Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report
Academic Year 2015-16
Annual Security
and
Fire Safety Report
Division Of Student Affairs
Dean of Students
September 2015
Dear Campus Community,
I appreciate your taking the time to review the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Annual Safety and Security Report. This
report is produced annually to provide prospective and current community members with information regarding how we keep
our campus safe, data regarding crimes that occur on and near the campus, and in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act of
1998.
Our campus is located in a vibrant area of the City of Milwaukee and this provides tremendous opportunity for our students,
faculty, staff and community to have rich learning and living experiences. Our philosophy of safety and security on the campus
is centered on ensuring ongoing safety awareness and education, regular monitoring of trends (locally and nationally), and
collaboration between the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Police Department, and
the City of Milwaukee Police department.
In the report you will notice that the Panther community was provided with many opportunities, including our Annual Campus
Safety Week, to learn about crime prevention, keeping themselves and property safe and what to do if there is an emergency
or someone in crisis. Safety on and around the campus is taken very seriously and this expands beyond crime. We provide
robust services and efforts to assist students in making healthy choices related to alcohol and other personal behavior as well as
support to those who may be in crisis.
Regular safety services are available to students and include our University Housing shuttle service and Be On the Safe Side
(B.O.S.S.) shuttle service. B.O.S.S. has been shown to reduce area crimes by 14% when it is operating (2014). Other services
that are open to all campus members include S.A.F.E. alert emergency notification systems, S.A.F.E. emergency phones, the
SAFE Walker program, and self-defense courses.
I encourage you to continue to become familiar with our campus and remember the following tips for whatever reason brings
you to the campus:
Be Aware and Alert
• Be aware and alert to what is going on around you.
• Stand tall, walk confidently, and make eye contact with those around you.
• Be aware of your surroundings especially when using a handheld device and/or wearing headphones.
• Avoid walking alone at night.
• If you have been drinking, have someone walk you home or get a ride.
Be Informed
• Know where the nearest blue light phone is.
• Know the hours of B.O.S.S. and SAFE in order to get around.
• Know your destination and how you are getting there.
• Download the UWM mobile app for easy access to campus safety resources.
• Program the Campus Police #’s into your phone - Emergency: (414) 229-9911/Non-Emergency: (414) 229-4627
Be Prepared
• Keep doors locked, even if you are away for only a few minutes.
• Do not leave electronics, purses, wallets, or backpacks unattended.
• Lock your vehicles to prevent theft of or from your vehicle.
• Never leave valuables in the passenger compartment of vehicles.
• Take a self defense course yearly.
I look forward to continuing to work with all of our campus and Milwaukee community members to continue to keep our campus a safe and great place to live, learn, and work.
Sincerely,
Timothy W. Gordon, PhD.
Dean of Students Table Of Contents
Letter From Dean of Students Timothy W. Gordon................2
Table Of Contents......................................................................3
Campus Safety Policies..............................................................4
Reporting Crimes and Other Emergencies..............................4
Missing Student Notification Policy......................................4
Timely Warning Policy.......................................................4
Campus Security Authority..................................................5
Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics...................................5
Security Of Campus Facilities....................................................6
Building/Grounds Security.................................................6
Contacting University Police................................................6
Emergency Notifications......................................................7
Emergency Evacuations......................................................7
Student Escort and Transportation Services...........................8
Guidelines for Personal Safety..............................................8
Campus Law Enforcement........................................................9
Police Services On Campus..................................................9
Off-Campus Criminal Activities...........................................9
Counselors Encourage Crime Reporting...............................10
Hate/Bias Incident Reporting............................................10
Informing Employees and Students About
Campus Security And Crime Prevention..............................10
Alcohol And Illicit Drugs.........................................................11
Health Effects Of The Abuse Of Alcohol
And Other Drugs.............................................................11
Drug And Alcohol Education Program................................11
BASICS..........................................................................12
Evaluation and Treatment Services....................................12
Prohibited Conduct..........................................................12
Disciplinary Sanctions......................................................12
Off-Campus Support Groups.............................................12
Wisconsin Criminal Sanctions...........................................13
Federal Criminal Sanctions...............................................13
Sexual Assault, Dating/Domestic Violence
And Stalking.............................................................................14
Scope And Scale...............................................................14
Prevention......................................................................14
Protecting Yourself From Sexual And Gender Violence...........15
Don’t Be A Sexual/Gender Violence Perpetrator....................15
Education.................................................................................16
University Police..............................................................16
Norris Health Center........................................................16
Women’s Resource Center..................................................16
University Housing..........................................................17
Violence Intervention And Prevention Series........................17
Services And Reporting Options.............................................18
Services..........................................................................18
Reporting.......................................................................18
Additional Resources........................................................18
Evidence Preservation.......................................................19
Campus Disciplinary Policies And Procedures......................20
Prohibited And Illegal Acts................................................20
Disciplinary Sanctions......................................................20
Sex Offender Information..................................................20
Explanation Of Terms.............................................................21
Crime Statistics.........................................................................21
Relevant Wisconsin Statutes....................................................25
Appendix 1: Health Effects Of Drugs Other
Than Alcohol...........................................................................34
Appendix 2: Sexual Assault Statistics......................................35
Fire Safety Statistics..................................................................37
Policies And Procedures Impacting Fire Safety.....................38
Fire Safety Systems In Student Housing...............................38
Policies On Portable Electronic Appliances,
Smoking And Open Flames In Student Housing...................38
Student Housing Evacuation Procedures.............................38
Fire Safety Education And Training for
Students, Faculty And Staff...............................................39
Reporting Fires................................................................39
Plans For Future Improvements In Fire Safety.......................39
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 3 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Campus Safety Policies
Reporting Crimes and
Other Emergencies
Students and other members of the
University community that witness
or become aware of any crime, suspicious activity or emergency are urged
to promptly and accurately notify the
University Police (x9911 from a campus
phone or 414-229-9911), or by picking
up any one of the blue lit S.A.F.E. emergency phones located on campus. Individuals may also report the crime or
emergency in person at the University
Police Department, located at 3410 N.
Maryland Ave.
For off-campus incidents, the Milwaukee Police Department can be contacted at 911 for emergencies and (414)
933-4444 for non-emergencies. The Milwaukee Police Department District One
station is located at 749 W. State St. in
downtown Milwaukee.
Students may also report crimes to the
Dean of Students (x4632 from a campus
phone, 414-229-4632 or at www.incident.
uwm.edu), the Director of University
Housing (x6589 from a campus phone
or 414-229-6589), or the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (x4038 from a
campus phone or 414-229-4038). The
Dean of Students, Director of University
Housing and Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs shall refer any crime report
impacting the safety of students or staff
to University Police.
If you are the victim of a crime, but do
not wish to pursue action within the
University or criminal justice system,
the University Police Department will
accept voluntary, confidential crime reports. The reports will be entered into
the Automated Records Management
System and tracked as anonymous. Reports provided in this manner will be
included in the annual crime statistics.
Missing Student
Notification Policy
Any individual who is aware that a student who resides in University Housing
has been missing for 24 hours or more
should report those circumstances to
any of the following campus authorities:
University Police Department
414-229-9911
Director of University Housing
414-229-6589
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
414-229-4038
Dean of Students
414-229-4632
In the event a student is reported missing, UWM officials will notify the University Police Department immediately and
local law enforcement within 24 hours.
Each student living in University Housing may register a confidential contact
person to be notified within 24 hours
in the event the student is determined
to be missing. To register a confidential
contact, a student may contact any member of the UWM University Housing
Department staff. Confidential contact
information is maintained in a confidential file accessible only to authorized
campus officials. It may not be disclosed
except to law enforcement personnel in
furtherance of a missing person investigation.
If a missing student is under 18 years of
age and is not emancipated, University
officials must notify the student’s parent
or guardian, in addition to any additional contact person designated by the student.
Timely Warning Policy
UWM has a policy of timely warning the
campus community of Clery Act crimes
occurring on campus that may constitute a serious or continuing threat to
students and employees.
If an incident occurs that, in the judgment of the University Police Chief, may
constitute a serious or continuing threat
to students or employees, the Chief or
his/her designee will normally consult
with the Vice Chancellor for University
Relations, the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and the Vice Chancellor
for Finance & Administrative Affairs, or
their designees, as has been determined
by that group to be appropriate based
Key Campus
Phone Numbers
University Police
9-911 (Emergency)
414-229-9911 (Emergency)
414-229-4627 (Non-Emergency)
Milwaukee Police
911 (Emergency)
414-933-4444 (Non-Emergency)
Director of University Housing
414-229-6589
Vice Chancellor for
Student Affairs
414-229-4038
Dean of Students
414-229-4632
Norris Health Center
414-229-4716
Women’s Resource Center
414-229-2852
BOSS
414-229-6503
Office of Equity and Diversity
414-229-5923
on the circumstances. If upon consultation with the appropriate UWM representatives, the Chief or the designee reasonably concludes that a campus-wide
“timely warning” is appropriate under
the Clery Act, UWM will issue a warning
designed to provide timely notice to the
affected members of the community.
The University Police Chief also has the
authority to issue unilaterally a timely
warning if the circumstances do not permit any consultation.
A timely warning most often takes the
form of an email to the campus or
portions of the campus, but may also
include any other media designed to
get the word out quickly campus-wide,
such as by posting physical signs at appropriate locations and/or distributing
information through social media sites.
Timely warnings will also be posted for
sixty days on the University Police web
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 4 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
site at: www4.uwm.edu/police/safetywarnings/. Timely warnings may also
be sent via email and text message using
the University’s Safe Alert system in cases of an immediate threat to the health
or safety of the campus community.
The Chief of University Police also may,
upon consultation with the Vice Chancellor for University Relations, the Vice
Chancellor for Student Affairs and the
Vice Chancellor for Finance & Administrative Affairs, or their designees, issue
a notice to the campus community regarding a safety threat that does not require a timely warning under the Clery
Act.
Crime reports given to the University
community will not disclose the identity of victims or witnesses that wish to
remain anonymous.
Campus Security Authorities
Campus Security Authorities or “CSAs”
are defined by the Clery Act as:
1. Members of the University Police Department;
2. Any individual who has responsibility
for campus security (e.g. those responsible for monitoring entrance into institutional property);
3. Any other individuals to whom criminal offenses should be reported (at
UWM, this is the Dean of Students, Director of University Housing, or Vice
Chancellor for Student Affairs); and
4. Any other officials of the institution
who have significant responsibility for
student and campus activities (at UWM,
this would include the Title IX Coordinator (Director of Equity & Diversity Services), the Norris Health Center
Director, all members of the Athletics
Department who actively work with students, all employees within University
Housing and the Dean of Students offices who actively work with students, and
advisors to student organizations).
Annually, Campus Security Authorities
(“CSA”s) are asked to report each and
every Clery Act crime that the CSA becomes aware of over the course of the
calendar year. The University Police Department and University Housing have
their own systems for gathering and reporting such incidents. CSAs in other
departments are required to complete
an online form (uwm.edu/reportit) and
submit it to the Dean of Students Office
as soon as possible after learning of the
crime. As allowed by law, reports may
be completed keeping the complainant
confidential and will be entered into the
Automated Records Management System and tracked as anonymous.
Annual Disclosure of
Crime Statistics
The Clery Act, the Campus Sex Crimes
Prevention Act of 2000, and 2013 amendments to the Clery Act via the Violence
Against Women Act of 2013 require that
UWM report and publish crime statistics
along with policies and procedures to be
followed in the case of sexual violence,
dating/domestic violence, stalking and
other crimes.
Each year, the Dean of Students Office
(in consultation with other campus
units, such as the University Police Department, University Housing, Women’s
Resource Center, Student Activities Office, Athletics, Norris Health Center,
Student Accessibility Center and the
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs)
uses existing records to compile its
crime statistics and to report these statistics, along with security and sexual-violence related policies and procedures,
to the Federal government. Crime statistics are also requested annually from the
City of Milwaukee, City of Glendale, City
of Wauwatosa, Village of Shorewood and
Ozaukee County for inclusion in the
UWM report.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 5 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Security Of Campus Facilities
The safety of students and other members of the University community is a
top priority at UWM.
The University Police Department provides 24-hour service, 365 days a year.
The Department, located on the ground
floor of the west tower of Sandburg
Halls, is comprised of uniformed police
officers supplemented by an array of security officers offering a full range of law
enforcement services. These services are
directed toward providing the safest and
most secure environment possible for
all members of the UWM campus community.
Buildings/Grounds Security
Security measures in place at UWM
buildings vary considerably from building-to-building and day-to-day in order
to accommodate the demands of the
academic year. Circumstances such as
late office hours, special events, semester breaks, legal holidays, spring break,
exam periods and mini-terms can cause
building schedules to change frequently.
Campus and non-campus buildings are
secured each night either by University
Police personnel or by building personnel in accordance with a schedule of
closing times set by the building chair of
each building and altered as necessary
by University Police. Weekend openings
and closings are managed by the University Police.
Access to specific areas, rooms or facilities within each building is determined
by the building’s Building Chair. When
deemed appropriate, keys or electronic
access may be issued to faculty/staff/
student personnel to allow them access.
Persons not issued keys are to contact
the University Police for access to locked
buildings or areas within buildings unless buildings have their own personnel
on duty to provide access.
Authorization for access to such areas
is confirmed for the University Police
by the provision of work permits, access
lists, memoranda or other communications from persons in charge of areas
specifying those allowed to be present
outside normal hours. University Police
do not provide access to any areas that
are under the jurisdiction of University Housing or the UWM Union. These
units provide access to areas under their
jurisdiction.
Malfunctions of security equipment are
to be reported to the University Police,
who will notify those responsible for
making repairs. Any exterior building
doors that cannot be secured are repaired immediately. Doors that are not
functional will not be propped open
and will be secured, and traffic will be
directed to nearest operational door.
Malfunctions in the S.A.F.E. emergency
telephone system are reported to UWM
telecommunications staff by the University Police.
Physical security measures and security patrols are augmented by a network
of security cameras on campus and at
non-campus residence halls. Security
cameras on campus are located in residence halls, the UWM Union, campus
buildings and other common areas. The
University Police also works with those
responsible for individual buildings on
campus to perform security surveys and
make recommendations to improve security.
The campus is toured periodically by
campus representatives and student organizations interested in security. Additional security needs are identified
and reported to the proper authority.
Tours include a review of the placement
and operation of lights and emergency
phones. Members of the campus community are encouraged to report any
concerns or suggestions they may have
concerning campus security to the University Police or to Facility Services.
UWM also has specific policies related
to the safety of minors on campus and to
ensure compliance with Wisconsin Executive Order 54, which requires mandatory reporting of child abuse and neglect by University staff. These include
portions of UWM’s Use of Facilities
Policies and Procedures (Selected Academic and Administrative Policy S-23),
UWM’s Criminal Background Check
Policy (Selected Academic and Adminis-
trative Policy S-14.5), and UWM’s Child
Abuse and Neglect Policy (Selected Academic and Administrative Policy S-64).
Contacting University Police
UWM maintains an advanced system
for the reporting of any problems to
the University Police Department. The
heart of the system is a dedicated 911
emergency telephone system with enhanced location determination capabilities. There are several types of phones
on the campus, all of which are connected to this system.
All intercampus (229 exchange) phones
are connected to this system. One must
dial 9911 (instead of just 911) from
these phones to gain access to the emergency system. These phones are located
in offices and corridors.
All public phones on campus are connected to the 911 system. No coin is required when dialing 911. Campus elevators are also equipped with emergency
phones.
A network of S.A.F.E. emergency phones
covers the campus. These phones are
mounted in yellow boxes on poles or
affixed to buildings and are illuminated
by a blue light. The phones are located
outside buildings, along walkways and
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 6 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
in parking lots and structures at various
locations where they will be most visible.
To use these phones, open the door to
the box and push the button. This will
activate the 911 system, which will display the phone’s location at the University Police Department. The caller and
the police dispatcher can then converse
with each other. Equipment installed
in 2004 is ADA compliant and includes
Braille instructions.
UWM also has a smart phone application. Users can activate the UWM app
on their phone and choose the safety
icon. This icon will provide the opportunity to direct dial the UWM police department.
Persons in need of assistance also may
approach any of the uniformed University Police or security personnel that
patrol the campus in marked police vehicles and on foot or bicycle.
Civilian security personnel employed by
the UWM Union, University Housing
and the UWM Libraries are equipped
with two-way radios that have the ability
to communicate directly with the University Police dispatcher. Personal escort
services such as BOSS are equipped with
radios or cellular phones for reporting
crimes or other emergencies.
Emergency Notifications
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
employs the S.A.F.E. Alert Emergency
Notification System to immediately notify the campus community upon the
confirmation of a significant emergency
or dangerous situation occurring on the
campus involving an immediate threat
to the health or safety of the campus
community.
The S.A.F.E. Alert system allows UWM
to contact faculty, staff and students via
text message to personal mobile phones
or a designated e-mail address. Registration in the S.A.F.E Alert System is voluntary for faculty and staff and is used for
emergency contact purposes only. The
S.A.F.E. Alert System will not be used to
distribute advertising or other unsolicited messages, and subscribers to S.A.F.E.
Alert will pay no fees for the service,
other than normal fees charged by their
mobile service provider for receiving
text messages. S.A.F.E. Alert is only avail-
able to members of the UWM campus
community.
The University also has a mass warning
speaker system on campus. Messages
can be broadcast via speakers in the fire
alarm system for some buildings and
speakers mounted at various locations
on campus.
In the event a significant emergency
or dangerous situation arises, UWM
has designated the Chief of University
Police or next in command within the
University Police Department to confirm there is a significant emergency,
determine whom to notify, determine
the content of the notification, including whether evacuation of all or part of
the campus is necessary, and initiate the
S.A.F.E. Alert System.
In making these determinations, the
Chief of University Police will, without
delay, take into account the safety of the
community as well as the impact of notification on efforts to assist victims or to
contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.
A similar notification as well as follow-up information will be sent via the
campus-wide e-mail accounts and will be
posted on the campus website as soon
as possible and without delay as information becomes available and may be
posted via social media.
Emergency Evacuations
UWM tests emergency response and
evacuation procedures twice annually.
First, the campus conducts a tornado
drill for all buildings during Tornado
Awareness Week in the spring. The drill
is organized by the Department of University Safety and Assurances in collaboration with the University Police and the
University of Wisconsin System Administration’s Office of Risk Management.
Procedures for tornado and other “shelter-in-place” responses are announced
to the campus community via campus
notices, e-mail messages and website
postings. Building Chairs and floor captains are offered pre-event training to
ensure they can safely direct campus
occupants to shelters or other refuge
areas. The S.A.F.E. Alert system is also
tested during the tornado drill. A text
message and e-mail alert is sent to all
registered participants announcing the
drill. In 2015, the tornado drill was conducted on April 16.
Then, in September and October each
year, campus-wide fire drills are conducted to test building evacuation
procedures. In case of a fire, buildings
need to be evacuated (opposite of sheltering-in-place), sending occupants outdoors or to a refuge area. The drills are
organized by the Department of University Safety and Assurances in collaboration with the University Police and the
University of Wisconsin System Administration’s Office of Risk Management.
Procedures for the fire drills are announced in advance to the campus community via campus notices, e-mail messages and website postings. Building
Chairs and Floor Captains are offered
pre-event training to ensure they can
safely direct campus occupants to emergency exits and ways of egress. Drills are
conducted for individual buildings and,
in 2014; the campus-wide fire drills were
conducted during the weeks of Sept. 15
and Dec. 11.
For individuals with disabilities, alternative evacuation procedures are in place.
These individuals are encouraged to
go to the nearest emergency stairwell.
These stairwells are considered “areas of
rescue assistance.” Emergency personnel will arrive at the stairwells and evacuate individuals as needed.
Prior to an emergency, it is recommended that each person with any limitations
ask a friend, colleague or fellow student
to provide assistance if an emergency
develops. The “evacuation assistant”
should be informed about what limitations an individual has and how the
evacuation assistant can be of help. The
evacuation assistant will go to the building evacuation assembly point and notify the on-site emergency personnel of
the location of the person with a disability. Emergency personnel will determine
if further evacuation is necessary.
Building chairs and floor captains also
check areas of rescue assistance before
reporting that a building has been fully
evacuated.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 7 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Student Escort and
Transportation Services
Guidelines For Personal Safety
(Provided by UWM Police)
• Use the S.A.F.E. phone systems around campus if you
feel threatened (yellow boxes with blue lights)
• Avoid the use of headphones and personal electronic
devices while walking as these can
distract your attention and/or attract thieves
• If confronted, surrender property rather than risk your life
• At home, keep your windows and doors locked
• When moving, unpack quickly and always have someone
monitoring your belongings
• Secure laptops with a lock if leaving them unattended
• Avoid propping open doors for long durations
• Keep your car locked and remove any valuables
• If biking, follow the rules of the road (i.e., wear a helmet,
ride with traffic, avoid sidewalks, etc.)
• Secure your bicycle with a Cycle-Safe bike locker
or a secure lock of your own
• Avoid walking alone, especially at night:
use B.O.S.S. anytime from 6PM – 2AM
• Stay sharp! Walk in well-lit areas and with a purpose,
and pay attention to your surroundings
• If you’ve been drinking, try to find someone
to drive or walk you home
• Don’t invite random people into your house
• Don’t drink anything that could have been tampered with
• Be careful what you post online
• Don’t verify any personal information over the phone
• Protect the privacy of your Social Security Number
Be on the Safe Side (BOSS - 414-2296503) is the free transit service on or
near campus. BOSS boundaries are
Capitol Dr. (north), Brady St. (south),
Holton St. (west) and the lake (east).
The service operates seven days a week
during the fall and spring semesters,
from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Limited service is
available at other times of the year. The
BOSS offices are located in the UWM
Union, Room 324.
In April 2014, a research study evaluated
the influence of a safe ride program on
neighborhood crime in a major urban
area. Using an hours of the week panel,
the BOSS program’s operation is associated with an approximately 14% reduction in crime. Plus, increases in rides
(the intensity of the program) are associated with reductions in crime. Such increases in program intensity are also associated with notably greater reductions
in crime occurring on weekends.
The University Housing shuttle service
operates continuously between the
UWM Kenwood Campus, Kenilworth
Square Apartments, Cambridge Commons and RiverView Residence Hall for
housing residents. The average shuttle
ride is 10 minutes, although it can be
shorter or longer depending on traffic. Some on-call services are provided
to University Housing residents during
break periods.
The University Police Department also
maintains the S.A.F.E. Walker program.
Uniformed S.A.F.E. Walkers are UWM
students employed by the University Police who patrol the neighborhoods surrounding UWM between the hours of 8
p.m. and 3 a.m., and report safety concerns to the University Police. University
Police will provide walking escorts, upon
request, at any time. An escort can be requested by calling University Police at
(414) 229-4627.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 8 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Campus Law Enforcement
Police Services On Campus
University Police have complete police
authority to apprehend and arrest anyone involved in committing violations of
Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter
UWS 18 (Conduct on University Lands),
and acts that are unlawful under state
statutes on campus and at other areas
under the control of the University of
Wisconsin System Board of Regents.
Individuals are encouraged to report
all crimes occurring on campus to the
University Police (x9911 from a campus
phone, and 414-229-9911 from all other
local phones).
The University Police work closely with
the City of Milwaukee Police Department and the Shorewood Police Department, as well as state and federal agencies whenever necessary.
Criminal offense reports, incident reports and citations under Chapter UWS
18 are used to document incidents reported to or observed by the police. Uniform traffic citations are issued to traffic
violators. Serious and/or persistent violators of criminal law may be referred to
the District Attorney’s office for prosecution.
University Police personnel have received training in first aid, CPR and
AEDs (Automated External Defibrillators). AEDs are kept in each police vehicle and in most buildings on campus,
including the residence halls. These officers have the training and experience
to provide the immediate life-sustaining
medical assistance needed in the first
critical minutes of any medical emergency.
All federal law enforcement agencies
are empowered to investigate violations
of federal law and take appropriate enforcement action. All state law enforcement agencies are empowered to investigate violations of state statutes, the state
administrative code and selected federal
laws and take appropriate enforcement
action. The Milwaukee County Sheriff’s
Department and the Milwaukee Police
Department possess concurrent authority to investigate violations of state statutes and selected federal laws on Univer-
sity property but neither is empowered
to enforce county or municipal ordinances on state property.
Off-Campus
Criminal Activities
Individuals are encouraged to promptly
and accurately report all crimes to the
local police department where the crime
occurred. In addition, University Police
may provide some law enforcement services to the non-campus locations under
the control of the Board of Regents.
When a UWM student is involved in an
off-campus offense, university police officers may assist with the investigation in
cooperation with local, state, or federal
law enforcement.
City of Milwaukee police routinely work
and communicate with university officers on any serious incidents occurring
in the immediate neighborhood and
business areas surrounding campus.
UWM does not operate or recognize any
campus organization’s off-campus facilities, including housing facilities. However, many graduate and undergraduate
students live in the neighborhoods surrounding UWM. While the Milwaukee
Police Department has primary jurisdiction in all areas immediately surrounding, UWM police can and do respond
to student-related incidents that occur
in close proximity to campus. UWM officers have direct communications with
the local police, fire department, and
ambulance services to facilitate rapid response in any emergency situation.
The University Police may take police
action off-campus and within Milwaukee
County under the authority of Wis. Stat.
§ 175.40(5)(d) and the University Police
Department Policy on Off-Campus Law
Enforcement Authority. Officers have
authority to arrest and take into custody any person for whom a federal, state
or municipal arrest warrant has been
issued. University Police officers may
also take action when assisting other law
enforcement agencies within Milwaukee
County.
The University Police are participating
members of the Suburban Mutual Assistance Response Teams (S.M.A.R.T.). Numerous suburban police departments
provide aid and support, by written
agreement, to fellow member departments in the event that an incident requires greater resources than are available from any single department.
At the beginning and end of each academic year UWM contracts with the
City of Milwaukee Police Department
to provide additional police services in
the neighborhoods surrounding UWM.
University Police may assist the City of
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 9 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Milwaukee Police with these patrols in
the UWM area.
Counselors Encourage
Crime Reporting
The Norris Health Center Counseling and Consultation Service provides
counseling for UWM students. While
counselors are exempt from the crime
reporting requirements of the Clery Act,
the Norris Health Center counselors encourage students they are counseling to
report crimes to the University Police
Department. Norris counselors also explain to students that they may report
crimes to the Dean of Students Office
on an anonymous basis for inclusion in
the annual disclosure of crime statistics
and/or under Title IX.
Hate/Bias
Incident Reporting
UWM defines a hate or bias-motivated
incident as any disruptive conduct (oral,
written, graphic, or physical) that is
against an individual, or individuals, because of their actual or perceived race,
color, national origin/ancestry, religion,
sex, age, disability, sexual orientation,
gender identity/expression, veteran
and National Guard status, marital status, pregnancy, political affiliation, or arrest/conviction record. (The definition
of “hate crime” for the purpose of crime
statistics reporting is different – see that
definition in the Crime Statistics section
of this report).
Members of the UWM community are
encouraged to report hate/bias incidents to the Office of Equity/Diversity
Services using the Hate/Bias Incident
Reporting Form found on its website at:
www4.uwm.edu/eds/hbr/.
Informing Employees
and Students About
Campus Security and
Crime Prevention
The University Police Department actively promotes campus security and
crime prevention/awareness programming throughout the year.
Each year, the University aims to reach
every new freshman through the New
Student Orientation Program (NSO)
and Transfer and Adult Student Orientation (TASO). The Dean of Students
Office, Norris Health Center and University Police present important information regarding personal safety, security programs, and crime prevention tips
at each NSO/TASO. NSO is offered 1520 and TASO 4-6 times per year.
Students living both on campus and off
campus have safety and security information reiterated to them by the University
Police each semester. UWM Housing arranges presentations for those residing
on campus. For those students living
off campus, the Community Outreach
and Assistance for Student Tenants
(COAST) program provides UWM students with information about resources
available to them, including safety and
security resources.
The Office of Neighborhood Relations
also works as a resource with the University Police , students and non-student
neighbors on topics of mutual concern,
including crime prevention and quality
of life issues. These collaborations are
ongoing throughout the year.
During the course of the school year,
the University Police Department participates in various informational events
and presentations on the topic of crime
prevention. Approximately six times a
year, the University Police Department
provides exhibits during events such as
Open House, the Employee Wellness &
Benefits Fair, Campus Safety Week and
others. Police officers staff a booth or
exhibit table at these events and provide answers to questions and distribute
crime prevention literature.
The University Police Department also
responds to requests for personal safety seminars by various student and staff
groups on campus. Such personal safety
presentations are given by the police department more than 15 times per year.
These presentations include conflict
resolution, drug and alcohol awareness,
rape aggression defense, self-defense,
active shooter response, online protection, and other topics. The University
also offers an online active shooter training video.
The UWM website is an important resource for informing employees and students about crime prevention tips and
information. On the Campus Health
and Safety website, there are various
links to resources, including personal
safety tips. The University Department
of Safety and Assurances also has resources on the UWM website for workplace violence prevention.
If the incident involves any crime or
emergency that may impact the safety
of members of the UWM community,
students or staff are urged to notify the
University Police (at x9911 from a campus phone, 414-229-9911, or by picking
up any one of the blue-lit S.A.F.E. emergency phones located on campus).
Individuals may also report the crime or
emergency in person at the University
Police Department, located at 3410 N.
Maryland Avenue.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 10 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Alcohol and Illicit Drugs
Substance use among college students impacts all aspects of University life, including
student well-being, the educational environment, and the quality of life on campus and in
the surrounding communities. In an ongoing effort to mitigate these high-risk behaviors,
UWM has instituted a variety of alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) prevention and
intervention initiatives. Assessment and treatment services for students are offered on campus, and the University can also facilitate referrals to appropriate community resources for
students or staff members who are experiencing problems related to their personal use of
alcohol or other drugs.
Health Effects of the Abuse of
Alcohol and Other Drugs
The results of the 2015 National College
Health Assessment (NCHA) Survey indicates that 74 percent of University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee students are current alcohol users, as defined by having
consumed alcohol at least once in the
past 30 days. While many UWM students
choose to drink moderately or not at all,
a significant portion report engaging in
high-risk drinking behaviors.
High-risk drinking is associated with
a variety of detrimental outcomes, including injury, illness, legal trouble,
regretted actions, high-risk sexual activity and violence. Additionally, research
consistently shows a strong correlation
between frequent alcohol use and poor
academic performance, and alcohol
and other drug use is known to impact
student retention rates.
While alcohol is the distinct “drug of
choice” among UWM students, the 2015
NCHA results show that 20 percent report having used marijuana in the past
30 days and 16 percent report having
used one or more prescription medications in a manner not prescribed by a
healthcare professional in the past 12
months. There is a small, but persistent,
presence of other illicit drug use within
the student community: the past 30 day
prevalence of other illicit drugs, such
as cocaine, heroin and methamphetamines, is less than 2 percent. Such substances carry the risk for serious health
consequences, and the use of these substances in combination with alcohol or
with each other can result in harmful
and potentially lethal interactions. Additional information related to the health
effects of the use and abuse of alcohol
and other drugs is in Appendix 1.
Finally, students who use alcohol and/
or other drugs are not the only individuals who may be detrimentally impacted,
as students and UWM community members report having experienced disturbances to their quality of life due to the
behaviors of intoxicated peers. These
impacts include, but are not limited to,
personal property damage, being awakened or kept from studying and being
made to feel unsafe.
Drug and Alcohol
Educational Programs
In its “A Call to Action: Changing the
Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges,”
the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse
and Alcoholism (NIAAA) presented a
“3-in-1 Framework” for the development
of multi-component, comprehensive
and integrated campus programs to mitigate substance use within the college
student community.
This framework encourages consideration of programs and policies that
work simultaneously with multiple audiences, including interventions that
target individuals (such as at-risk or alcohol-dependent drinkers), programs
that target the student body as a whole,
and environmental-level strategies that
reach the college and surrounding community.
In its recognition of the role that individual, interpersonal, community, and
societal factors play in influencing behaviors, the 3-in-1 Framework echoes
the Social-Ecological Model – a well-accepted behavioral theory that is often
utilized in guiding the development of
comprehensive public health programs.
By these standards, the Alcohol and
Other Drug Abuse (AODA) Prevention
and Intervention Program at UWM represents a comprehensive approach to
addressing substance use on campus.
UWM aims to provide students with
the information and skills necessary to
make healthy and responsible decisions
so as to reduce substance use rates and
the negative impact of high-risk use.
To this end, the University maintains a comprehensive breadth of evidence-based and theory-driven programs and services that concurrently
impact the individual, interpersonal,
community, and societal factors that influence these behaviors. These include
mandatory online alcohol education for
incoming students; training programs
for targeted student mentors/leaders
to assist them in disseminating information regarding alcohol and other drug
effects to their peers; numerous educational programs sponsored by Norris
Health Center, University Housing, the
Neighborhood Housing Office, Union
Student Involvement, and other campus entities; frequent substance-free social and service events; and the regular
distribution of policy and educational
information via campus-wide events, information tables, and bulletin boards as
well as within University Housing and
campus resource centers.
The University also maintains an AODA
Task Force, comprised of representatives
from a variety of campus entities. This
group meets regularly to collaborate on
programs related to alcohol and other
drug abuse prevention and to share updates regarding pertinent issues and initiatives. Information regarding alcohol
and other drugs, as well as strategies for
addressing these issues with students,
are incorporated into orientation presentations and resources materials for
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 11 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
UWM parents, family members, faculty,
and staff.
Additionally, the campus offers the following services for individuals who are
at risk for experiencing or causing issues
as a result of their personal use of alcohol or other drugs:
Brief Alcohol and other drug
Screening and Intervention for
College Students (BASICS)
BASICS offers UWM students an opportunity to explore their use of alcohol or marijuana in a confidential and
non-judgmental setting, receive personalized feedback about their use and to
consider strategies to reduce harmful
consumption and negative experiences
related to use.
BASICS includes a small group discussion followed by an individual feedback
session with a trained graduate student
facilitator. Another option is to meet
individually with the Campus Alcohol
& Other Drug Coordinator for 1-3 sessions. BASICS does not provide a diagnosis of substance abuse or dependence.
BASICS is free for voluntary (non-mandated) students.
For more information, visit https://
www4.uwm.edu/ace or contact the Norris Health Center Office of Health Promotion & Wellness at 414-229-3712 or
[email protected]
Evaluation and Treatment
Services
The Counseling and Consultation Services Unit of Norris Health Center offers voluntary, short-term Alcohol and
Other Drug Abuse (AODA) evaluation
and treatment services. These services
include voluntary AODA assessments
for students who have questions or concerns regarding their use of alcohol or
other substances.
For those students desiring treatment
of an identified substance use problem,
short-term weekly counseling sessions
are also offered. For students whose substance abuse problems require intensive
AODA services, referrals to community
resources are provided.
Off-Campus
Support Groups
From Norris Health Center
Alcoholics Anonymous
(414) 771-9119
Al-Anon/Alateen
(414) 257-2415
Cocaine Anonymous
(414) 445-5433
Families Anonymous
(414) 384-8051
First Call for Help
(262) 547-3388 or 211
(Waukesha, Dodge, Jefferson,
and Walworth Counties)
Impact Alcohol and Other Drug
Abuse Services
(414) 256-4808
Milwaukee County Crisis Line
(available 24/7)
(414) 257-7222
Narcotics Anonymous
(866) 913-3837
The Counseling Unit also offers an
open-ended weekly general therapy
which would be appropriate for many
students with AODA concerns who desire a group experience as part of their
recovery process. Call Norris Health
Center at 414-229-4716 to schedule an
appointment.
Prohibited Conduct
The University of Wisconsin System and
UWM prohibit the unlawful possession,
use, distribution, manufacture or dispensing of illicit drugs and alcohol by
students and employees on university
property or as part of university activities.
• The use or possession of alcoholic beverages is prohibited on university premises, except in faculty and staff housing
and as expressly permitted by the chief
administrative officer or under institutional regulations. (UWS 18.09(1), Wis.
Admin. Code; UWM’s Guidelines for
Serving Alcoholic Beverages (Selected
Academic and Administrative Policy S-5)
• Without exception, alcohol consumption is governed by Wisconsin statutory
age restrictions. (UWS 18.09(1), Wis.
Admin. Code)
• The unlawful use, possession, distribution, manufacture or dispensing of
illicit drugs (“controlled substances” as
defined in 961.01(4), Wis. Stats.,) is prohibited. (UWS 18.09(2), Wis. Admin.
Code)
• UWM’s policies relating to alcohol and
drugs are enforced off-campus, such as
in the UWM neighborhoods. This may
occur when the investigating officer determines that a student’s behavior adversely affects a substantial University
interest.
In making this determination, the investigating officer considers whether the
conduct constitutes or would constitute
a serious criminal offense, indicates that
the student presented or may present
a danger or threat to self or others, or
demonstrates a pattern of behavior that
seriously impairs the University’s ability to fulfill its mission. (UWS 17.08(2)
Wis. Admin. Code).
Disciplinary Sanctions
Violation of these provisions by a student may lead to the imposition of disciplinary sanctions, up to and including
suspension or expulsion, under Ch.
UWS 17, Wis. Admin. Code. University employees are also subject to disciplinary sanctions for violation of these
provisions occurring on University property or the worksite during work time,
up to and including termination from
employment.
• Disciplinary sanctions are initiated
and imposed in accordance with applicable procedural requirements and
work rules, as set forth in Wisconsin statutes, administrative rules and faculty, academic staff and university staff policies.
• Violations of s. UWS 18.09, Wis. Admin. Code may result in additional penalties as allowed under Ch. UWS 18, Wis.
Admin. Code.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 12 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
• Referral for prosecution under criminal law is possible.
Employees who are convicted of any
drug statute violation occurring in the
workplace must notify their dean, director or department chair within five days
of the conviction if the employees are
employed by the University at the time
of the conviction, in accordance with
the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act,
41 U.S.C. s. 701 et al., and UWM’s DrugFree Campus Policy (Selected Academic
and Administrative Policy S-19.5).
Wisconsin
Criminal Sanctions
The Uniform Controlled Substances
Act, Chapter 961, Wis. Stats., regulates
controlled substances and outlines the
penalties for violations.
• A person convicted for the first time
for possession of a controlled substance
can receive a sentence of up to one year
in prison and a fine of up to $5,000 (§
961.41(3g)(am)-(g), Wis. Stats.), depending on the drug.
• If a person is convicted of manufacturing a controlled substance, delivering
a controlled substance, or possessing a
controlled substance with an intent to
manufacture or deliver, he or she can be
imprisoned for up to 40 years and fined
up to $100,000 (§ 961.41(1m)(a)-(j),
Wis. Stats).
tence term (§ 961.46, Wis. Stats.).
Wisconsin has tough legal sanctions that
restrict the use of alcohol in a variety of
situations.
• It is illegal to procure for, sell, dispense
or give alcohol to anyone that has not
reached the legal drinking age of 21
years (§ 125.07(1)(a)(1), Wis. Stats.). A
first time violation can result in a fine up
to $500.
• All adults have a legal obligation to
prevent the illegal consumption of alcohol on property they own or control.
(§ 125.07(1)(a)(3), Wis. Stats). A firsttime violation of can result in a fine up
to $500.
• It is illegal for an underage person to
obtain or attempt to obtain an alcoholic beverage, or to represent falsely his
or her age in order to obtain alcohol,
to enter premises licensed to sell alcohol, or to consume or possess alcohol
on licensed premises (§ 125.07(4), Wis.
Stats.). A first-time underage violator
can be fined up to $500, required to participate in a supervised work program,
and have his or her license suspended.
Federal Criminal Sanctions
The Controlled Substances Act (CSA),
21 U.S.C. s. 801 et seq., is a consolidation of numerous federal laws regulating the manufacture and distribution of
controlled substances.
• Penalties differ depending on the type
of drug, the amount of the drug confiscated, previous convictions, and whether there are any aggravating factors.
The CSA establishes mandatory minimum penalties for the unlawful manufacturing and distribution of controlled
substances. Select penalties mandated
by the CSA are highlighted below.
• The distribution of a controlled substance to a minor can result in a person
receiving double the authorized sen-
21 U.S.C. 844(a)
• 1st drug conviction: Up to 1 year im-
prisonment and/or fined at least $1,000
• 2nd conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and/or fined
at least $2,500
• 3rd conviction: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years and/or fined
at least $5,000
21 U.S.C. 853 and 21 U.S.C. 881
• Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance, used
to transport a controlled substance,
obtained as the result of a violation of
federal law, or otherwise used to violate
federal law relating to controlled substances.
21 U.S.C. 844a
• Civil fine of up to $10,000.
21 U.S.C. 862
• 1st offense: Denial of Federal benefits,
such as student loans, grants, contracts,
and professional and commercial licenses for up to 1 year
• Subsequent offenses: Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants,
contracts, and professional and commercial licenses for up to 5 years
18 U.S.C. 922(g)
• Ineligible to purchase, receive, or
transport a firearm or ammunition.
Miscellaneous
• Drug convictions may result in the
revocation of certain federal licenses
and benefits, e.g. pilot licenses, public
housing tenancy, etc. The power to revoke such licenses and benefits is vested
within the authorities of the applicable
government agency.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 13 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Sexual Assault, Dating/Domestic Violence And Stalking
UW-Milwaukee is committed to creating a safe and inclusive campus community. As such, sexual
violence, such as sexual assault, relationship violence stalking and sexual harassment are not tolerated. We know that violence has a profound and pervasive impact on victims/survivors as well
as the campus and community. Sexual and other forms of violence may negatively impact campus
climate, student health/mental health, the ability to work and learn, academic achievement, retention and more. For this reason, prevention programs designed to raise awareness and educate all
members of the campus community about sexual violence are offered throughout the year. UWM
provides crisis intervention, personal support and counseling and advocacy services to victims/
survivors of crime. UWM also enforces its policies and procedures to support our commitment to
holding offenders accountable while also ensuring due process. In 2015, UWM’s Chancellor also
formed the Chancellor’s Task Force on Sexual Violence Prevention, Reporting, and Response, which
was charged with recommending both short and long-term strategies to improve campus efforts to
address sexual violence by preventing its occurrence, encouraging reporting, and ensuring a coordinated and caring response to such reports.
Scope And Scale
Sexual assault is the second most common violent crime committed on college campuses. Approximately 20-25
percent of women will experience sexual violence while in college, and college-age women are at high risk for all
forms of gender violence (stalking, sexual assault, sexual harassment and interpersonal relationship violence).
Men, too, can be victimized, and the
problem of gender violence affects us
all. It is a public health issue and a problem of international scope sustained
by deeply-rooted cultural norms. Consequently, UW-Milwaukee’s approach
to the problem of sexual violence is
informed by a social justice and public
health framework. Core values in our
approach include:
• Understanding of the role power, privilege and systems of oppression have in
sustaining (and ending) the problem of
gender violence
• Providing advocacy and support to primary and secondary victims of violence,
• Encouraging a caring community and
bystander intervention,
• Nurturing a safe and inclusive climate
that is conducive to reporting,
• Providing clear and visible avenues for
confidential reporting,
• Implementing prevention programs
designed to increase awareness and re-
duce risk for experiencing or perpetrating violence,
• Developing a network of professionals
and first responders that are knowledgeable and trained,
• Implementing sound and effective
methods of investigation and adjudication,
• Establishing and maintaining strong
working relationships with community
partners and resources.
Prevention
UWM’s primary prevention and awareness programs are informed by guidance from current research and best
practices. This includes expert guidance
from national and state organizations
such as the Department of Justice Office
of Violence Against Women, the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, and
the National Coalition Against Domestic
Violence.
UWM also follows guidance from the
White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Center
for Disease Control and Prevention’s
four-step approach to public health issues such as sexual violence. UWM also
complies with the array of Federal laws
concerning sexual violence, such as
Title IX, the Violence Against Women
Reauthorization Act of 2013, and the
Campus Sexual Violence Elimination
Act (part of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act).
UW-Milwaukee prohibits acts of sexual violence and communicates this
message clearly to new and returning
employees and students. This is accomplished through web-based and in-person orientation programs for new faculty, staff, students and student leaders;
dissemination of the UW-Milwaukee
Faculty/Staff Code of Conduct and
UWM’s Discriminatory Conduct Policy
(Selected Academic and Administration
Policy S-47); dissemination of UW-System Chapter 17 Student Nonacademic
Misconduct Disciplinary Procedures;
a comprehensive approach to Title IX
training across campus; and implementation of multiple small, medium and
large scale awareness raising and educational events throughout the academic
year.
These small-scale programs include
training for a small group of employees/students or a film screening and
discussion event with a student organization. Medium-scale programs include
training for an entire Division or athletic team, and large-scale programs include a program of national recognition
(e.g., Sex Signals, Can I Kiss You.) or
community wide awareness (e.g., Walk
A Mile In Her Shoes, Denim Day, Take
Back the Night) geared towards engaging hundreds of participants with a high
degree of visibility.
All prevention programs and initiatives
include information about where to talk
to someone confidentially, campus and
community resources, how to report an
incident of sexual violence, and disci-
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 14 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
plinary procedures. Specific examples
of educational programs are outlined at
the end of this section.
The CDC identifies several risk factors
that contribute to the risk for perpetration of sexual violence. A combination
of individual, relationship, community
and societal factors contribute to the
risk of perpetration of sexual violence.
Examples of these include alcohol and
drug use, hostility toward women, hypermasculinity, family violence, societal
tolerance of sexual violence, weak consequences for sexual violence perpetrators and social norms that support male
superiority and sexual entitlement.
Our understanding of these multi-level factors are incorporated into our
prevention programs, events and materials. Some programs and events are
directed toward challenging harmful
social norms and encouraging prosocial behavior. Others are geared toward
encouraging personal responsibility, as
well as imparting specific guidance and
skills to individuals.
Strategies for preventing perpetration
of these crimes emphasize that sexual violence is a crime and/or act of violence
and hostility. The vast majority of sexual assaults are committed by someone
known to the victim, don’t involve the
use of weapons, and involve pre-meditation and perpetrators taking measures
to increase victim vulnerability (i.e., isolating the victim or through the use of
alcohol and/or drugs).
When talking about strategies for protecting oneself, we are sensitive to the
prevalence and detrimental impact of
victim blaming and the frequency by
which victims subsequently misplace
shame and guilt for an assault upon
themselves. For this reason, discussions
about strategies for protecting oneself
are contextualized with clear messaging that sexual assault, in particular, is
a crime, and the ONLY person responsible for sexual assault is the perpetrator
of unwanted sexual contact.
A victim is NEVER responsible for what
has been done to him/her without his/
her consent. Protective strategies/tips
are shared as tools for empowerment.
Although they do not guarantee absolute protection from victimization, they
can reduce the risk of sexual assault.
Protecting Yourself From Sexual/Gender Violence
• Communicate Clearly
Communicate clearly and expect that
your wishes be honored.
• Trust Yourself
Trust your instincts about possible danger.
• Avoid Drinking And Drug Use
Drinking and other drug use can make
it harder to get out of a dangerous situation and can put someone at greater
risk for victimization. Victims under the
influence of drugs and/or alcohol at the
time of an assault, however, are NOT
responsible for a perpetrator’s actions.
• Know What You Drink
Be careful about drinking anything that
has been out of your sight. Drugs are
sometimes slipped into drinks to incapacitate a person in order to assault
them. Get your own drinks -- don’t let
someone else continually fill your cup
or get your drink.
• Watch for Certain Behaviors
Be wary of anyone that acts jealous or
possessive, displays anger or aggression, ignores your wishes, ignores your
personal space boundaries, attempts
to make you feel guilty or gets hostile
when you say “no.”
• Be Aware
Be aware of your surroundings. Think
twice about getting a ride from or being alone with someone you don’t
know well.
• Stay In A Group
Go out with a group or double date.
Whenever possible, walk with a group
of people.
• Avoid Strangers
Don’t open your door to strangers and
don’t allow strangers inside your house
or room.
• Speak Up
Yell for assistance and attract attention.
Yelling words like “fire” have greater
potential for drawing a crowd than using words like “help” or “rape.”
• Be Prepared
Carry emergency money and/or your
phone to call parents, friends, police,
B.O.S.S. or a taxi. Make the effort to
help friends and acquaintances, and
yourself get home safely.
Don’t Be A Sexual/Gender Violence Perpetrator
• Communicate Clearly
Ask permission before touching or becoming sexual with someone.
• Make Sure You Have Consent
Silence does not mean consent. Consent is a clear and freely given yes, not
the absence of a no. People who are
incapacitated by alcohol or drugs cannot give consent. Never be sexual with
someone who is passed out or overly
intoxicated.
• Take “NO” For An Answer
No is an answer regardless of whether
it is stated verbally or nonverbally (e.g.,
pushing/pulling away, struggling to get
away).
• Change Your Focus
If your main focus on a date or at a party is to have sex with someone, you are
at higher risk for perpetration of sexual
violence.
• Avoid Drug/Alcohol Parties
Stay away from parties that have heavy
alcohol/drug use. Being high or drunk
is no excuse for sexual aggression or
doing things you believe you would not
otherwise do.
• Know The Laws
Make yourself aware of the sexual assault, domestic violence, assault & battery, harassment and stalking laws in
your state.
• Monitor Your Friends
Confront friends who express sexist
attitudes, display disrespect or aggression towards others, or you suspect
may have intentions of engaging in
behaviors that constitute sexual violence, dating/domestic violence, and/
or stalking.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 15 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Education
At UWM, staff at the University Police Department, Norris Health Center, Women’s Resource Center,
University Housing, LGBT Resource Center, and the Dean of Students Office, with colleagues from
other departments, provide support services to students, serve on related committees and communicate regularly regarding sexual assault/harassment education and prevention. The purpose of this
cooperative approach is to provide coordinated, comprehensive services and programming which
are inclusive of diverse populations, reduce duplication of services, increase ease of referrals, and
achieve greater accuracy in the distribution of information about available resources and services.
Following is a description of only some of the campus programs offered at UWM in support of developing an informed campus community and creating a campus climate free of violence.
University Police
The University Police Department coordinates UWM’s annual Campus Safety
Week, offers sexual assault education
and information programs to University
students and employees upon request
and at new student orientations each
year. The University Police partner with
the Women’s Resource Center to offer
self-defense workshops and training.
Norris Health Center
The Norris Health Center provides
sexual assault education through counseling and outreach activities in collaboration with various departments on
campus and agencies in the community. The health center coordinates an
annual UWM Campus and Communities United Against Violence Resource
Fair, held in April during Sexual Assault
Awareness Month.
The event is held in collaboration with
the Peer Health Educators at UWM,
UWM Women’s Resource Center, UWM
LGBT Resource Center, University Police Department, UWM Student Involvement, and Milwaukee LGBT Community Center. The Resource Fair includes
campus departments and community
organizations that provide support services to survivors of sexual assault and
domestic violence.
The representatives from various departments on campus and agencies in
the community offer interactive activities and distribute resource materials
designed to further educate students
and the campus community about the
impact of sexual violence and inform
them of various resources available to
assist them related to prevention and
treatment.
Women’s Resource Center
The Women’s Resource Center (WRC)
is a drop-in student service office that
provides a welcoming, safe space where
students can sit and relax, access information and obtain confidential personal support, counseling and advocacy services from professional staff.
The WRC houses a free literature/brochure collection which contains more
than 50 titles related to sexual assault,
sexual harassment, stalking and domestic violence/interpersonal relationship
violence, and has a lending library with
over 100 topically-related books, DVDs,
and other materials that are available
to loan to members of the UWM community. These resources are used by individuals directly impacted by personal
experience, and by students seeking to
learn more about the subjects for academic papers and projects.
The WRC teaches workshops for stu-
dents interested in developing their
knowledge and improving their skills as
peer responders to concerns of sexual
assault, sexual harassment, stalking/cyber stalking and hate/bias and relationship violence.
Additionally, WRC professional staff
provides consultation services to colleagues across the institution who are
working with students impacted by these
experiences.
The WRC coordinates UWM’s Sexual
Assault Awareness Month activities and
sponsors a variety of campus-wide educational programs on these issues. In 2014,
these included Denim Day, The Vagina
Monologues and One Billion Rising.
WRC staff maintain strong collaborative relationships with campus and
community resources serving needs of
victims/survivors. On-going training of
professional staff at the WRC on best
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 16 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Violence Intervention And Prevention Series
The VIP Series is a series of six workshops offered by the Women’s Resource Center to students, faculty and
staff every semester and on request.
Faculty, staff and students interested
in any or all of these presentations can
contact the UWM Women’s Resource
Center at [email protected]
These workshops are:
• Understanding Campus Sexual Assault
• Understanding Sexual Harassment
• Stalking and Cyberstalking
• Stop Hate! Understanding Hate and
Bias
• Too Good to Leave, Too Bad to Stay:
Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships
• What Would You Do? Understanding
Bystander Intervention.
While each workshop has unique learning outcomes, these program also have
a lengthy list of learning outcomes in
common.
These learning outcomes fit any topic:
• Participants will be able to identify and
better understand myths associated with
the selected topic
• Participants will be able to define and
acquire basic knowledge about the selected topic, and understand its preva-
lence and impact.
• Participants will be familiar with and
understand the importance of compliance with relevant campus policies, as
well as state and federal laws regarding
the selected topic.
• Participants will be able to identify
campus and community resources for
information, consultation, victim services and reporting/filing a complaint.
• Experience an enhanced level of personal investment in taking responsibility
to prevent the selected topic topic, challenge the cultural norms that support
that topic and promote a caring community.
practices for programming, prevention, treatment, and policy related to
sexual assault, sexual harassment, and
other forms of gender violence ensure
the development and delivery of quality programs and services. The Women’s
Resource Center publishes information
about sexual assault and harassment on
its website at: www.wrc.uwm.edu.
ness of consent-related issues in college
student relationships. More on Sex
Signals can be found in The Atlantic
article:
http://www.theatlantic.com/
health/archive/2014/06/teaching-sexual-assault-prevention-through-comedy/371433/.
Approximately
450
students attended Sex Signals in late
August 2014.
University Housing
UWM also offers Thursday night programming called “Panthers After Dark.”
Panthers After Dark provides students
a fun and safe alternative to going out
and participating in high-risk behaviors,
specifically, high-risk drinking that puts
our students in unsafe situations. A couple hundred students participated in
the Panthers After Dark kick-off event in
early September 2014.Peer health educators also provided at the kickoff event
materials discussing sexual assault prevention and consent.
Many of University Housing’s educational efforts related to sexual violence
occur simultaneously with education
about the risks and consequences of alcohol and drug use.
There are several program initiatives
to address issues related to sexual violence. In addition to an extensive staff
training program for professional and
paraprofessional staff, University Housing annually hosts entertainers (comedian lecturers) who address the issue of
alcohol and its relationship to consent.
In 2014, several Resident Assistants also
adapted community bulletin boards
called, “Consent is Sexy” based on an
educational training session during August Resident Assistant training.
For 2014, University Housing, again,
partnered with the UWM Union and
Norris Health Center to bring the nationally recognized Sex Signals program
to Fall Welcome in August 2014. Fall
Welcome is the extended orientation
program offeredthe week before and
first two weeks of fall semester classes.
Each Fall Welcome has featured a
speaker who discussed interpersonal
relationship issues with a more recent
focus on consent. Sex Signals, recently featured in the The Atlantic in June
2014 works specifically on raising aware-
Finally, for 2014, the Student Housing
Administrative Council, the student governance body within the residence halls,
provided an educational, week-long program, “Sex Week,” that helps students
understand their roles and responsibilities in engaging in healthy interpersonal
relationships. Sexual consent is a topic that is addressed in multiple events
during the week, including Condom
Bingo and the Women’s Touch educational speaker.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 17 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Services And Reporting Options
Services
Students who experience any form of
sexual violence, including sexual assault,
dating/domestic violence, stalking or
sexual harassment, have several options
available to them, on and off campus,
including counseling, advocacy, access
to criminal and campus disciplinary systems and medical attention.
All of these services are available to students regardless of their choice to file a
complaint with law enforcement and/
or campus investigating authorities.
Most of these services are also free. On
campus, a student can talk to someone
confidentially about sexual violence at
the UWM Norris Health Center and the
UWM Women’s Resource Center, which
services are available to any student regardless of gender or gender identity.
UWM’s Norris Health Center (414-2294716) provides crisis intervention, confidential counseling services and addresses medical concerns presented by
students reporting incidents of sexual
violence. Free, professional short-term
counseling is available at Norris to students who have experienced sexual violence.
UWM’s Women’s Resource Center
(WRC) (UWM Union, WG90, 414- 2292852) provides confidential personal
support, counseling, crisis intervention,
and advocacy services to students who
have experienced sexual assault, sexual
harassment, stalking, and interpersonal
relationship violence.
Staff at the WRC may also support a
student in obtaining a protective order,
develop a safety plan, provide ongoing
emotional support and advocate for the
student victim/survivor’s interest. WRC
staff also works, in support of sexual violence survivors, with roommates, family members, friends, and others affected by the experience. The WRC is also
home to a lending library and collection
of print materials focused on these and
related issues.
The UWM Women’s Resource Center
staff and Norris medical and counseling
staff also facilitate referrals to the Sexual Assault Treatment Center of Greater
Milwaukee (SATC), the Sojourner Family Peace Center and additional complementary community based services and
support for student victims/survivors.
Staff at the SATC are specially trained
to provide counseling and medical care
and are able to collect forensic evidence
that could assist in the possible identification and prosecution of perpetrators.
Staff at the Sojourner Family Peace Center are specially trained to provide a
wide variety of services to individuals in
abusive relationships, including obtaining a protective order.
Reporting
For the sake of clarity, “reporting” is used
here to refer to the formal disclosure of a crime
and/or non-academic misconduct to law enforcement or campus authorities. It is also
important to note that victims have the right
to NOT report to law enforcement or campus
authorities if they so choose.
There are several places on campus
where someone can report an incident
of sexual violence:
University Police
Sandburg Hall, WB90
414-229-4627
Dean of Students Office (for students)
Mellencamp Hall, Room 118
414-229-4632
Office of Equity/Diversity Services
Mitchell Hall, Room 359
414-229-5923
If a report is made to the University Police, they will notify police in other jurisdictions if applicable. If a student is
uncertain about whether they want to
report an incident of sexual violence,
they can get help and talk to someone
confidentially at Norris Health Center or the Women’s Resource Center.
Employees may receive confidential assistance through UWM’s Employee Assistance Program (http://www4.uwm.
edu/hr/toolkits/eap.cfm) or their own
medical or mental health provider.
Reporting incidents of sexual assault to
UWM authorities as soon as possible will
Additional
Resources
UWM encourages individuals to
work with Norris Health Center and
the WRC to obtain recommedations
for referrals to outside resources.
Some of these organizations are
listed below.
Sexual Assault Treatment
Center of Greater Milwaukee
414-219-5555 (24hr hotline)
www.aurorahealthcare.org/services/sexual-assault/satc.asp
The Healing Center
of Milwaukee
414-671-HEAL
www.thehealingcenter.org
The Milwaukee LGBT
Community Center
414-271-2656
www.mkelgbt.org
The National
Sexual Assault Hotline
800-656-HOPE
Sojourner Family Peace Center
414-933-2722 (24hr hotline)
www.familypeacecenter.org
The Stalking Resource Center
(of the National Center for
Victims of Crime)
http://www.victimsofcrime.
org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center
help to ensure that victims/survivors are
aware of services available to them and
that University staff can act on UWM’s
commitment to providing a safe environment to live, work and learn.
At UWM, a number of departments provide direct services to survivors of sexual
violence and work together to meet the
needs of students in a sensitive and timely manner. These departments include
Equity/Diversity Services, University Police, Norris Health Center, Women’s Resource Center, University Housing and
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 18 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
the Dean of Student’s Office.
The Dean of Students Office (DOS)
(Mellencamp 118, 414-229-4632) is responsible for receiving disciplinary
complaints, and investigating and prosecuting nonacademic misconduct cases
involving students who commit sexual
violence on campus or against another member of the campus community.
This office also implements disciplinary
action, up to and including expulsion,
against students that are found to have
committed non-academic misconduct,
including sexual offenses.
EDS investigates sexual violence as well
as complaints of other forms of discrimination from employees and students.
EDS staff work collaboratively with the
DOS Office and/or University Housing
to address such behavior when students
are involved.
UWM staff will inform a victim reporting a sexual violence incident about
preserving evidence, options regarding
notifying University Police and campus
authorities, and resources available for
counseling, health, mental health, victim
advocacy, financial, visa/immigration,
and legal assistance and other services
available on-campus and in the community. Victims will also be informed
about the availability of assistance with
or changes to academic, work, and living situations and transportation, as well
as other available protective measures.
This information will also be presented
to victims in writing. A victim’s right
to such protective measures exists even
if they do not wish to pursue police or
disciplinary action. Such measures will
remain confidential to the extent such
confidentiality does not impair UWM’s
ability to implement such measures.
Incidents of sexual assault that occur in
the residence halls are investigated by
staff members in University Housing,
unless the alleged perpetrator is not a
residence halls student. For non-residence hall students allegedly involved as
the perpetrator of sexual violence, the
DOS Office will investigate.
Residence hall students found to have
committed non-academic misconduct,
including sexual offenses, may receive
disciplinary sanctions related to the
University Housing contract, up to and
including contract termination, and
University sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion. University
Housing staff work collaboratively with
the DOS Office and EDS to address
such behavior and regularly consults
with and/or refers students to various
campus resources surrounding these
issues, including the University Police,
Norris Health Center and the Women’s
Resource Center.
Reporting an incident of sexual violence
to University Police does not obligate
the victim to prosecute, nor will it subject the victim to scrutiny or judgmental
opinions from police officers. Filing a
police report may help:
• Ensure that a victim of sexual violence
receives any necessary medical treatment and has access to counseling from
individuals specifically trained in the
area of sexual assault crisis intervention
• Provide the opportunity for collection
and preservation of evidence which may
be difficult or impossible to obtain later
• Aid in the apprehension of offenders
and make it possible to pursue potential
prosecution through the criminal justice system as well as to pursue a protective (restraining) order.
deputy coordinators are also available
to any sexual violence victim to answer
questions, assist in referring victims to
health and wellness resources, and to
assist in reporting sexual violence incidents to the police. The Title IX coordinator and deputy coordinators, however, are not confidential resources.
Evidence Preservation
Preserving evidence related to sexual violence may be important to an investigation and potential criminal prosecution.
While it is not mandatory to report sexual violence to the police or to pursue
prosecution, once evidence of sexual
violence has been destroyed, it may impact any criminal or other disciplinary
proceeding.
In order to preserve such physical evidence, the Sexual Assault Treatment
Center recommends the following if you
have been sexually assaulted:
• Don’t blame yourself
• Do not rinse your mouth, smoke,
brush your teeth or have anything to
eat or drink until you have been seen by
one of our experts
• Do not wipe, bathe, wash, shower or
douche until you have been seen by one
of our experts
In addition to investigating sexual violence and discrimination complaints,
EDS coordinates the University’s compliance with Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments. Title IX, as amended, prohibits discrimination on the basis
of sex in any educational program or
activity receiving federal financial assistance. Covered under Title IX are educational programs and services such as:
housing, athletics, admissions, financial
aid, recruitment, student treatment services, counseling, guidance, discipline,
classroom assignments, and grading.
• If you think you may have been
drugged, please save your urine in a
clean container and bring with you to
the treatment center as soon as possible
(drugs may be found in urine)
EDS’s director is UWM’s designated Title IX coordinator. Certain staff within
Athletics, the DOS Office, and University Housing also serve as deputy Title IX
coordinators. Together, the Title IX coordinator and deputy coordinators are
responsible for ensuring the timely and
appropriate handling of sexual violence
reports. The Title IX coordinator and
• Consider reporting the assault to your
local police department
• Get to a safe place as soon as possible
• Save all of your clothing you were
wearing at the time of the assault
• Save any sheets, blankets or towels you
may have used or came in contact with
during or after the assault
http://www.aurorahealthcare.org/services/sexual-assault/satc.asp
Other evidence that is helpful to preserve may include email, text messages,
and telephone records.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 19 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Campus Disciplinary Policies And Procedures
Prohibited and Illegal Acts
UWM prohibits sexual violence, including
sexual assault, sexual harassment, dating/
domestic violence, and stalking on University property or in conjunction with
university activities. Wisconsin statutes
define these offenses. Sexual assault, including acquaintance rape as described in
§§ 940.225 and 948.02, Wis. Stats., is any
sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a
person without the consent of that person.
Consent means words or overt actions by a
competent person indicating freely given
agreement to the sexual contact or intercourse.
Consent is not a defense when the person
involved is less than 16 years of age, unconscious or unable to communicate, or
is suffering from mental illness or defect.
Acquaintance or date rape is sexual assault
committed by someone the victim knows.
At least two-thirds of reported rape victims
know the attacker.
Sexual harassment, as defined in §
111.32(13), Wis. Stats., includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual
favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Conduct which unreasonably interferes with an individual’s
work or educational participation or which
creates a threatening or intimidating environment for work or learning also constitutes harassment (UWM’s Discriminatory
Conduct Policy (including Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence). UWM policy
prohibits all harassment and strongly discourages consenting amorous or sexual
relationships between an instructor and
student or an employee and supervisor.
Sexual violence is a form of prohibited discrimination and is defined by UWM policy
as “physical sexual acts perpetrated against
a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent.” UWM’s Discriminatory Conduct Policy (including Sexual
Harassment and Sexual Violence) can be
found at:
http://www4.uwm.edu/eds/policies_
forms/upload/S_47-2015.pdf
Sexual exploitation by a therapist under
§ 940.22, Wis. Stats. includes intentional
sexual contact by any therapist with a client during an ongoing therapist/client
relationship. Consent is not an issue in
these cases. Criminal Harassment under §
947.013, Wis. Stats., is prohibited.
Disciplinary Sanctions
Sex offenses, including sexual assault, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic
violence and stalking by a student may lead
to university-imposed disciplinary procedures and sanctions under s. UWS 17.10,
Wis. Admin. Code. The discipline could
include a written reprimand; denial of
specified university privileges; payment of
restitution; educational/service sanctions,
including community service; disciplinary
probation; imposition of reasonable terms
and conditions on continuous student
status; removal from a course in progress;
enrollment restrictions on a course/program; suspension; or expulsion.
University employees are also subject to
disciplinary procedures and sanctions for
sexual misconduct including sexual assault, sexual harassment, dating violence,
domestic violence and stalking committed on university property or during work
time, up to and including termination of
employment. Disciplinary sanctions are
initiated and imposed in accordance with
applicable procedural requirements and
work rules, as set forth in Wisconsin statutes, administrative rules, and faculty, academic staff, and university staff policies.
The length of the disciplinary process
depends upon the rules for the employee
type at issue as well as other factors such
as the availability of any hearing body and
witnesses, among other factors. Referral
for prosecution under criminal law is also
possible and is a standard procedure in
cases of sexual assault.
Whether the investigation is being handled by EDS, the DOS Office, or University Housing, such investigations will be
prompt, fair, and impartial from the outset of the investigation through its conclusion. Whenever possible, UWM will
complete a sexual violence investigation
within 60 days, although this may not always be possible due to the availability of
witnesses and evidence, and other factors.
All individuals in the investigation and disciplinary hearing process, at a minimum,
receive annual training on the issues related to dating violence, domestic violence,
sexual assault, and stalking as well as how
to conduct and investigation/hearing process that protects the safety of victims and
promotes accountability.
If the alleged perpetrator is a student, the
process outlined in Chapter UWS 17, Wis.
Admin. Code must be followed. Such disciplinary procedures typically take 30-60
days following the conclusion of any sex-
Sex Offender Information
The State of Wisconsin maintains an official
Sex Offender Registry web site at: http://offender.doc.state.wi.us/public/.
In 1997, the State of Wisconsin enacted the
Sex Offender Registration and Community Notification Law. This law was created to
monitor and track people convicted of sex
crimes and to provide access to this information for police, victims and the general public.
The official web site is designed to enhance
public safety by making the information contained in the Sex Offender Registry easily accessible to the public. It also serves to enhance
public awareness about sexual violence in our
communities and provide valuable information about the ways in which individuals
and communities can protect themselves and
those they love from acts of sexual violence.
As part of State of Wisconsin’s Sex Offender Apprehension and Felony Enforcement
(SAFE) Initiative, beginning on Dec. 1, 2005,
the site displays the current reported residence address of registered sex offenders who
are in the community.
The State of Wisconsin encourages the public
to notify the Wisconsin Sex Offender Registry of information on the web site believed
to be inaccurate, as well as any information
concerning the whereabouts of non-compliant registrants, through the SAFE Tip line
toll free at (877) 234-0085 or through email
at [email protected] Information
regarding registered sex offenders who are either enrolled or employed by the institution
may be obtained by contacting the University
Police.
ual violence investigation. In all sexual
violence investigations, UWM uses a preponderance of evidence standard to determine whether an act of sexual violence
occurred. A “preponderance of evidence”
means information that would persuade
a reasonable person that a proposition is
more probably true than not true.
In the case of campus disciplinary procedures, both the accuser and the accused in
a case involving allegations of a sex offense
are entitled to the same opportunities to
have an advisor present at any institutional misconduct hearing. Mediation is not
used to resolve sexual assault cases. Both
the accuser and the accused will be informed of the outcome of any institutional
proceeding that is brought alleging sexual
misconduct. The “outcome” of the proceeding means UWM’s final determination with respect to the alleged sex offense
and any sanction that is imposed. The accuser has the same right of appeal in a disciplinary proceeding as the accused.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 20 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Explanation Of Terms
Homicide: Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
On Campus - UWM’s main “Kenwood” campus bounded
by Newport/Edgewood (north), Downer (east), Kenwood
(south) and Cramer/Maryland (west). This includes residence halls. The Columbia St. Mary’s property (Northwest
Quadrant/NWQ) was acquired on Dec. 29, 2010.
201220132014
On Campus Total
1
0
0
Residence Halls1
100
Non-Campus
000
Public Property 000
Residence Halls - UWM’s on-campus residence halls (Sandburg Residence Halls and Purin Hall).
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
Non-Campus - Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by UWM, and buildings or property owned/controlled by UWM but off the Kenwood campus that are
used in direct support of UWM’s educational purposes and
are frequently used by students. This includes, but is not
limited to, the Alumni House, School of Continuing Education, the Saukville Field Station, the University Services
and Research Building, the Capitol/Humboldt parking lot
and non-campus residence halls (Kenilworth Square, RiverView and Cambridge Commons).
Public Property - Public property immediately adjacent to
and accessible from the campus (e.g. roads surrounding
or intersecting the campus, or sidewalks surrounding the
campus). This includes the sidewalk across the street from
the campus, but not public property beyond the sidewalk.
Separate Campus - A location owned or controlled by
UWM but is not reasonably geographically contiguous with
the main campus, has an organized program of study and
has at least one person on site acting in an administrative
capacity. Beginning in 2010, UWM’s School of Freshwater
Sciences (“SFS”) met this definition. Crime statistics for SFS
are reported separately. SFS is covered by all other UWM
policies and procedures as outlined in this report. SFS does
not have any residence halls. Beginning in 2012, UWM’s
Zilber School of Public Health (“SPH”) was added as a separate campus, without residence halls, similar to SFS.
Hate Crimes - For this report, a “hate crime” is any criminal
homicide, negligent manslaughter, non-forcible or forcible
sex offense, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor
vehicle theft, arson, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, destruction/damage/vandalism OR any other crime
involving bodily injury, that is reported to local police agencies or a campus security authority, where there is manifest
evidence the victim was intentionally selected because of
the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, ethnicity,
or disability.
Arrests - Persons processed by arrest, citation or summons
for violations of the law.
Disciplinary Referrals - Referral of any person who is believed to have committed a violation of state law/regulation or local ordinance to any official who initiates a disciplinary action of which a record is kept and which may
result in the imposition of a sanction. At UWM, this means
referral to the Dean of Students Office and initiation of
non-academic misconduct charges or referral to University
Housing’s Resident Behavior Process.
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Homicide: Negligent Manslaughter
201220132014
On Campus Total
0
0
0
Residence Halls1
000
Non-Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Domestic Violence2
201220132014
On Campus Total
4
2
Residence Halls1 1 1
Non-Campus 10
Public Property
0
0
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
Dating Violence2
201220132014
On Campus Total
3
3
Residence Halls1 2 2
Non-Campus 01
Public Property
0
0
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 21 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Stalking2
Motor Vehicle Theft
201220132014
On Campus Total
1
3
Residence Halls1 0 0
Non-Campus 00
Public Property
0
0
201220132014
On Campus Total
0
0
1
Residence Halls1
000
Non-Campus
000
Public Property 420
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
Robbery
000
000
Arson
201220132014
On Campus Total
2
0
0
Residence Halls1
000
Non-Campus
011
Public Property 310
201220132014
On Campus Total
0
0
0
Residence Halls1
000
Non-Campus
310
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Aggravated Assault
000
000
Liquor Law Arrests3
201220132014
On Campus Total
0
0
1
Residence Halls1
001
Non-Campus
010
Public Property 100
201220132014
On Campus Total
287
111
0
Residence Halls1201 87
0
Non-Campus
6742 0
Public Property
29
33
0
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Burglary
000
000
Disciplinary Referrals For Liquor Violations
201220132014
On Campus Total
15
15
33
Residence Halls19 8 32
Non-Campus
129 5
Public Property 000
201220132014
On Campus Total
430
366
455
Residence Halls1
430366441
Non-Campus
214141227
Public Property
0
0
27
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
000
000
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 22 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Drug Law Arrests3
201220132014
On Campus Total
14
14
19
Residence Halls1
121014
Non-Campus
784
Public Property 7100
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Disciplinary Referrals For Drug Violations
201220132014
On Campus Total
161
186
125
Residence Halls1
120150120
Non-Campus
436166
Public Property 011
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
N/A
N/A
0
0
0
0
Weapons Arrests
201220132014
On Campus Total
4
2
2
Residence Halls1
211
Non-Campus
110
Public Property 000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
000
Public Property 000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
Disciplinary Referrals For Weapons Violations
201220132014
On Campus Total
4
0
6
Residence Halls1 405
Non-Campus
003
Public Property
000
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
000
000
The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) requires
institutions to include gender identity and national origin to the hate crime statistics for incidents
of bias. VAWA has also added domestic violence,
dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as new
categories for hate crimes.
Hate Crimes - TOTAL
2014Bias
5
Dating Violence
0
Domestic Violence
0
Stalking0
2013Bias
2
Dating Violence
0
Domestic Violence
0
Stalking0
2012
No reported hate crimes in any
covered location or category
Hate Crimes - Bias Category Breakdown
2014Race
1
Gender0
Religion0
Sexual Orientation
1
Ethnicity/National Origin 3
Disability0
2013Race
0
Gender0
Religion0
Sexual Orientation
0
Ethnicity/National Origin 1
Disability0
Hate Crimes - Secondary Category Breakdown
2014 Larceny/Theft0
Simple Assault
0
Intimidation0
Destruction/Damage/
Vandalism of Property
5
2013 Larceny/Theft0
Simple Assault
0
Intimidation0
Destruction/Damage/
Vandalism of Property
1
Statistical Footnotes
1 - Note that Residence Halls statistics are a subset of the On-Campus statistical category
2 - The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was amended on
March 7, 2013, and became law on July 1, 2015. VAWA adds domestic violence, dating violence and stalking to the crime categories universities must track.
3 - Due to changes in Wisconsin Law in 2014, citations for drug or
liquor law violations were counted as disciplinary referrals if no
arrest or referral to the District Attorney’s Office was made. 2012
and 2013 citations for drug or liquor law violations were originally reported as arrests, but were revised to reflect Wisconsin law.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 23 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was amended on March 7, 2013, changing the reporting categories for
Sex Offenses from forcible and non-forcible to Rape, Fondling, Statutory Rape and Incest.
The numbers from 2012 and 2013 are indicated below in their previous category,
while the numbers from 2014 are in the new categories.
Sex Offenses (Forcible)
On Campus Total
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
Sex Offenses: Non-Forcible
20122013
2
7
1
5
01
0
1
0
0
0
0
Sex Offenses - Rape
2014On-Campus
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
School of Freshwater Science
On-Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On-Campus
Public Property
20122013
0
0
0
0
00
0
0
0
0
School of Freshwater Science
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
School of Public Health
On Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
Sex Offenses - Statutory Rape
8
5
4
0
0
0
0
0
Sex Offenses - Fondling
2014On-Campus
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
School of Freshwater Science
On-Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On-Campus
Public Property
On Campus Total
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
2014On-Campus
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
School of Freshwater Science
On-Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On-Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sex Offenses - Incest
4
4
1
0
0
0
0
0
2014On-Campus
Residence Halls
Non-Campus
Public Property
School of Freshwater Science
On-Campus
Public Property
School of Public Health
On-Campus
Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 24 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Relevant Wisconsin Statutes
Statutory Information UW Systems
Institutions Are Required By
Wisconsin Statute § 36.11(22) To
Provide Annually To Students
Please Note: This information was
current as of March 19, 2008. To be
certain one is using the most current
version of a statute, please refer to the
Revisor of Statutes webpage at: http://
www.legis.state.wi.us/rsb/stats.html
Listing Of Statutes
Informatiom on Sexual Assault and
Sexual Harassment
for UW Students
Wis. Stat. § 36.11(22) - Student
Orientation Programs at
UW System Institutions
Defining Sexual Harassment
in Wisconsin
Wis. Stat. § 111.32(13) Definition of Sexual Harassment
Laws and Penalties For Sexual
Assault Crimes In Wisconsin
Wis. Stat. § 940.225 - Sexual Assault
Wis. Stat. § 948.02 - Sexual Assault
of a Child
Wis. Stat. § 948.025 - Engaging in
Repeated Acts of Sexual Assault of
the Same Child
Wis. Stat. § 940.22 - Sexual Exploitation by Therapist; Duty to Report
Wis. Stat. § 947.013 - Harassment
Rights of Victims and Witnesses of
Crime in Wisconsin
Wis. Stat. § 950.01 Legislative Intent
Wis. Stat. § 950.02 - Definitions
Wis. Stat. § 950.03 Eligibility of Victims
Wis. Stat. § 950.04 - Basis Bill of
Rights for Victims And Witnesses
Wis. Stat. § 950.055 - Child Victims
and Witnesses; Rights and Services
Wis. Stat. § 950.06 Reimbursement for Services
Wis. Stat. § 950.07 Intergovernmental Cooperation
Wis. Stat. § 950.08 - Information and
Mediation Services
Wis. Stat. § 950.09 - Crime Victims’
Rights Board
Wis. Stat. § 950.095 - Confidentiality
of Complaints
Wis. Stat. § 950.10 - Limitation on
Liability; Grounds for Appeal
Wis. Stat. § 950.11 - Penalties
Wis. Stat. § 36.11(22)
(22) ORIENTATION PROGRAM;
INFORMATION ON SEXUAL ASSAULT
AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT.
(a) The board shall direct each institution
and college campus to:
1. Incorporate in its orientation program for
newly entering students oral and written or
electronic information on sexual assault and
sexual harassment, as defined in s. 111.32
(13) , including information on sexual assault by acquaintances of the victims and on
all of the following:
a. The legal definitions of, and penalties for,
sexual assault under ss. 940.225 , 948.02 and
948.025 , sexual exploitation by a therapist
under s. 940.22 and harassment under s.
947.013
b. Generally available national and state statistics, and campus statistics as compiled under par. (c) and as reported under par. (d) ,
on sexual assaults and on sexual assaults by
acquaintances of the victims.
c. The rights of victims under ch. 950 and
the services available at the institution or
college campus and in the community to
assist a student who is the victim of sexual
assault or sexual harassment.
d. Protective behaviors, including methods
of recognizing and avoiding sexual assault
and sexual harassment and locations in the
community where courses on protective behaviors are provided.
2. Annually supply to all students enrolled
in the institution or college campus printed
or electronic material that includes all of the
information under par. (a)
(b) Annually, the board shall submit a report to the chief clerk of each house of the
legislature for distribution to the appropriate standing committees under s. 13.172 (3)
The report shall indicate the methods each
institution and college campus have used to
comply with par. (a)
(c) Any person employed at an institution
who witnesses a sexual assault on campus
or receives a report from a student enrolled
in the institution that the student has been
sexually assaulted shall report to the dean of
students of the institution. The dean of students shall compile reports for the purpose
of disseminating statistical information under par. (a) 1. b.
(d) Annually, each institution shall report to
the office of justice assistance in the department of administration statistics on sexual
assaults and on sexual assaults by acquaintances of the victims that occurred on each
campus of the institution in the previous
year. The office of justice assistance shall
include the statistics in appropriate crime
reports published by the office.
Wis. Stat. § 111.32 (2004)
111.32. Definitions.
When used in this subchapter:
(13) “Sexual harassment” means unwelcome sexual advances, unwelcome requests
for sexual favors, unwelcome physical contact of a sexual nature or unwelcome verbal
or physical conduct of a sexual nature. “Sexual harassment” includes conduct directed
by a person at another person of the same
or opposite gender. “Unwelcome verbal
or physical conduct of a sexual nature” includes but is not limited to the deliberate,
repeated making of unsolicited gestures or
comments of a sexual nature; the deliberate, repeated display of offensive sexually
graphic materials which is not necessary for
business purposes; or deliberate verbal or
physical conduct of a sexual nature, whether or not repeated, that is sufficiently severe
to interfere substantially with an employees
work performance or to create an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment.
Wis. Stat. § 940.225
940.225. Sexual assault
(1) FIRST DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
Whoever does any of the following is guilty
of a Class B felony:
(a) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with another person without consent of that
person and causes pregnancy or great bodily
harm to that person.
(b) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with another person without consent of that
person by use or threat of use of a dangerous weapon or any article used or fashioned
in a manner to lead the victim reasonably to
believe it to be a dangerous weapon.
(c) Is aided or abetted by one or more other
persons and has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent of that person by use or threat of force
or violence.
(2) SECOND DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
Whoever does any of the following is guilty
of a Class C felony:
(a) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with another person without consent of that
person by use or threat of force or violence.
(b) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 25 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
with another person without consent of that
person and causes injury, illness, disease or
impairment of a sexual or reproductive organ, or mental anguish requiring psychiatric
care for the victim.
(c) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with a person who suffers from a mental illness or deficiency which renders that person
temporarily or permanently incapable of appraising the person’s conduct, and the defendant knows of such condition.
(cm) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who is under the influence of an intoxicant to a degree which renders that person incapable of giving consent
if the defendant has actual knowledge that
the person is incapable of giving consent
and the defendant has the purpose to have
sexual contact or sexual intercourse with the
person while the person is incapable of giving consent.
(d) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with a person who the defendant knows is
unconscious.
(f) Is aided or abetted by one or more other persons and has sexual contact or sexual
intercourse with another person without the
consent of that person.
(g) Is an employee of a facility or program
under s. 940.295(2)(b), (c), (h) or (k) and
has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with
a person who is a patient or resident of the
facility or program.
(h) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with an individual who is confined in a correctional institution if the actor is a correctional staff member. This paragraph does
not apply if the individual with whom the actor has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
is subject to prosecution for the sexual contact or sexual intercourse under this section.
(i) Has sexual contact or sexual intercourse
with an individual who is on probation, parole, or extended supervision if the actor
is a probation, parole, or extended supervision agent who supervises the individual,
either directly or through a subordinate, in
his or her capacity as a probation, parole,
or extended supervision agent or who has
influenced or has attempted to influence
another probation, parole, or extended
supervision agent’s supervision of the individual. This paragraph does not apply if the
individual with whom the actor has sexual
contact or sexual intercourse is subject to
prosecution for the sexual contact or sexual
intercourse under this section.
(j) Is a licensee, employee, or nonclient resident of an entity, as defined in s. 48.685(1)
(b) or 50.065(1)(c), and has sexual contact
or sexual intercourse with a client of the entity.
(3) THIRD DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
Whoever has sexual intercourse with a
person without the consent of that person
is guilty of a Class G felony. Whoever has
sexual contact in the manner described in
sub. (5)(b)2. or 3. with a person without the
consent of that person is guilty of a Class G
felony.
(3m) FOURTH DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT. Except as provided in sub. (3), whoever has sexual contact with a person without the consent of that person is guilty of a
Class A misdemeanor.
(4) CONSENT. “Consent”, as used in this
section, means words or overt actions by a
person who is competent to give informed
consent indicating a freely given agreement
to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.
Consent is not an issue in alleged violations
of sub. (2)(c), (cm), (d), (g), (h), and (i).
The following persons are presumed incapable of consent but the presumption may be
rebutted by competent evidence, subject to
the provisions of s. 972.11(2):
(b) A person suffering from a mental illness
or defect which impairs capacity to appraise
personal conduct.
(c) A person who is unconscious or for any
other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness to an act.
(5) DEFINITIONS. In this section:
(abm) “Client” means an individual who receives direct care or treatment services from
an entity.
(acm) “Correctional institution” means a
jail or correctional facility, as defined in s.
961.01(12m), a juvenile correctional facility,
as defined in s. 938.02(10p), or a juvenile detention facility, as defined in s. 938.02(10r).
(ad) “Correctional staff member” means an
individual who works at a correctional institution, including a volunteer.
(ag) “Inpatient facility” has the meaning
designated in s. 51.01(10).
(ai) “Intoxicant” means any alcohol beverage, controlled substance, controlled substance analog, or other drug or any combination thereof.
(ak) “Nonclient resident” means an individual who resides, or is expected to reside, at
an entity, who is not a client of the entity,
and who has, or is expected to have, regular,
direct contact with the clients of the entity.
(am) “Patient” means any person who does
any of the following:
1. Receives care or treatment from a facility
or program under s. 940.295(2)(b), (c), (h)
or (k), from an employee of a facility or program or from a person providing services
under contract with a facility or program.
2. Arrives at a facility or program under s.
940.295(2)(b), (c), (h) or (k) for the purpose of receiving care or treatment from a
facility or program under s. 940.295(2)(b),
(c), (h) or (k), from an employee of a facility
or program under s. 940.295(2)(b), (c), (h)
or (k), or from a person providing services
under contract with a facility or program under s. 940.295(2)(b), (c), (h) or (k).
(ar) “Resident” means any person who resides in a facility under s. 940.295(2)(b), (c),
(h) or (k).
(b) “Sexual contact” means any of the following:
1. Any of the following types of intentional
touching, whether direct or through clothing, if that intentional touching is either for
the purpose of sexually degrading; or for the
purpose of sexually humiliating the complainant or sexually arousing or gratifying
the defendant or if the touching contains
the elements of actual or attempted battery
under s. 940.19(1):
a. Intentional touching by the defendant
or, upon the defendant’s instruction, by another person, by the use of any body part or
object, of the complainant’s intimate parts.
b. Intentional touching by the complainant,
by the use of any body part or object, of the
defendant’s intimate parts or, if done upon
the defendant’s instructions, the intimate
parts of another person.
2. Intentional penile ejaculation of ejaculate
or intentional emission of urine or feces by
the defendant or, upon the defendant’s instruction, by another person upon any part
of the body clothed or unclothed of the
complainant if that ejaculation or emission
is either for the purpose of sexually degrading or sexually humiliating the complainant
or for the purpose of sexually arousing or
gratifying the defendant.
(c) “Sexual intercourse” includes the meaning assigned under s. 939.22(36) as well as
cunnilingus, fellatio or anal intercourse between persons or any other intrusion, however slight, of any part of a person’s body or
of any object into the genital or anal opening either by the defendant or upon the
defendant’s instruction. The emission of semen is not required.
(d) “State treatment facility” has the meaning designated in s. 51.01(15).
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 26 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
(6) MARRIAGE NOT A BAR TO PROSECUTION. A defendant shall not be presumed
to be incapable of violating this section because of marriage to the complainant.
(7) DEATH OF VICTIM. This section applies whether a victim is dead or alive at the
time of the sexual contact or sexual intercourse
Wis. Stat. § 948.02
948.02. Sexual assault of a child
(1) FIRST DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
(a) In this subsection, “sexual intercourse”
means vulvar penetration as well as cunnilingus, fellatio, or anal intercourse between
persons or any intrusion of any inanimate
object into the genital or anal opening either by the defendant or upon the defendant’s instruction. The emission of semen is
not required.
(b) Whoever has sexual intercourse with a
person who has not attained the age of 12
years is guilty of a Class B felony.
(c) Whoever has sexual intercourse with a
person who has not attained the age of 16
years by use or threat of force or violence is
guilty of a Class B felony.
(d) Whoever has sexual contact with a person who has not attained the age of 16 years
by use or threat of force or violence is guilty
of a Class B felony if the actor is at least 18
years of age when the sexual contact occurs.
(e) Whoever has sexual contact with a person who has not attained the age of 13 years
is guilty of a Class B felony.
(1) FIRST DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
Whoever has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who has not attained
the age of 13 years is guilty of one of the following:
(a) If the sexual contact or sexual intercourse resulted in great bodily harm to the
person, a Class A felony.
(b) If the sexual contact or sexual intercourse did not result in great bodily harm to
the person, a Class B felony.
(2) SECOND DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT.
Whoever has sexual contact or sexual intercourse with a person who has not attained
the age of 16 years is guilty of a Class C felony.
(3) FAILURE TO ACT. A person responsible for the welfare of a child who has not attained the age of 16 years is guilty of a Class
F felony if that person has knowledge that
another person intends to have, is having or
has had sexual intercourse or sexual contact
with the child, is physically and emotionally
capable of taking action which will prevent
the intercourse or contact from taking place
or being repeated, fails to take that action
and the failure to act exposes the child to an
unreasonable risk that intercourse or contact may occur between the child and the
other person or facilitates the intercourse or
contact that does occur between the child
and the other person.
(2)(a) If an action under sub. (1)(a) is tried
to a jury, in order to find the defendant
guilty the members of the jury must unanimously agree that at least 3 violations of
s. 948.02(1)(b) or (c) occurred within the
specified period of time but need not agree
on which acts constitute the requisite number and need not agree on whether a particular violation was a violation of s. 948.02(1)
(b) or (c).
(4) MARRIAGE NOT A BAR TO PROSECUTION. A defendant shall not be presumed
to be incapable of violating this section because of marriage to the complainant.
(ag) If an action under sub. (1)(ag) is tried
to a jury, in order to find the defendant guilty
the members of the jury must unanimously
agree that at least 3 violations of s. 948.02(1)
(b), (c), or (d) occurred within the specified period of time but need not agree on
which acts constitute the requisite number
and need not agree on whether a particular
violation was a violation of s. 948.02(1)(b),
(c), or (d).
(5) DEATH OF VICTIM. This section applies whether a victim is dead or alive at the
time of the sexual contact or sexual intercourse.
Wis. Stat. § 948.025
948.025. Engaging in repeated acts of sexual assault of the same child
<Text of subsec. (1), as affected by 2005 Act
430, §§ 5, 6>
(1) Whoever commits 3 or more violations
under s. 948.02(1) or (2) within a specified
period of time involving the same child is
guilty of:
(a) A Class B felony if at least 3 of the violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(b) or
(c).
(ag) A Class B felony if at least 3 of the violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(b),
(c), or (d) but fewer than 3 of the violations
were violations of s. 948.02(1)(b) or (c).
(ar) A Class B felony if at least 3 of the violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(b),
(c), (d), or (e) but fewer than 3 of the violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(b),
(c), or (d).
(b) A Class C felony if fewer than 3 of the
violations were violations of s. 948.02(1).
<Text of subsec. (1), as affected by 2005 Act
437, §§ 3, 4>
(1) Whoever commits 3 or more violations
under s. 948.02(1) or (2) within a specified
period of time involving the same child is
guilty of:
(ag) A Class A felony if at least 3 of the violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(a).
(ar) A Class B felony if fewer than 3 of the
violations were violations of s. 948.02(1)(a)
but at least 3 of the violations were violations
of s. 948.02(1)(a) or (b).
(b) A Class C felony if fewer than 3 of the
violations were violations of s. 948.02(1).
<Text of subsec. (2), as affected by 2005 Act
430, §§ 7, 8>
(ar) If an action under sub. (1)(ar) is tried
to a jury, in order to find the defendant
guilty the members of the jury must unanimously agree that at least 3 violations of s.
948.02(1)(b), (c), (d), or (e) occurred within the specified period of time but need not
agree on which acts constitute the requisite
number and need not agree on whether
a particular violation was a violation of s.
948.02(1)(b), (c), (d), or (e).
(b) If an action under sub. (1)(b) is tried to
a jury, in order to find the defendant guilty
the members of the jury must unanimously
agree that at least 3 violations of s. 948.02(1)
or (2) occurred within the specified period
of time but need not agree on which acts
constitute the requisite number and need
not agree on whether a particular violation
was a violation of s. 948.02(1) or (2).
<Text of subsec. (2), as affected by 2005 Act
437, §§ 5, 6>
(2)(a) If an action under sub. (1)(ag) is
tried to a jury, in order to find the defendant
guilty the members of the jury must unanimously agree that at least 3 violations of s.
948.02(1)(a) occurred within the specified
period of time but need not agree on which
acts constitute the requisite number.
(am) If an action under sub. (1)(ar) is tried
to a jury, in order to find the defendant guilty
the members of the jury must unanimously
agree that at least 3 violations of s. 948.02(1)
(a) or (b) occurred within the specified period of time but need not agree on which
acts constitute the requisite number.
(b) If an action under sub. (1)(b) is tried to
a jury, in order to find the defendant guilty
the members of the jury must unanimously
agree that at least 3 violations of s. 948.02(1)
or (2) occurred within the specified period
of time but need not agree on which acts
constitute the requisite number and need
not agree on whether a particular violation
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 27 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
was a violation of s. 948.02(1) or (2).
(3) The state may not charge in the same
action a defendant with a violation of this
section and with a felony violation involving
the same child under ch. 944 or a violation
involving the same child under s. 948.02,
948.05, 948.06, 948.07, 948.075, 948.08,
948.10, 948.11, or 948.12, unless the other
violation occurred outside of the time period applicable under sub. (1). This subsection does not prohibit a conviction for an
included crime under s. 939.66 when the
defendant is charged with a violation of this
section.
Wis. Stat. § 940.22
940.22. Sexual exploitation by therapist;
duty to report
(1) DEFINITIONS. In this section:
(a) “Department” means the department of
regulation and licensing.
(b) “Physician” has the meaning designated
in s. 448.01 (5)
(c) “Psychologist” means a person who practices psychology, as described in s. 455.01 (5)
(d) “Psychotherapy” has the meaning designated in s. 455.01 (6)
(e) “Record” means any document relating
to the investigation, assessment and disposition of a report under this section.
(f) “Reporter” means a therapist who reports
suspected sexual contact between his or her
patient or client and another therapist.
(g) “Sexual contact” has the meaning designated in s. 940.225 (5) (b)
(h) “Subject” means the therapist named in
a report or record as being suspected of having sexual contact with a patient or client or
who has been determined to have engaged
in sexual contact with a patient or client.
(i) “Therapist” means a physician, psychologist, social worker, marriage and family
therapist, professional counselor, nurse,
chemical dependency counselor, member
of the clergy or other person, whether or
not licensed or certified by the state, who
performs or purports to perform psychotherapy.
(2) SEXUAL CONTACT PROHIBITED.
Any person who is or who holds himself or
herself out to be a therapist and who intentionally has sexual contact with a patient or
client during any ongoing therapist-patient
or therapist-client relationship, regardless of
whether it occurs during any treatment, consultation, interview or examination, is guilty
of a Class F felony. Consent is not an issue in
an action under this subsection.
(3) REPORTS OF SEXUAL CONTACT.
(a) If a therapist has reasonable cause to suspect that a patient or client he or she has
seen in the course of professional duties is a
victim of sexual contact by another therapist
or a person who holds himself or herself out
to be a therapist in violation of sub. (2) , as
soon thereafter as practicable the therapist
shall ask the patient or client if he or she
wants the therapist to make a report under
this subsection. The therapist shall explain
that the report need not identify the patient
or client as the victim. If the patient or client wants the therapist to make the report,
the patient or client shall provide the therapist with a written consent to the report and
shall specify whether the patients or clients
identity will be included in the report.
(b) Within 30 days after a patient or client
consents under par. (a) to a report, the therapist shall report the suspicion to:
1. The department, if the reporter believes
the subject of the report is licensed by the
state. The department shall promptly communicate the information to the appropriate examining board or affiliated credentialing board.
2. The district attorney for the county in
which the sexual contact is likely, in the
opinion of the reporter, to have occurred, if
subd. 1. is not applicable.
(c) A report under this subsection shall
contain only information that is necessary
to identify the reporter and subject and to
express the suspicion that sexual contact has
occurred in violation of sub. (2) The report
shall not contain information as to the identity of the alleged victim of sexual contact
unless the patient or client requests under
par. (a) that this information be included.
(d) Whoever intentionally violates this subsection by failing to report as required under pars. (a) to (c) is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
(4) CONFIDENTIALITY OF REPORTS
AND RECORDS.
(a) All reports and records made from reports under sub. (3) and maintained by the
department, examining boards, affiliated
credentialing boards, district attorneys and
other persons, officials and institutions shall
be confidential and are exempt from disclosure under s. 19.35 (1) Information regarding the identity of a victim or alleged victim
of sexual contact by a therapist shall not be
disclosed by a reporter or by persons who
have received or have access to a report or
record unless disclosure is consented to in
writing by the victim or alleged victim. The
report of information under sub. (3) and
the disclosure of a report or record under
this subsection does not violate any persons
responsibility for maintaining the confiden-
tiality of patient health care records, as defined in s. 146.81 (4) and as required under
s. 146.82 Reports and records may be disclosed only to appropriate staff of a district
attorney or a law enforcement agency within this state for purposes of investigation or
prosecution.
(b)
1. The department, a district attorney, an examining board or an affiliated credentialing
board within this state may exchange information from a report or record on the same
subject.
2. If the department receives 2 or more reports under sub. (3) regarding the same
subject, the department shall communicate
information from the reports to the appropriate district attorneys and may inform the
applicable reporters that another report has
been received regarding the same subject.
3. If a district attorney receives 2 or more
reports under sub. (3) regarding the same
subject, the district attorney may inform the
applicable reporters that another report has
been received regarding the same subject.
4. After reporters receive the information
under subd. 2. or 3. , they may inform the
applicable patients or clients that another
report was received regarding the same subject.
(c) A person to whom a report or record is
disclosed under this subsection may not further disclose it, except to the persons and
for the purposes specified in this section.
(d) Whoever intentionally violates this subsection, or permits or encourages the unauthorized dissemination or use of information contained in reports and records made
under this section, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
(5) IMMUNITY FROM LIABILITY.
Any person or institution participating
in good faith in the making of a report or
record under this section is immune from
any civil or criminal liability that results by
reason of the action. For the purpose of any
civil or criminal action or proceeding, any
person reporting under this section is presumed to be acting in good faith. The immunity provided under this subsection does not
apply to liability resulting from sexual contact by a therapist with a patient or client.
Wis. Stat. § 947.013
947.013. Harassment
(1) In this section:
(a) “Course of conduct” means a pattern of
conduct composed of a series of acts over a
period of time, however short, evidencing a
continuity of purpose.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 28 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
(b) “Credible threat” means a threat made
with the intent and apparent ability to carry
out the threat.
(c) “Personally identifiable information”
has the meaning given in s. 19.62 (5)
(d) “Record” has the meaning given in s.
19.32 (2)
(1m) Whoever, with intent to harass or intimidate another person, does any of the
following is subject to a Class B forfeiture:
(a) Strikes, shoves, kicks or otherwise subjects the person to physical contact or attempts or threatens to do the same.
(b) Engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts which harass or intimidate the person and which serve no legitimate purpose.
(1r) Whoever violates sub. (1m) under all
of the following circumstances is guilty of a
Class A misdemeanor:
(a) The act is accompanied by a credible
threat that places the victim in reasonable
fear of death or great bodily harm.
(b) The act occurs while the actor is subject
to an order or injunction under s. 813.12 ,
813.122 or 813.125 that prohibits or limits
his or her contact with the victim.
(1t) Whoever violates sub. (1r) is guilty of a
Class I felony if the person has a prior conviction under this subsection or sub. (1r) ,
(1v) , or (1x) or s. 940.32 (2) , (2e) , (2m)
, or (3) involving the same victim and the
present violation occurs within 7 years of the
prior conviction.
(1v) Whoever violates sub. (1r) is guilty of
a Class H felony if he or she intentionally
gains access to a record in electronic format
that contains personally identifiable information regarding the victim in order to facilitate the violation under sub. (1r)
(1x) Whoever violates sub. (1r) under all
of the following circumstances is guilty of a
Class H felony:
(a) The person has a prior conviction under
sub. (1r) , (1t) or (1v) or this subsection or
s. 940.32 (2) , (2e) , (2m) , or (3)
(b) The person intentionally gains access to
a record in order to facilitate the current violation under sub. (1r)
(2) This section does not prohibit any person from participating in lawful conduct in
labor disputes under s. 103.53
Wis. Stat. § 950.01
950.01. Legislative intent.
In recognition of the civic and moral duty
of victims and witnesses of crime to fully and
voluntarily cooperate with law enforcement
and prosecutorial agencies, and in further
recognition of the continuing importance
of such citizen cooperation to state and local law enforcement efforts and the general
effectiveness and well-being of the criminal
justice system of this state, the legislature
declares its intent, in this chapter, to ensure that all victims and witnesses of crime
are treated with dignity, respect, courtesy
and sensitivity; and that the rights extended
in this chapter to victims and witnesses of
crime are honored and protected by law enforcement agencies, prosecutors and judges
in a manner no less vigorous than the protections afforded criminal defendants.
Wis. Stat. § 950.02
950.02. Definitions - In this chapter:
(1) Except in sub. (3), “child” means a person who is less than 18 years of age.
(1m) “Crime” means an act committed in
this state which, if committed by a competent adult, would constitute a crime, as defined in s. 939.12.
(1t) “Custodial agency” means any person
authorized to arrest or take into actual physical custody an individual who is alleged to
have committed a crime. “Custodial agency”
includes a law enforcement agency, a sheriff,
superintendent or other keeper of a jail and
a person authorized to take custody of a juvenile under s. 938.19 or 938.20 (4).
2. If the person specified in subd. 1. is a
child, a parent, guardian or legal custodian
of the child.
3. If a person specified in subd. 1. is physically or emotionally unable to exercise the
rights granted under s. 950.04 or article I,
section 9m, of the Wisconsin constitution, a
person designated by the person specified in
subd. 1. or a family member of the person
specified in subd. 1.
4. If a person specified in subd. 1. is deceased, any of the following:
a. A family member of the person who is deceased.
b. A person who resided with the person
who is deceased.
5. If a person specified in subd. 1. has been
adjudicated incompetent in this state, the
guardian of the person appointed for him
or her.
(b) “Victim” does not include the person
charged with or alleged to have committed
the crime.
(4m) “Victim and witness office” means an
organization or program that provides services for which the county receives reimbursement under this chapter.
(5) “Witness” means any person who has
been or is expected to be summoned to testify for the prosecution, or who by reason
of having relevant information is subject to
call or likely to be called as a witness for the
prosecution, whether or not any action or
proceeding has yet been commenced.
(2) “Department” means the department of
justice.
Wis. Stat. § 950.03
950.03. Eligibility of victims
(2m) “District attorney” means any of the
following:
A victim has the rights and is eligible for the
services under this chapter only if the crime
has been reported to law enforcement authorities.
(a) The district attorney or other person
authorized to prosecute a criminal case or a
delinquency proceeding under ch. 938.
(b) A person designated by a person specified in par. (a) to perform the district attorney’s duties under this chapter.
(3) “Family member” means spouse, minor
child, adult child, sibling, parent, or legal
guardian.
(3m) “Law enforcement agency” has the
meaning given in s. 165.83 (1)(b).
(4)(a) “Victim” means any of the following:
1. A person against whom a crime has been
committed.
Wis. Stat. § 950.04
950.04. Basic bill of rights for victims and
witnesses
(1v) RIGHTS OF VICTIMS. Victims of
crimes have the following rights:
(a) To have his or her interest considered
when the court is deciding whether to grant
a continuance in the case, as provided under ss. 938.315 (2) and 971.10 (3)(b)3.
(b) To attend court proceedings in the case,
subject to ss. 906.15 and 938.299 (1). The
court may require the victim to exercise his
or her right under this paragraph using telephone or live audiovisual means, if available,
if the victim is under arrest, incarcerated,
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 29 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
imprisoned or otherwise detained by any
law enforcement agency or is admitted or
committed on an inpatient basis to a treatment facility under ch. 51,971 or 980, and
the victim does not have a person specified
in s. 950.02 (4)(a)3. to exercise the victim’s
right under this paragraph.
(bm) To be provided with appropriate intercession services to ensure that employers of
victims will cooperate with the criminal justice process and the juvenile justice process
in order to minimize an employee’s loss of
pay and other benefits resulting from court
appearances.
(c) To be accompanied by a service representative, as provided under s. 895.45.
(d) To request an order for, and to be given
the results of, testing to determine the presence of a communicable disease, as provided under ss. 938.296 or 968.38.
(dL) To not be the subject of a law enforcement officer’s or district attorney’s order,
request, or suggestion that he or she submit
to a test using a lie detector, as defined in
s. 111.37(1)(b), if he or she claims to have
been the victim of a sexual assault under
s. 940.22(2), 940.225, 948.02(1) or (2),
or 948.085, except as permitted under s.
968.265.
(e) To be provided a waiting area under ss.
938.2965 and 967.10.
(em) To have his or her interests considered
by the court in determining whether to exclude persons from a preliminary hearing,
as provided under s. 970.03 (4).
(f) To have the parole commission make a
reasonable attempt to notify the victim of
applications for parole, as provided under s.
304.06 (1).
(g) To have reasonable attempts made to
notify the victim of hearings or court proceedings, as provided under ss. 302.113(9g)
(g)2., 302.114(6), 938.27(4m) and (6),
938.273(2), 971.095(3) and 972.14(3)(b).
(gm) To have reasonable attempts made to
notify the victim of petitions for sentence
adjustment as provided under s. 973.195(1r)
(d).
(i) To have, at his or her request, the opportunity to consult with intake workers, district
attorneys and corporation counsel in cases
under ch. 938, as provided under ss. 938.245
(1m), 938.265 and 938.32 (1)(am).
(j) To have, at his or her request, the opportunity to consult with the prosecution in a
case brought in a court of criminal jurisdiction, as provided under s. 971.095 (2).
(k) To a speedy disposition of the case in
which they are involved as a victim in order
to minimize the length of time they must
endure the stress of their responsibilities in
connection with the matter.
(L) To have the district attorney or corporation counsel, whichever is applicable, make
a reasonable attempt to contact the victim
concerning the victim’s right to make a
statement, as provided under ss. 938.32 (1)
(b) 2., 938.335 (3m)(b) and 972.14 (3)(b).
m) To provide statements concerning sentencing, disposition or parole, as provided
under ss. 304.06 (1) (e), 938.32 (1) (b) 1.
[s. 938.32 (1) (b) 1g.], 938.335 (3m) (a)
[938.335 (3m) (ag)] and 972.14 (3) (a).
(n) To have direct input in the parole decision-making process, as provided by the
rules promulgated under s. 304.06 (1)(em).
(nn) To attend parole interviews or hearings
and make statements as provided under s.
304.06 (1)(eg).
(nt) To attend a hearing on a petition for
modification of a bifurcated sentence and
provide a statement concerning modification of the bifurcated sentence, as provided
under s. 302.113(9g)(d).
(o) To have information concerning the
impact of a delinquent act on the victim
included in a court report under s. 938.33
and to have the person preparing the court
report attempt to contact the victim, as provided under s. 938.331.
(p) To have the person preparing a presentence investigation under s. 972.15 make a
reasonable attempt to contact the victim, as
provided in s. 972.15 (2m).
(pm) To have the court provided with information pertaining to the economic, physical
and psychological effect of the crime upon
the victim and have the information considered by the court.
(q) To restitution, as provided under ss.
938.245 (2)(a)5., 938.32 (1t), 938.34 (5),
938.345, 943.212, 943.23 (6), 943.245,
943.51 and 973.20.
(qm) To recompense as provided under s.
969.13(5)(a).
(r) To a judgment for unpaid restitution, as
provided under ss. 895.035 (2m) and 973.09
(3)(b).
(rm) To compensation, as provided under
subch. I of ch. 949.
(s) To have any stolen or other personal
property expeditiously returned by law en-
forcement agencies when no longer needed
as evidence, subject to s. 968.205. If feasible,
all such property, except weapons, currency,
contraband, property subject to evidentiary
analysis, property subject to preservation under s. 968.205, and property the ownership
of which is disputed, shall be returned to the
person within 10 days of being taken.
(t) To receive information from law enforcement agencies, as provided under s. 950.08
(2g).
(u) To receive information from district attorneys, as provided under s. 950.08 (2r).
(um) To have district attorneys make a reasonable attempt to notify the victim under s.
971.17 (4m) regarding conditional releases
under s. 971.17.
(v) To have the department of corrections
make a reasonable attempt to notify the
victim under s. 301.046(4) regarding community residential confinements, under
s. 301.048(4m) regarding participation in
the intensive sanctions program, under s.
301.38 regarding escapes from a Type 1 prison, under s. 301.46(3) regarding persons
registered under s. 301.45, under s. 302.105
regarding release upon expiration of certain
sentences, under s. 304.063 regarding extended supervision and parole releases, and
under s. 938.51 regarding release or escape
of a juvenile from correctional custody.
(vm) To have the appropriate clerk of court
send the victim a copy of an inmate’s petition for extended supervision and notification of the hearing on that petition under s.
302.114 (6).
(w) To have the department of corrections
make a reasonable attempt to notify the
victim under s. 303.068 (4m) regarding
leave granted to qualified inmates under s.
303.068.
(x) To have the department of health and
family services make a reasonable attempt
to notify the victim under s. 971.17 (6m)
regarding termination or discharge under
s. 971.17 and under s. 51.37 (10) regarding
home visits under s. 51.37 (10).
(xm) To have the department of health and
family services make a reasonable attempt to
notify the victim under s. 980.11 regarding
supervised release under s. 980.08 and discharge under s. 980.09 (4).
(y) To have reasonable attempts made to
notify the victim concerning actions taken
in a juvenile proceeding, as provided under
ss. 938.24 (5m), 938.25 (2m), 938.312 and
938.346.
(yd) To have the appropriate clerk of court
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make a reasonable attempt to send the
victim a copy of a motion made under s.
974.07(2) for post conviction deoxyribonucleic acid testing of certain evidence and notification of any hearing on that motion, as
provided under s. 974.07(4).
(ym) To have the governor make a reasonable attempt to notify the victim of a pardon
application, as provided under s. 304.09 (2)
and (3).
(z) To make a written statement concerning
pardon applications, as provided under s.
304.10 (2).
(zm) To request information from a district
attorney concerning the disposition of a
case involving a crime of which he or she was
a victim, as provided under s. 971.095 (6).
(zx) To complain to the department of justice concerning the treatment of crime victims, as provided under s. 950.08 (3), and
to request review by the crime victims rights
board of the complaint, as provided under
s. 950.09 (2).
(2w) RIGHTS OF WITNESSES. Witnesses of
crimes have the following rights:
(a) To request information from the district
attorney about the final disposition of the
case.
(b) To be notified that a court proceeding
to which they have been subpoenaed will
not go on as scheduled, in order to save the
person an unnecessary trip to court.
(c) To receive protection from harm and
threats of harm arising out of their cooperation with law enforcement and prosecution
efforts, and to be provided with information
as to the level of protection available.
(d) To be informed of financial assistance
and other social services available as a result
of being a witness of a crime, including information on how to apply for the assistance
and services.
(e) To be informed of the procedure to be
followed in order to apply for and receive
any witness fee to which they are entitled.
(f) To be provided a waiting area under ss.
938.2965 and 967.10.
(fm) To have any stolen or other personal
property expeditiously returned by law enforcement agencies when no longer needed as evidence. If feasible, all such property, except weapons, currency, contraband,
property subject to evidentiary analysis and
property the ownership of which is disputed, shall be returned to the person within 10
days of being taken.
(g) To be provided with appropriate intercession services to ensure that employers
of witnesses will cooperate with the criminal justice process and the juvenile justice
process in order to minimize an employee’s
loss of pay and other benefits resulting from
court appearances.
(h) To be entitled to a speedy disposition of
the case in which they are involved as a witness in order to minimize the length of time
they must endure the stress of their responsibilities in connection with the matter.
Wis. Stat. § 950.055
950.055. Child victims and witnesses; rights
and services
(1) LEGISLATIVE INTENT. The legislature
finds that it is necessary to provide child
victims and witnesses with additional consideration and different treatment than that
usually afforded to adults. The legislature intends, in this section, to provide these children with additional rights and protections
during their involvement with the criminal
justice or juvenile justice system. The legislature urges the news media to use restraint
in revealing the identity of child victims or
witnesses, especially in sensitive cases.
(2) ADDITIONAL SERVICES. In addition
to all rights afforded to victims and witnesses
under s. 950.04 and services provided under
s. 950.06 (1m), counties are encouraged to
provide the following additional services on
behalf of children who are involved in criminal or delinquency proceedings as victims
or witnesses:
the provision of services under this section.
A county may seek reimbursement for services provided under this section as part of
its program plan submitted to the department under s. 950.06. To the extent possible, counties shall utilize volunteers and existing public resources for the provision of
these services.
Wis. Stat. § 950.06
950.06. Reimbursement for services
(1m) To be eligible for reimbursement under this section for the provision of services
to victims and witnesses, a county shall provide all of the following services to victims
and witnesses:
(a) Court appearance notification services,
including cancellation of appearances.
(b) Victim compensation and social services
referrals, including witness fee collection,
case-by-case referrals and public information.
(c) Escort and other transportation services
related to the investigation or prosecution
of the case, if necessary or advisable.
(d) Case progress notification services
which may be combined with services under
par. (a)
(dm) Assistance in providing the court with
information pertaining to the economic, physical and psychological effect of the
crime upon the victim of a felony.
(e) Employer intercession services.
(a) Explanations, in language understood
by the child, of all legal proceedings in
which the child will be involved.
(f) Expedited return of property services.
(b) Advice to the judge, when appropriate
and as a friend of the court, regarding the
child’s ability to understand proceedings
and questions. The services may include
providing assistance in determinations concerning the taking of depositions by audiovisual means under s. 908.08 or 967.04(7) and
(8) and the duty to expedite proceedings
under s. 971.105.
(h) Family support services, including child
and other dependent care services.
(c) Advice to the district attorney concerning the ability of a child witness to cooperate with the prosecution and the potential
effects of the proceedings on the child.
(d) Information about and referrals to appropriate social services programs to assist
the child and the child’s family in coping
with the emotional impact of the crime and
the subsequent proceedings in which the
child is involved.
(3) PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITY. In each
county, the county board is responsible for
(g) Protection services.
(i) Waiting facilities.
(2) The costs of providing services under
sub. (1m) shall be paid for by the county,
but the county is eligible to receive reimbursement from the state for not more than
90% of the costs incurred in providing those
services. The department shall determine
the level of services for which a county may
be reimbursed. The county board shall file
a claim for reimbursement with the department. The department shall reimburse
counties under this subsection from the appropriation under s. 20.455 (5) (k) , (kk)
and (kp) and, on a semiannual basis, from
the appropriations under s. 20.455 (5) (c)
and (g)
(3) The county board shall provide for the
implementation of the county’s plan under
sub. (4) Two or more counties may submit a
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 31 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
joint plan under sub. (4)
(4) If the county seeks reimbursement under sub. (2) , the county board shall submit
a program plan to the department for its approval. The county is eligible for reimbursement under sub. (2) only if the department
has approved the plan. The program plan
shall describe the level of services to victims
and witnesses that the county intends to provide; the personnel or agencies responsible
for related administrative programs and individual services; proposed staffing for the
program; proposed education, training and
experience requirements for program staff
and the staff of agencies providing related
administrative programs and individual services; the county’s budget for implementing the program and other information
the department determines to be necessary
for its review. The plan shall provide that
the district attorney, local law enforcement
agencies and the courts shall make available
to the person or agency responsible for administering the program all reports or files,
except reports or files which are required by
statute to be kept confidential, if the reports
or files are required by the person or agency
to carry out program responsibilities. Each
year, the county board shall submit a report
to the department on the operation of the
plan, including the provision of services under sub. (1m)
(5) The department shall review and approve the implementation and operation
of programs and the annual reports under
this section. The department may suspend
or terminate reimbursement under sub. (2)
if the county fails to comply with its duties
under this section. The department shall
promulgate rules under ch. 227 for implementing and administering county programs approved under this section.
Wis. Stat. § 950.07
950.07. Intergovernmental cooperation
The county board, district attorney, local
law enforcement agencies, local social service agencies, victim and witness offices and
courts shall all cooperate with each other to
ensure that victims and witnesses of crimes
receive the rights and services to which they
are entitled under this chapter.
Wis. Stat. § 950.08
950.08. Information and
mediation services
(1) DUTIES OF DEPARTMENT; TOLLFREE TELEPHONE NUMBER.
The department shall maintain a toll-free
telephone number to provide crime victims
and witnesses with all of the following services:
(a) Information and referral to available services.
(b) Crisis counseling and emotional support.
(c) Assistance in securing resources and protection.
(2) DUTIES OF DEPARTMENT; GENERAL
INFORMATIONAL PROGRAM.
The department shall provide an informational program to inform crime victims, the
general public, criminal justice officials and
related professionals about crime victim
rights and services.
(2g) INFORMATION TO BE PROVIDED
BY LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.
No later than 24 hours after a law enforcement agency has initial contact with a victim
of a crime that the law enforcement agency
is responsible for investigating, the law enforcement agency shall make a reasonable
attempt to provide to the victim written information on all of the following:
(a) A list of the rights of victims under s.
950.04 (1v)
(b) The availability of compensation under
ch. 949 and the address and telephone number at which to contact the department for
information concerning compensation under ch. 949
(c) The address and telephone number of
the intake worker, corporation counsel or
district attorney whom the victim may contact to obtain information concerning the
rights of victims and to request notice of
court proceedings under ss. 938.27 (4m)
and (6) , 938.273 (2) , 938.299 (1) (am)
and 938.335 (3m) (b) or ss. 971.095 (3) and
972.14 (3) (b) , whichever is applicable, and
to request the opportunity to confer under
ss. 938.245 (1m) , 938.265 or 938.32 (1)
(am) or s. 971.095 (2) , whichever is applicable.
(d) The address and telephone number of
the custodial agency that the victim may
contact to obtain information concerning
the taking into custody or arrest of a suspect
in connection with the crime of which he or
she is a victim.
(e) The address and telephone number of
the custodial agency that the victim may
contact for information concerning release
under s. 938.20 or 938.21 or ch. 969 , whichever is appropriate, of a person arrested or
taken into custody for the crime of which he
or she is a victim.
(f) Suggested procedures for the victim to
follow if he or she is subject to threats or intimidation arising out of his or her cooperation with law enforcement and prosecution
efforts relating to a crime of which he or she
is a victim.
(g) The address and telephone number at
which the victim may contact the department or any local agency that provides victim assistance in order to obtain further
information about services available for victims, including medical services.
(2r) INFORMATION TO BE PROVIDED
BY A DISTRICT ATTORNEY IN CRIMINAL
CASES.
As soon as practicable, but in no event later than 10 days after the initial appearance
under s. 970.01 or 24 hours before a preliminary examination under s. 970.03 , whichever is earlier, of a person charged with a
crime in a court of criminal jurisdiction, a
district attorney shall make a reasonable attempt to provide to each victim of the crime
written information on all of the following:
(a) A brief statement of the procedure for
prosecuting a crime.
(b) A list of the rights of victims under s.
950.04 (1v) and information about how to
exercise those rights.
(c) The person or agency to notify if the victim changes his or her address and wants to
continue to receive notices and services under s. 950.04 or 971.095 (3)
(d) The availability of compensation under
ch. 949 , including information concerning
eligibility for compensation and the procedure for applying for compensation.
(e) The person to contact for further information about a case involving the prosecution of a crime of which he or she is a victim.
(2s) INFORMATION CONCERNING JUVENILE CASES.
Notification of a victim of an act committed
by a juvenile concerning the rights of victims
under ch. 938 shall be provided as specified
in s. 938.346
(3) DUTIES OF DEPARTMENT; MEDIATION.
The department may receive complaints,
seek to mediate complaints and, with the
consent of the involved parties, actually mediate complaints regarding the treatment
of crime victims and witnesses by public
officials, employees or agencies or under
crime victim and witness assistance programs. The department may act as a liaison between crime victims or witnesses and
others when seeking to mediate these complaints and may request a written response
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 32 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
regarding the complaint from the subject
of a complaint. If asked by the department
to provide a written response regarding a
complaint, the subject of a complaint shall
respond to the department’s request within
a reasonable time.
Wis. Stat. § 950.09
950.09. Crime victims’ rights board
(1) In this section, “board” means the crime
victims’ rights board.
(2) At the request of one of the involved
parties, the board may review a complaint
made to the department under s. 950.08 (3)
regarding a violation of the rights of a crime
victim. A party may not request the board
to review a complaint under this subsection
until the department has completed its action on the complaint under s. 950.08 (3)
In reviewing a complaint under this subsection, the board may not begin any investigation or take any action specified in pars. (a)
to (d) until the board first determines that
there is probable cause to believe that the
subject of the complaint violated the rights
of a crime victim. Based on its review of a
complaint under this subsection, the board
may do any of the following:
(a) Issue private and public reprimands of
public officials, employees or agencies that
violate the rights of crime victims provided
under this chapter, ch. 938 and article I, section 9m, of the Wisconsin constitution
(b) Refer to the judicial commission a violation or alleged violation by a judge of the
rights of crime victims provided under this
chapter, ch. 938 and article I, section 9m, of
the Wisconsin constitution
(c) Seek appropriate equitable relief on behalf of a victim if such relief is necessary to
protect the rights of the victim. The board
may not seek to appeal, reverse or modify
a judgment of conviction or a sentence in a
criminal case.
(d) Bring civil actions to assess a forfeiture
under s. 950.11 Notwithstanding s. 778.06 ,
an action or proposed action authorized under this paragraph may be settled for such
sum as may be agreed upon between the
parties. In settling actions or proposed actions, the board shall treat comparable situations in a comparable manner and shall assure that any settlement bears a reasonable
relationship to the severity of the offense or
alleged offense. Forfeiture actions brought
by the board shall be brought in the circuit
court for the county in which the violation is
alleged to have occurred.
(3) In addition to its powers under sub. (2) ,
the board may issue reports and recommendations concerning the securing and provi-
sion of crime victims’ rights and services.
tims’ rights board.
(4) Actions of the board are not subject to
approval or review by the attorney general.
(b) Referring to the judicial commission information relating to alleged misconduct by
or an alleged disability of a judge or court
commissioner.
(5) The board shall promulgate rules establishing procedures for the exercise of its
powers under this section.
Wis. Stat. § 950.095
950.095. Confidentiality of complaints
(1) (a) The records of the department relating to a complaint made under s. 950.08
(3) are confidential unless the subject of the
complaint waives the right to confidentiality
in writing to the department.
(am) Before a finding of probable cause
under s. 950.09 (2) , a complaint referred
to the crime victims rights board under s.
950.09 (2) is confidential unless the subject
of the complaint waives the right to confidentiality in writing to the crime victims
rights board.
(b) If a complaint becomes known to the
public before the completion of action by the
department under s. 950.08 (3) or a finding
of probable cause by the crime victims rights
board under s. 950.09 (2) , the department
or the crime victims rights board, whichever
is applicable, may issue statements in order
to confirm that a complaint has been made
or is being reviewed, to clarify the procedural aspects of actions taken under ss. 950.08
(3) and 950.09 (2) , to explain the right of
the subject of the complaint to respond to
the complaint, to state that the subject of the
complaint denies the allegations, if applicable, to state that action under ss. 950.08 (3)
and 950.09 (2) has been completed and no
basis for the complaint was found or to correct public misinformation.
(1m) In investigating a complaint made under s. 950.08 (3) or being reviewed under
s. 950.09 (2) , the department or the crime
victims rights board, whichever is applicable, shall do all of the following:
(a) Act to avoid unnecessary embarrassment
to and publicity for the subject of the complaint.
(b) Request any person contacted for information not to disclose that an investigation
is being conducted or the nature of any
inquiries made by the department or the
crime victims rights board.
(c) Referring to an appropriate law enforcement authority information relating to possible criminal conduct or otherwise cooperating with a law enforcement authority in
matters of mutual interest.
(d) Referring to an attorney disciplinary
agency information relating to the possible
misconduct or incapacity of an attorney or
otherwise cooperating with an attorney disciplinary agency in matters of mutual interest.
(e) Disclosing to the chief justice or director of state courts information relating to
matters affecting the administration of the
courts.
Wis. Stat. § 950.10
950.10. Limitation on liability;
grounds for appeal
(1) No cause of action for money damages may arise against the state, any political
subdivision of the state or any employee or
agent of the state or a political subdivision of
the state for any act or omission in the performance of any power or duty under this
chapter or under article I, section 9m, of
the Wisconsin constitution or for any act or
omission in the performance of any power
or duty under ch. 938 relating to the rights
of, services for or notices to victims.
(2) A failure to provide a right, service or
notice to a victim under this chapter or ch.
938 or under article I, section 9m, of the
Wisconsin constitution is not a ground for
an appeal of a judgment of conviction or
sentence and is not grounds for any court to
reverse or modify a judgment of conviction
or sentence.
Wis. Stat. § 950.11
950.11. Penalties
A public official, employee or agency that intentionally fails to provide a right specified
under s. 950.04 (1v) to a victim of a crime
may be subject to a forfeiture of not more
than 1,000.
(2) This section does not preclude the department or the crime victims’ rights board
from doing any of the following:
(a) Informing the person who made the
complaint of the outcome of any action by
the department or review by the crime vic-
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 33 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Appendix 1: Health Effects Of Drugs Other Than Alcohol
Marijuana and hashish can cause mild
to severe anxiety or mild paranoia in
sensitive users. Its use has been associated with short-term memory problems
and can interfere with the learning of
new material, as well as the performance
of complex motor tasks.
Some research has associated long-term
heavy use with increased risk for respiratory problems, decreased levels of sex
hormones, the formation of precancerous cells in the lungs, impairment to the
immune system and decreased cognitive
function. Marijuana use may result in
psychological dependence, and withdrawal symptoms have been observed in
some heavy users.
Cocaine and its freebase form, crack,
are among the most potent of the stimulant drugs. These substances pose a high
risk for addiction.
Immediate negative effects include
restlessness, irritability, anxiety, and depressed mood. Snorting of these substances can cause serious damage to the
nasal membranes and nasal septum.
High doses or prolonged use can cause
irritability, mood disturbances, paranoia
and auditory hallucinations; prolonged
use of crack may also result in particularly aggressive paranoid behavior. Medical
complications can include disturbances in heart rhythm, heart attacks, chest
pain, respiratory failure, strokes, and
seizures.
Other stimulants with the potential for
abuse and dependence include Ritalin,
Adderall, amphetamine and methamphetamine (commonly referred to as
crystal meth, or ice). Short-term effects
can include anxiety, headaches, and increased heart rate and blood pressure.
In higher doses, there is risk for stroke,
convulsions, and irregularities in the user’s heart and respiration rates that can
lead to death. Crushing and snorting
stimulants and intravenous use greatly
increase the risk for overdose.
Large or prolonged doses can also cause
weight loss, paranoia, auditory and vi-
sual hallucinations, and delusions, as
well as significant post-use depression.
Methamphetamine use can also cause
irreversible damage to the blood vessels
in the brain, which can lead to strokes;
it has been associated with long-term decreased functioning of the brain areas
that regulate motor control and memory.
Narcotics include prescription pain relievers, such as Demerol and Oxycontin,
as well as opiates, such as opium, morphine, heroin, and codeine. About half
of those who use narcotics develop a tolerance and dependence to them. Tolerance can cause users to consume higher
doses in order to achieve the desired effect, which can increase the chance of
overdose.
Additionally, accidental overdose can result from the practice of inhaling drugs
that are meant to be taken orally, as well
as from different potency levels that
might be found within illicit and unregulated forms. For narcotics taken intravenously, contamination of the drug
and the use of unsterile needles can
lead to infection and disease, including
liver disease, hepatitis, tetanus, and HIV.
Depressants include substances that are
typically prescribed as medications to
relieve anxiety and induce sleep, such
as Xanax, Ativan, Valium, and Ambien.
These substances slow activity in the central nervous system and pose a risk if taken at higher dosages than prescribed.
Indeed, accidents or injuries can occur due to loss of coordination, slowed
reaction time, fatigue, and impaired
judgment. Moreover, depressants have a
high potential for physical and psychological dependence. Tolerance can also
develop, causing the user to need larger doses to achieve the desired effect,
which can increase the chance of overdose and death.
Hallucinogens, such as LSD (acid), PCP,
Psilocybin (magic mushrooms), mescaline, and peyote, can cause one’s sense
of direction, distance, time, sound, and
visual perception to become distorted.
These effects can last up to 12 hours.
Psychological risks of hallucinogen use
can include significant anxiety, confusion, depression, paranoia, and loss of
emotional control.
Flashbacks, violent behavior, or behaviors resembling psychosis may also result
from the use of hallucinogens and may
precipitate significant mental health
problems in emotionally vulnerable individuals.
Physical risks associated with the use
of hallucinogens can include elevated
heart rates and blood pressure, sleeplessness and tremors, decreased awareness of pain resulting in injury, convulsions, and coma.
GBH and Rohypnol are often referred
to as “date rape drugs,” because they can
immobilize and cause unconsciousness
in the user; in some cases, users describe
a feeling of paralysis during which they
could not move. Rohypnol can cause a
type of amnesia in which the user may
not remember what was said or done
while under the influence of the drug.
Club drugs include the substances
MDMA (ecstasy) and Ketamine. Ecstasy
has been shown to cause long-term damage to nerve cells in the brain, which
regulate emotion, memory, sleep, and
pain. Some studies suggest that lasting
negative effects may occur with experimental use of Ecstasy.
In higher doses, it can cause dehydration, dangerous increases in heart rate
and body temperature, heart attacks,
seizures, and death. Ketamine is a depressant that has dissociative properties.
In low doses, it produces psychedelic
effects, but in higher doses it can lead
to lack of coordination, slurred speech,
paranoia, aggressive behavior, heart attacks, strokes, coma, or death.
Steroid use is associated with higher
risks for heart attacks, strokes, and liver
problems. Steroid use may cause acne
and hair loss, mood problems, hostility,
aggression, and paranoia, and in men,
it may result in potentially irreversible
breast development and genital shrinking.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 34 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Appendix 2: Sexual Assault1 Statistics
Section 36.11(22), Wis. Stats., requires
that information about sexual assault
and sexual harassment programming
and prevention be reported annually
to the Board of Regents and forwarded
to the Legislature. The statute also requires that each UW institution annually report to the Wisconsin Department
of Justice statistics on sexual assaults
and on sexual assaults by acquaintances
that occurred on each campus during
the previous year. At the request of the
Education Committee of the Board of
Regents, statistical information that is
required to be sent to the Wisconsin Department of Justice is also included in
the annual report as Appendix I.
The statistics presented in this 2014 report represent the incidents of sexual
assault reported to UW System campus
officials by UW students at locations
on-campus and off- campus. Although
the statute only requires data regarding
assaults on-campus, the UW System has
always provided data regarding the sexual assaults reported to have occurred
off-campus as well.
As shown in the statistical summary that
follows, the number of UW System sexual assaults reported from 2009 to 2014
has risen significantly. It is important
to keep in mind that campuses have
worked to encourage reporting sexual
assaults and that definitions of off-and
on-campus have been redefined.
Reporting of sexual assault by acquaintances on a UW System campus has risen
from 39 incidents in 2005 to 97 in 2014.
Reporting of sexual assaults committed
by acquaintances on campus has gone
down in 2014 in comparison to the previous four years but is still higher than
in 2009. Reported assaults by unknown
perpetrators on campus have risen significantly over the 5-year period but the
number of incidents is comparably low.
The statistics further show that there
has been a significant rise in the reported assaults by acquaintances that occur
off-campus, from 80 incidents in 2009
to 211 incidents reported in 2014. The
reported off-campus assaults committed
by non-acquaintances has not changed
significantly during the five-year period,
but the 2014 numbers are still higher
than the 2009 ones. Reports of sexual
assaults by unknown perpetrators have
also significantly risen from 18 in 2009
to 88 in 2014.
Increased reporting by victims and
greater diligence in data gathering and
management is the main interpretation
cited in national media for the apparent increase in off-campus assaults or
the increased reporting of such assaults.
“Sexual assaults on and around college
campuses, long considered a vastly underreported crime, have received increased attention from the press, the
Obama administration, the schools, and
students.
As a result, campuses have stepped up
training, support, and outreach, and the
rising number for 2013 is seen as signaling that victims are more comfortable
reporting assaults. […] Specialists also
believe the spike in reporting may indicate that colleges are becoming more
thorough and transparent in collecting
and disclosing sexual assault data” (Rochelau, 2014)2.
However, national comparative data also
suggest that increased reporting does
not necessarily reflect the actual numbers of sexual assault experienced by
students at institutions of higher education, including UW System institutions.
Although there seems to be increased
reporting of sexual assaults, it is hard to
determine whether these numbers represent potentially a higher number of
incidents or an increase in the reporting
of crimes. It is not conclusively known
how many students do not report sexual
assault and/or harassment.
The U.S. Department of Justice, the
American College Health Association
(ACHA), the Wisconsin Department of
Justice, local law enforcement agencies,
and national organizations that regularly perform research on sexual violence
consistently report that sexual assault
is still an underreported crime despite
great improvements in the support of
victims, more accurate reporting by
campus and state authorities, as well as
better prevention efforts. A Department
of Justice research report on The Sex-
ual Victimization of College Women,
published in 2000, estimated that 5% of
college women experienced rape or attempted rape in an academic year, and
15.5% experienced some kind of sexual victimization. Other sources indicate
that an estimated 20-25% of undergraduate women are survivors of peer sexual violence (Benson, Gohm, & Gross,
2007, p. 348; Fisher, Cullen, and Turner,
2000, p. 10).
Research on the phenomenon of underreporting indicates that survivors do not
report assaults because they think no
one will believe them and that various
authorities, such as legal and medical
authorities, will be hostile (Fisher et al.,
2000, pp. 23–24).
Research also indicates that there is a
correlation between sexual violence and
the consumption of alcohol. The UW
System Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse
(AODA) survey of 2007 indicated that
5% of respondents reported they had
been pressured sexually.
The sexual assault statistics reported by
UW institutions are consistent with state
and national data that show sexual assault is predominantly a crime committed by an acquaintance, not a stranger.
In Wisconsin, in 2010 (the latest year for
which numbers are available), 89% of
sexual assaults were committed by someone known to the victim, not including
instances where the relationship was
Unknown (Wisconsin Office of Justice
Assistance Report on Sexual Assaults in
Wisconsin 2010). National data from
2010 also indicate that 78% of sexual
violence incidents involved an offender who was a family member, intimate
partner, friend, or acquaintance (U.S.
Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice
Statistics, 2013). The reported sexual
assaults from UW institutions show a
similar pattern with the majority of reported sexual assaults being perpetrated
by an acquaintance.
All UW System institutions are well
aware of the problem of underreporting
and are seeking multiple educational
pathways in order to encourage victims/
survivors of sexual violence to report
and seek assistance.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 35 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
National and State Statistics
For Forcible Rape3
U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics report4 based
on UCR category “forcible rape”5
Year StateNational6
2004
1,136
2005
1,226
2006
1,239
2007
1,223
2008
1,123
2009
1,112
2010
1,187
2011
1,190
2012
1,219
2013-2014not available
95,089
94,347
94,472
92,160
90,750
89,241
85,593
84,175
84,376
not available
State Statistics For Sexual Assault7
Office of Justice Assistance, State of Wisconsin
Year
Number Reported
2004
5,618
2005
5,363
2006
5,407
2007
5,176
2008
4,657
2009
4,627
2010
4,857
2011-2014
not available
Footnotes - Appendix 2 and Statistics
1 - Sexual assaults as defined by s. 940.225 and s.948.02, Wis.Stats.
2 - Matt Rochelau, The Boston Globe, Sexual assault reports
climb at area colleges N.E. schools’ data tied to greater awareness, October 6, 2014)
3 - The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Uniform Crime
Statistic website provides data for forcible rape for 1960-2012.
4 - Forcible rape data for 2014 is not published on the FBI website
as of April 2014
5 - Forcible rape, as defined in the Uniform Crime Reporting
(UCR) Program, is the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and
against her will. Assaults or attempts to commit rape by force or
threat of force are also included: however, statutory rape (without force) and other sex offenses are excluded.
6 - Based on data collected by law enforcement agencies
7 - Based on data collected from WI law enforcement agencies
for six state of WI specified categories [forcible rape, forcible
sodomy, assault with an object, forcible fondling, ejaculate/excrete upon victim, statutory rape].
Institutional Statistics On Reported
Sexual Assaults - UW System - 2014
Institution
CampusOff-Campus Total
(acquaintances/not acquaintances/unknown)
Eau Claire
11/0/0
26/3/4
37/3/4
Green Bay
1/1/1
10/0/1
11/1/2
LaCrosse 7/0/0 15/3/122/3/1
Madison 17/3/11 61/8/6478/11/75
Milwaukee8/2/0 19/4/1 27/6/1
Oshkosh10/0/1 29/2/239/2/3
Parkside6/0/0 1/0/0 7/0/0
Platteville7/0/0 8/1/2 15/1/2
River Falls
5/0/2
5/2/2
10/2/4
Stevens Point 7/0/0
13/2/5
20/2/5
Stout 2/1/0 3/6/15/7/1
Superior4/0/0 0/0/0 4/0/0
Whitewater12/0/2
21/2/5 33/2/7
Colleges0/0/0 0/0/0 5/0/0
Extension0/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/0
Total
97/7/17 211/33/88308/40/105
Note: In the 2014 report, the categories of “campus” and
“off-campus” incidents were clarified in order to present more
accurate data. In previous reports, Clery definitions of “non-campus” and “public property” were included in the UW System report in the category “campus.” However, these Clery definitions
do not correspond to the UW System definitions of what constitutes a “campus” location. It is possible that apparent increases in
the reported number of off-campus incidents at some UW institutions may be due to these changes in definition.
The term “campus” for the purposes of this report is any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the
same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and any
building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous, that
is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is
frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes,
such as a food or other retail vendor.
The term “off-campus” includes non-campus, public property,
and other; the category of other includes any and all reports of
sexual violence that occurred off-campus at any time in a student’s life.
Statewide Statistics On Reported
Sexual Assaults - UW System - 2009-2014
Year
CampusOff-Campus Total
(acquaintances/not acquaintances/unknown)
2009
39/3/8 80/22/18119/25/26
2010
51/13/4 106/42/37157/55/41
2011 65/11/10 126/21/24191/32/34
2012
59/8/15 94/24/85153/32/100
2013
83/14/9 149/48/59232/62/68
2014
97/7/17 211/33/88308/40/105
Note: Reporting categories changed in 2009 from the category
“total/subset involving acquaintances” to “acquaintances/not
acquaintances/unknown.”
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 36 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Fire Safety
The Higher Education Opportunity Act, enacted on August 14, 2008, requires institutions that
maintain on-campus student housing facilities to publish an annual fire safety report that contains
information about campus fire safety practices and standards of the institution.
Sandburg Residence Halls • 3400 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211
# of Injured
Property
Year
# of Fires Cause
Receiving Treatment # of Deaths
Damage ($)
2012
0
N/A
000
2013
1
Student dumped a foil cup of
ash from hookah into the
garbage can, which caught
fire.
0
0
$250
2014
0
N/A
000
Purin Hall • 2600 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, WI 53211
Year
# of Fires Cause
2012
0
N/A
2013
0
N/A
2014
0
N/A
# of Injured
Property
Receiving Treatment # of Deaths
Damage ($)
000
000
000
Kenilworth Square Apartments • 1915 E. Kenilworth Pl., Milwaukee, WI 53202
# of Injured
Property
Year
# of Fires Cause
Receiving Treatment # of Deaths
Damage ($)
2012
3
A student lit bulletin board
0
0
$1000
materials on fire twice and put
burning paper into a garbage
chute (the same student was
responsible for all three fires
2013
0
N/A
000
2014
0
N/A
000
Cambridge Commons • 2323 N. Cambridge Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211
Year
# of Fires Cause
2012
0
N/A
2013
0
N/A
2014
0
N/A
# of Injured
Property
Receiving Treatment # of Deaths
Damage ($)
000
000
000
RiverView Residence Hall • 2340 N. Commerce St., Milwaukee, WI 53212
# of Injured
Property
Year
# of Fires Cause
Receiving Treatment # of Deaths
Damage ($)
2012
0
N/A
000
2013
1
Student set fire to the paper towel
0
0
$61,000
dispenser in the RiverView
Commons bathroom
2014
0
N/A
000
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 37 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Policies And Procedures Impacting Fire Safety
Fire Safety Systems
In Student Housing
Kenilworth Square Apartments and
Sandburg Halls have the following fire
safety systems:
• Complete automatic sprinkler system.
• Fire alarm system monitored by the
UWM University Housing facilities staff
and the University Police Department.
• Smoke detector in each resident room
and each suite has an alarm and strobe
light located in the hallway or common
area within the suite or apartment.
• Egress corridors and stairwells are fire
rated.
• Residents with disabilities are accommodated according to their needs.
Note: Sandburg Halls are equipped with
a fire alarm system that sounds independently in each tower.
Purin Hall has the following fire safety
systems:
• Fire alarm system with notification system throughout the entire building.
area within the suite or apartment.
• Egress corridors and stairwells are fire
rated.
• Residents with disabilities are accommodated according to their needs.
Policies On Portable
Electrical Appliances,
Smoking and Open Flames In
Student Housing
On campus housing facilities have prohibitions against the following activities:
• Smoking
• Using lighted candles or other open
flames devices
• Cooking in unapproved areas (bedrooms) including use of toaster ovens
and appliances with an open heating element. Microwaves are allowed in some
areas
• Use of space heaters, air conditioners,
ceiling fans, or auxiliary heating/cooling devices
regulations are intended to prevent injuries to members of the University community and physical damage to facilities. Rooms are inspected periodically,
at random times, to assure compliance
with University regulations.
Because of the seriousness of the regulations that cover fire safety, UWM
University Housing takes disciplinary
action on the first offense. Such actions
may include an educational and/or a
disciplinary sanction (such as housing
Contract Probation, Contract Termination [eviction from the residence halls],
etc.).
In the event that an alarm is activated,
the fire alarm will sound and the strobe
lights will flash. Sandburg, Cambridge
Commons, Kenilworth Square, and RiverView Halls are each equipped with a
public address system, and University
Housing staff will provide instructions
for the residents to follow in response to
the fire alarm. Residents should assume
each alarm is genuine and respond according to directions given over the
public address system.
If the alarm is determined to be a false
alarm, an “all clear” will be issued over
the public address system. In the event
of an actual fire emergency, residents
will be instructed over the public address system to evacuate the building
immediately.
• Smoke alarms in each apartment.
• Misuse of extension cords and power-strips
• Egress corridors and stairwells are fire
rated.
• Tampering with or blocking any fire
protection equipment
• Heat detectors in kitchen areas.
• Possession of fireworks, live ammunition, flammable liquids and fuels, or
other explosive or combustible materials
During an evacuation, residents must:
• Use of halogen lamps or halogen
bulbs, and any lamp with a plastic shade
• If smoke or fumes are coming up the
stairwell, a different stairwell should be
used.
• Heat detectors in parking structure,
boiler room, and generator room.
Each Public/Private Partnership (Cambridge Commons and RiverView Residence Hall) facility has the following
fire safety systems:
• Complete automatic sprinkler system.
• Possession of hotplates, deep fryers,
toasters, toaster ovens, waffle irons, soldering irons, or grills
• Fire alarm system monitored by the
UWM University Housing facilities staff
and the University Police Department.
Additional information regarding fire
safety within the residence halls is available on the University Housing web site.
• Smoke detector in each resident room
and each suite has an alarm and strobe
light located in the hallway or common
Student Housing
Evacuation Procedures
• Immediately evacuate the building using the nearest stairwell.
• Do not use the elevators. Depending
on what activates the fire alarm, the elevators may go to the first floor and remain there.
• Once residents have exited the building, they must move as far away as possible from the building to allow fire fighters access to the building.
UWM University Housing’s fire safety
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 38 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
• University Housing Staff will make
clear announcements when the fire
emergency has been resolved, and inform residents when it is safe to return
to the building.
Fire Safety Education And
Training For Students,
Faculty And Staff
The department of UWM Safety and
Assurances (along with University Housing staff) provides training to University Housing staff including Resident
Assistants, student Security Staff, and
UWM University Housing Residential
Programs Staff (live-in, student and
professional employees) each year. The
training includes information on fire
protection features of facilities, fire
prevention, evacuation and emergency
procedures, and conducting health and
safety inspections in resident living spaces.
Each on-campus student housing facility is expected to have 4 fire evacuation
drill conducted and evaluated by the
UWM University Housing Residential
Programs Staff (live-in, professional employees) each year in coordination with
the UWM University Safety and Assurances department starting 2014.
The fire evacuation drills are conducted by activating each individual fire
alarm system in each on-campus student
housing facility. Two of the drills occur
during the business day in buildings
where there are office staff members,
the remainder occur in the early evening hours when the majority of students are within the halls.
Additional information regarding
UWM’s Campus Fire Safety program is
available on the following web site:
http://www4.uwm.edu/usa/safety/
general/firesafety.cfm
Reporting Fires
Reporting of fires on the UWM campus
occurs in several ways. First, most fires
are reported through automated smoke
detector or rate-of-rise heat detector systems. Each campus building is served by
an advanced automated fire detection
system that sounds a local alarm and
also sends an alarm to the campus 911
emergency system. The system dispatcher notifies the local fire department and
sends law enforcement officers to the
alarm location for further investigation.
Automated sensors are located in rooms
and hallways and also inside building
ventilation ductwork.
Second, fires are reported by use of
manual pull-boxes. The boxes, also connected to the advanced fire detection
systems, activate the local alarm and
send an alarm to the campus 911 emergency system.
Third, fires are reported by telephone
and cellular phone calls to the campus
911 system. Users of campus telephones
should dial 9-911 while cellular callers
should dial (414) 229-9911 to reach the
campus 911 dispatcher. The dispatcher
contacts the local fire department and
sends law enforcement officers to the
alarm location for further investigation.
Plans for Future
Improvements in Fire Safety
UW-Milwaukee continually evaluates the
fire protection systems in residential facilities. A systematic process of annually
planning and budgeting for fire protection system upgrades has been in place
for over 20 years. Such upgrades occur
through replacements or building renovations.
This year, half of the fire alarm doors at
the common side entrances of all of the
1st and 3rd floors in the Sandburg Halls
Contacts
Associate Director of Housing/
Assistant Dean of Students
Sandburg Commons C134
(414) 229-6149
Residence Hall Addresses:
Cambridge Commons
2323 N. Cambridge Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211
Kenilworth Square Apartments
1915 E. Kenilworth Pl.
Milwaukee, WI 53202
Purin Hall
2600 E. Kenwood Blvd.
Milwaukee, WI 53211
RiverView Residence Hall
2340 N. Commerce St.
Milwaukee, WI 53212
Sandburg Residence Halls
3400 N. Maryland Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53211
were upgraded, and there is a plan in
place to upgrade the rest of 1st and 3rd
floor Common side entrance in Sandburg Halls January of 2014.
2015-16 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report • Page 39 • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
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