Massey University Calendar 2012

Massey University Calendar 2012
Diary of Key Dates 2012
General Information
Statutes and Regulations
Degree, Diploma, and
Certificate Regulations
Page 1
Page 5
Page 17
College of Business
Page 39
College of Creative Arts
Page 73
Prescriptions and Schedule
of Papers
College of Education
Page 87
CONTENTS
College of Humanities and
Social Sciences
Page 135
College of Sciences
Page 209
Page 319
Massey University
Officers and Staff of
Glossary of Terms 2012
Index
Qualifications
the University
Page 293
New Zealand School
of Music
Page 481
Page 529
Page 535
Page 307
Diary of Key Dates
Diary of Key Dates 2012
Student Calendar
Administrative Calendar & Statutory Holidays
For start and end dates of semesters and mid-semester breaks, students should
check individual programme booklets for paper details as some programmes
of study do not follow the dates given here. Selected individual programme
dates are provided following the Diary of Key Dates.
New Zealand School of Music students follow Massey University dates
(outlined following) in Manawatu, but follow Victoria University dates in
Albany and Wellington.
2011
October
1
Enrolment into papers opens for 2012 academic year (unless
otherwise stated for programmes requiring selected entry).
Applications for University Halls of Residence and Apartments
submitted by this date will be included in the first round of offers
for 2012.
2011
November
21
Summer School begins.
2011
December
2011
December
7
Due date for new students to apply for admission and enrolment in
Semester One or Double Semester 2012.
2
University Council meets.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit applications
for new students who intend to commence study in Semester One.
22
University closes at 5pm.
15
2011 examination results notified about this date.
22
Students liable for exclusion notified.
2012
January
2012
January
4
Reporting in Person for Summer School January-February classes.
4
University re-opens.
4
Summer School re-commences.
23
11
Final date for appeals against exclusion.
Wellington Anniversary Day Holiday, Manawatu campus and
Wellington campus.
18
Due date for returning domestic students to apply for enrolment in
Semester One or Double Semester 2012.
30
Auckland Anniversary Day Holiday, Albany campus.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit applications
for returning domestic students who intend to commence study in
Semester One.
31
Final date for withdrawal of application for accommodation in
University Halls of Residence without forfeit of deposit.
February
February
1
Final date for applications to graduate at Albany campus.
6
Waitangi Day.
7
Final day of Summer School lectures.
7
Academic Committee meets.
8–10
Study days prior to Summer School examinations.
15
Academic Board meets.
13–18 Summer School examinations.
15
Due date for returning International students to apply for enrolment
in Semester One or Double Semester 2012.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit applications
for returning International students who intend to commence study
in Semester One.
18
Summer School ends.
20–24 Campus and College pre-semester activities, including reporting
in person and welcome sessions.
22
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add
a Semester One paper in distance (extramural) or block mode
conditional on availability of remaining places.
Dispatch of Semester One and Double Semester extra-mural material
normally completed for those who enrol by mid-January.
27
Semester One and Double Semester begins
Page 1
Diary of Key Dates
Student Calendar
March
Administrative Calendar & Statutory Holidays
March
1
Final date for applications to graduate at Manawatu campus and
Wellington campus.
2
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add a
Semester One or Double Semester paper in Internal mode conditional
on availability of remaining places.
12
Summer School results notified about this date.
16
Final date for Student Association/Society fee payment or exemption.
31
Final date for payment of outstanding fees for Semester One and
Double Semester papers.
2
University Council meets.
12
Academic Committee meets.
Final date to consider Committee for University Academic
Programmes (CUAP) proposals for round one.
21
Academic Board meets.
April
April
11–20 Mid-Semester One break (study and field trips, internal; distance
learning (extramural) contact courses).
6–10
17–20 Graduation ceremonies, Auckland.
18
Celebration to honour Pasifika graduands, Auckland.
20
Celebration to honour Māori graduates, Auckland.
23
Semester One resumes
May
Easter break.
11–20 Conferences at the Manawatu campus.
16
Academic Committee meets.
17–20 Graduation – Auckland.
25
Anzac Day.
26
Academic Board meets.
May
1
Final date for applications for Veterinary programmes selection.
1
Due date for all new International students to apply for admission
and enrolment in Semester Two 2012
Deadline for submission of information on programme offerings
for 2013.
4
University Council meets.
14–17 Graduation ceremonies, Palmerston North.
7
Academic Committee meets.
17
Celebration to honour Pasifika graduates, Palmerston North.
Final date for considering changes to the 2013 University Calendar.
18
Celebration to honour Māori graduates, Palmerston North.
14–18 Graduation – Palmerston North.
31
Graduation, Wellington.
31–1
June
Graduation – Wellington.
June
1
Celebration to honour Māori and Pasifika graduates, Wellington.
4
Queen’s Birthday observance.
Final day of Semester One lectures.
11
Academic Committee meets.
5–8
Study break
20
Academic Board meets.
11–23 Semester One examinations.
25 June–13 July
23
Semester One ends.
Conferences at the Manawatu campus.
25 June–13 July
Mid-year break (Distance learning (extramural) campus courses)
27
Due date for all new Domestic students to apply for admission and
enrolment in Semester Two 2012, conditional on availability of
remaining places.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit applications
for new students who intend to commence study in Semester Two
July
July
4
Due date for returning students to apply for enrolment in Semester
Two 2012, conditional on availability of remaining places.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/Cross Credit applications
for returning students who intend to commence study in Semester
Two.
11
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add
a Semester Two paper in distance (extramural) or block mode
conditional on availability of remaining places.
Dispatch of Semester Two distance learning (extramural) material
normally completed.
12
Semester One examination results notified about this date.
13
Reporting in Person all campuses
16
Semester Two begins
20
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add a
Semester two paper in internal mode conditional on availability of
remaining places.
31
Final date for payment of outstanding fees for Semester Two papers
Page 2
6
University Council meets.
9
Academic Committee meets.
Final date to consider Committee for University Academic
Programmes (CUAP) proposals for round two.
18
Academic Board meets.
Diary of Key Dates
Student Calendar
Administrative Calendar & Statutory Holidays
August
August
27–7 Sept 6
Academic Committee meets.
15
Academic Board meets.
Mid-Semester Two break (study and field trips, internal; distance
learning (extramural) contact courses).
27–7 Sept Conferences at the Manawatu campus.
September
September
1
Final date for applications to graduate at Manawatu Campus
November.
7
University Council meets.
10
Semester Two resumes.
10
Academic Committee meets.
October
October
1
Final date for applications for NZ School of Music students to
graduate in December.
5
University Council meets.
Applications for University Halls of Residence and Apartments
submitted by this date will be included in the first round of offers
for 2013.
8
Academic Committee meets.
17
Academic Board meets.
22
Labour Day.
19
Final day of Semester Two lectures
23–26 Study break
29–14 Nov Examinations for Semester Two and Double Semester papers.
31
Due date for new students to apply for admission and enrolment
in Summer School 2012, conditional on availability of remaining
places.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit for all
applications for new students who intend to commence study in
Summer School.
November
November
7
Due date for returning students to apply for enrolment in Summer
School 2012, conditional on availability of remaining places.
12
Academic Committee meets.
Due date for all Transfer of Academic Credit/ Cross Credit applications
for returning students who intend to commence study in Summer
School.
21
Academic Board meets.
30
Graduation – Palmerston North.
8
Dispatch of Summer School distance learning (extramural) material
normally completed for those who enrol by end of October.
14
Semester Two ends.
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add
a Summer School paper in distance (extramural) or block mode
conditional on availability of remaining places.
19
Summer School begins.
23
Due date for students who are already enrolled in 2012 to add a
Summer School paper in Internal mode.
30
Graduation ceremonies, Palmerston North.
December
December
7
Final date for payment of outstanding fees for Summer School
papers.
7
University Council meets.
13
Semester Two and Double Semester examination results notified
about this date.
10
Academic Committee meets.
21
University closes at 5pm
19
Students liable for exclusion notified.
21
Last day of Summer School lectures for 2012.
2013
January
2013
January
3
3
Summer School resumes.
University re-opens.
February
5
Final day of Summer School lectures.
11–16 Summer School Examinations.
16
Summer School ends.
Page 3
Diary of Key Dates
2012 Semester Dates
Semester One Begins
Mid Semester One Break
(incl Easter)
Semester One Ends
Mid Year Break
Semester Two Begins
University Wide
--- College of Education ---
NZSM
School of Aviation
Semester Dates
Initial Teacher
Education
programmes
Graduate
Diploma
Teaching
(Primary)
Graduate
Diploma
Teaching
(Secondary)
Wellington
& Albany
Campuses
Bachelor of Aviation
(Air Transport Pilot)
Feb 27
Feb 7
Jan 16
Feb 7
Feb 27
Apr 6 - 20
Apr 6 - 20
Apr 6 - 20
Apr 6 - 20
Apr 6 - 20
Apr 6 - 10
Jun 23
Jun 23
Jun 23
Jun 29
Jun 27
Jun 29
Jun 25 - Jul 13
Jun 25 - Jul 6
Jun 25 - Jul 6
Jul 2 - 13
Jun 28 - Jul 6
Returning Students Jan 9
New intake Jan 20
refer to school
Returning Students Jul 9
Jul 16
Jul 9
Jul 9
Jul 16
Jul 9
Aug 27 - Sept 7
Oct 1 - 5
Oct 1 - 12
Oct 1 - 12
Aug 20 - 31
refer to school
Semester Two Ends
Nov 14
Nov 14
Nov 30
Nov 14
Nov 10
Dec 21
Summer School begins
Nov 19
Nov 12
Mid Semester Break
Dec 24 - Jan 2
Dec 24 - Jan 2
Summer School Ends
Feb 16 (2013)
Mid Semester Two Break
Page 4
New intake Jul 6
General Information
General Information
Introduction.........................................................................................6
Halls of Residence..............................................................................10
Welcome Message................................................................................6
The University Farms.........................................................................10
Planning a Programme of Study...........................................................6
The Massey Collections......................................................................11
Semesters..............................................................................................6
The Arms and Colours of the University............................................11
The Credits System...............................................................................6
Academic Dress..................................................................................11
General Information for International Students....................................6
General Information for Postgraduate Programmes.............................7
Policy Statements..............................................................................13
Equity of Employment Opportunities.................................................13
Massey University...............................................................................7
Equity of Educational Opportunity.....................................................13
Mission..................................................................................................7
Treaty of Waitangi...............................................................................13
Strategic Goals (Massey University: The Road to 2020).....................7
Harassment Prevention and Complaints Resolution...........................13
Environmental Mission Statement........................................................8
Health and Safety................................................................................14
History..................................................................................................8
Massey University Manawatu...............................................................9
Massey University Albany....................................................................9
Massey University Wellington............................................................10
Associations.......................................................................................14
Office of Development and Alumni....................................................14
Students’ Associations........................................................................14
Page 5
General Information
Introduction
Welcome Message
Some programmes and papers do not conform to these standard semester
periods. Professional programmes in particular may have a longer
instructional year to accommodate practical requirements.
Welcome to Massey University. Ka rere atu ngā mihi o Te Kunenga ki
Pūrehuroa ki a koutou.
The Credits System
Throughout its history, Massey has played a uniquely important role in
the development of New Zealand through its groundbreaking research, its
distinctive mix of internal, distance (extramural) and international teaching,
commitment to innovation, and connections with communities.
Massey has served generations of learners from all backgrounds. Our students
experience research-led teaching, innovative modes of delivery, outstanding
student support services and high quality resources.
Our ambition is that all Massey students graduate with academic excellence
and creative, innovative approaches that will serve them well in whatever
they choose to do. The concepts and sentiments in this welcome underpin the
Massey University waiata – Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa.
Nei rā te reo karanga e tau atu nei. Ki te hāpai ake i te rau tāngata. Whakaako,
whakaeke ki te kōmata.
Te ara mātauranga ka whakarewa e. Te māramatanga ka kitea e. Kimihia,
rangahaua kia whita e.
Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa!
The staff at Massey University joins with me in wishing you well with your
studies.
Nō reira, tēnā koutou katoa,
Steve Maharey
Vice-Chancellor
Planning a Programme of Study
University programmes exist inside a regulatory framework with all degrees,
diplomas and certificates having a set structure. Some programmes are tightly
circumscribed in terms of the papers that must be included, while others offer
a great deal of flexibility.
Colleges have a detailed set of Regulations for each qualification that specify
the number of credits allotted to papers that must be selected. Typically there
is a core area of specialisation (the major or the endorsement) as well as a
number of associated College papers that may be taken from other areas.
When enrolling in a programme of study, students must keep in mind not only
the number of credits but also the combination of credits and papers necessary
to complete the requirements for their particular qualification.
There may also be requirements to be observed at a paper level, namely
prerequisites (papers that must be completed to a defined standard before
enrolment in another paper is confirmed), corequisites (papers that must be
attempted in the same semester as another paper unless the corequisite paper
has previously been passed) and restrictions (where papers are similar in
content and therefore students may not count both papers to a qualification).
Professional programmes will also have required practical components that
must be met.
Every paper has a credit value that indicates its contribution to the
qualification enrolled for (or to any other qualification to which that paper can
contribute). These values have been derived on the basis of an equivalent fulltime year for a degree being 120 credits.
The credit value also gives an indication of the total amount of time that a
student might reasonably expect to have to spend on each paper in order
to satisfactorily complete the assessment requirements (including lecturer
and tutor contact hours, workshops and tutorials, tests and assignments,
supervised practical placements, study time). Converted into a number of
hours per week, this is referred to as the effective weekly hours for the paper.
The total hours required for the paper can be calculated at 15 weeks (the
number per semester) with a total commitment of 10 effective hours per
week, or 150 effective hours per semester for a 15 credit paper. The effective
weekly hours for a paper will depend on the number of weeks over which it
is intended to spread the study programme during the year. The course outline
provided for each paper should indicate the effective weekly hours and how
these might typically be spent.
All undergraduate and taught postgraduate papers (with the exception of
a small number of papers) have a 15 credit value or multiples thereof.
Between 1999–2006 all undergraduate papers (apart from a small number of
qualification-specific papers in the Colleges of Design, Fine Arts and Music,
Education and Sciences) had a 12.5-point value. Papers passed in previous
years will carry the points earned in those years, except in the College of
Humanities and Social Sciences, where the papers passed in 1994 and prior
years will all count at 15 points.
For details of specific transitional arrangements, reference should be made to
the entry for the particular qualification elsewhere in the Calendar or to the
relevant qualification handbook.
General Information for International Students
The following applies to international students who seek admission to Massey
University:
1.
Applicants who have not previously attended a New Zealand University
and who wish to enrol in a first degree or diploma course must apply to
the International Office, Massey University. ‘International students’ are
all those people who are admitted to New Zealand on a student permit
issued by the New Zealand Immigration Service (including students
attending New Zealand secondary schools), and all persons who have
come to New Zealand from a country overseas unless they have become
New Zealand citizens or permanent residents.
2.
Students who have been enrolled at another university in New Zealand
or overseas and wish to gain credit for study already completed or wish
to undertake postgraduate study must apply to the International Office
(see ‘Admission Ad Eundem Statum Regulations’).
3.
As tuition is normally in English, applicants whose first language is not
English must gain an acceptable score in the ‘Princeton Test of English
as a Foreign Language’ (TOEFL) or the ‘International English Language
Testing System’ (IELTS) or some other appropriate and approved test
before an Offer of Place will be issued. Even when an Offer of Place is
issued, that Offer may be subject to the student satisfying the University
that he or she has the necessary English competency. Please refer to
English Language Competency under the Admission Regulations.
4.
The University is not permitted to give financial assistance to
international students, who must therefore make their own financial
arrangements. A condition of entry into New Zealand is proof that
students can support themselves financially for the duration of their
studies
5.
Full information on tuition fees and other charges for private or
sponsored international students is available from the International
Office.
The Calendar remains the definitive document for all Course Regulations.
Students requiring assistance in planning their programmes of study should
contact their College office or speak to one of the Student Liaison Advisers.
Semesters
The Massey University academic year is divided into distinct enrolment
periods, which are Semester One, Semester Two and Summer School. Each
semester consists of twelve teaching weeks and concludes with its own
examination period. In addition, a longer enrolment period, the Double
Semester, parallels Semesters One and Two with an examination period at the
end of Semester Two. Summer School comprises the November–February
period and includes some compressed offerings (generally January through
February) .
A winter break of three weeks is normally scheduled between the Semester
One examination period and the start of Semester Two. Within Semester One,
a two-week mid-semester break is linked to the Easter holiday break. Within
Semester Two, there is a two-week mid-semester break.
Page 6
General Information
General Information for Postgraduate Programmes
Higher Doctorates
Massey University offers a range of postgraduate programmes. The
responsibility for administration is delegated to Colleges in the case of
Postgraduate Diplomas, Bachelor Honours and Masters Degrees, and to the
Doctoral Research Committee for the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree,
the Doctor of Business and Administration (DBA), the Doctor of Clinical
Psychology (DClinPsych), the Doctor of Education (EdD) and higher
doctoral degrees (DSc and DLitt). As a committee of the Academic Board,
the Doctoral Research Committee may be asked to advise on research
developments affecting graduate teaching.
•
Doctorates
The University Council has approved the award of doctoral degrees in
Philosophy, Business and Administration, Clinical Psychology, Education,
Science and Literature The Regulations for these degrees are given in a
later section of this Calendar. The University also awards honorary doctoral
degrees in Science, Literature and Commerce. The University has approved
the following guidelines for these degrees:
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is awarded for a thesis, which is
an integrated and coherent report that demonstrates a candidate’s ability to
carry out independent research, analysis, and presentation of this research at
an advanced level in a particular field of study. The thesis as a whole should
make an original contribution to the knowledge of the subject with which it
deals, and the candidate should understand the relationship of the thesis to the
wider context of knowledge in which it belongs. Key entry qualifications for
the PhD include: (i) a relevant Honours, Bachelors or Masters Degree with
First Class or Second (Division 1/Upper Division) Honours, or the equivalent;
and (ii) the applicant has satisfied the Academic Board that they have
sufficient experience of independent research to benefit from the course.
Named Doctorates
•
Doctor of Business and Administration (DBA), Doctor of Clinical
Psychology (DClinPsych), and Doctor of Education (EdD)
The Doctor of Science and Doctor of Literature degrees are the highest
academic awards of the University. These degrees recognise scholarly
achievement and a demonstrated ability to make original contributions
in Science or in Letters resulting in major publications, which, in the
view of the examiners, mark the candidate as a creative and outstanding
scholar. Candidates must apply to be considered for examination for a
Higher Doctorate.
Honorary Doctorates
•
Honorary Doctor of Science (DSc honoris causa), Honorary Doctor of
Literature (DLitt honoris causa) and Honorary Doctor of Commerce
(DCom honoris causa)
The Honorary Doctor of Science, Doctor of Literature and Doctor of
Commerce are awarded by the University to persons whom it wishes to
honour. The Regulations and guidelines for the conferment of honorary
degrees are available from the University’s website at:
http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz/
Normally candidates will be expected to have an academic or other
appropriate association with New Zealand.
The Regulations for the PhD, EdD, DClinPsych, DBA, DSc and DLitt are set
out in the Doctoral Degrees section of the Calendar.
Massey University
Massey University was established as a university under founding legislation
which was the Massey University Act 1963. Tuition for degrees, diplomas and
certificates is offered by the Colleges of Business; Creative Arts; Education;
Sciences; Humanities and Social Sciences, and the New Zealand School of
Music.
Mission
The Named Doctorate is a specially tailored University programme
of high-level study and research to support the ongoing professional
development and education of existing and prospective senior managers
and leaders in a wide range of professions and private and public sector
institutions. The programme of study comprises: (1) a structured suite
of four high-level courses (120 credits); and (2) a thesis investigation
(240 credits) that is likely to be applied, creative or strategic in emphasis
rather than basic or fundamental research, as in the PhD. In all other
respects, including the examination, the standards of discipline, rigour
and scholarship, the requirements for the PhD and the Named Doctorates
are the same.
(Excerpt from the Massey University Charter)
The Doctor of Business and Administration (DBA) targets current
and potential business leaders and senior managers in the private and
public sectors, who are seeking experience and expertise in reflective
professional practice appropriate to a leadership role in business and
administration.
Massey University is driven by a spirit of community relevance and
engagement, while maintaining intellectual independence. We will use
our multi-campus structure to meet the needs of our constituent regional
communities, while our flexible delivery and distance (extramural) education
capabilities give a national and international reach to our educational
programmes.
The Doctor of Education (EdD) degree targets existing and prospective
educational leaders and managers across all sectors of education,
early years to tertiary and quasi government education agencies and
organisations, who are seeking experience and expertise in reflective
professional practice appropriate to a leadership role in education.
Key entry qualifications for the DBA and EdD include: (i) a relevant
Honours, Bachelors or Masters Degree with First Class or Second
(Division 1/Upper Division) Honours, or the equivalent; and (ii) a
background of appropriate professional leadership and management
experience in either business and administration or education.
The Doctor of Clinical Psychology (DClinPsych) programme is a
professional qualification that prepares people to integrate practice and
research in their careers as clinical psychologists. Entry criteria include
a relevant Honours, Bachelors or Masters Degree with First Class or
Second (Division 1/Upper Division) Honours, or PhD in psychology or
its equivalent as well as some entry level coursework.
The named doctorate normally involves a maximum of three or four
years of full-time study depending on the programme, or up to six years
part-time study. It is currently available in Business and Administration,
Clinical Psychology, and Education.
Massey University is committed to meeting the needs of New Zealand and
New Zealanders, enhancing access to university study for diverse populations,
preparing students for life-long learning, and meeting international standards
of excellence in research and teaching. Massey University is an integrated
multi-campus institution of higher learning that creates new knowledge and
understanding; synthesises, applies and disseminates knowledge; develops
advanced learning and scholarly abilities for a national and international
student body; and promotes free and rational inquiry. We offer high-quality
learning experiences that empower people and their communities to prosper in
an increasingly knowledge-dependent and technologically advanced world.
Massey University recognises and respects the significance of mana whenua
within its regions and the range of Māori organisations contributing to Māori
development and advancement. We have demonstrated our commitment
to Māori development by providing Māori academic leadership, research
opportunities and educational qualifications that assist in the achievement of
Māori aspirations.
Our integrated academic structures and organisational arrangements enable
and support interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research and academic
programmes. We pride ourselves on the relevance of our programmes; on
our openness to students of diverse backgrounds spanning age, geographic
location, educational background, ethnicity and culture; on the support we
provide for our students; and on the relationship we have built with our
alumni.
Strategic Goals (Massey University: The Road to 2020)
In recent years New Zealand’s place in the world has changed. A new New
Zealand is emerging. New Zealanders are carving out a future for themselves
confident that they have something unique to offer the world. They aspire
to achieve big things, break new ground and mark out a distinct Kiwi world
view. To succeed in the challenging times that lie ahead, New Zealanders
Page 7
General Information
must be creative, innovative and connected. They need to build on traditional
strengths that come from land-based industries. And they must find solutions
to problems, like climate change, that affect the world.
It is because New Zealand is building a new future for itself that Massey
University is so important. Throughout our history we have been seen as an
engine of change. For 83 years we have provided the knowledge underpinning
our agricultural and food industries; we have the nation’s only veterinary
school; for 125 years we have led design and fine arts; 20 years ago we were
one of the first universities to create a College of Education; 18 years ago
we opened a campus in Albany on the North Shore of Auckland to meet the
needs of the most rapidly growing community in New Zealand; we have
pioneered new fields of study in humanities and social science; ours was
the first business school and the first MBA; we are committed to promoting
indigenous knowledge and advancing Maori achievement; we were the first
university to develop a Pasifika strategy; 51 years ago we began what is now
one of the most respected distance learning programmes in the world; we host
two of the nation’s Centres of Research Excellence – the Riddet Institute and
the Allan Wilson Centre. As New Zealand and the world have changed, so
have we.
6. Enabling Excellence
Te Whakahiranga i ngā tāngata
We will provide the very best working and
learning environment for our staff and
students
Ka noho a Te Kunenga ki Purehuroa hei whare
whakahiranga i te tangata me ana mahi
hāngai ki ngā kaupapa whakaako.
Environmental Mission Statement
Massey University is committed to the principles of environmental
responsibility and sustainable resource management at local, national and
international levels. It will meet this commitment through community
involvement and leadership in education, research and sustainable
management practices.
The Massey University Environmental Policy translates the above statement
into the following general concepts of environmental responsibility for the
University:
•
Today Massey’s reputation for outstanding research and teaching grounded
in real world issues is well established. We are New Zealand’s national
university, teaching 34,000 students, with a presence in 20 nations around the
globe and a proud record of engagement with the communities we serve.
A commitment to the principles of environmental sustainability and
to raising environmental awareness, understanding and responsibility
throughout the University, the local communities within which its
campuses are situated, and in all the wider partnerships and associations
beyond the University.
•
A commitment to active leadership in environmental sustainability.1
•
Having been instrumental in defining the New Zealand of the past century,
Massey is determined to play a central role in the New Zealand of the 21st
century. We aim to be the engine of the new New Zealand.
A whole-institution commitment to environmental responsibility and to
sustainability, fostered by wide and continuing consultation.
•
A commitment to education for sustainability as a lifelong process for all
through interdisciplinary and holistic learning programmes.
Over the past two years, Massey has developed an ambitious strategy
designed to drive change in New Zealand and take the best of the nation’s
intellectual capability to the world.
•
A commitment to research about and for environmental sustainability at
local, national and global levels and into the processes of education for
sustainability.
Our strategy is based on the pillars of creativity, innovation, agri-food and
connectedness as well as a readiness to take on challenging issues like
sustainability. Our colleges of sciences, business, humanities and social
sciences, education and creative arts are building their research and teaching
programmes on these pillars. Our bold, innovative, “cando” approach will
ensure progress is made.
•
A commitment to monitoring and accountability for environmental
sustainability on each Campus.
This is the first major revision of our strategy since it was put into practice in
January 2009. It reflects the input of the University community and changes
in government policy which have in turn been driven by the world financial
crisis. It continues to set out clearly our determination to make a defining
contribution to the future of our nation and build a world-wide reputation as a
leading centre of tertiary learning.
Massey has identified six Big Goals in its Strategic Plan. They are as follows:
The Six Big Goals for Massey University
Ngā Tino Whāinga o Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa
1. Research and Scholarship
Te Rangahau me te Haepapa Matatautanga
We wil promote the highest standards of
research and scholarship and be a world
leader in our areas of specialisation.
Kia eke rawa te kounga o ngā āhuatanga
rangahau ki te kōmata taketake. Kia
pūrangiaho te māramatanga.
2. Teaching and Learning
Te Whakaako te Whakangungu
We will ensure an exceptional and distinctive
learning experience at Massey for all
students.
Ka kounga rawatia kia hira ngā mahi
akoranga. Mā te ako ka punenga, ka hihiri,
ngā ākonga katoa.
3. Connections
Ngā Tūhonotanga
We will strengthen our connections with
partners local, national and international
partners and stakeholders to gain mutually
benefical outcomes.
Ka whakamarohi, ka whakapakaritia ngā
tūhonotanga ki ngā rōpu, ki ngā tāngata, o
konei, o te ao whānui, kia kōkiri ngātahi ai.
Mā tēnei e tipu tahi ai ngā painga huhua.
4. Responsibility
Te Aronga Manaakitanga
We will enhance our reputation as NZs
defining university by contributing to the
understanding of and innovative responses to
social, economic, cultural and environmental
issues.
Kia kaha ake te manaaki i te tāngata, i te ao
turoa. Ka hāpaitia ngā kaupapa / āhuatanga
pāpori, ohaoha, tikanga a-tāngata me te ao
turoa e tipu kaha ai ki konei ki Te Kunenga ki
Pūrehuroa.
5. Generating Income
Te Whakatipu i ngā Rawa
We will significantly increase our income
to allow for more investment to enable the
University to achieve its goals.
Ka āta poipoi, ka āta whakatipuhia ngā rawa
e matomato ai, e tutuki ai ngā whāinga o Te
Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa.
Page 8
History
The University, established in 1964, grew out of an antecedent institution
called Massey Agricultural College. The College evolved from developments
at both Victoria University College and Auckland University College in the
1920s.
The first Chair established in the College of Sciences is named after Sir
Walter Clarke Buchanan, whose contribution towards the founding of a
Chair in Agriculture at Victoria University College led to the appointment of
Professor G. S. Peren as Professor of Agriculture in 1924. A bequest from Sir
John Logan Campbell led to the creation of a Chair in Agriculture at Auckland
University College, to which Professor W. Riddet was appointed in 1925.
The present Chair in Food Technology commemorates this benefaction. Two
Schools of Agriculture were initially established, and in 1926 it was resolved
by a committee of both Colleges that the Schools should be amalgamated and
their combined resources devoted to the establishment of a single institution
in the Manawatu. This decision was implemented by the passing of the
New Zealand Agricultural College Act in 1926 and by the purchase of the
Batchelar estate on the south side of the Manawatu River near Palmerston
North. In succeeding years the College acquired several adjoining properties
as the need for farm land and building sites increased.
The College was renamed in 1927 after William Ferguson Massey, a former
Prime Minister, by an amendment to the Agricultural College Act. In March
of 1928 Massey Agricultural College was formally opened. Professor Peren
became Walter Clarke Buchanan Professor of Agriculture and Principal of
the College, and Professor Riddet became Logan Campbell Professor of
Agriculture and Director of the Dairy Research Institute. There were other
staff appointments in Soil Chemistry, Agricultural Botany, Agricultural
Economics, Livestock and Veterinary Science, Agricultural Zoology, and
Bacteriology. The College offered courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Agricultural Science and Master of Agricultural Science of the University
of New Zealand. It also offered a variety of shorter courses in aspects of farm
1 Sustainability in the context of this policy statement means resources are used and managed
such that:
• renewable resources are consumed at a rate no greater than they can regenerate;
• non-renewable resources are consumed at a rate no greater than renewable resources can
be substituted for them;
• pollutants are not emitted at rates greater than they can be processed by the environment;
and
• irreversible impacts on ecosystems (eg the extinction of a species) are avoided.
General Information
management and technology leading to College diplomas and certificates.
Eighty-four students enrolled in the first year.
The history of the College for the next 25 years was one of consolidation
as a residential agricultural college, steady expansion of these teaching
programmes and development as a research institution in cooperation with
the New Zealand Dairy Research Institute and units of the Department
of Scientific and Industrial Research. For 14 years following the School
of Agriculture Act 1937, Massey Agricultural College and Canterbury
Agricultural College at Lincoln constituted the New Zealand School of
Agriculture under the direction of a joint Council that coordinated their
activities, although each College retained its own Board of Governors. This
Act was repealed in 1951.
The post-war period was marked by the introduction of degree courses in
Horticulture in 1948, as well as the acquisition of approximately 200 acres to
the immediate south in 1946. “Wharerata”, a large homestead set in 16 acres
of garden and bush, was added in 1951 following the addition of the farm
known as “Tuapaka” near Aokautere in 1948.
In 1960 a branch of the Victoria University of Wellington was founded in
Palmerston North on a 30 acre site at Hokowhitu and nearby Caccia Birch
House. Extramural courses were offered throughout the country in selected
subjects and tuition provided to Arts students in the Manawatu area. After
the dissolution of the University of New Zealand at the end of 1961, Massey
College elected, in terms of the Massey College Act of that year, to associate
itself with Victoria University pending the assumption of full autonomy. This
association was retained in the Massey University College of Manawatu Act
1962, which amalgamated Massey and the branch of Victoria University
as from 1 January 1963, the latter becoming the General Studies Faculty of
the new institution. By virtue of the Massey University of Manawatu Act
1963, the University was granted autonomy and degree-conferring powers as
from 1 January 1964. The ten degrees listed in the Schedule to that Act are
symbolised in the gyronny of the University Arms. Amendments abbreviating
the name to Massey University were passed in 1966.
These developments, coinciding with a programme of curricular expansion
initiated in the late 1950s, led to the establishment of many new departments
and to a substantial increase in the number of teaching, research and technical
staff. First-year science courses were introduced in 1958. Students working
in agricultural degrees had formerly undertaken these prerequisite studies
at one of the four colleges of the University of New Zealand. The Faculty
of Technology was established in 1961 and the Faculty of Veterinary
Science a year later. In 1965 the Faculty of Science was founded, where
work continues to be concentrated on the biological sciences. In the same
year General Studies was organised into two new Faculties, Humanities
and Social Sciences. These were consolidated on the main site in 1968
and the Hokowhitu property was made available for the development of
the Palmerston North Teachers’ College, which was initially established in
1956 at another location. To coordinate the expanding graduate and research
activities of the University, a School of Graduate Studies was created in 1969.
Business Studies courses, directed by a Board of Studies, were first offered
in 1971, and in 1972 joint teacher education and cooperation between the
University and Palmerston North Teachers’ College was formalised by the
creation of a School of Education. Business Studies and Education are now
both Colleges.
A School of Aviation was established in 1990. In the early 1990s, further
schools were formed in Applied and International Economics and
Mathematical and Information Sciences. In 1994 the latter became the
Faculty of Information and Mathematical Sciences. For much of its work the
University has national responsibilities; for instance, in agriculture, veterinary
and extramural education. For other purposes, such as extension work and
school accreditation, the University region is defined to the north by a line
running from Waitara to Wairoa and to the south by a line running from the
Waikawa River through to Mount Bruce. As the scope of its activities has
broadened, the University has maintained since 1963 an extensive building
and development programme designed to preserve as much as possible
the semi-rural character of the campus; additional farm land has also been
purchased during this period.
In 1996, Massey University merged with the Palmerston North College
of Education and in 1997 the first College was established: the College of
Education comprising the University Faculty and the former Palmerston
North College of Education. Later in 1997 the following Colleges were
established: the College of Business, comprising the former Faculty of
Business Studies, the School of Aviation and the School of Applied and
International Economics; the College of Humanities and Social Sciences,
comprising the former Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences; the
College of Sciences, comprising the former Faculties of Science, Technology,
Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Information and Mathematical
Sciences and Veterinary Science. In 1999 the College of Design, Fine Arts and
Music was formed as the result of a merger with the Wellington Polytechnic.
In 2005 the New Zealand School of Music was formed by collaboration
between Massey University and Victoria University. The College of Design,
Fine Arts and Music was renamed College of Creative Arts.
Massey University’s total roll in 2010 was 34,865, comprising 8,158
internal/block mode students at Palmerston North, 6,701 at Albany and
3,707 at Wellington, as well as 16,299 extramural students.. The continuing
development of the University is also reflected in the growing number of
research and service units and of student hostels on the campus and adjacent
sites. Descriptions of courses of study, research activities, departmental
interests, hostels, farms, the library and other general facilities available at the
University are given in later sections. Reference may also be made to other
information booklets published by the University.
Multicampus Structure
Massey University now comprises five Colleges and 43 academic units
located across three campuses in the North Island.
l
Campuses
Albany
Manawatu
Wellington
l
MU College of Education Centres
Albany
Napier
Manawatu
¡
Student Liaison Advisors
Albany
Hamilton
Napier
Manawatu
Wellington
Christchurch
Massey University Manawatu
Massey University’s early beginnings were in the Manawatu, as an
agricultural college founded in 1928. Throughout its history, right from those
first days, Massey University has been seen as an engine of change. Firstly,
providing the knowledge that underpinned New Zealand’s agricultural and
food industries. Today Massey University has extended out that leadership to
the areas of design and fine arts, education, humanities and social science and
business.
Today the Manawatu campus is home to New Zealand’s largest institution
for the life sciences, agricultural, horticultural and veterinary teaching and
research and is a leader in industrial innovation through areas such as food
science and technology, biotechnology, advanced material sciences and
product development.
The University has two campuses in Palmerston North. Hokowhitu is the site
of the College of Education, one of the first of its kind in New Zealand. The
Turitea campus is set in a beautiful 40 hectare park-like setting and houses the
Colleges of Business, Sciences, and Humanities and Social Sciences, and the
Vice-Chancellor’s Office.
On either side of the Manawatu River, both campuses are within walking
distance of the Palmerston North city centre, with a free bus service for all
staff and students allowing easy access to all parts of the city and University.
Massey Manawatu offers a wide range of on-campus halls and units, catering
for over 900 students of diverse ages, programmes of study, and cultural
backgrounds.
The campus is in close proximity to the student-friendly city of Palmerston
North, and to beautiful mountain ranges and countryside offering plenty of
outdoor activities.
Massey University Albany
Massey University Albany, the ‘innovation’ campus, is New Zealand’s
northern-most university campus. Styled on a Mediterranean hill town, it
opened in 1993 and has an ongoing building and facilities development to
Page 9
General Information
meet the needs of the rapidly growing regional population and business
community.
Massey Albany offers degree and diploma courses in business; education
and speech language therapy; humanities and social sciences; sciences and
engineering. The New Zealand School of Music, a joint initiative between
Massey University and Victoria University offers a jazz programme on
campus.
The campus is host to the New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study and
co-hosts the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution. The
campus has strong collaborative links with many external organisations and
Massey Albany was one of the first universities in New Zealand to open
a business incubator on campus, the e-Centre. Students at Massey Albany
benefit from a wide range of scholarships offered by the University and local
and multinational business organisations.
There are two student villages, both within close walking distance to the
campus and retail outlets. Each village offers self-contained, apartment-style
living to students.
Massey University Wellington
Massey University’s Wellington campus was established in 1999.
Known as the Creative Campus, Massey Wellington is at the heart of New
Zealand’s capital city, on the southern boundary of the central business
district in an area known as Mount Cook. The campus is built around some
of Wellington’s iconic buildings, with the National War Memorial standing
proudly at the Buckle Street entrance, and the beautiful Tokomaru, originally
built as the Dominion Museum in 1936, now part of the University.
A wide variety of programmes are taught at the campus from communication
and business, health and well-being to the creative arts. The College of
Creative Arts can trace its origins back to the Riley School of Design, which
was established in Wellington in 1886.
The campus occupies some eleven hectares and has several multi-storey
buildings located in the central zone, which was originally developed in the
1960s to house one of New Zealand’s first polytechnics. Accommodation
options include student flats, homestays, private flats or boarding. Massey
Wellington manages two residential facilities for students near the campus.
Sitting within a vibrant urban environment, the City’s café and theatre
districts lie within easy walking distance.
Halls of Residence
Manawatu
Until 1943 student accommodation was confined to the Old Hostel, but
in the ten years following 1943 residential facilities were tripled – first
by the purchase in that year of the Monro Homestead (purchased with the
aid of the Moginie bequest); second by the addition of the Pink Hostel,
constructed during World War II as a staff college for officers of the armed
services (1944); third by the acquisition of the ‘Rehab’ hostels erected by the
Government as part of its returned servicemen’s rehabilitation programme;
and fourth by the construction of the YFC Memorial Building, which was
financed by the Federation of Young Farmers’ Clubs to commemorate
members who were killed in the second World War (1953). Rehab ‘B’
and ‘C’ hostels were closed and removed during 2001, and both ‘A’
hostel and Woodhey were removed in 2005. YFC ceased being offered as
accommodation in 2005 and was renovated to house Accommodation Services
(formerly Halls Community Group), International Community Centre, Fale
Pasifika and Kainga Rua. The YFC Annex is a building dedicated to providing
academic support for Halls students through the Study Group Programme.
In the 1960s several other halls made their appearance: the new Monro House
(1961), now Craiglockhart, Fergusson Hall, Colombo Hall (1964) and Eliott
House (purchased in 1966). A further homestead, Fitzherbert House (now
Bindaloe House), was made available by the University (1966), followed by
Cubeside and The Stable (1982), and Moginie Hall (1985). In 1988 Cubeside
Hostel was relinquished to Māori Studies and the third wing on the 72-bed
Moginie Hall was completed to replace Cubeside. Following kitchen and
common room renovations, Moginie Hall now has 68 beds.
In 1989 the Pink Hostel was given over to the Accountancy Department
although it was returned to accommodation in 2002 and is now named
McHardy Hall.
Page 10
Colombo Hall was provided by the Government as part of the Colombo
Plan Aid Programme, but accommodation in it is neither compulsory for,
nor limited to international students. Fergusson Hall, an historic Manawatu
homestead, is administered by the Presbyterian Education Purposes Trust.
Walter Dyer Hall (1969) was financed in part from funds accumulated from
levies on students in residence. In its efforts to provide more on-campus
accommodation, the University continues to benefit from collaboration of this
sort with other bodies. A substantial contribution from the Palmerston North
City Council, with additional funds raised by Rotary Clubs in the district and
by the Federation of Taranaki Dairy Factories, led to the opening in 1971 of
City Court, Egmont Court and Rotary Court. Kairanga Court, again financed
in part from levies, opened in 1977.
In 1992 the Atawhai student community was developed to provide 65 single
beds in 13 units and twelve two-bedroom student family units. The Tararua
and Ruahine complexes of 24 beds were opened for student use in 1992 and
1996. The merger between the Palmerston North College of Education and
Massey University in 1996 added Blair Tennant Hall in Fitzherbert Avenue to
the University’s accommodation for students although this Hall has now been
decommissioned.
The University now has four new halls with 208 beds located within the
Turitea Community. Matai and Totara Halls, along with the Kanuka Commons
building opened in February 2005, with Tawa and Miro Halls and the Karaka
Commons opened in February 2006. (Older accommodation, specifically the
rehab hostels and Moginie flats have been decommissioned as a result.)
Residential accommodation on or adjoining the Manawatu Campus is now
available for 940 students. Dining facilities for all halls are in the newly
refurbished and significantly improved Student Centre.
Albany
Massey University Albany (MUA), together with its partner Buildcorp
Management Limited, offers student accommodation in two villages,
Millennium and Lucas Creek. All flats are self-catering and offer free car
parking. The properties have good-sized study bedrooms and common
areas. All villages are located in pleasant residential locations within 10-15
minutes’ walk to the heart of the Albany Campus, the Albany Village and the
Westfield Shopping Centre with its retail facilities, cafés, movie theatres and
supermarkets. During semester time a free shuttle bus operates between the
campus, the accommodation Villages and the Westfield shopping Centre.
The Millennium Village was opened on February, 1999. It is located at 548
Albany Highway. This accommodation village offers 31 self-catering, fully
furnished and equipped four-bedroom units, accommodating 127 students.
The Millennium Village also has a large common room with SKY television,
pool table, table tennis and indoor/outdoor flow where all residents gather for
communal social events.
The Lucas Creek Village opened in 2004. Located at 9 The Avenue, Albany,
it is only minutes away from the Albany Village. This quiet and peaceful
location is able to offer apartments of 3 and 7 bedrooms as well as studio
flats for couples or those who prefer to live separately. There is one large 12
bedroom house at Lucas Creek which is the central focus of the village. All
apartments are fully furnished and equipped and are self-catered. This village
is home to 100 students.
The University can also refer student tenants to Casa Bella, an
accommodation Complex located on the campus boundary. Casa Bella,
located at 427 Albany Highway, offers 4 bedroom fully furnished apartments,
a swimming pool, fully-equipped gym, and a tennis court. These apartments
are especially suitable for postgraduate students.
Wellington
The Wellington Campus manages two accommodation complexes within
a five-minute walk from the Campus and just minutes from downtown
Wellington. The Basin Reserve Apartments are sited opposite the Basin
Reserve, housing self-contained fully furnished five-bedroom apartments with
a total of 120 beds.
The Cube Complex accommodates 300 beds in self-contained, fully furnished
studio, five, three and two bedroom units and is situated on the corner of
Webb and Taranaki Streets. The University has a number of staff who live on
site to service the needs of the students .
The University Farms
The University operates 2,200 hectares of farmland, which is maintained
for teaching, research and extension purposes. A wide range of farming
General Information
enterprises and activities are conducted on 980 hectares of land adjacent to
the Turitea site of the Manawatu Campus. About three-quarters of this is
gently rolling country of heavy silt loam, while the remainder consists of
river flats varying from fertile silt loams and light sandy soil to river shingle.
The 980 hectares comprises three dairy farms, two sheep and beef units, a
deer research unit, a horticulture orchard and a number of intensive animal
research units.
The University has a unique range of agricultural research facilities that
enables it to undertake research, farming and educational functions. The
facilities include three milking sheds (all fitted with electronic data collection
equipment), wool sheds, sheep, deer and cattle yards, animal physiology and
feed processing units, forestry blocks, orchards, nurseries and glasshouses.
The University also operates two farming enterprises situated away from the
Manawatu Campus. Tuapaka Farm is a 476 hectare hill country sheep and
beef cattle farm, twelve kilometres away from the Manawatu Campus. About
20 percent of the farm is flat while the remainder consists of easy-to-steep
hill country, rising to an altitude of 212 metres above sea level. Tuapaka Farm
has three wind turbines positioned on the elevated areas of the farm as part
of a wind electricity generation scheme. Riverside Farm, a 723 hectare sheep
and beef cattle farm situated 13 kilometres from Masterton and 90 kilometres
from Palmerston North, is on a long-term lease to the University. The mixed
topography and location of the property provides a unique resource to
investigate summer dryland farming.
The Farms and Research Units provide an extensive research capability, allow
the demonstration of farming systems and facilitate a continuing programme
of research and extension to the benefit of agricultural, horticultural and
veterinary sciences both within New Zealand and overseas. The University
farmland plays an important role in meeting the overall educational and
research objectives of the University.
during his years as Prime Minister. This collection is now on display on level
three of the Registry.
Massey University holds seven collections:
•
Massey University Art Collection (contemporary New Zealand art):
Manawatu and Albany
•
Massey College of Education Arts Trust
•
Riddet Collection (representational New Zealand art)
•
Webster Collection of Porcelain
•
Massey University Collection of Georgian Silver
•
Wellington Campus Art Collection.
The Art Collections Policy aims to:
1.
(a) acknowledge and celebrate the history of Massey University and its
antecedent organisations
(b) provide a resource for the teaching, research and community
service activities of the University
(c) provide opportunities for the study and appreciation of art by
members of Massey University and the communities that it serves
(d) contribute to a stimulating and aesthetically pleasing environment
for the campuses.
2.
The Massey Collections
The life and work of the Right Honourable William Ferguson Massey has
been commemorated in many ways. Of these the most distinctive was the
decision shortly after his death to rename the newly-founded New Zealand
Agricultural College at Palmerston North. In introducing the amending
legislation, the Minister of Agriculture, the Hon. O.J. Hawken, proposed that
the College be known as Massey Agricultural College, saying:
“I think all honourable members honour that name, and I think it is the best
that could be chosen, because the late leader of the House was recognised
as an agriculturist. The interest he took in the subject is well known, and
I believe he had – more than most people realise – a longing to set up an
agricultural college. The opportunity did not occur in his time, but I am sure
that he was heart and soul in the project.”
The College was formally opened in 1928. Thirty-six years later it became an
autonomous multi-faculty university. Although the original use of Massey’s
name was related to his interest in agriculture, the name of the emergent
institution, Massey University, was readily maintained in view of his
eminent standing in the political history of the country. At the opening of the
University Library and Veterinary Clinical Sciences buildings in 1968, the
Governor-General, Lord Porritt, endorsed this view with the conclusion that
“William Massey was without doubt one of the country’s greatest politicians
and statesmen”. Massey University is the only tertiary educational institution
to be so named after a New Zealand citizen.
In 1968, a generous gift from the family of William Massey led to the
establishment of the Massey Trust. The University Council declared the
purposes of the Trust to be:
“To sustain at the University and in New Zealand the associations of the life
and work of the late William Ferguson Massey with the name, aspirations
and activities of the University and for the purposes of advancing knowledge
and interest in those aspects of the development of New Zealand with which
the late William Ferguson Massey was particularly associated, by collecting,
collating and preserving archives and other material relating to the late
William Ferguson Massey.”
Included in its functions was responsibility for organising, at intervals of
not more than three years, a Massey Memorial Lecture. Seven such lectures
have been given by distinguished New Zealand scholars, and in each case
the request that the lecture should be of a high standard on a matter of broad
public interest has been met. More recently, the Massey family presented to
the University a unique and very valuable collection of gifts given to him
Create a framework for the development, preservation and use of
Massey University’s several collections of art in order to:
Provide guidance to those responsible for the acquisition, preservation
and use of art collections so that the interests of the whole University are
maintained while at the same time duly recognising the multi-campus
nature of the University and the diversity of the communities that it
serves.
The Arms and Colours of the University
By the authority of the Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal and
Hereditary Marshal of England, the Kings of Arms assigned
arms to Massey University on the tenth day of May 1967.
The arms are defined as:
Gyronny of ten argent and azure a mullet gules fimbriated
argent and irradiated or and for the crest on a wreath of
the colours issuant from flames proper a ram’s head argent
horned and ensigned by the horns of the African long-legged ram.
On a scroll appear the words ‘floreat scientia’, which means, translated from
Latin, ‘Let knowledge flourish’.
The symbolism of the design is interpreted as follows:
The star is from the Arms of New Zealand. Here it also represents knowledge
and learning and so has been irradiated. It is in the centre of the shield, being
the central theme of the University. The background, a gyronny of ten pieces
in blue and white, represents the ten degrees first offered by the University.
The crest is the ram’s head that was used in former years by the Students’
Association. This, with its four horns, is unusual and memorable and provides
a link with agriculture and the former College. There are many ram’s head
crests used in heraldry, so this one is made distinctive by proceeding from
flames of learning. The flames also suggest, phoenix-like, the idea of a new
body being born out of an old.
The University colours and their British Colour Council reference numbers
are:
BCC Name
BCC Number
University blue
midnight
90
Light blue
forget-me-not
84
White
Academic Dress
1.
Graduates shall appear at all public ceremonies of the University in the
academic dress proper to their degree. Graduates of other Universities
may wear the academic dress of their own university.
2.
The form of the principal officers’ robes shall be as follows:
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General Information
Chancellor
(c) The hood for a Bachelor’s Degree or a Bachelor’s Degree with
Honours shall be as for the Master’s hood, but bordered with a
40mm white fur.
Of rich all-silk University blue damask. 50 mm gold oak leaf lace to
outer edges of facings. Gold ornaments to sleeves and sleeve cuffs edged
gold plate lace. Facings and shoulder wings trimmed in light blue taffeta
and shall bear the University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
(d) The hood for a Bachelor Honours Degree shall be as for the
Master’s hood, but bordered with a 40mm white silk.
(e) The hood for a PhD Degree shall be made of material of the colour
‘post office red’ (BCC No. 209) and shall be lined with ‘university
blue’ (BCC No. 90).
Pro-Chancellor
Of rich all-silk University blue damask, dispensing with sleeve
ornaments and using 25 mm gold lace to outer edges of facings and
shoulder wings. Facings and shoulder wings to be of light blue taffeta
and shall bear the University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
(f) The hood of other Doctors Degrees shall be the Master’s hood
appropriate to the discipline in which the degree was taken.
5.
Vice-Chancellor
Of rich all-silk University blue damask with silver sleeve ornaments and
using 25 mm silver lace to outer edges of facings and shoulder wings.
Facings and shoulder wings to be of light blue taffeta and shall bear the
University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
Regional Deputy Vice-Chancellors
BCC Name
BCC Number
indian yellow
6
172
Agriculture
pea green
AgriCommerce
verdigris
12
Agricultural Economics
verdigris
12
Agricultural Science
emerald
213
AgriScience
emerald
213
Applied Economics
dioptase
203
University Registrar
Applied Science
emerald
213
Of plain all-silk University blue ottoman without ornamentation, but
facings and shoulder wings to be of light blue taffeta and shall bear the
University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
Applied Statistics
parma violet
216
Arts
rose pink
32
Aviation
stonewhite
61
Regional Registrar
Aviation Management
stonewhite
61
Business Administration
tangerine
55
Business Information
indian yellow
6
Business Studies
indian yellow
6
Communication
indian yellow
6
University Council
The academic dress is as for the Cambridge Bachelor of Arts but with
a facing of light blue satin (50 mm wide, BCC 84 forget-me-not) edged
with an additional dark blue satin (25 mm wide, BCC 90 midnight), the
full length of the front. Graduates may wear the hat and hood of their
own degree.
Construction
claret
36
Counselling
medici crimson
230
Dairy Science and Technology
claret
36
180
Defence Studies
pansy
Regional Marshal
Design
white
1
The academic dress shall be of their own university and shall bear the
University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
Development Administration
rose pink
32
Education
tuscan yellow
233
Educational Administration
gull grey
81
Educational Psychology
tuscan yellow
233
Educational Studies
tuscan yellow
233
Engineering
claret
36
Engineering Technology
claret
36
Environmental Management
tartan green
26
Ergonomics
claret
36
Fine Arts
white
1
(b) The gown for a Master’s Degree is as for the Cambridge Master of
Arts.
Health Sciences
emerald
213
Horticulture
grass green
103
(c) The gown for the degrees of Doctors of Business and
Administration, Education and Philosophy is as for the Cambridge
Master of Arts, but with a facing of cloth ‘post office red’ (BCC
No. 209) ten centimetres wide the full length of the front.
Horticulture(Bus), (Sc) or (Tech)
tartan green
26
Information Science
parma violet
216
Information Systems
indian yellow
6
(d) The gown for all other Doctors Degrees is as for the Cambridge
Master of Arts, but the colour is ‘post office red’ (BCC No. 209).
Management
indian yellow
6
Māori Visual Arts
(a) The hood for every degree is of the same size and shape as the
Cambridge Master of Arts.
black, overprinted
with silver motif
Medical Laboratory Science
jade
122
Midwifery
crocus
177
Music
white
1
Music Therapy
white
1
Nursing
crocus
177
Performance Design
white
1
The Hats of These Officers Shall Be:
Trenchers made of the materials as used for the robes in each case, but
with a gold tassel for the Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor, silver for the
Vice-Chancellor, and light blue for the Registrar and Regional Deputy
Vice-Chancellors. The Chancellor’s hat is to be lightly decorated with
gold lace and the Vice-Chancellor’s hat lightly decorated with silver
lace.
4.
Accountancy
Of rich all-silk University blue damask, dispensing with sleeve
ornaments and using 25 mm silver lace to outer edges of facings and
shoulder wings. Facings and shoulder wings to be of light blue taffeta
and shall bear the University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
Of plain all-silk University blue ottoman without ornamentation, but
facings and shoulder wings to be of light blue taffeta and shall bear the
University’s Coat of Arms on each shoulder.
3.
The colours of the linings of the hoods for the Bachelors, Masters and
Doctors Degrees other than PhD are as follows:
(a) The gown for an undergraduate or for a Bachelor’s Degree is as for
the Cambridge Bachelor of Arts.
(b) The hood for Masters Degrees shall be made of material of the
colour ‘university blue’ (BCC No. 90) and shall be lined with
material of the colour appropriate to the degree, except for Master
of Philosophy, which shall be lined with material of the colour ‘post
office red’ (BCC No. 209).
Page 12
General Information
(i) monitor, review and evaluate progress towards achieving equal
employment opportunities.
BCC Name
BCC Number
Public Policy
rose pink
32`
Resource and Environmental Planning
forget-me-not blue
84
Equity of Educational Opportunity
Science
smalt blue
147
Social Work
horse chestnut
134
Massey University is committed to providing equity of access to educational
opportunities for all current and prospective students irrespective of their
sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national origin,
disability, age political opinion, employment status, family status or sexual
orientation. To achieve this policy objective Massey University will:
Speech and Language Therapy
emerald
213
Sport Studies
indian yellow
6
Te Aho TātaiRangi
tuscan yellow
233
Technology
claret
36
Veterinary Science
imperial purple
109
Veterinary Studies
imperial purple
109
Veterinary technology
imperial purple
109
Graduates in a conjoint programme of two degrees may choose which of
the relevant hoods they will wear.
6.
7.
(a) encourage enrolment from under-represented groups: specifically Maori,
People with Disability, Pacific Peoples and Women;
(b) work with students and endeavour to provide a learning environment
that facilitates successful participation by all, including those students
with specific needs. There may be situations where students will need
to provide personal support (e.g., mobility equipment, communications
devices, support person in a wet-lab) so their safety, the safety of others,
and the opportunity to achieve the learning outcomes are preserved;
The stole for diplomas is made of black material with a 15 mm band of
the colour light blue (BCC 84 forget-me-not) on the inner margin and
the Massey University Symbol (the University Coat of Arms) 75 mm in
diameter embroidered in light blue 75 mm above the lower margin on
the left side.
(c) be pro-active in providing access and equitable opportunities for success
for groups that are under-represented;
As an alternative to wearing the stole, diplomates who also hold a degree
may wear the robes of that degree.
(e) ensure that its processes or procedures are non-discriminatory and pay
due consideration to the needs of all groups of students; and
(a) The headgear for Bachelors, Masters and for diplomates who are
graduates is a black trencher with tassel.
(f) undertake regular reviews of its performance in relation to equity of
access to educational opportunities including reporting against indicators
specified during the Annual Planning process.
(b) The headgear for Doctors Degrees is a black velvet bonnet as for
the Oxford Doctor of Civil Law.
Note
Academic gowns, hoods and trenchers are available for hire from Academic
Dress Hire, P.O. Box 1713, Palmerston North. www.masseygowns.org.nz
Policy Statements
Equity of Employment Opportunities
Massey University is committed to upholding its responsibilities as an Equal
Opportunities Employer and creating a workplace that attracts, retains and
values diverse employees. To achieve this policy objective Massey University
will:
(d) ensure that each student has the opportunity to achieve according to his
or her own individual potential;
Treaty of Waitangi
Massey University is committed to giving effect to the principles of the
Treaty of Waitangi within the policies and practices of the University
and to recognising the mutual benefits that follow. It will promote Māori
development and full Māori participation across the University, maintain the
Māori language as an official language of the University, foster mutual regard
and understanding for academic knowledge and customary Māori knowledge,
recognise and acknowledge the special status of tangata whenua in the
mana whenua of each campus, seek opportunities for mutually beneficial
partnerships with Māori, and facilitate teaching and research programmes
consistent with Māori aspirations and processes.
Harassment Prevention and Complaints Resolution
(a) provide equal opportunities for recruitment, appointment, development
and promotion for all current and prospective employees, regardless
of sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national
origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status, family status
or sexual orientation;
Harassment Prevention and Complaints Resolution information are outlined
in:
(b) develop and maintain a workplace culture that values and supports
diversity;
1.
Massey University is committed to creating and maintaining a work
and study environment that is free from any form of harassment. The
University considers any form of harassment to be unacceptable and
will take all practical steps to eliminate It. The University treats all
complaints of harassment seriously and acknowledges that harassment
can damage working conditions and relationships and may substantially
impact on a person’s ability to perform by undermining their confidence,
concentration and motivation.
2.
Harassment is broadly defined as any behaviour directed towards
an individual or group that a reasonable person, having regard to
the circumstances would expect to insult, intimidate, victimise or
disadvantage the recipient, and which is:
• The Human Resources web pages (for employees only).
• The Student Services web pages (for students only).
(c) consider practical measures to enable flexible working arrangements for
employees including, where requested, job sharing;
(d) ensure that it provides a safe, supportive and healthy environment for all
employees that is conducive to quality teaching, research and community
service;
(e) identify and eliminate all aspects of policies and procedures and other
institutional barriers that cause or perpetuate inequality in respect of the
employment of any person or group of persons;
(f) not tolerate any form of unfair discrimination in the work-place on any
ground, including sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic
or national origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status,
family status or sexual orientation;
(g) promote equal employment opportunities as an integral part of
University policies and practices;
(h) support the health and wellbeing of woman staff members with
breastfeeding infants by ensuring the right to time for breastfeeding (or
expressing milk) and the provision of private facilities in the workplace
for breastfeeding or expresssing or storage of milk wherever possible;
•
unwelcome, hurtful or offensive to the recipient; and is
•
repeated, or is of such significance as to adversely affect the
recipient’s employment or wellbeing
Harassment may be of a sexual nature or based on gender, marital status,
religious belief, ethical belief, colour, race, ethnic or national origin,
disability, age, political opinion, employment status, family status,
sexual orientation or other grounds, and includes behaviours which may
be classed as bullying.
Page 13
General Information
responsible for the implementation, monitoring, review and planning of
health and safety policies, systems and practices.
Health and Safety
The purpose of this policy is to ensure active, consultative commitment to
health and safety management in the University.
1.
Massey University regards the promotion and maintenance of health and
safety as mutual objectives for everyone who works, studies, visits, or
has business on the University campus, sites and farmlands.
2.
Health and safety is to be ranked equal with the University’s primary
aims and objectives, and be integrated with all other functions within the
University.
3.
To ensure a safe and healthy work environment, the University will
develop and maintain a Health and Safety Management System.
Specifically, the University management will:
(a) Provide leadership, examples and commitment to health and safety
policy and objectives,
(b) Ensure coordination of health and safety systems within colleges,
regions and nationally shared services,
(c) Ensure appropriate resources are allocated to health and safety.
6.
There will be a Health and Safety Committee in each campus region
to assist and advise in the coordination, promotion, maintenance, and
participation in health and safety within each campus region.
7.
Health and safety procedures and related policies are outlined in the
Policy Guide, Health and Safety website.
Associations
Office of Development and Alumni
The office is part of Massey University’s External Relations group. It has
three main inter-related functions:
1.
The development and stewardship of relationships with sectors external
to Massey University, leading to positive benefits for the University.
2.
The procurement of income both as money and in kind from sources
other than EFTS-related. The income may take the form of sponsorships,
scholarships, legacies, grants, other donations, products and services.
3.
The growth and management of Massey University’s Alumni networks
and support services. These include:
(d) Set and monitor health and safety objectives and performance
criteria for all managers and campus regions,
(e) Annually review health and safety objectives and managers’
performance against the objectives,
(f) Require accurate and timely reporting and recording of all incidents
and injuries,
(g) Investigate all reported incidents and injuries to ensure all
contributing factors are identified and, where appropriate, plans are
formulated to take corrective action,
(h) Actively encourage the early reporting of any pain or discomfort,
(i) Provide a treatment and rehabilitation plan that ensures a safe, early
and durable return to work for injured staff,
(j) Identify all existing and new hazards and take all practicable steps
to eliminate, isolate or minimise the exposure to any hazards
deemed to be significant,
(k) Review accident statistics to ensure adequacy of hazard controls,
(l) Ensure that all staff, students, visitors, and those who have business
on the University campus sites and farmlands are made aware of
the hazards in their work area and are adequately trained to enable
them to perform in a safe manner,
(m) Encourage staff and student consultation and participation in all
matters relating to health and safety,
(n) Promote a system of continuous improvement, including an annual
review of policies and three yearly review of procedures,
(o) Meet obligations under the Health and Safety in Employment Act
1992, the Health and Safety in Employment Regulations 1995,
Codes of Practices, and any relevant Standards or Guidelines.
4.
Every staff member, student, visitor or person with business at Massey
University is expected to share in the commitment to this policy.
(a) Every manager and supervisor has a responsibility for the health
and safety of staff, students, and visitors working under their
direction.
(b) Each staff member, student, visitor or person with business at
Massey University is expected to play a vital and responsible role
in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace through:
(i) Ensuring that no action or inaction causes harm to another
person,
(ii) Observing all safe work procedures, rules and instructions,
(iii) The early reporting of any pain or discomfort,
(iv) Taking an active role in Massey University treatment and
rehabilitation plans, to ensure an ‘early and durable return to work’,
(v) Ensuring that all accidents, incidents and unsafe conditions are
reported to the appropriate person.
5.
There will be a Health and Safety Consultative Committee that
includes; union representatives, student association representatives,
health and safety representatives from each campus region, health and
safety conveners from each campus region, and senior management
representatives. The Health and Safety Consultative Committee is
Page 14
(a) the administration of a sophisticated database
(b) the provision of a range of memorabilia and apparel for purchase
(c) the organisation of alumni events and assistance with reunions, and
(d) the development of alumni activities and chapters, both nationally
and internationally.
Students’ Associations
Massey University Students’ Association Federation Inc.
At Massey, the responsibility for providing adequate representation that
aids the University to meet appropriate levels of student engagement falls
to the Massey University Students’ Association Federation Inc. (MUSAF);
a not-for-profit incorporated society. Student members of the Federation
will automatically, by virtue of the rules of the relevant Association and the
Federation Constitution, become members of one of the federated students’
associations most appropriate to the student (by geographical location).
The Federation consists of the following students’ associations represent
Massey University Internal Students by campus: Albany Students’ Association
Inc. (ASA), Massey University Students’ Association of Palmerston
North Inc. (MUSA), and Massey at Wellington Students Association Inc.
(MAWSA). All distance students are members of the Extramural Students’
Society Inc. (EXMSS). Māori students may also be members of one of
the following Massey University Māori Students’ Roopu: Manawatahi
(Palmerston North), Te Waka O Nga Akonga Māori Inc. (Albany), or Te Mana
Mahiri (Wellington).
The three main roles of students’ associations are representation, advocacy
and service provision. The education and welfare of students is of
paramount concern to the associations. The democratically-elected student
representatives advocate on the behalf of their student members at all levels
throughout the University including Council, Academic Board, Academic
Committee, the Teaching and Learning Committee, College Boards at the five
College Boards and regional sub-committees.
The students’ associations maintain an advocacy service to assist students
regarding disciplinary and grievance processes. Three of the associations are
affiliated to the New Zealand University Students’ Association Inc., and two
of the Māori Students’ Roopu are affiliated to the national Māori university
students’ association, Te Mana Akonga Inc.
The internal students’ associations are affiliated to University Sport New
Zealand Inc. Teams representing Massey at each campus take part in the
University Games and individuals are selected for New Zealand Universities’
teams. Massey University Blues are awarded annually to outstanding
sportspersons who have represented their Association while studying.
The students’ associations organise, fund and coordinate many student
activities. These include Orientation, capping, Winterfest, political/social/
educational campaigns, partial funding of affiliated clubs and societies,
publications, broadcasting of student radio stations, accommodation services,
General Information
recreation centres, Student Job Search, student shop, the social and events
centres and lunch-time entertainment (services and activities differ from
campus to campus.)
The affairs of each students’ association are administered by an Executive
committee responsible to the Association. The Executive for the subsequent
year is elected during the second semester. Details of fees and exemptions are
given in the table of fees. The students’ associations offices are open daily for
information and advice.
Extramural Students’ Society (Inc.)
The Massey University Extramural Students’ Society Inc. (EXMSS)
is the Students’ Association for distance students. EXMSS provides a
communication link between distance students and the University; a
professional and confidential advocacy service; a support network of EXMSS
regional representatives throughout New Zealand and overseas; special
benefits to members; and a representation structure to provide an extramural
voice on University decision-making bodies.
EXMSS communicates with members in a variety of ways. Three issues
of Off Campus magazine are dispatched to all members each year. The
magazine provides a point of unity for distance students, a forum for
exchange of ideas and opinions, and information. Distance students are also
invited to connect with the Society through the website community at www.
exmss.org, Facebook, or the President’s Blog which is accessed through
the EXMSS website. About 30 EXMSS regional representatives participate
in the University’s academic orientation meetings at the beginning of each
semester. Information/ support packs are distributed to students attending
these meetings and the orientation information is available on request to other
students. The EXMSS office has a free-phone number available to extramural
students
(0508 544 331) or visit their website at:
http://exmss.org/
The EXMSS Advocate is trained in the University grievance procedures
and offers a professional advocacy service exclusive to distance students.
All students’ complaints and grievances are treated in confidence. EXMSS
provides a support network of EXMSS regional representatives throughout
the country and overseas. EXMSS regional representatives are experienced
distance students who have volunteered to provide support, encouragement,
information and advice to other students. They hold the roll of the students
in their area and help put students in touch with each other. They also assist
students who wish to form local study groups. The complete list of EXMSS
regional representatives and their contact details is published in each issue of
Off Campus magazine.
EXMSS provides special benefits to members including a free EXMSS
shuttlebus service that meets distance students travelling by plane, bus or train
to the Manawatu Campus for contact courses (this service is also provided
in Wellington to/from the airport only, and subsidised in Auckland), study
assistance grants for distance students having difficulty meeting the costs
of study; EXMSS scholarships awarded annually; a graduation dinner held
exclusively for extramural graduates; and commercial student discounts
available to distance students showing their Massey University identification
card. EXMSS offers services during contact courses Including a help desk,
luggage minding, socials and entertainment.
EXMSS provides a representation structure so that the extramural point of
view is voiced on University decision-making bodies. The EXMSS President,
elected every two years by the membership, is the official spokesperson on
distance student issues. EXMSS undertakes research to keep abreast of the
distance student viewpoint. Distance student representatives monitor the
operations of the University and keep a check on issues of quality relating
to teaching and learning. The EXMSS President publicly comments on
Government tertiary education policies and how policies impact on distance
students.
Page 15
Page 16
Statutes and Regulations
Statutes and Regulations
Acts of Parliament.............................................................................18
Cases of Hardship – Vice-Chancellor’s Power...............................28
Admission Regulations.....................................................................18
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Regulations.............................28
Matriculation Regulations...................................................................18
Part A: Generic Regulations................................................................28
English Language Competency..........................................................18
Part B: Regulations relevant to specific programmes.........................29
Discretionary Entrance Regulations ..................................................19
Part C: Process, Definitions and Other Unsatisfactory Academic
Progress............................................................................................30
Admission with Equivalent Status Regulations
(Admission Ad Eundem Statum)......................................................19
Special Admission Regulations...........................................................19
Part D: Procedure for Appeals and Constitution of the Exclusion
Appeals Committee..........................................................................31
Personal Interest Regulations..............................................................19
Student Contract...............................................................................31
Enrolment Regulations.....................................................................19
Student Grievance Procedures........................................................31
Certificate of Proficiency Regulations................................................22
Aligned Resource Management..........................................................22
University Grievance Committee....................................................33
Recognition of Formal and Informal Prior Learning...................23
Graduation Regulations...................................................................33
Types of Massey University Credit That May Be Awarded...............23
Use of Information............................................................................33
Minimum Credits to be Completed Through Massey University.......23
Library Regulations............................................................................33
Cross-credits.......................................................................................23
Policy on Use and Access to Information Technology Systems.........35
Transfer of Credit................................................................................23
Intellectual Property............................................................................35
Informal Learning...............................................................................23
Law of Copyright................................................................................35
Professional Development through Massey University......................24
General Regulations for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate
Diplomas, Undergraduate Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and
Graduate Certificates........................................................................24
Code of Student Conduct.................................................................35
University Fees..................................................................................35
Fees Payment Regulations..................................................................35
Fee Grandparenting Regulations for Full Fee-Paying Students.........37
General Regulations for Postgraduate Degrees, Postgraduate
Students’ Association Fee Regulations...............................................37
Diplomas, and Postgraduate Certificates........................................25
Halls of Residence Fees Regulations..................................................37
Assessment and Examination Regulations.....................................26
Assessment and Course Work.............................................................26
Financial Support................................................................................37
Scholarships........................................................................................37
Final Examinations.............................................................................27
Page 17
Stautes and Regulations
Acts of Parliament
Massey University, like all tertiary education institutions in New Zealand, is
subject to the provisions of the Education Act 1989 (including amendments).
This Act specifies the constitution, functions and duties of the Council and
other matters relating to tertiary institutions.
Massey University is constituted by the Massey University Act 1963 and
Section 162(1)(a) of the Education Act 1989.
Admission Regulations
1.
Enrolment at Massey University requires completion of three processes,
admission to the University, admission to a specific qualification, and
enrolment for a programme. These processes may be completed either
separately or together.
2.
Admission may be granted conditionally in the case of students who
have not yet met the requirements for entry to University. At the
appropriate time prior to the commencement of an enrolment period
the University initiates offers of places in programmes in response to
Enrolment Applications. For doctoral students after the first Enrolment
Application the doctoral students must accept an Offer of Place and
receive a Confirmation of Enrolment for successive years.
3.
Applicants who intend to enrol for tuition in an imminent enrolment
period but who have not previously obtained admission to Massey
University should apply for admission and enrolment simultaneously
by submitting an Enrolment Application and by accepting any Offer of
Place. Enrolment in this case will remain conditional upon admission
being finalised.
4.
The final dates by which Enrolment Applications must be made are
advised under the Enrolment Regulations. Enrolments are regarded as
being stabilised four weeks from the commencement of a semester for
purposes of reporting to the Ministry of Education.
5.
Admission to Massey University does not of itself constitute entitlement
to be enrolled for tuition in any particular qualification or enrolment
period.
6.
Massey University operates a preferential score admission scheme for
admission to undergraduate qualifications. Applicants to undergraduate
qualifications will be assessed and eligible applicants will be offered a
place in a qualification.
Matriculation Regulations
Minimum Age
3.
Responsibilities
4.
At the time of acceptance of an Offer of Place, every student shall
promise to obey the statutes, regulations and rules of the University, and
shall provide evidence of date of birth and citizenship and of eligibility
to matriculate.
5.
Persons who are eligible to matriculate under these Regulations
may matriculate by having their names enrolled on the books of the
University as matriculated students. The University Council may decline
(under statutory authority) to matriculate a person in special cases.
English Language Competency
1.
Both English and Māori are recognised as official languages
in New Zealand. Tuition, examination and assessment at Massey
University is normally in the English language, although students may
be required to write or speak Māori or foreign languages in some papers.
Procedures also exist for those students who wish to submit written work
or examinations in Māori.
2.
It is expected that on entry to Massey University all students will be able
to:
(a) write grammatically correct English. Students must be able to
develop ideas and to express themselves in well-structured,
accurate and extended written English. Typically essays or reports
of about 1,000 words are expected of first-year students.
Even in papers where mathematical and scientific symbols are
the main means of expression, the ability to write clear, accurate
English is still needed. Most assignments and examinations use
essays and reports as the main type of written work.
(b) read English actively and with understanding. Students must be
able to find relevant information, without special guidance, to
follow the structure of a narrative, and to comprehend and analyse
a line of argument.
(c) listen to and discern key points in English. Students must be able
to follow complex and technical discussion in both formal lectures
and informal groups.
(d) speak freely and clearly in English. Students will be expected to
contribute actively to discussion and to present ideas in classes.
3.
The University does not accept responsibility for academic failure that is
attributable to a student’s lack of competence
in English. Students whose prior education was not in English are
advised to take 192.101 English for Academic Purposes for Speakers
of Other Languages in their first year at Massey to improve their
preparedness to study at university level.
4.
International students – All international students whose first language
is not English will be required to provide satisfactory evidence of their
proficiency in English, in the form of an academic IELTS or TOEFL
score, an equivalent recognised English language test, or other such
evidence that is acceptable to Academic Board. The required IELTS and
TOEFL scores are as follows:
Matriculation
1.
Every candidate for an undergraduate degree, diploma or certificate,
or for a certificate of proficiency in a paper of any degree shall have
matriculated or been admitted with equivalent status.
Academic Qualification for Matriculation
2.
Every person shall be academically qualified to matriculate at the
University who:
(a) is academically qualified for entrance to a university on the basis
of the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) as
promulgated by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority at http://
www.nzqa.govt.nz/, or
Applicants shall not be eligible to matriculate unless they have attained
the age of 16 years by the start of their study.
•
(b) has qualified for entrance to a university on the basis of the
New Zealand University Entrance, Bursaries and Scholarships
Examination prior to 2005, or the University Bursaries Examination
prior to 1993, or New Zealand University Entrance (by accrediting
or examination) prior to 1986, or
The Massey University centre for Professional and Continuing
Education is a registered IELTS testing centre. Results are usually
available two weeks after candidates have sat a test.
(c) has matriculated at any university in New Zealand; or
(d) is granted Special Admission, or
(e) is granted Discretionary Entrance under the Discretionary Entrance
regulations or Provisional Entrance under the regulations applying
in 2003, or
(f) is a New Zealand Citizen or Permanent Resident and has attained
the age of 20 years by the final date for acceptance of late
Enrolment Applications for the enrolment period in which study is
commenced.
Page 18
IELTS – Academic IELTS (International English Language Testing
System) score of 6.0 for undergraduate programmes with no band
less than 5.5, and 6.5 for postgraduate programmes with no band
less than 6.0.
•
TOEFL – (Princeton Test of English as a Foreign language) score
of 550 paper based test (213 computer based test or 80 internet
based test) for undergraduate students and 575 paper based test
(232 computer based test or 90 internet based test) for postgraduate
students. An additional TWE (Test of Written English) score of
4 (Essay Rating 4.0 or Writing 19 for undergraduate students,
20 for postgraduate students) is required. TOEFL tests listening
comprehension, knowledge of grammar, vocabulary and reading
comprehension. TWE (Essay Rating or Writing) tests ability to
write sustained English prose.
Statutes and Regulations
•
Some programmes have higher English language entry
requirements. Contact the International Office for details.
5.
New Zealand school leavers – New Zealand students (including
permanent residents) and international students must gain a university
entrance qualification, which includes literacy and numeracy
requirements, as set out by the NZQA.
6.
Other students whose first language is not English, and who have not
gained a New Zealand university entrance qualification, or an overseas
entrance qualification in a country where the main language is English,
will also be required to provide satisfactory evidence of their proficiency
in English in the form of an academic IELTS or TOEFL score or other
such evidence that is acceptable to the Academic Board.
7.
English language competency requirements for foundation studies and
pre-degree level programmes are available from the International Office.
Admission at Entrance Level
3.
Admission with Graduate Status
4.
A person under the age of 20 years who does not meet the University
Entrance standard, but:
(a) is a citizen or permanent resident of New Zealand or Australia*;
(b) has received secondary schooling to at least New Zealand Year 12
level (or its equivalent overseas) and earned at least 14 credits in an
approved subject at Level 2 towards NCEA (or its equivalent); and
5.
may apply for Discretionary Entrance.
* Australian applicants’ most recent year of schooling must have been in
New Zealand.
Discretionary Entrance is at the discretion of individual universities
and requires a high standard of achievement in Year 12. Normally an
applicant should, by the end of Year 12, have completed four subjects at
Level 2 of the
NCEA, each with a minimum of 14 credits and a grade average of at
least 60.
3.
Discretionary Entrance is granted to a nominated under-graduate
qualification.
4.
Persons who attempt to qualify for University Entrance in Year 13, but
who fail to do so, may be considered for mid-year admission in the year
following their NCEA assessment in universities where this is permitted.
Admission will be at the discretion of the university concerned.
5.
A person studying at a New Zealand secondary school, who is
attempting to qualify for entrance to university, may apply for
Discretionary Entrance in the same year for the purpose of enrolling in
papers offered in a Summer School by a university. Any person admitted
under this Regulation who does not, in the following January, meet the
University Entrance standard will be required to withdraw from the
university and may re-apply for admission at mid-year. Students required
to withdraw may complete their Summer School programme before
doing so, but any papers passed will not be credited to a qualification
until a University Entrance qualification is gained.
Admission with Equivalent Status Regulations
(Admission Ad Eundem Statum)
1.
Subject to the provisions of the Education Act 1989 and to the provisions
of these Regulations, the Council may admit any person with equivalent
status to candidature in any degree or other academic qualification or
part thereof. Admission with equivalent status (AES) means ‘admission
granted to a applicants with the status of the holder of the required
qualification’. AES admission is usually programme-specific and may
have conditions attached.
2.
An applicant for Admission with Equivalent Status shall lodge
an Enrolment Application by the published due dates in order for
applications to be fully considered and processed
Admission with Graduate Status for Graduate Qualifications
Council may grant admission to the status of the holder of a degree
with the right to proceed to a specific graduate diploma or certificate,
to an applicant who demonstrates practical, professional or scholarly
experience of an appropriate kind and equivalent to that of a graduate.
The applicant may be required to comply with any prerequisite
prescribed for such diploma or certificate, or for any specific paper.
(c) has met the literacy and numeracy standards required for University
Entrance, or their equivalents
2.
Admission with Graduate Status for Postgraduate Qualifications
Council may grant admission to the status of the holder of a degree
with the right to proceed to a specific higher diploma or higher degree
with or without Honours, provided that the applicant complies with
any prerequisite prescribed or required by Council for such degree or
diploma. The University will only consider applications for admission
with equivalent status to postgraduate qualifications on the basis of
completed academic work that is equivalent, or substantially corresponds
to coursework in this University.
Discretionary Entrance Regulations
1.
Council may grant admission to an undergraduate degree, diploma or
certificate, or for a certificate of proficiency in a paper of any degree,
with status equivalent to that of a person academically qualified for
entrance to a university in New Zealand on the basis of study at a
secondary or tertiary institution in New Zealand or overseas. In the
case of holders of overseas diplomas or certificates, applications shall
be considered on the basis of academic work completed and not on
qualifications obtained. Credit may be awarded for tertiary study on
the basis of the Recognition of Formal and Informal Prior Learning
regulations.
Special Admission Regulations
In exceptional cases, a New Zealand Citizen or Permanent Resident who does
not hold a university entrance qualification and who does not qualify under
Matriculation Regulation 2 (f) may apply for special permission to enter the
university. In assessing whether to grant Special Admission in a particular
case, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Academic and International, under
delegated authority from the Academic Board, will consider:
(a) whether the applicant has met a standard equivalent to that required
under the Matriculation regulations, and
(b) evidence of the applicant’s preparedness for university study.
Personal Interest Regulations
1.
Applicants who have already been awarded a recognised qualification, or
part thereof, but who do not wish to enrol for another qualification, may
be considered for enrolment under the Personal Interest Regulations.
2.
The fees for students admitted under Personal Interest regulation 1 shall
be as prescribed on the Massey University Website, www.massey.ac.nz.
Enrolment Regulations
1.
Every applicant must complete enrolment formalities which include
submission of an Enrolment Application, written acceptance of an Offer
of Place [unless waived in writing by the University] and receipt of a
Confirmation of Enrolment. Applicants who wish to study full-time
ought to apply to enrol for 120 credits of study at the beginning of each
year. Massey University has an online system for enrolment. A paper
based enrolment system will be used which comprises the same steps as
the online system when the online system is inoperative for any reason
or in other special circumstances as permitted by the Assistant ViceChancellor and Registrar.
Page 19
Stautes and Regulations
Due Date for Enrolment Applications
2.
For Papers In
New Applicants
Returning Students
Semester One/
Double Semester
Wednesday 7 December
2011
Wednesday 18 January
2012 (domestic students)
Wednesday 15 February
2012 (international
students)
Semester Two
Tuesday 1 May 2012
(International Students)
Wednesday 27 June 2012
(Domestic Students)
Wednesday 4 July 2012
Summer School
Wednesday 31 October
2012
Wednesday 7 November
2012
Some qualifications require applicants to apply in advance of the
standard due dates for selection and some papers do not follow standard
semester dates. The relevant enrolment dates for these qualifications
and/or papers are available from enrolment material on the University
website or by contacting the University.
Doctoral candidates shall submit their Enrolment Applications within
three weeks of the commencement date specified by the Doctoral
Research Committee. Candidates will need to enrol for each successive
year by accepting an Offer of Place and receiving a Confirmation of
Enrolment. Details of fees will be available each year before enrolment
is completed.
Final Dates
3.
Addition or Substitution of Paper(s)
Enrolled students may, at the University’s discretion, be permitted to
add or substitute papers. If students also wish to apply for admission to a
graduate or postgraduate level qualification they must apply by the dates
given in Enrolment Regulation 2 or, for Doctoral students, by the dates
in the Handbook for Doctoral Study. 
Except where stated otherwise in programme material, any applications
for adding or substituting papers must be received by the University
no later than the dates below, which are the first Friday of the semester
for internal papers, or Wednesday prior to semester start for distance
(extramural) and block papers.
For information about withdrawal from papers see Enrolment
Regulations 12–13.
Dates for applying to add or substitute papers in 2012 are:
For Papers in
Adding a Paper in
Distance (extramural) or
Block Mode
Adding a Paper in
Internal Mode
Semester One / Double
Semester
Wednesday 22 February
2012
Friday 2 March 2012
Semester Two
Wednesday 11July 2012
Friday 20 July 2012
Summer School
Wednesday 14 November
2012
Friday 23 November 2012
Note: Some papers do not follow standard semester dates and students
seeking to add papers should refer to programme material, the University
website or contact the University for due dates.
Limitation of Student Numbers
4.
The University Council (by its delegate) may limit the number of
students enrolled in any programme each year because of insufficiency
of staff, accommodation or equipment. Accordingly, where the number
of applicants for the programme exceeds the number of places available,
then Massey University will select from the applicants those students
who may be enrolled in the programme each year.
Late Enrolment
5.
over those received after the due date but before selection decisions are
made.
Generally, all applicants are expected to submit their Enrolment
Applications so that they are received by the University on or before the
due date. For most students the due dates for 2012 are:
When the number of applicants exceeds the places available,
applications received on or before the due date will be given priority
Page 20
Where Enrolment Applications are received after the due date, the
University may, at its discretion, after a Late Enrolment Appeal process,
consider approving a late enrolment. This will normally be no later than
four weeks after Enrolment Applications are due and usually before
selection decisions are made (if any).
Applicants may only submit a Late Enrolment Appeal when the
Enrolment Application is received after the relevant due date, and where
applicants have experienced exceptional personal circumstances or
believe that refusal of enrolment will cause undue hardship or in other
circumstances at the discretion of the University. Where relevant, the
Late Enrolment Appeal application must be supported by evidence of
the circumstances involved. When a Late Enrolment Appeal is made for
a programme where numbers are limited, all applicants that were not
selected are considered with the late application.
Even where exceptional circumstances exist, or refusal of enrolment
will cause undue hardship, late enrolments will not be approved if,
in the Assistant Vice-Chancellor and Registrar’s view, they cannot be
resourced adequately or in a timely manner.
Completion of Enrolment
6.
The University assesses the Enrolment Application in relation to its
regulations, capacity to provide tuition and its other requirements. The
University may approve only those parts of the application that can be
assessed as complying with course regulations and otherwise meeting its
requirements. Applications for enrolment normally proceed directly to
an Offer of Place unless withdrawn by the applicants in writing or unless
the approvals required from the University are not obtained.
Each applicant will be informed of the outcome of his or her Enrolment
Application by either a written Offer of Place or, when the applicant
does not meet University requirements, a response in writing. The Offer
of Place will advise applicants of the programme(s) (qualification(s)
and paper(s) (if any)) that they may study, the terms of their agreement
with Massey University and provide instructions on how to respond.
Applicants are required to submit to the University acceptance of the
Offer of Place, and the University must receive it, by the due dates
specified in the Offer of Place in the manner required, unless this
requirement is waived or varied by written notice by the University. On
accepting the Offer of Place, students agree to pay the tuition fees and
non-tuition fees and agree to the terms of their enrolment.
The Offer of Place may be subject to conditions which conditions are
inserted for the sole benefit of the University and may be waived by
the University by written notice. When the University receives the
acceptance of the Offer of Place, the University and the student have a
contractual relationship. When the Offer of Place is subject to conditions
those conditions must be satisfied or waived by the University,
by written notice, or the contract is at an end. In some cases, after
acceptance of the Offer of Place, students are required to select papers
for their programme(s). Even when that selection is made the University
may not permit the student to study the paper(s) selected but the
University may require the student to select paper(s) that they can study.
A Confirmation of Enrolment is issued by the University to the student
when the Offer of Place is unconditional or when there are no conditions
to be satisfied. Within a short defined period following the acceptance
of the Offer of Place by the student, the student may propose changes to
the programme (eg. by adding or substituting papers). If the University
agrees to the changes proposed by the student, any such changes
are recorded. When a Confirmation of Enrolment has already been
issued a new Confirmation of Enrolment is issued comprising a new
enrolment agreement for the programme(s) listed on the Confirmation
of Enrolment but otherwise on the terms and conditions already agreed.
When a Confirmation of Enrolment has not already been issued, and if
the University agrees, then a Confirmation of Enrolment will be issued
comprising an enrolment agreement for the programme(s) listed on the
Confirmation of Enrolment but otherwise on the terms and conditions
already agreed.
The dates for Students to add or substitute papers are given in Enrolment
Regulation 3. The dates and manner for students to withdraw from
papers are given in Enrolment Regulations 12-13. When a student has
received a Confirmation of Enrolment but then does not pay tuition
Statutes and Regulations
fees or non-tuition fees, or does not meet the requisites for one or more
papers, the University may, in writing, cancel that student’s enrolment
in a paper or programme at the University. Cancellation of enrolment
means the person is still liable to pay the University tuition fees and nontuition fees unless cancellation is during the period students are eligible
for a tuition fees refund. If the University cancels a person’s enrolment
in all papers in an academic year, during the period students are eligible
for a tuition fees refund, a withdrawal fee is payable.
Mixed Delivery Modes
7.
Applicants may apply to be enrolled simultaneously in papers offered
in different delivery modes. Such applications are subject to the
usual provisions of the General Regulations governing Matriculation,
Enrolment and Examinations.
8.
In exceptional circumstances applicants may apply to be enrolled in
the internal mode while not attending regularly scheduled classes on
campus. All such applications are subject to approval of Academic
Board (through the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the relevant College). In
giving approval, the Pro Vice-Chancellor shall ascertain that appropriate
arrangements have been made for tuition or supervision and for the
provision of services required to enable the applicant to undertake
the study with a reasonable likelihood of success. Except as set out in
this Regulation, students must abide by the conditions applying to the
particular mode in which each paper is offered.
Concurrent Programmes
9.
Students normally enrol for a single programme of study. With the
approval of Academic Board (through the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
relevant College), it is possible to enrol concurrently in papers for credit
to a second programme of study.
Concurrent Enrolment
10 Students who wish to be concurrently enrolled at Massey University
and another New Zealand University must obtain prior approval of
both institutions. Applications must be made in writing to the Pro
Vice-Chancellor’s office of the relevant College as well as the other
institution.
Normally enrolment is for credit to a Massey University qualification.
Students intending to complete a qualification from another New
Zealand tertiary institution may apply to be enrolled in papers taught
extramurally at Massey University for credit to the other institution’s
qualification.
Permission to credit specific papers to the qualification must be obtained
from the institution offering the qualification. This permission can be
sought at any time prior to enrolment. Enrolment by Massey University
does not imply that papers will be credited by another institution to its
qualifications.
Approval
11. The personal programme of every applicant shall require the approval
of the Council of the University or its delegate. This is exercised as part
of the administrative procedures at enrolment. Approval will normally
be granted for courses that are in accordance with the programme
regulations. Students’ progress to completion will be assessed under the
current year of regulations unless a transition pathway for the student is
defined. For general provisions affecting their programme, students are
referred to the General Regulations governing Matriculation, Enrolment
and Examinations.
Students who propose to change from one programme to another ought
to contact the University to determine which of the papers they have
passed may be credited to the new programme before they submit
Enrolment Applications. Student Allowances do not automatically
transfer from one programme to another and students applying for loans
and/or allowances should contact StudyLink to check their eligibility for
assistance.
Enrolment in a programme at Massey University requires:
(a) approval of admission to the qualification by the Council of the
University (or its delegate) (this includes applicants not being of
bad character, no misconduct, or breach of discipline and sufficient
progress in study);
(b) assurance from the relevant academic unit that the financial, human
and physical resources relevant to the proposed programme are
available; and
(c) enrolment in papers that meet the academic requirements of the
qualification.
Withdrawal
12. Withdrawals may only be notified by students using the online enrolment
facility (MyEnrolment) accessible from the University website or, as an
exception, by written notification of withdrawal. Doctoral students must
advise the Graduate Research School of their intention to withdraw on
the appropriate form. The date of withdrawal is deemed to be the date
on which the notice of withdrawal is received by the University. All
extramural students are required to return their study materials to the
University.
13. When the University receives written notification of withdrawal from
paper(s), comprising part but not all of a student’s programme(s) for the
year, before 10 percent of the study period has elapsed for the papers
concerned (as defined by the paper start and end dates), the student
will be eligible to receive a refund of tuition fees paid for the papers
concerned and no academic penalty shall apply. Students will not receive
a refund of non-tuition fees paid, and are still required to pay non-tuition
fees, but non-tuition fees may be reduced subject to the number of
credits remaining in the student’s programme.
When the University receives written notification of withdrawal from
paper(s), comprising all of a student’s programme(s) for the year, before
10 percent of the study period has elapsed for all paper(s) (measured
from paper start date), the student will be eligible to receive a refund
of tuition fees and non-tuition fees paid and no academic penalty shall
apply. A withdrawal fee is still payable and will be deducted from any
refund.
When the University receives written notification of withdrawal from a
paper(s) after 10 percent of the study period has elapsed but before 75
percent of the study period has elapsed for the paper(s) concerned (as
defined by the paper start and end dates) the student shall be withdrawn
without academic penalty but will remain liable to pay all University
prescribed fees and will not be entitled to a refund.
When the University receives written notification of withdrawal from a
paper(s) after 75 percent of the study period has elapsed for the paper(s)
concerned (as defined by the paper start and end dates) the student
shall be withdrawn with academic penalty and remain liable to pay all
University prescribed fees and will not be entitled to a refund.
Students who do not attend a paper, where they have accepted an Offer
of Place and where they have received a Confirmation of Enrolment, will
be liable to pay all fees prescribed by the University and are not entitled
to any tuition fee refund for that paper unless the correct withdrawal
procedures are followed and unless the University receives notice of
withdrawal before 10 percent of the study period has elapsed (as defined
by the paper start and end dates).
14. Withdrawal after 75 percent of the study period is termed ‘withdrawal
with academic failure’. The academic record will therefore show DNC
(Did Not Complete). Repeated DNC or academic failure in the same
paper may result in the University refusing to enrol that person in the
paper again. Refusal is notified to the student concerned in writing.
Unless specifically notified of exclusion from the University, students
remain eligible to apply to re-enrol in the future.
Fee Appeals
15. The University recognises that exceptional personal circumstances may
arise that make it impossible for a student to continue with his or her
study. Where such circumstances arise after the date by which students
may withdraw from study with a refund, the University may, at its sole
discretion, consider alternative arrangements.
Whether a refund or partial refund is granted is determined by the
University following the Fee Appeal process. Students are eligible
to submit a Fee Appeal who have experienced exceptional personal
circumstances, and have already withdrawn from the paper(s) in
question. Where relevant, the Fee Appeal application must be supported
by documented evidence of the exceptional circumstances.
16. The University may, at its discretion, defer a student’s study in a paper(s)
from one period to another.
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Stautes and Regulations
Carry Forward of Postgraduate Enrolment
17. (a) Postgraduate students undertaking research (other than for
Doctoral degrees), may apply to carry forward their enrolment
into the enrolment period immediately following the enrolment
period where the student paid tuition fees in order to complete the
requirements of a thesis, dissertation or project paper, where one of
the following conditions applies:
(i) Exceptional circumstances arise that prevent a student from
completing the requirements of a thesis, dissertation or project
paper within a single enrolment period.
(ii) Where a thesis, dissertation or project paper is being undertaken
on a part-time basis and completion within a single enrolment
period is not possible. Students may only apply when a part-time
classification is established at enrolment.
entitlement and fees payment purposes, the person’s status remains
as an international student.
22. Distance (extramural) enrolment may be permitted for applicants living
outside New Zealand who are not New Zealand citizens. The process
for setting tuition fees due for such enrolments are the same as for other
international full fee-paying students studying at Massey University.
Enrolment in international off-shore distance (extramural) programmes
may be subject to special terms and conditions as determined and
approved by Academic Board. Particular programmes of study and
papers may have a residential requirement which has a face-to-face
dimension. Approval of offshore distance (extramural) education
initiatives are subject to the requirements of the University’s Policy
Relating to the International Delivery of Qualifications.
Note: Enrolment by distance (extramural) education will not normally
be approved for citizens of the People’s Republic of China in order
to ensure degree recognition. Any exception requires approval by the
Pro Vice-Chancellor (or nominee) of the College responsible for the
student’s programme of study.
(b) Applications are subject to approval by the Pro Vice-Chancellor.
No further tuition fees are due for the enrolment period in which
Postgraduate Enrolment is carried forward. An application fee is
payable at the time that the application is made.
(c) ‘Exceptional Circumstances’ for Carry Forward of Postgraduate
Enrolment
This procedure enables Pro Vice-Chancellors to roll forward the
enrolment provided that:
(i) the Pro Vice-Chancellors is satisfied the student has been
making satisfactory progress, and
International Students Resident in New Zealand Enrolling for Distance
(Extramural) Study
23. Distance (extramural) enrolment may be permitted for students residing
in New Zealand who are not citizens or permanent residents of New
Zealand. Such students will be required to hold a Study Visa and will
pay international student fees.
Note: Enrolment by distance (extramural) education will not normally
be approved for citizens of the People’s Republic of China in order
to ensure degree recognition. Any exception requires approval by the
Pro Vice-Chancellor (or delegate) of the College responsible for the
programme.
(ii) ‘exceptional circumstances’ have prevented the thesis,
dissertation or project from being completed within the relevant
enrolment period.
‘Exceptional circumstances’ include any one of the following:
(i) Ill health of a significant extent or duration verified by a medical
certificate.
(ii) Close family bereavement or other traumatic personal event as
verified by relevant documentary evidence.
(iii) Unanticipated problems with the conduct of research or
with supervision or support which are beyond the control of the
candidate.
Maximum Student Workload
24. (a) The maximum credits students may take in Semester One, Semester
Two and the Double Semester shall not exceed 150 credits.
Students shall not enrol in more than 75 credits per semester.
(b) Credits for double semester papers are assigned in equal parts per
semester.
Enrolment of School Students
18. Notwithstanding Regulation 1 of the Matriculation Regulations, the
University may grant students who are enrolled for full-time instruction
in a secondary school permission to enrol in a paper or papers up to a
maximum of 30 credits in an academic year, of which not more than 22.5
may be taken in a single semester. Students allowed to enrol in papers
under this regulation must matriculate before they are formally admitted
to a university. When they have matriculated they may apply to credit to
a qualification papers passed under this regulation.
(c) Applicants shall not enrol in the same year for more than two
distinct courses for degrees and diplomas.
(d) The maximum credits students may take in Summer School shall
not exceed 60 credits.
Certificate of Proficiency Regulations
1.
An applicant who intends to register for tuition without fulfilling the
requirements of a full programme leading to a Massey University
qualification may be permitted to enrol for no more than 30 credits per
year on a Certificate of Proficiency basis. Except as permitted by the
Enrolment of School Students regulation, applicants are required to
satisfy Regulation 1 of the Matriculation Regulations.
2.
Applicants for a Certificate of Proficiency shall pay fees, complete
compulsory requirements and give notice of their intention to enter for
examinations, where appropriate, as if they were proceeding to a degree,
diploma or certificate. The Registration and Examination Regulations
shall apply to such candidates.
Enrolment of International Students
19. Massey University has agreed to observe and be bound by the Code of
Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students published by the
Minister of Education. Copies of the Code are available on request or
from the New Zealand Ministry of Education website at
http://www.minedu.govt.nz/goto/international.
20. International students must have appropriate and current medical and
travel insurance while studying in New Zealand.
Persons Resident Outside New Zealand Enrolling for Distance
(Extramural) Study
21. (a) New Zealand citizens residing outside New Zealand who enrol in a
programme leading to an award of a qualification are entitled to pay
domestic fees unless:
(i) they enrol at Massey University overseas campus; or
(ii) receive tuition primarily at an overseas site; or
(iii) are enrolled with an overseas provider.
(b) New Zealand permanent residents and Australian citizens living
outside New Zealand who are enrolled for tuition must pay fees at
the rate for international students. A residency visa enables a person
to be classified as a domestic student only while living in New
Zealand. Obtaining a Returning Resident’s Visa prior to leaving
New Zealand entitles a person only to re-enter New Zealand and
to be granted a Residence Visa on arrival; it does not influence
the person’s status while outside New Zealand. Therefore, for
Page 22
Approval of Course
3.
The personal course of study of every applicant for a Certificate of
Proficiency shall require the approval of the Academic Board. Normally
approval is exercised as part of the enrolment process.
Status of Certificate of Proficiency Pass
4.
A student who has passed in a paper for a Certificate of Proficiency
may at a later date have the paper credited towards a degree or diploma
provided that the necessary conditions for the paper as a part of the
degree or diploma were fulfilled at the time when the paper was passed
for a Certificate of Proficiency.
Aligned Resource Management
In keeping with principles of sound management, Massey University wishes
to ensure that it can adequately resource the programmes of study it offers.
Accordingly, the University reserves the right under Section 224(5) of the
Statutes and Regulations
completes the courses of study for two qualifications at the same time
and wishes to credit one or more papers to both qualifications. Except as
provided by these Cross-credit Regulations, a student shall receive credit
only once for each paper and shall not credit to separate degrees two
papers with substantially the same content.
Education Act (1989) to control the number of enrolments it will accept in
any programme.
The number of places to be funded in any programme and the criteria
for student selection will be available on application from the Student
Management office prior to each enrolment period. Every endeavour will be
made to meet the academic needs of students where this does not prejudice
the proper presentation or the academic standing of a programme.
5.
Credit shall not be granted for the same paper in more than two courses
of study.
6.
Unless otherwise specified in the Regulations for a particular
qualification, students may cross-credit 100- or 200-level papers that are
common to both courses up to the following maximum values:
Recognition of Formal and Informal
Prior Learning
(a) Where one course is a 60-credit undergraduate certificate and the
other is a 120-credit or greater undergraduate qualification, 15
credits, which shall normally be at 100-level.
Massey University recognises prior learning achieved within both formal
and informal settings. Credit is awarded for completed tertiary qualifications,
for incomplete tertiary qualifications, and for informal learning, as detailed
below.
(b) Where one course is a 120 credit undergraduate qualification and
the other is a 360 credit or greater undergraduate degree, 45 credits,
which shall normally be at 100-level.
Types of Massey University Credit That May Be Awarded
1.
(c) Where one course is a 240 credit undergraduate diploma and the
other is a 360 credit or greater undergraduate degree, 75 credits,
which shall normally be at 100-level.
Credit will be awarded at an appropriate level for the content of the
qualifying paper. Credit may be:
(d) Where both courses are 360 credit undergraduate degrees, 120
credits at 100-level or 200-level, of which a maximum of 45 shall
normally be at 200-level.
(a) For a specified Massey University paper, identified by paper
number.
(b) In a specified subject at a specified level, but not specifying
a paper number. The credits may count towards majoring or
minoring requirements (specialisation credits), where relevant.
They may be designated as part of a particular qualification
schedule (qualification credits) or, if not, simply count towards the
qualification (elective credits).
(c) Specified by level, but not by subject (elective credits). Elective
credits count towards the qualification, but not to any major or
minor and they may not be designated as part of a particular
qualification schedule.
(d) Under the provisions of Clause 18, for specified assessment(s)
towards a specified Massey University paper.
Minimum Credits to be Completed Through Massey University
2.
A student shall be required to complete at least the following through
Massey University to be awarded a Massey University qualification:
(a) For a 360 credit undergraduate degree, at least 105 credits.
(i) At least 60 300-level credits in the degree, including the
300-level credits required for a major subject(s),
(ii) Where a minor subject(s) is required or permitted within the
degree, at least 30 credits in the minor subject including at least
15 300-level credits, unless otherwise specified in the degree
regulations.
(b) For a 480 credit undergraduate degree, 120 credits at the highest
level in the degree, including all 400-level credits.
(c) For a postgraduate or graduate qualification, three-quarters of the
credits required.
(d) For a sub-degree or degree-level diploma or certificate, half of the
credits required.
3.
A student who earned transfer credit to an undergraduate degree while
on an official Massey University Student Exchange programme shall be
required to complete at least the following through Massey University
to be awarded a Massey University qualification. The remaining credits
specified by Regulation 2(a) or 2(b) may be completed through the
Exchange partner.
(a) For a 360 credit undergraduate degree, normally 105 credits
including 30 300-level credits, which must be part of the majoring
requirements unless a major is not required by the degree
Regulations.
(b) For a 480 credit undergraduate degree, at least 60 credits from the
fourth year of the degree.
Cross-credits
4.
The term ‘cross-credit’ refers to credit granted on the basis of a
completed qualification at Massey University or another approved
tertiary institution. Cross-crediting also applies where a student
(e) Where one course is a 360 credit undergraduate degree and the
other is a Massey University 480 or 600 credit undergraduate
degree, 180 credits at 100-level or 200-level, of which a maximum
of 90 shall normally be at 200-level.
7.
No paper at 300-level or above shall be cross-credited to another
qualification.
8.
Papers may not be cross-credited to or from a postgraduate diploma,
postgraduate certificate, graduate diploma or a graduate certificate unless
specifically stated otherwise in the Regulations for that diploma or
certificate.
9.
Where, because of these Regulations, students are unable to cross-credit
a paper that is compulsory in the second programme, they may substitute
such other paper as the Academic Board may approve.
10. The maximum number of credits that can be cross-credited from
completed qualifications is 120, irrespective of the number of
qualifications completed, unless Regulation 6(e) above applies or a
higher maximum is specified in the Regulations for the destination
qualification.
Transfer of Credit
11. Credit may be transferred from an incomplete qualification, at Massey
University or another approved tertiary institution. Application for
transfer of credit is a statement from the student that they do not intend
to complete the original qualification at a later date.
12. Students may be assessed under the Transfer of Credit Regulations,
rather than the Cross-credit Regulations, if they have been awarded a
Massey University certificate or diploma, or a Wellington Polytechnic
equivalent, and they surrender the certificate or diploma.
13. The Massey credit value for papers passed at other New Zealand
institutions will be obtained by multiplying the Equivalent Full-Time
Student (EFTS) value of the papers by 120.
14. Transfer credit will be awarded up to the maximum compatible with
the requirements of the destination qualification, except as specified by
Regulation 2 above for transfers from other institutions.
Informal Learning
15. (a) Credit for informal learning acknowledges relevant and appropriate
skills and knowledge obtained through training, work experience
and life experience.
(b) The principles by which these relevant and appropriate skills and
knowledge may be given credit include:
(i) credit should be awarded for learning, and not solely for
experience itself
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Stautes and Regulations
to that qualification or, where allowed within the relevant regulations, to
approved papers able to be selected from other qualifications or subjects.
(ii) credit should be awarded only for learning that is at the level of
the qualification towards which credit is requested
(iii) credit should be awarded only for learning that has a balance,
appropriate to the subject, between theory and practical application
4.
(iv) credit should be appropriate to the academic context in which
it is accepted
(v) credit can only be awarded for specified papers (that is
regulation 1(b) and 1(c) do not apply to credit for informal
learning).
16. Applications for credit for informal learning will be rigor-ously assessed
using normal university procedures, for example:
(a) assessment of a portfolio of supporting materials,
Specialisations
5.
(b) use of a challenge examination.
Students who are granted credit under this regulation will have had to
demonstrate their capability at the same level as students who enrol in
and pass the specified paper.
Notice of intention to submit a portfolio or to be examined must be given
before the end of the first year of enrolment at Massey University.
17. The maximum credit towards an undergraduate degree from informal
learning is 120 credits at 100- or 200-level. The maximum credit towards
a sub-degree or degree-level certificate or diploma from informal
learning is one-third of the credits required for the qualification. No
credit from informal learning towards a graduate or post-graduate
qualification is permitted.
Professional Development through Massey University
18. Credit for Massey University quality assured and delivered professional
development courses may be awarded towards a specified paper or
paper assessment, subject to prior College Board approval of the credit
arrangements.
19. Students may be awarded credit to the following maximum values,
unless this is precluded or a lower limit is specified under the Part II
regulations for a qualification:
(a) for a sub-degree certificate or diploma, one-half of the credits
required for the qualification;
(b) for an undergraduate certificate, diploma or degree, one-half of
the credits required for the qualification, up to a maximum of 120
credits;
(c) for a graduate certificate or graduate diploma, one-quarter of
the credits required for the qualification, up to a maximum of 30
credits;
Students may be credited with restricted passes. A student with a
restricted pass in any paper may subsequently enrol in the same paper
in order to attempt to improve the grade of pass. However, the paper
can be credited only once. The maximum credits able to be credited
from restricted passes are 60 for a 480 credit degree; 45 for a 360 credit
degree; 30 for a 240 credit diploma and 15 for a 120 credit certificate or
diploma; No R passes are permitted in a 60 credit certificate. A restricted
pass will not qualify as a pass for prerequisite purposes.
Qualifications for which specialisations, such as majors, minors, subjects
or endorsements, are listed may have these specified at the time of
course approval by the Academic Board. With the exception of minors,
the degree, diploma, or certificate completed by the student will state the
specialisation.
Student progression
6.
Students may not normally enrol for any 200-level paper unless they
have passed at least one 100-level paper, nor enrol for any 300-level
paper unless they have passed at least one 200-level paper.
7.
Students who wish to take a paper for which they do not have the
prerequisite(s) may make a case for admission to the relevant Head of
School or Programme Director concerned.
Maximum Time to Completion
8.
Unless otherwise specified in the Qualification Regulations there will
be 8 year maximum time for completion of any one Massey University
undergraduate or graduate qualification.
9.
Students who have been inactive for a period of 3 consecutive years
will be deemed to have abandoned their qualification. Abandonment
releases the University from its obligation to ensure a qualification can
be completed. Students may be permitted to re-enrol in a subsequent
current qualification should they meet the entry requirements; credits
previously achieved will be assessed and applied in accordance with
current regulations.
Variations and Personal Course Approvals
10. In exceptional circumstances, the Academic Board may, in such cases
as it thinks fit, approve a personal programme of study which does not
conform with the Regulations for that degree, diploma or certificate
while still conforming to the academic standards of the qualification.
The following rules will apply:
(d) for a post-graduate certificate or post-graduate diploma, one-quarter
of the credits required for the qualification, up to a maximum of 30
credits;
(a) There must be evidence of exceptional circumstances and/or
hardship to the student.
(e) for a masters degree, one-quarter of the credits required for the
qualification, up to a maximum of 60 credits.
(b) Variations will receive appropriate academic authorisation under
delegation from Academic Board and be formally documented.
(c) The variation will be recorded on the student’s academic record.
General Regulations for Undergraduate
Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas,
Undergraduate Certificates, Graduate
Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
These General Regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other
Statutes and Regulations of the University and the Qualification Regulations
specific to each Undergraduate Degree, Diploma and Certificate, Graduate
Diploma and Graduate Certificate offered by the University.
Admission
1.
Students must satisfy the admission requirements of the University and
the programme in which they wish to enrol.
Academic Requirements
2.
3.
An undergraduate or graduate qualification will consist of a number
of credits accumulated from papers, as specified in the Qualification
Regulations.
Every course of study will comply with any specified prerequisites, corequisites and restrictions requirements. This applies to papers specific
Page 24
(d) Personal course approvals will not normally permit a reduction in
the total amount of credit required to complete a qualification.
(e) The extent of variation cannot jeopardise the integrity of the
qualification. To this end there will be a limit on the extent to which
a qualification can be varied. The maximum amount of credit varied
will relate to the size of the qualification as follows:
120 credit qualification
15 credits
240 credit qualification
30 credits
360 credit qualification
45 credits
480 credit qualification
60 credits
(f) Variations will not normally be permitted in 60 credit qualifications
(g) Except where the special circumstances apply to a cohort of
students (for example when transitioning students as a result of
programme closure or paper unavailability) variations will only be
considered on a case-by-case basis and will not set a precedent.
Transitional Provisions
11. The University reserves the right to introduce such changes as it may
judge to be necessary or desirable, including the addition, restructuring
Statutes and Regulations
or withdrawal of qualifications, regulations and/or papers. Reasonable
provisions will be made to enable students to complete any qualification
which is discontinued or has its structure substantially altered, but such
provision will not extend beyond the permitted time to completion.
degrees must be completed within one year of first enrolling in fulltime study or within three years of first enrolling in part-time study.
(ii) Postgraduate diplomas and 120-credit masters degrees will
carry the award of Distinction if completed at a superior standard
(equivalent to First Class Honours), or Merit (equivalent to Second
Class Honours, Division One) within one year of first enrolling in
full-time study or within three years of first enrolling in part-time
study.
Limitation of Entry
12. For any courses of study offered by the University, the University
Council (by its delegate) may limit the number of students enrolled in
the courses of study or training each year because of insufficiency of
staff, accommodation, or equipment. Accordingly, where the number
of applications for the particular courses exceeds the number of places
available, then Massey University will select from the applicants the
students to be enrolled in the course of study.
General Regulations for Postgraduate
Degrees, Postgraduate Diplomas, and
Postgraduate Certificates
These General Regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other
Statutes and Regulations of the University and the Qualification Regulations
specific to each Postgraduate Degree, Diploma and Certificate offered by the
University.
(iii) 240-credit masters degrees will be awarded with First
Class Honours, Second Class Honours Division I, Second Class
Honours Division II or a pass. To qualify for the award of honours,
240-credit masters degrees must be completed within two years
of first enrolling for full-time study or within five years of first
enrolling for part-time study.
(iv) These periods may, in special circumstances, be amended/
extended by the Academic Board. The Academic Board may also
in special circumstances permit students to suspend their course of
studies for an approved period.
Specialisations
5.
Admission
Admission to a postgraduate certificate, postgraduate diploma, 120-credit
bachelor (honours) or a master’s degree requires that the student will:
Maximum Time to Completion
6.
(a) have made formal application for admission to postgraduate study
for the specified programme; and
(b) 120-credit Postgraduate Diplomas must be completed within a
maximum of four years.
(ii) have an approved academic qualification of similar standing to
the relevant bachelor’s degree; or
(c) 120-credit Masterates must be completed within a maximum of
four years.
(iii) have been granted admission with equivalent status as entitled
to proceed to the specified postgraduate degree, diploma or
certificate,
(d) 180-credit Masterates must be completed within a maximum of five
years.
(e) 240-credit Masterates must be completed within a maximum of six
years.
and, where appropriate to a specific qualification:
(c) (i) provide evidence of practical/professional experience of an
acceptable standard in an area(s) relevant to the qualification; or
(e) 120-credit Bachelor (Honours) must be completed within one year
of first enrolling for full-time study or within three years of first
enrolling for part-time study.
(ii) on the request of the Academic Board, delegated to PVCs,
carry out such work and satisfy such assessments as the Board may
determine to be necessary for admission.
Where credit has been transferred in accordance with Recognition of
Prior Learning Regulation 2(c), the above time limits may be pro-rated
when calculating maximum time limits for completion.
Academic Requirements
(a) A postgraduate qualification will consist of a number of credits
accumulated from taught papers and/or research papers, as specified
in the Qualification Regulations.
(b) For the award of the degree, diploma or certificate a pass is
required in each paper in the qualification. Normally, a student may
re-enrol and be re-examined only once in a failed paper.
Time limits may be waived, at the discretion of the University, where a
student exits with a qualification of lesser credit.
7.
(c) Restricted passes are not normally permitted at postgraduate level.
Research Reports & Theses
3.
Unless otherwise specified in the Qualification Regulations there will be
time limits for completion as follows:
(a) 60-credit Postgraduate Certificates must be completed within a
maximum of two years.
(b) (i) have qualified for the award of a relevant bachelor’s degree with
a grade average that demonstrates an adequate level of preparation
for the postgraduate programme; or
2.
Qualifications for which specialisations, such as endorsements or
subjects, are listed may have these specified as specialisations at the time
of course approval. The degree, diploma, or certificate completed by the
student will state the specialisation.
(a) A research report will consist of a minimum of 30 credits; a thesis
will consist of a minimum of 90 credits.
(b) The research component of postgraduate programmes will be 0,
30, 45, 60, 90 or 120 credits with the proviso that the bachelor
(honours) degree will normally have a minimum research
component of 30 credits and those master’s degrees that require a
research component will normally have a minimum of 45 credits of
research.
(c) Postgraduate diplomas and certificates may have a research
component of zero credits and consist entirely of taught papers.
Students who have been inactive for a period of 3 consecutive years
will be deemed to have abandoned their qualification. Abandonment
releases the University from its obligation to ensure a qualification can
be completed. Students may be permitted to re-enrol in a subsequent
current qualification should they meet the entry requirements; credits
previously achieved will be assessed and applied in accordance with
current regulations.
Variations and Personal Course Approvals
8.
In exceptional circumstances, the Academic Board may, in such cases
as it thinks fit, approve a personal programme of study which does not
conform with the Regulations for that degree, diploma or certificate
while still conforming to the academic standards of the qualification.
The following rules will apply:
(a) There must be evidence of exceptional circumstances and/or
hardship to the student.
Student Progression
(b) Variations will receive appropriate academic authorisation under
delegation from Academic Board and be formally documented.
4.
(c) The variation will be recorded on the student’s academic record.
(a) Students will normally have completed their 700-level paper
requirements prior to enrolling in the thesis paper.
(b) (i) 120-credit Bachelor (Honours) degrees will be awarded as First
Class Honours, Second Class Honours Division I, Second Class
Honours Division II or Third Class Honours. Bachelor (honours)
(d) Personal course approvals will not normally permit a reduction in
the total amount of credit required to complete a qualification.
Page 25
Stautes and Regulations
(e) The extent of variation cannot jeopardise the integrity of the
qualification. To this end there will be a limit on the extent to which
a qualification can be varied. The maximum amount of credit varied
will relate to the size of the qualification as follows:
120 credit qualification
15 credits
180 credit qualification
30 credits
240 credit qualification
30 credits
(f) Variations will not normally be permitted in 60 credit qualifications.
(g) Except where the special circumstances apply to a cohort of
students (for example when transitioning students as a result of
programme closure or paper unavailability) variations will only be
considered on a case-by-case basis and will not set a precedent.
Transitional Provisions
9.
The University reserves the right to introduce such changes as it may
judge to be necessary or desirable, including the addition, restructuring
or withdrawal of qualifications, regulations and/or papers. Reasonable
provisions will be made to enable students to complete any qualification
which is discontinued or has its structure substantially altered, but such
provision will not extend beyond the permitted time for completion.
Assessment and Examination Regulations
Assessment and Course Work
Eligibility for Assessment
1.
Students who enrol for a paper, pay their fees and do not withdraw will
be awarded a grade in that paper.
2.
Some papers require compulsory attendance at classes, including
laboratories, field trips, practical exercises or extramural contact courses
or block courses. In such papers, paper co-ordinators shall advise
students in writing at the commencement of tuition that non-attendance,
without exemption having been granted, constitutes failure in the paper,
regardless of the rest of the assessment procedure.
3.
Paper coordinators shall advise students at the commencement of tuition
which elements of the assessed course work will contribute towards the
final grade for the paper, and which elements, if any, are compulsory.
Unless otherwise stated all final exams are compulsory. Without
exemption having been granted, failure to:
(a) attend a compulsory exam, or;
(b) submit a compulsory assessment element, or;
(c) complete assessment components totalling 51% or more of the total
assessment, or;
(d) submit an Aegrotat application
(e) constitutes failure in the paper, regardless of the rest of the
assessment procedure.
Re-marking of Assessed Course work
4.
Students who seek to have an assessed course work component remarked should initially consult with the paper coordinator to clarify the
feedback and/or the mark awarded. If the informal consultation does not
address the student’s concerns, then a formal application for re-marking
may be made. Re-marking of course work is offered in exceptional
circumstances only; the onus is on the student to justify the request to
the chief examiner/Programme Director. Re-marking will normally be
by a different marker, using the original copy together with the marker’s
comments. Cases based on calculation errors within the original marking
of the course work should be forwarded directly to the paper coordinator
and do not require a formal application.
For coursework to be eligible for re-marking it must:
(a) be the original work submitted for assessment together with the
marker’s comments;
(b) normally contribute at least 15% towards the final grade for the
paper;
(c) must have been formally assessed only once previously;
(d) be submitted with a re-mark application within four weeks from the
date of dispatch of the original assessment result.
Page 26
As a result of a re-mark, the grade for the course work could remain
unchanged, or be amended upwards or downwards.
Students in named Doctoral degrees must refer to the Handbook for
Doctoral Study for separate details of re-marking provisions as the above
regulations do not apply to named Doctoral students. The Handbook is
available on the University website at http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz
Aegrotat and Impaired Performance Regulations
5.
Students may apply for Aegrotat (AEG)/Impaired Performance (IP)
consideration in relation to final examinations, and to internal assessment
and other compulsory elements that occur at a fixed time and place
as defined in the paper outline distributed to students at the beginning
of the delivery of a paper. AEG/IP applications may be considered if
the student is unable to complete a compulsory contact course or field
trip, but in such cases the grade for the paper may be withheld until the
contact course or field trip is completed by the student, normally during
the next paper offering in the same mode and location.
As a general guideline, applications that pertain to assessment tasks
worth less than 10% of the total assessment for the paper will not
normally be considered as part of these regulations. In such cases, and
for other internal assessment activities not of a fixed time and place,
the student should contact the paper coordinator to see if an alternative
arrangement can be made, and if supporting evidence is required.
Students intending to apply for Aegrotat or Impaired Performance on
health grounds in accordance with these regulations should normally
consult with a health professional as soon as possible, but no later than
seven days after the last assessment event for which the application is
being made. Applications made by students who consulted with a health
professional later than seven days after the assessment event should
demonstrate that the consultation occurred as soon as practicable. The
Manager, Assessment, Student Management, must receive a completed
Aegrotat and Impaired Performance Application Form from a health
professional acceptable to Academic Board who has assessed the
student.
Students in named Doctoral degrees must refer to the Handbook
for Doctoral Study for separate details of aegrotat provisions as the
above regulations do not apply to named Doctoral students. Note also
that students in Doctoral degrees must refer to the ‘Handbook for
Doctoral Study’ for separate details of oral examination provisions. The
Handbook is available on the University website at http://policyguide.
massey.ac.nz
Aegrotat
(a) Candidates who have been prevented by illness, injury,
bereavement or other critical personal circumstances from
presenting themselves at any examination, compulsory component,
or assessment activity may apply for AEGROTAT consideration.
An AEG pass or DNC grade will be the normal outcome of
an application unless a significant portion of the total formal
assessment (normally 60% or more) has been completed and the
paper coordinator considers the award of a letter grade appropriate.
To be awarded an AEG pass, the candidate’s University teachers
in the paper or papers affected must be confident that the student
would have passed the paper had the assessment for which the
Aegrotat application was made been completed.
AEG passes will not be awarded in cases where less than 40%
of the total assessment for the paper has been completed by the
student, however students who submit Aegrotat applications with
satisfactory grounds may receive a Not Finalised status for the
paper in question, and be permitted to complete the missed fixed
time assessments at the earliest practicable opportunity or at the
next offering of the paper at their campus of study.
Impaired Performance
(b) Candidates who consider that their performance in, or preparation
for, any examination or assessment activity has been seriously
impaired due to illness, injury, bereavement or other critical
personal circumstances may apply for Impaired Performance
consideration.
For impaired performance applications, paper co-ordinators will
assess the typical performance of a student during the paper and,
where the student’s performance for the assessment item covered
by the application was atypically poorer than that achieved in other
Statutes and Regulations
assessment tasks, and in relation to the overall class performance
for the assessment in question, assign a mark for the assessment
item and an overall letter grade for the paper based upon this
information.
Assignments and Examinations in Te Reo Māori
6.
The Māori language is an official language of the University. Those
considered to have the necessary level of competency may write
assignments, tests and examinations in Te Reo Māori, subject to
approval and where the subject is considered to be appropriate. Those
wishing to pursue this option should make application to the Manager,
Assessment, Student Management, by 31 January for Semester One and
Double Semester papers and by 16 June for Semester Two and Summer
School papers.
Doctoral theses may be submitted in Te Reo Māori, English, or in both
languages. The oral examination may also be conducted in Te Reo
Māori. Candidates intending to submit their doctoral thesis in Te Reo
Māori, or in a substantial combination of English and Māori, must
indicate this intention within two months of provisional registration.
They should supply a letter from the AVC (Māori and Pasifika) or
nominee, affirming that they have the required level of competency in Te
Reo Māori, will be working in an area where the language is considered
to be appropriate, and that supervisory expertise is available in the Māori
language.
Dishonesty in any Assessment or Examination
7.
Dishonest practice in connection with any examination or assessment
is considered to be a breach of the Code of Student Conduct and in
some cases, the Code of Responsible Research Conduct. The Student
Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure for managing the allegations
of misconduct are both found on the Massey University Policy Guide at
http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz. The Student Disciplinary Regulations
that provide a detailed account of the processes for resolution of
complaints of misconduct and the procedures for student appeals, is
found on the Massey University Policy Guide at http://policyguide.
massey.ac.nz
Final Examinations
Time and Venue
1.
The examinations conducted by the University shall be held at the places
and times specified in the examination timetables published by authority
of the Council.
Written Entry
2.
(a) Students enrolled in an internal offering of a paper are not required
to give notice in writing of intention to present themselves for
examination.
(b) (i) Students enrolled in a distance (extramural) or block mode
offering of a paper are to elect the centre where they propose to
sit their examinations (from the published list of centres) when
completing the Enrolment Application.
(ii) When subsequently advising a change of address, it will be
necessary to either confirm or amend the pro-posed examination
centre. If relocating over-seas, form ENR9 will have to be
requested and completed.
Examination Procedure
3.
The examinations shall consist of such written, oral and practical
examinations as the examiners may determine.
4.
Candidates shall write out answers to the questions in the presence of a
supervisor, who shall be appointed or approved by or on behalf of the
Council, and in accordance with such detailed instructions as may be
furnished by the Council.
5.
No candidate shall communicate with an examiner in regard to an
examination except through Massey Contact under delegated authority
from the Manager, Assessment, Student Management.
6.
Any candidate who has a permanent disability which could be
considered to adversely affect performance under ordinary examination
conditions must inform the Manager, Assessment, Student Management,
before the examination and supply such documentary evidence as is
required.
7.
The examination scripts shall be transmitted to the examiners, who shall
report the results for the paper to the Manager, Assessment, Student
Management.
8.
Note that assessments (including major tests) and examination scripts
not routinely returned to students should be retained by academic
departments for a period of 12 months.
Re-marking of Final Examination Scripts
9.
By making application to the Manager, Assessment, Student
Management, within four weeks from the date of the notification
confirming the official results of final examinations and paying the
prescribed fee, any student may have their final examination script remarked by the examiners, followed by a recalculation of the final grade
where appropriate. As a result of a re-mark, the final grade could remain
unchanged, or be amended upwards or downwards. The application
fee will be refunded if there is a change of final grade. No additional
information from the student shall be placed before the examiners.
Research Reports and Masters Theses
10. (a) All research reports (up to 60 credits) shall be graded by two
examiners, at least one of whom shall be independent of the
research work, with external moderation undertaken in accordance
with College policies.
(b) At the discretion of the examiner(s), a candidate may be examined
orally on the subject of the research report or thesis.
(c) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed research project
may be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
(d) All Masters theses shall be graded by two examiners who are
independent of the research work and one of whom is external to
the University.
(e) At the discretion of the examiner(s), a candidate may be examined
orally on the subject of the Masters thesis.
(f) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed Masters thesis
may be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
Theses
11. (a) A candidate whose examination includes the presentation of a thesis
(≥90 credits) shall have an approved supervisor or supervisors
before commencing work on the research.
(b) Before the thesis is forwarded to the examiners, the Head of
Academic Unit shall supply a certificate from the supervisor that
the thesis embodies work carried out be the candidate under direct
supervision and also stating the part the supervisor played in
preparation of the thesis.
(c) For the purposes of the assessment of the masters degree thesis a
candidate shall be required to submit three copies of the thesis as
required by the policy of the individual college that has supervised
the thesis. Students should contact their College Office for guidance
on submission procedures for their individual College.
(d) For the purposes of the assessment of the doctoral degree thesis
a candidate shall be required to submit to the Graduate Research
School (if located on Manawatu Campus), or to Massey Contact (if
located on Albany or Wellington campuses) four securely bound
copies of the thesis. Students not located close to a campus can post
or courier their theses to the Graduate Research School.
(e) Paper copies and the digital copy of the thesis shall, unless
the Librarian otherwise approves, conform with the format
requirements as detailed in the current library handbook A Guide to
the Presentation of Theses.
(f) (i) The relevant Academic Director (for Masters theses) or Dean
of Graduate Research School (for Doctoral theses) may agree
to accept a thesis solely in digital form, where the nature of the
research is such that it is not appropriate for the thesis to be
submitted in a printed form. Approval of the use of digital format
in this way should be sought by the candidate at an early stage of
enrolment in the thesis.
(ii) The relevant Academic Director (for Masters theses) or Dean
of Graduate Research School (for Doctoral theses) may agree to
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Stautes and Regulations
accept part of a thesis solely in digital form, where there are tables
of data or other information that are effectively appendices to the
thesis.
(g) The candidate shall be given a receipt for the copies of the thesis
by the Graduate Research School or the relevant Massey Contact
office. As soon as the assessment has been completed, and the
final version approved, in the case of successful candidates, the
candidate or the candidate’s supervisor shall be responsible for the
return to the Graduate Research School two hard bound copies and
one electronic copy of the thesis, unless otherwise stated in the
course regulations. One hard copy and one electronic copy shall
be lodged in the Library of the Campus of study, with the hard
copy being securely housed for archival purposes. The second hard
bound copy shall be returned to the Academic Unit.
(h) The paper and the digital copies of the thesis must be accompanied
by a declaration signed by the student stating that the paper and the
digital copy are the same (subject to the provisions of subsections
in (i)).
(i) The two copies destined for the Library will be fully catalogued,
and in the case of the digital copy, metadata tags will be added. The
print copy will be lodged permanently in secure facilities in the
Library, although available for consultation within the Library. The
digital copy will be lodged permanently in the University’s digital
repository. Unless the AVC (Research) has approved an embargo,
the print and digital copies will be publicly accessible.
Cases of Hardship – Vice-Chancellor’s
Power
In any case where it is shown to the satisfaction of the Vice-Chancellor that
any alteration or amendment of a University statute or Regulation involving a
change in a programme or in examination requirements has caused hardship
to a student, the Vice-Chancellor may make such provisions as is thought fit
for the relief of such hardship. The student may appeal the decision of the
Vice-Chancellor to the Council, which may make such provisions as it thinks
fit.
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress
Regulations
Part A: Generic Regulations
1.
A person whose academic progress is unsatisfactory may be excluded
by the Academic Board (or its delegate) or the Vice Chancellor (or his
delegate) from a paper, or programme of study, or College, or from the
University as set out in these Regulations.
2.
Massey University defines the grades of D, E, F, and DNC as failing
grades.
3.
Subject to clauses 11 to 24 (inclusive) and clause 28 below:
(a) Any person who fails to obtain a pass in a paper for which that
person has been enrolled on three occasions will usually be
excluded for a fixed term from enrolling in that paper as determined
by the Academic Board (or its delegate) or by the Vice Chancellor
(or his delegate).
(j) A thesis including parts of the thesis which were solely in digital
form, will be publicly accessible through the University’s digital
repository, unless embargoed. In the case of an embargo of the full
digital copy held by the University, only the author, title, abstract
and metadata will be publicly accessible through the University’s
digital repository while the embargo remains in place.
(b) Any person who fails to pass at least half of the credits for which
they have been enrolled, where they have been enrolled in at least
two semesters and at least 105 credits have been failed, will usually
be excluded for a fixed term from the College or programme as
determined by the Academic Board (or its delegate) or by the Vice
Chancellor (or his delegate).
(k) University records of the examiner’s assessment of the thesis shall
be retained and disposed of in accordance with the University
General Disposal Authority as required under the Public Records
Act 2005. The student academic transcript shall be archived in
accordance with the University General Disposal Authority as
required under the Public Records Act 2005.
(c) Exclusion from:
Note: The requirements to submit a digital copy will apply normally, and
as appropriate, to students who enrol in a thesis on or after 1 January
2007.
(i) Two Colleges; or
(ii) Two programmes; or
(iii) Any one College or programme of study on two occasions,
Key to Grading System
A
will normally result in exclusion from the University.
4.
A+
1st Class Pass
A–
B+
B
2nd Class Pass
B–
C+
C
(b) The Committee may:
Pass
Aeg
Aegrotat Pass
P
Ungraded Pass
R
Restricted Pass
(i) uphold the appeal; or
(ii) uphold the appeal subject to conditions; or
(iii) decline the appeal; or
(iv) amend the exclusion.
Fail Grades
D
Fail
E
Low Fail
F
Ungraded Fail
DNC
Did Not Complete
Other Entries
WD
Withdrew without
academic penalty
NF
Not finalised
CONT
Continuing enrolment
Page 28
(a) Students excluded and students excluded for a fixed term under
these Regulations shall have a right of appeal to the Exclusion
Appeals Committee on the grounds that their performance has
been seriously affected over an extended period of time by their
exceptional personal circumstances. “Exceptional Personal
Circumstances” means any extraordinary personal circumstances
(supported by corroborative evidence) that have not been the
subject of an Aegrotat and Impaired Performance Application.
(c) Any student whose appeal is upheld subject to conditions
is required to meet those conditions on re-enrolment. The
consequence of a student not meeting the conditions is that the
original exclusion for a fixed term, or exclusion, will be reinstated.
Reinstatement will be effective from the end of the enrolment
period in which the individual was last enrolled.
5.
Any person excluded from a programme or a College who wishes to
transfer to another programme or College requires the prior specific
written approval of the relevant Pro Vice-Chancellor (or their delegate)
of the programme into which the transfer is sought. Such approval may
be withheld or granted subject to such conditions as the Pro ViceChancellor (or their delegate) at their discretion determines. Students
seeking approval to transfer must provide the Pro Vice-Chancellor
(or their delegate) of the programme into which the transfer is sought
information pertinent to their study plans and seek course advice. This
process should be finalised prior to the start of lectures for the semester.
Statutes and Regulations
6.
Credits from study undertaken while excluded cannot be transferred
back to Massey University, the College, programme or paper that the
student was excluded from under these regulations.
7.
Except with the prior written permission of the Academic Board (or
its delegate), no person shall be enrolled at this University on transfer
from another University when their academic record is such that had
they been enrolled at Massey University then under these or other
University Regulations they would qualify for exclusion on the grounds
of unsatisfactory academic progress.
8.
Subject to:
(a) Clauses 11 to 24 (inclusive) below; and
(b) The University’s rights, at law, to refuse to enrol any person; and
(c) Other University prescribed requirements (including selection
criteria in courses with a limited number of places available),
any person who has been excluded for a fixed term under these
Regulations from a paper, or programme or College, may enrol
after a lapse of one complete year.
9.
Subject to:
(a) Clauses 11 to 24 (inclusive) below; and
(b) The University’s rights, at law, to refuse to enrol any person; and
(c) Other University prescribed requirements (including selection
criteria in courses with a limited number of places available),
any person who has been excluded from the University must
apply in writing to the Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Academic and
International (or their delegate) for written permission to re-enrol,
at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester in which reenrolment is sought. Such consent may be withheld or granted on
such conditions as the AVC-Academic and International (or their
delegate) at their discretion determines.
10. For all enrolments after any exclusion from the University, or from
any programme or College, a student is required to pass at least half
the papers for which they enrol in each enrolment period at any time
after exclusion to be eligible to remain enrolled or enrol for a further
semester(s).
Part B: Regulations relevant to specific programmes
In addition to clauses 1 to 10 (inclusive) and clause 28 below, the following
clauses regarding exclusion from specific programmes or College will apply.
11. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Design (Honours) or the
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) failure under clause 3(b) of these
regulations in either degree at first year level will result in exclusion for
a fixed term from both degrees.
12. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Early
Years, Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary, Bachelor of
Education (Teaching) Primary/Diploma in Education Studies, Bachelor
of Education (Secondary Teaching), Te Aho Tatairangi or Bachelor of
Speech and Language Therapy the following will lead to exclusion from
the programme or College as decided by the Academic Board (or its
delegate):
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions.
(b) Failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits of
full-time study or failure to pass at least 60 percent of an approved
part-time programme of study in any academic year.
(c) Failure to complete the degree of Bachelor of Education (Teaching)
Primary/Diploma in Education Studies within eight years
(including any exclusions) from the date of first enrolment.
(d) Failure to complete the degree within six years (including any
exclusions) from the date of first enrolment in the Bachelor of
Education (Secondary Teaching), Bachelor of Education (Teaching)
Early Years, Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary, Te Aho
Tatairangi or Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy.
Persons excluded under (a), (b) and either (c) or (d) above will only
be re-admitted to the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Early Years
degree, Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary degree, Bachelor of
Education (Teaching) Primary/Diploma in Education Studies degree,
Bachelor of Education (Secondary Teaching) degree, or the Te Aho
Tatairangi degree, with the approval of the Academic Board which
approval may be withheld or granted and if granted subject to conditions
as the Academic Board at its discretion determines. Students of the
Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy degree excluded under (a),
(b) or (d) above will not be re-admitted to the degree.
13. For persons enrolled in the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early
Childhood Education), Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary) or
Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) the following will lead to
exclusion from those programmes of study:
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
(b) Failure to pass papers totalling at least 60 academic credits of
full-time study or failure to pass at least 50 percent of an approved
part-time programme of study in any academic year;
(c) Failure to complete the diploma within two years from the date of
first enrolment (including any exclusions).
Persons excluded under (a), (b) and (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early Child-hood Education),
Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary) or Graduate Diploma of
Teaching (Secondary) programme with approval of the Academic Board
which approval may be withheld or granted and if granted, granted
subject to such conditions as the Academic Board at its discretion
determines.
14. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Veterinary Science, the following
will lead to exclusion from that programme:
(a) Failure in all subjects in the Second Examination.
(b) Failure to complete either the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth or Sixth
Examination in two successive attempts.
(c) Persons excluded under clause 14(b) will only be re-admitted to the
BVSc programme with approval of Academic Board under such
conditions as it may determine.
(d) Persons excluded twice under clause 14(b) above will not be
permitted to re-enrol for the BVSc degree.
15. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Midwifery the following will
lead to exclusion from that programme:
(a) No person will be entitled to enrol on more than two occasions
papers 177.101, 177.102 and 177.204, or enrol more than once
to pass papers 177.302 and 177.303, unless in extraordinary
circumstances and subject to the approval of the Head of School
which may be withheld or granted, and if granted subject to
conditions as the Head of School at their discretion determines.
(b) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory 177-prefix paper for
which they have been enrolled for two occasions or a compulsory
214-prefix paper for which they have been enrolled for three
occasions.
(c) Failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits in
a full-time academic year or failure to pass at least 60% of an
approved part-time programme of study in any academic year.
(d) Failure to complete the degree within 4 years from the date of first
enrolment, except under exceptional circumstances.
Persons excluded under (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted to the
Bachelor of Midwifery programme with the approval of the Academic
Board. Such approval may be withheld or granted subject to conditions.
16. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing the following will lead
to exclusion:
(a) No candidate will be given more than two opportunities to pass
each Praxis paper, including 168.121 and 168.123;
(b) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory 168-prefix paper for
which they have been enrolled for two occasions or a compulsory
214-prefix paper for which they have been enrolled for three
occasions;
(c) Failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits in
a full-time academic year or failure to pass at least 60% of an
approved part-time programme of study in any academic year;
(d) Failure to complete the degree within five years from the date of
first enrolment.
Page 29
Stautes and Regulations
Persons excluded under (b), (c) or (d) above will only be re-admitted to
the Bachelor of Nursing programme with the approval of the Academic
Board (or its delegate).
17. For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Social Work the following will
lead to exclusion:
(a) Candidates will be given only two opportunities to enrol in and
pass Field Education papers 179.355 and 179.455.
(b) Students who fail paper 179.355 or paper 179.455 twice will be
excluded from the degree for a period of one year and will be
required to apply for entry into the relevant part as specified in the
progression policy for the degree. Admission will be subject to the
University’s rights at law to refuse to enrol any person and subject
to other University prescribed requirements (including where
places are limited, being selected for that place).
18. For persons enrolled in the Master of Social Work (Applied) the
following will lead to exclusion:
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for on two occasions.
(b) Persons excluded under (a) above will only be re-admitted to the
Master of Social Work (Applied) programme with approval of the
Academic Board which approval may be withheld or granted and if
granted, granted subject to such conditions as the Academic Board
at its discretion determines.
19. For students enrolled in the Bachelor of Aviation - Air Transport Pilot
major the following will lead to exclusion:
(a) No candidate will be given more than two opportunities to pass
each flight assessment, unless in exceptional circumstances and
subject to the prior recommendation of the Student Review Board
and the approval of the General Manager.
(b) Candidates who have failed a flight assessment twice and whose
performance is deemed unacceptable by the School of Aviation
Student Review Board will be recommended to the General
Manager to be excluded from the BAv-ATP major. The General
Manager will consider the recommendation(s) of the School of
Aviation Student Review Board and any other matters the General
Manager considers relevant and make a recommendation to the
Academic Board (or its delegate).
The Academic Board (or its delegate) will make the final decision.
(c) Candidates who have failed a compulsory paper twice and whose
performance is deemed unacceptable by the School of Aviation
Student Review Board will be recommended to the General
Manager to be excluded from the BAv-ATP major. The General
Manager will consider the recommendation(s) of the School of
Aviation Student Review Board and any other matters the General
Manager considers relevant and make a recommendation to the
Academic Board (or its delegate).
The Academic Board (or its delegate) will make the final decision.
(d) Persons excluded under clause 19(b) and (c) will not be re-admitted
to the BAv-ATP major without first submitting themselves for reselection into the programme and being accepted.
20. Persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Veterinary Technology degree will
be excluded from re-enrolment from that programme on the following
basis:
(a) Failure to pass any 200- and 300- level paper in which they have
been enrolled on two occasions
(b) Failure to pass all 200- and 300- level papers within a period of five
years.
(c) Candidates who are excluded from the programme will be
readmitted to the course only with the approval of Academic Board.
Such approval may be granted under such conditions as it may
determine or withheld.
21. Persons enrolled in the Diploma in Veterinary Nursing will be excluded
from re-enrolment in that programme on the following basis:
(a) Failure to pass any 100- and 200- level paper in which they have
been enrolled on two occasions
(b) Failure to pass all 100- and 200- level papers within a period of five
years (including exclusions) from the date of first enrolment.
Page 30
(c) Candidates who are excluded from the programme will be
readmitted to the programme only with the approval of Academic
Board. Such approval may be withheld or granted and if granted,
granted on such conditions as it may determine.
22. Persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science will be
excluded from re-enrolment for that degree on the following basis:
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory 200- or 300-level paper in
which they have been enrolled on two occasions
23. Persons enrolled in a Graduate Diploma in Science for the purpose of
gaining registration as Medical Laboratory Scientists will be excluded
from re-enrolment in that diploma on the following basis:
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a 300- or 400-level paper in which they
have been enrolled on two occasions
24. Persons enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching the
following will lead to exclusion:
(a) Failure to pass the core compulsory paper for which they have
enrolled on two occasions
(b) Failure to pass any one of the papers listed in an endorsement
schedule for which they have enrolled on two separate occasions
will lead to exclusion from that endorsement.
Part C: Process, Definitions and Other Unsatisfactory Academic
Progress
25. Any person who may be excluded under Part A or Part B will be given a
reasonable opportunity to make written submissions to the person(s) or
Committee making the decision before the decision is made.
26. Unless the context requires otherwise:
“Exclusion” means either:
(a) the cancellation of a person’s enrolment at Massey University
in a paper or programme when during that person’s enrolment it
becomes evident that any of these Regulations apply; or
(b) if any person is not enrolled and any of the clauses in these
Regulations apply, then exclusion means the refusal to enrol
the person concerned in the paper(s) or programme(s) or at this
University as the case may be.
“Excluded for a Fixed term” means the refusal by Massey University
to admit and enrol any person into a paper or programme or College as
the case may be for a period of 12 months from the end of the enrolment
period in which the individual concerned was last enrolled.
Notwithstanding that a power under the Unsatisfactory Academic
Progress Regulations is said to be exercisable by the Academic Board (or
its delegate) the power may also be exercised by the Vice-Chancellor (or
his delegate).
27. Subject to clause 28, for the purposes of Section 224(12) of the
Education Act 1989, these Regulations comprise the Council refusing
to permit or cancelling the enrolment of a person as a student at Massey
University, or in a particular programme (as the case may be), on the
grounds that the person has made in-sufficient progress in the person’s
study or training after a reason-able trial at Massey University or at
another institution.
28. Nothing in these Regulations derogates from the University’s right to
refuse to permit, or from cancelling, the enrolment of a person as a
student at Massey University, or in a particular programme at Massey
University, on the grounds that the person has made insufficient progress
in the person’s study or training after a reasonable trial in circumstances
that are in addition to these Regulations or as otherwise permitted at law.
For the avoidance of doubt, and without limitation, a person’s enrolment
may be cancelled or a person’s enrolment may be refused when the
person repeatedly withdraws (with or without academic penalty).
Statutes and Regulations
Part D: Procedure for Appeals and Constitution of the Exclusion
Appeals Committee
Student Grievance Procedures
29. The Exclusion Appeals Committee shall be constituted by Council on
the recommendation of the Academic Board. Its powers are delegated by
Council. It shall comprise five persons.
Massey University’s Student Grievance Procedures are for all campuses and
cover all modes of delivery of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes
and related services. They are designed to ensure students receive a quality
education and that relations between staff and students are equitable. The
Procedures can be accessed from the University’s Policy Guide at http://
policyguide.massey.ac.nz.
•
Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Academic and International;
•
Three senior members of staff, including two academic staff, and
including one Maori member; and
•
One student member
except as required by law and except that no person shall appear
before the Committee to make oral submissions, the Committee shall
determine its own procedure. Each person(s) being the person appealing
the decision and the decision maker subject to the appeal shall have
reasonable opportunity to make written submissions together with any
other submitters or corroborative evidence the Committee requires.
Student Contract
The University and the Student form a contractual relationship when the
Student accepts an Offer of Place. That Contract is subject to the University,
issuing a Confirmation of Enrolment once all requirements have been
satisfied. If no Confirmation of Enrolment is issued then the Contract is at an
end. If the University issues a Confirmation of Enrolment, the following are
the terms of that Contract which the University and the Student accept are to
govern their relationship, along with statute, and with the Regulations and
Rules of the University.
The University will:
1.
Use best endeavours to provide the Student with tuition and supervision
of a professional standard in the course(s) in which the Student is
enrolled.
2.
Act reasonably and fairly in exercising its powers under the regulatory
framework and this Contract.
3.
Advise the Student of any changes in the course(s) required because of
changes in funding, staffing or other reasonable cause.
The Student will:
4.
Use best endeavours to fulfil the requirements prescribed by the
University for the course(s).
5.
Observe the Regulations and Rules of the University and accept the
jurisdiction of the University in all matters connected with academic
progress and with discipline.
6.
Pay the fees prescribed by the University for the course(s).
The University and the Student also agree:
7.
The Contract is formed when the Student accepts the Offer of Place.
That Contract is subject to the University issuing a Confirmation of
Enrolment. If a Confirmation of Enrolment is issued these are the terms
of the Contract that apply.
8.
The Contract will continue for the period for which the Student is
enrolled by the University and will then end. However, clause 12 will
continue to apply after the Contract ends.
9.
The University and the Student may enter into further contracts, in
subsequent periods, by repeating the process in clause 7.
Purpose
Objective
To foster the fair, speedy, and informal resolution of disputes at Massey
University, and an academic culture which will prevent such grievances.
Definition
A Grievance means any grievance, which a student (whether or not that
person has any other role within the university) has against the University
and/or a staff member because of a claim that he/she has sustained academic
disadvantage.
Such grievances may include but are not confined to:
•
The unfair assessment of course work not governed by University
assessment and examination regulations.
•
The unfair refusal or failure of the staff member to make him/herself
available to assist a student with difficulties regarding his/her course
work.
•
Unreasonable delays in the assessment of course work.
•
Inadequate course materials.
•
Inadequate teaching.
•
Deficient performance of associated administrative services.
Jurisdiction
The Student Grievance Procedures are distinct from, and may not be used
with respect to, any questions relating to the following rules, regulations,
statutes or procedures of the University including:
•
Cases of hardship - Vice-Chancellor’s Powers.
•
Disciplinary procedures.
•
Harassment procedures.
•
Final examination regulations.
•
Registration regulations.
•
Student fees.
Principles of Application
At all times the procedures will be carried out according to the following
principles:
Protection of persons
When a Grievance is taken to the University Grievance Committee all persons
who may be affected shall have their rights protected. Persons who may need
protection are:
1.
The Complainant.
2.
The Subject(s) of Complaint (Respondents).
3.
Heads of Departments, Institutes and Schools.
4.
Pro Vice-Chancellors (or their nominees) of Colleges.
5.
Assistant Vice-Chancellors (or their nominees)
6.
The University.
11. Liability for failure to perform this Contract is excluded where that
failure has been caused by circumstances beyond the control of the
University or the Student.
7.
Student representatives.
8.
Staff representatives.
12. Any dispute arising out of or in connection with this Contract, or
otherwise relating to the performance by the University or its staff
of their responsibilities to the Student, shall be resolved through the
Grievance Procedures prescribed by the University Calendar,; http://
www.massey.ac.nz/which shall be the exclusive procedures for
resolution of such a dispute.
9.
The Chairperson of the Grievance Committee.
10. The relevant Admission Application, ,Enrolment Application, Offer of
Place, Confirmation of Enrolment, regulations, rules of the University
and material published in the Calendar also form part of this Contract
but nothing else shall be incorporated into the contractual relationship
between the Student and the University.
Statutory Protection
The affected persons are entitled to the protection provided by:
•
The Official Information Act 1982
•
The Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987
Page 31
Stautes and Regulations
•
The Employment Relations Act 2000
•
The Human Rights Act 1993
•
The Privacy Act 1993
•
Consumer Guarantees Act 1993
•
The Protected Disclosures Act 2000
•
Any other relevant statutes.
3.
In the absence of extraordinary circumstances, the presence of which
will be determined (if necessary) by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor
(Academic and International), a complaint relating solely to the grade of
a piece of course work will not proceed beyond the relevant Pro ViceChancellor.
4.
The following may at any time request through the University Disputes
Advisor the assistance of a University Mediator:
(a)Complainant
Due dispatch
(b) Staff member affected or
The rights of all affected persons are enhanced by a prompt investigation and
resolution of the Grievance.
(c) Head of Department/School/Institute/Section or
Due process
(d) Relevant Pro Vice-Chancellor (or their nominee).
5.
If a Grievance is unresolved at the Pro Vice-Chancellor level, it may be
referred to the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International).
That step will not be taken unless and until the University Disputes
Advisor has established that all reasonable steps to resolve the problem
consensually have been attempted and exhausted. The Assistant ViceChancellor (Academic and International) or their nominee will review
the case, determine that all reasonable steps for resolution have been
addressed, and then forward the case the Chair of Academic Board who
will convene the University Grievance Committee.
6.
The University Grievance Committee will have the responsibility of
enquiring into the subject matter of the grievance and determining the
outcome of the complaint.
The procedures will follow the principles of natural justice, namely:
1.
Notice of any Grievance shall be given to the party/parties as soon
as reasonably practicable (subject to consistency with “Time Limits”
below).
2.
Any persons directly adversely affected by a Grievance shall be
adequately informed of the Grievance arising and be given an
opportunity to respond.
3.
The process for resolving the Grievance will be conducted fairly.
4.
The avoidance of bias or conflict of interest.
Time Limits
It may:
A grievance should be brought to the attention of the University within
one year of the occurrence or circumstances to which the grievance refers
(Note that assessments (including major tests) and examination scripts not
routinely returned to students should be retained by academic departments for
a period of 12 months). Thereafter a grievance may be considered only with
the consent of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International).
In deciding whether a grievance will be considered pursuant to Clause 9 of
this Policy, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International) will
consider:
(a) Conduct that inquiry (including the hearing of the respective cases
of the student complainant and the staff member affected) in such
manner as, consistent with the principles of natural justice, it thinks
fit.
1.
The seriousness of the alleged grievance;
2.
The availability of relevant information including witnesses and
documents;
3.
The prejudice to any other parties; and
4.
Any reasons for the delay in bringing the grievance to the attention of
the University.
Procedures
Step 1
The student and/or their representative approaches the staff member concerned.
If the approach is in writing the staff member should acknowledge the receipt of
the complaint within 7 days. (Mediation preferred forum for resolution.)
êè
Step 2
If no resolution, or Step 1 is inappropriate, complainant approaches Head of
Department/School/Institute/Section or, where the Head is the respondent or
there is no settlement of the Grievance, the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College.
(Mediation preferred forum for resolution.)
êè
Step 3
Step 4
University Disputes Advisor for referral to a Mediator agreed upon
by the Parties
University Disputes Advisor
If no resolution, complainant approaches Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
who will, after consultation with the University Disputes Advisor, forward the
matter to the Chair of the Academic Board who will initiate the convening of the
University Grievance Committee
(c) Meet with the parties and any other persons considered able to
assist the inquiry.
7.
The University Grievance Committee may meet with the parties
separately or together. However, any material relevant to the complaint
received from one party in the absence of the other must be either:
(a) Disclosed to the other party and an opportunity to comment given
or;
(b) Excluded from consideration.
8.
Each party will have the right to have a support person present at any
meeting with the University Grievance Committee.
9.
The University Grievance Committee may delegate to and authorise its
chairperson to carry out such aspects of its investigatory functions as it
thinks fit.
10. The University Grievance Committee will, following the inquiry, prepare
a report which will be issued to the parties and contain its decision on
the complaint.
11. The decision of the University Grievance Committee will be final and
binding. There will be no right of further appeal or review.
12. The proceedings of the University Grievance Committee shall be private,
confidential and privileged.
13. Any student with a Grievance should try and keep notes of details,
including times, dates, places and keep copies of any documentation
related to the Grievance.
ê
Notes to procedures
University Grievance Committee decision, which is final and binding.
1.
Students may in the first instance approach their Student Association
representative for support, advice and advocacy. Students may either act
alone or be accompanied by a representative through all steps of these
Grievance procedures.
2.
The complainant should also specify the remedies sought to resolve the
submitted Grievance.
1.
Students, whenever practicable, should in the first instance approach the
University staff member concerned about any Grievance.
2.
If the Grievance is unresolved with the staff member concerned, the
student may approach the relevant Head of Department/School/Institute/
Section, or where this is inappropriate, the relevant Pro Vice-Chancellor.
It is anticipated that the vast majority of Grievances will be resolved at
this stage. The preferred forum for grievance resolution is mediation.
1 Note that assessments (including major tests) and examination scripts not routinely returned to
students should be retained by academic departments for a period of 12 months.
Page 32
(b) Receive such material relevant to the subject of the inquiry as it
thinks fit.
(a) Outcomes arising from the procedures prior to the convening of the
University Grievance Committee will be such as the parties may
agree consensually.
These may include but are not confined to:
Statutes and Regulations
(i) a written or verbal apology
(ii) opportunity to receive a second opinion on assessed work
(a) Receive and investigate Grievances at all Massey University campuses
and through all modes of delivery of academic programmes.
(iii) substitution of a higher mark
(b) Make decisions relating to Grievances.
(iv) opportunity to resubmit an assignment
(c) Report annually to the Vice-Chancellor through Academic Board on the
nature of Grievances and policy issues that have risen during the year.
(v) initiation of a student feedback mechanism
(vi) extensions of deadlines for assignment
(vii) opportunity to resit an examination (subject to University
regulations).
(b) If the Grievance comes for resolution to the University Grievance
Committee it may make such decisions and give such directions as
it thinks fit.
3.
Graduation Regulations
1.
Any person wishing to have a degree conferred or a diploma presented at
the annual graduation ceremony must make application in the year of the
ceremony not later than 1 February for Albany ceremonies, 1 March for
ceremonies held in May at Manawatu and Wellington, and 1 September
for the November ceremony in Manawatu. Students who wish to
graduate must initiate the applications process as the University does not
advise students that they are eligible to graduate. Applications should
be forwarded to the University on time as late applications will only be
considered in exceptional circumstances.
2.
Any person who has completed the qualifications for a degree, diploma
or certificate, who does not wish to attend a graduation ceremony in
person, may at any time apply to have the degree, diploma or certificate
conferred at the next appropriate meeting of Academic Board.
3.
Application forms for both 1 and 2 above can be obtained by applying
online at http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/student-life/graduation/
graduation.cfm or by telephoning 0800 Massey or e-mailing:
[email protected]
If not resolved at a lower level, the Grievance must be presented in
writing to the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International).
The documentation provided to the University Grievance Committee
should contain the following information.
(a) The complainant’s full home address, contact phone number and
student ID number.
(b) Where appropriate the title and number of the course, the name of
the department or the name of the College in which the Grievance
concerns.
(c) The nature of the Grievance including the specific academic
disadvantage claimed.
(d) As many details regarding examples and instances of the Grievance
as possible (e.g. dates, times).
(e) Any other relevant information.
4.
On receipt of the written complaint, the University Grievance Committee
shall within 14 days:
(a) Acknowledge the receipt of the complaint.
(b) Inform the parties of their right to access a representative or other
support person if they have not already done so.
(c) Provide all relevant written documentation to the staff member(s)
concerned for written response.
Use of Information
Library Regulations
Preamble
1.
University Grievance Committee
Membership
Note
The University Grievance Committee is a committee of Academic Board and
shall consist of:
‘University Librarian’ or delegate means the person performing the
duties of the University Librarian. ‘Library’ means any room used
primarily for the purposes of the University Library. ‘Library material’
means any item, whether print, electronic or other format, provided by
the Library for information, study or research.
(a) An independent chairperson appointed by the Vice-Chancellor in
accordance with Note (i), who shall have both a deliberative and casting
vote.
(b) One staff member nominated by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor
(Academic & International).
(c) One member nominated by the appropriate student organisation.
Authorised Users
2.
(b) members of the staff of the University
(i) The independent chairperson shall in any specific case be selected from
a panel of not less than 3 persons (who shall not be current students or
staff members) of appropriate standing, qualifications and experience,
appointed by the Vice-Chancellor.
(iii) Members of the University Grievance Committee shall operate
independently and impartially and not as representatives of those
responsible for appointing, nominating or electing them.
The following persons shall be entitled to use the Library:
(a) members of the University Council
Note:
(ii) Members of this panel shall be appointed annually by the ViceChancellor, upon the recommendation of the Chair of Academic Board
following consultation. Members shall be eligible for reappointment.
The independent chairpersons shall sit in rotation.
The University Library is provided for the purpose of study and research
by the University’s students and staff and is a shared resource for the
Massey community. Every authorised user of the Library has both a
right to work without undue disturbance or distraction and a concomitant
duty to respect the rights of others. Not all services are available to all
categories of users. The following Regulations are promulgated for the
benefit of all Library users.
(c) students currently enrolled at the University
(d) retired members of staff
(e) scientific and technical staff of the Fonterra Research Centre, the
local divisions of the Crown Research Institutes, the Ministry of
Agriculture and Fisheries, and the Leather and Shoe Research
Association
(f) other persons at the discretion of the University Librarian.
Hours of Opening
3.
Hours of opening shall be posted at each Library and on the Library
Website. The hours may be varied at the discretion of the University
Librarian.
Powers
Library Cards
The Committee, subject to compliance with the principles of natural justice,
shall:
4.
(a) (i) Determine the conduct of its own procedures and;
(ii) Receive such information, as it considers relevant to the Grievance.
All authorised users shall carry a current library card and produce
it upon request. For most staff and students, the library card is the
University ID card.
Where a library card is lost, the user shall report that loss to the
University Librarian.
Page 33
Stautes and Regulations
Borrowing
5.
No library material shall be removed from the Library without the loan
first being properly recorded.
Library material shall be returned by the due date. The person in whose
name material is borrowed is responsible for its safekeeping for the
duration of the loan and for its return.
Loan Periods
6.
Notices advising loan periods are displayed at the Lending Desks at each
Library and on the Library website.
Library material on loan may be subject to recall at any time, including
study breaks and summer vacation. Recalled material must be returned
by the notified date. Failure to do so will incur a fine.
Loans may be renewed up to three times, provided that the items are not
required by another user. After three renewals they must be returned for
re-issue.
Items in the Course Reserves Collection may be loaned for periods
of up to two hours, or overnight from one hour before closing time.
Overnight loans are to be returned within half an hour of the Library’s
next opening.
Lost or Damaged Material
7.
Loss of, or damage to, library material shall be reported immediately
to the Library. Borrowers shall be required to pay such costs as may be
determined by the University Librarian for lost or damaged material,
together with the prescribed administration fee. These costs shall
not exceed the reasonable cost of restoring an equivalent item to the
collection.
Such material remains the property of the University, notwithstanding
payment of the bill for its replacement, and must, if found, be returned.
A refund in whole or part will be made (depending upon the condition
of the items), but the associated administration fee may be retained. No
refunds will be made if more than a year has elapsed since the original
payment.
Fines and Sanctions
8.
Borrowers who fail to return or renew any borrowed material shall
be liable to a fine unless they satisfy the University Librarian that
circumstances have prevented them from returning the material at the
appropriate time.
The University Librarian is under no obligation to notify borrowers
when material is overdue and fines may still be imposed when material
is returned after the due date, even though no notice has been received
by the borrower.
Fines shall be payable for each day or period (or part thereof) that the
material is overdue until it has been returned to the Library. Notices
advising fines charges are displayed at the Lending Desks at each
Library and on the website.
Where library material is not returned or a charge levied remains unpaid,
borrowing privileges will be withheld.
Students who have very overdue items and owe amounts in excess of
$150 shall be reported to Registry, and until the debt is discharged, shall
not be entitled to:
(a) Enrol in any other University course;
(b) have their academic records transferred to any other university;
All persons shall, when so requested by the Library staff, present their
bags and personal belongings for inspection.
All persons who use the Library shall identify themselves on request to a
member of the Library staff.
No person shall reserve a place by leaving books or other articles on
desks or seats for longer than 30 minutes. Material so left may be
removed.
In the case of any person using the Library who behaves in a disorderly
or improper manner or otherwise in breach of these Regulations, the
University Librarian may require that person to withdraw from the
Library.
Use of Subscribed Electronic Resources (e-journals, e-books and
article databases)
10. The Library subscribes to electronic resources whose licences stipulate
how and by whom they may be used. If a licence is violated by
anyone inside or outside the University, the publisher may suspend all
University access to the resource. Resource-specific permissions and
restrictions are available to view via the Library Catalogue. In addition
to these, the following must be observed:
(a) No person shall share their Massey University username and
password with another person.
(b) No person shall systematically download, print, or copy substantial
portions of electronic resources (e.g., entire journal issues or
books).
(c) No person shall post content from electronic resources to any
public space, such as a web site or blog.
(d) No person shall use content from electronic resources for
commercial purposes (as resources are accessed under an
educational use licence).
(e) No person shall share content from electronic resources with people
who are not Massey University staff or students.
(f) No person shall modify content or create derivative works.
(g) All users should seek advice from the Library before making
multiple paper copies of an article from an electronic resource,
or including a copy of an article in a course pack, study guide or
online course.
Users of electronic resources should be aware that their use can be
monitored by the Library.
Copyright
11. All persons who use a copying machine in the Library shall observe the
limits described in the Copyright Act 1994.
Note
Copyright notices are placed near machines and a copy of the Act may
be inspected at the Information Desk.
Theses and Research Papers
12. Two copies of theses, which have been accepted for the award of
Doctoral or Master’s degree, must be deposited in the Library. One copy
should be a hard-bound paper copy and the other a digital copy in CDROM format.
No person shall create any unnecessary noise or disturbance or behave in
a disruptive, disorderly or improper manner in the Library.
The paper copy shall, unless the University Librarian approves
otherwise, be on quality paper, and the digital copy shall be in a format
approved by the University Librarian (a CD-ROM of the thesis in
original format). Each copy must include the name of the author and the
title, and contain a short abstract.
No person shall deliberately or carelessly mutilate, deface or misplace
any library material or equipment.
Use of Te Reo in a thesis will follow the guidelines set out in Massey
University’s Māori Language Policy: Matua Reo Kaupapa.
Consumption of food and drink is permitted provided drinks are in
spill-proof containers, and food Is not strong smelling and does not
interfere with the cleanliness of the building or the study environment of
Library users. Food and drink are not permitted in areas equipped with
computers. Cell phones, laptops and other devices should not be used in
the Library in a manner which may disturb others.
Note: Students are advised to consult A Guide to the Presentation of
Theses, copies of which may be obtained from the Library or Library
website.
(c) have their academic transcripts or any other certificates issued.
Conduct of Persons Using the Library
9.
No person shall distribute or post any notices except on public
noticeboards in the Library, except with the prior authorisation of the
University Librarian.
Page 34
Research papers may be deposited in the Library.
Statutes and Regulations
The Library may copy all or part of a thesis and provide it to another
institution for the purposes of research and private study, unless the
author states otherwise in the thesis.
Code of Student Conduct
1.
(a) ethical conduct in undertaking academic studies and research;
A digital copy may be loaded on a server within the University, and
be made available, with appropriate document security, as part of
the Australasian Digital Theses Programme, unless the author states
otherwise in the thesis.
(b) integrity and respect in the teaching and learning process;
(c) courtesy, safety and respect amongst students and between students
and the University;
and to specify:
Theses may be embargoed for a period of time only if approved by the
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research). It is possible with digital theses to
embargo part of the thesis (eg an appendix) while allowing the general
text to be made available to the public.
(d) certain required standards of student conduct in respect of academic
studies, research and other behaviour connected with a student’s
course of studies or status as a member of the University;
(e) the University Disciplinary Procedures by which complaints of
misconduct by students shall be resolved.
Policy on Use and Access to Information Technology Systems
The purpose of the policy is to regulate access to and define authorised use
of all University information technology and communication systems by all
users. The policy is available on the University’s website at:
http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz/
Required standards of student conduct
2.
(b) comply with all relevant laws, including laws relating to the
privacy and confidentiality of information;
(c) treat other students, the University staff, other members of the
University community and the public with courtesy and respect;
This policy also covers the procedure for dealing with policy breaches by staff
and students. A breach of the policy is regarded seriously by the University
and may lead to disciplinary action.
(d) treat the property of other students, University staff, other members
of the University community and the public with respect;
(e) act with honesty and integrity when accessing and using the
University systems;
Related documents that should be read in conjunction with this policy can
also be found on the University’s website at:
http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz/
The University operates a Policy on Intellectual Property, and students are
subject to its provisions. Copies of this Policy are available at:
http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/fms/PolicyGuide/Documents/Research/
Intellectual%20Property%20Policy.pdf
Students shall:
(a) comply with this Code, and all other relevant University
policies, codes, regulations and procedures, including ethical and
professional standards and specific protocols for particular research
projects;
This policy covers IT and communications systems in general; items
specifically included are the authorisation for access and proper use, legal
ownership of messages generated or manipulated, system and information
misuse criteria, misuse of IT system communication mechanisms, privacy
issues relating to individuals and messages, regular message monitoring,
collection of statistical data and electronic remote control computer support.
Intellectual Property
The purpose of the Code is to encourage:
(f) act with honesty and integrity in submitting material or imparting
information to the university.
A full copy of the Student Disciplinary Regulations can be found in the
online Calendar at http://calendar.massey.ac.nz/. This Regulation has been
augmented for breaches of academic integrity only, by the Student Academic
Integrity Policy and the Procedure of Managing Breaches of Academic
Integrity at:
http://www.massey.ac.nz/?aa7ca0648c
The general provisions are as follows:
The University claims legal and beneficial ownership of all New Intellectual
Property Rights generated under the auspices of the University. However,
Staff and Students retain ownership of copyright and other rights in certain
works.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research) will take all reasonable steps to
fairly and transparently allocate the benefits of the Intellectual Property Rights
to all parties with an interest.
All students are reminded of their responsibility to abide by the Intellectual
Property Policy of the University, which they accept by enrolling at the
University. In particular, staff and students are bound by obligations
of confidentiality in relation to Intellectual Property Rights or other
commercially sensitive information they become aware of during their work
or study at the University.
University Fees
Fees Payment Regulations
1.
Tuition fees and non-tuition fees are subject to annual adjustment by
the University Council and the student agrees to pay the tuition fees
and non-tuition fees as set each year. Tuition and non-tuition fees are
calculated on an academic year basis not by semester. Where a student’s
study spans two academic years, e.g., student enrols for Semester Two
and later enrols for Semester One of the following academic year, the
student will be liable for the tuition and non-tuition fees as set for each
academic year.
2.
All University fees are payable immediately upon the University issuing
a Confirmation of Enrolment and before the start of study, or earlier if
required by the University and specified in an Offer of Place. All monies
received by the University are banked immediately for security reasons.
Each student’s fee account will remain in credit for any amount tendered
in payment for University fees until their programme has received
academic approval.
3
Students must pay all University fees to the University directly and not
to any recruitment agent or other party. For international transactions
there may be a bank fee charged which is payable by the student.
4.
Students who enrol at the same time for papers in more than one
enrolment period (for example, Semester One and Semester Two)
may, at the time of application to enrol in the first period, elect to defer
payment of tuition fees for the later period (for example Semester Two).
5.
Students who are paying all or part of their fees by direct credit through
the Student Loans Scheme are not able to defer payment. Payment of
University fees inclusive of tuition fees, non-tuition fees plus student
association fees for the full year will be made on approval of their loan
application. When student loans are declined in full or in part students
are still required to pay all fees.
Law of Copyright
The law of copyright allows the University under certain conditions to supply
material to students in which copyright works or parts of copyright works
are reproduced. Students are reminded of the obligations they must accept on
enrolment that materials supplied to them are to be used only for research or
private study and for no other purpose.
Massey University takes out a licence with Copyright Licensing Ltd, the Print
Media Copyright Agency, APRA/AMCO/PPNZ, and Screenrights annually.
These arrangements sets up guidelines for reproduction of copyright print
works, music, and broadcast sound and television works and indemnifies
the University and staff against any prosecution for any alleged breach of
copyright while acting under the conditions of the licences. The licences do
not lessen the obligation of students mentioned above.
Page 35
Stautes and Regulations
6.
Enrolment may proceed in advance of receipt of fee payment defined as
follows:
(a) that the fees due are to be paid from a student loan but if a student
loan is not approved in full or in part then the student must pay the
fees
(b) that the fees due are to be paid on behalf of the student by a
sponsor. A sponsor is normally an employer or a training body, a
government agency or a trust or Iwi authority, When the University
fees are not paid by the due date on behalf of the student, the
student must pay all University fees
(c) the student would suffer unreasonable hardship by being required
to pay fees before semester start date.
It is not possible to pay fees by deduction from Student Allowance
payments.
7.
Application to add papers after the original Enrolment Application
has been lodged must be accompanied by the additional tuition fees
estimated to be due. If the student has accepted an Offer of Place and
then wants to add papers or substitute papers, then if the University
agrees a Confirmation of Enrolment will issue which will constitute
a variation of the enrolment agreement and is deemed to be a new
enrolment agreement.
8.
Students who withdraw from a particular paper or all or part of their
programme after the final withdrawal date for a tuition fee refund, shall
remain liable for the fees assessed for the withdrawn paper(s).
9.
Delivery of any services or teaching material does not, in itself,
constitute an undertaking by the University that a student’s enrolment for
tuition will be continued if fee payment is not completed. The University
may, at the University’s option, cancel the student’s enrolment if any of
the University fees are not received. If cancellation occurs after the final
withdrawal date for a refund then all University fees are payable.
10. Invoice/Fees Statements will be issued monthly to all students who
have outstanding fees. When any fees are 60 days or more overdue the
University may, at the University’s option cancel the enrolment of the
student or suspend the enrolment. Suspension means that students:
(a) no longer have access to University facilities
(b) will not receive grades for papers
(c) will not have access to their academic records
(d) may not re-enrol at Massey University until the fees due have been
paid in full.
Cancellation means the person concerned is no longer a student at
Massey University and has no right to engage in any papers and no
privileges afforded to students. Even when enrolment is cancelled or
suspended, all fees owing to the University must be paid.
11. Refund of tuition fees shall be made to students who withdraw in the
manner required from their paper(s) before 10% of the study period
has elapsed as defined by the paper start and end dates (see Enrolment
Regulations). Students who withdraw from all of their study at Massey
University within the time and in the manner required to obtain a tuition
fees refund must pay a withdrawal fee. Commission paid by Massey
University to agents for international students will be deducted from
any refund in respect of the papers withdrawn from. Note that Doctoral
students are subject to different fee refund provisions which are outlined
in regulation 14 of these regulations.
When the University receives written notice from an international
student that he or she has attained permanent residence in New Zealand,
then, for any paper which has not been undertaken or less than 10% has
been undertaken (measured from the paper start and end dates) at the
date of receipt of the notice, the University will refund the student the
difference between tuition fees received and the domestic tuition fees
for the papers concerned. The University may require evidence of the
change of status
Refunds due for overpayment of fees or in the event of withdrawal with
a refund of tuition fees are made as soon as possible once enrolments
and financial support provisions have been established for a particular
study period. In any case, where a specific request is made for a refund
that has been approved, such refund will be made within 28 days. If
the refund cannot be made a written statement shall be provided to the
Page 36
student as to why the refund cannot be made, together with a date by
which the refund shall be made.
12. Massey University accepts no liability to pay interest or other
consideration in respect of monies held in full or part payment of
University fees and is not liable to the student or anyone else for
exchange rate movement, conversion charges, bank fees, or fees paid to
recruitment or immigration agents . This also includes charges incurred
by students through Studylink.
13. Partial refunds are normally made directly to the student who is
enrolled. Any sponsored student to whom a partial refund is made shall
be responsible for reimbursing any other party (such as a sponsor or
government agency) who has paid fees on their behalf. However, where
practicable, partial refunds will be made direct to the government agency
responsible for any fees paid where the University is party to such an
agreement.
When international students withdraw from their programme of study
at Massey University, in the manner required, before 10% of the study
period has elapsed, and cannot provide evidence of a long term visa
to remain in New Zealand, partial refunds will be made to a bank
account in the student’s home country, as nominated by the student.
Where students withdraw from Massey University and enrol at another
institution in New Zealand, partial refunds will be made directly to the
relevant institution.
In the case of students who are deceased, partial refunds, where
applicable, are made to the estate of the person concerned, care of the
next of kin as notified to the University.
PhD Doctoral Students
14. (a) Fees for PhD candidates are due on initial enrolment and thereafter
on the anniversary of their provisional registration of their
enrolment date, having regard for any period of suspension of their
studies.
(b) Candidates undertaking PhD programmes whether studying fulltime or part-time, shall be charged the annual tuition fee in full for
up to four years. Thereafter, no further tuition fee shall be charged
unless the candidate extends their candidature beyond their official
thesis submission date. See Clause 14(d).
(c) Candidates undertaking Named Doctorate programmes are required
to pay their course work, practicum, internship, tuition and thesis
fees as required by each programme.
(d) The following special provisions apply to all Doctoral candidates
tuition fees during the year of Doctoral thesis submission, or for
candidates who either withdraw from their programme or extend
their candidature:
(i) for candidates who submit their thesis, or withdraw from their
programme, within three months following the anniversary of
provisional registration (adjusted for any period of suspension), the
tuition fee for that year shall be refunded in full.
(ii) for candidates who submit their thesis, or withdraw from their
programme, within six months following the anniversary of first
enrolment (adjusted for any period of suspension), fifty percent of
the tuition fee for that year will be rebated.
(iii) for candidates who submit their thesis, or withdraw from their
programme, after six months following the anniversary of first
enrolment (adjusted for any period of suspension), the full tuition
fee for the year must be paid.
(e) Candidates who have had their oral examination and are required to
complete further work on their thesis and be re-examined, will be
re-enrolled, and must pay the full tuition fee for the duration of the
re-examination period until re-submission of the thesis. Provisions
in clause 14(d) will apply from the date the candidate is notified of
the required further work.
Masters Students
15. (a) Masters students pay tuition fees for the actual credits/papers for
which they are enrolled each year. Fees do not maximise at 1.0
EFTS (120 credits).
(b) When Masters research is not completed in the year of enrolment,
the student must re-enrol for the next year and pay tuition fees.
Exceptions are:
Statutes and Regulations
(i) If the thesis is completed and submitted before 31 March of the
following year, the student does not need to re-enrol or pay fees.
Late enrolment will be accepted if the thesis is still not completed
by 31 March.
(ii) If the thesis is being completed on a part-time basis (the HOD
must be able to verify that this was arranged on enrolment), then
the student is permitted to apply for Carry Forward of Postgraduate
Enrolment. No tuition fee is charged for students enrolling in the
immediately subsequent period under these circumstances.
Fee Grandparenting Regulations for Full Fee-Paying Students
Council may at its discretion grandparent fees for full fee-paying students
who enrolled in 2008 and earlier (students for whom the University receives
no Government subsidy). Fee grandparenting means that tuition fees will be
held at the same level as that set for the programme of study concerned at the
time Council grandparents fees. Full fee-paying students who were enrolled
in 2008 and earlier, and who enrolled at the time of grandparenting will
therefore know the full extent of fee liability for a given period.
Financial Support
Student Allowances and Loans are administered and paid by StudyLink.
Student Allowances and Loans can be applied for on-line: www.studylink.
govt.nz
Scholarships
Details on the scholarships available from Massey University are published
on the Internet:
http://awards.massey.ac.nz/
Further information is available from Massey Contact at each campus or
telephone 0800 MASSEY.
The following regulations will apply:
Duration
Fee grandparenting will apply for the lesser of the period set by Council
or the relevant minimum period for completion of the programme of study
concerned as a full-time student. This period also applies to extramural and
part-time students but on the basis such students are full-time students. In
such cases where Council has at its discretion determined grandparenting
will apply for the relevant number of years for completion of the programme
of study, papers credited to a programme of study will be deducted from
the relevant period for completion of the programme of study as a full-time
student. For example if a student receives credits equivalent to the first year of
study for a full-time student enrolled in a three-year programme of study, fees
will be grandparented for two years.
Application of Grandparenting
1.
Fee grandparenting will apply to tuition charges only, unless Council
includes other separate charges at the time of fee grandparenting. For
example some papers or programmes may have practicum charges or
other sundry charges attached to them.
2.
Fee grandparenting will not apply to Non-Tuition Fees (e.g Enrolment
Fee, Student Services Levy, Students Association Fees and other variable
fees).
Student Eligibility
Fee grandparenting applies only if the student remains continuously enrolled
in the programme of study the student was enrolled in at the time the Council
grandparented the fees concerned. Grandparenting does not apply to students
who change their programme of study. Grandparenting does not apply to
students who first enrol in 2009 and in subsequent years.
Students’ Association Fee Regulations
1.
Students may elect to join a Student Association. The full fee must be
paid to the University with other fees at the time of enrolment.
Halls of Residence Fees Regulations
1.
Resident students shall pay accommodation fees at the prescribed rates.
2.
Accommodation Fees for each semester shall be paid as scheduled.
3.
Any resident student whose accommodation fees are not paid by the
due date may be debarred from residence unless special arrangement
has been made with the Accommodation Services Office. A penalty fee
shall be added to any outstanding accommodation fees, which will also
jeopardise the receipt of University examination results and could result
in debt collection proceedings being taken.
4.
Any resident student intending to withdraw from study may also be
required to withdraw from University accommodation. Application
forms for release from University student accommodation are available
from Accommodation Services.
Page 37
Degree, Diploma, and Certificate Regulations
College of Business.........................................................................39
College of Creative Arts..................................................................73
College of Education.......................................................................87
College of Humanities and Social Sciences..................................135
College of Sciences.......................................................................209
Massey University Qualifications.................................................293
New Zealand School of Music......................................................307
Page 38
Business
COURSE REGULATIONS
College of Business
Undergraduate Degrees....................................................................40
Bachelor Honours Degrees...............................................................63
The Degree of Bachelor of Accountancy............................................40
The Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce with Honours.................63
The Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce........................................40
The Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics with Honours .........63
The Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics.................................42
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management with Honours .....64
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation...................................................43
The Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies with Honours ..............64
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management.............................45
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication with Honours................65
The Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies .....................................45
Masters Degrees................................................................................65
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication ......................................49
The Degree of Master of AgriCommerce...........................................65
The Degree of Bachelor of Sport and Exercise..................................52
The Degree of Master of Applied Economics ....................................65
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of
The Degree of Master of Aviation .....................................................66
Business Studies.................................................................................53
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Business Studies and
Bachelor of Science ...........................................................................54
Graduate Diplomas...........................................................................55
The Graduate Diploma in Aviation ....................................................55
The Graduate Diploma in Business Studies........................................55
The Graduate Diploma in Journalism.................................................60
The Graduate Diploma in Journalism Studies....................................61
The Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health................61
The Graduate Diploma in Public Sector Management.......................61
Undergraduate Diplomas.................................................................62
The Diploma in Business Studies.......................................................62
The Degree of Master of Business Administration ............................66
The Degree of Master of Business Studies ........................................67
The Degree of Master of Communication .........................................67
The Degree of Master of Finance ......................................................68
The Degree of Master of Management ..............................................68
Postgraduate Diplomas.....................................................................69
The Postgraduate Diploma in Accountancy .......................................69
The Postgraduate Diploma in AgriCommerce....................................69
The Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation ..............................................69
The Postgraduate Diploma in Banking ..............................................70
The Postgraduate Diploma in Business and Administration...............70
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication...................................70
Undergraduate Certificates..............................................................62
The Postgraduate Diploma in Health Service Management...............71
The Certificate in Business Studies.....................................................62
The Postgraduate Diploma in Sport Management .............................71
The Certificate in Sport Coaching*.....................................................63
Postgraduate Certificate...................................................................71
The Postgraduate Certificate in Business............................................71
* No new enrolments in these programmes
Page 39
Business
Undergraduate Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of Accountancy
BAcc
Course Regulations
(c) 15 credits (1 paper) from 219.202 or 219.203 and 15 credits (1
paper) from 156.200 or 156.231.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(d) 15 credits (1 paper) from 200 or 300-level with a prefix selected
from 114, 125, 127, 152, 153, 155, 156, 157, 178, in Part II or III of
the Schedule for the BBS degree.
2.
Candidates shall present themselves for assessment of their English
writing skills and are required to pass (or be exempted from) the English
Writing Skills for Business Students module (115.001) before they can
enrol beyond 120 credits for credit to their degree (suspended until
further notice).
3.
Candidates may credit to the BAcc course no more than 45 credits in
which they have gained an R (restricted pass). A restricted pass shall not
qualify as a pass for corequisite or prerequisite purposes.
4.
Credit for prior study must fit BAcc Regulation 1.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Every course of study shall include:
(a) 110.109, 110.209, 110.229, 110.249, 110.279, 110.289, 110.303,
115.101, 115.102, 115.103, 115.105, 115.106, 115.107, 115.108,
125.230, 155.203, 155.210.
(b) 60 credits (4 papers) from 110.309; 110.329; 110.349; 110.379;
110.389; 125.320 or 125.330; including 30 credits (2 papers) from
110.309; 110.329; 110.379.
The Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce
BAgriCommerce
(These regulations refer to students enrolled in or after 2012)
(a) A minor must include a minimum of 60 credits, including at least
45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
Course Regulations
(b) The minor must be in a different subject area from the major.
Part I
(c) Where the minor included is from another undergraduate degree the
regulations of the home programme for the minor will apply.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(d) The requirements for each minor offered within the
BAgriCommerce are outlined following the majoring requirements
for a subject in Schedule B of the Schedule to the Regulations for
the Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce.
Part II
Course of study
1.
2.
(e) No paper may be credited to both a major subject and a minor
subject, and no paper may be credited to more than one minor
subject.
To qualify for the degree, candidates are required to gain at least 360
credits and to satisfy the requirements for practical work specified in
Schedule C.
(f) A candidate may not normally credit to a minor a paper from
outside the schedule to the subject of the minor except where a
paper is required for prerequisite or co-requisite purposes.
(a) No more than 165 credits may be at 100-level.
(b) At least 75 credits must be at 300-level.
Recognition of Prior Learning
3.
All candidates must pass the core papers specified in Schedule A,
Part Ia, and either: Part Ib for candidates enrolling in either the Farm
Management or Rural Valuation majors, or Part 1c of the Schedule
for candidates enrolling in Agricultural Economics, International
Agribusiness, Food Marketing and Retailing, and Food Economies and
Society majors.
8.
4.
Candidates must complete the requirements for at least one major.
5.
Candidates may include a minor in the BAgriCommerce Programme.
Schedules to the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of
AgriCommerce
Candidates who, in the opinion of the Academic Board, have passed with
sufficient merit subjects for either a Diploma in Farm or Horticultural
Management from a New Zealand university, or relevant subjects from
some other recognised tertiary qualification, may be cross-credited with
specified or unspecified papers not exceeding a total of 120 credits.
Majors
Schedule A – Compulsory papers for BAgriCommerce degree
6.
Approved majors and their requirements are listed in Schedule B.
Part 1a – Compulsory papers for all Majors
(a) For all majors candidates must pass at least 90 credits in the major
subject, including, at least 30 credits at 200-level, and at least 45
credits at 300-level.
Candidates must complete each of:
115.101
Statistics for Business
15
R 195.101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.120 and 161.130
115.102
Accounting
15
R 110.100
Minors
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of
Business
15
7.
115.104
Principles of Marketing
15
R 156.100, 156.200
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100, 10.200 (pre-1997)
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
119.180
Introduction to Agribusiness
15
R 119.156
(b) In exceptional circumstances, Academic Board may approve a
variation to the requirements of a listed major.
Minors may be included from any undergraduate degree within the
University for which recognised minors are specified, including the
BAgriCommerce Degree.
Page 40
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112.248
Food and Agribusiness Value
Chains
15
P any 100-level paper; nil for
GradDipRurStud
Plus 30 credits from the following:
119.281
Decision Tools for Primary
Industries
15
P 119.180 and one of 117.152,
189.151, 283.101, 284.101,
286.101; nil for GradDipRurStud;
R 111.251, 111.231, 111.252
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper; R 127.255
138.255
Engineering Principles in Food and
Fibre Production
15
P any 100-level paper; nil for
GradDipRurStud
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
15
P Students must have achieved
240 credits;
C 112.302; R 112.301, 119.373
Plus either
AgriCommerce Capstone
or
119.373
Principles of Animal Science and
Production
15
P one of 117.141, 117.152,
119.154, 194.101, 199.101; nil for
GradDipRurStud
285.201
Understanding Plant Protection
15
P 120.101 or 171.102 or 283.101 or
171.128 or 171.127 or 284.101; nil
for GradDipRurStud; R 171.284
119.381
Decision-Making in Primary
Industry
15
P one of 111.231, 111.251, 119.281;
R 111.351
119.358
Agricultural Production Systems
15
P Students must have achieved 240
credits; C 119.381; R 119.357
119.382
Opportunity Analysis in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.381
189.251
Soil Fertility and Fertilisers
15
P 189.151 or 189.142
189.252
Land, Soil and Water
15
P one of 189.151, 189.141, 189.142,
233.101
283.201
Pasture and Crop Agronomy
15
P 15 credits at 100-level; R 171.20
Horticultural Production Systems
15
P 171.128 or 171.127 or 284.101;
nil for GradDipRurStud; R 171.227
117.254
127.242
239.373
Farm Management
or
or
Integrative Studies
15
P Students must have achieved
240 credits
Part 1b - Compulsory papers for Farm Management and Rural Valuation
majors
Candidates must complete each of:
or
284.201
283.101
Plants in Agriculture
15
R 171.102
Minor requirements
189.151
Soil Properties and Processes
15
R 189.142
No minor is available for Farm Management.
Animals and Agriculture
15
R 117.151 and 199.101
Food Economies and Society
Production Horticulture
15
R 171.127, 171.128
Plus either
117.152
or
284.101
146.209
Food and Eating
15
P any 100-level BA or 119.180 or
250.131
and 30 credits from
Part 1c - Compulsory papers for the Agricultural Economics,
International Agribusiness, Food Marketing and Retailing, and Food
Economies and Society majors
Candidates must complete each of:
117.152
Animals and Agriculture
15
R 117.151 and 199.101
284.101
Production Horticulture
15
R 171.127, 171.128
283.101
Plants in Agriculture
15
R 171.102
131.121
Rich World, Poor World
15
145.213
Resource Conservation and
Sustainability
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper,
R 145.313
119.258
Agricultural Systems
15
P one of 117.152 or 145.121; nil for
GradDipRurStud
and 45 credits from
176.308
Sociology of the Environment
15
P any 200-level BA paper
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Schedule B - Specific Papers for each BAgriCommerce degree major
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200 level BA or BSc paper
Agricultural Economics
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper;
R 178.357
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100 or 78.102; R 77.201,
77.202, 178.200 (pre-1998),
178.102 (pre-1998), 178.206 (1994
only), 178.208
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120;
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
and 45 credits from
Any combination of the above papers to a minimum of 60 credits, including
131.121 and 146.209, and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
Food Marketing and Retailing
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
112.301
International Food and
Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
156.231
Marketing Management
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits; R
156.701
156.232
Consumer Behaviour
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits; R
156.702
156.233
Marketing Research
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits.
115.101 or 161.110 (recommended);
R 156.703
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232; R 156.704
or
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
or
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 178.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
or
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
178.308
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
P any 178.2xx paper; R 178.300
178.358
International Trade in Agri-Food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper;
R 178.357
178.360
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics
15
P any 178.1xx paper and any
200-level paper
Development Economics
15
178.370
Minor requirements
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx paper;
and any 15 credits at 200-level
Minor requirements
and any 15 credits from
178.358
International Trade in Agri-Food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper;
R 178.357
156.333
Market Analysis
15
P 156.233 and 115.101 or 161.xxx
156.334
Marketing Planning
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
112.301
International Food and
Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
Any combination of the above papers to a minimum of 60 credits, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
Page 41
Business
Minor requirements
Rural Valuation
Any combination of the above papers to a minimum of 60 credits, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
International Agribusiness
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
any 45 credits from
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 178.1xx paper or 115.106
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
Methods of Economic Analysis
15
P 115.106 or any 178.1xx paper
119.381
Decision-Making in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.281 or 111.250 or 111.231;R
111.351
119.382
Opportunity Analysis in Primary
Industry
15
P 111.351 or 119.381; R 111.352,
127.355
127.356
Rural Valuation
15
P 127.242 or 127.255
132.221
Planning Studies
15
P any 100-level BA or BBS paper
155.201
Law of Property
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or 155.101;
R 155.216, 155.700
138.281
Building Technology, Construction
and Design
15
P any 100-level paper; nil for
GradDipRurStud; R 138.254,
138.282
or
178.221
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100 or 78.102; R 77.201,
77.202, 178.200 (pre-1998),
178.102 (pre-1998), 178.206 (1994
only), 178.208
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
152.263
Applied International Trade
Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.270
Māori Management
15
P any 100-level paper
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper;
R 178.357
152.366
Operational Management of
International Business
15
P any two 200-level papers
112.301
International Food and
Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
and 30 credits from
Minor requirements
Students who complete the Rural Valuation major will meet the academic
requirements for registration by the Valuers Registration Board. Applicants
will additionally need to meet the non-academic requirements for registration.
Minor Requirements
127.356 plus any combination of the above papers to a minimum of 60
credits, including at least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at
300-level.
Schedule C
Practical work requirements
Candidates must complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board a
period of not less than 30 weeks of approved practical work experience and
associated reports, including:
119.150
Practicum I
0
119.250
Practicum II
0
P 119.150
112.302 plus any combination of the above papers to a minimum of 60
credits, including at least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at
300-level.
The Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics
BApplEcon
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics shall
follow a personal course of study which shall consist of papers totalling
at least 360 credits with:
(a) not more than 180 credits at the 100-level; and
(b) at least 270 credits, including at least 90 credits at the 300-level,
must be taken from the Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of
Applied Economics.
2.
Every course of study shall include the following compulsory papers:
(a) Economics (90 credits)
115.106, 178.100, 178.200, 178.201; 178.300 or 178.308; 178.301
or 178.307.
(b) Numeracy (60 credits)
One of 160.101, 160.102, 160.103, 160.131; 115.101 or 161.120;
178.280 and .178.380
(b) The requirements for minors in the BApplEcon degree are set out
in the Schedule for the BApplEcon degree.
4
The remaining credits can be taken from a selection of elective papers,
which shall contain papers from the Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor
of Applied Economics, and approved papers from any other degree
course.
5.
Candidates may credit to the BApplEcon course no more than 45 credits
in which they have gained an R (restricted pass). A restricted pass shall
not qualify as a pass for corequisite or prerequisite purposes.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics
112.248
Food and Agribusiness Value
Chains
15
P any 100-level paper
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
115.101
Statistics for Business
15
R 195.101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.120 and 161.130
115.102
Accounting
15
R 110.100
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of
Business
15
R 155.100
115.104
Principles of Marketing
15
R 156.100
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
115.107
Management Information Systems
15
R 157.100
115.108
Organisations and Management
15
R 152.100
160.101
Calculus I
15
P 160.103 or 160.131 or appropriate
school background (Note 1), R
160.161
160.102
Linear Mathematics
15
At least 16 credits achieved in
NCEA Level 3 Mathematics with
Calculus or at least 24 credits in
NCEA Level 3 Mathematics
160.103
Methods of Mathematics
15
R 160.131
160.131
Mathematics for Business I
15
R 160.103, 160.231
(c) Business Communication (15 credits)
219.100 or 230.100.
3.
Candidates may complete the requirements for a minor subject.
(a) A minor subject must include a minimum of 60 credits, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level,
from one subject area.
Page 42
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R 115.101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.130
161.120
Introductory Statistics
15
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101
178.221
Methods of Economic Analysis
15
P 115.106 or any 178.1xx paper
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper
178.250
Contemporary Economic Issues
15
P any 100-level paper
110.309
Advanced Financial Accounting
15
P 110.209 or 110.313; R 10.310,
110.713
110.329
Advanced Management Accounting 15
P 110.229 or 110.223; R 10.320,
110.723
110.349
Advanced Accounting Information
Systems
P 110.249 or 110.243; R 110.743
15
Finance Minor and Schedule
At least 60 credits from 125.xxx papers in the Schedule below including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120,
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 178.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100
178.308
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
P 15 credits of 178.2xx; R 178.300
125.220
Financial Institutions, Markets and
Money
15
P 115.105 or 125.100
recommended; R 125.221, 125.231,
125.261
178.328
Project Evaluation
15
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
178.360
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics 178.370
Development Economics
178.380
Applied Econometrics
125.230
Business Finance
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper
P 115.105 or 125.100 or 110.109
pre-2009 or 110.100 pre-1997;
115.101 or 161.110 recommended;
R 125.201
125.241
Introduction to Investments
15
P 115.105 or 125.100; R 125.240
15
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
125.320
International Finance
15
15
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx paper;
and any 15 credits at 200-level.
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
15
P 178.220 or 178.280; R 178.321,
178.320
125.330
Advanced Business Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
125.340
Investment Analysis
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241; R 125.342
125.350
Financial Risk Management
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241
125.360
Banking Studies
15
P 125.220 or 125.230
125.363
Money, Banking and Financial
Markets
15
P 125.220 or 125.230 or 125.241
Notes
1.
A student who has passed 160.101 may not also be credited with a
pass in 160.103 or 160.131 that is obtained in either the same or a
subsequent examination period.
Minor requirements
Accountancy Minor and Schedule
At least 60 credits from 110.xxx papers in the Schedule below, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
110.109
Introductory Financial Accounting
15
P or C 110.100 or 115.102; R
10.110, 110.213 (1999), 110.215;
R 110.230
110.209
Intermediate Financial Accounting
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230; R
10.210, 10.213 (pre-1999), 110.313
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230; R
110.200, 10.220. 110.223
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 115.107 or 157.100 or PHOS; R
110.243, 10.240
110.229
110.249
Management Accounting
Accounting Information Systems
Note: Paper 115.105 will count as a 125 prefix paper for the purpose of this
minor.
Valuation and Property Management Minor and Schedule
At least 60 credits from 127.xxx papers in the Schedule below, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level.
127.241
Real Estate Valuation and
Management
15
P any 100-level paper, R 127.243
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper, R 127.255
127.341
Property Management and
Development
15
P 127.241 or P 127.243 or
P 127.244
127.342
Real Estate Investments
15
P 127.241 and (127.242 or PHOS)
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation
BAv
Course Regulations
(a) Air Transport Pilot majors must possess a Class One medical
certificate of fitness in accordance with the New Zealand Civil
Aviation Authority (NZCAA) medical requirements for the issue
of an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL). Candidates will be
required to maintain their Class One medical certificate throughout
any period that they are enrolled in this major.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(b) Air Traffic Management majors must possess a Class Two and
a Class Three medical certificate of fitness in accordance with
the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority (NZCAA) medical
requirements.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to this degree will be subject to a selection process, which
includes:
• Aptitude testing.
3.
The medical certificate(s) must be current throughout the degree.
4.
Before being admitted to this degree, candidates for the Aircraft
Maintenance major must have completed the NZQA national certificate
in aeronautical engineering and related technology, or an equivalent
qualification.
5.
Every course of study shall include at least 75 credits at 300-level.
• A simulator assessment.
• A selection interview and writing tasks.
• The possibility of a ‘trial flight’.
2.
Before being admitted to this degree, candidates must possess the
relevant medical certificate(s) for their major:
Page 43
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Course Requirements
6.
Part IV See Options Schedule (120 credits)
The Bachelor of Aviation is a degree for which candidates must pass
sequentially each of the Parts as specified in the relevant Schedules for
one of the following majors:
(a) Air Transport Pilot (ATP);
(b) Air Traffic Management (ATM) (not available in 2009); and
(c) Aircraft Maintenance (AM) (no new enrolments).
7.
(a) The Air Transport Pilot major is a 480-credit major for which
candidates complete the equivalent of four academic years of study.
(b) The Air Traffic Management major is a 360-credit major for which
candidates complete three academic years of study.
Schedule for Part IV Options
Airline Internship (no new enrolments)
Flight Systems – Flight Operations (no new enrolments)
Flight Instruction (Aeroplane)
Either:
190.297
Aerobatic Aircraft Handling for
Flight Instructors*
30
P 190.204
30
P 190.251 and 190.254 or hold a
CAA NZ Commercial Pilot Licence
- Aircraft, (CPL-A) endorsed with
multi-engine instrument rating
(MEIR) and have approval from
Head of School, Aviation.
or
(c) The Aircraft Maintenance major is a 480-credit major for which
candidates complete the equivalent of four academic years of study.
8.
9.
Each Part must be completed before a candidate may enrol for the next
successive Part. At the discretion of the Head of School, a candidate may
be granted approval to re-enrol for a failed paper concurrently with the
next Part, subject to the University’s maximum workload regulation.
190.298
Those papers that are identified in the Schedules below as integrated
papers comprise two components: academic and practicum. A candidate
must pass both the academic component and the practicum component to
gain a pass in the paper.
190.301
Flight Instructor Human Factors
15
P any-200 level paper
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
190.315
Flight Instruction Fundamentals I *
15
P 190.256
190.317
Evaluation Methods in Aviation
15
P 190.217, 190.225 or Part III ATP
190.335
Flight Instruction*
30
Part III ATP or hold a current
CPL (A)
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
Schedule for Air Transport Pilot Major (Aeroplane option)
190.104
Principles of Navigation I*
15
P Entry ATP; C 190.110
190.107
Human Performance*
15
P Entry ATP or PHOS; R 190.117
190.110
Introduction to Flying*
30
P Entry ATP or PHOS; C 190.104
190.112
Introduction to Flying II*
15
P Entry ATP and 190.110; C 190.104
190.118
Aeroscience I
15
P Entry ATP
Part II (90 credits)
190.119
Aeroscience II
15
P 190.118
190.120
Aeronautical Legislation*
15
P 190.104, 190.107, 190.110,
190.111
190.121
Aeronautical Meteorology*
15
P 190.104, 190.107, 190.110,
190.111
190.123
Aircraft Systems*
15
P 190.104, 190.107, 190.110,
190.111
190.124
Aircraft Performance*
15
P 190.104, 190.107, 190.110,
190.111
190.154
Principles of Navigation II*
15
P 190.104, 190.107, 190.110,
190.111
Part III (180 credits)
190.201
Aircraft Systems II (Part I)*
15
P 190.123
190.203
Air Traffic Control/Aviation Law*
15
P 190.120
190.204
Flight Planning and Advanced
Navigation (Part I)*
15
P 190.154
190.205
Crew Resource Management*
15
P 190.107; R 190.216
190.206
Aerodynamics
15
P 190.118
190.221
Advanced Support Studies*
15
P 190.121
190.237
Air Transport Cockpit Systems*
15
P 190.124
190.251
Aircraft Systems II (Part 2)*
15
P 190.201
190.254
Flight Planning and Advanced
Navigation (Part 2)*
15
P 190.204
190.256
Aerodynamics (Part 2)
15
P 190.206
190.288
Advanced Aircraft Handling*
30
P 190.205
Page 44
and all of:
* This is an integrated paper.
Part I (90 credits)
* This is an integrated paper.
Turbo-Prop and Jet Handing*
Aviation Human Factors
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors
Plus papers to the value of 105 credits selected from the following series of
papers. At least 60 credits must be at 300-level.
190.xxx
Aviation
175.xxx
Psychology
Aviation Business Management (see note below)
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
Elective papers to the value of 105 credits with the approval of the Head of
School. Up to 75 credits may be taken from series other than Aviation. At
least 60 credits must be at the 300-level.
190.xxx
Aviation
110.xxx
Accountancy
114.xxx
Human Resource Management
115.xxx
Business
125.xxx
Finance
152.xxx
Management
153.xxx
Dispute Resolution
155.xxx
Business Law
156.xxx
Marketing
157.xxx
Information Systems
178.xxx
Economics
219.xxx
Business Communication
Note: Many potential combinations of papers in the Aviation Business
Management option will not be possible in one year of full-time study
because of prerequisite requirements.
Schedule for Aircraft Maintenance Major
No new enrolments.
Business
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management
BAvMan
Course Regulations
190.220
Managing Aviation Systems
15
Part II P or C 190.109 or P 190.116
Part I
190.225
Introduction to Research Methods
in Aviation
15
P any 190.1xx
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
190.327
Managing Cultures in Aviation
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
190.340
Contemporary Issues in Aviation
Security
15
P any 190.2xx
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
2.
3.
Part B
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management shall
follow a personal course of study totalling at least 360 credits.
190.104
Principles of Navigation I*
15
C 190.110,
190.110
Introduction to Flying *
30
P Entry ATP or PHOS; C 190.104
190.112
Introduction to Flying II*
15
P Entry ATP and 190.110, C 190.104
190.207
Aviation Psychology
15
P 190.107 or 190.117
Every course of study shall include a major from those listed below:
190.211
Aviation Strategic Management
15
P any 100-level paper
(a) Aviation Management (120 credits from Part B of the Schedule for
the Bachelor of Aviation Management)
190.215
Heavy Aeroplane Performance
15
P 190.102 or 190.110 or 190.111
or CPL; R 190.202 or 190.235 or
190.237 or 90.252
190.217
Instruction and Learning in Aviation 15
P 190.107 or 190.109 or 190.117
or PHOS
190.222
Basic Air Safety Investigation
15
P 190.122
190.224
Environmental Impacts of Aviation
15
P any 100-level paper
190.240
Air Power
15
P any 100-level paper
190.249
Aircraft Maintenance Management
30
190.220 or 190.244 or AMEL
190.283
Aviation Law
15
190.299
Aviation Special Topic
15
PHOS; R 190.291 and 190.292
190.302
Check and Training for Airlines
15
P 190.235 or 190.237 or ATPL
190.306
Airline Strategic Management
15
P 190.211
190.307
Airport Planning
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.308
Airport Operational Management
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.309
Design of Airways and Air Traffic
Systems
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.310
Computer-Based Learning for
Aviation
15
P 190.217
Every course of study shall include 150 credits (10 papers) from Part A
of the Schedule.
(b) Aviation Psychology (120 credits from the following: 190.207,
190.217, 190.317, 175.102, 175.302, 175.306, 175.343 and
175.345). (No new enrolments in the Aviation Psychology major
from 2012.)
4.
5.
Elective papers:
The remaining credits to bring the total to 360 credits are electives
normally selected from Part B of the Schedule for the Bachelor of
Aviation Management degree. However, candidates may credit to the
degree up to 90 credits from papers taught by other departments or
schools in the University, with the proviso that no more than 75 credits
from the schedules of undergraduate degrees and diplomas in the
College of Business may be included in the degree and that permission
of the School of Aviation has been obtained.
Every course of study shall include at least 75 credits at 300-level, and
no more than 135 credits at 100-level.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management
190.312
Advanced Navigation Systems
15
P 190.204 or ATPL Navigation
Part A
190.314
Legal Issues in Aviation
15
P any 200-level paper
Compulsory papers:
190.317
Evaluation Methods in Aviation
15
P 190.217, 190.225 or Part III ATP
190.320
Heavy Aeroplane Performance II
15
P 190.237 or 190.215 or PHOS
190.321
Air Accident and Incident
Investigation
15
P 190.122 and one 190.2xx paper
190.328
Aviation Management Practicum
15
15 credits at 200-level from 190
prefix papers plus PHOS
190.398
Special Topic
15
PHOS, R 190.399
190.399
Aviation Special Topic
15
PHOS, R 190.398
190.109
Aviation Studies
15
190.116
Introduction to Management in
Aviation
15
190.117
Introduction to Human Factors
15
190.122
Introduction to Aviation Safety
Systems and Investigation
15
190.216
Aviation Human Factors
15
P 190.107 or 190.117; R 190.205
* This is an integrated paper.
The Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies
BBS
Course Regulations
(b) at least 240 credits including at least 75 credits at the 300-level
from the Schedule for the BBS degree;
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies shall follow
a personal course of study, which shall consist of papers totalling at least
360 credits with:
(a) not more than 180 credits at the 100-level;
(c) papers to the value of at least 30 credits from departments outside
the College of Business in addition to any listed in Part I of the
BBS Schedule.
2.
(a) Every course of study shall include the core business papers listed
in Part I of the BBS Schedule.
(b) A candidate must complete the requirements for the BBS with at
least one major.
Approved majors and their requirements are listed in Part II of
the Schedule to the Regulations. In exceptional circumstances,
Academic Board may approve a variation to the requirements of a
listed major.
Page 45
Business
3.
4.
A double major consists of two majors with no papers in common,
or two majors where there is one paper in common in which case the
candidate will choose a replacement paper of at least the same credits
value at the same or higher level in the same disciplinary prefix.
(b) The minor(s) must be in a different subject area from the major(s).
(c) Minors may be included from any undergraduate degree within the
University for which recognised minors are specified, including the
BBS. Where the minor is from outside the College of Business the
minor will also satisfy Regulation 1 (c).
(d) Where the minor included is from another undergraduate degree the
regulations of the home degree for the minor apply.
(e) All subjects available as majors in the BBS degree are available
as minors. All papers included in such a minor must be from those
listed under that subject in Part II of the Schedule for the BBS
degree.
(f) No paper may be credited to both a major subject and a minor
subject, and no paper may be credited to more than one minor
subject.
5.
7.
Accounting Information Systems
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 115.107 or 157.100 or PHOS; R
110.243, 10.240
110.279
Auditing
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.273, 110.274
110.289
Taxation
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.283, 110.274
Candidates may complete the requirements for a minor subject.
(a) A minor subject must include a minimum of 60 credits, including at
least 45 credits above 100-level and at least 15 credits at 300-level,
from one subject area.
5.
110.249
Notwithstanding Regulations 1 and 2, candidates who fail the
communication assessment embedded in the BBS core papers, will
normally be required to pass an approved communication paper to
qualify for the BBS degree.
Candidates who have been awarded the Graduate Diploma in Business
Studies may cross-credit up to 45 200-level credits to the BBS degree,
notwithstanding the provisions of Generic Undergraduate Part I
Regulation 4(a). Where the Diploma contained fewer than 45 200-level
credits, up to 45 unspecified 200-level credits may be credited.
Candidates who, in the opinion of the Academic Board, have passed with
sufficient merit subjects for the New Zealand Certificate of Commerce,
New Zealand Diploma in Business, or subjects for some other
recognised tertiary qualification, may be cross-credited with specified or
unspecified papers not exceeding a total of 120 credits.
Schedule to the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Business
Studies
Part I
Core papers for the BBS degree.
The following papers:
110.303
Integrative Accounting
15
P 300 credits inclusive of 110.209
or 110.313; 110.223 or 110.229
and at least 15 credits at 300-level
with a 110 prefix from the BBS
Schedule.
110.309
Advanced Financial Accounting
15
P 110.209 or 110.313; R 10.310,
110.713
110.329
Advanced Management Accounting 15
P 110.229 or 110.223; R 10.320,
110.723
110.349
Advanced Accounting Information
Systems
15
P 110.249 or 110.243; R 110.743
110.379
Advanced Auditing
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.279 or 110.274; R 10.370,
110.773
110.389
Advanced Taxation
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.289 or 110.274; R 110.783
Majoring Requirements of Accountancy
A major consists of 90 credits in Accountancy with 45 credits at 200-level
(including 110.209 and 110.229) and 45 credits at 300-level (including
110.303 and 110.309).
Note
Paper 110.109 is also required as a prerequisite for 200-level
Accountancy papers but does not count towards the major.
Agribusiness (no new enrolments from 2012)
112.248
Food and Agribusiness Value
Chains
15
P any 100-level paper
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
119.281
Decision Tools for Primary
Industries
15
P 119.180 and one of 117.152,
189.151, 283.101, 284.101,
286.101; nil For Grad DipRurStud;
R 111.231, 111.251, 111.252
119.381
Decision-Making in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.281
119.382
Opportunity Analysis in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.381
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper; R 127.255
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 or 119.180 and any
200-level paper
239.391
Special Topic
15
P Programme Director
115.101
Statistics for Business
15
R 195.101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.120 and 161.130
115.102
Accounting
15
R 110.100
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of
Business
15
115.104
Principles of Marketing
15
R 156.100, 156.200
A major consists of 90 credits in Agribusiness including 112.248, 112.302 and
a further 45 credits at 300-level.
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100, 10.200 –
(pre-1997)
Business Information Systems
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
115.107
Management Information Systems
15
R 157.100
115.108
Organisations and Management
15
R 152.100
Majoring Requirements of Agribusiness
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
157.240
Social Media Networks for
Business
15
P any 15 credits
157.241
Information Systems, Organisations
15
and E‑Commerce
P 115.107 or 157.1xx or 158.1xx or
159.1xx; R 157.242
Specific papers for each BBS degree major.
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two papers at 200-level
Note: With the approval of the Head of School, a candidate may substitute
up to 15 300-level credits from a related subject for equivalent 300-level
credits from the major subject. This approval is conditional on the Pro ViceChancellor’s office being notified in writing for inclusion in the student’s
textual record.
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
157.325
Information Management Project
15
P 157.24x; 157.341; R 157.342,
157.381
157.340
Organisational Knowledge
Management
15
P 152.2xx or 157.2xx or 158.2xx
or 159.2xx
157.341
Strategic Management for
Information Systems
15
P 157.2xx or 158.2xx or 159.2xx;
157.301, 157.373
Part II
Accountancy
110.209
Intermediate Financial Accounting
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230; R
10.210, 10.213 (pre-1999), 110.313
110.229
Management Accounting
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
R 110.200, 10.220, 110.223
Page 46
Majoring Requirements of Business Information Systems
A major consists of 152.252, 157.240, 157.241, 157.340, 157.341, and 15
credits from 157.325 or 152.304 or 152.341.
Business
Communication
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
219.203
Business Communication
15
P any 100-level paper
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
219.206
Managing Communications
Technology
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
Majoring Requirements of Communication
A major consists of 219.204, 219.209, 219.303, 219.305; 15 credits from
219.202, 219.203, 219.205, 219.206; and 15 credits from 219.304 or 219.307.
125.330
Advanced Business Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
125.340
Investment Analysis
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241; R 125.342
125.350
Financial Risk Management
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241
125.360
Banking Studies
15
P 125.220 or 125.230
125.363
Money, Banking and Financial
Markets
15
P 125.220 or 125.230 or 125.241
Majoring Requirements of Finance
A major consists of 90 credits in Finance, including 125.230, 125.241, and 60
credits from 125.320, 125.330, 125.340, 125.350, 125.360, 125.363 of which
at least 30 credits must be from 125.330, 125.340, 125.350.
Financial Economics (no new enrolments from 2011)
125.230
Business Finance
15
P 115.105 or 125.100 or 110.109
pre-2009 or 110.100 pre-1997;
115.101 or 161.110 recommended;
R 125.201
125.320
International Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
125.330
Advanced Business Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
125.340
Investment Analysis
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241; R 125.342
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120,
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 178.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
178.308
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
P 15 credits of 178.2xx, R 178.300
Economics
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
178.250
Contemporary Economic Issues
15
P any 100-level paper
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120,
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 178.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
178.370
Development Economics
15
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx paper;
and any 15 credits at 200-level
178.308
178.380
Applied Econometrics
15
P 15 credits of 178.2xx, R 178.300
P 178.220 or 178.280; R 178.321,
178.320
Majoring Requirements of Economics
A major consists of 90 credits in Economics, including 178.200; 178.201;
and at least 60 credits from 178.250, 178.280, 178.300, 178.301, 178.307,
178.308, 178.350, 178.370 and 178.380 of which 45 credits must be at
300-level.
Note: 178.100 is also required as a prerequisite for some 200-level Economics
papers but does not count towards the major.
Entrepreneurship and Small Business
Majoring Requirements of Financial Economics
A major consists of 90 credits in Financial Economics, with 45 credits at
200-level (including 125.230; 178.200 or 178.201; 178.280) and 45 credits
at 300-level (including 125.330 or 125.340; 125.320; 178.300 or 178.301 or
178.307 or 178.308). Note: 178.100 is also required as a prerequisite for some
200-level Economics papers but does not count towards the major.
Human Resource Management
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.230
Entrepreneurship
15
P any 100-level paper
114.240
Organisational Behaviour
15
P any 100-level paper
152.232
Small Business Management
15
P any 100-level paper
114.241
Managing Human Resources
15
P any 100-level paper
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
114.254
Managing Employment Relations
15
P any 100-level paper
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
114.326
Human Resource Practices
15
P 114.241
114.330
Equity and Diversity in the
Workplace
15
P any 200-level paper
114.350
Current Issues in Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.240, or 114.241 or 114.254
114.396
Strategic Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.241
152.330
Enterprise Development
15
P any two papers at 200-level
152.333
New Venture Project
15
P any 200-level paper
152.334
Innovation, Creativity and
Entrepreneurship
15
P any 200-level paper
Majoring Requirements of Entrepreneurship and Small Business
A major consists of 90 credits in Entrepreneurship and Small Business,
including 152.230, 152.232, 152.330, 152.333, 152.334 and 15 credits from
152.200 or 152.252 or 152.261.
Finance
125.230
Business Finance
15
P 115.105 or 125.100 or 110.109
pre-2009 or 110.100 pre-1997;
115.101 or 161.110 recommended;
R 125.201
125.241
Introduction to Investments
15
P 115.105 or 125.100; R 125.240
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
125.320
International Finance
Majoring Requirements of Human Resource Management
A major consists of 90 credits in Human Resource Management, including
114.240; 114.241; 114.254; 114.326; 114.396; and 15 credits from 114.330 or
114.350.
Information Systems (no new enrolments)
International Business
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.263
Applied International Trade
Management
15
P any 100-level paper
Page 47
Business
Majoring Requirements of Marketing Communication
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
152.366
Operational Management of
International Business
15
P any two papers at 200-level
A major consists of 90 credits in Marketing Communication, including
156.231; 156.232; 156.237; 156.331; 156.334; 219.305.
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
Sport Business Management
Majoring Requirements of International Business
A major consists of 90 credits in International Business: 152.200, 152.261,
152.263, 152.341, 152.366 and 219.304.
Management
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.203
Business and Society
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.101
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
153.204
Negotiating Principles
15
P any 100-level paper
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two papers at 200-level
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.328
152.333
New Venture Project
15
P any 200-level paper
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
152.341
Strategy and Change
152.370
Te Whanaketanga o te Pakihi
Māori – Advanced Māori Business
Development and Management
15
P 152.270
Majoring Requirements of Management
A major consists of 90 credits in Management with 45 credits at 200-level,
including 152.200, 152.203, and 15 credits from 152.252 or 152.261 or
153.204, and at least 45 credits at 300-level, including 152.329, 152.341, and
15 credits from 152.304 or 152.333 or 152.370.
156.231
Marketing Management
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.701
156.232
Consumer Behaviour
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.702
156.233
Marketing Research
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes. 115.101 or 161.110
(recommended); R 156.703
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232; R 156.704
156.333
Market Analysis
15
P 156.233 and 161.xxx
156.334
Marketing Planning
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
156.338
International Marketing
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
Majoring Requirements of Marketing
A major consists of 90 credits in Marketing, including 156.231; 156.232;
156.233; 156.331; 156.334 and 15 credits from 156.333, 156.338 and
219.305.
15
P any 100-level paper
Outdoor Recreation Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.215
Sport Facility and Event
Management
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.310
152.217
Sport Management Planning
15
P any 100-level paper
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
152.376
Sport Management/Coaching
Practicum
30
P 152.215 and (152.212 or 152.217),
or 152.214 and 152.216; R 152.371
and 152.372
Majoring Requirements of Sport Business Management
A major consists of 90 credits in Sports Management, including 152.211;
152.313; 152.215; 152.376 (30 credits) and either 152.212 or 152.217.
Valuation and Property Management
127.241
Real Estate Valuation and
Management
15
P any 100 level paper; R 127.243
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100 level paper; R 127.255
127.341
Property Management and
Development
15
P 127.241 or P 127.243 or
P 127.244
127.342
Real Estate Investments
15
P 127.241 and (127.242 or PHOS)
127.343
Applied Valuation II
15
P 127.242
155.201
Law of Property
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or 155.101;
R 155.216, 155.700
Majoring Requirements of Valuation and Property Management
Note: Students who wish to meet the requirements for accreditation by the
Valuers Registration Board, must also pass the following papers:132.221,
138.281, 138.382, 138.383, 178.242.
Web-Based Information Systems (no new enrolments)
Part III
110.109
Introductory Financial Accounting
15
P or C 110.100 or 115.102; R
10.110, 110.213 (1999), 110.215;
R 110.230
110.230
Introductory Financial and
Management Accounting
15
P any 100-level paper; R 110.109,
10.110, 10.213 (1999), 110.215
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
114.242
Human Resource Development
15
P any 100-level paper
114.271
Occupational Safety and Health I
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOD
114.272
Occupational Safety and Health II
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOS
114.297
Human Resource Development
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOS
114.298
Employment Relations
Management
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOS
114.368
Special Topic in Occupational
Safety and Health
15
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
15
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
114.370
Special Topic Occupational Safety
and Health
114.372
Occupational Hygiene
15
P 114.271, 114.272; or PHOS
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.701
114.374
Project in Occupational Safety and
Health
15
P 114.271, 114.272; or PHOS
114.375
Special Topic in Occupational
Safety and Health
15
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.702
114.397
The New Zealand Industrial
Relations Framework
15
P 114.298
114.398
Labour Negotiation Techniques
15
P 114.298
115.316
Special Topic
15
P any 200-level paper
115.319
Special Topic
15
P any 200-level paper
Marketing Communication (no new enrolments from 2012)
Marketing Management
Sport Business
152.212
A major consists of 90 credits in Valuation and Property Management,
including 127.241, 127.242, 155.201, 127.341, 127.342, and 127.343.
Marketing
156.231
152.211
156.232
Consumer Behaviour
156.237
Integrated Marketing
Communication
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business or non-Business
programmes
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232; R 156.704
125.211
The Financial Planning Process
15
P any 100-level paper; R 125.210,
125.237, 125.620
156.334
Marketing Planning
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
125.212
Personal Financial Management
15
P any 100-level paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
Page 48
Business
125.220
Financial Institutions and Markets
15
P 115.105 or 125.100
recommended; R 125.221, 125.231,
125.621
125.241
Introduction to Investments
15
P 115.105 or 125.100; R 125.240
125.250
Spreadsheet Modelling and Data
Analysis
15
P 125.230, 161.XXX
125.310
Financial Advice Implementation
15
P 125.240, 125.351; C one of
110.380, 125.342, 125.356,
125.357; R 125.311
125.342
Investment Planning
15
C 125.220 and P 125.230 or
P 125.240 R 125.340, 125.341
125.351
Personal Risk Management
15
P or C 125.211
125.356
Business Insurance
15
P or C 125.211
125.357
Advanced Issues in Insurance
15
P or C 125.211 or PHOS
127.356
Rural Valuation
15
P 127.242 or 127.255
152.116
Introduction to Sport Coaching
15
R 152.110
152.117
Introduction to Sport Management
15
R 152.110
152.214
Sport Coaching: Management and
Leadership
15
P any 100-level paper
152.216
Sport Coaching: Exercise
Fundamentals
15
152.269
Principles of E-Business
152.270
Māori Management
152.307
155.203
Law of Business Organisations
15
P 115.103 or 155.100; R 155.200,
155.700
155.210
Commercial Law
15
P 115.103 or 155.100; R 155.200,
155.700
155.215
Criminal Law
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or PHOS and
any 100-level paper
155.216
Land Law for Real Estate Agents
15
R 155.201, GradDipBusStuds (RE)
only
155.222
Immigration Law and Practice in
New Zealand
15
P any 100-level paper; 115.103 or
155.100 recommended
155.306
Health Care Law
15
P any two papers at 200-level; R
155.700
155.313
Commercial Transactions Contrary
to Conscience
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 and any
200-level paper; R 155.700
156.200
Marketing for Non-Marketers
15
P any 100-level paper; R 115.104
or 156.100
156.235
Electronic Marketing
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes
P any 100-level paper; R 152.314
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
15
P any 100-level paper
12.101, 77.101, 78.100 (pre-1997),
178.102
15
P any 100-level paper
178.110
The New Zealand Economy
15
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper
E-Business Strategy and Models
15
P 152.269 or 157.241 or 157.242
or 157.262
178.242
178.328
Project Evaluation
15
152.318
Sport Psychology and Leadership
for Managers and Coaches
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
15
Any three papers at 200-level
178.358
15
15
P 152.216 or (214.166 and any
200-level paper)
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper
152.319
Management of Fitness and
Athletic Conditioning
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
178.360
15
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
152.373
National Sport Organisation
Coaching Practicum
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics
30
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
200.261
World Politics
15
152.375
Ngā Ture Whenua – Managing
Māori Resources
P any 100-level BA paper; R
148.261
15
P any two papers at 200-level
219.100
15
152.386
Risk Management I
15
P any 200-level paper
Introduction to Business
Communication
152.387
Risk Management II
15
P any 200-level paper
219.101
Media Skills
15
152.392
Environmental Management for
Business
15
P any 200-level paper
219.107
Introduction to Cross-Cultural
Communication
15
153.200
Introduction to Dispute Resolution
15
P any 100-level paper
219.203
Business Communication
15
P any 100-level paper; R 219.100,
114.100
153.202
Law and Mediation
15
P any 100-level paper
153.204
Negotiation Principles
15
P any 100-level paper; R 153.307
219.232
Feature Writing and Freelancing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100, 139.107 or 119.177
153.210
Dispute Resolution Practicum
15
P PHOS
153.302
Mediation Process
15
P 153.200
219.234
Editing and Publishing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100, 139.107 or 119.177
153.306
Negotiation Practice
15
P any 200-level paper
219.309
Arbitration Practicum
15
P PHOS
International Case Studies in Public
15
Relations
P any 200-level paper
153.310
153.311
Mediation Practicum
15
P PHOS
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
153.314
Dispute Resolution Advocacy
15
P any 200-level paper; R 153.201
P any 30 credits at 200-level, R
219.331
153.315
Adjudicative Processes
15
P 153.200
219.336
Investigative Reporting
15
P any 200-level paper, R 219.332
153.320
Employment Dispute Resolution
15
P any 200-level paper; R 153.708
219.339
History of Journalism
15
P any 200-level paper
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication
BC
Course Regulations
2.
Every course of study shall include the core communication papers listed
in Part I of the BC Schedule.
3.
Every course of study shall include a major of 120 credits plus a minor
of 60 credits. The majors and minors and their requirements are shown
in Part II of the BC Schedule.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Communication shall follow a
personal course of study which shall consist of papers totalling at least
360 credits with:
(a) Not more than 165 credits at 100-level;
(b) At least 75 credits at 300-level;
(c) At least 300 credits from the Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor
of Communication.
(a) Students who complete a major in Communication Management,
Journalism Studies, Marketing Communication, Public Relations,
or composite Communication Management/Journalism Studies
must complete a minor in Expressive Arts, International Languages,
Linguistics, Media Studies, or composite Expressive Arts/Media
Studies.
(b) Students who complete a major in Expressive Arts, Linguistics,
Media Studies or composite Expressive Arts/Media Studies must
complete a minor in Communication Management, Journalism
Studies, Marketing Communication, Public Relations or composite
Communication Management/Journalism Studies.
Page 49
Business
Electives
4.
Electives comprising 60 credits, which may be taken from other
undergraduate degrees of the University, complete the degree
requirement.
Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor of Communication
139.326
Travel Writing
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or any
one of 206.206, 206.207, 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.231, 221.281, 221.282
139.327
Writing Creative Nonfiction
15
P any 200-level BA paper or any
one of the following: 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.209, 219.231, 221.281,
221.282, 226.200
139.329
Advanced Fiction Writing
15
P 139.229 and any 200-evel English
paper
139.374
Tragedy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.204
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Part I
Core papers for the BC degree
115.107
Management Information Systems
15
139.123
Creative Writing
15
154.101
Introduction to Media Studies
15
172.131
Language and Communication
15
219.100
Introduction to Business
Communication
15
219.101
Media Skills
15
219.107
Introduction to Cross-Cultural
Communication
15
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 157.100
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of the following: BDes 221.361,
221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
R 114.253, 219.203
Major requirements
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
A major consists of 120 credits in Expressive Arts, including at least 60
credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
Part II
Specific papers for the Majors and Minors for the BC degree.
A minor consists of 60 credits in Expressive Arts, including at least 15 credits
at 300-level.
Communication Management
International Languages (Minor only)
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
219.206
Managing Communications
Technology
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
219.302
Gender and Communication in
Organisations
15
P any 200-level paper
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P 219.2xx and PHOS
(a)Chinese
241.201
Chinese 2A
15
P 241.102, or 169.141 and 169.142,
or PHOS; R 241.241, 241.242,
169.241, 169.242; Notes 2, 3
241.202
Chinese 2B
15
P 241.201 or PHOS; R 241.241,
241.242, 169.241, 169.242; Notes
2, 4
241.203
20th Century Chinese Literature
and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 169.243
241.204
Chinese Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 169.244
241.301
Chinese 3A
15
P 241.202, or 241.241 and 241.242,
or PHOS; R 241.341, 241.342,
169.341, 169.342; Notes 2, 5
241.302
Chinese 3B
15
P 241.301 or PHOS; R 241.341,
241.342, 169.341, 169.342; Notes
2, 6
241.304
Chinese Grammar
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS: R 169.344
241.305
Translation from and into Chinese
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.343
241.306
Readings in Modern Chinese
Literature
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.345
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Communication Management, including at
least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Communication Management, including at
least 15 credits at 300-level.
Expressive Arts
139.209
139.223
Speaking: Theory and Practice
Creative Processes
15
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 119.155, 197.114, 206.101,
206.104, 270.105, 219.100,
PERF135, PERF136, PERF235,
PERF236
P any 100-level BA paper; or
any one of 152.230, 152.334,
206.102, 206.110; or any 100-level
197-prefix paper; or any 226-prefix
paper
(b)French
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
243.201
Intermediate French Language I
15
P 243.102 or 164.107 or equivalent
level; R 164.200, 164.101
243.202
Intermediate French Language II
15
P 243.201 or 164.101 or 164.200 or
equivalent level; R 164.201
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 243.301 or 244.301 or 245.301
243.301
Advanced French Language
15
P 243.202 or 164.201; R 164.301
243.304
Contemporary French Popular
Culture
15
P 243.301 or 164.301; R 164.307
139.224
Making Plays for Theatre
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
226-prefix paper; or 197.107,
197.109, 206.222
139.225
Writing for Children
15
P 139.123 or 139.106
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
244.201
Intermediate German Language I
15
P 244.102 or 164.118 or equivalent;
R 164.215, 164.116
244.202
Intermediate German Language II
15
P 244.201 or 164.215 or 164.116 or
equivalent level; R 164.216
(c) German (no new enrolments from 2011)
139.226
Life Writing
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 197.107, 197.109, 197.111,
197.114, 206.206, 206.207
139.229
Writing Poetry: Love, Loss and
Looking Around
15
P 139.123
139.303
Modern Drama
15
P any 200-level English paper
164.315
Germany Today – Transitions and
Identity
15
P any 200-level BA paper
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 243.301 or 244.301 or 245.301
139.323
Page 50
Media Script Writing
Business
244.301
Advanced German Language I
P 244.202 or 164.216 or equivalent
level; R 164.316
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS; R 169.221, 169.222,
169.128, 169.288
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
(d)Japanese
242.201
Japanese 2A
Students who have previously studied the target language should consult the
School of Language Studies for guidance prior to enrolment. Students who
are exempt from the above 200-level papers will be required to replace them
with appropriate papers in the same language.
15
Journalism Studies
242.202
Japanese 2B
15
P 242.201 or PHOS; R 169.221,
169.222
242.203
Japanese Language and Society
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS; R 169.224
219.232
Feature Writing and Freelancing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100, 139.107 or 119.177
242.205
Japanese Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.227
219.234
Editing and Publishing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100 or 139.107 or 119.177
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
Japanese 3A
15
P 242.201 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.321
219.305
242.301
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P 219.2xx and PHOS
242.302
Japanese 3B
15
P 242.301 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.322
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any 30 credits at
200-level; R 219.331
Reading and Writing about Current
Japan
Investigative Reporting
15
P any 200-level paper; R 219.332
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.324
219.336
242.304
219.339
History of Journalism
15
P any 200-level paper
242.305
Readings in Modern Japanese
Literature
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; C 242.301 and 242.302 or
PHOS; R 169.326
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Journalism Studies, including at least 60
credits at 300-level.
242.306
Japanese Linguistics
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.327
242.307
Japanese-English Translation
Techniques
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.328
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.232
Language and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.235
Linguistic Analysis
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
172.231
172.236
Forensic Linguistics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.237
Language, Discourse and Power
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.334
Field Methods
15
P 172.235
172.335
Language and Identity
15
P 172.232 or 172.237
172.336
Languages of the Pacific
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
172.338
Language and Mediated
Communication in a Transcultural
World
15
P any 200-level paper in Linguistics
(e)Spanish
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
245.201
Intermediate Spanish Language I
15
P 245.102 or 164.152 or equivalent
level; R 164.251
245.202
Intermediate Spanish Language II
15
P 245.201 or 164.251 or equivalent
level; R 164.252
245.204
Latin American Voices
15
P 245.201 or 164.251; R 164.255
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 243.301 or 244.301 or 245.301
245.301
Advanced Spanish Language
15
P 245.202 or 164.252; R 164.351
245.303
Latin American Rhythms and
Politics: From Tango to Rock
15
P 245.202 or 164.252 or 245.204 or
164.255; R 164.354
Traveller’s Tales: the Invention of
Latin America
15
245.304
P 245.202 or 245.204
Notes
1.
Students who do not have previous training or background in
the relevant international language will need to use two of their
electives to achieve the prerequisites at 100-level in the language.
In contrast, students who already have proficiency in the language
equivalent to at least a year of study at the tertiary level can enter at
200-level or above.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Journalism Studies, including at least 15
credits at 300-level.
Linguistics
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Linguistics, including 60 credits at
200-level and 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Linguistics, including at least 15 credits at
300-level.
2.
Not suitable for native speakers of Chinese. Please discuss other
options with the Head of School or Programme Coordinator
3.
Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 300
(approx) characters.
156.231
Marketing Management
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 or 156.200 or
any 75 credits
4.
Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 450
(approx) characters.
156.232
Consumer Behaviour
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 or 156.200 or
any 75 credits
5.
Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of 600 (approx.)
characters.
156.237
Integrated Marketing
Communication
15
6.
Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of 750 (approx)
characters.
115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
Minor requirements
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
A minor in International Languages requires a minimum of 60 credits,
including at least 15 credits at 300-level, from the papers listed for one of the
following options: (a) Chinese; (b) French; (c) German; (d) Japanese; or (e)
Spanish.
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P any 219.2xx and PHOS
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
219.331
Major requirements
There is no major in International Languages.
A minor in option (a) Chinese must include 241.201 and 241.202.
A minor in option (b) French must include 243.201 and 243.202.
A minor in option (c) German must include 244.201 and 244.202.
A minor in option (c) Japanese must include 242.201 and 242.202.
A minor in option (d) Spanish must include 245.201 and 245.202.
Marketing Communication
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Marketing Communication, including
156.231; 156.232; 156.237; either 219.202 or 219.209; 156.331; plus three of
219.304, 219.305, 219.307, 219.311, 219.335.
Page 51
Business
Minor requirements
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Marketing Communication, including at
least 15 credits at 300-level. At least 30 credits must be from 156-prefix
papers and at least 30 credits must be from 219-prefix papers.
A minor consists of 60 credits in Media Studies, including at least 15 credits
at 300-level.
Public Relations
Media Studies
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 115.104, 156.100, 197.102,
197.106, 213.206, 213.216, or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
154.205
Popular Music Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
154.206
Topics in Film History
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.309
International Case Studies in Public
15
Relations
P any 200-level paper
154.212
New Zealand Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200-level paper
154.215
Cult Media and Fandom
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P 219.2xx and PHOS
154.222
The Art of the Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
219.331
154.201
Television Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.202
Advertising and Society
15
154.203
Popular Culture and the Media
154.204
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of the following: BDes 221.361,
221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
154.228
Media History
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
139.228
139.376
Sexual/Textual Politics
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.301
Cultural Studies and the Media
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.302
Gender and Race in the Media
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.303
Hollywood Cinema
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
154.305
A Social History of Popular Music
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.308
Screen Fictions
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
154.309
Communications and Culture
15
P any 200-level BA paper; R
139.308
154.310
Visual Culture and the Electronic
Image
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.311
The Networked World: New Media
and Digital Cultures
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or
213.206 or 213.216; or any
200-level 156-prefix paper; or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
154.312
Trauma and the Media
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.313
Global Media Cultures
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.314
Independent Media in the
Information Age
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Media Studies, including at least 60 credits
at 300-level.
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Public Relations, including 60 credits at
200-level and 60 credits at 300-level. Both 219.209 and 219.305 must be
included in the major.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Public Relations, including both 219.209 and
219.305.
Composite Communication Management/Journalism Studies (no new
enrolments from 2011)
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits from Communication Management and
Journalism Studies papers, with at least 45 credits in Communication
Management and at least 45 credits in Journalism Studies, and including at
least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits from Communication Management and
Journalism Studies papers, with at least 30 credits in Communication
Management and at least 30 credits in Journalism Studies, and including at
least 15 credits at 300-level.
Composite Expressive Arts/Media Studies
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits from Expressive Arts and Media Studies,
including at least 45 credits in Expressive Arts and 45 credits in Media
Studies, with at least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits from Expressive Arts and Media Studies
papers, with at least 30 credits in Expressive Arts and at least 30 credits in
Media Studies, and including at least 15 credits at 300-level.
The Degree of Bachelor of Sport and Exercise
BSpEx
Course Regulations
(b) at least 75 credits at 300-level;
Part I
(c) at least 270 credits from the papers listed in Schedule A, with at
least 60 credits at 300-level;
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
The Bachelor of Sport and Exercise (BSpEx) shall comprise 360 credits
with:
(a) no more than 165 credits at 100-level;
Page 52
(d) at most 90 further credits from any Degree Schedule.
2.
Candidates may complete the requirements for the BSpEx with or
without a major.
(a) BSpEx with a major
A major requires a candidate to include at least 150 credits in
a particular subject area. The requirements of Schedule B of
the BSpEx must be satisfied. Candidates shall study one of the
following majors:
Management and Coaching
Business
Physical Education
152.376
Sport Management/Coaching
Practicum
30
P 152.215 and (152.212 or 152.217),
or 152.214 and 152.216; R 152.371
and 152.372.
155.315
Sport Law
15
P any 200-level paper, 115.103 or
155.100 recommended
214.101
Human Bioscience: Normal Body
Function
15
R 194.101, 194.241, 194.242
214.166
Training Principles and Practice
15
214.170
Structural Kinesiology
15
214.271
Exercise Prescription and Therapy
15
P 214.170 plus 214.101 or 214.166
214.272
Fitness Assessment
15
P any 100-level paper
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Sport and Exercise
214.371
Advanced Exercise Prescription
and Therapy
15
P 214.271
Schedule A
214.372
Exercise Prescription Practicum
30
P 214.271 and 214.274 or 214.272;
C 214.371 or permission of
Programme Director
Exercise Prescription and Training.
(b) BSpEx without a major
A candidate may complete the degree without a major by satisfying
all the requirements except Regulation 2(a).
3.
4.
A candidate may be credited with restricted passes in papers totalling up
to 45 credits. A restricted pass shall not qualify as a pass for prerequisite
and corequisite purposes.
There are no practical work requirements specific to this qualification.
(a) Ten core papers as follows:
234.201
Sport Biomechanics I
15
P 214.170
152.116
Introduction to Sport Coaching
15
R 152.110
234.203
Exercise Physiology
15
P 194.101 or 214.101
152.117
Introduction to Sport Management
15
R 152.110
234.205
Motor Behaviour
15
P 214.170
152.211
Sport Business
15
P any 100-level paper
234.301
Sport Biomechanics II
15
P 234.201; R 194.351
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
214.171
Introduction to Sport Science
15
274.253
Sport Performance
30
P 209.104 or 274.104; and 214.170
or 152.216; R 209.253
214.270
Applied Sport Science
15
274.254
Motor Skill Learning
15
P 209.104 or 274.104; R 208.263,
209.254
274.106
Introduction to Physical Education
15
274.104
Introduction to Human Movement
15
R 209.104
274.315
Kinesiology
15
P 209.104 or 274.104, or 208.255 or
208.257 R 209.315, 208.315
274.209
Sport Pedagogy
15
P 209.104 or 274.104; and 209.102
or 275.102 or 274.106; R 209.256
274.370
Promoting Hauora Through Te
Ao Kori
15
P 274.104, 274.106, 274.209
274.371
An Integrated Model of Physical
Education
15
P 274.209, 274.253 or 274.254; R
274.317 or 209.317
274.372
Current Issues in Health and
Physical Education
15
P 209.104, 209.256, 274.106,
274.104, 274.209, 274.256;
R 209.318
275.102
Human Development
15
R 184.102, 187.102, 208.102,
209.102, 270.102
P 162.101 or 194.101 or 214.171 or
194.144; R 194.244 and 234.202
plus
219.100
Introduction to Business
Communication
15
R 219.203, 114.253
Communication in the Sciences
15
R 119.177, 139.107, 139.177,
140.125, 140.150, 140.151
or
119.155
(b) At least 120 credits from the following list, with at least 60 credits
at 300-level:
Schedule B
Majors and their requirements:
115.104
Principles of Marketing
15
R 156.100, 156.200
115.108
Organisations and Management
15
R 152.100
Management and Coaching (150 credits)
128.300
Ergonomics/Human Factors: Work,
Performance, Health and Design
15
P any 200-level paper
115.104, 115.108, 152.214, 152.215, 152.216, 152.217, 152.318, 152.376, and
152.319.
152.212
Outdoor Recreation Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.214
Sport Coaching: Management and
Leadership
15
P any 100-level paper
152.215
Sport Facility and Event
Management
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.310
275.102, 214,170, 152.216, 274.253, 274.254, 274.370, 274.371, 274.372,
274.315.
152.216
Sport Coaching: Exercise
Fundamentals
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.314
Exercise Prescription and Training (150 credits)
152.217
Sport Management Planning
15
P any 100-level paper
152.318
Sport Psychology and Leadership
for Managers and Coaches
214.101, 214.166, 214.170, 214.271, 214.272, 274.254, 152.319, 214.371,
214.372.
15
Any three papers at 200-level
152.319
Management of Fitness and
Athletic Conditioning
15
P 152.216 or (214.166 and any
200-level paper)
Physical Education (150 credits)
Transition Arrangements
Students who enrolled in the BSpEx prior to 2011 may choose to complete
their programme under the regulations that were in force at the time of their
first enrolment. These transition arrangements expire in 2013.
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business Studies
BA/BBS
Course Regulations
gain at least 510 credits. Each of the two degrees is regarded as a
component of the conjoint programme.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
(a) To qualify for the conjoint award of the Degrees of Bachelor of
Arts and Bachelor of Business Studies, candidates are required to
(b) Each paper successfully completed for the conjoint programme
shall be credited to one or the other of the two components.
Except as provided by these Regulations, each component shall be
governed by the Regulations of the corresponding degree.
2.
The BA component shall consist of a total of 255 credits made up as
follows:
(a) The majoring requirements of at least one subject as specified in the
BA Schedule. Business Psychology is not available as a major in
the conjoint programme.
Page 53
Business
(b) Papers with prefixes 114, 115, 152, 178 and 219 may be included
in the BA component only if they are required for a major in
Economics, Environmental Studies, Media Studies, Politics or
Social Policy.
(c) Students taking a major in Economics in the BA component may
not include papers from this major in the BBS component.
4.
(c) No fewer than 105 credits selected from the Bachelor of Arts
Schedule, of which at least 30 credits must be at the 200-level or
above.
(d) Students may not include in these 105 credits papers with prefixes
114, 115, 152, 178 or 219.
(b) Candidates should normally pass all papers and achieve a Grade
Point Average of at least 4.0 each year in order to continue
enrolment in the conjoint programme.
(e) The BA component must include a Communication paper from
Part I of the BA Schedule. Candidates who have been awarded a
degree from a recognised tertiary institution, or who have passed an
equivalent paper at a recognised tertiary Institution, may apply for
exemption from this requirement.
3.
(c) A candidate is normally expected to advance studies concurrently
in both components of the programme in each year of enrolment.
(d) A candidate who has already completed the requirements of one of
the component degrees will not be permitted to enrol in the conjoint
programme.
The BBS component must be completed with a major and shall consist
of a total of 255 credits made up as follows:
(e) The requirements for both components of the conjoint programme
shall normally be completed within ten years of first enrolment in
the conjoint programme or either component.
(a) The compulsory eight core business papers: 115.101, 115.102,
115.103, 115.104, 115.105, 115.106, 115.107, 115.108.
(b) No fewer than 120 credits at the 200-level or above, of which at
least 60 credits must be at the 300-level, selected from Part II or III
of the Schedule for the BBS degree.
(a) Admission to the conjoint programme requires the attainment in
the previous year of study of a standard equivalent to a Grade Point
Average of at least 4.0. Students may be admitted after they have
completed papers to the value of 120 credits, provided that they
have obtained a Grade Point Average of at least 4.0 and have passed
at least one paper from each component of the conjoint programme.
5.
Papers may not be cross-credited into or between components of the
conjoint BA/BBS programme.
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Business Studies and Bachelor of Science
BBS/BSc
Course Regulations
(b) The majoring requirements of at least one subject as specified in
Section A of the BSc Schedule.
Part I
(c) Students taking any major in the Business Information Systems
area in the BBS component cannot include papers from this major
in the BSc component.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(d) Students should take an approved paper in communication skills in
the BSc component (see Section B of the BSc Schedule).
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
(a) To qualify for the conjoint award of the Degrees of Bachelor of
Business Studies and Bachelor of Science, candidates are required
to gain at least 510 credits. Each of the two degrees is referred to as
a component of the conjoint programme.
(e) The BSc requirement for a quantitative paper is satisfied by passing
the core statistics paper in the BBS component.
4.
(b) Each paper successfully completed for the conjoint programme
shall be credited to one or the other of the two components.
Except as provided by these Regulations, each component shall be
governed by the Regulations of the corresponding degree.
2.
(b) Candidates shall normally pass all papers and achieve a Grade
Point Average of at least 4.0 each year in order to continue
enrolment in the conjoint programme.
The BBS component must be completed with a major and shall consist
of a total of at least 255 credits made up as follows:
(c) A candidate is normally expected to advance studies concurrently
in both components of the programme in each year of enrolment.
(a) No more than 135 credits may be at 100-level.
(b) At least 255 credits must be from the BBS Schedule of papers,
including the compulsory eight core business papers: 115.101,
115.102, 115.103, 115.104, 115.105, 115.106, 115.107, 115.108;
and at least 60 credits at 300-level.
3.
The BSc component shall consist of a total of at least 255 credits of
which 240 must be from Section A of the BSc Schedule made up as
follows:
(a) At least one paper from each of at least three subjects in Section
A of the BSc Schedule. For this purpose papers are from different
subjects if the first three digits of the paper number are different.
Page 54
(a) Admission to the conjoint programme requires the attainment in
the previous year of study of a standard equivalent to a Grade Point
Average of at least 4.0. Students may be admitted after they have
completed papers to the value of at least 120 credits provided that
they have obtained a Grade Point Average of at least 4.0 and have
passed at least one paper from each component of the conjoint
programme.
(d) A candidate who has already completed the requirements of one of
the component degrees will not be permitted to enrol in the conjoint
programme.
(e) The requirements for both components of the conjoint programme
shall normally be completed within ten years of first enrolment in
the conjoint programme or either component.
5.
Papers may not be cross-credited into or between components of the
conjoint BBS/BSc programme.
Business
Graduate Diplomas
The Graduate Diploma in Aviation
GDipAv
Course Regulations
190.207
Aviation Psychology
15
P 190.107 or 190.117
Part I
190.211
Aviation Strategic Management
15
P any 100-level paper
190.215
Heavy Aeroplane Performance
15
P 190.102 or 190.110 or 190.111
or CPL; R 190.202 or 190.235 or
190.237 or 190.252
190.217
Instruction and Learning in Aviation 15
P 190.107 or 190.109 or 190.117
190.222
Basic Air Safety Investigation
15
P 190.122
Part II
Course Requirements
190.224
Environmental Impacts of Aviation
15
P any 100-level paper
190.225
15
P any 190.1xx
Eligibility
Introduction to Research Methods
in Aviation
190.240
Air Power
15
P any 100-level paper
1.
Before enrolment, candidates shall satisfy the Academic Board that they
have backgrounds and relevant experience sufficient to follow the course
with a reasonable chance of success.
190.249
Aircraft Maintenance Management
30
P 190.220 or 190.244 or AMEL
190.302
Check and Training for Airlines
15
P 190.202 or ATPL
190.306
Airline Strategic Management
15
P 190.211
Candidates shall:
190.307
Airport Planning
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.308
Airport Operational Management
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.309
Design of Airways and Air Traffic
Systems
15
P any 200-level 190 prefix paper
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors
15
190.205 or 190.216
190.314
Legal Issues in Aviation
15
P any 200-level paper
190.317
Evaluation Methods in Aviation
15
P 190.217, 190.225 or Part III ATP
190.320
Heavy Aeroplane Performance II
15
P 190.237 or 190.215 or PHOS
190.321
Air Accident and Incident
Investigation
15
P 190.122 and one 190.2xx paper.
190.327
Managing Cultures in Aviation
15
P 190.205 or 190.216
190.340
Contemporary Issues in Aviation
Security
15
P any 200-level paper
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
2.
(a) have qualified for the award of a university degree or qualification
approved for the purpose of these Regulations by the Academic
Board or have been admitted to this University under admission
with equivalent status Regulations; or
(b) have been credited with at least 120 credits towards a degree and
have met Regulation 1; or
(c) have sufficient maturity and have met the requirements of
Regulation 1.
3.
Before enrolling in the Flight Instruction endorsement:
(a) candidates must possess a Class One Medical Certificate recognised
by the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand and meet
appropriate pilot aptitude selection criteria as defined from time to
time by the School of Aviation; and
(b) hold a Commercial Pilot Licence (CPL) – Aeroplane (A).
Course of Study
4.
5.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study of 120 credits in
one of the following endorsements as listed in the Schedule:
Flight Instruction
Note: A Commercial Pilot Licence (Aeroplane) is a prerequisite for this
endorsement.
Compulsory papers for the Flight Instruction endorsement:
190.297
30
P 190.204
(a) Aviation Studies; or
Aerobatic Aircraft Handling for
Flight Instructors
190.301
Flight Instructor Human Factors*
15
P any-200 level paper
(b) Flight Instruction.
190.313
Advanced Aviation Human Factors# 15
P 190.205 or 190.216
Candidates are deemed to have met the prerequisite requirements for
the 200-level papers listed in the Schedule below when they have been
admitted to candidature.
190.315
Flight Instruction Fundamentals I*
15
P 190.256
190.317
Evaluation Methods in Aviation
15
P 190.217, 190.225 or Part III ATP
190.335
Flight Instruction*
30
Part III ATP or hold a current
CPL (A)
Schedule to the Graduate Diploma in Aviation
#
When paper 190.313 has already contributed towards the award of
any other Massey University qualification a candidate must select
another 190.xxx paper at 200 or 300-level to complete the Graduate
Diploma.
*
This is an integrated paper.
Aviation Studies
Compulsory papers for the Aviation Studies endorsement:
190.216
Aviation Human Factors
15
P 190.107 or 190.117; R 190.205
190.220
Managing Aviation Systems
15
Part II P or C 190.109 or P 190.116
Flight Instruction – Helicopter Option (no new enrolments)
Plus 90 credits with at least 60 beyond 200-level from the following papers
listed below:
The Graduate Diploma in Business Studies
GradDipBusStuds
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Before enrolment, candidates shall satisfy the Academic Board that they
have backgrounds and relevant experience sufficient to be able to follow
the course with a reasonable chance for success.
2.
Candidates shall:
Page 55
Business
(a) have qualified for the award of a university degree or qualification
approved for the purpose of these Regulations by the Academic
Board or have been admitted to this University under the admission
with equivalent status Regulations; or
3.
110.309
Advanced Financial Accounting
15
P 110.209 or 110.313; R 10.310,
110.713
110.329
Advanced Management Accounting 15
P 110.229 or 110.223; R 10.320,
110.723
(b) have been credited with at least 120 credits towards a degree and
have met Regulation 1; or
110.349
Advanced Accounting Information
Systems
15
P 110.249 or 110.243; R 110.743
(c) have sufficient maturity and have met the requirements of
Regulation 1.
110.379
Advanced Auditing
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.279 or 110.274; R 10.370,
110.773
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
110.389
Advanced Taxation
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.289 or 110.274;
R 110.783
To qualify for the award of the Diploma candidates shall:
(a) pass approved papers totalling at least 120 credits; and
(b) complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board such other work
as may be required as part of an approved course of study.
4.
Notwithstanding Regulations 3(a) and 3(b), up to 45 200-level credits
may be cross-credited from a completed degree of this University
provided that the papers are listed in Parts II or III of the BBS Schedule.
5.
The course shall not include 100-level credits and shall include at least
60 credits from above the 200-level.
6.
Candidates may credit to the Graduate Diploma in Business Studies no
more than 15 credits in which they have gained a Restricted pass.
7.
Where a course includes a combination of papers approved for the
purpose by the Academic Board, the Diploma may be awarded
with an endorsement in one of the following areas: Accounting,
Agribusiness, Business Information Systems, Business Law, Coaching,
Communication Management, Dispute Resolution, Economics,
Employment Relations Management, Entrepreneurship and Small
Business, Finance, Human Resource Management, Insurance
Management, International Business, Management, Management and
Leadership for Māori Providers, Marketing, Personal Financial Planning,
Personal Risk Management, Property Management, Public Relations,
Real Estate, Rural Valuation, Sport Management, Tax Consultancy,
Urban Valuation.
8.
(a) Where a candidate seeks to include a paper from outside the
College of Business, written application must be made to seek
approval from the Pro Vice-Chancellor’s office, normally prior to
enrolment in the paper.
(b) Where an endorsement provides for approval by the Head of
School of discretionary papers, this approval is conditional on the
Pro Vice-Chancellor’s office being notified in writing for inclusion
in the student’s textual record.
9.
An awarded GradDipBusStuds may be surrendered to obtain a greater
level of credit towards another Massey University qualification than
the maximum 45 200-level credits permitted under the cross-credit
regulations.
10. Candidates are deemed to have met the prerequisite requirements for
the 200-level papers specified in an endorsement when they have been
admitted to candidature for that endorsement, unless explicitly excluded
from this provision in the endorsement rules below.
Endorsement Requirements of Accounting
90 credits at 200-level or above from papers with a 110 prefix, with at least 45
of these credits at the 300-level; and 30 credits from papers listed in Parts II
or III of the Schedule for the BBS degree, with at least 15 of these credits at
the 300-level.
Note: Regulation 10 is excluded. Candidates must meet all prerequisites,
except for 110.230 which may be included in this endorsement without a
prerequisite.
Agribusiness (no new enrolments from 2011)
112.248
Food and Agribusiness Value
Chains
15
P any 100-level paper
112.302
Food and Agribusiness Strategies
15
P 112.248
119.281
Decision Tools for Primary
Industries
15
P 119.180 and one of 117.152,
189.151, 283.101, 284.101,
286.101; nil For Grad DipRurStud;
R 111.231, 111.251, 111.252
119.381
Decision-making in Primary Industry 15
P 119.281
119.382
Opportunity Analysis in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.381
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper: R 127.255
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 or 119.180 and any
200-level paper
239.391
Special Topic
15
P Programme Director
Endorsement requirements of Agribusiness
112.248 and 112.302 and 30 credits from 119.281, 127.242, 152.261; and
60 credits from 119.381, 119.382, 178.358, 239.391, or another 15 credits at
300-level approved as relevant to the candidate’s course.
Business Information Systems
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
157.240
Social Media Networks for
Business
15
P any 15 credits
Note: Where ”Head of School” is mentioned, it means the Head of the
School(s) where the endorsement is based.
157.241
Information Systems, Organisations
15
and E‑Commerce
P 115.107 or 157.1xx or 158.1xx or
159.1xx; R 157.242
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two papers at 200-level
Accounting
157.325
Information Management Project
15
P 157.24x; C 157.341; R 157.342,
157.381
110.209
Intermediate Financial Accounting
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230; R
10.210, 10.213 (pre-1999), 110.313
157.340
Organisational Knowledge
Management
15
P 152.2xx or 157.2xx or 158.2xx
or 159.2xx
110.229
Management Accounting
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
R 110.200, 10.220, 110.223
157.341
Strategic Management for
Information Systems
15
P 157.2xx or 158.2xx or 159.2xx;
R 157.301, 157.373
110.230
Introductory Financial and
Management Accounting
15
P any 100-level paper; R 110.109,
10.110, 10.213 (1999), 110.215
110.249
Accounting Information Systems
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 115.107 or 157.100 or PHOS; R
110.243, 10.240
152.252, 157.240, 157.241, 157.340, 157.341, (157.325 or 152.304) and 30
credits at 300-level from Parts II and III of the BBS Schedule.
110.279
Auditing
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.273, 110.274
Business Law
110.289
Taxation
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.283, 110.274
110.289
Taxation
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.283, 110.274
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
15
P 300 credits inclusive of 110.209
or 110.313; 110.223 or 110.229;
and at least 15 credits at 300-level
with a 110 prefix from the BBS
Schedule.
110.389
Advanced Taxation
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.289 or 110.274;
R 110.783
110.303
Page 56
Integrative Accounting
Endorsement requirements of Business Information Systems
Business
134.220
Business and Professional Ethics
15
P any 100-level BA or BBS paper;
R 134.320, 134.219, 134.319
155.201
Law of Property
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or 155.101;
R 155.216, 155.700
155.203
155.210
155.222
155.301
Law of Business Organisations
Commercial Law
Immigration Law and Practice in
New Zealand
Employment Law
15
15
P 115.103 or 155.100; R 155.200,
155.700
P 115.103 or 155.100; R 155.200,
155.700
Dispute Resolution
153.200
Introduction to Dispute Resolution
15
P any 100-level paper
153.202
Law and Mediation
15
P any 100-level paper
153.204
Negotiation Principles
15
P any 100-level paper; R 153.307
153.210
Dispute Resolution Practicum
15
P PHOS
153.302
Mediation Process
15
P 153.200
153.306
Negotiation Practice
15
P any 200-level paper
Arbitration Practicum
15
P PHOS
15
P any 100-level paper; 115.103 or
155.100 (recommended)
153.310
153.311
Mediation Practicum
15
P PHOS
153.314
Dispute Resolution Advocacy
15
P any 200-level paper; R 153.201
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 and any
200-level paper or 114.254, or
153.200 and 153.202; R 152.351,
155.700
153.315
Adjudicative Processes
15
P 153.200
153.320
Employment Dispute Resolution
15
P any 200-level paper; R 153.708
155.313
Commercial Transactions Contrary
to Conscience
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 and any
200-level paper; R 155.700
155.315
Sport Law
15
P any 200-level paper, 115.103 or
155.100 recommended
155.700
Fundamentals of Law
30
Graduate status and Permission
HOS
Endorsement requirements of Business Law
At least 75 credits selected from 110.380, 110.389, 155.301, 155.313, 155.315
and 155.700. Up to 45 credits selected from 110.289, 134.220, 155.201,
155.203, 155.210 and 155.222.
Note: Regulation 10 is excluded. Candidates must meet all prerequisites.
Coaching (no new enrolments from 2011)
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.211
Sport Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.214
Sport Coaching: Management and
Leadership
15
P any 100-level paper
152.216
Sport Coaching: Exercise
Fundamentals
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.314
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
152.318
Sport Psychology and Leadership
for Managers and Coaches
15
P any three papers at 200-level
152.319
Management of Fitness and
Athletic Conditioning
15
P 152.216 or (214.166 and any
200-level paper)
152.376
Sport Management/Coaching
Practicum
30
P 152.215 and (152.212 or 152.217),
or 152.214 and 152.216; R 152.371
and 152.372
Endorsement Requirements of Coaching
152.200, 152.211, 152.214, 152.216, 152.313, 152.319 and either 152.376; or
152.318 plus one other 300-level business paper.
Endorsement Requirements of Dispute Resolution
153.200; 30 credits from 153 prefix papers at 200-level; 45 credits from 153
prefix papers at 300-level; and a further 30 credits at 300-level from 114, 152,
153 and 155 prefixes.
Economics
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
178.210
Economic Policy
15
P 178.100 or 178.110
178.221
Methods of Economic Analysis
15
P 115.106 or any 178.1xx paper
178.240
Managerial Economics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper
178.250
Contemporary Economic Issues
15
P any 100-level paper
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120,
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 78.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
178.308
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
P 15 credits of 178.2xx, R 178.300
178.328
Project Evaluation
15
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Econ paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper
178.360
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper and any
200-level paper
178.370
Development Economics
15
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx paper;
and any 15 credits at 200-level
178.380
Applied Econometrics
15
P 178.220 or 178.280; R 178.321,
178.320
Communication Management
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
Endorsement Requirements of Economics
At least 30 credits from 178.2xx papers, 60 credits from 178.3xx papers, and
up to 30 credits of other papers at 200-level or above from Parts II and III of
the Schedule for the BBS degree.
219.203
Business Communication
15
P any 100-level paper; R 219.100,
114.100
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
219.206
Managing Communications
Technology
15
P any 100-level paper
114.297
Human Resource Development
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOS
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
114.298
15
P any 100-level paper and PHOS
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
Employment Relations
Management
219.302
Gender and Communication in
Organisations
15
P any 200-level paper
114.368
Special Topic in Occupational
Safety and Health
15
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
114.397
The New Zealand Industrial
Relations Framework
15
P 114.298
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
114.398
Labour Negotiation Techniques
15
P 114.298
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
152.381
Action Learning Management
Practicum
15
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200 level paper
Endorsement Requirements of Communication Management
60 credits from 219.202, 219.203, 219.204, 219.205, 219.206, 219.209,
219.231.
60 credits from 219.302, 219.303, 219.304, 219.305, 219.307, 219.310.
Employment Relations Management (no new enrolments from 2012)
(only available through the Employers and Manufacturers Association)
Endorsement Requirements of Employment Relations Management
114.297, 114.298, 114.398, two of 114.368 or 114.397 or 152.381, and
another 45 credits of which at least 15 credits must be above 200-level.
Entrepreneurship and Small Business (Subject to CUAP approval)
114.241
114.2xx
Managing Human Resources
15
P any 100-level paper
15
P any 100-level paper
Page 57
Business
114.3xx
114.350
Current Issues in Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.240, or 114.241 or 114.254
P any 100-level paper
114.396
Strategic Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.241
114.3xx152.3xx
15
P any 100-level paper
152.230
Entrepreneurship
15
P any 100-level paper
152.232
Small Business Management
15
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.328
152.330
Enterprise Development
15
P any two papers at 200-level
152.333
New Venture Project
15
P any 200-level paper
152.334
Innovation, Creativity and
Entrepreneurship
15
P any 200-level paper
114.240, 114.241, 114.326, 114.330, 114.350, 114.396 and 15 credits from
114.242, 114.254, or 114.271, and 15 credits from 152.3xx or 114.3xx.
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
Insurance Management (no new enrolments from 2012)
153.306
Negotiation Practice
15
P any 200-level paper
114.240
Organisational Behaviour
15
P any 100-level paper
156.200
Marketing for Non-Marketers
15
P any 100-level paper; R 115.104
or 156.100.
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
152.386
Risk Management I
15
P any 200-level paper
152.387
Risk Management II
15
P any 200-level paper
Endorsement Requirements of Entrepreneurship and Small Business
152.230, 152.232, 152.329, 152.330, 152.333, 152.334, and 30 credits from
114.241 and 114.3xx; or 156.200 and 152.341; or 114.2xx and 153.306.
Endorsement Requirements of Insurance Management
Finance
125.211
The Financial Planning Process
15
P any 100-level paper; R 125.210,
125.237, 125.620
125.220
Financial Institutions and Markets
15
P 115.105 or 125.100
recommended; R 125.221, 125.231,
125.621
15
P 115.105 or 125.100 or 110.109
pre-2009 or 110.100 pre-1997;
115.101 or 161.110 recommended;
R 125.201
125.230
Business Finance
125.240
Fundamentals of Investment
15
P any 100 level paper for BBS; C
125.211 for GradDipBusStuds; R
125.241
125.241
Introduction to Investments
15
P 115.105 or 125.100; R 125.240
125.250
Spreadsheet Modelling and Data
Analysis
15
P 125.230, 161.XXX
125.310
Financial Advice Implementation
15
P 125.240, 125.351, C one of
110.380, 125.342, 125.356,
125.357; R 125.311
125.320
International Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241; R 125.342
125.330
125.340
125.342
Advanced Business Finance
Investment Analysis
Investment Planning
152.200, 152.341, 152.386, 152.387, 114.240 and another 45 credits with at
least 30 credits at 300-level, as approved by the Head of School.
International Business
125.320
International Finance
15
P 125.230; and one of 125.220 or
125.241 or 110.209 or 178.200 or
178.201
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.262
Contemporary Issues in
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.263
Applied International Trade
Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.269
Principles of E-Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
152.366
Operational Management of
International Business
15
P any two papers at 200-level
156.231
Marketing Management
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.701
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
178.370
Development Economics
15
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx paper;
and any 15 credits at 200-level
15
C 125.220 and P 125.230 or
P 125.240; R 125.340, 125.341
200.261
World Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
148.261
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
xxx.2xx
Language paper
15
xxx.3xx
Language paper
15
125.350
Financial Risk Management
15
P 125.230; and either 125.220 or
125.241
125.351
Personal Risk Management
15
P or C 125.211
125.356
Business Insurance
15
P or C 125.211
125.357
Advanced Issues in Insurance
15
P or C 125.211 or PHOS
125.360
Banking Studies
15
P 125.220 or P 125.230
125.363
Money, Banking and Financial
Markets
15
P 125.220 or 125.230 or 125.241
Endorsement Requirements of International Business
152.200, 152.261, either 152.262 or 152.263, 152.341, 152.366; one paper
from 152.269, 156.231, 200.261, a 200-level language paper; and 30 credits
from 125.320, 178.350, 178.370, 219.304, a 300-level language paper.
Management
Endorsement Requirements of Finance
At least 30 credits from 125.2xx papers, 60 credits from 125.3xx papers, and
up to 30 credits of other papers at 200-level or above from Parts II and III of
the Schedule for the BBS degree.
Note: Regulation 10 is excluded. Candidates must meet all prerequisites.
Human Resource Management
114.240
Organisational Behaviour
15
P any 100-level paper
114.241
Managing Human Resources
15
P any 100-level paper
114.242
Human Resource Development
15
P any 100-level paper
114.254
Managing Employment Relations
15
P any 100-level paper
114.271
Occupational Safety and Health I
15
P any 100-level paper
114.326
Human Resource Practices
15
P 114.241
114.330
Equity and Diversity in the
Workplace
15
P any 200-level paper
Page 58
Endorsement Requirements of Human Resource Management
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.203
Business and Society
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.101
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
153.204
Negotiating Principles
15
P any 100-level paper
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two papers at 200-level
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.328.
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
152.333
New Venture Project
15
P any 200-level paper
152.370
Te Whanaketanga o te Pakihi
Māori – Advanced Māori Business
Development and Management
15
P 152.270
152.3xx
15
Business
Endorsement Requirements of Management
Endorsement Requirements of Personal Financial Planning
152.200, 152.203, 152.329, 152.341 and 15 credits from (152.252, 152.261,
or 153.204) and 15 credits from (152.304, 152.333 or 152.370) and another
30 credits from 152.3xx papers.
125.211, 125.212, 125.220, 125.240, 110.380, 125.342, 125.351, 125.310.
Management and Leadership for Māori Providers
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.270
Maori Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.2xx
Personal Risk Management (no new enrolments from 2012)
125.211
The Financial Planning Process
15
P any 100-level paper; R 125.210,
125.237, 125.620
125.220
Financial Institutions and Markets
15
P 115.105 or 125.100
recommended; R 125.221, 125.231,
125.621
125.240
Fundamentals of Investment
15
P any 100 level paper for BBS; C
125.211 for GradDipBusStuds; R
125.241
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
15
114.330
Equity and Diversity in the
Workplace
15
P any 200-level paper
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.328.
125.310
Financial Advice Implementation
15
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.300,
152.303, 152.365
P 125.240,125.351; C one of
110.380, 125.342, 125.356,
125.357; R 125.311
125.351
Personal Risk Management
15
P or C 125.211
125.356
Business Insurance
15
P or C 125.211
P 152.270
125.357
Advanced Issues in Insurance
15
P or C 125.211 or PHOS
152.370
Te Whanaketanga o te Pakihi
Māori – Advanced Māori Business
Development and Management
15
Interpersonal Communication
15
Endorsement Requirements of Personal Risk Management
152.3xx
219.307
P any 200-level paper
Endorsement Requirements of Management and Leadership for
Māori Providers
125.211, 125.220, 125.240, 110.380, 125.310, 125.351, 125.356, 125.357.
Property Management
152.252, 152.270, (150.201 or 152.2xx), 152.329, 152.341, 152.370, and 30
credits from (114.330, 152.3xx and 219.307).
127.241
Real Estate Valuation and
Management
15
P any 100 level paper; R 127.243
127.341
Property Management and
Development
15
P 127.241 or P 127.243 or
P 127.244
Marketing
127.342
Real Estate Investments
15
P 127.241 and (127.242 or PHOS)
127.343
Applied Valuation II
15
P 127.242
132.221
Planning Studies
15
P any 100-level paper
138.383
Building Technology: Commercial
Buildings
15
P 138.281 or 138.282
155.201
Law of Property
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or 155.101;
R 155.216, 155.700
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper
156.231
156.232
Marketing Management
Consumer Behaviour
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.701
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes; R 156.702
Endorsement Requirements of Property Management
Public Relations (no new enrolments from 2012)
156.233
Marketing Research
15
P 115.104 or 156.100 for BBS;
156.200 or any 75 credits for
other Business and non-Business
programmes. 115.101 or 161.110
(recommended); R 156.703
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232; R 156.704
156.333
Market Analysis
15
P 156.233 and 161.xxx
156.334
Marketing Planning
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
127.241, 132.221, 155.201, 178.242, 127.341, 138.383 and 30 credits from
127.342, 127.343, 115.377.
156.200
Marketing for Non-Marketers
15
P any 100-level paper; R 115.104
or 156.100
Endorsement Requirements of Marketing
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
156.231, 156.232, 156.233, 156.331, 156.333, 156.334, and another 30 credits
of which at least 15 credits must be above 200-level.
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.206
Managing Communications
Technology
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.309
International Case Studies in Public
15
Relations
P any 200-level paper
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200 level paper
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
219.331
Note: Regulation 10 is excluded. Candidates must meet all prerequisites,
except for 156.200 which may be included in this endorsement without a
prerequisite.
Personal Financial Planning
125.211
The Financial Planning Process
15
P any 100-level paper; R 125.210,
125.237, 125.620
125.212
Personal Financial Management
15
P any 100-level
15
P 115.105 or 125.100
recommended; R 125.221, 125.231,
125.621
125.220
Financial Institutions and Markets
125.240
Fundamentals of Investment
15
P any 100 level paper for BBS; C
125.211 for GradDipBusStuds; R
125.241
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
125.310
Financial Advice Implementation
15
P 125.240, 125.351, C one of
110.380, 125.342, 125.356,
125.357; R 125.311
125.342
Investment Planning
15
C 125.220 and P 125.230 or
125.240; R 125.340, 125.341
125.351
Personal Risk Management
15
P or C 125.211
Endorsement Requirements of Public Relations
219.204, 219.209, 219.305, 15 credits from 219.202, 219.206, 219.231,
156.200, and 60 credits from 219.303, 219.304, 219.307, 219.309, 219.310,
219.335.
Page 59
Business
Real Estate (no new enrolments)
Tax Consultancy (no new enrolments from 2011)
Rural Valuation
119.281
Decision Tools and Primary
Industries
15
P 119.180 and one of 117.152,
189.151, 283.101, 284.101,
286.101; nil For Grad DipRurStud;
R 111.231, 111.251, 111.252
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper; R 127.255
138.255
Engineering Principles in Food and
Fibre Production
15
P any 100-level paper
119.381
Decision-making in Primary Industry 15
P 119.281; R 111.351
119.382
Opportunity Analysis in Primary
Industry
15
P 119.381; R 111.352 and 127.355
127.356
Rural Valuation
15
P 127.242 or 127.255
Endorsement Requirements of Rural Valuation
119.281, 127.242, 138.255, 119.381, 119.382, 127.356, and another 30
credits, at least 15 credits of which must be at 300-level, approved by the
Head of School.
Sport Management
110.230
Introductory Financial and
Management Accounting
15
P any 100-level paper; R 110.109,
10.110, 10.213 (1999), 110.215
110.289
Taxation
15
P 110.100 or 110.230 or 115.102; R
10.283, 110.274
110.380
Estate and Tax Planning
15
P 110.274 or 110.289, or P or C
125.211
110.389
Advanced Taxation
15
P 110.109 or 110.215 or 110.230;
and 110.289 or 110.274; R 110.783
110.3xx
15
125.2xx
15
Endorsement Requirements of Tax Consultancy
110.230, 110.289, 125.2xx, 110.380, 110.389, 110.3xx plus 30 credits of
other papers at 200-level or above, including at least 15 credits from above
200-level, from Parts II and III of the Schedule for the BBS degree.
Note: Regulation 10 is excluded, except for 110.230 which may be taken
without a prerequisite.
Urban Valuation
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.211
Sport Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.212
Outdoor Recreation Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.215
Sport Facility and Event
Management
15
152.217
Sport Management Planning
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
127.241
Real Estate Valuation and
Management
15
P any 100 level paper; R 127.243
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100 level paper; R 127.255
P any 100-level paper; R 152.310
127.341
Property Management and
Development
15
P 127.241 or P 127.243 or P
127.244
15
P any 100-level paper
127.342
Real Estate Investments
15
P 127.241 and (127.242 or PHOS)
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
127.343
Applied Valuation II
15
P 127.242
15
P any 100-level paper; R 138.254
and 138.282
152.318
Sport Psychology and Leadership
for Managers and Coaches
15
P any three papers at 200-level
138.281
Building Technology: Construction
and Design
152.376
Sport Management/Coaching
Practicum
30
P 152.215 and (152.212 or 152.217),
or 152.214 and 152.216; R 152.371
and 152.372
138.383
Building Technology: Commercial
Buildings
15
P 138.281 or 138.282
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Econ paper
Endorsement Requirements of Sport Management
Endorsement Requirements of Urban Valuation
152.200, 152.211, 152.212 or 152.217, 152.215, 152.313, 152.318 and
152.376.
127.241, 127.242, 138.281, 178.242, 127.341, 127.342, 127.343, 138.383.
The Graduate Diploma in Journalism
GDipJ
Part I
Course of Study
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
4.
Part II
Course Requirements
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Graduate Diploma shall be subject to the approval of
the Academic Board.
2.
Candidates for entry to the Graduate Diploma in Journalism shall have
completed a bachelor’s degree or have been granted admission with
equivalent status through life or work experience and have achieved a
satisfactory rating for their interview.
3.
Places may be limited.
219.110
Journalism Technology Practices
15
P GDipJ admission
219.220
Information Technology for
Journalists
15
P GDipJ admission
219.221
Newswriting Fundamentals
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.222,
219.321, 219.322, 219.323, 219.324
219.222
Newsgathering Fundamentals
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.221,
219.321, 219.322, 219.323, 219.324
219.321
Advanced Newswriting
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.221,
219.222, 219.322, 219.323, 219.324
219.322
Advanced Newsgathering
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.221,
219.222, 219.321, 219.323, 219.324
219.323
Media Law
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.221,
219.222, 219.321, 219.322, 219.324
219.324
Journalism Workplace Practice
15
P GDipJ admission and C 219.221,
219.222, 219.321, 219.322, 219.323
5.
Page 60
The course of study for every candidate will consist of 120 credits (8
papers).
Candidates are required to complete industry practicums.
Business
The Graduate Diploma in Journalism Studies
GDipJS
Course Regulations
(c) Have sufficient maturity and have met the requirements of
Regulation 1.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
2.
Before enrolment, candidates shall satisfy the Academic Board that they
have the background and relevant experience sufficient to be able to
follow the course with a reasonable chance for success.
Candidates shall:
(a) Have qualified for the award of a university degree or qualification
approved for the purpose of these Regulations by the Academic
Board or have been admitted to this University under the admission
with equivalent status Regulations; or
3.
Every course of study should include: up to 60 credits from 200-level
and at least 60 credits from 300-level from the following:
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
219.232
Feature Writing and Freelancing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100, 139.107 or 119.177
219.234
Editing and Publishing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100 139.107 or 119.177
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level, R
219.331
219.336
Investigative Reporting
15
P any 200-level paper, R 219.332
219.339
History of Journalism
15
P any 200-level paper
4.
(b) Be granted admission with equivalent status through life or work
experience; or
Candidates are deemed to have met the prerequisite requirements for the
200-level papers listed in regulation 3 when they have been admitted to
candidature.
The Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health
GradDipOSH
Course Regulations
(a) 60 credits of compulsory papers:
114.271, 114.272, 114.374, 128.300.
Part I
(b) 60 credits of elective papers of which at least 45 credits must be at
300-level
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
114.240, 114.242, 114.254, 114.370**, 114.372, 152.386;
or other papers above 100-level as approved by the Head of School.
For graduate membership of IOSH (UK) the following elective
papers must be included; 114.240, 114.370**, 114.372.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Before enrolment for this Diploma candidates shall:
(a) have been admitted or qualified for admission to a university
degree, or a diploma or qualification approved for the purpose of
these Regulations by the Academic Board, or have been admitted
with equivalent status; and
(b) have satisfied Academic Board that they have achieved professional
competence in safety management, personnel management,
industrial relations, training and development, or a closely related
field and that they are likely to benefit from the course.
2.
To qualify for the Diploma candidates shall have passed 120 credits from
sections (a) and (b):
** Block Course Fee applies
3.
Candidates shall take all papers, except if a candidate has already passed
a University examination in one of the prescribed papers or in a paper
with substantially the same prescription and of the same standard, the
candidate may be allowed by the Board to offer another approved paper
that has not already been passed.
4.
Candidates are deemed to have met the prerequisite requirements for the
200-level papers specified when they have been admitted to candidature
for this Diploma.
5.
In a case of sufficient merit, a candidate may be awarded the Diploma
with Distinction, provided that the course of study does not extend
beyond 36 months of part-time study.
The Graduate Diploma in Public Sector Management
GradDipPSM
(No new enrolments from 2012)
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates for the Diploma in Public Sector Management shall, before
entering upon a course of study for the diploma, satisfy the Academic
Board of their fitness and ability to undertake the course and shall have
fulfilled the following conditions:
(a) have qualified for the award of a university degree; or
(b) have been admitted with equivalent status to proceed to the
Diploma in Public Sector Management; and
Page 61
Business
(c) have achieved appropriate practical experience sufficient to satisfy
the requirements of the DipPSM Admission Committee.
2.
3.
Notwithstanding any other provision of these Regulations, the Academic
Board may require candidates to demonstrate their fitness for admission
to the course by undertaking such tests, carrying out such work, and
passing such examinations as the Board may determine.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed three years, unless a
period of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
To qualify for a Diploma, a candidate shall pass the following papers:
115.301
Public Sector Human Resource
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.302
Public Sector Policy Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.303
Public Sector Financial
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.304
Public Sector Planning
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.305
Public Sector Service Delivery
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
Special Topic in Public Sector
Management (Practicum) (A)
15
Public Sector Evaluation
Management
15
Special Topic in Public Sector
Management (Practicum) (B)
15
115.306
115.307
115.309
P GDPSM Admission
P GDPSM Admission
P GDPSM Admission
Local Government Endorsement
115.311
Human Resource Management in
Local Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.312
Policy Management in Local
Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.313
Financial Management in Local
Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.314
Planning Management in Local
Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.315
Service Delivery Management in
Local Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.316
Special Topic
15
P any 200-level paper
115.317
Evaluation Management in Local
Government
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.319
Special Topic
15
P any 200-level paper
Te Aratau Endorsement
115.301
Public Sector Human Resource
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.302
Public Sector Policy Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.303
Public Sector Financial
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.304
Public Sector Planning
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.305
Public Sector Service Delivery
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.306
Special Topic in Public Sector
Management (Practicum) (A)
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.307
Public Sector Evaluation
Management
15
P GDPSM Admission
115.308
Nga Ahuatanga (Contemporary
Māori Development)
15
P GDPSM Admission
4.
An alternative paper may be offered. This is 115.310 Public Sector
Reform and Change Management. On approval of the DipPSM Board
of Studies, candidates may pass this paper as a replacement to any one
paper above.
5.
In case of sufficient merit, a candidate may be awarded the Diploma with
Distinction, provided that the course of study does not extend beyond
three years.
Undergraduate Diplomas
The Diploma in Business Studies
DipBusStuds
Course Regulations
2.
At least 90 credits must be taken from the Schedule for the Bachelor of
Business Studies degree. Up to 30 credits may be taken from Schedules
for other undergraduate degrees.
3.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma with endorsement, a candidate
shall pass papers totalling at least 45 credits at 200-level or above from a
single major subject in the Bachelor of Business Studies.
4.
A candidate who has been awarded a Diploma may apply to cross-credit
up to 45 credits of Diploma papers towards an undergraduate degree
of the University, provided that any such papers shall comply with the
Regulations for that degree. A candidate who wishes to credit papers
totalling more than 45 credits in terms of this Regulation will be required
to surrender the Diploma in Business Studies before transfer of credit
will be granted.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma, a candidate shall pass papers to
a total of at least 120 credits, with at least 45 credits above 100-level.
Undergraduate Certificates
The Certificate in Business Studies
CertBusStuds
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Page 62
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate, a candidate shall pass papers
to a total of at least 60 credits.
Business
2.
At least 45 credits must be taken from the Schedule for the Bachelor of
Business Studies degree. Up to 15 credits may be taken from Schedules
for other undergraduate degrees.
3.
A candidate who has completed the requirements for the Certificate in
Business Studies may apply to transfer the Certificate papers towards
an undergraduate diploma or degree of the University, provided that any
such papers shall comply with the Regulations for the diploma or degree
in question.
4.
A candidate who has been awarded a Certificate in Business Studies
may apply to cross-credit up to 15 credits of Certificate papers towards
an undergraduate degree of the University, provided that any such
papers shall comply with the Regulations for that degree. A candidate
who wishes to credit papers totalling more than 15 credits in terms of
this Regulation will be required to surrender the Certificate in Business
Studies before transfer of credit will be granted.
The Certificate in Sport Coaching
CertSpCoach
(No new enrolments from 2011)
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
152.211
Sport Business
15
P any 100-level paper
152.214
Sport Coaching: Management and
Leadership
15
P any 100-level paper
152.216
Sport Coaching: Exercise
Fundamentals
15
P any 100-level paper; R 152.314
152.373
National Sport Organisation
Coaching Practicum
30
P any 200-level paper and PHOS
Course Regulations
Or
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Enrolment for the Certificate in Sport Coaching shall be restricted to
coaches nominated by their National Sport Organisation (NSO).
2.
To graduate from the programme the candidate must successfully pass
the following 75 credits:
3.
A candidate who has been awarded the Certificate may apply to credit
Certificate papers towards an undergraduate degree of the University,
provided that any such papers shall comply with the regulations for that
degree. A candidate who wishes to credit more than 30 credits in terms
of this regulation will be required to surrender the Certificate before the
credit will be granted.
Bachelor Honours Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce with Honours
BAgriCommerce(Hons)
Part I
Course of Study
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
2.
The Bachelor of AgriCommerce with Honours shall consist of 120
credits, including:
(a) 112.748 AgriBusiness Management;
Part II
(b) 30 credits of approved research methods and data analysis papers;
Admission
(c) 30 credits of reported research (xxx.788/798);
1.
(d) Completion of 30 credits at 700-level in one of the following
subjects – Agricultural Economics, Farm Management, Food
Economies and Society, Food Marketing and Retailing,
International Agribusiness, Rural Valuation.
Admission into the Bachelor of AgriCommerce with Honours is on
the invitation of the College of Science and College of Business and is
based on achievement of a B+ average over the 300-level papers in the
Bachelor of AgriCommerce in the subject area in which the candidate
intends to specialise.
Special Topic papers (xxx.785 and/or xxx.786) may be included to a
maximum of 30 credits.
The Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics with Honours
BApplEcon(Hons)
Course Regulations
(i) 178.700, 178.705, 178.721 and 178.722; and
(ii) 30 credits of reported research (178.799).
Part I
(b) Electives not listed in the Schedule may be approved by the
Academic Board on recommendation by the Head of the School of
Economics and Finance.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
(a) The course shall consist of 120 credits from the Schedule and must
include:
Reported Research
2.
A candidate shall, before beginning work, discuss the project with the
Head of the School of Economics and Finance, who shall recommend
the appointment of a supervisor.
Page 63
Business
3.
The degree may also be awarded with Third Class Honours where
appropriate, subject to the same time constraint in Part I of the
Regulations.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Applied Economics with
Honours
178.722
Applied Econometrics
15
178.730
Economics for Non-Economists
15
178.750
Topics in International Economics
15
178.756
Economics of Agricultural and
Trade Policies
15
178.760
Environmental and Natural
Resource Economics
15
178.762
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics for NonEconomists
30
112.748
Agribusiness Management
30
178.700
Macroeconomics I
15
178.705
Microeconomics I
15
178.715
Applied Economics and Policy
30
178.770
Economic Growth and Development 15
178.718
Health Economics
30
178.799
Research Project
178.721
Research Methods in Applied
Economics
15
30
The Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management with Honours
BAvMan(Hons)
Course Regulations
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Aviation Management with
Honours
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Compulsory:
190.704
Research Methods in Aviation
30
190.795
Research Project
30
190.701
Human Factors for Professional
Aviation
30
190.703
Management in Aviation Systems
30
190.720
Aviation Strategic Management
30
190.721
Design and Management of
Airports
30
190.790
Special Topic
30
190.791
Special Topic
30
Electives:
The course shall consist of at least 120 approved credits, including
190.704 Research Methods in Aviation and 190.795 Research Report
plus papers as specified in the Schedule to these Regulations.
The Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies with Honours
BBS(Hons)
Course Regulations
examination in that subject, provided, however, that candidates
whose performance at a written examination have been seriously
impaired by illness (certified under the Examination Regulations)
may elect to present themselves at a subsequent examination and
still be eligible for the award of Honours.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(b) Subject to these Regulations, a person who has been awarded
the degree in one subject area may be a candidate for the degree
in another subject area and if eligible may be awarded honours
therein.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
2.
The course shall consist of at least 120 approved credits in masteratelevel papers, of which at least 90 credits shall be from one subject area
of those listed below, including a 30-credit research report: Accountancy,
Agribusiness, Business Information Systems, Communication
Management, Economics, Finance, Human Resource Management,
Management, Marketing, and Valuation and Property Management.
(a) Candidates shall be eligible for the award of Honours in any subject
only at the first occasion on which they present themselves for
Page 64
3.
The degree may also be awarded with Third Class Honours where
appropriate, subject to the same time constraint in Part I of the
Regulations.
Note: Part I Regulation 1 shall be interpreted to require a BBS degree of
Massey University or the equivalent degree from another New Zealand
university, together with passes at 300-level in the subject areas offered for
study.
Business
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication with Honours
BC(Hons)
(Subject to CUAP approval)
(a) At least 30 credits of taught papers from one of the subject areas in
the Schedule to Master of Communication.
Course Regulations
(b) The relevant Research Report for that subject area.
Part I
(c) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(d) At least 30 credits of taught papers from a secondary subject area in
the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the programme is on the basis of a completed Bachelor of
Communication degree with at least a B grade average in the 300-level
majoring papers of the intended primary subject area and at least 15
credits at 300 level achieved with a minimum B grade in the intended
secondary subject.
Course Requirements
2.
3.
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
Media Studies as their secondary area of study. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary area of study.
4.
The Bachelor of Communication (Honours) will be awarded with a
Subject in the primary subject area.
To qualify for the Bachelor of Communication with Honours every
candidate shall normally pass a selection of 700-level papers to a total of
120 credits comprising:
Masters Degrees
The Degree of Master of AgriCommerce
MAgriCommerce
Course Regulations
(b) 30 credits of approved research methods and data analysis papers ;
Part I
(c) At least 60 credits at 700-level in one of the following subjects –
Agricultural Economics, Farm Management, Food Economies and
Society, Food Marketing and Retailing, International Agribusiness,
International Rural Development;
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(d) Either a 120 credit thesis or a 90 credit thesis and an additional 30
approved elective credits at 700-level.
Part II
Admission
1.
Admission to the Master of Agricommerce is conditional upon
maintenance of a B average over the 300-level papers in the Bachelor of
AgriCommerce in the field related to the subject in which the candidate
wishes to specialise.
Special Topic papers (xxx.785 and/or xxx.786) may be included to a
maximum of 30 credits.
3.
Course of Study
2.
The Master of AgriCommerce shall consist of a minimum of 240
approved credits at the 700/800 level, including:
The course of study for a candidate who has qualified for the award of
the Degree of Bachelor of AgriCommerce with Honours or Postgraduate
Diploma in AgriCommerce, or the equivalent degree of another
recognised university, will be the Master of AgriCommerce by thesis
only, and shall consist of:
(a) either a 90 credit thesis and 30 credits of approved research
methods papers; or
(a) 112.748 AgriBusiness Management;
(b) a 120 credit thesis.
The Degree of Master of Applied Economics
MApplEcon
(No new enrolments)
(b) a 120-credit thesis (178.899).
Course Regulations
Remaining credits will be chosen from the papers listed in the Schedule
to the BApplEcon(Hons) Regulations or approved electives.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
The course shall consist of 240 postgraduate credits and must include:
(a) 178.700, 178.705, 178.708, 178.721, and 178.722 or 178.723; and
2.
A candidate who has qualified for the award of the Degree of Bachelor
of Applied Economics with Honours or the equivalent degree of another
recognised university shall follow a course of study for not less than 10
months consisting of a 90-credit thesis and 30 credits of approved papers
or a 120-credit thesis, which together with the qualifying course of study
shall form a coherent programme of 240 credits.
Reported Research
3.
The following conditions shall apply to the preparation and submission
of the thesis:
Page 65
Business
(a) Candidates shall, before they begin work on the thesis, discuss
a thesis proposal with a full-time academic staff member of the
School of Economics and Finance, who shall recommend to the
Academic Board the appointment of a supervisor and an adviser
(thesis committee).
(c) The oral defence shall be considered as part of the overall
examination of the thesis.
(d) The Head of the School of Economics and Finance shall supply
to the candidate a set of guidelines for the thesis approved by
the Academic Board. The guidelines shall refer to the time when
research work should commence, the period of time during which
the research should proceed, the form of the report that is required
and the final date for the presentation.
(b) When the thesis is forwarded to an assessor, the Head of the
School of Economics and Finance shall supply a certificate from
the supervisor stating that the thesis embodies work carried out by
the candidate under direct supervision and stating also the part the
supervisor played in the preparation of the thesis.
The Degree of Master of Aviation
MAv
Course Regulations
3.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
2.
A course of study may include up to 30 credits from other Departments,
Schools and Colleges subject to approval by the General Manager of the
School of Aviation.
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Aviation
Compulsory
190.704
The course shall consist of 240 approved aviation credits at the 700/800
level and must include:
Research Methods in Aviation
30
Electives
(a) at least 30 credits of reported research; and
190.701
Human Factors for Professional
Aviation
30
(b) paper 190.704.
190.703
Management in Aviation Systems
30
A candidate who has qualified for the award of the degree of Bachelor
of Aviation Management with honours or the Postgraduate Diploma
in Aviation shall follow a course of study consisting of 120 credits,
which together with the qualifying course of study shall form a coherent
programme of 240 credits.
190.720
Aviation Strategic Management
30
190.721
Design and Management of
Airports
30
190.790
Special Topic
30
190.791
Special Topic
30
190.795
Research Project
30
190.898
Thesis
90
190.899
Thesis
120
The Degree of Master of Business Administration
MBA
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates shall complete the requirements for the award of the degree
within the following periods of first enrolling for the degree. These
periods may, in exceptional circumstances, be extended by the College
of Business Board:
(a) Full time candidates – 15 months;
(b) Part-time (Executive) candidates - two calendar years plus one
month (25 months); or
(c) Modular candidates – three calendar years plus six months (42
months).
Failure to complete the degree within the time allowed may result in the
candidate being excluded from the programme.
2.
3.
To qualify for the degree, candidates shall meet coursework
requirements and pass examinations in Parts A and B.
In cases of sufficient merit the degree may be awarded with Distinction
provided that the requirements for the award of the degree are completed
within the periods specified in Regulation 1, which periods may in
exceptional circumstances be extended by the Academic Board.
Page 66
4.
The course of study shall comprise two parts, A and B:
(a) Part A shall consist of the papers (totalling 120 Credits), shown in
the Schedule to this Regulation.
(b) Candidates will be permitted to enrol in Part B only after having
passed all of the papers for Part A, and having attended the
appropriate skills development programme.
(c) Part B shall consist of papers and the MBA Applied Research
Project (totalling 120 Credits), shown in the Schedule to this
Regulation.
(d) Should there be sufficient demand, 30 credits of postgraduate
papers relevant to a particular industrial or professional group may
be substituted for the 30 credits of elective papers in Part B from
time to time at the discretion of the College of Business Board.
Schedule of Papers for Regulation 4
Part A
115.721
Business Law and Ethics
15
115.723
Accounting I
15
115.724
Business Finance
15
115.725
Leadership and People
15
115.726
Marketing
15
115.728
Contemporary Strategy
15
115.732
Operations and Logistics
15
115.745
Economics – Applied and
International
15
Business
Part B
115.727
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
15
115.731
Change Management
15
115.734
Strategic Management – Planning
and Application
15
115.735
Applied Business Research
15
Plus 30 credits from the following elective papers:
115.729
Accounting and Management
115.736
Business Development
15
115.738
Corporate Governance Best
Practice
15
115.739
Special Topic I
15
115.740
Special Topic II
15
115.750
Investments and Risk
15
MBA Applied Research Project
30
And
115.737
15
The Degree of Master of Business Studies
MBS
Course Regulations
2.
The course of study for a candidate who has qualified for the award
of the Degree of Bachelor of Business Studies with Honours or the
equivalent degree of another recognised university shall consist of a 120
credit thesis.
3.
The major areas of study for examination for the degree include the
following: Accountancy, Agribusiness, Banking*, Business Information
Systems, Business Law*, Communication Management, Economics,
Finance, Financial Economics*, Health Service Management*, Human
Resource Management, Management, Marketing, Occupational Safety
and Health*, Professional Accountancy*, Sport Business Management,
and Valuation and Property Management.
*
No new enrolments in these endorsements.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
The course of study shall consist of at least 240 approved credits at the
700- and/or 800-level, including an approved research methods paper,
and a 120 credit thesis.
The Degree of Master of Communication
MC
(Subject to CUAP approval)
(c) At least 30 credits of taught papers from a secondary subject area in
the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
Course Regulations
Part I
(d) A 120-credit thesis from the primary subject area.
4.
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
Media Studies as their secondary area of study. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary area of study.
5.
The Degree of Master of Communication will be awarded with a subject
in the primary area of study.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
2.
Admission to the Master of Communication (240 credits) is on the basis
of a completed Bachelor of Communication degree, or close equivalent,
with at least a B grade average in the 300-level majoring papers of
the intended primary subject area and at least 15 credits at 300 level
achieved with a minimum B grade in the intended secondary subject.
6.
Progression from the first 120 credits of the Master of Communication
to the remaining credits for the qualification will be approved for
students who have (i) passed the first 120 credits of study towards the
degree within four calendar years of first commencing study towards the
qualification, adjusted for any period of suspension or extension that has
been approved; and (ii) demonstrated appropriate academic achievement,
defined by GPA level, in the first 120 credits of study.
7.
Students who have been enrolled in the Master of Master of
Communication who do not meet the progression criteria specified in
(a), or who wish to exit after successful completion of 120 credits of
study, will be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Communication
provided that the 120 credits of study (i) meet the requirements for that
qualification and (ii) have been completed within four years of first
commencing study towards the Master of Communication, adjusted for
any period of suspension or extension that has been approved.
Admission to the Master of Communication by thesis (120 credits) is
open to students who have completed one of the following minimum
prerequisites with a grade point average across all 700-level papers of at
least a B:
(a) A Bachelor of Communication degree with Honours, or close
equivalent, with a primary subject area in the intended subject of
Masterate study; or
(b) A Postgraduate Diploma in Communication, or close equivalent,
with an Endorsement in the intended subject of Masterate study.
Course Requirements
3.
Progression and Exit
The Master of Communication shall consist of a minimum of 240
approved credits at 700/800 level including:
(a) At least 60 credits of papers at 700 level in a primary subject area
in the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Communication
(b) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
Communication Management
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
Page 67
Business
219.704
Advanced Cross-Cultural
Communication
30
172.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Linguistics)
120
219.705
Advanced News Media Processes
30
172.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
219.706
Advanced Public Relations
30
172.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
219.707
Critical Perspectives on Strategic
Communication
30
219.708
Political Communication
30
219.799
Research Report
30
219.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Communication Management)
120
219.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
156.755
30
R 156.717
219.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
Advanced Electronic and Mobile
Marketing
156.758
Advanced Social Marketing
30
R 156.718
156.775
Theories and Models of Marketing
30
R 156.711, R 156.712
156.799
Research Report
30
156.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Marketing Communication)
120
156.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
156.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
Marketing Communication
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
Expressive Arts
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
139.760
Writing Lyric Poetry: Blurring the
Boundaries
30
P 139.229 or PHOS
139.761
Writing Contemporary Fiction
30
P 139.329 or PHOS
139.763
Community Theatre
30
139.799
Research Report
30
139.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Expressive Arts)
120
139.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
154.701
30
139.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
Modern and Postmodern Visual
Cultures
154.702
Advanced Film Studies
30
154.707
The World of Noir
30
154.708
Modern Fiction, Popular Culture
and the Media
30
154.709
Sources of Media Ecology
30
154.719
Media, Entertainment and Ethics
30
154.798
Research Report
30
120
Media Studies
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
Linguistics
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
172.712
Multimodal Discourse Analysis
30
172.713
Language and Communication in
Late Modernity
30
154.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Media Studies)
172.799
Research Report
30
154.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
154.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
The Degree of Master of Finance
MFin
Course Regulations
across the first 120 credits for progression to the remainder of the
programme to be approved.
Part I
(c) A candidate who does not meet the criterion in 1 (b) above will
have credits for completed papers transferred to the Postgraduate
Diploma in Business and Administration or the Postgraduate
Certificate in Business.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
2.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
(a) The course of study shall consist of at least 240 approved credits at
the 700- and/or 800-level, including an approved research methods
paper and not less than 30 credits of reported research.
(b) A candidate must achieve a minimum performance standard of
a B- average, or higher where specified by the relevant School,
The course of study for a candidate who has been awarded the Degree of
Bachelor of Business Studies with Honours, or the equivalent degree of
another recognised university, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Business
and Administration, shall consist of at least 120 approved credits at the
700- and/or 800-level, including an approved research methods paper
and not less than 30 credits of reported research.
The Degree of Master of Management
MMgt
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Page 68
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
(a) The course of study shall consist of at least 240 approved credits at
the 700- and/or 800-level, including an approved research methods
paper and not less than 30 credits is reported research.
(b) A candidate must achieve a minimum performance standard of
a B- average, or higher where specified by the relevant School,
Business
across the first 120 credits for progression to the remainder of the
programme to be approved.
(c) A candidate who does not meet the criterion in 1 (b) above will
have credits for completed papers transferred to an appropriate
Postgraduate Diploma in Business or the Postgraduate Certificate in
Business.
2.
700- and/or 800-level, including an approved research methods paper
and not less than 30 credits of reported research.
3.
The course of study for a candidate who has been awarded the Degree of
Bachelor of Business Studies with Honours, or the equivalent degree of
another recognised university, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Business
and Administration, shall consist of at least 120 approved credits at the
The degree may be awarded with an endorsement or without an
endorsement. Approved endorsements are: Accountancy, Agribusiness,
Banking, Business Information Systems, Communication Management,
Economics, Finance, Financial Economics, Health Service Management,
Human Resource Management, International Business, Management,
Marketing, Occupational Safety and Health, and Sport Business
Management.
Postgraduate Diplomas
The Postgraduate Diploma in Accountancy
PGDipAcc
Course Regulations
110.711
Advanced Accounting Theory
30
Part I
110.714
Social and Environmental
Accounting
30
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
110.717
Research Methods in Accounting
30
110.718
International Accounting
30
110.720
30
Part II
Course Requirements
Contemporary Issues in
Management Accounting
110.770
Contemporary Issues in Auditing
30
110.780
Contemporary Issues in Taxation
30
110.784
Contemporary Issues in Taxation
Policy
30
110.785
International Taxation
30
110.792
Special Topic
30
110.799
Research Report
30
1.
To qualify for the award of the diploma, a candidate shall have passed at
least 120 approved masterate credits of which 90 credits shall be from
those listed in the Schedule below.
110.710
Contemporary Issues in Financial
Accounting
30
The Postgraduate Diploma in AgriCommerce
PGDipAgriCommerce
Course Regulations
Course of Study
Part I
2.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
The Postgraduate Diploma in AgriCommerce shall consist of a minimum
of 120 credits, including:
(a) 112.748 AgriBusiness Management;
Admission
(b) Completion of 60 credits at 700-level in one of the following
subjects – Agricultural Economics, Farm Management, Food
Economies and Society, Food Marketing and Retailing,
International Agribusiness, International Rural Development;
1.
(c) 30 approved elective credits at 700-level.
Part II
Admission to the programme is on the basis of a completed Bachelor
of AgriCommerce or equivalent undergraduate degree, or a completed
major/ graduate diploma in a field related to the chosen specialisation.
Special Topic papers (xxx.785 and/or xxx.786) may be included to a
maximum of 30 credits.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation
PGDipAv
Course Regulations
Schedule to the Postgraduate Diploma in Aviation
Part I
The required credits are to be selected from the following papers:
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Every candidate shall pass a selection of papers at the 700-level from the
following Schedule to a total of at least 120 credits.
190.701
Human Factors for Professional
Aviation
30
190.703
Management in Aviation Systems
30
190.704
Research Methods in Aviation
30
190.720
Aviation Strategic Management
30
190.721
Design and Management of
Airports
30
190.790
Special Topic
30
190.791
Special Topic
30
Page 69
Business
Note
Not all papers at the 700-level are available for the Postgraduate
Diploma in any one year. Students should consult the Head of School
before enrolling.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Banking
PGDipBank
Course Regulations
(b) at least 60 credits from 137.703, 137.704, 137.711; and
Part I
(c) up to 30 credits of electives approved by the Director, Centre for
Banking Studies.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
2.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates shall take all specified papers with the exception that, if
candidates have already completed an approved course in one of the
prescribed papers or in a paper with substantially similar prescription
and of the same standard, they may be allowed by the Board to offer
another approved paper in which they have not already passed.
To be eligible for the award of the diploma candidates shall have passed:
Note
(a) 137.710;
A qualification likely to be approved by the Academic Board for admission
purposes is CA.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Business and Administration
PGDipBusAdmin
Course Regulations
Part II
Course Requirements
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma, the candidate shall have passed
at least 120 approved credits. The Diploma may be awarded with an
endorsement in Agribusiness, Business Information Systems, Business Law,
Communication Management, Corporate and Institutional Governance,
Economics, Finance, Financial Economics, Human Resource Management,
Management, Marketing, or Occupational Safety and Health, provided that
the course of study consists of at least 120 credits approved by the Head of
School, including at least 90 credits from the area of endorsement.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication
PGDipC
(Subject to CUAP approval)
Course Regulations
Course Requirements
2.
Part I
(a) At least 60 credits at 700 level from one of the subject areas in the
Schedule to the Master of Communication.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(b) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the programme is open to students who have completed
one of the following minimum prerequisites, with at least a B- grade
average over the 300-level papers in the intended Endorsement and the
secondary area of study:
(a) A Bachelor of Communication degree or close equivalent, with
a minor or equivalent in the intended Endorsement or a closely
related field and at least 15 credits at 300-level in the secondary
area of study; or
(b) A completed Graduate Diploma in the intended Endorsement or
a closely related field, and at least 15 credits at 300-level in the
secondary area of study.
Page 70
To qualify for the award of the Diploma every candidate shall normally
pass 120 credits of papers, comprising:
(c) At least 30 credits of taught papers at 700 level from a secondary
subject area in the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
3.
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
Media Studies as their secondary subject area. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary subject area.
4.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication will be awarded with an
Endorsement in the primary area of study.
Business
The Postgraduate Diploma in Health Service Management
PGDipHSM
Course Regulations
152.707
30
Part I
Leading and Changing
Organisations
152.731
Innovation and New Ventures
30
152.740
Public Sector Management
30
152.742
Health Systems Management
30
R 250.742
152.743
Health Policy
30
R 250.743
Part II
Course Requirements
152.746
Contemporary Issues in Health
Service Management
30
R 250.746
152.752
Project Management
30
1.
152.753
Strategic Governance
30
152.781
Advanced Research Methods in
Business
30
110.700
Accountancy for Business
Administrators
30
125.700
Managerial Finance
30
155.706
Advanced Healthcare Law
30
157.701
Health Information Management
30
178.718
Health Economics
30
250.741
Managing Professional Practice
30
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Candidates shall pass papers to a total value of 120 credits as set out in
the following Schedule.
60 credits from:
152.742
Health Systems Management
30
R 250.742
152.743
Health Policy
30
R 250.743
152.746
Contemporary Issues in Health
Service Management
30
R 250.746
and 60 credits from:
152.700
Organisation and Management
30
152.702
Advanced Strategic Management
30
R 168.708
or other approved 700-level papers
to the value of 30 credits
The Postgraduate Diploma in Sport Management
PGDipSportMgt
Course Regulations
or
Part I
152.781
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
Advanced Research Methods in
Business
30
(or equivalent)
and approved papers to a total of 30 further credits at the 700-level.
Coaching Endorsement
To qualify for the Postgraduate Diploma in Sport Management a candidate
shall pass:
Management Endorsement
152.713
Advanced Sport Coaching
30
152.715
Advanced Sport Practicum
30
152.719
Advanced Management of Fitness/
Athletic Conditioning
30
Advanced Research Methods in
Business
30
or
152.710
Advanced Sport in the Social
Context
30
152.711
Advanced Sport Management
30
152.715
Advanced Sport Practicum
30
152.781
(or equivalent)
and approved papers to a total of 30 further credits at the 700-level.
Postgraduate Certificate
The Postgraduate Certificate in Business
PGCertBus
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
2.
A candidate who has satisfied the requirements of the Postgraduate
Certificate in Business and who then proceeds to a postgraduate diploma
in the College of Business will not be awarded the certificate but will
have the credits credited to the postgraduate diploma. If the certificate
has been awarded then the candidate must surrender the certificate if he/
she wishes to credit the certificate credits to a postgraduate diploma.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
The course shall consist of a minimum of 60 approved postgraduate
credits.
Page 71
Page 72
Course Regulations
College of Creative Arts
Undergraduate Degrees....................................................................74
Graduate Diplomas...........................................................................84
The Degree of Bachelor of Design with Honours..............................74
The Graduate Diploma in Design.......................................................84
The Degree of Bachelor of Design.....................................................78
The Graduate Diploma in Fine Arts....................................................85
The Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours...........................80
Masters Degrees................................................................................85
The Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts..................................................81
The Degree of Master of Design.........................................................85
Diplomas
The Degree of Master of Fine Arts.....................................................85
Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology
Postgraduate Diplomas.....................................................................86
The Diploma in Photography..............................................................83
The Postgraduate Diploma in Design.................................................86
Certificate...........................................................................................83
The Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Arts..............................................86
The Certificate in Art and Design Studies...........................................83
Page 73
Creative Arts
Undergraduate Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of Design with Honours
BDes(Hons)
Part I
Withdrawal
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
10. Should a student withdraw from the Bachelor of Design with Honours
programme, the relevant Head of Institute may determine what credit
already earned for papers listed in Schedule B may be transferred to the
Bachelor of Design programme.
Part II
Admission
Transition
1.
Admission to the Bachelor of Design with Honours will conform to the
normal requirements and procedures of the University and be based
partly on the assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the student.
2.
An applicant who holds the degree of Bachelor of Design shall not be
admitted to the Bachelor of Design with Honours programme.
Course of Study
3.
The Bachelor of Design with Honours consists of 480 credits arranged
in four parts, each comprising 120 credits of study. To be eligible to
graduate a student shall satisfy the requirements listed in Parts I, II, III
and IV shown in Schedule A to these regulations.
11. Transition arrangements will apply for students enrolled for the Bachelor
of Design prior to 2009. No student enrolled before 2009 will be
required to complete more than 480 credits to graduate as a consequence
of the introduction of these regulations.
Waivers
12. Notwithstanding Regulation 2 Part II, holders of a Massey University
or Wellington Polytechnic Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology
may, on surrender of the diploma, be permitted transfer and include
up to 195 credits at 100-level in the Bachelor of Design with Honours,
Fashion Design major.
(b) At least 180 credits must be at 300-level or above, including at least
120 credits at 400-level or above.
13. Notwithstanding Regulation 2 Part II, holders of a Massey University
Diploma in Photography, on surrender of the diploma, may be permitted
to transfer up to 120 credits at 100-level and up to 120 credits at 200
level to the Bachelor of Design with Honours, Photographic Design
major.
(c) Candidates for the Bachelor of Design with Honours shall complete
compulsory papers listed in the attached schedules for one of the
following majors:
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Design
with Honours
Fashion Design, Spatial Design, Industrial Design, Textile Design,
Integrated Design, Transport Design, Photographic Design or Visual
Communication Design.
Schedule A
(a) No more than 180 credits may be at 100-level,
Part I (at least 120 credits are required)
Progression
Compulsory:
4.
Admission to Part II will normally occur when the student has passed all
the papers in Part I relevant to the major to be taken.
197.131, 197.132, 237.101, 237.102.
5.
To maintain their enrolment in the Bachelor of Design with Honours
programme the student is normally required to achieve at least a B
average grade in the Part III credits that are relevant to the proposed
Honours study. Students who do not maintain this average or those
who elect not to pursue Honours will have their credit transferred to the
Bachelor of Design.
6.
The Academic Board may grant exemptions to the requirements in
regulations 4 and 5 based on the subjects studied and prior performance
of the student.
Time Limits and Honours
7.
8.
9.
To be eligible for the award of Honours, the degree must be completed
by full-time students in a time not more than one year in excess of
the minimum time for completing the degree (5 years), or by parttime students in a time not more than double the minimum time for
completing the degree (8 years), provided that:
Note: some majors have additional core papers as specified under each major.
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level papers listed in Schedule B or other
approved papers to comprise a total of at least 120 credits.
Major: Fashion Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed plus 197.135.
Part II:
212.201, 212.202, 212.203, 212.204, 212.205, 212.206, 212.220.
Part III: 212.303, 212.305, 212.306, 212.310, 212.381, 212.317.
Part IV: 212.425, 212.453, 212.454.
Major: Industrial Design
Compulsory:
(a) these periods may, in special circumstances be amended by the
Academic Board; and
Part I:
As listed above
Part II:
198.251, 198.252, 198,261, 198.271, 198.272, 198.281, 198.291.
(b) the Academic Board, may also, in special circumstances, permit
students to suspend their course of studies for an approved period.
Part III: 198.354, 198.355, 198.361, 198.362, 198.363, 198.371, 198.380.
The degree of Bachelor of Design with Honours may be awarded
with First Class Honours or with Second Class Honours Division I or
Second Class Honours Division II, or with Third Class Honours. The
class of Honours awarded shall be determined by the examiners on the
performance of the student in Part IV of the programme.
Students who have passed all credits for a Bachelor of Design with
Honours but who do not meet the time limit for completion specified in
regulation 7 will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Design.
Page 74
Part IV: 198.453, 198.454, 198.481.
Major: Integrated Design (no new enrolments from 2011)
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above
Part II:
198.214, 198.251, 222.202, 222.203, 222.215, 222.230, and
198.281 or 222.281.
Part III: 197.371, 197.374, 197.375, 197.376 197.380, 197.381.
Part IV: 197.453, 197.454, 197.456 197.481.
Creative Arts
Major: Photographic Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above plus 221.101.
Part II:
213.252, 221.270, 221.271, 221.272, 221.281.
Part III: 221.370, 221.373, 221.374, 221.381, 221.382.
Part IV: 221.453, 221.454, 221.470.
Major: Spatial Design
213.155
Drawing the Body I
15
R 197.101
213.254
Drawing II
15
P 213.154 or 197.101 or 197.121R
197.201
213.255
Drawing the Body II
15
P 213.155 or 197.101
R 197.200
213.355
Drawing the Body III
15
P 213.255 or 197.200
R 197.301
237.101
Critical Studies A
15
R 197.111
Compulsory:
237.102
Critical Studies B
15
R 197.109
Part I:
As listed above.
237.114
15
R 197.114
Part II:
224.251, 224.252, 224.261, 224.271, 224.272, 224.281, 224.291.
Writing and Communication in
Creative Arts
237.117
Maori Art and Design Studio I – Toi
Atea
15
R 197.117
237.207
Perception: Images, Objects and
Spaces
15
R 197.207
237.211
Maori Visual and Material Culture
– Toi Atea
15
P 197.109 or 237.102
R 197.110
237.217
Maori Art and Design Studio IIA –
Toi Atea
15
P 197.117 or 237.117
R 197.217
237.218
Maori Art and Design Studio IIB –
Toi Atea
15
P 197.117 or 237.117
R 197.218
237.317
Maori Art and Design Studio IIIA –
Toi Atea
15
P 197.217 or 197.218 or 237.217 or
237.218
R 197.317
237.318
Maori Art and Design Studio IIIB –
Toi Atea
15
P 197.217 or 197.218 or 237.217 or
237.218
R 197.318
237.319
Meanings of Things – Visual and
Material Culture
15
P 30 credits at 200-level
237.401
Studies in Material Culture A
15
P 237.319 or PHOD
237.402
Studies in Visual Culture A
15
P 237.207 and any 30 credits at
300-level
Compulsory:
237.403
Studies in Material Culture B
15
P 237.401
Part I:
As listed above plus 222.100 and 222.102.
237.404
Studies in Visual Culture B
15
P 237.402
Part II:
222.281 and one of the following groups
237.417
Maori Art and Design Studio IV – Toi
Atea
30
P (197.317 and 197.318) or (237.317
and 237.318)
Part III: 224.351, 224.352, 224.361, 224.371, 224.381, 224.382.
Part IV: 224.401, 224.453, 224.454.
Major: Textile Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above.
Part II:
223.201, 223.202, 223.203, 223.204, 223.205, 223.206, 223.220.
Part III: 223.301, 223.302, 223.303, 223.313, 223.320.
Part IV: 223.425, 223.450, 223.451, 223.454.
Major: Transport Design (no new enrolments from 2011)
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above plus 222.102, 225.151.
Part II:
198.291, 225.251, 225.252, 225.261, 225.262, 225.263, 225.271,
225.281.
Part III: 225.351, 225.354, 225.356, 225.362, 225.373, 197.380.
Part IV: 225.453, 225.454, 225.481.
Major: Visual Communication Design
•
Advertising: 222.203, 222.210;
•
Digital Media: Two of 222.230, 222.231, 222.270;
•
Graphic Design: 222.202, 222.203;
•
Illustration: 222.220, 222.230.
Part III: 222.381, 222.382 and one of the following groups:
•
Advertising: 222.310, 222.311;
•
Digital Media: Either (222.330, 222.331) or (222.340, 222.341) or
(222.355, 222.356) or (222.370, 222.371);
•
Graphic Design: 222.301, 222.302, 222.303;
•
Illustration: 222.320, 222.321.
Part IV: 222.453, 222.454.
Schedule B: List of Papers
197.131
Art and Design Studio A
15
P portfolio or 197.120 or 197.132
R 197.121
197.132
Art and Design Studio B
15
P portfolio or 197.121 or 197.131
R 197.120
197.133
Materials: Design and Making
15
197.134
Digital Design and Visualisation
15
197.135
Fashion, Body and Form
15
Fashion Design
212.201
Fashion Design Studio
15
P (197.101 and 197.121) or (197.132
and 197.135)
212.202
Fashion History
15
P 212.102 or 197.109 or 197.111 or
197.114 or 237.101 or 237.102
212.203
Pattern Development I
15
212.204
Anthropometry, Block Development
and Sizing
15
212.205
Garment Structuring I
15
212.206
Materials
15
212.220
Apparel Computing
15
P 212.203C 212.204
212.224
Photography for Fashion
15
P 197.212 or 197.132 or 197.135 or
213.100
212.228
Fashion Special Topic A
15
P 45 credits from 212.201–212.224
212.303
Pattern Development II
15
P 212.203
212.304
Drape for Design
15
P 212.203
212.305
Garment Structuring II
15
P 212.205
212.306
Materials, the Body and Apparel
15
P 212.206
212.309
Knit Product Development
15
P 212.201 and 212.203 and 212.205
197.191
Art and Design: Special Topic I
15
P any 30 credits
212.310
Fashion Product Design
30
P 212.201 and 212.303 and 212.305
197.291
Art and Design: Special Topic II
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
or PHOD
212.317
Fashion Design Special Project
15
P 212.201 and 212.203 and 212.305
212.326
Fashion Internship
15
P 45 credits from 212.2xx or PHOD
197.499
Design Special Topic
30
P PHOI
213.150
Introduction to Painting
15
R 213.203
213.151
Introduction to Sculpture
15
R 213.204
213.154
Drawing I
15
212.328
Fashion Special Topic B
15
P 45 credits from 212.201–212.224
212.381
Fashion Studies
15
P 212.202
212.402
Fashion Theory
15
P 212.381 or 198.380 or 222.381 or
223.302 or 224.381
Page 75
Creative Arts
212.403
Advanced Pattern Studies
15
P 212.205 and 212.303
212.405
Advanced Apparel Construction
Studies
15
P 212.203 and 212.305
197.377
Design and Usability
15
P One of 225.151, 198.214, 222.202,
PHOD
197.378
Design Internship
15
P B grade overall and PHOD
212.420
Apparel Production Computer
Applications
15
P 212.220 and 212.303
197.380
Design Research Methods
15
P One of 198.281, 222.281, 225.281
or PHOD
212.425
Fashion Industry
15
P 30 credits from 212.3xx or PHOD
R 212.325
197.381
Integrated Design Studies
15
P 198.281 or 222.281
212.453
197.453
P 198.376 and 197.380
30
P 212.381 and 212.310
Integrated Design Research and
Development
30
Fashion Design Research and
Development
212.454
Fashion Design Research Project
45
P 212.453
212.455
Fashion Design Studio Project
45
P 212.310
212.495
Fashion Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
Industrial Design
198.213
Furniture Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
198.214
Product Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
198.251
Industrial Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
198.252
Industrial Design Studio II
15
P 198.251
198.261
Industrial Design Graphic Processes
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
198.271
Industrial Design Modelling
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
198.272
Industrial Design and Manufacture
15
P 198.271
198.281
Industrial Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
198.291
Industrial Design Interaction and
Interfaces
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
198.308
Industrial Design Special Topic A
15
P PHOD
197.454
Integrated Design Research Project
45
P 197.453
197.455
Integrated Design Studio Project
45
P 197.453
197.456
Integrated Design Project
Management
15
P 197.376
197.463
Design Portfolio
15
P 197.263 or 198.361 or 222.301 or
225.362
197.481
Design Business and Practice
15
C 197.454 or 225.454
197.490
Integrated Design Special Topic
15
P PHOD
197.495
Integrated Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
15
P 2009: nil
P 2010 onwards: 237.101 or 237.102;
R 213.206
Photographic Design
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
221.101
Introduction to Photography
15
R 197.106
221.270
Photographic Contexts I
30
P (197.131 and 197.132) and (197.106
or 221.101)
221.271
Photographic Methods IA
15
P 197.106 or 221.101
R 213.202
198.309
Industrial Design Special Topic B
15
P PHOD
221.272
Photographic Methods IB
15
198.313
Furniture Design Studio II
15
P 198.213 or 198.354 or 224.351 or
225.351
P 197.106 or 221.101
R 213.222
221.281
Photography History and Criticism I
15
P 2009: 197.109
P 2010 onwards: 237.101 or PHOD
221.291
Photography Special Topic A
15
PHOD
221.370
Photographic Contexts II
30
P 221.270
221.373
Photographic Methods IIA
15
P 221.272 or PHOD
221.374
Photographic Methods IIB
15
P 221.271 and 221.272
P 221.281 and 213.252
198.314
Product Design Studio II
15
P 198.214 or 198.354
198.354
Industrial Design Studio III
15
P 198.252
198.355
Industrial Design Studio IV
15
P 198.354
198.361
Industrial Design Multimedia
15
P 198.261
198.362
Industrial Design Visualisation and
Communication
15
P 198.261
221.381
Photography History and Criticism II
15
198.363
Industrial Design Digital Processes
15
P 198.251
221.382
Photography Professional Practice
15
P 30 221.2xx credits
198.371
Industrial Design Technology
15
P 198.272
221.391
Photography Special Topic B
15
P 90 credits from 221.2xx or PHOD
198.380
Industrial Design Theory and
Research
15
P 198.281
R 198.381
221.453
Photography Research and
Development
30
P 221.370 and 221.381
198.391
Ergodesign II
15
P 198.291
221.454
Photography Research Project
45
P 221.374 and 221.373 and 221.470
and 222.453
221.455
Photography Studio Project
45
P 221.374 and 221.373 and 221.470
221.456
Photography and the Archive
15
P 15 221.3xx credits or PHOD
198.401
Industrial Design Studio V
15
P 198.355
198.453
Industrial Design Research and
Development
30
P 198.355 and 198.380
198.454
Industrial Design Research Project
45
P 198.453
221.457
Photography and Visuality
15
P 221.381 or PHOD
198.455
Industrial Design Studio Project
45
P 198.355
221.470
Photographic Contexts III
15
P 221.370
198.463
Industrial Design Digital
Representation
15
P PHOD
221.495
Photography Independent Study
15
P PHOD
198.481
Industrial Design Business and
Practice
15
P 198.453 or 198.401
198.490
Industrial Design Special Topic C
15
P PHOD
198.495
Industrial Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
Integrated Design
Spatial Design
224.204
Design for Performance I
15
P 197.121 or 197.131 or 213.100
or PHOD
R 226.2xx papers
224.205
Designing Exhibitions I
15
P 197.121 or 197.131 or 213.100
224.251
Spatial Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
197.263
Integrated Design Computer
Modelling
15
P 75 100 level credits
224.252
Spatial Design Studio II
15
P 224.251
224.261
Spatial Design Visual Representation
15
P 197.121 or 197.131
197.371
Integrated Design Technology
15
P 15 198.2xx credits or 15 222.2xx
credits
224.271
Spatial Design Materials and Making 15
P 197.121 or 197.131
224.272
Spatial Design Fabrication and
Technology
15
P 224.271
224.281
Spatial Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
197.374
Communication Strategy and Design
15
P 222.215 and one of 198.251 or
222.202
197.375
Integrated Design Multimedia
15
P 222.102 or PHOD
197.376
Integrated Design Studio
30
P 198.214 or (222.202 and 197.374)
Page 76
Creative Arts
224.291
Spatial Design Body, Space and Light
15
P 197.121 or 197.131
R 198.291
224.302
Spatial Design Special Topic A
15
P PHOD
224.303
Spatial Design Special Topic B
15
P PHOD
224.304
Design for Performance II
15
P 224.204
224.305
Designing Exhibitions II
15
P 224.205
224.351
Spatial Design Studio III
15
P 224.252
224.352
Spatial Design Studio IV
15
P 224.351 or PHOD
223.495
Textile Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
Transport Design
225.151
Structure, Form and Movement
15
225.251
Transport Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
225.252
Transport Design Studio II
15
P 225.251
225.261
Transport Design Drawing and
Graphic Processes
15
P 197.121 or 197.132
224.361
Spatial Design Multimedia
15
P 224.261 or PHOD
225.262
P 225.261
Spatial Design Computer
Applications
15
P 224.261 or 222.230 or 222.231
or PHOD
Transport Design Visualisation and
Communication I
15
224.362
225.263
Transport Computer-Aided Design I
15
224.371
Spatial Design Systems and
Technology
15
P 224.271
P 197.102 or 222.102 or PHOD; C
225.252
225.271
P 197.121 or 197.132
Spatial Design Theory and Practice
15
P 224.281
Transport Design Materials and
Model-making
15
224.381
224.382
Spatial Design Professional Practice
15
P 30 224.3xx credits
R 224.481
225.281
Transport Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102 or PHOD
224.401
Spatial Design Studio V
15
P 224.352
225.301
Transport Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
225.302
Transport Design Special Topic A
15
P PHOD
224.402
Spatial Strategies in Sustainable
Design
15
P 30 300 level credits from this
schedule
225.341
Vehicle Design
15
P 198.252 or 225.252
224.453
Spatial Design Research and
Development
30
P 224.352, 224.381
225.351
Transport Design Studio III
15
P 225.252
224.454
Spatial Design Research Project
45
P 224.453
225.354
Transport Design Studio with CAD
30
P 225.351
224.455
Spatial Design Studio Project
45
P 224.352
225.356
Transport Design Environmental
Safety and Conservation I
15
P 225.281
225.362
Transport Design Visualisation and
Communication II
15
P 225.262
225.373
Transport Design Materials,
Technology and Systems
15
P 225.271
R 225.371, 225.372
225.453
Transport Design Major Research and 45
Development Part I
P (197.380 or 225.380) and 225.354;
R 225.451
225.454
Transport Design Major Research and 45
Development Part II
P 225.453
R 225.452
225.455
Transport Design Studio Project
45
P 225.354
225.456
Transport Design Environmental
Safety and Conservation II
15
P 225.356 or 225.380
225.457
Technology Research for Transport
Design
15
P 225.380
225.463
Transport Computer-Aided Design
Advanced
15
P 225.354
225.481
Transport Design Business and
Practice
15
C 225.454
225.490
Transport Design Special Topic B
15
P PHOD
225.495
Transport Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
224.490
Spatial Design Special Topic C
15
P PHOD
224.495
Spatial Design Independent Study
15
P PHOD
Textile Design
223.201
Textile Design Studio I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
or 213.100
223.202
Textile Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
223.203
Textile Print Studio
15
P 197.113 or 197.121 or 197.132 or
213.100.
223.204
Textile Dyeing and Colouration
15
P 30 credits from 197.1xx, or PHOD
223.205
Textile Structure Studio
15
C 223.201
223.206
Textile Technology
15
P 15 197.xxx credits
223.211
Fashion Textiles Workshop
15
P 15 197.xxx credits
223.212
Interior Textiles Workshop
15
P 15 197.xxx credits
223.220
Digital Textile Design I
15
P 223.201
223.221
Mixed Media Textiles
15
P 197.132 or 197.133
223.227
Textile Knit Studio
15
P 197.121 or 197.132 or 213.100
223.228
Textile Design Special Topic A
15
P PHOD
223.301
Textile Design Studio II
15
P 223.201 or PHOD
223.302
Textile Design Studies
15
P 223.202 or 212.202 or PHOD
223.303
Textile Specialist Processes
30
P 223.203 and 223.205
C 223.301; R 223.314
223.313
Art Textiles
15
P 223.203 or PHOD
223.320
Digital Textile Design II
15
P 223.220 or PHOD
223.326
Textile Internship
15
P B grade average and PHOD
223.328
Textile Design Special Topic B
15
P PHOD
223.403
Multimedia Textiles
15
P 223.301
R 223.221
223.425
Textile Design and Business
15
P 30 credits of 223.3xx or PHOD
223.450
Textile Design Research Methods
and Practices
15
P 223.302
223.451
Textile Design Studio Research
15
P 223.301
223.454
Textile Design Research Project
45
P 223.450 and 223.451
223.455
Textile Design Studio Project
45
P 223.301 and 223.302
223.490
Textile Design Special Topic C
15
P PHOD
223.491
Textile Design Special Topic D
15
P PHOD
Visual Communication Design
222.100
Introduction to Visual Communication 15
Design Studio
P Portfolio R 222.200
222.102
Computers for Design
15
R 197.102
222.202
Graphic Design I
15
P (197.102 or 222.102) and 197.121
or (197.131 and 197.132) and
(222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
222.203
Typography I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
and (222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
222.209
Printmaking I
15
R 197.209
222.210
Advertising Design I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
and (222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
222.215
Marketing Communication and
Design I
15
P 197.121 or (197.131 and 197.132)
and (222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
222.220
Illustration I
15
P (197.102 or 222.102) and 197.121
or (197.131 and 197.132) and
(222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
222.224
Drawing for Visual Communication
Design
15
P (197.120 or 197.121) or (197.131
and 197.132) R 222.290
222.230
Digital Animated Media
15
P 197.102 or 222.102
222.231
Digital Interactive Media
15
P 197.102 or 222.102
Page 77
Creative Arts
222.235
Digital Audio Media
15
P 197.134 or 222.102
222.270
Digital Video Media
15
P 197.102 or 222.102
222.281
Visual Communication Design History 15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 197.114 or
237.101 or 237.102
222.290
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic I
P PHOI
222.291
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic II
P PHOI
222.301
Graphic Design II
15
P (222.202 or 222.201) and 222.203;
C 222.303
222.302
Graphic Design III
15
P 222.301
222.303
Typography II
15
P (222.202 or 222.201) and 222.203
222.304
Typography III
15
P 222.301 and 222.303
222.305
Advanced Digital Graphic Design
15
P 222.202
222.310
Advertising Design II
15
P 222.210
222.311
Advertising Design III
15
P 222.310
222.315
Marketing Communication and
Design II
15
P 222.215
222.320
Illustration II
15
P 222.220
222.321
Illustration III
15
P 222.320
222.322
Digital Illustration
15
P 222.220
222.323
Drawing for Image-makers
15
P 222.220
222.324
Animated Illustration
15
P 222.220
222.326
Sequential Art
15
P 222.220 or 222.230
222.330
Computer Animation I
15
P 222.230 or PHOI
222.382
Visual Communication Design and
Business
15
P (222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
and 222.281
R 222.481
222.390
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic A
P PHOI
222.391
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic B
P PHOI
222.392
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic C
P PHOI
222.395
Independent Visual Communication
Design Study
15
P PHOI
222.404
Typography IV
15
P 222.304
222.408
Information Design
15
P 222.304R 222.491
222.409
Contemporary Letterpress
15
P 222.304
222.411
Art Direction for Advertising
15
P 222.311
222.425
Illustration Studio Practice
15
P 222.321
222.430
Digital Media Studio
15
P 222.331 or 222.341 or 222.356 or
222.371
222.453
Visual Communication Design
Research and Development
30
P B- average over 222.381 and one of
(222.302, 222.311, 222.321, 222.331,
222.341, 222.356, 222.371)R 197.380
and 222.451
222.454
Visual Communication Design
Research Project
45
P (197.380 and 222.451) or 222.453
222.455
Visual Communication Design Studio
Project
45
P 222.456
222.456
Visual Communication Design:
Collaborative and Individual Design
Practices
15
P 222.381 and one of (222.302,
222.311, 222.321, 222.331, 222.341,
222.356, 222.371)
222.331
Computer Animation II
15
P 222.330
222.335
Digital Audio Design
15
P 222.230 or 222.231 or 222.270
or PHOI
222.490
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic D
P PHOI
222.491
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic E
P PHOI
222.492
Digital Media Special Topic
15
P PHOI
222.340
Design for Interactivity I
15
P 222.231
222.341
Design for Interactivity II
15
P 222.340
222.344
Packaging Design I
15
C 222.301
222.355
Motion Graphics I
15
P (222.100 or 222.200 or 222.201)
and (222.230 or 222.270)
222.493
Advertising Special Topic
15
P PHOI
222.494
Graphic Design Special Topic
15
P PHOI
222.356
Motion Graphics II
15
P 222.355
222.495
Illustration Special Topic
15
P PHOI
222.370
Digital Video I
15
P 222.230 or 222.270
222.496
P PHOI
222.371
Digital Video II
15
P 222.370
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic F
222.381
Visual Communication Design
Studies
15
P 222.281
222.497
Visual Communication Design Special 15
Topic G
P PHOI
222.499
Independent Visual Communication
Design Study
P PHOI
15
The Degree of Bachelor of Design
BDes
Part I
Course of Study
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
3.
(a) No more than 180 credits may be at 100-level.
Part II
Admission
1.
Admission to the Bachelor of Design will conform to the normal
requirements and procedures of the university and be based partly on the
assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the student, or
2.
Applicants with an incomplete Massey University Bachelor of Design
with Honours, who do not intend to complete the Bachelor of Design
with Honours, may transfer all credits earned for that degree to the
Bachelor of Design.
Page 78
The Bachelor of Design consists of 480 credits arranged in four parts,
each comprising 120 credits of study. A student admitted to the Bachelor
of Design programme shall satisfy the requirements listed in Parts I, II,
III and IV shown in Schedule A of these regulations.
(b) At least 180 credits must be at 300-level or above, including at least
60 credits at 400-level or above.
4.
Candidates for the Bachelor of Design shall complete compulsory papers
listed in the attached schedules for one of the following majors: Fashion
Design, Fashion Design and Business (joint major), Industrial Design,
Integrated Design, Photographic Design, Spatial Design, Textile Design,
Transport Design or Visual Communication Design.
5.
Admission to Part II will normally occur when the student has passed
all the papers in Part I relevant to the major to be taken. The Academic
Board may grant exemptions to the requirement based on the subjects
studied and prior performance of the student.
Creative Arts
Transition
Major: Integrated Design (no new enrolments from 2011)
6.
Compulsory:
Transition arrangements will apply to students enrolled for the Bachelor
of Design prior to 2009. No student enrolled before 2009 will be
required to complete more than 480 credits to graduate as a consequence
of the introduction of these regulations.
Waivers
7.
8.
Not withstanding Regulation 3 Part II, holders of a Massey University
or Wellington Polytechnic Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology
may, on surrender of the diploma, be permitted to include up to 195
credits at 100-level in the Bachelor of Design with Honours, Fashion
Design major.
Notwithstanding Regulation 3 Part II, holders of a Massey University
Diploma in Photography, on surrender of the diploma, may be permitted
to transfer up to 120 credits at 100-level and up to 120 credits at 200
level to the Bachelor of Design with Honours, Photographic Design
major.
Part I:
As listed above plus 222.102.
Part II:
198.214, 198.251, 222.202, 222.203, 222.215, 222.230, and
198.281 or 222.281.
Part III: 197.371, 197.374, 197.375, 197.376 197.380, 197.381.
Part IV: 197.453, 197.455, 197.481.
Major: Photographic Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above plus 221.101.
Part II:
213.252, 221.270, 221.271, 221.272, 221.281.
Part III: 221.370, 221.373, 221.374, 221.381, 221.382.
Part IV: 221.455, 221.470.
Major: Spatial Design
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Design
Schedule A
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above.
Part II:
224.251, 224.252, 224.261, 224.271, 224.272, 224.281, 224.291.
Part I (at least 120 credits are required)
Part III: 224.351, 224.352, 224.361, 224.371, 224.381, 224.382.
Compulsory:
Part IV: 224.401, 224.455.
197.131, 197.132, 237.101, 237.102.
Major: Textile Design
Note: some majors have additional core papers as specified under each major.
Compulsory:
Electives:
Part I:
As listed above.
Sufficient credits from 100-level papers listed in Schedule B or other
approved papers to comprise a total of at least 120 credits.
Part II:
223.201, 223.202, 223.203, 223.204, 223.205, 223.206, 223.220.
Major: Fashion Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed plus 197.135.
Part II:
212.201, 212.202, 212.203, 212.204, 212.205, 212.206, 212.220.
Part III: 212.303, 212.305, 212.306, 212.310, 212.317, 212.381.
Part IV: 212.425, 212.455
Major: Fashion Design and Business
Compulsory:
As listed for the Fashion Design major plus 90 credits above 100-level
including at least 45 credits at 300-level, meeting the requirements for one
major in the Bachelor of Business Studies.
Note: Where a business major requires a 100 level pre-requisite, the credits
for the pre-requisite do not count towards the business major, but do count
towards the Bachelor of Design requirements provided:
Part III: 223.301, 223.302, 223.303, 223.313, 223.320.
Part IV: 223.425, 223.455.
Major: Transport Design (no new enrolments from 2011)
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above plus 222.102, 225.151.
Part II:
198.291, 225.251, 225.252, 225.261, 225.262, 225.263, 225.271,
225.281.
Part III: 225.351, 225.354, 225.356, 225.362, 225.373, 197.380.
Part IV: 225.453, 225.455, 225.481.
Major: Visual Communication Design
Compulsory:
Part I:
As listed above plus 222.100 and 222.102.
Part II:
222.281 and one of the following groups:
•
Advertising: 222.203, 222.210;
•
Digital Media: Two of 222.230, 222.231, 222.270;
(a) the overall credit requirements in Regulation 3 are met; and
•
Graphic Design: 222.202, 222.203;
(b) no more than 105 credits from the BBS Schedule are included in
the degree.
•
Illustration: 222.220, 222.230.
Part III: 222.381, 222.382 and one of the following groups:
Major: Industrial Design
•
Advertising: 222.310, 222.311
Compulsory:
•
Digital Media: Either (222.330, 222.331) or (222.340, 222.341) or
(222.355, 222.356) or (222.370, 222.371)
•
Graphic Design: 222.301, 222.302, 222.303
•
Illustration: 222.320, 222.321.
Part I:
As listed above.
Part II:
198.251, 198.252, 198,261, 198.271, 198.272, 198.281, 198.291.
Part III: 198.354, 198.355, 198.361, 198.362, 198.363,198.371, 198.380.
Part IV: 198.401, 198.455, 198.481.
Part IV: 222.455 and 222.456.
Schedule B: List of Papers
(Refer to Schedule B of the Bachelor of Design with Honours.)
Page 79
Creative Arts
The Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours
BFA(Hons)
Part I
Waiver
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
12. Notwithstanding Part II, Regulation 3, holders of a Massey University
Diploma in Photography, on surrender of the diploma, may be permitted
to transfer up to 120 credits at 100-level and up to 75 credits at 200 level
to the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours.
Part II
Admission
1.
2.
Admission to the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours will conform
to the normal requirements and procedures of the university and be
based partly on the assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the
candidate. Applicants may be required to participate in an interview.
An applicant who holds the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts shall not be
admitted to the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours programme.
Course of Study
3.
The Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours consists of 480 credits arranged
in four parts, each comprising 120 credits of study. To be eligible to
graduate a student shall satisfy the requirements listed in Parts I, II, III
and IV shown in Schedule A of these regulations.
(a) No more than 180 credits may be at 100-level,
(b) At least 180 credits must be at 300-level or above, including at least
120 credits at 400-level or above.
Progression
4.
5.
6.
Admission to Part II will normally occur when the student has passed all
the papers in Part I.
To maintain their enrolment in the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours
programme the student is normally required to have successfully
completed 213.351, 213.352, 213.353, and 213.357. Students who elect
not to pursue Honours will have their credit transferred to the Bachelor
of Fine Arts.
The Academic Board may grant exemptions to the requirements of
Regulation 4 and 5 based on the subjects studied and prior performance
of the student.
Time Limits and Honours
7.
To be eligible for the award of Honours, the degree must be completed
by full-time students in a time not more than one year in excess of the
minimum time for completing the degree (5 years), or by part-time
students in a time not more than three years in excess of the minimum
time for completing the degree (8 years), provided that:
(a) these periods may, in special circumstances be amended by the
Academic Board; and
(b) the Academic Board, may also, in special circumstances, permit
students to suspend their course of studies for an approved period.
8.
9.
The degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours may be awarded
with First Class Honours or with Second Class Honours Division I or
Second Class Honours Division II, or with Third Class Honours. The
class of Honours awarded shall be determined by the examiners on the
performance of the candidate in Part IV of the programme.
Candidates who have passed all credits for a Bachelor of Fine Arts with
Honours outside the maximum time limit in clause 7 will be awarded the
degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts.
Note:  Entry to BFA Hons is subject to normal entry requirements that
will include an interview with a portfolio.
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours
Schedule A
Part I (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
197.131
Art and Design Studio A
15
197.132
Art and Design Studio B
15
237.101
Critical Studies A
15
237.102
Critical Studies B
15
Electives
Sufficient credits from 100-level papers listed in Schedule B or Schedule B of
the Bachelor of Design with Honours or other approved papers to comprise a
total of at least 120 credits.
Part II (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
213.251
Contemporary Art Studio II
60
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
15
213.253
Critical Studies IIB
15
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level or 200-level papers listed in Schedule B or
Schedule B of the Bachelor of Design with Honours or other approved papers
to comprise a total of at least 120 credits.
Part III (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
213.351
Contemporary Art Studio III
60
213.352
Critical Studies IIIA
15
213.353
Critical Studies IIIB
15
213.357
Introduction to Fine Arts Research
Methods and Practices
15
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level, 200-level or 300-level papers listed in
Schedule B or Schedule B of the Bachelor of Design with Honours or other
approved papers to comprise a total of at least 120 credits.
Part IV (at least 120 credits at 400-level or above are required)
213.451
Contemporary Art Studio IVA
45
Withdrawal
213.461
Contemporary Art Studio IVB
45
10. Should a candidate withdraw from the Bachelor of Fine Arts with
Honours programme, the Head of School may determine what credit
already earned for the papers listed in Schedule B may be transferred to
the Bachelor of Fine Arts programme.
213.462
Fine Arts Research
15
213.463
Fine Arts Research Seminar
15
Transition
11. Transition arrangements will apply to candidates enrolled for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts prior to 2009. No candidate enrolled before 2009
will be required to complete more than 480 credits to graduate as a
consequence of the introduction of these regulations.
Page 80
Schedule B: List of Papers
197.131
Art and Design Studio A
15
P Portfolio; R 197.120
197.132
Art and Design Studio B
15
P Portfolio; R 197.121
237.101
Critical Studies A
15
R 197.111
237.102
Critical Studies B
15
Creative Arts
213.150
Introduction to Painting
15
R 213.203
213.151
Introduction to Sculpture
15
R 213.204
213.154
Drawing I
15
213.155
Drawing The Body I
15
213.211
Fine Arts Special Topic II
15
213.251
Contemporary Art Studio II
60
P (197.131 and 197.132) or 197.121;
R 213.201
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
15
P 237.101 or 237.102 or 197.109
or 197.111 or 197.114 or 212.102;
R 213.206
R 197.101
213.265
Fine Arts Elective J
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.311
Final Arts Special Topic III
15
213.351
Contemporary Art Studio III
60
P 213.251 or 213.201
R 213.300, 213.310
213.352
Critical Studies IIIA
15
P 213.252 or 213.253 or 213.216; R
213.306
213.353
Critical Studies IIIB
15
P 213.252 or 213.253 or 213.216; R
213.316
213.357
Introduction to Fine Arts Research
Methods and Practices
15
P 213.352; C 213.353 or Permission
Programme Leader
213.355
Drawing The Body III
15
P 213.255; R 197.301
213.356
Fine Arts Elective E
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.358
Fine Arts Internship
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts; R 213.412
213.359
Fine Arts Elective K
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.360
Fine Arts Special Topic IIIB
30
213.411
Fine Arts Special Topic IV
15
213.451
Contemporary Art Studio IVA
45
P 213.351; C for honours only 213.462
and 213.463
R 213.401
213.461
Contemporary Art Studio IVB
45
P 213.451; C for honours only 213.462
and 213.463
R 213.401
213.253
Critical Studies IIB
15
P 237.101 or 237.102; R 213.216
213.254
Drawing II
15
P 213.154 or 197.101 or 197.121
213.255
Drawing The Body II
15
P 213.155 or 197.101
R 197.200
213.256
Fine Arts Elective A
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.257
Fine Arts Elective B
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.258
Fine Arts Elective C
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.259
Fine Arts Elective D
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.260
Fine Arts Special Topic IIB
30
213.261
Fine Arts Elective F
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.262
Fine Arts Elective G
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.462
Fine Arts Research
15
P 213.357 or PHoS; C 213.451 and
213.461 and 213.463
213.263
Fine Arts Elective H
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.463
Fine Arts Research Seminar
15
P 213.357 or PHoS;
C 213.451 and 213.461 and 213.462
213.264
Fine Arts Elective I
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
The Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts
BFA
Part I
Transition
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
5.
Part II
Admission
1.
2.
Admission to the Bachelor of Fine Arts will conform to the normal
requirements and procedures of the University and be based partly on the
assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the candidate. Applicants
may be required to participate in an interview.
Applicants with an incomplete Massey University Bachelor of Fine
Arts with Honours, who do not intend to complete the Bachelor of Fine
Arts with Honours, may transfer all credits earned for that degree to the
Bachelor of Fine Arts.
Course of Study
3.
4.
The Bachelor of Fine Arts consists of 480 credits arranged in four
parts, each comprising 120 credits of study. A candidate admitted to the
Bachelor of Fine Arts programme shall satisfy the requirements listed in
Parts I, II, III and IV shown in Schedules A of these regulations.
Transition arrangements will apply to candidates enrolled for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts prior to 2009. No candidate enrolled before 2009
will be required to complete more credits to graduate as a consequence
of the introduction of these regulations.
Waiver
6.
Notwithstanding Regulation 3, holders of a Massey University Diploma
in Photography, on surrender of the diploma, may be permitted to
transfer up to 120 credits at 100-level and up to 75 credits at 200-level to
the Bachelor of Fine Arts.
Note: Entry to Bachelor of Fine Arts is subject to normal entry requirements
that will include an interview with a portfolio.
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts
Schedule A
Part I (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
197.131
Art and Design Studio A
15
(a) No more than 180 credits may be at 100-level,
197.132
Art and Design Studio B
15
(b) At least 180 credits must be at 300-level or above, including at least
60 credits at 400-level or above.
237.101
Critical Studies A
237.102
Critical Studies B
Admission to Part II will normally occur when the candidate has passed
all the papers in Part I. However, the Academic Board may grant
exemptions to the requirement based on the subjects studied and prior
performance of the candidate.
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level papers listed in Schedule B or Schedule B of
the Bachelor of Design or other approved papers to comprise a total of at least
120 credits.
Page 81
Creative Arts
Part II (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
15
P 237.101 or 237.102 or 197.109 or
197.111 or 197.114 or 212.102;
R 213.206
213.251
Contemporary Art Studio II
60
213.253
Critical Studies IIB
15
P 237.101 or 237.102; R 213.216
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
15
213.254
Drawing II
15
P 213.154 or 197.101 or 197.121
213.253
Critical Studies IIB
15
213.255
Drawing the Body II
15
P 213.155 or 197.101; R 197.200
213.256
Fine Arts Elective A
15
P 60 credits at 100-level from College
of Creative Arts
213.257
Fine Arts Elective B
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.258
Fine Arts Elective C
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.259
Fine Arts Elective D
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level or 200-level papers listed in Schedule B or
Schedule B of the Bachelor of Design or other approved papers to comprise a
total of at least 120 credits.
Part III (at least 120 credits are required)
Compulsory:
213.351
Contemporary Art Studio III
60
213.260
Fine Arts Special Topic IIB
30
213.352
Critical Studies IIIA
15
213.261
Fine Arts Elective F
15
213.353
Critical Studies IIIB
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.262
Fine Arts Elective G
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.263
Fine Arts Elective H
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.264
Fine Arts Elective I
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.265
Fine Arts Elective J
15
P 60 credits at 100 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.311
Fine Arts Special Topic III
15
213.351
Contemporary Art Studio III
60
P 213.251 or 213.201; R 213.300,
213.310
213.352
Critical Studies IIIA
15
P 213.252 or 213.253 or 213.216; R
213.306
213.353
Critical Studies IIIB
15
P 213.252 or 213.253 or 213.216; R
213.316
213.357
Introduction to Fine Arts Research
Methods and Practices
15
P 213.352; C 213.353 or Permission
Programme Leader
213.355
Drawing The Body III
15
P 213.255; R 197.301
213.356
Fine Arts Elective E
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.359
Fine Arts Elective K
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts
213.358
Fine Arts Internship
15
P 60 credits at 200 level from College
of Creative Arts; R 213.412
213.360
Fine Arts Special Topic IIIB
30
Electives:
Sufficient credits from 100-level, 200-level or 300-level papers listed in
Schedule B or Schedule B of the Bachelor of Design or other approved papers
to comprise a total of at least 120 credits.
Part IV
Compulsory:
213.451
Contemporary Art Studio IVA
45
213.461
Contemporary Art Studio IVB
45
Electives:
Sufficient credits from papers listed in Schedule B or Schedule B of the
Bachelor of Design or other approved papers to comprise a total of at least
120 credits.
Schedule B: List of Papers
197.131
Art and Design Studio A
15
P Portfolio; R 197.120
197.132
Art and Design Studio B
15
P Portfolio; R 197.121
237.101
Critical Studies A
15
R 197.111
237.102
Critical Studies B
15
213.150
Introduction to Painting
15
R 213.203
R 213.204
213.151
Introduction to Sculpture
15
213.154
Drawing I
15
213.155
Drawing The Body I
15
213.211
Fine Arts Special Topic II
15
213.251
Contemporary Art Studio II
60
213.411
Fine Arts Special Topic IV
15
R 197.101
213.451
Contemporary Art Studio IVA
45
P (197.131 and 197.132) or 197.121;
R 213.201
P 213.351; C for honours only 213.462
and 213.463;
R 213.401
213.461
Contemporary Art Studio IVB
45
P 213.451; C for honours only 213.462
and 213.463
R 213.401
Diplomas
The Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology
DipFDT
Part I
Certificate grades with a total of 20 or less and the assessment of a
portfolio of work submitted by the candidate.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Course of Study
2.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma candidates shall follow a course
of study comprising 240 credits from the schedule to these Regulations.
Part II
Admission
3.
Candidates who have partially completed a Wellington Polytechnic
Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology may have all the credit
they obtained towards that qualification credited towards the 240 credits
required for this qualification.
1.
Admission to the Diploma will require 50 level 2 NCEA credits and at
least 14 credits at level 1 in literacy and numeracy, or four Sixth Form
Page 82
Creative Arts
Schedule to the Regulations for the Diploma in Fashion Design and
Technology
212.017
Historic Costume
15
212.112
Patternmaking II
30
P 212.012, C 212.113 and 212.114
212.012
Patternmaking I
30
C 212.013 and 212.014
212.113
Construction II
30
P 212.013, C 212.112 and 212.114
212.013
Construction I
30
C 212.012 and 212.014
212.114
Fashion Design II
15
P 212.014
212.014
Fashion Design I
15
212.115
Textiles II
15
P 212.015
212.015
Textiles I
15
212.116
Apparel Industry II
15
P 212.016
212.016
Apparel Industry I
15
212.119
Computer Technology for Apparel
15
P 212.012
The Diploma in Photography
DipPhoto
Part I
Schedule to the Regulations for the Diploma in Photography
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
Admission to the Diploma in Photography will conform with normal
requirements and procedures of the University and be based partly upon
the assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the candidate.
Course of Study
2.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma in Photography, candidates shall
follow a course of study comprising 240 credits from the Schedule to
these Regulations.
221.103
Photo Communication I
221.104
Photo Communication II
15
15
P 221.103
221.112
Studio Photography IA
30
P Portfolio
221.113
Photographic Documentary IA
15
P Portfolio
221.114
Studio Photography IB
15
P 221.112
221.115
Photographic Documentary IB
30
P 221.113
221.212
Photographic Technologies
30
P 221.103
221.214
Photographic Practices A
30
P 221.103, 221.104, 221.112,
221.113, 221.114, 221.115
221.215
Photographic Practices B
30
P 221.103, 221.104, 221.112,
221.113, 221.114, 221.115
221.216
Collaborative Photographic Project
30
P 30 221.1xx credits
Distinction
3.
The Diploma will carry the award of Distinction if completed at a
superior standard (equivalent to First Class Honours).
Certificate
The Certificate in Art and Design Studies
CertArtDesStud
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
Schedule to the Regulations for the Certificate in Art and Design
Studies
Compulsory:
213.155
Drawing the Body I
15
R 197.101
Elective:
221.101
Introduction to Photography
15
R 197.106
222.102
Computers for Design
15
R 197.102
237.101
Critical Studies A
15
R 197.111
237.102
Critical Studies B
15
R 197.109
237.114
Writing and Communication in
Creative Arts
15
R 197.114
222.209
Printmaking I
15
R 197.209
Transfer of Credit
198.281
Industrial Design History
15
P 197.109
3.
198.380
Industrial Design Theory and
Research
15
P 198.281; R 198.381
212.202
Fashion History
15
P 212.102 or 197.109 or 197.111 or
197.114 or 237.101 or 237.102
213.252
Critical Studies IIA
15
P 237.101 and 237.102 R 213.206
213.253
Critical Studies IIB
15
P 237.101 or 237.102; R 213.216
221.281
Photography History and Criticism I
15
P 2009: 197.109; P 2010 onwards:
237.101 or PHOD
221.381
Photography History and Criticism II
15
P 221.281 and 213.252
1.
A candidate shall follow an approved coherent course of study for the
equivalent of one year of full-time study.
2.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate a candidate shall pass papers
to a total of at least 120 credits as specified in the Schedule to these
Regulations, normally including at least 30 credits at 200-level or
above. Students may include up to 45 credits of approved papers from
Schedules for other degrees.
Candidates who have been awarded a Certificate may apply to credit
Certificate papers towards an undergraduate degree of the University,
provided that they comply with the Regulations for the degree in
question. Candidates who wish to credit papers totalling more than
45 credits in terms of this Regulation will be required to surrender the
Certificate before the credit will be granted.
Page 83
Creative Arts
222.281
Visual Communication Design History 15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 197.114 or
237.101 or 237.102
222.381
Visual Communication Design
Studies
15
P 222.281
223.202
Textile Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
223.302
Textile Design Studies
15
P 223.202 or 212.202 or PHOD
224.281
Spatial Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
224.381
Spatial Design Theory and Practice
15
P 224.281
225.281
Transport Design History
15
P 197.109 or 197.111 or 237.101 or
237.102
237.207
Perception: Images, Objects and
Spaces
15
R 197.207
237.211
Maori Visual and Material Culture
- Toi Atea
15
P 197.109 or 237.102 R 197.110
And, with permission of the Academic Director, any other paper from the
Schedules for the Bachelor of Design and the Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees.
Graduate Diplomas
The Graduate Diploma in Design
GDipDes
Part I
Advertising Design
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed under Advertising in the Visual
Communication Design major of the Bachelor of Design.
Part II
Admission
1.
Admission to the Graduate Diploma in Design requires that the
candidate will
(a) have qualified for admission to a degree; or
(b) have been admitted under the admission with the equivalent status
regulation; or
(c) be assessed as demonstrating equivalent practical, professional and
scholarly experience at the appropriate level; and
(d) be partially based on the assessment of a portfolio of work
submitted by the applicant.
Course of Study
Digital Media
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed under Digital Media in the
Visual Communication Design major of the Bachelor of Design.
Fashion Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Fashion Design major in
the Bachelor of Design.
Graphic Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed under Graphic Design in the
Visual Communication Design major of the Bachelor of Design.
Illustration
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed under Illustration in the Visual
Communication Design major of the Bachelor of Design.
2.
A candidate shall follow an approved coherent course of study.
Industrial Design
3.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Design, a candidate
shall pass papers to a total of at least 120 credits from the Schedule of
Papers for the Bachelor of Design degree, including a maximum of 60
credits at 200 level and a minimum of 60 credits at 300 level or above.
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Industrial Design major
in the Bachelor of Design.
Endorsement
4.
The Graduate Diploma may be awarded with or without endorsement. To
obtain an endorsement, a candidate shall meet the requirements specified
in the Schedule to these Regulations for the endorsement. The Diploma
may be awarded with an endorsement in the following areas: Advertising
Design, Digital Media, Fashion Design, Graphic Design, Illustration,
Industrial Design, Integrated Design, Photographic Design, Spatial
Design, Textile Design or Transport Design.
Distinction
5.
The Graduate Diploma will carry the award of Distinction if completed
at a superior standard (equivalent to First Class Honours).
Credit Transfer
6.
Candidates who have been awarded a Graduate Diploma may apply
to credit its papers towards an undergraduate degree of the University,
provided that they comply with the regulations for the degree in
question. Candidates who wish to credit papers totalling more than
45 credits in terms of this Regulation will be required to surrender the
Graduate Diploma before the credit will be granted.
Schedule to the Regulations for the Graduate Diploma in Design
Endorsements
Note: Not all endorsements are available on every campus or in every mode.
Some of the papers listed for some majors may be subject to limitations on
enrolment.
Page 84
Integrated Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Integrated Design major
in the Bachelor of Design.
Photographic Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Photographic Design
major in the Bachelor of Design.
Spatial Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Spatial Design major in
the Bachelor of Design.
Textile Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Textile Design major in
the Bachelor of Design.
Transport Design
At least 75 credits from the core papers listed for the Transport Design major
in the Bachelor of Design.
Creative Arts
The Graduate Diploma in Fine Arts
GDipFA
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
(d) be based on an interview and on the assessment of a portfolio of
work prepared by the applicant.
Course of Study
2.
A candidate shall follow an approved, coherent course of study for 120
credits.
3.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Fine Arts, a
candidate shall pass papers to a total of at least 120 credits from the
Schedule of Papers for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and/or 221
prefix papers from the Bachelor of Design schedule, including a
maximum of 60 credits at 200 level and a minimum of 60 credits at 300
level or above.
Admission to the Graduate Diploma in Fine Arts requires that the
candidate will
(a) have qualified for admission to a degree; or
(b) have been admitted under the admission with equivalent status
regulation; or
(c) be assessed as demonstrating equivalent practical, professional and
scholarly experience at the appropriate level; and
Distinction
4.
The Graduate Diploma will carry the award of Distinction if completed
at a superior standard (equivalent to First Class Honours).
Masters Degrees
The Degree of Master of Design
MDes
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(d) gain selection into the course through an interview and the
assessment of a portfolio of design work prepared by the applicant.
Course of Study
2.
Candidates shall successfully complete 120 credits comprised of 197.800
Design Thesis.
Part II
Admission
Thesis Requirements
1.
Admission to the Master of Design requires that the candidate must:
3.
(a) have qualified for the award of a relevant Bachelor (Honours)
degree with a grade point average that indicates an adequate level
of preparation; or
The thesis consists of two components:
(b) have qualified for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Design
with a grade point average that indicates an adequate level of
preparation; or
Candidates shall, before they begin work on the design thesis, secure
approval of the thesis topic from the Head of School/Institute who shall
recommend to the Academic Board the appointment of a supervisor(s).
(a) The candidate shall present, as part of the material to be examined,
a completed practice based project that has resulted from research
conducted in the course. This project shall be presented in an
appropriate professional format and be exhibited. The final format
of the presentation shall be approved by the supervisor and Head of
School/Institute.
(c) have been granted admission under the admission with equivalent
status regulations and demonstrate practical, professional and
scholarly experience at an appropriate level; and
(b) The candidate shall also present written extrapolation of the
research enquiry embodied in the design project.
The Degree of Master of Fine Arts
MFA
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(c) gain selection into the course through an interview and the
assessment of a portfolio of artwork prepared by the applicant.
Recognition of Prior Learning
Admission to the 240-credit MFA
Candidates meeting the above criteria who present a portfolio of work
demonstrating professional practice to a postgraduate diploma standard since
completion of their undergraduate degree may be credited with Recognition
of Prior Learning for up to a maximum of 120 credits at postgraduate diploma
level.
1.
Admission to the 240-credit MFA requires that the candidate must:
Admission to the 120-credit MFA
(a) have qualified for the award of a Bachelor of Fine Arts or
equivalent with a grade point average that indicates an adequate
level of preparation; or
2.
Part II
Admission
(b) have been granted admission under the admission with equivalent
status regulations and demonstrate practical, professional and
scholarly experience at an appropriate level; and
Admission to the 120-credit MFA requires that the candidate must:
(a) have qualified for the award of a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours)
degree or equivalent with a grade point average that indicates an
adequate level of preparation; or
Page 85
Creative Arts
The thesis consists of two components:
(b) have qualified for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Fine
Arts with a grade point average that indicates an adequate level of
preparation; or
(a) The candidate shall present, as part of the material to be examined,
a completed practice based project that has resulted from research
conducted in the course. This project shall be presented in an
appropriate professional format and be exhibited. The final format
of the presentation shall be approved by the supervisor and Head of
School.
(c) have been granted admission under the admission with equivalent
status regulations and demonstrate practical, professional and
scholarly experience at an appropriate level; and
(d) gain selection into the course through an interview and the
assessment of a portfolio of artwork prepared by the applicant.
(b) The candidate shall also present a written extrapolation of the
research enquiry embodied in the practice.
Course of Study
240-credit MFA
3.
Candidates for the 240-credit MFA shall follow an approved course of
study and successfully complete 120 credits at 700-level or above to
include 213.702, 213.704, 213.706 and 213.703
and 213.800 Master of Fine Arts Thesis.
120-credit MFA
4.
Candidates for the 120-credit MFA shall successfully complete 213.800
Master of Fine Arts Thesis.
Thesis Requirements
5.
Candidates shall, before they begin work on the fine art thesis, secure
approval of the thesis topic from the Head of School who shall
recommend to the Academic Board the appointment of a supervisor(s).
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Fine Arts
Compulsory: 240-credit MFA
213.706
Postgraduate Studio Practice I
30
C 213.704 or PHOS R 213.701
P 213.706 or PHOS
213.702
Postgraduate Studio Practice II
30
213.704
Fine Art Theory and Research
30
C 213.706 or PHOS
213.703
Special Topic
30
P 213.704 or PHOS
Compulsory: 120-credit and 240 credit MFA
213.800
Master of Fine Arts Thesis
120
PHOS
Postgraduate Diplomas
The Postgraduate Diploma in Design
PGDipDes
Part I
Recognition of Prior Learning
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
3.
Part II
Admission
1.
Schedule to the Postgraduate Diploma in Design
In addition to Part 1 requirements admission to the Postgraduate
Diploma in Design requires that the candidate must gain selection into
the course through the assessment of a portfolio of design work prepared
by the applicant. An interview may be required.
The following papers are compulsory:
197.701
Design Research Practices I
30
Graduate status
197.702
Design Research Practices II
30
197.701
The remaining 60 credits may be taken from the following:
Course of Study
2.
Candidates may transfer from an incomplete graduate or postgraduate
qualification credits constituting not more than 50% of the Postgraduate
Diploma in Design.
To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Design
candidates shall normally pass compulsory papers and papers in
design at postgraduate/honours level to a total of at least 120 credits in
accordance with the Schedule.
197.703
Design Special Topic A
30
197.704
Design Special Topic B
15
197.705
Independent Study
15
237.701
Studies in Material Culture
30
Permission HoS
237.702
Studies in Visual Culture
30
Permission HoS
or from 400-prefix papers in the Bachelor of Design (Honours) Schedule.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Arts
PGDipFA
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
In addition to Part I requirements admission to the Postgraduate Diploma
in Fine Arts requires that the candidate must gain selection into the
Page 86
course through an interview and the assessment of a portfolio of artwork
prepared by the applicant.
Course of Study
2.
To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Arts
candidates shall pass papers to a total of at least 120 credits in
accordance with the Schedule of 700-level papers for the Master of Fine
Arts.
Education
Course Regulations
College of Education
Undergraduate Degrees....................................................................88
Masters Degrees..............................................................................108
The Degree of Bachelor of Education................................................88
The Degree of Master of Counselling...............................................108
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Adult Education) .................91
The Degree of Master of Education..................................................109
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Teaching)..............................92
The Degree of Master of Educational Administration 1....................115
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/
The Degree of Master of Educational Administration and
Diploma in Education Studies 5 .........................................................93
Leadership.........................................................................................116
Te Aho Tātairangi: The Degree of Bachelor of Teaching Māori
The Degree of Master of Educational Psychology...........................117
Medium/Diploma in Māori Education................................................95
The Degree of Master of Literacy Education ..................................118
The Degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy...............96
The Degree of Master of Speech and Language Therapy.................119
Undergraduate Diplomas.................................................................97
The Degree of Master of Teaching English to Speakers of Other
4
The Diploma in Adult Education 4......................................................97
Languages Leadership......................................................................120
The Diploma for Education Support Workers....................................98
Postgraduate Diplomas...................................................................120
The Diploma in Human Development................................................98
The Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling 4.....................................120
Undergraduate Certificates..............................................................99
The Certificate in Adult Education 4...................................................99
The Certificate in Counselling Theory 4............................................100
The Certificate in Early Years Education 4........................................100
The Certificate in Human Development 3.........................................101
The Certificate in Teaching English as an Additional Language 3....101
Certificate.........................................................................................102
The Certificate for Teacher Aides 3...................................................102
Graduate Diplomas.........................................................................103
The Graduate Diploma in Adult Learning and Teaching 3................103
The Graduate Diploma in Education 4..............................................103
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early Childhood Education)..104
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary).................................105
The Postgraduate Diploma in Education..........................................121
The Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration and
Leadership.........................................................................................125
The Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology....................126
The Postgraduate Diploma in Evaluation 2.......................................126
The Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education............................126
The Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching...........................127
The Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language Therapy ........128
The Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary) 3.........................128
The Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) 3.....................129
Postgraduate Certificates...............................................................130
The Postgraduate Certificate in Education........................................130
The Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Administration and
Leadership.........................................................................................130
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary).............................105
The Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Psychology.................131
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) International 3......107
The Postgraduate Certificate in Specialist Teaching.........................131
Graduate Certificate.......................................................................108
The Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and Language Therapy .....132
The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as an Additional
The Postgraduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching............................133
Language...........................................................................................108
1
No new enrolments from 2009.
2
No new enrolments from 2010.
3
No new enrolments from 2011.
4
No new enrolments from 2012.
5
Subject to Approval by CUAP and NZTC.
Page 87
Education
Undergraduate Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of Education
BEd
Part I
(c) at least 45 credits from:
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Code
Title
Credits
249.382
Teaching Techniques in Special
Education
15
249.384
Consultation and Collaboration in
Inclusive Education
15
258.337
Teaching Students with Reading
Difficulties
15
262.339
The Education of Gifted and
Talented Students
15
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Education shall:
(a) complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board a teacher
education course of study nd teaching practice from an accredited
provider; or
(b) submit evidence to the satisfaction of the Academic Board that they
have completed two years of efficient service in the practice of
teaching or in educational work of a related character.
2.
The Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree consists of at least 360 credits
of study with:
(d) and up to 30 further credits from Schedule One 200-level or
300-level papers.
4.
Students who received credit prior to 2007 towards the BEd (Special
Education) and have not yet met their requirement to complete 187.231
may include 254.231 as an optional paper under 3(d) above.
5.
Candidates credited 300 credits towards the BEd may have counted
approved equivalent special education content from a Higher and/
or Advanced Diploma in Teaching towards the Special Education
endorsement leaving 249.334 and 3(c) or approved equivalents to
complete the degree.
6.
The degree may be awarded with an endorsement in Teaching English
to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) to those candidates who
complete the requirements of the Bachelor of Education including, to the
satisfaction of the Academic Board, completion of a teacher education
course of study and teaching practice from an accredited provider
or meeting the requirements of Regulation 1(b) through evidence of
experience in teaching English to speakers of other languages, and:
(a) no more than 180 credits from 100-level papers;
(b) at least 75 credits from 300-level papers;
(c) no fewer than 180 credits or more than 240 credits from Schedule
One papers, including:
(i) 254.101, 275.102, 186.230, 254.231 or approved equivalents
(see notes below);
(ii) at least 30 further credits from 200-level papers in Schedule
One; and
(iii) at least 60 credits from 300-level papers from List (a)
Education and/or List (b) Professional Education; and
(d) no fewer than 120 and no more than 180 credits from Schedule
Two, Subject Studies, papers.
Notes
(i) Passes in all four papers 136.151, 136.152, 136.251 and 136.252
are deemed equivalent to passes in all four of 254.101, 275.102,
186.230 and 254.231, while passes in three only of 136.151,
136.152, 136.251 and 136.252 will require a pass in 254.231;
passes in two only of 136.151, 136.152, 136.251 and 136.252
will require passes in 254.231 and 186.230; passes in one only
of 136.151, 136.152, 136.251 and 136.252 will require passes in
254.231, 186.230 and either 254.101 or 275.102.
(ii) A pass in 136.251 prior to 1989 counts as a pass in 254.231.
Requirements
(a) Three compulsory papers (45 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
172.132
Language and Culture
15
257.370
Teaching Learners of English as
Another Language
15
P 207.375 or 257.375
257.375
Learning English as Another
Language
15
P any 200-level Education or
Language Studies paper
(b) Five papers (75 credits) including 45 credits at the 300-level from
the following:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Endorsements
172.232
Language and Society
15
P any 100-level paper
(No new enrolments into Bachelor of Education endorsements from 2012)
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
3.
249.384
Consultation and Collaboration in
Inclusive Education
15
253.353
Guidance Principles and Practice
15
254.231
Curriculum Theory, Policy and
Practice
15
254.301
Philosophy of Education II
15
254.337
Teaching of Pacific Island Students
in New Zealand Contexts
15
262.339
The Education of Gifted and
Talented Students
15
263.301
Learning and Motivation
15
269.232
Multicultural Education
15
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
The degree may be awarded with an endorsement in Special Education
to those who complete the requirements of the Bachelor of Education
including:
(a) Two compulsory papers (30 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
249.284
Introduction to Special Education
15
249.334
Special Education
15
Requirements
(b) at least 15 credits from:
Code
Title
Credits
249.285
Factors that influence the Learning
of Students with Special Needs
15
Early Intervention
15
249.287
Page 88
Requirements
P any 200-level paper in Education,
Social Sciences or Business
Studies
P any 200-level paper
P any 100-level paper
Education
7.
Candidates who received credit prior to 2007 towards the BEd (TESOL)
and have not yet met their requirement to complete 187.231 may include
254.231 as an optional 200-level paper under 6(b) above.
8.
A candidate who has been awarded a certificate through Massey
University or the former Palmerston North College of Education that
includes papers listed in Regulation 6 and wishes to credit to the BEd
(TESOL) more than the cross-credit allowed under the Recognition of
Prior Learning Regulations will be required to surrender the certificate
before credit to the BEd will be granted.
9.
Candidates who enrol for papers that are prescribed for degrees other
than the Bachelor of Education shall comply with such Regulations for
those papers as apply in those degrees.
Credit Provisions
10. Candidates with previous educational qualifications may have them
assessed for credit to the BEd. Credit may be awarded as follows:
(a) the Higher Diploma may be credited up to 300 credits leaving 60
credits from 300 level papers from List (a) Education and/or List
(b) Professional Education to complete the degree;
(b) a three-year qualification leading to provisional teacher registration
from an accredited provider may be credited up to 240 credits
including credit for 254.101, 275.102, 186.230 and 254.231 or
their equivalents. The remaining 120 credits to complete the degree
should be made up of:
(i) 15 credits at 200 level or above from Schedule One List (a)
Education and/or List (b) Professional Education (excluding
186.230, 254.231 or their equivalents);
(ii) 30 credits from either Schedule One List (a) Education and/
or List (b) Professional Education or Schedule Two, including 15
credits at 200 level or above (excluding 186.230, 254.231 or their
equivalents); and
(iii) 75 credits at 300 level including 60 credits from Schedule One
List (a) Education and/or List (b) Professional Education, and 15
credits from either Schedule One List (a) Education and/or List (b)
Professional Education or Schedule Two; or
the 120 credits pattern of a BEd endorsement.
(c) a two-year qualification leading to provisional teacher registration
from an accredited provider may be credited up to 120 credits
towards the BEd with such credit made up of 254.101, 275.102,
186.230 and 254.231 or their equivalents, 45 credits from 200-level
unspecified Schedule One papers, and 15 credits from 200-level
unspecified Schedule Two papers; or
(d) a one-year qualification leading to provisional teacher registration
from an accredited provider may be credited up to 75 credits
towards the BEd with such credit made up of 254.101, 275.102,
186.230, 254.231 or their equivalents, and 15 credits from
200-level unspecified Schedule One papers;
(b) on a case-by-case basis, were Candidates to have done more than
14 papers, required to do no more papers to complete their BEd
than they would have under the 1996–1998 points distribution.
13. Candidates who began the BEd qualification prior to 2006 may continue
under the previous 300-level requirement for the award of a Bachelor’s
Degree.
14. The Academic Board may, in such exceptional cases as it thinks
fit, approve a personal course of study that does not conform to the
foregoing regulations.
Schedule One – Education and Professional Education
(a)Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.101
An Introduction to Social and
Cultural
Studies in Education
15
R 181.101, 187.101
254.103
Learning in the Information Age
15
R 186.103
254.201
Philosophy of Education I
15
P Any 100-level paper; R 187.201
254.203
Sociology of Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.203
254.301
Philosophy of Education II
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 184.331,
187.301
254.303
Advanced Sociology of Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.303
254.304
Educational Theory
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.304
256.201
Educational Psychology
15
P Any 100-level paper; R 186.201,
186.230; Note 1
263.301
Learning and Motivation
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.301
267.390
Educational Research Methods
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.390
275.102
Human Development
15
R 184.102, 187.102, 208.102,
209.102, 270.102
275.202
Development through Relationships 15
P 209.102 or 275.102, R 209.202,
209.309; Note 3
275.208
Adolescent Development
15
P One of 187.101, 208.102,
209.102, 254.101, 270.102 or
275.102; R 208.208, 208.308,
209.208, 209.308; Note 2
275.237
Narrative in Human Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.237
275.307
Infants in Families
15
P 209.202 or 275.202; R 209.307
(b) Professional Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
186.230
Learning and Teaching
15
P Any 100-level paper; Note 1; R
186.201, 256.201
187.286
Working with Parents
15
187.361
The Teaching of Christian Education 15
209.316
Comparative Physical Education
15
P 209.104, 209.254
209.317
Physical Education: Research
Studies
15
P 209.254 and 209.256 or 274.254
and 274.256
248.326
Art Education: Extension Studies
15
R 207.326
249.284
Introduction to Special Education
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.284
249.285
Factors that Influence the Learning
of Students with Special Needs
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.285
249.287
Early Intervention
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.287
12. Candidates eligible to graduate with a Massey University Diploma
of Teaching (including Kura Kaupapa Māori) in 1996 or after and
who were conjointly enrolled in the BEd subsequent to the merger of
Palmerston North College of Education and Massey University may be:
249.334
Special Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.334
249.382
Teaching Techniques in Special
Education
15
P any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.382
(a) awarded up to 270 credits towards the BEd and be required to do
no more papers to complete their BEd than they would have under
the 1996–1998 points distribution; or
249.384
Consultation and Collaboration in
Inclusive Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.384
(e) Notwithstanding the provisions of general Regulations, additional
credit of up to 30 credits for 200 level unspecified Schedule One
papers may be awarded at the discretion of the Academic Director
to candidates with a one-, two-, or three-year teaching qualification
for papers completed above the 100 level at an approved tertiary
institution.
Transition Provisions
11. Where there was coursework completed towards the BEd prior to 1999
students are required to complete a minimum of 351 credits to complete
the degree. All conforming papers passed and credits accrued to the BEd
will be counted. A minimum of 48 credits must be passed from 300-level
papers in List (a) Education and/or List (b) Professional Education. Any
paper passed under a different number will be credited to the credits
value of whichever paper’s credit value is greater where such a paper has
been re-designated a new number.
Page 89
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.250
Counselling Principles and Practice
15
P Any 100-level Education, Social
Sciences, or Business Studies
paper; R 209.250
269.332
Māori Issues in Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.332
269.334
Ngā Whakatauanga
15
253.255
Cultural Issues in Counselling
15
P Any 100-level Education, Social
Sciences or Business Studies
paper; R 209.255
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.334
269.371
He Akonga Reo Rua i Aotearoa/
Bilingual Education for Aotearoa
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.371
269.372
Understanding Migrant Cultures in
Aotearoa/New Zealand
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.372
269.373
Ethnic Relations and Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.373
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P Any 100-level paper; R 187.270
273.370
Professional Development and
Practice in Adult Education
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.370
273.373
Adult Learning and Teaching
Project
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.373
273.395
Policy and Issues in Adult
Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.395
276.325
Developing Children’s Numeracy
15
P Any 200-level paper from College
of Education; R 211.324
276.396
Numeracy in the Middle Years
15
R 211.396
277.324
Environmental Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from College
of Education; R 211.324
253.353
Guidance Principles and Practice
15
P Any 200-level paper in Education,
Social Sciences or Business
Studies; R 209.353
253.355
Professional Issues in Counselling
15
P One of 209.250, 209.255, 253.250
or 253.255; R 209.355
254.219
Special Topic
15
254.231
Curriculum Theory, Policy and
Practice
15
P any 100-level Education paper;
R 187.231
254.319
Role of the Associate and Tutor
Teacher
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.319
254.330
Philosophy for Children
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.330
254.332
School Organisation and
Management
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.332
254.333
Educational Media
15
254.335
Values Across the Curriculum
15
At least 15 credits at 200-level
from the College of Education; R
187.335
254.336
Education in the Digital Age
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.336
254.337
Teaching of Pacific Island Students
in New Zealand Contexts
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.337
254.342
Special Topic
15
Head of School; R 186.342
254.382
Administrative Project
15
R 187.382
254.377
Teaching and Learning Languages
up to Year 10
15
P Any 100-level languages paper or
equivalent; R 207.377
257.370
Teaching Learners of English as
Another Language
15
P 207.375 or 257.375; R 207.370
257.375
Learning English as Another
Language
15
P Any 200-level Education or
Language Studies paper; R 182.275
207.375
Notes
258.233
Teaching of Language and Reading
15
R 207.233
1.
258.337
Teaching Students with Reading
Difficulties
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.337
Students may not credit both 186.201 (256.201) and 186.230 unless
credit for 186.230 was attained prior to 1999.
2.
Students may not credit both 209.208 (275.208) and 209.308.
262.339
The Education of Gifted and
Talented Students
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.339;
Note 4
3.
Students may not credit both 209.202 and 209.309.
4.
263.331
Assessment of Learning
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.331
Students may not credit both 186.339 and either 186.289 or
185.285.
5.
Students may not credit both 182.234 and 182.232.
265.322
Perspectives in Early Years
Education
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 186.322
6.
265.344
Issues in Early Childhood Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.344
Students who have completed the Diploma of Teaching (Kura
Kaupapa Māori) may include 150.311 Te Papā o te Reo: Māori
Language III in partial fulfilment of Regulation 2(b)(iii).
265.374
Leadership in Early Childhood
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 187.374
266.281
Computers in Classrooms
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.281
266.379
Information Technology in the
Curriculum
15
P any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.379
266.391
Understanding Technology for
Technology Education
15
266.392
Technology Education Theory and
Practice
266.393
269.232
(i) Papers selected from the Bachelor of Education (Teaching)
programme (excluding Professional Inquiry and Practice papers
and those listed under the heading Studies in Subjects for Teachers)
as approved by the Academic Board.
(ii) Papers above 100-level approved for Higher Diploma of
Teaching, Advanced Diploma of Teaching, Graduate Diploma of
Adult Learning and Teaching and Bachelor of Education (Adult
Education).
(iii) Such other papers as may be approved by the Academic Board.
Credits from additional papers may not be credited towards
the 60 credits required at the 300-level from Schedule One.
Schedule Two – Subject Studies
1.
All available 100-, 200-, 300- and 400-level papers approved for degrees
in the University outside the College of Education.
2.
Papers completed while a student was enrolled in the Bachelor of
Education (Teaching) or Diploma of Teaching programme listed under
the heading Studies in Subjects for Teachers.
P any 200-level paper from College
of Education; R 211.391
3.
Other approved papers as follows:
15
P or C 211.391; R 211.392
The Arts and Physical Education
Technology in the School
Curriculum
15
P 211.391 and 211.392 or 266.391
and 266.392; R 211.393
Multicultural Education
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.232;
Note 5
269.234
Bilingual Education
15
R 182.234; Note 5
269.235
He Kōrero Paki
15
R 182.235
Page 90
(c) Additional Papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
248.325
Visual Art Studio III
15
R 207.325
248.327
Art Research: Practical Studies
15
R 207.327
254.322
Composition and Improvisation
15
R 207.322
274.315
Kinesiology
15
P One of 208.255, 208.257,
209.104, or 274.104; R 209.315
Education
Science
254.124
An Introduction to Science
15
R 211.142
254.208
Spaceship Earth and Beyond
15
P any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 211.208
254.124
An Introduction to Science
15
R 211.142
254.352
Coastal Processes
15
P any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 211.352
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Adult Education)
BEd(AdultEd)
(No new enrolments from 2012)
(f) A candidate who has successfully completed a two-year preservice
teacher education programme from an accredited provider may be
credited with up to 90 credits.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(g) A candidate who has successfully completed a one-year preservice
teacher education programme from an accredited provider may be
credited with up to 45 credits.
(h) A candidate who has successfully completed a one-year tertiary
teaching programme from an accredited provider may be credited
with up to 120 credits.
Part II
Course Regulations
Admission
1.
Candidates for admission to the degree of Bachelor of Education (Adult
Education) shall:
(i) A candidate who has successfully completed a two-year tertiary
teaching programme from an accredited provider may be credited
with up to 240 credits.
6.
(a) hold appropriate qualifications and/or experience in the occupation
or discipline area in which they teach adult learners; and
(b) be currently engaged in adult or tertiary education or training, or
have access to adult learners and adult learning organisations in
order to fulfil the practical requirements of the programme.
Course of Study
2.
The course of study of every candidate shall consist of one compulsory
zero credit teaching experience paper (273.200) and 360 credits of study
with:
Candidates must provide evidence of completing at least 400 hours of
satisfactory adult or tertiary teaching experience; this will be credited as
273.200 once evidence provided. Teaching experience hours that have
already been completed as part of a prior Certificate or Diploma in Adult
Education do not need to be repeated in a candidate’s BEd (AdultEd)
course.
Transition Provisions
7.
A student who has been enrolled in the BEd under Wellington
Polytechnic Academic Board Regulations will be able to complete their
studies under those Regulations or choose to complete under the Massey
University BEd(AdultEd) Regulations.
(a) no more than 150 credits at the 100-level;
(b) at least 75 credits at the 300-level;
Schedule One
(c) at least 270 credits from Schedule One for the degree of
BEd(AdultEd), including at least 90 credits at the 200-level and at
least 60 credits at the 300-level; and
Compulsory Papers
(d) up to 90 credits from papers listed in Schedule Two or from papers
selected from approved subjects listed under the Regulations for
other bachelor degrees or the Graduate Diploma in Adult Learning
and Teaching.
3.
Every course of study shall include the following core paper: 273.183.
4.
The papers of study are listed in the Schedules following these
Regulations.
Title
273.183
Adult Education Practicum
15
Requirements
273.200
Adult or Tertiary Teaching
Experience
0
P at least 30 100-level credits from
273 Adult Education; R 187.183
Elective Papers
Code
Title
269.332
Māori Issues in Education
15
P any 200-level paper from College
of Education; R 182.332
(a) The Academic Board may grant exemption from any prerequisite or
corequisite prescribed by these Regulations where a candidate has
previously attained a standard equivalent to that of the pre-requisite
or co-requisite, and may permit the candidate to enrol in a 200-level
or 300-level paper as the case may be.
273.180
Introduction to Adult Learning and
Teaching
15
R 187.180
273.181
Adult Teaching Strategies
15
R 187.181
273.182
Training Skills for the Workplace
15
R 187.182
(b) The Academic Board may in such exceptional cases as it thinks fit
approve a personal course of study which does not conform to the
foregoing Regulations.
273.186
Course Planning and Assessment
for Adult Learning
15
R 187.186
273.189
Interpersonal Skills in Adult
Learning
15
R 187.189
273.190
Academic Skills for Adult Learning
and Teaching
15
R 187.190
273.206
Adult Learning
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.206,
187.278
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.270
273.274
Curriculum Development for Adult
Learning
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.274
273.276
Assessment in Adult Learning
Contexts
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.276
273.281
New Ideas in Adult Teaching
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.281
Waivers, Exemptions and Recognition of Prior Learning
5.
Code
(c) Candidates who have been awarded the Certificate in Adult
Education may cross-credit up to 45 100-level credits to the
BEd(AdultEd) course. A candidate who wishes to credit more than
45 credits will be required to surrender the Certificate before the
credits will be granted.
(d) Candidates who have been awarded the Diploma in Adult
Education may cross-credit up to 45 100-level credits and 45
200-level credits to the BEd(AdultEd) course. A candidate who
wishes to credit more than 90 credits will be required to surrender
the Diploma before the credits will be granted.
(e) A candidate who has successfully completed a three-year preservice
teacher education programme from an accredited provider may be
credited with up to 240 credits.
Requirements
Page 91
Education
Code
Title
Requirements
Code
Title
Requirements
273.282
Teaching Young Adults
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.279,
187.282
273.388
Negotiated Adult Learning Project II 15
P 30 x 200-level credits; R 187.388
273.395
Negotiated Adult Learning Project I
15
P 30 x 100-level credits; R 187.293
Policy and Issues in Adult
Education
15
273.293
P any 200-level paper from College
of Education; R 187.395
273.370
Professional Development and
Practice in Adult Education
15
Any 200-level paper; R 187.370
273.398
Historical Perspectives on PostCompulsory Education and Training
15
P 30 x 200-level credits; R 187.398
273.371
Advanced Studies in Adult Learning 15
P 30 x 200-level credits; R 187.371
273.372
Advanced Studies in Adult Teaching 15
P 30 x 200-level credits from
College of Education; R 187.372
273.373
Adult Learning and Teaching
Project
15
P any 200-level paper; R 187.373
273.376
Culture, Society and Adult
Education
15
P 30 x 200-level credits; R 187.376
Additional Papers
Such other papers as may be approved by the Academic Board.
Schedule Two
Papers listed for other bachelor degrees.
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Teaching)
BEd(Tchg)
Part I
Year 2 – 2012
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
270.104
Integrated Curriculum: Health and
Physical Education
15
R 208.104
270.202
The Arts in the Early Years
15
P any 100-level 270 Early Years
Teaching paper
270.204
Developing Language and Literacy
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 206.204
270.209
Mathematics in the Early Years II
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 210.209,
210.287
270.228
Studies in Infants and Toddlers
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185 228
270.259
Professional Inquiry and Practice
Early Years II
15
P 136.107, 270.107; R 136.259
270.288
Integrated Curriculum I: Social
Sciences and Technology
15
P any 100-level 270 Early Years
Teaching paper; R 210.288
270.289
Integrated Curriculum II: Language
and Science
15
P any 100-level 270 Early Years
Teaching paper; R 210.289
Part II
Course Regulations
Admission
1.
For admission to this programme of study, students must satisfy all
the normal requirements for entry to the University and meet the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher. Students are selected into the degree.
Note
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms
and requirements of the Teachers Council in good faith, the final
decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers Council.
Duration and Total Credits Value
2.
Students enrolled for this degree shall follow an approved course of
study equivalent to three full-time years and pass papers with a total
value of at least 360 credits as specified below unless credit is granted
under the Recognition of Prior Learning Regulations.
Year 3 – 2012
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
270.228
Studies in Infants and Toddlers
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185 228
270.289
Integrated Curriculum II: Language
and Science
15
P any 100-level 270 Early Years
Teaching paper; R 210.289
270.304
Advanced Curriculum: Arts in the
Early Years
15
P any 200-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 206.304
Schedule One – Early Years (Birth to Age Eight) Option
270.322
Perspectives in Early Years
Education
15
P any 200-level paper; R 185.322
Year 1 – 2011
270.325
Inclusive Education
15
P any 200-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185.325
270.341
Early Years Assessment and
Programming
15
P any 200-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185.341
270.359
Professional Inquiry and Practice
Early Years III
15
P 136.259 or 270.259; R 136.359
Course Structure and Content
3.
The course of study must include no fewer than 75 credits at the
300-level.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
270.102
Understanding Child Development
15
R 208.102
270.103
Te Reo Māori Curriculum - Te Reo
Tipua
15
R 181.103
270.105
Foundations of Language and
Literacy
15
R 206.105
270.106
Mathematics in the Early Years I
15
R 210.104
270.107
Professional Inquiry and Practice
Early Years I
15
R 136.107
270.108
Introduction to Numeracy and
Literacy in the Early Years
15
R 270.108
One Subject Studies elective from:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
270.201
Te Noho Marae/Marae Learning
for Teachers
15
P 15 credits at 100-level from
College of Education; R 181.201
270.203
Children’s Literature
15
R 206.203
Spaceship Earth and Beyond
15
P any 100-level paper from College
of Education; R 210.208
Visual Arts for Teachers: Creating
and Presenting
15
R 206.223
270.117
Principles of the Early Years
Curriculum
15
R 185.117, 186.120, 265.120
270.208
278.161
The Self in School and Society
15
R 136.161, 181.101, 187.101,
254.101
270.223
Page 92
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
270.224
Basic Social Processes
15
P any 100-level paper from College
of Education; R 184.224
(a) Should a student in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching)
programme be convicted of an offence against the law after
entry into the programme, the student must advise the Pro ViceChancellor of the College of Education of the conviction within
seven days.
Year 3 from 2013
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Powers of the Disciplinary Regulations.
270.200
He Huarahi Ako: Māori Education
for Teachers
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 181.200
270.286
Learning and Development in the
Early Years Curriculum
15
P any 100-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185.286
270.304
Advanced Curriculum: Arts in the
Early Years
15
Any 200-level Early Years paper
270.322
Perspectives in Early Years
Education
15
P any 200-level paper; R 185.322
270.325
Inclusive Education
15
P any 200-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185.325
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
270.341
Early Years Assessment and
Programming
15
P any 200-level paper from 270
Early Years Teaching; R 185.341
270.359
Professional Inquiry and Practice
Early Years III
15
P 136.259 or 270.259; R 136.359
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 60% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year; or
278.361
Literacy for Diverse Learners
15
P 136.261, 206.204, 270.204 or
278.261; R 136.361
6.
Students enrolled in a Bachelor of Education (Teaching) will be
excluded from re-enrolment for that degree on the following basis:
(c) failure to complete the degree within six years from the date of first
enrolment.
Students excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be readmitted to the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) course with the
approval of the Academic Board.
Practical Requirements
4.
Supervised Student Teaching is a requirement of the degree. Each of the
Professional Inquiry and Practice papers includes at least seven weeks
of supervised teaching experience as well as College-based course work.
Students are required to pass both the teaching experience component
and the coursework component to pass these papers.
Variations
5.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) programme if a student,
in the opinion of the University, is found not to meet in general terms
the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
7.
At the discretion of the Academic Board, a candidate who has
successfully completed a three-year pre-service primary teaching
diploma from an accredited provider will be credited with up to 240
credits in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Early Years Option.
Commencement
8.
These Regulations come into force in 2011. They apply to all students
who enter the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Early Years from 2011.
Transition Provisions
9.
Students enrolled prior to 2011 will complete under the regulations that
were in force at the time of their initial enrolment into the programme.
These transition arrangements will expire in 2015.
The Degree of Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/Diploma in Education Studies
BEd(Tchg)Primary/DipEdStuds
Part I
Special Requirements
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
3.
Part II
Course Structure and Content
Course Regulations
Admission
1.
For admission to this programme of study, students must satisfy all
the normal requirements for entry to the University and meet the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in Aotearoa/New Zealand in terms of good
character and fitness to be a teacher. Students are selected into the
programme.
Note: While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the Teachers Council in good faith, the final decision for
registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand Teachers’ Council.
Duration and Total Credits Value
2.
Students enrolled for this programme shall follow an approved course
of study equivalent to four full-time years and pass papers with a total
value of at least 480 credits as specified below unless credit is granted
under the Recognition of Prior Learning Regulations.
The BEd(Tchg)/DipEdStuds must be completed concurrently as a
single programme of study. Only when all of the requirements of both
component qualifications have been completed may the degree/diploma
be conferred upon the candidate.
4.
The course of study for the BEd(Tchg) Primary/DipEdStuds must
include no fewer than 150 credits at the 300-level or above.
5.
The course of study must also include:
BEd (Tchg) Primary/DipEdStuds
Year 1
Code
Title
Requirements
278.108
Introduction to Classroom Practice
15
R 136.108
278.160
The Self, Learning and
Development Within Education
15
R 136.160
278.161
The Self in School and Society
15
R 136.161
278.162
Introduction to Literacy and
Numeracy
15
R 136.162
278.163
Foundations of Mathematics
Teaching
15
R 136.163
278.164
Foundations of Literacy Teaching
15
R 136.164
278.166
Multidisciplinary Studies I
15
R 136.165, 278.165
Page 93
Education
Code
Title
278.167
Multidisciplinary Studies II
15
Requirements
Code
Title
R 136.165, 278.165
278.321
Advanced Studies in Mathematics I 15
P any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 210.321
278.323
Art Research Practical Studies
15
P Any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 206.323
278.333
Learning Visual Language
15
P Any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 206.333
278.352
Coastal Processes
15
P Any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 210.352,
211.352, 254.352
278.355
Living in a Globalised World
15
P 15 credits on 278 Primary
Teaching at 200-level
Year 2
Code
Title
Requirements
278.206
Developing Teaching Practice
15
P 136.108 or 278.10; R 136.205,
136.206
278.260
Effective Teaching of Mathematics
15
P 136.162 or 278.162; P or C
136.163 or 278.163; R 136.260
278.261
Effective Teaching of Reading
15
P 136.162 and 136.164 or 278.162
and 278.164; R 136.261
278.264
The Child in Diverse Contexts
30
P 136.160 and 136.161 or 278.160
and 278.161; R 136.264
278.265
Effective Teaching of Writing
15
P 136.162 or 278.162; R 136.262,
136.265
278.266
Interdisciplinary Studies I
15
P 15 credits at 100-level from
278 Primary Teaching; R 136.263,
278.263
278.267
Interdisciplinary Studies II
15
P 15 credits at 100-level from
278 Primary Teaching; R 136.263,
278.263
Practical Requirements
6.
Credits
Requirements
278.305
Professional Teaching Practice
30
P One of 136.205, 136.206 or
278.206; R 136.305
278.360
Mathematics for Diverse Learners
15
P 136.260 or 278.260; R 136.360
278.361
Literacy for Diverse Learners
15
P One of 136.261, 206.204, 270.204
or 278.261; R 136.361
278.362
Interdisciplinary Studies for Diverse 30
Learners
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Powers of the Disciplinary Regulations.
One of the following papers:
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.301
Philosophy of Education II
15
P 15 credits at 200-level; R
184.301, 187.301, 278.363
254.304
Educational Theory
15
P 15 credits at 200-level from
College of Education; R 187.304,
278.363
One approved 200- or 300-level education paper to the value of 15 credits
Year 4
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
278.405
Advanced Professional Teaching
Practice
15
P 278.305 or 136.305, C 278.406
278.406
Classroom in Action
15
P 136.305 or 278.305
278.460
Classroom Numeracy and Literacy
15
P 136.360 and 136.361 or 278.360
and 278.361
278.461
Classroom Enquiry
15
P Any 300-level from 278 Primary
Teaching paper
278.463
Te Hononga - Engaging with Māori
in Education
15
P any 300-level from 278 Primary
Teaching paper
Two of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
278.300
Music Leadership in the Classroom
15
P Any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 206.300
278.301
Integrated Technology Resource
Development for Teachers
15
P Any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 210.301
278.319
Hauora (Total Wellbeing)
15
P any 200-level 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 208.319
Page 94
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/Diploma
in Education Studies programme if a student, in the opinion of the
University, is found not to meet in general terms the requirements set
down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher
in New Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/
Diploma in Education Studies programme be convicted of an
offence against the law after entry into the programme, the student
must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Education of
the conviction within seven days.
P Any 200-level from 278 Primary
Teaching paper; R 136.362
Code
Supervised Student Teaching is a requirement of the degree. Each of the
Professional Practice papers includes supervised teaching experience as
well as College-based course work. Students are required to pass both
the teaching experience component and the course work component to
pass these papers.
Variations
7.
Title
Requirements
15 credits from approved 200- or 300-level degree papers
Year 3
Code
Credits
8.
Students enrolled in a Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/
Diploma in Education Studies will be excluded from re-enrolment for
that degree on the following basis:
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 60% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year; or
(c) failure to complete the degree within six years from the date of first
enrolment.
Students excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Bachelor of Education (Teaching)/Diploma in Education Studies
course with the approval of the Academic Board.
Transition Provisions
11. (a) Students who enrolled in136.205 in 2009 and who fail to
successfully complete the course will not be disadvantaged in
278.206, and will be able to graduate with 5 less credits should this
circumstance arise.
(b) Students who enrolled in136.262 in 2009 and who fail to
successfully complete the course will not be disadvantaged in
278.265, and will be able to graduate with 5 extra credits should
this circumstance arise.
Commencement
12. These Regulations come into force in 2011. They apply to all students
who enter the Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary/Diploma in
Education Studies from 2011.
Education
Te Aho Tātairangi: The Degree of Bachelor of Teaching Māori Medium/Diploma in Māori
Education
BTchgMāoriMed/DipMāoriEd
Te Tau Tuarua – Year Two
Subject to Approval by CUAP and NZTC
Part I
Code
Title
These Regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
150.210
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
P 150.111
268.211
Te Tiringa
15
P 268.110
268.217
Te Kawa o te Kura II
30
P 268.107
Part II
268.220
Tikanga Pāngarau II
15
P 268.120
268.221
Te More
15
P 268.121
268.230
Te Irarua II
15
P 268.130
268.231
Te Aro ā-Wai
15
P 268.131
Course Regulations
Admission
1.
Students admitted to Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/DipMāoriEd
shall before enrolment have:
(a) Demonstrated a high level of competency in Te Reo Māori me ōna
tikanga;
2.
3.
Te Tau Tuatoru – Year Three
Title
Credits
Requirements
(b) Demonstrated competence in literacy and numeracy (including but
not limited to English) and;
150.211
Te Reo Whakanakonako:
Embellishing the Language
15
P 150.210
(c) Met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
268.310
Te Puanga
15
P 268.211
268.317
Te Kawa o te Kura III
30
P 268.217
268.320
Tikanga Pāngarau III
15
P 268.220
268.321
Te Weu
15
P 268.221
268.330
Te Irarua III
15
P 268.230
268.331
Te Aro ā-Tū, ā-Rongo
15
P 268.231
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the New Zealand Teachers Council in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers Council.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection
where this is required.
Students enrolled for this programme shall follow an approved course
of study equivalent to four full-time years and pass papers with a total
value of at least 480 credits as specified below unless credit is granted
under the Recognition of Prior Learning Regulations.
Special Requirements
5.
Requirements
Code
Duration and Total Credits Value
4.
Credits
Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/DipMāoriEd must be completed
concurrently as a single programme of study. Only when all of the
requirements of both component qualifications have been completed may
the degree/diploma be conferred upon the candidate.
Te Tau Tuawhā – Year Four
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
150.311
Te Papa o Te Reo:Māori Language
III
15
P 150.211, 150.210
268.417
Te Kawa o Te Kura IV
30
P 268.317
268.421
Te Aka
15
P 268.321
268.430
Te Kura Nui
30
P 268.330, 268.310
268.431
Te Aro ā-Tahi
15
P 268.331
Elective Studies (select one of the following):
Either
Course Structure and Content
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
6.
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100 level BA paper
269.332
Māori Issues in Education
15
R 182.332
254.377
Teaching and Learning Languages
up to Year 10
15
P any 100 level language paper or
equivalent R 207.377
7.
The course of study for the Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/
DipMāoriEd must include no fewer than 150 credits at the 300-level or
above, and a total of 60 credits in Te Reo Māori including 150.311.
The course of study must also include:
Bachelor of Teaching Māori Medium/Diploma in Māori Education
Te Tau Tuatahi – Year One
Code
Title
Credits
150.111
Te Reo Konakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
268.107
Te Kawa o te Kura I
15
268.110
Te Hā
15
268.120
Tikanga Pāngarau I
15
268.121
Te Pū
15
268.130
Te Irarua I
15
268.131
Te Aro ā-Kapa
30
Requirements
Or: 15 credits from approved 200- or 300- level papers listed under the
Regulations for degrees other than Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/
DipMāoriEd.
Practical Requirements
8.
Supervised student teaching is a requirement of the degree. Each of the
Te Kawa o Te Kura (professional practice) papers includes supervised
teaching experience as well as college-based course work. Students are
required to pass both the teaching experience component and the course
work component to pass these papers.
Variations
9.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration
of a student in Te Aho Tātairangi if a student, in the opinion of the
University, is found not to meet in general terms the requirements set
down by the New Zealand Teachers Council for registration as a teacher
in New Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in Te Aho Tātairangi be convicted of an offence
against the law after entry into the programme, the student must
Page 95
Education
advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Education of the
conviction within seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
10. Students enrolled in Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/DipMāoriEd
will be excluded from re-enrolment for that degree on the following
basis:
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 60% of an approved part-time programme of
study in any academic year; or
(c) failure to complete the Te Aho Tātairangi qualification within six
years from the date of first enrolment.
Students excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted to the
Te Aho Tātairangi: BTchgMāoriMed/DipMāoriEd course with the approval of
the Academic Board.
Transitional Provision
11. Students enrolled in Te Aho Tātairangi prior to 2011 will be permitted to
complete their course of study under the Regulations that were in place
at the time of their enrolment. These transition arrangements will expire
in 2012.
The Degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy
BSpchLangTher
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Credits
172.133
Introduction to Language Studies
15
172.234
Phonetics
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
Entry into Year One for the Degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language
Therapy requires University Entrance, including:
254.102
Introduction to Professional
and Ethical Practice in Different
Learning Contexts
15
Either
271.150
Introduction to Communication
Disorders
15
R 186.150
271.151
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech
and Hearing
15
P 186.150 or 271.150; R 186.151
271.152
Speech-Language Therapy and the
Treaty of Waitangi
15
R 186.152
271.154
Speech and Language Development 15
P 186.150, 186.151 and 186.152
or 271.150, 271.151 and 271152;
R 186.154
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
172.231
Linguistics for Speech Therapists
15
P 171.133; R 172.235
175.206
Memory and Cognition
15
P 175.102
271.253
Child Language Disorders I
15
P 186.153 and 186.154 or 254.102
and 271.154; R 186.253
271.254
Articulation and Phonological
Disorders in Children
15
P 186.153 and 186.154 or 254.102
and 271.154; R 271.254
271.255
Assessment Methods for Speech
and Language Disorders
15
P 186.153 and 186.154 or 254.102
and 271.154; R 186.255
271.256
Field Work and Clinical Skills I
15
P 186.153 and 186.154 or 254.102
and 271.154; R 186.256
271.257
Child Language Disorders II
15
P 186.253 and 186.254 or 271.253
and 271.254; R 186.257
271.258
Neurogenic Communication
Disorders I
15
P 186.253 and 186.254 or 271.253
and 271.254; R 186.258
Course Regulations
(a) 14 credits or more at Level 3 or higher on the National
Qualifications Framework in three approved subjects including:
14 credits at Level 3 or higher in English and a minimum of 16
credits or more at NCEA Level 3 or higher in one of the following
subjects; Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics with Calculus, Physics;
Science, or Statistics and Modelling; or
(b) admission to the University with a B Bursary or higher in the
University Entrance Bursaries and Scholarships Examination; or
(c) admission with a recognised alternative such as work completed at
tertiary degree level and equivalent entry qualification; and
(d) acceptance as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education.
2.
3.
Admission to the programme will be granted or withheld on
consideration of Regulation 1 and on a selection interview. To enter Year
Two students must have passed all papers in Year One and demonstrate
appropriate interpersonal, communication and clinical skills, which will
be evaluated at the end of Year One.
The programme of study for the Bachelor of Speech and Language
Therapy shall comprise the course of study as set out in the Schedule of
these Regulations and requires:
(a) successful completion of each paper prescribed for each year of
study; and
(b) satisfactory performance in such practical work as may be
prescribed to complete a minimum of 300 hours of supervised
clinical practice.
4.
Year 1
Title
Part II
1.
Course of Study
Students enrolled in a Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy will be
excluded from re-enrolment for that degree on the following basis:
Code
Requirements
Year 2
Year 3
(a) Failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
(b) Failure to pass papers totalling at least 62.5 academic points or
failure to pass at least 60 percent of an approved part-time course
of study in any academic year.
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
271.392
Technology in Communication
Disorders
15
P 186.255, 186.256, 186.257 and
186.258 or 271.255, 271.256,
271.257 and 271.258; R 186.392
(c) Failure to complete the degree within six years from the date of
first enrolment in the Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy.
This period may at any time, in special circumstances, be extended
by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Education.
Page 96
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
271.393
Neurogenic Communication
Disorders II
15
P 186.254, 186.255, 186.256,
186.257 and 186.258 or 271.254,
271.255, 271.256, 271.257 and
271.258; R 186.393
254.337
Teaching of Pacific Island Students
in New Zealand Contexts
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.337
271.486
Speech and Language Therapy
Practice and Diverse Clinical
Populations
15
P 186.490, 186.493 and 186.496 or
271.490, and 271.496
271.487
Paediatric Dysphagia
15
P 186.394, 186.396, 186.397 and
186.398 or 271.394, 271.396,
271.397 and 271.398; R 186.487
271.488
Aural Rehabilitation, Assessment
and Intervention
15
P 186.487, 186.490 and 186.496
or 271.487, 271.490 and 271.496;
R 186.488
271.489
Voice Disorders, Assessment and
Treatment
15
P 186.150, 186.151, 186.390,
186.394, 186.491 and 186.493
or 271.150, 271.151, 271.390,
271.394, 271.491 and 271.493;
R 186.391, 186.489
271.490
Advanced Topics in Speech and
Language Therapy I
15
P 186.394, 186.395, 186.396,
186.397 and 186.398 or 271.394,
271.395, 271.396, 271.397 and
271.398; R 186.490
271.496
Advanced Clinical Paper I
15
P 186.394, 186.396 and 186.398
or 271.394, 271.396 and 271.398;
R 186.496
271.498
Advanced Clinical Paper II
15
P 186.487, 186.490 and 186.496
or 271.487, 271.490 and 271.496;
R 186.498
271.394
271.395
271.396
Motor Speech Disorders
Fluency Disorders
Field Work and Clinical Skills II
15
15
15
P 186.392, 186.393 and 186.395
or 271.392, 271.393 and 271.395;
R 186.394
P 186.255, 186.256, 186.257 and
186.258 or 271.255, 271.256,
271.257 and 271.258; R 186.395
P 186.254, 186.255, 186.256 and
186.257 or 271.254, 271.255,
271.256 and 271.257; R 186.396
271.397
Adult Dysphagia
15
P 186.392, 186.393, 186.394 and
186.395 or 271.392, 271.393,
271.394 and 271.395; R 186.397
271.398
Research Methods for Speech and
Language Therapy
15
P 186.392, 186.393 and 186.395
or 271.392, 271.393 and 271.395;
R 186.398
Year 4
(i) All of the following:
Undergraduate Diplomas
The Diploma in Adult Education
DipAdultEd
No new enrolments from 2012
5.
Candidates who have been awarded the Certificate in Adult Education
may cross-credit up to 45 100-level credits to the Diploma in Adult
Education course. A candidate who wishes to credit more than 45 credits
will be required to surrender the Certificate before the credits will be
granted.
6.
Candidates must provide evidence of completing at least 400 hours of
satisfactory adult or tertiary teaching experience this will be credited
as 273.200 once provided. Teaching experience hours that have already
been completed as part of a prior Certificate in Adult Education do not
need to be repeated in a candidate’s Diploma in Adult Education course.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
Admission to the diploma shall be subject to the approval of the
Academic Board.
2.
Candidates for entry to the Diploma in Adult Education shall:
Transition Provisions
7.
(a) hold appropriate qualifications and/or experience in the occupation
or discipline area in which they teach adult learners;
(b) be currently engaged in adult or tertiary education or training, or
have access to adult learners and organisations in order to fulfil the
practical requirements of the programme.
Course of Study
3.
The course of study of every candidate shall consist of one compulsory
zero credit teaching experience paper (273.200) and 240 credits (16
papers) at 100-, 200- and 300-level chosen from those listed in the
Schedules to these Regulations. The following requirements must be
fulfilled:
(a) Not more than 150 credits (10 papers) shall be at the 100-level.
(b) At least 90 credits (6 papers) at 100-level and at least 90 credits
(6 papers) at 200-level shall be completed from Schedule One,
including 273.183 Adult Education Practicum.
(c) The remaining 60 credits (4 papers) may be selected from
Schedules One or Two.
4.
The Academic Board may in such exceptional cases as it thinks fit
approve a personal course of study that does not conform to the
foregoing Regulations.
A candidate who has been enrolled in the Advanced Diploma in Tertiary
Teaching under Wellington Polytechnic Academic Board Regulations
may be able to complete their studies under those Regulations or choose
to complete under the Massey University Diploma in Adult Education
Regulations.
Schedule One
Compulsory Papers
Code
Title
273.183
Adult Education Practicum
15
Requirements
273.200
Adult or Tertiary Teaching
Experience
0
P at least 30 100-level credits from
Schedule One; R 187.183
Elective Papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
269.332
Māori Issues in Education
15
R 182.332
273.180
Introduction to Adult Learning and
Teaching
15
R 187.180
273.181
Adult Teaching Strategies
15
R 187.181
273.182
Training Skills for the Workplace
15
R 187.182
Page 97
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
273.186
Course Planning and Assessment
for Adult Learning
15
R 187.186
273.371
Advanced Studies in Adult Learning 15
Credits
Requirements
R 187.371
273.372
Advanced Studies in Adult Teaching 15
R 187.372
273.189
Interpersonal Skills in Adult
Learning
15
R 187.189
273.373
Adult Learning and Teaching
Project
15
R 187.373
273.190
Academic Skills for Adult Learning
and Teaching
15
R 187.190
273.376
Culture, Society and Adult
Education
15
R 187.376
273.206
Adult Learning
15
R 187.278
273.388
Negotiated Adult Learning Project II 15
R 187.388
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.270
273.395
R 187.395
Curriculum Development for Adult
Learning
15
R 187.274
Policy and Issues in Adult
Education
15
273.274
273.398
R 187.398
Assessment in Adult Learning
Contexts
15
R 187.276
Historical Perspectives on PostCompulsory Education and Training
15
273.276
273.281
New Ideas in Adult Teaching
15
R 187.281
Additional Papers
273.282
Teaching Young Adults
15
R 187.279
Such other papers as may be approved by the Academic Board.
273.293
Negotiated Adult Learning Project I
15
R 187.293
273.370
Professional Development and
Practice in Adult Education
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.370
Schedule Two
Papers listed for other bachelor degrees.
The Diploma for Education Support Workers
DipEducSuppWkrs
Part I
Five elective papers (75 credits):
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the Diploma candidates are required to complete at least
120 credits as follows:
Three compulsory papers (45 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.285
Factors that Influence the Learning
of Students with Special Needs
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.285
Introduction to Professional
and Ethical Practice in Different
Learning Contexts
15
Introduction to Literacy and
Numeracy
15
254.102
254.162
R 136.162, 278.162
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.284
Introduction to Special Education
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.284
249.287
Early Intervention
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.287
249.382
Teaching Techniques in Special
Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.382
249.384
Consultation and Collaboration in
Inclusive Education
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education; R 186.384
258.301
Language, Literacy and Cognitive
Development
15
P Any 200-level paper from the
College of Education
264.101
How People Learn
15
264.102
Classroom Management
15
269.232
Multicultural Education
15
P Any 100-level paper from the
College of Education; R 182.232
271.150
Introduction to Communication
Disorders
15
R 186.150
275.102
Human Development
15
R 208.102, 209.102, 270.102
Transition Arrangements
Students who enrolled at Massey University in the Certificate for Teacher
Aides prior to 2011 may choose to complete their programme under the
regulations that were in force at the time of their first enrolment. These
transition arrangements expire in 2012.
The Diploma in Human Development
DipHD
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the diploma candidates are required to complete at least
120 credits as follows:
(a) Core Papers (60 credits)
All of the following papers:
Page 98
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
275.102
Human Development
15
R 208.102, 209.102, 270.10
275.203
Child Development
15
P One of 187.101, 208.102,
209.102, 254.101, 270.102 or
275.102
275.204
Adult Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102
275.208
Adolescent Development
15
P One of 187.101, 208.102,
209.102, 254.101, 270.102 or
275.102,; R 208.308, 208.208;
209.208, 209.308, 275.308
(b) Elective Papers (60 credits)
At least 30 credits from:
253.250
Counselling Principles and
Practices
15
P any relevant 100-level paper
in Education, Social Sciences or
Business Studies; R 209.250
253.255
Cultural Issues in Counselling
15
P any relevant 100-level paper
in Education, Social Sciences or
Business Studies; R 209.255
253.353
Guidance Principles and Practice
15
R 209.353
275.202
Development through Relationships 15
P 209.102
275.237
Narrative in Human Development
15
P 209.102
275.304
Gender Development
15
P any 200-level paper
253.250
Counselling Principles and
Practices
15
P any relevant 100-level paper
in Education, Social Sciences or
Business Studies; R 209.250
275.307
Infants in Families
15
R 209.307
Up to 30 credits from:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
176.211
Gender and Sexuality: Central
Themes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.221
Ethnicity and Identity: Central
Themes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
250.233
Gender and Health
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
168.213, 168.233
273.206
Adult Learning
15
P 30 x 100-level credits, R 187.278
Undergraduate Certificates
The Certificate in Adult Education
CertAdultEd
No new enrolments from 2012
5.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Transition Provisions
6.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Certificate shall be subject to the approval of the
Academic Board.
2.
Candidates for entry to the Certificate in Adult Education shall:
(a) hold appropriate qualifications and/or experience in the occupation
or discipline area in which they teach adult learners; and
(b) be currently engaged in adult or tertiary education or training, or
have access to adult learners and organisations in order to fulfil the
practical requirements of the programme.
Candidates must provide evidence of completing at least 200 hours of
satisfactory adult or tertiary teaching experience this will be credited as
273.100 once provided.
A candidate who has been enrolled in the Advanced Certificate in
Tertiary Teaching under Wellington Polytechnic Academic Board
Regulations may be able to complete their studies under those
Regulations or choose to complete under the Massey University
Certificate in Adult Education Regulations.
Schedule One
Compulsory Papers
Code
Title
Credits
273.100
Adult or Tertiary Teaching
Experience
0
Requirements
273.183
Adult Education Practicum
15
P at least 30 100-level credits from
Schedule One; R 187.183
Elective Papers
Course of Study
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
3.
273.180
Introduction to Adult Learning and
Teaching
15
R 187.180
273.181
Adult Teaching Strategies
15
R 187.181
273.182
Training Skills for the Workplace
15
R 187.182
273.186
Course Planning and Assessment
for Adult Learning
15
R 187.186
273.189
Interpersonal Skills in Adult
Learning
15
R 187.189
273.190
Academic Skills for Adult Learning
and Teaching
15
R 187.189
273.206
Adult Learning
15
R 187.206
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.270
The course of study of every candidate shall consist of one compulsory
zero credit teaching experience paper (273.100) and 120 credits (8
papers) at 100- and 200-level chosen from those listed in the Schedules
to these Regulations. The following requirements must be fulfilled:
(a) At least 90 credits (6 papers) shall be completed from Schedule
One, including 273.183 Adult Education Practicum.
(b) The remaining 30 credits (2 papers) may be selected from
Schedules One or Two.
4.
The Academic Board may in such exceptional cases as it thinks fit
approve a personal course of study that does not conform to the
foregoing Regulations.
Page 99
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.274
Curriculum Development for Adult
Learning
15
R 187.274
273.293
Negotiated Adult Learning Project I
15
R 187.293
273.276
Assessment in Adult Learning
Contexts
15
R 187.276
273.281
New Ideas in Adult Teaching
15
R 187.281
273.282
Teaching Young Adults
15
R 187.279; 187.282
Additional Papers
Such other papers as may be approved by the Academic Board.
Schedule Two
Papers listed for other bachelor degrees.
The Certificate in Counselling Theory
CertCounsTh
No new enrolments from 2012
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
275.208
Adolescent Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.208
275.237
Narrative in Human Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.237
(c) 30 credits may be selected from:
Code
Title
Credits
114.242
Human Resource Development
15
134.104
Practical Ethics
15
134.220/
320
Business and Professional Ethics
15
1.
Eligibility for enrolment will be as specified for undergraduate degrees.
146.211
Systems of Healing
15
2.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate in Counselling Theory, a
candidate shall be required to pass 120 credits from the following
Schedules.
147.201
Issues in Rehabilitation
15
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
175.201
Social Psychology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
176.211
Gender and Sexuality: Central
Themes
15
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
250.233
Gender and Health
15
(a) Compulsory (60 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.250
Counselling Principles and Practice
15
P Any 100-level paper in Education,
Social Sciences or Business
Studies relevant to the Certificate;
R 209.250
253.255
Cultural Issues in Counselling
15
P Any 100-level paper in Education,
Social Sciences or Business
Studies relevant to the Certificate;
R 209.255
253.355
Professional Issues in Counselling
15
P One of 209.250, 209.255,
253.250, or 253.255; R 209.355
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
(b) At least 30 credits from:
Code
Title
Credits
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore
and Economics
15
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
275.202
Development through Relationships 15
Requirements
R 134.219/319
3.
Candidates will be responsible for meeting prerequisites stipulated for
specific papers.
4.
Candidates may be credited with up to 45 credits to the Certificate from
other appropriate qualifications. Candidates may credit papers to a total
of not more than 45 credits from the Certificate in Counselling Theory
to a course for another University degree, diploma or certificate. Such
cross-credits shall require the approval of the Academic Board.
5.
A candidate who wishes to credit papers totalling more than 45 credits
in terms of this Regulation will be required to surrender the Certificate
before the credit will be granted.
6.
Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor, a student may select
papers up to the value of 30 credits from those papers listed in other
programme Schedules.
7.
In the case of sufficient merit, the Certificate may be awarded with
Distinction.
Requirements
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.202
The Certificate in Early Years Education
CertEarlyYears
No new enrolments from 2012
Part II
Part I
Course Regulations
Eligibility to Enrol
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Page 100
1.
Before enrolling for the certificate, a candidate shall have matriculated
or have been granted special admission.
Education
Course Regulations
2.
To qualify for the Certificate in Early Years Education a candidate shall
undertake a course of study comprising six papers from the following list
to a value of 90 credits:
(a) Five compulsory papers (75 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
265.120
Principles of the Early Years
Curriculum
15
R 186.120
265.289
Learning and Development and the
Early Years Curriculum
15
R 186.289
265.293
Studies in Infants and Toddlers
15
R 186.293
265.322
Perspectives in Early Years
Education
15
R 186.322
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.101
An Introduction to Social and
Cultural Studies in Education
15
R 187.101
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
3.
Students must pass one paper from 265.120, 254.101 or 275.102 before
enrolling in 200-level papers. At least one 200-level paper selected from
2(a) above must be passed before enrolling in 265.322.
Award of Certificate
4.
In cases of sufficient merit the certificate may be awarded with
distinction.
5.
A candidate who has been awarded a Certificate may apply to credit
certificate papers towards a first qualification of the University, provided
that any such papers shall comply with the Regulations for the degree in
question. A candidate who wishes to credit more than 30 credits will be
required to surrender the Certificate before the credit will be granted.
(b) One of the following papers (15 credits)
The Certificate in Human Development
CertHD
No new enrolments from 2011
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
275.208
Adolescent Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.208
275.237
Narrative in Human Development
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.237
275.307
Infants in Families
15
P 209.102 or 275.102; R 209.307
(b) 30 credits may be selected from approved BA and BEd papers in
related fields.
3.
A candidate who has been awarded a Certificate may apply to credit
Certificate papers towards a first degree of the University, provided that
any such papers shall comply with the Regulations for the degree in
question. A candidate who wishes to credit more than 30 credits in terms
of the Regulation will be required to surrender the Certificate before the
credit will be granted.
4.
A candidate who has been awarded the Certificate and who does not
wish to surrender it may apply to cross-credit 30 credits from the
Certificate to a first degree of the University. A cross-credit fee is
applicable.
5.
A candidate may be cross-credited with up to 30 credits of the Certificate
from other appropriate qualifications.
Course Regulations
1.
Eligibility for enrolment will be as specified for undergraduate degrees.
2.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate in Human Development,
a candidate shall be required to pass 120 credits from the following
Schedules:
(a) At least 90 credits from:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
275.202
Development through Relationships 15
R 209.202
The Certificate in Teaching English as an Additional Language
CertTEAL
No new enrolments from 2011
to speakers of other languages within a formal educational setting;
and
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(b) access to a group of learners of English as an additional language in
order to complete the practically oriented assignments.
3.
Part II
To qualify for the award of the Certificate in Teaching English as an
Additional Language, a candidate shall have passed a minimum of 60
credits from the following Schedules:
(a) Two compulsory papers:
Course Regulations
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
1.
Before enrolment in this Certificate, candidates shall:
257.370
15
P 207.375 or 257.375; R 207.370
(a) have met the English Language Competency requirements as
outlined in the relevant section of the Massey University Calendar.
Teaching Learners of English as
Another Language
257.375
Learning English as Another
Language
15
Any 200-level Education or
Language Studies paper; R 207.375
2.
Candidates must have:
(a) a teaching qualification from a New Zealand accredited provider
or provide evidence of recent experience in the teaching of English
Page 101
Education
(b) 30 credits from:
Either
Either
Code
Title
Credits
172.132
Language and Culture
15
Requirements
or one 100-level paper in a language (e.g. Spanish, Māori, French,
Japanese or German); and
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
172.232
Language and Society
15
P any 100-level paper
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
254.337
Teaching of Pacific Island Students
in
New Zealand Contexts
15
Any 200-level paper; R 187.337
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.270
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
186.230
Learning and Teaching
15
Any 100-level paper Note 1;
R.186.201, 254.201
or
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.231
Curriculum Theory, Policy and
Practice
15
Any 100-level Education paper;
R 187.231
Note: Those students who have already credited 207.370, 257.370 or 207.375,
257.375 to a previously completed qualification will be unable to enrol in the
Certificate of Teaching English as an Additional Language programme. Those
students should consult the Head of School for further course advice.
Certificate
The Certificate for Teacher Aides
CertTA
No new enrolments from 2011
(b) Four of the following:
Part I
Code
Title
Credits
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
182.001
Te Reo Tuatahi
8
182.002
Māori Language Teaching
8
182.003
Te Reo Tuarua
8
187.005
Reading
8
187.007
Library
8
Course Regulations
Entry Requirements
187.008
Mathematics
8
187.009
Written Language
8
1.
Before enrolment in this Certificate candidates shall:
187.010
Junior School
8
(a) be at least 18 years of age and produce such evidence of a general
education as may be required by the Academic Board; or
187.011
Creating Displays/Resources
8
187.013
Computer Applications
8
(b) be 20 years of age or over.
187.014
Social/Working Relationships
8
This programme is designed for people who are currently employed
as teacher aides in schools or centres, or people who wish to become
teacher aides and have obtained access to a school or centre in order to
fulfil the practical requirements of the programme.
187.047
Computer Applications in the
Classroom
8
187.048
Adapting the Curriculum for
Learners with Special Educational
Needs
8
187.049
Learners with Special Education
Needs:
An Introduction
8
187.050
Working with Others in Special
Education
8
187.051
Challenging Behaviours: Positively
Facilitating Behaviour Change
8
187.052
Helping Learners Develop Essential
Skills
8
Part II
2.
3.
To qualify for the Certificate, a candidate shall have passed a minimum
of 72 credits, including 40 credits from the four compulsory papers in (a)
and a further 32 credits selected from the papers in (b).
Candidates complete:
(a)Compulsory:
Code
Title
Credits
187.001
How Children Learn
10
187.002
The Developing Child
10
187.003
Language Development
10
187.004
Behaviour Management
10
Page 102
Requirements
Requirements
P C 182.001
Education
Graduate Diplomas
The Graduate Diploma in Adult Learning and Teaching
GradDipALT
No new enrolments from 2011
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Entry Requirements
1.
(a) been admitted to a university degree or diploma; or
Candidates must be:
(a) currently employed in adult education; or
(b) have access to adult learners and organisations in order to fulfil the
practical requirements of the programme.
Course of Study
3.
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.370
Professional Development and
Practice in Adult Education
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.370
273.373
Adult Learning and Teaching
Project
15
P/C 187.370; R 187.373
273.395
Policy and Issues in Adult
Education
15
P Any 200-level paper; R 187.395
Schedule Two
Before enrolment candidates shall have:
(b) provided evidence of at least two years of appropriate practical,
professional or scholastic experience of an appropriate level.
2.
Code
Candidates complete a minimum of 120 credits including at least 75
credits at 300-level. All papers in Schedule One must be completed.
Schedule One
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.206
Adult Learning
15
R 187.206
273.270
Teaching Adults
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.270
273.300
Post-compulsory Teaching
Experience
0
Candidates complete three papers at 200- or 300-level or their equivalent
approved by the Head of the School of Educational Studies from the BEd or
BEd (Adult Ed) Schedules. At least two must be at 300-level.
Endorsement
Candidates may qualify for an endorsement of the Diploma by taking at least
two papers specified in the Schedule for that endorsement as part of their
Schedule Two requirement.
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
257.370
Teaching Learners of English as
Another Language
15
P 207.375; R 207.370
257.375
Learning English as Another
Language
15
P any 200-level Education or
Language Studies paper; R 207.375
4.
Candidates must provide evidence of completing at least 200 hours of
satisfactory post-compulsory teaching experience this will be credited as
273.300 once provided.
5.
Candidates, with Head of School approval, may normally cross-credit up
to 30 credits at 200-level from another completed qualification.
The Graduate Diploma in Education
GradDipEd
No new enrolments from 2012
3.
(a) 200-, 300-, 400- or 700-level papers taught in the College of
Education; and/or
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
(b)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.599
Research Investigation
30
R 180.599
4.
Candidates will comply with the Regulations for each paper as apply in
the respective programmes in which the paper is prescribed. Candidates
may study papers in the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary)
programme or any other papers with the approval of the Director of the
School of Teacher Education and Undergraduate Studies.
5.
Candidates shall either complete to the satisfaction of the Academic
Board of the University and of the Board of Studies of a recognised
College of Education the papers and teaching practice required for
admission to teaching or submit evidence to the satisfaction of the
Academic Board that two years of efficient service in the practice
of teaching or in educational work of a related character have been
completed.
6.
The Academic Board may in such exceptional circumstances as it thinks
fit approve a course of study that does not conform to the foregoing
Regulations.
Before enrolling for this diploma candidates shall:
(a) have been admitted to a university degree or approved diploma
or have satisfied the Academic Board that they are academically
qualified to undertake the course; and
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
2.
Every course of study shall comprise a minimum of 120 credits with no
more than 45 credits at 200-level and at least 75 credits at 300-level or
above.
Candidates shall pass papers from:
Page 103
Education
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early Childhood Education)
GradDipTchg(ECE)
Subject to CUAP Approval
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section l (d) General Disciplinary
Powers of the Disciplinary Regulations.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
6.
Course Regulations
Admission to Preservice Teacher Education Programmes
1.
Candidates enrolled in a Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early
Childhood Education) will be excluded from re-enrolment for that
diploma on the following basis:
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
Candidates admitted to a Preservice Teacher Education Programme shall
before enrolment have:
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 60 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 50% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year; or
(a) satisfied all the normal requirements for entry to the University and
have been granted admission to graduate study; and
(c) failure to complete the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early
Childhood Education) within two years from the date of first
enrolment.
(b) met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
Candidates excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early Childhood Education) with
the approval of the Academic Board. Any appeal against exclusion will
be considered by a committee established by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
the College of Education.
2.
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the New Zealand Teachers’ Council in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers’ Council.
3.
Candidates selected for this programme must either:
Course of Study
(a) hold a New Zealand teacher education (Primary) degree or a
New Zealand teacher education (Primary) three-year diploma
or equivalent which meets the requirements of the New Zealand
Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand, or
7.
(b) hold an overseas teacher education (Primary) degree or overseas
teacher education (Primary) three-year diploma or equivalent and
be registered as a teacher with the New Zealand Teachers Council,
or
Professional Studies and Teaching Experience
Curriculum Subject Studies.
8.
(e) have completed approved papers in education to the value of at
least 30 credits.
4.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of the criteria in regulations 1 and 3, and upon an
interview for selection where this is required.
Cancellation of Registration in Preservice Teacher Education
Programmes
5.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme if, in the opinion
of the University, a student is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education of the conviction within seven days.
Page 104
The course of study must include:
(a) Professional Studies and Teaching Experience
(c) hold New Zealand university graduate status; and
(d) hold a qualification(s) approved by the New Zealand Teachers
Council as appropriate for entry; and
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Early
Childhood Education) candidates shall pass papers to a total of 120
credits in:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
265.470
Learning and Teaching in Early
Childhood Settings
15
R 185.470
265.471
Learning and Development in Early
Childhood Contexts
15
R 185.471
265.472
Advanced Studies of Infants and
Toddlers
15
R 185.472
265.485
Professional Inquiry and Practice
Early Childhood Education
15
P 185.470 or 265.470; R 136.485
270.322
Perspectives in Early Years
Education
15
R 185.322, 186.322, 265.322
(b) Curriculum Subject Studies
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
265.473
Integrating Early Childhood
Curriculum: Numeracy and Literacy
15
R 185.473
265.474
Studies in Early Childhood
Assessment
and Curriculum
15
R 185.474
265.475
The Arts in Early Childhood
15
R 206.470
Education
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary)
GradDipTchg(Primary)
6.
Subject to CUAP Approval
Part I
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 60 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 50% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year; or
(c) failure to complete the Graduation Diploma of Teaching (Primary)
within two years from the date of first enrolment.
Part II
Course Regulations
Admission to Preservice Teacher Education Programmes
1.
(b) met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
2.
3.
4.
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the Teachers’ Council in good faith, the final decision
for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand Teachers’
Council.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection
where this is required.
In addition to the usual entry requirements candidates will:
(a) hold New Zealand university graduate status, and
(b) hold a qualification(s) approved by the New Zealand Teachers
Council as appropriate for entry; their qualifications will
include subjects closely related to the New Zealand Curriculum
Framework; and
(c) have demonstrated competence in literacy and numeracy.
Cancellation of Registration in Preservice Teacher Education
Programmes
5.
Candidates excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Diploma of Teaching (Primary) course with the approval of the
Academic Board. Any appeal against exclusion will be considered by
a committee established by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of
Education.
Candidates admitted to a Preservice Teacher Education programme shall
before enrolment have:
(a) satisfied all the normal requirements for entry to the University;
and
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme if, in the opinion
of the University, a student is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education of the conviction within seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
Candidates enrolled in a Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary) will
be excluded from re-enrolment for that diploma on the following basis:
Course of Study
7.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary),
candidates shall follow for not less than one calendar year a course of
study comprising 165 credits. All candidates are required to pass the
following papers:
Professional Practice
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
278.420
Professional Practice I
15
R 136.442
278.421
Professional Practice II
15
P 278.421, R 136.443
278.461
Classroom Enquiry
15
Contextual Knowledge
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
278.422
Teaching in Context I
15
R 185.435
278.423
Teaching in Context II
15
P 278.422, R 185.436
Content Knowledge
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
278.424
Mathematics Teaching in the
Primary School
15
R 210.438
278.425
Effective Pedagogy in Mathematics
15
P 278.424, R 210.438
278.426
Literacy Development and
Pedagogy
15
R 206.437
278.427
Literacy Assessment and
Instruction
15
P 278.426, R 206.437
278.428
Education in Science, Social
Science and Technology
15
R 210.438
278.429
Education in the Arts, Hauora and
Learning Languages
15
R 181.439, 206.437; 210.438;
Transition Arrangements
Students who first enrolled prior to 2011 will be permitted to complete their
course of study under the Regulations that were in place at the time of their
enrolment. These transition arrangements will expire in 2013.
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
GradDipTchg(Sec)
Subject to CUAP Approval
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Regulations
Admission to Preservice Teacher Education Programmes
1.
Candidates admitted to a Preservice Teacher Education Programme shall
before enrolment have:
Page 105
Education
2.
3.
4.
(a) satisfied all the normal requirements for entry to the University;
and
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
(b) met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
260.490
Teaching in Context I
15
R 136.490
260.491
Teaching in Context II
15
P 260.490, R 136.490
260.492
Teaching and Learning in a
Secondary Context
15
R 136.491
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the New Zealand Teachers’ Council in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers’ Council.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection
where this is required.
(b) hold a qualification(s) approved by the New Zealand Teachers
Council as appropriate for entry; and
(c) have completed approved papers at 300- or 400-level in a subject
area(s) deemed suitable for teaching in New Zealand secondary
schools.
Cancellation of Registration in Preservice Teacher Education
Programmes
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme if, in the opinion
of the University, a student is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers’ Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in a Preservice Teacher Education programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education of the conviction within seven days.
Title
Credits
Requirements
260.483
Secondary Teaching Experience I
15
R 260.483
260.484
Secondary Teaching Experience II
15
P 260.483 or 260.483, R 260.484
(c) Curriculum Subject Studies Schedule One
At least one of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
260.353
Guidance Principles and Practice
15
R 260.353
260.420
Teaching Mathematics
15
R 260.420
260.422
Teaching Science
15
R 260.422
260.426
Teaching Technology
15
R 260.426
260.429
Teaching Languages
15
R 260.429
260.431
Teaching English
15
R 260.431
260.434
Teaching Social Studies
15
R 260.434
260.438
Teaching Music
15
R 260.438
260.441
Teaching Health and Physical
Education
15
R 260.441
260.444
Teaching Visual Arts
15
R 260.444
(d) Curriculum Subject Studies Schedule Two
One of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
260.421
Teaching Senior Mathematics
15
R 260.421
260.423
Teaching Senior Agriculture/
Biology/Horticulture
15
R 260.423
260.427
Teaching Senior Technology
15
R 260.427
260.430
Teaching Senior Languages
15
R 260.430
Candidates enrolled in a Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) will
be excluded from re-enrolment for that Diploma on the following basis:
260.432
Teaching Senior English
15
R 260.432
260.435
Teaching Senior History
15
R 260.435
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
260.437
Teaching Senior Commerce
15
R 260.437
260.439
Teaching Senior Music
15
R 260.439
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 60 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 50% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year; or
260.442
Teaching Senior Physical Education
15
R 260.442
260.445
Teaching Senior Visual Arts
15
R 260.445
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers’ Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
6.
Code
Candidates selected for this programme must:
(a) hold New Zealand university graduate status; and
5.
(b) Teaching Experience
(c) failure to complete the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
within two years from the date of first enrolment.
Candidates excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) course with the approval of the
Academic Board. Any appeal against exclusion will be considered by
a committee established by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of
Education.
(e) Curriculum Subject Studies Schedule Three
One of the following papers:
Code
Title
Requirements
260.420
Teaching Mathematics
15
R 260.420
260.422
Teaching Science
15
R 260.422
260.424
Teaching Senior Chemistry
15
R 260.424
Programme of Study
260.425
Teaching Senior Physics
15
R 260.425
7.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma of Teaching candidates shall
pass papers to a total of 120 credits in:
260.428
Teaching Graphics
15
R 260.428
260.431
Teaching English
15
R 260.431
Teaching Studies
260.433
Teaching Drama
15
R 260.433
Teaching Experience
260.434
Teaching Social Studies
15
R 260.434
Curriculum Subject Studies.
260.436
Teaching Senior Geography
15
R 260.436
260.440
Musicianship for School
Instrumental Music Teachers
15
R 260.440
260.443
Teaching Health
15
R 260.443
260.446
Teaching Senior Art History
15
R 260.446
8.
Each student’s course of study is subject to the approval of the Director
of the School of Teacher Education and Undergraduate Studies. The
course of study must include:
(a) Teaching Studies
Page 106
Education
The Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) International
GradDipTchg(Sec)Int
No new enrolments from 2011
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 60 academic credits of fulltime study or failure to pass at least 50% of an approved part-time
course of study in any academic year; or
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(c) failure to complete the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
International within three years from the date of first enrolment.
Students excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be re-admitted
to the Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary) International course
with the approval of the Academic Board. Students excluded under these
Regulations shall have the right of appeal through the Exclusion Appeals
Committee on the grounds that their performance has been seriously
affected over an extended period by illness, injury, bereavement or other
critical personal circumstances that should be taken into account. Where
such appeals are considered the Committee may:
Part II
Course Regulations
Admission to International Preservice Teacher Education Programmes
1.
Students admitted to an International Preservice Teacher Education
Programme shall before enrolment have:
(a) Uphold the appeal;
(a) satisfied all the normal requirements for entry to the University;
and
(b) met the requirements set down by the relevant teacher registration
or equivalent authority and/or the programme partner institutions in
terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher.
2.
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the relevant teacher registration or equivalent authority
in good faith, the final decision for registration is at the discretion of the
relevant authority.
3.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection.
4.
Candidates selected for this programme must hold New Zealand
university graduate status or its approved equivalent or a qualification
as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor in a subject area(s) deemed
suitable for teaching in secondary schools.
Cancellation of Registration in International Preservice Teacher
Education Programmes
5.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in an International Preservice Teacher Education programme if,
in the opinion of the University, a student is found not to meet in general
terms the requirements set down by the relevant teacher registration or
equivalent authority and/or the programme partner institutions in terms
of good character and fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in an International Preservice Teacher Education
programme be convicted of an offence against the law after
entry into the programme, the student must advise the Pro ViceChancellor of the College of Education of the conviction within
seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the relevant
teacher registration or equivalent authority and/or the programme
partner institutions in terms of good character and fitness to be
a teacher, the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the
University Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General
Disciplinary Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
6.
Students enrolled in a Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
International will be excluded from re-enrolment for that diploma on the
following basis:
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions;
(b) Uphold the appeal subject to special conditions; or
(c) Decline the appeal.
Programme of Study
7.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma of Teaching
(Secondary) International candidates shall pass papers to a total of 120
credits in:
Teaching Studies
Teaching Experience
Curriculum Subject Studies.
8.
Each student’s course of study is subject to the approval of the Director
of the School of Teacher Education and Undergraduate Studies. The
course of study must include:
(a) Teaching Studies
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
260.490
Teaching in Context I
15
R 136.490
260.491
Teaching in Context II
15
P 260.490, R 136.490
260.492
Teaching and Learning in the
Secondary Context
15
R 136.491
Requirements
(b) Teaching Experience
Code
Title
Credits
260.481
Secondary Teaching Experience
International I
15
260.482
Secondary Teaching Experience
International II
15
P 260.481
(c) Curriculum Subject Studies
Three of the following papers
260.420
Teaching Mathematics
15
R 260.420
260.421
Teaching Senior Mathematics
15
R 260.421
260.422
Teaching Science
15
R 260.422
260.429
Teaching Languages
15
R 260.429
260.431
Teaching English
15
R 260.431
260.432
Teaching Senior English
15
R 260.432
Page 107
Education
Graduate Certificate
The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as an Additional Language
GradCertTEAL
Part I
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P Any 200-level paper
254.337
Teaching of Pacific Island Students
in New Zealand Contexts
15
R 187.337
254.377
Teaching and Learning Languages
up to Year 10
15
R 207.377
269.372
Understanding Migrant Cultures in
Aotearoa/New Zealand
15
R 182.372
269.373
Ethnic Relations in Education
15
R 182.373
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolment, candidates shall provide evidence that they:
(a) have been admitted to a university degree or diploma; or
(b) have completed at least two years of relevant practical,
professional, or scholarly experience; and
(c) One elective paper (15 credits) may be replaced by an approved
language or education paper at 200-level or above.
(c) have access to teaching a group of learners of English as an
additional language within a formal educational setting (see Note
1).
1.
For the purposes of this programme, a relevant practice situation
may be a school or other approved institution, or be teaching under
the New Zealand English Language Partners scheme (formerly
ESOL Home Tutors, see http://www.esolht.org.nz).
2.
Those students who have already credited 257.375 or 257.370 to
a previously awarded qualification will be unable to enrol in the
Grad Cert TEAL programme unless they surrender the previously
awarded qualification. Those students should consult the HoS for
further course advice.
3.
172.132 Language and Culture is recommended for students who
need to complete a relevant 100-level paper in order to gain entry
to the programme.
4.
Subject to HoS agreement, a candidate may replace one 200-level
paper from schedule (b) with another relevant paper.
Notes
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Certificate students must
undertake a coherent programme with a total value of not fewer than 60
credits, including at least three 15 credit papers at 300-level or higher
from the following schedules:
(a) Two compulsory papers (30 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
257.370
Teaching Learners of English as
Another Language
15
P 207.375 or 257.375; R 207.370
257.375
Learning English as Another
Language
15
P Any 200-level paper in Education
or Language Studies; R 207.375;
See Notes 2 and 3
(b) Elective papers to the value of 30 credits, at least 15 credits of
which must be at 300-level or above, from the following:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P Any 100-level BA paper
Transition Arrangements
Students who enrolled at Massey University in the Certificate in Teaching
English as an Additional Language prior to 2011 may chose to complete their
programme under the regulations that were in force at the time of their first
enrolment. These transition arrangements expire in 2012.
Students enrolled prior to 2012 will not be disadvantaged if they have
completed papers under Schedule B.
Masters Degrees
The Degree of Master of Counselling
MCouns
Part I
2.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(a) Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Counselling and Guidance)
or
(b) Postgraduate Diploma in Rehabilitation (Rehabilitation
Counselling).
or an approved equivalent qualification.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
3.
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
(c) have been offered a place in the Professional Development papers.
Page 108
Entry into the Master of Counselling will be based on:
(a) satisfactory completion of the requirements for selection into the
professional development papers; and
Before enrolling for the degree of Master of Counselling, candidates
shall:
(a) have been admitted to a university degree and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed to the degree
of Master of Counselling; and
Candidates for the Master of Counselling shall have completed the;
(b) the minimum standard of performance shall be a ‘B’ average in the
qualifying course of study.
Course of Study
3.
Candidates shall follow for not less than two calendar years a course
of study comprising 120 credits and undertake in accordance with the
specifications below:
Education
(a) Three compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.761
Professional Development in
Counselling I
45
P 209.750 or 253.750, R 209.751
or 253.751
253.762
Professional Development in
Counselling II
30
P 253.751 or 253.761, R 209.752,
253.752
253.800
Research Project in Counselling
45
P 180.780, 186.788, 267.780 or
267.788 or an approved research
methods paper; R 209.758 or
253.758
4.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed three years, unless a
specified time of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic
Board. Consideration will be given for any time delays associated with
obtaining a place in the professional development papers.
5.
(a) The degree shall be awarded on the basis of the whole examination
which shall include the evaluation of the separate papers and of the
research project, with the proviso that all components shall be at
least of pass standard.
(b) Candidates will not be awarded the degree with distinction.
(c) A candidate may be permitted to revise an unsatisfactory Research
Project and to resubmit it, but shall not then be eligible for
distinction.
Note
1.
Professional Development in Counselling I (253.761) and II
(253.762) must be taken in consecutive years. Numbers are
restricted with selection for places in Professional Development
in Counselling I each year being determined through selection in
the preceding year. The major components of these two papers are
campus-based workshops and supervised practice. They involve
intensive and personally demanding work.
Transition arrangements
Candidates who enrolled in the Master of Counselling prior to 2012 will be
permitted to complete the qualification under the regulations that were in
place at the time of their original enrolment. Such candidates will substitute
253.762 Professional Development in Counselling II for 253.752 (209.752).
Candidates who have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Education
(Guidance Studies) will be eligible to apply for selection. These transition
arrangements will expire at the end of 2013.
The Degree of Master of Education
MEd
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
sufficient background of professional experience to be likely to
benefit from the course.
Transition arrangements
5.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
2.
Admission to the degree shall be subject to the approval of the Academic
Board. Relevance and standard of undergraduate studies will be criteria
for approval.
Before enrolling, a candidate shall:
Course of Study
6.
(a) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Education coursework
pathway, have at least a B average in a Postgraduate Diploma in
Education or equivalent; or
(b) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Education research pathway,
have at least a B+ average in a Postgraduate Diploma in Education
or equivalent; or
(c) for entry to the 240 credit Masters, have qualified for the degree of
Bachelor of Education or equivalent; with at least a B+ average; or
(d) have qualified for any other degree of a New Zealand university
with at least a B+ average and hold a professional qualification in
teaching; and
4.
A candidate has three options with the Master of Education and related
endorsements:
•
A 120 credit Coursework Pathway Masters (papers to a value of
120 credits); or
•
a 120 credit Research Pathway (a research methods paper [or
approved alternative if completed an equivalent paper in the
PGDipEd] and a thesis to the value of 90 credits); or
•
a 240 credit Masters (comprising coursework papers to a value of
120 credits, and a 30 credit research methods paper and a thesis to
the value of 90 credits).
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
211.740
Technology Education
30
248.770
The Practice of Visual Arts in
Education
30
R 207.770
248.771
Studio Practice in Visual Arts
Education
30
R 207.771
248.772
Visual Arts Technologies and
Processes
30
R 207.772
249.741
Assessment and Planning for
Learners with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.741
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
(a) Regulation 3 does not apply to candidates admitted to the Master of
Education endorsement in Adult Education.
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
(b) Under Regulation 2(d) a candidate for admission to the MEd(Adult
Ed) shall have qualified for any degree of a New Zealand university
and shall have satisfied the Academic Board that they have
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
254.701
Ethics in Education
30
R 187.701
(e) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
proceed to the degree of Master of Education.
3.
Students who are enrolled in masterate qualifications that are phased out
may be offered the option of transferring to another relevant qualification
or transferring the papers already completed in lieu of compulsory and/
or elective papers as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education
or nominee. Students may have up to four years, from the time of
their enrolment in the initial qualification, in which to complete the
qualification under existing regulations.
A candidate may not be admitted to both the degree of Master of
Education and the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Education
or the Master of Arts in Education.
Candidates for the Master of Education shall normally be enrolled in
the Postgraduate Diploma in Education in the first instance. Enrolment
into the Master of Education will be based on performance levels in
the Postgraduate Diploma in Education. The minimum standard of
performance shall be a ‘B’ average in the qualifying course of study.
Notes
Requirements
Page 109
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
267.790
30
R 182.793
254.704
Education and Historical Analysis
30
R 187.704
Indigenous Research
Methodologies
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
254.708
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Social Studies
30
R 187.708
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
269.737
Language Policy and Curriculum
30
R 182.737
254.738
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Science
30
273.722
Adult Learning: Myths and Realities 30
R 187.722
273.723
R 187.723
Educational Issues Among Pacific
Islands Peoples in New Zealand
30
R 187.744
Cultures and Learning: Diversity in
Adult Education
30
254.744
273.724
R 187.724
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
The Expert Teacher of Adults:
Principles
and Practice
30
254.773
273.784
30
R 186.784, 187.784
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
Learning and Teaching in Tertiary
Education
273.785
R 187.782, 187.785
Music Education: Theory and
Practice
30
R 207.710
Planning for Tertiary Learning and
Teaching
30
255.710
274.712
Responsibility in Physical Education 30
R 209.712
255.711
Music Leadership in Education
30
R 207.711
276.782
Mathematics Education
30
R 211.782
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
276.784
Current Issues in Teaching
Mathematics
30
R 211.784
257.732
Current Issues in Teaching English
30
R 207.732
277.703
R 211.703, 211.753
Leading TESOL in Diverse Contexts
30
P 257.769; R 207.766
Developing Environmental
Sustainability Education
Programme
30
257.766
257.767
Current Issues and Innovations in
TESOL Leadership
30
P 257.766 or 259.772; R 207.767
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.721
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
261.760
Instructional Design for E-Learning
30
R 186.757, 186.760
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 187.712, 186.764
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.761, 186.765
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
261.768
Advanced E-Learning Practice
30
P 180.702, 186.760, 186.764 and
186.766 or 254.702, 261.760.
261.764 and 261.766; R 186.768
262.750
Principles and Practices in the
Education of Gifted and Talented
Students
30
R 186.750
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
263.701
Enhancing Teacher Learning
30
R 180.701
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 186.731
263.706
Adolescent Learning and
Engagement
30
265.736
Quality in Early Years Education
30
R 186.736
265.737
Young Children and Their Families
30
R 186.737
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
267.720
Educational Research Methods for
Adult Educators
30
R 187.720
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
1.
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 185.788, 186.788
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
Page 110
Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, a student in
the Coursework pathway may select papers up to the value of 30 credits from
those papers listed in the other Masterate Schedules.
(b) Research pathway (120 credits):
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
30
R 186.723
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899
Note 3
or
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
or
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
and
267.880
Education Thesis
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
and
267.882
Education Thesis Part II
Notes
Education
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
267.880
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1-2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899
Note 3
Note: For endorsements please refer to the specific Schedule.
7.
(a) The degree shall be awarded on the basis of the whole examination,
which shall include the evaluation of the separate papers and, for
Research pathway candidates only, of the thesis, with the proviso
that all components shall be at least of pass standard.
(b) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed thesis may
be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
Endorsements
8.
9.
A candidate enrolled in the 120 credit coursework pathway is required
to complete compulsory papers. Candidates who have completed these
papers in their Postgraduate Diploma may select alternative papers in the
endorsement schedule.
and
267.882
A candidate selecting a 120 credit Research Pathway masters may be
eligible to enrol only if they have a PGDipEd in the same subject area.
Notes
1. Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+
average performance being attained.
10. The degree may be awarded with an endorsement to those candidates
who, subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education,
follow a course of study as specified in the schedule for the endorsement.
2. Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
The Endorsement Schedule (Adult Education) is:
3. Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression
in Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
(a) Coursework pathway
(i) At least 90 credits from the following:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.721
Knowledge and Power in Adult
Education Contexts
30
R 187.721
273.722
Adult Learning: Myths and Realities 30
R 187.722
273.723
Cultures and Learning: Diversity in
Adult Education
30
R 187.723
273.724
The Expert Teacher of Adults:
Principles
and Practice
30
R 187.724
273.725
Leadership and Communication in
Adult Education and Training
30
R 187.725
273.726
Futures in Adult Education:
Exploration and Anticipation
30
R 187.726
273.784
Learning and Teaching in Tertiary
Education
30
R 186.784, 187.784
273.785
Planning for Tertiary Learning and
Teaching
30
R 187.782, 187.785
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
(ii) The balance from the following:
Education Thesis Part II
(d) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, a
student who is in the Coursework pathway may select papers of up
to 30 credits from those listed in other Masterate Schedules.
The Endorsement Schedule (Distance and On-line Education) is:
(no new enrolments from 2010)
(a) Three compulsory papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
186.757
Instructional Design and Learning
Technologies in Distance and Online Education
30
R 186.760
187.712
Policy, Practice and Trends in
Distance and On-line Education
30
R 186.764, 261.764
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
either
(b) Coursework pathway
At least 90 credits from the following:
Code
Title
Credits
157.730
Web-Based Multimedia Systems
15
157.744
The Culture of the Computer
Learning Environment
15
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
186.761
Learning and Educational
Technologies
30
R 186.765
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
254.785
Special Topic
30
254.704
Education and Historical Analysis
30
R 187.704
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
261.760
Instructional Design for E-Learning
30
R 186.757, 186.760
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 187.712, 186.764
263.705
Assessment for Learning and
Teaching
30
R 180.705
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 186.788
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
or
(c) Research pathway
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
90
P 180.780, 180.790, 185/186.788,
187.720 or equivalent Note 1; R
180.898, 180.899
or
267.788
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
and
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.720
Educational Research Methods for
Adult Educators
30
R 187.720
and
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
180.897
Master of Education Thesis
or
Page 111
Education
180.898
Master of Education Thesis Part I
45
P 180.780, 180.790, 185/186.788 or
equivalent Notes 1–2; R 180.897
and
267.880
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899
Note 3
and
180.899
Master of Education Thesis Part II
45
P 180.898 and 180.780, 180.790,
185/186.788, or equivalent Note 3
R 180.897
or
and
267.881
30 credits from (b).
Education Thesis Part I
(d) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, a
student who is in the Coursework pathway may select papers of up
to 30 credits from those listed in other Masterate schedules.
Transition Arrangements
Students who have previously completed, or subsequently complete the
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Distance and On-line Education), and
meet the requirements for entry into the Master of Education may choose to
complete this qualification under the endorsement regulations existing at the
time of their enrolment; or complete an unendorsed Master of Education; or
enrol in the Master of Education (E-Learning) crediting the papers already
completed under the PGDipEd (Distance and On-line Education) in lieu of
compulsory and/or elective papers as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
and
267.882
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
The Endorsement Schedule (Early Years) is
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
(i) At least 60 credits from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
265.736
Quality in Early Years Education
30
R 186.736
265.737
Young Children and Their Families
30
R 186.737
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
265.738
Children’s Play and Learning in a
Goal-Directed Teaching Practice
30
Subject to approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, a student in the
Coursework pathway may select papers of up to 30 credits from those listed
in other Masterate Schedules.
The Endorsement Schedule (E-Learning) is:
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
(ii) At least 60 credits from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.765
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
276.782
Mathematics Education
30
R 211.782
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
(iii) The balance from the Master of Education Schedule:
Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, a
student who is in the Coursework pathway may select papers of up
to 30 credits from those listed in other Masterate schedules.
(i) Three compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
261.760
Instructional Design for E-Learning
30
R 186.760, 186.757
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 186.764, 187.712
(ii) Up to 60 credits from the following:
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.765
261.766
Teaching for E-Learning
30
R 186.766
261.768
Advanced E-Learning Practice
30
P 180.702, 186.760, 186.764, and
186.766 or 254.702, 261.760,
261.764 and 261.766; R 186.768
(iii) The balance to come from approved papers in Masterate
Schedules.
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
30
R 186.723
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
or
267.788
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
30
R 186.723
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
or
267.723
Page 112
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
or
267.723
or
267.788
Education Thesis Part II
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
and
267.880
Education Thesis
Education
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
267.880
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1-2
and
267.882
Education Thesis Part II
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
or
267.881
45
Education Thesis
Education Thesis Part I
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899
Note 3
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
and
267.882
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
Transition Arrangements
Students who have previously completed, or subsequently complete the
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Educational Technologies), and meet
the requirements for entry into the Master of Education may choose to enrol
in an unendorsed Master of Education, or enrol in the Master of Education
(E-Learning) crediting the papers already completed under the Postgraduate
Diploma in Education (Educational Technologies) in lieu of compulsory and/
or elective papers as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education.
The Endorsement Schedule (Special Education) is
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
The Endorsement Schedule (Guidance Studies) is
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
(i) One compulsory paper
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.750
Counselling Theory
30
R 209.750
(i) Two compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.741
Assessment and Planning for
Learners with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.741
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
(ii) At least 60 credits from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
253.754
Family and Couples Counselling
30
R 209.754
253.755
Culture and Counselling
30
R 209.755
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
(iii) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education or nominee the balance from:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
(ii) At least 60 credits from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.721
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
(iii) The remainder from Schedule (a) of the Master of Education
Degree.
Up to 30 credits from other masterate-level papers in Education or other
Schedules approved for the study of Guidance.
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
or
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
and
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
30
R 186.723
or
267.788
30
Education Thesis Part II
R 185.788, 186.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
or
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
and
Page 113
Education
267.880
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
and
267.882
Education Thesis Part II
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
The Endorsement Schedule (Teaching and Learning) is
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.761, 186.765
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
262.750
Principles and Practices in the
Education of Gifted and Talented
Students
30
R 186.750
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
274.707
Issues in Health and Physical
Education
30
276.782
Mathematics Education
30
R 211.782
276.784
Current Issues in Teaching
Mathematics
30
R 211.784
277.703
Developing Environmental
Sustainability Education
Programme
30
R 211.703
(iii) The balance to come from a) (i) or a student may select 30
credits from the Master of Education Schedule.
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
30
R 185.788, 186.788
30
R 186.723
or
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
(i) At least 60 credits from the following papers:
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
263.701
Enhancing Teacher Learning
30
R 180.701
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 186.731
or an equivalent research methods paper approved by Pro ViceChancellor of Education or nominee
263.705
Assessment for Learning and
Teaching
30
R 180.705
and
263.706
Adolescent Learning and
Engagement
30
or
267.723
267.880
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
(ii) At least 30 credits from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
211.740
Technology Education
30
248.770
The Practice of Visual Arts in
Education
30
R 207.770
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
254.708
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Social Studies
30
R 187.708
254.738
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Science
30
R 211.738
254.744
Educational Issues Among Pacific
Islands Peoples in New Zealand
30
R 187.744
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
255.710
Music Education: Theory and
Practice
30
257.732
Current Issues in Teaching English
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
258.720
258.721
Page 114
Requirements
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
and
267.882
Education Thesis Part II
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
R 207.710
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in consecutive
years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882 concurrently.
30
R 207.732
3.
30
R 207.769
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in Part I
as confirmed by the Supervisor.
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
Education
The Degree of Master of Educational Administration
MEdAdmin
No new enrolments from 2009
and
(d) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education,
papers from the following to the value of 30 or 60 credits:
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates..
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
Part II
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
Course Regulations
Eligibility
254.704
Education and Historical Analysis
30
R 187.704
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
1.
Before enrolling for the degree of Master of Educational Administration
candidates shall:
(a) have been admitted to a university degree and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed to the degree
of Master of Educational Administration;
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course; and
(c) normally be enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma of Education
(Educational Administration) in the first instance. Transfer into the
Master of Educational Administration will be based on performance
levels in the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Educational
Administration). A minimum standard of performance shall be a ‘B’
average in the qualifying course of study.
or other papers listed for the Master of Education.
or
(e) Research pathway
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
90
P 180.790 or 180.780 or 267.780
and
187.892
3.
The thesis shall embody the results obtained by a candidate in
an investigation relating to some part of the study of educational
administration or may consist of one or two major reports of
administrative projects.
4.
(a) The degree and honours therein shall be awarded on the basis of the
whole examination with the proviso that each paper and the thesis
shall be at least of pass standard.
Course of Study
2.
A candidate shall follow for not less than two calendar years a course of
study comprising either:
•
papers to the value of 150 credits, including a research methods
paper, and a thesis to the value of 90 credits (Research pathway); or
•
papers to a value of 240 credits (Coursework pathway).
•
Entry to the Research pathway shall be subject to approval of the
Academic Board.
(a) Two compulsory papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
(b) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed thesis may
be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candi-date
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
5.
Candidates who have completed the Massey University, Post-graduate
Diploma of Education (Educational Administration) or approved
equivalent qualification from another institution, and are eligible for
admission to the MEdAdmin degree shall follow an official course of
study for not less than one year, consisting of at least 120 credits. In
order to be eligible for admission candidates are required to have met
a minimum performance standard in their qualifying course of study,
normally a B average or equivalent.
6.
Candidates who have completed the Massey University, Postgraduate
Diploma in Education (Educational Administration) and who are eligible
for admission to the MEdAdmin degree shall follow an approved course
of study which together with the qualifying course of study shall form
a coherent programme of 240 credits. For such a candidate the Course
Regulations for the MEdAdmin shall be deemed to apply from the
date of enrolment for the postgraduate diploma. Such candidates who
surrender the scroll awarded on completion of the qualifying course
of study will be eligible for the award of honours in cases of sufficient
merit.
7.
Candidates who have completed at another institution a qualification
that is approved as equivalent to the Massey University Postgraduate
Diploma in Education (Educational Administration) and who are eligible
for admission to the MEdAdmin degree may be granted up to 120
credits towards the MEdAdmin degree. Such candidates shall follow an
approved course of study of at least 120 credits. They will not be eligible
for the award of honours but may be awarded the degree with distinction
in cases of sufficient merit.
(b) 60 credits from the following list:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
either
(c) Coursework pathway
Master of Educational
Administration and Leadership
Thesis
A minimum further 60 credits from (b)
Page 115
Education
The Degree of Master of Educational Administration and Leadership
MEdAdminLead
Part I
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.701
Ethics in Education
30
R 187.701
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
Part II
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
Course Regulations
Eligibility
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
257.767
Current Issues and Innovations in
TESOL Leadership
30
P 257.766 or 259.772; R 207.767
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
259.777
Leadership and Learning in Diverse
Contexts
30
R 187.777
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
273.725
Leadership and Communications in
Adult Education Training
30
R 187.725
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
1.
Before enrolling for the degree of Master of Educational Administration
and Leadership candidates shall:
(a) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Educational Administration
and Leadership coursework pathway, have at least a B average
in a Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration and
Leadership or equivalent; or
(b) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Educational Administration
and Leadership research pathway, have at least a B+ average
in a Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration and
Leadership or equivalent; or
(c) for entry to the 240 credit Masters, have qualified for the degree of
Bachelor of Education or equivalent; with at least a B+ average; or
(d) have qualified for any other degree of a New Zealand university
with at least a B+ average and hold a professional qualification in
teaching; and
(e) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
proceed to the degree of Master of Educational Administration and
Leadership; and
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
A candidate has three options with the Master of Educational
Administration and Leadership:
254.704
Education and Historical Analysis
30
R 187.704
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 186.764, 187.712
(a) A 120-credit Coursework Pathway Masters (papers to a value of
120 credits); or
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 185.788, 186.788
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
(f) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
Course of Study
2.
(b) A 120-credit Research Pathway (a 30 credit research methods paper
[or approved alternative if completed an equivalent paper in the
PGDipEdAdminLead] and a thesis to the value of 90 credits); or
(c) A 240-credit Masters (comprising coursework papers to a value of
120 credits, and a research methods paper and a thesis to the value
of 90 credits).
3.
(iii) Up to 30 credits from the following list:
Candidates enrolled in the 120 credit coursework pathway are required
to complete papers listed in
(i) up to two papers (60 credits) from list (i)
(ii) Candidates who completed these papers in the
PGDipEdAdminLead, may select at least 90 credits from list (ii)
below, and up to 30 credits from list (a) (iii) below.
4.
Candidates enrolled in the 120 credit research pathway are required to
complete papers listed in (b) research pathway in addition to a paper (30
credits) from list (ii).
5.
Candidates enrolled in the 240 credit masters are required to complete
papers listed in (i), two papers (60 credits) from list (ii) and the relevant
thesis option in list (b).
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Either
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 185.788, 186.788
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
Education Thesis Part I
45
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
Education Thesis Part II
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
or
267.788
And either
267.880
or
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits):
(i) Compulsory papers:
267.881
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
(ii) At least 30 credits from the following list:
Page 116
or other papers listed for the Master of Education.
and
267.882
Education
Notes
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
4.
Students enrolling in Postgraduate Diploma in Educational
Administration and Leadership or the Master of Educational
Administration and Leadership are advised to take 259.771 if
possible, before enrolling in 259.772
6.
An alternative approved paper may be taken where the candidate has
completed and equivalent research methods paper in the Postgraduate
Diploma in Educational Administration or Postgraduate Diploma in
Educational Administration.
7.
(a) The degree and honours therein shall be awarded on the basis of the
whole examination with the proviso that each paper and the thesis
shall be at least of pass standard.
(b) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed thesis may
be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
The Degree of Master of Educational Psychology
MEdPsych
Subject to CUAP Approval
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
(b) And 90 credits from:
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.880
Education Thesis
90
All of 186.722, 186.744, 186.754,
186.756 or all of 249.744, 256.754,
256.756, 258.722 for MEdPysch;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
45
All of 186.722, 186.744, 186.754,
186.756 or all of 249.744, 256.754,
256.756, 258.722 for MEdPysch;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Notes 1–2
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
Before enrolling candidates shall:
(a) have qualified for an approved undergraduate degree in Education,
Educational Psychology, Psychology or Teaching with a minimum
B average; and
(b) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
proceed to the degree of Master of Educational Psychology; and
or
267.881
Education Thesis Part I
(c) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course; and
2.
(a) Candidates for the degree of Master of Educational Psychology
shall normally be enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in
Education (Educational Psychology) in the first instance.
(b) Transfer into the Master of Educational Psychology will be
based on academic performance in the Postgraduate Diploma in
Education (Educational Psychology). A minimum performance of
B+ average or equivalent is required.
and
267.882
Notes
1.
(c) Candidates intending to apply for selection and admission into the
Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology (the internship)
are required to have successfully completed 45 credits in approved
undergraduate psychology papers with a minimum B average.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
Notes
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
4.
Those students intending on proceeding to the Postgraduate
Diploma in Educational Psychology (Internship) are required by
the Psychologists Registration Board to have completed three full
year or equivalent 200- or 300-level undergraduate psychology
papers e.g. organisational/social psychology, abnormal/clinical
psychology, neuropsychology, developmental psychology prior to
enrolling in the PGDipEdPsych programme.
5.
Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College
of Education, a student may select approved papers up to the
value of 60 credits from those papers listed in the other Masterate
Schedules. This option is not available for students who have been
granted an exemption for some prescribed papers as outlined in the
following Concession 4 and 5.
1.
2.
Successful completion of the Master of Educational Psychology
will not give automatic entry into the Postgraduate Diploma in
Educational Psychology.
Admission to the Postgraduate Diploma in Education Psychology is
by selection.
Course of Study
3.
Education Thesis Part II
A candidate shall follow for not less than two calendar years a course
of study of 240 credits comprising papers to the value of 150 credits
and a research thesis to the value of 90 credits (256.892 or 256.893 and
256.894) in accordance with the Schedule below.
(a) Five compulsory papers (150 credits):
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
256.754
Assessment in Educational
Psychology
30
R 186.747, 186.754
256.755
Professional Practice in Educational 30
Psychology
R 186.748, 186.755
Concessions
4.
Candidates who have completed the Massey University degree
of Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Educational Psychology)
or equivalent and who are eligible for admission to the Master of
Educational Psychology degree shall follow an official course of study
for not less than one year, consisting of at least 120 credits. For such
Page 117
Education
a candidate the Course Regulations for the Master of Educational
Psychology shall be deemed to apply from the date of enrolment for the
postgraduate diploma. Such candidates who surrender the scroll awarded
on completion of the qualifying course of study will be eligible for the
award of honours in cases of sufficient merit.
5.
Transition Arrangements
6.
Candidates who have been awarded a Resource Teacher: Learning and
Behaviour (RTLB), Resource Teacher: Literacy (RTLit) postgraduate
diploma or an approved equivalent qualification from another institution
and who are eligible for entry to the Master of Educational Psychology
degree shall follow an approved course of study of at least 120 credits,
which together with the qualifying course of study shall form a coherent
programme of 240 credits, provided that a specified minimum standard
of performance has been met (i.e. ‘B’ average). Candidates will not be
eligible for Honours but the degree may be awarded with distinction in
cases of sufficient merit.
Students who complete a Massey University PGDipEd (Special
Education) prior to 2014 may gain entry to the MEdPsych programme
under the 2008 eligibility regulations and complete the following papers:
267.780 Research in Education, 256.754 Assessment in Educational
Psychology, 256.755 Professional Practice in Educational Psychology
and 180.791 Research Report. Students who have already completed an
approved research paper as part of the PGDipEd (SpEd) may choose one
additional paper from the 2008 MEdPsych Schedule (b) as a replacement
for 267.780. These transition arrangements remain in force until
2014. All new students enrolling after 2010 will need to complete the
PGDipEd (EdPsych) prior to applying for admission to the MEdPsych
programme.
The Degree of Master of Literacy Education
MLitEd
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.721
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
(a) (i) a Bachelor of Education, a Bachelor of Education (Teaching), or
an Advanced Diploma of Teaching; or
(ii) a degree and a recognised teaching qualification of at least one
year’s duration; and
(b) been accepted as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
2.
(ii) One of the following papers:
Candidates for the Master of Literacy Education (MLitEd) must have:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 186.780
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 186.788
Before enrolling, a candidate shall:
(a) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Literacy Education coursework
pathway, have at least a B average in a Postgraduate Diploma of
Literacy Education or equivalent; or
(iii) Up to 120 credits from the following list:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.741
Assessment and Planning for
Learners with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.741
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 187.742, 211.735
254.744
Educational Issues Among Pacific
Islands Peoples in New Zealand
30
R 187.744
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
Course of Study
257.732
Current Issues in Teaching English
30
R 207.732
3.
Candidates enrolled in the 120 credit coursework pathway are required
to complete papers listed in (i) and (ii) below. Candidates who have
completed these papers in the PGDipLitEd, may select up to 120 credits
from list (iii) below.
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.765
Candidates enrolled in the 120 credit research pathway are required to
complete papers listed in (b) research pathway in addition to a paper
from list (ii).
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 180.704, 186.731
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
267.790
Indigenous Research
Methodologies
30
R 182.793
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
269.737
Language Policy and Curriculum
30
R 182.737
(b) for entry to the 120 credit Master of Literacy Education research
pathway, have at least a B+ average in a Postgraduate Diploma of
Literacy Education or equivalent; or
(c) for entry to the 240 credit Master of Literacy Education, have
qualified for the degree of Bachelor of Education or equivalent;
with at least a B+ average; or
(d) have qualified for any other degree of a New Zealand university
with at least a B+ average and hold a professional qualification in
teaching; and
(e) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
proceed to the degree of Master of Education.
4.
5.
Candidates enrolled in the 240 credit masters are required to complete
papers listed in (i) and (ii) below, one paper (30 credits) from list (iii)
and the relevant thesis option in list (b).
(a) Coursework pathway (120 credits)
(i) Three compulsory papers:
Page 118
Education
The balance to be taken from papers listed in Schedule (a) of the Master of
Education degree.
and
267.882
Education Thesis Part II
45
OR
(b) Research pathway (120 credits)
Notes
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.880
Education Thesis
90
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1
or
267.881
6.
Education Thesis Part I
45
P 267.881; R 267.880, 180.899;
Note 3
P One of 180.780, 180.790,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
267.720, 267.723, 267.780,
267.788 or an approved equivalent;
R 267.881, 267.882, 180.897,
180.898; Note 1–2
1.
Entry to the thesis options is dependent on at least a B+ average
performance being attained.
2.
Students will normally enrol in the thesis Parts 1 and 2 in
consecutive years. They may not enrol into 267.881 and 267.882
concurrently.
3.
Progression to Part II is dependent on satisfactory progression in
Part I as confirmed by the Supervisor.
(a) The degree and honours therein shall be awarded on the basis of the
whole examination with the proviso that each paper and the thesis
shall be at least of pass standard.
(b) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed thesis may
be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
The Degree of Master of Speech and Language Therapy
MSpchLangTher
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
271.710
Evidenced-Based Practice in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.710
271.711
Critical and Current Issues in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.711
271.712
Theoretical Issues in Speech and
Language Therapy
30
R 186.712
267.781
Research Methods in Professional
Practice
30
R 186.713, 271.713
120
R 186.810
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
2.
Admission to the degree shall be subject to the approval of the Academic
Board. Relevance and standard of undergraduate studies will be criteria
for approval.
Before enrolling in the Master of Speech and Language Therapy, a
candidate shall:
(a) have completed the degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language
Therapy or Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy with
Honours or equivalent;
plus
271.810
6.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed six years, unless a
period of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
Extension of time by suspension of study for one year will be considered
for students entering the degree with a Postgraduate Diploma of Speech
and Language Therapy.
7.
Candidates admitted to the Masters who have been awarded the
Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language Therapy shall follow
a course of at least 120 points, which together with the qualifying
course of study shall form a coherent programme of 240 points. For
such candidates the Course Regulations for the Masters Degree shall
be deemed to apply from the date of their enrolling in the Diploma.
Students will be required to surrender their Postgraduate Diploma before
being awarded the Master of Speech and Language Therapy.
8.
(a) The degree shall be awarded on the basis of the whole examination,
which shall include the evaluation of the separate papers and of the
thesis or research project, with the proviso that all components shall
be at least of pass standard.
(b) have been granted admission to postgraduate study and entitled to
enrol in the Master of Speech and Language Therapy; and
(c) have completed at least one year clinical experience in speech and
language therapy.
(d) be accepted as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
3.
4.
Candidates for the Master of Speech and Language Therapy shall
normally be enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and
Language Therapy in the first instance. Transfer into the Master of
Speech and Language Therapy will be based on performance levels in
the Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language Therapy. Students
must maintain a B+ average for entrance into the Master of Speech and
Language Therapy.
A candidate may not be concurrently enrolled in any other postgraduate
diploma or master’s degree.
Course of Study
5.
The course of study for a Master in Speech and Language Therapy shall
comprise the following four compulsory 30 credit papers:
Thesis in Speech and Language
Therapy
(b) At the discretion of the chief examiner, a failed thesis may
be revised and re-submitted once and may be subject to reexamination. Following successful re-examination the candidate
will not be eligible for honours or distinction.
Page 119
Education
The Degree of Master of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Leadership
MTESOLLeadership
Part I
Either
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
267.788
Course Regulations
Eligibility
Before enrolling for the degree of Master of Teaching English to
Speakers of Other Languages Leadership candidates shall:
(a) have completed a university degree and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed to the degree
of Master of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
Leadership;
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
Course of Study
2.
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 185.788, 186.788
Or
Part II
1.
267.723
3.
Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education, one 30
credit paper from the above schedule may be replaced by another paper
from the schedule for the Master of Education, Master of Educational
Administration and Leadership, or the Master of Arts.
4.
The course of study for a candidate who is admitted under clause 5 or 6
may not exceed four years unless a period of suspension or extension is
approved by Academic Board.
Concessions
5.
Candidates who have completed the Massey University Postgraduate
Diploma of Second Language Teaching and who are eligible for
admission to the MTESOLLeadership degree shall follow an approved
course of study for not less than one year, consisting of at least 120
credits.
6.
Candidates who have completed at another institution a qualification
that is approved as equivalent to the Massey University Postgraduate
Diploma of Second Language Teaching and who are eligible for
admission to the MTESOLLeadership degree shall follow an approved
course of study for not less than one year, consisting of at least 120
credits.
A candidate shall follow for not less than two calendar years a course of
study comprising 8 papers to a value of 240 credits:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
257.766
Leading TESOL in Diverse Contexts
30
P 257.769; R 207.766
257.767
Current Issues and Innovations in
TESOL Leadership
30
P 257.766 or 259.772; R 207.767
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
272.701
Language Awareness and
Language Issues
30
272.702
The Second Language Learning
Process
30
272.703
The Methodology of Second
Language Teaching
30
272.704
Curriculum and Materials Design
30
Honours/Distinction
7.
Where a candidate has been granted concession under clause 5, the
period of time between the completion of the qualifying course of study
and the commencement of the MTESOLLeadership will be excluded
from the completion time considered when determining honours
eligibility. Such candidates must surrender the scroll awarded on
completion of the qualifying course of study in order to be eligible for
honours.
8.
A degree completed with concession under clauses 5 or 6 may be
awarded with Distinction if it is completed at a superior standard
(equivalent to First class Honours) within one year of first enrolling for
full-time study or within three years of first enrolling for part-time study.
Postgraduate Diplomas
The Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling
PGDipCouns
No new enrolments from 2012
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course; and
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(c) have attended a selection workshop and been offered a place in the
professional development papers.
2.
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
Before enrolment for the diploma a candidate shall:
(a) have been admitted or qualified for have qualified for the award
for a university degree or approved diploma and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed to the
diploma;
Page 120
Candidates shall follow for not less than two years a course of
study comprising 180 credits and undertaken in accordance with the
specifications below.
(a) Three compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.750
Counselling Theory
30
R 209.750
253.751
Professional Development in
Counselling I
30
R 209.751
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.752
Professional Development in
Counselling II
30
P 209.751 or 253.751; R 209.752
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
(b) At least one of:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
253.754
Family and Couples Counselling
30
R 209.754
253.755
Culture and Counselling
30
R 209.755
Such other masterate-level papers in Education or other Schedules
approved for the study of Counselling.
Notes
1.
Professional Development (Counselling) I (253.751) and II
(253.752) must be taken in consecutive years. Numbers are
restricted with selection for places in Professional Development
(Counselling) I each year, being determined at a Selection
Workshop in the preceding year. The major components of these
two papers are campus-based workshops and supervised practice.
They involve intensive and personally demanding work.
2.
Until a place is obtained in these Professional Development
(Counselling) papers students will be enrolled in the Postgraduate
Diploma in Education (Guidance Studies) which includes the
same selection of theory papers as for the Postgraduate Diploma in
Counselling.
(c) Subject to the approval of the HOD the balance from
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
The Postgraduate Diploma in Education
PGDipEd
Part I
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
248.771
Studio Practice in Visual Arts
Education
30
R 207.771
248.772
Visual Arts Technologies and
Processes
30
R 207.772
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
Before enrolling for this diploma, a candidate shall:
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
(a) have qualified for the degree of Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of
Education (Teaching) or Advanced Diploma of Teaching; or
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
(b) have qualified for any other degree of a New Zealand university
and hold an appropriate professional qualification; and
254.701
Ethics in Education
30
R 187.701
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
(c) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Education.
254.704
Education and Historical Analysis
30
R 187.704
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 187.742, 211.735
254.708
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Social Studies
30
R 187.708
254.738
Current Issues in the Teaching of
Science
30
254.744
Educational Issues Among Pacific
Islands Peoples in New Zealand
30
R 187.744
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
255.710
Music Education: Theory and
Practice
30
R 207.710
255.711
Music Leadership in Education
30
R 207.711
257.732
Current Issues in Teaching English
30
R 207.732
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.721
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
2.
In respect to Regulation 1(b):
(a) A candidate for admission to the PGDipEd (Adult Education) shall
have qualified for any degree from a New Zealand University and
shall have satisfied the Academic Board that they have a sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
(b) A candidate for admission to the PGDipEd (Educational
Psychology) shall have qualified for an approved undergraduate
degree in Education, Educational Psychology, Psychology or
Teaching with a minimum B average. Candidates shall have
satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient background
experience to benefit from the course.
3.
A candidate may not be concurrently admitted to the Postgraduate
Diploma in Education and the degree of Master of Education, or the
degree of Master of Educational Administration and Leadership.
Course of Study
4.
5.
A candidate shall follow for not less than one year a course of study
comprising of a value of 120 credits.
Candidates shall either
(a) Pass papers from the following list to a total of at least 120 credits:
Code
Title
Credits
211.740
Technology Education
30
211.783
Research Exercise in Mathematics
Education
30
The Practice of Visual Arts in
Education
30
248.770
Requirements
261.760
Instructional Design for E-Learning
30
R 186.757, 186.760
P 180.780 or 180.790 or an
approved research methods paper
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 187.712, 186.764
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.761, 186.765
R 207.770
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
Page 121
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
273.724
The Expert Teacher of Adults:
Principles and Practice
30
R 187.724
263.701
Enhancing Teacher Learning
30
R 180.701
273.725
R 187.725
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 180.704, 186.731
Leadership and Communication in
Adult Education and Training
30
263.704
273.784
30
R 186.784, 187.784
Adolescent Learning and
Engagement
30
Learning and Teaching in Tertiary
Education
273.785
30
R 187.782, 187.785
265.736
Quality in Early Years Education
30
R 186.736
Planning for Tertiary Learning and
Teaching
265.737
Young Children and Their Families
30
R 186.737
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 186.788
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
273.722
Adult Learning: Myths and Realities 30
R 187.722
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.723
Cultures and Learning: Diversity in
Adult Education
30
R 187.723
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
273.724
The Expert Teacher of Adults:
Principles and Practice
30
R 187.724
253.754
Family and Couples Counselling
30
R 209.754
253.755
Culture and Counselling
30
R 209.755
273.784
Learning and Teaching in Tertiary
Education
30
R 187.784
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
273.785
Planning for Tertiary Learning and
Teaching
30
R 187.785
274.707
Issues in Health and Physical
Education
30
274.712
Responsibility in Physical Education 30
R 209.712
276.782
Mathematics Education
30
R 211.782
(i) one additional paper from Schedule (b)
276.784
Current Issues in Teaching
Mathematics
30
R 211.784
or
277.703
Developing Environmental
Sustainability Education
Programmes
30
R 211.703
263.706
(b) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
The Endorsement Schedule (Counselling and Guidance)
(a) One compulsory paper
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.750
Counselling Theory
30
R 209.750
(b) At least one of the following papers:
(c) Up to 30 credits from Schedule (b) above, or other masterate-level
papers in Education, Rehabilitation Studies, Psychology, or other
relevant subject area as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor
Education or nominee.
(d)Either:
(ii) one of: 267.780 Research in Education
or
267.788 Qualitative and Action Research in Education
or an approved research methods paper
or:
Note
(b) qualify for an endorsement of the diploma by taking, subject to
the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education or nominee,
papers as specified in the Schedule for that endorsement.
Note
Students intending to complete a master’s degree are advised to
seek approval to enrol in an approved research methods paper as
part of their diploma.
(c) Subject to the approval of the Academic Board, a candidate
enrolled in a College of Education masters qualification or Doctor
of Education degree may apply to exit with a Postgraduate Diploma
in Education providing they have completed at least 120 credits at
postgraduate level within four years, unless a period of suspension
or extension has been approved by the Academic Board.
6.
Candidates intending to complete the Master of Counselling Degree
must complete an approved research methods paper as part of their
diploma.
Transition Arrangements
Existing programmes will be offered concurrently. Candidates enrolled in
the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Guidance Studies) can transition
into new programme. Candidates enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in
Counselling will need to complete according to existing regulations at the
time of their first enrolment.
The Endorsement Schedule (Distance and On-line Education)
(no new enrolments from 2010)
The endorsements and their papers are
(a) Three compulsory papers
The Endorsement Schedule (Adult Education)
(a) At least three (90 credits) of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
273.721
Knowledge and Power in Adult
Education Contexts
30
R 187.721
273.722
Adult Learning: Myths and Realities 30
R 187.722
273.723
Cultures and Learning: Diversity in
Adult Education
R 187.723
Page 122
30
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
186.757
Instructional Design and Learning
Technologies in Distance and Online Education
30
R 186.760
187.712
Policy, Practice and Trends in
Distance and On-line Education
30
R 186.764, 261.764
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
Education
(b) One of the following:
Code
Title
Credits
186.761
Learning and Educational
Technologies
30
254.785
Special Topic
30
Requirements
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
(c) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
Transition Arrangements
From 2010, new students will be directed in the first instance to the new
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (E‑Learning).
Students who have previously enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in
Education (Distance and On-line Education) or Postgraduate Diploma
in Education (Educational Technologies) will be offered the option of
transferring to the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (E-Learning) crediting
the papers already completed in lieu of compulsory and/or elective papers
as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education or nominee; or of
completing the Postgraduate Diploma of Education under the endorsement
regulations existing at the time of their enrolment.
The Endorsement Schedule (Early Years)
(a) At least two of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
265.736
Quality in Early Years Education
30
R 186.736
265.737
Young Children and Their Families
30
R 186.737
265.740
Advanced Studies on Learning in
the Early Years
30
R 186.740
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
265.738
Children’s Play and Learning in a
Goal-Directed Teaching Practice
30
(b) Up to 60 credits may be chosen from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
The Endorsement Schedule (Educational Administration)
(no new enrolments from 2009)
(a) Two compulsory papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
(b) At least one of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
(c) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education or
nominee, papers may be selected from the following to the value of
30 credits:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
or other papers listed in other Masterate Schedules.
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
257.769
Teaching English Language
Learners
30
R 207.769
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.765
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
276.782
Mathematics Education
30
R 211.782
(c) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
The Endorsement Schedule (Educational Psychology)
Subject to CUAP Approval
Note
Students intending to complete a master’s degree are advised to
seek approval to enrol in an approved research methods paper as
part of their diploma.
The Endorsement Schedule (Educational Technologies)
(no new enrolments from 2010)
(a) One compulsory paper
Code
Title
Credits
186.761
Learning and Educational
Technologies
30
(b) At least two of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
186.734
Innovation and Educational
Technologies
30
R 186.769
186.757
Instructional Design and Learning
Technologies in Distance and Online Education
30
R 186.760
186.762
Educational Technologies and the
Curriculum
30
254.764
Learning from Images
30
R 207.764
261.766
Teaching for E-learning
30
R 186.766
(a) Four compulsory papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
256.754
Assessment in Educational
Psychology
30
R 186.754, 186.747
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
Requirements
(c) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
Page 123
Education
Transition Arrangements
From 2010, new students will be directed in the first instance to the new
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (E‑Learning).
Students who have previously enrolled in the Postgraduate Diploma in
Education (Distance and On-line Education) or Postgraduate Diploma
in Education (Educational Technologies) will be offered the option of
transferring to the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (E-Learning) crediting
the papers already completed in lieu of compulsory and/or elective papers
as approved by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education or nominee; or of
completing the Postgraduate Diploma of Education under the endorsement
regulations existing at the time of their enrolment.
The Endorsement Schedule (E-Learning)
(a) Three compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
261.760
Instructional Design for E-Learning
30
R 186.760, 186.757
261.764
Foundations of E-Learning
30
R 186.764, 187.712
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.750
Counselling Theory
30
R 209.750
(b) At least one of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
253.754
Family and Couples Counselling
30
R 209.754
253.755
Culture and Counselling
30
R 209.755
(c) The balance from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
253.759
Career Development: Theory and
Practice
30
R 209.759
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
Note
(b) One of the following:
261.765
Trends in E-Learning
30
R 186.765
261.766
Teaching for E-Learning
30
R 186.766
(c) In lieu of b), up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers
in Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
The Endorsement Schedule (Gifted and Talented Education)
In lieu of section (c) options, and with the approval of the Pro ViceChancellor of Education or nominee, a student may select papers
from those listed in other Masterate Schedules. Students intending
to complete a master’s degree are advised to enrol in an approved
research methods paper as part of their diploma.
Transition Arrangements
Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Guidance Studies) students may choose
to transition into the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Counselling and
Guidance).
The Endorsement Schedule (Māori Education)
(no new enrolments from 2012)
(a) Two compulsory papers
(a) Two compulsory papers
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
262.750
Principles and Practices in the
Education of Gifted and Talented
Students
30
R 186.750
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
262.751
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.790
Indigenous Research
Methodologies
30
R 182.793
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
R 186.749, 262.749
(b) One or two of the following papers:
(b) At least one of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 180.704, 186.731
263.705
Assessment for Learning and
Teaching
30
R 180.705
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
Code
Title
Credits
150.711
Te Tau-Ihu o te Reo: Advanced
Māori Literature
30
Requirements
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
269.737
Language Policy and Curriculum
30
R 182.737
(c) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
The Endorsement Schedule (Special Education)
(a) Two compulsory papers
(c) Up to 30 credits may be selected from approved papers in other
Masterate Schedules. Students intending to complete a master’s
degree are advised to enrol in an approved research methods paper
as part of their diploma.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
249.741
Assessment and Planning for
Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.741
Transition Arrangement
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
Candidates will need to complete according to existing regulations at
the time of their first enrolment. These transition arrangements expire in
2015.
The Endorsement Schedule (Guidance Studies)
(no new enrolments from 2011)
(a) One compulsory paper
Page 124
(b) At least one of the following papers:
147.705
Education and Rehabilitation of the
Visually Impaired
30
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
256.756
Applied Behaviour Analysis for
Educators
30
R 186.756
Education
147.705
Education and Rehabilitation of the
Visually Impaired
30
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation of Literacy Learning
Difficulties
30
R 186.722
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749, 262.749
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
263.701
Enhancing Teacher Learning
30
R 180.701
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 180.704, 186.731
263.705
Assessment for Learning and
Teaching
30
R 180.705
263.706
Adolescent Leaning and
Engagement
30
(b) Up to 60 credits (two papers) may be selected from Schedule (a)
(ii) Coursework pathway of the Master of Education Endorsement
Schedule (Teaching and Learning). Students intending to complete
a master’s degree (research pathway) are advised to enrol in an
approved research methods paper as part of their diploma.
Note
In lieu of section (b) options, and with the approval of the Pro ViceChancellor of Education or nominee, a student may select papers
up to 30 credits from those listed in other Masterate Schedules.
Students intending to complete a master’s degree are advised
to enrol in an approved research methods paper as part of their
diploma.
7.
Candidates who successfully complete the course of study may apply
for entry into the relevant degree of Master of Education, Master of
Educational Administration and Leadership, Master of Educational
Psychology, or the Master of Counselling, providing they have at least a
B grade average (Coursework pathway) or B+ (Research pathway) and
meet the specified criteria for each programme.
8.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed four years, unless a period
of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
9.
The diploma shall be awarded on the basis of the whole evaluation with
the provision that each paper shall be at least of pass standard.
The Endorsement Schedule (Teaching and Learning)
(a) At least 60 credits (two papers) from the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.702
Facing Big Questions in Education
30
R 180.702
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
and Policy Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
The Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration and Leadership
PGDipEdAdminLead
Part I
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
Part II
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
Before enrolling in the PGDip in Educational Administration and
Leadership candidates shall:
257.767
Current Issues and Innovations in
TESOL Leadership
30
P 257.766 or 259.772; R 207.767
(a) have been admitted to a university degree and have been
granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed
to the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration and
Leadership;
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
259.777
Leadership and Learning in Diverse
Contexts
30
R 187.777
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
273.725
Leadership and Communication in
Adult Education and Training
30
R 187.725
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Course of Study
2.
A candidate shall follow for not less than one year a course of study
comprising four papers to a value of 120 credits.
3.
Candidates shall pass papers from the following list to a total of at least
120 credits:
(a) Two compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
(b) At least one of the following papers:
(c) Subject to the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education or
nominee, papers may be selected from the following to the value of
30 credits:
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
R 209.753
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 185.788, 186.788
269.732
Cultural Differences and Education
30
R 182.732
or other papers listed in other Masterate Schedules.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
254.701
Ethics in Education
30
R 187.701
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706 187.742, 211.735
Note
Students intending to complete a master’s degree are advised to
seek approval to enrol in an approved research methods paper as
part of their diploma.
Page 125
Education
4.
Candidates who successfully complete the course of study may apply
for entry into the Master of Educational Administration and Leadership,
providing they have at least a B grade average (Coursework pathway)
or B+ (Research pathway) and meet the specified criteria for the
programme .
5.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed four years, unless a period
of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
6.
The diploma shall be awarded on the basis of the whole evaluation with
the provision that each paper shall be at least of pass standard.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology
PGDipEdPsych
Subject to CUAP Approval
Part I
5.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(a) supervised full-time practical work in one or more institutions
approved for this purpose by the Academic Board. Such practical
work will normally be carried out full-time for a period of
one academic year, although under exceptional circumstances
applications to carry out this practical work half-time over two
years will be considered by the Academic Board;
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology shall
be subject to the approval of the Academic Board.
2.
Before enrolling in the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational
Psychology, a candidate shall:
(a) have completed either a Master of Educational Psychology or a
Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Psychology, or equivalent
while maintaining a grade average of B+ or above; and
(b) have completed approved undergraduate psychology papers to
the value of 45 credits with a grade average of B+ or above, or
equivalent; and
(c) have participated in the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational
Psychology selection process, achieved a satisfactory score on each
of the specified selection criteria, and been offered a place in the
programme; and
(d) have met all requirements as set by the New Zealand Psychologists
Board for registration as an Intern Educational Psychologist.
3.
Commencement in the Diploma shall be contingent on the availability of
an approved internship placement.
4.
To qualify for the Diploma, every candidate shall complete to the
satisfaction of the Academic Board such course work as is specified in
these Regulations and pass an oral and a practical examination.
The course for the Diploma shall comprise:
(b) the submission for assessment of a portfolio of casework that the
candidate has studied since enrolling for the Diploma; and
(c) such readings, seminars and other work as shall be required from
time to time.
6.
The following papers provide a mechanism for assessing the supervised
practicum requirements:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
256.841
Case Study Analyses
30
P 186.842, 256.842 or 256.844, C
186.842 and 186.843 or 256.842 or
256.844 and 256.843; R 186.841
256.843
Professional Practice Examination
Process
30
P 186.842, 256.842 or 256.844; C
186.841 and 186.842 or 256.841
and 256.842 or 256.845; R 186.843
256.844
Advanced Professional Practice in
Educational Psychology I
30
C 256.841; R 186.842, 256.842
256.845
Advanced Professional Practice in
Educational Psychology II
30
P 256.841 and 256.844; C 256.843;
R 186.842, 256.842
Note
Students must have participated in a selection process and been
offered a place in the Postgraduate Diploma of Educational
Psychology.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Evaluation
PGDipEval
No new enrolments from 2010
Refer to 2009 Calendar
The Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education
PGDipLitEd
Part I
(a) (i) a Bachelor of Education or a Bachelor of Teaching, or an
Advanced Diploma of Teaching;
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(ii) a degree and a recognised teaching qualification of at least one
year’s duration; and
(iii) been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education; and
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Candidates for the Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education
(PGDipLitEd) must have:
Page 126
(b) been accepted as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
2.
The programme of study for the postgraduate diploma shall comprise
four 700-level papers as prescribed below.
Education
3.
To qualify for the Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education a
candidate must pass 120 credits from the following schedules:
(a) Three compulsory papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
258.720
Foundations of Literacy Education
30
R 186.720
258.721
Teaching Students with Literacy
Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.721
258.722
The Nature, Prevention and
Remediation
of Literacy Learning Difficulties
30
R 186.722
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 186.780
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 186.788
4.
Candidates who successfully complete the course of study may apply for
entry into the relevant degree of either Master of Education (MEd) or
Master of Literacy Education (MLitEd), providing they have at least a
B grade average (Coursework pathway) or B+ grade average (Research
pathway).
5.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed four years, unless a period
of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
6.
The Diploma shall be awarded on the basis of the whole evaluation with
the provision that each paper shall be at least of pass standard.
(b) One of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
267.723
Experimental Research and
Professional Skills in Education
30
R 186.723
The Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching
PGDipSpecTchg
Part I
6.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Candidates shall qualify for the diploma by completing, subject to the
approval of the relevant Head of School:
(a) one core compulsory paper:
Code
Title
Credits
254.765
Core Theory and Foundations of
Specialist Teaching
30
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
and
Before enrolling for this diploma, a candidate shall:
(b) papers as specified in the Schedule for one of the diploma
endorsements.
(a) hold a relevant professional qualification;
(b) have either
(i) qualified for any degree of a New Zealand university, or
equivalent; or
(ii) provided evidence of sufficient practical/professional
experience of an acceptable standard in an area relevant to the
qualification;
(c) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course;
(d) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching.
2.
3.
4.
Candidates who do not hold current New Zealand professional
Registration will be required to undergo police vetting prior to gaining
entry into the programme. Such candidates must meet requirements
equivalent to those set down by the New Zealand Teachers Council for
registration as a teacher in terms of character and fitness to be a teacher.
All international candidates and others whose first language is not
English who have not gained a New Zealand university entrance
qualification, or an overseas entrance qualification in a country where the
main language is English, will be required to provide evidence of their
proficiency in English in the form of an academic IELTS (International
English Language Testing System) score of 7.0 with no band less than
7.0 (or the equivalent TOEFL score) or other evidence that is acceptable
to Academic Board.
Any candidate who has previously graduated with a Postgraduate
Certificate in Specialist Teaching must surrender that qualification prior
to enrolling in the diploma. Time limits for completion and for the award
of distinction will apply from the time that the candidate first enrolled in
a paper credited towards the diploma.
Course of Study
5.
A candidate shall follow for not less than one year a course of study
comprising four papers to a value of 120 credits.
Requirements
7.
The endorsements and their papers are:
The Endorsement Schedule (Autism Spectrum Disorder)
All of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
249.745
Theory and Foundations of Autism
Spectrum Disorder
30
Requirements
249.749
Evidence-based Practice in Autism
Spectrum Disorder
30
P 249.745, 254.765
249.750
Practicum in Autism Spectrum
Disorder
30
P/C 249.749
The Endorsement Schedule (Blind and Vision Impairment)
All of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
249.746
Theory and Foundations of Blind
and Vision Impairment
30
Requirements
249.751
Evidence-based Practice in Blind
and Vision Impairment
30
P 249.746, 254.765
249.752
Practicum in Blind and Vision
Impairment
30
P/C 249.751
The Endorsement Schedule (Gifted and Talented)
All of the following papers:
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
R 186.749
262.752
Evidence-based Practice in Gifted
and Talented Education
30
P 254.765, 262.751
262.753
Practicum in Gifted and Talented
Education
30
P/C262.752
Page 127
Education
The Endorsement Schedule (Learning and Behaviour)
Special Requirements
All of the following papers:
9.
Code
Title
249.753
Theory and Foundations of Learning 30
and Behaviour Diversity
Credits
Requirements
249.754
Evidence-based Practice in
Learning and Behaviour Diversity
30
P 249.753, 254.765
249.755
Practicum in Learning and
Behaviour Diversity
30
P/C 249.754
No candidate will be given more than two opportunities to pass any
Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching paper.
Note
1.
Time Limit
8.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching must be completed
within a maximum of four years.
This qualification is offered by Massey University and The
University of Canterbury. Candidates will be enrolled at and
have their degree awarded by only one of the collaborating
universities. The following endorsements are only available at
Massey University: Autism Spectrum Disorder; Blind and Vision
Impairment; Gifted and Talented. The following endorsements are
only available at The University of Canterbury: Deaf and Hearing
Impairment. Early Intervention.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language Therapy
PGDipSpchLangTher
Part I
Course of Study
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
4.
A candidate shall follow for not less than one year a course of study
comprising of four papers to a value of 120 credits.
5.
The course of study for a Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language
Therapy shall comprise the following four compulsory 30 credit papers:
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
2.
Admission to the degree shall be subject to the approval of the Academic
Board. Relevance and standard of under-graduate studies will be criteria
for approval.
Before enrolling in the Postgraduate Diploma Speech and Language
Therapy, a candidate shall:
(a) Have completed the degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language
Therapy and the Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and Language
Therapy or equivalent while maintaining a GPA of B; or a Bachelor
of Speech and Language Therapy with Honours or equivalent;
(b) Have been granted admission to postgraduate study and entitled
to enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Speech and Language
Therapy;
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
271.710
Evidenced-Based Practice in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.710
271.711
Critical and Current Issues in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.711
271.712
Theoretical Issues in Speech and
Language Therapy
30
R 186.712
267.781
Research Methods Professional
Practice
30
R 186.713, 271.713
6.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed four years, unless a period
of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
7.
Candidates admitted to the Postgraduate Diploma who have been
awarded the Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and Language Therapy
shall follow a course of at least 60 credits, which together with the
qualifying course of study shall form a coherent programme of 120
credits. For such candidates the Course Regulations for the Postgraduate
Diploma shall be deemed to apply from the date of their enrolling in
the certificate. Students will be required to surrender their Postgraduate
Certificate before being awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Speech
and Language Therapy.
8.
The Postgraduate Diploma shall be awarded on the basis of the whole
evaluation with the provision that each paper shall be at least of pass
standard.
(c) Have completed at least one year clinical experience in speech and
language therapy, or;
(d) Be accepted as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
3.
A candidate may not be concurrently enrolled in any other postgraduate
diploma or master’s degree.
The Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary)
PGDipTchg(Prim)
No new enrolments from 2011
Part II
Part I
Course Regulations
Eligibility
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
1.
Students admitted to the Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Primary)
shall before enrolment have:
(a) qualified for the award of a relevant bachelor’s degree (or
equivalent);
(b) met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
Page 128
Education
2.
3.
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the New Zealand Teachers Council in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers Council.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection
where this is required.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in a Initial Teacher Education programme if, in the opinion
of the University, a student is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Should a student in a Initial Teacher Education programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education of the conviction within seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
Course of Study
5.
Code
Title
Credits
278.703
Professional Practice I
15
278.704
Professional Practice II
15
278.711
Classroom Inquiry
15
Requirements
P 278.703
Contextual Knowledge
Variations
4.
Professional Practice
Code
Title
Credits
278.701
Teaching in Context I
15
Requirements
278.702
Teaching in Context II
15
P 278.701
Requirements
Content Knowledge
Code
Title
Credits
278.705
Mathematics Teaching in the
Primary School
15
278.706
Effective Pedagogy in Mathematics
15
278.707
Literacy Development and
Pedagogy
15
278.708
Literacy Assessment and
Instruction
15
278.709
Education in Science, Social
Science and Technology
15
278.710
Education in the Arts, Hauora and
Learning Languages
15
Candidates shall follow for not less than one calendar year a course of
study comprising 165 credits. All candidates are required to pass the
following papers:
P 278.705
P 278.707
P 278.709
The Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
PGDipTchg(Sec)
No new enrolments from 2011
(a) Should a student in a Initial Teacher Education programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Education of the conviction within seven days.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Teachers Council for registration as a teacher in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a teacher,
the Pro Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University
Disciplinary Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary
Power of the Disciplinary Regulations.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Students admitted to the Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary)
shall before enrolment have:
(a) qualified for the award of a relevant bachelor’s degree (or
equivalent) in a subject area(s) deemed suitable for teaching in New
Zealand secondary schools., and
Course of Study
5.
Candidates shall follow for not less than one calendar year a course of
study comprising 120 credits.
6.
Each student’s course of study is subject to the approval of the Director
of Teacher Education and Undergraduate Studies. The course of study
must include:
(b) met the requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers
Council for registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a teacher.
2.
3.
While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the New Zealand Teachers Council in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the New Zealand
Teachers Council.
Admission to the programme shall be granted or withheld upon
consideration of criteria 1(a) and (b) and upon an interview for selection
where this is required.
Variations
4.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in a Initial Teacher Education programme if, in the opinion
of the University, a student is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Teachers Council for
registration as a teacher in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a teacher.
(a) Compulsory Papers (75 credits):
Teaching Studies
Code
Title
Credits
260.701
Teaching in Context I
15
260.702
Teaching in Context II
15
260.703
Professional Practice I
15
260.704
Professional Practice II
15
260.705
Teaching and Learning in the
Secondary Context
15
Requirements
P 260.701
P 260.703
(b) Approved Elective Papers (45 credits):
Subject Studies Papers
Page 129
Education
Code
Title
Credits
Code
Title
Credits
260.720
Teaching and Learning
Mathematics
15
260.734
Teaching and Learning Social
Studies
15
260.721
Teaching and Learning Senior
Mathematics
15
260.735
Teaching and Learning Senior
History
15
260.722
Teaching and Learning Science
15
260.736
15
260.723
Teaching and Learning Senior
Agriculture/Biology/Horticulture
15
Teaching and Learning Senior
Geography
260.737
Teaching and Learning Commerce
15
Teaching and Learning Senior
Chemistry
15
260.738
Teaching and Learning Music
15
260.739
15
260.725
Teaching and Learning Senior
Physics
15
Teaching and Learning Senior
Music
260.740
Teaching and Learning Technology
15
Teaching and Leading School
Instrumental Groups
15
260.726
260.727
Teaching and Learning Senior
Technology
15
260.741
Teaching and Learning Health and
Physical Education
15
260.728
Teaching and Learning Graphics
15
260.742
Teaching and Learning Languages
15
Teaching and Learning Senior
Physical Education
15
260.729
260.730
Teaching and Learning Senior
Languages
15
260.743
Teaching and Learning Health
15
260.744
Teaching and Learning Visual Arts
15
260.731
Teaching and Learning English
15
260.745
15
260.732
Teaching and Learning Senior
English
15
Teaching and Learning Senior
Visual Arts
260.746
Teaching and Learning Drama
15
Teaching and Learning Senior Art
History
15
260.733
253.753
Guidance in Education
30
260.724
Requirements
Requirements
R 209.753
Postgraduate Certificates
The Postgraduate Certificate in Education
PGCertEd
Part I
Course of Study
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
3.
A candidate shall follow a course of study comprising two papers to a
value of 60 credits from the Master of Education schedule.
4.
Before enrolling for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education, a
candidate shall:
Candidates who have completed the Certificate may apply for entry
with credit into the Postgraduate Diploma in Education, Postgraduate
Diploma in Educational Administration and Leadership, or the
Postgraduate Diploma in Literacy Education. Admission will be
determined by the entry criteria and requirements for each programme
and will require the Certificate to be surrendered.
5.
(a) have qualified for the degree of Bachelor of Education, or the
Bachelor of Education (Teaching); or
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed two years, unless a period
of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
6.
Subject to the approval of the Academic Board, a candidate enrolled
in a College of Education postgraduate diploma, masters qualification
or Doctor of Education degree may apply to exit with a Postgraduate
Certificate in Education providing they have completed at least 60
credits at postgraduate level within two years, unless a period of
suspension or extension has been approved by Academic Board.
Part II
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
(b) have qualified for any other degree of a New Zealand university
and hold an appropriate professional qualification; and
(c) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education.
2.
A candidate may not be concurrently admitted to both the Postgraduate
Certificate in Education and any other postgraduate qualification in
Education with the same endorsement.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Administration and Leadership
PGCertEdAdminLead
Part I
Part II
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Course Regulations
Eligibility
Page 130
1.
Before enrolling in the PGCert in Educational Administration and
Leadership candidates shall:
Education
(a) have been admitted to a university degree and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study as entitled to proceed to the
Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Administration and
Leadership; and
Code
TitleCredits
Credits
Requirements
254.774
Evaluation of Educational
Organisations
30
R 187.774
254.775
Management of Human Resources
in Educational Organisations
30
R 187.775
254.785
Special Topic
30
P Permission of Pro Vice-Chancellor
of Education; R 211.785
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
259.776
Gender Issues and Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.776
A candidate shall follow a course of study comprising two papers from
the following list to a value of 60 credits:
259.777
Leadership and Learning in Diverse
Contexts
30
R 187.777
(a) Compulsory paper
265.769
Professional Leadership in Early
Childhood Education
30
R 187.769
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course.
2.
A candidate may not be concurrently admitted to both the Postgraduate
Certificate in Educational Administration and Leadership and any other
postgraduate qualification in Education with the same endorsement.
Course of Study
3.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
259.771
Educational Leadership in Action
30
R 187.771
(b) May choose one from:
Code
TitleCredits
Credits
Requirements
254.706
Advanced Studies in Curriculum
Policy and Practice
30
R 180.706, 187.742, 211.735
254.773
Educational Policy Analysis
30
R 187.773
4.
Candidates who have completed the Certificate may apply for entry with
credit into the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Administration
and Leadership. Admission will be determined by the entry criteria
and requirements for the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational
Administration and Leadership and will require the Certificate to be
surrendered.
5.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed three years, unless a
period of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Psychology
PGCertEdPsych
Subject to CUAP Approval
(c) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
proceed to the Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Psychology.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Course Requirements
2.
To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate in Educational
Psychology, candidates shall be required to complete 60 credits from the
following Schedule:
Part II
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Course Regulations
256.754
Assessment in Educational
Psychology
30
R 186.747, 186.754
256.755
Professional Practice in Educational 30
Psychology
R 186.748, 186.755
1.
Before enrolling for the Postgraduate Certificate in Educational
Psychology candidates shall:
(a) hold a master’s degree in Education with a minimum of a B average
or above and have completed approved undergraduate psychology
papers to the value of 45 credits with a minimum of a B average or
above; and
(b) have completed sufficient study in educational psychology and
research to be able to meet the New Zealand Psychologists Board
registration requirements; and
3.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed three years, unless a
period of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
Transition arrangements
Students who completed the PGCertEdPsych prior to 2012 and intend
applying for the PGDipEdPsych (internship) may require a personal course
with approved papers to meet provisional registration with the New Zealand
Psychologists Board. These transition arrangements expire in 2014.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Specialist Teaching
PGCertSpecTchg
Part I
Part II
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Course Regulations
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling for this certificate, a candidate shall:
(a) hold a relevant professional qualification;
(b) have either
(i) qualified for any degree of a New Zealand university, or
equivalent; or
Page 131
Education
(ii) provided evidence of sufficient practical/professional
experience of an acceptable standard in an area relevant to the
qualification;
(b) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
background of professional experience to be likely to benefit from
the course;
(a) one compulsory paper:
Code
Title
Credits
254.765
Core Theory and Foundations of
Specialist Teaching
30
and
(c) have been granted admission to postgraduate study as entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Certificate in Specialist Teaching.
2.
3.
(b) one elective paper (30 credits) from the following:
Candidates who do not hold current New Zealand professional
Registration will be required to undergo police vetting prior to gaining
entry into the programme. Such candidates must meet requirements
equivalent to those set down by the New Zealand Teachers Council for
registration as a teacher in terms of character and fitness to be a teacher.
Code
Title
Credits
249.745
Theory and Foundations of Autism
Spectrum Disorder
30
249.746
Theory and Foundations of Blind
and Vision Impairment
30
All international candidates and others whose first language is not
English who have not gained a New Zealand university entrance
qualification, or an overseas entrance qualification in a country where the
main language is English, will be required to provide evidence of their
proficiency in English in the form of an academic IELTS (International
English Language Testing System) score of 7.0 with no band less than
7.0 (or the equivalent TOEFL score) or other evidence that is acceptable
to Academic Board.
262.751
Theory and Foundations of Gifted
and Talented Education
30
249.753
Theory and Foundations of Learning 30
and Behaviour Diversity
Course of Study
4.
A candidate shall follow for not less than one semester a course of study
comprising two papers to a value of 60 credits.
5.
Candidates shall qualify for the certificate by completing, subject to the
approval of the relevant Head of School:
Requirements
Requirements
R 186.749
Time Limit
6.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Specialist Teaching must be completed
within a maximum of two years.
Special Requirements
7.
No candidate will be given more than two opportunities to pass any
Postgraduate Certificate in Specialist Teaching paper.
Notes
1.
This qualification is offered by Massey University and The
University of Canterbury. Candidates will be enrolled at and have
their degree awarded by only one of the collaborating universities.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and Language Therapy
PGCertSpchLangTher
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
3.
Course Requirements
4.
Part II
Course Regulations
1.
2.
A candidate may not be concurrently enrolled in any other postgraduate
certificate, postgraduate diploma or master’s degree.
The course of study for the Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and
Language Therapy shall comprise the following two compulsory 30
credit papers:
Admission to the degree shall be subject to the approval of the Academic
Board. Relevance and standard of undergraduate studies will be criteria
for approval.
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
271.710
Evidenced-Based Practice in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.710
Before enrolling in the Postgraduate Certificate of Speech and Language
Therapy, a candidate shall:
271.711
Critical and Current Issues in
Speech and Language Therapy
30
R 186.711
5.
Candidates who have completed the Postgraduate Certificate in
Speech and Language Therapy may apply for entry with credit into the
Postgraduate Diploma of Speech and Language Therapy. Admission into
this programme is based on academic performance.
(c) have completed at least one year clinical experience in speech and
language therapy, or;
6.
A candidate’s course of study may not exceed three years, unless a
period of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic Board.
(d) be accepted as a candidate by the Pro Vice-Chancellor of
Education.
7.
The Postgraduate Certificate shall be awarded on the basis of the whole
evaluation with the provision that each paper shall be at least of pass
standard.
(a) have completed the degree of Bachelor of Speech and Language
Therapy or equivalent while maintaining a GPA of B;
(b) have been granted admission to postgraduate study and entitled to
enrol for the Postgraduate Certificate in Speech and Language Therapy;
Page 132
Education
The Postgraduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching
PGCertTT
Part I
Course Requirements
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
2.
To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate in Tertiary
Teaching, candidates shall be required to complete 60 credits from the
following Schedule:
Part II
Code
Title
Credits
Requirements
Course Regulations
273.784
Learning and Teaching in Tertiary
Education
30
R 186.784, 187.784
273.785
Planning for Tertiary Learning and
Teaching
30
R 187.782, 187.785
1.
Before enrolling for the Postgraduate Certificate of Tertiary Teaching
candidates shall:
(a) have been admitted to a university degree and have been granted
admission to postgraduate study;
3.
With the approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of
Education, paper 273.785 may be substituted with any other paper from
the Master of Education Schedule that deals predominantly with the
teaching of a specific discipline at the tertiary level.
4.
A candidate shall satisfy the requirements for the Certificate within three
years of admission to the programme.
(b) have access to tertiary level learners and/or tertiary teaching
contexts; and
(c) have satisfied the Academic Board that they have sufficient
professional experience and suitability to be likely to benefit from
the course of study.
Page 133
Page 134
Humanities and Social Sciences
Course Regulations
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Undergraduate Degrees..................................................................137
The Degree of Master of Health Science..........................................187
The Degree of Bachelor of Arts........................................................137
The Degree of Master of International Development.......................188
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and
The Degree of Master of International Security...............................188
Bachelor of Business Studies............................................................150
The Degree of Master of Māori Visual Arts.....................................189
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and
The Degree of Master of Nursing.....................................................190
Bachelor of Science..........................................................................150
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication ....................................151
The Degree of Bachelor of Defence Studies.....................................154
The Degree of Bachelor of Health Science.......................................155
The Degree of Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts..................................159
The Degree of Bachelor of Midwifery*............................................160
The Degree of Bachelor of Nursing..................................................161
The Degree of Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning.162
The Degree of Bachelor of Social Work...........................................165
Undergraduate Diplomas...............................................................167
The Diploma in Arts..........................................................................167
The Diploma in Health Science........................................................168
The Diploma in Rehabilitation Studies ............................................168
The Degree of Master of Public Health............................................191
The Degree of Master of Public Health (Biosecurity)......................192
The Degree of Master of Public Policy.............................................192
The Degree of Master of Resource and Environmental Planning....193
The Degree of Master of Social Work..............................................193
Postgraduate Diplomas...................................................................194
The Postgraduate Diploma in Arts....................................................194
The Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Psychology..........................195
The Postgraduate Diploma in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy...........196
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication.................................196
The Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies........................197
The Postgraduate Diploma in Discursive Therapies.........................197
The Postgraduate Diploma in Emergency Management..................198
Undergraduate Certificates............................................................169
The Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science..................................198
The Certificate in Arts.......................................................................169
The Postgraduate Diploma in Industrial/Organisational
The Certificate in Pacific Development............................................169
Psychology........................................................................................198
The Certificate in Social and Community Work...............................170
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Security........................199
Graduate Diplomas.........................................................................170
The Postgraduate Diploma in Māori Visual Arts..............................200
The Graduate Diploma in Arts..........................................................170
The Postgraduate Diploma in Museum Studies................................200
The Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management........................171
The Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing..............................................200
The Graduate Diploma in Māori Development................................172
The Postgraduate Diploma in Planning............................................201
Graduate Certificates......................................................................172
The Graduate Certificate in Arts.......................................................172
The Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management......................173
Bachelor Honours Degrees.............................................................173
The Degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours.................................173
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication with Honours..............177
The Degree of Bachelor of Health Science with Honours................178
Masters Degrees..............................................................................179
The Degree of Master of Applied Social Work.................................179
The Degree of Master of Arts...........................................................180
The Degree of Master of Communication........................................184
The Degree of Master of Creative Writing.......................................185
The Degree of Master of Defence Studies........................................185
The Degree of Master of Emergency Management..........................186
The Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Practice......................201
The Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health.....................................202
The Postgraduate Diploma in Rehabilitation....................................202
The Postgraduate Diploma in Second Language Teaching..............203
The Postgraduate Diploma in Social Sector Evaluation Research ..204
The Postgraduate Diploma in Social Service Supervision...............204
Toku Reo Toku Oha The Postgraduate Diploma in Te Reo Māori...204
The Postgraduate Diploma in Whānau Development.......................205
Postgraduate Certificates...............................................................205
The Postgraduate Certificate in Arts.................................................205
The Postgraduate Certificate in Health Science................................206
The Postgraduate Certificate in Nursing...........................................206
The Postgraduate Certificate in Planning..........................................207
The Postgraduate Certificate in Whānau Development....................207
Page 135
Humanities and Social Sciences
*
No new enrolments into Part I or Part II for the Bachelor of Midwifery in
2012. Returning and transferring students refer to page 160.
The following programmes are not taking new enrolments. Students who
are completing these programmes must fulfil the appropriate regulations
as previously published in the Massey University Calendar:
Bachelor of Defence Studies (2011)
Postgraduate Diploma in Discursive Therapies (2011)
Graduate Diploma in Maori Development (2011)
Certificate in Social and Community Work (2011)
Page 136
Humanities and Social Sciences
Undergraduate Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of Arts
BA
Course Regulations
Part I
(c) Where a minor is included from the Bachelor of Business Studies
or the Bachelor of Science degree:
(i) the regulations of the Bachelor of Business Studies or the
Bachelor of Science for the minor subject will apply; except that
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
There are no admission requirements specific to this qualification.
Course of Study
2.
The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree consists of at least 360 credits of
study with:
(a) not more than 165 credits from 100-level papers
3.
(ii) where the same minor subject is also offered in the Bachelor of
Arts degree, the regulations of the Bachelor of Arts for the minor
subject will apply.
(d) No paper may be credited to both a major subject and a minor
subject, and no paper may be credited to more than one minor
subject.
(e) Subject to the approval of Academic Board, a candidate may
substitute up to 15 credits from a related subject for equivalent
credits in the minor subject.
Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
(b) at least 75 credits from 300-level papers
Part I: Written Communication Requirement
(c) at least 240 credits from the Schedule for the degree of Bachelor of
Arts.
All students must pass one of the following papers, or an approved
alternative, normally within the first 120 credits of study:
Candidates must pass a paper in written communication from Part
I of the BA Schedule, normally within the first 120 credits of study
towards the degree. Candidates who have been awarded a degree from a
recognised tertiary institution, or who have passed an equivalent paper
at a recognised tertiary institution, may apply for exemption from this
requirement.
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
192.102
Academic Writing in English for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note
Note
Majors
4.
Candidates must complete the requirements for at least one major
subject.
(a) For all majors except Business Psychology, candidates must pass at
least 135 credits in the major subject, including at least 15 credits at
100-level, at least 30 credits at 200-level, and at least 60 credits at
300-level.
Students whose prior education was not in English should normally
take 192.102.
Part II: Major and Minor Requirements
Business Psychology
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
114.241
Managing Human Resources
15
P any 100-level paper
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
175.201
Social Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.203
Introduction to Psychological
Research
15
P 175.102
175.205
Brain and Behaviour
15
P 175.102
175.206
Memory and Cognition
15
P 175.102
175.210
Ngā Tirohanga Rua o te Taha
Hinengaro: Bicultural Perspectives
in Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA paper, R
175.312
114.326
Human Resource Practices
15
P 114.241
114.330
Equity and Diversity in the
Workplace
15
P any 200-level paper
114.350
Current Issues in Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.240, or 114.241 or 114.254
114.396
Strategic Human Resource
Management
15
P 114.241
Minors
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two papers at 200-level
6.
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.328
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 15 credits at 200-level; R
152.300, 152.303, 152.365
175.301
Community Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.302
Abnormal and Therapeutic
Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.303
The Practice of Psychological
Research
15
P 175.203
(b) For the Business Psychology major, candidates must pass at
least 195 credits, including 30-credits at 100-level, 75 credits at
200-level, and 90 credits at 300-level.
(c) The requirements for each major are set out in Part II of the BA
schedule.
(d) Subject to the approval of Academic Board, a candidate may
substitute up to 15 300-level credits from a related subject for
equivalent 300-level credits in the major subject.
Double Majors
5.
Candidates may complete a double major by:
(a) Passing at least 120 credits in each of two majoring subjects listed
in Part II of the BA Schedule, including at least 45 credits at
300-level exclusive to each major; and
(b) Meeting all other majoring requirements in each of two majoring
subjects listed in Part II of the BA schedule.
(c) No paper may be credited to more than one major.
(d) Business Psychology is not normally available as part of a double
major.
Candidates may complete the requirements for a minor subject.
Candidates may complete a maximum of two minor subjects. The
minor(s) must be in a different subject area from the major(s).
(a) The subjects available as minors within the BA degree, and the
requirements for those minors, are specified in Part II of the BA
Schedule.
(b) Minor subjects may also be selected from the Bachelor of Business
Studies and the Bachelor of Science degrees.
Page 137
Humanities and Social Sciences
Notes:
175.306
Assessment of Individual
Differences
15
P 175.203
175.309
Forensic Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.311
Psychology of Women
15
P 175.203
175.316
Evolution, Culture and Mind
15
P 175.203, R 175.202 (1998–2001
only)
175.317
Health Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.318
Experimental Psychology
15
P 175.203, 175.205, 175.206,
Note 2
175.343
Personnel Psychology and Career
Development
15
P 175.203, R 175.344
4. Before enrolling in Chinese language papers below the
300-level, native speakers of Chinese must consult the Programme
Coordinator or Head of School to discuss the appropriate selection
of papers.
175.345
Organisational Psychology
15
P 175.203, R 175.344
5. Suitable for heritage learners of Chinese who possess a
knowledge of 600 (approx) characters.
1. Not suitable for native speakers of Chinese. Please discuss
other options with the Head of School or Programme Coordinator.
2. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 300
(approx) characters.
3. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 450
(approx) characters.
6. Suitable for heritage learners of Chinese with a knowledge of
750 (approx) characters.
Notes
1. All papers scheduled with prefixes 114 and 152 are included
in the maximum of 120 credits permitted from the Schedules for
other degrees under BA degree Regulation 2(c).
2. Students who have passed 175.203 and either 175.205 or
175.206 may be permitted to take the third prerequisite as a corequisite.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Chinese, including 15 credits at 100-level;
30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any level
from the Chinese schedule. All majors must include at least one of 241.103 or
241.203.
Majoring Requirements
Minor Requirements
A major in Business Psychology consists of 195 credits, including 175.101,
175.102; 45 credits from 200-level Psychology papers, including 175.201
and 175.203; 30 credits consisting of 114.241 and 152.200; 60 credits from
300-level Psychology papers, including 30 credits from 175.306, 175.343,
175.345; and 30 credits from 114.326, 114.330, 114.350, 114.396, 152.304,
152.329 and 152.341.
A minor consists of 75 credits in Chinese, including 15 credits at 300-level;
30 credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the
Chinese schedule.
Classical Studies
134.102
Great Western Philosophy
15
Minor Requirements
135.103
Magic and Witchcraft
15
Business Psychology is not available as a minor subject.
201.112
Greek History
15
201.113
Greek Mythology
15
201.114
Early Rome
15
201.115
Introductory Latin
15
201.116
Latin
15
Chinese
241.101
Chinese 1A
15
R 169.141, 169.142; Note 1
241.102
Chinese 1B
15
241.101 or PHOS; R 169.141,
169.142; Note 1
241.103
Chinese Cultural World
15
R 169.143
201.117
Greek and Roman Warfare
15
P 241.102 or 169.141 and 169.142
or PHOS; R 241.241, 241.242,
169.241, 169.242;Note 1, 2
201.119
Ancient Sport and Entertainment
15
135.201
Ancient Religions
15
P any 100-level BA paper
135.211
Jesus and his World
15
P any 100-level BA paper
200.215
Political Theory from Plato to Marx
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 134.211, 134.311, 200.211,
200.311
241.201
Chinese 2A
15
P 201.115
241.202
Chinese 2B
15
P 241.201 or PHOS; R
241.241,241.242, 169.241, 169.242;
Note 1, 3;
241.203
20th Century Chinese Literature
and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.243
201.201
15
P any 100-level BA paper
241.204
Chinese Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.244
The Pursuit of Happiness in the
Classical World
201.211
15
P any 100-level BA paper
241.205
Business Chinese
15
P 241.102 or 169.141 and 169.142
or PHOS; R 169.254; Note 4
Love and Sexuality in Ancient
Greece
201.216
The Trojan War
15
P any 100-level BA paper
241.295
Individual Research Project I in
Chinese Studies
15
Permission HOS; R 169.298
201.218
Greek and Roman Religion
15
P any 100-level BA paper
201.219
Greek Art and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Chinese 3A
15
201.220
Roman Art and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.309
Ancient Philosophy
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy or
201.201
201.313
Myth and Greek Tragedy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Imperial Rome
15
P any 200-level BA paper
241.301
241.302
Chinese 3B
15
P 241.202 or 241.241 and 241.242
or PHOS; R 241.341, 241.342,
169.341, 169.342; Note 1, 5
P 241.301 or PHOS; R 241.341,
241.342, 169.341, 169.342; Note
1, 6
241.304
Chinese Grammar
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.344
201.314
201.318
Greek and Roman Religion
15
P any 200-level BA paper
241.305
Translation from and into Chinese
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.343
201.319
Greek Art and Society
15
P any 200-level BA paper
201.320
Roman Art and Society
15
P any 200-level BA paper
241.306
Readings in Modern Chinese
Literature
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.345
241.395
Individual Research Project II in
Chinese Studies
15
Permission HOS; R 169.397
241.396
Individual Research Project III in
Chinese Studies
15
Permission HOS; R 169.398
Page 138
Note
No student may enrol for a paper in Classical Studies with the same
title as one for which credit has already been given.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Classical Studies, including 15 credits
201-prefix at 100-level; 30 credits 201-prefix at 200-level; 60 credits
Humanities and Social Sciences
201-prefix at 300-level and 30 credits at any level from 134-, 135- and
200-prefix papers in the Classical Studies schedule.
146.313
Issues in South Pacific
Anthropology
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Minor Requirements
146.318
Environmental Anthropology
15
P any 200-level BA paper
A minor consists of 75 credits in Classical Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Classical Studies schedule. The minor must include at least 60-credits
from 201-prefix papers.
170.302
Research for Social Change
15
P 170.201 or 170.202
176.309
Development and Social Change:
Contemporary Issues
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.323
The Transformation of the Pacific:
Contemporary Issues
15
P any 200-level Sociology paper
179.330
Māori Development and the Social
Services
15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.301
Contemporary International Conflict 15
P any 200-level BA paper
Defence Studies
149.100
Fundamentals of Command
15
149.110
Introduction to Logistics
15
149.140
Introduction to Tactics
15
149.151
An Introduction to the History of
Modern Warfare
15
R 148.151
149.200
Command Development
15
P 149.100
Minor Requirements
149.210
Intermediate Logistics
15
P 149.110
149.230
Military Law
15
P any 100-level BA paper
149.240
Intermediate Tactics
15
P 149.140
A minor consists of 75 credits in Development Studies, including 131.121,
131.221, 131.321; at least one of 150.213, 145.311 or 146.318 and 15 credits
at any level from the Development Studies schedule.
149.251
A Military History of the First
World War
15
P any 100-level BA paper
149.253
A Military History of the American
Civil War
15
P any 100-level BDefStuds or BA
paper; R 149.291 (2009)
190.240
Air Power
15
Majoring Requirements
Development Studies is not available as a major subject.
Economics
115.106
Economics
15
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
P any 100-level paper
178.110
The New Zealand Economy
15
148.205
New Zealand Politics Since 1890
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 178.211
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101; R 178.204
178.210
Economic Policy
15
P 178.100 or 178.110
178.221
Methods of Economic Analysis
15
P 115.106 or any 100-level
Economics paper
178.240
Managerial Economics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 100-level Economics paper
or 115.106
178.250
Contemporary Economic Issues
15
P any 100-level paper
178.280
Research Methods in Economics
and Finance
15
P 115.101 or 161.110 or 161.120
and 115.105 or 115.106 or 125.1xx
or 178.1xx; R 178.220
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.307
Markets, Firms and Consumers
15
P 178.201 or 178.204 or 125.230; or
(115.106 or 178.101) and 178.280
178.308
Economic Analysis of Money,
Banking and Financial Markets
15
P 15 credits of 178.2xx, R 178.300
A minor consists of 75 credits in Defence Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200-and/or 300-level; and 30 credits at any level from
the Defence Studies schedule.
178.328
Project Evaluation
15
P any 100-level Economics paper
and any 200-level paper
178.350
International Economics
15
P 178.201 or 178.240 or 178.204
Development Studies
178.358
International Trade in Agri-food
Products
15
P any 100-level Economics paper or
119.156 and any 200-level paper;
R 178.357
178.360
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics
15
P any 100-level Economics paper
and any 200-level paper
178.370
Development Economics
15
P 115.106 or 178.xxx and any 15
credits at 200-level
149.300
Current Issues in Command Studies 15
P 149.200
149.310
Advanced Logistics
15
P 149.210
149.335
Law of Armed Conflict
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.340
Operational Art and Strategy
15
P any 200-level 149 prefix paper
149.350
The History of Defence and
Security Intelligence
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.360
Defence and Security Technology
15
P 149.151 or 149.180; and any
200-level 149-prefix paper; R
149.160
149.370
Psychology of Evidence in the
Security Environment
15
P any 200 level BA or BDefStud
paper
Note
Not all papers will be offered every year or in every mode or
location.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Defence Studies including 15 credits at
100-level; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any
level from the Defence Studies schedule.
Minor Requirements
R 178.101
131.121
Rich World, Poor World
15
132.112
Planning for Sustainable
Development
15
146.102
Endangered Cultures
15
131.221
Contemporary Development Issues
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.218
Development and Inequality
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
Notes
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
176.219
The Transformation of the Pacific:
Central Themes
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
1. Students without Mathematics with Calculus at Bursary level
or NCEA Level 3 are recommended to take either paper 160.103 or
160.101. This is especially so if contemplating postgraduate studies
in Economics.
200.201
Middle Eastern Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
121.311
Global Environmental Issues
15
P 121.103 or equivalent knowledge
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
P any 200-level BA paper
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Economics, including 115.106, 178.100,
178.200 and 178.201; 60 credits at 300-level, including at least one of
178.300, 178.308, 178.360 or 178.370, and 15 credits at any level from the
Economics schedule.
Page 139
Humanities and Social Sciences
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Economics, including 115.106, 178.100;
15 credits at 300-level, and 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level from the
Economics schedule.
Education
249.287
Early Intervention
15
P any 100-level College of
Education paper; R 186.287
256.201
Educational Psychology
15
P any 100-level paper; R 186.201
175.306
Assessment of Individual
Differences
15
P 175.203
249.384
Consultation and Collaboration in
Inclusive Education
15
P any 200-level College of
Education paper; R 186.384
256.301
Behaviour Modification in
Education
15
P any 200-level College of
Education paper
256.302
Developmental Psychopathology in
Education
15
P any 200-level College of
Education paper
254.101
An Introduction to Social and
Cultural Studies in Education
15
R 187.101
254.103
Learning in the Information Age
15
R 186.103
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
254.201
Philosophy of Education I
15
P any 100-level paper; 187.201
254.203
Sociology of Education
15
P any 100-level paper; R 187.203
258.301
15
256.201
Educational Psychology
15
P any 100 level paper, R 186.201,
186.230; Note 2
Language, Literacy and Cognitive
Development
P any 200-level College of
Education paper
263.301
Learning and Motivation
15
275.202
Development through Relationships 15
P 275.102 or 209.102; R 209.202,
Note 2
P any 200-level College of
Education paper; R 186.301
263.331
Assessment of Learning
15
275.208
Adolescent Development
P One of 187.101, 208.102,
209.102, 254.101, 270.102 or
275.102, R 209.208, 208.208,
208.308, 209.308, 275.308
P any 200-level College of
Education paper; R 186.331
15
275.237
Narrative in Human Development
15
P 275.102 or 209.102; R 209.237,
Note 2
254.301
Philosophy of Education II
15
P any 200-level paper; 187.301
254.303
Advanced Sociology of Education
15
P any 200-level paper; R 187.303
254.304
Educational Theory
15
P any 200-level Education paper;
R 187.304, 278.363
263.301
Learning and Motivation
15
P any 200-level paper; R 186.301,
Note 1
267.390
Educational Research Methods
15
P any 200-level paper; R 187.390
269.373
Ethnic Relations and Education
15
P any 200-level paper; R 182.373
275.307
Infants in Families
15
P 275.202 or 209.202 or 209.309,
R 209.307; Note 2
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits, including 275.102, 175.102, 175.203,
256.201, 175.306, 256.301, 256.302; and at least one of 249.284, 249.287,
175.201, 175.205, 175.206, 175.210; and at least one of 263.331, 249.384,
263.301, 258.301.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits, including 175.102, 275.102, 175.203, 256.201
and one of 175.306, 256.301 or 256.302.
Note
The following are recommended as elective papers: 175.101,
175.302.
English
139.104
Drama in Performance
15
139.105
Fiction: The Long and Short of It
15
139.120
Shakespeare and Film
15
139.122
Contemporary Literary Forms of
Aotearoa New Zealand
15
139.123
Creative Writing
15
139.139
Introduction to English Studies
15
139.142
Mythology and Fantasy
15
139.171
Introduction to Literary and Cultural 15
Studies
R 139.101, 139.139
A major consists of 135 credits in Education, including 254.101 and 275.102;
30 credits at the 200-level, including at least one of 256.201, 254.201,
254.203 or 275.202; 60 credits at the 300-level including 267.390, and 15
credits at any level from the Education schedule.
154.108
Reading the Media
15
R 139.108, 154.103
139.201
Love and Revenge in Shakespeare’s
England
15
P any 100-level English paper
139.202
Romantic Writing: Self and Nature
15
P any 100-level English paper
Minor Requirements
139.209
Speaking: Theory and Practice
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of 119.155, 197.114, 206.101,
206.104, 206.105 or 270.105,
219.100, PERF135, PERF136,
PERF235, PERF236
139.210
Rewriting Classic Fiction
15
P any 100-level English paper
139.223
Creative Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 152.230, 152.334, 206.102,
206.110 or 270.110; or any
100-level 197-prefix paper; or any
226-prefix paper.
139.224
Making Plays for Theatre
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
226-prefix paper; or any one of
197.107, 197.109, 206.222
Notes
1. Students may not credit both 186.301 Learning and
Motivation and 186.301 Psychology of Education (formerly
136.302).
2. Prerequisite requirements may be waived in the case of
students with appropriate credits in other subjects.
3. Students may not credit both 186.201 and 186.230 unless
credit for 186.230 was attained prior to 1999.
Majoring Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Education, including 15 credits at 300-level;
30 credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the
Education schedule.
Educational Psychology
R 139.101, 139.171
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
175.201
Social Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.203
Introduction to Psychological
Research
15
P 175.102
175.205
Brain and Behaviour
15
P 175.102
175.206
Memory and Cognition
15
P 175.102
139.225
Writing for Children
15
P 139.123 or 139.106
175.210
Ngā Tirohanga Rua o te Taha
Hinengaro: Bicultural Perspectives
in Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA or BHlthSc or
BSc paper; R 175.312
139.226
Life Writing
15
249.284
Introduction to Special Education
15
P any 100-level College of
Education paper; R 186.284
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 197.107, 197.109, 197.111,
197.114, 206.206 or 270.206,
206.207
139.229
Writing Poetry: Love, Loss and
Looking Around
15
P 139.123
139.230
Writing Centre Theory and Practice
15
PHOS
Page 140
Humanities and Social Sciences
139.242
Medieval Worlds
15
P any 100-level English paper
176.206
Understanding Social Life
15
P any 100-level Sociology paper
139.251
Mid-Twentieth Century Aotearoa/
New Zealand Literature
15
P any 100-level English paper;
or any one of 148.114, 148.115,
176.102, 176.104, 187.101,
254.101, 197.109
121.311
Global Environmental Issues
15
P 121.103or equivalent knowledge,
Note 3
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.318
Environmental Philosophy
15
P any two 200-level BA or BSc
papers, Note 2
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
146.318
Environmental Anthropology
15
P any two 200-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
176.308
Sociology of the Environment
15
P any 200-level BA paper
139.253
The American Short Story
15
P any 100-level English paper,
R 139.353
139.254
Literature and Nationalism in
Modern Ireland
15
P any 100-level English paper
139.272
Auckland Writers and Their Region
15
P any 100-level English paper
139.275
Gothic
15
P any 100-level English or Media
Studies paper
139.302
Victorian Writing: Self and Society
15
P any 200-level English paper
139.303
Modern Drama
15
P any 200-level English paper
Notes
139.304
Literature and Society in Early
Modern England
15
P any 200-level English paper,
R 139.204
139.307
The Victorian Novel: Territory,
Modernity, Settlement
15
P any 200-level English paper
1. An equivalent research methods paper may be substituted with
the permission of the Head of School of People, Environment and
Planning.
2.
Only one of 134.218/134.318 may be credited.
3. Students are recommended to include 121.212, 121.312 and
196.205 in their degree programme.
139.305
Twentieth Century Literature
15
P any 200-level English paper
139.323
Media Script Writing
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
139.326
Travel Writing
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or
any one of 206.206 or 270.206,
206.207, 213.206, 213.216,
219.202, 219.204, 219.231,
221.281, 221.282
A major consists of 135 credits in Environmental Studies, including 145.111,
121.211, 176.206, 176.308; a further 45 credits at 300 level, and 30 credits at
any level from the Environmental Studies schedule.
139.327
Writing Creative Nonfiction
15
P any 200-level BA paper or any
one of the following: 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.209, 219.231, 221.281,
221.282, 226.200
A minor consists of 75 credits in Environmental Studies, including 145.111,
121.211, 176.308; 15 credits at 200- or 300-level and 15 credits at any level
from the Environmental Studies schedule.
139.329
Advanced Fiction Writing
15
P 139.123 and any
200-level English paper
139.330
Writing Centre Practicum
15
Majoring Requirements
Minor Requirements
French
164.162
Contemporary European Literature
15
P 139.230
243.101
Introductory French Language I
15
R 164.106
Introductory French Language II
15
P 243.101 or 164.106 or equivalent
level; R 164.107
139.352
Postcolonial Literature
15
P any 200-level English paper
243.102
139.361
The Literature of Women
15
P any 200-level English or Women’s
Studies paper, R 139.261
164.261
15
P any 100-level BA paper
139.374
Tragedy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
139.376
Sexual/Textual Politics
15
P any 200-level BA paper
243.201
Intermediate French Language I
15
P 243.102 or 164.107 or equivalent
level; R 164.200, 164.101
154.308
Screen Fictions
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
243.202
Intermediate French Language II
15
P 243.201 or 164.101 or 164.200 or
equivalent level; R 164.201
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.301
243.301
Advanced French Language
15
P 243.202 or 164.201; R 164.301
243.304
Contemporary French Popular
Culture
15
P 243.301 or 164.301; R 164.307
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in English, including either 139.139 or
139.171; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any
level from the English schedule.
Minor Requirements
Majoring Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in English, including either 139.139 or
139.171; 15 credits at 300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 15
credits at any level from the English schedule.
No new enrolments in this major from 2008 onwards. Students enrolled for
this major in 2007 or earlier may continue under the regulations in the 2007
Calendar.
Environmental Studies
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in French, including 15 credits at 300-level; 30
credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the French
schedule.
121.103
New Zealand Environments
15
132.111
Planning and the Environment
15
132.112
Planning for Sustainable
Development
15
145.111
Society, Environment and Place
15
145.111
Society, Environment and Place
15
146.102
Endangered Cultures
15
145.121
Introduction to Physical Geography
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 176.104
145.201
Geographical Research Techniques
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
121.211
New Zealand Environmental Issues
15
P 121.103 or 145.111; Note 3
145.213
Resource Conservation and
Sustainability
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper,
R 145.313
Resource Conservation and
Sustainability
15
145.213
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper,
R 145.313
145.214
Social Change and Environment
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
145.214
Social Change and Environment
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
145.216
Urban Environments
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.218
Development and Inequality
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
145.222
Rivers and Slopes
15
P 145.121
Geography
Page 141
Humanities and Social Sciences
145.223
Climate Change and Natural
Hazards
15
P 145.121, 233.101 or equivalent;
R 145.325
148.114
Making New Zealand: A Survey
to 1914
15
145.224
Biogeography
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper,
R 145.324
148.115
Remaking New Zealand: A Survey
Since 1914
15
145.225
Glaciers and Glaciation
15
P 145.121
148.116
Medieval Europe
15
145.301
Research Practice in Human
Geography
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
148.120
Blockbusters and Biopics: History
at the Movies
15
145.303
Field Work: Alpine Physical
Geography
15
P 145.222 or 145.221
(or equivalent)
176.104
Identity and Culture in New
Zealand
15
R 148.106, 176.102
145.304
Applied Field Geomorphology
15
P 145.222 or 145.223
148.204
The New Zealand Land Wars
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
148.205
New Zealand Politics Since 1890
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.318
Geopolitics
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
148.208
Revolutionary Europe 1750–1850
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.320
Quaternary Biogeography and
Environmental Change
15
P 145.223 or 145.224; R 145.302,
145.308 (2009 only)
148.212
The Crusades
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.213
Modern United States History
15
P any 100-level BA paper
River Dynamics
15
148.214
New Zealand Rural History
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 148.108
148.216
The Tudors and the English
Reformation
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.217
Victoria’s World
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.218
The Vikings
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.220
The Second World War
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.221
The Black Death and Other Plagues, 15
1300–1700
P any 100-level BA paper
148.222
Popular Culture in Medieval Europe
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.291
Special Topic
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.301
English Radicalism
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.313
The French Revolution
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.316
New Zealand Between the Wars
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.317
New Zealand Religious History
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.324
Late Medieval England
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.329
Fascism
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.330
Medieval Women
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.331
Germany’s Long Century,
1871–1991
15
P any 200-level BA paper
15
148.332
The Politics of Protest
15
P any 200-level BA paper
The Napoleonic Wars
15
P any 200-level BA paper
145.327
P 145.222
Notes
1. Prerequisites may be waived with the approval of the Head
of School in the case of students with appropriate credits in other
subjects.
2. Most courses include some laboratory and/or field work –
145.111 (one day), 145.222 (one day), 145.301 (two days), 145.303
(seven days), 145.304 (six days), 145.320 (one day) and 145.327
(one day).
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Geography including 145.111 and 145.121;
30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level including at least one of
145.301, 145.303, 145.304, 145.320, 145.327, and 15 credits at any level from
the Geography schedule. With permission of the Head of School 15 credits (ie
one paper) at 100- or 200-level may be credited to the Geography major from
a related discipline.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Geography, including 15 credits at 300-level;
30 credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the
Geography schedule.
German (no new enrolments from 2011)
164.162
Contemporary European Literature
244.101
Introductory German Language I
15
R 164.117
148.333
244.102
Introductory German Language II
15
P 244.101 or 164.117 or equivalent
level; R 164.118
148.334
Sports History
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.335
The Great War and its Legacy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
P any 100-level BA paper
148.336
Urbanisation in the British Empire
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.337
Māori Responses to Colonisation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
148.338
Issues in Christian History
15
P any 200-level BA paper; R
187.363
148.391
Special Topic
15
P any 200-level BA paper
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
244.201
Intermediate German Language I
15
P 244.102 or 164.118 or equivalent;
R 164.215, 164.116
244.202
Intermediate German Language II
15
P 244.201 or 164.215 or 164.116 or
equivalent level; R 164.216
164.315
Germany Today – Transitions and
Identity
15
P any 200-level BA paper
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.316
244.301
Advanced German Language I
15
P 244.202 or 164.216 or equivalent
level; R 164.316
Major Requirements
German is not available as a major subject.
Minor Requirements
German is not available as a minor subject.
History
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in History including 15 credits at 100-level,
30 credits at 200-level, 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any level from
the History schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in History including 15 credits at 300-level; 30
credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the History
schedule.
Japanese
242.101
Japanese 1A
15
R 169.121, 169.122; Note 1
242.102
Japanese 1B
15
P 242.101 or PHOS; R 169.121,
169.122; Note 1
148.105
The World Since 1900
15
148.109
European Roots
15
242.103
Introduction to Japanese Culture
15
R 169.123
148.110
Headlines in History
15
242.201
Japanese 2A
15
148.111
A History of the World
15
148.113
Early Medieval England
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS, R 169.221, 169.222;
Note 1
Page 142
Humanities and Social Sciences
242.202
Japanese 2B
15
P 242.201 or PHOS, R 169.221,
169.222; Note 1
242.203
Japanese Language and Society
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS; R 169.224
242.205
Japanese Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.227
242.301
Japanese 3A
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.321, 169.322;
Note 1
242.302
Japanese 3B
15
P 242.301 or 169.121 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.321, 169.322;
Note 1
242.304
Reading and Writing about Current
Japan
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.324
242.305
Readings in Modern Japanese
Literature
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; C 242.301 and 242.302 or
PHOS; R 169.326
242.306
Japanese Linguistics
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.327
242.307
Japanese–English Translation
Techniques
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.328
242.390
Individual Research Project in
Japanese Studies
15
Permission HOS; R 169.395
172.338
2. Notwithstanding Generic Regulation 5 for Undergraduate
Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates, provided ability to the
appropriate level has been attained, students may enrol directly
in 242.102, 242.201, 242.202, 242.301 or 242.302. Students are
encouraged to contact the Programme Coordinator to discuss their
appropriate point of entry into language papers if in doubt.
3. Students who gain exemption from 242.101 and 242.102 may
instead credit the two following papers to their major: 172.131
Language and Communication and 172.132 Language and Culture
or other approved electives.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Japanese, including 242.103; 30 credits
at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the
Japanese schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Japanese, including 15 credits at 300-level;
30 credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the
Japanese schedule.
Linguistics
172.131
Language and Communication
15
172.132
Language and Culture
15
172.133
Introduction to Language Studies
15
172.231
Linguistics for Speech Therapists
15
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Linguistics, including 15 credits at
100-level; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits
at any level from the Linguistics schedule. Subject to approval from the
Head of School, 242.306 may be taken in partial fulfilment of the majoring
requirements.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Linguistics, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Linguistics schedule.
Māori Studies
150.106
Ngā Hanga Whakairo: Traditional
Māori Visual Art
15
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising
in Māori
15
Note 1
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
Note 2
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore and Economics
15
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.204
Mana Māori: Māori and Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.206
Ngā Momo Whakairo:
Contemporary Māori Visual Art
15
P 150.106
150.210
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
P 150.111
150.211
Te Reo Whakanakonako:
Embellishing the Language
15
P 150.210
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
150.216
He Huarahi Rangahau: Māori and
Research
15
P three papers at 100-level
including one paper from Māori
Studies
150.301
Te Mana Te Kāwanatanga: Māori
Policy and the State
15
P 150.201
150.302
Planning for Māori Health
15
P 150.202
150.303
Mana Wāhine: Māori Women
15
P 150.216 (or approved alternative
research methods paper);
R 150.203
150.311
Te Papā o te Reo: Māori Language
III
15
P 150.211
Notes
1. This paper is not suitable for native speakers of Japanese.
Please discuss other options with the Head of School or Programme
Coordinator.
Language and Mediated
Communication in a Transcultural
World
Notes
P 172.133; R 172.235
172.232
Language and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.234
Phonetics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.235
Linguistic Analysis
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
172.231
172.236
Forensic Linguistics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.237
Language, Discourse and Power
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.330
Sounds and Structures
15
P 172.235; R 172.331, 172.332
172.334
Field Methods
15
P 172.234 or 172.235
172.335
Language and Identity
15
P 172.232 or 172.237
172.336
Languages of the Pacific
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
172.337
Historical and Comparative
Linguistics
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
1.
This paper is for beginners.
2.
Previous experience in Māori language necessary.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Māori Studies, including 15 credits at
100-level; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level including 150.311,
and 30 credits at any level from the Māori Studies schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Māori Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Māori Studies schedule.
Mathematics
160.101
Calculus I
15
R 160.161, 160.111, 160.112,
228.171, 228.172 Notes 1, 3
160.102
Linear Mathematics
15
R 160.111, 160.112, 228.171,
228.172 Notes 2, 3
160.103
Methods of Mathematics
15
R 160.131
Page 143
Humanities and Social Sciences
160.111
160.112
Mathematics 1A
Mathematics 1B
15
15
R 160.101, 160.102, 160.161,
228.171; Note 1.
P 160.111 or 228.171 or any one
of 160.101, 160.102, 160.161;
R 228.172,
154.204
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.205
Popular Music Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.206
Topics in Film History
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.212
New Zealand Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
160.131
Mathematics for Business I
15
R 160.103, 160.231
154.215
Cult Media and Fandom
15
P any 100-level BA paper
160.203
Calculus II
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101)
154.222
The Art of the Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper
160.204
Differential Equations I
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101)
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
160.211
Applied Linear Algebra
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.102)
160.212
Discrete Mathematics
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101 or
160.102 or 157.111)
P any 100-level BA paper, or
any one of the following: BDes
221.361,221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
154.228
Media History
15
161.200
Statistical Models
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101) and
one of 115.101, 161.100–161.130,
R 161.231
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 139.228
154.291
Special Topic
15
P any 100-level Media Studies
paper
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
133.303
Music for Stage and Screen
15
P any 200-level BA paper
139.323
Media Script Writing
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
160.301
Analysis
15
P 160.203
160.302
Algebra
15
P 160.212 (and 160.102 prior to
2012)
160.314
Combinatorics
15
P 160.212
160.316
Geometry
15
P any 200-level Mathematics paper
160.317
Methods of Mathematical Physics
15
P 160.203
160.318
Differential Equations II
15
P 160.203, 160.204
139.376
Sexual/Textual Politics
15
P any 200-level BA paper
160.319
Mathematical Modelling
15
P 160.204, 160.211
146.316
15
P any 200-level BA paper
160.320
Mathematics in Education
15
P any 200-level Mathematics paper
Visual Anthropology: Film and
Video Approaches
160.325
History of Mathematics
15
P 160.101 and any 200-level
Mathematics paper
154.301
Cultural Studies and the Media
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
160.380
Project
15
P Note 9
154.302
Gender and Race in the Media
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
Notes
154.303
Hollywood Cinema
15
P any 200-level BA paper
1. At least 16 credits achieved in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics
with Calculus OR at least 24 credits in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics.
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
154.305
A Social History of Popular Music
15
P any 200-level BA paper
2. Students enrolling in 160.102 Linear Mathematics should have
achieved at least 14 credits in mathematics at Level 3 of NCEA, or
its equivalent.
154.308
Screen Fictions
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
154.309
Communications and Culture
15
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 139.308
154.310
Visual Culture and the Electronic
Image
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.311
The Networked World: New Media
and Digital Cultures
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or
213.206 or 213.216; or any
200-level 156-prefix paper; or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
154.312
Trauma and the Media
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.313
Global Media Cultures
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.314
Independent Media in the
Information Age
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.391
Special Topic in Media Studies
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.392
Special Topic in Media Studies
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
176.303
Making the Nation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
3. The papers 160.101 and 160.102 will be available in
Extramural Mode only in 2012. These papers have been replaced
by 160.111 and 160.112 for internal students, but these new papers
will not be offered in extramural mode until 2013.
Majoring Requirements
160.111 (unless exempted for prerequisite purposes), 160.112 (or 160.101
and 160.102), 60 credits from 200-level papers and 60 credits from 300-level
papers listed in the Mathematics Schedule above. Students who intend to
advance to Honours or Masters in Mathematics are recommended to include
in their major the papers 160.212, 160.301, 160.302, 160.317, 160.318 and
160.319.
Minoring Requirements
Both of 160.111, 160.112 (or at least one of 160.101 or 160.102); 45 credits
from papers with 160.2XX and 160.3XX, with at least 15 credits at 300-level.
Media Studies
139.120
Shakespeare and Film
15
154.101
Introduction to Media Studies
15
154.103
Seeing Through the Media
15
R 139.108, 154.108
154.108
Reading the Media
15
R 139.108, 154.103
154.115
Stardom and Celebrity in the Media 15
172.131
Language and Communication
15
139.275
Gothic
15
P any 100-level English or Media
Studies paper
146.206
Visual Ethnography
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.201
Television Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.202
Advertising and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 115.104, 156.100, 197.102,
197.106, 213.206, 213.216, or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
154.203
Popular Culture and the Media
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Page 144
Note
All papers scheduled with prefix 219 are included in the maximum
of 120 credits permitted from the Schedules for other degrees under
BA degree Regulation 2(c).
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Media Studies, including 15 credits at
100-level; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any
level from the Media Studies schedule.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Media Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level; and 30 credits at any level from
the Media Studies schedule.
Humanities and Social Sciences
Music
MUSC 267
Analysis
20
P MUSC 167, MUSC 266;
R 133.239, MUSI 218, NZSM 262,
NZSM 362
MUSC 350
Research in Music, Society and
Culture
20
P MUSC 164 or 166, and one
of MUSC 220-259 or PHOS; C
one of MUSC 330-359 or PHOS;
X 133.361, MUSI 361, NZSM 350
MUSC 352
Music of Asia 2
20
P 200-level points from MUSC, or
ASIA or PHOS; X 133.362, NZSM
352
PERF 250
Gamelan Performance
15
PERF 350
Ethnomusicology Performance 2
20
133.101
European Music I
15
R MUSC 130
133.107
Music Practice I
15
PHOD
133.108
Popular Song
15
133.109
Theory of Music: Basic Techniques
15
R MUSI 105, 107, 108; NZSM 160,
161, 162, MUSC 160, 166, 167,
266; Note
133.115
Jazz History
15
R MUSC 125, NZSM 132
133.201
European Music II
15
P any 100-level BA paper
133.202
New Zealand Music I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
133.205
The Music of Pink Floyd
15
P any 100-level Music paper
133.206
Choral Repertoire
15
P any 100-level BA paper
133.207
Music Practice II
15
P 133.107
154.205
Popular Music Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.101
Knowledge and Reality
15
133.301
Opera
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.102
Great Western Philosophy
15
133.302
New Zealand Music II
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.103
Critical Thinking
15
133.303
Music for Stage and Screen
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.104
Practical Ethics
15
133.305
The Music of the Beatles
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.105
15
R 134.206, 134.306
133.307
Music Practice III
15
P 133.207
Philosophy of Religion: God,
Freedom and Evil
133.333
Research Projects in Music History
and Repertoire
15
P any 200-level Music paper or
PHOD
134.201
Philosophy of Mind
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.203
Ethics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.305
A Social History of Popular Music
15
P any 200-level BA paper
134.204
Aesthetics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
254.322
Composition and Improvisation
15
R 207.322
134.205
Logic
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.208
Philosophy of Science
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
134.215
Asian Philosophies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.216
Modern Philosophy
15
P any 100-level BA paper
134.218
Environmental Philosophy
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper
or 132.111
134.220
Business and Professional Ethics
15
P any 100-level BA or BBS paper;
R 134.219, 134.319
200.215
Political Theory from Plato to Marx
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 134.211, 134.311, 200.211,
200.311
134.302
Metaphysics
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy
134.303
Ethics
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy
134.308
Philosophy of Science
15
P any two 200-level BA or BSc
papers
134.309
Ancient Philosophy
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy, or
201.201
Note
This paper is open to all students whether they have passed
previous theory papers or not. In this course Process is just
as important as Outcome as the idea is to present theoretical
knowledge in a way that relates to outside systems but injects new
concepts into the process.
Majoring Requirements
Music is not available as a major subject
Philosophy
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Music, including 15 credits at 300-level; 30
credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the Music
schedule.
The following New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) papers may also be
credited to the Music minor:
P PHOS and PERF 250 or NZSM 217
and PHOS; R 133.364, NZSM 317
MUSC 125
Jazz History
20
R 133.115, NZSM 132
MUSC 130
Hildegard to Avant Garde: Western
Music 900–2005
20
R 133.133, MUSI 141, NZSM 131
MUSC 150
Music in World Cultures
20
R 133.161, MUSI 161, NZSM 150
134.310
Philosophy of Literature
15
MUSC 164
Jazz Theory 1
20
P B+ or better in MUSC 160
or entrance test; R 133.117,
NZSM 163
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy
134.312
Epistemology: Seeing and Knowing
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which is in Philosophy
MUSC 166
Classical Theory 1
20
P B+ or better in MUSC 160 or
entrance test; 133.109; R 133.134,
133.135, MUSI 107, 108, NZSM
161, 162
134.317
Recent and Contemporary
Philosophy
15
P any two 200-level papers at least
one of which is in Philosophy
134.318
Environmental Philosophy
15
P any two 200-level BA or BSc
papers
MUSC 167
Classical Theory 2
20
P MUSC 166; R 133.134, 133.135,
MUSI 107, 108, NZSM 161, 162
134.320
Business and Professional Ethics
15
P any 200-level BA or BBS paper;
R 134.219, 134.319
MUSC 226
Free Jazz
20
P 20 MUSC 100-level points, R
NZSM 240
200.315
Contemporary Political Theory
15
P any 200-level BA paper
MUSC 227
Jazz Rock Fusion
20
P 20 MUSC 100-level points; R
133.215, NZSM 241
MUSC 250
Music in Social and Cultural
Contexts
20
P 30 100-level points; R 133.261,
NZSM 250
1. Prerequisites may be waived in the case of students with
appropriate credits in other subjects; students should consult the
Head of School.
MUSC 252
Music of Asia 1
20
P 30 100-level points; R 133.262,
MUSI 263, NZSM 252
2. Not all 200- or 300-level papers will be offered each year.
Students should consult the Head of School.
MUSC 264
Jazz Theory 2
20
P MUSC 164,
MUSC 266
Classical Theory 3
20
P MUSC 166 , or NZSM 161 and
162, or equivalent; X 133.234,
MUSI 207, 208, NZSM 262
3. No student may enrol for a paper in Philosophy with the same
title as one for which credit has already been given.
Notes
Page 145
Humanities and Social Sciences
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Philosophy, including 15 credits at
100-level; 30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level and 30 credits at any
level from the Philosophy schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Philosophy, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Philosophy schedule.
Politics
131.121
Rich World, Poor World
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
178.110
The New Zealand Economy
15
200.161
Introduction to Politics
15
200.162
Politics and Public Policy in New
Zealand
15
R 176.104
R 179.102
175.201
Social Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.203
Introduction to Psychological
Research
15
P 175.102, Note 1
175.205
Brain and Behaviour
15
P 175.102, Note 1
175.206
Memory and Cognition
15
P 175.102, Note 1
175.210
Ngā Tirohanga Rua o te Taha
Hinengaro: Bicultural Perspectives
in Psychology
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 175.312, Note 1
175.301
Community Psychology
15
P 175.203, Note 1
175.302
Abnormal and Therapeutic
Psychology
15
P 175.203, Note 1
175.303
The Practice of Psychological
Research
15
P 175.203, Note 1
175.306
Assessment of Individual
Differences
15
P 175.203, Note 1
175.309
Forensic Psychology
15
P 175.203
Psychology of Women
15
P 175.203
135.210
Islam: Religion and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.311
146.208
Political Anthropology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.316
Evolution, Culture and Mind
15
146.214
The Politics of Culture
15
P any 100-level BA paper
P 175.203, R 175.202 (1998–2001
only)
148.205
New Zealand Politics Since 1890
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.317
Health Psychology
15
P 175.203
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
175.318
Experimental Psychology
15
P 175.203, 175.205, 175.206,
Note 2
175.343
15
P 175.203, R 175.344, Note 1
150.204
Mana Māori: Māori and Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Personnel Psychology and Career
Development
170.201
What is Feminism?
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
175.345
Organisational Psychology
15
P 175.203, R 175.344, Note 1
176.206
Understanding Social Life
15
P any 100-level Sociology paper
200.201
Middle Eastern Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
200.203
Human Rights in a Global Context
15
P any 100-level BA paper
200.215
Political Theory from Plato to Marx
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 134.211, 134.311, 200.211,
200.311
Notes
1.
Laboratory and/or practical work is associated with this paper.
2. Students who have passed 175.203 and either 175.205 or
175.206 may be permitted to take the third prerequisite as a corequisite.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Psychology including 175.101 and 175.102;
45 credits at 200-level, including 175.203; and 60 credits at 300-level.
200.261
World Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 148.261
279.201
Social Policy: Concepts and
Theories
15
P 279.101 or 179.101 or 200.162,
(179.102 to 2009) or 200.161; R
179.201
145.318
Geopolitics
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
148.329
Fascism
15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.301
Contemporary International Conflict 15
P any 200-level BA paper
147.101
Rehabilitation Studies
15
200.302
Israel/Palestine and the Arab
World
15
P any 200-level BA paper
147.102
Psychiatric Disability
15
147.201
Issues in Rehabilitation
15
P any 100-level BA paper
200.315
Contemporary Political Theory
15
P any 200-level BA paper
147.202
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
15
P 147.102
200.361
Contemporary New Zealand Politics 15
P any 200-level BA paper
147.203
Measurement in Rehabilitation
15
P 147.101
279.301
Government Policy, Planning and
Administration
P 279.201 or 179.201; R 179.301
147.301
Community-based Rehabilitation
15
P 147.201
147.302
Alcohol and Drug Use
15
P any 200-level BA paper
15
Note
Appropriate papers from other subject areas may be accepted by the
Head of School in place of the prescribed prerequisite.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Psychology; including 175.102 and 175.203,
15 credits at 300-level, 15 credits at 200- or 300-level, and 15 credits at any
level from the Psychology schedule.
Rehabilitation Studies
Major Requirements
Rehabilitation Studies is not available as a major subject.
Majoring Requirements
Minor Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Politics, including 200.161, 200.215,
200.261; 60 credits at 300-level; and 30 credits at any level from the Politics
schedule.
A minor consists of 75 credits in Rehabilitation Studies, including 15 credits
at 300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level
from the Rehabilitation schedule.
Minor Requirements
Religious Studies
A minor consists of 75 credits in Politics including 200.161; at least one of
200.215 or 200.261; 15 credits at 300-level; 15 credits at 200- or 300-level,
and 15 credits at any level from the Politics schedule. The minor must include
at least 60-credits from 200-prefix papers.
Psychology
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
Page 146
Note 1
135.101
Hinduism and Buddhism
15
135.102
Judaism, Christianity and Islam
15
135.103
Magic and Witchcraft
15
135.104
Introduction to Sanskrit
15
135.201
Ancient Religions
15
P any 100-level BA paper
135.204
East Asian Religions
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Humanities and Social Sciences
2. 153.200 and 152.386 are included in the maximum of 120
credits permitted from the Schedules for other degrees under the
BA regulations.
135.207
Sex, Gender and Religion
15
P any 100-level BA paper; Note
135.209
Religion and Current Issues
15
P any 100-level BA paper
135.210
Islam: Religion and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Majoring Requirements
135.211
Jesus and his World
15
P any 100-level BA paper
135.305
Religious Writings
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which must be in Religious
Studies
A major consists of 135 credits, including 149.180, 149.280, 149.380,
149.381, 149.385; 15 credits at 200-level; 15 credits at 300-level; and 30
credits at any level from the Security Studies schedule.
135.308
Religions in New Zealand
15
P any two 200-level papers, at least
one of which must be in Religious
Studies
Majoring Requirements
No new enrolments in this major from 2008 onwards. Students enrolled for
this major in 2007 or earlier may continue under the regulations in the 2008
Calendar.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Religious Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Religious Studies schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits, including 149.180, 149.280; 15 credits of 149
prefix papers at 300-level; 15 credits of 149 prefix papers at 200- or 300level; and 15 credits at any level from the Security Studies schedule.
Social Anthropology
146.101
Introductory Social Anthropology
15
146.102
Endangered Cultures
15
131.221
Contemporary Development Issues
15
P 146.102 or 131.121
146.206
Visual Ethnography
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.208
Political Anthropology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.209
Food and Eating
15
P any 100-level BA paper or
119.180 or 250.131
146.210
Ritual and Belief
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.211
Systems of Healing
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.213
Anthropological Enquiry
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.214
The Politics of Culture
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 176.316
146.302
Regional Ethnography
15
P any 200-level BA paper
146.303
Practice of Field Work
15
P any 200-level BA paper
146.304
Culture, Biology and Racism
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Security Studies
134.103
Critical Thinking
15
148.105
The World Since 1900
15
149.170
Introduction to Border Security
15
149.171
Introduction to the Security of
Global Trade
15
149.180
Introduction to Security Studies
15
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
178.110
The New Zealand Economy
15
200.161
Introduction to Politics
15
200.162
Politics and Public Policy in New
Zealand
15
R 179.102
146.307
Business and Professional Ethics
15
P any 100-level BA or BBS paper;
R 134.219, 134.319
The Cultural Construction of Gender 15
and Sexuality
P any 200-level BA paper
134.220
146.310
Applied Anthropology
15
P any 200-level BA paper
146.208
Political Anthropology
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.311
P any 200-level BA paper
Intelligence in the Security
Environment
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Medical Systems of China, India
and the West
15
149.272
146.313
P any 200-level BA paper
Emerging Security Issues
15
P 149.180
Issues in South Pacific
Anthropology
15
149.280
153.200
Introduction to Dispute Resolution
15
P any 100-level paper
146.316
15
P any 200-level BA paper
172.236
Forensic Linguistics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Visual Anthropology: Film and
Video Approaches
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
176.316
146.317
Urban Anthropology
15
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 146.284
200.261
World Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
148.261
146.318
Environmental Anthropology
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.310
15
P any 200-level BA paper
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
Ethnicity and Ethnic Identity:
Contemporary Issues
145.318
Geopolitics
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc paper
149.350
History of Defence and Security
Intelligence
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.360
Defence and Security Technology
15
P 149.151 or 149.180 and any
200-level 149-prefix paper;
R 149.160
149.370
Psychology of Evidence in the
Security Environment
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.380
Strategy and Security
15
P 149.280
149.381
Terrorism and Political Violence
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.385
Security and the Law
15
P 149.280
152.386
Risk Management I
15
P any 200-level paper
200.301
Contemporary International Conflict 15
P any 200-level BA paper
Notes
1. Not all papers will be offered every year or in every mode or
location.
Note
Appropriate papers from other subject areas may be accepted in
place of the prescribed prerequisites with the approval of Head of
School.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Social Anthropology, including 146.101;
30 credits at 200-level, including 146.213; 60 credits at 300-level, including
146.303, and 30 credits at any level from the Social Anthropology schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Social Anthropology, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Social Anthropology schedule. The minor must include at least 60 credits
from the 146-prefix papers.
Social Policy
115.106
Economics
15
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 178.101
R 176.104
Page 147
Humanities and Social Sciences
176.104
Identity and Culture in New
Zealand
15
R 148.106, 176.102
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
R 112.101, 177.101, 178.100 (prior
to 1997), 178.102
178.110
The New Zealand Economy
15
200.161
Introduction to Politics
15
200.162
Politics and Public Policy in New
Zealand
15
279.101
Social Policy: An Introduction
148.205
New Zealand Politics Since 1890
150.201
Sociology
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
176.103
Self and Society
15
176.104
Identity and Culture in New
Zealand
15
R 148.106, 176.102
R 179.102
176.203
Development and Social Change:
Central Themes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
15
R 179.101
176.204
Small Groups
15
P any 100-level BA paper
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.205
Animals and Human Societies
15
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper;
R 176.105
176.206
Understanding Social Life
15
P any 100-level Sociology paper
150.204
Mana Māori: Māori and Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.207
Family, Intimacy and Domestic Life
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.206
Understanding Social Life
15
P any 100-level Sociology paper
176.211
Gender and Sexuality: Central
Themes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 176.316
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 176.316
176.218
Race, Nation and Modernity
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
176.218
Race, Nation and Modernity
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
178.210
Economic Policy
15
P 178.100 or 178.102 or 178.110
176.219
An Introduction to Social Research
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule; R 176.202, Note 1
The Transformation of the Pacific:
Central Themes
15
179.202
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
176.221
P any 100-level BA paper
The Wellbeing of Pacific Peoples in
New Zealand
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Ethnicity and Identity: Central
Themes
15
179.230
176.301
The Sociological Project
15
P 176.201 or 176.206
200.215
Political Theory from Plato to Marx
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 134.211, 134.311, 200.211,
200.311
176.302
Techniques of Social Investigation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.303
Making the Nation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.261
World Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 148.261
176.308
Sociology of the Environment
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.309
Development and Social Change:
Contemporary Issues
15
P any 200-level BA paper
R 176.104
279.201
Social Policy: Concepts and
Theories
15
P 279.101 or 179.101 or 200.162,
(179.102 to 2009); R 179.201
176.310
P any 200-level BA paper
Law, Government and Social Policy
15
P 279.101 or 179.101 or 200.162,
(179.102 to 2009); R 179.203
Ethnicity and Ethnic Identity:
Contemporary Issues
15
279.203
176.316
Te Mana Te Kāwanatanga: Māori
Policy
and the State
15
P 150.201
Understanding Globalisation in
Depth
15
150.301
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 176.216
176.318
Sociology of Death and Dying
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.301
The Sociological Project
15
P 176.201 or 176.206
176.322
The World of Work: Contemporary
Issues
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.303
Making the Nation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
176.323
P any 200-level Sociology paper
Ethnicity and Ethnic Identity:
Contemporary Issues
15
P any 200-level BA paper
The Transformation of the Pacific:
Contemporary Issues
15
176.310
179.320
Community Development
15
P any 200-level BA paper
179.330
Māori Development and the Social
Services
15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.361
Contemporary New Zealand Politics 15
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 134.211, 200.211
279.301
Government Policy, Planning and
Administration
15
P 279.201 or 179.201; R 179.301,
Note 2
279.302
Policy Research and Evaluation
15
P 179.202 or 176.202; R 179.302,
Note 1
Notes
1.
These papers include laboratory or field work requirements.
2. Appropriate papers from other subject areas may be accepted
by the Head of School in place of the prescribed prerequisite.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Social Policy, including at least one of
279.101 or 200.162; at least one of 178.100 or 178.110; both 279.201 and
179.202; 60 credits at 300-level, including 279.301 and 279.302, and 15
credits at any level from the Social Policy schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Social Policy, including at least one
of 279.101 or 200.162; both 279.201 and 279.301; 15 credits at 200- or
300-level, and 15 credits at any level from the Social Policy schedule.
Page 148
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Sociology, including 176.101; 30 credits at
200-level including 176.206; 60 credits at 300-level including 176.301; and
30 credits at any level from the Sociology schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Sociology, including 15 credits at 300-level;
30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level; and 30 credits at any level from the
Sociology schedule.
Spanish
164.162
Contemporary European Literature
15
245.101
Introductory Spanish Language I
15
R 164.151
245.102
Introductory Spanish Language II
15
P 245.101 or 164.151 or equivalent
level; R 164.152
245.103
Hispanic Culture and Heritage
15
R 164.153
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
245.201
Intermediate Spanish Language I
15
P 245.102 or 164.152 or equivalent
level; R 164.251
245.202
Intermediate Spanish Language II
15
P 245.201 or 164.251 or equivalent
level; R 164.252
245.204
Latin American Voices
15
P 245.201 or 164.251; R 164.255
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.351
Humanities and Social Sciences
245.301
Advanced Spanish Language
15
P 245.202 or 164.252; R 164.351
245.303
Latin American Rhythms and
Politics: From Tango to Rock
15
P 245.202 or 164.252 or 245.204 or
164.255; R 164.354
245.304
Travellers’ Tales: the Invention of
Latin America
15
P 245.202 or 245.204
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Spanish, including 15 credits at 100-level;
30 credits at 200-level; 60 credits at 300-level, and 30 credits at any level
from the Spanish schedule.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Spanish, including 15 credits at 300-level; 30
credits at 200-and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from the Spanish
schedule.
Statistics
160.101
160.111
160.112
Calculus I
Mathematics 1A
Mathematics 1B
15
15
15
3. The papers 160.101 and 160.102 will be available in
Extramural Mode only in 2012. These papers have been replaced
by 160.111 and 160.112 for internal students, but these new papers
will not be offered in extramural mode until 2013.
Majoring Requirements
A major consists of 135 credits in Statistics, including 160.111, at least one
of 161.120 or 161.130 (or one of 161.100, 161.110); 45 credits at 200-level
consisting of 161.220; one of 161.200 or 161.231 and one of 161.221,
160.203 or 160.211, and 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Statistics, including one of 161.120 or
161.130 (or 161.100); 15 credits at 300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300
level, and 15 credits at any level from the Statistics schedule.
Women’s Studies
170.101
Introduction to Women’s Studies
15
170.102
Women of Ideas and Action
15
170.201
What is Feminism?
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
170.202
New Zealand Feminism
15
P 160.111 or 228.171 or any one
of 160.101, 160.102, 160.161; R
228.172
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule
170.301
Contested Feminisms
15
P 170.201 or 170.202
170.302
Research for Social Change
15
P 170.201 or 170.202
170.303
Gender and Violence
15
P any 200-level BA paper
R 160.161, 160.111, 160.112,
228.171, 228.172, Notes 1, 3
P 160.103 or 160.131 or appropriate
school back-ground, Note
1R 160.101, 160.102, 160.161,
228.171
161.120
Introductory Statistics
15
Note 2; R 115.101, 161.100,
161.110, 161.130, 195.101
161.130
Introductory Biostatistics
15
Note 2; R 115,101, 161.100,
161.110, 161.120, 195.101
160.203
Calculus II
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101)
160.211
Applied Linear Algebra
15
P 160.111, 160.112 (or 160.101)
161.200
Statistical Models
15
P 160.111 (or 160.101) and one
of 115.101, 161.100–161.130 R
161.231
Major Requirements
No new enrolments in this major from 2007 onwards. Students enrolled for
this major in 2006 or earlier may continue under the regulations in the 2006
Calendar.
Minor Requirements
A minor consists of 75 credits in Women’s Studies, including 15 credits at
300-level; 30 credits at 200- and/or 300-level, and 30 credits at any level from
the Women’s Studies schedule.
161.220
Data Analysis
15
P one of 115.101, 161.100–161.130
161.221
Applied Linear Models
15
P one of 161.100-161.130 and one
of 160.101-160.103; R 161.320
161.223
Introduction to Data Mining
15
P one of 115.101, 161.100-161.130;
R 161.324, 161.326, 161.777
161.230
Probability Modelling
15
P one of 115.101, 161.100–130
and 160.1xx; R 161.240
192.101
English for Academic Purposes for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note
161.231
Statistical Modelling
15
P 160.111 (or 160.101) and one of
115.101, 161.100-130; R 161.200
192.102
Academic Writing in English for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note
161.240
Applied Probability for
Management
15
P one of, 115.101, 161.100–
161.130; and 160.1xx; R 161.230,
204.200
161.301
Statistical Inference
15
P 161.200 or 161.231
161.320
Fitting Regression Models
15
P one of 161.200, 161.220, 161.231
161.321
Sampling and Experimental Design
15
P one of 161.2XX
161.322
Survey Design, Implementation and 15
Analysis
P one of 161.200, 161.220, 161.223,
161.231
161.323
Multivariate Analysis
15
P one of 161.2XX
161.324
Data Mining
15
P 161.220 or 161.221; R 161.223
161.325
Statistical Methods for Quality
Improvement
15
P one of 161.200, 161.220, 161.230,
161.240
Health
161.326
Statistical Machine Learning
15
P (159.2xx and 161.1xy) or 161.2xx;
R 159.302
Part III: Other BA Subjects and Papers
English for Speakers of Other Languages
Note
These papers may be credited to other undergraduate degree
programmes.
European Studies
164.162
Contemporary European Literature
15
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.301 or 164.316 or 164.351
250.131
Health Studies
15
250.231
The Socio-political Context of
Health Care
15
P 250.131 or 177.101, R 168.202,
168.231
161.331
Biostatistics
15
P 161.220 or 161.221
161.342
Forecasting and Time Series
15
P 161.220 or 161.230
250.317
Disability in Society
15
161.345
Stochastic Models in Operations
Research
15
P 160.111 (or 160.101), one of
161.200, 161.230, 161.240
P any 200-level BA or BHlthSc
paper; R 176.317
250.233
Gender and Health
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 168.213, 168.233
Notes
250.331
Health of Communities
15
1. At least 16 credits achieved in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics
with Calculus OR at least 24 credits in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics.
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 168.331
250.333
Health and Ageing
15
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 168.333
2. A school mathematics background of Year 12 (NCEA level 2)
is recommended for 100-level Statistics papers.
Page 149
Humanities and Social Sciences
Humanities and Social Sciences
230.102
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
230.101
Auckland: A Social and Cultural
Study
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
Pacific Peoples in New Zealand
15
Planning Studies
15
Planning
132.221
P any 100-level BA or BBS paper
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business Studies
BA/BBS
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(e) The BA component must include a written communication paper
from Part I of the BA schedule.
3.
(a) The compulsory eight core business papers: 115.101, 115.102,
115.103, 115.104, 115.105, 115.106, 115.107, 115.108.
(b) No fewer than 120 credits at the 200-level or above, of which at
least 60 credits must be at the 300-level, selected from Schedule
A of the Schedule of Undergraduate Papers of the College of
Business.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
(a) To qualify for the conjoint award of the degrees of Bachelor of
Arts and Bachelor of Business Studies candidates are required to
gain at least 510 credits. Each of the two degrees is regarded as a
component of the conjoint programme.
(b) Each paper successfully completed for the conjoint programme
shall be credited to one or other of the two components. Except as
provided by these Regulations, each component shall be governed
by the Regulations of the corresponding degree.
2.
(c) Students taking a major in Economics in the BA component may
not include papers from these majors in the BBS component.
4.
The BA component shall consist of a total of 255 credits made up as
follows:
(a) Admission to the conjoint programme requires the attainment in
the previous year of study of a standard equivalent to a Grade Point
Average of at least 4.0. Students may be admitted after they have
completed papers to the value of 120 credits provided that they
have obtained a Grade Point Average of at least 4.0 and have passed
at least one paper from each component of the conjoint programme.
(b) Candidates shall normally pass all papers and achieve a Grade
Point Average of at least 4.0 each year in order to continue
enrolment in the conjoint programme.
(a) The majoring requirements of at least one subject as specified in the
BA Schedule. Business Psychology is not available as a major in
the conjoint programme.
(c) A candidate is normally expected to advance studies concurrently
in both components of the programme in each year of enrolment.
(b) Papers with prefixes 114, 152, 157, 178 and 219 may be included
in the BA component only if they are required for a major in
Economics, Environmental Studies, Media Studies, Politics, or
Social Policy.
(d) A candidate who has already completed the requirements of one of
the component degrees will not be permitted to enrol in the conjoint
programme.
(e) The requirements for both components of the conjoint programme
shall normally be completed within ten years of first enrolment in
the conjoint programme or either component.
(c) No fewer than 105 credits selected from the Bachelor of Arts
Schedule, of which at least 30 credits must be at the 200-level or
above.
(d) Students may not include in these 105 credits, papers with prefixes
114, 152, 157, 178 or 219.
The BBS component must be completed with a major and shall consist
of a total of 255 credits made up as follows:
5.
Papers may not be cross-credited into or between components of the
joint BA/BBS programme.
The Conjoint Programme for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
BA/BSc
Course Regulations
2.
Part I
(a) The majoring requirements of at least one subject as specified in the
BA Schedule. Business Psychology is not available as a major in
the BA component.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(b) No fewer than 105 credits selected from the Schedule for the
Degree of Bachelor of Arts, of which at least 30 credits must be at
the 200-level or above.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
(a) To qualify for the conjoint award of the degrees of Bachelor of Arts
and Bachelor of Science, candidates are required to gain at least
510 credits. Each of the two degrees is referred to as a component
of the conjoint programme.
(b) Each paper successfully completed for the conjoint programme
shall be credited to one or other of the two components. Except as
provided by these Regulations, each component shall be governed
by the Regulations of the corresponding degree.
The BA component shall consist of a total of 255 credits made up as
follows:
(c) Students may not include in these 105 credits, papers with prefixes
121, 160, or 161.
(d) The BA component must include a written communication paper
from Part I of the BA schedule.
3.
The BSc component shall consist of a total of at least 255 credits from
Section A of the BSc Schedule made up as follows:
(a) At least one paper from each of at least four subjects in Section
A of the BSc Schedule. For this purpose papers are from different
subjects if the first three digits of the paper number are different.
(b) The majoring requirements of at least one subject as specified in
Section A of the BSc Schedule.
Page 150
Humanities and Social Sciences
(c) Papers with prefixes 145 and 175 may be included in the
BSc component only if they are needed to meet the majoring
requirements for a Geography or Psychology major respectively in
this component.
4.
5.
(b) Candidates shall normally pass all papers and achieve a Grade
Point Average of at least 4.0 each year in order to continue
enrolment in the conjoint programme.
(c) A candidate is normally expected to advance studies concurrently
in both components of the programme in each year of enrolment.
Students may not include in the BA component of the BA/BSc conjoint
programme papers from the subject in which they major in the BSc
component. Similarly, students may not include in the BSc component
papers from the subject in which they major in the BA component.
(a) Admission to the conjoint programme requires the attainment in
the previous year of study of a standard equivalent to a Grade Point
Average of at least 4.0. Students may be admitted after they have
completed papers to the value of at least 120 credits provided that
they have obtained a Grade Point Average of at least 4.0 and have
passed at least one paper from each component of the conjoint
programme.
(d) A candidate who has already completed the requirements of one of
the component degrees will not be permitted to enrol in the conjoint
programme.
(e) The requirements for both components of the conjoint programme
shall normally be completed within ten years of first enrolment in
the conjoint programme or either component.
6.
Papers may not be cross-credited into or between components of the
joint BA/BSc programme.
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication
BC
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Communication shall follow a
personal course of study which shall consist of papers totalling at least
360 credits with:
219.100
Introduction to Business
Communication
15
219.101
Media Skills
15
219.107
Introduction to Cross-Cultural
Communication
15
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 114.253, 219.203
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
Part II
Specific papers for the Majors and Minors for the BC degree
Communication Management
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
(b) At least 75 credits at 300-level;
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
(c) At least 300 credits from the Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor
of Communication.
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
2.
Every course of study shall include the core communication papers listed
in Part I of the BC Schedule.
219.206
Managing Communications
Technology
15
P any 100-level paper
3.
Every course of study shall include a major of 120 credits plus a minor
of 60 credits. The majors and minors and their requirements are shown
in Part II of the BC Schedule.
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
219.302
Gender and Communication in
Organisations
15
P any 200-level paper
(a) Students who complete a major in Communication Management,
Journalism Studies, Marketing Communication, Public Relations
or composite Communication Management/Journalism Studies
must complete a minor in Expressive Arts, International Languages,
Linguistics, Media Studies or composite Expressive Arts/Media
Studies.
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P any 219.2xx and PHOD
(a) Not more than 165 credits at 100-level;
(b) Students who complete a major in Expressive Arts, Linguistics,
Media Studies or composite Expressive Arts/Media Studies must
complete a minor in Communication Management, Journalism
Studies, Marketing Communication, Public Relations or composite
Communication Management/Journalism Studies.
Electives
4.
Electives comprising 60 credits, which may be taken from other
undergraduate degrees of the University, complete the degree
requirement.
Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor of Communication
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Communication Management, including at
least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Communication Management, including at
least 15 credits at 300-level.
Expressive Arts
139.209
Speaking: Theory and Practice
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of 119.155, 197.114, 206.101,
206.104, 270.105, 219.100,
PERF135, PERF136, PERF235,
PERF236
139.223
Creative Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or
any one of 152.230, 152.334,
206.102, 206.110; or any 100-level
197-prefix paper; or any 226-prefix
paper.
Part I
Core papers for the BC degree
115.107
Management Information Systems
15
139.123
Creative Writing
15
154.101
Introduction to Media Studies
15
172.131
Language and Communication
15
R 157.100
Page 151
Humanities and Social Sciences
139.224
Making Plays for Theatre
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
226-prefix paper; or 197.107,
197.109, 206.222
139.225
Writing for Children
15
P 139.123 or 139.106
139.226
Life Writing
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 197.107, 197.109, 197.111,
197.114, 206.206, 206.207
139.229
Writing Poetry: Love, Loss and
Looking Around
15
P 139.123
139.303
Modern Drama
15
P any 200-level English paper
139.323
Media Script Writing
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
139.326
Travel Writing
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or any
one of 206.206, 206.207, 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.231, 221.281, 221.282
139.327
Writing Creative Nonfiction
15
P any 200-level BA paper or any
one of the following: 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.209, 219.231, 221.281,
221.282, 226.200
139.329
Advanced Fiction Writing
15
P 139.229 and any
200-level English paper
139.374
Tragedy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.204
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of the following: BDes 221.361,
221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Expressive Arts, including at least 60
credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Expressive Arts, including at least 15 credits
at 300-level.
International Languages
243.202
Intermediate French Language II
15
P 243.201 or 164.101 or 164.200 or
equivalent level; R 164.201
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.301
243.301
Advanced French Language
15
P 243.202 or 164.201; R 164.301
243.304
Contemporary French Popular
Culture
15
P 243.301 or 164.301; R 164.307
(c) German (no new enrolments from 2011)
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
244.201
Intermediate German Language I
15
P 244.102 or 164.118 or equivalent;
R 164.215, 164.116
244.202
Intermediate German Language II
15
P 244.201 or 164.215 or 164.116 or
equivalent level; R 164.216
164.315
Germany Today – Transitions and
Identity
15
P any 200-level BA paper
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.316
244.301
Advanced German Language I
15
P 244.202 or 164.216 or equivalent
level; R 164.316
(d)Japanese
242.201
Japanese 2A
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS, R 169.221, 169.222,
169.128, 169.288
242.202
Japanese 2B
15
P 242.201 or PHOS, R 169.221,
169.222
242.203
Japanese Language and Society
15
P 242.102 or 169.121 and 169.122
or PHOS; R 169.224
242.205
Japanese Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.227
242.301
Japanese 3A
15
P 242.201 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.321
242.302
Japanese 3B
15
P 242.301 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.322
242.304
Reading and Writing about Current
Japan
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.324
242.305
Readings in Modern Japanese
Literature
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; C 242.301 and 242.302 or
PHOS; R 169.326
242.306
Japanese Linguistics
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.327
242.307
Japanese-English Translation
Techniques
15
P 242.202 or 169.221 and 169.222
or PHOS; R 169.328
(a)Chinese
241.201
241.202
Chinese 2A
Chinese 2B
15
15
P 241.102 or 169.141 and 169.142
or PHOS; R 241.241, 241.242,
169.241, 169.242; Note 2, 3
P 241.201 or PHOS; R 241.241,
241.242, 169.241, 169.242, Notes
2, 4
(e)Spanish
241.203
20th Century Chinese Literature
and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.243
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
241.204
Chinese Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
169.244
245.201
Intermediate Spanish Language I
15
P 245.102 or 164.152 or equivalent
level; R 164.251
241.301
Chinese 3A
15
P 241.202 or 241.241 and 241.242
or PHOS; R 241.341, 241.342,
169.341, 169.342; Note 2, 5
245.202
Intermediate Spanish Language II
15
P 245.201 or 164.251 or equivalent
level; R 164.252
245.204
Latin American Voices
15
P 245.201 or 164.251; R 164.255
241.302
Chinese 3B
15
P 241.301 or PHOS; R 241.341,
241.342, 169.341, 169.342; Note
2, 6
164.361
Theory and Practice of Translation
15
C 164.351
245.301
Advanced Spanish Language
15
P 245.202 or 164.252; R 164.351
241.304
Chinese Grammar
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; 169.344
245.303
Latin American Rhythms and
Politics: From Tango to Rock
15
P 245.202 or 164.252 or 245.204 or
164.255; R 164.354
241.305
Translation from and into Chinese
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.343
245.304
Travellers’ Tales: the Invention of
Latin America
15
P 245.202 or 245.204
241.306
Readings in Modern Chinese
Literature
15
P 241.241 and 241.242 or 169.241
and 169.242 or PHOS; R 169.345
Notes
1. Students who do not have previous training or background
in the relevant international language will need to use two of their
electives to achieve the prerequisites at 100-level in the language.
In contrast, students who already have proficiency in the language
equivalent to at least a year of study at the tertiary level can enter at
200-level or above.
(b)French
164.261
Crisis and Creation in European
Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
243.201
Intermediate French Language I
15
P 243.102 or 164.107 or equivalent
level; R 164.200, 164.101
Page 152
2. Not suitable for native speakers of Chinese. Please discuss
other options with the Head of School or Programme Coordinator.
Humanities and Social Sciences
3. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 300
(approx) characters.
4. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of about 450
(approx) characters.
5. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of 600
(approx) characters.
6. Suitable for heritage learners with a knowledge of 750
(approx) characters.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Linguistics, including at least 15 credits at
300-level.
Marketing Communication
156.231
Marketing Management
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits, R
156.701
156.232
Consumer Behaviour
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits, R
156.702,
156.237
Integrated Marketing
Communication
15
P 156.200 or any 75 credits; R
156.234, 156.236
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
156.331
Marketing Strategy
15
P 156.231 and 156.232
219.304
Cross-Cultural Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P any 219.2xx and PHOD
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any two 200-level papers; R
219.331
Major requirements
There is no major in International Languages.
Minor requirements
A minor in International Languages requires a minimum of 60 credits,
including at least 15 credits at 300-level, from the papers listed for one of
the following options: (a) Chinese, (b) French, (c) German, (d) Japanese, or
(e) Spanish.
A minor in option (a) Chinese must include 241.241 and 241.242; a minor in
option (b) French must include 243.201 and 243.202; a minor in option (c)
German must include 244.201 and 244.202; a minor in option(d) Japanese
must include 242.201 and 242.202; and a minor in option (e) Spanish must
include 245.201 and 245.202.
Students who have previously studied the target language should consult the
School of Language Studies for guidance prior to enrolment. Students who
are exempt from the above 200-level papers will be required to replace them
with appropriate papers in the same language.
Journalism Studies
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Marketing Communication, including
156.231, 156.232, 156.237, either 219.202 or 219.209, 156.331, plus three of
219.304, 219.305, 219.307, 219.311, 219.335.
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
Minor requirements
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
219.232
Feature Writing and Freelancing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100 or 139.107 or 119.177
219.234
Editing and Publishing
15
P any 30 credits or one of 219.100,
230.100 or 139.107 or 119.177
A minor consists of 60 credits in Marketing Communication, including at
least 15 credits at 300-level. At least 30 credits must be from 156-prefix
papers and at least 30 credits must be from 219-prefix papers. Either 156.234
or 156.236 may be included but not both.
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P any 219.2xx and PHOD
154.201
Television Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any two
200-level papers, R 219.331
154.202
Advertising and Society
15
219.336
Investigative Reporting
15
P any 200-level paper, R 219.332
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 115.104, 156.100, 197.102,
197.106, 213.206, 213.216, or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
219.339
History of Journalism
15
P any 200-level paper
154.203
Popular Culture and the Media
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Major requirements
154.204
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
A major consists of 120 credits in Journalism Studies, including at least 60
credits at 300-level.
154.205
Popular Music Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.206
Topics in Film History
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Minor requirements
154.212
New Zealand Cinema
15
P any 100-level BA paper
A minor consists of 60 credits in Journalism Studies, including at least 15
credits at 300-level.
154.215
Cult Media and Fandom
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.222
The Art of the Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of the following: BDes 221.361,
221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
154.228
Media History
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 139.228
139.376
Sexual/Textual Politics
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.301
Cultural Studies and the Media
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.302
Gender and Race in the Media
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.303
Hollywood Cinema
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
154.305
A Social History of Popular Music
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.308
Screen Fictions
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
154.309
Communications and Culture
15
P any 200-level BA paper;
R 139.308
154.310
Visual Culture and the Electronic
Image
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Linguistics
172.232
Language and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.233
Language Learning Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.235
Linguistic Analysis
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
172.231
172.236
Forensic Linguistics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.237
Language, Discourse and Power
15
P any 100-level BA paper
172.334
Field Methods
15
P 172.235
172.335
Language and Identity
15
P 172.232 or 172.237
172.336
Languages of the Pacific
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
172.338
Language and Mediated
Communication in a Transcultural
World
15
P any 200-level Linguistics paper
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Linguistics, including 60 credits at
200-level and 60 credits at 300-level.
Media Studies
Page 153
Humanities and Social Sciences
154.311
The Networked World: New Media
and Digital Cultures
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or
213.206 or 213.216; or any
200-level 156-prefix paper; or any
200-level 222-prefix paper
154.312
Trauma and the Media
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.313
Global Media Cultures
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
154.314
Independent Media in the
Information Age
15
P any 200-level Media Studies
paper
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Media Studies, including at least 60 credits
at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Media Studies, including at least 15 credits
at 300-level.
Public Relations
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
P any two
200-level papers; R 219.331
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits in Public Relations, including 60 credits at
200-level and 60 credits at 300-level. Both 219.209 and 219.305 must be
included in the major.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits in Public Relations, including both 219.209 and
219.305.
Composite Communication Management/Journalism Studies
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits from Communication Management and
Journalism Studies papers, with at least 45 credits in Communication
Management and at least 45 credits in Journalism Studies, and including at
least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
219.202
Professional and E-Business
Writing
15
P any 100-level paper
219.204
News Media Processes
15
P any 100-level paper
219.205
Professional Presentations in
Business
15
P any 100-level paper
219.209
Public Relations Practice
15
P any 100-level paper
219.231
Introduction to Journalism
15
P any 100-level paper
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
P any 200-level paper
219.309
International Case Studies in Public 15
Relations
P any 200-level paper
219.310
Speech Writing
15
P any 200-level paper
219.311
Communication Internship
15
P 219.2xx and PHOD
A minor consists of 60 credits from Communication Management and
Journalism Studies papers, with at least 30 credits in Communication
Management and at least 30 credits in Journalism Studies, and including at
least 15 credits at 300-level.
Composite Expressive Arts/Media Studies
Major requirements
A major consists of 120 credits from Expressive Arts and Media Studies,
including at least 45 credits in Expressive Arts and 45 credits in Media
Studies, with at least 60 credits at 300-level.
Minor requirements
A minor consists of 60 credits from Expressive Arts and Media Studies
papers, with at least 30 credits in Expressive Arts and at least 30 credits in
Media Studies, and including at least 15 credits at 300-level.
The Degree of Bachelor of Defence Studies
BDefStuds
No new enrolments will be accepted into the Bachelor of Defence
Studies from 2011
149.151
An Introduction to the History of
Modern Warfare
15
R 148.151
Course Regulations
148.204
The New Zealand Land Wars
15
P any 100-level BA paper
149.200
Command Development
15
P 149.100
149.210
Intermediate Logistics
15
P 149.110
149.230
Military Law
15
P any 100-level paper
149.240
Intermediate Tactics
15
P 149.140
200.261
World Politics
15
P any 100-level paper; R 148.261
Part II
Course of Study
149.300
Current Issues in Command Studies 15
P 149.200
149.335
Law of Armed Conflict
15
P any 200-level paper
1.
149.340
Operational Art and Strategy
15
P any 200-level Defence Studies
paper
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
The Bachelor of Defence Studies degree consists of at least 360 credits
of study with:
(a) No more than 165 credits from 100-level papers.
2.
(b) At least 75 credits from 300-level papers.
Schedule B
To qualify for the award of the degree a candidate shall:
At least 150 credits from the following list of papers or other approved papers
drawn from other Bachelor’s degrees. The normal prerequisites are to be
observed.
(a) Pass all papers listed in Schedule A (210 credits).
(b) Pass elective papers to a total of 150 credits as indicated in
Schedule B.
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Defence Studies
Schedule A
134.103
Critical Thinking
15
134.104
Practical Ethics
15
149.170
Introduction to Border Security
15
149.171
The Security of Global Trade
15
161.100
Principles of Statistics
15
149.100
Fundamentals of Command
15
149.110
Introduction to Logistics
15
200.161
Introduction to Politics
15
149.140
Introduction to Tactics
15
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
Page 154
R 115.101,161.110, 161.120,
161.130, 195.101, Note 1
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
Humanities and Social Sciences
134.203
Ethics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
135.210
Islam: Religion and Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.205
New Zealand Politics Since 1890
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.220
The Second World War
15
P any 100-level BA paper
149.251
A Military History of the First
World War
15
P any 100-level paper
149.253
A Military History of the American
Civil War
15
P any 100-level BDefStuds or BA
paper; R 149.291 (2009)
149.272
Intelligence in the Security
Environment
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.201
200.215
Political Theory from Plato to Marx
15
P any 100-level BA paper;
R 134.211, 134.311, 200.211,
200.311
148.333
The Napoleonic Wars
15
P any 200-level BA paper
149.310
Advanced Logistics
15
P 149.210
149.350
The History of Defence and
Security Intelligence
15
P any 200-level paper
149.370
Psychology of Evidence in the
Security Environment
15
P any 200 level BA or BDefStud
paper
176.302
Techniques of Social Investigation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.301
Contemporary International Conflict 15
P any 200-level BA paper
200.302
Israel/Palestine and the Arab
World
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
153.200
Introduction to Dispute Resolution
15
P any 100-level paper
200.315
Contemporary Political Theory
15
P any 200-level BA paper
156.200
Marketing for Non-Marketers
15
P any 100-level paper; R 115.104,
156.100
200.361
Contemporary New Zealand Politics 15
P any 200-level BA paper
190.240
Air Power
15
P any 100-level paper
Note
200.201
Middle Eastern Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
1. A school mathematics background of Year 12 (NCEA Level 2)
is recommended for 100-level Statistics papers.
P any 100-level BA paper
The Degree of Bachelor of Health Science
BHlthSc
Course Regulations
Note
Part I
Students whose language competency qualifies them for direct
entry to 150.211 will be exempt from paper 150.210 but will be
required to substitute another 150-prefix paper. Students whose
language competency qualifies them for direct entry to 150.311 will
be exempt from papers 150.210 and 150.211, but will be required
to substitute two other 150-prefix papers.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the degree candidates are required to gain at least 360
credits.
2.
(a) No more than 165 credits may be at 100-level.
(b) At least 75 credits must be at 300-level.
(c) At least 300 credits must be from Schedules A, B, C and D for the
BHlthSc.
Psychology
175.101; 175.102; 175.203; at least three papers (45 credits) from 175.201,
175.205, 175.206, 175.210; at least four papers (60 credits) from 175.301,
175.302, 175.303, 175.306, 175.309, 175.311, 175.317, 175.318, 175.345.
Rehabilitation
147.101 and 147.102; 147.201, 147.202, 147.203 and at least one paper from
150.202, 175.205, 175.206, 250.233; 147.301 and at least three papers from
128.300, 147.302, 150.302, 175.301, 250.317, 250.333.
Notes
(d) No more than 60 credits may be from papers selected from
approved subjects listed under the Regulations for degrees other
than the BHlthSc.
1. Students who intend to include 175.205 or 175.206 in their
Rehabilitation major, need to take the prerequisite 175.102 as one
of the papers required from Schedule B, of the BHlthSc.
(e) At least 45 credits must be from Schedule B and at least 90 credits
must be from Schedule C.
3.
Candidates may complete the requirements for the BHlthSc with or
without a major.
(a) BHlthSc with a major: A major requires a candidate to include at
least 150 credits, of which at least 60 credits must be at 300-level,
in a particular subject area. The majors and their requirements are
specified in Regulation 4. Double majors are not permitted.
(b) BHlthSc without a major: A candidate may complete the degree
without a major by satisfying all the requirements except
Regulation 3(a).
4.
Major requirements
Human Health and the Environment
214.110, 214.111, 214.215, 214.216, 214.311, 214.312, 214.314, 214.316,
214.317; and at least one paper (15credits) from 214.211, 214.213, 150.202.
2. Students who intend to include 175.301 in their Rehabilitation
major, need to take papers 175.102 and 175.203 from Schedule B
of the BHlthSc.
Sport and Exercise
214.101, 214.166, 214.170, 214.201, 214.271, 214.274, 234.201, 214.371,
214.372 (30 credits) and one paper (15 credits) from 128.300, 214.373,
234.301.
Transfers and Cross-credits
5.
Candidates who have previously completed 214.001 Introduction to
Normal Body Function and/or paper 214.002 Applied Science for
Health and Exercise, and who have achieved a grade of A or A+ in the
paper(s), may, upon application, be credited with paper 214.101 Human
Bioscience: Normal Body Function paper and/or 214.102 Applied
Sciences for Health Professionals in the BHlthSc degree, respectively.
Māori Health
Schedules to the Degree of Bachelor of Health Science
A total of 150 credits, including at least two papers from 150.110, 150.111,
150.210, 150.211; 150.201, 150.202 and 150.216; 150.114 or 150.303;
150.301, 150.302 and at least two of 148.337, 150.311, 179.330.
Schedule A
Students must complete the three core papers, one communications paper, and
a research methods paper (total of 75 credits from Schedule A).
Page 155
Humanities and Social Sciences
1.
The following core papers:
Māori Studies
250.131
Health Studies
15
R 168.101, 168.131
150.110
15
Note 2
250.231
The Socio-political Context of
Health Care
15
P 250.131 or 177.101, R 168.202,
168.231
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising
in Māori
150.111
15
Note 2
250.331
Health of Communities
15
P 250.231 or 168.231, R 168.331
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore
and Economics
15
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
15
P any 100-level BA paper
2.
An approved Communications paper selected from:
119.155
Communication in the Sciences
15
R 119.177, 139.107, 139.177,
140.125, 140.150, 140.151
119.177
Written Communication for
Information Sciences
15
R 119.155, 139.107, 139.177,
140.125, 140.150, 140.151,
228.125, 22.150
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
192.102
Academic Writing in English for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note 1
150.210
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
P 150.111
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
150.211
Te Reo Whakanakonako:
Embellishing the Language
15
P 150.210
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
150.216
He Huarahi Rangahau: Māori and
Research
15
P any three 100-level papers
including one 100-level Māori
Studies paper
150.301
Te Mana Te Kāwanatanga: Māori
Policy and the State
15
P 150.201
Note
The Communications paper should normally be taken within the
first 120 credits of study.
3.
An approved Research Methods paper selected from:
147.203
Measurement in Rehabilitation
15
P 147.101
150.302
Planning for Māori Health
15
P 150.202
150.216
He Huarahi Rangahau: Māori and
Research
15
P three 100-level papers including
one 100-level Māori Studies paper
150.303
Mana Wāhine: Māori Women
15
175.203
Introduction to Psychological
Research
15
P 175.102
P 150.216 (or approved alternative
research methods paper);
R 150.203
150.311
P 150.211
Understanding Social Life
15
P any 100-level Sociology paper
Te Papā o te Reo: Māori Language
III
15
176.206
214.212
Research Methods in the Health
Sciences
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
15
P 250.231 or 168.231, R 168.309
Midwifery
177.314
Birthing and Early Parenting
Schedule B
Papers offered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.
Communication
192.101
English for Academic Purposes for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note 1
Development Studies
131.221
Contemporary Development Issues
15
P any 100 level BA paper
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
P any 200 level BA paper
Geography
Psychology
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
175.201
Social Psychology
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc paper
175.203
Introduction to Psychological
Research
15
P 175.102
175.205
Brain and Behaviour
15
P 175.102
175.206
Memory and Cognition
15
P 175.102
175.210
Ngā Tirohanga Rua o te Taha
Hinengaro: Bicultural Perspectives
in Psychology
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc paper,
R 175.312
175.301
Community Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.302
Abnormal and Therapeutic
Psychology
15
P 175.203
145.111
Society, Environment and Place
15
145.121
Introduction to Physical Geography
15
145.222
Rivers and Slopes
15
P 145.121
175.303
15
P 175.203
145.224
Biogeography
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc paper,
R 145.324
The Practice of Psychological
Research
175.306
Assessment of Individual
Differences
15
P 175.203
175.309
Forensic Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.311
Psychology of Women
15
P 175.203
175.317
Health Psychology
15
P 175.203
175.318
Experimental Psychology
15
P 175.203,175.205, 175.206, Note 3
175.345
Organisational Psychology
15
P 175.203, R 175.344
Health
250.233
Gender and Health
15
P any 100-level BA paper,
R 168.213, 168.233
250.317
Disability in Society
15
P any 200-level BA or BHlthSc
paper; R 176.317
250.333
Health and Ageing
15
P any 200-level BA paper,
R 168.333
History
148.337
Page 156
Māori Responses to Colonisation
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Rehabilitation Studies
147.101
Rehabilitation Studies
15
147.102
Psychiatric Disability
15
147.201
Issues in Rehabilitation
15
P any 100-level BA paper
147.202
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
15
P 147.102
147.203
Measurement in Rehabilitation
15
P 147.101
147.301
Community-based Rehabilitation
15
P 147.201
Humanities and Social Sciences
147.302
Alcohol and Drug Use
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Resource and Environmental Planning
132.221
Planning Studies
15
P any 100-level BA or
BBS paper
Sleep, Circadian Rhythms and
Shift Work
121.103
New Zealand Environments
15
121.211
New Zealand Environmental Issues
15
P 121.103, Note 4
121.311
Global Environmental Issues
15
P 121.103, Note 4
15
P any 100-level paper in Science
Ergonomics/Human Factors: Work,
Performance, Health and Design
15
P any 200-level paper
Human Genetics
15
P 162.101, R 162.253
Epidemiology
Sleep and Circadian Science
252.201
Environmental Science
202.251
15
P 214.101; R 214.217
Principles of Epidemiology in
Human Populations
Ergonomics
Social Anthropology
128.300
146.101
Introductory Social Anthropology
15
146.204
Culture and Medicine
15
P 146.101 or 146.102
146.211
Systems of Healing
15
P any 100-level BA paper
146.311
Medical Systems of China, India
and the West
15
P any 200-level BA paper
Genetics
203.203
Human Health and the Environment
Social Policy
214.101
Human Bioscience: Normal Body
Function
15
R 194.101, 194.241, 194.242
214.102
Applied Sciences for Health
Professionals
15
R 123.101, 123.103
P 279.101 or 179.101 or 200.162 (or
179.102 to 2009); R 179.201
214.110
Human Health and Housing
15
214.111
Chemistry in the Environment
15
R 123.103
P 279.201 or 179.201; R 179.301
214.201
Human Bioscience: Impaired Body
Function
15
P 214.101 and 214.102
214.202
Pharmacology
15
P 214.101 and 214.102
214.211
Environmental Science
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.212
Research Methods in the Health
Sciences
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.213
Toxic Substances, Human Health
and the Environment
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
Notes related to Schedule B
214.214
Microbes and Society
15
1. Paper 192.101 may not be included as a Schedule A
Communication paper in place of 192.102
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.215
Food Safety and Human Health
15
2 150.110 is for beginners. 150.111 is for students with some
prior experience in Te Reo Māori.
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.216
Environmental and Public Health
Law
15
P any 100-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.311
Epidemiology and Communicable
Diseases
15
P any 200-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.312
Environmental Monitoring and
Investigative Methods
15
P any 200-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.314
Water and Waste Treatment
15
P any 200-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.316
Bio-Physical Effects of Noise,
Vibration and Electromagnetic
Radiation
15
P any 200-level BHlthSc Schedule
paper
214.317
Human Health and the Environment 15
179.330
Māori Development and the Social
Services
15
P any 200-level BA paper
279.101
Social Policy: An Introduction
15
R 179.101
279.201
Social Policy: Concepts and
Theories
15
Government Policy, Planning and
Administration
15
279.301
Sociology
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
176.103
Self and Society
15
176.206
Understanding Social Life
15
R 176.104
P any 100-level Sociology paper
3. Students who have passed 175.203 and either 175.205 or
175.206 may be permitted to take the third prerequisite as a corequisite.
Schedule C
Papers offered by the College of Sciences.
Biochemistry
122.102
Biochemistry of Cells
15
P 123.101, 162.101
122.233
Metabolic Biochemistry
15
P 122.102
Microbiology
Cell Biology
162.101
Biology of Cells
P 214.216
15
Note 1
Chemistry
162.211
Biology and Genetics of
Microorganisms
15
P 162.101, R 162.213, 162.214
162.212
The Microbial World
15
P 162.101, P(D) 162.211 (Note 5)
or 162.213
123.101
Chemistry and Living Systems
15
Note 2
162.283
Medical Microbiology
15
P(D) 162.211, Note 5
123.102
Chemistry and the Material World
15
Note 2
162.303
Immunology
15
123.103
Introductory Chemistry
15
R 119.153, 123.101, 123.102;
Note 3
P 162.101, plus any
200-level paper, R 162.389
151.231
Food Chemistry for Nutrition
15
P 123.101
151.232
Nutrition and Metabolism
15
P 123.101, 122.102, R 214.131
151.331
Maternal and Child Nutrition
15
P 151.232; R 151.345
151.332
Nutrition for Sport and Performance 15
Nutrition
Computer Applications
158.100
Computer Applications and the
Information Age
15
P 151.232
Page 157
Humanities and Social Sciences
151.333
Adult Nutrition and Positive Ageing
15
P 151.232
151.334
Nutritional Science and Eating
Behaviour
15
P 151.232
214.131
Introduction to Food and Nutrition
15
R 151.232, 141.101
214.231
Applied Nutrition Issues
15
P 214.131 or equivalent; R 151.232
214.273
Nutrition for Sport, Exercise and
Health
15
P 214.101 and 214.102 or 214.131;
R 151.232
214.331
Food Choice and Nutrition
Promotion
15
P 214.131 and any 200-level
Science or Health Science paper;
R 151.232, 214.232 Note 6
have achieved an equivalently acceptable level in an alternative
assessment system to NCEA, or passed Bursary Chemistry or
123.103 or an acceptable alternative.
3. 123.103 may not be taken after 123.101 or 123.102 have been
passed.
4. Alternative prerequisites may be approved by the Programme
Director.
5.
7. Students will be assumed to have studied at least 20 credits
from NCEA Level 3 Physics and achieved at least 14, or passed
Bursary Physics or 124.100 or an acceptable alternative
Physics
124.101
Physics I(a)
15
R 124.111, Note 7
124.102
Physics I(b)
15
Note 7
124.111
Physics for Life Sciences
15
R 124.101
8. Students are strongly advised to take 194.241 before 194.242
or 194.243.
9. A school mathematics background of Year 12 (NCEA Level 2)
is recommended for 100-level Statistics papers.
Physiology
194.241
Physiological Control Systems
15
P 194.101
194.242
Physiology of Mammalian Organ
Systems
15
P 194.101 Note 8
194.344
Nerves and the Nervous System
15
P 194.241 and one of 194.242,
194.243
194.346
Control of Metabolism
15
P two of 194.241, 194.242, 122.233
194.350
Human Lifecycle Physiology
15
P 194.241 or 194.242
Sport and Exercise
10. Students wishing to take Physiology or Nutrition papers
as choices within the major must complete the prerequisites for
these papers at an appropriate time. Students considering these
options should take both 122.102 and 123.101, and also 151.232 or
194.242.
Schedule D
Papers offered by colleges other than College of Humanities and Social
Sciences, and the College of Sciences.
Business Law
214.166
Training Principles and Practice
15
214.169
Introduction to Sports Medicine
15
214.170
Structural Kinesiology
15
214.270
Applied Sport Science
15
P 162.101 or 194.101 or 214.171,
R 194.244; 234.202
253.250
214.271
Exercise Prescription and Therapy
15
P 214.170 plus 214.101 or 214.166
214.272
Fitness Assessment
15
P any 100-level paper
214.273
Nutrition for Sport, Exercise and
Health
15
214.274
Physiological Aspects of Exercise
and Health I
214.371
214.372
155.306
Health Care Law
15
P any two 200 level papers
Counselling Principles and Practice
15
P any 100-level paper in Education
or Social Sciences; R 209.250
253.255
Cultural Issues in Counselling
15
P any 100-level paper in Education
or Social Sciences; R 209.255
P 214.101 or 194.101; R 151.232
253.355
Professional Issues in Counselling
15
P 253.250 or 253.255 or 209.250 or
209.255; R 209.355
15
P 214.101, 214.170, 214.166; R
214.270, 214.272, 234.203
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
275.202
15
P 214.271
Development Through
Relationships
15
Advanced Exercise Prescription
and Therapy
P 275.102 or 187.102 or 209.102;
R 209.202
Exercise Prescription Practicum
30
P 214.271, 214.272 or 214.274;
C 214.371 or Permission of
Programme Director
P 214.170
Human Development
214.373
Physiological Aspects of Exercise
and Health II
15
P 214.274
234.201
Sport Biomechanics I
15
P 214.170
234.203
Exercise Physiology
15
P 194.101 or 214.101
234.301
Sport Biomechanics II
15
P 234.201, R 194.351
234.302
Investigating Sports Performance
15
P/C one of 234.301, 234.303,
234.304, 151.332, R 194.352
Human Resource Management
114.271
Occupational Safety and Health I
15
Permission HOD and any 100-level
paper
114.272
Occupational Safety and Health II
15
Permission HOD and any 100-level
paper
114.372
Occupational Hygiene
15
P 114.271, 114.272
Management
152.313
Sport in the Social Context
15
P any 200-level paper; R 152.210
152.319
Management of Fitness and
Athletic Conditioning
15
P 152.216 or (P 214.166 and any
200-level paper)
Statistics
161.120
Introductory Statistics
15
R 115,101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.130, 195.101, Note 9
161.130
Introductory Biostatistics
15
R 115.101, 161.100, 161.110,
161.120, 195.101, Note 9
Notes related to Schedule C
1. Students will be assumed to have studied at least 20 credits
from NCEA Level 3 Biology and achieved at least 14, or passed
Bursary Biology or 162.103 or an acceptable alternative.
2. Students must normally have studied at least 20 credits
from NCEA Level 3 Chemistry and achieved at least 14, or
Page 158
Or 141.222.
6. Students are recommended to take 214.101 and/or 214.201.
Alternative pre-requisite papers may be allowed by the Director of
Health Sciences Programmes.
Transition Arrangements
6.
These regulations take effect from 1 January 2010.
(a) Students who passed at least 30 credits towards the Bachelor of
Health Science under the 2009 or earlier regulations may complete
under those regulations until the end of the 2014 academic year.
(b) Students who have passed at least 30 credits towards the Bachelor
of Health Science prior to 2010 may choose to transfer to these
regulations, but must then meet all of the requirements specified
herein.
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Degree of Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts
BMVA
Course Regulations
Part II
(at least 120 credits required)
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
Admission to Part I of the Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts will conform
to the normal requirements and procedures of the University and will be
based partly on the assessment of a portfolio of work submitted by the
candidate.
Compulsory:
150.206
Ngā Momo Whakairo:
Contemporary Māori Visual Art
15
P 150.106
150.207
Mata Oho: Studio IIA
30
P 150.107
150.208
Mata Oho: Studio IIB
45
P 150.108
15
P 150.110
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
P 150.111
plus either
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
or
Course of Study
2.
The Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts degree consists of four parts, each
containing 120 credits.
3.
The degree of Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts may be awarded with
or without Honours. A candidate who has fulfilled the requirements
prescribed in the Regulations and whose work has been of a sufficiently
high standard may be recommended by the Academic Board for
admission to the degree with First or Second Class Honours. Candidates
awarded Second Class Honours shall be listed in Division I or Division
II.
150.210
Electives:
Any one of the following papers or another paper approved by the Head of
School:
146.206
Visual Ethnography
15
P any 100-level BA paper
148.204
The New Zealand Land Wars
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
150.216
He Huarahi Rangahau: Māori and
Research
15
P three papers at 100-level
including one paper from Māori
Studies
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts
154.201
Television Studies
15
P any 100-level BA paper
Part I
(at least 120 credits required)
154.222
The Art of the Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.303
Mana Wāhine: Māori Women
15
P 150.216 (or approved alternative
research methods paper);
R 150.203
4.
The following Schedule sets out parts, paper numbers and credit values
applying to papers offered for the degree of Bachelor of Māori Visual
Arts.
Compulsory:
150.106
Ngā Hanga Whakairo: Traditional
Māori Visual Art
15
150.107
Mata Puare: Studio IA
30
Part III
(at least 120 credits required)
150.108
Mata Puare: Studio IB
45
Compulsory:
plus either
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising
in Māori
15
or
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
P 150.110 or equivalent
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
150.307
Mata: Studio IIIA
30
P 150.207
150.308
Mata: Studio IIIB
60
P 150.208
plus
150.210
Electives:
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
P 150.111; Note
Note
Any one of the following papers or another paper approved by the Head of
School.
If 150.210 has already been passed, a paper approved by the Head
of School.
146.101
Introductory Social Anthropology
15
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore and Economics
15
Part IV
(120 credits required)
154.101
Introduction to Media Studies
15
Compulsory:
150.407
Matatau: Studio IVA
60
P 150.307
150.408
Matatau: Studio IVB
60
P 150.308
Page 159
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Degree of Bachelor of Midwifery
BMid
No new enrolments will be accepted into Part I, Part II or Part III of
the Bachelor of Midwifery in 2012
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
(a) Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Midwifery shall before
enrolment have met the requirements set down by the Midwifery
Council of New Zealand for registration as a midwife in New
Zealand in terms of good character and fitness to be a midwife.
(b) Admission to Part I is subject to the successful completion of a
First Aid Certificate and Health Clearance requirement.
(c) Registered nurses may be admitted with credit to the programme
and are required to pass all core midwifery papers, facilitate 30
births and meet the standards and competencies required for
registration as a midwife with the Midwifery Council of New
Zealand.
(d) Registered midwives may be admitted with advanced standing to
Part III of the programme and may be eligible for up to 300 credits
dependent on prior qualifications and work experience.
Course of Study
2.
3.
4.
Candidates for the Bachelor of Midwifery shall follow a course of
study of not less than three years and not more than four years, unless
application has been made and permission granted by the Midwifery
Council to complete over a longer period of time.
No person will be entitled to enrol on more than two occasions papers
177.101, 177.102 and 177.204, or enrol more than once to pass papers
177.302 and 177.303, unless in extraordinary circumstances and subject
to the approval of the Head of School which may be withheld or granted,
and if granted subject to conditions as the Head of School at their
discretion determines.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student
does not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the
Midwifery Council for registration as a midwife in New Zealand
in terms of good character and fitness to be a midwife, the Pro
Vice-Chancellor will refer the matter to the University Disciplinary
Committee under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary Powers of the
Disciplinary Regulations.
Note: While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the Midwifery Council of New Zealand in good faith, the
final decision for registration is at the discretion of the Midwifery Council.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Midwifery
The Bachelor of Midwifery includes a minimum of 1500 hours of supervised
clinical practice. The programme is delivered in three parts, each containing
120 credits of study.
Part I
(120 credits)
All of the following papers:
214.101
Human Bioscience: Normal Body
Function
15
R 194.101, 194.241, 194.242
214.102
Applied Sciences for Health
Professionals
15
P 214.101; R 123.101, 123.103
250.231
The Socio-political Context of
Health Care
15
P 250.131 or 177.101, R 168.202,
168.231
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
One of the following papers:
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory 177-prefix paper for
which they have been enrolled for two occasions or a compulsory
214-prefix paper for which they have been enrolled for three
occasions;
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 176.104
(c) failure to complete the degree within 4 years from the date of first
enrolment, except under exceptional circumstances.
Students excluded under (a) or (b) above will only be re-admitted
to the Bachelor of Midwifery course with the approval of the
Academic Board. Such approval may be withheld or granted
subject to conditions.
(a) A candidate may be credited with restricted passes in papers
totalling up to 45 credits, except in papers with the prefix of 177.
(b) Exemptions of one or more prescribed papers may be granted on
the basis of prior learning by the candidate before admission to the
degree course.
(c) Credit for papers listed in Part I, II and III of the Bachelor of
Midwifery degree that have been passed for credits to other degrees
or approved qualification may be granted subject to approval by the
Academic Board of the University.
6.
(a) Should a student in the Bachelor of Midwifery programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Humanities and Social Science of the conviction within
seven days.
For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Midwifery the following will
lead to exclusion from that programme:
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 60% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year;
5.
requirements set down by the Midwifery Council of New Zealand for
registration as a midwife in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a midwife.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in the Bachelor Midwifery programme if a student, in the
opinion of the University, is found not to meet in general terms the
Page 160
Part II
(120 credits)
All of the following papers:
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
P any 100-level BA paper
177.204
Midwifery Practice II
30
P 177.201
214.202
Pharmacology
15
P 214.101 and 214.102
Part III
(120 credits)
All of the following papers and an approved elective:
168.310
Research for Clinical Practice
15
P 177.102 and any
200-level paper
177.301
Challenges in Midwifery and
Neonatal Care
15
P 177.201, 177.202, 177.203;
177.204
177.302
Midwifery Practice III
30
P 177.301
177.303
Independent Midwifery Practice
30
P 214.202, P 177.301
Humanities and Social Sciences
177.304
Business Management for Health
Professionals
15
P any 200-level paper
Registered Midwives admitted to Part III of the programme will complete:
168.310
An approved elective paper to the value of 15 credits. Suggested electives
include:
Research for Clinical Practice
15
And may select additional papers from the following:
168.311
15
P any 100-level BA paper; R
176.316
Ethico-legal Dimensions of Nursing
Practice
177.304
15
15
P any two 100-level papers, R
176.202
Business Management for Health
Professionals
177.314
Birthing and Early Parenting
15
Birthing and Early Parenting
15
P 250.231 or 168.231, R 168.309
Sleep, Circadian Rhythms and
Shift Work
15
P 214 or equivalent, as approved by
the Programme Director; R 214.217
176.207
Family, Intimacy and Domestic Life
15
P any 100-level BA paper
176.216
Understanding Globalisation
15
179.202
An Introduction to Social Research
177.314
252.201
R 168.309
An approved 300-level midwifery practice paper or an approved elective.
The Degree of Bachelor of Nursing
BN
Course Regulations
4.
Part I
For persons enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing, the following will lead
to exclusion:
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory 168-prefix paper for
which they have been enrolled for two occasions or a compulsory
214-prefix paper for which they have been enrolled for three
occasions;
Part II
Admission
(b) failure to pass papers totalling at least 75 academic credits or
failure to pass at least 60% of an approved part-time course of
study in any academic year;
1. In addition to the normal university entrance requirements, entry is based
on the following pre-selection criteria:
(c) failure to complete the degree within five years from the date of
first enrolment.
(a) Candidates must meet the requirements set down by the Nursing
Council of New Zealand for registration as a nurse in New Zealand
in terms of good character and fitness to be a nurse.
(b) Candidates from countries where English is not the first language,
or those where the language of instruction in secondary school
education is not in English, are required to provide satisfactory
evidence of their proficiency in English, in the form of an
overall academic score of at least 6.5 in an IELTS assessment (or
equivalent) with no band score less than 6.5.
(d) Students excluded under (a), (b) or (c) above will only be readmitted to the Bachelor of Nursing course with the approval of the
Academic Board (or its delegate).
5.
Normally students will not be permitted to enrol in Part II nursing papers
(prefix 168.2xx) prior to completing all of Part I of the programme, or in
Part III nursing papers (prefix 168.3xx) prior to completing all of Part II.
6.
(a) A candidate may be credited with restricted passes in papers
totalling up to 45 credits, except in papers with the prefix of 168.
xxx and papers 214.101 and 214.102.
(c) 14 credits or more at NCEA level 3 in Biology. Supporting credits
including Chemistry, Physics, Statistics and Modelling, English,
History and Geography will be taken into consideration. Applicants
who do not meet this criterion will be considered on a case-bycase basis and may be required to pass specific papers to gain the
required background prior to commencing the degree.
(d) A current First Aid Certificate (NZQA 6400, 6401 and 6402) and
Health Clearance requirement.
(e) Candidates may be required to attend a selection interview.
Note: While the University will endeavour to meet the general terms and
requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand in good faith,
the final decision for registration is at the discretion of the Nursing
Council.
Course of Study
2.
3.
Candidates for the Bachelor of Nursing shall follow a course of study
for normally not less than three years and not more than five years
(extension to six years requires prior approval by Nursing Council of
New Zealand) and pass the papers and practical work specified in the
Schedule to these Regulations including a minimum of 1100 hours
of approved supervised practice. Students will be expected to attend
practice laboratories and clinical practice as compulsory components of
the degree.
No candidate will be given more than two opportunities to pass each
Praxis paper, including 168.121 and 168.123.
(b) Exemptions of one or more prescribed papers may be granted on
the basis of prior learning by the candidate before admission to the
degree course.
(c) Credit for papers listed in Parts I, II and III of the Bachelor of
Nursing degree that have been passed for credit to other degrees or
approved qualifications may be granted subject to approval by the
Academic Board of the University.
7.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in the Bachelor of Nursing programme if a student, in the
opinion of the University, is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the Nursing Council of New Zealand for
registration as a nurse in New Zealand in terms of good character and
fitness to be a nurse.
(a) Should a student in the Bachelor of Nursing programme be
convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Humanities and Social Science of the conviction within
seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the Nursing
Council for registration as a nurse in New Zealand in terms of
good character and fitness to be a nurse, the Pro Vice-Chancellor
will refer the matter to the University Disciplinary Committee
under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary Powers of the Disciplinary
Regulations.
Page 161
Humanities and Social Sciences
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Nursing
Part I
(120 credits)
All of the following papers:
168.242
Nursing in Long-term Adaptation
for Healthy Living
15
P 168.121, 168.123, 168.124 and
168.125, C 214.201
168.243
Praxis II
15
C/L 168.242
168.244
Promoting Health with Individuals,
Families and Communities
15
P 168.121, 168.123, 168.124 and
168.125
168.121
Introduction to Nursing and Praxis
15
168.245
Praxis III
15
C/L 168.244
168.123
Assessment and Clinical Decisionmaking I
15
168.246
Professional Development in
Nursing
15
P 168.121, 168.123, 168.124 and
168.125
168.124
Nursing in Health and Wellness
Across the Lifespan
15
214.201
Human Bioscience: Impaired Body
Function
15
P 214.101 and 214.102
168.125
Research Methods and Academic
Writing in Nursing
15
214.202
Pharmacology
15
P 214.101 and 214.102
214.101
Human Bioscience: Normal Body
Function
15
R 194.101, 194.241, 194.242
214.102
Applied Sciences for Health
Professionals
15
R 123.101, 123.103
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
One of the following papers:
Part III
(120 credits)
All of the following papers.
Compulsory:
168.310
Research for Clinical Practice
15
P any 200-level paper
168.312
Issues in Clinical Practice
15
P 168.246
168.341
Nursing in Acute Illness and
Trauma
15
P 168.243, 168.245, C 168.342
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
168.342
Praxis IV
30
C/L 168.341
176.103
Self and Society
15
168.343
Professional Practice
30
P 168.341, 168.342
168.344
Assessment and Clinical Decisionmaking II
15
C 168.343
Part II
(120 credits)
All of the following papers:
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
P any 100-level BA paper
The Degree of Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning
BRP
Course Regulations
(d) Pass elective papers to the value of 30 credits from papers offered
for other Bachelor degrees.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
The Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning consists of four
parts, each containing 120 credits of study including field trips, studios,
workshops and laboratories.
2.
To qualify for the award of the degree a candidate shall:
(a) Pass the Planning papers required in the four parts of the course of
study set out in Schedule A (285 credits).
(b) Complete a minor subject comprising 135 credits, with at least
105 credits above 100-level and including at least 45 credits above
200-level from papers listed in Schedule B. The minor subjects
available are:
Agriculture
Ecology
Economics
Geography
Management
Māori Studies
Property Management
Soil/Earth Science.
(c) Pass papers to the value of 30 credits from Schedule C, during Part
I of the BRP.
Page 162
(e) Attend field trips, studios, workshops and laboratories as required.
Honours
3.
The degree of Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning may
be awarded with or without Honours. A candidate who has fulfilled the
requirements prescribed in the Regulations and whose work has been
of a sufficiently high standard may be recommended by the Academic
Board for admission to the degree with First or Second Class Honours.
Candidates awarded Second Class Honours shall be listed in Division I
or Division II.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Resource and Environmental
Planning
Schedule A – Planning Papers
Part I
132.106
Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
15
132.111
Planning and the Environment
15
132.112
Planning for Sustainable
Development
15
Part II
Before enrolling for Core Planning papers in Part II, BRP candidates shall
normally have passed or been credited with all Core Planning papers in Part I
of the Schedule A.
132.212
Professional Practice I
15
Humanities and Social Sciences
132.213
Policy Analysis and Evaluation
15
132.217
Planning Hazard-Resilient
Communities
15
132.218
Building Collaborative Communities 15
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
Ecology
P any 100-level paper
P any 100-level paper
120.101
Biology of Plants
15
199.101
Biology of Animals
15
120.218
The Flora of New Zealand
15
P 120.101 or equivalent
knowledge
188.263
Environmental Science I
15
P 121.103
196.205
Ecology and Conservation
15
P 199.101 or 120.101 or
121.103, 161.1xx
199.206
The Fauna of New Zealand
15
P 199.101 or equivalent
knowledge
196.313
Limnology
15
P two 199.2xx/196.2xx papers
or equivalent knowledge.
196.315
Applied Ecology and Resource
Management
15
P 196.205
196.316
New Zealand Plant Ecology
15
P 120.218 and 196.205
196.317
Community and Ecosystem Ecology
15
P two 199.2xx/196.2xx papers
or equivalent knowledge.
196.321
Vegetation Studies in New Zealand
15
P 120.218 and 196.205
120.303
Plant Biodiversity
15
P 120.218. Alternative
prerequisites may be approved
by the Programme Director,
BSc. Students are strongly
advised to take 120.217 before
120.303.
162.304
Environmental Microbiology
15
P 162.212 and either 162.211
(or 141.222) or 162.213 or
196.213
188.363
Environmental Science II
15
P 188.263 and either (a)
practical work related to land
use systems, or (b) one or
more of the following papers:
111.251, 119.258, 119.259,
171.202, 196.205.
199.312
Behavioural Ecology
15
P two 199.2xx/196.2xx papers
or equivalent knowledge.
199.317
Animal Biodiversity
15
P 196.207
15
Part III
Before enrolling for Core Planning papers in Part III, BRP candidates shall
normally have passed or been credited with all Core Planning papers in Part II
of the Schedule A.
Core Planning papers (75 credits)
132.305
Natural Resource Policy and
Planning
15
132.311
Planning Theory
15
132.312
Environmental and Planning Law
15
132.313
Advanced Planning Techniques
15
132.314
Transport and Urban Planning
15
Part IV
Before enrolling for the Core Planning papers in Part IV, BRP candidates shall
normally have passed or been credited with all Core Planning papers in Part
III of the Schedule A.
Core Planning papers (90 credits)
132.403
Planning Project
30
132.412
Professional Practice II
15
132.414
Urban Planning and Design
15
132.415
Environmental Planning
15
132.419
Professional Practice Studio
15
Notes
1. In approved circumstances students transferring from another
degree or another university may be permitted to take 132.111 and
132.112 in Part II.
2. Papers with significant overlap of content will not be approved
for inclusion in the degree. Paper 132.221 Planning Studies cannot
be credited to the BRP degree.
Economics
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of Business 15
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
178.200
Intermediate Macroeconomics
15
P 178.100
Schedule B – Minors
178.201
Intermediate Microeconomics
15
A minor consists of 135 credits, with at least 105 credits above 100-level
including at least 45 credits above 200-level.
P 115.106 or 178.101;
R 178.204
178.240
Managerial Economics
15
P 115.106 or 178.101
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 178.1xx paper or
15.106
178.300
Advanced Macroeconomics
15
P 178.200
178.301
Advanced Microeconomics
15
P 178.201
178.360
Natural Resource and Environmental
Economics
15
P any 178.1xx paper and any
200-level paper
178.370
Development Economics
15
P 115.106 or any 178.xxx
paper and any 15 credits at
200 level
Agriculture
117.152
Animals and Agriculture
15
R 117.151, 199.101
119.180
Introduction to Agribusiness
15
R 119.156
189.151
Soil Properties and Processes
15
R 189.142
283.101
Plants in Agriculture
15
R 171.102
117.254
Principles of Animal Science and
Production
15
P one of 194.101, 199.101,
119.154, 117.152, 117.141
119.258
Agricultural Systems
15
P one of 117.152 or 145.121
283.201
Pasture and Crop Agronomy
15
P 15 credits at 100-level;
R 171.202
283.301
Pasture Production and Practice
15
P 171.202, 283.201; R
171.301
283.305
Arable Production and Technology
15
P 171.202 or 283.201 or
120.101 or 171.102 or
283.101 plus any 200-level
paper; R 171.305
283.321
283.322
Trees on Farms
Landscape Revegetation
15
15
P 15 credits at 200-level;
R 171.304
P 15 credits at 200-level;
R 171.364
Geography
145.111
Society, Environment and Place
15
145.121
Introduction to Physical Geography
15
145.201
Geographical Research Techniques
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc
paper
145.213
Resource Conservation and Sustainability 15
P any 100-level BA or BSc
paper, R 145.313
145.214
Social Change and Environment
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc
paper
145.216
Urban Environments
15
P any 100-level BA paper
145.218
Development and Inequality
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc
paper
Page 163
Humanities and Social Sciences
145.222
Rivers and Slopes
15
P 145.121
150.302
Planning for Māori Health
15
P 150.202
145.223
Climate Change and Natural Hazards
15
P 145.121, 233.101 or
equivalent; R 145.325
150.303
Mana Wāhine: Māori Women
15
145.224
Biogeography
15
P any 100-level BA or BSc
paper, R 145.324
P 150.216 (or approved
alternative research
methods paper); R 150.203
150.311
Te Papā o te Reo: Māori Language III
15
P 150.211
145.225
Glaciers and Glaciation
15
P 145.121
145.301
Research Practice in Human Geography
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc
paper
145.303
Field Work: Alpine Physical Geography
15
P 145.222 or 145.221 (or
equivalent)
145.304
Applied Field Geomorphology
15
P 145.222 or 145.223
145.311
Geographies of Globalisation
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc
paper
145.318
Geopolitics
15
P any 200-level BA or BSc
paper
145.320
145.327
Quaternary Biogeography and
Environmental Change
15
River Dynamics
15
P 145.223 or 145.224;
R 145.302, 145.308 (2009
only)
Notes
1.
This paper is for beginners.
2.
Previous experience in Māori language necessary
Property Management
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of Business
15
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
127.241
Real Estate Valuation and Management
15
P any 100-level
127.242
Applied Valuation I
15
P any 100-level paper; R
127.255
138.281
Building Technology: Construction and
Design
15
P any 100-level paper; R
138.254 and 138.282
155.201
Law of Property
15
P 115.103 or 155.100 or
155101.; R 155.216, 155.700
178.242
Land Economics
15
P any 178.1xx paper or
115.106
127.341
Property Management and Development
15
P 127.241 or 127.243 or
127.244
127.342
Real Estate Investments
15
P 127.241 and (127.242 or
Permission HOS)
127.343
Applied Valuation II
15
P 127.242
138.382
Building Technology: Services
15
P one of 138.281, 138.282,
138.254, 127.362; R 138.331
138.383
Building Technology: Commercial
Buildings
15
P one of 138.281, 138.282,
127.362, 138.254
P 145.222
Notes
1. Prerequisites may be waived with the approval of the Head
of School in the case of students with appropriate credits in other
subjects.
2. Most courses include some laboratory and/or field work –
145.111 (one day), 145.222 (one day), 145.301 (two days), 145.303
(seven days), 145.304 (six days), 145.320 (one day) and 145.327
(one day).
Management
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of Business
15
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100
115.108
Organisations and Management
15
R 152.100
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
P any 100-level paper
152.203
Business and Society
15
P any 100-level paper
152.204
Investigative Management Skills
15
P any 100-level paper; R
152.201, 152.202
Soil/Earth Science
121.103
New Zealand Environments
15
152.232
Small Business Management
15
P any 100-level paper
145.121
Introduction to Physical Geography
15
152.252
Project Management
15
P any 100-level paper
189.151
Soil Properties and Processes
15
R 189.142
152.261
International Business
15
P any 100-level paper
233.101
Introductory Earth Science
15
R 189.141
152.304
Managing Services
15
P any two 200-level papers
145.222
Rivers and Slopes
15
P 145.121
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
P any 30 credits at 200-level;
R 152.300, 152.328
145.223
Climate Change and Natural Hazards
15
P 145.121, 233.101 or
equivalent; R 145.325
152.333
New Venture Project
15
P any 200-level paper
145.225
Glaciers and Glaciation
15
P 145.121
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
P any 200-level paper; R
152.300, 152.303, 152.365
189.251
Soil Fertility and Fertilisers
15
P 189.151 or 189.142
189.252
Land, Soil and Water
15
P one of 189.141, 189.151,
189.142, 233.101
233.202
Earth Science Field Work I
15
P 233.101 or 145.121; R
189.272
233.205
Volcanology and Mineralogy
15
P 233.101; R 189.275,
189.375, 233.305
233.208
Plate Tectonics and New Zealand Geology 15
233.250
Understanding New Zealand Geology
15
P 233.101; R 233.200, 233.207
233.251
GIS and Remote Sensing
15
P 233.101 or 189.151
or 145.121 or 158.100;
R 233.201, 233.204
145.303
Field Work: Alpine Physical Geography
15
P 145.222 or 145.221 (or
equivalent)
145.304
Applied Field Geomorphology
15
P 145.222 or 145.223
145.320
Quaternary Biogeography and
Environmental Change
15
P 145.223 or 145.224;
R 145.302, 145.308 (2009 only)
145.327
River Dynamics
15
P 145.222
189.362
Soil Fertility and the Environment
15
P 189.251 or 189.252
189.363
Soil Resources and Sustainable Land Use
15
P one of 189.251, 189.252,
233.210, 233.310
233.301
Advanced Remote Sensing
15
P 233.251; R 189.371
Māori Studies
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising in
Māori
15
Note 1
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
Note 2
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori Custom, Lore
and Economics
15
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
150.204
Mana Māori: Māori and Politics
15
P any 100-level BA paper
P any 100-level BA paper
150.210
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language IIA
15
P 150.111
150.211
Te Reo Whakanakonako: Embellishing the 15
Language
P 150.210
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
P 150.114 or 146.101
150.216
He Huarahi Rangahau: Māori and
Research
15
P three papers at 100-level
including one paper from
Māori Studies
Te Mana Te Kāwanatanga: Māori Policy
and the State
15
150.301
Page 164
P 150.201
Humanities and Social Sciences
233.302
Earth Science Field Work III
15
P 233.202; R 189.372
150.111
How the Earth Works
15
P 233.250 (or 233.200);
R 233.300, 233.208, 233.308
Te Reo Konakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
233.350
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori Custom, Lore
and Economics
15
158.100
Computer Applications and the
Information Age
15
Schedule C – Planning Related Papers
115.103
Legal and Social Environment of Business
15
160.101
Calculus I
15
115.105
Fundamentals of Finance
15
R 125.100
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
115.106
Economics
15
R 178.101
178.100
Principles of Macroeconomics
15
115.108
Organisations and Management
15
R 152.100
189.151
Soil Properties and Processes
15
117.152
Animals and Agriculture
15
R 117.151 and 199.101
199.101
Biology of Animals
15
R 119.156
R 160.161
R 189.142
119.180
Introduction to Agribusiness
15
200.161
Introduction to Politics
15
120.101
Biology of Plants
15
219.101
Media Skills
15
121.103
New Zealand Environments
15
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
145.111
Society, Environment and Place
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
145.121
Introduction to Physical Geography
15
233.101
Introductory Earth Science
15
R 189.141
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising in
Māori
15
279.101
Social Policy: An Introduction
15
R 179.101
283.101
Plants in Agriculture
15
R 171.102
The Degree of Bachelor of Social Work
BSW
Course Regulations
(ii) They have been admitted to Part III by a selection process
approved by the Head of School; and
Part I
(iii) They hold a current full driver’s licence. Students with
disabilities will receive special consideration.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
(c) Candidates shall not enrol in Part IV unless they have been
admitted to Part IV by a selection process approved by the Head of
School.
Credit Transfer
3.
(a) Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Social Work shall
follow a course of study for not less than four years and complete
to the satisfaction of the Academic Board 120 days of approved
supervised field education. Students will also be expected to attend
practice laboratories and field trips as compulsory components of
the degree.
(b) The course for the degree comprises papers to a total value of 480
credits, of which 90 credits relate to supervised field education.
Papers are listed as being compulsory, or elective, the latter being
papers drawn from other Bachelor’s degrees.
(b) Notwithstanding the provisions of general Regulations, candidates
who have completed university papers or a tertiary social work
Diploma (levels five and six) (no more than 150 credits at the
100 level or level five) which are, in the opinion of the Academic
Board, substantially the same as those prescribed for the degree of
Bachelor of Social Work, may be recommended for such credit and/
or exemptions as to permit them to enter Part III and complete the
BSW degree in two years’ full-time study or on a part-time basis.
(c) Candidates will be given two opportunities to pass Field Education
papers 179.355 and 179.455. Students who fail twice will be
excluded from the degree for a period of one year and will be
required to apply for entry into the relevant part as specified in the
Progression Policy for the degree.
(c) Candidates whose prior learning in informal settings and through
work experience substantially meets the requirements for particular
papers offered by the School, may apply for recognition of prior
learning under the University Recognition of Prior Learning
Regulations outlined in the Calendar. Guidelines are available from
the Head of School.
Selection into Parts II, III and IV
2.
(a) Candidates shall not enrol in Part II unless:
(i) They have passed papers to at least 75 credits. The candidate
may on the recommendation of Academic Board, be permitted
to enrol in approved papers of Part II in the same year that the
candidate is enrolled in the remaining papers of the previous part.
(ii) They have met the requirements set down by the Social Workers
Registration Act 2003 for registration as social workers in New
Zealand in terms of candidates being ‘fit and proper persons to
practise social work’.
(b) Candidates shall not enrol for Part III unless:
(i) They have passed all the compulsory requirements of the
previous parts except that a candidate who has passed all the
prerequisites for entry to Part III of the degree, except one of the
compulsory papers in Part I or Part II may, with the approval of the
Academic Board, be permitted to enrol in Part III; and
(a) Notwithstanding the provisions of general Regulations, candidates
who have completed a tertiary social work Certificate or papers
in the social sciences (no more than 120 credits) which are, in the
opinion of the Academic Board, substantially the same as those
prescribed for the degree of Bachelor of Social Work, may be
recommended for such credit and/or exemptions as to permit them
to enter Part II and complete the BSW degree in three years’ fulltime study or on a part-time basis.
Field Education
4.
Candidates must complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board
120 days of approved supervised field education. The supervised field
education and work experience required by BSW Regulation 1(a), are as
follows:
Field Education
120 days of supervised field education are required. Field education will
be in three parts.
(a) 179.255 Introduction to Field Education
(i) Reports for this paper will be taken into consideration when
students are being selected for entry into Part II of the BSW degree.
Page 165
Humanities and Social Sciences
The paper will be graded on a pass/fail basis. A fail grade will
automatically disqualify a candidate from proceeding to the next
part of the degree. Provision for an appeal in these situations will
be provided.
(b) 179.355 Field Education I
(i) Students will be required to undertake field education
placements in accordance with requirements of the appropriate
School and in accordance with the availability of professionally
qualified supervisors.
(ii) Reports on each student will be submitted to the Head of School
by field education supervisors and
a pass or fail grade will be awarded by the Academic Board. A fail
grade in 179.355 will disqualify a candidate from proceeding to
Part IV of the degree. Provisions for an appeal in these cases will
be provided.
(iii) Students will be sufficiently prepared to undertake the
placement by having demonstrated in the prerequisite papers the
ability to adequately respond to presenting problems and have
participated in preliminary placement planning discussions.
(iv) Where elective papers taken in Part III are available
extramurally, students may be requested to complete field education
requirements outside of the Massey University campus regions.
(c) 179.455 Field Education II
(i) Students will be required to undertake field education
placements in accordance with the requirements of the appropriate
School and in accordance with the availability of professionally
qualified supervisors.
(ii) Reports on each student will be submitted to the Head of
School by field education supervisors and a pass or fail grade will
be awarded by the Academic Board.
(iii) Students will be sufficiently prepared to undertake the
placement by having demonstrated in the prerequisite papers the
ability to adequately respond to presenting problems and have
participated in preliminary placement planning discussions.
Honours
5.
The degree of Bachelor of Social Work may be awarded with or without
Honours. A candidate who has fulfilled the requirements prescribed in
the Regulations and whose work has been of a sufficiently high standard
may be recommended by the Academic Board for admission to the
degree with First or Second Class Honours. Candidates awarded Second
Class Honours shall be listed in Division I or Division II.
Variations
6.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of
a student in the Bachelor of Social Work programme if a student, in
the opinion of the University, is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Social Workers Registration
Board in terms of being ‘fit and proper persons to practise social work”.
(a) Should a student in the Bachelor of Social Work programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry into the
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Humanities and Social Sciences of the conviction within
seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Social Workers Registration Board in terms of good
character and fitness to be a social worker, the Pro Vice-Chancellor
will refer the matter to the University Disciplinary Committee
under Section 1(d) General Disciplinary Powers of the Disciplinary
Regulations.
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Social Work
Part I
(120 credits)
Compulsory papers:
179.110
Introducing Social and Community
Work Practice
15
179.155
An Introduction to Helping Skills
in Social and Community Work
Practice
15
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
279.101
Social Policy: An Introduction
15
R 179.101
One paper at any level in Social Anthropology or Māori Studies.
One of the following papers:
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 176.104
176.104
Identity and Culture in New
Zealand
15
R 148.106, 176.102
Electives:
Papers to a total of 30 credits drawn from papers offered for other Bachelor’s
degrees.
Part II
(120 credits)
Compulsory papers:
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100-level BA paper
179.202
An Introduction to Social Research
15
P any two 100-level papers, at
least one of which is from the BA
schedule, R 176.202
179.210
Social Work Theories, Assessment
and Interventions
15
P 179.110
179.255
Introduction to Field Education
15
P 179.155
179.230
The Wellbeing of Pacific Peoples in
New Zealand
15
P any 100-level BA paper
279.201
Social Policy: Concepts and
Theories
15
P 279.102 or 179.101; R 179.201
279.203
Law, Government and Social Policy
15
P 279.101 or 179.101; R 179.203
Electives:
One paper to a total of 15 credits drawn from papers offered for other
Bachelor’s degrees.
Part III
(105 credits)
Compulsory papers:
179.310
Integrated Practice with Groups
and Families
15
P 179.210
179.320
Community Development
15
P any 200-level paper
179.330
Māori Development and the Social
Services
15
P any 200-level BA paper
179.355
Field Education I
45
P 179.255, C 179.310, 179.320,
179.330
279.301
Government Policy, Planning and
Administration
15
P 279.201 or 179.201; R 179.301
Part IV
(135 credits)
Compulsory papers:
179.410
Social Work Fields of Practice
30
P pass in Part III
179.420
Advanced Social Work Practice
30
P pass in Part III
179.440
Management in the Social Services 15
P pass in Part III
179.455
Field Education II
45
P 179.355, C 179.410, 179.420
279.401
Social Policy Evaluation
15
P 279.301 or 179.301; R 179.462
Transition
7.
Page 166
These regulations take effect from 1 January 2011.
Humanities and Social Sciences
(a) Students who have passed at least 120 credits towards the BSW
prior to 1 January 2011 are not required to include 179.155 in their
programme of study in order to graduate. Students who have passed
at least 75 credits will be permitted to study 179.155 and 179.255
concurrently in 2011.
(b) Students who have passed at least 240 credits towards the BSW
prior to 1 January 2011 are not required to include 179.230 in their
course of study.
Undergraduate Diplomas
The Diploma in Arts
DipArts
Course Regulations
Or
Part I
(c) Expressive Arts endorsement
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma, a candidate shall pass papers to
a total of at least 120 credits, with at least 45 credits above 100-level.
2.
The course of study must include one of the following papers:
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
192.102
Academic Writing in English for
Speakers of Other Languages
15
Note
Note
Students whose prior education was not in English should normally
take 192.102.
3.
4.
At least 90 credits must be taken from Part II of the Schedule for the
Bachelor of Arts degree and/or from Schedule A for the Bachelor of
Defence Studies degree. Up to 30 credits may be taken from Schedules
for other undergraduate degrees.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma with endorsement, a candidate
shall either:
(a) Pass at least 75 credits, including 45 credits above 100-level, from
a single major subject in the Bachelor of Arts degree (excepting
Business Psychology) or from a single minor subject that has the
Bachelor of Arts as its home degree.
(b) The endorsement requirements parallel the minor subject
requirements in the Bachelor of Arts degree, except that inclusion
of 15 credits at 300-level is not required in the Diploma in Arts.
Endorsements
Chinese
Mathematics
Classical Studies
Media Studies
Defence Studies
Music
Development Studies
Philosophy
Economics
Politics
Education
Psychology
Educational Psychology
Rehabilitation Studies
English
Religious Studies
Environmental Studies
Security Studies
French
Social Anthropology
Geography
Social Policy
History
Sociology
Japanese
Spanish
Linguistics
Statistics
Māori Studies
Women’s Studies
Pass at least 75 credits, including 45 credits above 100-level, from
papers listed below:
139.104
Drama in Performance
15
139.123
Creative Writing
15
139.142
Mythology and Fantasy
15
139.209
Speaking: Theory and Practice
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of 119.155, 197.114, 206.101,
206.104, 206.105, 219.100,
PERF135, PERF136, PERF235,
PERF236
139.223
Creative Processes
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or
any one of 152.230, 152.334,
206.102, 206.110; or any 100-level
197-prefix paper; or any 226-prefix
paper.
139.224
Making Plays for Theatre
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
226-prefix paper; or 197.107,
197.109, 206.222
139.225
Writing for Children
15
P 139.106 or 139.123
139.226
Life Writing
15
P any 100-level BA paper; or any
one of 197.107, 197.109, 197.111,
197.114, 206.206, 206.207
139.229
Writing Poetry: Love, Loss and
Looking Around
15
P 139.123
154.204
Media Practice I
15
P any 100-level BA paper
154.224
Documentary (Non-Fiction) Film
15
P any 100-level BA paper, or any
one of the following: BDes 221.361,
221.462, 222.270, 222.370;
BPerfDes 226.203
139.303
Modern Drama
15
P any 200-level English paper
139.323
Media Script Writing
15
P any 200-level English or Media
Studies paper
139.326
Travel Writing
15
P any 200-level BA paper; or any
one of 206.206, 206.207, 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.231, 221.281, 221.282
139.327
Writing Creative Nonfiction
15
P any 200-level BA paper or any
one of the following: 213.206,
213.216, 219.202, 219.204,
219.209, 219.231, 221.281,
221.282, 226.200
139.329
Advanced Fiction Writing
15
P 139.123 and any 200-level paper
139.374
Tragedy
15
P any 200-level BA paper
154.304
Media Practice II
15
P 154.204
5.
A candidate who has been awarded a Diploma in Arts may apply to
cross-credit up to 45 credits of Diploma papers towards an undergraduate
degree of the University, provided that any such papers shall comply
with the Regulations for the degree in question. A candidate who wishes
to credit papers totalling more than 45 credits in terms of this Regulation
will be required to surrender the Diploma in Arts before the transfer of
credit will be granted.
Page 167
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Diploma in Health Science
DipHlthSc
Course Regulations
an undergraduate degree of the university, provided that any such
papers shall comply with the Regulations for the degree in question. A
candidate who wishes to credit papers totalling more than 45 credits in
terms of this Regulation shall be required to surrender the Diploma in
Health Science before the transfer of credit will be granted.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
2.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma in Health Science, candidates
are required to gain at least 120 credits for papers listed in the Schedules
A, B and C for the Bachelor of Health Science degree. At least 45 of the
credits must be at the 200-level or higher.
To qualify for the Diploma candidates must pass:
(a) The core papers 250.131 Health Studies and 250.231 SocioPolitical Context of Health Care;
(b) A Communications paper selected from Schedule A, section 2 of
the Bachelor of Health Science degree;
(c) At least 15 credits from Schedule B, and at least 30 credits from
Schedule C of the Bachelor of Health Science degree;
(d) The balance of papers from Schedules A, B, C or D of the Bachelor
of Health Science degree.
3.
Transition Provisions
These regulations apply from 1 January 2010.
Part II
1.
4.
Transfers and Cross-credits
A candidate who has been awarded a Diploma in Health Science
may apply to cross-credit up to 45 credits of Diploma papers towards
(a) All candidates commencing study towards the Diploma in Health
Science on or after 1 January 2010 must satisfy the requirements
specified in these regulations.
(b) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in Health
Science prior to 1 January 2010, and who have passed at least 15
Massey credits while enrolled in the Certificate in Health Science
programme, may complete under the CertHlthSc regulations in the
2009 Massey University Calendar (or earlier regulations) until the
end of the 2012 academic year.
(c) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in Health
Science in 2009 or earlier may choose to transfer to the Diploma in
Health Science, but must then satisfy all requirements specified in
the regulations for the Diploma.
(d) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in Health
Science prior to 2010, but who have not completed the Certificate
by the end of the 2012 academic year, will not be permitted to
complete the Certificate and will be required to transfer to the
Diploma in Health Science from 2013.
The Diploma in Rehabilitation Studies
DipRehabStuds
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
2.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma, a candidate shall follow
an approved course study for the equivalent of one year of full-time
study and pass the examinations in papers chosen from those listed in
Regulation 2 to a total of at least 120 credits, of which 45 credits shall be
at the 200-level or above.
Every course of study for the Diploma shall include:
(a) Five core papers:
147.101
Rehabilitation Studies
15
147.201
Issues in Rehabilitation
15
P any 100 level BA paper
147.203
Measurement in Rehabilitation
15
P 147.101
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
250.131
Health Studies
15
R 168.101, 168.131
(b) Optional papers – three of the following or as approved by the
Head of School.
146.101
Introductory Social Anthropology
15
147.102
Psychiatric Disability
15
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising
in Māori
15
Page 168
Note 1
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
Note 2
150.114
He Tirohanga O Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore and Economics
15
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
175.102
Psychology as a Natural Science
15
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 176.104
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
279.101
Social Policy : An Introduction
15
R 179.101
147.202
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
15
P 147.102
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
P any 100 level BA paper
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
P any 100 level BA paper
175.205
Brain and Behaviour
15
P 175.102
250.231
The Socio-political Context of
Health Care
15
P 250.131 or 177.101, R 168.202,
168.231
253.250
Counselling Principles and Practice
15
P any 100 level paper in Education
of Social Sciences; R 209.250
253.255
Cultural Issues in Counselling
15
P any 100 level paper in Education
or Social Sciences; R 209.255
250.233
Gender and Health
15
P any 100 level BA paper, R
168.213, 168.233
128.300
Ergonomics/Human Factors: Work,
Performance, Health and Design
15
P any 200-level paper
147.301
Community-based Rehabilitation
15
P 147.201
147.302
Alcohol and Drug Use
15
P any 200-level BA paper
250.317
Disability in Society
15
P any 200 level BA or BHlthSc
paper
Humanities and Social Sciences
250.333
Health and Ageing
15
(a) All candidates commencing study towards the Diploma in
Rehabilitation Studies on or after 1 January 2010 must satisfy the
requirements specified in these regulations.
P any 200 level BA paper, R 168.
333
Note:
1.
(b) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in
Rehabilitation Studies prior to 1 January 2010, and who have
passed at least 15 Massey credits while enrolled in the Certificate
in Rehabilitation Studies programme, may complete under the
CertRehabSt regulations in the 2009 Massey University Calendar
(or earlier regulations) until the end of the 2012 academic year.
Paper 150.110 is for beginners.
2. Paper 150.111 is for students with some prior experience in Te
Reo Māori.
Transfers and Cross-credits
3.
A candidate who has been awarded a Diploma in Rehabilitation Studies
may apply to cross-credit up to 45 credits of Diploma papers towards
an undergraduate degree of the university, provided that any such
papers shall comply with the Regulations for the degree in question. A
candidate who wishes to credit papers totalling more than 45 credits in
terms of this Regulation shall be required to surrender the Diploma in
Rehabilitation Studies before the transfer of credit will be granted.
(c) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in
Rehabilitation Studies in 2009 or earlier may choose to transfer
to the Diploma in Rehabilitation Studies, but must then satisfy all
requirements specified in the regulations for the Diploma.
(d) Candidates who commenced study towards the Certificate in
Rehabilitation Studies prior to 2010, but who have not completed
the Certificate by the end of the 2012 academic year, will not
be permitted to complete the Certificate and will be required to
transfer to the Diploma in Rehabilitation Studies from 2013.
Transition Provisions
4.
These regulations apply from 1 January 2010.
Undergraduate Certificates
The Certificate in Arts
CertArts
Course regulations
3.
A candidate who has completed the requirements for the Certificate
in Arts may apply to transfer the Certificate papers towards an
undergraduate diploma or degree of the University, provided that any
such papers shall comply with the Regulations for the diploma or degree
in question.
4.
A candidate who has been awarded a Certificate in Arts may apply
to cross-credit up to 15 credits of Certificate papers towards an
undergraduate diploma or undergraduate degree of the University,
provided that any such papers shall comply with the Regulations for the
diploma or degree in question. A candidate who wishes to credit papers
totalling more than 15 credits in terms of this Regulation will be required
to surrender the Certificate in Arts before the transfer of credit will be
granted.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
1.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate, a candidate shall pass
undergraduate papers to a total of at least 60 credits.
2.
At least 45 credits must be taken from Part II of the Schedule for the
Bachelor of Arts degree. Up to 15 credits may be taken from Schedules
for other undergraduate degrees.
The Certificate in Pacific Development
CertPacificDev
Part I
(b) Elective papers – select three from the following:
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course of Study
1.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate, candidates are required to
pass papers to the value of 60 credits.
2.
Every course of study for the Certificate shall include:
131.121
Rich World, Poor World
15
146.102
Endangered Cultures
15
172.132
Language and Culture
15
179.110
Introducing Social and Community
Work Practice
15
179.230
The Wellbeing of Pacific Peoples in
New Zealand
15
P any 100-level BA paper
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
(a)Compulsory:
230.102
Pacific Peoples in New Zealand
15
Page 169
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Certificate in Social and Community Work
CertSclComWk
No new enrolments from 2011
146.102
Endangered Cultures
15
The Certificate in Social and Community Work is an introductory programme
for practitioners in the social services.
147.101
Rehabilitation Studies
15
175.101
Psychology as a Social Science
15
Course Regulations
176.101
Introductory Sociology
15
176.102
New Zealand Society
15
R 176.104
176.104
Identity and Culture in New
Zealand
15
R 148.106, 176.102
200.162
Politics and Public Policy in New
Zealand
15
R 179.102
230.100
Introduction to Academic Writing
15
R 139.107, 119.155, 119.177,
197.114, 237.114
275.102
Human Development
15
R 209.102
279.203
Law, Government and Social Policy
15
P 279.101 or 179.101 or 200.162
(179.102 to 2009); R 179.203
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate Certificates,
Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Admission
1.
Persons applying to enrol must have at least 12 months’ experience in an
appropriate social or community work setting.
Course of Study
2.
Notes
1. This paper is for beginners.
2. Previous experience in the Māori language is necessary.
Every course of study shall include:
(a)Compulsory:
179.110
Introducing Social and Community
Work Practice
15
279.101
Social Policy: An Introduction
15
R 179.101
179.210
Social Work Theories, Assessment
and Interventions
15
C 179.110
179.230
The Wellbeing of Pacific Peoples in
New Zealand
15
C 279.101 or 179.101
179.255
Introduction to Field Education
15
C 279.101 or 179.101
(b) Optional papers – one of the following or as approved by the Head
of School:
150.110
Te Reo Whakahoahoa: Socialising
in Māori
15
Note 1
150.111
Te Reo Kōnakinaki: Developing the
Language
15
Note 2
150.114
He Tirohanga o Mua: Māori
Custom, Lore
and Economics
15
150.201
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
Rich World, Poor World
All candidates must attend extramural contact courses as required.
4.
Candidates who have already passed a university examination in one of
the prescribed papers or in a paper with substantially the same content
may be granted an exemption from that paper, but shall be required to
offer another paper that they have not already passed.
5.
Candidates whose prior learning in informal settings and through work
experience substantially meets the requirements for particular papers
offered by the School may apply for recognition of prior learning under
the University Recognition of Prior Learning Regulations outlined in the
Calendar. Guidelines are available from the Head of School.
6.
Candidates may credit to the Certificate in Social and Community Work
papers to a total of no more than 45 credits that are also credited to the
course for another degree or university diploma or certificate providing
that such cross-credits shall each require the approval of the Academic
Board.
7.
A candidate who has been awarded a Certificate may apply to credit
Certificate papers towards an undergraduate degree of the University,
provided that any such papers shall comply with the Regulations of that
degree. A candidate who wishes to credit papers to a total of more than
45 credits in terms of this Regulation will be required to surrender the
Certificate before the credit will be granted.
8.
In the case of sufficient merit, the Certificate may be awarded with
Distinction.
P any 100-level BA paper
(c) Elective papers – two of the following:
131.121
3.
15
Graduate Diplomas
The Graduate Diploma in Arts
GradDipArts
Course Regulations
with at least 75 credits above 200-level. All 120 credits must be taken
from Part II of the Schedule for the Bachelor of Arts degree, subject to
the exceptions permitted by Regulation 3.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate Certificates,
Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Arts, a student must
pass papers at 200-level and 300-level to a total of at least 120 credits,
Page 170
2.
A student may be credited with a maximum of 15 credits in which they
have gained a Restricted (R) pass.
3.
In exceptional circumstances, a student may be given approval to include
up to 30 credits from 700-level paper(s) from the Bachelor of Arts
(Honours), Postgraduate Diploma in Arts or Master of Arts schedules
in the Graduate Diploma in Arts. Approval for enrolment in 700-level
paper(s) will only be given when the student has passed at least 30
credits at 200-level and 30 credits at 300-level in the subject.
Humanities and Social Sciences
Endorsements
4.
The subject areas available for endorsement are those subject areas
available as majors in the Bachelor of Arts degree. To qualify for the
award of the Graduate Diploma in Arts with an endorsement a student
must pass at least 90 credits from papers listed for a major subject in the
Bachelor of Arts schedules, with at least 60 credits at 300-level.
Linguistics
5.
Endorsements
Chinese
Mathematics
Classical Studies
Media Studies
Defence Studies
Philosophy
Economics
Politics
Education
Psychology
English
Security Studies
Environmental Studies
Social Anthropology
Geography
Social Policy
History
Sociology
Japanese
Spanish
Statistics
Māori Studies
Completion of the Graduate Diploma in Arts without endorsement
requires the prior approval of the Pro Vice-Chancellor or his/her
nominee. To qualify for the award of the Diploma without endorsement,
a student must pass a coherent set of papers to the value of 120 credits.
Transition Arrangements
6.
These regulations take effect from 1 January 2011.
(a) Students who have passed at least 30 credits towards the Graduate
Diploma in Arts under the 2010 or earlier regulations may complete
under those regulations until the end of the 2014 academic year.
(b) Students who have passed at least 30 credits towards the Graduate
Diploma in Arts prior to 2011 may choose to transfer to these
regulations, but must then meet all of the requirements specified
herein.
(c) Students who have passed fewer than 30 credits towards the
Graduate Diploma in Arts prior to 1 January 2011 must transfer to
the 2011 regulations.
The Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management
GradDipEmergMgt
Course Regulations
175.201
Social Psychology
15
Part I
114.355
Management Development
15
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
Part II (Subject to CUAP approval)
Eligibility
152.386
Risk Management I
15
152.387
Risk Management II
15
1.
193.304
Animal Emergency Response
15
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
Admission to the Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management is open
to students who have completed a university degree or other approved
qualification.
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
Course Requirements
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
2.
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
Candidates shall complete 120 credits including 30 credits from List A
and 90 credits from List B.
Note
List A, Compulsory papers 30 credits from:
130.201
Introduction to Civil Defence
Emergency Management in New
Zealand
15
130.301
Incident Command Systems
15
List B, Qualification Papers, 90 credits from the following papers, with at
least 60 credits at 300-level:
114.242
Human Resource Development
15
114.271
Occupational Safety and Health I
15
114.272
Occupational Safety and Health II
15
132.221
Planning Studies
15
152.200
Contemporary Management
15
152.252
Project Management
15
Subject to approval by the Head of School (or delegate), students
may substitute up to 15 credits from relevant papers at the 200- or
300-level for a paper in List B.
Transition Provisions
3.
These regulations take effect on 1 January 2012.
4.
Candidates who have commenced study and passed at least 30 credits
towards the Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management prior to 1
January 2012 may transfer to the 2012 (or later) regulations at their next
enrolment.
5.
Candidates who have commenced study and passed at least 15 credits
towards the Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management prior to
1 January 2012 may be eligible to transfer to either the Graduate
Certificate in Emergency Management or the Postgraduate Diploma in
Emergency Management. Transfer eligibility depends on the level of
papers completed and level of academic achievement; refer to relevant
regulations for those qualifications.
Page 171
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Graduate Diploma in Māori Development
GradDipMāoriDev
No new enrolments from 2011
269.332
Māori Issues in Education
15
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
Part I
150.702
Mauri Ora: Māori Mental Health
30
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
150.711
Te Tau-Ihu o te Reo: Advanced
Māori Literature
30
150.714
Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero:
Māori Research Methodologies
30
Part II
Course of Study
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
150.717
He Hanganga Māori mo te Hauora:
Applied Māori Mental Health
30
150.791
Kaupapa Motuhake: Special Topic
30
Course Regulations
1.
To qualify for the Diploma, a candidate shall have passed papers from
the following list to a total value of at least 120 credits provided that:
(a) at least 75 credits are from papers at the 300- or 700-levels; and
Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The
Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand
Society
15
150.202
Hauora Tāngata: Māori Health
Foundations
15
150.210
Te Reo Kōrerorero: Māori Language 15
IIA
150.211
Te Reo Whananakonako:
Embellishing the Language
15
150.213
Tikanga-ā-Iwi: Tribal Development
15
150.301
Te Mana Te Kāwanatanga: Māori
Policy and the State
15
150.302
Planning for Māori Health
15
150.311
Te Papā o te Reo: Māori Language
III
15
179.330
Māori Development and the Social
Services
15
Graduate Status and PHOS; R
150.791 (2007 and 2008 only)
2.
Candidates who have already passed a university examination in one of
the prescribed papers may be allowed by the Academic Board to offer
another approved paper which they have not already passed.
3.
Endorsement may be given to Diplomas indicating that students have
specialised in Māori Health, Māori Policy or Māori Language. To obtain
an endorsement, students must comply with the following:
(b) passes have been obtained in any three of 150.201, 150.202,
150.210, 150.211, 150.213.
150.201
R 182.332
(a) approval from the Head of School;
(b) demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Head of School substantial
experience in the particular field; and
(c) obtain passes in papers specified as follows:
Endorsement in Māori Health
150.201, 150.202; one of 150.210, 150.211, 150.213; 150.301, 150.302,
150.702, 150.717.
Endorsement in Māori Policy
150.201, 150.210, either 150.211 or 150.213; 150.301, 150.701.
Endorsement in Māori Language
150.210, 150.211; 150.311; one of 150.201, 150.202, 150.213; 150.711.
Graduate Certificates
The Graduate Certificate in Arts
GCertArts
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
To qualify for the award of the Certificate, a candidate shall pass papers
at 200- and 300-level to a total of at least 60 credits, with at least 45
credits at 300-level. All 60 credits must be taken from Part II of the
Schedule for the Bachelor of Arts degree.
Endorsements
2.
3.
The Graduate Certificate in Arts may be endorsed in a subject area. The
subject areas offered as endorsements are those subject areas available as
majors in the Bachelor of Arts degree. Endorsements may also be offered
in some subject areas available as minors in the Bachelor of Arts degree.
To qualify for the award of an endorsement at least 45 credits, including
30 credits at 300-level, must be completed in a single subject area.
Page 172
Endorsements
Chinese
Māori Studies
Classical Studies
Mathematics
Defence Studies
Media Studies
Development Studies
Philosophy
Economics
Politics
Education
Psychology
English
Security Studies
Environmental Studies
Social Anthropology
Geography
Social Policy
History
Sociology
Japanese
Spanish
Linguistics
Statistics
Progression to Further Study
4.
A candidate who has completed the requirements for the Graduate
Certificate in Arts may apply to transfer the Graduate Certificate papers
towards an undergraduate diploma, undergraduate degree, or graduate
Humanities and Social Sciences
diploma of the University, provided that any such papers shall comply
with the Regulations for the particular qualification.
5.
6.
A candidate who has been awarded a Graduate Certificate in Arts and
subsequently enrols for the Graduate Diploma in Arts may surrender
the Graduate Certificate towards the Graduate Diploma. All papers
completed as part of the Graduate Certificate in Arts will then be
transferred to the Graduate Diploma in Arts.
A candidate who has been awarded a Graduate Certificate in Arts
may apply to cross-credit up to 15 credits of Graduate Certificate
papers towards an undergraduate diploma or undergraduate degree of
the University, provided that any such credit shall comply with the
Regulations for the particular qualification. A candidate who wishes to
credit papers totalling more than 15 credits in terms of this Regulation
will be required to surrender the Graduate Certificate in Arts before the
transfer of credit will be granted.
The Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management
GradCertEmergMgt
(Subject to CUAP approval)
List B, Qualification Papers, 30 credits from:
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations
for Undergraduate Degrees, Undergraduate Diplomas, Undergraduate
Certificates, Graduate Diplomas and Graduate Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management
is open to students who have completed a university degree or other
approved qualification combined with sufficient background or
experience in civil defence.
Course Requirements
2.
A candidate shall follow a course of study comprising papers to the
value of 60 credits including 30 credits from List A (Compulsory Papers)
and 30 credits from List B (Qualification Papers).
List A. Compulsory Papers, 30 credits from:
130.201
Introduction to Civil Defence
Emergency Management in New
Zealand
15
130.301
Incident Command Systems
15
114.355
Management Development
15
131.321
Strategies for Sustainable
Development
15
152.329
Leadership and Governance
15
152.341
Strategy and Change
15
152.386
Risk Management I
15
193.304
Animal Emergency Response
15
219.303
Organisational Communication
15
219.305
Public Relations Management
15
219.307
Interpersonal Communication
15
219.335
Media Law and Ethics
15
Note: Subject to approval by the Head of School (or delegate), students may
substitute up to 15 credits from relevant papers at the 300--level for a paper in
the elective list (B).
Transition Provisions
3.
Candidates who have completed at least 15 credits towards the Graduate
Diploma in Emergency Management prior to 1 January 2012 may
apply to transfer up to 30 credits towards the Graduate Certificate in
Emergency Management. Candidates who have completed 130.705,
130.701 or 130.702 may be granted qualification credits at 300-level.
Bachelor Honours Degrees
The Degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours
BA(Hons)
Course Regulations
Course Requirements
Part I
2.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study to a minimum value
of 120 credits and satisfy all course requirements in one of the subject
areas listed and detailed in the Schedule to these Regulations.
3.
Subject to these Regulations, a candidate who has been awarded the
degree in one subject may be a candidate for the degree in another.
4.
Subject to these Regulations, candidates enrolled in a course for Master
of Arts may, with the permission of the Academic Board, transfer to a
course for Bachelor of Arts with Honours provided that for the purpose
of Regulation 8(c) (Part I Regulations) the date of first enrolling in the
course for Master of Arts be taken as the beginning of the course of
study.
5.
The Academic Board may approve an examination in a combination of
these subjects, with appropriate prerequisites and appropriate courses
selected from the following Schedule.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) is open to students who
have completed one of the following minimum prerequisites at an
appropriate level of academic achievement:
(a) A Bachelor of Arts degree or close equivalent, with a major in the
intended postgraduate subject;
(b) A Bachelor of Arts degree or close equivalent, with a minor in the
intended postgraduate subject followed by a Graduate Certificate in
Arts endorsed in the intended postgraduate subject.
(c) A Bachelor of Arts degree or close equivalent, followed by a
Graduate Diploma in Arts in the intended postgraduate subject.
Page 173
Humanities and Social Sciences
Schedule to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
with Honours
Defence Studies
Prerequisite
178.770
Economic Growth and Development 15
178.799
Research Project
30
As specified in Regulation 1, or the Bachelor of Defence Studies degree.
Education
Course of Study
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including 267.792 Research Exercise:
Papers to the value of 90 credits from the following list, including either
149.798 or 149.799 (but not both), plus 30 credits from approved research
methods paper(s).
134.703
Ethics of War and Peace
30
149.701
The New Zealand Strategic
Environment
30
149.702
New Zealand’s Defence Policy
30
149.703
Modern Campaign Studies
30
149.704
Command Studies
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
149.708
Joint, Interagency and
Multinational Operations
30
149.709
Terrorism, Insurgency and
Transnational Crime
30
149.732
Public International Law for
Defence and Security
30
149.760
Defence and Security Technology
30
149.798
Research Report
30
149.799
Research Report
60
200.761
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
30
178.703
The Theory and Practice of
Economics
30
R 187.704
263.704
Advanced Studies in Motivation
and Learning
30
R 180.704, 186.731
265.737
Young Children and Their Families
30
R 186.737
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
267.792
Research Exercise
30
R 180.792
269.711
Policy and Development in Māori
Education
30
R 182.711
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the following list, including 139.799
Research Report (30). With the approval of Head of School, up to 30 credits
from other relevant subjects may be substituted for an elective from the
following list:
P 178.200 and 178.220 or PHOD
178.705
Microeconomics I
15
178.711
The Microeconomics of Banking
30
178.712
International Monetary Economics
30
178.713
Financial Economics: Advanced
Microeconomic Issues
30
178.714
Financial Economics: Advanced
Macroeconomic Issues
30
178.715
Applied Economics and Policy
30
178.718
Health Economics
30
178.721
Research Methods in Applied
Economics
15
178.722
Applied Econometrics
15
178.732
Advanced Econometrics
30
Graduate Status and PHOD
178.750
Topics in International Economics
15
Graduate Status and 178.200 or
178.201 or 178.204 or 178.240 or
PHOD; R 77.403, 78.450, 78.750
178.756
Economics of Agricultural and
Trade Policies
15
178.760
Environmental and Natural
Resource Economics
15
Page 174
R 187.701
30
English
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list. The programme of study shall
normally include 178.700, 178.705, and 178.721 or its equivalent and 178.799
Research Project.
15
30
Education and Historical Analysis
For students proceeding to the MA, 267.780 Research in Education
is a prerequisite for enrolment in 267.891 Thesis.
Economics
Course of Study
Macroeconomics I
Ethics in Education
254.704
Note
Note: Enrolment in research methods paper(s) is subject to the approval
of the Director of the Centre for Defence Studies, or nominee. In some
circumstances, approval may be given to replace 30 credits of research
methods paper(s) with a research methods workshop and approved elective
paper(s) to the value of 30 credits. 178.700
254.701
P 178.301 or PHOD
Graduate Status, 178.307 and
either 178.201 or 178.204 or PHOD
P 178.200, 178.308 or PHOD
139.702
Criticism, Theory and Research
30
139.707
Women, Desire and Narrative
30
139.710
Rhetoric, Composition and the
Teaching of Writing
30
139.720
Poetry and Politics: The English
Civil Wars
30
139.723
Aspects of Romanticism
30
139.725
The Post-Romantic Subject
30
139.735
Shakespeare
30
139.750
Contemporary New Zealand
Writers in an International Context
30
139.751
A Topic in New Zealand Literature
30
139.752
New Zealand Drama
30
139.757
Twentieth-Century New Zealand
Fiction: Texts and Theories
30
139.758
Postcolonial Writing
30
139.760
Writing Lyric Poetry: Blurring the
Boundaries
30
P Graduate Status, and 139.229
or PHOS
139.761
Writing Contemporary Fiction
30
Graduate Status and 139.329; or
PHOS
139.763
Community Theatre
30
R 139.753
139.775
Trauma, Memory, Haunting
30
139.799
Research Report (30)
30
R 139.795 (2008 only)
P Graduate Status, with a major or
minor in English or equivalent
Note
The Research Essay is designed to act as an introduction to
research in the field of English. It provides training for and tests the
following range of skills: defining an area of research, formulating
a question for investigation, developing a sustained and coherent
argument, synthesising various forms of data, commenting
analytically on material used, meeting the formal requirements of
the genre(s) in which results are presented and furnishing scholarly
documentation. The results of the research may be partially
embodied in the form of an artistic work.
Environmental Studies
Note
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
Humanities and Social Sciences
Geography
Course of Study
160.704
Studies in Theoretical Mathematics 15
Papers selected from the following list, including either 145.798 Research
Report (60) or 145.799 Research Report (30):
160.705
Studies in Discrete Mathematics
15
160.715
Advanced Computational Methods
15
160.725
General Relativity
15
131.703
Gender and Development
30
160.733
Methods of Applied Mathematics
15
131.704
Sustainable Development
30
160.734
Power and Geographic Knowledge
30
Studies in Applied Differential
Equations
15
145.701
145.702
Alpine Geomorphology
30
160.737
Studies in Mathematical Physics
15
145.704
Advanced Quaternary Biogeography 30
P 145.320 or equivalent
160.738
Studies in Continuum Mechanics
15
P or C 145.327 or equivalent
160.739
Studies in Applied Mathematics
15
145.705
Fluvial Geomorphology: Dynamics
and Management
30
160.783
Mathematics Project
30
145.706
Historical Geography
30
160.791
Special Topic
15
145.707
Economic Geography
30
160.792
Special Topic
15
145.710
Consumption and Place
30
145.798
Research Report (60)
60
145.799
Research Report (30)
30
Media Studies
Course of Study
History
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list and which must include papers
148.720, 148.730 and a 15,000-word Research Report (60) 148.799. With
permission of the Head of School a 7,500-word Research Report (30)
(148.798) can be substituted for 148.799, together with an approved paper
from History or an appropriate discipline.
Papers selected from the following list including either 154.797 or 154.798.
With the approval of the Head of School, up to 30 credits at the 700-level
from other relevant subjects may be substituted for an elective paper from the
following list.
139.702
Criticism, Theory and Research
30
154.701
Modern and Postmodern Visual
Cultures
30
154.702
Advanced Film Studies
30
148.720
Advanced Historiography
30
154.704
Media Research Methods
30
148.730
Advanced Historical Methodology
30
154.705
Special Topic in Media
30
148.798
Research Report (30)
30
154.707
The World of Noir
30
148.799
Research Report (60)
60
154.708
30
200.761
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
30
Modern Fiction, Popular Culture
and the Media
154.709
Sources of Media Ecology
30
154.719
Media, Entertainment, and Ethics
30
R 148.761
Māori Studies
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list. Students are required to enrol in
150.714 (or another approved 30-credit paper in research methods) and
150.799 Research Report (30).
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
150.702
Mauri Ora: Māori Mental Health
30
150.710
Te Reo Whakawhitiwhiti: The
Language
of Everyday Communication
30
150.711
Te Tau-Ihu o te Reo: Advanced
Māori Literature
30
150.714
Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero:
Māori Research Methodologies
30
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
150.717
He Hanganga Māori mo te Hauora:
Applied Māori Mental Health
30
150.791
Kaupapa Motuhake: Special Topic
30
150.799
Research Report (30)
30
154.797
Research Report (60)
60
154.798
Research Report (30)
30
219.705
Advanced News Media Processes
30
Note
The Research Essay is designed to act as an introduction to
research in the field of Media Studies. It provides training for and
tests the following range of skills: defining an area of research,
formulating a question for investigation, developing a sustained and
coherent argument, synthesising various forms of data, commenting
analytically on material used, meeting the formal requirements of
the genre(s) in which results are presented and furnishing scholarly
documentation. The results of the research may be partially
embodied in the form of an artistic work.
Midwifery (no enrolments from 2011)
Prerequisites
Graduate Status and PHOS; R
150.791 (2007 and 2008 only)
Normally 60 credits from 300-level 168 or 177 prefix papers offered for the
BA or BMid degree, normally will have practiced as a registered midwife for
a minimum of two years within five years of application for admission to the
programme and hold a current annual practising certificate.
Course of Study
Each course of study must include:
Mathematics
Prerequisite
It is recommended that prior study includes 160.212, 160.301, 160.302,
160.317, 160.318 and 160.319.
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, normally including 160.783
Mathematics Project:
160.702
Advanced Algebra
15
160.703
Advanced Analysis
15
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
One paper may be selected from the following list:
168.707
Women’s Health
30
168.709
Contemporary Trends in Clinical
Teaching and Learning
30
168.712
Pain Management
30
Page 175
Humanities and Social Sciences
168.717
250.741
Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in
Professional Practice
30
Managing Professional Practice
30
Normally 60 credits from 300-level Nursing papers offered for the BA or BN
degree, normally have practiced as a registered nurse for a minimum of two
years within five years of application for admission to the programme and
hold a current annual practising certificate.
Course of Study
Each course of study must include:
168.895
Health Research Design and
Method
Research Report (30)
30
30
P 168.810
One or two of the following papers:
168.707
Women’s Health
30
168.709
Contemporary Trends in Clinical
Teaching and Learning
30
168.717
Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in
Professional Practice
30
168.731
Leadership in Nursing
30
168.732
Personal and Community Health
30
One paper may be selected from the schedules for the MN degree.
Philosophy
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list including 134.799 Research Report
(60):
134.703
Ethics of War and Peace
30
134.740
Advanced Study of Philosophical
Topics
30
134.750
Advanced Study of Philosophical
Texts
30
134.798
Research Report (30)
30
134.799
Research Report (60)
60
Politics
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list. Each course of study must include
an approved 30-credit paper in research methods, which will normally be
176.702 and a research report of at least 30 credits (200.798 or 200.799).
131.701
Advanced News Media Processes
30
219.708
Political Communication
30
Graduate Status and Permission
Head of Department
279.701
Social Policy and Political Economy
30
R 179.701
279.703
Social Policy Studies
30
R 179.704
R 168.708
Nursing
Prerequisites
168.810
219.705
Psychology
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including Research Report (30)
(175.799):
175.705
Applied Behaviour Analysis
15
175.718
Postmodernism and Psychology
15
175.719
Applied Criminal Psychology
15
175.720
Advanced Psychology of Women
15
175.721
Child and Family Therapy
15
175.722
Principles of Clinical
Neuropsychology
15
175.725
Advanced Social Psychology
30
175.729
Psychology and Culture
15
175.730
Professional Practice in Psychology
15
175.732
Psychological Well-being in
Organisations
15
175.733
Culture at Work
15
175.734
Child Clinical Neuropsychology
15
175.737
Occupational Psychology
15
175.738
Psychological Research: Principles
of Design
15
175.739
Health Psychology: Understanding
Health and Illness
15
175.740
Occupational Health Psychology
15
175.741
Psychological Assessment in
Organisations
15
175.743
Health Psychology: The Social
Context
15
175.744
Health Psychology: Promoting
Health
15
175.746
Psychological Research:
Multivariate Data Analysis
15
175.747
The Psychology of Sport and
Exercise
15
175.748
The Psychology of Organisational
Change
15
175.751
Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
15
175.761
Theory and Practice of Cognitive
Behaviour Therapy
15
175.781
Clinical Psychopathology
15
R 175.701
P Graduate Status
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
131.703
Gender and Development
30
175.782
Clinical Psychology Assessment
15
R 175.708
144.721
Public Policy and Political Economy
30
175.783
Clinical Psychology Interventions
15
R 175.707, 175.727
144.722
Public Policy Research and
Evaluation
30
175.799
Research Report (30)
30
149.701
The New Zealand Strategic
Environment
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
152.741
Public Policy
30
176.702
Advanced Social Inquiry
30
200.761
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
30
200.798
Research Report (30)
30
200.799
Research Report (60)
60
Page 176
Note
Paper 175.738 is compulsory for all new students enrolling in
postgraduate qualifications in Psychology. This excludes the PhD,
PGDipClinPsych, PGDipCogBehTher, PGDipDisTher and PGDipI/
OPsych qualifications.
Religious Studies
Note
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
R 148.761
Humanities and Social Sciences
Social Anthropology
Course of Study
Statistics
Prerequisite
Papers selected from the following list. Each course should normally include
papers 146.701 and 146.703 and either 146.798 Research Report (60) or
146.799 Research Report (30).
As specified in Regulation 1, except that prior study must include 160.203 or
160.211.
146.701
Contemporary Approaches in
Anthropological Theory
146.703
The Practice of Anthropology
30
146.798
Research Report (60)
60
146.799
Research Report (30)
30
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, normally including 90 credits selected
from the following list and a further 30 credits from papers in Mathematics,
Computer Science, or related subjects. The course of study shall normally
include 161.782 Research Report.
30
161.702
Theory of Linear Models
15
161.704
Bayesian Statistics
15
Social Policy
Course of Study
161.705
Advanced Statistical Inference
15
Papers selected from the following list. Each programme of study shall
include 279.796 and normally include 279.701 and 179.702.
161.709
Topic in Statistical Theory
15
161.721
Design and Analysis of Experiments 15
161.723
Theory of Multivariate Statistics
15
161.725
Statistical Quality Control
15
161.726
Extensions to the Linear Model
15
161.728
Contingency Table Analysis
15
161.729
Topics in Applied Statistics
15
161.742
Time Series Analysis
15
161.743
Statistical Reliability and Survival
Analysis
15
161.749
Topics in Applied Probability
15
Statistical Consulting
15
132.741
Long-Term Community Planning
30
178.715
Applied Economics and Policy
30
179.702
Advanced Research Methods
30
179.711
Special Topic
30
179.783
Māori Development and the Social
Services
30
179.722
Social Work with Migrants,
Refugees and Asylum Seekers
30
Graduate Status; R 132.737 (2008
only)
179.773
Disability Studies
30
161.770
179.777
Disability, Consumer Rights and
Advocacy
30
161.771
Analysis of Experiments for
Researchers
15
279.701
Social Policy and Political Economy
30
R 179.701
161.772
15
279.703
Social Policy Studies
30
R 179.704
Multivariate Analysis for
Researchers
279.796
Research Report (30)
30
R 179.796
161.773
Regression for Researchers
15
161.774
Time Series for Researchers
15
161.775
Sample Surveys
15
R 161.322
161.776
Statistical Modelling for
Researchers
15
P 161.200, 161.231 or equivalent;
R 161.304
161.777
Practical Data Mining
15
P 161.223; R 161.324
161.778
Biostatistics for Researchers
15
R 161.331
161.781
Analysis Project
15
161.782
Research Report
30
161.790
Special Topic
15
161.791
Special Topic
15
Sociology
Course of Study
Each course of study must include 176.701 Current Issues and Theories,
176.702 Advanced Research Methods, 176.799 Research Report (30) and one
further paper to be selected from the following list:
176.701
Current Issues and Theories
30
176.702
Advanced Social Inquiry
30
176.711
Sociology of Underdevelopment
30
176.715
Culture and New Zealand Society
30
176.718
Environmental Sociology
30
Note
176.799
Research Report (30)
30
Normally only one of 161.771 to 161.775 will be allowed.
The Degree of Bachelor of Communication with Honours
BC(Hons)
(Subject to CUAP approval)
majoring papers of the intended primary subject area and at least 15
credits at 300 level achieved with a minimum B grade in the intended
secondary subject.
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Note: New for 2012.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the programme is on the basis of a completed Bachelor of
Communication degree with at least a B grade average in the 300-level
Course Requirements
2.
To qualify for the Bachelor of Communication with Honours every
candidate shall normally pass a selection of 700-level papers to a total of
120 credits comprising:
(a) At least 30 credits of taught papers from one of the subject areas in
the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
(b) The relevant Research Report for that subject area.
(c) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Page 177
Humanities and Social Sciences
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
Media Studies as their secondary area of study. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary area of study.
(d) At least 30 credits of taught papers from a secondary subject area in
the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
3.
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
4.
The Bachelor of Communication (Honours) will be awarded with a
Subject in the primary subject area.
The Degree of Bachelor of Health Science with Honours
BHlthSc(Hons)
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Health Science with Honours
shall before enrolment have:
(b) been granted admission with equivalent status as entitled to proceed
in the subject or subjects offered.
Course Requirements
3.
Māori Health
Prerequisite
A major in Māori Health or equivalent, according to the BHlthSc Regulations.
(a) qualified for the award of the Degree of Bachelor of Health
Science and passed at the 300-level such papers as are indicated
in the prerequisite provisions in the prescriptions for the subject
or subjects they offer at a standard that, in the opinion of the
Academic Board, is sufficient to enable them to take an appropriate
programme of study for the degree; or
2.
or other approved paper to the value of 30 credits from an appropriate
discipline
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study to a minimum value
of 120 credits and satisfy all course requirements in one of the subject
areas listed and detailed in the Schedule for these Regulations.
Subject to these Regulations, candidates enrolled in a course for the
Master of Health Science may, with permission of the Academic Board,
transfer to the course for Bachelor of Health Science with Honours
provided that for the purpose of Regulation 8 (Part I Regulations) the
date of first enrolling in the course for Master of Health Science be taken
as the beginning of the course of study.
Schedule for the Degree of Bachelor of
Health Science with Honours
Environmental Health
Prerequisite
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including a research methods paper
(150.714 or 168.810 or an approved alternative) and 150.799 Research Report
(30):
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
150.702
Mauri Ora: Māori Mental Health
30
150.714
Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero:
Māori Research Methodologies
30
150.717
He Hanganga Māori mo te Hauora:
Applied Māori Mental Health
30
150.799
Research Report (30)
30
231.704
Māori Health
30
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
or other approved paper to the value of 30 credits from an appropriate
discipline.
Psychology
Prerequisite
A major in Psychology or equivalent, according to the BHlthSc Regulations.
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including the research methods paper
(175.738) and 175.799 Research Report (30):
A major in Environmental Health or equivalent, according to the BHlthSc
Regulations.
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including a research methods paper
(168.810 or an approved alternative) and 214.798 Research Report:
175.718
Postmodernism and Psychology
15
175.719
Applied Criminal Psychology
15
175.720
Advanced Psychology of Women
15
175.721
Child and Family Therapy
15
175.722
Principles of Clinical
Neuropsychology
15
214.772
Advanced Topics in Food Quality
30
214.773
Advanced Topics in Water Quality
30
175.725
Advanced Social Psychology
30
214.774
Advanced Topics in Sound and its
Reception
30
175.730
Professional Practice in Psychology
15
214.775
Advanced Topics in Environmental
Health
30
175.732
Psychological Well-being in
Organisations
15
214.776
Advanced Topics in Investigative
Methods, Analysis and
Interpretation
30
175.733
Culture at Work
15
175.734
Child Clinical Neuropsychology
15
175.737
Occupational Psychology
15
214.781
Advanced Topics in Health Science
30
175.738
Research Report
30
Psychological Research: Principles
of Design
15
214.798
231.704
Māori Health
30
175.739
15
231.707
Environmental Health
30
Health Psychology: Understanding
Health and Illness
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
175.740
Occupational Health Psychology
15
175.741
Psychological Assessment in
Organisations
15
Page 178
Graduate Status and PHOS; R
150.791 (2007 and 2008 only)
P Graduate Status
Humanities and Social Sciences
175.743
Health Psychology: The Social
Context
15
168.810
175.744
Health Psychology: Promoting
Health
15
175.746
Psychological Research:
Multivariate
Data Analysis
15
175.747
The Psychology of Sport and
Exercise
15
175.748
The Psychology of Organisational
Change
15
175.761
Theory and Practice of Cognitive
Behaviour Therapy
15
175.781
Clinical Psychopathology
15
R 175.701
175.782
Clinical Psychology Assessment
15
R 175.708
175.783
Clinical Psychology Interventions
15
R 175.707, 175.727
175.799
Research Report (30)
30
Health Research Design and
Method
30
Or other approved paper to the value of 30 credits from an appropriate
discipline.
Sport and Exercise
Prerequisite
A major in Sport and Exercise or equivalent, according to the BHlthSc
Regulations.
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including a research methods paper
(168.810, or 119.728, or an approved alternative) and 234.799 Research
Report:
Or other approved paper to the value of 30 credits from an appropriate
discipline.
Rehabilitation
Prerequisite
A major in Rehabilitation or equivalent, according to the BHlthSc
Regulations.
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list, including paper 147.701, a research
methods paper (168.810 or an approved alternative) and 147.799 Research
Report (30):
147.701
Rehabilitation Theory and Practice
30
147.702
Rehabilitation Counselling
30
147.703
Vocational Rehabilitation
30
147.704
Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation
30
147.705
Education and Rehabilitation of the
Visually Impaired
30
147.799
Research Report (30)
30
231.704
Māori Health
30
119.728
Research Practice
15
151.709
Biometrics for the Animal and
Nutritional Sciences
15
Graduate Status and Permission AD
175.744
Health Psychology: Promoting
Health
15
175.746
Psychological Research:
Multivariate Data Analysis
15
175.747
The Psychology of Sport and
Exercise
15
234.701
Muscle Mechanics
15
R 234.751
234.702
Skeletal Muscle Metabolism
15
R 234.751
234.703
Advanced Topics in Exercise
Science
15
234.704
Advanced Biomechanics
15
234.705
Advanced Topics in Physical
Conditioning
15
234.706
Advanced Topics in Exercise,
Health and Disease
15
234.799
Research Report
30
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
R 234.753
Or other approved paper to the value of 30 credits from an appropriate
discipline.
Masters Degrees
The Degree of Master of Applied Social Work
MAppSW
Course Regulations
(c) shall meet the requirements set down by the New Zealand Social
Workers Registration Board for registration as social workers in
New Zealand in terms of candidates being ‘fit and proper persons to
practise social work’; and
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling in the course for the degree of Master of Applied Social
Work candidates:
(a) shall normally have completed an undergraduate degree in the
social sciences, which has included papers in social and cultural
studies, research, and human development, or have substantial
relevant experience. The Head of School may permit this
requirement to be met during the period of enrolment for the
Master of Applied Social Work; and
(b) shall normally hold a drivers’ licence that is valid in New Zealand;
and
(d) in addition to following the normal university admission and
enrolment procedures, candidates may be required to attend a
selection interview.
Course Requirements
2.
Candidates will be required to pass the following course of study (240
credits):
179.781
Social and Community Work Theory 30
and Practice I
179.782
Social Policy Analysis
30
179.783
Maori Development and the Social
Services
30
179.784
Social and Community Work Theory 30
and Practice II
P 179.781
179.789
Field Work Practice I
C 179.781 and 179.782
30
Page 179
Humanities and Social Sciences
179.790
Field Work Practice II
30
C 179.784 and 179.789
179.792
Management in the Social Services 15
P 179.781 or C 179.782,
179.891
Applied Research in Social Work
15
C 179.782
179.895
Research Report – Master of
Applied Social Work
30
C 179.784 179.891 and 179.789
3.
Massey University may cancel or refuse to permit the registration of a
student in the Master of Applied Social Work programme if a student, in
the opinion of the University, is found not to meet in general terms the
requirements set down by the New Zealand Social Workers Registration
Board in terms of being ‘fit and proper persons to practise social work’.
programme, the student must advise the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the
College of Humanities and Social Sciences of the conviction within
seven days.
(b) If the Pro Vice-Chancellor is of the opinion that any student does
not meet in general terms the requirements set down by the New
Zealand Social Workers Registration Board in terms of good
character and fitness to be a social worker, the Pro Vice-Chancellor
will refer the matter to the University Disciplinary Committee
under section 1(d) General Disciplinary Powers of the Disciplinary
Regulations.
4.
(a) Should a student in the Master of Applied Social Work programme
be convicted of an offence against the law after entry in the
Students enrolled in a Master of Applied Social Work will be excluded
from re-enrolment for the degree on the following basis:
(a) failure to obtain a pass in a compulsory paper for which they have
been enrolled for two occasions.
The Degree of Master of Arts
MA
Course Regulations
Subjects
Part I
5.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
(b) The Academic Board may approve an examination in a combination
of these subjects, with appropriate pre-requisites and appropriate
courses selected from the following Schedule.
Concessions
6.
Admission to the Master of Arts (240 credits) is open to students who
have completed one of the following minimum prerequisites, at an
appropriate level of academic achievement:
(b) Candidates may be exempted from some or all of the prescribed
papers.
(b) A Bachelor of Arts degree, or close equivalent, with a minor in the
intended postgraduate subject followed by a Graduate Certificate in
Arts endorsed in the intended postgraduate subject.
(c) Candidates shall not be eligible for the award of Honours but may
be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work is judged
by the examiners to be of superior merit and they complete the
requirements for the award of the degree either within one calendar
year of first enrolling for full-time study or within three consecutive
calendar years of first enrolling for part-time study in the subject
area for the degree. Superior merit is defined as equivalent in
quality to First Class Honours.
(c) A Bachelor of Arts degree, or close equivalent, followed by a
Graduate Diploma in Arts in the intended postgraduate subject.
Admission to the Master of Arts by thesis (120 credits) is open to
students who have been awarded one of the following, at an appropriate
level of academic achievement:
(a) A Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree with an endorsement in the
same subject as that in which the thesis will be done;
(b) A Postgraduate Diploma in Arts with an endorsement in the same
subject as that in which the thesis will be done.
Course Requirements
3.
The choice of papers, thesis topic or other work must normally be
approved by the appropriate Head of School or Programme Coordinator
unless otherwise specified.
4.
Except as provided in Regulations 5, 6 and 7:
(a) Candidates shall follow a course of study totalling 240 credits
normally comprising papers to a value of 120 credits (in one of
the subjects listed in the Schedule) plus a thesis (or other approved
research-based work) to a value of 120 credits.
(b) Candidates shall normally complete all papers prior to enrolment in
the thesis and candidates will not be permitted to enrol in the thesis
until they have passed papers to the value of at least 60 credits;
(c) Progression from papers to thesis will not normally be approved
unless the candidate has achieved a satisfactory standard across all
papers attempted.
(d) When the thesis is forwarded to the examiner, the Head of School
shall supply a certificate from the supervisor stating that the
thesis embodies work carried out by the candidate under direct
supervision and stating also
the part the supervisor played in the preparation of the thesis.
Page 180
Candidates who have been awarded the degree of BA(Hons) or the
Postgraduate Diploma in Arts may be a candidate for the degree of MA
in the same subject under the following conditions:
(a) Candidates shall follow an approved course of study of not less
than one calendar year in a subject area listed and detailed in the
Schedules to these Regulations.
(a) A Bachelor of Arts degree, or close equivalent, with a major in the
intended postgraduate subject;
2.
(a) The subjects for examination for the Degree of Master of Arts are
listed in the Schedule below.
(d) Candidates must complete all requirements within
four consecutive calendar years of first enrolling for the degree.
7.
Candidates enrolled for the degree of BA(Honours) who have not been
awarded that degree may, on transferring to the course of the degree
of Master of Arts, be exempted from such requirements for the MA
as the Academic Board may approve. For such candidates, the Course
Regulations for the degree of Master of Arts shall be deemed to apply as
from the date of their enrolling for the degree of BA(Hons).
8.
In special circumstances approved by the Academic Board, candidates
for the MA who have presented themselves for examination in all of the
required papers but do not present a thesis may be awarded the degree
without honours subject to completing within a specified time such
additional requirements as may be prescribed.
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Arts
Defence and Strategic Studies
Papers selected from the following list to the value of not less than 120
credits, plus a thesis (149.800 or 149.899) or other approved research-based
work from a Schedule approved by the Board of Defence and Strategic
Studies with the value of not less than 120 credits, for a total value of not less
than 240 credits.
149.701
The New Zealand Strategic
Environment
30
149.702
New Zealand’s Defence Policy
30
Humanities and Social Sciences
149.703
Modern Campaign Studies
30
149.704
Command Studies
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
149.708
Joint, Interagency and
Multinational Operations
30
149.709
Terrorism, Insurgency and
Transnational Crime
30
149.732
Public International Law for
Defence and Security
30
149.760
Defence and Security Technology
30
149.798
Research Report (30)
30
Note: Candidates normally enrol for a Master of Philosophy in Emergency
Management.
English
P Graduate Status or equivalent
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for English, plus
a thesis (139.899 or 139.816 and 139.817) or other approved research-based
work to the value of 120 credits. With the approval of the Head of School, up
to 30 credits at the 700-level from other relevant subjects may be substituted
for an elective paper from the BA (Hons) list.
Note: Candidates normally enrol for a Master of Philosophy in Defence and
Strategic Studies.
Note: The Masterate thesis in English is designed to provide training for and
to test the following range of skills: defining an area of research, formulating
a question for investigation, developing a sustained and coherent argument,
synthesising various forms of data, commenting analytically on material used,
meeting the formal requirements of the genre(s) in which results are presented
and furnishing scholarly documentation. The results of the research may be
partially embodied in the form of an artistic work.
Economics
Environmental Studies
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Economics, plus
a thesis (178.899) with the value of 120 credits. The selected papers shall
normally include 178.700, 178.705, and 178.721.
French
P Graduate Status or equivalent
Education
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Education,
including 267.780, plus a thesis (267.891) with a value of 120 credits.
Note: 267.780 Research in Education is a prerequisite for enrolment in
267.891 Thesis.
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
Geography
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Geography and a
thesis (145.899 or 145.897 and 145.898) with the value of 120 credits.
German
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
Emergency Management
Papers selected from the following list to a value of 120 credits, including
at least 60 credits from 130.701, 130.702 and 130.705, a thesis (130.899 or
130.816 and 130.817) or other approved research-based work with the value
of 120 credits, for a total value of not less than 240 credits:
History
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA (Hons) list for History,
including 148.720 and 148.730, and a thesis (148.899 or 148.816 and
148.817) or other approved research-based work to the value of 120 credits.
114.731
Advanced Occupational Safety
and Health
30
114.773
Hazard Management
30
130.701
Natural Hazards
30
Māori Studies
130.702
Coping with Disasters
30
130.705
Emergency Management
30
131.701
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Māori Studies,
including 150.714 (or another approved 30-credit paper in research methods)
plus a thesis (150.899 or 150.816 and 150.817) or other approved researchbased work with the value of 120 credits.
131.702
Development Management
30
132.735
Natural Resource Planning
30
132.739
Assessing Environmental Impacts:
Principles and Practice
30
132.751
Natural Hazards and Resilient
Communities
30
144.724
Public Sector Management and
Law
30
152.702
Advanced Strategic Management
30
152.707
Leading and Changing
Organisations
30
175.738
Psychological Research: Principles
of Design
15
175.746
Psychological Research:
Multivariate Data Analysis
15
179.702
Advanced Research Methods
30
230.791
Special Topic Humanities and
Social Sciences
30
Note: The Masterate thesis in Media Studies is designed to provide training
for and to test the following range of skills: defining an area of research,
formulating a question for investigation, developing a sustained and coherent
argument, synthesising various forms of data, commenting analytically on
material used, meeting the formal requirements of the genre(s) in which
results are presented, and furnishing scholarly documentation. The results of
the research may be partially embodied in the form of an artistic work.
240.757
Logistics in Humanitarian Aid
Projects
15
Midwifery (no new enrolments from 2011)
130.816
Thesis (Part I)
60
130.817
Thesis (Part II)
60
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Midwifery plus
a thesis (177.899 or 177.816 plus 177.817) or
other approved research-based work with the value of 120 credits.
130.899
Thesis Emergency Management
120
Japanese
This endorsement is not available in the 2012 academic year.
Mathematics
An approved selection of papers to give a total of 120 credits from the
BA(Hons) list for Mathematics, plus a thesis or other approved research-based
work with the value of 120 credits.
Media Studies
P Graduate Status; R 152.709,
152.705
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA (Hons) schedule for Media
Studies, plus a thesis (154.899 or 154.816 and 154.817) or other approved
research-based work to the value of 120 credits. With the approval of the
Head of School, up to 30 credits at the 700-level from other relevant subjects
may be substituted for an elective paper from the BA (Hons) list.
Page 181
Humanities and Social Sciences
Note: Candidates will normally have practiced as a registered midwife for a
minimum of two years within five years of application for admission to the
programme.
Museum Studies
Papers to the value of 120 credits selected from the following list of 700-level
papers. Papers must include 150.715 and at least two from 167.742, 167.743,
167.744, plus a thesis (167.899 or 167.816 and 167.817) or other approved
research-based work to the value of 120 credits.
175.894 and 175.896) or other approved research-based work to the value of
120 credits.
Note: No new enrolments in the Industrial/Organisational Psychology
endorsement from 2010 onwards.
Endorsements
The degree may be awarded with an endorsement to those candidates who,
subject to the approval of the Head of School, follow a course of study as
specified in the schedule to the endorsement.
(a) The endorsement schedule (Clinical Psychology) is: (No new
enrolments from 2011)
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
167.742
Collection Management
30
167.743
Museum Management
30
167.744
Museums and the Public
30
167.890
Advanced Research Practicum
60
167.816
Thesis (Part I)
60
167.817
Thesis (Part II)
60
167.896
Dissertation
60
167.899
MA Thesis
120
and
30
Satisfactorily complete a Research Thesis to the value of 120 credits
An approved paper from another discipline
175.738
Psychological Research: Principles
of Design
15
175.781
Clinical Psychopathology
15
R 175.701
175.782
Clinical Psychology Assessment
15
R 175.708
175.783
Clinical Psychology Interventions
15
R 175.707, 175.727
175.7xx
Another 60 credits from Psychology
(b) The endorsement schedule (Health Psychology) is:
Notes
1. Candidates normally enrol for a Master of Philosophy in
Museum Studies.
175.730
Professional Practice in Psychology
15
175.738
Psychological Research: Principles
of Design
15
175.739
Health Psychology: Understanding
Health and Illness
15
175.740
Occupational Health Psychology
15
175.743
Health Psychology: The Social
Context
15
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Nursing or the
Master of Nursing list plus a thesis (168.899, or 168.816 plus 168.817) or
other approved research-based work with the value of 120 credits.
175.744
Health Psychology: Promoting
Health
15
175.7xx
Elective Psychology paper
15
Note: Candidates will normally have practiced as a registered nurse for a
minimum of two years within five years of application for admission to the
programme.
xxx.7xx
Another 30 credits from Psychology or other relevant postgraduate papers offered by
the University
2. Candidates with less than three years’ full-time museum
experience would normally be expected to complete 150.715,
167.742, 167.743, 167.744.
3. 167.890 and 167.896 can be combined to form a single project
worth 120 credits.
Nursing
Philosophy
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Philosophy, plus
a thesis (134.899 or 134.816 and 134.817) or other approved research-based
work with the value of 120 credits.
Politics
and
Satisfactorily complete supervised practical work of at least 240 hours and
assignments associated with enrolment in paper
175.879
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Politics, plus a
thesis (200.899 or 200.816 and 200.817) or other approved research-based
work to the value of 120 credits. All students must complete an approved
30-credit paper in research methods, which will normally be 176.702 and a
research project of at least 30 credits.
and
Psychology
For the degree without specialist endorsement
or
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Psychology, plus
a thesis (175.899 or 175.894 and 175.896) or other approved research-based
work to the value of 120 credits. With the approval of the Head of School, up
to 30 credits from other relevant postgraduate papers may be substituted.
175.898
175.895
Page 182
P at least two of 175.744, 175.743,
175.739 and PHOS
Thesis
90
Thesis Part I (30)
30
Thesis Part II
60
and
175.896
Note
Students enrolled for the Clinical Psychology endorsement will complete
papers to the value of 150 credits plus a thesis (175.899 or 175.894 and
175.896) or other approved research-based work to the value of 120 credits.
Note: No new enrolment in the Clinical Psychology endorsement from 2011
onwards
Students enrolled for the Industrial/Organisation Psychology endorsement
will complete papers to the value of 150 credits plus a thesis (175.899 or
30
Satisfactorily complete a Research Thesis to the value of 90 credits in the area
of Health Psychology.
For the degree with specialist endorsement
Students enrolled for the Health Psychology endorsement will complete
papers to the value of 150 credits plus a thesis (175.898 or 175.895 and
175.896) or other approved research-based work to the value of 90 credits.
Health Psychology Practicum
Paper 175.738 is normally compulsory for all new students
enrolling in postgraduate qualifications in Psychology. This
excludes the PhD, PGDipClinPsych, PGDipCogBehTher,
PGDipDisTher and PGDipI/OPsych qualifications.
Rehabilitation
Papers to a value of 120 credits from the following list, plus a thesis (147.899
or 147.816 and 147.817) or other approved research-based work with the
value of 120 credits.
147.701
Rehabilitation Theory and Practice
30
Humanities and Social Sciences
Social Anthropology
147.702
Rehabilitation Counselling
30
147.703
Vocational Rehabilitation
30
147.704
Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation
30
147.705
Education and Rehabilitation of the
Visually Impaired
30
147.706
Adaptive Communication and
Independent Living Skills
30
Note 4
147.707
Orientation and Mobility
30
Note 4
147.709
Rehabilitation Practicum
30
Notes 5, 6
147.712
Coexisting Substance Use and
Mental Health Problems
30
C 147.704, Permission HOS
147.791
Special Topic I
30
147.799
Research Report (30)
30
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
An approved paper from another
discipline
30
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Social
Anthropology, normally including 146.701, 146.703 and either 146.798 or
146.799, plus a thesis (146.899 or 146.816 and 146.817) or other approved
research-based work with the value of 120 credits.
Social Policy
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Social Policy,
plus a thesis (279.899 or 279.816 and 279.817) or other approved researchbased work with the value of 120 credits, or papers to a value of 150 credits,
plus a thesis (279.898) or other approved work with the value of 90 credits.
Each course of study shall normally include 178.715, 279.701, 179.702 and
279.703.
Sociology
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Sociology
(should normally include 176.701 and 176.702), plus a thesis (176.899 or
176.816 and 176.817) or other approved research-based work with the value
of 120 credits.
Statistics
Notes
1. Candidates normally enrol for a Master of Philosophy in
Rehabilitation Studies.
2. Prerequisite a BA or equivalent degree with a major in human
or social sciences or education.
3. Candidates who have previously taken papers or qualifications
equivalent to 147.701 may with the permission of the Head of
School substitute other papers.
4. These papers are restricted and are only available to students
specialising in the rehabilitation of the visually impaired.
5. Enrolment in a practicum is normally restricted to students
specialising in a particular field of rehabilitation. Students are
expected to have completed 147.701 and at least one other paper
relevant to the chosen field of rehabilitation.
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Statistics, plus
a thesis (161.899) or other approved research-based work to the value of 120
credits. The papers may include up to 30 credits from Mathematics, Computer
Science or related subjects.
Visual and Material Culture
Papers to the value of 120 credits plus a thesis to the value of 120 credits
selected from the following list. Papers must include 237.701, 237.702 and
237.799 and normally one of 150.715, 154.701 or 167.744 plus a thesis
(237.899 or 237.816 and 237.817) or other approved research-based work to
the value of 120 credits.
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
154.701
Modern and Postmodern Visual
Cultures
30
167.744
Museums and the Public
30
237.701
Studies in Material Culture
30
237.702
Studies in Visual Culture
30
Religious Studies (no new enrolments from 2011)
237.791
Special Topic
30
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BA(Hons) list for Religious
Studies, plus a thesis (135.899 or 135.816 and 135.817) or other approved
research-based work with the value of 120 credits.
237.799
Research Report
30
237.816
Thesis Part I
60
237.817
Thesis Part II
60
Second Language Teaching
237.899
Thesis
120
6. Admission to the paper is based on places available, access
to field settings, approval of a nominated field work supervisor
and demonstrated suitability for advanced skill development in the
particular field of practice.
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the following list and a thesis (272.899
or 272.816 and 272.817) or other approved research-based work with the
value of 120 credits.
272.701
Language Awareness and
Language Issues
30
R 172.701
272.702
The Second Language Learning
Process
30
R 172.702
272.703
The Methodology of Second
Language Teaching
30
R 172.703
272.704
Curriculum and Materials Design
30
R 172.704
272.799
Research Report (30)
30
R 172.799
Notes
1. Prerequisite: a completed degree with a major in a languagerelated field of study plus at least one year’s teaching experience in
an area related to second language teaching.
2. Students who have qualified for the award of Massey
University Postgraduate Diploma in Second Language Teaching or
its equivalent may study for the MA in Second Language Teaching
by thesis only and may qualify for the award of the degree with
Distinction if their work is considered to be of sufficient merit
and all requirements have been completed within one year of first
enrolling for full-time study or within three years of first enrolling
for part-time study in the degree.
Note
The thesis (237.899 or 237.816 and 237.817) will be either a
written study of 35-40,000 words in length or a combination
of written exegesis (no less than 30% or 12-15,000 words) and
research-informed creative work (no more than 70% of the course
of study).
Women’s Studies (no new enrolments from 2011)
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the following list and should normally
include 170.701 and 170.702, plus a thesis (170.899 or 170.816 and 170.817).
131.703
Gender and Development
30
139.707
Women, Desire and Narrative
30
168.707
Women’s Health
30
170.701
Theoretical Perspectives in Gender
and Sexuality
30
170.702
Feminist Research Methodologies
30
170.704
Bodies, Gender and Power
30
170.707
Feminist Textual Subversions
30
170.708
Special Topic in Women’s Studies
30
170.709
Gender, Sex, Law
30
170.799
Research Report (30)
30
170.816
MA Thesis (Part I)
60
Page 183
Humanities and Social Sciences
170.817
MA Thesis (Part II)
60
170.899
MA Thesis Women’s Studies
120
179.711
Special Topic
30
The Degree of Master of Communication
MC
(Subject to CUAP approval)
Course Regulations
the Master of Communication, adjusted for any period of suspension or
extension that has been approved.
Part I
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Communication
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Communication Management
Course of Study
Part II
Eligibility
1.
2.
Admission to the Master of Communication (240 credits) is on the basis
of a completed Bachelor of Communication degree, or close equivalent,
with at least a B grade average in the 300-level majoring papers of
the intended primary subject area and at least 15 credits at 300 level
achieved with a minimum B grade in the intended secondary subject.
Admission to the Master of Communication by thesis (120 credits) is
open to students who have completed one of the following minimum
prerequisites with a grade point average across all 700-level papers of at
least a B:
(a) A Bachelor of Communication degree with Honours, or close
equivalent, with a primary subject area in the intended subject of
Masterate study; or
(b) A Postgraduate Diploma in Communication, or close equivalent,
with an Endorsement in the intended subject of Masterate study.
Course Requirements
3.
The Master of Communication shall consist of a minimum of 240
approved credits at 700/800 level including:
219.704
Advanced Cross-Cultural
Communication
30
219.705
Advanced News Media Processes
30
219.706
Advanced Public Relations
30
219.707
Critical Perspectives on Strategic
Communication
30
219.708
Political Communication
30
219.799
Research Report
30
219.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Communication Management)
120
219.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
219.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
Expressive Arts
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
139.760
Writing Lyric Poetry: Blurring the
Boundaries
30
P 139.229 or PHOS
139.761
Writing Contemporary Fiction
30
P 139.329 or PHOS
139.763
Community Theatre
30
139.799
Research Report
30
139.850
120
(c) At least 30 credits of taught papers from a secondary subject area in
the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
Master of Communication Thesis
(Expressive Arts)
139.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
(d) A 120-credit thesis from the primary subject area.
139.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
(a) At least 60 credits of papers at 700 level in a primary subject area
in the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
(b) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
4.
Papers selected from the following list:
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
Media Studies as their secondary area of study. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary area of study.
Linguistics
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
172.712
Multimodal Discourse Analysis
30
172.713
Language and Communication in
Late Modernity
30
Progression and Exit
172.799
Research Report
30
6.
172.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Linguistics)
120
172.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
172.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
5.
7.
The Degree of Master of Communication will be awarded with a Subject
in the primary area of study.
Progression from the first 120 credits of the Master of Communication
to the remaining credits for the qualification will be approved for
students who have (i) passed the first 120 credits of study towards the
degree within four calendar years of first commencing study towards the
qualification, adjusted for any period of suspension or extension that has
been approved; and (ii) demonstrated appropriate academic achievement,
defined by GPA level, in the first 120 credits of study.
Students who have been enrolled in the Master of Communication who
do not meet the progression criteria specified in (a) or who wish to exit
after successful completion of 120 credits of study, will be awarded the
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication provided that the 120 credits
of study (i) meet the requirements for that qualification and (ii) have
been completed within four years of first commencing study towards
Page 184
Marketing Communication
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
156.755
Advanced Electronic and Mobile
Marketing
30
R 156.717
156.758
Advanced Social Marketing
30
R 156.718
Humanities and Social Sciences
156.775
Theories and Models of Marketing
30
154.702
Advanced Film Studies
30
156.799
Research Report
30
154.707
The World of Noir
30
156.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Marketing Communication)
120
154.708
Modern Fiction, Popular Culture
and the Media
30
156.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
154.709
Sources of Media Ecology
30
Thesis (Part II)
60
154.719
Media, Entertainment and Ethics
30
154.798
Research Report
30
154.850
Master of Communication Thesis
(Media Studies)
120
154.851
Thesis (Part I)
60
154.852
Thesis (Part II)
60
156.852
R 156.711, R 156.712
Media Studies
Course of Study
Papers selected from the following list:
154.701
Modern and Postmodern Visual
Cultures
30
The Degree of Master of Creative Writing
MCW
Course Regulations
preparation of the thesis. The certificate shall also state the proportion of
assessment to be allotted to each part of the thesis.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates Part II.
Master of Creative Writing Thesis
6.
Eligibility
1.
(b) The creative work will be a body of work written in a single genre
or will be expressly cross-genre in nature. It will demonstrate
originality in conception and execution; be unified thematically
and/or around one or more formal or other aesthetic principles;
show mastery of form, structure, and style; and reflect critical
engagement with relevant contemporary aesthetic issues and
creative work in the student’s chosen genre.
Before enrolling candidates shall:
(a) have been awarded or qualified for the degree of Bachelor of Arts
with Honours or Postgraduate Diploma in Arts or an equivalent
qualification, in Creative Writing, Expressive Arts, English or
another approved subject; or, in exceptional circumstances, have
been awarded or qualified for another degree as approved by
Academic Board;
(c) The research essay will be of a scholarly standard appropriate to
Masters work and will investigate one or more aesthetic, formal, or
scholarly issues raised by the student’s own creative work, writing
process, or by the body of creative and critical work the student
encounters during his or her study. It will show fluency with an
appropriate critical vocabulary, with a body of relevant critical
work, and, where relevant, with appropriate theory and debates on
craft or aesthetic principles.
(b) have submitted a portfolio of creative writing of sufficient
substance and quality as an admission requirement; and
(c) have been granted admission to the degree on either a full-time or
part-time basis.
Course Requirements
2.
(a) A candidate shall follow an approved course of study for one year
of full-time study or two years of part-time study.
(b) The candidate will attend a compulsory residential workshop in the
first year of enrolment.
3.
To qualify for the award of the MCW every candidate shall complete a
thesis to the value of 120 credits, comprising a creative writing project
and an associated research essay.
4.
The choice of thesis topic must be approved by the relevant Head of
School or his/her nominee.
5.
When the thesis is forwarded to the examiner, the Head of School
or nominee shall supply a certificate from the supervisor stating that
the thesis embodies work carried out by the candidate under direct
supervision and stating also the part the supervisor played in the
(a) The thesis will comprise a creative project and an associated
research essay, the proportion of each to be negotiated by candidate
and supervisor within stated guidelines.
Distinction/Merit
Candidates may be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work is
judged by the examiners to be of superior standard, and with Merit if their
work is judged by the examiners to be of high standard. Superior standard
indicates a GPA of 7 or above, and high standard a GPA of 6.
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Creative Writing
139.860
Master of Creative Writing Thesis
120
139.861
Master of Creative Writing Thesis
(Part I)
60
139.862
Master of Creative Writing Thesis
(Part II)
60
The Degree of Master of Defence Studies
MDefStuds
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling, a candidate shall have been awarded or qualified for
the Bachelor of Defence Studies or an equivalent qualification.
Course Requirements
2.
The choice of papers, thesis topic or other work must normally
be approved by the appropriate Director of Centre or Programme
Coordinator unless otherwise specified.
Page 185
Humanities and Social Sciences
3.
Except as provided in Regulations 4 and 5 below:
(a) Candidates shall follow a course of study totalling 240 credits
normally comprising papers to a value of between 120 to 150
credits from those listed plus a thesis to a value of 90 or 120
credits.
(b) Candidates shall normally complete all papers prior to enrolment in
the thesis and candidates will not be permitted to enrol in the thesis
until they have passed papers to the value of at least 90 credits.
149.709
Terrorism, Insurgency and
Transnational Crime
30
149.732
Public International Law for
Defence and Security
30
149.760
Defence and Security Technology
30
P Graduate Status or equivalent
149.798
Research Report (30)
30
Permission Director of Centre
200.761
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
30
(c) Progression from papers to thesis will not normally be approved
unless the candidate has achieved a satisfactory standard across all
papers attempted.
Notes
1. In addition, with the approval of the Director of Centre, it is
possible to take a 30 credit masters paper from other programmes
within the university or from other New Zealand universities
covered by normal transfer of credit regulations.
(d) Candidates should normally have attended the methods workshop
prior to commencing the thesis but must have done so before a
substantial part of the thesis is completed.
(e) When the thesis is forwarded to the examiner, the Director of
Centre shall supply a certificate from the supervisor stating that
the thesis embodies work carried out by the candidate under direct
supervision and stating also the part the supervisor played in the
preparation of the thesis.
4.
(a) Candidates who have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in
Arts (Defence and Strategic Studies) may, upon surrender of that
qualification, transfer up to 120 credits to the Master of Defence
Studies. To be eligible for the award of the degree with honours,
the course of study for candidates who have surrendered the
Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (Defence and Strategic Studies) shall
not exceed one year for full-time students or three years for parttime students.
(b) Candidates who have enrolled for the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts
(Defence and Strategic Studies) and who have not been awarded
that qualification may, upon achievement of a satisfactory academic
standard, transfer to the Master of Defence Studies degree and
be exempt from such requirements as the Academic Board may
determine. For such candidates, the Course Regulations for the
degree of Master of Defence Studies shall be deemed to apply as
from the date of their enrolling for the Postgraduate Diploma in
Arts (Defence and Strategic Studies).
2.
6.
90
149.891
Defence Studies Thesis Part A
45
Defence Studies Thesis Part B
45
and
149.892
(b) The 120 credits thesis includes the research methods workshop and
either:
149.896
30
149.701
The New Zealand Strategic
Environment
30
149.702
New Zealand’s Defence Policy
30
149.703
Modern Campaign Studies
30
149.704
Command Studies
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
149.708
Joint, Interagency and
Multinational Operations
30
Defence Studies Thesis
120
Defence Studies Thesis Part A
60
Defence Studies Thesis Part B
60
Or
149.894
and
149.895
Note
The research methods workshop will be delivered in block mode.
(c) Candidates enrolled in 149.891, 149.893, 149.894 or 149.896
will be expected to attend the research methods workshop or to
complete an approved research methods paper. Those students who
elect to complete a research methods paper will not be required
to attend the research methods workshop. The research methods
workshop will be delivered in block mode. It will be of three days
duration and will introduce students to the techniques of qualitative
and quantitative research investigation.
(a) Candidates shall follow an approved course of study comprising a
thesis of either 90 or 120 credits and papers to the value of 120 to
150 credits from the following list. At least 90 credits must come
from papers with the 149 subject prefix.
Ethics of War and Peace
(a) The 90 credit thesis includes a research methods workshop and
either:
Defence Studies Thesis
Course of Study
134.703
Not all papers may be available in any given year.
149.893
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Defence Studies
5.
Graduate Status or equivalent
(d) When enrolled in the thesis, research candidates will normally be
required to attend the Centre’s Research Seminar and deliver a
short presentation on their research.
Transition
7.
Students who commenced the MPhil (DSS) prior to 2008 can complete
under MPhil regulations until the end of 2012. Such students also have
the option of transfer to the MDefStuds at any time during the term of
their enrolment providing they will meet the course requirements of the
MDefStuds.
8.
Students who have had the MPhil (DSS) awarded may not surrender that
qualification towards the MDefStuds.
The Degree of Master of Emergency Management
MEmergMgt
(Subject to CUAP approval)
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Page 186
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Master of Emergency Management (120 credits) is
open to students who:
(a) Have relevant industry experience of an appropriate kind and
duration; and
Humanities and Social Sciences
(b) Have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Emergency
Management or equivalent, at an appropriate level of academic
achievement.
Course Requirements
2.
Candidates for the Master of Emergency Management shall follow
an approved course of study and successfully complete 120 credits,
following either the Coursework Pathway (Option A) or the Research
Pathway (Option B).
144.724
Public Sector Management and
Law
30
152.702
Advanced Strategic Management
30
152.707
Leading and Changing
Organisations
30
230.703
Techniques and Methods in
Evaluation Research
30
Coursework Pathway (Option A)
Notes
Compulsory Papers
1. Subject to approval by the Head of School, or nominee,
students may substitute up to 30 credits from relevant papers at the
700-level for one of the above Qualification papers.
90 credits from:
130.799
Research Report in Emergency
Management
30
130.801
Advanced Leadership in Emergency
Management
60
2. Students who have completed the GradDipEmergMgt prior
to 2012 should seek advice from the Head of School, or nominee,
regarding the appropriate selection of papers.
Research Pathway (Option B)
Qualification Papers
130.816
30 credits from the following list to make qualification total of 120
credits:
And
130.817
Thesis (Part I)
60
Thesis (Part II)
60
Thesis in Emergency Management
120
Or
114.731
Advanced Occupational Safety
and Health
30
114.773
Hazard Management
30
130.701
Natural Hazards
30
Distinction/Merit
130.702
Coping with Disasters
30
3.
131.701
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
131.702
Development Management
30
132.735
Natural Resource Planning
30
132.751
Natural Hazards and Resilient
Communities
30
130.899
Candidates may be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work
is judged by the examiners to be of superior standard, and with Merit if
their work is judged by the examiners to be of high standard. Superior
standard indicates a GPA of 7 or above, and high standard a GPA of 6 or
above. To be eligible for Distinction or Merit a candidate shall complete
the requirements within one year of first enrolling if full-time or within
three years if part-time.
The Degree of Master of Health Science
MHlthSc
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(a) Candidates for the Master of Health Science shall undertake a
course of study normally comprising papers to a value of 120
credits (in one of the subjects listed in the Schedule) plus a thesis to
the value of 120 credits.
Part II
Eligibility
(b) Candidates shall normally pass all papers prior to enrolment in the
thesis and candidates will not be permitted to enrol in the thesis
until they have passed papers to the value of at least 60 credits.
1.
4.
(c) Progression from papers to thesis will not normally be approved
unless the candidate has achieved a satisfactory standard across all
papers attempted.
Candidates for the Degree of Master of Health Science shall before
enrolment have:
(a) qualified for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Health
Science and passed at the 300-level such papers as are indicated
in the prerequisite provisions in the prescriptions for the subject
or subjects they offer at a standard that, in the opinion of the
Academic Board, is sufficient to enable them to take an appropriate
programme of study for the degree; or
(b) qualified for admission to the degree of Bachelor of Health Science
with Honours; or
(c) qualified for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma of Health
Science with a satisfactory standard across all papers, or
(d) been granted admission with equivalent status as entitled to proceed
in the subject or subjects offered.
Course Requirements
2.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study to a minimum value
of 240 credits and satisfy all course requirements in one of the subject
areas listed and detailed in the Schedule for these Regulations.
3.
The Academic Board may approve a course of study involving papers
from more than one of the subjects listed in the Schedule, provided that
at least half of the total points for the papers are chosen from the same
subject as the thesis.
(d) When the thesis is forwarded to the examiners, the relevant Chief
Examiner shall supply a certificate from the supervisor stating that
the thesis embodies work carried out by the candidate under direct
supervision and stating also the part the supervisor played in the
preparation of the thesis.
5.
(a) Candidates who have been awarded the degree of Bachelor
of Health Science with Honours or have been awarded the
Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science may be candidates for
the degree of MHlthSc in the same subject and may complete the
degree with a 120 credit thesis.
(b) Candidates shall not be eligible for the award of Honours but may
be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work is judged
by the examiners to be of superior merit and they complete the
requirement for the award of the degree within one calendar year
of first enrolling for full-time study or within three consecutive
years of first enrolling for part-time study in the subject area for the
degree. Superior merit is defined as equivalent in quality to First
Class Honours.
Page 187
Humanities and Social Sciences
Note: Graduates of the Bachelor of Health Science without a major who wish
to be candidates for the degree of Master of Health Science must first seek
approval of the Director of Health Science Programmes.
Subjects
Environmental Health
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BHlthSc(Hons) schedule for
Environmental Health, including a research methods paper (168.810 or an
approved alternative), plus a thesis (214.899 or 214.897 and 214.898) to the
value of 120 credits.
Māori Health
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BHlthSc(Hons) schedule for
Māori Health, including a research methods paper (150.714 or 168.810 or an
approved alternative), plus a thesis (150.899 or 150.816 and 150.817) to the
value of 120 credits.
Psychology
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BHlthSc(Hons) schedule for
Psychology, including a research methods paper (175.738 or an approved
alternative), plus a thesis (175.899 or 175.894 and 175.896) to the value of
120 credits.
Rehabilitation
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BHlthSc(Hons) schedule for
Rehabilitation, including paper 147.701 and a research methods paper
(168.810 or an approved alternative), plus a thesis (147.899 or 147.816 and
147.817) to the value of 120 credits.
Sport and Exercise
Papers to the value of 120 credits from the BHlthSc(Hons) schedule for Sport
and Exercise, including a research methods paper (168.810 or an approved
alternative), plus a thesis (234.899 or 234.897 and 234.898) to the value of
120 credits.
The Degree of Master of International Development
MIntDev
(Subject to CUAP approval)
60 credits from the following list
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
131.703
Gender and Development
30
131.704
Sustainable Development
30
131.706
Globalisation and Development
30
131.707
Development Research Design
30
Note
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the Master of International Development is open to
students who have completed the requirements for the Postgraduate
Diploma in Development Studies or an equivalent qualification at an
appropriate level of academic achievement.
1. Subject to approval by the Head of School, or nominee,
students may substitute up to 30 credits from relevant papers at the
700-level for one of the above Qualification papers.
Research Pathway (Option B)
131.816
Candidates for the Master of International Development shall follow
an approved course of study and successfully complete 120 credits,
following either the Coursework Pathway (Option A) or the Research
Pathway (Option B).
Coursework Pathway (Option A)
131.817
131.899
Thesis (Part II)
60
Thesis
120
P 131.707
60
P 131.707
Distinction/Merit
60 credits from:
Research Report
60
Or
3.
List A, Compulsory Papers
131.897
Thesis (Part I)
And
Course Requirements
2.
R 131.705
P 131.707
List B, Qualification Papers
Candidates may be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work
is judged by the examiners to be of superior standard, and with Merit if
their work is judged by the examiners to be of high standard. Superior
standard indicates a GPA of 7 or above, and high standard a GPA of 6 or
above. To be eligible for Distinction or Merit a candidate shall complete
the requirements within one year of first enrolling if full-time or within
three years if part-time.
The Degree of Master of International Security
MIntSec
(Subject to CUAP approval)
Course Regulations
Part II
Eligibility
Part I
1.
Before enrolling in the course for the degree of Master of International
Security candidates shall:
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(a) have completed a relevant Bachelor’s degree plus the equivalent
of a minimum of two years of full-time relevant professional
experience; or
(b) be able to demonstrate scholarly work in conjunction with
extensive relevant professional experience and standing in
leadership, managerial and planning positions in government or
non-government security agencies appropriate for Admission with
Equivalent Status.
Page 188
Humanities and Social Sciences
Course Requirements
Endorsements
2.
4.
Candidates will be required to pass an approved course of study (180
credits) that includes all the following compulsory requirements:
(a) 149.720 International Security; and
(b) at least 60 credits from Part A; and
(c) 60 credits from Part B; and
Progression and Exit
5.
Progression from the first 120 credits of the Master of International
Security to the remaining credits for the qualification will be approved
for students who have (i) passed the first 120 credits of study towards the
degree within three calendar years of first commencing study towards the
qualification, adjusted for any period of suspension or extension that has
been approved; and (ii) demonstrated appropriate academic achievement,
defined by GPA level, in the first 120 credits of study.
6.
Students who have been enrolled in the Master of International Security
who do not meet the progression criteria specified in (a), or who wish to
exit after successful completion of 120 credits of study, will be awarded
the PGDip International Security provided that the 120 credits of
study (i) meet the requirements for that qualification and (ii) have been
completed within three years of first commencing study towards the
Master of International Security adjusted for any period of suspension or
extension that has been approved.
(d) up to 30 credits from Part C.
3.
Students who have completed a Postgraduate Diploma in International
Security or other relevant postgraduate qualification may be exempted
from up to 120 credits conditional upon meeting all other eligibility
requirements.
Part A
149.701
New Zealand’s Strategic
Environment
30
149.704
Command Studies
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand’s
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
149.708
Joint, Interagency and
Multinational Operations
30
149.715
The Brunei Strategic Environment
30
149.732
Public International Law for
Defence and Security
30
149.740
Security and Crime
30
149.741
Intelligence in the International
Security Environment
30
149.744
Intelligence Operations since 1939
30
149.760
Defence and Security Technology
30
149.820
Applied Security Research Report
60
149.821
Applied Security Planning Exercise
60
Time Limits
7.
Part C
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
All requirements must be completed within five calendar years of first
enrolling for the qualification, adjusted for any periods of suspension or
extension that may be approved. Candidates granted exemptions under
regulation 3 may have the time limit for degree completion reduced
proportionally.
Distinction/Merit
8.
Candidates may be awarded the degree with Distinction if their work
is judged by the examiners to be of superior standard, and with Merit if
their work is judged by the examiners to be of high standard. Superior
standard indicates a GPA of 7 or above, and high standard a GPA of 6 or
above. To be eligible for Distinction or Merit a candidate shall complete
the requirements within two years of first enrolling if full-time or within
four years if part-time.
9.
Candidates granted exemptions under regulation 3 may have the time
limit for completion with Distinction or Merit reduced proportionally.
Part B
200.761
An endorsement in Intelligence is available. As part of the requirements
outlined above, candidates seeking the endorsement in Intelligence must
complete at least 60 credits from 149.740, 149.741, or 149.744.
30
The Degree of Master of Māori Visual Arts
MMVA
Course Regulations
or
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
Schedule to the Degree of Master of Māori Visual Arts
Part I (120 credits)
60
150.726
Rangahau Whakairo: Pre-thesis
Practicum (Part II)
60
Rangahau Whakairo: Pre-thesis
Practicum
120
150.720
Part II (120 credits)
Either:
150.809
Te Wahapu Matatau (Matau):
Advanced Studio Practice
90
and 30 credits from the Schedule of papers below not completed previously;
Either:
Te Tataitanga Matatau (Matau):
Advanced Studio Practice
Rangahau Whakairo: Pre-thesis
Practicum (Part I)
or
Candidates who have qualified for the Postgraduate Diploma in Māori Visual
Arts and who are eligible for admission to the Masterate degree shall follow
an approved course of study for not less than one year consisting of 120
credits to fulfil the requirement/s of Part II of the Option selected for the
Masterate programme.
150.707
150.725
90
and 30 credits from the Schedule of papers below;
or
150.825
Ngā Miro Whakaaturanga: Master
of Māori Visual Arts Thesis
Practicum (Part I)
60
Page 189
Humanities and Social Sciences
150.826
Ngā Miro Whakaaturanga: Master
of Māori Visual Arts Thesis
Practicum (Part II)
60
Ngā Miro Whakaaturanga: Master
of Māori Visual Arts Thesis
Practicum
120
or
150.821
Schedule of papers
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
150.711
Te Tau-Ihu o te Reo: Advanced
Māori Literature
30
150.714
Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero:
Māori Research Methodologies
30
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
150.791
Kaupapa Motuhake: Special Topic
30
167.742
Collection Management
30
167.743
Museum Management
30
167.744
Museums and the Public
30
Note
30
Candidates are eligible to enrol in 150.720 Rangahau Whakairo:
Pre-Thesis Practicum if they are able to demonstrate a minimum of
ten years exhibition or commission experience.
The Degree of Master of Nursing
MN
Course Regulations
168.734
Clinical Pharmacology
30
Part I
168.810
30
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Health Research Design and
Method
168.853
Advanced Neonatal Nursing
Practicum
30
Plus 60 credits from the Master of Nursing schedule of electives.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Honours/Distinction
Before enrolling for the degree of Master of Nursing candidates shall be
registered nurses, normally holding a current practising certificate from
the Nursing Council of New Zealand, with two years’ relevant speciality
practice
within five years of admission to the programme and have satisfied the
Academic Board that they have sufficient professional experience and
suitability to be likely to benefit from the course.
Course Requirements
2.
A candidate shall follow a course of study comprising papers to the
value of 240 credits.
3.
The Master of Nursing is normally awarded without endorsement. To
complete the degree without endorsement, a candidate must pass all of
the following papers:
5.
The degree of Master of Nursing may be awarded with First Class
Honours, Second Class Honours (Division I) or Second Class Honours
(Division II), as determined by academic performance, to candidates
who have not been awarded cross-credit under Regulation 7. In order to
be eligible for the award of Honours, all requirements must be completed
within two years by full-time students or within five years by part-time
students.
6.
The degree of Master of Nursing may be awarded with Distinction, in
cases of sufficient merit, to candidates who have been awarded crosscredits under Regulation 7.
(a) In order to be eligible for Distinction, students who are crosscredited with 60 credits must complete all requirements within two
years of full-time study or within four years of part-time study.
(b) In order to be eligible for Distinction, students who are crosscredited with 120 credits must complete all requirements within
one year of full-time study or within three years of part-time study.
168.728
Assessment and Clinical DecisionMaking
30
168.733
Physiology and Pathophysiology
30
Recognition of Prior Learning
168.734
Clinical Pharmocology
30
7.
168.810
Health Research Design and
Method
30
Candidates who have been awarded an approved Postgraduate Certificate
or Postgraduate Diploma (or equivalent) in nursing, or other equivalent
programme, may apply for cross-credit to the Master of Nursing degree.
Such candidates may be cross-credited with up to 60 or up to 120 credits,
respectively. The course of study for candidates credited 60 credits shall
not exceed four calendar years and for candidates credited 120 credits
shall not exceed three calendar years.
8.
Candidates enrolled for the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) (Nursing) or the
Postgraduate Diploma in Nursing or Postgraduate Certificate in Nursing
who have not been awarded that degree, diploma or certificate may, on
transferring to the course of the degree of Master of Nursing, transfer
papers completed under the previous qualification to the Master of
Nursing. For such candidates the Course Regulations for the degree of
the Master of Nursing shall be deemed to apply as from the date of their
enrolling for the BA(Hons)(Nursing), PGDipNurs or PGCertNurs.
Plus one of the following papers:
168.850
Prescribing Practicum for Nurses
30
168.851
Practicum
30
168.895
Research Report (30)
30
P 168.810
Plus 90 credits from the Master of Nursing schedule of electives.
Endorsement
4.
The Master of Nursing is also available with a Neonatal endorsement.
The course of study for the Neonatal endorsement must include all of the
following papers:
168.725
Neonatal Science and Clinical Care
of the Neonate I
30
168.726
Neonatal Science and Clinical Care
of the Neonate II
30
168.729
Neonatal and Family Assessment
and Practice
30
Page 190
Time Limits
9.
A candidate’s course of study shall not exceed five calendar years unless
a specified time of suspension or extension is approved by the Academic
Board. A candidate granted cross-credit under Regulation 7 shall have
the course of study duration reduced accordingly, such that the course
of study for candidates credited 60 credits under Regulation 7 shall not
exceed four calendar years and for candidates credited 120 credits shall
not exceed three calendar years.
Humanities and Social Sciences
Master of Nursing Schedule of Electives
175.764
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for
Chronic and Complex Disorders
15
P 175.761
30
250.741
Managing Professional Practice
30
R 168.708
Contemporary Trends in Clinical
Teaching and Learning
30
252.701
Sleep and Circadian Science for
Health
30
P Postgraduate Status; R 252.702
168.712
Pain Management
30
168.714
Advanced Assessment and
Therapeutic Intervention in Mental
Health
30
168.717
Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in
Professional Practice
168.718
168.719
168.703
Managing Lifelong Conditions
30
168.707
Women’s Health
168.709
P 168.733
Specific requirements for the Neonatal Endorsement
168.725
Neonatal Science and Clinical Care
of the Neonate I
30
30
168.726
Neonatal Science and Clinical Care
of the Neonate II
30
P 168.725or equivalent
Clinical Specialty: Family Practice
30
168.729
30
Clinical Specialty: Older Persons’
Health
30
Neonatal and Family Assessment
and Practice
C 168.725; R 168.727, 168.760;
Note 4
168.853
168.720
Clinical Specialty: Mental Health
Advanced Neonatal Nursing
Practicum
30
30
168.721
Māori Centred Practice
30
P 168.725, 168.729 (or 168.727 and
168.760); C 168.726; R 168.761,
168.762; Note 4
168.722
Wound Management
30
168.724
Primary Health Care Nursing
30
168.731
Leadership in Nursing
30
168.732
Personal and Community Health
30
168.791
Special Topic I
30
147.704
Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation
30
147.712
Coexisting Substance Use and
Mental Health Problems
30
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
150.702
Mauri Ora: Māori Mental Health
30
150.717
He Hanganga Māori mo te Hauora:
Applied Māori Mental Health
30
150.723
Ngā Momo Whānau: Whānau Form 30
and Function
152.742
Health Systems Management
30
152.746
Contemporary Issues in Health
Service Management
30
175.761
Theory and Practice of Cognitive
Behaviour Therapy
15
Notes
C 168.733
1. The clinical experience associated with this practicum may
be taken in a variety of fields of practice. Approval of the student’s
choice is dependent on access to appropriate field settings, approval
of a nominated clinical preceptor and suitability for practice in the
selected field. The student is required to hold a current practising
certificate issued by the Nursing Council of New Zealand and have
indemnity insurance.
C 147.704
2. The B entry requirement for 168.850 applies to all students
enrolling in papers 168.728 and 168.734 or their equivalent from
2010.
3. Entry to a Certificate of Proficiency for 168.850 Prescribing
Practicum for Nurses is decided on an individual basis.
4. The clinical experience associated with this paper may
be taken in a variety of fields of practice related to neonatal or
newborn nursing. Approval of the student’s choice is dependent
on access to appropriate field settings, approval of a nominated
clinical preceptor and suitability for practice in the selected field.
The student is required to hold a current practising certificate
issued by the Nursing Council of New Zealand and have indemnity
insurance.
The Degree of Master of Public Health
MPH
Course Regulations
Course Requirements
Part I
2.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
A candidate shall follow an approved course of study for the equivalent
of one year’s full-time study and not more than four years’ part-time
study.
3.
To qualify for the award of the MPH every candidate shall normally
complete either:
Part II
Eligibility
1.
(a) a thesis to the value of 120 credits (231.899 or 231.816 and
231.817); or
Before enrolling a candidate shall have been awarded or qualified for the
Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health or an equivalent qualification.
(b) a research project to the value of 60 credits plus papers from the
PGDipPH schedule to the value of 60 credits.
Honours/Distinction
4.
Honours are not available for 120-credit Masters.
Page 191
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Degree of Master of Public Health (Biosecurity)
MPH(Biosecurity)
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling candidates for the MPH (Biosecurity) shall have been
awarded a medical degree and be eligible for registration to practice in
the country from where they will be enrolled to receive the programme.
195.741
Epidemiological Techniques for
Disease Investigation
15
195.742
Disease Surveillance and
Diagnostic Testing
15
195.743
Principles of Disease Control and
Management
15
231.721
International Public Health
15
231.722
Communicable Disease Prevention
and Control
15
231.723
Epidemiological Methods
15
231.724
International Occupational and
Environmental Health
15
Course Requirements
2.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study comprising 120
credits:
Note
The Public Health papers will normally be undertaken only after
completion of the four core papers, 195.740, 195.741, 195.742, and
195.743.
Schedule for the Degree of Master of Public Health (Biosecurity)
195.740
A Population Basis for Measuring
Health
15
The Degree of Master of Public Policy
MPP
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(c) 60 credits from the following Schedule, or other suitable elective
papers to a maximum of 60 credits approved by the Head of School
or nominee:
110.780
Contemporary Issues in Taxation
30
131.701
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
Part II
Eligibility
131.704
Sustainable Development
30
1.
132.733
Conservation Policy and Planning
30
132.734
Urban Planning and Development
30
132.735
Natural Resource Planning
30
144.713
Special Topic
30
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
152.702
Advanced Strategic Management
30
Candidates who do not have appropriate prerequisites in economics,
social or political science may be required to take selected papers before
proceeding to enrol under the MPP Regulations.
Course of Study
2.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study comprising 240
credits.
Compulsory Papers:
144.721
Public Policy and Political Economy
30
152.704
Business and Sustainability
30
144.722
Public Policy Research and
Evaluation
30
152.753
Strategic Governance
30
152.761
Advanced International Business
30
144.723
Applied Economics and Public
Finance
30
152.762
The International Business
Environment
30
144.724
Public Sector Management and
Law
30
152.764
Topics in International Business
30
178.715
Applied Economics and Policy
30
178.750
Topics in International Economics
15
178.751
Advanced International Economics
II
15
178.756
Economics of Agricultural and
Trade Policies
15
178.762
Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics for NonEconomists
30
179.777
Disability, Consumer Rights and
Advocacy
30
152.743
Health Policy
30
and either:
(a) A thesis to the value of 120 credits (144.899 or 144.816 and
144.817)
or
(b)
144.895
Research Report (60)
60
plus
Page 192
P Graduate Status and 110.389
or PHOS
R 115.783
Graduate Status and 178.200 or
178.201 or 178.204 or 178.240 or
PHOD; R 77.403, 78.450, 78.750
R 250.743
Humanities and Social Sciences
259.772
Theory and Process in Educational
Leadership
30
R 187.772
279.703
Social Policy Studies
30
R 179.704
120 credits to the Master of Public Policy. To be eligible for award of
the degree with honours, the course of study for candidates who have
surrendered the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (Public Policy) shall
not exceed one year for full-time students or three years for part-time
students.
Concession
3.
Candidates who have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts
(Public Policy) may, upon surrender of that qualification, transfer up to
The Degree of Master of Resource and Environmental Planning
MRP
Course Regulations
132.804
Applied Research in Planning
30
P Graduate status, at least 30
credits of 700-level papers from the
MRP schedule
132.815
Thesis MRP (Part I)
60
P 132.804
132.816
Thesis MRP (Part II)
60
P 132.804
132.895
Research Report (30)
30
P 132.804; R 132.798
132.897
Thesis MRP
90
P 132.804
132.899
Thesis MRP
120
P 132.804
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Course Requirements
1.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study comprising:
Notes
(a) papers to the value of 210 credits, including 132.731, 132.732,
132.736 and 132.804, plus a 30 credit research report (132.895); or
(b) papers to the value of 150 credits, including 132.731, 132.732,
132.736 and 132.804, plus a 90 credit thesis (132.897); or
(c) 132.731, 132.732, 132.736 and 132.804, plus a thesis to the value
of 120 credits (132.899 or 132.815 and 132.816).
2.
Papers may include compulsory field trips and/or Block courses
and related activities.
Concessions
3.
The papers for the qualification shall be selected from the following
schedule:
132.705
Applied Ecological Economics
30
P Graduate Status
132.730
Policy Analysis and Evaluation
Techniques
30
P Graduate Status
132.731
Planning Law
30
P Graduate Status
132.732
Planning Theory
30
P Graduate Status
132.733
Conservation Policy and Planning
30
P Graduate Status
132.734
Urban Planning and Development
30
P Graduate Status
132.735
Natural Resource Planning
30
P Graduate Status
132.736
Professional Practice
30
P Graduate Status
132.737
Special Topic in Planning
30
P Graduate Status
132.738
GIS Principles and Applications
30
P Graduate Status
132.739
Assessing Environmental Impacts:
Principles and Practice
30
P Graduate Status
132.741
Long-Term Community Planning
30
P Graduate Status; R 132.737
(2008 only)
132.742
Planning History: From Town
Planning to Resource Management
30
P Graduate Status
132.751
Natural Hazards and Resilient
Communities
30
P Graduate Status
Candidates who have been awarded a 480-credit Resource and
Environmental Planning degree (with First Class Honours or Second
Class Honours (Division One) or equivalent), or with a Postgraduate
Diploma in Planning or equivalent, completed to an equivalent standard,
may be permitted with the approval of the Head of School to complete
the MRP with not less than 150 credits including 132.804 and a thesis to
the value of 120 credits (132.899 or 132.815 and 132.816).
Transition Provisions
4.
These regulations apply from 1 January 2012.
(a) All candidates who commenced study towards the MRP degree on
or after 1 January 2012 must satisfy the requirements specified in
these regulations.
(b) Candidates who commenced study towards the MRP degree in
2011 or earlier, and who have completed fewer than 180 credits at
the beginning of the 2012 academic year must transfer to the 2012
MRP regulations.
(c) Candidates who commenced study towards the MRP degree in 2011
or earlier may choose to transfer to the 2012 regulations, but must
then satisfy all requirements specified in the 2012 MRP regulations.
(d) Candidates who commenced study towards the MRP degree in
2011 or earlier, and who have completed 180 credits or more by the
beginning of the 2012 academic year are not required to include
132.804 in their programme of study, provided that such candidates
complete all MRP requirements by the end of the 2013 academic
year.
The Degree of Master of Social Work
MSW
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling in the course for the degree of Master of Social Work
candidates shall have qualified for admission to the degree of Bachelor
of Social Work or Bachelor of Social Work with Honours from this
University or shall have qualified for admission to a Bachelor’s degree in
social sciences or have been admitted with equivalent status as entitled
to proceed to the degree of Master of Social Work
Page 193
Humanities and Social Sciences
Course Requirements
2.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study comprising papers
to the value of 120 credits, including 179.702, plus a thesis (179.899, or
179.816 plus 179.817) to the value of 120 credits, or papers to a value of
150 credits, including 179.702 plus a thesis (179.898) to the value of 90
credits.
Four papers shall be selected from the following list:
179.702
Advanced Research Methods
30
179.720
Spirituality and Social Work
30
179.722
Social Work with Migrants,
Refugees and Asylum Seekers
30
179.736
Substance Misuse and Addictions
30
179.740
Social Service Supervision: Theory
and Practice
30
179.761
Current Issues and Theories in
Social Service Practice
30
179.763
Clinical Practice
30
179.768
Māori Society and the Social
Services
30
C/P 179.781 or equivalent,; 179.774
(2005)
179.771
Child Welfare
30
179.772
Family Practice
30
179.773
Disability Studies
30
179.777
Disability, Consumer Rights and
Advocacy
30
179.778
Mental Health and Social Work
30
279.703
Social Policy Studies
30
R 179.704
179.816
Thesis (Part I)
60
P 179.702
179.817
Thesis (Part II)
60
P 179.702
179.898
Thesis
90
P 179.702
Thesis
120
P 179.702
179.899
Concession
3.
Candidates with a 480 credit social work degree (with First Class
Honours or Second Class Honours (Division One) or equivalent) or with
a completed social work Postgraduate Diploma with Distinction may be
exempt for up to 90 credits in course work with the approval of the Head
of School.
Postgraduate Diplomas
The Postgraduate Diploma in Arts
PGDipArts
Course Regulations
Education
Public Policy (Note 6)
Part I
English
Religious Studies (Note 1)
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Geography
Social Anthropology
Geographic Information Systems
(Note 3)
Social Policy
Part II
Eligibility
History (Note 4)
Social Work
Māori Studies
Sociology
1.
Mathematics
Statistics (Note 7)
Media Studies
Visual and Material Culture (Note 8)
Philosophy
Women’s Studies (Note 1)
Admission to the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts is open to students
who have completed one of the following minimum prerequisites, at an
appropriate level of academic achievement:
(a) A Bachelor’s degree, with a minor or equivalent in the intended
postgraduate subject; the minor in the proposed subject of study
must include at least 30 credits at 300-level.
(b) A Bachelor’s degree followed by a Graduate Certificate in Arts
endorsed in the intended postgraduate subject; the endorsed
Graduate Certificate in Arts must have all 60 credits in the intended
postgraduate subject.
Planning (Note 9)
Notes
1.
No new enrolments will be accepted for this endorsement.
2.
Every candidate for the Diploma in the subject of Defence and Strategic
Studies shall pass a selection of papers to the value of at least 120 credits
chosen from those offered in Defence and Strategic Studies at 700-level.
For the purposes of this Regulation, 200.761 International Relations:
Theory and Practice and 134.703 The Ethics of War and Peace may be
regarded as papers in Defence and Strategic Studies.
3.
Candidates for the Diploma in the subject of Geographic Information
Systems shall normally pass 132.738, 132.740, 189.761 and a further 30
credits in GIS-related papers offered at the 700-level, that may include
papers with a 157 or 159 prefix, a GIS research project or such other
papers as may be approved.
4.
Every candidate for the Diploma in the subject of History must pass
148.720 and 148.730.
5.
Papers for the Psychology endorsement shall be selected from the
BA(Hons) list for Psychology to a total of at least 120 credits, and must
include paper 175.738 Psychological Research: Principles of Design.
With the approval of the Head of School, up to 30 credits from other
relevant postgraduate papers may be substituted.
6.
Every candidate for the Diploma in the subject of Public Policy must
select papers listed for the Master of Public Policy and must include
three papers from 144.721, 144.722, 144.723, 144.724.
(c) A Bachelor’s degree followed by a Graduate Diploma in Arts
endorsed in the intended postgraduate subject.
Admission to the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts in the subject area
Psychology follows the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (Honours)
or Master of Arts (240 credits).
Course of Study
2.
3.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma each candidate shall normally
pass a selection of 700-level papers to a total of 120 credits from those
offered internally and extramurally in one of the subject areas listed
below.
Unless otherwise stated and with the approval of the Head of School, not
more than 30 credits from appropriate papers in other disciplines may be
included in a candidate’s course of study.
Endorsements
Defence and Strategic Studies (Note
2)
Politics
Economics
Psychology (Note 5)
Page 194
Humanities and Social Sciences
7.
To enrol for the Diploma in the subject of Statistics, candidates shall
have complied with the general conditions for admission and also have
passed three approved papers in Mathematics and/or Statistics.
179.763
Clinical Practice
30
179.772
Family Practice
30
179.778
Mental Health and Social Work
30
179.781
Social and Community Work Theory 30
and Practice I
179.783
Māori Development and the Social
Services
30
249.741
Assessment and Planning for
Learners with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.741
249.742
Teaching Methods for Learners
with Diverse Needs
30
R 186.742
249.744
Understanding Learners with
Behaviour Difficulties
30
R 186.744
Disability Studies (no new enrolments from 2011)
267.780
Research in Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790
The course of study shall normally include:
267.788
Qualitative and Action Research in
Education
30
R 180.780, 180.790, 182.793,
185.788, 186.723, 186.788,
187.720, 267.720, 267.723,
267.780, 267.790
279.703
Social Policy Studies
30
R 179.704
8.
9.
Candidates for the Diploma in the subject of Visual and Material Culture
shall normally pass 237.701, 237.702, 237.799 and a further 30 credits in
one of 150.715, 154.701, 167.744 or 237.791. With the approval of the
Head of School, up to 30 credits from other relevant postgraduate papers
may be substituted.
No enrolments from 2011
In addition to an endorsement outlined in the Course of Study above,
a candidate may be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts with an
endorsement in Disability Studies by completing the course of study outlined
below.
(a)Compulsory:
179.773
Disability Studies
30
179.777
Disability, Consumer Rights and
Advocacy
30
Notes
1.
(b) Plus two papers from the following list:
147.701
Rehabilitation Theory and Practice
30
179.702
Advanced Research Methods
30
179.761
Current Issues and Theories in
Social Service Practice
30
Not all papers will be available in any given year.
2. Not more than 30 credits from appropriate papers in other
disciplines and subject areas may be included in a candidate’s
course of study, on approval of the Head of School.
3. Note that the prescriptions and criteria for assessment for the
papers listed in the Schedule allow the student to focus on disability
studies as a key subject area.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Psychology
PGDipClinPsych
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
they need to complete in order to meet the requirements for admission with
equivalent status for eligibility to enrol.
Course of Study
2.
To qualify for the Diploma every candidate shall complete to the
satisfaction of the Academic Board such course work as is specified in
these Regulations and pass in an oral and practical examination.
3.
The course for the Diploma shall comprise:
(a) supervised full-time practical work in one or more institutions
approved for this purpose by the Academic Board. Such practical
work will normally be carried out full-time for a period of
one academic year although under exceptional circumstances
applications to carry out this practical work half-time over two
years will be considered by Academic Board.
Further to the Generic Postgraduate Part I Regulations 1(a)(i)–(iii)
and subject to the Regulations for Admission with Equivalent Status,
a candidate for the Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Psychology
shall, before enrolment, have fulfilled the requirements for one of the
following:
(a) the Master of Arts with Honours in Psychology; or
(b) the Master of Science with Honours in Psychology; or
(b) the submission for assessment of reports on six different cases the
candidate has studied since enrolling for the diploma.
(c) an equivalent course under the Master of Philosophy Regulations;
and
(c) such readings, seminars and other work as shall be required from
time to time.
(d) in addition, shall have obtained an appropriate endorsement in
Clinical Psychology.
Note: Students holding BA(Hons) or BSc(Hons) degrees in Psychology
should consult the Head of School about additional courses and papers
4.
The following papers provide a mechanism for assessing the supervised
practice and training of students who undertake the Diploma:
175.841
Clinical Case Studies
48
175.842
Internship Work
36
175.843
Practical/Oral Exam
36
Page 195
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Postgraduate Diploma in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
PGDipCogBehTher
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
Before enrolment for this Diploma a candidate will seek approval of the Head
of School.
175.762
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for
Depression
15
175.763
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for
Anxiety Disorders
15
175.764
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for
Chronic and Complex Disorders
15
Plus the following Compulsory paper:
175.765
Eligibility
1.
Before enrolling a candidate shall:
Notes
(a) have been awarded or qualified for a relevant Bachelor’s degree
from a New Zealand tertiary institution; or
1
4. Clinical practicum work placements may not be available in
any given year.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma every candidate shall normally:
5. Candidates who have completed either an undergraduate or a
postgraduate qualification in Psychology at least six years prior to
registration for the Diploma may be required by the Head of School
to pass 175.707 Psychotherapy I: Theory, Research and Practice or
any other specified papers before being permitted to enrol.
(a) pass a selection of papers in Psychology at the 700-level to a total
of at least 120 credits and complete practical work as appropriate;
and
(b) complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board such
coursework and clinical practical work as may be prescribed from
time to time for the approved course of study;
6. Candidates enrolling for the Clinical Practicum (175.765)
shall have prior documented psychotherapy experience in mental
health and a current supervised caseload in institutions approved
for this purpose by the Academic Board. Practical work will
normally be carried out part-time for a period of one academic year.
(c) where prescribed, produce evidence to Academic Board of a
specified period of approved employment.
The course for the Diploma comprises papers to a total value of 120
credits including at least four papers from the following Schedule:
175.761
Theory and Practice of Cognitive
Behaviour Therapy
This programme is only available on a part-time basis.
3. Unless approved by the Academic Board, papers should be
taken in the numerical order in which they are listed.
(c) have relevant work experience in mental health, undertaken within
five years of application for admission to the course, as approved
by the Head of School.
3.
60
2. Students should normally take 175.761, 175.762, 175.763 and
175.764 in their first year of study, and 175.765 in a subsequent
year of study.
(b) have been admitted with equivalent status as eligible to proceed to
the Diploma; and
2.
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Clinical Practicum
15
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication
PGDipC
(Subject to CUAP approval)
Course Regulations
Course Requirements
2.
Part I
(a) At least 60 credits at 700 level from one of the subject areas in the
Schedule to the Master of Communication.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
(b) At least 30 approved credits from: 139.702 Criticism, Theory
and Research, 154.704 Media Research Methods, 156.776
Research Methods in Marketing, 219.790 Research Methods in
Communication.
Part II
Eligibility
1.
Admission to the programme is open to students who have completed
one of the following minimum prerequisites, with at least a B- grade
average over the 300-level papers in the intended Endorsement and the
secondary area of study:
(a) A Bachelor of Communication degree or close equivalent, with
a minor or equivalent in the intended Endorsement or a closely
related field and at least 15 credits at 300-level in the secondary
area of study; or
(b) A completed Graduate Diploma in the intended Endorsement or
a closely related field, and at least 15 credits at 300-level in the
secondary area of study.
Page 196
To qualify for the award of the Diploma every candidate shall normally
pass 120 credits of papers, comprising:
(c) At least 30 credits of taught papers at 700 level from a secondary
subject area in the Schedule to the Master of Communication.
3.
Students whose primary subject area is Communication Management or
Marketing Communication must select Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or
Media Studies as their secondary subject area. Students whose primary
subject area is Expressive Arts, Linguistics, or Media Studies must select
Communication Management or Marketing Communication as their
secondary subject area.
4.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Communication will be awarded with an
Endorsement in the primary area of study.
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies
PGDipDevStud
Course Regulations
(b) shall normally complete 131.701 and 131.702;
Part I
(c) may include papers not specifically on development but which
are deemed pertinent to a candidate’s disciplinary specialism to
complete a total of 120 credits in the Diploma.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
1.
2.
3.
Candidates shall follow an approved course of study for not less than
one year. With the approval of the Academic Board, study for a limited
period may be undertaken at an institution outside the University.
Where a course of study includes a paper for which pre-requisites,
corequisites or linked paper(s) are listed in the Calendar, candidates must
fulfil the special requirements unless exemption is formally approved by
the Head of School which offers the paper concerned.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma a candidate:
(a) shall pass papers from the Schedule to these Regulations at the
700-level to the value of at least 120 credits;
Schedule to the Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies
131.701
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
131.702
Development Management
30
131.703
Gender and Development
30
131.704
Sustainable Development
30
131.706
Globalisation and Development
30
Graduate Status
131.707
Development Research Design
30
R 131.705
131.799
Research Report (30)
30
131.798
Research Report (60)
60
The Postgraduate Diploma in Discursive Therapies
PGDipDisTher
No new enrolments from 2011
(b) complete to the satisfaction of the Academic Board such
coursework and practical work as may be prescribed from time to
time for the approved course of study.
Course Regulations
5.
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Part II
1.
Before enrolment for this Diploma a candidate will seek approval of the
Head of School.
Eligibility
2.
(a) Criteria for approval for admission to the Diploma are a formal
professional psychology-, health- or counselling-related
qualification and relevant professional work experience.
(b) Before enrolling a candidate shall:
(i) have been awarded or qualified for a relevant Bachelor’s degree
from a New Zealand tertiary institution; or
(ii) have been admitted with equivalent status as eligible to proceed
to the Diploma; and
(iii) have relevant work experience in health, mental health
or counselling undertaken within five years of application for
admission to the diploma, as approved by the Head of School.
3.
A candidate shall satisfy all requirements for the Diploma within four
years of admission to the qualification.
4.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma every candidate shall normally:
(a) pass the prescribed papers in Psychology at the 700-level to a total
of at least 120 credits; and
The course for the Diploma comprises six papers to a total value of
120 credits, to be drawn from six papers (175.771–8 below), with the
opportunity to substitute a special topic paper for one of 175.773–8:
175.771
Contemporary Theoretical
Perspectives
30
175.772
Contemporary Therapeutic
Perspectives
30
175.773
Principles of Just Therapy
15
175.774
Issues of Cultures and Gender in
Psychological Practice
15
175.776
On-Line Seminar in Contemporary
Professional Development
15
175.778
Principles of Social Therapy
15
R 175.736 (2008)
Notes
1. Candidates who do not have sufficient approved Psychology
papers in their undergraduate degree and/or substantial relevant
work experience may be required by the Head of School to pass any
or all of the following papers: 175.302 Abnormal and Therapeutic
Psychology; 175.306 Assessment of Individual Differences;
175.316 Evolution, Culture and Mind; 175.707 Psychotherapy I:
Theory, Research and Practice; or any other specified papers before
being permitted to enrol.
2. Candidates who have completed either an undergraduate or a
postgraduate qualification in Psychology at least six years prior to
registration for the Diploma may be required by the Head of School
to pass 175.707 Psychotherapy I: Theory, Research and Practice or
any other specified papers before being permitted to enrol.
3.
A candidate must pass all papers to be awarded the Diploma.
Page 197
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Postgraduate Diploma in Emergency Management
PGDipEmergMgt
(Subject to CUAP approval)
130.799
30
Course Regulations
Research Report in Emergency
Management
131.701
Development and
Underdevelopment
30
131.702
Development Management
30
132.735
Natural Resource Planning
30
132.751
30
Part II
Eligibility
Natural Hazards and Resilient
Communities
144.724
Public Sector Management and
Law
30
1.
152.702
Advanced Strategic Management
30
152.707
Leading and Changing
Organisations
30
230.703
Techniques and Methods in
Evaluation Research
30
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Admission to the Postgraduate Diploma in Emergency Management is
open to students who have either:
(a) completed the Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management at an
appropriate level of academic achievement; or
(b) completed the Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management
at an appropriate level of academic achievement, combined with
relevant industry experience of an appropriate kind and duration.
Notes
1. Subject to approval by the Head of School, or nominee,
students may substitute up to 30 credits from relevant papers at the
700-level for 30 credits of List C papers.
Course Requirements
2.
A candidate shall follow a course of study comprising of 120 credits at
700-level including 30 credits from List A, at least 30 credits from List
B, and up to 60 credits from List C.
2. Students who have completed the GradDipEmergMgt prior
to 2012 should seek advice from the Head of School, or nominee,
regarding the appropriate selection of papers.
List A, Compulsory Paper, 30 credits from:
130.705
Emergency Management
30
List B, Qualification Papers, at least 30 credits from:
130.701
Natural Hazards
30
130.702
Coping with Disasters
30
List C, Qualification Papers, up to 60 credits from:
114.731
Advanced Occupational Safety
and Health
30
114.773
Hazard Management
30
130.701
Natural Hazards
30
130.702
Coping with Disasters
30
Transition Provisions
3.
Candidates who have commenced study and passed at least 30 credits
at 700-level towards the Graduate Diploma in Emergency Management
prior to 1 January 2012, and who have achieved a Grade Point Average
of 5.0 or better in those papers, may transfer to the Postgraduate
Diploma in Emergency Management from 1 January 2012.
4.
The provision to transfer to the Postgraduate Diploma will terminate at
the end of the 2013 academic year.
5.
Where a candidate exercises the transfer option, the 700-level credits
achieved towards the Graduate Diploma will be transferred to the
Postgraduate Diploma. The time period for eligibility for Distinction for
part-time candidates may be reduced in proportion to the quantum of
credit transfer.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science
PGDipHlthSc
Course Regulations
Part II
Course of Study
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
1.
To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Health Science
candidates shall pass a selection of papers from the BHlthSc(Hons)
Schedule to a minimum value of 120 credits.
2.
The subjects of examination for the Postgraduate Diploma in Health
Science are those listed in the Schedule for the BHlthSc(Hons). The
Academic Board may approve an examination in a combination of these
subjects. The Diploma may be awarded endorsed or unendorsed, with an
endorsement in a subject requiring 90 credits or more in that subject.
The Postgraduate Diploma in Industrial/Organisational Psychology
PGDipI/OPsych
Course Regulations
Part II
Part I
Before enrolment for this Diploma, a candidate will seek approval of the
Head of School.
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Page 198
Humanities and Social Sciences
Eligibility
Course of Study
1.
Before enrolling a candidate shall:
3.
(a) have qualified for a Masters or Doctoral degree specialising in I/O
Psychology from a New Zealand tertiary institution or similarly
recognised institution overseas. Normally this prerequisite degree
will include papers in I/O Psychology and I/O Psychology-related
topics, and/or a thesis related to I/O Psychology; and
A candidate shall follow an approved course of study for the equivalent
of one academic year’s full-time study and not more than three years’
part-time study.
4.
To qualify for the award of the Diploma, every candidate shall:
(b) be in paid or unpaid employment in an organisation where their
activities require them to engage in significant I/O Psychology
issues. This is determined by the Head of School from the job
description, to be provided by the student on the employer’s
letterhead and signed by an executive-level or human resources
manager. All candidates are required to supply this prior to
enrolment.
2.
Criteria for approval for admission to the Diploma will be:
(a) the relevance and standard of the candidate’s post-graduate studies;
(b) current and ongoing psychology-related employment. Presentation
of a letter, from an organisation approved by the Head of School,
stating that the candidate is currently employed in a position in
which the practice of I/O Psychology is a significant component.
This letter is to be signed by the workplace manager who is
supporting the enrolment.
(a) pass the following papers: 175.821 Professional Issues in the
Practice of I/O Psychology and 175.822 Practicum in I/O
Psychology;
(b) produce evidence to the Academic Board of the specified period
of approved practical work in the form of an employer’s certificate
of performance. This is to be provided prior to the examination in
175.822 and is intended to confirm that the candidate has completed
the equivalent of one year of full-time work.
5.
The course of the Diploma consists of the following compulsory papers
to a total value of 120 credits:
175.821
Professional Issues in the Practice
of Industrial/Organisational
Psychology
60
175.822
Practicum in Industrial/
Organisational Psychology
60
6.
A candidate must pass all components leading to this Diploma.
7.
In the event of a change in employment status that may adversely affect
the programme of study, the candidate may apply for a suspension of
enrolment.
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Security
PGDipIntSec
Part A
(Subject to CUAP approval)
149.701
The New Zealand Strategic
Environment
30
149.704
Command Studies
30
149.705
Strategic Issues in New Zealand
Defence and Foreign Policy
30
149.708
30
Part II
Eligibility
Joint, Interagency and
Multinational Operations
149.715
The Brunei Strategic Environment
30
1.
149.732
Public International Law for
Defence and Security
30
149.740
Security and Crime
30
149.741
Intelligence in the International
Security Environment
30
149.744
Intelligence Operations since 1939
30
149.760
Defence and Security Technology
30
International Relations: Theory and
Practice
30
Course Regulations
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
Before enrolling in the course for the Postgraduate Diploma in
International Security candidates shall:
(a) have completed a relevant bachelor’s degree; or
(b) be able to demonstrate scholarly work in conjunction with
extensive relevant professional experience appropriate for
Admission with Equivalent Status.
Course requirements
2.
Candidates will be required to pass an approved course of study (120
credits) that includes:
(a) 149.720 International Security;
Part B
200.761
(b) at least 60 credits from Part A, with at least one paper from
149.740, 149.741, or 149.744; and
Endorsements
(c) up to 30 credits from Part B.
3.
Compulsory Paper:
149.720
International Security
An endorsement in Intelligence is available. As part of the requirements
outlined above, candidates seeking the endorsement in Intelligence must
complete at least 60 credits from 149.740, 149.741, or 149.744.
30
Page 199
Humanities and Social Sciences
The Postgraduate Diploma in Māori Visual Arts
PGDipMVA
The Postgraduate Diploma in Māori Visual Arts offers a qualification for
students who have a degree or can demonstrate an appropriate qualification.
Note: Students intending to enrol for papers in Māori Visual Arts should
consult with the Head of School.
Course Regulations
and 30 credits from the Schedule of papers below;
or
150.720
Rangahau Whakairo: Pre-thesis
Practicum
120
Schedule of papers
Part I
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
150.701
Tino Rangatiratanga: Strategic
Māori Development
30
150.711
Te Tau-Ihu o te Reo: Advanced
Māori Literature
30
Part II
150.714
Tā Te Māori Rangahau Kōrero:
Māori Research Methodologies
30
150.715
Taonga Tuku Iho: Heritage Aotearoa 30
150.791
Kaupapa Motahake: Special Topic
30
167.742
Collection Management
30
167.743
Museum Management
30
167.744
Museums and the Public
30
1.
2.
A candidate shall follow an approved course of study of not less than one
year of full-time study and not more than three years’ part-time study.
Candidates are eligible to enrol in 150.720 Rangahau Whakairo: PreThesis Practicum if they are able to demonstrate a minimum of ten years’
exhibition or commission experience.
Either
150.707
Te Tataitanga Matatau (Matau):
Advanced Studio Practice
90
The Postgraduate Diploma in Museum Studies
PGDipMusStud
Course Regulations
167.742
Collection Management
30
Part I
167.743
Museum Management
30
These regulations are to be read in conjunction with all other Statutes
and Regulations of the University including the General Regulations for
Postgraduate Degrees, Diplomas and Certificates.
1
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