Radio Shack | DX-397 | Owner`s manual | Radio Shack DX-397 Owner`s manual

Radio Shack DX-397 Owner`s manual
20-227.fm Page 1 Wednesday, August 4, 1999 10:13 AM
Cat. No. 20-227
OWNER’S MANUAL
Please read before using this equipment.
DX-397
AM/FM/SW 12-Band
Portable Receiver
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FEATURES
Your RadioShack DX-397 AM/FM/SW 12-Band Portable Receiver
brings you the voices of the world. Simple to operate, the receiver
tunes mediumwave (MW or AM), FM, and shortwave stations. In
the 10 international shortwave bands, you can hear news broadcasts and other programs from sources around the world, such as
Radio Japan, Israel Radio, the British Broadcasting Corporation,
and Radio Australia.
Your receiver’s features include:
Light and Compact Design — lets you carry the receiver with you
wherever you go.
Two Built-In Antennas — provide good reception of received signals.
Earphone Jack — lets you connect earphones or headphones for
private listening.
Three Power Options — let you power the receiver from batteries,
standard AC power (with an optional AC adapter), or your vehicle’s
battery (with an optional DC cigarette lighter adapter).
Shortwave Band Coverage List — this Owner’s Manual lists the
most popular U.S. and international shortwave stations, so you can
quickly tune to these stations.
© 1998 Tandy Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.
RadioShack is a registered trademark used by Tandy Corporation.
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CONTENTS
Preparation ..................................................................................
Connecting to Power .............................................................
Installing Batteries ..........................................................
Using Standard AC Power .............................................
Using Vehicle Battery Power ..........................................
Adjusting the Antennas .........................................................
Connecting an Earphone/Headphones .................................
Listening Safely ..............................................................
Traffic Safety ..................................................................
4
4
4
5
6
7
8
8
9
Operation ................................................................................... 10
Listening Hints ..........................................................................
Reference Sources ..............................................................
Frequency Conversion ........................................................
Band Allocation ...................................................................
International Frequencies .............................................
Time Standard Frequencies .........................................
11
11
11
12
12
13
Listening Guide ......................................................................... 14
Care and Maintenance .............................................................. 18
The FCC Wants You to Know .............................................. 19
Specifications ........................................................................... 20
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PREPARATION
CONNECTING TO POWER
You can power the receiver from internal batteries, standard AC
power, or your vehicle’s battery.
Installing Batteries
You can use three AA batteries (not supplied) to power the receiver. For the best results and longest life, we recommend alkaline
batteries such as RadioShack Cat. No. 23-552.
Cautions:
• Always use fresh batteries of the required size and recommended type.
• Do not mix old and new batteries, different types of batteries
(standard, alkaline, or rechargeable), or rechargeable batteries
of different capacities.
Follow these steps to install the batteries.
1. Open the battery compartment cover by
pressing on the dotted portion and sliding it in the direction of the arrow below.
2. Slide three AA batteries into
the compartment according to
the polarity symbols (+ and –)
marked inside.
3. Close the cover.
4
(Illus)
(Illus)
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Cautions:
• If you will not be using battery power or if you will only use an
adapter for several months, remove the batteries.
• Dispose of old batteries promptly and properly.
Using Standard AC Power
To power the receiver from standard AC power, you need an optional AC adapter, such as Cat. No. 273-1662.
Note: Connecting an AC adapter disconnects internal batteries.
Cautions:
• The AC adapter must be capable of delivering 4.5 volts, its
center tip must be set to negative, it must deliver at least 200
milliamps, and its barrel plug must properly fit the receiver’s DC
IN 4.5V jack. The recommended adapter meets these specifications. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications
could damage the receiver or the adapter.
• When you finish using the AC adapter, unplug it from the AC
outlet first, then disconnect it from the receiver.
Follow these steps to use AC power.
(Illus)
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1. Set the adapter’s voltage switch to 4.5V.
2. Line up the 5.5 mm outer diameter/2.1 mm inner diameter barrel plug with the adapter’s socket so it reads –TIP, and insert
the plug into the socket.
3. Insert the barrel plug into the receiver’s DC IN 4.5V jack.
4. Plug the adapter into a standard AC outlet.
Using Vehicle Battery Power
To power the receiver from your vehicle’s battery, you need an optional DC cigarette lighter adapter, such as Cat. No. 270-1560.
Cautions:
• The DC cigarette lighter adapter must be capable of delivering
4.5 volts, its center tip must be set to negative, it must deliver
at least 200 milliamps, and its barrel plug must properly fit the
receiver’s DC IN 4.5V jack. The recommended adapter meets
these specifications. Using an adapter that does not meet
these specifications could damage the receiver or the adapter.
• Always plug the DC cigarette lighter adapter into the receiver
before you plug it into your vehicle's cigarette-lighter socket.
Always unplug the adapter from the vehicle's cigarette-lighter
socket before you unplug it from the receiver.
Follow these steps to power the receiver from your vehicle’s battery.
(illus)
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1. Set the DC cigarette lighter adapter’s voltage switch to 4.5V.
2. Line up the 5.5 mm outer diameter/2.1 mm inner diameter barrel plug with the adapter’s socket so it reads –TIP, and insert
the plug into the socket.
3. Insert the adapter’s barrel plug into the receiver’s DC IN 4.5 V
jack.
4. Insert the adapter’s plug into the vehicle’s cigarette-lighter
socket.
ADJUSTING THE ANTENNAS
FM/SW — For the best FM and shortwave reception, pull up the telescoping
antenna’s base, then fully extend the antenna and position it for the best reception.
MW (AM) — For the best MW reception,
rotate the receiver. The receiver uses a
built-in antenna for this band.
(Illus)
(Illus)
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CONNECTING AN EARPHONE/
HEADPHONES
For private listening, you can plug optional mono headphones or an
earphone with a 1/8-inch (3.5 mm) plug (both available at your local
RadioShack store) into the
jack on the left side of the receiver.
This automatically disconnects the internal speaker.
(illus)
Listening Safely
To protect your hearing, follow these guidelines when you use an
earphone or headphones.
• Do not listen at extremely high volume levels. Extended highvolume listening can lead to permanent hearing loss.
• Set the volume to the lowest setting before you begin listening.
After you begin listening, adjust the volume to a comfortable
level.
• Once you set the volume, do not increase it. Over time, your
ears adapt to the volume level, so a volume level that does not
cause discomfort might still damage your hearing.
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Traffic Safety
Do not use an earphone or headphones with your receiver when
operating a motor vehicle or riding a bicycle in or near traffic. Doing
so can create a traffic hazard and could be illegal in some areas.
If you use an earphone or headphones with your receiver, be very
careful. Do not listen to a continuous broadcast. Even though some
earphones or headphones let you hear some outside sounds when
listening at normal volume levels, they still can present a traffic hazard.
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OPERATION
1. To turn on the receiver, slide POWER to ON.
(illus)
2. Set SW/MW/FM to the desired band. To tune a shortwave
broadcast, set SW/MW/FM to one of the SW bands (1 to 10).
See “International Frequencies” on Page 12 for information
about each SW band.
(illus)
3. Adjust TUNING to tune to the
desired station then adjust
either of the radio’s antennas
if necessary (see “Adjusting
the Antennas” on Page 7).
The TUNING indicator on the
front of the receiver lights
when a station is properly
tuned.
(Illus)
4. Adjust VOLUME to a comfortable listening level.
(Illus)
5. Slide POWER to OFF to turn off the receiver.
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LISTENING HINTS
Shortwave listening is a hobby with thousands of participants
worldwide. It requires no special knowledge or skills, but your enjoyment increases as you gain experience and develop special listening techniques.
The information in this section can help you make the most of your
DX-397.
REFERENCE SOURCES
Publications about shortwave listening such as Listening to Shortwave Radio (available at your local RadioShack store), the World
Radio Handbook, Radio Amateur’s Handbook, Passport to World
Band Radio, Monitoring Times, and Popular Communications are
available through your local library or newsstand. These publications can help you learn about the conditions that make long-distance reception possible and provide up-to-date listings for
shortwave broadcasts in English and in other languages.
FREQUENCY CONVERSION
A band is a group of frequencies. Sometimes, bands are grouped
according to their wavelengths, in meters. The tuning location of a
station can be expressed as a frequency (kHz or MHz) or a wavelength (meters).
Amateur radio operators generally refer to the frequencies they operate on using the frequency’s wavelength. For example, the 19meter band refers to the range of frequencies with waves about 19
meters long.
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Use the following equations to convert kHz, MHz, and meters.
To convert MHz to kHz, multiply by 1,000. For example:
9.62 MHz ¥ 1000 = 9,620 kHz
To convert kHz to MHz, divide by 1,000. For example:
2780 kHz ³ 1000 = 2.780 MHz
To convert MHz to meters, divide 300 by the number of MHz. For
example:
300 ³ 7.1 MHz = 42.25 meters
To convert meters to MHz, divide 300 by the number of meters. For
example:
300 ³ 42.25 meters = 7.1 MHz
BAND ALLOCATION
International Frequencies
International commercial broadcasts are found in the following
shortwave bands. Programs (often in English) usually contain
news, commentaries, music, and special features reflecting the culture of the broadcasting country. Reception for this range is best
between 6:00 PM and midnight (your time).
12
Band
Frequency Range
(in MHz)
SW1
4.39–5.18
SW2
5.72–6.33
SW3*
SW4
9.20–10.02
SW5
11.35–12.25
7.00–8.05
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Band
Frequency Range
(in MHz)
SW6 **
13.25–14.28
SW7
15.00–16.05
SW8
17.30–18.18
SW9
18.70–19.25
SW10
21.20–22.30
* These bands are reserved for stations in tropical areas.
** Interference is heavy in this band because amateur radio operators and international stations share this range.
Time Standard Frequencies
These stations announce the exact time of day at specified intervals.
WWV in Fort Collins, Colorado: 5,000 kHz
CHU in Canada: 7,335 kHz
VNG in Australia: 12,000 kHz
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LISTENING GUIDE
The following list contains some of the most popular stations. All
stations broadcast in English unless otherwise specified. You can
hear these stations throughout North America. However, reception
varies based on the season, time of day, and a number of other
conditions.
This information can change at any time. For sources of yearly, upto-date listings, see “Reference Sources” on Page 11.
kHz
Station
4,750
Radio Bertoua
Bertoua, Cameroon
4,755
Imo Regional
Radio
Imo, Nigeria
4,777
Radio/TV Gabon
Libreville, Gabon
French
4,795
Radio Nueva
America
La Paz, Bolivia
Spanish
4,820
Radio Paz y Bien
Ambala, Ecuador
Spanish
4,832
Radio Reloj
San Jose, Costa Rica
Spanish
4,855
Radio Clube do
Para
Belem, Brazil
Portuguese
4,890
National
Broadcasting
Commission
Papua New Guinea
4,915
Voice Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya
4,920
Australian
Broadcasting
Commission
Brisbane, Australia
4,945
Radio Colosal
Neiva, Colombia
Spanish
4,965
Radio Santa Fe
Bogota, Colombia
Spanish
4,980
Ecos del Torbes
San Cristobal,
Venezuela
Spanish
5,020
Solomon Islands
Broadcasting
Service
Honiara,
Solomon Islands
5,057
Radio Gjirokaster
Gjirokaster, Albania
5,950
Guyana
Broadcasting
Service
Georgetown, Guyana
5,954
Radio Casino
Puerto Limon,
Costa Rica
14
Location
Programs are in:
Albanian
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kHz
Station
Location
Programs are in:
5,960
Radio Canada
International
Montreal, Canada
5,980
Radio RSA
Johannesburg,
South Africa
6,005
CFCX
Montreal, Canada
6,025
Radio Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
6,045
Radio Australia
Lyndhurst, Australia
6,055
Nihon Shortwave
Broadcasting
Company
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese
6,060
Radio Nacional
Buenos Aires,
Argentina
Spanish
6,075
Radio Sutatenza
Bogota, Colombia
Spanish
6,090
Radio Luxembourg
Ville Louvigny,
Luxembourg
6,095
Polskie Radio
Warsaw, Poland
6,105
Radio
New Zealand
Wellington, New
Zealand
7,140
Trans World
Radio
Monte Carlo, Monaco
7,170
Radio Noumea
Noumea, New
Caledonia
7,300
Radio Tirana
Tirana, Albania
9,475
Radio Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
9,515
Voice of Greece
Athens, Greece
9,525
Radio Korea
Seoul, South Korea
9,530
Spanish Foreign
Radio
Madrid, Spain
9,535
Swiss Radio
International
Berne, Switzerland
9,540
Radio Prague
Prague,
Czech Republic
9,570
Radio Bucharest
Bucharest, Romania
9,575
Italian Radio and
Television Service
Rome, Italy
Chinese
French
15
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kHz
Station
Location
9,610
Radio-TV Algeria
Algiers, Algeria
9,620
Radio Berlin
International
Berlin, Germany
9,645
Radio Norway
Oslo, Norway
9,720
Radio Iran
Tehran, Iran
9,745
HCJB
Quito, Ecuador
9,770
Austrian Radio
Vienna, Austria
9,800
Radio Kiev
Kiev, Ukraine
9,835
Radio Budapest
Budapest, Hungary
11,655
Israel Radio
Jerusalem, Israel
11,690
Radio Kuwait
Kuwait City, Kuwait
11,705
Radio Sweden
Stockholm, Sweden
11,720
Radio Moscow
Moscow, Russia
11,735
Radio Sofia
Sofia, Bulgaria
11,745
Voice of Free
China
Taipei, Taiwan
11,815
Radio Japan
Tokyo, Japan
11,825
Radio Tahiti
Papeete, Tahiti
11,835
4VEH
Cap Haitien, Haiti
11,845
Radio Canada
International
Montreal, Canada
11,850
Deutsche Welle
Cologne, Germany
11,890
Voice of Chile
Santiago, Chile
11,900
Radio RSA
Johannesburg, South
Africa
11,910
BBC
London, England
11,930
Radio Havana
Cuba
Havana, Cuba
11,935
Radio Portugal
Lisbon, Portugal
11,945
Radio Beijing
Beijing, China
11,955
Voice of Turkey
Ankara, Turkey
11,980
Radio Moscow
Moscow, Russia
15,135
Radio Moscow
Moscow, Russia
15,165
HCJB
Quito, Ecuador
16
Programs are in:
Arabic
Farsi
Tahitian
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kHz
Station
Location
Programs are in:
15,190
ORU
Brussels, Belgium
15,205
All India Radio
New Delhi, India
15,260
BBC
London, England
15,265
Finnish Radio
Helsinki, Finland
15,275
Radio Sweden
Stockholm, Sweden
15,305
Swiss Radio
International
Berne, Switzerland
15,310
Radio Japan
Tokyo, Japan
15,320
Radio Australia
Melbourne, Australia
15,400
BBC
London, England
15,430
Radio Mexico
Mexico City, Mexico
Spanish
15,465
Radio Pakistan
Islamabad, Pakistan
Urdu
17,720
Radio France
International
Paris, France
17,825
Vatican Radio
Vatican City
17,860
Austrian Radio
Vienna, Austria
21,495
Israel Radio
Jerusalem, Israel
21,525
Radio Australia
Melbourne, Australia
21,625
Israel Radio
Jerusalem, Israel
21,645
Radio France
International
Paris, France
21,735
Radio-TV
Morocco
Rabat, Morocco
Arabic
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CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your RadioShack DX-397 AM/FM/SW 12-Band Portable Receiver
is an example of superior design and craftsmanship. The following
suggestions will help you care for your receiver so you can enjoy it
for years.
Keep the receiver dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately. Liquids can contain minerals that can corrode the electronic circuits.
Use and store the receiver only in normal temperature environments. Temperature extremes can
shorten the life of electronic devices, damage batteries, and distort or melt plastic parts.
Handle the receiver gently and carefully. Dropping it
can damage circuit boards and cases and can cause
the receiver to work improperly.
Keep the receiver away from dust and dirt, which can
cause premature wear of parts.
Wipe the receiver with a damp cloth occasionally to
keep it looking new. Do not use harsh chemicals,
cleaning solvents, or strong detergents to clean the
receiver.
Use only fresh batteries of the required size and recommended type. Always remove old and weak batteries. They can leak chemicals that destroy
electronic circuits.
Modifying or tampering with the receiver’s internal components can
cause a malfunction, invalidate your receiver’s warranty and void
your FCC authorization to operate it. If your receiver is not operating as it should, take it to your local RadioShack store for assistance.
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THE FCC WANTS YOU TO KNOW
Your receiver might cause radio or TV interference even when it is
operating properly. To determine whether your receiver is causing
the interference, turn off your receiver. If the interference goes
away, your receiver is causing it. Try to eliminate the interference
by:
• Moving your receiver away from the receiver
• Connecting your receiver to an outlet that is on a different electrical circuit from the receiver
• Contacting your local RadioShack store for help
If you cannot eliminate the interference, the FCC requires that you
stop using your receiver.
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SPECIFICATIONS
Power Supply ........................................................... 3 AA batteries
AC/DC adapter 4.5V DC 200 mA center tip negative
Frequency Ranges:
FM ....................................................................... 88–108 MHz
MW (AM) .......................................................... 530–1710 kHz
SW1 (60 m) ..................................................... 4.39–5.18 MHz
SW2 (49 m) ..................................................... 5.72–6.33 MHz
SW3 (41 m) ..................................................... 7.00–8.05 MHz
SW4 (31 m) ................................................... 9.20–10.02 MHz
SW5 (25 m) ................................................. 11.35–12.25 MHz
SW6 (21 m) ................................................. 13.25–14.28 MHz
SW7 (19 m) ................................................. 15.00–16.05 MHz
SW8 (16 m) ................................................. 17.30–18.18 MHz
SW9 (15 m) ................................................. 18.70–19.25 MHz
SW10 (13 m) ............................................... 21.20–22.30 MHz
Maximum Sensitivity (for 50 mW output 8 Ohm):
FM ................................................................ 6.3 µV at 98 MHz
MW (AM) ................................................. 631 µV at 1,000 kHz
SW1 (60 m) .................................................. 10 µV at 4.9 MHz
SW2 (49 m) ................................................ 10 µV at 6.05 MHz
SW3 (41 m) .................................................. 10 µV at 7.2 MHz
SW4 (31 m) ............................................... 12.6 µV at 9.5 MHz
SW5 (25 m) ............................................. 12.6 µV at 11.7 MHz
SW6 (21 m) ............................................. 12.6 µV at 13.8 MHz
SW7 (19 m) ............................................. 15.9 µV at 15.5 MHz
SW8 (16 m) ............................................. 15.9 µV at 17.5 MHz
SW9 (15 m) ............................................. 15.9 µV at 18.9 MHz
SW10 (13 m) ........................................... 15.9 µV at 21.5 MHz
Usable Sensitivity (for 20 dB S/N):
FM (for 30 dB S/N) ..................................... 12.6 µV at 98 MHz
MW (AM) .............................................. 1,000 µV at 1,000 kHz
SW1 (60 m) ............................................... 12.6 µV at 4.9 MHz
SW2 (49 m) ............................................. 12.6 µV at 6.05 MHz
SW3 (41 m) ............................................... 12.6 µV at 7.2 MHz
SW4 (31 m) ............................................... 12.6 µV at 9.5 MHz
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SW5 (25 m) ............................................
SW6 (21 m) ............................................
SW7 (19 m) ............................................
SW8 (16 m) ............................................
SW9 (15 m) ............................................
SW10 (13 m) ..........................................
12.6 µV at 11.7 MHz
12.6 µV at 13.8 MHz
15.9 µV at 15.5 MHz
15.9 µV at 17.5 MHz
15.9 µV at 18.9 MHz
15.9 µV at 21.5 MHz
Speaker ................................................. 2.5 Inch, 8 Ohm, 0.5 Watt
Output Power ....... 150 mW 8 Ohm (10% THD) for built-in speaker
5 mW per channel for headphones
Headphone Jack ................................... 1/8 Inch (3.5 mm), 32 Ohm
Dimensions (HWD) ...................................... 31/2 × 65/8 × 11/4 Inches
(90 × 167 × 32 mm)
Weight:
Without Batteries ............................................. 9.87 oz (280 g)
With Batteries ..................................................... 12 oz (340 g)
Specifications are typical; individual units might vary. Specifications
are subject to change and improvement without notice.
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NOTES
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Limited Ninety-Day Warranty
This product is warranted by RadioShack against manufacturing defects in material and workmanship under normal use for ninety (90) days from the date of purchase from RadioShack company-owned stores and authorized RadioShack
franchisees and dealers. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RadioShack MAKES
NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING
THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE DURATION OF THE WRITTEN
LIMITED WARRANTIES CONTAINED HEREIN. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED
HEREIN, RadioShack SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY TO
CUSTOMER OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY WITH RESPECT TO ANY
LIABILITY, LOSS OR DAMAGE CAUSED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY BY USE
OR PERFORMANCE OF THE PRODUCT OR ARISING OUT OF ANY BREACH
OF THIS WARRANTY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY DAMAGES
RESULTING FROM INCONVENIENCE, LOSS OF TIME, DATA, PROPERTY,
REVENUE, OR PROFIT OR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF RadioShack HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Some states do not allow the limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts or
the exclusion of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or
exclusions may not apply to you.
In the event of a product defect during the warranty period, take the product and
the RadioShack sales receipt as proof of purchase date to any RadioShack store.
RadioShack will, at its option, unless otherwise provided by law: (a) correct the
defect by product repair without charge for parts and labor; (b) replace the product
with one of the same or similar design; or (c) refund the purchase price. All replaced parts and products, and products on which a refund is made, become the
property of RadioShack. New or reconditioned parts and products may be used in
the performance of warranty service. Repaired or replaced parts and products are
warranted for the remainder of the original warranty period. You will be charged
for repair or replacement of the product made after the expiration of the warranty
period.
This warranty does not cover: (a) damage or failure caused by or attributable to
acts of God, abuse, accident, misuse, improper or abnormal usage, failure to follow instructions, improper installation or maintenance, alteration, lightning or other
incidence of excess voltage or current; (b) any repairs other than those provided
by a RadioShack Authorized Service Facility; (c) consumables such as fuses or
batteries; (d) cosmetic damage; (e) transportation, shipping or insurance costs; or
(f) costs of product removal, installation, set-up service adjustment or reinstallation.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights
which vary from state to state.
RadioShack Customer Relations, Dept. W, 100 Throckmorton St., Suite 600,
Fort Worth, TX 76102
We Service What We Sell
3/97
RadioShack
A Division of Tandy Corporation
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
4A8
Printed in China
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