Steelcase Health Time for Change Insights + Applications Guide

Steelcase Health Time for Change Insights + Applications Guide
V2
INSIGHTS, APPLICATIONS + SOLUTIONS
TIME FOR CHANGE:
NEW SOLUTIONS FOR
HEALTHCARE SPACES
We work with leading healthcare organizations
to create safe and efficient spaces that deliver
greater connection, empathy and wellbeing for
everyone involved in the experience of health.
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An Introduction: Insights
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Insight-Led Applications
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Exam Spaces
40
Clinical Team Spaces
56
Patient Rooms
72
Infusion Treatment Spaces
86
Transition Spaces
104
Product Solutions
THE IMPROVEMENT IMPERATIVE
THE EXPERIENCE OF HEALTHCARE
IS RAPIDLY EVOLVING
Today’s healthcare is an enormous enterprise
undergoing massive change as it simultaneously
tackles multiple challenges: improving the health
of the population, providing better patient experiences and outcomes, and reducing costs—all
without sacrificing the dedication, engagement
and wellbeing of the people who comprise the
healthcare profession.
MOUNTING EVIDENCE CONFIRMS
THAT IMPROVEMENT IS IMPERATIVE :
Despite expert clinicians, advanced treatments
and technologies plus expanding patient
involvement, at least 60 percent of the U.S.
population fails to meet baseline metrics
of good health, and at least 40 percent report
they lack a connected relationship with their
primary care physicians.
Worldwide, more than one in three patients
think providers do not spend enough time
on their care.1
Among the advanced economies of the
world, the United States spends the most
on healthcare—$2.9 trillion annually—with
the worst outcomes. 2
While the rate of health-cost growth has
slowed in every high-income country during
the past decade, many people are paying
higher out-of-pocket costs.3
Nearly half of U.S. physicians experience
symptoms of burnout.4
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Yet for most organizations, improving healthcare value remains a complex undertaking.
New realities, tensions and expectations place
significant strains and burdens on existing
business models, processes and facilities. As
new administrative tasks and technologies
redirect clinical practice, care providers’ stress
increases and their wellbeing suffers.5 As
patients and their families take on higher outof-pocket costs6 and become more informed
as consumers of care, their expectations
keep rising.7 And, despite growing evidence
that clinician/patient/family interaction is key
to patient and clinician outcomes,8 many
healthcare spaces aren’t designed to support
their mutual participation.
$4,551
Average spent per capita
over the course of one
year (2013) on health
expenditures in highly
industrialized nations
(shown in USD). 9
US
$9,146
CANADA
$5,718
GERMANY FRANCE
$5,006
$4,864
JAPAN
$3,966
UK
$3,598
ITALY
$3,155
RUSSIA
$957
To address the challenges, leverage opportunities and advance healthcare’s mission of
excellence, forward-facing organizations are
reassessing every aspect of their operations
and retooling their strategies for success.
1 PRNewswire (March 13, 2012). HawkPartners/ICARE
Global Patient Pulse reveals U.S. patients conflicted
about future of healthcare system, despite high
satisfaction. Cambridge, MA.
2 Davis, K., Stremikis, K., Squires, D. & Schoen, C.
(2014). Mirror, mirror on the wall: How the performance
of the U.S. health system compares internationally.
New York: Commonwealth Fund.
3 Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development (2015). Focus on health spending: OECD
health statistics.
4 Peckham,
C. (2015). Physician Burnout: It just keeps
getting worse. Medscape, January 26, 2015.
5 Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., & Valente, M. (2009).
The effect of environmental design on reducing
nursing errors and increasing efficiency in acute
care settings: a review and analysis of the literature.
Environment and Behavior, 41(6), 755-786.
6 Collins, S., Rasmussen, P., Doty, M., & Beutel,
S. (2014). Too high a price: Out-of-pocket health
care costs in the United States. Findings from the
Commonwealth Fund Health Care Affordability
Tracking Survey, September–October 2014.
Commonwealth Fund pub. 1784 Vol. 29.
7 Sadler, B. (2009). Letter to the editor. Health
Environments Research & Design Journal, 3(1), 102-104.
8 Street, R., Makoul, G., Arora, N., & Epstein, R. (2009).
How does communication heal? Pathways linking
clinician-patient communication to health outcomes.
Patient Education & Counseling, 74(3), 295-301.
9 World Health Organization Global Health Expenditure
database.
AN INTRODUCTION: INSIGHTS
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An Introduction : Insights
A RADICAL TRANSFORMATION
Healthcare is evolving at a rapid pace, changing
on almost every front as healthcare organizations,
patients, families and payers all seek improved
experiences, safety, outcomes and satisfaction.
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AN INTRODUCTION: INSIGHTS
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An Introduction : Insights
THE NEW PARADIGM
MUTUAL PARTICIPATION
ENGAGING ALL
PARTICIPANTS
IN HEALTH IS THE
NEW PARADIGM.
ILLNESS
WELLNESS
WELLBEING
The focus is expanding beyond treating illness to include wellness and wellbeing, with patients,
their families and health professionals actively participating throughout the continuum of care.
Innovators are staking out a role that goes beyond
treating illnesses. They’re strategically expanding
their focus to include wellness and wellbeing,
tapping into growing awareness that poor
health diminishes the quality of people’s lives.1
Clinicians and allied healthcare professionals are
encouraging the active engagement of patients
and their families, taking time to build relationships
of partnership and mutual participation as together
they set goals and make decisions about care.
Processes are fast becoming less directive
and more collaborative, involving patients
and their families more actively. 2
Needs and expectations are changing as
patients’ perspectives, values and preferences
become more integral to the care process.3
The accelerating scope, scale and impact
of technology is driving a need to share
information in new ways.2
1 Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (n.d.).
National Healthy Hospital Choices.
2 Institute of Medicine (2013). Partnering with patients to drive shared decisions, better value, and care improvement.
3 Frampton, S. (2012). Healthcare and the patient experience: Harmonizing care and environment. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 5(2), 3-6.
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An Introduction : Insights
LEVERAGING SPACE
Faced with such sweeping changes,
healthcare organizations shouldn’t overlook
an asset that’s highly leverageable and
pivotal to success: their spaces.
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INTRODUCTION
AN INTRODUCTION:
LEVERAGING
INSIGHTS
SPACE
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An Introduction : Insights
EXPECTATIONS REGULATION ADHERENCE VS. PATIENTS AS CONSUMERS
AREAS OF TENSION
Expectations of healthcare providers are increasing due to changes in both
regulatory and consumer demands. New laws enabled by the Affordable Care
Act are driving business model and systems changes to effectively manage
reimbursement levels, placing new demands on healthcare institutions that must
continue to deliver safe, high-value care. Concurrently, healthcare expectations
are rising as the patient-consumer does more research, asks more questions
and requires more personalized attention and responsiveness—ultimately
choosing care options and providers that meet their individual needs.
COMPLEXITY CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT VS. HEALTH FACILITY CONSTRAINTS
As changing dynamics add complexity to an already burdened
industry, the hurdles that healthcare organizations face are greater
than ever. Addressing high-priority issues is key to developing
strategies for sustainable success. Steelcase research has identified
four primary tensions that are challenging existing healthcare
norms. Each presents challenges but also significant opportunities.
Worldwide, the burden of chronic diseases is rapidly increasing, expected to reach
57 percent of the population by 2020,1 resulting in health conditions that require not
only team-based care but also the active participation of family care partners. While
coordinated care must be provided by teams of primary care doctors, advanced
practice providers, nurses, pharmacists and allied health staff, there is also growing
understanding of the importance of families as essential care partners who bring
information, perspectives, advocacy and encouragement to the care process. Adding
complexity to the situation is the realization that the coordination of care must often
be accomplished within constrained healthcare facilities that undermine collaborative
care. The result is inefficient and even potentially unsafe workflows for the team of
providers, as well as unwelcoming and unproductive environments for family members.
STRAIN CLINICIAN STRESSORS VS. HEALTH SYSTEM STRESSORS
Healthcare has always been high-stress work, and significant changes underway in the
profession are intensifying workloads and challenges. Rising retirement rates and fewer
people entering healthcare professions have resulted in clinician shortages, resulting
in demanding work schedules and appointment delays. Physician burnout is being
further complicated by the need to embrace health system changes such as electronic
health records, new technologies and demands for more efficiency. As healthcare
systems grapple with the new risks and pressures of a rapidly evolving industry, making
necessary changes while also maintaining clinician sustainability is often challenging.
SAFETY ACCOUNTABILITY VS. EVOLVING BOUNDARIES
Research and regulatory pressures are continually redefining the meaning of “first, do
no harm.” What was once good enough—or unfortunate but inevitable—is no longer
acceptable as the concepts of harm and preventability evolve and expand.2 From
healthcare-acquired conditions to adverse events in ambulatory care, the boundary of
patient safety is stretching. Tackling patient safety requires engagement of the entire
health system—the people, the processes, the policies and the environment of care.
1 The Center for Health Design (2015). EDAC Study Guide 1: An introduction to evidence-based design:
Exploring healthcare and design (3rd ed., Chapter 1, pp.1-60). Concord, CA.
2Vincent, C., & Amalberti, R. (2015). Safety in healthcare is a moving target. BMJ Quality & Safety.
Published Online First: July 6, 2015. http://doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2014-003702.
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An Introduction : Insights
THE HEALTHCARE JOURNEY
TODAY’S HEALTHCARE
JOURNEY NEEDS TO
BE HUMAN-CENTERED.
Environments affect human behaviors and
experiences. Healthcare organizations that
embrace this reality—in their spaces as well
as in their strategies, decisions and cultures—
are positioned to deliver greater value in a
differentiated way. When spaces are intentionally designed to meet people’s intrinsic and
extrinsic needs, they can improve healthcare
experiences in significant ways:
When spaces productively support communication
and collaboration, care providers, patients and
family members can all be mutual participants in
the important undertaking of improving health.
When spaces are inviting and meet the fundamental
needs of family members, their vital role as partners
in care is supported.
When spaces afford the physical, cognitive and
emotional wellbeing of care providers, their potential
for delivering exemplary care becomes amplified.
Ulrich, R., Zimring, C., Joseph, A., Quan, X., & Choudhury, B.
(2004). The role of the physical environment in the hospital of
the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Concord,
CA: The Center for Health Design.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
When spaces support patient safety through
collaboration and organizational awareness,
ergonomically appropriate furnishings, and easily
cleanable surface materials, latent harms can be
mitigated.
AN INTRODUCTION: INSIGHTS
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An Introduction : Insights
THE CHALLENGE FOR HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS
As healthcare organizations face today’s complex challenges,
improving performance and delivering greater value throughout
the enterprise is fundamental for attaining competitive advantage.
Total cost management is an unrelenting priority
as pressure mounts to manage costs while improving
safety, quality and satisfaction. Every investment must
contribute to delivering an effective, efficient and
satisfying healthcare experience for patients and
their loved ones. Balancing investment and ROI must
also include attracting and retaining quality healthcare professionals and ensuring their efficiency, safety,
satisfaction and wellbeing at work.
Health outcomes are why health organizations
exist: to help people become healthier and maintain
optimal health. As always, this depends on improving
the quality and safety of care. Now, however, improving
health goes beyond diagnosing and treating illness. It
also includes preventing adverse events and focusing
on wellness and wellbeing, collaborating with patients
and their families throughout the healthcare journey as
decisions are made about health goals and care options.
Revenue generation is an essential driver of an
organization’s sustainability, and it is directly affected
by the shift from volume-based to value-based
models of care. Solutions must support an organization’s ability to generate revenue and even create
opportunities for new service offerings at each point
of the healthcare journey, including waiting and
transition times.
Patient & staff satisfaction depends on developing a deep understanding of what people want
and need, and then delivering experiences that
demonstrate differentiating value. For patients and
their families, this means experiences that promote
optimal healing and ease stress. For healthcare
professionals, this means productive and meaningful
work experiences that enable them to do their
best work by affirming their physical, cognitive and
emotional needs.
TOTAL COST
MANAGEMENT
REVENUE
GENERATION
HEALTH
OUTCOMES
PATIENT & STAFF
SATISFACTION
Effectively manage
the total cost of the
experience.
Create revenue through
new efficiencies,
performance levels
and offerings.
Improve clinical outcomes
by meeting or exceeding
industry requirements for
quality, safety, infection
control, clinical efficiency
and sustainability.
Improve patient/family
perception of care
and support clinician
sustainability.
Sadler, B., DuBose, J., & Zimring, C. (2008). The business case for building better hospitals through evidence-based design. Healthcare Environments
Research and Design Journal, 1(3), 22-39.
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An Introduction : Insights
OUR RESEARCH
23 INVESTIGATIONS COMPLETED
52 HEALTHCARE FACILITIES STUDIED
15,280 HOURS OF OBSERVATIONAL RESEARCH
YIELDED NEW INSIGHTS
At Steelcase Health, we are continually working
to deepen our understanding of the science
and experience of healthcare delivery. For
more than a decade, our teams have delved
into the published literature and undertaken
our own primary research to better understand the realities and opportunities that all
healthcare organizations face. We’ve studied
a broad spectrum of facilities, observing
and documenting everyday processes and
interactions in real time.
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As we continue to learn and synthesize
our findings, we gain new insights into
how healthcare organizations can
achieve their goals by fully leveraging
the power of place.
AN INTRODUCTION: INSIGHTS
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An Introduction : Insights
DESIGN PRINCIPLE
PATIENTS
Design for the Human Factor
Our research complements long-standing findings that spaces profoundly affect
people’s relationships, perceptions and behaviors. Designing for the human factor
can help healthcare organizations improve patient and staff experiences, support
safety, improve health outcomes, and reduce costs.1
HUMANIZE
EMPOWER
CONNECT
the care process
to promote a
compassionate
experience.
people to optimize
the clinical encounter.
stakeholders to
support better
outcomes.
FAMILY
PROVIDERS
Enhance people’s connections, wellbeing
and safety by designing for the human factor.
1 Cama, R. (2009). Evidence-based healthcare design. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
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An Introduction : Insights
DESIGN PRINCIPLE
PEOPLE
Integrate the Experiences
Structures, processes and outcomes in
healthcare are all interrelated. As a result,
it’s essential to design for the many intersections of people, place and technology.1
The result can be safer, more engaging
settings that fully leverage the power
of place to support optimal healthcare
experiences.
CONNECTED
CARE
N
OL
OG
Y
E
AC
PL
TE
CH
Optimize healthcare experiences by connecting
people + place + technology.
1 The Center for Health Design (2015). EDAC Study Guide 1: An introduction to evidence-based design: Exploring healthcare and design
(3rd ed., Chapter 1, pp.1-60). Concord, CA.
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AN INTRODUCTION: INSIGHTS
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INSIGHT- LED APPLICATIONS
As we continue to learn and synthesize our findings, we gain
new insights into how healthcare organizations can achieve their
goals by fully leveraging the power of place.
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS
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Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Patient Rooms
Infusion
Transition
EXAM SPACES
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EXAM SPACES OBSERVATIONS
OBSERVATIONS
Inefficient, unwieldy
floor plans
Exam
No storage for patient’s
clothing and personal items
LEARNING
Poor support/sightlines for
sharing digital information
PROVIDER
“The way I see it, my health belongs to me. So I
use a health app and do a lot of research online.
But during my doctor appointments, I usually end
up just answering a few questions and mostly
listening. It’s not really set up to be a two-way
conversation.”
“We need to interact with patients in a setting
more conducive to consultation. Only a small
portion of a clinical visit today involves a physical
exam. Traditional exam rooms, however, are
dominated by the tools needed for that activity.”
Awkward postures due
to lack of same-level
seating for patients,
families and clinicians
PATIENT
TEACHING
AND FAMILY
PROVIDERS
Exam spaces designed for two-way teaching and
learning encourage a collaborative approach to healthcare.
Transition
PATIENT
Clinical Team Spaces
Inadequate
accommodation
for family members
Patient Rooms
“My husband wants me with him when he sees
his doctor, and I want to be there to make sure
he reports all his symptoms and we both
understand what’s what. But the exam room
is very crowded. I always feel like I’m getting
in the way.”
Infusion
FAMILY
For most people, the exam room is at the center of the healthcare
experience. No longer just a space for medical exams and treatments,
it’s also a space where consulting, learning and person-to-person
sharing happens among patients, family members and the care
team. In fact, one study found that in a typical patient visit, 80 percent
of the experience is spent in conversation while the physical
exam comprises only 20 percent.1
1.2 BILLION
Number of visits to
physician’s offices,
hospital outpatient
clinics and emergency
departments.
Source: Centers for Disease Control
Whether in a doctor’s office, urgent care, surgery center or the
emergency department, exam rooms today must be hardworking,
high-functioning spaces that support the activities, interactions
and technologies that sustain connected, satisfying and effective
health experiences.
and Prevention, National Center for
Health Statistics (2014). Fastats:
Ambulatory care use and physician
office visits. Retrieved from www.cdc.
govnchs/fastats/physician-visits.html.
1 http://www.mayo.edu/center-for-innovation/projects/jack-and-jill-rooms
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS EXAM SPACES
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EXAM SPACES DESIGN PRINCIPLES
1 Wherever appropriate, replace
exam tables with recliners so that
patients and care team members
can be eye-to-eye, enhancing
communication.
2 Provide adequate space and
comfortable seating so that family
members can feel welcomed and
be included in the exam.
3 Create a collaboration zone with
same-level seating and equal
access to digital and analog
information.
Maintaining personal relationships between
patients and staff is vital for satisfaction. Even as
payers alter reimbursement systems, efficiency remains
an important measure of healthcare effectiveness. The
stress of trying to maintain meaningful, thorough
patient visits while rushing through appointments can
negatively impact physician’s work lives and patient outcomes and satisfaction.3 Efficient, well-equipped spaces
that simultaneously support the patient and family
interaction with care team members can support efforts
to improve patient satisfaction and ease staff burnout.
To be effective versus intrusive, technology must
be seamlessly incorporated and carefully managed
in exam rooms.5 Mobile devices, apps and web-based
information are new tools for diagnosis and treatment,
accessing and sharing information, and communicating
effectively. However, if exam rooms aren’t well-designed
for technology use, it can be more harmful than helpful,
detracting from conversations and distancing participants
from each other.6 In contrast, when everyone can
easily and equally view and share digital information,
it has the potential to boost collaboration and shared
decision-making.
2 Choose storage that minimizes
visual clutter while keeping
frequently used items in easy
reach.
3 Leverage vertical planes for
information displays and technology hosting.
1 Include storage for patients’ clothing
and personal items.
Exam
1 Zone the exam area so clinicians
can easily arrange and use their
equipment and tools.
PROVIDE FOR
PARTICIPANTS’ EMOTIONAL
NEEDS AND COMFORT.
2 Ease transition times with positive
distractions by providing monitors
for viewing.
Clinical Team Spaces
Family or other support persons in the exam room
are important partners in the patient’s health.4
Accommodating their presence—whether it’s physical
or virtual via videoconferencing—helps ensure that
important information is shared, understood and factored
into decisions about care.
OPTIMIZE SPATIAL
EFFICIENCY AND HYGIENE.
3 Provide visible access to basic
hospitality items for patients and
family members: power, tissues, etc.
4 Place handwashing opportunities
in direct visual relationship with
the exam room entrance(s).
4 Select mobile seating for the care
team so they can fluidly move close
to patients and family for meaningful
conversations.
5 Select surfaces and furnishings
that can be quickly and easily
cleaned between patients.
5 Preserve information privacy with
acoustic integrity.
Patient Rooms
Two-way learning is essential for effective healthcare.1 The care team and patients and families all play
important roles—engaging in dialogue about health
history, symptoms, goals and preferences can yield
invaluable insights, even helping to prevent medical
errors.2 And when patients participate in developing the
action plan and understand it, they tend to be more
engaged in their care. Because patients all have different
learning styles and literacy and acuity levels, effective
exam rooms leverage multiple ways of presenting
information. Increasingly, shared learning may include
viewing digital information from the patient’s as well as
the care team’s mobile devices.
DESIGN EXAM ROOMS
FOR MULTIPLE ACTIVITIES—
EXAMS, TREATMENTS,
INFORMATION SHARING
AND DISCUSSION—AND
MULTIPLE PARTICIPANTS:
THE PATIENT CARE TEAM,
PATIENTS AND FAMILY
MEMBERS.
Infusion
With more information and higher expectations, patients and their families are transforming the dynamics
of healthcare. It’s important that exam rooms evolve, too. More than just a setting for physical exams,
today’s best exam rooms are intentionally designed for transparent collaboration and interpersonal
interactions. Here are some insights to consider when designing exam rooms to meet all participants’ needs.
6 Build in flexibility with demountable
walls and modular furniture
to support evolving technology.
4 Provide compact surfaces for
patient and family members’
notepads and pens, mobile technologies, and/or personal items.
Transition
EXAM SPACES KEY INSIGHTS
5 Support videoconferencing with
specialists or family members who
can’t be physically present.
6 Include a work setting for scribes
and other participants in the
healthcare team.
1 Ahren, D., Woods, S., Lightowler, M., Finley, S., & Houston, T. (2011). Promise of and potential for patient-facing technologies to enable meaningful use.
American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 40(5, Supplement 2), S162-S172.
2 Unruh, K., & Pratt, W. (2007). Patients as actors: The patient’s role in detecting, preventing, and recovering from medical errors. International Journal of
Medical Informatics, 76(1), S236-S244.
3 Bodenheimer, T., & Sinsky, C. (2014). From triple to quadruple air: Care of the patient requires care of the provider. Annals of Family Medicine, 12(6), 573-576.
4 Frampton, S., Wahl, C., & Cappiello, G. (2010). Putting patients first—partnering with patients’ families. American Journal of Nursing, 110(7), 53-56.
5 Almquist, J., Kelly, C., Bromberg, J., Bryant, S., Christianson, T., & Montori, V. (2009). Consultation room design and the clinical encounter: The space and
interaction randomized trial. Healthcare Environments Research and Design Journal, 3(1), 41-78.
6 Misra, S., Cheng, L., & Genevie, J. (2014). “The iPhone Effect: The Quality of In-Person Social Interactions in the Presence of Mobile Devices.”
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EXAM SPACES MULTIPURPOSE EXAM
This fluid space sets the stage for improved interaction by replacing the
traditional exam table with a recliner, putting everyone on the same level
and making it easier to transition from one encounter to the next.
Exam
A recliner replaces the exam table,
placing patients in a more stable
and familiar posture, ready to ask
questions and volunteer information.
Clinical Team Spaces
A large monitor provides equal visibility
of information or data from a clinician’s
device, such as lab or X-ray results, and
allows for videoconferencing.
Patient Rooms
1
4
Infusion
5
3
Transition
6
2
Dimensions: 10' x 10'
A lightweight, movable stool gives
care team members flexibility and
efficiency during exams. Adjacent
storage keeps medical equipment
and supplies in easy reach.
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This seating for family members offers
power for technology devices and is
situated so they can actively engage or
participate in the conversation. Adjacent
coat hooks provide a place for patient and
family to hang handbags and jackets.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Folio..............................................................119
4 Verge.............................................................118
2 Regard..........................................................112
5 Pocket...........................................................127
3 Empath.........................................................114
6 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS EXAM SPACES
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EXAM SPACES DOUBLE-DOOR
Access from a staff corridor means the care team can move themselves and their
charting technology efficiently from room to room, while patients enter and exit from
a separate corridor. The staff corridor is also a space where care team members
can have private conversations before they enter the exam room.1
Exam
Space is allotted for a scribe or clinician’s
assistant who updates medical records that
can be viewed instantly on a monitor, freeing
clinicians to focus on patients.
Clinical Team Spaces
Patients are centered in a recliner with clear
sightlines to information and everyone in the
room. A rotating tablet arm supports mobile
devices and note taking.
1
5
Infusion
Patient Rooms
2
4
Transition
3
Family members have dedicated
seating, allowing them to be involved
as partners in care. A space for their
belongings is nearby.
With eye-to-eye seating, clinicians
can easily connect to the patient
and family while using medical
equipment close at hand.
Dimensions: 13' x 9'
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Folio..............................................................119
4 Empath.........................................................114
2 Verge.............................................................118
5 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
3 Regard..........................................................112
1 Wang, Z., Downs, B., Farell, S., Cook, K., Hourihan, P., & McCreery, S. (2013). Role of a service corridor in ICU noise control, staff stress, and staff satisfaction. Health
Environments Research and Design Journal, 6(3), 80-94.
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EXAM SPACES QUICK-CARE EXAM
A recliner replaces the exam
table, supporting a stable,
independent posture and
eye-to-eye communication.
Clinical Team Spaces
This clinician’s workstation supports
touchdown activities. As part of a single
integrated unit, the other side provides
ample seating with room for belongings.
Exam
Compact quick-care spaces with minimal medical equipment are a convenient
option for appointments that are straightforward and don’t require a full exam.
6
Patient Rooms
4
Infusion
1
5
Transition
7
3
2
Dimensions: 20' x 10'
Clinicians on the go are supported by
mobile carts that house technology
and enable easy movement from task
to task and space to space.
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FEATURED PRODUCTS
Clinical team members can examine
patients and shift weight off their feet
at the same time when they use a
lightweight stool that moves with them.
1 Edge Series................................................. 132
5 Regard..........................................................112
2 Pocket...........................................................127
6 Empath.........................................................114
3 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
7 Verge.............................................................118
4 Folio..............................................................119
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS EXAM SPACES
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EXAM SPACES CONSULTATIVE CARE ROOM
Clinical Team Spaces
Whiteboards facilitate capturing
questions, next steps or quick
explanatory drawings that can be
photographed on a mobile device.
2
6
Patient Rooms
Technology for videoconferencing makes
it easy to include remote participants in
discussions about the patient’s condition
and care while integrated LED lighting
illuminates the setting.
Exam
Not every medical appointment involves an exam. Sometimes scheduled time is
spent reviewing images, test results and treatment options. This high-performance
space maximizes confidential information sharing and personal connections.
3
1
Transition
Infusion
5
4
Dimensions: 10' x 11' 10"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
Same-level seating brings patients
and family close to information and
the clinical team member, supporting
active participation.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
1 Sorrel............................................................113
4 Await............................................................ 106
2 Qivi................................................................117
5 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
3 media:scape................................................ 129
6 c:scape.........................................................121
A sturdy ottoman holds
personal items or can be
used as overflow seating.
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS EXAM SPACES
37
EXAM SPACES CARE SUITE
Videoconferencing capabilities enable
consultation with specialists or family
members who aren’t physically present.
Clinical Team Spaces
A hardworking footwall supports multiple
functions with integrated technology for
visual display, discreet storage, whiteboards
and a dedicated cart-charging station.
Exam
Having separate spaces to handle the medical exam and consultation optimizes the
appointment, with each activity occurring in the best-equipped and supported space,1
improving the experience for all participants. An entrance and a walkthrough provide
multiple means of access.
2
4
Patient Rooms
3
Infusion
1
Transition
5
7
6
Exam Space Dimensions: 9' 8" x 13' 4"
Consult Space Dimensions: 8' 3" x 13' 4"
Superior sound management,
whiteboards and LED lighting are
integrated into a demountable wall.
Another whiteboard can display visual
information to remote participants.
Patients and family are afforded
learning and decision-making
opportunities with a table for
note-taking and power outlets
at surface level in the seating
for technology.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Folio..............................................................119
5 Regard..........................................................112
2 Pocket...........................................................127
6 Alight............................................................ 106
3 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
7 Elective Elements....................................... 122
4 i2i.................................................................. 108
1 http://www.mayo.edu/center-for-innovation/projects/jack-and-jill-rooms
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS EXAM SPACES
39
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Patient Rooms
Infusion
Transition
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
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41
Cognitive Stressors
multitasking
new technologies
changing
documentation
administrative
requirements
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES OBSERVATIONS
noisy, busy
environments
PATIENT
“It’s hard to get any rest when the nurses are
working and talking right across the hall.”
OBSERVATIONS
Crowded and noisy
nurses’ stations with
ineffectual layouts
No support for on-the-fly
collaboration needs
Almost no spaces for
focus or privacy
Inconveniently located/
inadequate break rooms
Physical Stressors
moving patients
Emotional Stressors
centralized supplies
step-intensive layouts
burnout
long shifts
higher patient acuity
inability to rest and
reenergize
high employee
turnover
Exam
“It’s a very unwelcoming place. Everyone is behind
a big counter and they all look like they’re much
too busy to answer my question. So I’m never
sure where to go or which person to interrupt.”
Clinical Team Spaces
FAMILY
lack of privacy for
emotional respite
pressure for efficiency
and accuracy
As the healthcare industry undergoes rapid change, the care team’s work is more demanding
than ever. While efforts to reduce the physical strains of providing care—distributed supplies,
step-efficient layouts, patient lifts, etc.—are generating positive results,1 the cognitive and
emotional burdens of healthcare professionals keep rising. New technologies plus changing
documentation and administrative requirements are adding stressors at every level of
healthcare. Patients and their families have heightened expectations for more detailed and
transparent information about their illnesses and health status. The care team is often stretched
thin, working in noisy, busy environments that don’t offer settings for individual focus, private
conversations or moments to reenergize, increasing the risk for costly errors and staff burnout.
Infusion
“Go all the way down the hall for a break? We’re
lucky to find time for a few sips of water before
something else comes up. We need to stay close
to our patients. That’s the world we live in.”
Transition
PROVIDER
Patient Rooms
Visitors unsure where
to go for information
These professional realities escalate the need for a range of reimagined spaces that support
safe patient care and the work, holistic wellbeing and safety of those who deliver care.2
Environments where teamwork thrives lead to greater job satisfaction, more responsive
and patient-sensitive service, and the delivery of better outcomes and more cost-effective
healthcare.3 For focused tasks, members of the clinical team require private settings where
they can be shielded from unnecessary distractions and demands.
Whether they’re updating electronic medical records, collaborating with teammates or taking
an important private phone call, care professionals can benefit from spaces that meet their
needs. When their workspace is intentionally designed to provide choices—patient-facing as
well as more private settings, settings for individual tasks as well as collaboration—it can be
a strategic asset for enhancing safety, accuracy, satisfaction and wellbeing, which ultimately
improves patient care and creates a more effective organization.4
1 Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., & Valente, M. (2009). The effect of environmental design on reducing nursing errors and increasing
efficiency in acute care settings: a review and analysis of the literature. Environment and Behavior, 41(6), 755-786.
2 Sikka, R., Morath, J.M., & Leape, L. (2015). The Quadruple Aim: care, health, cost and meaning in work. BMJ Quality & Safety, 24 (10),
608-610. doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2015-004160.
3 Hua, Y., Becker, F., Wurmser, T., Bliss-Holtz, J., & Hedges, C. (2012). Effects of nursing unit spatial layout on nursing team communication
patterns, quality of care, and patient safety. Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 6(1), 8-38.
4 Joseph, A. (2006). The Role of the Physical and Social Environment in Promoting Health, Safety, and Effectiveness in the Healthcare
Workplace. Concord, CA: The Center for Health Design.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
43
2 Use transparent and semi-opaque
glass to create a sense of
openness and put visitors at ease.
Increasingly, clinical team members alternate
between collaboration and focused individual
work, while the need to maintain patient surveillance remains constant.1 For clinicians, there is
no such thing as a predictable, typical work shift.
Interruptions are unavoidable, and quick transitions
between focused individual work and collaboration are
more frequent than ever. Because of quick-changing
work modes, traditional team stations are often
inefficient and stressful, yet distributed units are
distancing. As clinicians struggle to find the best
settings for their range of tasks, maintaining sightlines
and proximity to patients is always key. Uninterruptable
privacy is not an option.
Because their work is so dynamic, clinical team
members benefit from a variety of “just in time”
posture and workflow options. 3 Unlike workers
in many other professions, clinicians seldom sit for
long while on the job. Work settings are shared, and
individuals usually don’t take time to adjust the furniture
to fit their bodies and tasks. Providing choices for a range
of posture and workflow preferences, such as perching
on a stool or leaning at a standing-height table, assures
that needs of the moment can be satisfied.
Today’s healthcare is increasingly team-based. 2
Sharing information across disciplines—both in person
and via technology, including telemedicine videoconferencing—is a vital component of successful healthcare today. When hand-offs are optimized and all
participants are able to share observations, insights,
and concerns, patients benefit.
Moments of privacy at work can improve staff
performance and wellbeing.4 Noisy team stations
without areas for individual focus, private conversation
or moments of personal renewal increase the risk of
errors and burnout. Because each person’s privacy
needs vary depending on tasks, needs and overall
frame of mind, a variety of accessible privacy options
assures choices with minimal transition time from
space to space, task to task or mood to mood.
3 Carve out quiet sitting areas where
clinicians can discuss patients’
treatments and health status with
their families.
4 Create semi-private zones
so clinicians can move fluidly
between group work and
focused tasks.
DESIGN SPACES THAT
ARE EASILY ADAPTABLE
TO CHANGING PROCESSES
AND PRIORITIES.
BOOST CLINICIAN
WELLBEING AT WORK
BY SUPPORTING THEIR
PHYSICAL, COGNITIVE
AND EMOTIONAL NEEDS.
1 Plan sightlines and adjacencies
carefully to afford visual proximity
to patients and coworkers.
1 Provide ways for clinicians to shift
weight off their feet and change
postures.
2 Design multiple entries and clear
pass-throughs in shared spaces to
support on-the-move workflows.
2 Reduce the stress-inducing
distractions of noise and clutter
wherever possible.
3 Provide ample space for mobile
workstations and support for
powering technology.
3 Leverage vertical planes for
information displays to lighten
cognitive loads.
4 Include designated collaboration
spaces with technologies for
videoconferencing and sharing
content from individual devices.
4 Acknowledge clinicians’ needs for
moments of privacy by including
shielded and enclosed spaces in
both work and respite areas.
Clinical Team Spaces
1 Position a desk at the entrance
of the unit to provide a clearly
designated point of contact
for visitors.
EFFECTIVELY SUPPORT
CLINICIANS’ SPECTRUM
OF WORK WITH A VARIETY
OF INTERCONNECTED
SETTINGS.
Patient Rooms
Effective and innovative space design starts with understanding clinicians’ work—their workflows,
the tools and technology they use, their personal wants and needs on the job and where they
experience stressors. Because facilities are a significant and long-term investment for healthcare
organizations, it’s equally important to anticipate trends and design in flexibility. Spaces that can
adapt to changing processes, technologies and business models provide long-lasting advantage.
CREATE CUES THAT
SIGNAL HOW TO USE
THE SPACE.
5 Include an easily accessible,
well-equipped respite area for
socializing, refreshment, rest or
privacy as needed.
Infusion
When healthcare organizations create new or upgraded facilities, they often prioritize areas for patients
and visitors, and invest much less attention in clinicians’ work environments. This can be a missed
opportunity to influence organizational awareness and collaboration, patient safety, and staff wellbeing.
Exam
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES DESIGN PRINCIPLES
Transition
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES KEY INSIGHTS
1 Specify movable, flexible furnishings versus permanent built-ins.
2 Identify areas where demountable
walls can provide flexibility as
business needs change.
3 Anticipate advancing technologies
with an adaptive infrastructure.
1 Henrich, A., & Chow, M. (2008). Maximizing the Impact of Nursing Care Quality: A Closer Look at the Hospital Work Environment and the Nurses Impact on
Care Quality. Concord, CA: The Center for Health Design.
2 Robert Woods Johnson Foundation (2011). Implementing the IOM Future of Nursing Report—Part II: The potential of intraprofessional collaborative care to
improve safety and quality. Charting Nursing’s Future, November 2011.
3 Becker, F., & Parsons, K. (2007). Hospital facilities and the role of evidence-based design. Journal of Facilities Management, 5(4), 263-274.
4 Nejati, A., Shepley, M., Rodiek, S., Lee, C., & Varni, J. (2015). Restorative design features for hospital staff break areas: a multi-method study. Healthcare
Environments Research & Design Journal, 937586715592632, first published on July 10, 2015.
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
45
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES CLINICAL TEAM HUB
Care team members can work
individually or collaboratively
while keeping an eye on the
patient corridor.
3
4
Patient Rooms
2
Integrated technology in the vertical
plane creates efficient use of space.
7
1
6
Infusion
Conveniently located storage keeps
supplies close at hand to minimize
search time.
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
Positioned just across the hall from the patient rooms, this hub is a dynamic
gathering space for on-the-go clinicians, adaptable to a wide variety of tasks,
needs and preferences.
A powered beam provides a parking
space and a recharging station for
mobile workstations and devices.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Transition
5
Dimensions: 25' 7" x 13'
A standing-height surface is a
welcoming space where family
can approach whenever they
have questions or concerns and
that supports impromptu clinical
discussions and collaboration.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Folio..............................................................119
5 Pocket...........................................................127
2 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
6 Sync..............................................................119
3 Verge.............................................................118
7 Amia..............................................................116
4 c:scape.........................................................121
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
47
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES COLLABORATION SPACE
Whether it’s used for shift-change meetings, team huddles or teaching/learning
exchanges, this semi-enclosed space with standing-height tables has been
carefully designed for various kinds of information sharing.
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
2
Patient Rooms
3
Infusion
Integrated technology gives
all users the ability to display
and share content from
individual devices.
A standing-height table keeps everyone
at the same level, resulting in less
disruption as they come and go.
Transition
1
4
Dimensions: 22' 6" x 13' 4"
A split table accommodates whole
teams as well as smaller groups
or pairs who need a space to step
away, increasing its versatility.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 media:scape TeamStudio.......................... 129
3 cobi stool......................................................116
2 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
4 Regard..........................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
49
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES RESPITE
Exam
Clinicians are often so focused on caring for patients that they deprioritize their own
needs. An appealing retreat space close to the work hub is a strategic investment in
staff health and wellbeing. Zoned for various activities and levels of socializing, an easily
accessed retreat space encourages clinicians to make the most of their break time.
2
A locker area has open storage
for quick-grab items such as
water bottles, facilitating quick
moments of refreshment.
7
1
6
Patient Rooms
A personal retreat with
integrated power, ergonomic
comfort, personal storage and
lighting is a place for staff to
relax and recharge.
Clinical Team Spaces
Small enclosures are private spaces
to make a phone call or personally
recharge. Opaque glass provides
concealment for a mother’s room.
Transition
Infusion
8
3
5
4
Dimensions: 28' 4" x 29' 4"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
Informal socializing is supported by
an efficient kitchenette and dining
area plus comfortable lounge seating
for relaxed conversation.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
1 Folio..............................................................119
5 Lagunitas..................................................... 108
2 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
6 Brody........................................................... 107
3 Elective Elements....................................... 122
7 Victor2..........................................................124
4 Enea Lottus................................................. 108
8 SW_1 table...................................................127
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
51
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES PRIVATE SPACES
Being able to focus on detailed work is critical in healthcare, but achieving privacy
can’t mean physical distance from patients. Small privacy spaces adjacent to the group
hub can promote greater focus and concentration. Mostly intended for short-term,
spontaneous use, these “get away without going away” spaces support concentrated
work as well as confidential conversations or necessary moments of retreat.
8
Clinical Team Spaces
Integrated power, ergonomic comfort,
personal storage and lighting creates
a place for staff to retreat for a moment
of respite or to focus their attention,
get in flow and get work done.
Exam
6
Tucked away, these workstations are
efficient spaces for focused individual
work, with ample surface space for
paperwork, with adjustable monitors,
chairs and tables.
4
2
Patient Rooms
5
Infusion
A private office for the charge nurse
assures privacy for concentrated work
or confidential conversations with staff.
Glass walls assure visibility and quick
accessibility if needed.
7
Transition
3
1
Private Office Dimensions: 7' x 6' 8"
Phone Booth Dimensions: 3' x 6' 8"
Respite Dimensions: 5' 8" x 6' 2"
This private work
setting is ideal for a
quick phone call or
dictation task.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
A semi-enclosed work area is sized
for two people and equipped for
technology-supported collaboration,
including videoconferencing with
remote participants in care.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Lox stool...................................................... 109
5 Amia..............................................................116
2 Brody........................................................... 107
6 V.I.A. ............................................................ 128
3 Elective Elements....................................... 122
7 media:scape................................................ 129
4 Airtouch........................................................124
8 Eyesite......................................................... 130
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
53
CLINICAL TEAM SPACES OUTPATIENT—TEAM CORE
10
6
2
9
4
1
5
Transition
7
Patient Rooms
8
Infusion
Colocated care team members can
quickly gather shoulder-to-shoulder
around this worksurface to share
information.
Natural light makes this an appealing
space for team meetings. Flanking it are
a quiet niche for focused work and a
business center with supplies and storage.
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
As outpatient clinics evolve from role-specific work areas, a team zone provides
a variety of shared workspaces to match needs. There’s ample support for
collaboration as well as individual work. Visually and acoustically shielded from
the traffic of the patient and care-partner corridors, staff members are free to
share information openly in private conversations.
3
A dedicated zone for
concentration allows
clinicians to focus on
the task at hand.
Dimensions: 63' x 52'
Core Width: 20'
The comfortable familiarity of a booth setting
provides a welcome postural change during
hand-offs and debriefs while a markerboard
on the back provides a surface for information
exchange/display.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Regard..........................................................112
6 Amia..............................................................116
2 Sync..............................................................119
7 Verge.............................................................118
3 Folio..............................................................119
8 cobi...............................................................116
4 media:scape................................................ 129
9 Elective Elements....................................... 122
5 FrameOne................................................... 122
10 Brody......................................................... 107
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS CLINICAL TEAM SPACES
55
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Patient Rooms
Infusion
Transition
PATIENT ROOMS
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57
PATIENT ROOMS OBSERVATIONS
PATIENT
FAMILY
“Whenever the nurses came in, I had to leave the
room because there wasn’t enough space for
them, all their equipment and me.”
OBSERVATIONS
Family not comfortably
hosted
Life/Work
Eat, Sleep,
Hygiene
Heal
Physical Care
Teaching / Learning
Emotional Care
Tidying Up
Housekeeping
Patient Rooms
Advocacy Care
Charting
ILY
IC
Transition
IN
CL
Infusion
M
FA
“Now patients judge us like they would a restaurant
or a hotel. There is pressure to provide a great
experience, but there just isn’t time to do everything
we want to do for the patient and manage the
ever-present family, too.”
Preparation for
Clinical Procedures
Life/Work
Eat, Sleep,
Hygiene
Hosting
AM
Little patient/family
control of space
Cluttered, institutional
environments
CLINICIAN
Clinical Team Spaces
Technology not well
supported
Clinical
Procedures
TE
“There was no place to charge my cell phone, I
couldn’t reach my water without asking for help,
and I had no idea where my things were. I felt
like I wasn’t in control of anything.”
Positive
Distractions
Staff workarounds
and make-dos
AL
PATIENT
Exam
Bulky, hard-to-move
furniture
Increasingly, patient rooms are more than just a place for a bed and medical equipment. They
are multifunctional environments—a temporary home for a healing patient and family members,
a destination for visitors, and a workspace for clinical team members who need easy access
to deliver care. When hosting, comfort and communication are integrated throughout safe and
efficient patient room design, a better and safer experience of care can be anticipated.1
1 Press Ganey Associates, Inc. (2011) 2011 Press Ganey Pulse Report.
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
59
PATIENT ROOMS DESIGN PRINCIPLES
Teaching and learning are essential components
of the entire healthcare journey, requiring multiple
ways of sharing and displaying information.4
Patients and family members increasingly expect
more personal, private and frequent communications,
but many patient rooms don’t adequately support
informative interactions. There’s inadequate support
for technology and information persistence, which is
essential because exchanges among patients, family
members and clinical team members don’t always
occur with everyone present and equally engaged.
2 Reduce clutter with open storage
for frequent-use items and closed
storage for everything else, with the
ability to lock away personal items
for security if necessary.
3 Support effortless use of mobile
devices by clinical team members,
family members and recovering
patients.
4 Incorporate individual lighting and
temperature adjustments to increase
personal control and comfort.
Today’s healthcare includes and supports
family members as information sources, patient
advocates and care partners. 3 Families face their
own challenges when a loved one is hospitalized, but
they need to feel engaged and welcomed in the care
process. Equipping patient rooms for family groups,
overnight stays and basic levels of self-sufficiency can
help maintain a balance between daily activities and
staying close to their loved one.
Hospitalization increases feelings of vulnerability
and stress, intensifying the need for choices and
personal comfort in the space.5 Hospitalization
places demands upon patients and their families on all
levels: physically, emotionally and cognitively. Positive
distractions and environments that feel hospitable
versus institutional and accommodate individual preferences can mitigate stress.
5 Include sound-absorbing materials
and/or an acoustical masking system.
1 Include open areas around the
patient bed to ensure clinician
access, plus a table and seating
for family that can be moved if
needed to support various activities and proximity to the patient.
2 Promote patient ambulation and
independence with patient chairs
that are easy to use and support
a safe transfer and sit-to-stand.
3 Free up adequate floor space
for mobile bedside charting,
procedures and testing.
6 Specify soothing and comforting
colors and furniture.
4 Include seating for family and visitors that comfortably supports a
range of body types and postures,
including lounging and reclining.
OPTIMIZE SPATIAL
EFFICIENCY AND HYGIENE.
5 Welcome and host family with
visible amenities—power access,
blankets, pillows, small tables,
etc.—as well as in-room support
for overnight stays.
1 Promote understanding with clear
eye-to-eye and eyes-to-information visibility for all participants.
Exam
Without space to spare in patient rooms, the needs
and desires of patients, family members and
clinicians often conflict.2 Because they must support
so many different activities—clinical procedures, rest
and healing, nourishment, positive distraction, and
different types of interaction—all areas of a patient
room must be multifunctional and synergistic, with
adjacencies carefully considered to ensure clinician
access to the patient and efficient workflows.
SUPPORT FREQUENT AND
INCLUSIVE COMMUNICATION
AMONG PATIENTS, FAMILY
AND CLINICAL TEAM
MEMBERS.
Clinical Team Spaces
1 Provide for positive distraction with
artwork, views to nature and seating
that accommodates lounge postures.
ANTICIPATE AND SUPPORT
THE RANGE OF PATIENT,
CLINICAL TEAM MEMBER
AND FAMILY ACTIVITIES
THAT NEED TO OCCUR IN
THE SPACE.
2 Help families be effective patient
advocates with support for note
taking and personal devices, as
well as a whiteboard for displaying
information, capturing questions
and quick visualizations.
3 Include stools or movable chairs
for clinical team members so
they can move closer and sit at
the same level as patients and
family during consultations and
discussions.
Patient Rooms
INTENTIONALLY DESIGN
PATIENT ROOMS TO
DECREASE STRESS.
Infusion
Understanding the many activities that occur in patient rooms is the basis of people-centered,
evidence-based design solutions. When the elements of people, place and technology are holistically
considered, the result can be patient rooms that effectively connect people and information.
Meaningful clinician–patient communication is associated with fewer readmissions.1
4 Include support surfaces and
monitors that make it easy to
share information from tablets and
laptops.
Transition
PATIENT ROOMS KEY INSIGHTS
5 Add videoconferencing capabilities for communication with
clinical team members or family
located elsewhere.
1 Choose storage that minimizes
visual clutter while keeping frequently
used items in easy reach.
2 Leverage vertical planes for information
displays and technology hosting.
3 Create an adaptive infrastructure
that can be reconfigured as spatial
and technology needs evolve.
1 Senot, C., Chandrasekaran, A., Ward, P., Tucker, A., & Moffatt-Bruce, S.D. (2015). The Impact of Combining Conformance and Experiential Quality
on Hospitals’ Readmissions and Cost Performance. Management Science, 06/2015. doi: 10.1287/mnsc.2014.2141.
2 Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., & Valente, M. (2005). Advantages and disadvantages of single- versus multiple-occupancy rooms in acute care
environments: a review and analysis of the literature. Environment & Behavior, 37(6), 760-786.
3 Choi, Y., & Bosch, S. (2013). Environmental affordances: Design for family presence and involvement. Health Environments Research & Design
Journal, 6(4), 53-75.
4 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2013). Guide to Patient and Family Engagement in Hospital Quality and Safety.
5 Williams, A., & Irurita, V. (2004). Enhancing the therapeutic potential of hospital environments by increasing personal control and emotional comfort
of hospitalized patients. Applied Nursing Research, 18(1), 22-28.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
4 Place handwashing opportunities
in direct visual relationship with
the entrance.
5 Support infection control with easily
cleaned surfaces, finishes and
furniture.
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
61
PATIENT ROOMS FAMILY CORNER
Casegoods provide storage
plus power access, a monitor
for TV or projecting from a
personal device, and a whiteboard to capture questions
and information.
3
4
Clinical Team Spaces
Promoting patient ambulation,
a drop-down-arm recliner affords
an easier bed-to-chair transfer,
while molded arms with integrated
grip and a scalloped footrest edge
support a safe sit-to-stand.
The familiarity of a sofa setting
brings some of the comforts of
home to the hospital so family
members can stay in the room
comfortably.
Exam
With everything close at hand, this environment comfortably hosts family
as active partners in a loved one’s care.
5
Infusion
Patient Rooms
2
6
Transition
7
1
A directional lamp enables
family to read or work without
disturbing a resting patient.
Dimensions: 22' x 15'
Featured Footprint: 15' x 14' 6"
Open cubbies store visitors’
belongings and make bedding
visible for family members. The
top can be used as a nightstand.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
Open storage keeps family members’
belongings close at hand and visible,
and clamp-on, easy-to-access power
assures personal devices stay charged.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
A small perching stool allows staff
to pull up close and create a samelevel conversation circle as they
consult with the patient and family.
1 Empath.........................................................114
5 Regard table.................................................112
2 Sieste sleeper sofa.......................................115
6 Jenny table.................................................. 126
3 Opus.............................................................119
7 dash............................................................. 133
4 Verge.............................................................118
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
63
PATIENT ROOMS BEDSIDE ACTIVITY ZONE
Opportunities for interaction and learning are maximized in this patient room that
positions clinicians and family members in sit-down settings at the patient’s side
so everyone can participate in discussions and decisions.
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
A mobile whiteboard, reserved
for family, provides a place to jot
down questions or leave messages
for staff. It’s also ideal for quick
sketches or explanations during
physician consultations.
As a patient becomes more
physically active, they can
transition to a recliner where
they can change postures
easily and converse naturally
with care providers and family.
3
6
5
Patient Rooms
4
Transition
Infusion
1
2
Dimensions: 23' x 14' 5"
Featured Footprint: 15' 7" x 14' 5"
With a stool and technology that’s wellpositioned for eye-to-eye conversation,
a clinician can engage in meaningful
conversation at bedside.
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A hip-height seat brings a family
member to patient level for eye
contact and physical connection, while
a desk supports note-taking during
consultations and keeping up with
everyday activities.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Empath.........................................................114
4 Verge.............................................................118
2 Sieste sleeper sofa......................................115
5 Move.............................................................110
3 Opus..............................................................119
6 Relay.............................................................131
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
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PATIENT ROOMS PEDIATRIC PATIENT ROOM
Close-at-hand open and closed storage
anchors parents and their belongings in
the family zone. Power is at accessible
height for personal devices.
3
Patient Rooms
Parents can easily move this chair close
to their child’s bedside or turn it toward
the table for eating or working. A gentle
bounce relieves nervous energy.
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
When a child is hospitalized, both parents often want to stay close and wellinformed. With a large monitor just inside the threshold, clinicians can quickly
display health information or videoconference with a physician or family
member in another location.
1
Infusion
2
Transition
6
4
A double sleeper sofa
accommodates overnight
stays for both parents.
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5
Dimensions: 22' 9" x 17' 7"
Featured Footprint: 9' x 10' 4"
A pull-out surface gives clinical
team members a place to rest
mobile devices and helps define
a communication circle.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Sonata..........................................................119
4 Regard table.................................................112
2 Verge.............................................................118
5 Cura............................................................. 107
3 SOTO LED task light................................... 133
6 Double X-tenz..............................................115
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
67
PATIENT ROOMS SPACE-EFFICIENT PATIENT ROOM
Closed storage keeps patient
belongings out of the way to
minimize visual clutter.
2
Clinical Team Spaces
A small table is positioned close to
power so family members can use
personal devices. Shelves above it
display cards and flowers where the
patient can see them.
Exam
Even in a small footprint, family can be welcomed and accommodated without
hampering clinical workflow.
1
Transition
Infusion
Patient Rooms
3
Dimensions: 17' 8" x 16'
Featured Footprint: 9' 2" x 6' 2"
A recliner does dual duty as a seating
option for patients as well as a place
for family members to rest.
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FEATURED PRODUCTS
A padded bench provides overflow seating for
family as well as storage for things they want
to keep in sight and at hand. It also serves as an
additional seat for a quick meal at the table.
1 Opus............................................................ 126
3 Empath.........................................................114
2 Regard table.................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
69
PATIENT ROOMS CLINICAL WORKZONE
A whiteboard keeps
information visible so
patients and families
can remain informed.
Clinical Team Spaces
The workzone is divided to
support infection control, with
necessary items within easy
reach on a mounting board
that reduces wall damage.
Ample storage keeps supplies
at hand, and access to power
under open shelves means
charging items can be off the
worksurface, freeing space for
clinicians to array their work.
Exam
Looking through a hallway window, clinicians can chart in a seated position,
maintaining visibility to the patient without disturbing them.
4
1
Patient Rooms
3
Transition
Infusion
2
Dimensions: 22' 8" x 16' 8"
Featured Footprint: 10' x 7' 6"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Folio..............................................................119
3 Sync .............................................................119
2 Pocket...........................................................127
4 Shortcut........................................................117
A mobile workstation positions
technology where clinicians
need it—bedside for eye-to-eye
communication with patients or
near the workzone for charting.
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS PATIENT ROOMS
71
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Patient Rooms
Infusion
Transition
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
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INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES OBSERVATIONS
OBSERVATIONS
PATIENT
“I wish it could just be me and my family when I get
my treatments. Cancer has already invaded my
body. I don’t need my privacy invaded, too.”
EFFICIENCY + COMFORT
Bulky, hard-to-move
furniture
Inefficient workarounds
and make-dos
Little privacy or control
of space
Crowded, cluttered
settings
Exam
Insufficient
accommodations
for family
Clinical Team Spaces
“I feel like no one knows my mom as well as I do,
so I want to be next to her during her treatments.
But it seems like wherever I put my chair, I’m
always in the wrong place at the wrong time for
the nurses.”
ACCESS + FAMILY PRESENCE
PATIENT NEEDS
CLINICIAN NEEDS
VISIBILITY + PRIVACY
SAFETY + SUPPORT
Patient Rooms
FAMILY
Institutional, unfamiliar
look and feel
challenges.”
Technology use not well
supported
Infusion
“We need to have clear sightlines and be able to
get close to our patients without anything getting
in our way, but right now equipment and family
are crowding the space. That’s one of our big
Transition
PROVIDER
Today, infusion therapy is a commonly used treatment for a multitude of conditions: cancer,
congestive heart failure, Crohn’s Disease, hemophilia, immune deficiencies, multiple
sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and more. The durations and frequency of treatments vary
and everyone has different physical and emotional needs throughout their individual
journey. For clinicians, patients and family members, a well-designed facility can make a
tremendous difference: supporting a wide range of activities, affording mutual learning and
providing options for positive distraction as well as privacy.
Especially when a person’s health is compromised by an illness, being in an environment
that supports individual needs and wants is critically important for a sense of control and
independence. Studies suggest that a positive mindset enhances wellbeing and can even
potentially improve patient outcomes.1
1 Allison, P., Guichard, C., Fung, K., & Gilain, L. (2003). Dispositional optimism predicts survival status 1 year after diagnosis in head and
neck cancer patients. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 21(3), 543-548.
2 Bratman, G., Hamilton, J., Hahn, K., Daily, G., & Gross, J. (2015). Nature experience reduces rumination and subgenual prefrontal cortex
activation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112 (28), 8567-8572.
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INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
75
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES DESIGN PRINCIPLES
An inviting, well-hosted and calming environment
improves the care experience.2 For staff, patients and
family members alike, natural light, artwork and views
of nature elevate mood and may actually change brains
in ways that improve emotional health and wellbeing.3
An absence of visual clutter, storage to keep tools and
necessary items hidden from view while still easily accessible, and as well as noise abatement create a calming
environment, easing the strain on patients, families
and staff.
Clinician-patient relationships are vital to the
infusion experience. Chair-side reassurance, counseling and education are essential components of
infusion care, helping patients and families cope with
the expected and unexpected. Environments that
afford teaching and learning opportunities are primed
to help clinicians help patients.
1 Provide settings for various levels
of privacy, distraction
or socializing.
2 Specify thresholds, floor
coverings and furniture that
allow patients to move around
safely as needed or desired.
3 Allow for control of lighting
levels in private and semiprivate
spaces.
4 Include a communal area with
a café, TV, game tables, Internet
access, easy-to-access power
outlets, reading materials, etc.
OPTIMIZE SPATIAL
EFFICIENCY AND HYGIENE.
1 Ensure clinicians have unhampered access to patients,
technologies and supplies.
2 Plan for the presence of family
members, ensuring they can be
near loved ones during treatments
and also have the option of
settings that support activities
of daily life such as phone calls,
work tasks, refreshment and rest.
3 Support use of personal devices
as a means of positive distraction
as well as a communication aid.
1 Design for sightlines that support
patient/clinician visibility.
Exam
1 Choose recliners with comfort
amenities and easy-to-use
posture adjustments and provide
in-reach storage so patients
have a space for their things
plus access to blankets, tissues,
water, etc.
CAREFULLY PLAN
SETTINGS TO ENHANCE
COMMUNICATION AMONG
ALL PARTICIPANTS IN
THE CARE PROCESS.
2 Create settings that allow patients
and/or family members to share
experiences, learn together and
form social bonds if they choose
to do so.
Clinical Team Spaces
Family members provide vital support to patients,
and their needs shouldn’t be overlooked.1 Designing
spaces for family during treatment ensures they are
connected to the care process. It’s also important to
include supportive amenities for family members who
are juggling demands from their outside lives while
serving as partners in care. Simple conveniences such
as comfortable seating, storage for personal items, outlets
to charge mobile devices so they stay connected with
work and life, and spaces with varying levels of privacy
to make phone calls or rest without leaving the facility
can help them cope with their loved one’s illness.
DESIGN ENVIRONMENTS
THAT SUPPORT PEOPLE’S
EMOTIONAL AND
PHYSICAL COMFORT.
3 Leverage technology to enhance
interactions and mutual learning,
but don’t let it overwhelm the
environment.
Patient Rooms
For patients, maintaining a sense of control is just
as important as physical comfort. More than just
spaces to treat conditions, treatment centers should be
appealing, safe and soothing spaces that support total
wellbeing: body, mind and emotions. Having choices for
different levels of privacy or distraction and being able
to move safely within the environment improves the
treatment experience and satisfies individual preferences. At the same time, patients’ desire for control
and independence can never compromise clinicians’
ability to closely monitor their care.
CREATE A RANGE OF
PRIVATE, SEMIPRIVATE
AND COMMUNAL SPACES
THAT GIVE PATIENTS
AND FAMILY CHOICES
AND CONTROL OF THEIR
ENVIRONMENTS.
4C
reate a multifunctional learning
space by including support for
conversations and sharing analog
as well as digital information.
Infusion
Organizations that focus holistically on improving the treatment experience for all participants—
providing clinicians with the spaces, tools and technology they need plus giving patients and
families choices and control to humanize this often difficult time—can realize the rewards of
supported clinicians plus improved patient satisfaction.
4 Wherever possible, select colors,
materials, lighting and furnishings
that feel welcoming and relaxing,
instead of overpoweringly clinical
or institutional.
Transition
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES KEY INSIGHTS
5 Include expansive windows and
skylights, providing access to
natural light and calming views of
nature.4
2 Choose storage that minimizes
visual clutter while keeping
frequently used items in easy
reach.
3 Build in flexibility with demountable walls and modular furniture
to support evolving technology
and treatment modalities.
1 Ulrich, R., Zimring, C., Zhe, X., DuBose, J., Seo, H., Choi, Y., et al. (2008). A review of the scientific literature on evidence-based healthcare design. Health
Environments Research & Design Journal, 1(3), 61-125.
2 Wang, Z., Pukszta, M., Petoldt, N., Cayton, J. (2011). Cancer treatment environments: From pre-design research to post-occupancy evaluation. World
Health Design, 4(3), 68-74.
3 Bratman, G., Hamilton, J., Hahn, K., Daily, G., Gross, J., (2015). “Nature experience reduces rumination and subgenual prefrontal cortex activation,”
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
4 Ulrich, R. (2008). Biophilic theory and research for health design. In S. Kellert, J. Heerwagen, & M. Mador (Eds.), Biophilic design: Theory, science &
practice. New York: John Wiley.
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4 Place handwashing opportunities
in direct visual relationship with
infusion areas.
5 Select surfaces and furnishings
that can be quickly and easily
cleaned between patients.
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77
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES SEMI-OPEN TREATMENT AREA
Clinical Team Spaces
Clinician touchdown stations are
integrated with modular seating for
family so clinicians can maintain easy
visual access and keep supplies close.
Patient Rooms
In the recliner, patients can change
postures and use heat or massage
features to increase comfort
throughout their treatment.
Exam
A group setting with ample room for family members, this area supports
interaction and information sharing.
3
Infusion
5
4
Transition
6
2
1
Modular furniture meets patient, family
and staff needs with storage for belongings,
surfaces for taking notes, integrated power
for personal devices, and opportunities
to hide tools and waste.
A rotating tablet arm on the
recliner provides the patient
with a surface for activities,
beverages or personal items.
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Clinicians can get off their feet at the
touchdown station in a height-adjustable,
easy-to-clean and stable stool.
Dimensions: 40' x 11' 7"
Individual Bay Width: 10'
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Shortcut........................................................117
4 Sonata..........................................................119
2 Verge.............................................................118
5 Empath.........................................................114
3 Montage...................................................... 123
6 Regard..........................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
79
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES SMALL PRIVATE TREATMENT ROOM
Clinicians can pull up close to the patient
and family members for same-level
consulting, as well as care procedures,
making the experience more personal.
Clinical Team Spaces
Necessary supplies and a waste
bin are hidden yet easily accessible,
unobtrusively stored in cabinetry.
Exam
Away from others, this is a space where patients and family can read, enjoy entertainment, or rest and
relax during an extended treatment. In the case of a more severe illness, patients are able to achieve
better privacy and desired separation. Personal consultations with a clinical team member, such
as Q&A session during an initial visit, can occur without distractions, and integrated technology
can be used for collaborative learning as well as watching TV or a movie for positive distraction.
5
Patient Rooms
1
Infusion
4
Transition
2
3
Dimensions: 10' x 10'
FEATURED PRODUCTS
To decrease the patient’s stress and
feelings of vulnerability, personal
necessities, such as eyeglasses or
tissues, are always within reach.
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For quick tasks, activities or
refreshments, a table creates
a shared setting that’s adaptable
to many uses.
1 V.I.A.............................................................. 128
4 Sonata..........................................................119
2 Empath.........................................................114
5 Verge.............................................................118
3 Leela............................................................ 109
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
81
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES SEMI-OPEN QUADRANTS
A cluster arrangement of “rooms within a room,” this setting affords patient
and family privacy as well as clinicians’ needs for efficiency.
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Family members are accommodated
with integrated power in their seating
and a light-scale table that can be
positioned for various activities:
snacks, work and taking notes.
A spokes-and-hub layout of modular
furniture creates seated privacy, while
mid-height space divisions promote
visibility for caregivers.
Patient Rooms
1
Transition
Infusion
3
4
2
The caregiver has visibility to each
patient as well as a space to store
essentials in each unit and a pull-out
surface to array tools, papers, etc.
Dimensions: 21' 6" x 20'
Individual Bay: 11' 6" x 9' 6"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
Personal belongings, such as coats and
tote bags, are close at hand. An open
shelf with an integrated outlet is an ideal
spot for powering personal devices.
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1 Sonata..........................................................119
3 Empath.........................................................114
2 Verge.............................................................118
4 Regard..........................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
83
INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES ALONE/TOGETHER TREATMENT AREA & COMMUNAL SPACE
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
A semi-open treatment area adjacent to a communal hub allows patients to
be at the edges of activity, while the communal space is where family members
can connect with others, focus on necessary tasks or just rejuvenate while
maintaining proximity to their loved ones.
Patients with brief treatment sessions are
accommodated with comfortable recliners,
personal storage, access to power and
views into the communal space.
3
Infusion
Patient Rooms
5
Transition
2
1
4
6
Clinician touchdown stations
are integrated with modular
seating for family so staff can
maintain easy visual access.
For patients who are feeling up to
it, connecting with other patients
and their families during treatment
sessions is afforded in a communal
treatment space.
Dimensions: 50' 5" x 34'
Infusion Footprint: 23' 6" x 18'
Lounge Footprint: 21' x 18'
FEATURED PRODUCTS
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1 Campfire paper table...................................125
4 Empath.........................................................114
2 Regard..........................................................112
5 Folio..............................................................119
3 Sonata..........................................................119
6 Pocket...........................................................127
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS INFUSION TREATMENT SPACES
85
Exam
Clinical Team Spaces
Patient Rooms
Infusion
Transition
TRANSITION SPACES
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87
TRANSITION SPACES OBSERVATIONS
PROVIDER
“Waiting rooms aren’t something we used to consider
a valuable investment, but now we’re seeing that
they are a hidden asset and can be a beneficial
feature in a person’s experience at our facility.”
Chairs crowded in rows
with little privacy
PATIENT TO STAFF
Exam
Seating used to hold
personal items, mark
territory
Visual + Auditory Access
Close Proximity
Patients and family
preferring seating with
sightlines to information
sources
Uncomfortable, unappealing
environments with few
positive distractions
Clinical Team Spaces
Minimal support for
personal devices
Emotional Support
Information
PSYCHOSOCIAL
NEEDS
PHYSICAL
NEEDS
Physical Safety
Physical Comfort
Activities of Daily Living
Patient Rooms
“My time is valuable to me. I don’t want to sit and
flip through old magazines while I wait for my
appointment. I’d rather be able to stay on top of my
email, answer my phone with some privacy, and
stay connected to my work, my family and my life.”
OBSERVATIONS
Emotional Support
Information
Visual + Auditory Privacy
Positive Distraction
Infusion
PATIENT
“There was no privacy while we waited for my
dad’s surgery to be over. My mom was really
anxious and needed to talk, but felt uncomfortable
with everybody able to hear our conversation.”
PATIENT TO FAMILY
Transition
FAMILY
Healthcare experiences are made up of more than moments of care—they also include the time
spent in transition between those moments. Waiting to meet with the care provider. Waiting for a
diagnosis. Receiving updates and results. And these transitional spaces where patients and their
families wait—whether for minutes or hours—are often uncomfortable and unappealing, increasing feelings of stress and negative mindsets.1
Transition spaces are a significant opportunity for improving the healthcare experience.
By providing more choices and supporting a range of postures and activities—conversations,
information sharing, getting work done, resting and relaxing, or using personal devices to stay
connected with the outside world—waiting spaces should be adaptable and productive environments that provide better healthcare experiences.
1 Leather, P., Beale, D., Santos, A., Watts, J., & Lee, L. (2003). Outcomes of environmental appraisal of different hospital waiting areas.
Environment & Behavior, 35(6), 842-869.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
89
1 Provide comfortable settings
and hosting amenities, including
a space for items such as bags,
personal devices or beverages.
2 Accommodate people’s preferences for varying levels of noise
and other stimuli, creating quiet
zones where people can retreat
from sources of noise.
3 Create conversation areas where
families can be together without
the distraction of strangers.
People seek proximity to family, clear sightlines to
information sources and separation from strangers
in group settings. People tend to separate themselves
from strangers8 in group settings, while families prefer
to sit in clusters to create intimacy and privacy. 9
Patients and families also tend to prefer open sightlines
to reception areas and clinical area entrances. In one
case study, 15 to 30 percent of chairs in a traditional
waiting room were used as privacy barriers or for
personal belongings.9
1 A
rneill, A.B., & Devlin, A.S. (2002). Perceived quality of care: The
influence of the waiting room environment. Journal of Environmental
Psychology; 22 (4), 345-360.
2 Press Ganey Associates, Inc. (2011). 2011 Press Ganey Pulse Report.
3 Becker, F., & Douglass, S. (2008). The Ecology of the Patient Visit:
Physical Attractiveness, Waiting Times, and Perceived Quality of Care;
31(2), 128-141.
4 Trimm, D. R., & Sanford, J. T. (2010). The Process of Family Waiting
During Surgery. Journal of Family Nursing, 16(4), 435-461.
5 Hosking, S., & Haggard, L. (1999). Healing the hospital environment:
Design, management, and maintenance of healthcare premises.
New York: Routledge.
6 Nanda, U. (2011). Impact of visual art on waiting behavior in the
emergency department. Concord, CA: Center for Health Design.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Productive transitions are not a one-settingfits-all experience. Television, noisy conversations
or children playing nearby can be unwelcome for those
who feel unwell or who wish to read, rest or work.10
One big, open room with chairs in straight rows is a
template for an underperforming space. A variety of
postures and activity options produces flexibility and
control of the experience for patients and families,
decreasing anxiety and making transition spaces
beneficial assets for healthcare organizations.
4 Incorporate soothing materials,
textures, colors, lighting and views.
LEVERAGE TECHNOLOGY
FOR LEARNING AND
OTHER POSITIVE
DISTRACTIONS WHILE
PEOPLE WAIT.
1 Balance organizational needs
for seating density with people’s
desires for diverse settings and
various levels of privacy while
they wait.
1 Include well-placed wall monitors
to display information about
the organization, health-related
information and/or waiting updates.
2 Provide seating with clear
sightlines to doorways, clinician
entrances and information desks.
3 Use modular furniture to divide
the floor plate into smaller settings
that support a range of activities.
4 Select furniture that supports
activities and postures appropriate for the duration of the wait:
work settings, lounge options,
café tables, etc., for longer waits.
Clinical Team Spaces
Needs for physical and emotional comfort heighten
while people are in transition.4 Environmental distractions and giving people a choice in what they do
has been shown to decrease stress and anxiety.5
Calming colors, comfortable seating with spaces for
personal belongings, soothing artwork,6 nature views
and supporting technology use can all make transition
environments feel less intimidating and help put
people at ease.7
PROVIDE FOR PRODUCTIVE
TRANSITIONS WITH A RANGE
OF SETTINGS APPROPRIATE
FOR VARYING ACTIVITIES
AND DURATIONS.
2 Provide media settings for selfdirected or group learning.
3 Support use of personal devices
with easy access to power
throughout the space.
Patient Rooms
Technology in transition spaces promotes purposeful uses of time. Whether used for self-directed
check-ins, health history and other previsit assessments,
distractions, surgery progress updates, or teaching/
learning experiences, technology in transition spaces
connects people and information. Well-integrated and
managed technology can make a clinic visit more
productive and efficient, support accurate information
transfer, and allow people to pass the time.
CREATE INVITING, WELLHOSTED TRANSITION
SPACES THAT REDUCE
STRESS AND REFLECT
ORGANIZATIONAL
VALUES.11
4 Anticipate new and emerging
technologies with an adaptive
infrastructure.
Infusion
Transition spaces should be considered an asset, not an afterthought. They can support more meaningful
uses of time plus prepare patients and family members to have productive interactions with members of
the healthcare team.1 Well-designed and attractive waiting environments are also related to a patient’s
satisfaction,2 perceived quality of care,1,3 likelihood to recommend, and anxiety relief.3
Exam
TRANSITION SPACES DESIGN PRINCIPLES
5 Optimize the real estate with
flexible spaces that can accommodate after-hours learning
sessions, health-related support
groups, etc.
Transition
TRANSITION SPACES KEY INSIGHTS
7 S
chweitzer, M., Gilpin, L., & Frampton, S. (2004). Healing Spaces:
Elements of environmental design that make an impact on health.
Derby, CT: The Planetree Organization.
8 Sommer, R. (1966). The ecology of privacy. The Library Quarterly,
36(3), 234-248.
9 Ossmann, M. (2012). “Sommer revisited—seating patterns in a hospital
waiting room,” in Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Conference of the
Environmental Design Research Association, Seattle, WA. May 30-June
2, edited by Rula Awwad-Rafferty, PhD, and Lynne C. Manzo, PhD.
10 Catania, C., Pas, T., Minchella, I., Braud, F., Micheli, D., Adamoli, L., et al.
(2010). “Waiting and the Waiting Room: How Do You Experience Them?”
Emotional Implications and Suggestions from Patients with Cancer.
Journal of Cancer Education, 26(2), 388-394.
11 B
ecker, F., & Douglass, S. (2008). The ecology of the patient visit:
Physical attractiveness, waiting time and perceived quality of care.
Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, 31, 128-141.
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
91
TRANSITION SPACES OUTPATIENT SURGERY CENTER—ACTIVE
Exam
Even routine surgeries can take several hours, from prepping to post-surgery
monitoring. For families, this transition space has settings for a variety of
activities, encouraging movement to reduce stress.
Clinical Team Spaces
A zone for children with ottomans and a
paper-topped coloring table is centrally
positioned so parents stay close in
several settings.
Instead of pacing, adults
can expend nervous energy
while they pass the time by
using a workstation that’s
also a low-speed treadmill.
Patient Rooms
1
2
3
4
Infusion
5
Transition
6
7
Conversation, refreshment breaks,
games and use of personal devices all
happen easily in this social setting.
Lockers let family members
store and retrieve personal items
as needed, instead of having
to carry everything with them.
Just outside the surgery corridor, this
semi-private setting for consultation
with the surgeon includes a monitor
for sharing visual information.
Dimensions: 60' x 20'
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Elective Elements....................................... 122
5 Regard..........................................................112
2 Alight............................................................ 106
6 Groupwork.................................................. 126
3 Walkstation.................................................. 128
7 Move.............................................................110
4 Campfire paper table..................................125
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93
TRANSITION SPACES OUTPATIENT CLINIC
Exam
Whenever people have an outpatient appointment, there’s an opportunity to
prepare them for an optimized visit. A welcoming transition space puts people
at ease, setting the stage for positive experiences with their care providers.
Clinical Team Spaces
For patients who need to fill out forms
or have questions, this table behind the
welcome desk is a comfortable, easily
accessed setting where the patient and
a staff member can interact.
4
Patient Rooms
3
Infusion
5
Transition
2
1
Returning patients can quickly check
themselves in or sign up for after-hours
activities that take place here, such as
healthy cooking classes, yoga, etc.
An open welcome desk makes
the check-in experience feel
friendly versus intimidating
and institutional.
Dimensions: 47' 4" x 25' 3"
Featured Space: 13' 6" x 25' 3"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Regard..........................................................112
4 Bindu........................................................... 106
2 Sync..............................................................119
5 Folio..............................................................119
3 Enea Lottus table.........................................125
94
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
95
TRANSITION SPACES OUTPATIENT CLINIC—PRODUCTIVE
Even a quick health check can intrude on a busy schedule. Allowing patients and
family members to seamlessly continue with their day by providing café-like work
settings can help ease work-life disruption.
Patient Rooms
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
Digital and analog information are available for
patients and families. This is a way the Outpatient
Clinic can take advantage of patient and family
time by using it to inform them of upcoming events
or classes, health tips, facility amenities, etc.
Infusion
1
3
Transition
2
Dimensions: 47' 4" x 25' 3"
Featured Space: 9' x 19' 7"
Patients can appreciate a bit of separation
between each seating group, whether it is
provided by furniture configuration, screens,
plants or orientation.
96
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Desk-height tables provide a space where
family can access power and work if they
aren’t accompanying the patient during an
exam. Alternatively, it can be a place for a
quick meal or snack before or after a class.
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Elective Elements....................................... 122
3 Enea Lottus................................................. 108
2 Regard..........................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
97
TRANSITION SPACES PHYSICIANS’ OFFICE/WELLNESS CENTER—MULTIPURPOSE
Exam
Patients and their families have many choices in this environment designed for
purposeful activities. After hours, it does double-duty as a well-equipped
and comfortable space for group learning sessions on targeted health topics.
2
Infusion
4
Patient Rooms
Clinical Team Spaces
Patients and family members can watch television
comfortably in this familiar, residential-style seating
configuration that also lends itself to small-group
classes after hours.
Transition
5
1
3
Dimensions: 47' 4" x 25' 3"
Featured Space: 26' x 19' 7"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
A child-friendly setting with a paper-topped
coloring table nestles between adult seating,
keeping parents nearby while also able to
comfortably converse or use personal devices.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
1 Regard..........................................................112
4 Jenny........................................................... 108
2 Campfire paper table..................................125
5 i2i.................................................................. 108
3 Ripple............................................................112
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
99
TRANSITION SPACES CORRIDOR
Clinical Team Spaces
Exam
In large medical facilities, patients and family members may spend an entire
day visiting multiple specialists and departments. Corridors can be used
for transitions, providing spaces to rest or work between appointments.
A bench is a resting spot for people
who need to catch their breath
en route to the next appointment.
At above-standard height, it’s an
easy-to-reach perch.
3
2
Infusion
Patient Rooms
Patients and family members can productively
use the time between appointments to get some
work done, charge personal devices or grab
a snack. Staff can also use this space to take
short breaks.
4
Transition
1
Dimensions: 43' x 3' 8"
Family members can appreciate
a few moments to put their feet up
and recharge between appointments
or before the trip home.
100
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Regard..........................................................112
3 Alight............................................................ 106
2 Campfire paper table..................................125
4 Jenny........................................................... 108
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
101
TRANSITION SPACES PRIMARY CARE
Clinical Team Spaces
When time will be short, a few settings
are scattered throughout the space that
provide access to worksurface-height tables
and/or power for those who may be using the
space for a slightly longer duration while the
patient completes their appointment.
Patient Rooms
Both self check-in and traditional check-in
options are available to accommodate differing
levels of autonomy and to promote efficiency.
Exam
When the time before an appointment is expected to be minimal, this setting
allows patients and families to keep their eyes on the desk and still maintain
physical separation from others.
Transition
Infusion
4
5
3
2
1
6
With much of the seating oriented perpendicular to
the exterior view and the reception area, patients
can maintain visibility to the check-in area so as to
feel confident they won’t miss anything, while also
enjoying the views of nature.
Multiple individual seats
provide seating options for
those who have come alone.
102
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Dimensions: 36' x 39' 5"
FEATURED PRODUCTS
1 Regard..........................................................112
4 Jenny........................................................... 108
2 Campfire slim table......................................125
5 Tava...............................................................113
3 Groupwork.................................................. 126
6 Thread......................................................... 130
INSIGHT-LED APPLICATIONS TRANSITION SPACES
103
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
106Seating
119Casegoods
121
Desk Systems + Storage
124Tables + Carts
128
Space Division
129Technology
130Worktools
134
Product Comparison Quick Reference
For more information about any of these products, go
to SteelcaseHealth.com and search by product name.
SEATING GUEST + LOUNGE
Alight™ by turnstone Bob™ by Coalesse A crafted beauty. With flared arms, a matte polished aluminum
base and a coordinating ottoman, Bob Lounge is well suited
to any professional space.
With endless configuration possibilities, Alight ottomans provide solo
seating or creative grouping for any space. Fully upholstered bench,
corner and round seating shapes can be mixed and matched to
create custom settings that are endlessly extendable. Coordinating
end and coffee tables complement Alight.
Aspekt™ by Steelcase Health Brody™ by Steelcase Aspekt offers a clean, minimal aesthetic for patient and guest seating.
Wave-shaped arms and back contours give Aspekt a sleek, dynamic
style. Active webbed seat suspension and steel frames and legs
lend strength and comfort to this light-scale design. Chairs and
coordinating tables can gang together or stand alone.
Cura™ by Steelcase Health Cura seating features refined ergonomics and a distinctive flexing
frame to increase comfort and relieve anxiety. With an integrated
headrest, independent seat and back, and CuraNet suspension,
Cura accommodates subtle adjustments and nervous energy while
aiding overall circulation. A coordinating ottoman can be added
to further increase comfort.
The Await collection is the perfect solution for lobby and lounge
settings. Its staggered ganging capabilities exemplify versatility and
functionality in transforming space. Sharp tailoring featuring top
stitch detail speaks to the sophisticated styling of Await; the spring
packs in the seats bring a new level of comfort. With power and
data options and coordinated tables, Await creates contemporary
niches of dramatic in-between spaces.
Bindu™ by Coalesse Enea® by Coalesse Bindu modern side and guest seating is sensibly designed to
express a softer, more residential feeling with contract durability.
Bindu combines the comfort and craft of an upholstered lounge
with the performance needs of a task chair. Bindu conference
and high-back executive seating features a five-star base, with
a complementary four-leg side chair.
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PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Await™ by Coalesse The Brody WorkLounge is designed to be good for the body
and brain. This comfortable microenvironment integrates power,
ergonomics, personal storage and lighting while creating a shelter
from visual distractions. LiveLumbar™ technology and adaptive
bolstering provide dynamic back support, and a footrest gives
additional support for legs and feet. The adjustable worksurface
holds technology at eye level, reducing neck and shoulder strain.
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
The Enea seating collection is comfortable, stackable, durable
and versatile, with a wide palette of colors and finish possibilities.
Available as both a side chair and stool, with arms or without,
Enea is well suited for a range of spaces. Tables come in a variety
of heights and shapes, with laminate or solid wood tops and
optional power and data integration. A round steel base creates
strength and stability.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING GUEST + LOUNGE (continued)
Enea Lottus™ by Coalesse Leela™ by Steelcase Health Enea Lottus is a beautifully sculpted collection of flexible, multi-height
chairs and tables with a wide palette of color and finish choices. The
collection integrates simply and cleanly into any space, providing
comfort and elegance. Seating includes a side chair, sled stool
or post stool, with options for stackability and a propylene or
upholstered seat insert.
i2i® by Steelcase The crisp lines and sleek metal bases of Leela seating make any
waiting place feel familiar, clean and comfortable. Leela works well
with other furnishings and architectural elements to unify a look
across a healthcare facility or campus. Metal legs, webbed seat
suspension and structural steel frame add stability and strength, and
a clean-out space and open bases facilitate cleaning. Coordinating
freestanding tables feature solid surface or painted steel tops.
Lincoln by turnstone i2i seating is designed specifically to foster collaboration. Clinicians
and patients can maintain eye-to-eye and eye-to-information contact
through the unique dual swivel mechanism—it allows the back
and seat to swivel together or independently. Flexing fingers in the
backrest give appropriate support according to the user’s position
for better comfort, longer. The i2i family includes an optional writing
tablet and coordinating table.
Lox™ by Steelcase Inviting, inspiring, involving, the Lox Stool and Chair are designed
to bring people together with minimal effort. While minimalist in
materials, the clean silhouette of Lox Chair flows sculpturally and
supports comfortably. Individualize the black or white shell with fabric
or leather. Swivel with ease on a polished aluminum four-star base.
With four unique styles and fabrics for any décor, Jenny seating
delivers contemporary flair with traditional elements that make a
timeless addition to any space. Jenny’s sturdy construction is built
to last and is ideal for high-traffic areas. Wipeable fabrics lend extra
protection. A coordinating ottoman and coffee and end tables
expand the Jenny collection.
Lagunitas™ by Coalesse Malibu™ by Steelcase Health A comprehensive seating and table collection, Lagunitas creates
a space within a space. The unique articulating back cushion supports
changing postures. High and low panels create varying degrees of
privacy for consultation and family conversation. With 44 pieces;
one-, two- and three-seat options; and tables in a variety of shapes
and sizes, this comprehensive collection provides endless
opportunities to configure the ideal setting.
108
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Jenny ® by turnstone Lincoln lounge seating is a comfortable, attractive and durable
choice for a variety of reception and waiting areas. Lincoln offers
a contemporary look with a leather surface, clean lines and tailored
details at an affordable price point.
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Malibu seating elevates the aesthetic of public waiting areas with
the warmth of hardwood maple construction in a transitional design.
Seating and coordinating freestanding tables blend beautifully with
a variety of architectural and furnishing styles. Performance features
include extended arms to provide easy grip and open backs that
facilitate cleaning.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING GUEST + LOUNGE (continued)
media:scape Lounge seating creates collaborative settings that
integrate seamlessly with media:scape technology. Eight unique
pieces in a variety of shapes combine to accommodate a range of
group sizes and purposes. Ledges lend additional standing-height
surfaces. Canopies keep conversations contained and add a sense
of separation in large spaces.
Mitra® by Steelcase Health Outlook Collection by Steelcase Health
The Outlook collection includes flexible and accommodating seating in five
distinct frame styles with coordinating tables for waiting areas, reception and
patient rooms. All Outlook styles offer steel construction with webbed seat
suspension for comfort and durability. A generous clean-out space between
seats and backs simplifies cleaning. Arms are designed for easy grip.
Outlook Empress™ The Mitra seating collection combines strength and beauty with slim,
steam-bent curves and structural steel inner frames. The extensive
line includes guest, lounge, high-back, recliner, and sleeper seating
and coordinating freestanding tables to create a cohesive experience
across many healthcare settings. Active webbed seat suspension
provides comfort and support. Performance features include extended
arms for easy grip and open backs that facilitate cleaning.
Move™ by Steelcase Empress seating features
mission-inspired vertical
side slats and solid maple
construction.
Outlook Jarrah™ Comfortable and versatile, Move multipurpose seating includes
lightweight, stackable solutions. Move was designed to adjust and
conform to the natural movements of the body through an inner core
system for adaptive bolstering. It can blend or make a statement
with an extraordinary range of material and color choices. Move
is available as a side chair, and in perching and stool heights.
Neighbor™ by Steelcase Health With distinctive back heights and shapes—simple rectilinear lines—
the Neighbor lounge system defines personal space in public waiting
environments. Seating, tables and armrests combine to create
unique configurations for intimate conversations and productive
waiting. Benches and cushioned armrests invite alternative postures,
while multi-seat units accommodate bariatric needs.
110
Outlook Hawthorne™ STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Hawthorne seating features
traditional style with distinctive
curves and solid maple
construction.
Outlook Nikko™ Jarrah seating features
rounded oval steel legs
designed for strength, safety
and cleanability.
Nikko seating features fully
upholstered arm panels and
solid maple construction.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
media:scape® Lounge by Steelcase Outlook Sequoia™ Sequoia seating features
clean lines and solid maple
construction.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING GUEST + LOUNGE (continued)
Player ® by Steelcase Snodgrass by Steelcase The simple and durable Player chair is convenient, comfortable
and stackable. Its slim, quiet aesthetic fits in anywhere, and stows
away when not needed. A reinforced steel frame means long-term
durability, and ganging and alignment devices are available to
configure chair groups. Player is available with sled base or four
legs, and also as a stool option.
Regard™ by Steelcase Health Snodgrass guest and occasional seating complements contemporary
and transitional styling. It delivers classic simplicity in any space.
Custom needs and looks can be accommodated through choice of
wood or metal frames and arms, and open loop or armless versions.
Sorrel™ by Steelcase Health The Regard modular lounge system was created to make moments
of transition more meaningful throughout the healthcare journey.
Regard supports comfort, connection and privacy, giving patients
and their families choice and control over their experience. Seating
and settings support multiple postures and waiting activities. Desks
and media cabinets accommodate technology and make room for
personal belongings. Power for mobile devices is integrated to
enable active waiting and positive distraction.
Tava™ by Steelcase Health The Ripple bench is a sculptural seating solution that simultaneously
complements and enhances waiting spaces and lobbies. Its
articulating waveform and soft edges create an engaging, inspired
aesthetic. Ripple is available in single or triple seat lengths with a
flat or wave orientation.
The extensive Tava family of seating offers a fresh, transitional
design featuring ash wood arms and legs with mitered finger joints.
Steel frames and springs bring comfort and strength, with a hidden
crumb sweep and open base to facilitate cleaning. The Tava collection
includes guest, lounge and high-back seating. Coordinating tables
with solid surface or powder-coated steel tops complete the look.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Ripple™ by Coalesse Light in scale and stackable, Sorrel seating helps maximize every
square foot of a healthcare setting. Sorrel is highly customizable with
options including a maple wood back, armed and armless seating,
and standard and wallsaver legs. Steel frame construction provides
strength and durability. Chairs can stand alone or gang together,
with coordinating tables that nest closely.
Sieste® by Steelcase Health The Sieste collection of seating brings a clean, simple design profile
with a range of options for patients and visiting family. Sieste offers
single and multiple-seat lounge chairs, plus a coordinating sleeper
sofa and tables. All Sieste seating features durable hardwood frames
and reinforced seats, and arm and lounge chairs have a clean-out
space between seat and back.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING RECLINERS
SEATING SLEEPERS
Empath™ by Steelcase Health Mitra® Sleeper Seating by Steelcase Health Empath recliner seating is designed to reduce stress and the
potential for injury for both patients and clinicians while increasing
physical and emotional connection. A central locking system activates
with pedals on either side. Molded arms with dual flip-down option
facilitate patient transfer. The recliner’s back recline paddle is easy
to activate from either arm and operates independent of the footrest,
with infinite stops from upright to full recline. Many options expand
comfort and utility. For example, the optional tablet arm provides a
convenient surface for easy access to personal items.
Mineral™ by Steelcase Health Mitra sleeper seating cleverly converts from a chair to a sleeper,
allowing family members to remain nearby around the clock. This
double-duty performer coordinates with the extensive Mitra family
of seating for patients and guests. With its wood frame and steel
mechanism, the Mitra sleeper provides a comfortable seat, easy
conversion and outstanding durability.
Sieste® Sleeper Sofa by Steelcase Health Mineral recliner seating provides a clean aesthetic in a compact
design. It delivers big-chair comfort, yet fits into a smaller footprint
and reduces strain on clinicians as they move patients through the
healthcare journey. The recliner’s backrest operates independent
of its seat, with infinite stops from upright to full recline. Its seat
depth is designed for easy exit and entry. An optional flip-down arm
facilitates patient transfer and many other options expand comfort
and utility.
Mitra® by Steelcase Health The Sieste sleeper sofa encourages visiting family and friends to stay
with patients as active partners in care. The sofa folds open with ease
to reveal a sleeping surface separate from the sitting surface. A large
drawer provides storage for personal belongings or amenities. With
three standard lengths and an armless option, the sofa can be customized
for the perfect fit.
X-tenz™ Sleeper Chairs by Steelcase Health Single X-tenz and Double X-tenz sleeper seating welcomes families
in patient rooms, keeping them near. Simple to convert from sitting
to sleeping, X-tenz is ideal for tight footprints and underutilized areas.
Single X-tenz opens to the left or right with foot-activated release,
while each seat on Double X-tenz pulls forward independently to
provide lounge posture or full sleeping positions. Both include a
sleeping surface separate from the sitting surface.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Mitra recliner seating responds to the intensive demands of
healthcare environments with comforting strength and beauty.
It coordinates with the Mitra family of seating and transitions with
ease to accommodate rest or sleep in patient rooms and treatment
areas. The recliner’s back recline actuator is easy to activate and
operates independent of the footrest, with infinite stops from upright
to full recline. Its seat depth is designed for easy exit and entry.
Many options expand comfort and utility.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING TASK
Amia® by Steelcase Gesture™ by Steelcase Amia is a hardworking, versatile ergonomic task chair that adds
an element of simple sophistication. Unique, adjustable-height
LiveLumbar™ technology inside the chair provides a system of
flexors that contour to and move with a user’s back for consistent,
dynamic support. Amia is available as a chair or stool.
Cachet ® by Steelcase Gesture is the first office chair designed to support a greater range
of technologies, postures and user sizes. Adjusting the Gesture
chair is as easy as adjusting posture. 3D LiveBack™ technology
allows Gesture to change shape and mimic the natural motion of the
user’s spine, and adaptive bolstering allows the seat to contour for
customized comfort. The Gesture 360 arm moves like a human arm
for support in any position. Gesture is available as a chair or stool.
Leap® by Steelcase Cachet seating is ideal for healthcare and research applications
where comfort and cleanability are key. Cachet creates the perfect
blend of ergonomics, durability and versatility for the toughest
environments. A balanced-action suspension system automatically
adjusts to provide proper support, while composite edges and
flexible slotted surfaces absorb and evenly distribute weight. Cachet is
available in height-adjustable work chair, stool or stackable versions.
QiVi™ by Steelcase With only a single manual adjustment (seat height), the rest of the
cobi task chair’s ergonomic design is automatic. A weight-activated
mechanism senses the user’s center of gravity and adjusts for tailored
comfort. The flexing seat, back and top edge move with the user’s body
and support various postures. cobi is available as a chair or stool.
Criterion® by Steelcase Shortcut by turnstone Criterion seating’s soft curves and pleasing contours provide all-day
comfort with exceptional durability. Seven independent adjustments
offer support through the full range of dynamic seating postures.
Optional molded and sewn upholsteries make cleaning spills, marks
and messes simple. Criterion is available as a chair with high- or midback, and as a stool. Criterion Plus brings extra support and seat width.
116
Intelligently designed to promote collaboration, QiVi seating
encourages movement, supports multiple postures and provides
comfort for extended periods of time. A pivoting backrest naturally
adjusts as the body moves, and a gliding seat intuitively slides
forward and back with the user, encouraging healthy shifts in
position. QiVi seating is available in five-star or sled base, and in
stool height with five-star base.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
cobi® by Steelcase A perfect fit with a wide range of adjustments, the Leap task
chair delivers full support for various body shapes and sizes. The
LiveBack™ system changes shape to mimic the movement of the
spine. The chair’s Natural Glide System™ enables comfortable recline
without straining eyes, neck or arms. Leap is available as a chair,
stool or WorkLounge with headrest. Leap Plus gives extra support
and seat width.
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Sleek, modern and incredibly versatile, Shortcut is simple sophistication
in a truly multipurpose chair or stool. Elbow rests are specially crafted
for using technology with full support, or pulling close to a table without
arm adjustment. The generous seat allows for easy-in, easy-out mobility
to keep pace in busy environments. An optional cushion adds comfort,
while the cushion-free choice eases cleaning.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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SEATING TASK
CASEGOODS MODULAR
Think™ by Steelcase Folio™ by Steelcase Health Think is the chair with a brain and a conscience. This ergonomic task
chair understands how you sit and adjusts itself intuitively, and it’s
up to 95% recyclable. The Integrated LiveBack™ system conforms
to and moves with the user’s body as postures change. An advanced
weight-activated seat allows anyone to get comfortable, quickly.
Adaptive bolstering in the seat cushion conforms to the user’s shape.
Think is available as a chair or stool.
Verge™ by Steelcase Health Folio casegoods deliver progressive storage designed around the
changing demands of healthcare. Folio integrates handwashing
stations, kitchenettes, information display, a recycling center and
more. Wall-hung components facilitate cleaning. Folio reconfigures
with ease to support clinician work process and patient needs in
a variety of spaces—today and tomorrow.
Opus® by Steelcase Health The Verge stool gives clinicians a convenient, comfortable and quick
place to sit for eye-to-eye conversations and care at bedside, in
treatment or exam rooms, and throughout workspaces. Verge is
available in three heights for sitting, perching and counter work. The
stool can be approached from any side and moves with ease on
casters or glides, while a foot ring eases pressure on backs and legs.
Opus casegoods define personal space and enhance the care
experience for patients and families. Components include storage,
display, tables, lighting and accessories, with opportunities to
integrate technology. Opus configures and adapts in multiple ways
to create a consistent aesthetic across patient and exam rooms,
consultation spaces, and other settings. The Opus collection includes
a coordinating overbed table.
Sonata™ by Steelcase Health PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Sonata casegoods lend privacy without isolation in treatment areas,
emphasizing both physical and emotional comfort. Personal space
is balanced with clear sightlines for constant access to clinicians.
Standing-height worksurfaces feature pull-out prep space, medical
supply storage or discreet waste bin storage. Components combine
and reconfigure over time to accommodate evolving work processes.
Sync™ by Steelcase Health Designed to support clinicians in action, Sync modular workstations
facilitate collaboration between colleagues, connection to patients
and access to the technologies and information vital to quality care.
This open-plan solution provides clear sightlines with access from
all sides. A variety of surface heights and optional touch-control
adjustability accommodates changing postures and users.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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CASEGOODS FREESTANDING
Ainsley™ by Steelcase Health Waldorf™ by Steelcase Health Ainsley casegoods bring comforting touches of home to patient
rooms with familiar design and the warmth of real wood. Elements
of the collection combine to create custom spaces.
Waldorf casegoods create an inspired, easy-to-customize look
for storage in patient rooms. Classic details give these convenient,
hardworking solutions a comfortable, residential feel. Multiple
wardrobe widths and configurations fit unique patient needs and
space requirements.
Davenport™ by Steelcase Health Durable and simple, Davenport casegoods offer smart design for
patient room storage. Davenport has classic styling with a sleek leg
profile, bow-front tops and curved handles. Matching or contrasting
laminate top and leg options expand the aesthetic possibilities.
DESK SYSTEMS + STORAGE
Park by Steelcase Health Answer ® by Steelcase Answer solutions meet today’s evolving demands with a range
of applications, aesthetics, technology support and ownership
adaptability. Perfect for creating multipurpose spaces, Answer
systems host individuals and groups while balancing collaboration
and privacy, supporting mobility, and optimizing real estate. A refined
design language and range of aesthetic options and materials make
Answer compatible with the Steelcase portfolio of solutions.
Form follows function with the crisp, understated design of Park
casegoods. Integrated door and drawer pulls are free of embellishment
and easy to grip. One- or two-tone finish options can create custom
looks. The Park mobile cabinet provides a useful dual-tiered surface.
Clean and classic, Senza is an extensive line of casegoods, with
equal parts elegance, performance and flexibility. A range of
surface materials and drawer and cabinet pulls allows high levels
of customization. Multiple wardrobe widths and configurations fit
unique patient needs and space requirements.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
c:scape® by Steelcase Senza™ by Steelcase Health c:scape removes visual and social barriers, giving people better
access to each other, information and technology. Five simple
components can be configured and reconfigured to create a variety
of applications for both focused and collaborative work, from open
areas to private spaces. Data and power integrated in connect zones
give easy access to multiple users.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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DESK SYSTEMS + STORAGE (continued)
Duo™ by Steelcase Montage® by Steelcase Duo is an integrated storage solution that facilitates clinician
workflow and collaboration. It puts often-used tools and supplies
within reach and defines workspaces without hindering sightlines.
Duo Overhead Storage can accommodate binders and books. Duo
Slim Storage provides a transactional top and piling surfaces. Duo
Tall Storage offers seated privacy and creates a natural perching
area at standing height.
Elective Elements® by Steelcase Elective Elements desk systems seamlessly blend style, craftsmanship and performance to address changing needs in clinician or
consultation spaces. With limitless configurations, Elective Elements
creates a range of applications with a unified aesthetic through wallmounted, panel-supported and freestanding components. Open storage
and layered worksurfaces hold supplies and establish boundaries.
Integrated technology means easy access to power and data.
Montage panel system offers a breadth of surface material options
and is highly customizable to support the work needs of clinicians.
Stackable and de-stackable frames allow for clear sightlines, and
layered elements create ample surface for charting and other
administrative tasks. Montage’s open-frame construction routes
power and data at base and desk height for powering technology.
Universal Storage by Steelcase Our most versatile and extensive storage offering, Universal Storage
works seamlessly with a broad range of freestanding and panel
systems. Lateral files, towers, cabinets, bookcases and bins create
boundaries and add visual privacy and effective storage. Lateral files
with a cushion top welcome guests for impromptu conversations.
Adjacent lateral files make space for supplies in a team area.
FlexFrame™ by Steelcase PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Configured with functional surfaces and modular components,
FlexFrame workwall combines storage, organization and built-in
technology to support the many modes of work. FlexFrame includes
convenient connections for flat-panel displays, power and data, and
can seamlessly integrate with media:scape. And as needs shift and
evolve, FlexFrame is designed to shift with them—reconfiguring
without locating studs or disrupting drywall.
FrameOne™ by Steelcase FrameOne bench is designed to enrich varying levels of mobility
and collaboration. A convenient integrated rail hosts worktools, lighting,
power access and privacy screens. The modular design adapts and
reconfigures easily to maximize space and adjust to changing needs.
Integration with media:scape supports information sharing.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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DESK SYSTEMS + STORAGE WASTE + RECYCLING
Victor2™ by Steelcase Campfire™ Paper Table by turnstone Victor2 encourages recycling with upscale and streamlined aesthetics.
Eight interchangeable inserts and icons give clear direction for
disposal and recycling. Multiple surface material options blend
with a variety of furnishings and aesthetics. Front access to bins on
freestanding units and rear access on mobile units make servicing
quick and effortless.
Topped with a giant stack of paper, Campfire Paper Table allows
patients and clinicians to write, draw or plan, then take their notes
with them. Or it makes a creative activity for children in lounge or
waiting settings. Campfire Paper Table is also available with a glass
top for use again and again with dry-erase markers.
Campfire™ Slim Table by turnstone Slim Table’s sleek design makes it a go-to addition for any lounge
space. With built-in power and a place to pile, Slim Table adds
functionality with modern flair. Place Slim Table with Campfire Half
Lounge to create an instant side area to place work materials.
TABLES + CARTS
Enea Lottus™ Table by Coalesse Airtouch height-adjustable desks allow personal control and customization in shared spaces as people come and go. The innovative
Airtouch mechanism lets users quickly and quietly adjust the surface
without the need for electricity—from seated height to standing
height in just 1.2 seconds. A height range of 26" to 43" with infinite
increments suits many needs.
Bob™ Table by Coalesse Exchange™ by Steelcase Health Bob tables have a business-like attitude with a warm embrace. Bob
tables are available to complement the collection and have glass
tops with a sturdy base.
124
Enea Lottus is a beautifully sculpted collection of flexible, multi-height
chairs and tables with a wide palette of color and finish choices.
The collection integrates simply and cleanly into any space, providing
comfort and elegance. Seating includes a side chair, sled stool
or post stool, with options for stackability and a propylene or
upholstered seat insert.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Airtouch® by Steelcase STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
The compact worksurface and posture-supportive design of the
Exchange table provide an impromptu place for clinicians to gather,
share and connect. The surface is available in round, oval and bullet
shapes, with a scallop detail for cable management. The base is
oversized for stability, with a foot ring to allow healthy posture.
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125
TABLES + CARTS (continued)
Groupwork® by Steelcase Pocket ® by Steelcase Health Groupwork tables promote open thinking in meeting rooms,
consultation spaces, cafés and more. Available in a variety of
surface shapes and heights, Groupwork tables bring flexibility for
collaboration or individual use. Rounded options with no corners
lend safety to small spaces, and optional round bases lend extra
stability. Flip-top tables nest for easy storage.
SW_1 Table by Coalesse Available in a modern or classic style, the Jenny Coffee and
Side Table is crafted to look beautiful in any collaborative office
environment or lounge space.
Mobile Overbed Tables by Steelcase Health The beauty and smart design of the SW_1 Conference Table also
comes in a standard height. Choose from four shapes and a range
of sizes, from four-person to 16-person. Complete the picture with
the SW_1 Chair. Optional grommet and cable management host your
technology elegantly. Add PowerPod to electrify. SW_1 Conference
Tables are offered in a wide range of surface finishes—veneers, glass,
plus a solid white surface. The cast aluminum base is recycled and
recyclable. A modern beauty.
Series 7 by Steelcase Overbed tables accommodate patient meals—plus consultation,
collaboration and a host of activities. Height-adjustable and easy
to move, they are a just-right surface anywhere within the patient
room or treatment area. Tables are available in two base styles
with a variety of surface shapes, with spill top standard on all rigid
thermoform options. An optional vanity drawer stores personal items.
Opus™ Overbed Table by Steelcase Health The Opus Overbed Table is central to activity and interactions
in the patient room. It provides a convenient, height-adjustable
surface with cup holders and spill top for patient meals and tasks.
An additional stationary standing-height surface with cubby allows
room for clinicians. This overbed table coordinates with the Opus
modular casegoods family.
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Series 7 electric height-adjustable desks allow users to sit or stand
at a whim and customize temporary workspaces to the perfect
height—without disturbing others. With an exceptional load capacity,
an energy-saving standby mode and a height range of 24 ¼" to 52",
Series 7 helps ensure ergonomic comfort and convenience for a
variety of users.
Trees™ by Coalesse PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Jenny ® Table by turnstone The Pocket mobile worksurface supports connected care from
task to task and space to space. With a small footprint and smooth
gliding casters, it moves easily with clinicians to bring people, tools
and technology together, wherever they’re needed. Pocket holds
laptops, tablets, monitors, CPUs, all-in-ones and a range of clinical
supplies. Movable magnetic accessories and adjustable height
options enable customization.
The Trees table collection lends playfulness to waiting places. An
embossed wood texture on all sides creates visual interest and
adds dimension. Trees tables are available in two unique shapes
of different sizes.
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127
TABLES + CARTS (continued)
TECHNOLOGY
Walkstation by Steelcase media:scape® by Steelcase media:scape integrates technology and furniture to bring people,
space and information together for greater collaboration and
productivity. Simple, fast and effective, media:scape lets multiple
users connect and share content instantly. Incorporating video
technology allows participants to connect remotely and discuss
test results, medical data, treatment options or educational tools.
media:scape is available in a range of sizes and applications,
accommodating one-on-one to full-team collaboration.
The Walkstation treadmill desk gives the option to walk without
disrupting workflow, enhancing health and productivity. In waiting
spaces, the integrated treadmill and Series 7 height-adjustable desk
combine for a welcome alternative to sitting or pacing for expending
energy. In clinician work or respite areas, a Sit-to-Walkstation option
incorporates a larger worksurface and room for seating.
media:scape® mini by Steelcase media:scape mini extends the media:scape experience into
small and existing spaces. Simply placing media:scape mini on
top of virtually any surface transforms health settings into highperforming, collaborative environments. Optimized for small groups,
media:scape mini invites two to four people to connect and share—
with equal access to information, and without cables to pass,
remotes or extra software.
SPACE DIVISION
media:scape® TeamStudio by Steelcase V.I.A. is Vertical Intelligent Architecture that creates rooms designed
to augment human interaction through true acoustical privacy
and hosting technology. Its relocatable walls support embedded
monitors, integrated whiteboards and short-throw projectors, as well
as power and data access. Walls are available in clear glass, opaque
glass or solid surface, and surface materials can be switched
without the need to tear down. V.I.A. achieves an acoustic Sound
Transmission Class rating of 52—the highest in the market.
media:scape TeamStudio is a setting that enables interaction and
more productive content sharing by optimizing videoconferencing
and removing physical barriers, including distance. Regardless of
location, TeamStudio brings all the benefits of media:scape to clinical
teams gathered for advanced collaboration. Tables are standing
height to support alternative postures.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
V.I.A.™ by Steelcase RoomWizard ® by Steelcase The RoomWizard web-based scheduling system saves time and
increases efficiency by easily coordinating room use. Exam rooms,
quick-care spaces, and clinician work or respite rooms can be
reserved on the spot with the touch of a finger or ahead of time from
a laptop or computer. Screens display reservation information, and
red and green lights indicate availability.
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129
TECHNOLOGY (continued)
Relay™ by Steelcase Health Thread simplifies power distribution, providing power to the devices
people use exactly where it’s needed. Its ultra-thin design lays
underneath carpeted floor, with a height of just 3/16" that doesn’t
impact foot traffic. Power hubs at worksurface- or seated-height
can be positioned anywhere in a space, with built-in modularity that
means power can be reconfigured over time.
The Relay wall-mounted arm supports information technology and
the clinician work process at the point of care. Relay makes it easy to
access information and share with patients and families. It includes a
standard and enclosed CPU holder, plus smart cable management.
Monitor and keyboard adjust vertically and horizontally with a single
hand in one continuous movement. When not in use, Relay conveniently
stores 9" from the wall.
WORKTOOLS COMPUTER SUPPORT
WORKTOOLS ORGANIZATION TOOLS
Eyesite™ by Steelcase SOTO® Worktools by Steelcase The Eyesite flat-panel monitor arm is designed to give users control
over the angle and depth of displays regardless of shape, size or
quantity. Columns in heights of 12", 18" or 26" accommodate up to six
displays and laptop support in a variety of configurations. Focal depth
bars have 13" of adjustability and tuck back neatly when not in use.
SOTO Worktools bring flexible organization, increasing productivity
in today’s evolving spaces. The broad range of solutions includes a
variety of boxes, rails and shelves, computer and technology support,
personal organization, and more.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Thread™ by Steelcase FYI® by Steelcase The FYI monitor arm easily repositions without tools to accommodate
any user’s height or posture. Available in single or dual models, the
arm adjusts quickly for comfort and information-sharing with 360°
upper arm rotation, 30° tilt and 90° rotation for portrait or landscape
displays. Integrated cable management keeps cords organized, and
an optional C-clamp brings sturdy support.
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WORKTOOLS WHITEBOARDS
WORKTOOLS LIGHTS
Edge™ Series by Steelcase dash® by Steelcase Edge Series is part of the Steelcase Premium Whiteboards collection
and has more writing area with a sleek, slim design and exceptional
value. The ultra-smooth writing surface allows dry-erase markers
to glide easily and improves erasability with no ghosting. Made
of virtually indestructible e3 CeramicSteel™, Edge Series is highly
resistant to impact damage, abrasion, scratching and color fading.
ēno® by Steelcase The dash and dash mini LED lights feature clean lines, fluid
movement and a timeless aesthetic. Superior light quality with
dimming capability eliminates distracting shadows, reduces eye
strain and improves comfort. A Passive Infrared (PIR) occupancy
sensor turns the light off when not in use, saving energy and
extending lamp life.
SOTO® LED Task Light by Steelcase ēno blends the simplicity of a traditional whiteboard with the interactivity
of a large, flat-panel display by combining both analog markers and
digital multimedia into one surface. ēno makes sharing simple with
an easy-to-use interface and Bluetooth-enabled stylus—and no
cords, cables or costly installation needed. All ēno whiteboards are
made of virtually indestructible e3 CeramicSteel™ and are highly
resistant to impact damage, abrasion, scratching and color fading.
Verb™ Whiteboard by Steelcase Underline® by Steelcase The Underline shelf light gives users greater control of their space
with performance-enhancing, energy-smart lighting. Mounted flush
to the bottom of a bin or shelf, Underline adjusts light levels with a
discreet design that stays hidden when turned off. Underline uses
nearly 25% less energy than similar two-foot. T8 task lights, and
nearly 50% less than three-foot. T8 task lights.
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
The Verb whiteboard is small enough for personal use and large
enough to display and share information with others when collaborating.
Double-sided surfaces provide extra room for writing. A coordinating
whiteboard easel allows for display or storage, and wall tracks and
hooks bring additional opportunity for presentation. Made of virtually
indestructible e3 CeramicSteel™, Verb whiteboard is highly resistant
to impact damage, abrasion, scratching and color fading.
Out of the way yet always where it’s needed, the SOTO LED Task
Light is the perfect companion for any sized work area. With refined
design, it makes a powerful yet unobtrusive light output. Mini SOTO
LED lights are designed for hard-to-reach and hard-to-light places,
such as between shelves and flat-panel monitors. Both standard and
mini SOTO lights are available in extended versions with extra reach.
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133
SEATING
This matrix represents an abbreviated statement of line for each product. Additional features, options or components may
not be fully represented. Please view the specification guide for complete product details and specification rules. All seating
products shown are ANSI/BIFMA compliant and can be specified with an optional moisture barrier and/or contrasting fabrics.
Mitra
Tava
Malibu
Outlook
Nikko
Outlook
Sequoia
Outlook
Hawthorne
Outlook
Empress
Outlook
Jarrah
Aspekt
Sorrel
Cura
Verge
Single chair
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Multi-seat
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
GUEST
Regard
Neighbor
Sieste
Leela
Easy access
•
LOUNGE
•
Single chair
Multi-seat
•
•
Loveseat/sofa
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPECIALTY
High-back chair
Bariatric
•
•
•
•
•
Sleeper (also see sleeper matrix)
•
•
•
•
Recliner (also see recliner matrix)
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
steel
wood/steel
•
•
•
•
•
Ganging tables
Frame construction
•
•
•
Ottoman
Freestanding tables
•
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
wood/steel
•
•
•
•
steel
steel
steel
steel
steel
optional glider
stackable
six on floor
four on floor
bariatric
optional
sled base
three stool
heights
optional wallsaver
wave-shaped
arms
add-on chairs
two back styles
optional wallsaver
optional
tablet arm
casters
power access
privacy elements
Unique features
booth seating
media cabinets
desks
three back styles
optional
tablet arm
wallsaver
wallsaver
two arm panel
styles
optional glider
optional glider
add-on chairs
optional glider
•
•
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Bench
glides
transport dolly
planters
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135
RECLINERS
SLEEPERS
This matrix represents an abbreviated statement of line for each product. Additional features, options or components may
not be fully represented. Please view the specification guide for complete product details and specification rules. All recliners
shown are ANSI/BIFMA compliant.
This matrix represents an abbreviated statement of line for each product. Additional features, options or components may
not be fully represented. Please view the specification guide for complete product details and specification rules. All sleepers
shown are ANSI/BIFMA compliant.
Mineral
Mitra
Empath
steel
wood/steel
steel
Infinite backrest recline positions
•
•
•
Sleep occupancy
Independent back and footrest adjustment
•
•
•
Integrated storage
Full recline
•
•
•
Separate sitting and sleeping surfaces
Integrated arm grip
•
Sleep conversion
Dual back recline actuators
•
Foot-activated release
Integrated lower bumpers
•
Coordinating chairs and tables
Frame construction
Footrest scallop
Locking casters
•
•
•
•
•
central locking
•
Adjustable headrest (optional)
•
Trendelenburg (optional)
Flip-down arm (optional)
Additional features available on all recliners
single
Frame construction
Unique features
Optional features
available on all sleepers
Mitra
X-tenz
Double X-tenz
Sieste
wood/steel
steel
steel
wood
single
single
double
single
•
extends forward
•
•
•
extends sideways
extends forward
fold over
•
•
•
casters are standard. rear
casters swivel and lock, front
casters are directional and
non-locking.
•
caster models feature front
locking, rear non-locking
swivel casters.
pull-out sections operate
independently for
simultaneous lounge and
sleep positions.
optional features include
round bolster pillow, two leg
positions, arms or armless,
and multiple widths.
moisture barrier
contrasting fabrics
replaceable components
•
single or dual
tablet arm
drainage bag hanger
push bar
iv pole holder
heat and massage
moisture barrier
pull-out footrest
iv pole*
contrasting fabrics
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
*Ordered as a service part for Mineral and Mitra recliners
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
137
MODULAR CASEGOODS
FREESTANDING CASEGOODS
This matrix represents an abbreviated statement of line for each product. Additional features, options or components may not
be fully represented. Please view the specification guide for complete product details and specification rules. All casegoods
shown are ANSI/BIFMA compliant.
This matrix represents an abbreviated statement of line for each product. Additional features, options or components may not
be fully represented. Please view the specification guide for complete product details and specification rules. All casegoods
shown are ANSI/BIFMA compliant.
Base cabinets
ADA base cabinets
Storage cabinets
Sink cabinets
Desk cabinets
•
•
•
•
•
Conference table cabinets
Wardrobes
Bookcases
Upper storage shelves and cabinets
•
•
•
Bedside tables
Mobile overbed table
Opus
Casegood finish
•
•
•
•
•
Front finish
Wardrobe units
Nurse servers
Islands
Bench
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
fascia
sloped fascia
ceiling tracks
coat hooks
mounting boards
mounting boards
flat screen monitor arm
plastic drawer liners
cushions
stainless steel sinks
coat hooks
laminate
laminate
laminate
laminate
laminate
thermoform
laminate
wood
thermoform
laminate/thermoform
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dressers
•
•
•
•
Writing desks
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bedside tables
•
Mobile cabinets
•
•
drawer liners
bar holders
•Litter bag holders
•Gallery rails (exception: Davenport)
•Casters available on bedside table
•J-Bar coat rods available in wardrobe (exception: Davenport)
•Mirrors
•Mobile overbed tables
•Headboards and footboards
•Towel
wall trim packages
fascia end panels
Senza
•Plastic
end panel
inside corner filler panel
Waldorf
•Locks
inside corner filler panel
Accessories
Ainsley
All freestanding casegoods are available with the following features and options (exceptions noted):
common top
sloped fascia
Davenport
Bookcases
end filler panel
end filler panel
Park
TV units
•
•
•
Base
Media units
Sonata
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS
Folio
wall-anchor brackets
fascia stabilizer bracket
floor-anchor brackets
oshpd brackets
led light
ul transformer
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STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
PRODUCT SOLUTIONS STEELCASEHEALTH.COM
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140
STEELCASE HEALTH INSIGHTS + APPLICATIONS GUIDE
Call 800.342.8562 or visit www.SteelcaseHealth.com
Item #15-0001092 11/15 ©2015 Steelcase Inc. All rights reserved. All specifications subject to change without notice. Printed in U.S.A.
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