MM IT Teiiii AND

MM IT Teiiii AND
3
SCIENCE AND ART
-OF-
Teiiii
MM
Stales Hi
-BY-
^W.
County
H. SOHTJLZ,
Superintendent of Schools, Sauk County, Wis.
A BOOK FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS.
IT
J
I
SCIENCE
AND ART
OF TEACHING
United States History,
W. H. SCHULZ,
Sjiperintendent of Schools ,
"
Sank County.
There are many ways to Rome,
is the pleasantest and shortest,
but the one which
and at the same time most profitable to pass over.
is
certainly the best."
METHODS SHOULD MIKE WORK
PLEASANT, TIME SAYING AND PROFITABLE.
Entered accoidinj^
to act
of Cong^ress, by
SPRING GREEN,
W.
II.
Schulz, in 1891.
WIS.:
^'
3/
PREFACE.
The author has been prompted
knowing
is
of
that there
is little
our educational literature that
any direct help to the inexperienced teacher
Some
special subject.
element of science,
use to
only a
young
teachers,
scientific
text- books
to teach a
of our scientific treatises lack the
simplicit}', so that
viz.,
and some are mere
first
they are of no
outlines, giving
arrangement of the subject matter, which are
nothing better than what
brief
of teaching history
is
We
on history.
young teacher a
in
in
volume
to write this little
given
in
connection with most
hope to be able to give to the
and clear exposition of the principles
and
also a limited selection of
methods
connection with outlines and exercises as examples.
The Author.
SOME PRINCIPLES OF TEACHINO HISTORY.
READ CAREFULLY, PRACTICE DAILY.
Lead from
1.
the
hwivn
to
the
unknown.
This principle should be observed in teaching history as
well as
ill
geography or any other
stud}'
because we can only
(knowledge) we already have.
see with the light
Liffht
comes
from a luminous source, then later on, after it has illumined something it may come also from an illumined source.
first
Note.— Teach
school
is
incidents in the history of the localit}' where the
situated.
Caution.— Be
2.
laterest
Interest
" water of
is
careful to avoid gossip or scandalous incidents.
and arouse
cariosity first., then thought.
always, and
life,"
in
the beginning
that arouses the
mind
especially, the
to thought
and
sets
the tongue to floAving.
If
your
class
kindled into
is
fire
dull
it is
because their hearts have not been
by a well told
historical incident.
—
Note. Select the veiy best striking occurrences
town first, then county and state,
3.
your own
History should he the story and every story history.
This means that history
story
in
telling
for
several
to be begun and continued as
months and then occasionally.
is
^'Children learn largely by hnitation,'^ hence they will readily
become good story
tellers
by imitating
their teacher.
The
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
4
great aim in history teaching sliould be to teach to tliiok and
tell
and
tell
and think.
Note — Stories of great events in our country's history.
Note 2.— Biographical stories that are full of grandeur.
1.
The
4.
exercises should he of
and cuhivate
our pupils act dull,
If
such a nature as
the 7nind, not blurr
it is
and
to
stimulate
dull.
a pretty sure sign that they are
and the only remedy is to wake them up.
There are plenty of methods; the fault is our own if we do
being
dulled,
not succeed.
I'each one thing at
5.
a
time.
This means teach one point at a timCj and from point to
point until a topic
the whole subject
and
also
is
is
mastered, theu from
mastered.
to topic until
toi)ic
This gives the student a clear
comprehensive view of a subject with a relation of
all its parts.
This
is
the capital
argument for the
topical
method
of
teaching history.
6.
Be
(aj
Thoughts are made up of ideas
(b)
Words
assured, that the student has correct
in
and
clear ideas.
proper order.
are the signs of ideas.
(c) Impressions that are well
made on
the
mind and are
recallable, are ideas.
(d) Thoughts put together in a certain
make
way
lead one to
a conclusion.
The above
will lead
any one to see
at a glance the impor-
tance of correct impressions, and the knowing of the correct
meaning of words that occur
in
a lesson.
Students
fre-
quently cannot get the thought in a discourse because they
do not know the ideas that some of the words represent.
7.
See
to it
that students
fonn
correct conclusions or judij-
ments.
may
One of the best ways is
in several ways.
up the chain of thought and discover the
comparison of thoughts that leads to our conclusion, and see
This
be done
to separate or break
S(Jlli-NCK
wiietber
all
AND AKT OV TEACHING UNITED STATES
parts are
historical subjects,
Develop
kind
is
call the philosoph}'^ of history.
an equal development
Seek
8.
This application of our minds to
tiiie.
we
faculties
IIISTOKV.
of all the faculties of the
that are neglected.
absolutel3^ necessary to
mind.
Attention of
make powerful and
this
successful
minds.
History has
9.
To
1st.
get
its
special mission in
ivleas,
mind
development.
thoughts and conclusions on historical
subjects and the cousequent power of the mind to judge,
form concepts, and reason.
2d.
To retain and recall useful knowledge. We probably
alwa3's retain, whether directly conscious of the fact or not,
but
it
very
is
learned.
desirable
difficult for
many
to recall
what they have
The power of recalling, which is one of the most
that we can possess, depends on the mind's power to
associate ideas, thoughts, conclusions, dates, &c.
The power of association should receive 'special attention.
Minds noted for great memory ahvays have this power greatly developed.
10.
Lore of purity, fistke and
liberty
should receive
much
attention.
''
The feelings as vvell as the intellect must be developed.
One half of the time nov/ spent on English grammar at too
early an age,
the republic,
ers."
would be sufficient to teach our children to love
and to become its lo3^al and life-long support-
— Garfield.
11.
A
desire to act
and
act right as
a
citizen.
The student should at first be impelled by
on, more and more by liis own resolve.
12-
Ifte ktud;i of history
interest, later
and government must
develop the
citizen and. patriot of the future-
Greek children were taught
ancestors, the
Romans
to
admire the virtues of their
and the grand-
to worship their heroes
eur of Rome, so must ours learn to admire the deeds of our
.great
Americans.
METHODS, OUTLINES AND DIRECTIONS.
PEIMAKY AND MIDDLE FOKM COURSE.
I.
Incidents in the history of the
loc.il it}^
where the school
is
situated.
EXERCISES ORAL.
About
1.
the building of the i^chool liouse.
When the country was new.
en away. Was it right.?
What shows that Indians
3.
arrow heads, copper
corn-fields,
here.?
Driv-
(Stone axes,
stone kniv^es, sod over-grown
Ivuives,
mounds.)
vers, rattle snakes
Early
5.
G.
War
and bears very plenty then.
settlers.
they lived.
Great
7.
were
all.
Deer, wolves, wild cats, panthers, bison, badgers, bea-
4.
How
When.?
Indians owned
2.
Name
some.
Where they came from.
Their houses, farms, oxen, wagons, tools.
between North and South.
Many men
went.
fights.
Each
locality generally has
some few events
that can
be given.
DIRECTIONS.
1.
These
facts should be
woven
teacher.
2.
Talked about next day.
into short stories
by the
SCIENCE
AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
3.
A
4.
Higher history
HISTORY.
few questions asked.
may
class
some very short
write
stories
about local incidents.
5.
Read one
(CAUTION.
of these stories occasionally to them.
— Avoid o-ossip or scandalous stories.
Why?
II.
Interesting occurrences in the history of your
county and
'
own town,
state.
How
named.
Why.?
First settler.
P'irst house, ciiurch, school house,
railroad, &c.
Town:
<!
Villages built.
Indian troubles.
When.?
Great
Factories built.
Men
laws— became
'
fires.
that went to war— make
noted.
Other incidents.
Why } When
Name.
Indians.
them
?
Wars.
settled
Wliat
— cities—
—
First villages
First
?
still
to
settler.
be seen of
factories.
County :<[ The wild woods— prairies— beasts.
Noted men noted women.
First railroads.
Steamboats.
Old farm life— hardships.
Daily talks.
Name.
Questions.
Why
settled.?
wars, great
State:
women,
so.?
Stories
fires,
When
Other events.
One composition.
settled.?
By whom
about settlements, Indians,
epidemics, gi-eat men, great
generals.
-l
Oldest town.
Some
When.?
State buildings.
Choice
Where.?
When
stories of great events.
built.?
What
for.?
Questions.
One composition.
III.
OUR LAND.
Stories of events.
Biographical stories.
[First in each day's exercise talk about the story told the
before.]
day
«
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
SCIENCE
A
Tell the stories, don't read them.
HISTORY.
good example goes
a
great ways.
Read only
for a variety.
1.
How
2.
The red men.
3.
Three or four that have
our land was found.
sailed
around the world.
gellan, Drake, Cook, Grant, Nellie Bly.
Compare
in
Matime
taken.
4.
5.
Ponce De Leon.
Captain John Smith and Jamestown.
7.
The Pilgrims.
The war that made
8.
George Washington, a
9.
Benj. Franklin, a stoiy.
6.
us free.
10.
How we
11.
Thomas Jefferson, a
The first steamboat.
12.
Lexington.
Bunker
Hill.
story.
got Louisiana.
story.
13.
Slaves, the cotton gin.
14.
How
15.
Daniel Webster, a story.
16.
The war between
we got Texas,
New
Mexico, Arizona, California.
North and
South.
Your choice
battle, in easy language.
17.
Abraham
Lincoln, a story.
18.
James A.
Garfield, a story.
19.
The
20
A
reaper.
composition about six inventions.
DIRECTIONS
1.
little
name
Read or
tell
know a
name of the hero of the story,
Then have
the name of the event.
a story once in a while that they
about, avoiding the
of battle or war, or
you who or what 3^ou were talking about.
Use libraries or primary histories to get stories from.
Most readers give some very good ones.
them
2,
tell
METHODS, OUTLINES AND DIRECTIONS.
UPPER FORM COURSE.
1.
Maps should always be
2.
Locate every
in use with
every lesson.
mentioned in each
Trace every explorer on the map.
3.
])lace
Time and Place are
13.
lesson.
the eyes of History.
Fixing the time and place lead to a better understanding
This does not mean that the student should learn
of events.
a great lot of nnimi)ortant dates and places, but every event
must stand in its proper time and
and to other events.
The mind must be trained
14.
as
to
cause, time. ]}lace^ character
The 14th
to
is
])]ace in
relation to itself
to make associations
and results.
principle of teaching history
if
closely adhered
one of the most valuable and useful trainings
human mind can
To be able to
be subjected
of events
tliat
the
to.
associate like causes with like events
like events with like causes; the times with their events,
and
events
with their times; character of persons or events alike or op-
and the probable or inevitably consequent
makes the historical mind, the mind that is able
posite;
results;
this
to
mar-
shal the proper material for the narration of historical events.
The power
of associating
keener judgment, and above
makes a better memory and a
all
things a better reasoner.
10
SCIENCE
15.
It is
realize in
This
il
is
tJie
AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
what we
idealize of the jxist, that
we are
tri/ing to
'present.
mi axiomatio truth and we as teachers must see to
that our pupils form noble ideals of character
and
action.
THE ABORIGINES.
V/hen America was discovered they found here the
1.
different Indian nations.
The Indians ma}^ be divided
2.
3.
f
(
Pre-Historic
^'
1^
j
Indians and Astecs.
in
Mound builders
Cliff-d wellers
Cave-dwellers
Astecs^
j
l^
f Astecs
Historic^ Pueblos
^
Indians
Cliff-dwellers
{
Algonquin
Huron
Iroquois
Cherokee
Indians
Catawba
Uchee
Natchez
Dacotah or Sioux
extreme North. Patao-onians
(nations)
Esquimaux
in
'
in
extreme
South.
Divisions of nations was:
4.
5.
6.
7.
The nations hito tribes.
The tribes into clans.
The clans into families.
The Sachem was the chief magistrate of the tribe.
The Chief was the leader of the tribe in war.
The Pre-Historic Astecs vvere the probable ancestors
of the Astecs.
8.
They occupied nearly
all
of
North America about from
1,000 to 2,000 years ago.
9.
These ancient peoples apparently built the mounds
in
South West,
in
the Mississii)pi valle_y, dwelt in
caves
in the
Norih
V\^est.
cliffs
in the
AND
SCIhxNCK
10.
AIJT
The remains
OF
UNITED STATK^S
T!:ACIiIN<;
of the
11
llISTOJiV.
Monndbuilders are some twenty
or twenty-five th^onsimd monnds, luimerous broken pottery,
fish-hooks, fish-traps, stone drills, copper knives, stone-headed
spears, stone axes
and hammers, weaving hooks, copper spear-
heads, copper mines worked.
11.
Tiie nature of
warlike, industrious,
The
12.
Cliff
llieir earth- works shows that they were
and probably cannibals.
dwellers lived in ancient times as the^' do
They
novv in the South West.
much like the MoundThey dwelt in clilTs where
from the more warlike tribes.
v/ere
builders, except not so warlike.
by
location the}^ were isolated
The Cave-dwtllers lived in the North West, and are
They were much like the Cliff-dwellers, but
dwelt in caves and caverns, worshipped the sun and some
idols, and understood the art of weaving a coarse cloth.
The Historic Astecs were found by the Spaniards in
14.
Mexico, Central America and Peru.
15.
They were a comparatively peaceful people; had a
monarchial form of government; had some large cities and
fine palaces; had good roads and bridges.
16.
Their emperor at the time of the conquest of Mexico
was Montezuma, His successor was CTuatamozin.
13.
now
extinct.
17.
1
8.
Their houses were built of stone or adobe.
In the City of JMexico they had a large temple where
human
in
beings were
Peru the sun.
19.
Some
were found
works
in Peru.
and precious
20.
fine
sacrificed.
in
The}' w^orshipped idols and
the art of carving and architecture
They were
rich in gold, silver, copper
stones.
money
Their
in
[)art
consisted of glass tubes filled
with grains of gold.
21.
and
They could weave, work
in
gold, silver, copper, glass
clay.
22.
The
cruel Spaniards destroyed nearly all of
Their descendants
their wealth.
compared with
23.
Many
now
them
for
are quite degenerate
their forefathers.
ruins of fine buildings are
still
found
in
Peru,
1
SCIENCE
2
AND AKT
TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
OP^
Central America, Yucatan and parts of Mexico, one partly
broken and dilapidated sphinx
in Central America and an
adobe pyramid of 80 feet in hight in Chihuahua.
The Pueblos or Village Indians are still found in
24.
northern Mexico and the south-western part of the United
.
They
States.
live in large
to five liundred people
Our modern Indian
25.
adobe houses,
make
in
which from
fifty
their abode.
is
probably the descendant of the
Prehistoric Astec.
Indian characteristics:
26.
In a
wigwam.
Dressed
fished.
the work.
Raised corn, beans, melons, tobacco, and some potatoes.
Life of the Indian:
(a)
in skins.
Hunted and
Squaws did
Cooked, tanned, made and mended their clothes.
(b)
They believed
a preserver of
(c)
life
in a
Good
Spirit
and an Evil
Spirit,
and
they called Manitou.
They believed
a
in
with happy
hereafter
hunting-
grounds.
27.
Where did the Aborigines come from?
The proper answer is Where did they come
—
of the following answers are probable
from.^
Some
and are urged by
fair
authority
1.
Came from Asia across Behring Strait. Some claim that
about 1300 years ago where Behring Strait is there was an
isthmus, and the American Continent
was then joined to
Asia.
2.
The Chinese
told Gen.
Grant
in
his tour
around the
world, that their history states that 2,200 years ago they dis-
covered and settled America.
3.
their
4.
Some say that the
way to America.
lost ten tribes of the
Hebrews found
There was a tradition among the Phoenecians that far
was a land the}^ had found and colonized,
to the west there
but that
it
became
lost
and they could not
find
it
again.
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
SCIENCE
It
5.
tral
is
claimed that inscriptions have been found in Cen-
Americn
Ancient Coptic.
in the
The Ancient Astecs had a
6.
much
like the
Some
7.
13
HISTORY.
tradition of the creation
Mosaic.
claim that the American Indian
the descendents of
many
is
a
mixed race,
and Euro-
lost colonies of Asiatic
pean nations.
There seems to be some semblance of truth
in this claim.
QUESTIONS.
Where did
1.
ment did they
the Astecs
Who
have.^
What
live.'^
kind of govern-
was their emperor?
2.
What
3.
AVhere has a pyramid been found
4.
Where was Ancient Mexico,
5.
Who
kind of a religion did they
conquered Mexico.^
have.'^
Describe
?
the city
Peru
.^
it.
?
Attempted
to con-
quer Florida.?
6.
W^hy did Columbus take a cargo
7.
Where did
Sioux Indians
the
of Indians to Spain.?
live.?
The
Iroquois.?
The Hurons.?
What proofs
8.
Mound builders.?
Who
9.
can you
The last of the Mohicans.?
Chippewa Legend.? Bridal of Pen-
wrote Hiawatha.?
Leather Stocking Tales.?
nacook
give of the existence of the
.?
10.
In what state are said to be over 10,000 mounds.?
11.
What
tribe in the southern part of the
worshipped the sun.?
13.
United States
o?liers.?
How do you think America
12.
Why
What
was
first
peopled
.?
When
,?
.?
In what did the Astecs ditfer from the Indians.?
the Cliff-dwellers.?
The Cave
dwellers.?
From
The Pueblos.?
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Let the
class read all they
can procure about the In-
dians and Astecs.
2.
Each student should have a
history note book.
—
—
14
SCIKNCK
AKD AKT OF
Draw an
3.
and locate on
Some
histories
TEACIIINC L']SiTKD
map of North and South America
map the various Aboriginal nations.
outline
this
have such
mf^ps.
Assign subject outlines for
4.
Example
S'J'ATES HISTOItY.
historical compositions.
:
Their houses,
C
Tools.
Arts.
i
The Pueblos
<{
Mode
of Life.
I
[
Astecs, Mobilians,
Conclusions.
Moimds, Indian
Life,
Indian Warfare,
Indian Government, &c.
The teacher should
5.
Nothing pays
talks.
one or more interesting-
furnish
Why
better.
?
DIVISION OF THE SUBJECT.
The
history of the country
f
Periods of American
History.
II.
J
]
l^
divided into periods.
is
I.
III.
Why?
Discovery and Exploration.
Colonial.
Revolutionary.
IV. Constitutional.
Periods extended
1st,
from
2d,
"
''
3cl,
^'
^'
4th,
"
''
As
to
to kind, history
_
mny be
divided into sacred, profane,
military, political, social, educational
and other kinds.
Define each of the above terms fully, since
that
we should understand them
well.
it is
necessary
DISCOVERIES
AND EXPLORATIONS.
NOKTHMEN.
1.
made
2.
The Northmen discovered Iceland about 860 and
settlement there in 861.
It
is
claimed that Greenland was discovered by them
is
certain that the
in 866.
3.
It
settled in
4.
Northmen discovered and even
Greenland about the year 982.
They
claim to have discovered the
also
about the year 1000.
There
They
truth of this claim.
main land
almost no doubt about the
is
called the
new land Vinland,
be-
cause of the abundance of grapes.
5.
Snorri
6.
I.,
Biorne
it is
A
was the discoverer.
claimed was the
Settlements were made.
white child born in America.
curious old tower has been formed at Newport, R.
f.nd a strange inscription
7.
first
on a
rocl^ at
Documents have been found
Dighton, Mass.
in Iceland that testify to
this discovery.
QUESTIONS.
1.
Who
2.
What have you
3.
Describe the tower at Newport.
were
the Dio'hton rock
the.
?
Northmen
?
seen in other histories about
tliis?
What was found on
:
16
AND
SCIENCE
4.
What
5.
Who
did
AIIT
tlic}^
OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
call the
knd
they discovered?
Why?
were the Vikings?
CHRISTOPHER COLUAIIUJS.
1.
The followmg events
led to the discovery of
America:
(a) Invention of priiitiiig.
''
(b)
''
''
(c)
'•
compass.
astrolahe.
(d)
''
•'
gnn i)Owder.
(e)
'•
''
theodolite.
Reading books of
(f)
travel.
Marco Polo's expeditions.
(h) Yasco De Gama's expeditions.
Columbus was born at Genoa, Italy, 1435; died
(g)
2.
in
Spain, 1500.
3.
that
4.
He
by
believed in the theoiy that the world
is
westward one could reach Asi:i.
Columbus' first voyage. (Give the missing
round, and
sailing
—
links.)
to Gomera
Where-*
" San Salvador
Where?
''
''
''
"
5
.
Coin m b u s' Voyages
In 1492
discovered what?
—
1st,
2d,
(I.
—
Cuba —Whore?
Hay ti— Where?
St. Mary's— Where?
Where?
''
3d,
"
4th,
"
1493—
1498—
1502—
Columbus' burial
In 150G at
'^
1513 '^
2{[^
3d,
1536
i)laces:
1st,
4th,
^'
^'
- 1877
'•
QUESTIONS.
1.
What
can you
tell
about Columbus' boyhood?
SCIKNCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
Wh.'ii
2.
caA you
Portugal, Spain
Where
o.
in
sa^'
about
his trying to get aid at
17
Genoa,
?
else
had he thought of going
not successful
if
Spain?
What
When
4.
0.
did Columbus discover on his
and
where
did
he
first
discover
8.
voyage?
A.? What
did he think he had fountl?
Wdiat WL're the names of
6.
his first three vessels?
made Columbus think the Orinoco had its source
garden of i^den? What did he call the Orinoco?
Wliat did Columbus do when he stepped on American
Wliat
7.
in the
8.
Why?
soil?
Wliy did Columbus have his chains buried with him?
Did Columbus kno.v what he had discovered when
9.
iO.
he died.'
Was Columbus
11.
first
to see land?
Who?
DIRECTIONS.
1.
VYrite a biography of
2.
Let each pupil write a
mentioned
in this lesson.
Columbus.
list
nnmes
Answer next day.
of ten geographit-al
Exchange.
Trace Columbus' voyages on the map.
3.
4.
Let pupils write twelve or
5.
Tell
all
tifteen questions
on
this lesson.
about the facts which led to the discovery of
America.
^Mnemonic form, Spanish explorations:
6.
—
— ilver and gold hunting.
P — once De Leon, Pizzaro.
A — rmada founded.
N — arvaez — Nunez De Balboa.
— ndian slavery.
S — oto De.
H — ernando Cortez.
Spanish
S
I
Note.
— Kecite by
the
from memory
mnemonic
outline
first.
Have the pupils
by using the initial or suggestive letter first, hiter without.
These nmemonic forms are to be used as
any other topical outline to recite by. and for beginners are
write
it
tirst
claimed to be superior, since
if
used proiterly.
tliey
help to strengtlien the
memory
DATE, PLACE
AND EVENT.
ASSOCIATIONS.
What
1.
events do you associate with 1492, 1493, 1498,
1502?
2.
With 1502, 1513, 1536, 1587?
3.
1500, ir,10, 1520, 1530, 1540?
With 1519-21, 1539-41, 1510, 1512, 1513, 1528, 1565?
What events do you associate with the following
5.
Gomera,
Guanahani,
Palos,
Pamana, Mexico,
places:
4.
Mississippi,
Orinoco R.
6.
Seville,
Yalladolid,
Florida,
St.
Augustine,
?
What
person and date do you associate with:
covery of the main land, conquest of
the oldest town in the U.
jNIexico,
Dis-
founding of
discovery of the Mississippi,
S.,
taking 500 Indians to Europe, wading into the ocean to his
arm-pits, looking for the fountain of youth, circumnavigating
the globe, killing the Incas,
7.
What were
America; the conquest of
the
Montezuma?
the causes
that
led to the discovery of
ftlexico; the exploration of Florida;
conquest of Peru.; the founding of
St.
Augustine: the
circumnavigation of the globe?
QUKSTIONS.
1.
Why
over in?
2.
did Balboa hide in a bariel in the vessel
How
became
did he take possession of the Pacific Ocean?
What was Ponce De Leon
looking for?
Why?
Has
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
SCIENCE
it
ever been found
What
?
did
it
prove to be?
3.
Wiiat did Cortez find in Mexico?
4.
Tlie Visigoths buried their Alaric in the
Where did
the
De Soto?
Busento
Why?
river.
Where
Why?
before?
What
5.
Spaniards bury
W
HISTORY.
explorer had both bloodhounds and priests in
the same expedition?
What
G.
the sun
explorer told the natives that he was the son of
(Cortez.)
?
7.
Wiiere did
8.
The
De Ayllon
capture Indians for slaves?
three great discoverers
Christopher Columbus of Genoa^
I.
Americus Vespuccius of Florence,
III.
John Cabot of Venice-,
were of what nationality ? Served what three nations ?
9.
Who was told by the Astecs that they got their gold
from the norlh? What explorer afterwards explored this
same region where gold was found 300 years later?
II.
What happened just 500 years before 1492?
What did the Spaniards claim under the title
10.
11.
Mexico?
On what
12.
exi)loration
New
did
they
base their claim?
(Discovery,
and settlement.)
Who
13.
of
Florida?
founded Santa Fe ?
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Draw an
outline
map
of
N. A. and trace
in colors the
route of each explorer.
2.
3.
4.
mnemonic form until you know it.
Put much stress on Causes, Claims and Conquests.
French explorations, mnemonic form.
Re-write the
French
—
F — ather
Marquette.
R— ibaut — Roberval.
E — xplorations
N — ew
C—
of Mississippi Valley.
—
France Nicollet.
artier
Champlain.
—
H — ennepin.
?
SCIENCE AJ^D AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
20
ASSOCIATIONS.
What
1.
events do YOU associate with 1506, 1524, 1534,
1562-64-65.?
2.
With 1605. 1608?
3.
What
dates and persons with the discovery of the
Lawrence; Wilmington to Nova Scotia; Huguenot
Gulf of
St.
Colony
at St. John's R., Fla.;
Nova
down
Port Royal,
Scotia; settlement of Quebec;
the Mississippi R.
S.
C;
Port Royal,
Lake Champlain, Huron;
?
What causes led to the exploration of tlie Gulf of St.
Lawrence; St. Lawrence R. settlement of Port Royal, S. C.;
Quebec; Port Royal, Nova Scotia; Second Discovery of the
4.
;
Mississippi
?
QUESTIONS.
1.
Who
discovered the Gulf of
St.
The
Lawrence?
St.
Lawrence River?
4.
What city stands now where Hochelaga was?
What did John Ribaut do ? Was it successful
What did Laudonniere do
Was he successful
5.
Who made
2.
3.
?
the
first
?
?
Why
Why
?
?
permanent French settlement?
Where ?
6.
7.
8.
Who were the Jesuit Missionaries? Name some?
Who made the second discovery of the Mississippi R.
Who sailed down the Mississippi R. into the Gulf of
?
Mexico?
Could he
find his
way back
to the Mississippi R.
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Draw an
outline
map
of the
French claims —Arcadia,
Canada, Louisiana.
2.
your
each.
3.
Write a
list
of twenty historical terms that
class does not
What
you think
understand and require the meaning of
principle
is
this exeicise
P^nglish explorations,
based on?
mnemonic form.
science and art oe teaching united states history.
English
21
—
E — xploratioiis
N — ew Albion.
G — osnold.
by the Cabots.
L — ondoii and Plymouth Companies.
— sland of Roanoke.
Sir Francis
— Walter
H — umphrey Gilbert.
I
S
ir
,
ASSOCIATIONS.
What
1.
facts
doyou
associate with 1511)-2l
and 1577-79
?
1583-84-85-87?
By
parallels
—
1502, 1G02; 1505, 1G05; 1577 and thirty years
What
2.
the globe
}
later.?
person and date with second circumnavigation of
Roanoke Island
Jamestown
?
.?
Northwest Pas-
Martha's Vineyard?
sage?
QUESTIONS.
1.
sage?
2.
Name three persons that sought the Northwest
When? Where? Did they find it? Why?
What did Frobisher try to find ? Why?
Pas-
What were the motives of
Drake's expeditions ? Of GilOf Raleigh's? OfGosnold's? Of Amidas and Barlow?
4.
Who brought tobacco to England? The potato?
Three turkeys and two savages? A load of glittering earth?
The Golden Hind with $4,000,000 worth of gold, silver and
3.
bert's?
precious stones ?
5.
Who
Magellan
6.
7.
ed
it?
8.
sailed
around the world
just fifty
years
after
?
Who
was Queen of England at
What nation owned the
What was the result?
great
this
time?
Armada
?
Who
defeat-
Mention two English explorers that sailed around the
world?
9.
Where
w^as
South Virginia?
North Virginia?
so called ?
10.
Where was New Albion?
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Draw an
outline
map
of the English claims.
Why
^ss
:
—
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
22
Let each pupil write a composition on English explor-
2.
ations.
Write and re- write the mnemonic forms.
Always use the map with every recitation.
3.
4.
DUTCH EXPLORATIONS.
By Henry Hudson
Hudson River;
Hudson Straight;
Hudson Bay.
Claimed from the mouth of the Delaware to
the
mouth of
the Connecticut.
Sought for a Northwest Passage.
1.
OVERLAPPING OF CLAIMS.
Very important
— Whyf
—
,— Spanish Claimed
Florida.
New
South Virginia.
Overlapped
b}^
New
Mexico.
Albion.
-French Claimed —
Arcadia.
Canada.
Overlapped by
New
Louisiana.
-DUTOH ClUMED—^
New
North Virginia.
South Virginia.
Netherlands.
Overlapped
b}^
Albion.
North Virginia,
—
-English Claimed
North Virginia.
South Virginia.
New
Now
Overlapped by
What
What
of French ?
of Spanish?
Albion.
French and Spanish ?
draw a map representing the overlapping of claims.
FIRST settlements.
Spanish
Where?
When?
Why?
French
English
Dutch
Spanish claims were based on
1.
Discovery by Columbus.
2.
Exploration.
3.
Settlement.
4.
Grant by Pope Alexander the VI, who granted one-
half of the
new world
to Simin, the other half to Portugal.
SCIENCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
French claims were based on
1.
Discovery.
2.
Exploration.
3.
Settlement.
Dutch claims were based on
Exploration by Hudson.
)
.
2.
Settlement.
QteNERAL REVIEW OUTLINE FOR PERIOD OF DISCOVERY AND
EXPLORATION.
r
23
SCIENCK AND AKT OF TKAClUMx UNITED fSTATKS H18TOKY.
24
SOME SU(4GESTION8.
1.
Require each student to keep a history note book.
Get them to bring outside matter to the class.
Do a great deal of drawing of important territory
3.
question —important battles.
2.
4.
Have
well outlined topics for recitations
and
also
in
some
for written essays.
6.
Have students make tables.
Show how history depends on
7.
Always note causes and
o.
(reography.
effects
and
the
relation of
events.
own
8.
Get students
9.
Bring out important points fully by your own ques-
to recite in their
language.
tions.
10.
side of
11.
Students should learn to make original research out-
common
text books.
Lead students
to appreciate interesting features of a
history lesson.
12.
Cautiously an»l carefully lead them lo form opinions
by asking well directed questions as to what they think about
this act or that event.
They should give reasons for forming
such opinions.
Find
opinions upon them.
no
fault.
Do
not force
your own
SECOND PERIOD OR COLONIAL HLSTORY
The topical method should he
the leading
method in
the study
of hi story.
This method
best, because
is
it
presents the subject as a
systematically connected and related whole.
not follow this method of study without great
A
student can-
benefife.
Other
methods, however, should be used to supplement this method,
no one method
since
is
perfect in itself alone.
Virginia, 1607
V — alor of
Smith.
iidian Treaty.
I
Il--ebel)ioi)
G— old
Hunt.
I-ndian
War— 1st.
N— pgroes.
I
— uflian War—
A
iiiipx
-2(1.
Royal.
BIIIST IN TIME.
1.
First Settlement.
2.
''
Charter.
3.
''
Famine.
"
Governor.
4.
''
Slaves.
6.
"
Tobacco Grown
7.
"
Colonial Assembly.
8."
''
Indian War.
0.
''
Royal Province.
10.
''
Rebellion.
.5.
for Export.
—
SCIENCE AND AKT OF THA( MIXC UNITED STATES HISTORY.
26
I>I1JE<TK)NS
AM)
(JIJESTIOXS.
2.
Draw a map of South Virginia.
What were the Navigation acts.^
3.
Give the time, place and kind
1.
of
government of the
colony.
Write an essay about Bacon's Rebellion.
4.
Massachusetts, 1820
—
M— ayflower — Speedwell.
A— ssociatioii
S— taiiclish
voluntar}'.
Mile8.
— alem setrled.
A— nne'Hntehinson.
C — barter.
H— arvai-d College.
TJ — nioj) of four coloniee.
S — wansea and Deerrteld desti-oyed.
Williams.
E—
one.)
T — hankRoiviiio- 1621
T — ribes of Indians beaten.
S
xilin^^- Ilo«>-er
(first
S— alem
Witchcraft.
DIRECTIONS
map
AND
QUESTIONS.
North Virginia.
Draw a
1.
King Philip's war.
about
an
Write
essay
2.
What dates and events do 3^ou associate with Plym3.
outh, Boston, Cambridge, Salem, Jamestown, Williamsburg.?
New
of
Hampshire, 1623
N— ew Enoland (^oloii}'.
E — nglish
Settlement.
W— eymouth.
H— eld by Massachusetts 39 yeai-s.
A— ndios's Rule.
M—ason.
P— ortsmouth.
S — Ferdinand Gorges.
H— eirs of Mason.
I— ndependence from Massachusetts.
i]'
R— oyal Pj'ovince.
E— arthquake 1683.
SCIENCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
27
DIRECTIONS AND QUESTIONS.
Let the pupils write ten questions each on Virginia and
Excliange.
Recite next day.
1
Massachusetts.
Let the teacher write
2.
five questions
on the blackboard,
to be looked up.
Connecticut, 1033
C — olon.y
at
—
Windsor.
O— id Charter Oak.
N— e\v Haven Colony.
K"
— ew Haven and Conneticut Colonies United.
E — ngland's
Rule by Andros.
C— onnecticut Colonies— Hartford,
T — he Quaker
I
Windsor, Whethersfield.
Persecution.
— ncUan War.
C— olleo-e, Yale 1700.
U — nion of Four Colonies.
T— he Dutch Claim.
Rhode
I.,
1636
—
R— oger Williams.
H— utchinson
O — rdinance
Anne.
of Relio:ious Liberty.
D — orr's Rebellion.
E — arly
I
New
Settlers
(Purposely)
from
New
England.
—ndians were paid for Land.
York, 1614—
N— ew Netherlands
E — arly
W—
Settlements.
India Company.
Y—ork, the Duke of.
O range Fort.
est
—
R— elij^ion, Dutch Reformed.
K— idd's Career.
Penn., 1682
—
P— hiladelphia.
E — nglish
Quakers.
N— ew Sweden Added.
N — ot one Indian Trouble.
.
science and art of teaching united states history,
28
Delaware, 1638 —
D — ntch
E — ariy
Mild
Swedes.
Troubles.
L— eo-islature, 1703.
A— iinex of New Netherlands.
W—
iliiiino'toii.
A— nnex of Pennsylvania.
R— nled by a Deputy Gov.
E — nglish
Quakers.
Maryland, 1634 —
M— ade Settlement at
St.
Mary's.
A— of Toleration
R— ebellions of Clayborne.
(jt
Y— ear of 1655— Civil War.
L— eonard Calvei-t.
A— uthority of Calvert Ke-established
N— o more Troubles.
D— ues of the Proprietor to Eno-land.
Write and re-write these acrostics from memory.
New
J.,
1664
—
N— ew
Jersey where Settled?
E — ast
and West Jersey.
W— hst about Land Titles?
J
— ersey Island.
N. and
8.
Where?
Calolinas, 1664 and 1670
N— orth Carolina, Settled, W^hen?
S—outh Carolina, Settled, W^en?
C — arteret's Colony, Charleston.
A— Ibemarle Colony.
R — Ice Planters.
O— Id Charleston by Sayle,
L— oke's
Grand Model.
— ndian Wars.
N — ew Charleston.
A— frican Slaves from
I
S
— old and
Separated.
Bnrbadoes.
Where?
Where?
science and art of teaching united states history.
Georgia,
29
1738—
G— oveiinent, Propnetar\\ Royal.
E— stablished -In Trust for the Poor."
— glethorpe, James.
R— mil and Slavery Prohibited.
G— overLmeut by Pres. and Council.
— nvasion by the Spanish.
A— Savannah, 1733.
I
t
DIRECTIONS AND QUESTIONS.
Have
1.
ervch
student draw a
map
of the Atlantic Coast,
or thirteen Original Colonies, showing boundaries between,
if
any, also dates, and locations
make a
table of settlements, with dates,
and western claims of each,
of
settlements.
first
2.
Get students
to
by whom
places of settlement, authority of settlement,
set-
tled.
3.
Contrast religious troubles of Maryland and Connecti-
cut; Massachusetts
4.
and Virginia.
Contrast Indian troubles of
New York and
Pennsyl-
vania; Virginia and Connecticut; Massachusetts and
Rhode
Island.
New' England
Contrast government of Middle Colonies and
Colonies; Southern Colonies and
5.
6.
What changes
What did the
of
New England
government took place
in
Colonies.
each Colony
?
Indians of Pennsylvania plant to grow
powder?
Negroes.''
Were women sold in Jamestown
What chiircli did Roger Williams found in America.?
7.
.?
8.
Who
9.
ate
?
Anne Hutchinson perish
What was the first American
10.
Third
him
How
did
r
Where?
college?
Second.?
?
11.
12.
V/ho was the '' Indian Apostle?"
What state had '-blue laws?" "Witchcraft
"The Great Law?"
13. »What did they pay
For the
site of
Pliiladelphin
the Indians
?
for
laws.?"
Rhode Island?
For Manhattan Island?
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
30
14.
Who
said
'^
;
I
thank
or printing presses, and
more
P'ool has taken
than I did for the murder of
We
"
will
must burn them"
make
15.
IG.
?
my
•'
What
place
What
is
a
''
lives in that
naked country
father.^"
we are interrupted again
you" ?
sometimes called Jimtown.^
is
Hub
.?
not have them
shall
If
the sun shine through
Brotherly love
that there are no free schools
come?"
these 300 years to
"The Old
God
hope that we
I
I
City of
of the Universe?
Quaker Gun"?
Who
was the ''Quaker
King"?
17.
Who
can
couutry blame for the
this
Tobacco?
tion of
Negro slavery?
corn?
Religious liberty
?
first
introduc-
Rice?
Potato?
Iii'iian
(Put so purposely.)
What man of Colonial Times do you most admire?
18.
What woman? What Indian? What Colon}'? What event?
What city? What custom? (Giv^e reasons why.)
THE GRAND REVIEW.
COLONIES.
New England.
Middle.
New York
New Jersey
Southern.
1.
Virgiuia
2.
North Carolina
1.
Massachusetts
1.
2.
New
2.
3.
Connecticut
3.
Delaware
3.
South Carolina
4.
Rhode Island
4.
Pennsylvania
4.
Georgia
Hampshire
o.
Seven Facts.
Maryland
Seven Facts.
Seven Facts.
Settlement
1.
Settlement
Settlement
2.
Time and Place
Time and Place
Time and Place
3.
Cause and Effect
Cause and Effect
Cause and
4.
Kind of goverment Kind of goverment Kind
of
Eft'ect
Goverment
5.
Religious troubles Religious troubles Religious troubles
6.
Indian Wars
Indian Wars
Indian Wars
7.
Customs
Customs
Customs
\\'isely
weighted wi til whensand wherefores, wh^^s and
wa^^^s.
SC'IKNCK
AM) ART OF TEACHING INITED STATES HISTORY.
i\
1.
Rei^ellions
81
TtENEkal andix particular.
— Bacon's Rebellion, Clay home's Rebellion,
Rebellion of 1G86 in Sontii Carolina.
2.
— Navigation
Acts 16G0, Toleration Act
Stamp Act 1765, Mutiny Act 1765.
Between Puritans and Baptists,
Religious Troubles
Great Acts
1049, Molasses Act 17oo,
3.
—
Persecution of Quakers in Massachusetts, Virginia and Connecticut.
4.
Between Protestants and Catholics
Colonial
Maryland.
French and Indian.
King William's War
Queen Anne's War
King George's War
French and Indian
Spanish.
Indian.
Georgian
Indian Massacres Ya.
Indian Massacres N. Y.
War
King Philip's War
Pequod War
1739
Pontiac's
in
Wars —
War
War
-
Give causes, events and
results of each.
T-REATiES— Plymouth Colon}^ Treaty with the Indians.
5.
Roger Williams' Treaty with the Indians. Hudson's Treaty
Penn's Treaty with the Indians.
with the Indians.
of Ryswick. Treaty of Utrecht. Treaty of
Treaty
Aix La Chapelle.
Treaty of Paris.
When, where, and
made ?
to what effect
was each one of these
treaties
6.
—
Kinds of Government. Royal, Charter, proprietary,
Give
association and commercial association.
voluntary
some examples
common in all
Why?
ern?
7.
of N.
Colleges.
J.,
Which was
eacli?
In N. E.
— Harvard,
.^
best.^
When and
Which most
In Middle?
In South-
William and Mary, Yale, College
University of Penn., Columbia,
Dartmouth.
some
of
colonies?
Brown
University,
where was each founded?
Give
iiistory of each.
— Charter Oak, Penn's Elm.
— James River, Ashley R.,
8.
Historic Trees.
9.
Historic Rivers and Lakes.
Delaware
R.,
Hudson
R.,
Connecticut R.,
St.
Lawrence R.
—
32
soiENCJ-:
AND
Historic
10.
Airr op^ tkaciunc;
Cities.
—
•
ixitkd states iiistohy.
Willininslnirii-,
Philadelphia,
Ne\v
York, Boston, Savannah.
Associate some event with each one
give
its
1st
—
Governor?
Royal Province?
4.
Rebellion?
5.
White child?
Assembly?
—
Constitution?
8.
Navigation Act?
9.
Witchcraft?
10.
Colony, Swedish
11.
Colony, Dutch
12.
Treaty?
13.
College?
14.
Printing Press?
15.
New^spaper
16.
Book?
17.
Historian?
18.
History?
Civil
Stove?
Have
Time.
-
—
?
?
—
?
—
^-
the students
till
out the blanks without any direct
Use afterwards for a concert exercise
last
What?
4.
Gov. of Va.?
Gov. of N. Y.?
Treaty?
Colony?
5.
Navi"-ation
3.
and
War?
19.
20.
1.
10,
•
7.
2.
and
Colony, English?
3.
help.
II
iS\\ME.
2.
6.
8,
1st.
Fn.'ST
WiLvrr
1
in
histoiy.
Act?
until mastered.
— last.
Name.
Time.
—
'
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
33
War?
6.
Indian
7.
Colonial Conoress?
NORTHWEST PASSAGE SEEKERS.
1,
(apt. John Smith;
Drake:
Henry Hudson;
De
3,
Sir
Francis
John and SeName some others. Give
7, Champlain.
Why did they seek for a Northwest passage ?
Cabot;
bastian
2,
Frobi.^her; 5, Ferdinand
4,
history of each.
SLAVERY
IN
Soto;
6,
COLONIAL TIMES.
brought to Va.
It;i9, Slaves
162G,
'^
'^
»
N. Y.
1037,
'•
^'
-
N. E.
1712, African Co. and Eng. South Sea Co. were given the
monopoly of bringing slaves to America.
1741, Negro Plot in N. Y.
The Quakeis and Puritans and also the Germans
in
Penn.
were opposed to slavery.
TABLE OF FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR.
comjnianders.
Battle.
Time.
English.
French.
Success.
Gt.
Meadows,
Eng.
P't.
Necessity,
Fr.
Lake George,
Oswego,
Fr.
Kittanning,
Eng.
Battle,
Ft.
Eng.
AVm. Henry,
Fr.
Louisburg,
Eng.
Ticonderoga,
Fr.
Quebec,
Eno-.
Ticonderoga and Cr.
Pt.
'^
"
Niagara,
"
Montreal,
Fill the
missing links.
Make every
friA- in
history exercise
more or
less
which the student must develope some
of a pleasant
skill.
—
SCIENCE AND AET OF TEACHING TNITED STATES HISTORY.
34
WAS CALLED "SEVEN
YEARS' WAR," IN EUROPE.
ACROSTIC BY YEARS.
F—
F—
1—1754— four—
2-^1755— five—
t.
Necessitj'.
t.
Du
Qiiesne.
— 1756 — six — S — of Oswes^o,
4— 1756— seven— S —
of Ft. William Henry.
5 — 1758—
— E — xpedition Ticonderooa.
6 — 1759— nine — N —
and Quebec.
3
ie((e
ieo-e
.
vs.
ei.i>ht
iajj'ara
7—1760— sixty— S— illery.
Draw
a
map
of
Quebec and
vicinity.
c03dianders.
English
—
B — raddock,
Edward.
A— nihei'st, Jeffrey.
S— hirlev,
William.
A — bercombie, Gen.
L— oudon,
Lord.
French —
M— ontcalm,' IMarquis.
D— ieskeau, Baron,
directions.
Write a
1.
and
if
2.
list
of the forts and tell
when each was taken
re-taken.
Enumerate
five results of the war.
Justify your answer
in each case.
3.
Smith,
Give short biographies of: King James I, Capt. John
Pocahontas, Governor Berkeley, Nathaniel Bacon,
Lord Culpepper, Govei-nor Bradford, Governor Endicott,
Thomas Hooker, John Davenport, Roger Williams, Peter Minnit, Wouter Van Twiller, William Kieft, Peter Stuyvesant,
Henry Hudson, Anne Hutchnison, King Philip, Wm. Penn,
King Cliarles II, Oliver Cromwell, John Locke, James Oglethorpe, John Wesley, General Wolfe, Increase Mather, Cotton
Mather, John Winthrop, Elihu Yale, Jonathan
Beninmin Franklin.
Edwards,
SCitlsCK
AM) AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATE8 HISTORY.
35
TEN DATE ASSOCIATIONS.
Concert Exercises.)
(
0.
What
events do you associate with
:
—
1
500, 1520, 1540,
1610, 1620, 1640, 1650, 1660, 1700?
What
dates do you associate with:
— Discovery
of Brazil,
Discovery of Carolina, Explorations of Coronado, Starving
time in Virginia, Pilgrims settle Plymouth, Indian W^ar in N.
Y., Settlement of
N. C, Navigation Act which required ex-
ports to be sent to Eng., Penn's death?
1.
What
events
with— 1521,
1541,
1621,
1631,
1651,
1741?
What
dates with the Circumnavigation of
tiie
globe and
Conquest of Mexico, Discovery of Mississippi River, Written
constitution for Virginia, 1st Navigation Act, 2d Navigation
Act, N. Y. Negro Plot?
2.
What events with:— 141)2, 1512,1542,1612,1622,1692,
What dates with the Discovery of America,
1702, 1732?
Discovery of Florida, Voyage of Cabrillo, 3d Charter
of
Virginia, 1st Indian Massacre of Virginia, Salem Witchcraft,
Yale College founded, Washington born?
3.
What
events with 1493, 1513, 1613, 1643, 1663, 1673,
1713, 1733, 1763?
What
dates with Columbus' 2d voyage,
Discovery of Pacific Ocean, Marriage of Pocahontas, Provi-
dence and Newport united, 4th Navigation Act, Internal trade
restrictions, Treat}^ of Utrecht, Molasses Act,
4.
What
What
News
5.
events with 1524, 1624, 1634, 1644, 1704, 1744?
dates with Verrazani's Vo3^age,
Maryland
settled,
2d Indian
St.
Lawrence
banished, Claybourn's 2d Rebellion,
6.
What
in
Philip's
What
dissolved,
Virginia, Boston
War?
events with 1535, 1635, 1645, 1655,1675?
dates with the Discovery of
King
London Co.
Massacre
Letter published. Close of Spanish
What
Treaty of Paris?
New
What
Roger Williams
Sweden conquered,
R.,
War.
events with 1506, 1606, 1636, 1656, 1676, 1686?
dates with Columbus' death,
London and Plymouth
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORl.
36
Go's organized, R.
rebellion,
7.
settled, Persecution ol
1.
Quakers, Bacon's
N. E. made a Royal Province?
What
with 1607,
events
What
1697?
1637,
dates
Jamestown settled, Anne Hutchinson banished, King
William's War ended ?
with
8.
What
What
Holland,
with
events
1608,
1498,
1638,
1748?
1688,
with Vo3'age of Sebastian Cabot, Piloi-imsgo to
'lates
King George's
Del. settled. Free schools in Va.,
War ended ?
9.
What events
What
Hudson River discovered,
with 1499,1609, 1619, 1649, 1699?
dates with Vo\'age of Vespucci,
Slavery in Va., Toleration Act
career ended
SOME
1.
in
Sir
INid.,
William Kidd's
?
Have concert
SL:<i<iESTI<JNS.
exercises in well learnt short
2.
These must be learnt from the same book
S^'stematize all matter and all work done.
3.
In
phies.
order to have a successful concert
must be well
the lesson
learnt
and
all
of
biograverbatim.
drill exercise,
the
class
must
learn the lesson.
4.
Biography
5.
Review daUy, not once
6.
Direct pupils
7.
Have
not accept
is
the best part of history.
how
the pupils
less
in a while.
to study.
Do
not recite for them.
do the work outhned for them.
by no means.
Do
REVOLUTIONARY WAli
PRIME CAUSE
f
I
.
,-,
,
.
_.
j
^
]
t
I
— LOVE
OF LIBERTY.
Unjust ooveniment by England.
8eit" government.
The Inter Colonial War.
Taxation without representation.
Navigation Acts 1 68 1-5 1-60-63.
j
1^
Stamp Act.
I
Causes
I
Restrictions on inland trade.
Forbidding export of hats.
*'
Secondary
<[
iron works.
iMutiny Act.
Writs of assistance.
Duty on
tea.
Repeal of Stamp Act.
ACTS LEADING IP TO THE REVOLUTION.
Time.
1.
Patrick Henry's Resolutions,
2.
Sons of Liberty,
3.
Daughters of
4.
First Colonial Congress,
5.
Soldiers sent to the Colonies.
6.
New York
7.
Boston Massacre,
S.
Duty on
Lil)erty.
riot,
tea
removed.
SCIENCE
38
9.
10.
AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED SlATES
HISIOKV,
Boston Tea Party,
Boston Port Bill,
11.
First Continental Congress,
12.
Minute Men.
'"''''"^' ^'"^''*
^'
memor"^''
""^^^
__
'^ ""'''' '^' ^'^^"^^^ f^^^'"
EVENTS OF 1775.
Lexington, Ticonrleioga, Bunker
Hill,
gress.
2d Continental Con-
1776.
Siege of Boston, Siege of
Charleston, Battle of Lono»
Irenton,
is
-•,
1777.
Pnnoeton, Branclywine, Gennantown,
nington, Saratoga.
Ticonderoga
Ben-
1778.
Monmouth, Savannah,
Alliance,
Wyoming, Cherry,
1779.
Kettle Creek, Brier Creek,
Savannah.
1780.
Charleston, Sanders' Creek,
King's Mt.
1781.
Cowpens, Guilford C.
H.,
Eutaw
Spring,, Yorktown.
1788.
Treaty of Paris.
LIBERTY—MNEMONIC.
li— exington
1775.
I— iKlepeiideiiee
1776.
B— urgoyne's Siirreiifler 1777.
E— vacnation of PhilaOelphia 1778,
R— ecaptiiie of Stony Point 1770.
T~reason of Arnold 1780.
Y— orktown 1781.
Valley.
39
STATES HISTORY.
SCIENCE AXP ART OF TEACHING UNITED
TABLE FOR REVOLUTIONARY AVAR.
19 Great Battles.
(For concert drill— very good.)
177o— L.
Lexington
How
400.
1,700.
1,500
3,000
Montgomery
3,000
Parker
\
.
\
Bunker Hil
.
.
Smith..
Prescott
\
Monireal
Men.
Generals,
B ^TTLES.
)
Ft.
.
.
.
Am.
.
Brit.
.
Am.
^^00
'
^^000
5,000
,20,000,
2.400.
Parker
Putnam
\
.
Howe
I
Washington
\
Trenton
1,500,
,11.000,
,
Washington
\
..
Brit.
Howe
18,000.
9,000.
6,000
11,000
15.000
Gates
,11,000.
.Am.
Howe
i
Gates
Burgoyne
Washington
j
(
Germantovvn
I
\
Saratcjga
1
\
"(
\
i
Naval Battle
1780— T.
Am.
Brit.
7,000.
400
Brit.
12,000.
.Am.
Washington
..
1779-R.
Savannah ....
.
Greene...
Cornwallis
j
Mercer
1778— E.
.
Burgoyne
\
Monmouth.
.
i
Bemis Heights
Brit.
.Am.
,
Rahi ./.
I
1777— B.
Brandy wine
450
]y/[.,^^itrie
,
)
Long Island
1/^00-
Carleton
.
1776—1.
Moultrie.
Ft.
.
.
Montgomery
Quebec
Success.
Vf'l^rl?.
Clinton
Lincoln
Prevost
•
•
(
Bon Homme
]
Merchant Marine
11,000.,
4.500.
Brit
3,000
Am
Pvich'd, etc
oj 00
Lincoln
(Clinton
\
Charleston
.
.
.
\
Cowpens
17S1-Y.
Guilford C.H.
[
Tarleton
(
Greene
I
.Am.
]'^-Pr!l
1,200.
4,400
Cornwallis
•
Washinotcn
Yorktown-
Cornwallis
Brit.
9,000
Morgan
,
•
2.400.
16,000.
'
.500
.Brit.
.
.Am.
—
——
science and aet of teaching united states history.
40
political acrostic.
Stars and Stripes, 1777
fS— tainpAcl.
T ;ix;irioii u itiioiit
I
Causes
-J
j
I'cproseiitation.
A
rl)itiary i^ov't
II
(^i)nblicaii Institutions.
tS— oils
and
Kiiy:lan(l.
<>r
Dair^'iitors of Liberty.
AND
f
S — ecoiid
T—
S,
I
Results
<{
I
(''oiitiiieiital Con.i^n^ss.
A]>i)Pa!s^ro Kino-. G. B., and Canada,
esolve to ti^llt Tor Libei'ty.
lie
—
I— ndependenee Declared
P — atriots fi-0111 abroad come to
E — pluribns unitm established.
LS — eparation
froni
C B. ao'reed
aid.
to.
A iiODEL TRACING LESSON.
On an outline map drawn l»y a student let the class trace
Gen. Washington through the war from siege of Boston to
Brooklyn
Ft., to
New
North Castle, to N.
York, to Harlem, to White Plains, to
J.,
to Trenton, to Princeton, to Morris-
town, to Philadelphia, to The Brandy wine, to Germantown,
to Valley Forge, to
Monmouth,
to
White
town, towards N. Y., to Yorktown.
Plains, to JMorris-
Describe events
brietl}"
yet pointedly.
THE GRAND REVIEW.
to
Tell
all
add
to
Allow others
you can about each person or event.
what has been said.
— Arnold,
1.
Traitors
2.
Turning Point of the
Lee.
War— Saratoga.
one of the decisive battles of the world.
Creasy
Draw
a
calls it
map
of the
battle-ground.
3.
Naval Battle— Paul
4.
In
What
Moultrie,
Morgan
5.
sun of
Battles.^
Putnam,
?
Who
Said.^
lil)erty
is
—
Jones'.
— Parker,
Prescott,
Washington, Gates,
'^
set,
I rei)eat
it,
Sirs,
Montgomery,
Greene,
we must
Lincoln,
fight,"
"The
the Americans must light the lamps of
SCIL'NCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
41
n.ii(l economy." ' Caesar had his Brutus,
Charles I.
Cromwell," ''By the authoi'ity of the Continental Con-
industry
his
''Howe has not so much taken Phihidelphia, as Philadelphia has taken him," • I have not 3et begun to fight."
gress,"
"Beware
that your noilhern laurels do not turn to southern
willows,"
"He
can make his mark."
O
"
God,
it is
all
over,"
" Give nie liberty or death?"
6.
Brief Biographies --Benj. Franklin, Ethan Allen, Dan.
li. Lee, Henry Lee, Wm. Moultrie,
Lord Howe, Lord Corn wall is.
La Fayette, Kosciusko, Puhiski, Steuben, De Kalb, Benj.
Lincoln, (^en. Wayne, J. P. Junes, Gen, Greene, Gien. Morgan,
George Washington, \\ m. AVashington, Pobert Morris.
Boone, Chas. Lee, R.
7.
Historic Halls.
8.
Historic Trees.
ter
— Faneu'l
Hall,
Lidependence Hall.
— Washington's Elm. Penn's Elm, Char-
Oak.
9.
Historic Rides.
— Paul Revere's Ride,
Putnam's Ride,
Andre's Ride.
10.
First.
Last.
name.
TIME.
name.
Lexington
Organized
1st.
Con.
TIME.
Yorktown
Disbanded
B.\ttle
Army
Last Con.
C(JNGRESS
—
Grevt Political Docu.ments
Dec. of Rights 1765,
Petition to the King 18G5, Appeals to Parliament 17G5, Dee.
of Rights 1774, Petition to the King 1774, Appeal to G- B.
1774, Address to Canada 1774, Petition to the King 1775,
11.
Dec. of Independence 1776. Articles of Confederation. Ordi-
nance of 1787.
Cost of
Constitution of the United States.
War.— G.
U.
B. 51,0U0 men, |6iJ(,),0UU,00U,
S, 41.0{)()
"
140,000,000.
questions.
Which is your favorite battle.^ Why.^
Which is 3^our favorite General
Why.^*
3.
Which do you think was the ablest general
Americans? The most daring-?
1.
2.
.^
of
the
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
42
4.
was the gloomiest winter of the war?
Wliich
The
coldest ?
6.
Name
When
7.
In what battle did both armies make a night attack.^
8.
In what battles were entire armies surrendered
9.
Name
5.
the largest
Tea Party you know
did a fog save our army
five cities that
?
A
Wh}^ held?
of.
rain
have been besieged
r
?
10.
What
11.
vVhat battle was opened
12.
VVhat great Ft. was captured at midnight?
general
won
one was taken without
13.
Which
battle
favor of the U. S
?
?
a battle without orders?
firing a
b}"
prayer?
What
shot?
was the turning point of the war
in
CONSTITUTIONAL PERIOD.
WASHINGTON, 1789—1797.
''The Father of his Country."
1.
2.
3.
Born February
had such a code.?
4.
5.
6.
1732; died December 14th, 1799.
2'2d,
Was a noble boy.
Made a code of
Why.?
own
morals for his
Give some of these
use.
Who
else
rules.
Was a surveyor at 16 years of age.
Was an officer in the militia of Va. at the age of 21.
Was Commander-in-Chief of the American forces in
Rev. War.
7.
Wns
8.
The
9.
Frederick the Great
the president of the Constitutional Convention.
first
president of the U. S.
said that
Princeton were the greatest on record
10.
"From
Byron said:— ''The
cinnatus of the West."
12.
He
13.
First in war,
is
first,
World
the
first
In D.
to the Greatest."
the best
in peace, first in
TtlE PLACE.
The
last,
called the father of his country.
countrymen,
14.
achievements at
Frederick also sent him a sword with the inscription:
the Oldest General in the
11.
1 .5.
his
in military history.
C,
.Sd
pop. 228,160.
capital of the IT. S.
— The
Cin-
Wliy.?
the hearts of his
——
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTOllY.
44
16.
Was burned
17.
Its voters
Wnr
in the
of 1812.
cannot vote for Pres. of U. S. Why?
W^ashington Monnnient is there, height 555 ft.
1<S.
The Smithsonian Institute is there.
The Capitol, AVhite House, U. 8. Treasury, Patent
19.
20.
OfHce and other public buildings are to be found
tliere.
QUESTIONS.
Tell something about Washington's parents,
1.
his
bo}^-
hood, youth, his surveying.
What
2.
bod_y elected him Commander-in-Chief?
Who
elected him president?
Constitutional Convention
?
3.
Tell something that other great
4.
Who
The
first
was the
of the U. 8.?
men
said of him,
president of the Republic?
The 10th?
The
The
last.?
20tli?
W^hen and where was he inaugurated? W^h}' not on
March
When and where the second time ?
Where is Federal Hall? Faneuil Hall? Independence
5.
the 4th of
6.
Hall
first
W^ho
elected him president of the
.^
?
8.
What States admitted?
What party elected him?
9.
Give
7.
all
W^ho was
his vice-president?
the reasons that you can wh}^
Washington
shoula be regarded and honored as a great man.
Father of
Country-.
his
As
the Greatest
As
the
General of the
World.
10.
Let the pupils write ten questions each and exchange.
(They should be important questions, not
less ones.)
Washington—
W— hiskey
A
S
^
Rebel
1 i
on.
Trouhlos.
paiiish Treaty.
aniiltoirs Plan.
li;ieriMn
H—
I — lulian
N — orth West Territoi}-,
G—
'i'l-oublos.
eiiet.
T— i-eaty witli England.
O — hio r'ouii)any.
N oA]liane(>.
trivial,
meaning-
45
HISTORY.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
PARALLEL DATES BY DE(\\DES PRIOR.
1789 Washington iimugunited.
1790 National Capital.
1791 U. S. Bank.
1792 Cotton Gin.
1793 Corner Stone.
Address,
] 897 Farewell
1779 Recapture of Stony Ft.
1780 Arnokl's Treason.
1781 Yorktown.
1782 Preliminary Treaty.
1783 Treaty of Paris.
'87.
1 787 Ordinance of
BY CENTURIES PRIOR.
1689 King William's War, N. Y. Royal Prov.
1579 Drake Circumnavigated the globe.
1692 Salem Witchcraft.
1492 What happened.?
.70HN
ADAMS 1797-1801.
"The Firm
1.
Born
2.
Was
3.
in
1735; died
Federalist."
in 1826.
Congressman and 2d president of U. S.
Secured the adoption of the Declaration of Independa noted
ence in a three days debate.
4.
He was
said to have the clearest head of
any man
in
congress.
5.
He nominated Washington Commander-in-Chief
of
the arm}^
"Jeft'erson still survives."
G.
Last words:
7.
Died July 4th, 1826.
QUESTIONS.
3.
and where was Adams inaugurated ?
was vice president?
ho
What two grtat men died in 1799 ?
4.
What was done
1.
When
2.
Who
W
was made the same
5.
Tell
G.
Vvlio
7.
8.
with the capital in 1800
?
year.?
you can about Pinckney.
was the 12th president.? The
all
Did Achtms choose a new
Seven questions by the pupils.
cabinet.?
22d.?
in
1699?
What
treaty
—
science and art of teaching united states history.
46
Adams
—
A— buse
of Privileges,
D — ifficultic;?
A— lien
M
ill
witli France.
and Sedition Laws.
ions for Defense, &o.
S— later's Cotton
Mill.
PAKALLEI, dates by DECADES.
What happened
What in 1790?
1799 Washington died.
1800 Seat of gov't.
in
1789?
BY CENTURIES.
Who
became King
ot Spain in
1
700
?
THOMAS JEFFERSON 1801-1809.
''The Sage of Monticello."
Born
1.
year
in
1743; died in 1826.
Who
died
the
same
?
5.
He
He
He
He
6.
Very
7.
He
2.
3.
4.
until
8.
it
was a
fine scholar.
was a
brilliant talker as well as
was an excellent penman and a
an elegant writer.
fine violinist.
was a noted Hnguist.
fonrl of athletic sports
said:
and a bold horseman.
The executive authority had
to be stretched
cracked, to cover the purchase of Louisiana,
He
was. with the exception of a few words, the author
of the declaration ol independence.
9.
Noted
for simplicity
and power.
even Mr. was loth to him.
10.
Hated
11.
The great Anti
12.
Died on the 4th of July.
titles,
13.
Died rich
14.
Last Words:
15.
He
in
Federalist.
honor but poor in money.
''This
is
the fourth day of July."
celebrated only one day of the year, the fourth of
July.
16.
Originated our decimal monetary system.
17.
Originated our government surveying system.
cribe
it.
Describe
it.
Des-
SCIIiNCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
What was
Ordinance of 1787.
18.
Give
it.^
47
five of its
provision*.
Jefferson
J
—
—
efFei'scirs Biooi-aj)h3\
E — mbnri^'o Act.
F— iiiiit l)et\voeii llaniiltoii and Burr.
F — niton's Steamboat.
E xix'dition ot Lewis and Clarke.
B,— e-eleetion.
S
— panish Cession
O— bio Admitted.
N — o Fi-aud in tbe
(La.)
Treasniy.
QUESTIONS.
What was
1.
tion
?
2.
3.
Tell
the greatest event of Jefferson's administra-
about
all
it.
Who
was Aaron Burr.?
AVho was Alexander Hamilton?
4.
Burr was tried for treason.
5.
Who
invented the
What name ?
What is
G.
7.
a
Bashaw
first
?
A
From
10.
Two
Tell
all
What
St.
A
?
When?
Bey ?
Louis.
Why
Where?
A
Sultan ?
did they
there to Oregon.
Who claimed "Once an
man T' Why ?
8.
9.
Shah
Trace Lewis and Clarke to
halt there ?
Why?
steamboat?
Englishman, always an English-
you can about Decatur.
is
of the R«v.
a traitor?
Name
one
in this administration.
War.
11.
Let tlie pupils vTrite five questions each about the
meaning of some hard words found in history. Exchange.
Answer next day.
12.
W^hat is meaJft by "Right of Search"? "Embargo
Act"? "Orders in Council"?
13.
Who fell in a duel where his son had fallen ?
14.
On what did .Jefferson write the Declaration of Inde-
pendci:ice?
48
AXD AUT
SOIENCt:
TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
OP^
What
dictionary was published during this adminis-
Draw
a
15.
tration ?
16.
Trace on
map
this
Who
17.
mnp
the
of
La. T\'. as
the route of Lewis
was the od president
it
was purchased.
and Clarke.
The loth?
?
The 23d
?
PARALLEL DATES BY DECADES.
What
What
What
What
What
1801 Jefferson inaugurated.
1802 Ohio.
1803 Louisiana.
1804 Lewis and Clarke.
1806 Webster's Dictionary.
1807
(?)
1797
(?)
1787
(?)
1777
in
1791 ?-81?
in
LS92?
in
1753 ?-S3 ?-63
in
1763?
?
in '96 ?
(?)
BY CENTURIES.
1802, 1702, 1602, 1502?
1806, 1606 or
What
7,
1506?
event do you associate with each of the above dates
MADISON 1809
''
1.
Was
2.
Did much
born
in
— 1817.
The Firm Republican."
Va. 1751
;
died 1S36.
to secure the adoption of the constitution.
Was a strong advocate of State Rights. Wrote
3.
1698— '99 Resolutions on State Rights.
4.
Was noted for his learning. Like who else ?
5.
"Said:
?
— 'T al.Tays talk
better
6.
It
was
7.
It
was said of him that
his lot to
when
I
lie.'''
have the whole nation for
'die
the
his friends.
could not be kicked into a
fight."
8.
Was
long a congressman.
9.
Had
a wonderful
history for their
10.
Was
their policy?
memory.
memory.
like Jefferson
Name
and Monroe
seven
men noted
in ix>licy.
in
What was
49
science an1> art of teaching united states history.
Madison
M—
—
iclii<;^nn.
A— nierican Naval
Victories.
D — eti'oit
Surrender.
I
Beaten at Tippecanoe.
iKiiaiis
S— cott's Surrender at Niao-ara.
O — liver Perry's Victory.
N— 9\v Orleans Battle.
QUESTIONS.
1.
When,
noe fought
2.
ors as
Was
you
Hull a coward or a traitor
3.
What
Name
5.
]!l^ame as
.''
many
trait-
can you
the
tell
about the Little Belt.
battles in which Hull fought.^
principal
?
Wliat General displayed a table-cloth as a sign of dis-
Where.?
tress.?
6.
the battle of Tippeca-
can.
4.
Harrison
how and why, was
v.'here,
?
MV by.?
Detroit, Meigs, Stephen-.
Locate the following forts:
soiW^rie,
McHeniy and Dearborn.
Tell something about
ea(^fort.
7.
What
8.
In what battle was General Brock
9.
What General
is
meant by the '^impressment
sat
his
seamen?"
upon a stump when blown up?
What had he under his head when
What was Perry's message
10.
were on
of our
kiileri.?
he died.?
of victory.?
What words
blue pennant?
12.
Who woma naval victory
Who lost it?
Who defended a fort with
13.
W^hat were the d\'ing words of Captain Lawrence?
14.
What saved
15.
Who shot Tecumseh?
How did the Indians think
11.
and had never seen a naval
battle before?
16.
Who
gun?
How.?
Proctor in the battle of the Thames?
an earthquake?
17.
a single
said ^M'll try. sir?"
Tecumseh could produce
?
.
SCIENCK AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
50
19.
In what battle was each American shot
Why ? How many
How many English?
19.
What song
Americans were
did
Francis S.
bombardment of Ft. McHenry ?
20.
What battle was fought after
21.
What were
causes of
the
in the
head
?
killed in this battle ?
Key
the
this
during the
write
war?
war?
Give seven
causes.
22.
23.
24.
What were the results ? Give three results.
What large city now where Ft. Dearborn was?
What was the U S. Bank ? When chartered ?
it
For
.
how long
How
?
long time to wind up
How often ?
?
Who burned the capitol
its
business ?
Was
re-chartered
'2i).
ington
26.
27.
and other buildings
at
Wash-
?
What did Proctor lay a bounty on ?
What unhuman acts did the British perpetrate on
the
Atlantic coast?
3lnem0ni(^
Don't Give
form for the w^ar of 1812.
Up the Ship—
D— etroit.
O — peratious on
N— e\v Orleaii.*.
the Sea.
T— hames
G — uerriere
and ('onstitntion.
— ndian Troubles.
V— ictories on the Sea.
E — rie Fort.
U — nhunian Acts —
P— erry's Victory.
I
>\'liere
T— he Battle^of
Lundy's Lane.
H — eij^hts of (^ueenstoNMi.
E— fleets of Naval
Victories.
— hannon and Chesapeake.
H— orseshoe Bend.
I — ronsides,
P — revest at Plattsburji;.
S
,^
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
SCIENCE
51
HISTORY.
PARALLEL DATES BY DECADES.
1
What
What
What
What
What
What
What
809 Embargo.
1810 Proclamfition.
1811 Tii)pecanoe.
1812 Detroit.
1813 Battle of Lake Erie.
1814 Lundj's Lane.
1815
New
Orleans.
BY
What
associations
in 1
799-'89-'79 ?
m
1800-1790-'80
in
1781
?
in
1792
?
in
1803-1783 ?
1804-1794?
1805-1795?
in
in
?
cf:nti^kih:s.
do you make
?
1810—1610—1510.
1813—1513.
1809—1609.
1812—1612—1.112.
DH^iXTIONS.
1.
2.
Draw
Draw
country
3.
about
in
map
map
ground of Lundy's Lane.
Lake Erie and Lake Ontario and the
between, and locate each field and naval action.
a
a
of the battle
of
Let each pupil
this war.
wiite
NAVAL
On
the
twelve geographical
Answer
Exchange.
in
two
questions
daj's.
H.VTTLKS.
Mnemonic Plan
of Study.
[Ask always when?
Wlien^?
'»Vho Connnaiuled?
American? Which British? Who Victorious?]
Which
OCEAN BATTLES.
1
Essex and Alert
2.
Essex and Phoebe
1
President and Little Belt
2.
President and a Squadron
1.
Constitution and Gueriere
2.
Constitution and Java
3.
Constitution and Cyane and Lcvan
1
2.
3.
Wasp and Frolic
Wnsp and Reindeer.
Wasp and Avon
.
,
.
.
.
52
SCIENCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
Hornet and Peacock
Hornet and Penguin
1
2.
LAKE BATTLES.
Lake Ene
Lake Champlain
Lake Borgne
1.
2.
3.
The
British had 900 vessels.
and a great number
sels
of
gun
The Americans had 12
yes-
boats.
LAND BATTLES.
-
Ameiican Defeats.
Van Home's, Aug.
Detroit,
Aug.
5th, 1812.
15;h, 1812.
Frenchtovvn, Jan. 22d, 1813.
Oswego,
May
Miller's,
Aug.
6 th, 1814.
A:\IERICAN VICTORIES.
9th. 1812.
Queenstown, Oct. 13th, 1812.
Ft. Meigs,
May
Ft. Stephenson,
.
5th, 1813.
Aug. 2d, 1813.
Thames, Oct. 5th, 1813.
Creek War, Nov. 1813.
Lundy's Lane, July 25th, 1814.
Ft. Erie, Aug. 15th, LSI 4.
Ft.
McHenry,
New
Sept. 13th, 1814.
Orleans, Jan. 8th,
1
815.
Write the above Irom memory leaving out the
less
inpor-
tant dates.
Important Forts of the
War
of 1812 on the
Mnemonic
Plan.
SEVEN
m's.
Miami, Meigs, Madden, Mimms, Makinaw, Montgomery
and McHenry.
ODD ONES.
Ft. Stephenson, Ft, Erie.
SCIKNCE
AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
HISTORY.
53
AMERICAN COMMANDERS.
Harrison, Hampton, Dearborn, Scott and
FIull.
BRITISH COMMANDERS.
Proctor, Brock
— Inrlian,
Tecuraseh.
COMMODORES.
Perry and Decatur.
CAPTAINS.
Blakely, Lavv-rence, Stewart, Hull.
WAR WITH
ALGIERS.
("Decatur was sent, May, 1815.
June
17, captured a frigate.
June
28,
Americans released.
INIade a treat}' with Algiers.
June, 1815:
<J
To pay for property d^troyed.
To ask no more tribute.
Tunis and Tripoli agreed to same.
All accomplished in one cruise.
MONROE, 1817-1825.
''The Spotless President."
Born 1758; died July 4th 1831.
Fought as a soldier in the battles of Brandywine,
Germantown and Monmouth.
1.
2.
5.
Was
Was
Was
7.
Jefferson said:
3.
4.
a lawyer.
Washington's minister to France.
minister to the same country under
Helped to make the purchase of Louisiana.
6.
Monroe was "more prudent than brilliant."
-'If
his soul
not a spot would be found on
turned inside out,
it."
He died "poor in money but rich in
He was the author of the JMonroe
8.
9.
was
srere
Jefferson.
honor."
Doctrine.
What
it.^
10.
His administration
is
known
as
"The
era of
good
.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
54
feeling,"
or
golden era of United States history."
''The
Why ?
The most important
11.
was
tion
promise
political
event of his administra-
Compromise'
What was
the
com-
?
One
12.
Missouri
the
Monroe's inaugurations was on the 5th of
of
March.
La Fayette made a
13.
visit to the
a tour of the principal places.
Bunker
Hill
Monroe
—
U.
8. in
Made
1824.
Laid the foundation
oi the
monument.
M— issouri romjMoniise.
O — cean Steamer.
N — obleinaii La Fayette's Visit.
R— adical Doctrine ot Monroe.
O — rder Keinoving
E — ra
of
Good
the Indians.
Fee!ii»»r.
<^>IIESTI0NS.
1.
2.
On what day did Monroe die.^
What was the name of the first
The steamer th-it
Which iuauguration
steamer ?
3.
March
4.
Why
.'
River
Why ?
5tli
of
?
What war during tiiis administration
What about?
low did it turn out?
Where.?
5.
ocean steamer.?
La Fayette home ?
of Monroe was on the
carried
?
When
?
1
Which
is
considered the most important political event
of this administration?
().
7.
What does 3(j^ 3(V remind you of?
What party elected Monroe ?
S.
Wliat
is
9.
Name
the
10.
Who
the
Monroe Doctrine?
first five
presidents.
visited this country in
1824?
Tell
all
about
him.
1 1
What territory was ceded to the U. S. in J 81 9 ? What
were brought to Virginin ju>t two hundred years before'.^
12.
What name
did the " Ohl Republican Part}" " })egin
SCIENCE AM) AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
to take during this time
What
13.
oppose
14.
15.
did
Who
Who
demand?
Wliigs
The
Democrats
introduced the Mo. Compromise?
were the ''Locofoeos ?"
Where
17.
Wl)a,t
19.
?
the
?
10.
18.
55
Who
How
is
Tammany
Hall?
a protective tariff 1
is
Carpenter's Hall?
-'^
revenue
tariff'?
were the four candidates for president?
was
Adams
chosen
?
I'AKALLEL DATES BY DPXADES.
1817 Seminole.
W^hat
1818
What in
What in
What in
What in
What in
What in
Illinois.
1819 Florida.
1820 Mo. Comp.
1821 Mo. ad.
1822 Monroe Doct.
1824 La Fayette.
in
1807-1797-77?
1808-1778?
18u9-1799-'89-79
?
1810-1800?
1811-01 ?
181
2-02-1792
1814
?
?
ASSOCIATIONS RY CENTURIES.
1819-1019 1519?
1821-1521 ?
1824-1024-1524?
1817-1617?
i82()-]()20-I520
?
1822-1022?
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Write ten questions each about the meaning of
words used
cal
2.
T}^
in history.
Draw an
outline
(b) La. purchase,
3.
Review
4.
Always have
the
map
of the U. S. showing (a) original
(c) Florida cession.
"Washington Acrostic."
a map at hand ivhen yon^recite.
J. Q.
ADAMS, 1825-1829.
"Old Man Eloquent,"
2.
Was born in
Was the son
3.
Noted
1.
politi-
Exchange.
1767; died 1848.
of a president.
for his learning.
Why
f
SOIENCK AXD ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES KISTOKY.
56
4.
Was
always on time.
5.
His
vice
and nearly a majority of both
president
houses were demoerats.
Had a wonderful memory like that of
He was a vvonderful worker and was
6.
7.
connected
public
viith
his father.
nearly 70 3^ears
affairs.
Died of paralysis while in his seat m congress.
9.
He was tlie greatest champion of anti-slavery, and a
What was this law.?
strong opposer of the "gag law."
8.
Last words:
10.
— ''This
is
the last of earth; I
am
con-
tent."
Adams
—
A— dams' Biography.
D— and Hudson Canal R. R.
A — Ibany and Schenectady R.B,.
el.
M— akiiigthe Erie Canal.
S — emi-Centeiuiiah
QUESTIONS.
p
Why
2.
was Adams c<slied "Old Man Eloquent?"
What body elected J. Q. Adams president?
3.
How
1.
was the news carried from Buffalo to New York
v»^qs completed ?
Then, what did they
that the Erie Canal
pour into
The
New
Who
4.
Yoi-k Bay?
invented
the
Wh}^?
first
R,
R.?
Describe the cars.
What kind of rails did they have.?
What two men died July 4th, 1826? What
locomotis^e.
5.
three
presidents died on the 4th of July?
What
6.
^id
meant by the "American System?"
is
How
the people like it?
What
7.
parties elected each of the presidents
from Wash-
ington to Jackson?
When
8.
was the U.
For how long?
What
9.
10.
S.
;
O.
;
is
S.
W~hen did
a mint
bank chartered the second
its
time.?
charter expire?
?
Look on any gold or silver coins for the letters C. C;
Sometimes you will find no letter. Where is the
D.
coin in question
made
in
each
c;ise?
SCIENCE AND AET OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
57
JACKSON, 1829-1837.
"Old Hickory."
Jackson was born 1767; died 1845.
1.
Was
Was
2.
3.
very
a poor boy.
very fond of athletic sports, but did not like books
well.
Was
4.
a few months a soldier in the Revolution,
when
only 14 years of age.
5.
Was
6.
Had many
Congressman
a lawyer.
in 1796,
way
quarrels and fights, one on the
to his
inauguration.
7.
Sometimes called the
8.
Distiuguished himself in the war of 1812, against the
'-'
figh'ting president."
Creeks, and ni the battle of New Orleans.
9.
He believed in " rotation in office."
What
does this
mean?
his first year there were over 700 reaaovals
during the 40 years preceding just 74.
During
10.
from
office;
11.
Was once U.
12.
Died of dropsy.
S.
Senator.
Was
buried, wrapped in the f»ag of
his country.
U.
13.
He was
14.
Vetoed the
strongly opposcl to nullification.
bill for
the 3d charter of the
Bank
of the
S.
Prosecuted the Black
15.
Hawk War.
Threatened to make reprisals of Freneli vessels if the
$5,000,000 damage done to our commerce during Napoleon's
16.
Wars were not
Jackson
J
paid at once.
—
— ohn C. Calhoun.
A— dclltional Duties.
C
— lay's second Coinpromiso.
K — ing of France Paid Damages.
S— eminole
War,
O — sceola's Vengeance.
N — unification.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES RISTOKY.
58
QUESTIONS.
1.
Who
2.
What
was the fighting president?
state
U.
declared the
S.
tariff
law 'Muill and
void?"
3.
secede
What state
mean?
Mention some northern
4.
secede
6.
have tlireatened to
states that
?
On what doctrine did states
What compromise settled
0.
Why? What does
threatened to secede?
base this right to secede?
Who
trouble?
this
was
noted in history for making compromises?
Did Clay believe
7.
Rights
in State
?
Web-
is
a veto ?
Calhoun
?
ster ?
What financial
8.
Name
9.
What
Bank?
11.
it.
money
in the
Were
effects of this act.
U.
S.
the effects
?
What war broke
Why
out in the north-west?
Hawk
did thej^ take Black
him the large
12.
What
?
?
did Jackson do with the
Enumerate the
10.
good
did Jackson veto
bill
other officers that can veto
Tell about
and show
to the East
cities?
What war
in the
South
?
Causes?
Why
was the treaty
broken ?
Why
did the King of France pay
14.
How
was Osceola captured
15.
What medal was
13.
tiie
U.
S.
$5,000,-
000?
What
?
Where did he die?
struck in the South?
Who
for?
for ?
16.
Who
did the Indians call
17.
What
can you say about the ''Showers of Shooting
'•
The Sharp Knife
?"
Stars" of 1833?
18.
In what year did the Asiatic Cholera ])reak out in
the U. S.
10.
?
Is this disease
What reaper was
contagious
invented
in
?
1833?
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING U^^TED STATES HISTORY.
59
DIRECTIONS.
Write a brief histoiy of the U.
Write a short history of the
1.
2.
Van Buren's
Bank.
S.
tarifl^
moveraeut up to
administrationi*
VAN BUREN, 1837-1841.
"The Shrewd Man."
1.
Van Buren was born 1782;
2.
In 1818 started the Democratic party.
3.
1831 minister to England.
4.
He was an
anti slavery
died 1862.
man.
In 1837 a Financial Panic, Canadian Rebellion, Murder of E. P. Lovejoy, Telegraph patented, Texas applied for
5.
admiss'on, 2d Seminole War.
6.
In 1839 first normal school organized, Washingtonian
temperance society, Mormons go to Nauvoo, 111.
7.
In 1840 Sub-treasury
Bill.
Van Buren —
V — an Buren's Biography.
A— .>hhinton Treaty.
N— 3W York Failures.
B— nnk of U. S.
U — Itimatiim.
R— e-election Failed.
E — ighth President.
N— orth East Boundary.
QUESTIONS.
1.
Who
was the 8th president?
4.
What
What
What
5.
Who
2.
3.
v/as the " Patriot
What was
Why
Who
What
was Horace Mann?
6.
8.
?
did the Sub-treasury Bill provide for
7.
campaign?
War ? "
caused the Panic of 1337
was
wild cat
tile
money
?
noted for?
?
Harrison campaign called " Hard Cider"
^
were the Mormons
?
Their leader
?
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEAa^lNG UNITED STATES HISTORY.
60
Tippecanoe and Tyler too ? "
ad ministration what societies were organ-
What was meant
9.
Durino- this
10.
b}'
''
School built?
ized ?
1841 HARRISON AND TYLER 1845.
T^der
— (The
1st accidental president.)
1.
Tyler was born 1790; died 1862.
2.
Great admirer of Henr}^ Clay.
3.
First accidental president.
4.
Nominated unanimously
5.
In 1841, Sub-treasury Bill repealed, Harrison died, two
bills for
for vice president.
national bank vetoed, banlirupt law passed.
In 1842, Webster-Ashburton Treaty, Tariff act of '42,
6.
Dorr's Rebellion.
1845, Anti-rent Riots, Annexation of Texas,
In
7.
Ad-
mission of Florida.
Harrison
AND
Tyler—
T — exas
annexed.
Y—ieldintj of
Mornious,
L — atter Day Saints.
tlie
E — lectro-Magnetic
II
Tele.oraph.
— ebellion in Rhode Island.
QUESTIONS.
1.
\\
ho was the 9th President.?
How
long-
was
lie
ident ?
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
What is a bankrupt law.?
What was the Webster-Ashburton Treaty about?
What did people mean l)}^ 54, 40 or fight.?
What state is called Lone Star State.?"
What did they do with Dorr.?
''
How long was Texas a Republic?
Who was called Mill boy of the
Who founded the IMormon sect?
'^
Slashes?''
Pres-
ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
SCIliNCE ANT>
the sewing
W^'ho invented
10.
tel egra ph
W' h e n
?
machine?
61
The magnetic
?
POLK, 1845-1849.
"
Young Hickory."
Polk was born 1795; died 1849.
Polk served fourteen years in Congress.
Was a great admirer of Jackson, hence
1.
2.
3.
"Young
Hickory."
Died sliortly after retiring from office.
In 1845 the Mexican Minister left Washington, Sir John
Franklin's last vo3^age, Naval Academy at Annapolis.
6.
In 184G Mexican War, Wilmot Proviso, suspension
bridge at Niagara, pub. \\'orcester's diet., Howe's sewing
4.
5.
machine, Smithsonian Institute founded.
In 1848 gold disc, in Cal., Free Soil Party, deaths ot
7.
J. Q.
Adams and
Jackson, Astor library established.
MEXICAN WAR TABLE.
(Concert
Drill.)
Taylor's campaign.
Men.
Generals.
Battles.
Success,
Am.
1^
PaloAlto,
Tavlor
^^-.^^^
2,300
LaPalma
J
Taylor
2,200
0,000
Am.
6,600
10,300
Am.
4,700
r- rnr\
/,000
Am.
Scott
3,200
Am.
,^.^^.^^-^^^^
^^^^^.^
-D
,
(
.
'
Monte ry,
(
Arista
(
Taylor
'(
-r,
Buena
^j.
\
,
Vista,
I
g;^Q(3.
Ampudia
Taylor
^
>
Santa
*
Anna
i
1
scott's campaign.
^r
vera p
<-i"''Z.
,.
(
\
.
r^
erro Gordo.
^
.
-^
(Scott
,.
Santa
<
}
.
.
Anna
8,800
nnn
i
12,000
w:»
Am.
SOIENCK AND AWT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES mSTORY.
62
Scott..
Chevubuseo,
]
'
^
(
Snnta
Bravo
^
Am.
8,000
2o,000
Anna
2,500
All victories American.
Closed by the Treatj^ of Guada-
lupe Hidalgo,
Polk
—
P— alo Alfo.
— reoonniid
L— a
Bi-it.
Am.
Boimdiir}'.
Ptilnia Battle,
K — earney's Expedition.
QUEvSTIONS.
1.
Who
2.
Wiio wns
3.
Which was the " Battle on the Housetops.^"
What were the causes of the Mexican War?
Hovf many battles did the Mexicans win?
What was agreed to in the treaty of Guadalupe
4.
5.
6.
Hidalgo
7.
8.
9.
said
"Give them a little more grape?"
"Old Rough and Ready?"
called
?
What was
Who
Who
the
was the
Wilmot Proviso?
first
to discover gold in California?
was the " Pathfinder?"
1849 TAYLOR AND FILOrORE 1853.
FILLMORE.
(2a Accidental Pres.)
1.
Fillmore was born 1800; died 1874.
2.
Was
3.
A
4.
In 1850 Calhoun died, invasion of Cuba, Taylor died,
governor, and
years a congressman.
signer of the "fugitive slave law."
importation
of slaves into D. C.
Cabin pub., Cal. admitted as
state,
forbidden. Uncle
Tom's
postage reduced to three
cents.
5.
In 1852 Webster and Clr^y died, Under-ground R. R.,
Visit of Louis Kossouth to the U. S.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY,
FiLT.MORE
—
F— u;L>'itive
I
I^aws.
— nvasion of
L — o?s
M
Cuba by Lopez.
Laws.
ibei-ly
li
63
of three
Law
aiiie
?^-i'eat
orators.
passed.
O— ini]ibns,Bil].
"R
— epeal of
E — lection
Missouri Compromise.
of Pierce.
QUESTIONS.
it
1.
Wliat were the provisions of the Omnibus bilL?
2.
Who
wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin?
What
influence did
have."
3.
Who
4.
When
said
'^I
wouhl rather be right than president.?"
was postage reduced to three cents?
What is
it
now }
5.
What was
the under-ground R. R.?
G.
What was
the
Mo. Compromise?
What
bill
was con-
sidered a repeal of this compromise?
7.
8.
9.
Who
were the Abolitionists?
What was the ^'Gold Fever" of 1848-49?
What is the capital of D. C?
10.
AVhat
11,
Who
is
the
Maine Law?
invaded Cuba?
PIERCE,
Why?
1853-1857.
'•The Yankee."
1.
Pierce was born 1804; died LS69.
8.
Was
Was
4.
In 1853 the
2.
a U.
S.
senator.
Mexican War.
Gadsden purchase was made, Crystal Pal-
a brigadier general in the
ace opened at N. Y., Dr. Kane's 2d expedition.
5.
braska
In ]85[ Perry's Treaty witli Japan, Kansas and
Bill, Civil v»-ar
m
Ne-
Kansas, Republican party oro-anized.
——
.
soienck and art of teaching united states history.
64
Pierce
—
P— eiT^-'.*
I
Treaty
JajKin.
witli
licii.jinrics in K;iiisasarul
E
Nebraska.
New
E,
XjKisirioii ;U
York.
e[)ul)]ican ijart}- or^i^'aiiized.
— nban
C-
Ti'on.ltles.
E — xp] orations
lor Pacific R. R.
QUESTIONS.
What was
Dr. Kent
Wb.at was
tlie
0.
Kane searching for?
Gadsden purchase.^ What did
Where and what was the Crystal Palace?
Wlio was the filibuster Walker?
What was the treat}- with Japan? Who made
6.
What was
the civil war in Kansas abont?
7.
Do you
1.
2.
3.
4.
review daily?
Have you got
it
cost?
it?
a liistory note
book ?
BUCHANAN,
"
1.
2.
o.
4.
1
857-1861
The Bachelor."
Buchanan was born 1791; died 1868.
Was the first bachelor president.
Was minister to England.
Had been U. S. Senator.
In 1857 Dred Scott decision, personal liberty bills,
Lecompton Constitution, Panic of 57.
In 185S Lincoln and Douglas debate, Lajdng the At6.
5.
lantic Cable, Crj'Stal Palace burned.
In 1859 John Brown's Raid, Horace
Mann and Washing-
ton Irving died.
In 1861
Crittenden Compromise, seven states secede and
Southern confederac}^ organized, Morril Tariff
Buchanan —
B— rowii's
Raid.
TJ— tall Rebellion.
C — onfederacy or<>'aiilzed.
H— abeas Corpus refused Dred Scott.
A— track on Ft. Snnipter.
"N— e\v Parties — Discuss them.
A— braham Lincoln elected.
N — on Coercion Policy.
Bill.
SCIfNCE AND
AllT
65
OF TEACFTIXG UNITED STATES FITSTOKY.
QUKSTJONS.
3.
Who
Who
Who
4.
What
1.
2.
Who
was Dred Scott?
Whnt
laid the Atlantic
Cable?
was John Bi-own
?
did
S.
C.
How
What was
long was
his raid
it?
about?
other states secede for?
ai-ul
was called the
was' the decision about?
''
Prince of American Letters
?"
AVhat was the panic of 1857?
6.
What was
What was
7.
8.
the
Lecompton Constitution?
the capital of the Confcderac\^?
LixcoLN, 1861-1865.
'•The Savior of his Country."
Lincoln was born 1809; died 1865,
His father could not read nor write,
1.
2.
Onl_y had one yeai's schooling.
Hired out for $10 per month at the age of
3.
4.
Split rails
5.
7.
Was a
Was a
8.
In 1861
6.
19.
to fence his father's farm.
captain in the Black
great story
War
of
Hawk War.
a lawyer and U. S, Senator.
Reljellion, Napoleon intei-feres with
teller,
Gatling gun invented, Douglas dies.
In 1862 Homestead and Greenbaclc acts.
Li 1863 National Banks founded.
Mexican
9.
10,
affairs,
Causes of Civil
S
War —
— lavery Introdneed 1819.
T—ariiit Bills 1828-32.
A— Compromise of 1S20.
R— epeal
S
of
Mo. Comp.
Mo. Compromise 1854.
— tates Rights Dodfrine.
.
AND
B— rown's Raid 1850.
A— nti-Slavery papers and books.
B— igbt to Extend Slavery.
S — ecession of States
18(51.
otheFk causes.
1.
Omnibus
2.
Fuo-itive Slave
Bill 1850.
Law
1850.
.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
66
3.
4.
5.
'Invention of cotton gin 179?.
Annexation of Texas 1S45.
Dred Scott Decision 1857.
—
Slaveky
S iinipter Bombarded.
—
L— ookout Mountain.
A— tianta to the Sea.
V—
and Gettysbui-j^.
E — mancipation Proclamation.
K—
o d E
te d
Y— ielding- at Appomattox C. H.
ick-sbui'i;'
i
cli in
1
1
v;ic
1
1
a
BATTLES OF THE CIVIL WAR.
EAST.
Ft.
1861.
WEST.
Sumpter
Bnll
Carthage
Run
Wilson's Creek
1862.
Fair Oaks
Malvern Hill
Cedar Mountain
Manassas
Pittsburg Landing
Harper's Ferry
Perry ville
Antietam
Murfreesborough
Pea Ridge
Mill Spring
Fredericksburg
Ft.
Henry
Ft.
Donnelson
1863.
Chancellorsville
Vicksburg
Gettysburg-
Chickamauga
Siege of Cliarleston
Chattanooga
1864.
Wilderness
Atlanta
Spottsjdvania
Nashville
Winchester
Savannah
1865.
Siege of
Richmond
Battle of Five Forks
Capture of Richmond
Surrender
of
Lee
scikncf, ant>
art of
teaciti^'g
united states history.
67
table of sixtkkn gtjfat battles.
in
Battlk.
^^ „ ^
Bull Run,
(
,
i
.,,
^
,,
Gettysburg,
,
Meade
(
^^ ilderness,
^
Harbor,
Coid „
,
^
(
Grant
^ee
Grant
i
Appomatox,
5rj
| j^^^
-j
(
-j
j^^^
I\
^,
^'^^^^^^^
,,
,
,
Murfreesboro,
,,.
Vicksburg
,
,
Rosecrans
(
j
^^^^^
(GraTt
^
^,
,
Chickainauga,
Pembertom
(Rosecrans
| g^.^^^g
(Grant
Chattanooga,
.„
^.
^'-^shville,
,
-j
Con.
Un.
Con.
qOQ
Con.
1)0,000
35,000
Un.
100,000
28,000
Un.
55,000
40,000
Un.
45,000
o5^qqq
Un.
70,000
45,000
Un.
55,000
50^000
Un.
80.000
50,000
Un.
20,000
50^000
Un.
THE WEST,
(Grant
I Johnson
,
.
Con.
150,000
Grant
,
Five Forks,
150,000
gQ^QQO
| j^^^
Un.
120.000
80,000
gQ^OOO
^^^
Grant
i
80,000
4q^000
90,000
45,000
^^^
Success.
^0,000
^q qqq
(Hooker
^
^.
Un.
^^^^^
j
,
Con.
90,0r)0
(Burnside
-^
Chaneellorsville,
,
30,000
30,000
| ^^^^
,.,,
^
Fredncksbnrg,
,,
McDowell
McClellan
(
.
Men.
McClellan
^^^
-j
Antietam,
Generals.
Beauregard
-j
Seven days,
the east.
j^^,^^^
(Thomas
jy^^^^
Cost of war, $2,750,000,000
Cost of war in men, 1,000,000
science axd art of te^vciiing united states history.
68
Wak —
Results of
R—
to Secede Repudiated.
E— niaucipatiou of Slaves.
i,i>ht
S— tars
and Bars Defeated.
U— iiion Restored.
L — aws
of ReconsL]-iietion.
T — hirteenth
S
AiiU'iidnient.
— tars and Stripes Triumphant.
OTHER EVENTS.
1861.
men for three montlis, Extra session of ConBlockade of Soutliern ports declared, McCIellan ap-
Call for 75,000
gress,
pointed commander of the armies Ol Virginia, Congress freed
slaves in the C'onfederate army,
The Trent
affair.
1862.
Merrimac and Monitor, Capture of New Orleans, Negroes
U. S. army, Slaver}^ prohibited in D. C. and all ter-
in the
ritories, Issue of
greenbacks.
1863.
Emancipation Proc, Guerilla bands, Draft Riot
in
N. Y.
1864.
Mine explosion at Petersburg, Blockade of Mobile, Gold
190 per cent., Alabama and Kearsarge.
1865.
Sherman's March, Lee's Surrender, Johnston's Surrender.
Lincoln
—
L — iberator
of the Slaves,
— nvasion of the South, ISOl.
N— aval fight, Monitor-Meirimac, 1862.
I
C— hancellorsville,18G3.
O— n to Richmond, 1864.
L— ee's
N"
1.
Surrender,
ISO;"),
— ation Restored.
State fully what led to the Civil
War.
SCIKNCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HTSTORY.
G9
2.
Trace General Grant through the war.
Sherman.
0.
Who
1st Bull
Seven
were the opposing genei'als
Days,
in
Antietam, Fredericksburg,
Run,
Chancellorsville,
Appomat-
Gett3\sburg, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Five Forks,
tox C. IF?
With how man}- men, and what generals opposed each
4.
other in Shiloh, Murfreesborough, Vicksburg, Chickamauga,
Chattanooga, Nashville?
Which battle was the turning
Draw a plan of Gettj-^sburg.
5.
6.
point of the war
?
Justify
?
QUESTIONS.
Who
1.
fell
said "all hail
the Stars
and stripes" and then
dead?
Who
2.
was " Stonewall Jackson
How did
?"
he get that
name ?
Wiien did Congress vote half a million men and
3.
half a
billion dollars?
was the Trent Affair?
4.
W^iiat
5.
What was
G.
Who
called the
Yankee cheese box?
invented the Monitor?
What
Why?
others
did
he
invent?
Who
7.
used the words "unconditional surrender?"
On
what occasion ?
8.
How
9.
Where was 81,500,000 worth
Why
are the islands of the Mississippi river
of
cotton
numbered?
destroyed?
?
10.
Which was
11.
Who
12.
What
the
first fight
of ironclads?
was called the " Rock of Chickamauga?
was called " the battle above the clouds?"
battle
JOHNSON, 18G5-1869.
(The Third Accidental.)
bom
1.
Johnson
2.
Was
3.
Learnt the alphabet from a workman.
w'as
1808; died 1875.
a tailor by trade.
Spelling from
70
SCIENCE
AISTD
ART OF TKACHING UNITED
STATF:S HISTOHV.
a friend and studied 3*to 4 hours at niglit to get an education.
4.
His wife was also
5.
He
his tutor.
held the ofllces of Alderman, Ma3'or,
Member
of
the Legislature, State Senator, Congressman, Governor, U.
President.
S. Senatoi",
6.
Was
7.
In
3
noted
in his administration for his
independence.
865, Assassination of Lincoln, amnesty proclama-
army disbanded, 13th amendment, Johnson's
tion,
recon-
struction policy, congressional policy.
8.
In 1866, Atlantic Cable.
9.
In 1867, IMexican troubles, Alaska bought, Tenure of
office Bill.
10.
In 1868, Johnson impeached, 14th amendment, Burlingame Treaty, Ku-Klux-Klan.
Johnson
J
—
— ohnson impeached.
O— Id
Union
restored.
H— eart's Content and Valencia Bay Cable.
N— apoieon's plan in Mexico frustrated.
S — anitary Comuiission.
O— rations
N— e\v
on the Civil
Air.<^ndnient.s.
Ri.o-hts Bill.
National Debt.
questions.
Who
Who
Who
1.
2.
Abraham Lincoln?
tailor })resident.'^
What
4.
5.
From whom was Alaska
6.
bought.?
How much
did
it
?
What new amendments were made
What about?
What was the Tenure of Office Bill
7.
tion ?
8.
Klan
9.
was the
was " Honest Abe.-"
did Booth say when he shot Lincoln.'
In what disguise was JeiT Davis captured.'^
3.
cost
assassinated
''^
to the constitu-
The Ku-Klux-
?
What
is
an amnesty pi-oclamation
?
An impeachment
?
71
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHIX(^ UNTTRD STATES HISTORY.
GRANT, 1869-1877.
"
1.
Silent
Man."
Grant was born 1822; died 1885.
3.
Was
Was
4.
Won
5.
Was one
2.
The
a tanner by trade.
a graduate of West Point Military Academy.
some
distinction in the
Mexican war.
of the three most noted generals of the Civil
War.
^60 the Pacific railroad was opened, Black Friday.
6.
In
7.
In 1870 Fenian Troubles, 15th
8.
In 1871
1
Amendment.
Alabama Claims, Chicago fire, fire in Wiscon-
sin forests.
9.
In 1872 Geneva Arbitration, Credit Mobelier,
War, Boston
10.
Modoc
Fire.
1873 Salary Grab, Money Panic, Invention of
In
Telephone.
Woman's Crusade.
11.
In 1874 Grangers, and
12.
In 1875 Resumption Act.
13.
In 1876 Centennial, the Sioux War.
14.
In 1877 Electoral Commission.
Grant
—
G— rab Act— Back
Pay.
— Eobberies.
A— of Specie Resumption.
N— orthern Pacific.
E,
iiio-
ct
T— rial
of Election.
QUESTIONS.
1.
2.
What was Black Friday ?
What was the Salary Grab ?
sumption
3.
What was
4
Who
all
.=>
Re-
the Centennird
said " I
vvdll
fight
it
?
out on this line
if
it
takes
summer.?"
Who
wns the "
Chapaqua?"
5.
of
Credit Mobelier
Act.-^
Silent
Man r"
" Little Giant?"
" Sage
.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
72
Who
Who
6.
7.
said
"go
was the
'^
we^^t
young man?"
Tanner President?"
"
The Father
of
Greenbacks?"
HAYES, 1877-1881.
(Policy President.)
Hayes was born in 1822.
He was a graduate of Kenyon College
1.
2.
Law
au'i
Harvard
School.
3.
He fought
in the Civil
War, was elected
to congress,
governor of Ohio.
4.
In
1877
II.
H. riots,
Murphy Movement, Edison's
Phonograph,
5.
In 1878 Yellow Fever, Fishery Award, Bland Silver
Bill.
6.
In 1879
Negro exodus, introduction
of electric light.
Grant's tour around the world.
7.
In 188(3 U. S. census.
Hayes—
H— ayes Biographii.
A— ward to G B
IT— ellow Fevei-.
.
E — vacuation
S— ilver
ot'
tlie
South.
Bill
QUESTIONS.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Who
was the policy president?
What was the Negro Exodus ?
What is the phonograph ?
What is a veto ? Specie payment ?
What is a coolie ?" A riot ?
What was the cause of the R. R. riot
A
Bill ?
of
1877 ?
''
AKTHUR, 1881-1885.
1.
2.
3.
4.
N. Y.
Was born 1830; died 1886.
Was a graduate of Union College.
He was a lawyer by profession.
During the Civil War was Quartennaster
General of
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
1881
In
5.
James A.
Koute investigation, Assassination of
Star
Garfield, Centennial at
Yorktown.
In 1882 Guiteau hanged, Miss, floods, deaths of Lons;--
6.
fellow and Emerson, Anti-Chinese and Anti-Polj^gamy
7.
t^vo cents,
Ohio
Tarift'
bills.
and North-
In 1883 completion of Brooklyn bridge
ern Pacific R. K., Civil Service and
age
iS
bills,
letter post-
floods.
made
8.
In 1884 Alaska
9.
In 1885 \Vas!iington
is
a torritor3\
monument,
biJo ft.
high,
is
com
pleted.
Arthur
—
A— ssassiiiatioi) of (xarfield.
K— edneliou of Postage.
T—
of Guiteau.
H— igh floods in Miss, and O. rivers.
rial
U — uveiling Wssliiugton Monument;.
H— ailroad Standard Time,
QUESTIONS.
1.
Who
vais
the
"Martyr president?"
The
'^
Teacher
president?"
6.
What celebration vas held at Yorktown? W^hat for?
What can yoi^ tell about Brookl^'ii bridge?
What was Pendleton's Civil Service Reform Bill ?
What is R. R. standard time ? Explain.
What are postal notes ? IMone}^ orders ?
7.
Write a brief biography of James A. Garfield.
1.
Cleveland was born 1837.
2.
3.
4.
5.
.
CLEVELAND, 1885-1889.
2.
He was a Lawyer, District Attorney,
Governor of N. Y.
He ^vas the 22d president.
3.
4.
In
Fair at
1
Sheriff,
Mayor,
885 deaths of Grant, McClellan, Hendricks, World's
New
Orleans,
Haymarket Riot
in
Chicago, Eartholdi
Statue.
5.
In
1886 deaths of Hancock, Logan, Seymour and
Tvlden, Presidental Succession
Bill.
M
SCIENCE AND AHT OK TKACIUNCi UNITKD STATES HISTORY.
74
commerce and
electoral count bills.
C.
In 1887 Inter-stntc
7.
In 1888 Act for excliuling- the Chinese.
In 1889 four states admitted— S. Dak., N. Dak., Mont.,
-S.
and Wash.
Cleveland
—
C — hinese Exclusion Act.
L— abor Disturbuiicp.
E— X Pres. AiTliur and Grant died.
V— ice Pro;-. lleudi-icUs died.
E — arthqnako at <^harle>ton.
L— aw of Presidential Succession.
A — narchists at 'hicago.
N— e\v Oi-lean* Fail-.
(
D— eaths of many
prominent men.
QUESTIONS.
it
1.
What was
2.
Who
3.
Wliat
4.
Why
5.
What
passed
6.
7.
is
A
an anarchist?
is
A
socialist?
are the Chinese to be excluded
communist?
?
the law of presidental succession
?
Why
was
?
What was
regulate
Hay market Riot?
the
presented the Bartholdi statue to the U. S.?
tiiis
tlie
inter-state
commerce
bill?
Who
must
kind of commerce?
Tell about
tlie Chai-lest><:)n
iiAKHisoN,
earthciuake.
1889-1893.
1.
He was born
2.
His father was a farmer, his grandfather president, his
1883.
o-reat-gTandfather a signer of the declaration ol independence.
3.
4.
He is a graduate of JNIiami University.
He fought in the Civd war as Brigadier General and
was known
as ''Little
Ben."
1889 Pan-American
Washington Centir-nnial,
5.
In
Congress,
McKinley
0.
In 1890 Silver Bill,
7.
In 1891 deaths of Bancroft and
in the
Dakotas.
Johnstown Hood,
Tariff Bill.
Windom, Indian War
sctence and art of teacfhng united states history.
Harrison
H—
A
/
—
Tnrift Act.
io-li
tlantic,
Boston. Y(^rkto\vii— vvnrshi
ps.
H— iisk l?t Secj^ of Agiiniltme.
H— eed's qiiornin vnlo.
I — dnho and WnsliinL2;ton aduiltted.
S— ilvei'Bill.
O — klahoma
N — ew
opened.
Orleans Trouble.
QUESTIONS.
Who
Ben .?"
What was the Pan American
1.
2.
propose
6.
7.
Who
5.
Little
Congress.''
What
did
it
?
What
What
What
What
8.
4.
was
''
was the McKinley Bill?
was the Johnstown disaster?
was the cause of the Indian War
in
the Dakotas.^
was the nature of the Chilian troubles?
are the Mafia?
REVIEW OF REVIEWS.
Associations
—To
Write.
1800-1890.
1800 Treaty with Napoleon, 1810 Proclamation by Madisou, 1820 Missouri Compromise, 1830 Webster and ITa3^ne
Bill, 1850 Omnibus Bill, 1860 Se1870 15th Amendment, 18S0 U. S. Census, 1890
Debate, 1840 Subtreabury
cession,
McKinlev
Bill.
1881-1891.
1881
First
written message to Congress, 1811 Battle of
Tippecanoe, 1821 IMissouri Admitted, 1881 Nullification in
S.
C, 1841 Passage
to three
fire,
cents,
of
Bankrupt Law, 1851 Postage reduced
1861 Southern Confederacy, 1871 Chicago
1881 investigation of Star Route fraud, 1891 Indian war
in the Dakotas.
1802-1882.
1802 Military Academy at West Point, 1812 Second war
SCIENCE
7G
AND ART OK
TP:ACH1NG UNITED STATES HISTOKY.
for indepeiKlence, 1822 Rei)ublics of S. A. ret-ognized,
Black
R.
R.,
Hawk War,
1832
1842 Dorr's Rebellion, 1852 Underground
1862 Battle between Monitor and Merrimac, 1872
Credit Mobelier, 1882 P^dmund's Anti-rolygai>:y
Bill.
1803-1883.
1803 Louisiana Purchase, 1813 Battle of the Thames, 1823
Monroe Doctrine, 1833 Meteoric shower, 1843 Sewing machine, 1853 Crystal Palace opened, 1863 Emancipation Proc-
lamation, 1873 Panic of '73, 1883 Standard R. R. time.
1804-1884.
1804 12th Amendment, 1814 Battle of Lundy's Lane,
1824 Tariff of '24, 1834 McCormick's reaper patented, 1844
Morse's telegraph, }854 Perry's Treaty withJa])an, 1864 Ala-
bama
vs.
Kearsarge, 1874
Woman's Crusade, 1884 Alaska
Ty. organized.
1805-1885.
1805 Lewis and Clark expedition, 1815 Battle of New
Orleans, 1825 P>ie Canal opened, 1835 Specie Circular, 1845
New York
anti-rent riots, 1855 Slavery disputes, 1865 Lee's
surrender, 1875 Resumption act, 1885 Washington
monument.
1806-1886.
1806 Berlin and Milan decrees, 1816 2d U. S. Bank, 1826
Adams and Jefferson, 1836 Death of Madison,
1846 N. W. boundary, 1856 Assault on Sumner, 1866 AtlanDeaths of
tic
Cable, 1876 Centennial, 1886 Pres. Succession
bill.
1807-1887.
1807 Fulton's Steamboat, 1817 Seminole war, 1827 first
railroad in America, 1837 Panic of '37, 1S47 Mormons went
to Ut:di, 1857, Panic of '57, 1867 Purchase of Alaska, 1877
Edison's Phonograph, 1887 Inter-state commerce
bill.
180S-188S.
1808 Importation of slaves forbidden, 1818 Illinois admit1828 Webster's dictionary published, 1838 Chorokees
ted,
SCrKNCK AXI> ART OF TKACHING ILMTKI) tSTATES IHSTOKY.
removed
to Indian Ty.,
/
/
1848 California gold discover}^, 1858
Amendment, 1878 Bland
LincoIn-Dong-las debates, 1868 I4th
silver
liill,
18S8 Act excluding Chinese.
1809-1889.
.
1809 Non-intercourse
act.
1819 Purchase of
Fla.,
1829
Civil service reforms, 1889 1st normal school, 1849 Invasion
of Cuba, 1859
J<.)hn
Brown's
raid,
1869 Union Pacific E. R.
world, 1889 Pan-
opened, 1879 Grant's tour around the
American
Conc];ress.
DlFiECTIONS.
1.
and
2.
Let
i)upils
re- write
the above in chronological order
recite.
Ask Questions
at
random.
TWENTY WAKS OF
,
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
78
1.
Give the time, causes and
2.
Number
results of each war.
of Confederate trocps In the Civil
War was
about 600,000.
ADMINISTRATIONS.
Important Event.
President.
.
Whiskey Rebellion.
George Washington,
John Adams,
Alien and Sedition Laws.
3.
Thomas
Purchase of Louisiana.
4.
James Madison
James Monroe,
J. Q. Adams,
1.
2.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Jefferson,
War
of 1812.
Missouri Compromise.
Fn-st R. R. in the U. S.
Andrew Jackson,
Martin Van Buren,
Rotation in
Wm.
Office seekers.
office.
Panic of 1S37.
H. Harrison,
10.
John Tyler,
11.
James K. Polk,
Annexation of Texas.
Mexican War.
12.
Zachary Taylor,
Invasion of Cuba.
13.
Millard Fillmore,
Omnibus
14.
Franklui Pierce,
Kansas-Nebraska
15.
James Buchanan,
Slavery Question.
16.
Abraham Lincoln,
Andrew Johnson,
Civil
17.
18.
U.
19.
R. B. Hayes,
8.
Bill.
Bill,
War-
Reconstruction.
Grant,
Centennial.
Bland Silver Bill.
Star Route Frauds.
A. Garfield,
20.
J.
21.
Chester A. Arthur,
22.
Grover Cleveland,
Civil Service
23.
Benj. Harrison,
McKinlev
Anti- Polygamy Bill,
Reform.
TaritT Bill.
DIRECTIONS.
1.
Recite individually, then in concert.
Let students make the table moie complete by adding
other columns, showing when and where they were born,
when and where the}^ died, when inaugurated, time in ufHce
2.
and by what party
3.
Illustration
:
elected.
— Washington, the
first
president, was born
79
SCTKNCE ANIJ AUT OF TEACHING UNITKT) STATRS HISTORY.
He
1732, and died in 1799 at Mt. Vernon.
was inanourated April 30th, 1789, and or.e of the important
events of his administration was the Whiskey Rebellion.
in Virginia in
CONSTITUTION AND AMENDMENTS.
The
1.
from
in
May
constitntional convention was held at Philadelphia
14 to September 17, 17S7.
was fully adopted
It
1789.
George Washington was president of this convention.
John Adams, James Madison, Hamilton, Randolph and
Franklin were among the leading members,
First ten amendments were adopted from 1789-91, the
4.
2.
3.
nth
in
1798, the 12th in 1S04, the loth in lS65, the 14th in
1868, and the loth
5.
What
is
m
1S70.
each of the last five amendments about?
GRAND REVIEW.
RE VIE W
The grand review
!
R EVIE \V
'.
!
K E VI
as outlined in this
I-:
W
!
!
intended to be
book
by subjects, rather
is
a systematic seheme of reviewing history
than by a routine course.
done
will lead
search.
The
The very nature
the student to
chief
aim
make
of the w^ork should
the habit of making researches.
of
the
work
a closer historical re-
ResearrJi!
now be
to
form
Research!
POLITICAL HISTORY.
The
teacher
may
requn-e each topic to be studied, or take
only the more important ones.
The important
acts of parties
should receive close attention, and causes and affects noted.
PARTIES AND PARTY MEASURES -—DURING THE REVOLUTION TO 1789.
Whig— FOR
Tory — vs.
Revolution,
Revolution,
Independence,
Independence,
Confederation,
Gonfederation,
Free Government.
The
P.'itriots.
CONSTITUTIONAL PERIOD.
first heghie.
Federal Party— Majority Power -For;
Constitution,
Strong Central Government,
Tariff,
Internal revenue,
Militia in
U.
S.
government.
Bank,
War with France,
No Alliance,
Alien and Sedition Laws,
Rigid Naturalization.
democratic-republicans.
Minority Poaver
— For
:
Constitution; People's Rights; States' Rights; France; Ya.
and Ky. Resolutions; Freedom of Speech and Press; Religious Liberty;
Liberal Naturalization;
Free Trade and De-
crease of Officers.
Presidents— Washington and Adams.
Let the teacher write a
the class to answer orally.
list
of twenty
model questions for
SCIENCT: AXI)
art of TEACniNO UNITED STATES niSTORY.
81
second regime.
Democratic-Republican Party
— Majority Power — For:
States' Ri'obts,
Personal Rights,
Louisiana Purchase,
Embargo
Act,
Non-Intercourse Act,
War
with England,
Short Terms of Office,
Low
Tariff,
National Bank,
Purchase of Florida,
Missouri Compromise,
Monroe Doctrine,
Removal of Creek
Indians.
Monroe's second term
—era
of good feeling
—party
spirit
SLEEPS.
Minority Powers — Federal Party — For:
U.
vS.
Bank; Strong Central Gov't; Repeal of Embargo
Territory; Hartford Convention;
Act; Non-Extension of
Peace.
Hartford Convention Element
— For
:
Taxation and Representation according to Population;
Natural Born Citizens as Officers; Declaration of War by a
two-thirds Vote; States to Defend
Own
Territory; Another
Convention.
—
Madison, Monroe, Adams.
Let the teacher write twenty-five pointed questions for the
Presidents
class first to
be answered orally, then
in writing.
THIRD REGBIE.
Democratic Party— Majority Power
Internal Improvement,
State Banks,
— Foe:
SCIENCE AND AIJT OF TP:ACPnNG UNITED STATES HISTOKY.
82
Removal of Deposits,
Double Currency,
Removal ol Indians,
Annexation of Texas,
Sub treasuiy,
Rotation in Office,
Minority Powers
— Whig Party — For:
Circulation of Anti-slavery literature; Rights of Petition;
State Banks;
One Term
Limited Veto Power and Protective
;
Tariff.
National Republican Party
Land Proceeds
—For:
for the Slates
;
Sub-treasury.
Vs.
Rotation io
Office.
Anti-Mason Party— For:
Anti-Mason Measures; Whig Principles.
Nullification
Party— Foe
:
Nullification; States' Rights in an
LocoFoeos Party — For
Extreme
Sense.
:
Democratic Principles; Repeal of Bad Laws.
Vs.:
Paper
Money; Monopolies; Assumed Powers.
Anti-Siavery Party— For:
Abolition of Slaveiy; National Sovereigntj'.
Presidents— Jackson and Van
Let each student write
Bitren.
fifteen questions.
swer next day.
fourth regime.
WriiG
Party — Majority
Power— For:
President for one Term,
Protective Tariff,
Limited Veto Power,
AVell Controlled Currenc^y,
Reform
Vs.
of Presidential Usurpation.
Seminole War.
Exchange.
An-
science and art of teaching united states history.
Minority Powers
83
— Democratic Party— For:
Democratic Principles; Renioval
of Indians;
Annexation
of Texas; Rotation in Office; States' Rights.
Liberty Party—For:
Abolition; Equality; Liberty.
to the Constitution
Barn-burners
— For
Fugitive Slave Clause
Vs.
Slave Trade,
;
:
Democratic principles maini3^
Hunkers
— For
:
Democratic principles mainly.
Presidents —Harrison and Tyler.
FIFTH regime.
Democratic Party
— Majority
Power
— For:
Annexation of Texas,
Mexican War,
Reserved Rights of
States,
Full Rights of Citizenship,
Land Proceeds
for Nation,
A^eto Power,
F^.;
Wilmot Proviso.
— Whig
Minority Powers
Party — Vs:
Annexation of Texas; Mexican War;
States' Bights; Wil-
mot Proviso.
A MERic AN Pa rt y —
Foreigners
Free Soil Party
Free Soil Free
;
Tariff
;
Vs-
— America for Americans.
— For:
Men Free Labor
;
;
Free
Land
Prohibition of Slavery in territories;
to Settlers
Liberty Party;
Barn-burners and Hunkers same principles as before.
President --Polk.
—
—
science and art of teaching united states ihstoky.
84
sixth i?egime.
Whig
Party — xMajority
Omnibus
Power — Fur:
Bill,
Slaver}^ in Slave States,
Compromising.
Vs.:
Va. and Ky. Resolntions, State Rights.
Minority Powers -Democratic Party
Omnibus
-
For:
Va. and K3^ Resolutions; Slavery
in
Slave
Independence of Hayti; International Arbitration.
Vs.:
Bill;
States; States' Rights;
Silver
Compromising.
Grays— Branch
of
Whigs.
Free Soil Party— For:
Omnibus
Bill;
Fugitive Slave Act.
American Party— For:
America for Americans; Stricter Naturalization Laws; ReFreedom; Reserved Right of States. Vs.: Whig Pol-
ligious
icy.
Presidents— Taylor and Fillmore.
seventh regime.
Democratic Party —Majority
Power— For:
Compromise Measures,
Kansas
aiicl
Nebrasl^a
Settlement of Slavery
^
Bill,
})y Teri-itory,
Free Seas,
Dred Scott Decision,
Pacific R. R.,
Fugitive Slave Law%.
M inorit Y
Po w er s
Republic an P a t r
i {
For
:
Internal Improvements; Pacific R. R.; Admission of Kansas.
Vs.:
Extension of Slavery; Kansas Policy; Slavery
Territories.
in
HISTORY.
SCIENCK AND AET OF TEACHING UNITED STATES
85
as before.
Free Soil and American Parties same demands
Presidents— Pierce and Buclianan.
eighth regime.
Republican
Civil
Party— Majokity Power— For:
War
if
Need
be,
Internal Revenue,
Treasury Notes,
U. 8. Bonds,
National Banks.
Emancipation
of Slaves,
Monroe Doctrine,
Amendments to Constitution,
Civil Rights Bill,
Reconstruction,
Improvement of
Ku-Klux Act,
Credit,
Resumption Act,
Civil Service Reform,
Vs.:
Extension of Slavery,
Unsettled Property in Slaves,
Lecompton Constitution,
Slave Trade.
MiNoraTY Powers— Confederate
Slavery; Fugitive Slave
Law;
Party— For:
Pacific R. R.;
Cuba.
Loyal Democratic Party— For:
Admission of States on Douglas' Plan,
Supreme Court Decision,
Pacific R. R.,
Peace by a Convention,
Civil
Law.
Constitutional Party
Liberty; Union and
-For
:
Constitution.
Annexation of
,
science and art of teaching united states history.
86
Liberal Party
— BictvvEen:
Republicans and Dtfmocrats.
Prohibition
Party— For:
Liquor Traffic; Reduction of Postage: Re-
PiJoliibilion of
duction of E. R, Hates; Conipalsoiy Education; Election by
Direct Vote; Universal Suffrage.
Labor Parties:
Independent, Union, National, People's.
Demand
in viz
:
to better the conditions of the laboring classes^
—
1.
Low
2.
Anti-monopol3^
3.
Popular Election of Presidents.
Tariff.
"
"
4.
" Senators.
5.
Increase of Currency.
6.
Graduated Tax.
Presidents —Lincoln,
Johnson,
Grant,
Hayes,
Arthur.
ninth regime.
Democratic Party —Majority Power — For:
Improvement
Tariff
of
Water waj^s,
Reform,
Reduction of Revenue,
Honest Civil Service Reform,
Vs.:
Unnecessar3^ Taxation
Importation of Mongols.
Sumptuary Laws.
Minority Powers.
Same
as in 8th
Regime.
President —Cleveland.
TENTH
REGIiME.
Republican Party— Majority Power
Revision of Tariff,
Protection,
— For:
Garfield,
SCIENCE AND AJIT OF TEACHING LXITKD STATES HISTORY.
87
Nicaragua Canal,
Civil Sfi-vice Reform.
Vs.:
Free Ship
Bill,
Pension Vetoes.
Same
Minority Powers.
President
1.
— Hirrrison.
in
a maJorit\' rule.
Name
five political parties
tUeni.
Tliere are ten Ivcgimes.
3
Federals:
presidents— 3 terms.
DemiGcratic-Rej}.:
Democrats:
Whif/s:
G
3 presidents— 7 terms.
presidents— 7 terms.
4 presidents — 2 terms.
RepMlcans:
3.
Kegime.
Dnriug onr national history only
have been
'2.
as in 9tli
7
presidents— 7 terms.
Democratic-PcpuMicans, Democrats and Repnblicans
each 7 terms.
4,
Democrats were in power in odd numbered regimes—
and Oth.
Republicans in even numbered regimes -8th and lOth.
3d, 5th, 7th
o.
G.
Vv'
higs even
]Y]iifj
— 4th and
Elements:
Gth.
National Republican, Anti-Mason, Anti-
Slavery Society, Liberty, Free
Democratic ElcWcCnts:
Soil, Silver Ch-ays,
American.
Locofocos, Barnburners, Hunkers,
Douglas Wing, Confederates, Anti-Nel)raskans.
Republiccvn Elements:
Liberals, Independents, Reformers,
Federals.
Mixed Elements:
Nullification,
Labor
Parties, Prohibition,,
Constitutional.
SEVEN SUBJECTS FOR CO.MPOSITIONS.
3d.
2d, Tlie Federalists.
1st, The Whigs and Tories.
The Democratic-Republicans. 4ih, The Whigs and Kindred
5th,
The Democrats nnd Kindred Elements,
Elements.
—
88
SCIKNCK AND AI?T OF TEACHING UNITED STATES IllSTOKY.
6th,
Tlic
and Kindred Elements.
Repnbliciins
7tb,
Mixed Elements.
IIISTOPvY
1
OF T2:RKIT0KTAL GROWTH
— By Treaty vrith
2 — Lo ulsiana
— SEVEN
England.
Pa r chase.
In 1803,
By
Pui'chase,
Cost $15,000,000
-What?
Size 1,000,000 sq. m.
From
3
France.
Florida Purchase.
In 1819,
By
Purchase,
Cost $5,000,000,
Size 67,000 sq. m.,
From
4
Spain.
Texas
A nnexation.
In 1845,
By Annexation,
Was a Republic,
Size 318,000 sq. m..
Debts Assumed $7,000,000.
5
California Purchase
and Conq.
In 1847,
By
Purchase and Conquest,
Cost $18,000,000,
Size 525,000 sq. m., includes other Ty.,
From Mexico.
6
Gadsden Purchase^
In 1853,
By
Purchase,
Cost 110,000,000,
Size 45,500 sq.
From Mexico.
m.,,
AQLTSITIONS.
The
89
SCIENCK AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES HISTORY.
7
— A laslca
Pu rch ase.
\n 1867,
By
riivchase,
Cost $7,200,000,
Size 570,000 sq. m.,
From
Russia.
Draw
a large
Aqnisition
map
of
tlie
territorial
(
1
By
-|
5
"
Treaty,
Purchase,
(I
"
Annexation.
growth of the U.
ADMISSION OF STATES.
Outlines to be use'l with the text.
Vermont
—
•
Vt.
2.
Admitted in 1791.
Green Mountain State.
3.
Settled at Brattleboro 1724,
4.
Bought
1.
itself for ^^30,000.
Kentucky —Ky.
— 1791.?
1.
Admitted
2.
State of Blood3^ Ground.
Settled at Boonesborough, 1775.
Settled by Daniel Boone.
0.
4.
Te nn essee
in
1792
— Tenn
m
\.
Admitted
2.
Settled at Ft.
3
State of Franklin
4.
Birthplace of Polk, Johnson, Jackson.
1786.
London 1756.
from 1785-88.
OJuo-0.
1.
Admitted
2.
Sattled at Marietta 1788.
*in
1803.
3.
Buckeye
4.
Settled by Rufus
5.
Birthplace of Hayes, Garfield, Harrison,
State,
Putnam.
S.
SCIENCE AND AKT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES IIISTOKY.
90
Louisiana
— La.
1.
Admitted
2.
Settled at Biloxi 1699, by Iberville.
in 1812.
3.
Creole State.
4.
Ead's Jetties below
5.
Birthplace of Taylor.
New
Orleans.
Indiana— Ind.
1.
Admitted 1816.
2.
Settled at Vincennes 1702.
3.
Hoosier State.
4.
Birthplace of Ben]
Mississippi
Harrison.
— Miss.
1.
Admitted 1817.
2.
Settled at
3.
Settled
Rosalie.
P^t.
by Iberville.
Name Means ''(xreat River."
4.
Illinois-
III.
1.
Admitted
2.
Settled at Knska>-kia, Cabokia
3.
Sucker State.
in 1818.
Nauvoo Temple commenced there.
Dearborn IS 12 — now Chic-iiio.
4.
0.
Ft.
6.
Birthplace of Lincoln and
Alalawa
4.
(rrrint.
— Ala.
Admitted 1819.
1.
Settled at Mobile 1711, by the French.
2.
3.
and Peoria 1682,
'
Lizzard State.
Paid Ga,
1;^
milli<jn dolbirs for AlM,bam:t.
Ma;ine—Me.
1.
Admitted
2.
Monhegan 1622.
Gosnold, Pring, De Monts au'! Weymoiith explored
3.
in
1620.
Settled at
1602-03-04-05 respectively.
4.
The V\\w Troc
Stnto.
ui
SCIKXCK ANI>
Missouri
AI;T
OF TKAOIHNG UNiTFJ) STATKS
IliSTOin'.
91
-."Ifo.
Admitted 1821.
Settled at St. Genevieve 17o5 by French.
Name means "Muddy Water."
What can you tell about Mo. Compromise?
l.
2
3.
4.
Six States
—I.T.11AM.AI.
I—
M — ississippi
I llinois
A — lal^aina
M— aine
M — issonri
11(1 i:i
I
|
;>
Admitted
in 181G-1 7-18-19-20-21.
1
j
The student should by this time have a good idea of how
to make out outlines foi* hiinstlf foi" the ''admission of states."
It is better to make much of the work of the student a task,
but the work should be S3^stematic. Merely the names of
the states nnd the dates of admission will be given for the
other.s.
1836 Arkansas
1863 West Virginia
1837 Michigan
1845 Florida
1864 Nevada
1867 Nebraska
1845 Texas
1846 Iowa
1876 Colorado
1 889 North Dakota
1848 California
1850 Wisconsin
1889 South Dakota
1889 Montana
1889 Washington
1858 Mijuiesota
1859 Oregon
1890 Idaho
1890 W^yoming.
1861 Kansas
STUDY OF
.^I'ATKS'
UI^IHTS.
Originated
in
Expressed
in articles of confederation.
Recognized
Colonial history.
in the
U.
S. constitution.
Whisky Rebellion.
Yirginia and Kentucky Resolutions.
Ilartforfl
Convention.
South Carolina Nullification.
SOIKNCK AND
02
Al."!
OK TKACHING UNITKD STATKS HlSTOiJY
Rights Party in Mississippi.
8.
vStates'
9.
Personal Liberty Laws passed in nortliern
10.
states.
Secession of sonthern states.
STUDY OF inve>;tions.
Benj. Franklin
— stove, accordeon, lightning rod,
1760.
Whitney-— cotton gin, 1790.
Robert Fulton— stenmboat, 1807.
Eli
Wood — cast
Jethro
Cyrus^ McCormi(;k
F.
iron plow.
— rea})er,
834.
1
B.IMorse— Magnetic Telegraph, 1837.
Ellias
Howe— sewing
Hoe — cylinder
machine, 1846.
printing press, 1847.
Gatling— Gatling gun, 1861.
— Monitor, 1862; Vesuvius, 1888.
— telephone, 1873.
Thos. Edison — phonograph, 1877; electric light,
Capt. Ericson
Graham
Bell
1879.
STUDY OF SLAVERY QUESTION.
Columbus took oOO Indians
to
Europe for
slaves.
Indian slavery in the West Indies.
Negro slavery
in Virginia ni 1619.
Slavery encouraged by G. B.
Negro
plot in
New York
1741.
In 1783 northern states l)egan to abolish slavery.
Effects of the invention of the cotton gin.
Constitution forbade slave importation 1808.
Congress declares slave tiade piracy 1820.
Slavery died out north of Mason and Dixon's
Missouri Compromise 1820.
Admission of Texas.
Wilmot Proviso 1846.
Omnibus Bill 1850.
Kansas and Nebraska
Kansas
Bill
1854.
civil war.
Dred Scolt decision 1857.
John Brown's raid 1859.
Election of
Abraham
Lincoln.
line.
SCIENCK AM) AIJT OF TEACHING
93
STATES HISTORY.
Proclamation 1863.
Lincoiii's P^mancipation
Thirteenth
UMTED
Amendment
1S65.
Freed men's Bureau and Civil Rights
Bill.
STUDY OF FAMOUS TREATIES.
Eysivick:
Same
Holland.
as before..
Acadia given to P:ngland.
Louisburg to France.
Aix-la-Chapelle: •Germany.
Paris: France. Spain ceded Florida to England.
UtrecJit
:
Holland.
France cedes
all
lands east of the iMississippi except
Orleans and the two
land.
New
Newfoundland
islands south of
Orleans and
all
to
New
Eng-
west of the Mississippi to Spain.
independParis: France. England acknowledges the
of Newshores
the
on
fish
to
right
and
S.,
ence of the U.
Mississippi
the
at
upon
agreed
lines
Boundary
foundland.
was
on the west and Great Lakes on the north. Florida
ceded to Spain.
Ghent: Belgium.
Same
Guadnloiqoe Hidalgo
:
as before.
Mexico.
Boundary
as
Rio Grande,
Mexico
southern New Mexico, Gila and Colorado Rivers.
the
U. S.
and
California
and
ceded to the U. S. New Mexico
paid Mexico $^15,000,000.
made,
Tell at the close of what war each treaty was
1.
cause of the war and general results.
2.
Civil
Why
was there no
ti-eaty
made
at the close of
the
War?
STUDY OF GREAT MEN AND WOMEN.
HamilOndors: Patrick Henry, John Actlims, Alexander
Webster.
Daniel
Clay,
ton, J. C. Calhoun, Henry
Washington, Jefferson, Clay, Webster, Lincoln,
Statemien :
(iJarfield.
Poets:
Longfellow,
Bryant,
Whittier,
Holmt;s, Lowell,
Poe. LLalleck, Emerson.
Historicms:
Bancroft, Lossing, Prescott, Hildreth, Irving,
Motley, Cooper, Parkman.
Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, Holland, W'allace.
Novelists:
Harriet 'Beecher Stowe,
94
SCiENCK AND A!rr OF
TK.AClllIS'O
UMTKl) STATICS
HISTOI.'T.
Franklin, Morse. Edison, Agassiz, Dana, Conte.
Loolc nj) the biogmpjiy of each one of the
above in your history or Cyelopedin.
Scientists
:
Direction:
EXTRA READING AND STUDY.
Articles of Confederation.
Declaration of Independence.
Ordinance of 1787.
Washington's Farewell Address.
The United States Constitntion.
*
'
History of Constitutional Amendments.
Had Columbia, 1798.
Star-spangled Banner, 1814.
Paul Revere's Ride.
Song',
The Webster and Hayne Debate.
Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1850.
Sheridan's Ride.
Building of the Nation.
Boys of
Boys of
'76.
'(3i.
FIN A L CI njONOLO( aC \ L RKVIFAW
1776
— Indei)endence declared.
7.
Battle of Sai'atogn.
8.
Evacuation of I^liihidelphia.
Recapture of Stony Point.
9.
1780— Treason
1.
2.
of Arnold.
Yorktown Surrendered.
Preliminary Treaty.
f).
Disbanding the Arn:y.
4.
Congress
5.
Ambassadors:
6.
in
Trenton.
Adams to Eng., Jefferson to France,
Jefferson's land survey system adopted.
7.
Constitutional Convention
8.
Nine
9.
First president inaugurated.
states
adopt the constitution.
SCIKNCK AND AKT OF
Ti:AClfI>JG
UNITED STATES lUSTORY.
Philadelphin
]790_ConoTCSs decrees
the
capital
for
95
ten
3^ears.
1.
Anthracite coal discovered
in
Penn.
Columbia River.
2.
Gray discovers
0.
Difficulties with
4.
Wayne
5.
Jay's Treaty with England.
the
Genet.
defeats the Indians.
(5.
Washington's Farewell Address.
7.
Embassy
8.
Quasi war, Alien and Sedition Laws.
9.
Virginia Resolutions.
1800— Seat
of
to France.
government changed
to Washington.
1.
Period of natur.'dization changed from 14 to 5 years.
2.
Military
3.
Louisiana Purchase.
Acadamy
established at
4.
Expedition of Lewis and Clark.
5.
Treaty of Peace with Tripoli.
6.
Oders
7.
Treason
8
Importation of slaves forbidden.
9,
Embargo and Non
1810
West
in Council, Berlin Decree.
trial of
Burr.
Intercourse Acts.
— ?Jadison's Commerce Proclamation
).
Battle of Tippecanoe.
2
Battle of
3
Perry's ^'ictory on Lake Erie.
4
Hartford Convention.
5,
Battle of
(•>
T.-iriff
7.
New
Orleans.
law of ISiC
2d U.
S.
Bank.
Seminole war.
admitted
steamboat crossed the Atlantic.
8.
Illinois
9
First
1S20
Queenstown
— JNIissouri
Compromise.
1
Jdissouri admitted.
2
S A. republics recognized.
Point.
SCIENCE AND AiJT OF TEACHING UNITED STATES IlISTOKY.
96
4.
Monroe Doctrine.
La Fayette's visit,
5.
Erie Canal completed.
3.
Adams and
6.
Deaths of
7.
First R. R. in the United States.
8.
Tariff of 1828.
9.
Mexican independence recognized.
1830
1.
Jefferson.
— Famous Webster and
Tlayne debate.
Nullification in South Carolina.
Hawk War.
2.
Black
3.
U.
4.
Great
5.
Fiorina
6.
8.
Admission of Kansas.
Financial Panic.
Patriot War.
Cherokee Indians removed to Indian Ty.
9.
First
7.
deposits distributed
S.
New
fire in
War
among
begun.
Normal School opened.
1840— Mormons
settle at
Nraivoo,
1.
Repeal of the sub-treasury
2.
Webster-Ashburton Treaty.
3.
Dickens' visit
4.
First treaty with China.
t«)
111.
bili.
the U. S.
New
5.
Ami-rent
6.
Suspension bridge at Niagara
7.
Oneida Commnity founded
8.
Astor Library foup.ded.
9.
Department
1850
1.
state banks.
York.
riots in
York.
in
built.
N. Y.
of Interior created.
— Compromise of
Omnibus
1850.
Hill.)
Maine Law passed.
2.
The under-ground
3.
Cr3'stal
4.
Perry's Treaty with Japan.
railroad.
Palace opened
war
in
Kansas.
5.
Civil
6.
Brooks assaults Sumner.
7.
Dred Scott Decision
in
N. Y.
;
Panic of '57.
SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING UNITED STATES IIISTOKY.
S.
Lecomptoii constitution; Lincoln Douglas debate.
1).
John Brown's Raid;
1860
— South
Prescott, Irving-
and Mann died.
Carolina seceded.
1.
Crittenden compromise; Morrill
2.
Issue of greenbacks;
3.
4.
Sioux war; Gettj^sburg.
Fight between Alabama and Keai'sarge.
5.
Freedman's Bureau; Amnesty proclamation.
tariit
Homestead
bill.
act.
6.
Atlantic cable laid.
7.
8.
Purchase of Alaska; Tenure of Oilice
Johnson impeached; Ku-Klux-Klan.
9.
Black Friday; Union Pacific R. R. opened.
1870
— loth Amendment;
1.
2.
8.
4.
Fenian excitement.
fire;
Credit Mobelier;
:.
Resumption act; Louisiana troubles.
Centennial; Sioux war.
Electoral Commission; R. II. strike.
Bland Silver bill; Fishery Award.
9.
Negro Exodus; Resumption
5.
().
7.
bill.
Alabama Claims.
Geneva arbitration.
Telephone; Grab Act; Panic of Wo.
Patrons of Husbandry; Woman's Crusade.
Chicago
1880— U.
S.
of specie payment.
census.
Yorktown
Centeiuiinl.
1.
Star route frauds;
2.
Anti Polygam}^
3.
Civil service reform bill; Brookljni bridge.
4.
Territorial
bill;
Anti-Chinese
bill.
5.
government for Alaska.
Washington monument; Bartholdi
6.
Presidential succession
7.
Inter-state
8.
Chinese exclusion
9.
Oklahoma opened; Pan-American Congress.
1890— McKmley
1.
commerce
tariff
bill
bill;
;
statue.
Charleston earthquake.
Electoral count
bill.
bill.
bill.
George Bancroft died; Chilian
97
trouble.
08
SCIKIn'CE
and AUT of teaching
UNITE!) STATES HISTORY.
2.
400th anniversary of the discovery of America,
;>.
Woild's Fair
h.ehl at Cb.icago.
DIKECTIONS
1
Usf^ the
above for a thorough oral review, asking quesone of the above events.
tions about each
2.
o.
4.
Review the whoh) subject,
Review the reviews.
Do not neglect to have each
pui)il
keej) a iiistoi-y note
l)Ook.
5.
Always introduce
selections
from standard authors,
that apply to the lesson,
Remember
G.
that
history
and
geograjih}-
are
sister
stuvlies, and that one will always support the other.
Always, for each lesson, have a set of review questions
7.
to ask.
8.
0.
make
10.
Review daily.
While reviewing, maps should be drawn from memory.
Always question very closely, so as to have pupils
a close and critical study.
Ladl);,
and
ahi-ai/s,.
have
all
niidal-es corredcd
ma,;/ occi-r.
^f^-i^*f^'SW'
that
*
GENERAL
INDEX.
PAGE.
Pi-eface,
2
Principles of teaching" history,
O
o
Outlines for primaiy grades,
Outlines for middle grades.
Some more
6
.
8
.
10
principles,
9
Aborigines,
Division of the snl)ject.
Discoveries and explorations,
14
.
Columbus,
in
Spanish exploi-ations,
.
Fiench exj)lorations,
English exph)ratioiis.
.
21
.
23
22
period outline.
Colonial histor}',
25
25-29
Colonfal acrostics.
Grand review
— colonial,
French and Indian war
— tnble.
30
.
Colonial date associations.
Revolutionary war.
— mnemonic.
Revolutionary war — table.
Liberty
and
stripes acrostic.
33
35
.
37
.
38
.
40
Causes of the Revolution,
Stars
17
19
Overlapping of claims.
First
15
37
39
GENERAL INDEX.
(Tiand
review— revolution,
40
Constitutional period,
43
Washington,
44
Adams,
4G
....
Jefferson,
47
Madison,
41)
Mnemonic form
Nav^al battles
for
war of 1812,
— a study,
51
.
Monroe,
Adams,
5(r
54
J. Q.,
50
,
Jackson,
57
Van Buren,
59
Tyler,
Mexican war
GO
— table,
6i
Polk,
(32
Fillmore,
.
•
,
,
0:>
Pierce,
G4
Buchanan,
64
Causes of Civil War,
Civil
war — table
65
67
Lincoln,
68
Johnson,
70
Grant,
71
Hayes,
72
Arthur,
73
Cleveland,
74
Harrison,
75
Review
of Reviews,
Twenty wars of the United Slates,
Grand review— constitutional,
Political histoiy.
75
77
79
.80
Territorial growth.
88
Admission of
89
states,
States' rights study.
Inventions,
.
Chronological review.
91
92
94
f
*
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
010 546 462 9
lit.
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