05
$34,682
$35,843
60
$1,161
3.2%
2005-06
$35,287
$38,084
59
$2,797
7.3%
2006-07
$37,265
$39,641
60
$2,376
6.0%
Position
Clerk/Clerk Typist
Data Entry Operator
Electrician
AC Tech
Mechanic
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these position groups display salary patterns consistent with the prior
years.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 76 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Support/Technical Personnel Salaries
State
Average
Polk
Average
Number
Employed
Salary
Difference
Percent
Difference
2004-05
$37,828
$35,130
38
-$2,698
-7.7%
2005-06
$37,429
$36,802
36
-$627
-1.7%
2006-07
$40,741
$38,286
40
-$2,455
-6.4%
2004-05
$14,769
$13,520
1,302
-$1,249
-9.2%
2005-06
$15,354
$16,277
1,327
$923
5.7%
2006-07
$16,207
$16,384
1,317
$177
1.1%
2004-05
$15,433
$11,511
487
-$3,922
-34.1%
2005-06
$15,903
$12,209
491
-$3,694
-30.3%
2006-07
$16,833
$12,714
495
-$4,119
-32.4%
2004-05
$13,790
$10,281
917
-$3,509
-34.1%
2005-06
$14,110
$10,681
910
-$3,429
-32.1%
2006-07
$14,890
$11,086
910
-$3,804
-34.3%
2004-05
$21,106
$17,038
658
-$4,068
-23.9%
2005-06
$21,704
$18,117
673
-$3,587
-19.8%
2006-07
$22,815
$18,605
706
-$4,210
-22.6%
Position
Carpenter
Teacher Aide
Bus Driver
Food Service Worker
Custodian/
Groundskeeper
SOURCE: FL DOE Survey 3 data
Target for 2007-08: Salaries within 5 percentage points of top quartile in the state.
Finding: This table is calculated on DOE classifications and reports number employed based on Polk County statistics. Thus, Charter
District personnel are included in the report. Based on this, these position groups display salary patterns consistent with the prior
years, except for Teacher Aide.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 77 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 6: Incorporate diversity benchmarks into the performance evaluation process for teachers and administrators.
a) Review and revise the current performance evaluation process for teachers and administrators to include diversity
benchmarks.
2005-06
Teacher Assessment Benchmarks:
• The district’s teacher assessment system focuses on essential performance criteria that include six rating rubrics linked to the
Florida Educator Accomplished Practices [FEAP] of Diversity, Planning, Instructional Strategies, Assessment and Managing
the Learning Environment.
• Each of these FEAPs addresses diversity directly. In addition, one other of the district essential performance criteria,
Professionalism, contains two rubrics directly related to diversity issues.
• Finally, the district essential performance criteria item labeled “Student Performance”, addresses learning gains for all
students across AYP sub-groups.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
Administrator Assessment Benchmarks:
• The district assessment system for school-based administrators is based on the 10 Florida Educational Leadership
Standards. One of those standards is “Diversity”.
• The assessment of principals and assistant principals includes an evaluation by the supervisor related to specific behavioral
indicators delineated in the Florida Leadership Standard, Diversity.
• In addition, school-based administrators are evaluated in relation to their School Improvement Plan Goals, one of which must
address student performance. Student performance indicators include learning gains targets across AYP sub-groups.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
2006-07
Teacher Assessment Benchmarks
• Developed and implemented rubrics that include specific expectations for teachers concerning diversity issues as a part of the
essential performance criteria item under the label of Professionalism
• Focused IPGP development and implementation on AYP sub-group variables
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 78 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 6: Incorporate diversity benchmarks into the performance evaluation process for teachers and administrators.
a) Review and revise the current performance evaluation process for teachers and administrators to include diversity
benchmarks.
2006-07 (Continued)
Administrator Assessment Benchmarks
• Identified Diversity as one of the 11 essential performance criteria for principals with benchmarks as defined in the Florida
Leadership Standards
• Developed a specific rubric for each of the 11 essential performance criteria including Diversity that provides a rating rationale for
principals on that criteria item
SOURCE: Professional Development Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 79 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 7: Recognize those who initiate and implement innovative activities that make a difference in learning diversity,
multicultural education, and the unique contributions of minority history.
a) Develop policy and procedures for recognition of activities that make a difference in learning diversity, multicultural
education, and the unique contributions of minority history.
Event Type
Count
of
Events
2005-06
Count of
Count of
Events w/
Awards
Community
at
Involvement Events
Count
of
Events
2006-07
Count of
Events w/
Community
Involvement
Count of
Awards
at
Events
African American Awareness Events
75
30
242
126
63
12
Hispanic Awareness Events
89
47
21
71
34
5
282
148
75
59
44
5
69
58
23
29
46
0
Other Cultural Groups’ Events
Minority Parents’ Events
SOURCE: Office of Diversity Management Report. Schools/Departments Reporting in 2005-06 = 77, in 2006-07 = 64
Target for 2007-08: Policy and procedures for recognition of diversity activities will be developed, approved and implemented.
Finding: The number of events and number of events with community involvement increased for African Awareness and Hispanic
Awareness events. A new system of monthly reporting has been put in place to ensure a complete and thorough report of events
and number of awards received.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 80 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
Objective 8: Implement leadership team strategies that are designed to comprehensively impact academic performance,
discipline sanctions and technology standards of low performing schools.
a) Develop and implement leadership team strategies.
2005-06
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2006-07
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Regular Principal/Assistant Principal meetings were held.
Book Studies were conducted, e.g. Seven Steps of Effective Leadership.
The Leadership Institute provided various sessions to increase the effectiveness of school-based leaders.
Planning for 2006-07 book studies was conducted, e.g. Qualities of Effective Teachers, Building Background Knowledge, The
Leaders Guide to Standards
Site visits and feedback to school-based leaders was provided.
School principals and assistant principals met regularly to address strategies for implementing their school improvement
plans.
Sr. Coordinators met regularly to discuss district professional development needs and to address use of instructional
strategies.
Loop Group – sharing information and coordinating efforts among various district offices
Continuation of Principal/Assistant Principal meetings
Continuation of book studies, leadership institute and site visits
Introduced the Problem Solving/Response to Intervention model and framework to all elementary guidance counselors.
Provided professional development for selected principals on implementing and monitoring standards-based instruction to
include the use of Learning Focused Strategies
Identified and implemented best practices and recent research that supports academic achievement for early learners
District-wide focus on science
Senior Directors meet annually with school administrators to ensure existing School Improvement Plan is implemented
SOURCE: Senior Director Report
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 81 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
School Name
Alta Vista
Apple School
Auburndale Central
Ben Hill Griffin
Boone Middle
Boswell
Caldwell
Churchwell
Crystal Lake Elem.
Crystal Lake Middle
Combee
Davenport SOTA
Dixieland
Dr. N.E. Roberts
Dundee Elem.
Dundee Ridge Middle
Eagle Lake
Eastside
Elbert
Floral Avenue
Foundation Charter
Frostproof
Garner
Gibbons St.
Griffin
Hillcrest
Inwood
Janie Howard Wilson
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Schools In Need of Improvement(SINI) Status
05-06 Status
06-07 Status
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Closed
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Non-SINI
Non-SINI
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Holding & Transfer
Not Title I School*
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Non-SINI
Non-SINI
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Holding & Transfer
Made AYP
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Non-SINI
Non-SINI
No Choice - Not In Improvement Transfer
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Non-SINI
Non-SINI
No Choice - Not In Improvement Transfer
Transfer & SES
Holding, Trans & SES
07-08 Status
Restructuring Planning
Closed
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
Corrective Action
Holding, Trans. & SES
Restructuring Planning
Transfer
Restructuring Planning
Removed from Title I Status
Holding, Corrective Action
New Title I School*
Restructuring Planning
Transfer
Holding, Trans. & SES
Holding, Corrective Action
Made AYP
Holding, Trans. & SES
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
Transfer
Transfer & SES
Holding, Trans. & SES
Transfer
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Page 82 of 101
School Name
Jessie Keen
Kathleen Elementary
Kathleen Middle
Kingsford
Lake Alfred
Lake Shipp
Lena Vista
Lewis/Anna Woodbury
Lime Street
Loughman Oaks
McLaughlin
North Lakeland
Oscar J. Pope
Padgett
Pinewood
Polk Avenue
Polk City
Purcell
Sandhill
Sleepy Hill Middle
Snively
Socrum
Spook Hill
Stephens
Wahneta
Westwood
Winston
05-06 Status
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Non-SINI
Transfer & SES
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Holding & Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Non-SINI
Transfer & SES
No Choice - Not In Improvement
Holding & Transfer
Transfer
Transfer & SES
No Choice - Not In Improvement
Non-SINI
Transfer & SES
Non-SINI
Transfer & SES
Holding & Transfer
Holding & Transfer
No Choice - Not In Improvement
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
06-07 Status
Corrective Action
Holding, Trans & SES
Non-SINI
Corrective Action
Made AYP
Holding, Trans & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Holding, Trans & SES
Corrective Action
Non-SINI
Corrective Action
Transfer
Transfer & SES
Transfer & SES
Corrective Action
Transfer
Non-SINI
Corrective Action
Non-SINI
Corrective Action
Made AYP
Transfer & SES
Transfer
Corrective Action
Corrective Action
Corrective Action
07-08 Status
Restructuring Planning
Made AYP
Transfer
Restructuring Planning
Made AYP
Made AYP
Corrective Action
Holding, Corrective Action
Made AYP
Restructuring Planning
Transfer
Holding, Corrective Action
Holding, Transfer
Holding, Trans. & SES
Corrective Action
Holding, Corrective Action
Holding, Transfer
Transfer
Restructuring Planning
Transfer
Restructuring Planning
Made AYP
Holding, Trans. & SES
Transfer & SES
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
Restructuring Planning
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
Note: * Dr. N.E. Roberts Elementary School was not selected for Title I service in 2006-07 because it fell below the district’s cutoff for free and reduced lunch. They qualified for Title I again for 2007-08,
because they were not Title I in 06-07. Their AYP sanctions start from square one and no sanctions will apply to them unless they fail to make AYP for two consecutive years.
Finding: In 2005-06, 29 schools did not make AYP and had to provide Transfer and Supplemental Education Services. 12 made AYP and
went into a holding pattern. In 2006-07, 24 (83%) of the same 29 schools did not make AYP and progressed to the Corrective
Action phase; 4 entered holding; and, one charter school closed. In 2007-08, 18 schools did not make AYP and entered
Restructuring Planning; and 6 are in a holding pattern
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 83 of 101
Goal 5: Instructional Leadership
We will recruit and retain highly qualified personnel by providing a professional work environment that is challenging, nurturing and
conducive to professional growth.
School-based Instructional Staff with At Least Level One Technology Proficiency
Count of Level One Percent of Level One
Proficiency
Proficiency
School Year
Total Staff
2004-05
5,488
1,043
19.0%
2005-06
6,352
2,429
38.2%
2006-07
5,824
3,820
65.6%
SOURCE: Office of School Technology
NOTE: Counts of level one proficiency reflect teachers within the school year with tech one proficiency regardless of the year in which the proficiency was obtained.
Target for 2007-08: District-wide 40% or more of the school-based instructional staff will achieved at least level one technology
proficiency.
Finding: The percent of instructional staff with at least level one technology proficiency has nearly doubled each year since the baseline.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 84 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 1: Create a design for elementary, middle, and high schools, and standard relating to each school type that are
consistent with educational research concerning student learning processes.
a) Research and review effective campus designs to reflect effective instructional practices, incorporate the findings into
existing campuses, and utilize best-practices and equitable consideration in construction of new campuses.
2005-06
Effective designs have been reviewed to reflect effective instructional practices and have been incorporated into school designs as
follows:
• Prototypical elementary schools, Elementary Schools “A = Horizon,” “B = name to be determined,” “G = Chain of Lakes,” “H =
property not acquired,” and “I = Sleepy Hill.”
• Prototypical middle school, Middle School “AA = scope changed to elementary, named Lake Marion Creek.”
• Prototypical high schools, High Schools, “AAA = Ridge Community,” and “BBB = Teneroc.”
• Special School Projects at Harrison School of the Arts, McLaughlin Middle School and Ridge Technical Center.
• Classroom building additions at more than 40 schools.
SOURCE: Office Facilities and Operations
Review of facilities use with principals:
• Sr. Directors conducted facility walk-throughs with principals
• Utilization of portables reviewed with Sr. Directors
In addition, the Fine Arts Department and Facilities Division planned and/or began implementation of fine arts facility improvements at
Frostproof Middle/Senior, Harrison SOA, and McLaughlin Middle during the 2005-06 school year and the Sr. Director of Middle School
was provided sketches of new campus designs for future middle schools facilities for review.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Instructional Services
• Discussion and planning for comprehensive school visitor tracking system
• Discussion and planning for a GIS-based automated bus routing system, bio-metrically based (fingerprint) for student tracking and
buses electronically tracked via GIS map.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Support Services
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 85 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 1: Create a design for elementary, middle, and high schools, and standard relating to each school type that are
consistent with educational research concerning student learning processes.
a) Research and review effective campus designs to reflect effective instructional practices, incorporate the findings into
existing campuses, and utilize best-practices and equitable consideration in construction of new campuses.
2006-07
Effective designs are continually reviewed to reflect effective instructional practices and have been incorporated into school designs as
follow:
• Prototypical elementary schools
• Prototypical middle school
• Prototypical high schools
• Prototypical ninth grade center
• Special School Projects at Harrison School of the Arts, McLaughlin Middle School and Ridge Technical Center are to be
completed by the summer of 2009.
• Evaluation and updating of campus master plans.
SOURCE: Office Facilities and Operations
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 86 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 2: Cultivate a highly professional environment that is safe, orderly and family friendly.
a) Require all employees to wear ID badges.
Perceived Level of Employee ID Badge Utilization
4
3.3
3.6
3.7
3.8
Mean Response
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
January 2006
June 2006
January 2007
2008 Target
SOURCE: Strategic Plan Implementation Survey administered to all school based-administrators and Sr. Coordinator level and higher district staff. Construct measured with four items on a scale of one to
four with four being most favorable.
Finding: The perceived level of employee badge utilization has increased gradually with a trend that appears to be in-line to meet the 2008
target.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 87 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 2: Cultivate a highly professional environment that is safe, orderly and family friendly.
b) Front office staff will greet school visitors in a timely manner, and parent concerns will be resolved at the point of origin.
2005-06
• For the 05-06 School Year, approximately 160 participants were trained in “Family Friendly Schools”, a four-hour professional
development training for school-based office staff, aimed at increasing effective interactions with families and family
involvement by creating an inviting and helpful school environment.
• The Polk County Schools Mission Statement and Strategic Plan set the purpose of the session followed by data and research
related to family involvement and its relationship to student achievement.
• Differences in families were explored as well as the need for different communication methods.
• Information about customer service and business success was provided while customers’ needs and our obligation to serve
the customers was reiterated.
• Examination of communication skills including non-verbal communication (body language) and how to send positive
messages was conducted.
• The Six Characteristics of a Family Friendly School (as identified by the Florida Partnership for Family Involvement) was
discussed followed by reviewing specific school strategies and planning for action.
• Additionally, five workshops of F.I.S.H. (Focus, Invite, Smile, Help) with approximately 300 participants were conducted.
They were aimed at increasing positive interactions within the workplace by teaching individuals to reevaluate their attitudes
and thus create a more family-friendly environment.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Office of Human Resource Development
•
It was also noted that under section 4.7 of the teacher agreement regarding professional dress, it states: “In as much as
teachers are role models for students, each teacher shall maintain a neat, professional appearance appropriate for his/her
specific teaching assignment.”
2006-07
Customer Friendly Staff
• Continued delivery of “Family Friendly Schools” professional development activities for educational support staff
• Facilitated educational support staff professional institute with sessions that pertained to family friendly strategies,
interpersonal communication skills, ethics, and effective telephone skills
Source: Professional Development Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 88 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 2: Cultivate a highly professional environment that is safe, orderly and family friendly.
2005-06
Student Service Personnel have developed a number of training programs to promote the understanding and use of pro-active methods
of working with students. These include:
• Bullying Prevention online training
• Suicide prevention training
• Behavior management strategies
• The support and training of schools in the Positive Behavior Support (PBS) process
SOURCE: Student Services Department
2006-07
Student Services personnel continued training efforts in the areas of bullying prevention, suicide prevention, behavior management,
and support for the district’s Positive Behavior Support (PBS) process. Child abuse was added to the list of training initiatives. Other
initiatives for the 2006-07 school year are listed below:
• More than 150 participants completed the Bullying blackboard (online), comprehensive training module. Bullying prevention
outreach training was conducted with all elementary guidance counselors and sessions were presented to administrators at the
Summer Leadership Conference. Three schools were targeted with more intense bullying prevention initiatives.
• A Blackboard Suicide Prevention training module was launched during the 2006-07 school year.
• A suicide prevention module targeting high risk students was also developed. A trainer of trainers model was used to in-service
selected crisis team/school psychologists to provide the training to ROTC students.
• Crisis Intervention training was conducted for approximately 50 support personnel including school psychologists, counselors,
social workers, nurses, and prevention personnel.
• Threat Assessment and NOVA (National Organization for Victim Assistance) training was provided for student services and
administrative personnel. There were 35 participants.
• Procedures for responding to potential child abuse were updated and distributed to Student Services and Administrative
personnel.
• A comprehensive child abuse training application was begun during the 06-07 school year by a multi disciplinary committee of
PCSB and community agency personnel. Training formats ranging from Blackboard (comprehensive) to presentations that can
be adapted to the needs and time constraints of the audience are being added.
• Student Services personnel worked closely with Information Services to develop a student attendance Genesis application to
accommodate Elegrade and Pinnacle attendance data, distinguish between excused and unexcused absences, and track
student attendance on a daily basis.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 89 of 101
Goal 6: Safe and Orderly Environment
We will establish learning environments that ensure the academic and personal success of each student.
Objective 2: Cultivate a highly professional environment that is safe, orderly and family friendly.
2006-07 (Continued)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Driver License Attendance Program Procedural Manual was developed and implemented to ensure compliance with state
reporting requirements.
The Student Code of Conduct was revised to strengthen the district’s attendance policy.
.An Attendance Procedural Manual was begun for Social Workers to ensure consistency across the district with attendance
procedures and truancy interventions.
The Substance Abuse Code of Conduct program at the Mark Wilcox Center served approximately 370 students who were
referred by school personnel or voluntarily chose to participate in the district’s substance abuse prevention program. The
program was evaluated during the 2006-07 school year by Data Integrated Monitoring and Evaluation Systems with findings
confirming the positive impact of the program on students and their parents.
Approximately 4,500 students were drug tested through the Student Athletic Drug Testing grant program and 400 students who
voluntarily participated in the Rally Against Drugs program at Mulberry High School. Our district’s Prevention Survey
administered to students in grades 6-12 indicates significant downward trends in the use of marijuana and binge drinking among
students engaged in the testing process. The final results of the 3 year U.S. DOE Drug Testing Grant will be available in
December of 2007.
New Harcourt Health and Fitness and Glencoe text books have been adopted, purchased, and will be distributed to all (K-9)
classroom teachers during the 2007-08 school year.
A Pandemic Influenza Plan was developed by a multidisciplinary committee of student services and support services personnel
and approved by the School Board. A federal Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools grant project was submitted.
Prevention Education RNs provided 7,237 lessons in Human Growth and Development, Disease Awareness and Prevention and
Healthy Lifestyle Choices for students in grades 4-12.
AED training and implementation continued throughout the 2006-07 school year.
The Administrative Code of Conduct was updated to ensure accuracy and consistency in reporting discipline data by school
based administrators.
SOURCE: Student Services Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 90 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 1: Establish an effective system of communication linking district, school and home.
a) Establish mechanisms at the district and school level to communicate with parents, staff and community on a regular
basis.
2005-06
District, school and home links were established using 18 plans in the 2005-06 school year compared to 13 reported in 2004-05.
1. Communiqués and correspondence to parents/others
2. Board meeting special recognitions
3. Community Involvement (volunteer/mentor programs, Partners in Education, etc.)
4. Community Reports (insert in daily newspaper)
5. Correspondence, text, public presentations and speeches
6. District Office reception and foyer area
7. Education Channel
8. Monthly E-memos
9. Information Guide and Meet the School Board and Superintendent brochure
10. Florida Learn & Serve
11. Media Relations (newspaper, television, and radio coverage)
12. Parent Guide
13. Polk County Times
14. Public and general information requests
15. Research/archival retrieves
16. Five Star Schools
17. School House News
18. Special Events
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department and Office of Minority Relations
2006-07
The Community Relations Department provided information and collaborated with the community on minority, challenged and/or
economically disadvantaged students and school needs through communications vehicles involving the following events or programs:
• National Achievement Scholar program,
• MLK Jr. Day Essay Contest,
• Minority Achievement Banquet,
• Florida's Positive Behavior Support Project,
• Doris Sanders playground opening,
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 91 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 1: Establish an effective system of communication linking district, school and home.
a) Establish mechanisms at the district and school level to communicate with parents, staff and community on a regular
basis.
2006-07 (Continued)
• About Face and Master Key Awards,
• Free and Reduced Price Meal program,
• Two Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource Systems workshops,
• Florida Family Literacy Initiative with Lakeland Teen Parent,
• Central Florida Business Diversity Council,
• Polk Life and Learning Country Store,
• Gause Academy-Jeppesen Vision Quest partnership,
• Minority student winning U.S. National Botanic Conservatory art contest,
• Victory Against Hunger program,
• Roosevelt Academy Senior Q Month event,
• School Board recognition of long-serving minority educator,
• Autism & Law Enforcement Workshop,
• Locks of Love,
• Free Summer Meal program,
• Noah’s Nest,
• Polk County Builders Association/Workforce Education construction project,
• Southwest Elementary Learn & Serve Alzheimer’s project,
• Minority Relations Parent Outreach Program, minority staff member honored by Florida Literacy Coalition,
• Minority Relations Breakfast Roundtable
The following were also added to the mechanisms established in 2005-06:
• School Newsletters
• PTA and PTO
• Active Education subcommittees in area Chambers of Commerce.
• School signs (marquees) used to promote district needs, initiatives and recognitions.
• Schools held parent meetings in community buildings near where students live.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department and Learning Division.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 92 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
a) Provide information and collaborate with the community on student and school needs (e.g., parent workshops).
2005-06
• There were 41 events, programs and initiatives to promote school and community interaction among 168 community groups,
associations, and organizations in the 2005-06 school year compared to 15 reported events in 2004-05.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department and Office of Minority Relations
2006-07
• There were 162 events, programs and initiatives to promote interaction among 246 community groups, associations and
organizations in 2006-2007.
• Communication plans linking district, school and home were:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Communiques, correspondence to parents/others
Board meeting special recognitions
Community Involvement (volunteer/mentor programs, Partners in Education)
Community Update published in Polk County’s largest daily newspaper
Public presentations and speeches
District Office reception and foyer area
Education Channel
Month E-Memo to community stakeholders
Information Guide
Florida Learn & Serve
Media Relations (newspaper, television, radio coverage)
Polk Voice blog
Parent Guide
Polk County Times
Fulfillment of information requests from public
Five Star Schools
School House News
Special Events
Teacher Appreciation Week poster campaign
Teacher Appreciation Week cable television advertising
No Weapons In School poster campaign
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 93 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
a) Provide information and collaborate with the community on student and school needs (e.g., parent workshops).
2006-07 (Continued)
During the 2006-2007 school year the Office of Diversity Management expanded its outreach to the community through parent
engagement resources and community based organizations. These community contacts included the following:
• Established the District-wide Diversity Council with representation from various ethnic groups, churches, parents, civil rights
groups, university officials and educators
• Monthly report Community Relations Advisory Committee (CRAC) which consisted of representatives from the Sheriff’s
Office, County Commissioners, churches, businesses, community-based non-profits and retired educators
• Continued to work with various ministerial groups in the minority community who are interested in drop-out prevention and
credit recovery programs for struggling students
• Shared the District’s learning initiatives and other programs that impact diverse students with Leadership Lakeland, Winter
Haven Focus on Leadership, Central Florida Minority Contractors, PCC Martin Luther King Luncheon, Say No To DrugsBartow Chamber and various school staffs
• Developed a relationship with a number of organizations as part of our Parent Engagement Program activities: Big
Brothers/Big Sisters of Tampa Bay, Haines City Chamber of Commerce, Church Service Center-Bartow, Compassion Action
for Haitians, Domino’s Pizza-Bartow, Family Fundamentals-Lakeland, Lifeline for Youth and Family-Winter Haven, Publix
Supermarkets, St. Ann’s Catholic Church-Haines City, Writers, Inc.: Read Me Another Story-Lakeland, and outreach to
parents in the Parent Engagement Programs at five pilot schools.
• Assisted the schools and the County with the Martin Luther King Essay contest.
Source: Office of Diversity Management
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 94 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
b) Establish communication with local post secondary institutions.
2005-06
• PCC and Chain of Lakes Collegiate High Schools on college campuses
• Grant planning with:
o USF Lakeland – Educational Leadership
o USF Tampa – Institution for Instructional Research & Practice
o PCC – Upward Bound
o USF Lakeland – Instructional Technology
o UF – Educational Leadership
o UF – Public Health
o UCF – Educational Leadership
o USF Tampa – Institute of Mental health
o PCC – Workforce Education
• Workforce education articulation agreements were developed with several post-secondary schools for 2006-07
implementation.
• Polk Education Foundation (PEF) works with all local colleges and universities to facilitate scholarships to Polk graduating
seniors
• Planning for a program designed to assist minority students in attending USF and having peer mentoring services for support
was facilitated by PEF.
SOURCE: Sr. Director & Director Reports
2006-07
• A number of formalized inter-institutional agreements have been established with various post-secondary institutions as part
of a commitment to enhance educational opportunities available to students via accelerated options such as dual enrollment
and college credit early admission.
• An additional inter-institutional agreement was executed in 2006-2007 with South Florida Community College to increase
access for Ft. Meade and Frostproof High School students.
SOURCE: Sr. Director & Director Reports
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 95 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
c) Collaborate with the community on Pre-K student needs and school readiness.
2005-06
Polk County Schools Pre-Kindergarten programs partner with:
• Polk County Early Learning Coalition
o Quality Initiatives:
ƒ Florida First Start: Birth to 3 parenting program
ƒ Family Literacy Project – Take Home Library (FFS and PreK)
ƒ Comprehensive Health Services Project (PreK)
ƒ Teacher Resource Support (PreK)
o County Level Committees and Board
ƒ Coalition Board
ƒ Enhancements project
ƒ Curriculum Development Committee
o Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Services
ƒ Summer 300 hour program
ƒ Spring Semester 540 hour program
• Youth and Families Alternatives, Inc.
o School Readiness services (Pre-Kindergarten) for 700+ children
• Success by 6 / United Way
o Committee participants
• Polk Community College
o TEACH scholarship Program: 57 participants
• Polk Collaborative Partners in Quality Early Care and Education
o Co-host annual conferences
2006-07
Polk County Schools Pre-Kindergarten Programs continued partnerships with:
• Polk County Early Learning Coalition
o ELC-Polk Board participation
o Quality Initiatives (family literacy, Florida First Start, nursing supports)
o Childcare services program enhancements and curriculum development committees
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 96 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
c) Collaborate with the community on Pre-K student needs and school readiness.
2006-07 (continued)
• VPK (Voluntary PreKindergarten)
o Spring Semester 540 hour program - 552 students at 48 school locations
o Summer 300 hour program - 252 students at 10 school locations
• Youth and Families Alternatives, Inc.
o Subsidized child care services for 602 children
• Success by 6 / United Way
o Special emphasis on early literacy and vocabulary development activities
• College Scholarships:
o Polk Community College and University of South Florida
o 59 PreK staff members are actively enrolled in classes
SOURCE: Child Care Services
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 97 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 2: Expand the system’s community outreach function to promote school and community interaction.
c) Collaborate with the community on Pre-K student needs and school readiness.
Kindergarten Readiness Rate
SRUSS 2004-05
SRUSS 2005-06
FLKRS 2006-07
District
76%
74%
78%
State
84%
82%
86%
SOURCE: Office of Assessment, Accountability, and Evaluation
DIBELS Status Results
Polk County Schools
Status
Letter Naming Percent
Initial Sounds Percent
Fall 2004
Fall 2005
Fall 2006
Fall 2004
Fall 2005
Fall 2006
N=
5,986
6,469
6,874
5,984
6,357
6,723
Above Average
36
36
42
34
34
38
Low Risk
16
15
15
20
21
21
Moderate Risk
20
20
19
22
21
21
High Risk
28
29
24
25
24
20
STATE
N=
175,023
178,953
182,278
174,913
172,901
176,957
Above Average
48
50
56
39
41
44
Low Risk
15
14
14
19
20
19
Moderate Risk
17
16
14
20
20
19
High Risk
20
19
16
22
20
18
Target for 2007-08: A 9% increase in Kindergarten Readiness Rate over 2004-05 baseline year. (Aligned with Polk Vision’s Goal)
Finding: Kindergarten Readiness rates increased from the baseline year, in spite of the fact that a different instrument was used in 2006-07. This is
also reflected in the first administration of the DIBELS. Students are entering Polk schools with a higher rate of students scoring “Above
Average” and less as “High Risk.”
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 98 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 3: Promote initiative and encourage inclusive practices that increase multi-cultural cooperation within the schools and
community.
a) Provide information and collaborate with the community on minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged
students and school needs.
2005-06
• Started the Annual Superintendent’s Breakfast with the minority community to recruit support from churches, community
leaders and organizations
• Participation in the MLK Essay Challenge
• A Sponsor of the new Multi-cultural Festival
• A parent engagement committee with staff and parents was formed as an outgrowth of parent outreach and visitation program.
• A diversity council was established consisting of staff and community leaders for the purpose of making recommendations to
the superintendent regarding improving the district’s diversity effectiveness.
• The United Negro College Fund participation and contribution was continued.
• Assisted external organizations in securing grants for programs serving low income families, i.e. after-school programs,
career enhancement programs, and career preparation programs
• Minority Achievement Council highlighted achievement of high achieving minority students, some received scholarships.
• PEF provides 4-year scholarships to students with physical disabilities who meet free/reduced lunch criteria and have the
potential for college success with external donor funds.
• Established a ESOL Parent Leadership Council with the goal of increasing parental involvement
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department, Office of Minority Relations, and Sr. Directors & Directors Reports
2006-07
• Elementary Principals received diversity training.
• The parent engagement committee was continued as an outgrowth of the parent outreach and visitation program. One (1)
Parent Engagement Facilitator and five (5) Parent Engagement Para educators were hired to serve pilot schools to make the
home school connection to increase the level of involvement of minority parents and level of support for schools and
teachers
• Continued participation in the Annual Superintendent’s Breakfast with the minority community, and sponsoring the Multicultural Festival to recruit support from churches, community leaders and organizations
• Continued involvement in the MLK Essay challenge with over 630 students actively participating
• The diversity council consisting of staff and community leaders for the purpose of making recommendations to the
superintendent regarding improving the district’s diversity effectiveness was continued.
• The United Negro College Fund participation and contribution was continued.
• Assisted external organizations in securing grants for programs serving low income families.
• Minority Achievement Council highlighted achievement of high achieving minority students, some received scholarships.
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 99 of 101
Goal 7: Stakeholder Relationships
We will actively pursue and cultivate parent, community and business involvement.
Objective 3: Promote initiative and encourage inclusive practices that increase multi-cultural cooperation within the schools and
community.
a) Provide information and collaborate with the community on minority, challenged and/or economically disadvantaged
students and school needs.
2006-07 (Continued)
• Continued the ESOL Parent Leadership Council with the goal of increasing parental involvement
• Supported the employment of a supplier of Diversity to increase voluntary participation in economic and business
opportunities to regional small and minority businesses with the district.
• Collaborated with the curriculum department to implement a comprehensive Reading Plan that enforces Principal
involvement, uninterrupted reading blocks of time, and feedback on academic progress of all students, including minority
students
• Assisted in the submittal of Head Start Program grant for the district
• Continue to focus on sensitivity to demographic diversity.
SOURCE: PCSB’s Community Relations Department, Office of Diversity Management, and Sr. Directors & Directors Reports
Assessment, Accountability and Evaluation
Page 100 of 101
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