Roland | DS-50A | Owner`s manual | Roland DS-50A Owner`s manual

015
• Do not force the unit’s power-supply cord to share
an outlet with an unreasonable number of other
devices. Be especially careful when using
extension cords—the total power used by all
devices you have connected to the extension
cord’s outlet must never exceed the power rating
(watts/amperes) for the extension cord. Excessive
loads can cause the insulation on the cord to heat
up and eventually melt through.
...........................................................................................................
016
• Before using the unit in a foreign country, consult
with your retailer, the nearest Roland Service
Center, or an authorized Roland distributor, as
listed on the "Information" page.
...........................................................................................................
020
• Keep lithium batteries out of reach of small
children. If a child has accidentally swallowed a
battery, see a doctor immediately.
...........................................................................................................
021
• Lithium batteries must never be recharged,
heated, taken apart, or thrown into a fire or water.
...........................................................................................................
022a
• Always turn the unit off and unplug the power
cord before attempting installation of the circuit
board (model no. VS8F-2; Chapter29).
...........................................................................................................
023
• DO NOT play a CD-ROM disc on a conventional
audio CD player. The resulting sound may be of a
level that could cause permanent hearing loss.
Damage to speakers or other system components
may result.
...........................................................................................................
101a
• The unit should be located so that its location or
position does not interfere with its proper ventilation.
...........................................................................................................
102b
• Always grasp only the plug on the power-supply
cord when plugging into, or unplugging from, an
outlet or this unit.
...........................................................................................................
104
• Try to prevent cords and cables from becoming
entangled. Also, all cords and cables should be
placed so they are out of the reach of children.
...........................................................................................................
106
• Never climb on top of, nor place heavy objects on
the unit.
...........................................................................................................
107b
• Never handle the power cord or its plugs with
wet hands when plugging into, or unplugging
from, an outlet or this unit.
...........................................................................................................
108a
• Before moving the unit, disconnect the power
plug from the outlet, and pull out all cords from
external devices.
...........................................................................................................
109a
• Before cleaning the unit, turn off the power and
unplug the power cord from the outlet .
...........................................................................................................
110a
• Whenever you suspect the possibility of lightning
in your area, pull the plug on the power cord out
of the outlet (Page 80).
...........................................................................................................
113
• Use only the specified type (model no. CR2032) of
lithium battery (Chapter29). Be sure to insert it as
directed (to ensure correct polarity).
...........................................................................................................
114
• Used lithium batteries must be disposed of in
compliance with whatever regulations for their
safe disposal that may be observed in the region
in which you live.
...........................................................................................................
115a
• Install only the specified circuit board(s) (model
no. VS8F-2). Remove only the specified screws
(Chapter29).
...........................................................................................................
118
• Should you remove the optical connector caps and
the screws, make sure to put them in a safe place
out of children's reach, so there is no chance of
them being swallowed accidentally.
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3
Important Notes
In addition to the items listed under “IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS” and “USING THE UNIT SAFELY” on pages 2
and 3, please read and observe the following:
Power Supply
301
• Do not use this unit on the same power circuit with any
device that will generate line noise (such as an electric
motor or variable lighting system).
307
• Before connecting this unit to other devices, turn off the
power to all units. This will help prevent malfunctions
and/or damage to speakers or other devices.
Maintenance
401a
• For everyday cleaning wipe the unit with a soft, dry cloth
or one that has been slightly dampened with water. To
remove stubborn dirt, use a cloth impregnated with a
mild, non-abrasive detergent. Afterwards, be sure to wipe
the unit thoroughly with a soft, dry cloth.
402
• Never use benzine, thinners, alcohol or solvents of any
kind, to avoid the possibility of discoloration and/or
deformation.
Repairs and Data
452
Placement
351
• Using the unit near power amplifiers (or other equipment
containing large power transformers) may induce hum.
To alleviate the problem, change the orientation of this
unit; or move it farther away from the source of interference.
352
• This device may interfere with radio and television
reception. Do not use this device in the vicinity of such
receivers.
• Please be aware that all data contained in the unit’s
memory may be lost when the unit is sent for repairs.
Important data should always be backed up on a storage
device (e.g., CD-R/RW disc or Zip disk), or written down
on paper (when possible). During repairs, due care is
taken to avoid the loss of data. However, in certain cases
(such as when circuitry related to memory itself is out of
order), we regret that it may not be possible to restore the
data, and Roland assumes no liability concerning such
loss of data.
Memory Backup
353
• Noise may be produced if wireless communications
devices, such as cell phones, are operated in the vicinity of
this unit. Such noise could occur when receiving or
initiating a call, or while conversing. Should you
experience such problems, you should relocate such
wireless devices so they are at a greater distance from this
unit, or switch them off.
354a
• Do not expose the unit to direct sunlight, place it near
devices that radiate heat, leave it inside an enclosed
vehicle, or otherwise subject it to temperature extremes.
Excessive heat can deform or discolor the unit.
501b
• This unit contains a battery which powers the unit’s
memory circuits while the main power is off. When this
battery becomes weak, the message shown below will
appear in the display. Once you see this message, have the
battery replaced with a fresh one as soon as possible to
avoid the loss of all data in memory. To have the battery
replaced, consult with your retailer, the nearest Roland
Service Center, or an authorized Roland distributor, as
listed on the “Information” page.
355
• To avoid possible breakdown, do not use the unit in a wet
area, such as an area exposed to rain or other moisture.
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Additional Precautions
551
•
Please be aware that the contents of memory can be
irretrievably lost as a result of a malfunction, or the
improper operation of the unit. To protect yourself
against the risk of loosing important data, we
recommend that you periodically save a backup copy of
important data you have stored in the unit’s memory on
a storage device (e.g., CD-R/RW disc or Zip disk).
Handling the Internal Hard
Disk Drive
For details on hard disk handling, refer also to the
instructions that accompanied your hard disk.
• Before performing any of the following actions, be sure to
perform the shutdown (See User Guide p. 24) procedure.
Failure to do so may result in the loss of project data or
damage to the hard disk.
552
• Unfortunately, it may be impossible to restore the
contents of data that was stored on a storage device
(e.g., CD-R/RW disc or Zip disk) once it has been lost.
Roland Corporation assumes no liability concerning such
loss of data.
553
• Use a reasonable amount of care when using the unit’s
buttons, sliders, or other controls; and when using its
jacks and connectors. Rough handling can lead to
malfunctions.
554
• Never strike or apply strong pressure to the display.
556
• When connecting / disconnecting all cables, grasp the
connector itself—never pull on the cable. This way you
will avoid causing shorts, or damage to the cable’s
internal elements.
557
• Turning off the power of the VS-2480
• Turning off the power of the disk drive connected with
SCSI connector
• While using the VS-2480, be careful not to subject the unit
to vibration or shock, and avoid moving the unit while the
power is turned on.
• Install the unit on a solid, level surface in an area free
from vibration. If the unit must be installed at an angle, be
sure the installation does not exceed the permissible
range.
• Avoid using the unit immediately after it has been moved
to a location with a level of humidity that is greatly
different than its former location. Rapid changes in the
environment can cause condensation to form inside the
drive, which will adversely affect the operation of the
drive. When the unit has been moved, allow it to become
accustomed to the new environment (allow a few hours)
before operating it.
• A small amount of heat will radiate from the unit during
normal operation.
Handling the Zip Disk Drive
558a
• Install the unit on a solid, level surface in an area free
from vibration. If the unit must be installed at an angle, be
sure the installation does not exceed the permissible
range: upward, 12°; downward, 12°.
• To avoid disturbing your neighbors, try to keep the unit’s
volume at reasonable levels. You may prefer to use
headphones, so you do not need to be concerned about
those around you (especially when it is late at night).
559a
• When you need to transport the unit, package it in the box
(including padding) that it came in, if possible. Otherwise,
you will need to use equivalent packaging materials.
562
• Use a cable from Roland to make the connection. If using
some other make of connection cable, please note the
following precautions.
• Some connection cables contain resistors. Do not use
cables that incorporate resistors for connecting to this
unit. The use of such cables can cause the sound level
to be extremely low, or impossible to hear. For information on cable specifications, contact the manufacturer of the cable.
602
603
• Avoid using the unit immediately after it has been moved
to a location with a level of humidity that is greatly
different than its former location. Rapid changes in the
environment can cause condensation to form inside the
drive, which will adversely affect the operation of the
drive and/or damage Zip disks. When the unit has been
moved, allow it to become accustomed to the new
environment (allow a few hours) before operating it.
604
• To insert a disk, push it gently but firmly into the drive—
it will click into place. To remove a disk, press the EJECT
button firmly. Do not use excessive force to remove a disk
which is lodged in the drive.
606
• Remove any disk from the drive before powering up or
down.
607
• To prevent damage to the disk drive’s heads, always try
to hold the Zip disk in a level position (not tilted in any
direction) while inserting it into the drive. Push it in
firmly, but gently. Never use excessive force.
608
• To avoid the risk of malfunction and/or damage, insert
only Zip disks into the disk drive. Never insert any other
type of disk. Avoid getting paper clips, coins, or any other
foreign objects inside the drive.
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Handling Zip Disks
Handling CD-R/RW Discs
651
651
• Zip disks contain a plastic disk with a thin coating of
magnetic storage medium. Microscopic precision is
required to enable storage of large amounts of data on
such a small surface area. To preserve their integrity,
please observe the following when handling Zip disks:
• Please observe the following when handling CD-R/RW
discs:
• Never touch the shiny underside (encoded surface) the
disc.
• Do not use or store CD-R/RW discs in dirty or dusty
areas.
• Never touch the magnetic medium inside the disk.
• Do not use or store Zip disks in dirty or dusty areas.
• Do not subject Zip disks to temperature extremes (e.g.,
direct sunlight in an enclosed vehicle). Recommended
temperature range: -22 to 51° C (-7.6 to 123.8° F).
• Do not expose Zip disks to strong magnetic fields, such
as those generated by loudspeakers.
653
• The identification label should be firmly affixed to the
disk. Should the label come loose while the disk is in the
drive, it may be difficult to remove the disk.
654
• Store all disks in a safe place to avoid damaging them,
and to protect them from dust, dirt, and other hazards. By
using a dirty or dust-ridden disk, you risk damaging the
disk, as well as causing the disk drive to malfunction.
Handling CD-R/RW Drive
DO NOT play a CD-ROM disc or CD-R/RW disc which
contain project data on a conventional audio CD player. The
resulting sound may be of a level that could cause
permanent hearing loss. Damage to speakers or other system
components may result.
602
• Install the unit on a solid, level surface in an area free
from vibration. If the unit must be installed at an angle, be
sure the installation does not exceed the permissible
range: upward, 5°; downward, 5°.
603
• Avoid using the unit immediately after it has been moved
to a location with a level of humidity that is greatly
different than its former location. Rapid changes in the
environment can cause condensation to form inside the
drive, which will adversely affect the operation of the
drive and/or damage CD-ROM, CD-R/RW discs. When
the unit has been moved, allow it to become accustomed
to the new environment (allow a few hours) before
operating it.
606
• Remove any disc from the drive before powering up or
down.
• When transporting the CD-R/RW drive, remove the disc
from the loading tray. Also, avoid having the loading tray
face downwards when carrying it.
• Do not knock, shake, or move the drive while the power
to the unit is on.
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• Do not subject CD-R/RW discs to temperature
extremes (e.g., direct sunlight in an enclosed vehicle).
Recommended temperature range: 10 to 50 ° C (50 to
122 ° F).
• Put the disc back into its case for storage.
• Do not leave discs in the CD-R/RW drive for extended
periods.
• Do not affix stickers, labels, or other such items to the face
of discs.
801
• Avoid touching or scratching the shiny underside
(encoded surface) of the disc. Damaged or dirty CD-ROM
discs may not be read properly. Keep your discs clean
using a commercially available CD cleaner.
• Using a soft, dry cloth, wipe the disc from the center to the
circular direction.
• Avoid ending or twisting discs, as this can adversely
affect them to extent that data can no longer be read from,
nor written to them. Device malfunction can be caused as
well.
Handling CD-ROMs
801
• Avoid touching or scratching the shiny underside
(encoded surface) of the disc. Damaged or dirty CD-ROM
discs may not be read properly. Keep your discs clean
using a commercially available CD cleaner.
Copyright
851
• Unauthorized recording, distribution, sale, lending,
public performance, broadcasting, or the like, in whole or
in part, of a work (musical composition, video, broadcast,
public performance, or the like) whose copyright is held
by a third party is prohibited by law.
852a
• When exchanging audio signals through a digital
connection with an external instrument, this unit can
perform recording without being subject to the restrictions of the Serial Copy Management System (SCMS).
This is because the unit is intended solely for musical
production, and is designed not to be subject to restrictions as long as it is used to record works (such as your
own compositions) that do not infringe on the copyrights
of others. (SCMS is a feature that prohibits second-generation and later copying through a digital connection. It is
built into MD recorders and other consumer digital-audio
equipment as a copyright-protection feature.)
853
• Do not use this unit for purposes that could infringe on a
copyright held by a third party. We assume no responsibility whatsoever with regard to any infringements of
third-party copyrights arising through your use of this
unit.
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Table of Contents
Step-by-Step Instruction Finder
1—Welcome
19
27
About this Manual ..........................................................................................................................................................
How the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual is Organized .................................................................................................
Names ........................................................................................................................................................................
Note, Tip, Glossary and Warning Icons ...............................................................................................................
Other Documents in the VS-2480 Box ..........................................................................................................................
Getting More Help ..........................................................................................................................................................
The Roland US Web site .........................................................................................................................................
The Roland US Faxback System ............................................................................................................................
Roland US Product Support ...................................................................................................................................
2—Getting Around
27
27
28
28
29
29
29
29
29
31
The Top Panel of the VS-2480 ........................................................................................................................................
Analog Input Jacks ..................................................................................................................................................
Monitor/Display Controls .....................................................................................................................................
Channel Strips ..........................................................................................................................................................
Display Area .............................................................................................................................................................
TRACK EDIT Area ..................................................................................................................................................
EZ ROUTING, AUTOMIX, CD-RW/MASTERING and MENU Buttons .......................................................
General Controls ......................................................................................................................................................
SCRUB, PREVIEW and Transport Buttons ..........................................................................................................
LOCATOR/MARKER/SCENE Area ...................................................................................................................
The Rear Panel of the VS-2480 ......................................................................................................................................
3—Introduction to the VS-2480
51
What’s Inside the VS-2480? ............................................................................................................................................
Input Jacks and Connectors ....................................................................................................................................
The Mixing Console .................................................................................................................................................
The Internal Effects ..................................................................................................................................................
The Hard Disk Recorder .........................................................................................................................................
Output Jacks and Connectors ................................................................................................................................
Signal Flow .......................................................................................................................................................................
Projects ..............................................................................................................................................................................
Busses in the VS-2480 .....................................................................................................................................................
What’s a Bus? ............................................................................................................................................................
Achieving Perfect Levels ................................................................................................................................................
What’s “Clipping?” .................................................................................................................................................
How Do I Get Good Levels? ..................................................................................................................................
The Importance of Backing Up .....................................................................................................................................
4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
31
31
32
33
36
37
39
41
42
44
46
51
51
52
54
55
55
56
56
57
57
58
58
58
59
61
Things You’ll Need ......................................................................................................................................................... 61
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Table of Contents
Power ......................................................................................................................................................................... 61
A Way to Listen to the VS-2480 .............................................................................................................................. 61
Getting Ready .................................................................................................................................................................. 61
Powering Up .................................................................................................................................................................... 63
What Happens During the VS-2480’s Power-Up ................................................................................................ 63
Configuring the VS-2480 ................................................................................................................................................ 64
Setting Up the VGA Monitor, Mouse and Keyboard .......................................................................................... 64
Setting the VS-2480’s Clock ..................................................................................................................................... 65
A Few Fundamental Concepts ...................................................................................................................................... 65
Selection ..................................................................................................................................................................... 65
Switches ..................................................................................................................................................................... 66
Parameters and Values ............................................................................................................................................ 66
Tools You’ll Use All the Time ........................................................................................................................................ 66
The Cursor/ZOOM Buttons ................................................................................................................................... 66
The F Buttons ............................................................................................................................................................ 66
Pages .......................................................................................................................................................................... 67
The TIME/VALUE Dial .......................................................................................................................................... 67
The ENTER/YES and EXIT/NO Buttons ............................................................................................................. 67
The SHIFT Button ..................................................................................................................................................... 68
Using a Mouse .......................................................................................................................................................... 68
Using an ASCII Keyboard ....................................................................................................................................... 69
Using the VGA Info Display ................................................................................................................................... 70
UNDO and REDO .................................................................................................................................................... 72
Naming ...................................................................................................................................................................... 73
Entering Numbers with the Numeric Keypad .................................................................................................... 74
If You’re Using DS-90A or DS-50A Monitors .............................................................................................................. 75
Setting Up for Roland’s DS-90A and DS-50A Digital Monitors ........................................................................ 75
Adjusting Your Listening Level .................................................................................................................................... 75
Playing the Factory Demos ............................................................................................................................................ 76
“What You Don’t Know” ........................................................................................................................................ 76
“Don’t Stop” .............................................................................................................................................................. 80
Turning Off the VS-2480 ................................................................................................................................................. 80
Turning Off the VS-2480 .......................................................................................................................................... 80
5—Understanding Effects
81
Harnessing the VS-2480’s Effects .................................................................................................................................. 81
Dry and Wet .............................................................................................................................................................. 81
Effect Routings ................................................................................................................................................................. 81
Insert Effects .............................................................................................................................................................. 82
Loop Effects ............................................................................................................................................................... 82
Master Effects ................................................................................................................................................................... 83
External Effects ................................................................................................................................................................ 83
Getting the Most From Your Effect Processors ........................................................................................................... 84
6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
85
VS-2480 Hard Disk Drives ............................................................................................................................................. 85
What’s a Hard Drive? .............................................................................................................................................. 85
How a VS-2480 Hard Drive Organizes Data ........................................................................................................ 86
Preparing a Hard Drive for Use ............................................................................................................................. 86
Using Other V-Studio Drives ................................................................................................................................. 86
How Audio Is Recorded on a VS-2480 Hard Drive .................................................................................................... 86
How Recordings Are Played Back ................................................................................................................................ 87
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Table of Contents
Random Access ........................................................................................................................................................
What’s Pointer-Based Playback? ...........................................................................................................................
Non-Destructive, Pointer-Based Editing .....................................................................................................................
Pointer-Based Editing ..............................................................................................................................................
What Is a VS-2480 Track? ...............................................................................................................................................
The Power of V-Tracks ............................................................................................................................................
Track Editing Basics ........................................................................................................................................................
About Editing Phrases ............................................................................................................................................
About Editing Regions ............................................................................................................................................
7—Project and Drive Operations
87
87
88
88
89
90
90
90
91
93
Navigating the PROJECT Menu Screens ..................................................................................................................... 93
Working with the PROJECT LIST ......................................................................................................................... 93
About “Store Current?” Messages ........................................................................................................................ 94
Project Operations ........................................................................................................................................................... 95
About F6 (MARK) .................................................................................................................................................... 95
SELECT ...................................................................................................................................................................... 95
NEW ........................................................................................................................................................................... 96
NAME ........................................................................................................................................................................ 99
PROTECT .................................................................................................................................................................. 99
OPTIMIZE ............................................................................................................................................................... 100
Destination Drive Selection .................................................................................................................................. 101
COPY ....................................................................................................................................................................... 101
ERASE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 102
SPLIT ........................................................................................................................................................................ 103
COMBINE ............................................................................................................................................................... 104
BACKUP ................................................................................................................................................................. 105
RECOVER ............................................................................................................................................................... 107
IMPORT .................................................................................................................................................................. 108
EXPORT ................................................................................................................................................................... 109
Drive Operations ........................................................................................................................................................... 111
Disk Maintenance .................................................................................................................................................. 111
Fragmentation ........................................................................................................................................................ 112
Format Drive .......................................................................................................................................................... 113
Clear Partition ........................................................................................................................................................ 115
Drive Check ............................................................................................................................................................ 116
8—The Home Screen
119
Elements of the Home Screen ......................................................................................................................................
Display Pop-Up Menu Button .............................................................................................................................
Current Channel Display ......................................................................................................................................
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knob Display ..................................................................................................................
Meters Display .......................................................................................................................................................
Position Bar .............................................................................................................................................................
The Playlist .............................................................................................................................................................
Meter Switches .......................................................................................................................................................
Input Peak Indicators ............................................................................................................................................
Current Time Location Display ...........................................................................................................................
Clock, Calendar ......................................................................................................................................................
Using the Fader/Pan Display .....................................................................................................................................
The F/P Switches ...................................................................................................................................................
About The ID Buttons ..................................................................................................................................................
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119
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Table of Contents
9—Working with Input Signals
129
Analog Input Signals .................................................................................................................................................... 129
Making Analog Connections ................................................................................................................................ 129
Phantom Power ............................................................................................................................................................. 130
Setting Analog Input Levels ................................................................................................................................. 130
Digital Input Signals ..................................................................................................................................................... 131
Digital Connections ................................................................................................................................................ 131
Selecting the Desired Digital Inputs .................................................................................................................... 131
Digital Considerations ........................................................................................................................................... 132
The Master Clock .................................................................................................................................................... 132
Recording S/P DIF-Format Digital Input Signals ............................................................................................. 134
Routing Input Signals to Input Channels .................................................................................................................. 135
Choosing an Input Patching Screen .................................................................................................................... 135
How Input Connections Work ............................................................................................................................. 136
Patching Input Connections ................................................................................................................................. 136
10—Using the Digital Mixer
137
Changing Channels ....................................................................................................................................................... 137
Switching Between Input, Track, Aux and FX Channels ................................................................................. 137
Channel Selection .......................................................................................................................................................... 138
Selecting a Channel for Editing ............................................................................................................................ 138
About the Channel Faders ........................................................................................................................................... 138
Setting a Fader to Unity Gain and Centering its Panning ................................................................................ 138
Using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs ..................................................................................................................... 139
Adjusting Stereo Positioning ................................................................................................................................ 139
Setting Dynamics and EQ Parameters for One Channel .................................................................................. 139
The KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 Button ................................................................................................. 140
To Set What the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature Controls ........................................................................... 140
To Turn the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature On and Off .............................................................................. 141
Activating Knob or Fader Control of Aux Send Levels .................................................................................... 141
Controlling a Parameter of Your Choice ............................................................................................................ 141
The MASTER Fader ...................................................................................................................................................... 142
Muting and Soloing Channel Signals ......................................................................................................................... 142
Mute Mode .............................................................................................................................................................. 143
Solo Mode ................................................................................................................................................................ 143
Scenes .............................................................................................................................................................................. 144
Basic Scene Operations .......................................................................................................................................... 144
Editing Scenes ......................................................................................................................................................... 145
Scenes in Safe Mode ............................................................................................................................................... 146
Resetting Mixer Parameters ......................................................................................................................................... 147
11—Input and Track Channel Tools
149
Viewing a CH EDIT Screen .......................................................................................................................................... 149
Introduction to the CH EDIT Screens ......................................................................................................................... 149
How the CH EDIT Screens Are Organized ........................................................................................................ 149
The CH EDIT Screens ................................................................................................................................................... 150
The CH EDIT VIEW Screen .................................................................................................................................. 150
The DYN Screen ..................................................................................................................................................... 157
The EQ Screen ......................................................................................................................................................... 162
The FX Ins Screen ................................................................................................................................................... 166
The Surrnd Screen .................................................................................................................................................. 166
The CH EDIT P.BAY Screen ................................................................................................................................. 166
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Table of Contents
The CH EDIT ASSIGN Screen .............................................................................................................................
Parameter View ......................................................................................................................................................
Assorted CH EDIT Tools .............................................................................................................................................
The CH EDIT VIEW CpyPRM Button ................................................................................................................
The DYN and EQ Screen RESET Buttons ...........................................................................................................
12—Working with Input Channels
171
Introduction to Input Channel Routing .............................................................................................................
Routing Linked Stereo Input Channels ..............................................................................................................
Routing an Input Channel Signal to a Track .............................................................................................................
Quick-Routing Input Channels to Tracks ..........................................................................................................
Input Signal Routing on the EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen ...............................................................................
Input Channel Signals and the Main Mix ..................................................................................................................
Removing Input Channel Signals from the Main Mix .....................................................................................
Adding an Input Channel’s Signal to the Main Mix ........................................................................................
Routing an Input Channel Signal to a Direct Bus ....................................................................................................
13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
171
171
172
172
174
175
175
175
175
177
The Transport Buttons ..................................................................................................................................................
The Main Transport Buttons ................................................................................................................................
Special Transport Buttons .....................................................................................................................................
The SHUTTLE Ring ...............................................................................................................................................
The TRACK STATUS Buttons .....................................................................................................................................
How the TRACK STATUS Buttons Work ..........................................................................................................
Recording .......................................................................................................................................................................
Before Recording a Track ......................................................................................................................................
Recording a New Track ........................................................................................................................................
Playback .........................................................................................................................................................................
Basic Playback Procedure .....................................................................................................................................
Moving Through a Project ....................................................................................................................................
Using Jump .............................................................................................................................................................
Looped Playback ....................................................................................................................................................
Vari Pitch Playback ................................................................................................................................................
Preview ....................................................................................................................................................................
Scrub ........................................................................................................................................................................
Locators ..........................................................................................................................................................................
Basic Locator Operations ......................................................................................................................................
Other Locator Operations .....................................................................................................................................
Switching Automatically to Locator Mode ........................................................................................................
Locators in Safe Mode ...........................................................................................................................................
Markers ...........................................................................................................................................................................
Placing a Marker ....................................................................................................................................................
Moving the Timeline to a Marker ........................................................................................................................
Clearing Markers ...................................................................................................................................................
Editing Markers .....................................................................................................................................................
Punching .........................................................................................................................................................................
Simple and Dual Monitoring ...............................................................................................................................
Before You Punch ..................................................................................................................................................
Punching In and Out Manually ...........................................................................................................................
Auto-Punching .......................................................................................................................................................
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
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14—Working with Track Channels
195
Bouncing ......................................................................................................................................................................... 195
The Mechanics of Bouncing .................................................................................................................................. 196
Mono and Stereo Bouncing ................................................................................................................................... 196
First Things First ..................................................................................................................................................... 196
Link the Destination Tracks For a Stereo Bounce .............................................................................................. 197
Routing Tracks for a Bounce ................................................................................................................................. 197
Listening as You Bounce ....................................................................................................................................... 200
Mixing the Bounce ................................................................................................................................................. 200
Performing the Bounce .......................................................................................................................................... 201
Sending a Track Channel’s Signal to a Direct Bus .................................................................................................... 202
Routing a Track to a Direct Bus ............................................................................................................................ 202
Mixing ............................................................................................................................................................................. 202
The Mechanics of Mixing ...................................................................................................................................... 202
15—The Aux and Direct Busses
205
Aux Busses ..................................................................................................................................................................... 205
Aux Bus Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 205
When Would You Use an Aux Bus? .................................................................................................................... 205
Sending a Signal to an Aux Bus ........................................................................................................................... 206
Stereo Aux Busses .................................................................................................................................................. 206
Aux Bus Levels ....................................................................................................................................................... 206
Configuring an Aux Bus ....................................................................................................................................... 207
Direct Busses .................................................................................................................................................................. 208
When Would You Use a Direct Bus? ................................................................................................................... 208
Sending a Signal to a Direct Bus .......................................................................................................................... 209
Direct Bus Levels .................................................................................................................................................... 209
Configuring a Direct Bus ....................................................................................................................................... 209
Aux Bus/Direct Bus Strategy ...................................................................................................................................... 210
Sending Signals to Internal Effects ...................................................................................................................... 210
Sending Signals to External Devices ................................................................................................................... 210
Sending Signals to Tracks ..................................................................................................................................... 210
Creating a Headphone Mix Using an Aux Bus ......................................................................................................... 211
16—Using Effects
213
Using Loop Effects ........................................................................................................................................................ 213
Setting Up an Internal Loop Effect ...................................................................................................................... 213
Setting Up an External Loop Effect ..................................................................................................................... 215
Inserting an Effect .......................................................................................................................................................... 216
About Insert Effects ................................................................................................................................................ 216
Input and Track Channel Insert Effects .............................................................................................................. 216
MASTER Bus Insert Effects ................................................................................................................................... 219
Selecting, Editing and Saving Effect Patches ............................................................................................................. 220
The EFFECT VIEW Screen .................................................................................................................................... 220
The Algorithm View Screen .................................................................................................................................. 221
Selecting Effect Patches ......................................................................................................................................... 221
Editing Effect Patches ............................................................................................................................................ 223
Saving Effect Patches ............................................................................................................................................. 224
Speaker Modeling .......................................................................................................................................................... 225
Using Speaker Modeling ....................................................................................................................................... 225
Microphone Modeling .................................................................................................................................................. 226
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17—Working with FX Return Channels
227
The FX Return Channel Fader .....................................................................................................................................
FX Return CH EDIT Tools ...........................................................................................................................................
The Main FX Return CH EDIT Screen ................................................................................................................
The FX Return Parameter View Screen ..............................................................................................................
Routing Effects to Tracks .............................................................................................................................................
Quick Routing an FX Return Channel ................................................................................................................
FX Return Routing on the EZ Routing VIEW Screen .......................................................................................
Adding Effects to a Headphone Mix ..........................................................................................................................
18—Editing Tracks
227
227
228
231
231
232
233
234
235
Editing Concepts and Overview .................................................................................................................................
Phrases and Regions ..............................................................................................................................................
Edit Points ...............................................................................................................................................................
Performing Edits ...........................................................................................................................................................
The Appearance of Selected Tracks, Phrases and Regions ..............................................................................
Where Editing Takes Place ...................................................................................................................................
Editing Methods .....................................................................................................................................................
Edit Messages .........................................................................................................................................................
Editing with a Mouse ............................................................................................................................................
Editing with the TRACK EDIT Buttons ..............................................................................................................
Editing from the TRACK Menu ...........................................................................................................................
19—Phrase Editing Operations
255
COPY ..............................................................................................................................................................................
MOVE .............................................................................................................................................................................
TRIM IN ..........................................................................................................................................................................
TRIM OUT ......................................................................................................................................................................
DELETE ..........................................................................................................................................................................
SPLIT ...............................................................................................................................................................................
NEW ................................................................................................................................................................................
NORMALIZE .................................................................................................................................................................
DIVIDE ...........................................................................................................................................................................
NAME .............................................................................................................................................................................
Take Mngr ......................................................................................................................................................................
20—Region Editing Operations
255
257
257
258
258
258
259
260
260
261
262
263
COPY ..............................................................................................................................................................................
MOVE .............................................................................................................................................................................
INSERT ...........................................................................................................................................................................
CUT .................................................................................................................................................................................
ERASE .............................................................................................................................................................................
COMP/EXP. ..................................................................................................................................................................
IMPORT ..........................................................................................................................................................................
EXCHANGE ..................................................................................................................................................................
ARRANGE .....................................................................................................................................................................
NAME .............................................................................................................................................................................
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270
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
273
Understanding the Phrase Pads .................................................................................................................................. 274
What a Phrase Pad Plays ....................................................................................................................................... 274
Phrase Pad Setup .................................................................................................................................................... 274
Activating Phrase Pad Mode ................................................................................................................................ 275
Playing the Pads in Phrase Pad Mode ................................................................................................................ 275
Sequencing a Phrase Pad Performance ...................................................................................................................... 275
Activating Phrase Sequence Mode ...................................................................................................................... 275
The PHRASE SEQ STATUS Buttons ................................................................................................................... 275
Playing the Pads in Phrase Sequence Mode ....................................................................................................... 275
The PHRASE SEQUENCE Screens ...................................................................................................................... 276
What the Appearance of Sequenced Data Means ............................................................................................. 277
The Phrase Sequencer Grid ................................................................................................................................... 277
Phrase Sequencer Undo ......................................................................................................................................... 277
Realtime Phrase Sequencing ................................................................................................................................. 278
Step Entry ................................................................................................................................................................ 279
Phrase Pad Button Summary ................................................................................................................................ 280
Editing a Phrase Sequence ........................................................................................................................................... 281
Phrase and Region Editing of Phrase Sequenced Data ..................................................................................... 281
Phrase Sequence Editing Tools ............................................................................................................................ 281
Controlling the Sound of Sequenced Tracks ............................................................................................................. 285
Phrase Sequence Bouncing ........................................................................................................................................... 285
22—Working with the VS-2480 Outputs
287
The VS-2480 Outputs .................................................................................................................................................... 287
Output Pairs ............................................................................................................................................................ 287
Analog Output Jacks .............................................................................................................................................. 287
Digital Output Connectors ................................................................................................................................... 287
Output Signal Routing .................................................................................................................................................. 288
Bus Routing ............................................................................................................................................................. 288
Track Direct Outs ................................................................................................................................................... 289
23—EZ Routing
291
The EZ ROUTING Screens ........................................................................................................................................... 291
Navigating the EZ ROUTING Screens ................................................................................................................ 291
EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen ................................................................................................................................. 292
The EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY Screen ............................................................................................................. 292
The EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN Screen ................................................................................................... 293
The EZ ROUTING LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN Screen ......................................................................................... 294
EZ Routing Tools ........................................................................................................................................................... 295
Saving and Loading EZ Routing Templates ............................................................................................................. 296
Saving an EZ Routing Template .......................................................................................................................... 296
Loading an EZ Routing Template ........................................................................................................................ 297
24—MIDI and Synchronization
299
MIDI Operations ............................................................................................................................................................ 299
VS-2480 MIDI Basics .............................................................................................................................................. 299
V.Fader—The VS-2480 MIDI Control Surface ................................................................................................... 300
Remote MIDI Control of the VS-2480 .................................................................................................................. 301
Remote MIDI Storage of VS-2480 Settings ......................................................................................................... 304
MIDI Metronome ................................................................................................................................................... 305
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Synchronization .............................................................................................................................................................
Why Sync the VS-2480? .........................................................................................................................................
Basic Synchronization Concepts ..........................................................................................................................
Working with a Sync Track ..................................................................................................................................
Working with a Tempo Map ................................................................................................................................
Syncing an External Device to the VS-2480 ........................................................................................................
Syncing the VS-2480 to an External Device ........................................................................................................
Exchanging Digital Audio Data During Synchronization ...............................................................................
25—Surround
319
What is Surround? ........................................................................................................................................................
Surround Formats ..................................................................................................................................................
How the VS-2480 Delivers Surround .........................................................................................................................
Turning on Surround Mode ........................................................................................................................................
Positioning a Signal in the Surround Field ...............................................................................................................
Adjusting Master Surround Bus Levels .....................................................................................................................
26—Automix
307
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319
320
321
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323
325
The Benefits of Automix ..............................................................................................................................................
How Automix Works ...................................................................................................................................................
The AUTOMIX Screen ..........................................................................................................................................
Activating Automix Mode ....................................................................................................................................
The AUTOMIX STATUS Buttons ........................................................................................................................
Recording Automix Data .............................................................................................................................................
Realtime Automix Recording ...............................................................................................................................
Realtime Punching of Automix Data ..................................................................................................................
Snapshot Recording of Parameter Values ..........................................................................................................
Playing Back Automix Data ........................................................................................................................................
Editing Automix Data ..................................................................................................................................................
Automix Editing Concepts ...................................................................................................................................
Automix Editing Methods ....................................................................................................................................
Automix Editing Operations ................................................................................................................................
Micro-Editing Automix Data ...............................................................................................................................
27—Mastering and CD-R/RW Operations
339
Mastering ........................................................................................................................................................................
Mixing for Mastering ............................................................................................................................................
Important Mastering Concepts ............................................................................................................................
Working in the VS-2480 Mastering Room ..........................................................................................................
Editing Mastering Tracks ......................................................................................................................................
Placing CD Track Markers ...................................................................................................................................
CD-R/RW Operations ..................................................................................................................................................
Creating an Audio CD ..........................................................................................................................................
Erasing a CD-RW Disk ..........................................................................................................................................
If You Encounter Error Messages During CD Burning ....................................................................................
The CD Player Feature ..........................................................................................................................................
.WAV File Importing ............................................................................................................................................
Exporting Tracks and Phrases as .WAV Files ....................................................................................................
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28—Utility Menu Parameters
359
The Main UTILITY Menu Screen ................................................................................................................................ 359
SYSTEM .......................................................................................................................................................................... 360
PHANTOM SW ...................................................................................................................................................... 360
EXT LEVEL METER (MB-24) ............................................................................................................................... 360
DRIVE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 361
VGA .......................................................................................................................................................................... 361
PS/2 MOUSE .......................................................................................................................................................... 362
PS/2 KEYBOARD .................................................................................................................................................. 362
GLOBAL ......................................................................................................................................................................... 362
OPERATION DISPLAY ........................................................................................................................................ 365
PROJECT ......................................................................................................................................................................... 366
DIGITAL I/0 ........................................................................................................................................................... 366
DISPLAY .................................................................................................................................................................. 367
PLAYREC ....................................................................................................................................................................... 367
VARI PITCH ........................................................................................................................................................... 368
SOLO/MUTE .......................................................................................................................................................... 368
PREVIEW ................................................................................................................................................................ 368
MIDI ......................................................................................................................................................................... 368
SYNC ............................................................................................................................................................................... 369
TEMPO ............................................................................................................................................................................ 369
Metronome ..................................................................................................................................................................... 369
AUTO PUNCH/LOOP ................................................................................................................................................. 371
MARKER ........................................................................................................................................................................ 371
LOCATE ......................................................................................................................................................................... 371
V.FDR .............................................................................................................................................................................. 372
SCENE ............................................................................................................................................................................. 372
AUTOMIX ...................................................................................................................................................................... 372
SURROUND ................................................................................................................................................................... 372
Oscillator/ANALYZER ................................................................................................................................................ 372
Generator ................................................................................................................................................................. 372
Analyzer .................................................................................................................................................................. 374
DATE/TIME .................................................................................................................................................................. 376
Parameter Initialization ................................................................................................................................................ 376
Resetting Mixer and UTILITY Parameters ......................................................................................................... 376
Phrase Sequencer ........................................................................................................................................................... 377
R-BUS .............................................................................................................................................................................. 377
29—Expanding the VS-2480
379
Installing a VS8F-2 Effect Expansion Board .............................................................................................................. 379
Connecting a CD-R/RW Drive to the VS-2480 ......................................................................................................... 381
Connecting a Zip Drive to the VS-2480 ...................................................................................................................... 381
Attaching an MB-24 Level Meter ................................................................................................................................ 382
Connecting the MB-24 to the VS-2480 ................................................................................................................. 382
Replacing the VS-2480’s Battery .................................................................................................................................. 382
Installing A New Internal Hard Drive ....................................................................................................................... 384
Supplemental Information
387
R-BUS Remote Control ................................................................................................................................................. 387
DIF-AT Settings ...................................................................................................................................................... 387
Using a Roland DIF-AT ......................................................................................................................................... 388
ADA-7000 Settings ................................................................................................................................................. 389
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Table of Contents
AE-7000 Settings ....................................................................................................................................................
VSR-880 Settings ....................................................................................................................................................
Using the VS-2480 with a VM-7000 Mixing System ................................................................................................
Using a Roland VE-7000 ...............................................................................................................................................
Connecting the VE-7000 ........................................................................................................................................
Using the VE-7000 ..................................................................................................................................................
Roland MB-24 Notes .....................................................................................................................................................
Factory EZ Routing Templates ...................................................................................................................................
Recording Template ..............................................................................................................................................
Bouncing Template ................................................................................................................................................
Mixdown Template ...............................................................................................................................................
Mastering Template ...............................................................................................................................................
Surround 2+2 Template ........................................................................................................................................
Surround 3+1 Template ........................................................................................................................................
Surround 3+2+1 Template ....................................................................................................................................
VS-2480 Tick Resolution Table ....................................................................................................................................
MIDI Channels and Control Change Maps ..............................................................................................................
V-Fader Control Messages ...........................................................................................................................................
Automix Parameter List ...............................................................................................................................................
V-Studio Song/VS-2480 Project Compatibility ........................................................................................................
Recording Mode Tables ........................................................................................................................................
Parameter Translations .........................................................................................................................................
Glossary
Index
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Table of Contents
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Step-by-Step Instruction Finder
Activating R-BUS 2, Coaxial or Optical Digital Inputs .................................................................................131
Activating Vari Pitch .................................................................................................................................................183
Attaching an MB-24 Level Meter ........................................................................................................................382
Auto Punch
Editing Auto Punch IN and OUT Points Manually ...........................................................................................193
Performing an Auto Punch ...................................................................................................................................194
Setting Auto Punch Points Using Locators .........................................................................................................193
Setting Auto Punch Points Using Markers .........................................................................................................193
Setting Auto Punch Points When a Project Isn’t Playing ..................................................................................192
Setting Auto Punch Points While a Project Is Playing ......................................................................................193
Automix
AUTOMIX Button Punching .................................................................................................................................330
AUTOMIX STATUS BUTTON Punching ...........................................................................................................329
Activating Automix Mode .....................................................................................................................................327
Creating a New Automix Event ...........................................................................................................................338
Deleting an Automix Event ...................................................................................................................................338
Micro-Editing Automix Data ................................................................................................................................338
Navigating to the Automix Screen .......................................................................................................................326
Playing Back Automix Data ..................................................................................................................................331
Recording a Realtime Automix .............................................................................................................................328
Taking a Snapshot ...................................................................................................................................................331
Targeting Automix Data ........................................................................................................................................332
The AUTOMIX EDIT Screen .................................................................................................................................331
Undoing a Micro-Edit ............................................................................................................................................338
Using the AUTOMIX STATUS Buttons ...............................................................................................................327
Aux Busses
Adjusting an Aux Bus’s Master Level .................................................................................................................207
Configuring an Aux Bus from a CH EDIT VIEW Screen ..................................................................................207
Configuring an Aux Bus from a MASTER EDIT Screen ...................................................................................207
Metering Aux Bus and Direct Bus Levels ...........................................................................................................206
Sending a Signal to an Aux Bus ............................................................................................................................206
Setting Up a Headphone Mix ................................................................................................................................211
CD-R/RW Operations
Burning an Audio CD ............................................................................................................................................350
Erasing a CD-RW Disk ...........................................................................................................................................352
Importing a .WAV File ...........................................................................................................................................355
Making Sure You Have Enough Space ................................................................................................................350
Playing an Audio CD .............................................................................................................................................353
Changing Your Current Location in a Project .................................................................................................126
Channels
Activating Fader Control of Aux Send Levels ....................................................................................................141
Assigning KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature to Faders .....................................................................................140
Controlling a Parameter of Your Choice Using a Fader ...................................................................................141
Selecting a Channel for Editing ............................................................................................................................138
Switching Between Input, Track, Aux and FX Channels ..................................................................................137
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Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
To Reset a Channel’s Fader and Pan ................................................................................................................... 138
Turning KNOB/FADER ASSIGN On and Off .................................................................................................. 141
Connecting a CD-R/RW Drive to the VS-2480 .............................................................................................. 381
Connecting a Zip Drive to the VS-2480 .......................................................................................................... 381
DIF-AT
With a TASCAM DA Series Device ..................................................................................................................... 388
With an ADAT ........................................................................................................................................................ 388
Designating the Master Clock for Digital Audio Input ................................................................................ 133
Direct Busses
Configuring a Direct Bus ....................................................................................................................................... 209
External Insert-Like Effects ................................................................................................................................... 208
Metering Aux Bus and Direct Bus Levels ........................................................................................................... 206
Sending a Signal to a Direct Bus .......................................................................................................................... 209
Drives
Clearing a Drive/Partition .................................................................................................................................... 115
Formatting a Hard Drive ...................................................................................................................................... 114
Running Drive Check ............................................................................................................................................ 117
Selecting a New Destination Drive ...................................................................................................................... 101
Selecting an Item in the Project List ....................................................................................................................... 94
To Display the Projects on a Drive ........................................................................................................................ 94
EZ Routing
Initializing and Clearing Routings ...................................................................................................................... 295
Loading an EZ Routing Template ........................................................................................................................ 297
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN Screen ......................................................... 294
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY Screen ................................................................... 293
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen ............................................................................... 292
Making Connections on the LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN Screen ......................................................................... 294
Saving an EZ Routing Template .......................................................................................................................... 296
Editing Tracks
Configuring the Behavior of the IN, OUT, FROM and TO Buttons ............................................................... 247
Copying Data by Dragging with Your Mouse ................................................................................................... 245
Moving Data by Dragging with Your Mouse .................................................................................................... 244
Moving or Copying Data Using the TRACK EDIT Buttons ............................................................................ 248
Performing an Edit Operation From the Edit Pop-Up Menu .......................................................................... 246
Performing an Edit Operation from the TRACK Menu ................................................................................... 250
Performing an Editing Operation with the TRACK EDIT Buttons ................................................................ 248
Placing Edit Points Using the IN, OUT, FROM and TO Buttons .................................................................... 247
Placing Edit Points on a TRACK Menu Operation Screen ............................................................................... 250
Placing Edit Points with Your Mouse ................................................................................................................. 242
Quick-Selecting from the TRACK Menu ............................................................................................................ 250
Selecting Phrases By Clicking or Dragging Your Mouse ................................................................................. 243
Selecting Phrases and Regions with the VS-2480’s Buttons ............................................................................. 247
Selecting Phrases from the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up Menu ......................................................................... 243
Selecting Regions From the SELECT TRACK Pop-Up Menu .......................................................................... 244
Selecting Regions by Dragging Your Mouse ...................................................................................................... 243
Selecting a Track Using the VS-2480’s Buttons .................................................................................................. 247
Selecting a Track with Your Mouse ..................................................................................................................... 242
Selection Using the TRACK Menu’s Onscreen Selection Tools ...................................................................... 252
Snapping to Grid .................................................................................................................................................... 245
Effects
Adding Effects to a Headphone Mix ................................................................................................................... 234
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
Editing an Effect Patch ...........................................................................................................................................224
External Insert-Like Effects ...................................................................................................................................208
Inserting Effects on an Input or Track Channel .................................................................................................217
Inserting Effects on the MASTER Bus .................................................................................................................219
Routing Aux and Direct Busses to Internal Effects ............................................................................................210
Routing Effects to Tracks .......................................................................................................................................231
Saving an Effect Patch ............................................................................................................................................225
Selecting an Effect Patch ........................................................................................................................................223
Setting Up an External Loop Effect ......................................................................................................................215
Setting Up an Internal Loop Effect .......................................................................................................................213
Using Microphone Modeling ................................................................................................................................226
Using Speaker Modeling .......................................................................................................................................225
Exporting .WAV Files
Burning Exported .WAV Files to CD ...................................................................................................................358
Exporting Phrases as .WAV Files .........................................................................................................................357
Exporting Tracks as .WAV Files ...........................................................................................................................356
Exporting Tracks as .WAV Files ..........................................................................................................................356
Exporting a VS-2480 Project ...............................................................................................................................110
Fader Groups
Assigning Channels to a Fader Group .................................................................................................................155
Finding Events with Microscopic Precision Using Scrub ...........................................................................185
Headphone Mix Setup ..............................................................................................................................................211
Importing
Recovering Backup Data ........................................................................................................................................107
Importing a .WAV File .............................................................................................................................................355
Importing a Song from an Earlier V-Studio .....................................................................................................108
Input Channel Signals
Removing Input Signals from the Main Mix ......................................................................................................175
Routing an Input Signal to Direct Bus .................................................................................................................175
Routing to Tracks ....................................................................................................................................................174
Sending an Input Channel’s Signal into the Main MIX ....................................................................................175
Installing A New Internal Hard Drive .................................................................................................................384
Installing a VS8F-2 Effect Expansion Board ...................................................................................................379
KNOB/FADER ASSIGN
Activating Knob or Fader Control of Aux Send Levels ....................................................................................141
Controlling a Parameter of Your Choice .............................................................................................................141
To Set What the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature Controls ............................................................................140
To Turn the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature On and Off ..............................................................................141
Locators
Changing Locator Banks ........................................................................................................................................186
Clearing a Locator ...................................................................................................................................................186
Clearing a Locator in Safe Mode ..........................................................................................................................188
Editing Locators ......................................................................................................................................................186
Recalling a Locator .................................................................................................................................................186
Recalling a Locator in Safe Mode .........................................................................................................................187
Storing a Locator .....................................................................................................................................................186
Storing a Locator in Safe Mode .............................................................................................................................188
Switching Automatically to Locator Mode .........................................................................................................187
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Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
Looping
Activating Looped Playback ................................................................................................................................ 182
Editing Loop FROM and TO Points Manually .................................................................................................. 182
Setting Loop Points Using Locators .................................................................................................................... 181
Setting Loop Points Using Markers ..................................................................................................................... 181
Setting Loop Points When a Project Isn’t Playing ............................................................................................. 181
Setting Loop Points While a Project Is Playing .................................................................................................. 181
MIDI
Changing Effect Patches via MIDI ....................................................................................................................... 303
Changing Scenes via MIDI .................................................................................................................................... 302
Receiving SysEx Bulk Dump Data ....................................................................................................................... 305
Remote Control of the VS-2480 with Control Change Messages .................................................................... 303
Remote Control of the VS-2480 with SysEx Messages ...................................................................................... 302
Sending SysEx Bulk Dump Data .......................................................................................................................... 304
Setting Up a MIDI Metronome ............................................................................................................................. 306
Using the VS-2480 as a MIDI Control Surface ................................................................................................... 301
Markers
Clearing Markers .................................................................................................................................................... 190
Editing Markers ...................................................................................................................................................... 190
Moving the Timeline to a Marker ........................................................................................................................ 189
Placing a Marker ..................................................................................................................................................... 189
Mastering
Building Mastering Tracks Selection-by-Selection ............................................................................................ 344
Editing Mastering Tracks ...................................................................................................................................... 346
Navigating to the Mastering Room ..................................................................................................................... 343
Navigating to to the Mastering Room ................................................................................................................. 343
Placing CD Track Markers .................................................................................................................................... 348
Recording Mastering Tracks ................................................................................................................................. 345
Selecting the Mastering Room Operating Mode ............................................................................................... 343
Selecting the Mastering Tracks’ Recording Mode ............................................................................................. 343
Selecting the Mastering V-Tracks ........................................................................................................................ 344
Stretching Effects .................................................................................................................................................... 346
Turning On the Mastering Room ......................................................................................................................... 343
Using the Mastering Tool Kit ............................................................................................................................... 345
Metronome
Programming the Metronome’s Beat Box ........................................................................................................... 370
Sending the Metronome to Outputs .................................................................................................................... 371
Setting Up a MIDI Metronome ............................................................................................................................. 306
Moving Through a Project ..................................................................................................................................... 180
Muting Channels in Mute Mode ........................................................................................................................... 143
Naming
Entering a New Name Using the VS-2480 Controls ........................................................................................... 74
Entering a New Name from a Keyboard .............................................................................................................. 74
Outputs
Routing a Pair of Busses to a Pair of Outputs .................................................................................................... 288
Routing a Pair of Busses to the Stereo MONITOR Bus .................................................................................... 289
Routing a Pair of Tracks to a Pair of Outputs .................................................................................................... 290
Setting Up Pre or Post Track Direct Outputs ..................................................................................................... 290
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs
Activating Knob Control of Any Channel Parameter ....................................................................................... 141
Activating Knob Control of Aux Send Levels .................................................................................................... 141
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
Activating Knob Control of Channel Panning ...................................................................................................139
Activating Knob Control of Dynamics and EQ Parameters .............................................................................140
Assigning KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Switch to Knobs .......................................................................................140
Controlling a Parameter of Your Choice .............................................................................................................141
Turning KNOB/FADER ASSIGN On and Off ...................................................................................................141
Phrase Pads
Activating Phrase Pad Mode .................................................................................................................................275
Activating Phrase Sequencer Mode .....................................................................................................................275
Bouncing Phrase Sequence Tracks .......................................................................................................................286
Controlling the Sound of Sequenced Tracks .......................................................................................................285
Micro-Editing Sequencer Data ..............................................................................................................................283
Navigating to the PHRASE SEQUENCE Screens ..............................................................................................276
Phrase Sequencing Using Step Entry with AutoLoc .........................................................................................279
Phrase Sequencing Using Step Entry without AutoLoc ...................................................................................280
Phrase Sequencing in Realtime .............................................................................................................................278
Playing the Phrase Pads .........................................................................................................................................275
Quantizing Phrase Sequence Data .......................................................................................................................282
Setting Up a Phrase Pad .........................................................................................................................................274
Turning On the Phrase Sequencer Playlist Grid ................................................................................................277
Using Tie, Rest and BackStep ................................................................................................................................284
Pinpointing an Event with the PREVIEW Buttons .........................................................................................184
Playing Back Recorded Tracks .............................................................................................................................180
Playing the Factory Demos ......................................................................................................................................76
Power
Powering Up ..............................................................................................................................................................63
Turning Off the VS-2480 ..........................................................................................................................................80
Projects
Backing Up a Project ...............................................................................................................................................106
Combining Two Projects ........................................................................................................................................104
Copying a Project ....................................................................................................................................................101
Creating a New Project ............................................................................................................................................98
Entering a Project Comment ...................................................................................................................................99
Erasing a Project ......................................................................................................................................................102
Exporting a VS-2480 Project ..................................................................................................................................110
Importing a Song from an Earlier V-Studio ........................................................................................................108
Loading a Project ......................................................................................................................................................95
Locking and Un-Locking a Project on Your Hard Drive ..................................................................................100
Marking a Project ......................................................................................................................................................95
Optimizing a Project ...............................................................................................................................................100
Re-Naming a Project .................................................................................................................................................99
Recovering Backup Data ........................................................................................................................................107
Selecting a New Destination Drive ......................................................................................................................101
Selecting an Item in the Project List .......................................................................................................................94
Splitting a Project ....................................................................................................................................................103
To Display the Projects on a Drive .........................................................................................................................94
Quick Routing
An Input Signal to a Track .....................................................................................................................................173
Recording S/P DIF-Format Digital Input Signals ...........................................................................................134
Recording a New Track ...........................................................................................................................................179
Replacing the VS-2480’s Battery .......................................................................................................................382
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Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
Resetting Mixer and UTILITY Parameters ...................................................................................................... 376
Routing
Effects to Tracks with EZ Routing ....................................................................................................................... 233
Effects to Tracks with Quick Routing .................................................................................................................. 232
Input Channel Signals to Tracks with EZ Routing ............................................................................................ 174
Input Channel Signals to Tracks with Quick Routing ...................................................................................... 173
Input Signals to Input Channels .......................................................................................................................... 136
Tracks to Track with EZ Routing ......................................................................................................................... 198
Tracks to Track with Quick Routing ................................................................................................................... 197
Scenes
Changing Scene Banks ........................................................................................................................................... 145
Clearing a Scene ..................................................................................................................................................... 145
Clearing a Scene in Safe Mode ............................................................................................................................. 147
Editing Scenes ......................................................................................................................................................... 145
Leaving Scene Mode .............................................................................................................................................. 145
Protecting a Channel’s Settings When a Scene is Recalled .............................................................................. 146
Recalling a Scene .................................................................................................................................................... 145
Recalling a Scene in Safe Mode ............................................................................................................................ 146
Storing a Scene ........................................................................................................................................................ 144
Storing a Scene in Safe Mode ................................................................................................................................ 147
Setting Up
Roland DS-90A and DS-50A Digital Monitors ..................................................................................................... 75
The VS-2480’s Clock ................................................................................................................................................. 65
VGA Monitor, Mouse and Keyboard .................................................................................................................... 64
Soloing Channels in Solo Mode ........................................................................................................................... 143
Spectrum Analysis Display
Analyzing Your Speakers and Room .................................................................................................................. 375
Powering the Spectrum Analysis Display .......................................................................................................... 374
Setting Up the Spectrum Analysis Display ........................................................................................................ 375
Surround
Positioning a Signal in the Surround Field ......................................................................................................... 322
Turning on Surround Mode ................................................................................................................................. 321
Synchronization
Converting a Sync Track to a Tempo Map ......................................................................................................... 314
Creating a Sync Track Automatically .................................................................................................................. 311
Creating a Tempo Map from Markers ................................................................................................................ 314
Exchanging Digital Audio Data During Synchronization ............................................................................... 317
Generating a Sync Track from Markers .............................................................................................................. 311
Recording a Sync Track from an External Device ............................................................................................. 311
Setting Up the VS-2480 as a Sync Slave .............................................................................................................. 315
Setting Up the VS-2480 as the Sync Master ........................................................................................................ 315
Shaping a Tempo Map By Hand .......................................................................................................................... 313
Shifting the Project Start Time .............................................................................................................................. 316
Starting Synchronized Playback with the VS-2480 as Master ......................................................................... 315
Starting Synchronized Playback with the VS-2480 as Slave ............................................................................ 317
To Set an Analog Input Level ............................................................................................................................... 130
Track Editing
Selecting Phrases from the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up Menu ......................................................................... 243
Selecting Regions From the SELECT TRACK Pop-Up Menu .......................................................................... 244
Turning Fader Control On or Off ......................................................................................................................... 300
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
Turning Phantom Power On or Off .....................................................................................................................130
Undoing a Track Recording or Editing Operation ............................................................................................73
Using Jump ...................................................................................................................................................................180
Using Microphone Modeling ..................................................................................................................................226
Using Speaker Modeling .........................................................................................................................................225
Using a Roland VE-7000 ........................................................................................................................................394
Using the VS-2480 with a VM-7000 Mixing System ................................................................................393
Viewing a CH EDIT Screen ....................................................................................................................................149
Zooming In and Out on the Playlist .....................................................................................................................123
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
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Step-By-Step Instruction Finder
26
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
1—Welcome
Congratulations on the purchase of your Roland VS-2480 Digital Studio Workstation.
The VS-2480 will allow you to take your music—or any other kind of sound—from the
first spark of inspiration to completed recording.
Although the VS-2480 is designed to be simple to operate, the sheer number of tools it
provides do require some introduction and explanation. That’s what the VS-2480
Owner’s Manual is for. Of course, what you do with these tools is up to you and your
imagination.
If you’ve purchased a VS8F-2 Effect Board, MB-24 Meter Bridge, VS-CDRII/CD-RACK
or VE-7000 for your VS-2480—or would like to attach a Zip® drive—you may want see
Chapter 29, beginning on Page 379 before reading the Owner’s Manual.
Your VS-2480 is an extremely reliable device. However, there’s no guarantee against
data loss due to improper use of the VS-2480 or unforeseen events. Roland Corporation
assumes no liability concerning such loss of data.
About this Manual
How the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual is Organized
The VS-2480 Owner’s Manual explains the VS-2480 ‘s architecture, features, operations
and settings. It also provides application suggestions and presents step-by-step
procedures. To get the most from your VS-2480, we recommend reading the entire
manual. The structure of the manual generally reflects the order in which a typical
signal flows through the VS-2480, with extra explanations for beginners at the front.
If you’d like to get to work immediately, you may first want to:
•
•
set the VS-2480’s internal clock and calendar—The VS-2480 time-stamps each
recording to make it easy for you to keep track of your work. See Page 65 for
instructions.
connect a mouse, ASCII keyboard and VGA monitor—See Page 64 for more information.
Here’s where you’ll find some instructions that describe how to perform some basic
operations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Creating a New Project”—Page 98
“Recording a New Track”—Page 179
“Backing Up a Project”—Page 106
“Inserting Effects on an Input or Track Channel”—Page 217
“Setting Up an Internal Loop Effect”—Page 213
“Mixing”—Page 202
These procedures will get you up and running, but, of course, they’re no substitute for
actually reading the manual and really learning how the VS-2480’s features work.
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
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27
1—Welcome
To make it easy for you to find the manual’s numerous step-by-step procedures, we’ve
assembled a “Step-by-Step Instruction Finder” that starts on Page 3. There’s also a
standard Table of Contents at the front of the book and an Index at the back.
Additional information can be found in the “Supplemental Information” chapter
starting on Page 387.
In this manual, illustrations that show VS-2480 screens reflect their appearance at the
time the manual was written. As the VS-2480’s software is enhanced through operating
system upgrades, the appearance of the VS-2480’s screens may change.
Names
Throughout the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, the names of buttons, knobs, faders, jacks—as
well as settings that appear in the display—are shown exactly as they look on the
VS-2480 itself. As a result, names printed on the VS-2480 are shown completely in
capital letters. For example, the button labeled “PROJECT” will appear in the manual
as the PROJECT button, or simply PROJECT, as in “Press PROJECT.” Settings on the
display are shown in the same lower- and upper -case letters they use onscreen.
A few buttons serve several purposes and have long names. In such cases, we’ll refer to
the button by the name that reflects its current use. For example, if we want to view CH
EDIT parameters, we’ll say to press the “desired CH EDIT button,” not the “desired CH
EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/AUTOMIX STATUS” button. Some buttons
have two labels. If we need to refer to both, we’ll show the labels with a bullet between
them, as with the HOME•DISPLAY button.
The F 1-6 buttons beneath the display do different things at different times. We’ll show
an F button’s current function in parentheses after its name, as in “F1 (INPUT).”
The four arrow keys are a special case. Sometimes, we’ll collectively refer
to ", #, $ and % as “cursor” buttons since they allow you to move, or
“cursor,” around in the VS-2480’s display.
Note, Tip, Glossary and Warning Icons
Throughout the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, you find the symbols shown below in the lefthand margins. Here’s what these symbols mean.
Notes provide additional information about the topic described in the main text.
Tips offer interesting ways to use the feature under discussion. They’ll also let you know
why you should care about what’s being said.
This symbol will be of special interest to beginners, because the word—or words—to its
right can be found in the glossary that starts on Page 415.
Make sure you pay attention whenever you see the Warning symbol. Warnings provide
important information that will help you avoid damage to your recordings, VS-2480,
other equipment or even yourself.
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
1—Welcome
Other Documents in the VS-2480 Box
The VS-2480 User’s Guide provides a quick look at the VS-2480’s major features. It’ll take
you through the steps for a variety of basic operations.
The VS-2480 Appendices provide additional detailed information not included in the
Owner’s Manual. For example, the VS-2480 will display an error message if you attempt
to perform an operation that the VS-2480 doesn’t allow—the Appendices contain a list of
all error messages and an explanation of what each one means. You’ll also find a
Troubleshooting section that can help you figure out what to do if the VS-2480 behaves
in an unexpected manner.
Getting More Help
If you have questions that can’t be answered by the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, Roland
offers a number of informational resources.
The Roland US Web site
Visit the Roland US Web site at: http://www.rolandus. com. You’ll find lots of information
about the VS-2480 and a wealth of support materials. If you’re new to recording or
mixing, you’ll especially enjoy the downloadable booklets for beginners.
The Roland US Faxback System
If you can receive faxes, you can access our library of support documents 24 hours a
day, seven days a week. Call 323-890-3780 for more information about using our
faxback system.
Roland US Product Support
If you need help from a real, live person, call the Roland US Product Support team at
323-890-3740, Extension 3741.
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
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1—Welcome
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
2—Getting Around
The Top Panel of the VS-2480
Analog Input Jacks
COAXIAL
OPTICAL
1
2
L MASTER R
L AUX A R
L MONITOR R
1
3
7
2
L AUX B R
4
5
6
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT
8
WORD CLOCK IN
PHONES 1 PHONES 2
FOOT
SWITCH
VGA OUT
IN
SCSI
MOUSE KEYBOARD
PS / 2
OUT / THRU
MIDI
SMPTE
IN
4
ANALOG INPUT
SEE OPERATION MANUAL FOR
CORRECT MICROPHONE CABLE
AND MICROPHONE CONNECTION.
3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
VOIR LE MANUEL D’UTILISATION
POUR BRANCHER CORRECTMENT
LES MICROPHONES ET LEURS CÀBLES.
8
CONTRAST
9
GND COLD
(SLEEVE) (RING)
HOT
(TIP)
1
5
ON
ATTENTION:
1
2
GUITAR
Hi-Z
CAUTION:
(+ PHANTOM)
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
PHONES 1
PAD
PUSH
20 dB
0
10
PHONES 2
6
8
SENS
dBu
+14
-6
-44
-64
1
+14
-6
-44
-64
+14
-6
2
ANALOG INPUT
1-16
-44
-64
3
+14
-6
-44
-64
4
+14
-6
-44
-64
+14
-6
5
-44
-64
+14
-6
6
-44
-64
7
+14
-6
-44
-64
+14
-6
8
2
1
1-8
-44
-64
9
1-8
+14
-6
-44
-64
10
+14
-6
-44
-64
11
+14
-6
-44
-64
12
+14
-6
-44
-64
13
+14
-6
-44
-64
+14
-6
14
-44
-64
15
COAXIAL
OPTICAL
L/R
L/R
+14
-6
-44
-64
0
10
MONITOR
16
7
PATCH BAY
INPUT MIXER
The analog input jacks allow you to bring analog audio into the VS-2480’s 24-bit analogto-digital (A/D) converters using balanced XLR connectors and balanced or
unbalanced 1/4” connectors. The VS-2480 also provides -20 dB pads and level
sensitivity adjustment knobs for each input jack. We’ll explain how to correctly set an
analog input’s level in “Setting Analog Input Levels” on Page 130.
Don’t use the same-numbered XLR and TRS input jack—each pad and SENS knob
controls both jacks, so you won’t have independent control of the two jacks’ signals.
Analog, 24-bit, balanced, XLR, unbalanced, TRS, dB, pad
1—XLR Inputs 1-8
Each of the eight XLR input jacks accepts an input signal from a balanced XLR
connector.
The VS-2480 can provide phantom power for a condenser-type mic connected to an
XLR jack. See “To Turn an XLR Input Jack’s Phantom Power On or Off” on Page 130.
2—TRS Inputs 1-16
Connect a 1/4” phone-type TRS balanced or unbalanced audio connector to any of the
sixteen TRS input jacks.
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2—Getting Around
3—GUITAR HI-Z
If you’d like to plug an electric guitar or bass directly into the VS-2480, connect it to the
GUITAR HI-Z (for “high impedance”) 1/4” phone-type jack for a loud, clean signal with
a minimum of noise.
High impedance
You can use either the GUITAR HI-Z input jack or TRS Input 16, but not both at the
same time. The setting of the GUITAR HI-Z ON switch determines which of these jacks
is turned on.
4—GUITAR HI-Z ON Switch
Press the GUITAR HI-Z ON switch to turn on the GUITAR HI-Z input jack, and to turn
off TRS Input 16—when the switch is locked in its “in” position, the GUITAR HI-Z input
jack is activated.
5—PAD Switches 1-16
When the PAD button is in its “in” position, the signal in the corresponding XLR or TRS
input jack is reduced by 20 dB.
Lower the VS-2480’s MASTER fader—and Aux master faders controlling headphone
mix levels—before pressing a PAD button to avoid damage to your amp or speakers.
6—SENS Knobs 1-16
You can adjust the sensitivity of an XLR or TRS input jack by turning its SENS—for
“Sensitivity”—knob. Turn the knob all the way clockwise for a mic level (-44 dBu) device
or all the way counter-clockwise for a line level (+14 dBu) device.
When no input signal is connected or in use, turn each input jack’s SENS knob all the
way counter-clockwise—and turn on its PAD—to avoid unwanted noise.
Mic level, line level, dBu
Monitor/Display Controls
7—MONITOR Knob
This knob controls the volume of the VS-2480’s stereo MONITOR bus and outputs. It
can also set the basic listening level of the PHONES 1 and 2 jacks.
8—PHONES 1 AND PHONES 2 Knobs
These knobs control how loudly the VS-2480’s MONITOR output is heard through
headphones connected to the PHONES 1 and 2 jacks, respectively. To learn how to set
your headphone listening level, see “Adjusting Your Listening Level” on Page 75.
9—CONTRAST Knob
The CONTRAST knob allows you to change the contrast of the VS-2480’s display. Turn
the knob until the display looks its best from your viewing angle.
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
2—Getting Around
Channel Strips
1
AUX
PHRASE
SEND
RATIO
THRESHOLD
ATTACK
RELEASE
LEVEL
Dynamics
FREQ
GAIN
Filter
PHRASE SEQ
// AUTOMIX
4
8
PAN / AUX SEND 1-8
2
3
7
FREQ
GAIN
EQ Low
FREQ
Q
GAIN
EQ Lo - Mid
FREQ
Q
GAIN
PRM
EDIT
FREQ
EQ High
EQ Hi - Mid
CH EDIT / SELECT / PHRASE SEQ STATUS / AUTOMIX STATUS
IN 1-16
MANUAL
WRITE
PAD PLAY
PHRASE
SEQ
9
IN 17-24
AUX MST
10
READ
FROM
TRACK STATUS / PHRASE PAD
SOLO
MUTE
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
TO
FX RTN
12
TRACK
5
REC
PLAY
OFF
PHRASE
PAD
1
17
R
2
18
3
19
4
20
5
21
6
22
7
23
8
24
9
10
AUX1MST AUX 2
FX1RTN
FX 2
11
12
13
14
15
16
AUX 3
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
AUX 7
AUX 8
FX 3
FX 4
FX 5
FX 6
FX 7
FX 8
(dB)
(dB)
6
6
4
4
0
R
0
4
6
11
FADER
MASTER
4
8
8
12
12
18
18
24
24
42
42
L
L
13
Each of the first sixteen channel strips contains—reading from the bottom up—a fader,
a TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD button, a CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/
AUTOMIX STATUS button and a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob. Channel strips are
described in detail in Chapters 9. At the right side of this area is the MASTER fader
(Page 142).
1—PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs
These multi-purpose knobs perform several functions, depending on the current color
of the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button (see “7—AUX SEND•PRM EDIT Button” on
Page 34).
Each PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob controls its channel’s panning when the AUX
SEND•PRM EDIT button is unlit. You can set the knob to control another channel
setting if you wish. See “Using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs” on Page 139.
The PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs are described in detail starting on Page 139.
When using the channel strips as a MIDI control surface—see Page 300—use the knobs
to transmit MIDI Control Change messages.
Channel, channel strip, fader, panning, MIDI, MIDI control surface, MIDI Control Change
messages
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2—Getting Around
2—CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/AUTOMIX STATUS
Buttons 1-16
When working with input, track and FX (“effect”) return channels, press this button to
view a channel’s CH EDIT settings—the button lights to show that the input, track or
FX return channel is selected. When working in Phrase Sequence or Automix modes,
the color of each of these buttons shows the current status of its sequence or Automix
track, respectively. See “3—PHRASE SEQ/AUTOMIX Key” below.
3—PHRASE SEQ/AUTOMIX Key
The PHRASE SEQ/AUTOMIX key explains the meaning of CH EDIT/PHRASE SEQ
STATUS/AUTOMIX STATUS button colors when working in Phrase Sequence or
Automix modes.
4—TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD
Buttons 1-16, 17-24, AUX MSTR 1-8, FX RTN 1-8
When working with track channels, press this button to set each track channel’s
status—the current status of the button is shown by its color (See ““5—TRACK STATUS
Key”” below). In Phrase Pad mode, each button acts as a pad you can strike to play a
phrase. See “Playing the Pads in Phrase Pad Mode” on Page 275. These buttons are also
used when selecting destination tracks during editing.
5—TRACK STATUS Key
The TRACK STATUS key explains the meaning of TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD
colors so you can tell if a track channel is set to record a track, play a track, do nothing
or play a phrase.
6—Channel Strip Faders
Use each channel strip fader to make adjustments to its channel’s output level. When
using the channel strips as a MIDI control surface—see Page 300—use the faders to
transmit MIDI Control Change messages.
You can use the faders to control a variety of settings. See “To Set What the KNOB/
FADER ASSIGN Feature Controls” on Page 140.
7—AUX SEND•PRM EDIT Button
The color of the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button shows what the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs (Page 33) are set up to do. Press the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button to change its
setting. When the button is:
•
•
•
Unlit—Each PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob controls the PAN setting of its channel.
Red—Each PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob adjusts the value of the setting printed
beneath it for the currently selected channel.
Green—Each PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob controls the send level from its channel to
the currently selected Aux bus. See “The KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8
Button” on Page 140 to learn how to set the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button to green.
An AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button color key is printed above and below the button.
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2—Getting Around
8—PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ Button
This button activates and de-activates the playing of phrases and the recording of
phrase sequences using the TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD buttons. When the
PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button is:
•
•
•
•
Unlit—Phrase Pad and Phrase Sequence modes are turned off.
Green—Phrase Pad mode is activated.
Red—Phrase Sequence mode is activated.
Flashing red—the phrase sequencer is recording.
9—IN 1-16•SOLO
Press the IN 1-16•SOLO button to assign the sixteen channel strips to Input Channels
1-16 (see Page 137). Hold SHIFT and press IN 1-16•SOLO to enter and exit Solo mode
(Page 143).
10—IN 17-24/AUX MST•MUTE
Press the IN 17-24/AUX MST•MUTE button to assign the first eight channel strips to
Input Channels 17-24 and the rest to the eight Aux master channels (see Page 137).
Hold SHIFT and press IN 17-24•MUTE to enter and exit Mute mode (Page 143.).
11—TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT
Press the TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT button to assign the sixteen channel strips to Track
Channels 1-16 (see Page 137). Hold down SHIFT and press TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT to
display the MASTER EDIT VIEW screen (Page 207, Page 209).
12—TR 17-24/FX RTN•V. FADER
Press the TR 17-24/FX RTN•V. FADER button to assign the first eight channel strips to
Track Channels 17-24 and the rest to the eight FX return channels (see Chapter 17).
Hold SHIFT and press TR 17-24/FX RTN•V. FADER to change the mixer into a MIDI
control surface (see Page 300).
13—MASTER FADER
The position of the MASTER fader sets the level of the main stereo MASTER mix bus.
Since the MONITOR outputs and the PHONES jacks are typically set to listen to the
MASTER mix bus, the position of the MASTER fader also affects your listening level.
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2—Getting Around
Display Area
1
DISPLAY
PAGE
F1
F2
3
F3
F4
2
F5
F6
HOME
4
The LCD display and its buttons are central to everything you do on the VS-2480. The F
buttons discussed in Chapter 4, on Page 66.
1—LCD Display
The LCD display is your window to all of the VS-2480’s operations. In addition to
providing you vital information, the display is central to every VS-2480 activity.
2—F Buttons 1-6
The F 1-6 buttons are “soft” buttons whose job changes depending on what you’re
doing. When an F button is active, its current function is shown on the display above
the button. For more on how the F buttons work, see Page 66.
3—PAGE Button
Some activities on the VS-2480 require more than a single screenful of settings—each
screenful is called a “page.” For such activities, you can repeatedly press the PAGE
button to cycle through the available pages.
4—HOME•DISPLAY Button
Press the HOME•DISPLAY button to return to the VS-2480’s Home screen, described
in detail in Chapter 8, beginning on Page 119. Hold SHIFT and press the button to
change what appears in the playlist area of the Home screen (Page 124).
Although the HOME•DISPLAY button is actually labeled as “DISPLAY•HOME,” we
call it HOME•DISPLAY to reflect its most typical use.
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2—Getting Around
TRACK EDIT Area
1
2
3 4
ROUTING
PATCH BAY
AUTOMIX
5 6
7
8
SPLIT
NEW
PHRASE
REGION
AUTOMIX
UNDO
TRACK EDIT
EZ
COPY
MOVE
TRIM IN
TRIM OUT
DELETE
COPY
MOVE
INSERT
CUT
ERASE
COMP / EXP.
IMPORT
GRADATION
A.PUNCH
IN
OUT
FROM
TO
LOOP
WAVE DISP
REDO
CD-RW
CD
RW
MASTERING
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
You’ll use the top row of buttons in this area as shortcuts when editing the regions and
phrases of recorded tracks—the TRACK EDIT buttons are described on Page 247. To
learn about tracks, phrases and regions, see Chapter 6, starting on Page 85. To learn
about editing phrase and regions, see Chapters 18-20. You’ll also use the TRACK EDIT
buttons when working with Automix data; see Chapter 26. The buttons you’ll need
when you want to use the VS-2480’s Auto Punch feature or when you want to loop a
part of a song are also found in this area.
Tracks, regions, phrases, Automix, Auto Punch, punch, loop
The function of Buttons 1-7 in the illustration above depends on whether you’re editing
regions, phrases or Automix data, as shown by the color of the PHRASE•REGION
•AUTOMIX button. In the following text, the label above most of the buttons—for
phrase editing—appears before the label beneath it that applies to region and Automix
editing, which works with regions of Automix data. Two of the buttons have three
labels: one each for phrase editing, region editing and Automix operations.
1—COPY•COPY Button
Press this button to copy a currently selected phrase or region.
2—MOVE•MOVE Button
Press this button to move a currently selected phrase or region.
3—TRIM IN•INSERT Button
•
•
When editing a phrase, press this button to change where the phrase begins.
When editing a region, press this button to insert silence into the selected region,
pushing subsequent recorded data back in time.
4—TRIM OUT•CUT Button
•
•
When editing a phrase, use this button to change where the phrase ends.
When editing a region, press this button to delete the selected region, moving
subsequent recorded data forward in time.
5—DELETE•ERASE Button
•
•
When editing a phrase, press this button to delete the phrase from the track
without affecting its other audio.
When editing a region, press this button to clear the selected region of all data.
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2—Getting Around
6—SPLIT•COMP/EXP Button
•
•
When editing phrases, press this button to split the selected phrase at the timeline.
When editing regions, press this button to perform time compression or expansion
on the currently selected track region, or scaling of automated parameter values.
Timeline
7—NEW•IMPORT•GRADATION Button
•
•
•
When editing phrases, press this button to create a new phrase from a recorded
take on your hard drive.
When editing regions, press this button to copy a recording from a different project
(Page 56) into the current project.
When using Automix, press this to view the Gradation dialog (Page 337).
8—PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX Button
Press this button to select the type of editing you wish to do: phrase, region or Automix
editing. The color of the button—as shown in the key to its left—shows the currently
selected type of editing:
•
•
Green—phrase editing
Red—region editing
•
Orange—Automix editing
9—A. PUNCH Button
Press this button to activate (lit) or de-activate (unlit) Auto Punch. See Page 192.
10—IN Button
Press the IN button to set the current position of the timeline as the start of a region of
data you want to edit, or as the punch-in location when holding down A.PUNCH.
11—OUT Button
Press the OUT button to set the current position of the timeline as the end of a region of
data you want to edit, or as the punch-out location when holding down A.PUNCH.
12—FROM Button
Press FROM to select the current position of the timeline as a time-reference point in a
section of data to be moved or copied. When looping, press FROM while holding down
LOOP when the timeline’s at the location you want to use as the start of your loop.
13—TO Button
Press TO to select the current position of the timeline as a location at which you want
the FROM point to be placed when data is moved or copied. When looping, press TO
while holding down LOOP when the timeline’s at the location you want to use as the
end of your loop.
IN, FROM, OUT and TO work together, playing a part in a variety of editing operations.
They’re discussed as a group in Chapter 18, on Page 236.
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2—Getting Around
14—LOOP Button
Press this button to turn looping on (lit) or off (unlit). See Page 181.
15—WAVE DISPLAY Button
Press WAVE DISPLAY to view the currently selected track’s audio as waveform data
(lit) or as a simple rectangle (unlit).
Waveform data
EZ ROUTING, AUTOMIX, CD-RW/MASTERING
and MENU Buttons
TR ACK EDIT
TRACK
EZ
ROUTING
1
PATCH BAY
AUTOMIX
COPY
MOVE
TRIM IN
TRIM OUT
DELETE
DELE
TE
SPLIT
NEW
NE
PHRASE
PHR
ASE
COPY
MOVE
INSERT
CUT
ERASE
ER
ASE
COMP / E
EXP.
XP.
IMPORT
IMPOR
GR ADATION
GRADATION
REGION
AUTOMIX
A.PUNCH
IN
OUT
FROM
TO
LOOP
WAVE DISP
UNDO
PROJECT
TRACK
EFFECT
UTILITY
4
5
6
7
2
REDO
MENU
CD-RW
MASTERING
3
1—EZ ROUTING Button
Press the EZ ROUTING button to set up, load and save signal routings in the VS-2480:
To learn about
see:
Routing input signals to input channels
Chapter 9
Routing input channels to tracks
Chapter 12
Recording tracks onto other tracks
Chapter 14
Routing FX return channels to tracks
Chapter 17
Configuring the digital inputs
Chapter 9
Activating and de-activating phantom power
Chapter 9
Setting up output signals
Chapter 22
Sending channels to the internal effects
Chapter 16
Saving and loading EZ Routing templates
Chapter 23
Clearing routings
Chapter 23
Initializing routings
Chapter 23
Routing
2—AUTOMIX Button
Press this button to turn Automix on (lit) or off (unlit). Hold down SHIFT and press
AUTOMIX to view the Automix edit screen. See Chapter 26, starting on Page 325.
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2—Getting Around
3—CD-RW•MASTERING Button
Press this button to view the CD-RW/MASTERING menu. From there you can enter
the VS-2480’s Mastering Room—where you can complete the master mix of a project
and create an audio CD—play audio CDs on a connected Roland CD-R/RW drive or
import and export .WAV files. See Chapter 27, starting on Page 339.
Mastering, CD-R/RW drive
4—PROJECT Button
When you press PROJECT, a menu appears in which you’ll find an assortment of
project-management tools and tools for working with your internal IDE drive and a
connected Zip drive.
IDE, hard drive, removable disk drive
5—TRACK Button
Press the TRACK button to view the TRACK region and phrase editing menus.
The TRACK region and phrase editing menus work hand-in-hand with the TRACK
EDIT area buttons described beginning on Page 37.
6—EFFECT Button
Press EFFECT to set up the VS-2480’s internal effects. Chapter 5 discusses important
underlying effects concepts. Chapter 16 provides the specifics on using the VS-2480’s
internal effects.
7—UTILITY Button
The UTILITY button provides access to the UTILITY menu, which offers a wide variety
of settings that determine the behavior of the VS-2480. See Chapter 28, starting on
Page 359.
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2—Getting Around
General Controls
SPLIT
LOOP
NEW
NE
PHRASE
PHR
ASE
GRADATION
GR
ADATION
REGION
AUTOMIX
WAVE DISP
UNDO
REDO
1
8
MIDI / DISK
+
ZOOM
TIME / VALUE
SHUTTLE
+
7
6
SHIFT
2
5
ENTER
/ YES
EXIT
/ NO
3
4
This area contains frequently used controls that are part of many VS-2480 operations.
1—MIDI/DISK Indicator
The MIDI/DISK indicator lights:
•
•
Green—whenever the VS-2480 receives MIDI data from an external device.
Red—whenever the internal IDE drive is being read or being written to.
2—SHIFT Button
Many of the VS-2480’s buttons have a secondary function. When you hold SHIFT and
press one of these buttons, the button performs the function shown in its boxed label.
See Page 68 for more information on using the SHIFT button.
3—ENTER/YES Button
Press ENTER/YES in response to a yes/no question shown on the display, to execute a
procedure, mark an item currently selected on the display or select data for editing.
The ENTER/YES button often flashes to underscore that you’re being asked a question
on the display or that further options are available for your current activity.
4—EXIT/NO Button
Press EXIT/NO in response to a question on the display, to cancel an operation, exit the
current screen or un-mark an object currently selected on the display.
The EXIT/NO button often flashes to underscore that you’re being asked a question on
the display.
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2—Getting Around
5—TIME/VALUE Dial
The TIME/VALUE dial—located inside the SHUTTLE ring—performs two important
jobs:
•
•
During project playback, you can turn the dial to move forward or backward in
time. See Page 126 for more information.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to adjust settings.
6—SHUTTLE Ring
Turn the SHUTTLE ring—the wheel that surrounds the TIME/VALUE dial—to move
quickly back (counter-clockwise) or forward (clockwise) through a project. See “The
SHUTTLE Ring” on Page 178 for details.
7—"#$%(Cursor)/ZOOM Buttons
Press the ", #, $ or % cursor buttons to move the selection cursor (Page 65) around
the VS-2480’s display.
Hold down SHIFT and press the desired arrow button to zoom in and out on track data
shown in the playlist area of the Home screen (Page 119) and other screens:
•
•
•
•
Press # to increase the horizontal magnification.
Press " to decrease the horizontal magnification.
Press $ to increase the vertical magnification.
Press % to decrease the vertical magnification.
8—UNDO•REDO Button
The VS-2480 allows you to reverse—or “undo”—up to 999 of your last recording or
editing actions. Press the UNDO•REDO button to view the Undo dialog. After undoing
any action, you can also “redo” it by pressing UNDO•REDO while holding down
SHIFT—the Redo dialog appears.
SCRUB, PREVIEW and Transport Buttons
2
3
4
PREVIEW
TO
1
THRU
FROM
SCRUB
PROJECT TOP
EXT SYNC
5
PROJECT END
ZERO
STOP
PLAY
REC
STORE
SHUT / EJECT
RESTART
AUTOMIX REC
6
7
8
9
1—SCRUB Button
When you need to precisely locate a moment in a track, press SCRUB to activate the
Scrub feature. When SCRUB is lit, you can turn the TIME/VALUE dial to move the
timeline and listen to a tiny piece of the track play over and over—this lets you zero in
on just the moment you’re looking for. This can be very helpful when editing. To turn
off scrubbing, press SCRUB again so its light goes out. See Page 184 to learn more.
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2—PREVIEW TO•PROJECT TOP Button
Press PREVIEW TO to listen to the last few moments leading up to the current location
of the timeline—you can set how much you want to hear. Hold SHIFT and press
PREVIEW TO to jump to the start, or “top,” of the audio recorded in the project.
3—PREVIEW THRU Button
Press PREVIEW THRU to listen to a small chunk of audio leading up to the current
location of the timeline and a small chunk that plays after it, as determined by the
PREVIEW TO and PREVIEW FROM time settings.
4—PREVIEW FROM•PROJECT END Button
Press PREVIEW FROM to listen to what occurs just after the current location of the
timeline—you can set how much you want to hear. Hold SHIFT and press PREVIEW
FROM to jump to the end of the audio recorded in the project.
PREVIEW TO, PREVIEW THRU and PREVIEW FROM work together, and are all
described in detail in “Preview” on Page 183.
5—EXT SYNC Button
Press EXT SYNC so that it lights to synchronize the VS-2480’s playback to an external
MTC- or SMPTE-generating device. Press it again so that it’s not lit when you want the
VS-2480 itself to provide the master timing reference (this is the VS-2480’s normal
operating mode). Synchronization is described in Chapter 24. Hold down SHIFT and
press EXT SYNC to jump to the VS-2480’s synchronization settings.
MTC, SMPTE
6—ZERO•STORE Button
Press ZERO•STORE to return to the beginning of the project (Time 00h00m00s00f00)—
see Page 126. Hold down SHIFT and press ZERO•STORE to save the current state of
your project to your hard drive.
7—STOP•SHUT/EJECT Button
Press STOP to halt playback at the timeline’s current location—see Page 122. Hold
down SHIFT and press STOP•SHUT/EJECT to power down the VS-2480—you’ll be
asked if you want to save your project first—and to eject any mounted Zip drive
cartridges.
8—PLAY•RESTART Button
Press PLAY•RESTART to begin playback from the current location of the timeline—see
Page 122. Hold down SHIFT and press PLAY •RESTART to restart the VS-2480 instead
of turning it off after you’ve performed a shutdown procedure (SHIFT + STOP•SHUT/
EJECT).
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2—Getting Around
9—REC•AUTOMIX REC Button
Hold down REC•AUTOMIX REC and press PLAY to record audio onto a track (see
Page 179). When the AUTOMIX button (Page 39) is lit, hold down REC•AUTOMIX and
press PLAY to record mixer settings as Automix data—see Chapter 26 (Page 325) to
learn about automated mixing on the VS-2480.
Realtime
LOCATOR/MARKER/SCENE Area
11 10
LOCATOR / MARKER / SCENE
1
LOCATOR
7
8
9
SCENE
BANK
AUX 7
AUX 8
USER
BANK
MARKER
2
3
4
5
6
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
1
2
3
AUX 1
AUX 2
AUX 3
0 /-
NEXT
PREVIOUS
4
5
9
8
7
6
The buttons in this area are described in detail in Chapter 13, starting on Page 177,
except as noted.
1—LOCATOR•BANK Button
Press the LOCATOR•BANK button so it’s lit to store and recall locators using the
numeric keypad (see “11—Numeric keypad•AUX 1-8, USER” on Page 46). A locator
remembers a particular timeline position within a project—when you recall the locator,
the timeline instantly jumps back to that time position. Locators are discussed in detail
in “Locators” on Page 185.
Each project can contain up to 100 locators arranged in groups, or “banks,” of ten
locators each. To select a locator bank, hold down SHIFT, press LOCATOR•BANK so it’s
lit, and press the desired bank’s number on the numeric keypad.
2—MARKER Button
Press the MARKER button so it’s lit to create and recall markers using the numeric
keypad (see “11—Numeric keypad•AUX 1-8, USER” on Page 46). Each project can
contain up to 1,000 markers, numbered from 000 to 999. Markers are used for
navigation during editing, looping and punching. Special markers are used for track
indexing when creating an audio CD.
3—CLEAR Button
To delete a locator, marker or scene, hold down CLEAR and press the desired locator,
marker or scene (Page 144) number on the numeric keypad.
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2—Getting Around
4—NUMERICS Button
Press NUMERICS so that it lights to enter numeric values for various settings using the
VS-2480’s keypad or a connected ASCII keyboard. When NUMERICS is lit, the area
into which you can type becomes selected on the display. See Page 74.
5—PREVIOUS Button
Press PREVIOUS to move the timeline to the beginning of the currently selected track
phrase or to the end of the phrase immediately before it. Hold down SHIFT and press
PREVIOUS to move the timeline back in time to the nearest marker.
6—NEXT Button
Press NEXT to move the timeline to the end of the currently selected track phrase or to
the beginning of the phrase immediately after it. Hold down SHIFT and press NEXT to
move the timeline forward in time to the nearest marker.
7—JUMP Button
You can jump to any location in a project by pressing JUMP and entering the desired
time location on the VS-2480’s numeric keypad or TIME/VALUE dial. You can select the
desired time in time code (01:01:01:01.01) at the left of the dialog that appears, or
measures, beats and clocks (001-01-001) at the right. Press ENTER/YES to move to the
selected location.
8—KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 Button
When you press the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 button so that it flashes, you
can press a number on the numeric keypad to assign the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs to
the job of sending signals from the individual channel strips (Page 33) to the
corresponding Aux bus. In addition, you can press 9•USER to assign them to another
setting of your choice. See Page 141.
9—TAP•SNAPSHOT Button
Press TAP•SNAPSHOT to create a marker at the current position of the timeline—the
marker is numbered automatically. When AUTOMIX (Page 325) is lit, press AUTOMIX
and this button to create a snapshot of your current mixer settings that can be recalled
as part of an automated mix. Automix and snapshots are discussed in Chapter 26. Hold
down CD-RW•MASTERING and press TAP•SNAPSHOT to place a CD track marker at
the timeline’s current location.
10—SCENE•BANK Button
Press the SCENE•BANK button so it’s lit to store and recall scenes using the numeric
keypad (see “11—Numeric keypad•AUX 1-8, USER” on Page 46). A scene stores your
current mixer settings, allowing you to save different versions of your project for
instant recall. Scenes are discussed in detail in “Scenes” on Page 144.
Each project can contain up to 100 scenes in groups, or “banks,” of ten scenes each. To
select a scene bank, hold down SHIFT, press SCENE•BANK so it’s lit, and press the
desired bank’s number on the numeric keypad.
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2—Getting Around
11—Numeric keypad•AUX 1-8, USER
The numeric keypad serves two general purposes:
•
•
You can type the desired number or numbers on it when storing and recalling
locators, scenes and markers, or when entering values when NUMERICS is lit.
When KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 is flashing, you can assign the PAN/
AUX SEND 1-8 knobs to the job of sending signals from the individual channel
strips to one of the eight Aux busses (Page 141) by pressing the desired 1-8 button,
or to some other job by pressing 9•USER (also Page 141).
Bus
Every set of ten items on the numeric keypad—banks, locators, scenes and so on—is
numbered from 0 to 9.
The Rear Panel of the VS-2480
1—POWER Switch
1
Use the POWER switch to turn the VS-2480
on and off.
Don’t simply flip the POWER switch
when you want to shut down the
VS-2480—if you do this, data loss may
occur. Make sure to use the proper
shutdown procedure, described on
Page 80.
POWER
ON
AC IN
2—AC IN Jack
Connect one end of the supplied AC power
cord to a grounded AC outlet, and the other
end to the AC IN jack.
2
3
Use only the supplied AC power cord to prevent damage to your VS-2480.
3—Cooling Fan Exhaust Vent
The VS-2480 contains a cooling fan that prevents it from overheating. The fan expels hot
air through this exhaust vent.
Be sure never to block the cooling fan exhaust vent. If hot air from the VS-2480 chassis
isn’t allowed to escape through this vent, the VS-2480 may overheat and be damaged.
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2—Getting Around
4
THIS DEVICE COMPLIES WITH PART 15 OF
THE FCC RULES. OPERATION IS SUBJECT
TO THE FOLLOWING TWO CONDITIONS:
(1) THIS DEVICE MAY NOT CAUSE HARMFUL
INTERFERENCE, AND (2) THIS DEVICE MUST
ACCEPT ANY INTERFERENCE RECEIVED,
INCLUDING INTERFERENCE THAT MAY
CAUSE UNDESIRED OPERATION.
SMPTE
IN
5
PS / 2
KEYBOARD MOUSE
6
7
8
9
IN
FOOT
SWITCH
PHONES 2 PHONES 1
MIDI
OUT// THRU
10
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT
+4dBu BALANCED / -2dBu UNBALANCED
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
R
L
R
L
R
L
R
L
GND COLD
(SLEEVE) (RING)
HOT
(TIP)
MONITOR
AUX B
AUX A
MASTER
DIGITAL
SCSI
11
12
VGA OUT
WORD CLOCK IN
13
2
DIGITAL 8ch I / O
14
1
DIGITAL 8ch I / O
OUT
IN
OUT
OPTICAL
15
IN
COAXIAL
16
4—SMPTE IN Jack
When synchronizing the VS-2480 as a slave to an external SMPTE-generating device,
connect the external device’s SMPTE output to the VS-2480’s SMPTE IN jack.
Synchronization is discussed in Chapter 24, starting on Page 307.
Slave
5—PS/2 KEYBOARD and MOUSE Jacks
Connect a PS/2 ASCII keyboard (purchased separately) and mouse (shipped with the
VS-2480) to the PS/2 KEYBOARD and MOUSE jacks, respectively. See Page 62.
PS/2, ASCII
6—MIDI OUT/THRU Jack
By default, this jack functions as a MIDI output jack—connect it to the MIDI input of
any device to which you wish to send MIDI data from the VS-2480 (see Chapter 24,
Page 299). You can also set the MIDI OUT/THRU jack to function as a THRU jack that
passes along any MIDI data the VS-2480 receives from an external device (Page 300).
7—MIDI IN Jack
Connect the MIDI output of an external device to the MIDI IN jack when you want the
VS-2480 to receive and respond to MIDI data transmitted from an external device. See
Chapter 24, starting on Page 299.
8—FOOT SWITCH Jack
You can control a variety of VS-2480 functions using an optional foot switch—such as a
Roland DP-2 or BOSS F5-SU—connected to this jack. See Page 362.
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2—Getting Around
9—PHONES 1 and 2 Jacks
Connect standard stereo headphones (purchased separately) to either or both of these
jacks for listening to the VS-2480. Each jack has its own volume control (Page 75). You
can select the signals to be sent to the PHONES jacks, as described in Chapter 22.
10—ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT Jacks 1-8
These are the VS-2480’s line-level analog output jacks. When used with balanced
cables, they produce a +4dBu level; when used with unbalanced cables, they produce a
level of -2dBu.
The label for each pair of jacks shows its factory default setting. However, you can
assign different signals to the jacks if you wish. See Chapter 22, starting on Page 287.
11—Grounding Terminal
In rare cases, you may feel a slight electrical current when you touch the case of the
VS-2480. While completely harmless, you may want to connect the VS-2480’s grounding
terminal to an external ground to eliminate the sensation. There’s a slight risk, however,
that grounding the VS-2480 will cause a low-level hum to occur.
There are a few external grounding sources you should never attempt to use. Do not
connect the grounding terminal to water pipes, which can cause shock, or even
electrocution. Don’t ground the VS-2480 to gas pipes—this can result in fire or
explosion. And don’t connect the terminal to a telephone jack or lightning rod, which
can be dangerous in the event of lightning.
12—SCSI Jack
The VS-2480’s SCSI jack is a DB-25-type SCSI connector to which you can attach a SCSI
cable connected to Roland CD-RW drive or compatible drive. You’ll find some tips for
successful SCSI connections in the VS-2480 Appendices.
13—VGA OUT Jack
Connect an external VGA CRT color video monitor—purchased separately—to this
DB-15-type VGA output jack. The monitor’s Info Display provides helpful large-screen
information about a variety of VS-2480 operations. You’ll find setup details on Page 64
and an introduction to the Info Display screens on Page 70.
14—WORD CLOCK IN Jack
When synchronizing the VS-2480’s signal to a group of external digital devices, connect
the master timing source’s word clock output to the VS-2480’s WORD CLOCK IN jack
using a standard BNC cable.
Word clock
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2—Getting Around
15—R-BUS 1 and 2 DIGITAL 8ch I/O Jacks
Using Roland’s R-BUS technology, you can bring digital audio into and out of the
VS-2480 by connecting it to any R-BUS-compliant external digital device. This includes
the following Roland products (purchased separately):
•
•
•
•
•
•
ADA-7000 8-Channel A/D-D/A Converter that provides additional analog inputs
AE-7000 AES/EBU Interface that provides AES-EBU connectivity
The RPC-1 R-BUS Interface Card for exchanging digital audio with a computer
The VM-7000 V-Mixing system
The VM-3100Pro V-Mixing Station
XV-5080 128-Voice Synthesizer/Sample Playback Module
To connect the VS-2480 to another R-BUS device, connect one
end of an R-BUS cable to the VS-2480’s R-BUS 1 jack or R-BUS
2 jack, and the other to an R-BUS jack on the external device.
Be sure to use the shortest Roland-approved R-BUS cables
possible. Note that other cables—such as SCSI, RS-232C
or parallel cables—may have connectors that look like
R-BUS connectors, but they’re not the same, and these
cables can’t be used successfully with R-BUS jacks.
VS-2480
FOOT
SWITCH
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT
PHONES 2 PHONES 1
8
R
MONITOR
7
6
L
R
+4dBu BALANCED / -2dBu UNBALANCED
5
4
L
R
AUX B
3
2
L
R
AUX A
1
L
MASTER
DIGITAL
WORD CLOCK IN
2
DIGITAL 8ch I / O
1
DIGITAL 8ch I / O
OUT
IN
OPTICAL
OUT
IN
COAXIAL
VM-7000 Series + VM-24E
If you plan to use only one of the VS-2480’s R-BUS jacks, use the R-BUS 1 jack, whose
eight channels of digital audio are always available. The full set of eight channels
associated with the R-BUS 2 jack is available only when you’re not using the coaxial
and optical digital inputs, as described on Page 131.
Each R-BUS jack can both receive and send eight separate digital audio signals, so only
one connection is needed between two R-BUS devices. R-BUS connections can also
carry MIDI, MMC and MTC data in both directions.
MMC
See Page 377 to learn how to configure a connected R-BUS device. Page 131 describes
how to activate R-BUS 2, coaxial and optical inputs. See Page 288 to learn how to route
the desired signals to your R-BUS outputs.
R-BUS was formerly called “RMDB II “or “RMDB2” in earlier Roland products.
16—OPTICAL and COAXIAL Digital Audio Connectors
The VS-2480 can both receive and transmit S/P DIF-format digital audio via its optical
and coaxial digital IN and OUT connectors. Each connector carries a stereo digital
audio signal. See Page 132 to learn how to successfully handle incoming digital audio.
We’ll explain how to route signals to either OUT connector starting on Page 288.
S/P DIF
You can configure the VS-2480 to record digital audio received from an external digital
device connected to these jacks—see Page 134.
The coaxial IN and OUT jacks carry only S/P DIF digital audio signals. The IN jack
won’t accept standard analog audio signals, and the OUT jack doesn’t produce them.
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3—Introduction to the VS-2480
To master the VS-2480, it’s important to understand the components that make up this
self-contained 24-track recording studio. That’s what we’ll do here. More specific
descriptions of how to use these components can be found in later chapters as noted.
While advanced V-2480 users may already understand much of what’s discussed here,
everyone should make sure to read “Projects” on Page 56. This section introduces the
project, the basic structure in which all VS-2480 work takes place.
What’s Inside the VS-2480?
Every recording studio has the same mission: the capturing of sound and the
conversion of that sound into a form—an audio CD, a film or video soundtrack, a
broadcast—that people can hear. If you were to go into any conventional multitrack
recording studio, you’d therefore see the same sort of tools. All of these tools can also
be found inside your VS-2480. Here’s what’s hidden inside its case:
Input jacks and connectors
Mixing console
Internal effects
Hard disk recorder
Output jacks and connectors
Input Jacks and Connectors
Obviously, you’ve got to have a way to get sound into the VS-2480.
Analog and digital sounds travel through the cables that bring them to the VS-2480 as
electrical signals, called “input signals.”The VS-2480 provides jacks that recognize
analog audio signals from microphones and from electric or electronic instruments. It
also has digital connectors that accept digital audio signals from devices such as
synthesizers or effect boxes with digital outputs, and from digital audio tape (DAT)
decks and other kinds of digital recorders, including computer-based audio recorders.
We’ll discuss the VS-2480’s analog input jacks and digital connectors in detail in
Chapter 9, starting on Page 129.
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The Mixing Console
The VS-2480 contains a digital 64-channel mixing console.
What’s a Digital Mixing Console?
First, let’s make sure we understand what a mixing console, or “mixer,” is. A mixer is a
device that lets you manipulate audio, and lets you combine multiple audio signals into
a single sound, or a “mix.”That mix can be in mono, stereo or Surround.
A digital mixer converts all audio signals into binary data—numbers—and performs all
of its operations using complex mathematical equations. When you listen to the
mixer—and any time audio comes out of its analog outputs—the sound is converted
back into audible form. A digital mixer has several powerful advantages:
•
•
•
Digital mixers produce extremely high-quality sound.
They can memorize settings that can be restored with the touch of a button.
They have a flexible internal structure—it’s all just numbers under the hood, after
all, not physical wires—so you can easily re-configure the mixer’s internal
connections in ways that aren’t possible with a traditional analog mixer.
64 Channels?
In the VS-2480, each audio signal has its own set of controls with which you can
manage and shape its sound. This set of controls is called a “channel.”The
VS-2480’s mixer has 64 channels, all of which are always active and available:
•
•
•
•
24 input channels—control signals received by 24 of the VS-2480’s analog input
jacks and digital connectors. The 24 input channels are sometimes collectively
referred to as the “input mixer.”
8 Aux master channels—control the master volume, or “level,” of the eight Aux
busses. We’ll explain the Aux busses in Chapter 15.
24 track channels—control the sound of recordings being played back by the
VS-2480’s hard disk recorder. They may be referred to as the “track mixer.”
8 FX return channels control the sound produced by the VS-2480’s internal effects.
As you can see, there are just 16 physical channel strips—plus the MASTER strip—on
the VS-2480. If it actually had 64 physical channel strips, the VS-2480 would be huge.
Input channels
Track channels
Aux
masters
FX
returns
MASTER fader
Even so, all 64 channels are available at all times. Here’s how this is possible.
Once you’ve set a channel’s controls the way you want them, the channel does its job
without further action on your part—you only need to get to its controls when you want
to change their settings. On the VS-2480, when you need to change a particular
channel’s settings, you press a FADER button, and the controls belonging to one of the
physical channel strips become the controls for the selected channel.
We’ll discuss the operation of the mixer in detail in Chapter 10, starting on Page 137.
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The Main Roles of the VS-2480 Mixer
Two of the most important jobs the mixer performs in the VS-2480 are this:
It helps you make an input signal sound the
way you want it to on its way to a track.
It helps you get the track to sound the way you
want, both during recording and while it’s being
played back when you’re mixing or bouncing.
You’ll also use the VS-2480’s mixer to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
mix input signals for your performers to listen to in headphones or stage monitors.
send input signals to the VS-2480 internal effects.
set the amount of internal effects processing you want to add to your input signals.
control the level of input signals sent to external devices for effect processing, and
the sound of what comes back into the VS-2480 from the external devices.
listen to the hard disk recorder’s tracks as you record so that you can hear what
they’re recording.
send tracks to the internal effects.
set the amount of internal effects processing you want to hear on your tracks.
control the level of tracks sent to external devices for effect processing, and the
sound of what comes back into the VS-2480 from the external devices.
create a mix to send to a house public address (PA) system when you’re using the
VS-2480 for live recording in a club or concert hall.
What all of these jobs have in common is that all involve the same basic abilities in the
mixer. The mixer lets you:
•
•
•
•
control the level of all kinds of audio.
set the audio’s stereo or Surround positioning between your speakers.
change the tonal characteristics of audio with equalization, or “EQ.”
apply dynamics processing to audio to change the way it gets louder or softer.
Bouncing, equalization, EQ, dynamics processing
MIDI Control Surface
When the VS-2480’s V.Fader feature is active, you can use each channel strip’s fader and
its PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to send MIDI Control Change messages to an external
MIDI device. This can be especially handy when you’re using the VS-2480 with a MIDI
sequencer. You can use the mixer to work the sequencer’s controls directly from the
VS-2480. See “V.Fader—The VS-2480 MIDI Control Surface” on Page 300 to learn more
about using the mixer as a MIDI control surface.
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The Internal Effects
What Are the Internal Effects?
The VS-2480 contains a set of individual internal effects processors. As shipped from
the factory, there are two internal stereo effect processors onboard. You can install up to
three additional VS8F-2 Effect Expansion Boards (purchased separately) for a total of
eight internal stereo effect processors.
What Are Effects?
An effect is a type of audio processing that’s added to a sound to enhance it. There are a
variety of effects available in the VS-2480, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reverbs—A reverb adds an ambience to a sound, creating the impression that it
exists in an actual physical space. Some people call reverb “echo,” though
technically that word applies to something else, as we’ll see. A reverb can be short
in duration—so that it sounds like an average-sized room in your home—or long,
so that it sounds like big concert hall. It can also be set to any size in-between.
Delays—A delay causes the original sound to repeat one or more times, often at
levels that get quieter and quieter with each repeat. Long delays help re-create
classic rock ‘n roll sounds. Any delay can also useful for subtly suggesting an
ambience. Another word for “delay” is “echo.”
Choruses, flangers and phasers—All three effects add their own type of swirling
texture to a sound, most often to instruments such as electric pianos and electric
guitar or bass. They utilize subtle delays and/or pitch changes to do what they do.
Filters—A filter removes part of the original sound. This group of effects includes
EQs and things like wah-wah pedal simulations.
Compressors, limiters, gates—These effects, collectively called “dynamics processors,”
alter the volume of the original signal in one way or another. Compressors and
limiters even out volume fluctuations, while a gate lowers the level of a signal—or
shuts it off altogether—when it falls below a certain volume level.
Modeling—Roland’s COSM™ (Composite Object Sound Modeling) process
emulates various guitar amps, microphones and speakers with amazing realism.
The VS-2480 also offers effects that use several of these audio processes at once.
How Does the VS-2480 Create Effects?
Each of the VS-2480’s effects is created by subjecting an audio signal—remember, it’s
just numbers while it’s inside the VS-2480—to a complex mathematical formula called
an “algorithm.”The VS-2480 contains 36 algorithms. You’ll find a list of them in the
VS-2480 Appendices booklet.
Each algorithm has its own collection of settings. You can save an algorithm’s settings in
the VS-2480 memory as an “effect patch.”The VS-2480 ships from the factory with 250
pre-programmed patches, many of which offer more than one kind of effect. The
VS-2480 also provides 200 memory locations into which you can save your own effect
patches. See the VS-2480 Appendices for a list of the factory effect patches.
Effects can be applied to an audio signal in either of two ways, as we’ll discuss in
Chapter 5, starting on Page 81.
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The Hard Disk Recorder
The VS-2480’s hard disk recorder is the simplest of its three major components to
explain and understand—it’s an audio recorder, acting a lot like a cassette recorder,
VCR or any other traditional kind of recorder. Its basic controls will be familiar to you.
Instead of recording on a cassette or VHS tape, however, the hard disk recorder records
audio onto a computer hard disk drive (Page 85). This provides some important
advantages over other kinds of recorders:
•
•
•
•
•
Its sound quality is excellent.
You can instantly jump to any location in a recording with no waiting while the
machine fast-forwards or rewinds.
You can easily manipulate recorded audio, copying it, pasting it, moving it, timestretching it and much more.
You can edit audio “non-destructively,” with the ability to undo any edit you make.
The VS-2480 can memorize multiple locations within a recording so that you can
jump back and forth between sections in a heartbeat.
How Many Tracks Can It Record?
The hard disk recorder can record up to 16 tracks at once, and play back up to 24 tracks
at a time. That’s really only the beginning of the story, though, since each project on the
VS-2480 can actually contain 384 “Virtual Tracks” from which you can pick and choose.
The words “track” and “Virtual Track” have special meanings in the VS-2480. We’ll
discuss them in Chapter 6.
The number of tracks you can record and play at once is determined by the selected
recording mode, as you’ll learn in Chapter 7.
We’ll discuss how to use the hard disk recorder in Chapter 13, starting on Page 177.
The Phrase Pads
The audio recorded on a particular track can be divided up into phrases (Chapter 6).
Normally, these phrases play back when you press the hard disk recorder’s PLAY
button. However, you can also play a phrase on a track by striking the corresponding
track channel’s TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD button. You can also record your strikes
as a performance captured by the VS-2480’s phrase sequencer. See Chapter 21 on
Page 273 to learn more about the phrase pads and phrase sequencer.
Output Jacks and Connectors
If you’ve got a Roland VS-CDRII or CD-RACK (purchased separately) connected to
your VS-2480’s SCSI jack, you can burn your own audio CDs directly from the VS-2480.
However, there are lots of reasons you might want to get audio out of the VS-2480. You
may want to:
•
•
•
•
•
send your MASTER mix to a pair of monitors so you can hear what you’re doing.
send input signals or tracks to an external effect processor.
send tracks to a computer for further editing or other purposes.
send signals to a headphone amplifier to give your performers a way to hear what’s
being recorded during a recording session.
send signals to a stage monitors to let your performers hear what they’re playing or
singing when using the VS-2480 for live recording.
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The VS-2480 provides analog output jacks and digital connectors for all of these
situations. We’ll discuss them in detail in Chapter 22, starting on Page 287.
Burn
Signal Flow
Here’s an illustration that shows, in general terms, how signals typically flow in the
VS-2480. You can see how the inputs, input channels, hard disk recorder, track channels
and outputs work together:
Inputs
Input Channels 1-24
Hard disk
recorder
There are several
places at which you can
add effects to signals—
the effects processor
isn’t shown in this
illustration for visual
clarity.
Track Channels 1-24
Outputs
Projects
Everything you do in the VS-2480 takes place inside something called a “project.” As its
name suggests, a project is a hard disk file that contains all of the information for a
particular work or performance you’re creating. That work could be a song, a
soundtrack, a broadcast, a jingle or anything else. It could even be the music for an
entire CD, containing multiple songs, or a set of songs recorded live.
In other V-Studios—such as the VS-1880, VS-890, VSR-880 and VS-840GX—projects are
called “songs.”
Projects provide an easy way to keep all the materials for a particular piece in one
place, ready to go when you need them, including:
•
•
•
•
•
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everything you’ve recorded.
your most recent mixer settings, as well as any alternate mixer setups you’ve saved.
your effect settings.
all locations you’ve saved for use in navigation, punching and looping.
all Automix data.
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3—Introduction to the VS-2480
•
•
•
playback speed settings.
all information relating to tempo and synchronization.
all project-related UTILITY menu settings.
The VS-2480 always has a project loaded, even if you’ve never created one yourself.
A projects can be as large as space allows, as long as it doesn’t exceed the maximum
number of allowable events (see below.) You can save up to 200 projects on your hard
drive, space permitting. You can change from project to project by loading the project
you want to work on as needed. You can also copy data between projects. Project
operations are discussed in Chapter 7 on Page 93.
We’ll describe how to create and name a new project in Chapter 7.
If the intended final destination for your project is an audio CD, be sure to select a
44.1kHz sampling rate for your project when you create it—see Page 339.
About Events
The smallest chunk of project data that the VS-2480 works with is called an “event,” a
piece of information that the VS-2480 needs to do its job. For example, each recording
you make uses up at least two events: one that tells the VS-2480 where on the hard drive
the recording’s file starts, and one that tells it where it ends. Each project can contain
roughly 10,000 events—when all of its events have been used up, the project is full, even
if you have disk space left. You can trim the number of events in a project by
“optimizing” it, as discussed in Chapter 7.
Busses in the VS-2480
In order to get signals from one place to another within the VS-2480—and to provide a
way to get them out of the VS-2480—the VS-2480 uses an assortment of “busses.” While
we’ll describe the use of the VS-2480’s busses in various places throughout the VS-2480
Owner’s Manual, it’s important to first understand what a bus is.
What’s a Bus?
A bus is a pathway down which one or more
signals can travel to a common destination.
Bus
Destination
In older analog mixers, a bus was literally a single wire into which signals were fed—
the wire was then connected to the desired destination’s input.
This simple mechanism is more significant than it may seem since it lets you send a
group of signals to a track, into a mix, to an effect, to specific outputs and more. Much
of the VS-2480’s bussing occurs behind the scenes—so you won’t always be dealing
directly with it—but some of its busses play an important, visible role in its operations.
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Although every bus is essentially the same thing—a pathway—busses are named for
the type of signal they typically carry. The VS-2480 provides the following busses.
Type of bus:
What it does:
RECORD
Each of these 24 busses carries signals to one of the hard disk
recorder’s tracks.
MASTER
This stereo left/right pair of busses carries the VS-2480’s main
stereo mix to any number of possible destinations.
MONITOR
This stereo left/right pair of busses carries signals to your
listening device: monitor speakers or headphones
AUX
“AUX” is short for “Auxiliary Send.”The eight AUX busses carry
signals to the VS-2480’s internal effects. They can also carry signals
to outputs connected to external devices such as effect boxes or
headphone amplifiers for your performers.
DIR
“DIR” is short for “Direct bus.” Unlike most busses, the eight
Direct busses don’t carry groups of signals—each one provides a
way to route a single signal directly to one of the VS-2480’s
internal effects, or to an output and an external device.
Don’t be confused by the name “R-BUS.” R-BUS isn’t a kind of bus—it’s Roland’s own
digital connector format. Of course, you can route some of the VS-2480’s busses to
the VS-2480’s R-BUS connectors (Page 288) to send them to an external digital device.
Achieving Perfect Levels
In all digital recording, the best sound is achieved when a signal is at just below 0 dB in
level so that the audio takes fullest advantage of the recording device’s available bit
depth. You need to be careful, though: If the signal exceeds 0 dB, the signal will “clip.”
Bit depth
What’s “Clipping?”
Clipping is the introduction of clicking and other noises when a signal’s too loud.
There’s no really good way to get rid of these noises once they’ve been recorded. You
may have some success importing the audio into a wave editor with de-clicking tools,
but it’s best to avoid clipping in the first place.
How Do I Get Good Levels?
The goal, therefore, is to capture as loud a signal as possible without exceeding 0 dB.
Achieving a loud-but-not-too-loud signal is the challenge of digital recording. When
you’re working with audio that has a consistent, predictable dynamic range, it’s not
hard to accomplish. However, if your project swings wildly between loud and soft
passages—or if you’re recording musicians whose volume changes a lot—it can be a bit
more tricky.
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Take Care During Recording
When it comes to establishing great levels, the most critical stage is during the original
recording process. The most difficult recording situations involve the recording of
musicians whose levels fluctuate between one performance and another, or even
within the same performance—it can be hard to capture a strong level if you can’t be
sure how loud the performance is going to get. Fortunately, the VS-2480 provides some
peak-detection options that can help you anticipate potential level problems (Page 125).
If you’ve set all of your recording levels and feel that they’re all universally too loud or
too soft, you can use the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT screen’s REC ATT parameter to raise
or lower the recording level of all of your tracks simultaneously—see Page 201.
If you’re finding a performer’s level just too erratic to manage, consider running the
signal through an external compressor/limiter that can smooth out some of the volume
fluctuations in the performance before it even gets to the VS-2480. Try to find an
acceptable trade-off between making the signal manageable on one hand, and not
removing expressive dynamics from the signal on the other.
Compressor, limiter
The level of a digital input signal is normally controlled at its source, the external digital
device that produces it.
Watch the Meters
The VS-2480 provides meters that let you view your signal levels at every stage in the
project-creation process. The VS-2480’s various meters are described in detail in
Chapter 8, which starts on Page 119.
As you work on your project, pay close attention to your levels:
•
•
•
•
•
Watch the input channel meters during recording—they set the levels of signals as
they’re recorded onto your tracks.
Watch your Aux bus levels if you’re using them to send signals to the internal
effects or external devices.
Watch your Direct bus levels if you’re using them to send signals to external
devices or the internal effects.
During mixing, watch:
• your track levels—if they’re too loud, bring them down and raise your MASTER
fader setting.
• your MASTER bus levels—this is the mix’s overall level.
Watch your output meters if you’re sending signals to external devices.
The Importance of Backing Up
It’s a simple fact of life that computers and their hard drives can misbehave—everyone
who owns a computer knows this. Outside events—such as power outages and
spikes—can also cause problems to occur.
The VS-2480 is a highly specialized computer designed for recording, but it is a
computer, and all of your data is stored on its hard drive. As such, it’s subject to the
same mishaps as any other computer. While your VS-2480 is very reliable, there can be
no absolute guarantee that nothing will ever go wrong.
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It’s vitally important, therefore, that you do what every computer user must do:
regularly back up your data to an external storage device. If an unexpected problem
does occur, you can always re-load your backed-up data and carry on.
We strongly recommend that you purchase a Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive such as
the Roland VS-CDRII or CD-RACK. These devices allow you to easily and quickly back
up your data on inexpensive CD-R (“CD-Recordable”) or CD-RW (“CD-ReWritable”)
disks that can hold large amounts of data. The VS-2480 provides extensive backup and
recovery tools, as described in Chapter 7.
While backing up your data requires an investment of your time on a regular basis,
there’s no substitute for the peace of mind it provides, especially if something does go
wrong. Backing up your project is the best way to ensure that all of your inspired
moments and hard work remain completely safe and sound, no matter what happens.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
Things You’ll Need
Power
You’ll need a standard AC power socket that supplies grounded AC power. If you’re
going to listen to the VS-2480 through speakers, you’ll also need power for them and for
their amplifier if it’s a separate component.
A Way to Listen to the VS-2480
You can listen to—or “monitor”—the VS-2480 through speakers or by connecting
standard stereo headphones to either or both of the VS-2480’s PHONES jacks.
For speakers, we recommend Roland’s DS-90A or DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors
(purchased separately). There are several reasons:
•
•
•
•
They have ultra-flat frequency responses. It’s critical that your speakers tell you the
truth as you work so you know what your recordings really sound like. The
DS-90As and DS-50As tell the truth.
The DS-90As and DS-50As are powered monitors, meaning that they have their
own built-in amplifiers that are perfectly matched to the speakers.
They have SP/DIF digital inputs so that you can connect them to the VS-2480
digitally and avoid noise that can occur with analog wiring.
They can take advantage of Roland’s advanced COSM Speaker Modeling that lets
you try out your work on a variety of virtual speaker models. The VS-2480’s built-in
speaker models eliminate the difficulty of making sure your recordings sound good
on any speaker system.
A Headphone Note
The VS-2480’s PHONES 1 and 2 jacks are 1/4” stereo phone-type jacks, so you’ll need to
make sure that the headphones you use have 1/4” stereo phone-type plugs. If your
headphones have some other type of plug, you’ll need to purchase an adapter for them.
Getting Ready
Turn Everything Off, Turn Everything Down
In order to prevent any unpleasant surprises or damage to your monitoring equipment,
you should turn off all of your equipment—the VS-2480, monitors, etc.—before making
your connections. In addition, you should turn down all of the appropriate volume
controls before powering up your system:
•
•
If you’re using a speaker amplifier, turn its gain control down all the way.
On the VS-2480, turn down the MONITOR knob to the left of the display all the
way. If you’re going to connect headphones to the PHONES 1 and/or 2 jack, turn
down the corresponding PHONES knob(s) all the way.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
Connect a PS/2 Mouse and PS/2 ASCII Keyboard
A mouse and ASCII keyboard can make the operation of the VS-2480 even easier. The
VS-2480 supports the use of a PS/2-type mouse and PS/2 keyboard. A PS/2 mouse is
included with your VS-2480. A PS/2 keyboard must be purchased separately.
Many of the VS-2480’s operations can be performed using a mouse instead of the
VS-2480’s top-panel controls, as described on Page 68. You can also perform some
important operations and navigate the VS-2480 using a connected ASCII keyboard
(Page 69).
Connect the included mouse to the rear-panel PS/2 MOUSE jack. Connect your
keyboard to the PS/2 KEYBOARD jack.
You may need to activate your ASCII keyboard. See the keyboard settings on Page 64.
Connect a VGA Monitor
Certain information that’s shown on the VS-2480’s built-in display is also sent through
its VGA output to a connected color VGA monitor acting as your Info Display (monitor
purchased separately). The Info Display lets you view this information in a large-easyto-read format.
You can use any standard VGA display that has a refresh rate from 60-75 Hz. Connect
your monitor’s DB-15-type VGA cable to the VS-2480’s rear-panel VGA OUT jack.
See “Using the VGA Info Display” on Page 70 for an introduction to the Info Display.
Connect Monitors or Headphones
The connections you’ll need to make depend on how you’ll be listening to the VS-2480:
•
If you’re going to be listening to the VS-2480 through DS-90A or DS-50A monitors,
you can connect the VS-2480’s COAXIAL OUT or its OPTICAL OUT to the
monitors’ COAXIAL or OPTICAL DIGITAL INPUT. Make sure the DS-90A/DS-50A
Digital Input Select Switch is set to the type of digital connection you’ve chosen to
use, and that the Input Select Switch is set to DIGITAL INPUT. See your DS-90A or
DS-50A Owner’s Manual for more information.
When using one of the VS-2480’s DIGITAL OUTs for monitoring, you’ll need to
configure them as described in “If You’re Using DS-90A or DS-50A Monitors” on
Page 75.
•
•
If you’re using any other type of monitors, connect the VS-2480’s ANALOG MULTI
OUTPUTs 7 and 8 to the left and right inputs, respectively, of your speaker system.
If you’re using headphones, connect them to the PHONES 1 or 2 jack. You can use
two sets of headphones—with each plugged into its own jack—if you wish.
Connect All Other Devices
Connect any other devices to the appropriate VS-2480 jack or connector. If you’re
unsure which jack or connector to use, consult the device’s documentation.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
Making Power Connections
Connect one end of the supplied AC power cable to a grounded AC outlet, and the
other to the VS-2480’s AC IN jack—use only the supplied AC cable. Connect all other
devices’ power cables as recommended in their documentation.
Powering Up
It’s important that you power up the VS-2480 and any equipment to which it’s attached
in the following order to prevent damage to your equipment and to make sure the
VS-2480 recognizes everything you’ve connected to it.
In the following steps, allow each piece of equipment to finish its power-up sequence
before proceeding to the next step.
1.
2.
3.
Turn on everything connected to the VS-2480 except your monitors or monitoring
system. This includes devices connected to the VS-2480 via analog connections or
digitally, your VGA monitor and any external SCSI devices.
Turn on the VS-2480 by pressing its rear-panel POWER switch to its On position. When
the Home display—shown here—appears, the VS-2480 power-up sequence is
complete.
This takes a few moments, as explained in the next section.
Turn on your monitor speakers or monitoring system.
What Happens During the VS-2480’s Power-Up
When you turn the VS-2480 on, it performs a few important tasks that help ensure its
successful operation. It:
•
•
•
•
performs some diagnostic routines to make sure everything’s working properly.
scans its SCSI bus to learn what SCSI devices are connected and available for use.
sets up the available effects.
re-loads the project that was loaded at power-down. (When you turn on the
VS-2480 for the first time, this is the “What You Don’t Know” demo.) As a project
loads, the faders move to their last-saved positions and the project’s settings are
restored.
SCSI, SCSI bus
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Configuring the VS-2480
Setting Up the VGA Monitor, Mouse and Keyboard
You’ll want to make sure your mouse, keyboard and VGA monitor are properly set up.
All of the settings for these devices are found on the same UTILITY menu pages. To get
there:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE—if necessary—until “SYSTEM” appears above F1.
Press F1 (SYSTEM).
Press F2 (Param2).
Use the ", #, $ and % buttons as necessary to select each setting—a setting’s
outline darkens when it’s selected—and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the
desired value.
If you don’t have a VGA monitor or keyboard, skip over its parameters.
VGA Monitor Parameters
Parameter:
What it sets:
Typical setting is:
VGA OUT
Turns the VGA output on or off
On
REFRESH RATE
Sets the rate at which the monitor
re-draws it image
Manufacturer’s
recommended setting
H. POSITION
Shifts the image left or right
0
V. POSITION
Shifts the image up or down
0
Consult your VGA monitor’s documentation to learn its recommended refresh rate. If
you select a value the monitor doesn’t support, image quality may be poor, and damage
to the monitor may result.
The VGA parameters are described in greater detail on Page 361.
Mouse Parameters
Parameter:
What it sets:
Typical setting is:
PS/2 MOUSE
Turns the mouse on or off
On
POINTER SPEED
Sets how fast the mouse’s cursor
moves
3
ASCII Keyboard Parameters
64
Parameter:
What it sets:
Typical setting is:
PS/2 KEYBOARD
Turns the keyboard on or off
On
KEYBOARD TYPE
Selects the nationality of the ASCII
keyboard you’re using
101/104 (in USA);
106/109 (Japan)
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Setting the VS-2480’s Clock
The VS-2480 time-stamps your recordings to make it easier for you to keep track of your
work. In order to allow the VS-2480 to do this, you’ll need to set its system clock.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE repeatedly—if necessary—until “DATE” appears above F5.
Press F5 (DATE). The DATE/TIME screen appears.
If the DATE parameter isn’t selected, use the ", #, $ and % buttons to select it.
If the month isn’t already selected, press " to select it.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial until the current month is displayed.
Press # and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose today’s date.
Press # and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the current year.
Press # and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the desired DATE FORMAT
setting. Dates can be shown on the display in any of the following styles:
This value:
mm/dd/yyyy
dd/mm/yyyy
yyyy/mm/dd
MMM.dd ‘YY
dd MMM ‘YY
Displays dates as:
07/12/2001
12/07/2001
2001/07/12
Jul. 12, ‘01
12 Jul ‘01
10. Press % to select the TIME parameter.
11. Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the current hour.
The VS-2480 uses 24-hour time: Midnight is Hour 00, 1 am is 01, and 1 pm is Hour 13.
12. Press # and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the minute, and then second.
13. Press F5 (SET) to confirm your changes.
14. Press F6 (EXIT) to leave the DATE/TIME screen and finish the procedure.
A Few Fundamental Concepts
Selection
Before you can change something in the VS-2480, you must first select it. In the case of
physical controls, it’s obvious: before you can move a fader, you’ve got to grab it with
your fingers. This rule also applies to items shown on the VS-2480’s display. When you
select something on the display, you’re telling the VS-2480 you want to do something to
the thing you’ve selected. The two most common ways to make a selection are to use
the cursor buttons or to click the desired item with your mouse. Once you’ve made a
selection, you can make the desired change using the appropriate tool.
When you select one displayed item and then another, you’re
moving the “selection cursor.”
The VS-2480 shows you what’s currently selected. Often, the
selected item becomes “highlighted” —its colors are inverted. Text,
for example, becomes white with a black background.
Selected
Not selected
When you select a box in which you can enter data or choose a
different value, the box’s outline becomes darkened.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
Switches
Some settings in the VS-2480 are presented as switches. They’re typically
shown in either of two ways:
•
•
As a box—when a switch is on, it’s darkened. When it’s off, it’s not.
As checked items—when a value is checked, it’s on. If it’s not, it’s off.
On
Off
In this illustration, the -6 dB
value is turned on.
Parameters and Values
Up until now in this manual, we’ve been using the word “setting” to describe
something you can adjust. The correct term is actually “parameter,” the word we’ll use
from here on (except in a few cases where “setting” is clearer). When you adjust a
parameter, what you change is its “value.”You can set a parameter with the cursor
buttons—see below—and TIME/VALUE dial, or by using your mouse (Page 68).
Tools You’ll Use All the Time
The Cursor/ZOOM Buttons
Most of the time, you can navigate to the desired parameter on the display by pressing
the ", #, $ and % cursor/ZOOM buttons. When you press any of these buttons, you’ll
see the selection cursor move in the direction of the arrow button you’ve pressed.
By holding down SHIFT and pressing the ", #, $ and % buttons, you can zoom in or
out on track displays. See Page 42.
If you’ve connected an ASCII keyboard to the VS-2480, you can often use its arrow keys
instead of the ", #, $ or % buttons.
The F Buttons
In all of the VS-2480’s operations, the LCD display provides information and visual
feedback about what you’re doing. Parameters, on/off switches and more appear on the
display. Often, boxes appear at the bottom of the display—each of these boxes shows
the current function of the F button directly beneath it.
If there’s nothing on the display above an F button, it’s currently inactive.
You can always use the F1-F6 buttons on a connected ASCII keyboard instead of the
F buttons beneath the VS-2480’s display if you wish.
When the boxes at the bottom of the screen are small rectangles, the F buttons
typically:
•
•
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display the parameters associated with an operation.
execute an operation.
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
•
•
•
•
act as on/off switches.
change the value of the associated parameter.
move the selection cursor to a location on the display.
exit the current screen.
Sometimes the boxes at the bottom of the screen are large and
contain icons. When this is the case, you can press the
corresponding F button to begin an operation or view a menu of
related parameters.
In all cases, the F button label tells you what the button does.
Pages
Often, there are more parameters available than can fit on the display at once. In these
cases, the parameters are arranged over several “pages” on the display. In such situations,
you see the Page symbol in the lower left-hand corner of the display—the display may also
show what look like folder tabs, presenting the available pages as tabbed layers.
Tabs
Press the PAGE button repeatedly to display each of the available pages.
If you’ve connected an ASCII keyboard to the VS-2480, you can always press its Tab key
instead of the VS-2480’s PAGE button.
Param 1, 2, Etc. Screens
In some VS-2480 menus, parameter pages are divided further into sub-pages called
“Param1,”“Param2,” etc. You can select one of these sub-pages by pressing its F button.
The TIME/VALUE Dial
TIME / VALUE
SHUTTLE
Once you’ve selected a parameter you want to edit, you can turn the
TIME/VALUE dial to change the parameter’s value. (The TIME/VALUE
dial is the inner part of the large black dial—the outer part is the
SHUTTLE ring, described on Page 178.)
When you’re adjusting parameter values with the TIME/VALUE dial, hold down SHIFT
as you turn the dial to move through the available values by different-sized increments.
You can change your current time location in a project using the TIME/VALUE dial (see
Page 126).
The ENTER/YES and EXIT/NO Buttons
Use the ENTER/YES or EXIT/NO buttons to execute or cancel the
current operation, or to respond to a question posed on the display.
ENTER
/ YES
EXIT
/ NO
The ENTER/YES and EXIT NO buttons blink to signify that you can press the:
•
•
ENTER/YES button to finish, or press EXIT/NO to cancel, the current operation.
ENTER/YES to answer “yes” to a displayed question, or EXIT/NO to reply “no.”
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
The ENTER/YES button also blinks to indicate that you can press it to view additional
options. EXIT/NO flashes at times to show you can press it to exit the current screen.
If you prefer, you can always use the Enter key on your keyboard instead of ENTER/
YES, or the Esc key instead of EXIT/NO.
The SHIFT Button
Primary
function
UNDO
Secondary
function
REDO
Many of the VS-2480’s buttons perform more than one job—these
buttons often have an upper label and a lower label that’s printed
inside an outline box. The un-boxed label shows the button’s
primary function, the boxed label its secondary use.
To cause a button to perform its secondary job, hold down SHIFT and press
the button before letting go SHIFT.
REDO
+
=
REDO
SHIFT
You can set the SHIFT button so that it toggles on and off with each touch
to cut down on SHIFT-button presses. See “SHIFT LOCK” on Page 363.
Using a Mouse
The VS-2480 uses a two-button mouse. If we say to “click” the mouse, click the left-hand
button. You can click the right-hand button to display various pop-up menus.
Mouse Cursors
The cursor changes to show you what the mouse can do as you move it over different
items on the display.
This cursor:
Means that the mouse:
is moving between items on the display. On the Home screen, you can
click on a track to select it.
can click on the item beneath the cursor. If it’s a switch, you can toggle
through its values by repeatedly clicking. If it’s an adjustable
parameter, you’ll see either of the next two cursors after you click.
can raise or lower the parameter’s value as you drag the mouse up or
down, respectively.
can raise or lower a parameter’s value as you drag the mouse right or
left, respectively.
can drag the data beneath it during editing operations.
is ready to move whatever’s beneath the mouse to a new location.
is ready to copy whatever’s beneath the mouse by dragging; this
appears when SHIFT is held down during track editing.
When a parameter’s values are presented in a list or in a box, you can simply click the
desired value with your mouse without having to select the parameter first.
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Pop-Up Menus
When a pop-up menu is available, you can select an item in the
menu by dragging the mouse to it—so the item’s highlighted—
and then click the left mouse button to select it. The following two
pop-up menus are available from a number of screens.
Drag to the
desired
menu item
and click.
Display Pop-Up Menu
You can quickly jump to some of the VS-2480’s most important screens by clicking on
the small rectangle in the upper left-hand corner of many of the VS-2480’s screens.
Channel Pop-Up Menu
If you’re using a mouse, you can also select a new input, track or FX return channel from
any screen on which the currently selected channel’s number is displayed as shown here.
Input channel
Track channel
FX return channel
To select a new channel:
1.
2.
Click the channel number. The Channel Pop-Up menu appears.
Move the cursor to the desired channel and click.
Using an ASCII Keyboard
After you’ve connect an ASCII keyboard to the PS/2 KEYBOARD jack, and activated it
(Page 64), you can use the keyboard to perform various actions.
What You Can Do With an ASCII Keyboard
You can use the keyboard’s:
To:
Letter and number keys
enter names for projects, tracks, scenes, locators, etc.
Space bar
start, stop and continue project playback
Arrow keys
move the cursor on the VS-2480’s display
SHIFT+arrow keys
zoom in and out vertically and horizontally
Home
display the Home screen
F7
display the EZ Routing VIEW screen
SHIFT+F7
display the EZ Routing P.BAY screen
SHIFT+F8
display Mastering Room screen
Ctrl+S
store the current project
Ctrl+Alt+Delete
shut down the VS-2480
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
And the keyboard’s:
Acts as the VS-2480’s:
F1-F6
F1-F6 buttons
Tab
the PAGE button
Enter
the ENTER/YES button or left mouse button
Esc
the EXIT/NO button
F9
the PROJECT MENU button
F10
the TRACK MENU button
F11
the EFFECT MENU button
F12
the UTILITY MENU button
Using the VGA Info Display
Most of the VS-2480 Info Display’s screens are divided into four areas.
General Information Strip
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Strip
Meters Strip
Bottom Pane
The Info Display also provides a date and time readout in its upper right-hand corner.
General Information Strip
1
3
2
4
5
6
7
10
8
9
11
This area appears at the top of all of the Info Display’s screens. The:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
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ABS/REL indicators—tell whether the Info Display’s time counters are showing
absolute time or are shifted to correspond to the setting of the SYNC OFFSET TIME
parameter in the UTILITY menu.
VARI PITCH indicator—shows when VARI PITCH in the UTILITY menu is on.
TIME—shows the current location in hours, minutes, seconds, frames, subframes.
MEASURE/BEAT/TICK—shows the current time in measures, beats and ticks.
(There are 480 ticks in each beat.)
MARKER—shows the last marker before the current position of the timeline.
A.PUNCH indicator—shows when automatic punching is turned on.
EXTSYNC indicator—shows when external synchronization is active.
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8. LOOP indicator—shows when looping is turned on.
9. AUTOMIX indicator—shows when Automix is turned on.
10. REMAIN—shows how much disk space you have left. (You can set the unit of
measurement with the REMAIN DISPLAY TYPE parameter in the UTILITY menu.)
11. SCENE—shows the number and name of the current scene.
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knob Strip
Currently selected channel group
Clipping indicators
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob settings
The VS-2480’s PAN/AUX Send 1-8 knobs can perform a variety of functions, as
described on Page 139. This strip shows their current settings. At the left of the strip, the
currently selected channel group and channel are shown. To the right of the strip are
input clipping indicators that show when a channel’s input signal level is too loud.
Meters Strip
In certain display modes—see “Selecting Info Displays Manually” below—the meters
strip shows the set of meters currently selected on the Home screen.
Whenever the meters
strip is visible, meters
for the MONITOR and
MASTER busses
appear at its right.
Currently selected meters
Bottom Pane
The contents of the Info Display’s bottom pane changes from screen to screen.
Controlling What’s On the Info Display
As you navigate the VS-2480’s LCD display, the Info Display automatically switches
between various screens. You can manually switch to a few key screens, and you can
lock the display so that it doesn’t change as you move around on the VS-2480.
Selecting Info Displays Manually
You can access several key screens from the VS-2480’s Home screen.
1.
2.
Press HOME/DISPLAY.
Press PAGE until “ID PL” appears above the F1 button.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
3.
You can press F1 through F5 to view the following screens:
• ID PL (Info Display Playlist screen)—shows the track playlist in the lower area on
the display.
• ID IN (Info Display Input Channels)—shows all 24 input channels in the lower
area on the display.
• ID TR (Info Display Track Channels)—shows all 24 track channels in the lower
area on the display.
• ID Mlt (Info Display Multiple Parameters)—shows a detailed view of the currently
selected group of 16 channel strips (Page 137).
• ID ChV (Info Display Channel View)—shows the CH EDIT parameters for the
currently selected input, track or FX return channel.
When the ID PL, ID IN or ID TR screens are in view, the meters strip is visible. You can
change what’s shown on the left side of the meters strip—the right side always shows
the MONITOR and MASTER output levels:
1.
2.
3.
Press HOME/DISPLAY.
Press PAGE until INPUT appears above F1.
Press:
• INPUT—to meter the VS-2480’s analog and digital input jacks and connectors.
• IN Mix—to meter input channel levels.
• TR Mix—to meter track channel levels.
• AUXDIR—to meter the AUX and DIR bus levels.
• OUTPUT—to meter the VS-2480’s output levels.
Locking the Info Display
You can lock the currently displayed Info Display screen so that it stays in view as you
move from screen to screen on the VS-2480 itself.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press HOME/DISPLAY.
Press PAGE until “IDHold” appears above the F6 button.
Press F6 (IDHold).
To unlock the display, repeat Steps 1-3.
UNDO and REDO
Undo
The Undo function allows you to reverse—or “undo”—track recording and editing
operations. Each project remembers up to 999 of your most recent recording and
editing actions and can restore the project to the state it was in before each action.
Each action is assigned a numbered
“Undo level.”The lower the number
of the level, the more recent the
action. All undoable actions in a
project appear in the Undo list along
with the date and time of each action.
Newest
Newest
Fourth guitar solo take at 3:10
Undo Level 1
Third attempt at guitar solo at 3:08
Undo Level 2
Tried to record solo again at 3:05
Undo Level 3
Recorded guitar solo at 3:00
Undo Level 4
Oldest
Oldest
When you undo a recording or editing operation, everything you did after the
operation originally took place is also undone.
Undo affects track recording and editing operations only—it doesn’t undo parameter
value changes.
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If a project contains data required for undoing actions you’re sure you’ll never need to
undo, you can perform a project optimization to discard the unwanted data and reduce
the size of the project and the space it takes up on your hard disk. See Page 100.
Undoing a Track Recording or Editing Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press UNDO•REDO.
Locate the desired action in the Undo list.
Turn the TIME VALUE dial to select the desired Undo
level—the selected level has an arrow to its left.
Press ENTER/YES. The selected action—and all other
recording and editing actions that took place after it—
is undone.
The
currently
selected
Undo level
After the Undo operation is complete, the UNDO•REDO button remains lit to indicate
that you can cancel the Undo operation by performing a Redo.
You can set the UTILITY menu’s UNDO MESSAGE parameter so that when you press
UNDO, the VS-2480 instantly reverses the last operation without displaying the Undo
list—see Page 364.
Redo
If you change your mind about an action—or series of actions—you’ve undone, you can
perform a “Redo” while the UNDO•REDO button is lit. To do this, hold down SHIFT
and press UNDO•REDO. When the Redo dialog appears, press ENTER/YES.
The ability to perform a Redo operation lasts only until you next save the project.
Naming
You can assign names to a wide range of things in the VS-2480, such as:
•
•
•
projects (Page 99)
•
phrases (Page 261) •
markers (Page 190) •
tracks (Page 272)
•
effect patches (Page 225) •
scenes (Page 144)
•
takes (Page 262)
locators (Page 186)
routing templates (Page 296)
The pages in the above list provide details about how to access each item’s naming
screen. The procedure you’ll use is the same no matter what it is you’re naming, and all
of the naming screens feature an area that looks like this:
The project-naming screen provides some additional elements, including information
about the project and an area into which you can enter comments about the project.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
Entering a New Name Using the VS-2480 Controls
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press " to select the first character in the naming box if it isn’t already selected.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired first character—a box appears
around the currently selected character in the area below the naming box.
Press # to select the next character.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the second character in the new name.
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 until you’ve entered the entire new name.
When you’re done, press F5 (OK).
Entering a New Name from a Keyboard
1.
2.
3.
Press " to select the first character in the naming box if it isn’t already selected.
Type the desired name.
Press F5 (OK).
Naming Tools
The F buttons beneath the naming screen provide tools you may want to use as you
create a name.
Press:
To:
F1 (HIST)
recall with each press one of the names you’ve entered since
powering up.
F2 (BackSp)
delete the character to the left of the currently selected character.
F3 (DELETE)
erase the currently selected character and move all following
characters to the left by one position.
F4 (INSERT)
add a blank space before the currently selected character, moving all
following characters one position to the right.
F5 (OK)
assign the currently entered text to the item you’re naming.
F6 (CANCEL)
leave the naming screen without assigning a new name.
Entering Numbers with the Numeric Keypad
In parameter boxes that contain project time locations, you can enter the desired
number using the VS-2480 numeric keypad. To do this:
1.
2.
Press NUMERICS. It lights—and ENTER/YES and EXIT/NO flash—to indicate that
the keypad is active.
Press " or # to select the part of the number you want to enter.
If you’re entering a long string of numbers, select the right-most digit on the display—
each number you enter from the keypad pushes the displayed numbers to the left.
You can set the VS-2480 so that numbers are entered from the keypad right-to-left (the
default method) or left-to-right. See “NUMERICS TYPE” on Page 364.
3.
4.
Enter the desired value by pressing the appropriate keys on the keypad.
When you’ve finished entering the number, press ENTER/YES.
To enter “-” using the keypad, press “0” twice.
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If You’re Using DS-90A or DS-50A Monitors
If you’re using Roland DS-90A or DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors, you’ll need to
route the MONITOR bus to the digital output to which you’re connecting the monitors.
(In the factory demo songs, this has already been taken care of. When you create a new
project, however, the MASTER stereo mix, not the stereo MONITOR bus, is routed to
the OPTICAL and COAXIAL OUT connectors.)
Setting Up for Roland’s DS-90A and DS-50A Digital Monitors
1.
2.
Press EZ ROUTING•PATCHBAY.
Press F3 (OUTPUT). The OUTPUT ASSIGN screen appears. On this screen, you
can change the signal routed to each of the VS-2480 output jacks and connectors.
All of the VS-2480’s
output jacks and
connectors.
Along the left edge
of the screen, you
see all of the
VS-2480’s busses
(Page 57).
3.
4.
Each bus runs from left
to right across the
display. When you
select an output and
turn the TIME/VALUE
dial, a connection box
moves down the
screen to reach the
desired bus.
Press # until the digital output you want to connect to your monitors is selected in
the top row—in this screenshot, we’ve chosen the COAXIAL OUT:
The thick black line—think of it as a virtual cable—shows that the MASTER mix
(MASTL/R) is routed to the COAXIAL OUT (COAX).
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise so that “cable” connects MONL/R to the
selected digital OUT connector—”MONL/R” stands for “MONITOR Left/Right.”
If you prefer, you can drag the
output’s connection box down
to MONL/R using your mouse.
Adjusting Your Listening Level
PHONES 1
If you’re listening to the VS-2480 through monitor speakers, the MONITOR
knob to the left of the display sets your listening level. You’ll generally want
to keep this at the 0dB position (3 o’clock). Of course, you can always turn
the MONITOR knob to raise or lower the listening level as needed—the 0dB
position serves as a good starting point. Adjust your DS-90A/DS-50A
INPUT LEVEL or monitor-speaker amplifier level settings so that the
VS-2480 is producing sound at a desirable level.
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0
10
PHONES 2
0
10
MONITOR
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
If you’re using headphones, the setting of the MONITOR knob establishes the basic
monitoring level, so set it to its 0dB position. To adjust your headphones’ volume, use
the PHONES 1 or 2 knob that corresponds to the jack into which you’ve plugged your
headphones. Start with the knob turned all the way counter-clockwise, and slowly turn
it clockwise to reach the desired listening level.
If you’ve connected a speaker system directly to the VS-2480 and would like separate
control of your speakers and headphones, route the MASTER outputs to the desired
PHONES jack on the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN screen (see Steps 1-3 in “If
You’re Using DS-90A or DS-50A Monitors” on Page 75). The MONITOR knob will
control only the speakers, and each PHONES knob will control the associated jack.
In the factory demos, the MASTER bus is routed to the PHONES jacks, so each
PHONES knob independently controls the level produced by its headphone jack.
Playing the Factory Demos
As shipped from the factory, your VS-2480 has two demonstration songs—”demos”—
stored as projects on its internal hard drive. When you power up the VS-2480, the “What
You Don’t Know” project is loaded into the VS-2480, all of its settings are restored, and
its track channel faders move to their last-saved positions.
If you’d like to make changes to a demo project and save your changes, make a copy of
the project (Page 101) to work with. The copies loaded onto your hard drive at the
factory are write-protected (Page 99) and are therefore not editable.
“What You Don’t Know”
This section presumes you’ve just powered up your VS-2480 and the factory demo
project “What You Don’t Know” is loaded. If this isn’t the case, load “What You Don’t
Know” —see “Loading a Project” on Page 95 to learn how to load a project. (For demo
details, see the track sheets included in the VS-2480 box.)
Bring Down the MASTER Fader
To make sure the demo isn’t too loud, bring the MASTER fader all the way down before
you play the demo.
The MASTER fader controls the level of the MASTER mix bus that’s routed to the
MONITOR bus (see “What’s a Bus?” on Page 57). Since the MONITOR bus is supplying
audio to the MONITOR and PHONES jacks—and to the digital output you’re using for
your DS-90Aor DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors—moving the MASTER fader has
the effect of adjusting your listening level.
Starting Playback of the Demo
1.
2.
Press PLAY to begin playback.
Slowly bring up the MASTER fader to set the MASTER mix to a comfortable
listening level.
If the demo finishes playing before you’re done reading the following sections, press
ZERO to restart it.
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A Quick Look at What’s on the Display
1.
2.
Press HOME•DISPLAY.
Press PAGE until “INPUT” appears on the display above F1.
The display should look something like this:
Time counters
Meters
Playlist
3.
Timeline
If it doesn’t, hold down SHIFT and press HOME•DISPLAY repeatedly until it does.
You can also change the magnification of the playlist by holding down SHIFT and
pressing ", #, $ and/or %.
You’re now looking at the Home screen. This screen is so important that an entire
chapter—Chapter 8, starting on Page 119—is devoted to it. For now, we’ll just point out
a few items of interest. They’re labeled in the illustration above.
•
•
•
•
Time counters—The time counters show your current location in the project. You can
move to a new location by dialing in a new time in the counters, as described on
Page 126.
Meters—The meters show you important level information during recording and
playback. If TR Mix above F3 isn’t highlighted, press F3 (TR Mix). The meters are
now showing you the level of each of the project’s tracks.
Playlist—The playlist shows the data on all of the project’s tracks. Each chunk of
data you see is called a “phrase,” and is shown as a rectangle. As the project plays,
the data moves from right to left. (We’ll explain tracks, phrases and more on
Page 86.)
Timeline—The timeline is a visual representation of the time location shown in the
counters. It shows you where in the project you are right now. You can think of it as
the “now line” if you prefer. When data in the playlist crosses the timeline, you hear
it.
Stopping and Starting Playback
•
•
•
•
To stop listening to the demo before it ends, press STOP.
To resume playback from the spot at which you stopped, press PLAY.
To play the demo again from the top, press ZERO, and then PLAY.
You can turn the SHUTTLE ring on the outside of the TIME/VALUE dial to fastforward and rewind.
Navigating the Demo Using Locators
You can store up to 100 specific time locations in each project as “locators.” By recalling
a locator, you can instantly jump to its location in the project.
“What You Don’t Know” contains 10 locators, all stored in Locator Bank 0—there are
ten locator banks, numbered 0-9.
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Here’s where the locators in Bank 0 take you:
Locator Number:
Takes you to:
At hour:minute:second:frame:subframe:
00
Verse 1
00:00:10:15:00
01
Turnaround 1
00:00:37:12:11
02
Chorus 1
00:00:48:05:78
03
Turnaround 2
00:01:33:15:36
04
Chorus 2
00:01:45:06:02
05
Interlude
00:02:13:06:79
06
vocal lick before the solo
00:02:32:08:94
07
just before the solo
00:02:35:02:94
08
end of the solo
00:03:01:11:63
09
Tag
00:04:11:18:00
You can recall locators when the project is playing or stopped—we’ll recall them when
the project isn’t playing so you can see how they help you move through a project:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press STOP to stop playback.
Press ZERO to return to the beginning—Time Zero—of the project.
If LOCATOR•BANK isn’t lit, press it so that it lights. Since Locator Bank 0 is
already selected, we only need to press the desired locator’s second digit.
Press 0—the VS-2480 takes you to Locator 00, the top of the first verse.
Press 5—you’re now at the start of the breakdown in the middle of the project.
Locators are discussed in detail in “Locators” on Page 185.
Adjusting Track Levels
The VS-2480’s 16 physical channel strips (Page 33) can control any of the VS-2480’s
input, track, Aux master or FX return channels. See Chapter 10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
If TR 1-16 isn’t already lit, press it. Once it’s lit, the channel strips control
the sound of Tracks 1-16.
Press ZERO to return to the beginning, and then press PLAY to begin
playback.
Slide the channel strip faders up and down to hear how they change the
levels of the first 16 tracks in “What You Don’t Know.”
Press TR 17-24/FX RTN to assign the channel strips to the control of Tracks
17-24 and the eight FX returns.
Explore the level changes you can make to Tracks 17-24 and the effects.
IN 1-16
SOLO
IN 17-24
AUX MST
MUTE
Watching Automix in Action
Automix allows the VS-2480 to memorize and play back mix-related settings, including
any changes you make to those settings as the project plays.
“What You Don’t Know” contains Automix data that adjusts various track channel
levels throughout the course of the song. Since the VS-2480 has motorized faders, you
can literally watch some of these changes taking place.
1.
2.
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Press AUTOMIX so that it lights—Automix is now turned on.
Press TR 1-16 so the 16 channel strips are controlling Tracks 1-16.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press 1 on the numeric keypad to jump to Locator 01 at the start of the first
turnaround. The first four faders—the bass drum, snare, hi-hat and floor tom—
move downward since the drums don’t play in this part of the project.
Press PLAY to begin playback.
Watch how the drum faders move up in time for the drums’ entry in the chorus.
Press ZERO and then hit PLAY to watch Automix at work.
When you’re done, press ZERO and then AUTOMIX to turn it off.
See Chapter 26 to learn about Automix.
Playing the Phrase Pads
You can press a channel strip’s TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD button—we’ll call it a
“PHRASE PAD” button for the rest of this section—to play a phrase located on the
corresponding track. This feature can be turned on or off for each track in a project. In
“You Don’t Know,” you can play phrases on several tracks.
1.
2.
3.
Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it lights green.
Press TR 1-16 so the channel strips control Track Channels 1-16. The PHRASE PAD
buttons for Tracks 4-10 are lit in amber to show that they’re set to play phrases.
Press the PHRASE PAD button for Track Channel 9—the first Taos drum phrase
sounds.
In “What You Don’t Know,”Tracks 9 and 10 are linked (Page 152). When you play a
linked channel’s phrase pad, both tracks play. In this case, the stereo Taos drum on
Tracks 9 and 10 plays. Tracks 5 and 6, and Tracks 7 and 8 are also linked in this project.
4.
5.
6.
Play a rhythm on Track Channel 9’s PHRASE PAD button.
Do the same with Track Channel 8 to play a phrase on Tracks 7 and 8.
Try out the phrases on Track 4 and Tracks 5/6. The play audio from overhead drum
mics that’ve captured the room sound from the bass drum, snare and hi-hat.
To learn more about the phrase pads, see Chapter 21, “Using the Phrase Pads.”
Recalling Scenes
The VS-2480 can memorize up to 100 mix setups as “scenes.” Scenes allow you to:
•
•
store and recall multiple versions of a mix.
store and recall different versions of a project with different V-Tracks (Page 90).
“What You Don’t Know” contains some scenes that show off the way scenes work.
1.
Press SCENE•BANK so it lights.
Scenes—like locators—are stored in banks of ten scenes each, numbered from 0-9.
Since Scene Bank 0 is already selected, we only need to enter each desired scene’s
second digit for the scenes in “What You Don’t Know.”
2.
Press 1 on the keypad. Scene 01—Default Mix—loads the settings it contains.
The name of the current scene appears in the top right area of a connected Info Display.
3.
4.
Play “What You Don’t Know” to hear how it sounds in Scene 01.
Press STOP when you’re done and keep your eyes on the display.
You can recall scenes only while a project isn’t playing, so press STOP before
attempting to recall a scene.
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4—Setting Up and Basic Operations
5.
6.
7.
Press SCENE again, and then 2 on the keypad to recall Scene 02—AcIntro Dflt. The
display changes to show that this scene uses different V-Tracks than Scene 01.
Press ZERO and then PLAY to hear what’s been added to the project’s introduction.
Try out the other scenes in “What You Don’t Know.”
To learn about storing scenes, recalling them and more, see “Scenes” on Page 144.
“Don’t Stop”
Your hard drive also contains a second demo project, “Don’t Stop,” by Teddy Riley. To
learn how to load this demo project, see “Loading a Project” on Page 95.
Turning Off the VS-2480
It’s important the you don’t simply flip the VS-2480’s POWER switch to turn it off—
always use the procedure below to prevent damage to your data.
If you’d like to restart the VS-2480—perhaps while troubleshooting a problem—use the
procedure below as well.
Turning Off the VS-2480
1.
Hold down SHIFT, and press STOP•SHUT/EJECT. The following dialog appears:
2.
If you wish to turn off or restart the VS-2480, press ENTER/YES. If not, press EXIT/
NO to cancel the operation. If you press ENTER/YES, a dialog like this one appears:
The name of the
currently loaded project.
The project’s sample rate and
recording mode (Page 98).
3.
If you’ve made changes to the currently loaded project you’d like to preserve, press
ENTER/YES. If you haven’t, press EXIT/NO.
If you’re shutting down the VS-2480 when a factory demo song—or any other protected
project—is loaded, you won’t be prompted to store the current song.
In either case, the VS-2480 takes a few moments to prepare to shut down—and to
save your project if you pressed ENTER/YES in Step 3. When the VS-2480 is ready
to be powered off, the following message appears:
4.
If you’d like to restart the VS-2480, hold down SHIFT and press PLAY•RESTART—
the VS-2480 begins its power-up sequence. If you’d like to shut down the
VS-2480, flip its rear-panel POWER switch to its Off position.
If you need to move the VS-2480 after shutting it down, wait 30 seconds or so to give its
hard drive a chance to stop spinning in order to avoid damaging it.
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5—Understanding Effects
Harnessing the VS-2480’s Effects
The VS-2480 provides a range of creative possibilities when it comes to effects. How
and where you apply them will have a big impact on the sound you achieve.
This chapter discusses important effect-related ideas, including:
•
•
•
•
effect routings—How you get your signals in and out of an effect has a lot to do with
the way they’ll sound.
master effects—You can add effects to your entire mix. This ability is especially
important when you’re creating a final master.
when and where to apply effects—You can add effects as you record, during mixdown,
or add them to your entire mix at once. We’ll offer some tips that’ll help you decide
when and where to apply your effects.
external effects—You can send signals out of the VS-2480, into external effectsprocessing devices, and back, if you wish to.
Dry and Wet
“Dry” and “wet” are two terms that are frequently used in any discussion of effects,
providing a shorthand way to say whether or not a signal has had effects applied to it:
•
•
dry—A dry signal is a signal to which you haven’t applied an effect.
wet—A wet signal is a signal to which you have applied an effect.
You can bring a signal into the VS-2480 that already uses an effect—from the effect
processor built into a synthesizer, for example—but for our purposes, until you add a
VS-2480 effect to the signal, we’ll consider it dry.
Effect Routings
There are two basic methods you can use to apply an effect to a signal.
You can:
Term for an effect applied this way:
replace the dry signal with a wet version of the
signal so that only the wet version is heard.
insert effect
add a wet version of the signal to the dry
version so that both are heard.
loop effect
Loop effects are sometimes called “send-and-return effects.”
The method you’ll choose depends on the type of effect you’re applying to your
signal—the patch list in the VS-2480 Appendices shows the suggested use for each effect
patch. We’ll describe how to set up insert and loop effects in Chapter 16 starting on
Page 213. The following sections explain how the two methods work.
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5—Understanding Effects
Insert Effects
Dry signal
An insert effect detours a signal as it makes its way through the
VS-2480. The signal is diverted into the effect, processed, and the
effect’s output—the wet version of the signal—takes the original
signal’s place and resumes its journey. The name “insert effect”
refers to the idea that you’ve inserted the effect in the signal’s path.
Effect
When To Use Insert Effects
You’ll typically want to insert the following types of effects:
•
•
•
•
Wet signal
dynamics-based effects like compressors, limiters, gates and
expanders
distortion effects
• Microphone and Speaker Modeling effects
chorus, flanger and phaser effects • rotary speaker effects
guitar and vocal multi-effects
• filter effects such as EQs and vocoders
Insert effects act a lot like the small effects boxes and pedals through which guitarists,
bassists and keyboardists run their instruments on their way to their amps. Any type of
effect you might apply in this way is a good insert-effect candidate.
Loop Effects
Dry signal
Copy of dry signal
With a loop effect, you combine two different versions of the
signal: the original dry signal and an effected, wet version. This is
accomplished in two stages.
•
•
Effect
You send a copy of the signal into the effect.
You return the output of the effect—the wet version of the
signal—to a mixer channel, and combine this channel’s signal
with the original signal.
Dry signal Wet signal
About the Terms “Send” and “Return”
“Send” and “return” are used in mixing as both verbs and nouns. This can be confusing
to beginners, so let’s be clear about what we mean.
When we use:
As a verb, it describes the act of:
As a noun, it refers to:
Send
directing a signal into an
effect, as in “Send Track
Channel 1 into Effect 1.”
the device we use to carry the copy
into the effect, as in “Adjust the
send.” Also, the copy itself, as in
“The send is too loud.”
Return
routing the effect’s output into
a channel, as in,“Return Effect
1 to FX Return Channel 1.”
the channel into which the effect’s
output is routed, as in “Adjust the
return.”
Aux Sends
In the VS-2480, each of the eight Aux send busses provides a pathway into one of the
eight internal effects. By default, Aux 1 carries signals into Effect 1, Aux 2 to Effect 2,
and so on. When you want to send an input, track or even an FX return channel’s signal
to an internal effect, you send it to the corresponding Aux bus—you can set how much
of the signal you want to send to the effect by setting the AUX send level on its CH
EDIT screen or by using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs (Page 139).
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5—Understanding Effects
Pre-Fader and Post-Fader Sends
The VS-2480 allows you to send a signal to an Aux bus from either of two places as the
signal makes its way through a channel. You can send it:
•
•
pre-fader—to send the signal to the Aux bus before the signal reaches its channel
fader. The Aux send level isn’t affected by changes you make to the fader’s
position—it stays the same even if the level of the signal itself changes. This can be
handy, for example, if you’re using an Aux bus to create a headphone mix for
performers, and don’t want them to be bothered by changes you make to the
channel’s output level. It can also be useful if you’re sending a signal to an effect
and want its effect level to remain constant as the level of the signal itself changes.
post-fader—to send the signal to the Aux bus after its fader. Changes you make to
the signal’s level using its fader affect the amount of the signal sent to the Aux bus.
As the fader goes up, the Aux send level goes up, and vice versa. This can be
especially useful when you’re using the Aux bus to add an effect to the signal—the
relationship between the signal level and effect level stays the same as you change
the signal’s level. You’ll usually want to use a post-fader send for effects.
Each Aux bus can be configured to accept either pre-fader or post-fader signals from
the input, track and FX return channels, as described on Page 207.
When To Use Loop Effects
You’ll use loop effects any time you want to add an effect to a signal so that both the
signal and the effect are heard. The most frequent use of loop effects is with reverbs
and delays, the two most frequently used effects there are.
Master Effects
The VS-2480 allows you to apply an effect to your entire mix at once. You can do this by
inserting the effect into the main MASTER mix’s signal path. While you can do this at
any time, this capability is particularly important when creating final stereo mastering
tracks in preparation for burning an audio CD. The VS-2480’s Mastering Tool Kit (MTK)
effects are specially designed for this purpose and provide everything you need to add
the final touches to your recordings.
Mastering tracks
External Effects
While the VS-2480 provides a wide range of effects, you may wish
to send a signal out of the VS-2480 and into an external effect
processor. You’ll use the processor’s effect as a loop effect, by:
•
•
•
•
•
External effect
processor
sending the signal to an Aux bus
routing the Aux bus to one of the VS-2480’s outputs
connecting the output to the input of the external device
processing the signal inside the external device
connecting the device’s output to one of the VS-2480’s inputs
to return the wet signal to the VS-2480.
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5—Understanding Effects
We’ll describe this procedure in more detail on Page 215.
Even though an external effect is always a loop effect, you can simulate an insert effect
by using only the external processor’s return, and none of the original dry signal.
Getting the Most From Your Effect Processors
It’s important to be strategic about how you employ your effects so that you’ll have the
effects you need at each step along the way as you record and mix your project. Even
engineers in the best-equipped studios in the world may find that they wish they had
one more effect processor available from time to time. The simple truth is that while an
effect processor’s creating a particular effect, it’s not available for any other use.
Here’s an example. If you’ve got a single VS8F-2 in your VS-2480 and are already using
Effect 1 and 2, you don’t have any other internal effect processors available for a third
effect. (This is why we recommend installing as many VS8F-2’s in your VS-2480 as
possible.)
Consider Recording Your Effects As You Go
The solution is planning. Try to work out in advance the effects you’ll need for all of the
elements in your project. This will allow you to budget your effect-processing power.
One of the main tricks you can use to be sure you’ve got all the effects you need is to
apply a signal’s effect as you record the signal—the resulting track contains both the
signal and its effect. This is called “printing” the effect. The benefit of recording your
effects as you go is that it frees up the effect processor for later use.
This method isn’t without risk, however: Once you’ve recorded an effect onto a track
along with a signal, the effect can’t be altered or removed. It can also be difficult to
anticipate how a signal and its effect will sound when all other project elements have
been recorded and are in place.
If you’ve got spare tracks, you can hedge your bets by recording the signal on one track,
its effect on another, and then combining them later into a single track—or pair of
tracks if you’re using a stereo effect—once you’re sure you like what you’ve got.
Even so, printing effects with your tracks can be a real lifesaver in a project that needs
lots of effects.
Printing effects can also make a mix easier, since the printed effects will have already
been dealt with, freeing you up to concentrate on other details during the oftencomplex mixing process.
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6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
This chapter describes the fundamentals of hard disk recording in the VS-2480. If you’re
new to hard disk recording, you’ll find all the basics here. We’ll explain:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
what a hard disk drive is.
how a VS-2480 hard drive organizes data.
how a hard drive must be prepared for use by the VS-2480.
how the VS-2480 records audio on a hard drive.
how the VS-2480 plays back audio recorded on a hard drive.
non-destructive, pointer-based editing.
what a VS-2480 phrase is.
what a VS-2480 V-Track is.
what a VS-2480 track is.
what a VS-2480 region is.
Even experienced users should read about VS-2480 tracks and their contents: takes,
V-Tracks, phrases and regions. You’ll need to understand what each of these is to fully
master the VS-2480 editing capabilities. See Page 89.
VS-2480 Hard Disk Drives
What’s a Hard Drive?
A hard drive is a hardware mechanism that contains a rigid platter—that’s why it’s
called a “hard” drive—on which data is stored. A hard drive may also be referred to as a
“disk drive.” In the VS-2480, a hard drive stores all of your recordings and project
settings. It’s a great way to store and quickly retrieve data, and provides for some
amazing features, as we’ll see.
Your VS-2480 shipped from the Roland factory with an 30GB (gigabyte) IDE hard drive
installed. This provides lots of space for your projects. In addition, the VS-2480 offers a
25-pin SCSI connector to which you can connect a Zip drive or other compatible SCSI
device for backup and to provide additional storage space for project copies.
You can also attach a Roland-approved CD-RW drive to the rear-panel SCSI connector.
We strongly recommend purchasing a Roland VS-CDRII or CD-RACK for your
VS-2480, since either drive allows you to back up your data on inexpensive media and
to create your own audio CDs and CD-production masters. CD-RW operations are
described in Chapter 27.
Back up, recover
The VS-2480 requires an internal hard drive for project recording and playback. If you’d
like to replace the original drive with a second drive or a larger one, you can turn off the
VS-2480 and swap drives. You’ll need an HPD35-K20 mounting kit for the new drive,
purchased separately. You can use the kit with an ATA100 3.5” hard drive that has an
access time of 10ms or less—for a list of approved drives, see the Roland US Website.
You can’t power up and use the VS-2480 without an internal hard drive installed.
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How a VS-2480 Hard Drive Organizes Data
A VS-2480 hard drive divides up its total disk space into sections called “partitions.”
Partitions help keep project data together on the hard drive. Each partition acts like a
separate virtual drive—it even looks that way on the VS-2480’s screens.
Your 30GB VS-2480 internal hard drive was divided into three approximately 10 GB
partitions at the factory. These partitions are labeled IDE:0, IDE:1 and IDE:2.
Internal hard drive
When we refer to a “drive” in the rest of the VS-2480, we’ll be referring to a partition.
This reflects that way the VS-2480’s software views partitions, and will make disk- and
drive-related operations easier to explain and understand. When we need to refer to an
entire hard disk mechanism, we’ll call the mechanism a “hard drive.”
Preparing a Hard Drive for Use
Before you can use a new internal hard drive with the VS-2480, it must be prepared for
use with the VS-2480. The hard drive must be erased, formatted and divided into
partitions using the FmtDrv (for “Format Drive”) command described on Page 113.
The internal hard drive that came with your VS-2480 was formatted and partitioned
before the demo songs were installed at the factory. It’s ready to be used as is.
Using Other V-Studio Drives
Hard drives formatted for other V-Studios are not compatible with the VS-2480, and a
hard drive set up for the VS-2480 can’t be used with other V-Studios.
How Audio Is Recorded on a VS-2480 Hard Drive
Each time you record audio in the VS-2480, the audio is stored as a disk file comprised
of digital data. This file is called a “take.” It includes your audio and a time-stamp of the
date and time at which the recording took place. Until you perform a project
optimization (Page 100), the VS-2480 holds on to all of the takes you’ve recorded in a
project.
Even when you re-record a performance—”recording over” your first attempt—the
original take actually remains on your hard drive and is still available to you should you
want it. And when you edit a recording on the VS-2480, you don’t actually edit the take
itself, thanks to non-destructive, pointer-based editing, which we’ll discuss shortly.
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6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
How Recordings Are Played Back
Random Access
When your VS-2480 plays back your music from a hard drive, it uses something called
“random access” playback. The phrase “random access” has its roots in computer
programming, but what it means to you is this: The recorder can instantly play any
audio in a project located anywhere on its hard disk.
Random access playback produces a couple of very important benefits:
•
•
You never have to wait for the recorder to rewind or fast-forward to a location in a
project. The VS-2480 gets where it needs to in a heartbeat.
The VS-2480 can employ pointer-based playback and editing.
What’s Pointer-Based Playback?
When you play a recording, the VS-2480 uses a set of “pointers” to identify the audio
you want to play. Each pointer is simply a chunk of information about the audio.
Among other things, pointers allow the VS-2480 to play parts of a take, rather than
having to play the entire disk file from beginning to end.
A simple set of pointers would include information such as:
• the identity of the take that contains the desired audio
• the time location within the take at which playback is to begin
• the time location within the take at which playback is to end
Phrases
A set of pointers is called a “phrase.” Every time you make a new recording—or punch
in and out—the VS-2480 automatically creates a new phrase to play the new audio.
Each phrase appears in the Home screen’s playlist (Page 122) as rectangle.
Each phrase is a rectangular box. This
illustration shows a string of three
phrases.
Phrases are also created in other ways:
•
•
Any time you re-record a portion of a track—typically by punching (Page 191)—the
new recording appears on the track as a phrase.
You can create a new phrase that plays a currently unused take.
You can perform various editing operations on phrases, and edit regions of audio
within phrases, as we’ll discuss later in this chapter, on Page 90.
Virtual Tracks, or “V-Tracks”
As you record audio, punch in and out and edit it, you create a string of phrases
positioned one after the other in the order in which they’ll play back. This string of
phrases is called a “Virtual Track,” or “V-Track” for short.
From here on in the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, we’ll refer to a string of phrases by its
short name: “V-Track.”
Of course, if you’ve made a recording but haven’t done any punching or editing, the
V-Track that plays it will consist of just the one phrase that plays the recording’s take.
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Non-Destructive, Pointer-Based Editing
Pointer-Based Editing
When you edit audio on the VS-2480, what you’re actually doing is editing a phrase, the
set of pointers that instruct the VS-2480 how to play the audio. You’re not actually
changing the take stored on your hard disk at all—you’re only editing its pointers. This
type of editing is called “non-destructive editing” because it does no harm to the take
itself. It doesn’t alter the take at all.
A few editing operations change audio by copying it and altering the copy—even so,
the original take remains unaffected, and the pointers simply point to the copied audio.
This illustration shows how erasing unwanted audio from a recording affects its
pointers. The dark portion of the take is the part that you hear during playback.
Before editing:
After editing:
2. Start playback
3. Stop playback
Throat-clearing
0 minutes
1. Name of take
Singing
1 minute
2 minutes
Talking
3 minutes
3. Stop playback
2. Start playback
Throat-clearing
4 minutes
0 minutes
Vocal 1
1. Name of take
Singing
1 minute
2 minutes
Talking
3 minutes
4 minutes
Vocal 1
All you’ve really done is changed the positions of Pointers 1 and 2.
Though we’re creating pointers and pointer names here for demonstration purposes,
the VS-2480 takes care of all this in its internal programming language.
Because random access playback is so fast, the VS-2480 jumps from one location within
the take to another so quickly it sounds as if it’s playing one continuous recording.
In fact, the VS-2480 can instantaneously jump from one take to another during
playback. In the illustration below, a phrase on one V-Track contains a great vocal
performance except for the third verse. A phrase on a second V-Track has a great Verse
3. Here’s what happens if you copy Verse 3 from the second V-Track to the first:
First V-Track’s phrase
Second V-Track’s phrase
2. Play
1. Take
3. Stop
2. Play
3. Stop
(great)
(great)
(great)
(fair)
(great)
(fair)
(fair)
(fair)
(great)
(fair)
Verse 1
Verse 2
Chorus 1
Verse 3
Chorus 2
Verse 1
Verse 2
Chorus 1
Verse 3
Chorus 2
Vocal 1
1. Take
Vocal 2
Best parts of both, now in the first V-Track’s phrase
5. Play
2. Play
1. Take
6. Stop
3. Stop
(great)
(great)
(great)
Verse 1
Verse 2
Chorus 1
Vocal 1
8. Play
(great)
Verse 3
Vocal 2
4. Take
9. Stop
(great)
Chorus 2
Vocal 1
7. Take
The VS-2480 creates and places all of the pointers it needs behind the scenes—all you
experience is that the first phrase now contains a completely great vocal performance.
You can also move or copy entire phrases to new locations on the same V-Track or from
one V-Track to another—and much more—as described in Chapter 19.
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6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
The Advantage of Non-Destructive Editing
Non-destructive editing allows you to undo any edits you perform because all of your
original hard disk recordings—your takes—remain safe and sound on your hard disk
no matter how many edits you perform on the phrases that play them. It’s only their
pointers that have been edited.
This provides a tremendous amount of creative freedom since you can feel free to
explore any creative editing possibility without worrying that you won’t be able to get
back to where you started.
If you’re sure you no longer need your discarded data, you can clear it from your hard
drive to gain disk space by performing a project optimization, described on Page 100.
What Is a VS-2480 Track?
The VS-2480’s 24 tracks resemble the tracks of a traditional multitrack recorder, so its
basic operation feels familiar and comfortable to anyone who’s used a multitrack
recorder. In fact, VS-2480 tracks are something a bit different, something that provides
an incredible amount of recording power.
If...
•
•
•
a recording is stored on your hard drive as a disk file called a “take,” and
the sets of pointers that tell the VS-2480 how to play a take are called “phrases,” and
a group of phrases strung together for playback is called a “V-Track”
...then what’s a track?
In the VS-2480, a track is a collection of 16 V-Tracks, any one of which can be selected at
any given time. When a V-Track is selected, you can record on it or play it back.
Each track’s 16 V-Tracks can contain anything you want. They can play the same take (or
takes) in different ways or they can each contain completely different things altogether.
Related recordings on all
of the track’s V-Tracks
Assorted recordings on the
track’s V-Tracks
ttempt 1
ax
itar (El.)
mony
You can select which of its 16 V-Tracks each track will play at any given time. We’ll
describe how to do this on Page 151.
When you record or play a V-Track, the settings of the corresponding track channel
determine what it sounds like. Track 1’s currently selected V-Track is heard through
Track Channel 1, Track 2’s V-Track through Track Channel 2, and so on. Track channels
are discussed in Chapters 10, 11 and 14.
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6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
The Power of V-Tracks
Although the VS-2480 is a 24-track studio, in a very real sense it’s way more than that.
Since each of its 24 tracks can play any of 16 V-Tracks, a project can actually hold as
many as 384 recordings from which you can choose 24 for playback at any given time.
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Track 4
Track 5
Track 6
Track 7
Track 8
Track 9
Track 10
Track 11
Track 12
Track 13
Track 14
Track 15
Track 16
Track 17
Track 18
Track 19
Track 20
Track 21
Track 22
Track 23
Track 24
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T1
V.T2
V.T3
V.T4
V.T5
V.T6
V.T7
V.T8
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
V.T9
V.T10
V.T11
V.T12
V.T13
V.T14
V.T15
V.T16
As you can see, this gives you with a huge sonic palette to work with. You can even
construct totally different versions of a project from its massive collection of V-Tracks.
Track Editing Basics
During editing operations, the word “track” serves as a shorthand for the currently
selected V-Track. When we say we’re editing a track, what we literally mean is that
we’re editing the audio on the track’s currently selected V-Track.
The following sections provide just a brief introduction to the editing of tracks in the
VS-2480. We’ll discuss it in detail beginning in Chapter 18, which starts on Page 235.
There are two basic ways you can edit the contents of a track:
•
•
You can work with phrases (Page 87).
You can work on a specific time “region” within a track.
About Editing Phrases
Phrase editing is the quickest way to work with a track’s audio, since it works with predefined chunks of the track. You can perform a range of operations on a phrase—these
are detailed in Chapter 19.
You may also find it handy to manually divide the phrases on a V-Track into new
convenient, easy-to-work-with chunks. Though this can take a little time, it can save
you a lot of time later on in the editing process:
•
•
If you’re working on a song, and think you’ll be moving a track’s sections around,
you can turn each section into a phrase. This’ll let you simply grab the desired
phrase when it’s time to assemble the track.
If you’re using sound effects, you can turn each one into a separate phrase, making
the positioning of your elements quick and easy.
The phrase DIVIDE operation can automatically separate your audio into separate
phrases, as described on Page 260.
On the VS-2480, you can also play phrases using the TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD
buttons.
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6—Understanding the Hard Disk Recorder
About Editing Regions
A region is a selected time range within a track. You define the region you want to edit
by placing two “edit points”:
•
•
IN—The position of the IN marker determines the
beginning of the section you want to edit. This location
is called the “IN point.”
OUT—The position of the OUT marker determines
the end of the section you want to edit.This location is
called the “OUT point.”
Edit region
The region is the portion of the track that occurs after the
IN point and before the OUT point. It can contain data
from one or more phrases, and can also contain silence.
Chapter 18 describes how to set IN and OUT points for track editing, as well as two
other very important editing points, FROM and TO. See Page 236.
Chapter 20, beginning on Page 263, describes region editing operations.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
This chapter describes the various project- and hard drive-related activities you can
perform from the VS-2480’s PROJECT menu screens. Most everything that has to do
with an entire project can be found on this menu.
You can quickly save the latest changes you’ve made to the currently loaded project by
holding down SHIFT and pressing ZERO•STORE. We recommend you do this often.
Navigating the PROJECT Menu Screens
1.
Press PROJECT in the MENU area of the VS-2480’s top panel.
MENU
PROJECT
2.
TRACK
EFFECT
UTILITY
The VS-2480 scans your drives. When it’s done, the first PROJECT menu screen
appears.
Currently
selected drive
The project that’s
currently loaded in
the VS-2480’s
memory is shown in
white type on a
black background in
the project list.
The project list
occupies the top of
every PROJECT
menu screen.
Tabbed layers
of F Buttons
To perform a project- or hard drive-related operation, press the operation’s F button,
shown on a tabbed layer at the bottom of the screen.
If you’re looking for an operation
whose F button is currently
hidden, press PAGE repeatedly
until its F button appears.
Working with the PROJECT LIST
You can scroll through the items in the project list by pressing % or $.
As noted in “How a VS-2480 Hard Drive Organizes Data” on Page 86, each hard drive
partition is called a “drive.”
The project list shows all your available drives. Your internal drives are labeled as
“IDE:(partition number).” As shipped from the factory, these partitions are IDE:0, IDE:1
and IDE:2. Each additional drive—including a connected Roland-approved CD-R/RW
drive or a Zip drive—is identified by its SCSI ID number.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
To learn how to connect a CD-R/RW drive or a Zip drive to the VS-2480, see Page 381.
If you encounter error messages when working with a CD-R/RW drive or a Zip drive,
check Page 353 or the VS-2480 Appendices to learn what the messages mean.
In the project list, you can also see all of the projects on the currently selected drive. The
VS-2480 provides information about each project.
Write-protect status
Sample rate
Name
Size
Recording mode
Type of project
Creation date and time
We’ll discuss write-protection, project sample rates and recording modes later on in
this chapter.
Selecting an Item in the Project List
To select a project or drive shown in the project list:
1.
Press % or $ or turn the TIME/VALUE dial until the desired item is outlined.
When an item is outlined and has an arrow pointing to it from the right, it’s selected.
To Display the Projects on a Drive
1.
2.
Select the drive. When a drive is selected, the LIST button appears
in the screen’s lower-right-hand corner.
Press LIST—the VS-2480 displays a list of the projects on the drive.
PROJECT menu
F6 (LIST)
To view the contents of an audio CD, see “The CD Player Feature” on Page 353.
About “Store Current?” Messages
During the course of most PROJECT menu operations, the VS-2480 asks you:
Position in project list
Project name
Sample rate and
recording mode
The VS-2480 displays this message when an operation needs to temporarily borrow the
part of the VS-2480’s memory that holds the currently loaded project—after the
operation is complete, the VS-2480 re-loads the project from your hard drive. If you’ve
made any changes to the project since you last stored it, press ENTER/YES in response
to this message to ensure that those changes aren’t lost.
If a project is write-protected (Page 99), this message doesn’t appear, since the project is
locked to prevent the making of any changes to it.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
Project Operations
About F6 (MARK)
Before you can perform some of the project operations, you have to
target the project on which you want to perform the operation. You do
this by marking the project.
PROJECT menu
F6 (MARK)
Marking a Project
1.
2.
Press % or $ or turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the project.
Press F6 (MARK) to place a checkmark to the left of the project’s name, thus
targeting it.
F6 (MARK) is available only when a project, not a drive, is selected.
SELECT
Press SELECT to load the project that’s currently selected in the project
list. When it’s loaded, it replaces the project that’s currently stored in
the VS-2480’s onboard memory. You can play, record, edit and mix a
project only while it’s loaded into the VS-2480.
PROJECT menu
F1 (SELECT)
The SELECT button doesn’t look quite like any other VS-2480 menu button, and it acts
differently, too. It’s the only button that performs its action as soon as you press it. All
of the other buttons merely display the corresponding operation’s screens.
To load a project from another drive, select the drive and press F6 (LIST), as described
in “To Display the Projects on a Drive” on Page 94.
Loading a Project
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PROJECT.
If “SELECT” isn’t visible above F1, press PAGE until it is.
In the project list, select the project you want to load.
Press F1 (SELECT). The VS-2480 displays:
5.
Press ENTER/YES to load the selected project, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks:
If the currently loaded project is write-protected (Page 99), the VS-2480 loads the new
project without displaying this question.
6.
Press ENTER/YES to store your latest changes to the currently loaded project
before loading the new one, or EXIT/NO to skip re-saving it.
The VS-2480 loads the selected project into its memory.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
NEW
When you create a new project, you make two important choices that determine both
the nature of the project and what you can do with its audio. While these choices are a
product of the VS-2480’s great flexibility, they can’t be changed once the project’s been
created, and so they must be made carefully. Before we go through the steps involved
in creating a new project, let’s discuss these decisions so you’ll know what to do when
you encounter them during project creation.
Sample Rate
All digital recorders record audio by creating a numerical representation of it at a
particular moment in time—this numerical representation is called a “sample.” By
creating samples many thousands of times per second—and playing them back just as
quickly—the illusion is created of a single stream of continuous audio. In fact, what
you’re hearing is really a series of separate samples.
Since audio is constantly changing, the more samples a recording device makes per
second, the greater its chances are of faithfully capturing and reproducing its sound.
The number of times per second that a digital recorder samples audio is called its
“sample rate.”The VS-2480 can record audio at a variety of sample rates.
This sample rate:
Creates this many samples per second:
32k (kiloHertz)
32,000
44.1kHz
44,100
48kHz
48,000
64kHz
64,000
88.2kHz
88,200
96kHz
96,000
Sample rates are displayed in kiloHertz, or thousands of cycles/samples. On the
VS-2480’s project NEW screen, “kHz” is abbreviated as “k.”
You might think you’d always use the highest sample rate, but it’s not that simple.
Higher sample rates use up disk space faster, and there’s an even more serious issue:
•
Audio CDs can only play audio recorded at 44.1k. If you’ve connected a Rolandapproved CD-R/RW drive to your VS-2480 and plan to write your project onto an
audio CD, use the 44.1k sample rate. (Chapter 27 describes creating audio CDs.)
While you can export non-44.1k audio from the VS-2480 via R-BUS or as .WAV files
(Page 356) for processing and eventual return to the VS-2480 for CD-burning, sample
rate conversion generally reduces a sound’s quality. It’s smarter to record your audio at
44.1k in the first place if you plan to deliver it to listeners on an audio CD.
The other available sample rates are provided for special needs. Recording at 96k is
growing in popularity for the extra quality it promises, but so far, only DVDs can utilize
96k audio—if you’re doing a project for DVD, 96k recording is a consideration. The 48k
sample rate can be helpful if you’re digitally importing 48k-recorded tracks from an
external digital device.
Some effect patches are not available in projects that use a 64k-or-higher sample rate.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
Recording Mode
The VS-2480 provides eight “recording modes” from which to choose. A project’s
recording mode configures the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder at the desired balance
between a project’s audio quality, how many tracks the project contains, and the
amount of disk space its audio consumes.
Unless you have a reason to do otherwise, use the 24-track, 24-bit MTP recording mode.
The VS-2480 Owner’s Manual assumes that your projects use this mode, except as noted.
Description of Each Recording Mode
Recording mode:
Description:
M24 (Mastering 24-bit)
Audio is recorded as linear 24-bit data.
MTP (Multi Track Pro)
This is the VS-2480’s default 24-bit recording mode.
CDR (CD-R Writing)
Audio is recorded as 16-bit linear data in a CD disk-image file
format ready for burning to an audio CD (Page 340)—great
for compiling mastering tracks for an album’s worth of songs.
M16 (Mastering 16-bit)
Audio is recorded as 16-bit linear data similar to that
produced by a CD player or DAT recorder.
MT1 (Multi Track 1)
This recording mode offers twice the recording time of M16
while preserving its sound quality.
MT2 (Multi Track 2)
This mode offers even more recording time than MT1.
LIV
Use the LIV mode when you’re doing live recording and can’t
be sure how long you’ll need to keep recording. It’s also
handy if you’re running out of space on your hard drive.
LV2
Use LV2 for recording speech, for reference recordings, or if
you’re concerned about running out of disk space.
Number of Available Playback Tracks in Each Recording Mode
The number of playback tracks in each mode depends on the selected sample rate:
Recording mode:
Tracks up to 48k:
Tracks at 64k and higher:
M24
Tracks 1-16
Tracks 1-8
MTP
Tracks 1-24
Tracks 1-12
CDR
Tracks 1-16*
*
M16
Tracks 1-16
Tracks 1-8
MT1
Tracks 1-24
Tracks 1-12
MT2
Tracks 1-24
Tracks 1-12
LIV
Tracks 1-24
Tracks 1-12
LV2
Tracks 1-24
Tracks 1-12
*
Use the 44.1k sample rate when creating a CDR mode project since only 44.1k
audio can be burned onto a CD. Tracks in CDR mode are linked as odd/even pairs.
Number of Available Simultaneous Recording Tracks in Each Recording Mode
•
•
All modes can record up to 16 tracks at once if the sampling rate is 48k or lower.
All modes can record up to 8 tracks at once if the sampling rate is 64k or higher.
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7—Project and Drive Operations
Amount of Recording Time with Each Recording Mode
This chart shows the number of minutes you’d get when recording a single track in a
single 10G partition. The available time depends on the selected sample rate.
Mode:
96k
88.2k
64k
48k
44.1k
32k
M24
662
721
993
1,324
1,442
1,987
MTP
1,989
2,165
2,983
3,977
4,329
5,966
CDR
994
1,082
1,491
1,989
2,165
2,983
M16
994
1,082
1,491
1,989
2,165
2,983
MT1
1,989
2,165
2,983
3,977
4,329
5,966
MT2
2,651
2,885
3,976
5,302
5,771
7,953
LIV
3,181
3,462
4,772
6,362
6,925
9,543
LV2
3,977
4,329
5,966
7,955
8,558
11,932
Creating a New Project
1.
2.
3.
Press PROJECT.
If “NEW” isn’t visible above F2, press PAGE until it is.
Press F2 (NEW)—the PROJECT NEW screen appears.
4.
Set the Copy System Prm parameter to:
• Off—to create a new project with default UTILITY menu parameter values
(UTILITY menu parameters are described in Chapter 28).
• On—to copy the current project-related UTILITY parameter values into the
new project.
Set the Copy Mixer/Scene Prm parameter to:
• Off—to create a new project with default mixer settings and no scenes.
• On—to copy the mixer settings and scenes from the currently loaded project
into the new project.
5.
PROJECT menu
F2 (NEW)
Since scenes remember effect patch edits, copying scenes lets you move effect settings
from the current project into the new one you’re creating.
6.
7.
Select the desired sample rate and recording mode (Page 96).
Name the new project.
You can re-name the project later on—and add a comment, if you like—using the
project NAME operation (see Page 99).
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8.
Press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 displays:
9.
To proceed, press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
The VS-2480 asks if you want to store the current project before creating and
loading the new one.
10. Press ENTER/YES to save any changes you’ve made to the currently loaded project,
or press EXIT/NO to create and load the new project without saving the old one.
NAME
You can re-name the currently loaded project. On the PROJECT NAME screen, you can
also enter a comment about the project and view assorted project information.
Re-Naming a Project
1.
2.
3.
Press PROJECT.
If “NAME” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (NAME)—the PROJECT NAME screen appears.
4.
Enter the desired name as described in “Naming” on Page 73.
PROJECT menu
F3 (NAME)
Entering a Project Comment
1.
On the PROJECT NAME screen, select the Comment box and enter the desired
comment the same way you’d enter a name.
PROTECT
You can lock a project on your hard drive to protect its data from being
accidentally overwritten, and to prevent accidental erasure of the
project. This is called “write-protecting” a project. You can also unlock a
project using the same procedure.
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PROJECT menu
F4 (PROTEC)
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7—Project and Drive Operations
Locking and Un-Locking a Project on Your Hard Drive
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PROJECT.
If “PROTEC” isn’t visible above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Select the desired project.
Press F4 (PROTEC). Depending on whether the project is
currently locked or not, the VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to:
...lock the project...
5.
or
These symbols tell
you if a project’s:
Locked
Unlocked
...unlock the project.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
OPTIMIZE
As described in “UNDO and REDO” on Page 72, the VS-2480 retains all of your
recorded data so that you can undo up to 999 of your most recent actions. A project can
grow quite large with audio you don’t plan to use.
You can “optimize” a project, deleting from your hard drive all data not currently on a
project V-Track. In some cases, this can lead to the recovery of large amounts of drive
space. A lean project is also faster to back up, and requires less CD-R/RW disk space.
After you’ve optimized a project, you can no longer undo actions performed prior to
the optimization procedure. Your Undo levels start over again back at Level 1 with the
first action taken after the optimization.
You can’t use Undo to reverse an optimization procedure.
Optimization on the VS-2480 is not the same as optimization on a computer. On the
VS-2480, optimization doesn’t defrag your drive (Page 113)—it deletes unwanted files.
Optimize deletes only unused audio in the selected project. It doesn’t affect any audio
on any of your V-Tracks, whether the V-Tracks are currently selected or not.
Optimizing a Project
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
100
Load the project you want to optimize.
Press PROJECT.
If “OPTIMZ” isn’t visible above F5, press PAGE until it is.
Select the desired project.
Press F6 (MARK) to place a checkmark to the left of the project’s
name, targeting it for optimization.
Press F5 (OPTIMZ). The VS-2480 asks:
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PROJECT menu
F5 (OPTIMZ)
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7—Project and Drive Operations
7.
If you’re sure you want to proceed, press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to cancel
optimization of the displayed project.
Since you’re about to permanently delete audio data, the VS-2480 asks again:
8.
Press ENTER/YES to optimize the current project, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
Destination Drive Selection
When you’re moving project data from one place to another—when you’re copying,
backing up or exporting project data—you can select the desired destination drive
before beginning the operation, as noted in the procedures described later in this
chapter. In addition, you’ll see F4 (SelDrv) at the bottom of the operation’s main screen
in case you change your mind later and want to select a new destination drive.
Selecting a New Destination Drive
1.
Press F4 (SelDrv) to display the SELECT DRIVE screen.
2.
3.
Use % or $ or the TIME/VALUE dial to highlight the desired drive.
Press F5 (OK) to select the drive and return to the project operation’s screen.
COPY
Use the PROJECT menu’s COPY operation to make a copy of a project. You can store
the copy in the project’s current drive or in another one, providing the destination drive
has enough free space. This can be handy when you want to have a safety copy of a
project while you work on the original. It can also be useful if you need to create
multiple versions of a project based on the same original work. Finally, it can be helpful
if you’re having problems backing up a project.
Copying a Project
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press PROJECT.
Select and mark the project(s) you want to copy.
If “COPY” isn’t visible above F1, press PAGE until it is.
Mark the project(s) you want to copy.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the drive to which you want to
copy the marked project(s).
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PROJECT menu
F1 (COPY)
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7—Project and Drive Operations
6.
Press F1 (COPY)—the PROJECT COPY screen appears.
List of projects
you’ve marked
Currently
selected
drive info
7.
8.
Drive to which
data will be
copied
Press F2 to scroll down
through the list of projects
if it extends out of view, or
F1 to scroll up the list.
You can wipe the destination drive clean before copying your data to it.
Set Erase all Projects to:
• Off—if you want to add what you’re copying to the list of projects already on the
destination drive.
• On—if you want to clear the drive so it contains only what you’re copying.
Press F5 (OK)—the VS-2480 asks:
9.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the COPY operation.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks if you want to store any changes
you’ve made to the currently loaded project before beginning the COPY process.
10. Press ENTER/YES to save your most recent changes to the currently loaded project
before copying the marked project(s), or EXIT/NO to simply begin copying.
11. If Erase all Projects is on, the VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to erase the
destination drive first—press ENTER/YES to do so, or EXIT/NO to cancel copying.
ERASE
You might want to erase a project from your hard drive to gain back free drive space,
when you’ve copied it to another drive, or when you simply no longer want to project.
The project ERASE command permanently erases a project from your hard drive. This
operation cannot be reversed using the VS-2480’s Undo feature, so perform it with care.
Erasing a Project
1.
2.
3.
4.
102
Press PROJECT.
Select and mark the project—or projects—you want to erase.
If “ERASE” isn’t visible above F2, press PAGE until it is.
Press F2 (ERASE)—the VS-2480 asks:
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F2 (ERASE)
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5.
6.
If you’re sure you want to delete the marked project(s) from your hard drive, press
ENTER/YES. If not, press EXIT/NO.
Since ERASE is irreversible, the VS-2480 asks again:
7.
To erase the marked project(s), press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to cancel.
SPLIT
SPLIT creates a new project from selected V-Tracks, removing them from the currently
loaded project. The new project inherits the original project’s settings, including
markers, locators, Automix data, the tempo map and sync track, project-related
UTILITY menu settings and its name, with a distinguishing last character added. The
new project is stored on the same drive as the original project.
Project SPLIT can be handy if you’ve got a large project with lots of V-Tracks you’re not
using but don’t want to erase. You can split out these V-Tracks to a new project, making
the original project smaller and easier to back up.
SPLIT cannot be reversed using the VS-2480’s Undo feature—V-Tracks removed from a
project can returned to it only by using the region IMPORT feature. See Page 269.
Project SPLIT uses very little additional space on your hard drive since it’s essentially
moving data from the original project to the new one, not creating new data.
Splitting a Project
1.
2.
3.
4.
Load the project you want to split (Page 95).
Press PROJECT.
If “SPLIT” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (SPLIT)—the VS-2480 first SPLIT screen appears.
PROJECT menu
F3 (SPLIT)
You can mark V-Tracks on SPLIT’s V-Track MAP screen—shown above—or on its
Select Track screen. You can mark as many V-Tracks as you want on either screen.
In the map of the project’s V-Tracks, any V-Track that contains data appears as a
small black box with a checkbox to its left.
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5.
To select a V-Track, cursor to it and press F4 (MARK) to check its checkbox; to
unselect it, press F4 (MARK) again. You can select and unselect all of the V-Tracks in
the map at once by repeatedly pressing F3 (ALL).
To quickly select or unselect one track’s entire set of V-Tracks, cursor all the way to the
left so that the track’s name is highlighted and press F4 (MARK).
6.
7.
If you prefer to work on the Select Track screen, press F1 (SelTrk).
To select a V-Track for export on the Select Track screen, turn the TIME/VALUE dial
to highlight the V-Track and press F4 (MARK) to place a checkmark next it.
Hold down SHIFT as you turn the TIME/VALUE dial to jump between same-numbered
V-Tracks on different tracks.
8.
When you’ve selected all of the desired V-Tracks, press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 asks:
9. Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
10. If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks if you want to save recent changes to
the currently loaded project before proceeding.
11. Press ENTER/YES to save the project’s recent changes before performing the split,
or EXIT/NO to skip directly to splitting the project.
COMBINE
Project COMBINE—as its name suggests—allows you to append a project from your
hard drive onto the end of the currently loaded project. You can use COMBINE to
collect, one-by-one, individual projects into one large project. You might want to, for
example, do this when assembling the songs for an album if each song has been
recorded as a separate project—see “Multi-Project Compilation CDs” on Page 341.
Only projects that share the same sample rate and recording mode can be combined.
How COMBINE Works
•
•
•
•
The project that’s added to the end of the currently loaded project is placed four
seconds after the end of the current project’s last audio.
A new marker is automatically placed at the start of the newly appended material.
The appended project’s track and V-Track assignments are preserved in the new
combined project.
The appended project is no longer on your hard drive as a separate project since its
data is now part of the new combined project.
Some aspects of appended project are not carried over into the currently loaded
project, such as markers, locators, Automix data, the tempo map and sync track, and
project-related UTILITY menu settings.
Combining Two Projects
Since COMBINE alters both projects, we recommend you back both of them up before
performing the COMBINE operation.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Load the project you want to use as the basis for the final project.
Press PROJECT.
Select the project you want to add to the end of the loaded project.
If “COMBIN” isn’t visible above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Press F4 (COMBIN)—the VS-2480 asks:
6.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed with the combining of the two projects, or press
EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks again if you’re really sure:
7.
8.
9.
PROJECT menu
F4 (COMBIN)
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
The VS-2480 asks if you want to save any changes you’ve made to the currently
loaded project before proceeding.
Press ENTER/YES to store the current project’s changes, or press EXIT/NO to skip
directly to the combining of the two projects.
BACKUP
We strongly recommend that you back up your projects regularly. When you back up a
project, you make a copy of it on a CD-R or CD-RW, and store the backup in a safe,
separate place. Though your VS-2480 is an extremely reliable device, unexpected
events—including power outages and worse—can occur during its operation. The only
way to guarantee that your work remains safe is to back it up.
You can re-load a project backup at any time by performing a RECOVER operation—
see Page 107.
When you connect a Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive to your VS-2480, you can back
up your VS-2480 projects on reliable CD-R and/or CD-RW disks. We recommend
backing up on CD-R or CD-RW disks since many VS-2480 projects can fit on a single
disk, and the disks themselves are inexpensive. You can also back up a project on one or
more Zip disks.
A Roland VS-CDRII, CD-RACK or a Zip drive must be purchased separately.
To learn how to connect a CD-R/RW drive or a Zip drive to the VS-2480, see Page 381.
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Backing Up a Project
1.
2.
Connect your Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive or Zip drive to the VS-2480.
Insert the required media—a CD-R/RW or Zip disk—into the drive.
The BACKUP operation re-formats the destination media for backup use. The media,
therefore, doesn’t need to be formatted ahead of time.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press PROJECT.
Mark the project(s) you want to back up.
If “BACKUP” isn’t visible above F1, press PAGE until it is.
Press F1 (BACKUP)—the PROJECT BACKUP screen appears.
List of projects
you’ve marked
Currently
selected
drive info
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
PROJECT menu
F1 (BACKUP)
Drive to which
data will be
backed up
Press F2 to scroll
down through the list
of projects if it extends
out of view, or F1
(Scrol) to scroll up
through the list.
If you’d like to back up your data to a Zip disk, press F4 (SelDrv) and select your Zip
drive—for details, see “Destination Drive Selection” on Page 101.
If you’ve selected a Zip drive, skip to Step 11.
If you’re backing up to CD, select whether or not you’d like the VS-2480 to verify the
accuracy of your backup once it’s been written on the CD. While this causes the
backup to take a bit longer, we recommend turning Verify on to make absolutely
sure your project data’s been correctly backed up.
Select the CD burner’s write speed. The VS-2480 offers you only speeds supported
by the connected drive. We recommend trying the MAX setting that uses your
drive’s fastest supported speed. If you experience any problems, try a lower speed.
Press F5 (OK).
The VS-2480 asks if you want to save any recent changes to the currently loaded
project before proceeding with the backup.
Press ENTER/YES to save your currently loaded project before proceeding with the
backup, or EXIT/NO to skip straight to the backup.
If you’re using a CD-RW disc that already contains data, the VS-2480 asks if you
want to erase the disk. For details on the messages that may appear, see Page 352.
Press ENTER/YES to erase the CD-RW, or EXIT/NO to cancel the backup.
If a project is too large to fit on the medium you’re using, the VS-2480 asks you for
additional media as needed.
During a multi-CD backup, the VS-2480 asks for each disk twice: once to label the disk,
and once to actually write data on the disk.
14. Insert the requested media and press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to abort the
procedure.
15. If you’re backing up multiple projects, the VS-2480 backs up each one in turn.
Project backup data cannot be played as is. To play the project, use project RECOVER to
restore the project to your hard drive in playable form.
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RECOVER
To re-load VS-2480 project backup data, use the RECOVER operation. When you
recover a project, the project is restored to your internal hard drive in its original state.
RECOVER is available only when the selected drive contains project backup data.
You can also use project RECOVER to restore song backup and archive data from the:
•
•
VS-880
VS-890
•
•
VS-880EX
VS-1680•VS-1880
•
VSR-880
When you recover a song from an earlier V-Studio, the VS-2480 converts it into a
VS-2480 project. You can recover song data from a Zip disk or CD. After the VS-2480
recovers the song, it’s loaded as the current project. If you’re importing multiple songs,
the last song the VS-2480 imports becomes the current project.
See “V-Studio Song/VS-2480 Project Compatibility” on Page 412 for details on how
other V-Studios’ songs are transformed into VS-2480 projects.
Recovering Backup Data
1.
2.
Press PROJECT.
Insert the medium containing the backup into the appropriate
CD-R/RW or Zip drive.
PROJECT menu
F2 (Recovr)
If the project is backed up on more than one disk, insert the first
disk containing backup data.
3.
4.
Select the drive containing the project backup data.
Press F6 (LIST) to view the drive’s contents. The VS-2480 displays:
New drive’s
name
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Press ENTER/YES to change drives, or EXIT/NO to cancel the drive change.
Mark the project(s) you want to recover.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the drive to which you want to recover the
marked backup data.
If “Recovr” isn’t visible above F2, press PAGE until it is.
Press F2 (Recovr)—the PROJECT RECOVER screen appears.
List of project
backup data
you’ve marked
Drive
containing
backup
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Drive to which
data will be
recovered
Press F2 to scroll down
through the list of
project backup data if it
extends out of view, or
F1 (Scrol) to scroll up
through the list.
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10. Set Erase all Projects to:
• Off—if you want to add the project(s) you’re recovering to the list of projects
already on the destination drive.
• On—if you want to clear the drive so it contains only your recovered projects.
11. If you’re recovering data from a CD, set the desired CD drive speed. Try MAX. If
you experience problems recovering the data, try a lower speed.
12. Press F5 (OK).
The VS-2480 asks if you want to save the currently loaded project.
13. Press ENTER/YES to save the loaded project before the recovery operation, or
press EXIT/NO to go straight to recovery.
The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to proceed with the recovery.
14. Press ENTER/YES to continue the recovery, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
15. If Erase All Projects is on, the VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to erase the
destination drive first—press ENTER/YES to do so, or EXIT/NO to cancel recovery.
16. If the backup is larger than a single disk, the VS-2480 asks for additional disks as
needed. Insert each requested disk in your drive and press ENTER/YES to proceed.
IMPORT
You can import songs into the VS-2480 from the:
•
•
VS-880
VS-890
•
•
VS-880EX
VS-1680
•
•
VSR-880
VS-1880
IMPORT loads earlier V-Studio songs saved as song copy playable files. When you
import a song, the song is converted into a VS-2480 project that you can then save onto
your hard drive. You can import playable V-Studio data stored on Zip disks.
To import songs that were backed up or stored as archives on Zip disks or CD, use the
VS-2480’s RECOVER operation (Page 107).
You can’t import songs from the VS-1680 or VS-1880 by installing their internal hard
drives in the VS-2480. The VS-2480 utilizes a different type of drive format.
To import a VS-840 song, use the VS-840’s Song Convert operation to convert it first into
VS-880 format, and then import the song into the VS-2480. Only the song’s audio and
track assignments are imported—all other settings must be recreated manually.
See “V-Studio Song/VS-2480 Project Compatibility” on Page 412 for details on how
other V-Studios’ songs are transformed into VS-2480 projects.
Importing a Song from an Earlier V-Studio
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Connect the Zip drive or CD-R/RW drive that you intend to use for
the IMPORT procedure.
Insert the media containing the song data into its drive.
Press PROJECT.
Select the device containing the song data.
Press F6 (LIST). The VS-2480 displays:
PROJECT menu
F3 (IMPORT)
New drive’s
name
6.
7.
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Press ENTER/YES to change drives, or EXIT/NO to cancel the drive change.
Mark the song(s) you want to import.
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8. Select the drive to which you want to import the song.
9. If “IMPORT” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
10. Press F3 (IMPORT)—the PROJECT IMPORT screen appears.
Drive to which
data will be
imported
List of song
data you’ve
marked
Press F2 to scroll down
through the list of songs if
it extends out of view, or
F1 (Scrol) to scroll up
through the list.
Drive
containing
song data
11. Press F5 (OK) to import the marked songs—the VS-2480 asks if you’re sure.
12. Press ENTER/YES to start importing, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
The VS-2480 imports the selected song data. Depending on the amount of data, and
the amount of conversion required, this can take a while.
EXPORT
You can export the current project from the VS-2480 so that it can be played on the:
•
•
VS-880
VS-890
•
•
VS-880EX
VS-1680
•
•
VSR-880
VS-1880
The VS-2480 won’t export a project directly to the VS-840’s data format. You can export a
project as VS-880 data, and use the VS-840’s Song Convert feature to load the data.
How Export Works
This section describes how the currently loaded VS-2480 project is translated for export
to the various V-Studios. In all cases, when you export a VS-2480 project, the newly
created song uses the project’s sample rate and recording mode.
The VS-2480’s M16 recording mode is the same as other V-Studios’ MAS mode.
You can export a project to Zip disk or CD-R/RW. If the project fits on a single Zip disk,
you can export it in playable form—if it’s larger than one Zip disk, you can export it in
archive format. You can export a project to CD-R/RW only as a song archive.
Exporting to a VS-880 or VS-880EX
•
•
•
•
Eight project tracks are exported. You can select Tracks 1-8, 9-16 or 17-24.
Only V-Tracks 1-8 are exported to VS-880 songs—to export data on V-Tracks 9-16,
copy the data to V-Tracks 1-8. In VS-880EX songs, the VS-2480’s V-Tracks 1-8 are
exported to Bank A, and V-Tracks 9-16 to Bank B.
Only the project’s Locators 00-31 are exported.
Projects that use the M24, MTP, CDR and LV2 recording modes can’t be exported as
VS-880 or VS-880EX songs.
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Exporting to a VS-890 or VSR-880
•
•
•
•
Eight project tracks are exported. You can select Tracks 1-8, 9-16 or 17-24.
V-Tracks 1-8 are exported to Bank A, and V-Tracks 9-16 to Bank B.
Projects that use the M24 and LV2 recording modes can’t be exported as VS-890 or
VSR-880 songs.
MTP-recorded project data is converted to VSR mode during export—this process
can take a while.
Exporting to a VS-1680
•
•
•
16 project tracks are exported. You can select Tracks 1-16 or 9-24.
Only the project’s Locators 00-63 are exported.
Projects that use the M24 and CDR recording modes can’t be exported as VS-1680
songs, nor can projects that contain CDR mastering tracks—see Page 340.
Exporting to a VS-1880
•
•
•
18 project tracks are exported. You can select Tracks 1-18 or 7-24.
Only the project’s Locators 00-63 are exported.
Projects that use the M24 recording mode can’t be exported as VS-1880 songs.
Exporting a VS-2480 Project
In order to export a project as a playable song to a Zip disk, the Zip
disk must first be formatted by the VS-2480—see “Format Drive”
on Page 113.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Connect the Zip drive or CD-R/RW drive that you intend to use for
the EXPORT procedure.
Load the desired project into the VS-2480.
Press PROJECT.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the drive to which you want to export the
project.
If “EXPORT” isn’t visible above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Press F4 (EXPORT). The PROJECT EXPORT screen appears, showing parameters
appropriate to the device you’ve selected as the destination for your exported data.
You selected a Zip drive in Step 4.
7.
110
PROJECT menu
F4 (EXPORT)
You selected a CD-R/RW drive in Step 4.
If you’ve selected a Zip drive, set Mode to determine the type of exported data you
wish to create. You can select:
• Archive—if the project won’t fit on a single Zip disk, or if you simply prefer to
export it as a song archive.
• Playable—if the project will fit on a single Zip disk.
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It’s not always easy to tell if a project will fit on a Zip disk when it’s exported from the
VS-2480. You can get a very rough idea by dividing the project’s total number of tracks
by the number of tracks you’re exporting, and then dividing the project’s total size by
that number. If you’re not absolutely sure the project will fit on the disk, export it as a
song archive to be safe—if you guess wrong, the export will fail.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
If you’re exporting to a CD-R/RW, set the Verify and CD Speed parameters:
• Verify’s setting determines whether or not the VS-2480 double-checks the
accuracy of the data it writes on your CD. Turning Verify on is always the safest
method, though it does cause the export to take a little longer.
• CD Speed—sets the speed at which the exported data is written to the CD. Try
the MAX setting to make the EXPORT process faster. If you experience
problems, try a slower setting.
Set the Save As parameter to select the type of V-Studio data the VS-2480 exports.
Export Track determines which of the project’s tracks are exported.
Press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 asks if you want to save any recent changes you’ve made
to the current project before proceeding.
Press ENTER/YES to save any recent changes, or EXIT/NO to skip to exporting.
If you’re using a CD-RW disc that already contains data, the VS-2480 asks if you
want to erase the disk. For details on the messages that may appear, see Page 352.
If a project is too large to fit on the medium you’re using, the VS-2480 asks you for
additional media as needed. Insert the requested media and press ENTER/YES, or
press EXIT/NO to abort the procedure.
During a multi-CD export operation, the VS-2480 asks for each disk twice: once to label
the disk, and once to actually write data on the disk.
Drive Operations
A reminder: each disk drive partition appears in the VS-2480’s project list as a separate
drive. As we noted in Chapter 6, when we refer to a “drive,” we mean a partition. When
we refer to an entire hard drive mechanism, we call it a “hard drive.”This distinction is
very important to remember in the following sections.
Before proceeding with the PROJECT menu’s hard drive- and drive-related operations,
here’s some information about keeping your hard drive operating at its best.
Disk Maintenance
As with any piece of sophisticated electronic equipment, you hard drive requires a bit
of maintenance from time to time in order to perform at its very best.
When you shut down the VS-2480 correctly (Page 80)—instead of just switching it off—
you’re performing simple everyday maintenance, letting the VS-2480 properly conclude
disk operations, storing your latest work safely on the currently selected drive before
shutting down.
In addition, you’ll want to make sure your hard drive doesn’t begin to show signs of
“fragmentation,” which can slow down the VS-2480 and cause other problems.
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Fragmentation
What Is Fragmentation?
When a hard drive has first been set up and has lots of free space, your VS-2480 can
write each file’s data in one single area of the hard drive. When the file is played back,
the VS-2480 only has to look in one place to find all the necessary data.
When a hard drive has been in use for a while, however, the empty spaces for writing
new data become smaller and smaller. This occurs for a few reasons:
•
•
•
There’s simply less free space.
New data for each project may be written far away from the rest of the project data
when you’ve got several projects taking up space on the hard drive.
When you optimize a project (Page 100) to free up disk space, small chunks of
unwanted data are discarded.
When the VS-2480 stores new files, it squeezes them into
any bits of space it can find. As a result, the data winds up
scattered all over the hard drive. When the data is stored in
such little bits and pieces, the hard drive is said to be
“fragmented.”
When the VS-2480 plays back a file from a fragmented hard
drive, it has to grab a little piece from here, another piece
from there and so on. This is much harder than simply
playing one continuous chunk from a single hard drive
location, and it takes more time. This can slow things down
unacceptably and lead to errors during playback or recording.
With fragmentation, little bits
and pieces of a file are
written all over the drive.
Fragmentation is a naturally occurring process for any hard drive used with any
computer or recording device. Hard drives that record audio are especially prone to
fragmentation due to the stop-and-start nature of recording.
How Can I Prevent Fragmentation?
We strongly recommend you perform the following three-step procedure, in order,
once a month to eliminate any fragmentation on your hard drive before it starts causing
problems:
1.
2.
3.
Back up all of the projects stored in the hard drive, as described on Page 105.
Perform a Format Drive operation (Page 113) with Physical Format turned on.
Recover your projects to the hard drive (Page 107).
When you format a hard drive, you erase all of the data on it, in all of its partitions. Do
not format your hard drive until you’ve backed up every one of its projects—see
“BACKUP” on Page 105.
Is My Hard Drive Fragmented?
Your hard drive may be fragmented if:
•
•
•
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you experience “Drive Busy!” messages.
you hear pops and clicks when you play back a project.
the VS-2480’s transport begins to feel sluggish as you navigate a project.
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What Can Be Done About a Fragmented Hard Drive?
You can de-fragment—or “defrag”—your hard drive using the same three steps we
listed in “How Can I Prevent Fragmentation?”
If you have trouble backing up a project, it may be because it’s just too fragmented.
Perform the following actions, in order:
1.
2.
3.
Optimize the project (Page 100).
After optimization, copy the project to another drive, preferably one that’s less
crowded with project data (Page 101).
Back up the copy and perform the steps in “How Can I Prevent Fragmentation?” on
the previous page.
If you have trouble backing up the copied project, try lowering the CD speed.
Format Drive
When you format a hard drive, you erase all of the information currently on it, and
prepare it for use by the VS-2480. Formatting completely wipes clean all of the hard
drive’s partitions. You’d format a hard drive:
•
•
•
•
after backing up all of its projects during your monthly hard drive maintenance, as
described in “How Can I Prevent Fragmentation?” on Page 112.
when you’re de-fragging a hard drive after backing up all of the projects on it.
when you’ve purchased and installed a new internal hard drive, or one that’s been
used by another device.
when you’re preparing a Zip disk for the storage of exported project data.
When a hard drive is formatted for use with the VS-2480, it can’t be used by another
device, nor can another device’s hard drive be used by the VS-2480 without being
re-formatted.
What Gets Formatted
When you format a drive, all of its contents are erased. If the drive has multiple
partitions—as your internal hard disk does—they’re all wiped clean of data.
About Partition Sizes
To learn about partitions, see “How a VS-2480 Hard Drive Organizes Data” on Page 86.
When you format a hard drive, you’re asked to decide the size of its drives/partitions.
The VS-2480 offers you four choices:
•
500MB
•
1GB
•
2GB
•
10GB
“MB” is short for megabytes, one thousand bytes.
We recommend you select a 10GB partition size when you format a hard drive for use
with the VS-2480—a 10GB partition provides plenty of room for the VS-2480’s 24-track
projects. The other sizes are provided mainly for their familiarity to users of earlier
V-Studios.
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Formatting a Hard Drive
Back up all data on the hard drive before formatting. Formatting erases all of the data
on the hard drive, and the data cannot be recovered using Undo or any other method.
If you accidentally delete data, that data cannot be restored to its previous state. Roland
Corporation assumes no liability concerning such loss of data.
The Format Drive operation is available only when a drive is selected.
When you select a drive for formatting, you’re really selecting its entire hard drive, all
of whose partitions are erased during formatting.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PROJECT.
Select a drive belonging to the hard drive you want to format.
If “FmtDrv” isn’t visible above F2, press PAGE until it is.
Press F2 (FmtDrv)—the FORMAT DRIVE screen appears.
PROJECT menu
F2 (FmtDrv)
Information
about the
drive you’ve
selected.
5.
6.
Select the desired partition size. We recommend 10GB.
Set Physical Format to:
• Off (Quick)—for faster formatting if you’re re-formatting a VS-2480 hard drive.
•
On—if the hard drive is being formatted for the VS-2480 for the first time. If you
have time—Physical Format extends the formatting process considerably—use
Physical Format to absolutely eliminate any lingering data corruption.
Unless you have a specific reason to question its underlying data, don’t turn on
Physical Format when formatting a Zip disk.
7.
8.
Set Surface Scan to:
• Off—to skip a check of the hard drive platter’s surface during formatting.
• On—so that it checks the surface of the hard drive’s platter by performing an
automatic read/write test after formatting. This can take a while, but it’s a good
thing to do periodically.
Press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to format the hard drive:
Selected drive
9.
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Press ENTER/YES to proceed with the formatting, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 double-checks to make sure you want to
proceed, since you’re about to erase everything that’s on the selected hard drive.
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Selected drive
10. Press ENTER/YES to proceed with formatting, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks if you want to save any recent changes
to the currently loaded project.
11. Press ENTER/YES to save the project, or EXIT/NO to proceed without doing so.
Depending on your Physical Format and Surface Scan settings—and the size of the
drive—formatting can take anywhere from a few moments to several hours.
Do not interrupt the formatting operation before it’s finished.
Clear Partition
You can erase, or “initialize,” the contents of a single drive—a partition—to make room
for new projects. The PROJECT menu’s Clear Partition operation performs this task.
Clearing a drive has no effect on fragmentation. Only backing up your projects and reformatting a hard drive can de-frag it.
Clearing a Drive/Partition
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PROJECT.
Select the drive you wish to clear.
If “ClrPrt” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (ClrPrt)—the appears.
PROJECT menu
F3 (ClrPrt)
Information
about the
selected drive/
partition
5.
6.
Set Surface Scan to:
• Off—to skip a check of the hard drive platter’s surface during initialization.
• On—so that it checks the surface of the hard drive’s platter by performing an
automatic read/write test after initialization. This can take a while, but it’s a
good thing to do periodically.
Press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to clear selected drive:
Selected drive
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7—Project and Drive Operations
7.
Press ENTER/YES to clear the drive, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 double-checks to make sure you want to
proceed, since you’re about to wipe everything on the selected drive/partition.
8. If you want to proceed, press ENTER/YES. To cancel the operation, press EXIT/NO.
9. If you pressed ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 asks if you want to save any recent changes
to the currently loaded project.
10. Press ENTER/YES to save the project before clearing the drive, or EXIT/NO to
proceed without doing so.
Drive Check
If you’re experiencing problems loading a project, copying it or backing it up, you can
run a Drive Check operation to determine if the problem is with your data—if not, you
may have a connection problem or a hardware malfunction. Drive Check examines the
directory that keeps track of where your files are, and seeks out potential problems
with your data. When it’s done, it displays a report of its findings.
Drive Check found no
problems with this drive.
Understanding the Drive Check Report
The most important part of the Drive Check Report is the line at its top left that either
says “No Err”—as in the illustration above—or “(x) Err,” where “x” equals the number
of errors found. If Drive Check does find errors, it lists them in the report—turn the
TIME/VALUE dial to view them. Items marked with “OK” have no problems.
Here’s what some of the terms in the report mean:
•
•
•
•
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Cluster—the smallest chunk of disk data the VS-2480 reads and writes.
Cross link (X-Link)—a case in which audio from one project is mistakenly referenced
by another. This may cause one project’s audio to be heard during playback of
another.
Loose Area—a chunk of orphaned audio data not associated with any project.
Directories—the list of each drive’s files and where they’re located on the disk. If a
directory becomes confused or damaged, you may see “IllegalDIR” error messages.
This:
Refers to:
Total
Total number of clusters
Defect
Number of damaged or unusable clusters
Used
Number of clusters in use
Free
Number of clusters not yet used
X-Link Err
Number of cross links
Loose Area
Number of orphaned clusters
Illegal Dir
Number of directories with incorrect information
Read Error
Number of data-reading problems during the check
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About Drive Check’s Repair Capabilities
If Disk Check finds a problem it can attempt to fix it for you by deleting the data that’s
causing the trouble you’re experiencing. Often—once the damaged data is removed—
the problems that led you to Drive Check disappear.
After Drive Check resolves a problem, we recommend backing up all of your data, reformatting the drive and recovering the backed-up data to ensure that no lingering
problems remain.
When you begin a Drive Check repair, the VS-2480 warns you that you’ll lose data. The
fact is that the data you’ll lose is no longer any good anyway, as evidenced by the fact
that you’ve been experiencing problems and that Drive Check has targeted the data for
deletion.
Running Drive Check
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PROJECT.
Select the drive you want to check.
If “DrvChk” isn’t visible over F1, press PAGE until it is.
Press F1 (DrvChk). The VS-2480 asks:
PROJECT menu
F1 (DrvChk)
Selected drive
5.
6.
Press ENTER/YES to check the selected drive, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
The VS-2480 asks if you want to save any recent changes to the current project.
Press ENTER/YES to save the project, or EXIT/NO to proceed to the Drive Check.
The Drive Check can take a while, depending on the size of your drive.
You can cancel the Drive Check at any time by pressing EXIT/NO. Do not interrupt
Drive Check by turning off the VS-2480’s power.
7.
When the check is complete, the VS-2480 displays a report of the results.
If errors have been found, press ENTER/YES to have Drive Check attempt to
remove the cause of the problem from your drive, or press EXIT/NO to cancel
Drive Check.
If you’re concerned about the risks of proceeding and would like some guidance, give
our Product Support team a call at 323-890-3740, x3741 from 8:30am to 5pm PST,
Monday-Friday.
8.
The VS-2480 warns you: “You’ll Lose Data,” but, as noted above, any data Drive
Check wants to remove is probably unusable anyway.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
When Drive Check has finished its repair, it displays what it’s done. Projects that’ve
been partially altered are indicated by “Alt,” and projects that have been completely
deleted are shown as “Del.”
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8—The Home Screen
The Home screen is central to VS-2480 operations. It’s one screen every VS-2480 user
needs to master:
•
•
•
It’s the first screen you see when you power up the VS-2480.
It provides you a comprehensive overview of the current project.
It serves as your home base, no matter what you’re doing on the VS-2480.
We call it the “Home” screen because it provides a great place to return to if you get
confused navigating the VS-2480’s many displays. Should this ever happen, press
HOME•DISPLAY to return to the familiar Home screen and regain your bearings.
As noted in Chapter 2, the HOME•DISPLAY button is labeled as “DISPLAY•HOME”
on the VS-2480’s top panel. We call it “HOME•DISPLAY,” however, to best reflect they
way you’ll most often use it—to return home.
Elements of the Home Screen
You can change the appearance of the Home screen to suit the way you like to work,
and for certain specific operations—we’ll discuss the possibilities later in this chapter.
When you first turn on the VS-2480, the Home screen contains the following elements:
11.
10.
1.
2.
9.
3.
8.
4.
5.
6.
7.
1. Display Pop-Up
Menu button
2. Current channel
display
3. PAN/AUX SEND
1-8 Knob display
4. Meters display
5. Position bar
6. Playlist area
7. Meter switches
8. Input peak
indicators
9. Current time
location display
10. Clock
11. Calendar
Numbers 1-3 and 8-11 in the above illustration appear on a variety of VS-2480 screens.
The descriptions in the following pages explain how they work.
Display Pop-Up Menu Button
Click the small rectangle in the upper left corner of the Home screen to
view the Display Pop-Up menu, described on Page 69.
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8—The Home Screen
Current Channel Display
or...
or...
The current channel display shows you the name of the input, track or FX return
channel that’s most recently been selected for editing (“Selecting a Channel for
Editing” on Page 138).
There’s always an input, track, Aux master or FX return channel selected in the VS-2480,
even if you’ve just powered up and haven’t manually selected one. After power-up,
Track Channel 1 is selected.
As described on Page 69, you can click on a channel’s name in the current channel
display to access the Channel Pop-Up menu.
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knob Display
The PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs can adjust a variety of parameters—see “Using the PAN/
AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs” on Page 139. The left side of the Home screen’s PAN/AUX SEND 18 Knob display shows what the knobs are currently controlling. Each of the 16 onscreen
knobs shows the current setting of the corresponding PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob.
Meters Display
Meter group label
Pre/post indicator
Meter group labels
The vertical black
bars are the
meters.
Meter names
The meters display shows the levels of your signals. The meter switches at the bottom
of the display select the signals to be displayed—they’re described on Page 124. In the
illustration above, F3 (TR Mix), for “Track Mixer,” has been pressed and is currently
highlighted at the bottom of the display (not shown).
The meters display often shows the meters for more than one set of signals at a time, as
in the illustration above. Each group of meters is labeled—the label appears just above
the meters. The numbers at the bottom of the meters display identify each meter’s
signal. In the illustration, the meters to the left are showing the levels of the 24 tracks.
The meters to the right show the levels of the stereo MONITOR and MASTER busses.
The meters display can be replaced by the fader/pan display, described on Page 127. If
the meters display isn’t visible, press PAGE on the VS-2480 until the meter switches
appear, and then select the desired meters’ display view (Page 124).
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How the VS-2480 Meters Show Signals
Levels are shown on the VS-2480’s display in a
row of vertically oriented meters. Each meter’s
signal is shown as a thick black bar that grows
taller as its signal gets louder. The 48, 12, 4 and 0
markings to the left of the meters show you how
loud the signal is in dBs— -48 dB, -12 dB, -4 dB
and 0 dB—as the black bar varies in height.
This signal’s
volume is
-12 dB
This signal’s
volume is
around -2 dB
How Loud Is Too Loud?
In general, you want each signal to be as loud as possible without exceeding 0 dB. 0 dB
is the loudest a digital signal can get without causing clipping—see Page 58.
Each signal should be in the -12 dB to 0 dB range when you’re setting:
•
•
•
a signal’s input level
Aux bus levels
Direct bus levels
•
•
•
a track’s recording level
the overall level of a mix
output levels
When you’re mixing, the playback level of individual tracks is determined by how they
sound in the mix, not by metered levels. Fortunately, if you’ve set each track’s recording
level properly, it’ll be impossible to set its playback level so that it exceeds 0 dB.
To help you keep track of how loud your signals get, a
peak line representing each signal’s loudest level
remains for a few moments in its meter after the signal’s
level goes back down. This lets you look from meter to
meter without worrying that you’ve missed a too-loud
signal peak.
The peak
line shows
that the
signal
peaked at
-4 dB before
dropping in
level.
You can set the peak lines so they “stick” at their loudest levels until you release them,
to make sure you don’t miss anything important—see “PEAK HOLD Sw” on Page 367.
Pre- and Post-Fader Level Metering
You can meter the level of most any signal:
•
•
when it’s traveled through its entire channel except its final fader level control. This
is called “pre-fader,” or “pre” for short.
after its level has been adjusted by its fader. This is called “post-fader,” or “post.”
You can’t meter input signals pre- or post-fader because they haven’t yet traveled
through an input channel. You can meter an input channel’s signal this way, however.
The meters display’s pre/post indicator shows you whether you’re viewing pre-fader or
post-fader signals, as shown in the illustration on Page 120. The meter switches
(Page 124) include a switch that lets you select a pre- or post-fader view.
In general, you’ll want to view signal levels post-fader. However, it can be helpful to
view pre-fader levels when you’re experiencing a problem and need to track down the
precise spot in the signal’s signal flow at which the problem is occurring.
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Position Bar
Handle
The position bar has a handle you can grab with your mouse and drag:
•
•
rightward to move to a later time in the project.
leftward to move to an earlier time .
The position bar’s handle shows where you are in the project. The black area to either
side of the handle shows the portion of the project currently displayed in the playlist.
The Playlist
Timeline
Name of the
currently
selected track
(Track 22 in
this illustration)
Name of the
phrase touching
the timeline on
the currently
selected track
V-Track map
Tracks display
The project playlist shows you what’s on a project’s tracks, and is therefore central to all
track editing operations. It shows you a left-to-right list of all of the phrases to be
played back in a project. As a project plays, the displayed phrases move from right to
left, with each phrase playing as it crosses the timeline.
The name of the currently selected track is shown above the tracks display, and the
name of the phrase on the track that’s touching the timeline is shown next to it.
Timeline
Now!
The timeline shows your current position in a project. It’s a graphic
representation of the time shown in the current time location display
(Page 126).The timeline represents now—some people call it the
“Now line.”
The timeline also plays a part in track phrase editing (Chapter 19).
When a phrase is touching the timeline, it can be selected for editing.
Now!
Tracks Display
The tracks display shows two things:
•
•
the tracks in the current project
the phrases on the tracks
Each track in the tracks display is a list of the phrases
presented from left to right in the order in which they’ll
play.
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When you zoom out, some
track numbers are shown
as dots in order to fit them
all on the display.
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8—The Home Screen
If this sounds similar to a V-Track (Page 87), you’re right. Each track in the tracks display
shows the string of phrases that comprise its currently selected V-Track. In fact, to put it
more plainly: What you see on each track in the tracks display is its currently selected
V-Track, laid out from left to right.
You can zoom in and out on the tracks display, and even expand its overall size. See
“Zooming In and Out on the Playlist” and “Expanded Playlist Views” below.
The V-Track map shows you the project’s V-Tracks (Page 87)
arranged in a grid of horizontal rows corresponding to the
project’s tracks. Each of the 16 V-Tracks in a row is represented
by a symbol that tells you if the V-Track contains data and if it’s
currently selected or not.
V-Track has
recorded data
and is selected
V-Track is
selected but has
no recorded data
V-Track has no
recorded data and
is not selected
Tracks 1-24
V-Track Map
V-Tracks 1-16
V-Track has
recorded data and
is not selected
During track editing, the V-Track map shows the V-Tracks involved in the current
editing operation—see Page 251.
You can select a V-Track for recording and/or playback by clicking it with your mouse—a
dialog appears to confirm that you’ve selected a new V-Track. You can also select a new
V-Track for a track using its CH EDIT V.Trk parameter (Page 151).
Zooming In and Out on the Playlist
You can hold down SHIFT and press ", #, $ or % to change the magnification of the
playlist’s tracks. Press:
•
•
•
•
SHIFT + "—to squeeze the tracks so that more project time fits into view.
SHIFT + #—to spread out the tracks so that you can see track data more clearly.
SHIFT + $—to make the tracks taller, with fewer tracks fitting on the display.
SHIFT + %—to fit more tracks onto the display.
You can also right-click on the playlist to open the Edit Pop-Up menu, which provides a
pair of zooming options. Scroll to the type of zooming you want to set and click.
Choose the number of
tracks to be displayed
Choose the desired power of
horizontal magnification
In either dialog, you can select the desired magnification by scrolling to it and clicking.
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Expanded Playlist Views
You can hold down SHIFT and press HOME•DISPLAY to more radically change the
way the playlist is displayed. Each time you press HOME•DISPLAY, the screen cycles
through two additional playlist views and back to its original appearance:
Wide
•
•
Wide and tall
Wide view—the tracks fill the entire width of the Home screen.
Wide and tall view—the tracks expand in height as well, reaching up to the position
bar. The meters or fader/pan display and V-Track map are hidden.
You can further zoom in and out in the wide and wide and tall playlist views using the
techniques described in “Zooming In and Out on the Playlist” on Page 123.
Meter Switches
The meter switches determine the signals to be shown in the meters display. Select:
•
F1 (INPUT)—to show the level of signals coming into the input jacks from the
analog and digital input jacks and connectors.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Analog Inputs 1-16
R-BUS 1 Digital Inputs 1-8
R-BUS 2 Digital Inputs 1-8
Stereo digital coaxial inputs
Stereo digital optical inputs
The light gray line across the analog input meters shows the current setting of the input
peak indicators (Page 125).
An input jack’s signal can be metered only once it’s been routed to an input channel.
•
F2 (IN Mix)—to show the level of input channel signals before or after their faders,
and to show the MONITOR and MASTER bus levels.
1. Input Channels 1-24
2. Stereo MONITOR bus
3. Stereo MASTER bus
1.
2.
3.
When you’re recording a track, the level setting of the input channel that’s routed to the
track sets the track’s recording level.
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•
F3 (TR Mix)—to show the playback levels of the tracks and the MONITOR and
MASTER bus levels.
1. Track Channels 1-24
2. Stereo MONITOR bus
3. Stereo MASTER bus
1.
•
2.
3.
F4 (AUXDIR)—to show the master levels of the eight Aux send busses, eight Direct
busses and the MONITOR and MASTER bus levels.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
•
3.
4.
F5 (OUTPUT)—to show the levels of signals at the VS-2480 analog and digital output
jacks and connectors.
1.
•
2.
Aux Busses 1-8
Direct Busses 1-8
Stereo MONITOR bus
Stereo MASTER bus
2.
3.
4.
5. 6. 7.
8.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Stereo
Stereo
R-BUS
R-BUS
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Aux Output A
Aux Output B
1 Digital Outputs 1-8
2 Digital Outputs 1-8
digital coaxial outputs
digital optical outputs
MONITOR bus
MASTER bus
F6 (To Pre/To Pst)—This switch allows you to select pre or post metering (Page 121)
when viewing the IN Mix, TR Mix and AUXDIR meter views. (The switch is grayedout when you’ve selected the INPUT or OUTPUT meter views.) When the pre/post
indicator (Page 120) shows “Pre,” you can press F6 (To Pst) to set the metering to
post-fader. When the indicator shows “Pst,” you can press F6 (To Pre) to switch to
pre-fader metering.
Pre- and post-fader AUXDIR metering shows Aux and direct bus signals before or after
the Aux bus and Direct bus master level controls—see Page 207 and Page 209.
Input Peak Indicators
The input peak indicators help you set the level of signals coming into the VS-2480’s
analog input jacks. The 16 numbered indicators correspond to the 16 analog input jacks,
respectively.
In this illustration,
Input Channel 4’s
signal is too loud.
When you’re adjusting a SENS knob (Page 32) to set the input level for a signal coming
into an analog input jack, a dark box appears around its input peak indicator if the
signal exceeds a pre-determined level—the INPUT PEAK LEVEL parameter (Page 362)
sets the input peak indicators to light when a signal reaches -6 dB, -3 dB or 0 dB. A light
gray line appears in the INPUT meters display view (Page 124) to show the input peak
indicators’ current volume threshold setting.
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8—The Home Screen
Current Time Location Display
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
ABS/REL indicator
Frames
Subframes
Measures
Beats
Markers
Ticks
At the top of many of the VS-2480’s screens is the current time location display, which
consists of three project time counters. Each shows you the timeline’s current location
in the project using its own form of time measurement:
This counter:
Shows the current time:
Time code
as hours, minutes, seconds, frames and subframes
Measures and beats
as measures, beats and ticks (there are 480 ticks in each beat)
Markers
by showing the last marker that passed across the timeline
If you’re recording MIDI instruments from a sequencer synced to the VS-2480, the
measures and beats counter can make it easy to perform very precise track edits on the
VS-2480. Be sure to set the project’s time signature and tempo to match that of the
sequencer before recording. See “Working with a Tempo Map” on Page 312.
Frame, subframe, tick
The ABS/REL indicator tells you whether the displayed time is:
•
•
absolute time (ABS)—based on the real project start time.
relative time (REL)—shifted during synchronization of the VS-2480 to an external
device. See “Shifting the Project Start Time” on Page 316.
Changing Your Current Location in a Project
You can change your location using the current time location display, moving through
the project by any of its time increments.
To use the:
Do this:
mouse
1.
Click on the desired unit of time measurement and drag
up or down to move forward or back in the project.
TIME/VALUE dial
1.
Use ", or # to underline the desired unit of time
measurement.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise or counter-clockwise
to move forward or back in the project. Hold SHIFT as you
turn the dial to move by larger chunks of time.
2.
You can move through a project by 1/100ths of a frame by selecting the time code
counter’s subframe value and holding down SHIFT as you turn the TIME/VALUE dial.
Clock, Calendar
The clock shows the current time and the calendar shows today’s date.
In order for the calendar and clock to accurately show the current date and time, you
must set the VS-2480’s system clock. See “Setting the VS-2480’s Clock” on Page 65.
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8—The Home Screen
You can replace the calendar and clock with a readout that shows you how much free
space remains on the selected drive. See “DATE/REMAIN Sw” on Page 365.
Using the Fader/Pan Display
You can replace the meters display (Page 120) on the Home screen with the fader/pan
display if you wish. The fader/pan display presents a small channel strip representing
each channel of the type selected with the F/P Switches. Each onscreen channel strip
contains a fader and pan knob that you can set using your mouse.
The F/P Switches
The F/P switches activate the fader/pan display and select the set of channels you’d like
to view. To display the F/P switches, press PAGE until “IN F/P” appears above F2.
Press:
To show channel strips for:
IN F/P
the 24 input channels, the MONITOR bus and the MASTER bus.
TR F/P
the 24 track channels, the MONITOR bus and the MASTER bus.
AUXF/P
the eight Aux busses, eight Direct busses, eight FX return
channels, the MONITOR bus and the MASTER bus.
About The ID Buttons
When you’ve pressed PAGE until ID PL, ID IN, ID TR, ID Mlt and ID ChV appear above
the F buttons, you can use the buttons to select what’s shown on the Info Display, as
described in “Controlling What’s On the Info Display” on Page 71.
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8—The Home Screen
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9—Working with Input Signals
This chapter describes how to get signals into the VS-2480’s analog and digital input
jacks and connectors. You’ll learn how to set analog input levels and how to configure
the VS-2480’s digital inputs for the external digital devices you want to use. Finally,
we’ll describe how to get your input signals to the desired input channels.
Analog Input Signals
Making Analog Connections
Before connecting instruments, microphones or other external sound sources to the
VS-2480’s analog input jacks, bring the MASTER fader all the way down to prevent
damage to your speakers, headphones or other equipment as you make the connection.
After the connection’s been made, bring the MASTER fader back to its 0 marking.
When connecting an instrument, mic or other sound-producing device to the VS-2480,
connect one end of the device’s cable into the device, and the plug on its other end into
the appropriate VS-2480 jack.
If you’re using an AKG C3000B, Roland DR-20, Shure SM-57 or SM-10, or Lavaliere
mic, consider using the VS-2480’s Microphone Modeling to simulate the sound of an
expensive studio mic—see Page 226.
The VS-2480’s -20 dB pads and SENS knobs allow it to accommodate a wide range of
input levels, from mic level (-64 dBu) to line level +14 dBu).
If a cable’s plug doesn’t exactly fit the input jack, don’t force it—make sure you’ve
selected the correct VS-2480 jack. If the jack seems too small or large, it’s most likely the
wrong jack. See Chapter 2 for detailed information on the VS-2480’s input jacks. You
may need to purchase an adaptor that will let you to use the cable with the VS-2480. If
you’re sure you’ve properly matched plug to jack, and still have a problem making a
connection, consult the vendor from whom you purchased the plug/cable for a remedy.
About XLR Connectors
Cold
Make sure that all XLR plugs and cables you plan to use with the
VS-2480 are wired as shown in the diagram to the right.
Gnd
Hot
3
1
2
Avoiding Feedback
If you or your performers are listening to the VS-2480 through speakers—and you’re
using microphones—feedback, unpleasant high-pitched squealing, can occur. To avoid
feedback:
•
•
•
make sure that your microphones are pointed away from the speakers to avoid
feedback.
try to move the mics and speakers further apart.
turn down the speakers’ volume.
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9—Working with Input Signals
Phantom Power
Each of the VS-2480’s eight XLR jacks can supply +48 V phantom power to a connected
condenser microphone that doesn’t have its own internal power source.
To Turn an XLR Input Jack’s Phantom Power On or Off
If you’ve already routed the input jack to an input channel, bring the input channel’s
fader all the way down before turning the jack’s phantom power on or off.
1.
Hold down SHIFT and press EZ ROUTING—the PATCH BAY screen appears.
Phantom power
switches
2.
3.
4.
You can also turn phantom
power on or off for each
XLR input jack using the
corresponding PHANTOM
SW parameter on the
UTILITY SYSTEM
Param1 screen.
Press % to select the row of ANALOG INPUT PHANTOM POWER 48V switches.
Press "or # to select the desired input jack.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to turn the jack’s phantom power on or off, as desired.
To avoid damage to a connected mic or instrument, make sure the corresponding XLR
jack’s phantom power is turned off when you’re using one of the 1/4”TRS jacks.
Setting Analog Input Levels
Once you’ve connected a signal to an analog input jack, you’ll need to set its level.
To Set an Analog Input Level
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Make sure the input jack’s PAD button is in its “up” position (Page 32).
If you’re connecting an electric guitar or bass to the GUITAR HI-Z jack, be sure to
lock in the GUITAR HI-Z ON switch (Page 32).
Press HOME•DISPLAY on the VS-2480.
Send some signal into the input jack.
Input peak
The 16 input peak indicators (Page 125)—the
indicators
small row of numbers 1-16 in the top right part of
the screen—represent the 16 analog input jacks.
Turn up the jack’s SENS knob until its peak
indicator lights on the display.
In this illustration,
Input Jack 2’s input
peak indicator has lit.
6.
7.
Turn the SENS knob counter-clockwise slightly until the indicator doesn’t flash.
If you’ve turned the SENS knob all the way down and the input peak indicator still
flashes, press the jack’s PAD button so that it locks in, and then repeat Step 8.
You can view a jack’s level in the Home screen’s INPUT meter view only if it’s been
routed to an input channel. If you don’t see the jack’s signal, see Page 135.
You can set the level at which the input peak indicators turn on (Page 362).
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9—Working with Input Signals
Digital Input Signals
Digital Connections
The VS-2480 can accept digital audio from an external digital device through the
VS-2480’s S/P DIF stereo coaxial and optical inputs or via its two R-BUS connectors. To
learn about connecting devices to these jacks, see Page 49.
Selecting the Desired Digital Inputs
The VS-2480 can receive up to 16 digital audio signals at a time (in addition to 16 analog
input signals). The eight digital audio inputs provided by the R-BUS 1 jack are always
available. You can select the remaining eight digital inputs from among the 12 offered
by the R-BUS 2, coaxial and optical jacks. The R-BUS 2 jack has eight digital audio
inputs, and the coaxial and optical jacks provide a stereo pair each.
Activating R-BUS 2, Coaxial or Optical Digital Inputs
1.
2.
Hold down SHIFT and press EZ•ROUTING—the PATCH BAY screen appears.
Press % until R-BUS2 COAXIAL SELECT is highlighted, as shown here.
This illustration shows the
PATCH BAY screen as it appears
after a new project is created and
with its first page displayed. You
can activate phantom power from
either PATCH BAY page.
3.
4.
5.
6.
The settings of the R-BUS2 COAXIAL SELECT and R-BUS2 OPTICAL SELECT
parameters select the R-BUS 2, coaxial and/or optical inputs you want to use.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select one of the following values:
• R-BUS21/2,R-BUS25/6—to activate R-BUS 2 Channels 1, 2, 5 and 6, and deactivate the coaxial digital input.
• COAXIAL, R-BUS21/2—To activate the coaxial digital input and R-BUS 2
Channels 1 and 2.
• COAXIAL, R-BUS25/6—To activate the coaxial digital input and R-BUS 2
Channels 5 and 6.
Press % to highlight R-BUS2 OPTICAL SELECT.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select:
• R-BUS2 3/4,R-BUS2 7/8—to activate R-BUS 2 Channels 3, 4, 7 and 8, and deactivate the optical digital input.
• COAXIAL, R-BUS2 3/4—To activate the optical digital input and R-BUS 2
Channels 3 and 4.
• COAXIAL, R-BUS2 7/8—To activate the optical digital input and R-BUS 2
Channels 7 and 8.
Route your active inputs to the desired input channels as described on Page 135.
To turn on all eight R-BUS 2 inputs, select R-BUS2 1/2,R-BUS2 5/6 for R-BUS2
COAXIAL SELECT, and R-BUS2 3/4,R-BUS2 7/8 for R-BUS2 OPTICAL SELECT.
The R-BUS2 COAXIAL SELECT and R-BUS2 OPTICAL SELECT parameters can also
be found on the UTILITY menu’s PROJECT PARAMETER screen.
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9—Working with Input Signals
Digital Considerations
This section discusses a couple of issues you should consider to help ensure that your
digital audio is successfully captured by the VS-2480.
Sample Rates
The VS-2480 operates at the sampling rate of the currently loaded project. As a result, it
will successfully receive only external digital audio that uses the project’s sample rate.
Sample rate
If you’re creating a new project, set it to the sample rate of the external digital audio
you want to bring in. Be aware, however, that the project will always remain at that
sample rate—you can’t change it once the project’s been created.
If your source material is at a higher sample rate than your project, consider converting
the external audio’s sample rate to the project’s sample rate before bringing it into the
VS-2480. There are various devices and utilities that you can use for this purpose.
Bit Depth
The VS-2480 records audio using 24 bits or 16 bits, according to the project’s recording
mode (Page 97). The M24 and MTP recording modes use 24-bit resolution; the other
modes use 16-bit resolution.
If an external digital audio device uses a bit depth that’s higher than your project’s,
dither the device’s output down to the project’s recording resolution before bringing
the audio into the VS-2480. If the device uses the same or a lower bit depth, the VS-2480
will record the audio as is, at the project’s selected bit depth.
The VS-2480 can also dither its digital output to match a lower bit depth used by an
external digital device receiving audio from the VS-2480—see Page 366.
The Master Clock
In order for two digital audio devices to communicate successfully, they have to both
use the same timing reference, or “master clock.” If they don’t, the digital audio they
exchange is likely to wind up at the wrong pitch, or to have clicks and pops within it.
The master clock timing reference can be produced by:
•
•
•
the device producing the digital audio—The timing information, called “word clock,” is
sent alongside the digital audio signal from the source device—the “master”—to
the receiving device, called the “slave.”
a word clock generator—In situations where there are multiple interconnected digital
audio devices, a device whose sole purpose is to produce word clock—and no
audio—can serve as the master timing reference for the entire group.
a device to which the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder transport is being synchronized— You
can derive the digital audio’s master timing reference from the synchronization
signal, either SMPTE or MTC time code. In such a situation, however, it’s better to
slave both devices to a separate word clock generator if possible.
If you’re using a word clock generator, you’ll need to connect its output to the VS-2480’s
WORD CLOCK IN jack.
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9—Working with Input Signals
Who Should Supply the Master Clock?
There are two basic conditions in which you’ll be bringing digital audio signals into the
VS-2480’s digital inputs, and each has its own master clock considerations:
•
•
when its hard disk recorder isn’t being synchronized to an external device
when its hard disk recorder is being synchronized to an external device
When the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder isn’t being synchronized to an external device,
and is receiving digital audio from:
•
•
a single external device—use the external device as the source of the master clock.
multiple external devices—use a separate word clock generator and slave all of your
devices, including the VS-2480, to the generator’s master clock. Set the VS-2480’s
MASTER CLOCK parameter to WORD CLOCK.
When the VS-2480’s transport is being synchronized to an external device, and is
receiving digital audio from:
•
•
the same device to which the VS-2480 is being synchronized—you have a few options,
listed here in order of preference:
• If you have a separate word clock generator—slave the sync/signal source device
and the VS-2480 to the generator’s word clock. Set the VS-2480’s MASTER
CLOCK parameter to WORD CLOCK.
• If you don’t have a separate word clock generator—use the device to which the
VS-2480 is being synchronized and from which the digital audio is coming as
the master clock source. Set MASTER CLOCK to EXT TIME CODE.
multiple external devices—use a separate word clock generator and slave all of your
devices, including the VS-2480, to the generator’s master clock. Set the VS-2480’s
MASTER CLOCK parameter to WORD CLOCK.
Each Roland R-BUS device has its own unique capabilities and setup parameters. The
“Supplemental Information” chapter at the end of this manual explains how to set up
each R-BUS device for use with the VS-2480—these instructions include details on
configuring the devices for the successful transfer of digital audio into the VS-2480.
Designating the Master Clock for Digital Audio Input
When you’re receiving digital input signals from a connected R-BUS device, either
device can serve as the master—be sure to set up the other as a slave.
However, in order for the VS-2480 to successfully receive digital audio from other
external digital audio devices, the VS-2480 should usually be slaved to an external
master clock. Here’s how to set up a successful master/slave digital audio relationship:
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “Proj” appears above F3.
Press F3 (Proj) to view the DIGITAL I/0 parameters.
4.
Press $, if necessary, to select the MASTER CLOCK parameter.
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9—Working with Input Signals
5.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired master word clock source.
When you select:
The master clock comes from:
INT
the VS-2480.
R-BUS1
the device connected to the VS-2480’s R-BUS 1 jack.
R-BUS2
the device connected to the VS-2480’s R-BUS 2 jack.
COAXIAL IN
the device connected to the VS-2480’s COAXIAL IN jack.
OPTICAL IN
the device connected to the VS-2480’s OPTICAL IN jack.
WORD CLOCK
the device connected to the VS-2480’s WORD CLOCK IN jack.
EXT TIME CODE
the device connected to the appropriate jack for the time code
selected as the external sync source on the UTILITY menu’s
SYNC PARAMETER screen (Page 315).
Completing the Master/Slave Setup
Make sure that:
•
•
the device designated as the master clock source uses its internal clock as its timing
reference. On the VS-2480, set MASTER CLOCK to INT in Step 5 on Page 133.
you’ve set all of the slave devices to use the master clock source you’ve selected.
To learn how to configure each external digital device, consult its documentation.
Recording S/P DIF-Format Digital Input Signals
Before you can record signals received by the VS-2480’s coaxial and optical IN jacks,
you have to enable S/P DIF recording on the VS-2480. Here’s how:
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “GLOBAL” appears above F2.
Press F2 (GLOBAL).
If you don’t see the
screen shown here,
press F1 (Param1).
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press ", #, $ and/or % to highlight the CD DIGITAL REC parameter if necessary.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select On.
The “Concerning Copyright” statement appears as a reminder of the laws
governing the digital copying of copyrighted materials. It also presents Roland’s
position on the SCMS digital recording copy-protection protocol.
After reading the statement, press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to suspend
activation of S/P DIF recording.
If you pressed ENTER/YES in Step 6, the VS-2480 licensing agreement appears.
If you agree to the displayed terms, press ENTER/YES. If not, press EXIT/NO to
leave S/P DIF recording disabled.
Since the CD DIGITAL REC parameter is a global parameter, it doesn’t ever need to be
re-set unless you initialize your VS-2480’s system settings (Page 376).
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9—Working with Input Signals
Routing Input Signals to Input Channels
Much of the internal “wiring” through which a signal travels from one place to another
in the VS-2480 is virtual—the signal path is determined by your current settings, not by
permanently placed physical wires. This means that you can route signals from your 16
analog input jacks—or your 16 active digital input connectors (Page 131)—to the input
channels you want. This can save you lots of time un-plugging and re-plugging
cables—this virtual patching system lets you send a signal where you need it to go
without changing a single physical wire.
Patching
Once a signal has been routed to an input channel, you can shape the signal, add
effects to it, and send it to the desired track or tracks for recording. If you wish, you can
send it back out of the VS-2480 to some external device. See Chapter 10 for general
information on using mixer channels. Chapter 11 describes the various channel
parameters and Chapter 12 provides detailed information about using input channels.
To clear all current input-to-input channel routings, press PAGE until “ClrPB” appears
above F2, and then press F2 (ClrPB). To initialize them to their default routings—with
each input connected to the corresponding input channel, and the R-BUS 1 input
connectors routed to Input Channels 17-24—press F1 (IniPB).
Choosing an Input Patching Screen
You can route inputs to input channels on either of two screens:
PATCH BAY screen
ROUTING VIEW screen
This row of boxes shows all
of your analog and digital
input jacks and connectors.
This box shows the
24 input channels.
The lines between the inputs
and input channels are “wires”
that represent connections.
The light-gray arrows at the
left of each screen shows the
direction in which its wires’
signals are flowing.
The above illustrations show the screens as they appear in a newly created project.
Both screens have two pages—see Chapter 23, either of which can be used for routing.
The only difference between the pages are their F button options.
To get to the:
Fast method:
Alternate method:
PATCH BAY screen
1.
1.
Hold SHIFT and press
EZ ROUTING
2.
ROUTING VIEW screen
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
1.
Press F7 on your
keyboard
1.
2.
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Press EZ ROUTING or
F7 on your keyboard.
Press F2 (P.BAY) or F2
on your keyboard
Press EZ ROUTING.
Press F1 (VIEW) if
necessary
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9—Working with Input Signals
How Input Connections Work
Input Channel Perspective
Input routing is done from the input channels’ point of view. You begin by selecting the
desired input channels, and then choose the signals you want to route to them.
Two by Two
In the VS-2480’s virtual patching system, all input jacks, digital input connectors and
input channels are grouped into odd/even pairs:
•
•
When you select input channels, you select an odd/even pair of input channels.
When you choose the signals you want to route into those input channels, you
select an odd/even pair of inputs jacks or connectors.
Though the input and input channel pairs are pre-set and can’t be changed for
patching, each input channel otherwise operates independently unless you’ve linked it
to another input channel (Page 152). You can send any input channel signal to any track.
Patching Input Connections
We’ll use the PATCH BAY screen here for simplicity—you can also perform these steps
on the ROUTING VIEW screen, or use the CH EDIT P.BAY screen (Page 166).
Connecting Input Signals to Input Channels
1.
Go to the PATCH BAY or ROUTING VIEW screen (Page 135), and use ", #, $ and/
or % to highlight the input channels to which you want to route your input signals.
We’ve selected
Input Channels
1 and 2.
2.
(In this illustration,
we’ve cleared all
input-to-input channel
connections for visual
clarity.)
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise. With each tick of the dial, the next pair of
inputs—viewed from left to right—is routed to the selected input channels.
Before an R-BUS 2,
coaxial or optical digital
connector can be routed
to input channels, it
must be activated—see
Page 131.
3.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to route the desired pair of inputs to the input channels.
You can route the same inputs to multiple pairs of input channels—this allows you to
create two different versions of a signal that you can use for different purposes.
4.
136
To break the connection between an input pair and its input channels, turn the
TIME/VALUE dial clockwise until no wires connect them.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
In this chapter, we’ll discuss how to perform basic operations on the mixer. For an
introduction to the VS-2480’s built-in digital mixer, see Chapter 3.
Changing Channels
As described on Page 52, all of the VS-2480’s 64 mixer channels are active and available
at all times.
•
•
24 input channels
8 Aux master channels
•
•
24 track channels
8 FX return channels
The four FADER buttons above the MASTER fader let you choose the type of channels
you want to work with. When you press the appropriate FADER button, the controls of
the 16 physical strips become the controls for the desired group of channels.
PAN / AUX SEND 1-8
AUX
SEND
RATIO
THRESHOLD
ATTACK
RELEASE
LEVEL
Dynamics
FREQ
GAIN
Filter
FREQ
GAIN
EQ Low
FREQ
Q
GAIN
EQ Lo - Mid
FREQ
Q
GAIN
IN 1-16
TRACK STATUS / PHRASE PAD
Channel strips
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
9
10
AUX1MST AUX 2
FX1RTN
FX 2
PRM
EDIT
FREQ
EQ High
EQ Hi - Mid
CH EDIT / SELECT / PHRASE SEQ STATUS / AUTOMIX STATUS
11
12
13
14
15
16
AUX 3
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
AUX 7
AUX 8
FX 3
FX 4
FX 5
FX 6
FX 7
FX 8
(dB)
PHRASE
PAD PLAY
PHRASE
SEQ
IN 17-24
AUX MST
SOLO
MUTE
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
FADER buttons
FX RTN
FADER
MASTER
(dB)
6
6
4
R
4
0
0
4
4
8
8
12
12
18
18
24
24
42
42
L
Switching Between Input, Track, Aux and FX Channels
You can turn the 16 physical channel strips into the channel controls you want with a
single button-press.
Press...
Channel Strips 1-16 control:
Press...
IN 17-24
IN 1-16
Input Channels 1-16
AUX MST
MUTE
SOLO
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
Track Channels 1-16
MASTER
EDIT
FX RTN
V.FADER
...and Channel Strips 1-16 control:
Input Channels 17-24
and Aux Master Channels 1-8
Track Channels 17-24
and FX Return Channels 1-8
When you change what the channel strips control, the motorized channel faders move
to physically reflect their current channels’ level settings.
If you ever get confused about what the channel strips are controlling, just look at the
four FADER buttons—they’ll tell you at a glance what the channel strips are doing.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Channel Selection
When you want to adjust a channel’s parameters, you must first select the channel.
Selecting a Channel for Editing
Using the CH EDIT Buttons
1.
2.
CH
EDIT
button
Press the FADER button that selects the set of channels containing the
channel you want to work with (Page 137).
Press the desired input, track or FX return channel’s CH EDIT button. The
CH EDIT button lights and the channel’s parameters appear onscreen.
An Aux master channel has no parameters to adjust other than its level, which you can
set using its fader.
You can also use your mouse to select any channel from the Channel Pop-Up menu,
described on Page 69.
About the Channel Faders
Each channel strip provides a fader for fine control of its signal level.
Faders are especially helpful when adjusting, or “riding,” signal
levels during an actual recording or mix. (You set up basic recording
levels using the SENS knobs, as described on Page 130.)
RATIO
1
17
The VS-2480’s faders are motorized, so each fader automatically
moves to its channel’s current level setting when you press one of the
FADER buttons to select a new set of channels. When you use
Automix (Chapter 26), the faders move up and down automatically to
reflect automated level changes. And when you load a project, the
faders move to their channels’ most recent level settings.
The faders have markings printed to their left that show the relative
position of each fader in dBs. To the left of the channel strips area,
numbers are printed alongside these markings.
(dB)
R
6
4
0
4
8
Fader
12
18
24
42
L
Position
markings
When a fader is at its 0dB position, it’s neither adding to or subtracting from the level of
its input signal or recorded track. This position is referred to as “unity gain,” since the
signal’s level leaving the fader is the same as it is coming into the fader.
Setting a Fader to Unity Gain and Centering its Panning
The VS-2480 provides a quick shortcut for setting a channel’s fader to its unity gain
position. This procedure also places the channel’s signal to the center stereo position.
After adjusting an input’s SENS knob when setting input levels, set its input channel’s
fader to its unity gain position.
To Reset a Channel’s Fader and Pan
1.
2.
138
Press the desired FADER button.
While holding down CLEAR, press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs
When the channel strips are controlling input, track and FX return channels, the PAN/
AUX SEND 1-8 knobs at the top of the strips can do a variety of things. They can:
•
•
adjust the stereo positioning of the selected channels’ signals.
adjust the dynamics and EQ CH EDIT parameters for a single channel.
The AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button sets the function of the PAN/AUX SEND
1-8 knobs—the button’s color tells you what the knobs are currently
controlling. In addition, the button works with the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX
SEND 1-8 button, allowing you to configure the knobs so that they can:
•
•
AUX
SEND
PRM
EDIT
send each channel’s signal to one of the Aux busses.
control a single parameter of your choosing in each channel.
See Page 140 to learn how the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 button and the
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs interact.
You can set the VS-2480 so its display jumps to the parameter whose value you’re
changing with a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob. Turn on the PAN KNOB AUTO Disp, AUX
KNOB AUTO Disp and PRM KNOB AUTO Disp parameters in the UTILITY menu
(Page 364). If you choose not to do this, don’t be confused by the fact that you may be
changing a setting for a channel that’s not currently being displayed.
Adjusting Stereo Positioning
When the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button is unlit, the 16 PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs set
the stereo positioning—or “panning”—of the 16 currently selected channels except for
the Aux master channels. This lets you quickly set up the panning for all of your
channels without having to individually navigate to each channel’s pan setting.
The PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs adjust the selected channels’ CH EDIT PAN parameter.
You can also set this parameter from the desired channel’s CH EDIT screen.
Activating Knob Control of Channel Panning
1.
If the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button is:
• not lit—the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs are set to control channel panning
• lit red—press the button repeatedly until it’s no longer lit.
• lit green—press the flashing KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX 1-8 button in the
LOCATOR/MARKER/SCENE area of the VS-2480’s top panel.
2.
Turn a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to adjust the corresponding channel’s panning.
Since this feature provides a fast way to get to the pan setting for multiple channels at
once, bear in mind that you may be adjusting the panning of a channel whose
parameters aren’t currently in view on the display.
Setting Dynamics and EQ Parameters for One Channel
When the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button is lit red, each of the 16 PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs adjusts the value of one of the currently selected channel’s dynamics or EQ
parameters (Chapter 11). The parameter each knob adjusts is printed beneath the knob.
This offers the convenience of having a dedicated knob for these important parameters.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Activating Knob Control of Dynamics and EQ Parameters
1.
2.
3.
4.
If the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button is:
• lit red—the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs are set to control the selected channel’s
dynamics and EQ parameters
• not lit—press the button repeatedly until it’s lit red.
• lit green—press the flashing KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX 1-8 button in the
LOCATOR/MARKER/SCENE area of the VS-2480’s top panel.
Activate control of the channel by pressing the FADER button that selects the set of
channels that includes the desired channel.
Press the CH EDIT button for the channel whose parameters you wish to adjust.
Turn the desired PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to adjust a parameter’s value.
While the above steps describe selecting the desired channel after activating the knobs
for channel-parameter control, you can select the channel first if you prefer.
The KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 Button
The KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX SEND 1-8 button—located to the right of
the VS-2480’s numeric keypad—allows you to set the PAN/AUX SEND
1-8 knobs or the channel faders so that you can use them to:
•
•
send each channel’s signal to one of the Aux busses.
adjust the value of a selected channel parameter in any channel.
You can use the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN feature when you want to quickly adjust the
selected Aux send or desired channel parameter for multiple input, track or FX return
channels.
To Set What the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature Controls
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE repeatedly until GLOBAL appears above F2.
Press F2 (GLOBAL).
Press ", #, $ or %, if necessary, to select the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN Sw parameter.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select:
• Knob—to use the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN feature with the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs.
• Fader—to use the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN feature with the channel faders.
Press F6 (EXIT).
This feature works with either the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs or the channel faders—
not both at once. If it’s already turned on when you change the setting of the KNOB/
FDR ASSIGN Sw parameter in Step 5 above, and the switch had previously been set to:
•
•
140
Knob—the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs return to the control of panning or the
currently selected channel’s dynamics and EQ parameters, as determined by the
setting of the AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button (Page 139).
Fader—each fader returns to the control of its channel’s signal level.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
To Turn the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature On and Off
1.
2.
Press KNOB/FDR ASSIGN so that it’s flashing to turn the feature on.
Press KNOB/FDR ASSIGN again—so its indicator light goes out—to turn the
feature off.
Activating Knob or Fader Control of Aux Send Levels
Before you can control a channel’s Aux send level with its PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob,
you have to turn on the channel’s CH EDIT Send Status parameter. For input and track
channels, see Page 152. For FX return channels, see Page 230.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Sw to Knob or Fader to assign the feature to the
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs or the channel faders (Page 140), as desired.
Press the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX 1-8 button in the LOCATOR/MARKER/
SCENE area so that the button’s indicator flashes.
On the keypad, press the number of the Aux bus whose send levels you’d like to
control (1-8). The selected Aux bus’s number lights on the keypad.
Turn a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob or move a channel fader—depending on what
you’ve selected in Step 1—to adjust the corresponding channel’s send to the
selected Aux bus.
Controlling a Parameter of Your Choice
The VS-2480 allows you to assign any CH EDIT parameter to the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs or channel faders so you can quickly adjust its value for all of your channels. This
parameter is referred to as the “USER” parameter, and can be handy in any number of
situations. For example:
•
•
In a recording session in which you’re recording multiple players at once, select
ATT as your USER parameter so that you can move from input to input, adjusting
each input’s level attenuation by turning its PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob.
The fact that you can select any channel parameter as your USER parameter lets
you use the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs or the channel faders as convenient
realtime controllers when you’re recording Automix data (Chapter 26).
Activating Knob or Fader Control of Any Channel Parameter
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Set the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Sw to Knob or Fader to assign the feature to the
PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs or the channel faders (Page 140), as desired.
Press the KNOB/FDR ASSIGN•AUX 1-8 button in the LOCATOR/MARKER/
SCENE area of the VS-2480’s top panel so that it’s flashing.
While holding down SHIFT, press 9•USER on the numeric keypad—this shortcut
takes you directly to the UTILITY menu’s USER parameter.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired USER parameter.
Press F6 (EXIT.)
On the numeric keypad, press 9•USER. Its indicator button lights, and the PAN/
AUX SEND 1-8 knobs or channel faders—depending on what you’ve selected in
Step 1—are now controlling the selected USER parameter.
Your USER parameter choice is stored with each project, so that whenever you’re
working on a project, you can quickly switch the knobs or faders back to the control of
your USER parameter.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
The MASTER Fader
MASTER
The MASTER fader—located at the far right of the channel strip area—
controls the overall level of the main stereo MASTER mix.
(dB)
6
R
4
0
4
While Recording
8
12
18
During recording, you’ll typically listen to this mix, so moving the MASTER
fader affects how loud the overall mix is. It’s a good idea to set it to 0db in this
context, and then use the MONITOR or PHONES knobs to actually set the
listening level.
24
42
L
When you’re recording, the setting of the MASTER fader has no effect on the level of
signal recorded on your tracks—it adjusts the level of the mix you’re listening to.
While Mixing
Since the MASTER fader controls the level of the MASTER mix, its setting is critical in
controlling the overall level of your final mix. When you fade out your mix, you’ll use
the MASTER fader to perform the fadeout.
Automix can memorize a fadeout you perform using the MASTER fader.
The VS-2480’s level meters tell you how loud or soft your overall mix level is. To learn
about metering in the VS-2480, see “Meters Display” on Page 120.
Start your mix by setting the MASTER fader to 0db, and adjust your channels’ levels to
achieve the proper overall level. Once you’re close to finishing your mix, you can move
the MASTER fader to fine-tune the overall level.
Muting and Soloing Channel Signals
There may be times when you’d like to temporarily silence, or “mute,” individual
channels in order to hear your other signals more clearly. Likewise, you may want to
isolate, or “solo,” individual channels so that you can listen to them without hearing
other channels’ signals. While you can always turn track channels on or off by pressing
their TRACK STATUS buttons, the VS-2480 provides two ways for you to more easily
mute and un-mute or solo and un-solo input, track and FX return channels:
•
•
You can turn on a channel’s CH EDIT MUTE or SOLO switch (Chapter 11).
To quickly control the muting or soloing of multiple channels, you can use Mute
mode and Solo mode, respectively.
In both Mute and Solo modes, the CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/
AUTOMIX STATUS buttons are referred to as simply the “SELECT” buttons since they
select the channels that are muted or soloed.
If a channel is both muted and soloed at the same time, the channel’s signal is muted.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Mute Mode
Mute mode lets you mute or un-mute multiple input, track and FX return channels
quickly and easily. After muting the desired channels, you can leave Mute mode with
the channels remaining muted. You can return to Mute mode at any time to un-mute
the silenced channels, or you can turn off their CH EDIT MUTE switches.
Automix can record and play back the muting and un-muting of channels.
Muting Channels in Mute Mode
1.
IN 17-24
SHIFT
While holding down SHIFT, press IN 17-24/AUX MST•MUTE.
+
The channel strips’ SELECT buttons flash. When a channel strip’s
SELECT button is flashing in Mute mode, its signal is not muted.
Press the desired FADER button to select the set of channels
containing the channel you wish to mute.
Press the desired channel’s SELECT button—it lights solidly to show the channel is
muted, and its signal silenced. You can mute as many channels as you wish.
To un-mute a channel, press its SELECT button again. It flashes to show that the
channel’s no longer muted.
To exit Mute mode, hold down SHIFT and press IN 17-24/AUX MST•MUTE.
AUX MST
MUTE
2.
3.
4.
5.
To un-mute all currently muted channels, hold down CLEAR and press IN 17-24/AUX
MST•MUTE.
Solo Mode
In Solo mode, you can quickly isolate individual channels—temporarily silencing all
other channels—so that you can hear them more clearly. After you’ve soloed the
desired channels, you can exit Solo mode and turn to other tasks with the selected
channels remaining soloed. You can return to Solo mode at any time to un-solo the
channels or turn off their CH EDIT SOLO switches.
Soloing Channels in Solo Mode
1.
SHIFT
IN 1-16
While holding down SHIFT, press IN 1-16•SOLO.
+
The channel strips’ SELECT buttons flash. When a channel strip’s
SELECT button is flashing, its signal is not currently soloed.
Press the desired FADER button to select the set of channels
containing the channel you wish to solo.
Press the desired channel’s SELECT button—it lights solidly to show the channel is
now soloed, and all other channels are temporarily silenced. You can solo as many
channels as you like.
To un-solo a channel, press its SELECT button again. It flashes to show that the
channel’s no longer soloed.
To exit Solo mode, hold down SHIFT and press IN 1-16•SOLO.
SOLO
2.
3.
4.
5.
To un-solo all currently soloed channels, hold down CLEAR and press IN 1-16•SOLO.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Scenes
The VS-2480 allows you to save a wide range of current mixer settings as a “scene.” Each
project can contain up to 100 scenes. A scene contains all of your current:
•
•
channel fader positions
MASTER level settings
•
•
channel parameter settings
signal routings
• effect settings
When you save your settings as a scene, you “store” the scene. When you re-install its
settings, you “recall” the scene. You can recall a scene at any time a project isn’t playing.
You can name each scene to help you remember what it contains, and protect
individual channels from having their settings changed when a scene is recalled.
Scenes don’t store your listening levels. Before recalling a scene, make sure that your
MONITOR—and PHONES 1 and/or 2—knobs are set to levels that won’t result in any
nasty surprises. Use these knobs to adjust your listening level after recalling the scene.
Since so much time in any studio is spent setting up and adjusting your settings, scenes
are incredibly convenient, allowing you to try out and save alternate versions of a setup
or mix. In addition, since a scene includes the V. Track CH EDIT parameter that
determines the audio each track is to play, you can actually create and store different
versions of a project, containing different elements—vocal and instrumental
performances, different solos, and so on—that can be recalled instantly.
Scenes are stored in sets called “scene banks,” with each bank containing ten scenes,
numbered from 0 to 9. You can also name each scene to help you identify it.
Basic Scene Operations
LOCATOR / MARKER / SCENE
You can quickly and easily store and recall scenes using the VS-2480’s
numeric keypad when its SCENE•BANK button is lit to show you’re in
Scene mode.
LOCATOR
LO
CATOR
7
8
9
SCENE
BANK
AUX 7
AUX 8
USER
BANK
MARKER
RKER
4
5
6
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
1
2
3
AUX 1
AUX 2
AUX 3
PREVIOUS
PRE
IOUS
0 /-
NEXT
NE
Scenes can be stored and recalled only when a project isn’t currently playing.
You can also perform these tasks from the UTILITY menu (Page 145).
You can use the Scene feature’s Safe mode, and perform scene operations more
carefully and slowly from a list in the SCENE window. See Page 146.
Storing a Scene
1.
2.
3.
144
Press SCENE•BANK if it’s not already lit.
Each scene is stored in a numbered location from 0 to 9, corresponding to the 0-9
buttons on the numeric keypad. When a scene has been stored in a location, the
corresponding number button is lit on the keypad.
Press any 0-9 button on the keypad to store the scene in the corresponding location.
If you’d like to store the scene in a different scene bank, follow the instructions in
“Changing Scene Banks” and press its button in the selected bank.
If a location already contains a scene, and you’d like to store a new scene in its
place, you’ll have to clear the older scene first. See “Clearing a Scene” on Page 145.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
Recalling a Scene
1.
2.
Press SCENE•BANK if it’s not already lit.
If the current scene bank contains the scene you want, press the scene’s lit button
on the keypad. To recall a scene from a different bank, follow the instructions in
“Changing Scene Banks” and then press the scene’s button in the desired bank.
Changing Scene Banks
1.
2.
3.
Press SCENE•BANK if it’s not already lit. If any scenes are stored in the currently
selected scene bank, their buttons light on the numeric keypad.
While holding down SHIFT, press SCENE•BANK. The button for the currently
selected bank lights solidly, and the other keypad buttons flash.
Press 0-9 to select the desired scene bank—if scenes are stored there, their
numbers light on the keypad.
Clearing a Scene
1.
2.
Press SCENE•BANK if it’s not already lit. If you’d like to clear a scene from a
different bank, see the instructions in “Changing Scene Banks” before proceeding.
While holding down CLEAR, press the desired scene’s button on the keypad. The
scene is cleared from that location, and the button’s light turns off.
Leaving Scene Mode
With its default settings, after you store or recall a scene, the VS-2480 reverts to Locator
mode and the numeric keypad goes back to its normal job of recalling locators
(Page 185)—this is intended to help you get right back to navigating your way through
the project. You can change this default behavior if you wish so that Scene mode
remains active—and the SCENE button remains lit—until you manually leave it.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
If you don’t see “GLOBAL” above F2, press PAGE until it you do.
Press F2 (GLOBAL).
If F1 (Param1) isn’t highlighted, press F1 (Param1).
You can set the RETURN TO LOCATE Sw parameter to:
• On—to automatically return to Locate mode after you store or recall a scene.
• Off—so that you return to Locate mode by manually pressing LOCATE.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes.
Editing Scenes
You can edit scenes on the UTILITY menu’s SCENE screen. You can name them, clear
them, store and recall them, and select the channels whose settings are to be recalled.
1.
2.
Press UTILITY and press PAGE repeatedly until “SCENE” appears above F1.
Press F1 (SCENE).
The VS-2480 timestamps each scene when
it’s created, as shown on
this screen.
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3.
Press $ or % or turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired scene. You can:
• Press F1 (NAME) to rename (Page 73) the selected scene.
• Press F2 (CLEAR) to delete the selected scene.
• Press F3 (STORE) to store your current settings as the selected scene.
You can store a new scene by selecting a blank scene location in the list and pressing F3
(STORE).
4.
• Press F4 (RECALL) to recall the selected scene.
• Press F5 (Ch Sel) to protect channels when scenes are recalled—see below.
Press F6 (EXIT) when you’re done to confirm your changes.
Protecting a Channel’s Settings When a Scene is Recalled
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE repeatedly until “SCENE” appears over F1.
Press F1 (SCENE).
Press F5 (CH Sel). The channel-selection box appears.
Each channel is represented by a box. When the box is black, its settings will be
changed when a scene is recalled. When it’s white, they won’t.
Press ", #, $ and/or % to select a channel you want to protect. (In the above
illustration, Input Channel 1 is selected, as shown by the outline around its box.)
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial so the channel’s box turns white to show it’s protected.
Repeat Steps 5 and 6 for any channels you want to protect/ignore.
Press F6 (EXIT) when you’re done.
Scenes in Safe Mode
Scenes are so fast and easy to recall that it’s possible to recall the wrong one, especially
since you normally recall a scene by its number, not its name. The VS-2480 provides a
Safe mode that allows you to work with scenes in a SCENE window that shows each
scene’s number and name. You can also store and clear scenes in Safe mode. While this
is a slower way to work, it provides greater certainty that you’ve got the right scene.
The UTILITY menu’s LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE parameter turns Safe mode on or off—
see Page 364. Its default value is Quick. To turn on Safe mode, select Safe.
Recalling a Scene in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
146
Press SCENE—the SCENE window opens.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired scene is visible.
Enter the scene’s two-digit number on the keypad—
an arrow appears to the left of the scene in the list,
and “Load Scene?” appears in the window.
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10—Using the Digital Mixer
4.
Press ENTER/YES to recall the selected scene and close the window, or just press
EXIT/NO twice to leave the window without recalling a scene.
Storing a Scene in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press SCENE—the SCENE window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired unused scene memory location is
visible.
Enter the memory location’s two-digit number on the
numeric keypad—an arrow appears to the left of the
scene in the list and “Save Scene?” appears in the
window.
Press ENTER/YES to store your current mixer settings in the selected scene
memory location and close the window, or just press EXIT/NO twice to leave the
window without saving the scene.
Clearing a Scene in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press SCENE—the SCENE window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired scene is visible.
Enter the scene’s two-digit number on the numeric
keypad—an arrow appears to the left of the scene in
the list.
Press CLEAR—“Clear Scene?” appears.
Press ENTER/YES to clear the selected scene and close the window, or just press
EXIT/NO three times to leave the window without clearing the scene.
Resetting Mixer Parameters
You can quickly reset most mixer parameters to their default values should you wish to
start over with a “clean slate.”To do this:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “PrmIni” appears above F6.
Press F6 (PrmIni).
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select MIXER.
Press F5 (OK)—a confirmation screen appears.
If you’re sure you want to proceed, press ENTER/YES. To cancel the operation,
press EXIT/NO.
The reset procedure does not initialize all of the mixer’s settings. For example, it
doesn’t delete your scenes, or reset the LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE parameter described
on Page 146.
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11—Input and Track Channel Tools
Input channel and track channels offer almost exactly the same parameters with which
you can shape their signals. This chapter describes these “CH EDIT” parameters,
named for the button you press to view them. They have their own chapter since they’re
the main tools you use to make your input signals and tracks sound the way you want.
Input channel CH EDIT settings affect how a signal will be recorded. Track channel CH
EDIT changes affect only how the hard disk recorder plays a track, and are therefore
less permanent. If you’re not sure about a change you’re thinking of making to a signal
you’re about to record, make the changes in its track channel.
Though this chapter discusses working with the CH EDIT parameters from the CH
EDIT screens, you can also control any CH EDIT parameter using the PAN/AUX 1-8
knobs’ USER feature (Page 141).
FX return channels have their own CH EDIT parameters. However, they’re a bit
different than the CH EDIT parameters discussed here—you can learn about them in
Chapter 17.
Viewing a CH EDIT Screen
CH EDIT
button
To view the CH EDIT parameters for an input channel or track channel:
1.
2.
3.
Press the desired FADER button (Page 137).
Press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button.
To view a specific CH EDIT screen whose F button is currently:
• visible—press the screen’s F button.
• hidden—press PAGE, and then press the screen’s F button.
1
17
Introduction to the CH EDIT Screens
There are six CH EDIT parameter screens for input channels and track channels.
Input channel CH EDIT screens:
Track channel CH EDIT screens:
VIEW
P.BAY
VIEW
ASSIGN
DYN
EQ
DYN
EQ
FX Ins
Surrnd
FX Ins
Surrnd
The two sets of screens are identical except for the input channels’ P.BAY screen and
the track channels’ ASSIGN screen.
How the CH EDIT Screens Are Organized
All of the CH EDIT screens have three sections. The top and bottom sections are always
available as you move from CH EDIT screen to CH EDIT screen. When you select a new
CH EDIT screen, it’s the contents of the middle area that change. This chapter devotes a
section to each CH EDIT screen, or—more precisely—what you’ll find in the middle
section of each screen.
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11—Input and Track Channel Tools
The Top of the CH EDIT Screens
The top of each CH EDIT screen contains elements also found on the Home screen:
6.
5.
1.
7.
8.
9.
2.
3.
4.
This illustration shows the top section of an input channel.
In a track channel, the input peak indicators are replaced
by the selected track’s name.
1. Display Pop-Up
Menu button
2. Current channel
display
3. PAN/AUX SEND
1-8 Knob display
4. Position bar
5. View label
6. Clock
7. Calendar
8. Current time
location display
9. Input peak
indicators
For a detailed description of what’s at the top of a CH EDIT screen, see Chapter 8.
The Bottom of the CH EDIT Screens
At the bottom of the CH EDIT screens you’ll find an F button for each CH EDIT screen.
The buttons are organized into a pair of tabbed layers. Press the PAGE button to toggle
between the two layers.
The input channel tabs
The track channel tabs
The remaining F buttons activate CH EDIT tools available on various CH EDIT screens.
We’ll describe the role of F5 on the VIEW, DYN and EQ screens in the following
sections. F6 turns on the parameter view, described on Page 167.
The CH EDIT Screens
The CH EDIT VIEW Screen
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
14.
11.
12.
19.
15.
16. 17.
18.
20.
This illustration
shows a track
channel CH EDIT
VIEW screen. 1-4
are present only
in track channels
—with input
channels, that
area of the
screen is empty.
21.
To learn about the
CH EDIT VIEW
screen’s CpyPRM
button, see
Page 169.
6.
13.
You can toggle back and forth between the CH EDIT VIEW screen and the last nonCH EDIT screen you were on by repeatedly pressing CH EDIT.
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You can hold down SHIFT as you turn the TIME/VALUE dial to move through
parameter values in fine increments on the CH EDIT VIEW screen.
1. STATUS (track channel only)
The STATUS parameter mirrors the behavior of the TRACK STATUS buttons
(Page 178). Changing a track’s recording or playback status in either place
changes it in both. You can set the parameter to:
•
•
•
PLAY—The track channel’s TRACK STATUS button lights green and any data that’s
been recorded on the track plays back when you press the PLAY transport button
(Page 177).
REC—The TRACK STATUS button flashes red to show that the track is now armed
for recording. To learn how record, see “Recording a New Track” on Page 179.
MUTE—The TRACK STATUS light turns off and the track is silenced.
2. V.Trk (track channel only)
The V.Trk selector allows you to select one of the track’s 16 V-Tracks for recording
and/or playback. To learn about V-Tracks, see Page 87.
You can use this parameter to select the desired V-Track in either of two ways. In both
cases, you start by selecting the V.Trk parameter. Then, you can:
•
•
turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired V-Track.
press the flashing ENTER/YES button to view the V. Trk Pop-Up
window that graphically displays all 16 of the track’s V-Tracks. Each
V-Track appears as a line. If the line is thin, there’s no recorded data
on the V-Track—if it’s thick, there is. Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to
select the desired V-Track and press ENTER/YES to complete the
process and close the window.
Data
No data
You can also select a track channel’s V-Track with your mouse using the Home screen’s
V-Track map. See Page 123.
3. PhrPAD (track channel only)
The PhrPAD (“Phrase Pad”) switch activates or de-activates the track’s phrase
pad. If PhrPAD is turned on, the track’s PHRASE PAD button turns amber to
show it can be played and sequenced when the VS-2480’s Phrase Pad feature is
active (see Chapter 21). Turn PhrPAD off to turn off the track’s phrase pad.
4. PlyMod (track channel only)
PlyMod (“Play Mode”) sets the manner in which track’s phrase pad (Chapter
21) plays its phrase. You can set it to:
•
•
•
Gate—so that the phrase plays for only as long as the PHRASE PAD button is held
down.
Trg (“Trigger”)—so that each press of the PHRASE PAD button toggles the phrase’s
playback on or off.
OneS (“One-Shot”)—so that the phrase restarts and plays in its entirety each time
the PHRASE PAD button is struck.
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5. ChLink
When CHLink (“Channel Link”) is turned on, the current channel becomes
linked to the channel next to it. If the current channel is:
•
•
odd-numbered—it’s linked to the even-numbered channel to its right.
even-numbered—it’s linked to the odd-numbered channel to its left.
When channels are linked, you can change a CH EDIT parameter’s value in both
channels at once by changing it in either of the linked channels. This can be especially
helpful when two channels control the left and right sides of a stereo signal.
When you link input or track channels, each resulting pair of inputs or tracks acts as a
single stereo object during routing, with a single input and output connection point.
When two channels are linked, their PAN and FADER parameters change in
appearance and behave differently. See Page 156 and Page 154, respectively, for more.
When you link two channels, the VS-2480 automatically moves their faders to 0dB, or to
their most recent linked level value. When you unlink a pair of linked channels, both
channels are reset to 0dB.
When channels are linked, you can individually adjust their FADER and PAN settings
on the PRM.V— “parameter view”—screen (Page 167).You can press ENTER/YES when
FADER’s selected to jump to its parameter view.
The F.LINK parameter (Page 155) links only the channels’ faders if you want to retain
individual control of their other parameters.
6. AUX Send Controls 1-8
The AUX Send Controls 1-8 allow you to send a copy of the
channel’s signal to an Aux bus routed to an internal effect or
output jack or connector. There’s a separate pair of controls for
sending the channel’s signal to each of the eight Aux busses.
(To learn more about the Aux sends, see Chapter 15.)
•
•
152
Send Status
Send Level
The Send Status parameter—turns the channel’s send to the Aux bus on or off. Select:
• Off—so that no signal is sent to the Aux bus from the channel.
• Pre or Pst (depending on the Aux bus’s current configuration)—to turn on the send to
the Aux bus from the channel. See below for more details.
The Send Level parameter sets the amount of the channel’s signal to be sent to the
Aux bus. The range is from -∞ to 6 dB.
If the Aux bus is configured as one of a linked pair of
Send Status
Aux busses, its Send Level control changes in
appearance and behavior. It sets the amount of the
channel’s signal to be sent to both linked busses. The
Send Pan knob that appears controls the signal’s
position in the stereo image created by the two linked
Aux busses.
Send Level
Send Pan
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About Aux Send Configuration
In the VS-2480, each Aux bus can accept pre-fader signals from all input and track
channels or post-fader signals from the input and track channels—not a mix of both. An
Aux bus can also be linked with its odd/even partner to form a single stereo send. You
can configure an Aux bus on the MASTER EDIT VIEW screen (Page 207) or from the
CH EDIT VIEW screen as described on Page 207.
To learn about pre- and post-fader Aux sends, see “Pre-Fader and Post-Fader Sends”
on Page 83. For more about linking Aux busses, see “Stereo Aux Busses” on Page 206.
You can also send channel signals to an Aux bus using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs—see “Using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 Knobs” on Page 139.
7. ATT
The ATT (“Attenuation”) parameter allows you to adjust the level of the
signal coming into the channel. If the signal is clipping or sounds distorted,
you can lower the ATT value by as much as -42.0 dB. If the signal is too soft,
you can raise it by up to 6.0 dB.
The ATT parameter can be particularly handy when you’re working with a digital input
signal, since its input level is set by the device producing it. You can adjust its input
channel’s ATT value to place the signal at a proper level (Page 58).
When you’re working with analog input signals, you won’t usually need to change the
ATT setting if you’ve properly set your input levels (Page 130). The same is true if you’ve
recorded your tracks correctly—as described on Page 58. Even so, the ability to adjust
the level of the signal coming into a channel can be handy if the need arises.
8. DYNAMICS
The DYNAMICS section provides an on/off switch that lets you turn
the channel’s dynamics tools on or off from the VIEW screen, and
graphically shows you the current dynamics settings. The channel’s
dynamics parameters are found on its DYN screen (Page 157).
When the DYNAMICS on/off switch is selected, press the flashing
ENTER/YES button to jump directly to the DYN screen.
9. EQ
Dynamics on/off
switch
EQ on/off switch
In the VIEW screen’s EQ section, you can see the channel’s
current EQ settings presented in graphic form, and can turn all
of the channel’s EQ bands on or off with a single switch. Set the
channel’s EQ parameters on its EQ screen (Page 162).
When the EQ on/off switch is selected, press the flashing ENTER/YES button to jump
directly to the EQ screen.
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10. Channel Output Meter
11. Channel Output Meter Pre/Post Switch
The channel output meter shows the level of the channel’s signal as it leaves
the channel. With an input channel, this is particularly important since it
shows the level at which the signal is being sent to a track and recorded—in
essence, it’s the recording level (see Page 179). When you’re creating a mix,
the meter can help you visually keep track of a channel’s level.
Pre/post
switch
The channel output meter pre/post switch allows you to set the channel output meter
so it shows the channel signal’s pre-fader level or post-fader level—it can be set to Pre
(“Pre-fader”) or Pst (“Post-fader”). Most of the time, leave it to set to Pst to show the
channel’s final output level. The Pre setting is useful if you’re using a pre-fader Aux
(Page 152) or Direct bus (Page 156) and want to view the level of the channel’s signal
before it’s sent. Also, if you want to verify that a track has been successfully recorded,
set its track channel meter to Pre—this lets you see the recorded signal level.
12. MIX
When MIX is turned on, the channel’s signal is sent into the VS-2480’s MASTER
mix. When it’s turned off, the signal is not sent into the mix. When you’re mixing, each
track channel’s MIX parameter must be turned on to hear its signal in your mix.
As shipped from the factory, all of the VS-2480’s input and track channels are sent into
the MASTER mix. You may want to remove the input channels from the mix during
recording so that you’re not bothered by unwanted input channel signals as you play
back your recorded tracks. See Page 175.
13. FADER
When you adjust the FADER parameter’s value to raise or lower the output
from the channel, you’re doing the same thing as moving its physical fader—
in fact, if the channel is currently being controlled by the channel strips, you’ll
see the fader move as you adjust the parameter.
When a channel is linked with its odd/even partner (Page 152, Page 155), the
appearance of the FADER parameter changes to a stereo fader to show that
adjusting the parameter’s value changes the level for both linked channels.
You can see the channel’s output level in the channel output meter
(Page 154).
The FADER parameter provides a handy way to change a channel’s output level when
the 16 physical channel strips are controlling other channels.
If a channel is linked (Page 152), you can individually adjust its FADER value by
pressing ENTER/YES when FADER is selected—a pop-up window with a common
stereo fader and individual faders appears. Press ENTER/YES again when you’re done
setting FADER values in the pop-up window.
14. PHASE
Conflicting air-pressure changes produced by two sound waves can result in the
two sounds canceling each other out momentarily—the sounds can disappear
altogether. More typically, a “swirling” effect will be heard. This happens most
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frequently in situations with multiple mics placed close together, as when a drum kit is
being recorded. To fix this, change the PHASE switch value from Nrm (“Normal”) to
Inv (for “Invert”) to reverse the timing, or “phase,” of one or more of the signals until
their sound waves agree and the problem is resolved.
15. GROUP
The VS-2480 provides 16 fader groups, each of which lets you to simultaneously
control the level of a group of input, track and/or FX return channels while maintaining
the volume differences between them. This can be extremely helpful if you’re happy
with the way a group of signals work together, but you need to make all of them louder
or softer. Rather than having to individually adjust each channel’s level, you can assign
them to a fader group and move a single fader to raise or lower their levels as one unit,
preserving the delicate balance you’ve established between them.
To Assign Channels to a Fader Group:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set the individual channels’ levels as desired.
Press CH EDIT for the first channel you want to add to the group and navigate to its
CH EDIT VIEW screen if necessary.
Set GROUP to the number of the fader group you want to use, from 1 to 16.
Repeat Steps 2-4 for the other channels you want to include in the group, using the
same number in Step 3 for each of the channels.
Once the channels have been grouped, you can move any of their faders to
simultaneously raise or lower the levels of all of the group’s channels.
To remove a channel from a group, set its GROUP parameter to OFF.
You can change the level of a channel in a fader group without affecting the group’s
other channels by holding down CLEAR and moving its fader to the desired position.
When you release the CLEAR button, the channel is returned to fader group control.
16. F.LINK
The F.LINK (for “Fader Link”) on/off switch lets you link the faders of odd/even
channel pairs. If the current channel is:
•
•
odd-numbered—its fader is linked with that of the even-numbered channel to its
right.
even-numbered—its fader is linked with that of the odd-numbered channel to its left.
When two channels’ faders are linked, you can move either fader to control the output
level of both channels simultaneously. This can be handy when you want to
simultaneously adjust the levels of two related channels.
When you link two channels’ faders, the VS-2480 automatically sets them both to 0dB,
or to their last linked setting. When you un-link the faders, the faders are reset to 0dB.
When two channels are linked, their FADER parameter changes in appearance and
behaves differently. See Page 154.
The F.LINK parameter differs from the ChLink parameter in that it only links the
channels’ faders. All of their other parameters remain independent of each other.
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17. FX INS
The FX INS display shows the number of any effect that’s been
inserted into the channel’s signal flow(Page 82), or “Off” if there are
no effects inserted in the channel.
Press ENTER/YES to jump to the FX Ins screen to insert an effect on
the channel, or to remove an insert effect. See Page 217.
18. DIR 1-8
Use the DIR 1-8 boxes to assign the channel to any of the eight Direct
busses (Page 208) pre- or post-fader (Page 209).
In this
illustration,
Effect 3 is
inserted in the
channel.
DIR Bus 1 is
selected and
highlighted here.
To assign a channel’s signal to a Direct bus from a CH EDIT VIEW screen:
1.
2.
Select the desired Direct bus box.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial so that its number is highlighted.
Only one channel’s signal can be routed to a Direct bus at a time. When you assign a
channel to a Direct bus, it replaces the channel previously routed to the bus. For a list of
the channels currently routed to the Direct busses, press ENTER/YES. Press EXIT/NO
to close the list.
19. SOLO
Turn SOLO on to quickly isolate the channel by turning off any other channels
whose SOLO switch is not turned on. To solo multiple channels, you’ll find it
quicker to use Solo Mode (Page 143).
When a channel is soloed in Solo Mode, its SOLO switch is automatically turned on.
20. MUTE
Use a channel’s MUTE switch to quickly silence the channel’s signal. To quickly
mute more than one channel, use Mute mode (Page 143).
When a channel is muted in Mute Mode, its MUTE switch is automatically turned on.
21. PAN
The PAN knob sets the channel’s stereo position in the MASTER mix and when
you’re performing a stereo bounce (Page 195). PAN can be set from L63—all the
way to the left—to R63—all the way to the right.
When the channel’s parameters are linked with another channel via the
ChLink parameter, the appearance of the PAN parameter changes to
show the stereo image created by the two linked channels. Adjusting the
PAN parameter’s value shifts their entire stereo image left or right while
maintaining the positions of the two channels relative to each other.
Use the PAN parameter only when the channel’s signal is being sent to a stereo
destination, such as the MASTER mix, a pair of tracks or a pair of outputs.
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The DYN Screen
1.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
2.
Currently selected
type of dynamics
processor
9.
To learn about
the CH EDIT
DYN screen’s
RESET button,
see Page 169.
10.
11.
Each VS-2480 input and track channel has its own dynamics processor that can act as a
compressor, expander or a combination expander/compressor for the channel’s signal.
What is Dynamics Processing?
A dynamics processor—as its name suggests—shapes a signal by responding to
changes in its level. It can help you control extreme fluctuations in volume or
exaggerate them by reducing portions of the signal’s level, or “gain.”
The Basic Mechanics of Dynamics Processing
All dynamics processors respond to the same fundamental information:
•
•
•
•
A threshold level setting tells the processor to start working when the channel’s
signal is at a particular level.
An attack setting tells the processor how quickly it should respond when the signal
hits the threshold level.
A ratio setting tells the processor how much to change the signal’s level.
A release setting tells the processor when to stop changing the signal’s level.
The VS-2480 offers three dynamics processors on the DYN screen. Here’s a description
of each one and how it works.
What’s a Compressor?
A compressor is a device that reduces the difference between the loudest part of a
recording and the softest—what it compresses is the signal’s dynamic range. This can
smooth out volume peaks and can make the signal more manageable.
Compression can also add its own sound to a signal, making it seem tighter and more
professional, since compressors are used so widely on commercial recordings.
When a signal’s level exceeds the threshold setting, the compressor lowers the signal’s
gain—the ratio setting determines by just how much. The attack time sets how quickly
the compressor starts reducing the signal’s level after it crosses the threshold, and the
release time determines how long the compressor keeps working before letting the
signal return to its un-processed level.
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What’s an Expander?
The DYN screen expander is a downward-type expander that exaggerates the
differences between a signal’s loudest parts and its softest parts—it widens, or
“expands,” the signal’s dynamic range. You can use an expander to make unwanted
background noise quieter. An expander can also make a signal’s original dynamic
changes more exciting by making them more pronounced.
An expander can be handy when it’s used as a gating mechanism that makes unwanted
background noise quieter than it is in the original signal.
The expander works by bringing down the level of any signal that falls below the
threshold level setting, making the signal even quieter. The ratio setting determines
how much gain reduction will be applied. The speed at which expansion begins is set
by the attack time, and the release time sets how long expansion lasts before the
signal’s allowed to rise back up to its un-processed level.
What’s an Expander+Compressor?
An expander+compressor—or “compander”—reduces the gain of signal levels that are
both lower and higher than the threshold level. This has the effect of bringing out signal
levels at or near the threshold level while reducing the gain of everything else.
Use an expander+compressor when you want to lower the level of background noise
that’s nearly as loud as the part of the signal you want to keep. Set Threshold so that the
desired portion of the signal is accentuated. Use a slow Attack setting for subtlety.
When a signal falls below the threshold setting, the expander+compressor lowers its
signal, just like an expander. Like a compressor, it also reduces the level of a signal that
exceeds the threshold setting. This has the effect of tapering off the signal’s level as it
gets further away above and below the threshold level. The ratio setting sets how
extreme this tapering will be. The attack settings determines how quickly it will occur,
and the release setting for how long.
An expander+compressor requires a lot of processing power—if you use one on a track
channel, all input channel dynamics processors are de-activated. If you use one on an
input channel, all track channel dynamics processors are de-activated.
1. Dynamics Sw
The Dynamics switch—also visible on the CH EDIT VIEW screen—turns the channel’s
dynamics processor on or off.
2. DYN Type
Select the desired type of dynamics processor by setting the DYN Type switch. Choose:
COMPRESSOR
•
EXPANDER
•
EXP+COMP (expander/compressor).
3. Ratio
The ratio setting determines the strength of the dynamics processing to be
applied to signals as they cross the threshold level (Page 159).
158
For a:
The Ratio parameter sets how much gain reduction will be applied when:
compressor
the signal’s level exceeds the threshold level setting.
expander
the signal’s level falls below the threshold level setting.
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You can set Ratio anywhere from 1.00:1 to ∞:1. The Ratio setting tells you how much a
signal’s level is to be changed by describing how much gain control the processor
would apply to keep a signal 1 dB from the threshold. With a 4.00:1 compressor ratio,
for example, every time a signal exceeds the threshold by 4 db, the compressor reduces
the signal level so that it’s only 1 dB above the threshold. An 8.00:1 compressor ratio
therefore suggests—and requires—twice as much gain reduction to keep the signal
down to the same 1 dB.
The logic of the Ratio setting can be simply stated as: The higher the number to the left
of the colon, the more the dynamics processor reduces the level of the channel’s signal
as it moves beyond the threshold level setting.
When a compressor’s ratio is set to a 10:1 value or higher, the compressor acts as a
“limiter” because it effectively blocks signals from becoming too loud.
As you look for the right compression ratio, start out with a lower value and gradually
increase the Ratio setting until you like what you hear. If the sound of the processor
turning on and off is too obvious—this is called “pumping”—lower the Ratio setting.
4. Threshold
The Threshold value sets the signal level at which the dynamics processor
starts applying gain reduction to the signal. It can be set from -24 dB to 0 dB.
For a:
The Threshold parameter determines the signal level:
compressor
above which the compressor begins to apply gain reduction.
expander
below which the compressor begins to apply gain reduction.
The Threshold value in essence sets how much of the signal will be processed:
•
•
When you’re using a compressor—setting Threshold to lower values means that more
of the signal will be above the threshold and qualify for gain reduction.
When you’re using an expander—setting Threshold to higher values means that more
of the signal will be below the threshold and qualify for gain reduction.
Threshold and Ratio Settings for a Compressor
While all of the DYN screen parameters interact, Threshold and Ratio work together as
arguably the two most fundamental parameters. Here are some guidelines for setting
Threshold and Ratio when you’re using a compressor:
•
•
•
•
For a signal that has just a few level peaks you want to tame, try a 4:1 Ratio value
with a high Threshold setting so that only the loudest levels are compressed.
To compress a singer, start with a 2:1 ratio—and a low Threshold value—and
gradually raise the Ratio value to taste.
To smooth out a bass or tighten a snare, try a middle/low threshold and a 4:1 ratio.
To add sustain to a lead guitar, try a ratio of 8:1 with a low threshold.
Once you’re got Threshold and Ratio working as desired, use the other settings to finetune your dynamics processing.
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5. AutoGain
AutoGain automatically boosts signals whose levels have been lowered by
dynamics processing so that they peak at -6 dB below 0 dB.
AutoGain sets the signal to a maximum of -6 dB in order to leave a bit of headroom for
fast transient volume peaks that occur before the dynamics processor has a chance to
respond.
6. Attack
The Attack parameter—which can be set from 0.0 ms (milliseconds) to 800.0
ms—sets the speed at which gain reduction begins when a signal:
•
•
goes above the threshold when you’re using a compressor.
falls below the threshold level when you’re using an expander.
If you want to make sure your dynamics processor catches even the fastest peaks or
drops in the signal, make the attack fast by setting Attack to a low value. If you’re more
concerned with applying gain reduction to signals that stay above or below the
threshold for longer periods of time—with compression or expansion, respectively—
set Attack to a higher, longer value.
Adjust the setting of the Attack parameter to help soften the audible pumping that can
occur with a high Ratio value.
7. Release
The Release parameter sets how long gain reduction will be applied, and
can be set from 0 to 8000 ms. When your signal has a lot of quick changes in
level, set Release to a high enough value that you don’t hear the dynamics
processor switching on and off constantly. If you’re only interested in
managing a few isolated level changes in a signal, try a shorter, lower value.
Adjust the setting of the Release parameter to help soften the audible pumping that
can occur with a high Ratio value.
8. Level
Dynamics processing often affects the overall level of a signal. Use the Level
parameter to re-adjust the signal’s level as it leaves the dynamics processor.
9. KeyIn
The KeyIn parameter lets you select a different audio source as a
trigger for your dynamics processor—the dynamics processor will
respond to level changes in the KeyIn signal, and apply those changes
to the current channel’s signal.
•
•
For input channels—you can select any input channel’s signal.
For track channels—you can select any track channel’s signal.
To de-activate the KeyIn feature, set the KeyIn parameter to the current channel.
If the channel is linked, you can select a separate KeyIn signal for both linked channels.
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The KeyIn feature can be helpful when the current channel’s signal level fluctuations
aren’t making the dynamics processor react the way you want. If there’s another signal
with stronger dynamic changes that match the timing of those in the channel’s signal,
you can use that other signal to drive the channel’s dynamics processor.
If the signal you’re working with is too steady in level to adequately trigger its
dynamics processor, you can create a copy of the channel’s signal to use just as a KeyIn
signal source—don’t send the copied signal to the main mix or a track. Add
exaggerated EQ (Page 162) to the copy so that its level changes are more dramatic and
can better trigger your dynamics processor. If you’re working with an input channel
signal, you can make your KeyIn copy by assigning the input jack or connector you’re
using to an additional input channel. If you’re working with a track channel signal, you
can record a dummy track with exaggerated EQ for KeyIn use.
You can use KeyIn to set up “ducking,” in which one channel’s signal level is
automatically lowered in response to the presence of a signal in another channel. If
you’re doing spot production, for example, use your voice-over as the KeyIn source for
your music bed—when the voice-over starts, the bed’s level is automatically lowered.
You can also create interesting special effects by using a KeyIn signal whose dynamic
changes don’t match those in the channel’s signal. This lets you impose a new, totally
different set of dynamic changes on the channel’s signal. For example, a KeyIn
percussion sound can make the channel’s signal level go up and down in rhythm.
10. Graphic Dynamics Display
The graphic dynamics display shows you how the dynamics
processor is shaping the level of the channel’s signal. The numbers
at the bottom of the graph represent the signal’s original level, while
the levels on the right show the action of the dynamics processor
with your current settings.
Here’s a simple way to understand the graphic display. Locate your Threshold setting
along the lower edge of the display. If you’re using a compressor, you can see how the
compressor shapes your signal’s level to the right of the threshold. An expander’s effect
is shown to the left of the threshold. With an expander/compressor, both sides of the
threshold show the processor’s effect.
11. IN/OUT/GR Meters
The DYN screen provides three meters that let you see what the channel’s
dynamics processor is doing to its signal at any given moment. The:
•
•
•
IN meter—shows the signal’s original level coming into the dynamics
processor.
OUT meter—shows the signal’s level coming out of the dynamics processor.
GR (Gain Reduction) meter—shows the amount of gain reduction being applied.
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The EQ Screen
1.
2.
4.
3.
To learn about
the CH EDIT EQ
screen’s RESET
button, see
Page 169.
9.
5.
Knob labels
6.
7.
8.
What Is EQ?
A sound wave is a repeating change in air pressure that your ear perceives as a sound.
The sound wave changes over and over between its least amount of air pressure and its
greatest very quickly—many, many times per second. The number of times it repeats
this cycle in each second is called its “frequency.” Frequencies are measured by single
cycles (called “Hertz” or “Hz”), or by thousands of cycles (“kilohertz” or “kHz”). A lowfrequency sound wave repeats its cycle fewer times per second than a high-frequency
sound wave.
What’s important about this is that a sound wave’s frequency determines its pitch.
In fact, every sound you hear is made up of a mix of sound waves that occur so close
together in time that the ear perceives them as one single sound. Each of these sound
waves is occurring at its own frequency, of course. This means that every sound you
hear is comprised of sound waves at a variety of pitches and at different volumes, all
working together to create a single complex sound. The low-frequency sound waves
make up its bass, while the high-frequency sound waves make up its treble range.
EQ, or “equalization,” allows you to raise or lower the volume of specific sound waves
within a sound, identifying the sound waves by their frequencies. By raising or
lowering the volume of specific frequencies within a sound, you can change its
character, making it brighter or warmer, harsher or sweeter. You can lower the volume
of any frequencies you don’t like in a sound, or make other frequencies louder.
There are two basic types of devices that can manipulate a signal’s frequency content:
equalizers and filters. The VS-2480 provides both.
A device that performs equalization is called an “equalizer,” or simply “EQ” for short.
Some equalizers divide up a signal into specific frequency ranges, or “bands,” with a set
of controls assigned to each band. A low band EQ adjusts the levels of bass frequencies,
while a high band EQ operates on the treble content in a signal.
A filter reduces the level of specified frequencies within a signal by a pre-set amount.
The EQ screen filter can also boost the level of the selected frequencies under certain
circumstances, as we’ll see.
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The Basic Mechanics of an Equalizer
All EQs use the same basic devices to do what they do. They all contain a:
•
•
frequency selector—that allows you to select the desired frequency range by selecting
the frequency at its center, sometimes called the “center frequency.”
gain control—that lets you turn the selected frequencies up or down in volume.
“Parametric” EQs also offer a Q, or bandwidth, control. This control lets you set the
width of the affected range of frequencies below and above the center frequency.
You can find a frequency by turning up the EQ’s gain and sweeping through the
frequency values until you hear what you want. If you’re using a parametric EQ, lower
the Q. Once you’ve found the frequency, set the gain and Q as desired.
Here’s an EQ tip: Set the gain control so that the sound changes the way you want it to,
and then back off a little. This simple trick can really improve your EQ.
The Basic Mechanics of a Filter
There are several ways a filter can work. It can behave as a:
•
•
•
•
low pass filter—that lowers the volume of all frequency content above a specified
frequency, called the “cutoff frequency.” It’s a “low pass” filter because it lets all
frequencies that are lower than the specified frequency pass through unaffected.
high pass filter—that lowers the volume of all frequency content below the specified
cutoff frequency. It’s called a “high pass” filter because it lets all frequencies that
are higher than the specified frequency pass through unaffected.
band pass filter—that only allows the selected band of frequencies to pass through
unaffected, lowering the level of all other frequency content below and above the
selected range of frequencies.
band eliminate filter—that reduces the level of the selected range of frequencies.
The EQ Screen Frequency-Based Tools
The EQ screen provides a set of tools with which you can alter the frequency content of
the channel’s signal: a filter and four bands of equalization.
F
Q
G
G
G
G
F
F
F
F
Q
Q
G=gain control; F=frequency selector
This tool:
Offers these controls:
Filter
configuration switch, frequency selector, Q control
Low Band EQ
gain control and frequency selector
Lo-Mid Band EQ
gain control, frequency selector, Q control
Hi-Mid Band EQ
gain control, frequency selector and Q control
High Band EQ
gain control and frequency selector
The channel signal flows through the EQ screen from top to bottom in the chart above,
or left-to-right onscreen.
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1. EQ Sw
The EQ Sw (“EQ Switch”) parameter turns the CH EDIT EQ on and off.
2. ATT
The EQ screen provides easy access to the ATT parameter that also appears
on the CH EDIT VIEW screen. See Page 153.
3. EQ Meters
There are two meters on the EQ screen:
•
•
The IN meter shows you the level of the signal as it enters the EQ screen.
The OUT meter shows you the signal’s level as it leaves the EQ screen.
4. Interactive EQ Display
The interactive EQ display shows you the settings of the four EQs. Each equalizer is
represented by a triangle.
Lo-Mid band Hi-Mid band
High band
The dotted vertical
lines help you see
where you are as
you drag a triangle.
Gain
Low band
Frequency
You can change a band’s gain and frequency values with your mouse by dragging its
triangle:
•
•
left or right to lower or raise, respectively, change its frequency.
down or up to lower or raise, respectively, its gain.
5. Filter
The role of each filter parameter changes depending on the filter’s
configuration, as set by the value of the Filter Sw parameter.
164
Filter Sw value:
Sets the filter so that it:
Frequency selector:
Q:
Off
is turned off
does nothing
does nothing
LPF
(low pass filter)
reduces the level of
frequencies above the
cutoff frequency
sets the cutoff
frequency
sets the
steepness of the
filter
HPF
(high pass
filter)
reduces the level of
frequencies below the
cutoff frequency
sets the cutoff
frequency
sets the
steepness of the
filter
BPF
(band pass
filter)
reduces the level of
frequencies outside the
selected frequency range
sets the center
frequency
sets the width
of the frequency
range
BEF
(band
eliminate filter)
reduces the level of
frequencies within the
selected frequency range
sets the center
frequency
sets the width
of the frequency
range
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11—Input and Track Channel Tools
The filter frequency selector can be set anywhere from 20 Hz to 20.0kHz. The Q setting
can be set to any value from .36 to 16.0. Higher Q values result in a steeper filter slope—
in the low and high pass configurations—and a narrower bandwidth in the band pass
and band eliminate configurations.
You can actually use the filter to raise the level of the selected frequencies by setting its
Q to a .90 or higher value.
6. Low Band EQ
The Low EQ band operates on all frequencies below the selected
frequency. It has a:
•
•
frequency selector—that sets the center frequency, from 20 Hz to 1.00 kHz.
gain control—that raises or lowers the level of the selected frequency range. It can
be set anywhere from -15.0 dB to 15 dB.
The low band EQ is a shelving-type EQ that affects the level of all frequencies below
the selected frequency, as well as a narrow range of frequencies slightly above it. As
such, it requires no Q setting.
7. Lo-Mid Band EQ
The Lo-Mid EQ band is a parametric EQ that contains a:
•
•
•
frequency selector—that sets the center frequency, from 20 Hz to 20.0 kHz.
gain control—that raises or lowers the level of the selected frequency
range. It can be set anywhere from -15.0 dB to 15 dB.
Q—that sets the width of the affect range of frequencies, from .36 to 16.0.
Although this EQ is called the “Lo-Mid” band, its wide range of frequency values
means that you can use it to adjust the level of any frequencies in a signal, low or high.
8. Hi-Mid Band EQ
The Hi-Mid EQ band is a parametric EQ that contains a:
•
•
•
frequency selector—that sets the center frequency, from 20 Hz to 20.0 kHz.
gain control—that raises or lowers the level of the selected frequency
range. It can be set anywhere from -15.0 dB to 15 dB.
Q—that sets the width of the affect range of frequencies, from .36 to 16.0.
Although this EQ is called the “Hi-Mid” band, its wide range of frequency values
means that you can use it to adjust the level of any frequencies in a signal, high or low.
9. High Band EQ
The high band EQ operates on all frequencies above the selected
frequency. It has a:
•
•
frequency selector—that sets the center frequency, from 1.00 kHz to 20.0 kHz.
gain control—that raises or lowers the level of the selected frequency range. It can
be set anywhere from -15.0 dB to 15 dB.
The high EQ band is a shelving-type EQ that affects the level of all frequencies above
the selected frequency, as well as a narrow range of frequencies slightly beneath it. As
such, it requires no Q setting.
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The FX Ins Screen
The FX Ins (“Effect Insert”) screen is discussed in Chapter 16—see Page 217.
The Surrnd Screen
The Surrnd (“Surround”) screen is described in Chapter 25, on Page 322.
The CH EDIT P.BAY Screen
You can assign an input signal to the current input channel on its CH EDIT P.BAY
screen. This screen operates similarly to the EZ ROUTING P.BAY screen (Page 136),
though without the virtual “wires.”To learn the basics of routing input jacks and digital
connectors to input channels in the VS-2480, see “Digital Input Signals” on Page 131.
To route an input jack or connector to the current input channel on this screen:
•
•
use the cursor buttons to select the desired input pair (Page 136) and turn the TIME
VALUE dial clockwise—each odd or even input highlights to show that it’s routed
to the channel. To disconnect the input, turn the TIME/VALUE dial counterclockwise.
click the desired input pair with your mouse—the corresponding odd or even input
highlights to show that it’s routed to the channel. To disconnect the input, click it
again.
The P.BAY screen makes available only those digital inputs that are currently active
according to the settings of the R-BUS2 COAXIAL SELECT and R-BUS2 OPTICAL
SELECT parameters. These parameters are explained in “Activating R-BUS 2, Coaxial
or Optical Digital Inputs” on Page 131.
Only one input at a time can be routed to an input channel. When you route a new
input to the channel, the previous one is automatically disconnected.
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11—Input and Track Channel Tools
The CH EDIT ASSIGN Screen
The 24 input
channels
Tracks
The eight
FX returns
The eight
Direct Busses
The eight
Aux Busses
On a track channel’s ASSIGN screen, you can route input channel, FX return, Aux bus
and Direct bus signals, or other tracks, to the current channel’s track for recording. The
screen acts like the EZ ROUTING VIEW screen (Page 292), but without virtual “wires.”
To route an input channel’s signal or another track to the current channel’s track:
•
•
use the cursor buttons to select the desired signal source and turn the TIME VALUE
dial clockwise—the selected signal source highlights to show that it’s routed to the
current channel’s track. To disconnect the source, turn the TIME/VALUE dial
counter-clockwise.
click the desired signal source with your mouse—the selected signal source
highlights to show that it’s routed to the current channel’s track. To disconnect the
source, click it again.
You can route as many input channel signals or tracks to the current channel’s track as
you like.
If you select a stereo source—linked input channels, tracks or Aux busses—both linked
signals will be combined and routed into the current channel’s track. If the current
channel’s linked to another channel, the left side of the source signal will go to the oddnumbered track and the right side to the even-numbered track.
Parameter View
Selected channel and
parameter (group)
Parameter
Parameter
The CH EDIT PRM.V (for “Parameter View”) feature allows you to view a selected CH
EDIT parameter in multiple channels at the same time. You can also adjust the
parameter in any of the displayed channels. This can save you time when you need to
adjust the same parameter in a group of channels.
To activate the Parameter View, press F6 (PRM.V) from any CH EDIT screen. On a track
channel’s CH EDIT VIEW screen, however, F6 (PRM.V) is unavailable when the
STATUS parameter is selected—choose another parameter to activate F6 (PRM.V).
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11—Input and Track Channel Tools
To return to the normal CH EDIT display, press F6 (CH.V).
At the bottom of the Parameter View screen is a set of four tabbed layers that contain an
F button for each of the viewable parameters or parameter groups for the current
channel. Press the desired F button. To reveal an F button that’s currently hidden, tap
PAGE until the tabbed layer it’s on appears. There are also F buttons for the DYN and
EQ screens that show all their parameters at once, as described below.
The F2 (Surrnd) button is active only when the UTILITY menu’s SURROUND MIX Sw
parameter (Page 321) is turned on.
At the left side of the screen, you’ll see the displayed parameter’s name. If a group of
related parameters is in view, each is labeled at the left side of the screen.
The Parameter View screen can’t always show all of the channels’ settings for a
parameter at the same time. When all of the channels won’t fit on the screen at once,
you’ll see an arrow pointing to the right at the right-hand side of the screen. You can
press # or click the arrow with your mouse to view the remaining channels, or " to go
back.
In some cases, you’ll see up and down arrows at the left edge of the screen. In general,
these mean that there’s more to see above and/or below the current view—you can
press % or $, or click either arrow with your mouse. What happens when you click one
of the arrows depends on what’s being viewed.
When the PRM.V screen shows:
Use the up and/or down arrows to view:
DYN parameters
the DYN screen’s expander/expander+compressor
parameters, and all of the compressor parameters.
See Page 157. At the top of the PRM.V section of the
display, you’ll see the name of the currently displayed
set of dynamics parameters. When the dynamics
processor is set to compressor, all expander-related
parameters are hidden, and vice versa.
EQ parameters
all of the EQ screen’s parameters. See Page 162.
FXIns parameters
the effect insert settings—and patch name—for each
of the available effects, one at a time. See Page 216. At
the top of the PRM.V section of the display, you’ll see
the name of the currently displayed effect.
AUXSnd parameters
the Aux send settings for each of the eight Aux
busses, one at a time. See Page 152. At the top of the
PRM.V section of the display, you’ll see the name of
the currently displayed Aux send.
If you edit a parameter while in Parameter View, its channel automatically becomes the
currently selected channel.
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Assorted CH EDIT Tools
The CH EDIT VIEW CpyPRM Button
You can copy another input or track channel’s parameter values to the current channel
from the current channel’s CH EDIT VEW screen. To do this:
1.
Press F5 (CpyPRM)—the COPY MIXER PARAMETER dialog opens.
2.
Set the SOURCE Ch parameter to the channel whose parameters you’d like to copy.
You can select any input or track channel.
The COPY TARGET select the parameters you want to copy to the current channel.
3.
Select:
To copy:
ALL
all of the source channel’s parameter settings to the current
channel.
DYNAMICS
all of the source channel’s DYN screen parameter settings to the
current channel.
EQ
all of the source channel’s EQ screen parameter settings to the
current channel.
LEVEL
the source channel’s FADER and Aux send levels to the current
channel.
The CpyPRM feature doesn’t copy the following track-channel-only parameters—
STATUS, V.Trk, PhrPAD, PlyMod.
The DYN and EQ Screen RESET Buttons
There may be times when you’d like to start over with a clean slate as you set up a
channel’s dynamics processing or EQ. To reset all of the parameters on the CH EDIT
DYN and EQ screens, press F5 (RESET).
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12—Working with Input Channels
Introduction to Input Channel Routing
This chapter discusses what to do with an input channel’s signal once you’ve got it
sounding the way you want. If you’d like to learn about:
•
•
•
routing an analog input jack or digital connector to an input channel, see Chapter 9.
using the VS-2480’s digital mixer, see Chapter 10.
shaping each input channel’s signal, see Chapter 11.
You can send an input channel’s signal to:
•
•
•
•
a track in the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder—the most common destination for an input
channel’s signal in the VS-2480. You can route as many signals to the same track as
you want. Once the signal’s been routed to a track, it can be recorded on the track.
the MASTER mix—You’ll want to route an input channel’s signal into the MASTER
mix before you’re ready to send it to a track for recording. You’ll also want to route
input channel signals into the MASTER mix when you’re combining live audio
input signals with recorded tracks in your final mix. This would be the case when
you’re running a MIDI sequencer alongside your recorded VS-2480 tracks.
a Direct bus—on which it can be carried to an internal effect or an output on its way
to an external device such as an external multitrack recorder.
an Aux bus—You can send an input channel’s signal to an Aux bus on which it can
travel to one of the VS-2480’s internal effects, or through an output to an external
device such as a headphone amplifier or an external effect processor.
In the following sections, we’ll discuss how to route input signals to the first three of
these destinations—Chapter 15 discusses how to send signals to the Aux busses.
Routing Linked Stereo Input Channels
When you’re bringing stereo audio into the VS-2480, you can link the input channel
that’s controlling the left side of the stereo image with the input channel that’s
controlling the right side by turning on the CH EDIT ChLink parameter (see Page 152).
When input channels are linked, they act as single object for routing purposes. On
routing screens that show virtual wires, one wire connects both input channels to the
desired destination. You can connected a linked pair of input channels to a single track
or to pair of tracks whose track channels are linked (Page 152)—linked track channels
share a single connection point. If you connect the linked input channels to:
•
•
a single track—both input channels’ signals are combined onto the selected track.
a linked pair of tracks—the left input channel’s signal goes to the odd-numbered
track, and the right input channel’s signal goes to the even-numbered track.
In the same way a linked pair of input channels acts as a single stereo object during
routing, a linked pair of tracks acts as a single stereo destination.
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12—Working with Input Channels
Routing an Input Channel Signal to a Track
When you’ve routed a signal to a track for recording, the signal can be recorded on the
track’s currently selected V-Track. To learn more about V-Tracks, see Page 87.
You can route an input signal to a track in any of three ways in the VS-2480:
•
•
•
You can use the fast and easy Quick Routing mode, described below.
You can route the signal to the track on the EZ ROUTING VIEW screen (Page 174).
You can also route a signal to a track right from within its input channel using the
CH EDIT ASSIGN screen, as described on Page 167.
While the following sections describe routing single input channels and tracks, linked
input channels and tracks behave just like their unlinked counterparts during routing.
You can save any routing you create as an EZ Routing template. See Chapter 23 to learn
about EZ Routing templates.
When an Input Channel is Routed to a Track
When the track is record-enabled or recording—so its TRACK STATUS buttons is
flashing red or lit solidly red—the VS-2480 automatically removes the input channel’s
signal from the MASTER bus. This prevents your hearing the signal through the input
channel and the track’s channel at the same time. When you record, you’ll hear only the
track channel so you know what the track is “hearing” and thus what it’ll record.
As soon as the track is set to play back or turned off—so its TRACK STATUS button is
green or unlit, respectively—the VS-2480 returns the input channel’s signal to the
MASTER bus. If you don’t want to hear the input signal, and don’t want to unplug its
source or lose its fader setting, you can remove it from the mix manually—see Page 175.
Quick-Routing Input Channels to Tracks
Quick Routing begins with the selection of the desired destination track—once you’ve
selected the track, you route the desired signal to it. In Quick Routing mode, the
TRACK STATUS buttons select a destination track and the FADER and SELECT
buttons select the source input channel signals you want to send to the track.
In Quick Routing, the CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/AUTOMIX STATUS
buttons are referred to as simply “SELECT” buttons, since they select source signals.
•
•
•
One FADER button lights solidly to tell you that the SELECT buttons apply to that
group of source channels—it also shows the tracks the TRACK STATUS buttons
control, as explained in the table at the top of the next page.
The TRACK STATUS button for the currently selected track channel solidly lights
to show that its track is the destination track.
The SELECT button for any channel routed to the selected track lights solidly.
All other FADER, SELECT and TRACK STATUS buttons flash. Route each desired
input channel to the track by pressing the input channel’s SELECT button.
You can also route other tracks, Aux busses and FX return channels to tracks using
Quick Routing.
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12—Working with Input Channels
How the FADER Buttons Act in Quick Routing
When you press:
The SELECT buttons route:
Press a TRACK STATUS button to:
IN 1-16
Input Channels 1-16
select Track 1-16 as a destination
IN 17-24
Input Channels 17-24
(& Aux Busses 1-8)
select Track 17-24 as a destination
TR 1-16
Track Channels 1-16
select Track 1-16 as a destination
TR 17-24
Track Channels 17-24
(& FX Returns 1-8)
select Track 17-24 as a destination
To Quick-Route an Input Signal to a Track
1.
2.
Press the FADER button that selects the group of track channels
containing the desired destination track’s channel.
Hold down the desired track channel’s TRACK STATUS button for a
second or so until the QUICK ROUTING screen appears.
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
FX RTN
V.FADER
MASTER
EDIT
In this illustration,
we’ve cleared all
connections for visual
clarity. When you
create a new project,
Input Channels 1-24
are already routed to
Tracks 1-24.
Input
Channels
1-24
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks 1-24
We selected
Track 1. It
flashes to show
it’s selected.
The FADER button you pressed in Step 1 and the TRACK STATUS button you held
down in Step 2 light solidly to show the currently active group of SELECT buttons
and the current destination track. If any channels are already routed to the track,
their SELECT buttons also light solidly.
To clear all of a track’s routings, hold down its TRACK STATUS button and press
CLEAR. To clear all of the QUICK ROUTING screen’s connections, press F4 (AllClr).
3.
4.
Press the FADER button for the set of input channels containing the
one whose signal you want to route to the track.
Press the desired input channel’s SELECT button—a virtual wire
appears on the screen to show the connection you’ve made.
SOLO
IN 17-24
AUX MST
MUTE
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
We pressed
Input Channel
1’s CH EDIT
button
5.
IN 1-16
If you want to break the connection press SELECT again.
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12—Working with Input Channels
6.
7.
8.
9.
To route another signal to the track, repeat Step 3, if necessary, and Step 4.
To select another destination track, press the desired track’s TRACK STATUS
button—it lights solidly to show that it’s now the Quick Routing destination track. If
the track you want isn’t in the current active group of track channels, press the
track’s FADER button and then its TRACK STATUS button.
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 to select the input channel signal you want to send to the
track.
When you’ve finished, press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your routing and leave Quick
Routing mode.
Input Signal Routing on the EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen
1.
Press EZ ROUTING.
Input
channels
1-24
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks
1-24
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
174
In this illustration,
we’ve cleared all
connections for visual
clarity. When you
create a new project,
Input Channels 1-24
are already routed to
Tracks 1-24.
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
If the ROUTING VIEW screen doesn’t appear, and you see “VIEW” above F1, press
F1 (VIEW)—if you don’t see “VIEW” above F1, press PAGE and then F1 (VIEW).
The INPUT MIXER block provides connections for bringing signals into the 24
input channels—at the top of the block—and the outputs from the 24 input
channels at the bottom of the block.
Use ", #, $ and/or % to select the desired input channel’s output along the lower
edge of the INPUT MIXER block. We’ve selected Input Channel 1’s output in the
illustration above.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise—as you turn it, a wire appears that connects
the input channel to one track after another in the RECORDING TRACKS block.
Turn the dial in either direction to select the desired destination track.
To break the connection between an input channel and a track, repeat Steps 3 and
4, and turn the TIME/VALUE dial counter-clockwise until no connections exist.
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12—Working with Input Channels
Input Channel Signals and the Main Mix
Removing Input Channel Signals from the Main Mix
When you create a new project, the VS-2480’s input channels are routed into the
MASTER mix to help ensure that you can easily hear their signals even before you
route them to tracks. Once you have routed them to tracks, and recorded their signals, it
can be a good idea to remove them from the main mix. When you play back your
project, you’ll be able to hear your tracks without also hearing unwanted audio coming
through your input channels.
If you have live mics connected to inputs, you may experience feedback from monitor
speaker or headphone signals leaking into the mics. Taking the input channels out of
the main mix is a good way to avoid this problem.
The idea is to remove the input channel’s signal from the MASTER mix. This method
spares you from having to disconnect the input signal’s source from the VS-2480 or
lowering its input channel fader in case you’ll want to send it back into the mix later on.
Removing Input Signals from the MASTER Mix
Press the desired IN 1-16 or IN 17-24/AUX MST button to select the group of channels
containing the input channel you want to remove from the mix.
1.
2.
3.
Press the desired input channel’s CH EDIT button—the input channel’s CH EDIT
VIEW screen appears.
Turn MIX (Page 154) off.
Press the CH EDIT button for any input channel you’ve routed to a track and turn
its MIX parameter off.
Adding an Input Channel’s Signal to the Main Mix
If you need to add an input channel back into the mix after having
de-activated its send to the MASTER bus, it here’s how.
IN 1-16
Sending an Input Channel’s Signal into the Main Mix
1.
2.
3.
SOLO
IN 17-24
AUX MST
MUTE
Press the desired IN 1-16 or IN 17-24/AUX MST button.
Press the channel’s CH EDIT button.
Turn the channel’s MIX parameter on (Page 154).
Routing an Input Channel Signal to a Direct Bus
To route an input channel’s signal into the MASTER mix:
IN 1-16
1.
2.
3.
Press the desired IN 1-16 or IN 17-24/AUX MST button.
Press the channel’s CH EDIT button.
Turn on the desired Direct bus’s on/off switch (Page 156).
SOLO
IN 17-24
AUX MST
MUTE
To learn about more about Direct busses, see Chapter 15.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
This chapter discusses the mechanics of using the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder—
basically, it’s all about recording and playing back a project. We’ll describe the
recorder’s set of helpful tools for navigating a project and for playing it back in a variety
of ways.
If you’re not clear on what the hard disk recorder is and what it does, see “The Hard
Disk Recorder” on Page 55. To learn the fundamentals of how it records and plays back
audio—and how its built-in hard disk works—see Chapter 6, starting on Page 85.
You can reverse any recording action using the VS-2480’s Undo and Redo features,
described on Page 72.
The Transport Buttons
The Main Transport Buttons
ZERO
STOP
PLAY
REC
STORE
SHUT / EJECT
RESTART
AUTOMIX REC
The most basic tools you have for recording and playing a project—and running the
hard disk recorder—are the transport buttons.
Press:
To:
PLAY
begin playback from the timeline’s current position in the project.
STOP
halt playback at the timeline’s current position.
ZERO
return to Time 00h00m00s00f00, the very beginning of the project.
REC
begin recording any armed tracks, as described on Page 179.
The buttons perform other tasks when SHIFT is held down. STORE is described on
Page 43, SHUT/EJECT and RESTART on Page 80, and AUTOMIX REC in Chapter 26.
Special Transport Buttons
In addition to the main transport buttons, you can jump to the:
•
•
the beginning, or “top,” of the project’s audio—by holding down SHIFT
and pressing PREVIEW TO•PROJECT TOP.
the end of the project’s recorded audio—by holding down SHIFT and
pressing PREVIEW TO•PROJECT END.
SHIFT
+
PROJECT TOP
SHIFT
+
PROJECT END
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The SHUTTLE Ring
TIME / VALUE
SHUTTLE
The outer ring around the TIME VALUE dial is the
SHUTTLE ring. You can use the ring to move quickly:
•
•
back through the project—by turning the ring counterclockwise.
forward through the project—by turning the ring
clockwise.
When you let go of the SHUTTLE ring, it jumps back to its center position.
The farther you turn the SHUTTLE ring, the faster you travel through the project.
When it’s turned about 45 degrees in either direction, you’ll be moving 10 times the
speed of playback; at 80 degrees you’ll be going 40 times the normal playback speed.
-3x
-4x
-10x
-20x
-2x
2x
TIME / VALUE
3x
SHUTTLE
4x
10x
20x
-30x
30x
-40x
40x
If you use the SHUTTLE ring while the project’s playing, the VS-2480 will preview short
snippets of audio at fixed intervals as you move through the project so you can hear
where you are. When you let go of the SHUTTLE ring, normal playback resumes.
The TRACK STATUS Buttons
When the channel strips are controlling the track channels—
when TR 1-16 or TR 17-24 is lit—the TRACK STATUS•PHRASE
PAD buttons act as TRACK STATUS buttons. Each of these
buttons sets the current behavior of its corresponding track.
TRACK
STATUS
button
1
17
How the TRACK STATUS Buttons Work
Each time you press a TRACK STATUS button, you change the current operating mode
of the corresponding track. (We’ll mention some shortcuts for doing this later on.) The
TRACK STATUS button’s color shows you the track’s current state:
178
If the button is:
The track:
Not lit
is turned off. No recording or playback will occur.
Green
is set to play back what’s recorded on the track.
Flashing red
is ready, or “armed,” for recording with simple monitoring
(Page 191).
Flashing red and amber
is armed for recording with dual monitoring (Page 191).
Solidly lit red
the track is in the process of recording.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
Recording
The following section describes the recording of a single mono track. If you’d like to
record stereo audio across a pair of tracks, link their track channels (Page 152) and
follow the steps below.
Before Recording a Track
Select a V-Track
When you record a track, what you’re doing is recording audio on the track’s currently
selected V-Track—to learn what a V-Track is, see Page 87. You can select a V-Track in
either of two ways: on the Home screen’s V-Track map (Page 123) or by setting the
corresponding track channel’s CH EDIT V.Trk parameter (Page 151). In either case,
you’ll want to select the desired V-Track before recording a track.
Set Up Your Routing
Before you can record a signal, you’ve got to get it to the track:
1.
2.
Route the signal to an input channel. To learn how to do this, see Page 135.
Route the input channel’s signal to the track or pair of tracks. See Page 172.
Set Up Your Monitoring and Shape the Signal to Taste
During recording, you’ll typically monitor the MASTER mix. Make sure the MASTER
fader is set as desired and set the track’s channel fader to 0 so you can hear the track.
If you’re sure you want to make permanent changes to the signal’s sound before
recording, use the input channel’s CH EDIT tools (Chapter 11) to do so. Otherwise,
shape its sound using its track channel CH EDIT parameters. Set the input channel’s
fader—and FADER parameter, therefore—to the desired recording level. For tips on
recording levels, see “How Do I Get Good Levels?” on Page 58.
Recording a New Track
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press ZERO to return to the beginning of the project.
Hold down REC and press the track’s TRACK STATUS button. It flashes red to
show that the track is armed and ready to be recorded.
Press REC—it, too, flashes to show that you’re about to record.
Press PLAY—recording starts. REC and the TRACK STATUS button light solid red.
To halt recording the track, press STOP.
If you want to record the track again, repeat Steps 1-5.
To play back the track, press ZERO and then PLAY.
If the RECORD MONITOR PlayRec parameter (Page 191) is set to Source, hold down
STOP and press the TRACK STATUS button before pressing ZERO and PLAY.
If you’ve finished recording a track, make sure that its TRACK SELECT button is green
or unlit before moving on to ensure that you don’t accidentally record over the track.
You can re-record any part of an already recorded track by punching—see Page 191.
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Playback
Basic Playback Procedure
Playing Back Recorded Tracks
1.
Press TR 1-16 and TR 17-24 and make sure that the TRACK STATUS button for any
track you want to play back is lit green.
Here’s a shortcut for setting a TRACK STATUS button to green for playback. Hold
down STOP and press the desired TRACK STATUS button.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bring up the track channel faders for any track you want to hear to the desired
position—or to 0, if you’re not sure—and make sure the MASTER fader is set to 0.
Set your listening level as described on Page 75.
Press ZERO to return to the very beginning of the project, or hold down SHIFT and
press PREVIEW TO to go to the beginning of the project’s recorded audio.
Press PLAY to begin playback.
Press STOP to halt playback.
You can begin playback from anywhere in the project by placing the timeline at the
desired location and hitting PLAY.
Moving Through a Project
You can place the timeline in a variety of ways, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
using the current time location display (Page 126)
the SHUTTLE ring (Page 178)
locators (Page 185)
markers (Page 188)
the position bar (Page 122) found on many of the VS-2480 screens
the Jump feature—see below.
Using Jump
The VS-2480’s Jump feature allows you to quickly move the timeline to any
location in the project:
1.
Press JUMP—a dialog appears showing you the location to which you can jump.
2.
You can select a new desired location in any of few ways. You can:
• use the cursor buttons and the TIME/VALUE dial to select anew destination.
• press NUMERICS (Page 74) and enter the desired location on the keypad.
3.
Press ENTER/YES to move the timeline to the selected location.
If you need to enter a long string of numbers as a Jump destination using the keypad,
select the right-most part of the number on the display first—each digit you enter from
the keypad pushes the other numbers leftward by default. You can change this behavior
by resetting the UTILITY menu’s NUMERICS TYPE parameter. See Page 364.
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Looped Playback
LOOP
You can loop a section of a project so that it plays over and over. This can be
handy when a section needs rehearsal, or when you’re punching a section over
and over as a performance is perfected (see Page 192.)
To use the Loop feature, you must first tell the VS-2480 where you want the looped
section of the project to begin and where you want it to end by setting loop FROM and
TO points, respectively. You can do this in a variety of ways.
You can manually edit the Loop FROM and TO point locations to make their placement
more precise. See Page 182.
Setting Loop Points When a Project Isn’t Playing
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Move the timeline to the beginning of the section to be looped.
Hold down LOOP and press FROM.
Move the timeline to the desired loop end location.
Hold down LOOP and press TO.
If you need to re-set either point, move the timeline to the desired location, hold
down LOOP and press the FROM or TO button.
Setting Loop Points While a Project Is Playing
For this entire process, hold down the LOOP button until instructed otherwise.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Start playback shortly before the location at which you want the loop to start.
Hold down LOOP.
Without releasing LOOP, press TAP at the top of the section you want to loop.
Continue holding down LOOP and press TAP at the end of the section.
Release LOOP.
Setting Loop Points Using Locators
You can learn about locators on Page 185. The following steps presume you’ve already
placed locators at the beginning and end of the section you want to loop.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press LOCATOR—so it’s lit—and select the locator bank containing the locators
you’ve placed at the start and end of the section you want to loop.
Press the locator positioned at the start of the section.
Hold down LOOP and press FROM.
Press the locator positioned at the end of the section.
Hold down LOOP and press TO.
Setting Loop Points Using Markers
Markers are described on Page 188. Before setting your Loop FROM and TO points,
place markers at the beginning and end of the section to be looped.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Move to the marker located at the start of the section.
Hold down LOOP and press FROM.
Move to the marker located at the end of the section.
Hold down LOOP and press TO.
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Editing Loop FROM and TO Points Manually
You can edit, clear and place Loop Punch FROM and TO points on the AUTO PUNCH/
LOOP screen in the UTILITY MENU.
1.
Hold down SHIFT and press LOOP—the AUTO PUNCH/LOOP screen appears.
Loop IN time
Loop OUT time
2.
You can do a few things with your Auto Punch IN and OUT points on this screen:
• You can use the cursor buttons and TIME/VALUE dial, or your mouse, to
change either point’s location by time code or measures and beats.
• You can select FROM or TO on the screen and press F2 (CLEAR) to erase its
current time assignment.
• You can grab the timeline’s current position as a new FROM or TO point. Select
FROM or TO on the screen and click F3 (GetNow).
• You can move the timeline to an FROM or TO location by selecting FROM or
TO on the screen and clicking F4 (GO TO).
Press EXIT when you’re done to confirm your changes.
Activating Looped Playback
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Move the timeline to a location shortly before the section you’ll be looping.
Press LOOP so it’s lit.
Press PLAY—when the VS-2480 reaches the end of the section to be looped—the TO
point—it starts over again at the beginning of the section (the FROM point) and
plays the section over and over again.
Press STOP to halt playback.
To turn looping off, press LOOP so it’s not lit.
Vari Pitch Playback
You can play—and record—a project at different speeds to raise or lower the pitch of its
recordings. There are a few situations in which you might want to do this:
•
•
You might need to record a new track using an instrument that can’t be easily
retuned to your already recorded tracks, such as a piano or organ.
You can record a track at an abnormally slow or fast speed so that when the project
is returned to normal speed, the track sounds sped-up or slowed down as a special
effect.
Audio CDs can only hold audio that’s at a 44.1kHz sample rate. If you plan to burn your
project onto a CD, don’t use Vari Pitch to set the project’s normal playback speed—use
it only during recording.
When you use Vari Pitch playback, the number of available project tracks may decrease.
In addition, the use of Vari Pitch may alter effect delay times and may change the sound
of distortion effects.
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Activating Vari Pitch
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
If you don’t see “PlyRec” above F4, press PAGE until you do.
Press F4 (PlyRec).
Vari Pitch
parameters
4.
5.
6.
Turn VARI PITCH Sw on to activate the Vari Pitch feature—the VS-2480 takes a few
moments to switch to Vari Speed operation.
VARI PITCH sets the project’s playing speed—its default value is the project’s
sample rate. Higher values speed up playback, lower values slow it down.
Set the VARI PITCH parameter from 16.00kHz to 50.00kHz.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes.
Probably the easiest way to calculate the desired VARI PITCH setting is to figure out the
percent of pitch change you need using a tuner, and multiply the project sample rate by
the percentage to arrive at the right VARI PITCH setting.
When Vari Pitch is turned on, a small V appears to the left of the current time in the
VS-2480’s display.
Preview
PREVIEW
TO
THRU
FROM
SCRUB
PROJECT TOP
PROJECT END
The VS-2480’s Preview feature plays a few moments of the project just before and/or
after the timeline’s current position. This can be handy when you’re trying to find the
precise time at which a recorded event occurs when you’re placing locators (Page 185)
or markers (Page 188). You can set the preview length as described on the next page.
There are three PREVIEW buttons. Press:
•
•
•
PREVIEW TO—to play a few moments of the project
leading up to the timeline’s current position.
PREVIEW FROM—to play a few moments of the project
starting at the current position of the timeline.
PREVIEW THRU—is like pressing PREVIEW TO and
FROM one after another. When you press THRU, the
VS-2480 plays a few moments leading up to the timeline,
on through to a few moments after the timeline.
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Timeline
PREVIEW TO
length
PREVIEW FROM
length
PREVIEW TO
PREVIEW FROM
PREVIEW THRU
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Pinpointing an Event with the PREVIEW Buttons
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Position the timeline in the general area of the event you want to pinpoint, noting
its position in the current time location display.
Press PREVIEW TO to see if the preview reaches the event or plays right through it.
If PREVIEW TO doesn’t reach the event, move the timeline forward in time slightly.
If it plays through the event, move the timeline back a little.
Press PREVIEW TO again.
Repeat Steps 2-4 until the preview ends just at the beginning of the event.
Note the timeline’s current position and press PREVIEW FROM.
Make sure that none of the event is being chopped off at the front, and that as soon
as you hit PREVIEW FROM, you hear the event.
Adjust the timeline’s position as necessary, checking it with PREVIEW FROM.
When you’re satisfied that you have the timeline positioned at the moment at
which the event occurs, place a locator or a marker so that you can easily return to
the event as you need to.
In the above instructions, we used both PREVIEW TO and FROM. You may not always
need to use both to find the location you’re looking for.
Setting the PREVIEW TO and FROM Times
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
If “PlyRec” isn’t displayed above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Press F4 (PlyRec).
Press F2 (Param2).
Set PREVIEW TO LENGTH and PREVIEW FROM LENGTH to the desired times,
in tenths of a second, from 1.0 sec to 10.0 sec.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes.
Scrub
SCRUB
When you want to find an audio event with absolutely
microscopic precision—such as when you’re editing
tracks—use the Scrub feature. Scrub plays a tiny piece of
the project quickly over and over so that as you move the
timeline in small increments, you can find precisely what
you’re looking for. You can set Scrub to play before or after
the timeline using the PREVIEW TO or FROM buttons.
You can also set the Scrub length.
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Timeline
Scrub length
Scrub length
Scrub
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Finding an Event with Microscopic Precision Using Scrub
If you’re looking for an event in a single track, you may find it useful to switch to the
wave display’s microscopic view (Page 238) when you’re searching for exact locations
using the Scrub feature, as described below. It’ll let you see what you’re hearing.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press HOME•DISPLAY.
Move the timeline to approximately the location of the event you want to locate.
Select the track containing the event you seek.
Press STOP if the project’s playing back.
Press WAVE DISPLAY to view the track’s audio in a magnified view.
Press PLAY to visually locate the event you’re looking for.
Press SCRUB—you hear the VS-2480 play a short chunk of audio over and over.
Scrub typically plays such a short fragment of audio that you won’t see the timeline
moving in the wave display as it works.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Press PREVIEW TO to set Scrub so that it’s set to play audio leading up to the event.
In the current time location display, underline the subframe time value so you can
move the timeline in tiny time increments.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial slowly to find the timeline position just before the
event.
Press PREVIEW FROM to set Scrub to play from the event and on.
Use the TIME/VALUE dial to set the timeline’s position so that it’s at the very start
of the event.
Press SCRUB again to turn it off.
Place a locator (Page 185) or marker (Page 188) at the timeline’s position—you can
use the locator or marker to move to this spot during track editing.
Setting Scrub Times
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
If “PlyRec” isn’t displayed above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Press F4 (PlyRec).
Press F2 (Param2).
Set SCRUB LENGTH to the desired time, from 25 ms (milliseconds) to 100 ms.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes.
Locators
The VS-2480 can memorize up to 100 locations in a project, allowing you to jump to any
one of them instantly. This makes it easy to quickly get from place to place without
having to slow down to hunt for each section of the project you need to get to. Each
place you want the VS-2480 to remember is stored in its memory as a “locator.”To jump
to that place, recall the locator and the timeline instantly moves to its position in the
project.
Locators are stored in ten locator banks, numbered from 0-9. Each bank can contain up
to 10 locators, also numbered 0-9. You can also name each locator to help remind you
where in the project it’ll take you—see “Editing Locators” on Page 186.
It’s best to use locators to store the locations of sections of your project, as opposed to
the locations of individual audio events. Since locators are so easy to recall, they’re
great for getting around. For places you want to bookmark but don’t plan to visit often,
use markers (Page 188)—you can have up to 1,000 markers in project.
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Basic Locator Operations
LOCATOR / MARKER / SCENE
The following operations take place when the LOCATOR indicator is
lit to signify you’re in Locator mode.
LOCATOR
7
8
9
SCENE
BANK
AUX 7
AUX 8
USER
BANK
MARKER
RKER
4
5
6
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
1
2
3
AUX 1
AUX 2
AUX 3
PREVIOUS
PRE
IOUS
0 /-
NEXT
NE
You can use the Locator feature’s Safe mode to perform locator
operations more carefully from list in a LOCATOR window. See Page 187.
Storing a Locator
You can store locator’s while a project’s playing or when it’s stopped.
1.
2.
3.
Press LOCATOR•BANK if it’s not already lit.
Each locator bank contains 10 memory slots, numbered from 0-9, in which a locator
can be stored. These memory slots correspond to the 0-9 buttons on the numeric
keypad. When a locator’s been stored in a slot, its button lights on the keypad.
Press any 0-9 button on the keypad to store the locator in the corresponding
memory slot. If you’d like to store the locator in a different locator bank, see
“Changing Locator Banks” and press the desired button in the selected bank.
If a memory slot already contains a locator, and you want to store a new locator
there, you’ll have to first clear the older locator. See “Clearing a Locator” below.
Recalling a Locator
1.
2.
Press LOCATOR if it’s not already lit.
If the currently selected locator bank contains the locator you want, press the
locator’s lit button on the keypad. To recall a locator from another bank, follow the
instructions in “Changing Locator Banks” and press its button in the selected bank.
Changing Locator Banks
1.
2.
3.
Press LOCATOR if it’s not already lit. If any locators are stored in the currently
selected locator bank, their buttons light on the numeric keypad.
While holding down SHIFT, press LOCATOR•BANK. The button for the currently
selected bank lights solidly, and the other keypad buttons flash.
Press 0-9 to select the desired locator bank—if locators are stored there, their
numbers light on the keypad.
Clearing a Locator
1.
2.
Press LOCATOR if it’s not already lit. If you’d like to clear a locator from a different
bank, see the instructions in “Changing Locator Banks” first.
While holding down CLEAR, press the desired locator’s button on the keypad. The
locator is cleared from that memory slot, and the button’s light turns off.
Other Locator Operations
Editing Locators
You can edit locators on the UTILITY menu’s LOCATE screen. You can name them,
clear them, create them, change their positions and jump to them from this screen.
1.
2.
3.
186
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE repeatedly until “LOCATE” appears over F5.
Press F5 (LOCATE).
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4.
Press $ or % or turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired locator. You can:
• press F1 (NAME) to rename (Page 73) the selected locator.
• press F2 (CLEAR) to delete the selected locator.
• press F3 (GetNow) to reset the locator to the timeline’s current position.
You can store a new locator at the timeline’s current position by scrolling to an unused
locator line and pressing F3 (GetNow).
5.
• Press F4 (GO TO) to move the timeline to the selected locator’s position.
Press F6 (EXIT) when you’re done to confirm your changes.
Switching Automatically to Locator Mode
You can set the VS-2480 so that it remains in Scene mode after recalling and storing
scenes, or so it automatically returns to Locator mode after either action.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
If you don’t see “GLOBAL” above F2, press PAGE until you do.
Press F2 (GLOBAL).
If F1 (Param1) isn’t highlighted, press F1 (Param1).
You can set the RETURN TO LOCATE Sw parameter to:
• On—to automatically return to Locate mode after you store or recall a scene.
• Off—so that you return to Locate mode by manually pressing LOCATE.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes.
Locators in Safe Mode
If you prefer to work with locators a bit more slowly and carefully, you can use Safe
mode. Safe mode allows you to work with locators in a LOCATOR window that shows
each locator’s number and name. You can also store and clear locators in Safe mode.
While this is a slower way to work, it provides greater certainty that you’ve got the right
locator.
The UTILITY menu’s LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE parameter turns Safe mode on or off—
see Page 364. Its default value is Quick. To turn on Safe mode, select Safe.
Recalling a Locator in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press LOCATOR—the LOCATOR window opens.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired locator is in view.
Enter the locator’s two-digit number on the keypad—
an arrow appears to the left of the locator in the list,
and “Locate? appears in the window.
Press ENTER/YES to recall the selected locator and close the window, or just press
ENTER/NO twice to leave the window without recalling a locator.
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Storing a Locator in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Position the timeline at the desired location on the
project.
Press LOCATOR—the LOCATOR window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired unused locator slot is visible.
Enter the slot’s two-digit number on the numeric
keypad—an arrow appears to the left of the slot in the
list and “Regist Locator?” appears in the window.
Press ENTER/YES to store the timeline’s current position as a new locator and
close the window, or just press EXIT/NO twice to leave the window without
registering the locator.
Clearing a Locator in Safe Mode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press LOCATOR—the LOCATOR window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list
until the desired locator is visible.
Enter the locator’s two-digit number on the numeric
keypad—an arrow appears to the left of the locator in
the list.
Press CLEAR—“Clear Locator?” appears.
Press ENTER/YES to clear the selected locator and close the window, or just press
EXIT/NO three times to leave the window without clearing the locator.
Markers
You can bookmark up to 1,000 locations in a project using markers. Markers are a great
way to keep track of key moments in a project. You can use them to tag edit points
you’ve located using the Preview (Page 183) or Scrub (Page 184) features. You can also
use them to re-order the sections of a project using the Region Arrange feature.
Markers can be named and manually edited.
You can see the last marker the timeline passed in the current time location display. If
there are no markers in the project, the marker area of the display (Page 126) shows
“—.” If the timeline hasn’t yet reached the first of the project’s makers, you see “***.”
We recommend using markers to tag the locations of individual project events, and
using locators (Page 185) to memorize where your project’s sections are since you can
recall locators more quickly than markers. And with 1,000 markers, you won’t use them
all up as quickly as the 100 locators in a project.
When you create an audio CD on the VS-2480 (Chapter 27), you’ll place special CD
track markers to identify the selections on the CD.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
Placing a Marker
You can place a marker when the project is stopped or when it’s playing.
There must be at least 0.1 seconds of time between any two markers.
To Place a Marker
1.
Press TAP to place a marker at the timeline’s current location. The
marker appears as a downward-pointing arrow above the home
screen’s playlist in the location at which you hit TAP.
We’ve placed three
markers, as shown by
the arrows above the
playlist.
How Marker Numbers are Assigned
When a marker is placed, it’s assigned a number—this number serves as the marker’s
name unless you manually edit it (Page 190). A marker’s number reflects its position in
a chronological list of all of the markers in a project. If new markers are placed in the
project, any markers that follow them are renumbered to reflect their new, later
position in the marker list.
Moving the Timeline to a Marker
Using the Locate to Marker Window
You can jump to any marker’s position in the project at any time.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press MARKER—the Locate to Marker window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to place an arrow to the left of
the desired marker—ENTER/YES turns on.
Press ENTER/YES to jump to the marker’s location.
Press EXIT/NO to close the window.
You can also clear a marker from the Clear Marker window, as described on Page 190.
Using PREVIOUS and NEXT
You can jump from one marker to the next, or back using the
PREVIOUS and NEXT buttons:
•
•
Hold down SHIFT and press NEXT—to jump to the next marker in
the project after the timeline’s current position.
Hold down SHIFT and press PREVIOUS—to jump to the last marker
in the project before the timeline’s current position.
SHIFT
NEXT
+
SHIFT
PREVIOUS
+
You can change the behavior of the PREVIOUS and NEXT buttons so you don’t have to
hold SHIFT. As shipped from the factory, they’re set to move from phrase to phrase on
the selected track (Page 239). To change the buttons’ behavior, switch the PREVIOUS/
NEXT Sw Utility menu parameter (Page 363) to MARKER.
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Clearing Markers
In addition to the two methods listed here, you can clear a marker in the UTILITY
menu’s Marker screen, described in “Editing Markers” below.
Clearing a Marker Using PREVIOUS and NEXT
1.
2.
Move to the marker you want to clear using PREVIOUS or NEXT (see Page 189).
Hold down CLEAR and press TAP.
Clearing a Marker in the Clear Marker Window
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press MARKER—the Locate to Marker window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to place an arrow to the left of
the desired marker.
Press CLEAR—the Clear Marker window appears.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select another marker if you
want to.
Press ENTER/YES to clear the selected marker.
Press EXIT/NO to leave the Clear Marker window.
Press EXIT/NO to close the Locate to Marker window.
Clearing All Markers at Once
When you clear all markers, every marker in the project is deleted, including all CD
track markers.
1.
2.
Hold down SHIFT and CLEAR and press TAP. The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you
want to delete all of the project’s markers.
Press ENTER/YES to clear all markers from the project, or EXIT/NO to cancel the
operation.
Editing Markers
The UTILITY menu’s Marker screen provides tools for naming, clearing, resetting or
jumping to any marker.
1.
Hold down SHIFT and press MARKER.
2.
Press $ or % or turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the marker you want to edit.
You can:
• Press F1 (NAME) to rename (Page 73) the selected marker.
• Press F2 (CLEAR) to delete the selected marker.
• Press F3 (GetNow) to reset the marker to the timeline’s current position.
• Press F4 (GO TO) to move the timeline to the selected marker’s position.
Press F6 (EXIT) when you’re done to confirm your changes.
3.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
Punching
You can re-record any section of an already recorded track using a process called
“punching.”The process actually has three stages, each with its own name:
•
•
•
When you start the re-recording, you “punch in.”
The re-recording act itself is called the “punch.”
When you end the re-recording, you’re “punching out.”
On the VS-2480, you can punch manually, or you can pre-set the places in the project
where you’ll punch in and out using the Auto Punch feature. Auto-punching is great
for hands-free punching when you’re recording yourself.
The VS-2480 punches in and out quite quickly, so you can punch even very small pieces
of a track if you’re fast enough. If you’re not, use Auto Punch.
Simple and Dual Monitoring
When you’re punching on a track somewhere other than at the very start of the project,
you’ll typically begin playback just before the section you want to re-record. This lets
you get oriented before recording actually starts. However, you may want to hear either
of two things on the track as you wait for the punch. Would you (or your performers)
prefer to hear the already recorded track or the live input signal?
•
•
If you listen to what’s already on the track, you’ll be able to hear where you are, but
you won’t really be able to warm up or rehearse because you won’t hear yourself.
If you choose instead to listen to the live input signal, you won’t be able to hear the
recording, and may not know exactly where to come in for the punch.
The VS-2480 offers you a few choices. We’ll begin with “simple monitoring.”
With simple monitoring, you can hear either the already recorded audio or the live
input signal, which is called the “source signal” in this context.
•
•
When the project is stopped—so it’s neither recording or playing back—you’ll hear
the source signal.
The RECORD MONITOR parameter on the UTILITY PlayRec screen (Page 367)
determines what you’ll hear before, during and after a punch. If it’s set to:
• Auto—you’ll hear the recorded track before the punch and the source signal as
you record. After you punch-out, you’ll hear the recorded track.
• Source—you’ll hear the source signal before, during and after the punch.
“Dual monitoring” offers an additional option. As you wait for the punch, you can
press the TRACK STATUS button once more—it blinks red and amber, and you hear
the recorded track and the input source before, during and after the punch.
Before You Punch
When you’re re-recording a portion of a track you’ve just recorded, you don’t have to
do anything to prepare your signal for punching. If you’re punching on a track recorded
at an earlier time, do your best to match the original recording’s sound and level.
Decide whether you want to monitor the punch using simple or dual monitoring
(above). If you select simple monitoring, decide if you want to hear the recorded audio
before the punch or your source signal.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
Punching In and Out Manually
If you want to punch something quickly without stopping to set up an auto-punch—
and you’ve got a hand free—you can punch in and out using the transport buttons.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Hold down REC and press the track’s TRACK STATUS button so that it’s flashing
red to arm the track for recording.
Move to a location in the project shortly before the spot where you want to punch
in—pick a place that lets you get your bearings before the punch-in occurs.
Press PLAY.
If you want to dual-monitor the track (Page 191), press the track’s TRACK STATUS
button again—it blinks red and amber and you can hear the recorded track and
your source signal.
When you reach the place at which you want recording to start, press REC—
recording begins and the REC button lights solid red.
To punch out, press REC again when you reach the point at which you want
recording to end.
Auto-Punching
A.PUNCH
The VS-2480’s Auto Punch feature automatically punches in and out at
specified locations in the project. When you use Auto Punch:
•
•
•
You don’t have to bother with manually punching in and out and can concentrate
on what’s being recorded
If you’re recording yourself, you can punch hands-free.
If you’ll be needing to do the same punch over and over until the recorded
performance is just right, Auto Punch ensures that each attempt will occur at
precisely the same location as the last.
You can use Auto Punch together with looped playback (Page 181) to automatically
record multiple takes of the same section as a performance is perfected. Set the loop so
that it starts a measure or two before the punch, and ends a measure or two after it so
that the section plays over and over in a musically sensible way. Make sure LOOP and
A.PUNCH are lit during punching. You can retrieve past takes recorded with this
method from your hard drive using the VS-2480’s Take Manager and New Phrase
features, described in Chapter 19.
An auto-punch begins with the placement of Auto Punch IN and OUT points that tell
the VS-2480 where you want to punch in and where you want to punch out. There are a
few ways different ways you can set these—use whichever method you prefer.
You can manually edit the Auto Punch IN and OUT point locations to make their
placement more precise. See Page 193.
Setting Auto Punch Points When a Project Isn’t Playing
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
192
Move the timeline to the desired punch-in location.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press IN.
Move the timeline to the desired punch-out location.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press OUT.
If you need to re-set either point, move the timeline to the desired location, hold
down A.PUNCH and press the IN or OUT button. You can repeat this as many
times as necessary.
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13—Operating the Hard Disk Recorder
Setting Auto Punch Points While a Project Is Playing
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Start playback shortly before the location at which you want the punch to begin.
Hold down A.PUNCH.
Without releasing A.PUNCH, press TAP at the desired punch-in point.
Continue holding A.PUNCH and press TAP at the desired punch-out location.
Release A.PUNCH.
Setting Auto Punch Points Using Locators
You can learn about locators on Page 185. The following steps presume you’ve already
placed locators at the desired punch-in and -out locations.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press LOCATOR—so it’s lit—and select the locator bank containing the locators
you want to use as punch-in and punch-out points.
Press the locator positioned at the start of the section you want to punch.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press IN.
Press the locator positioned at the end of the section you want to punch.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press OUT.
Setting Auto Punch Points Using Markers
Markers are described on Page 188. Before setting your Auto Punch In and OUT points,
place markers at the desired punch-in and -out locations.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Move to the marker located at the desired punch-in location.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press IN.
Move to the marker positioned at the end of the section you want to punch.
Hold down A.PUNCH and press OUT.
Editing Auto Punch IN and OUT Points Manually
You can edit, clear and place Auto Punch IN and OUT points on the AUTO PUNCH/
LOOP screen in the UTILITY MENU.
1.
Hold down SHIFT and press A.PUNCH—the AUTO PUNCH/LOOP screen
appears.
Auto Punch IN time
Auto Punch OUT time
2.
You can do a few things with your Auto Punch IN and OUT points on this screen:
• You can use the cursor buttons and TIME/VALUE dial, or your mouse, to
change either point’s location by time code or measures and beats.
• You can select IN or OUT on the screen and press F2 (CLEAR) to erase its
current time assignment.
• You can grab the timeline’s current position as a new IN or OUT point. Select
IN or OUT on the screen and click F3 (GetNow).
• You can move the timeline to an IN or OUT location by selecting IN or OUT on
the screen and clicking F4 (GO TO).
Press EXIT when you’re done to confirm your changes.
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Performing an Auto Punch
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
194
Set your Auto Punch IN and OUT points as described above.
Press A.PUNCH so it’s lit.
Move to a convenient location in the project before the location you want to punch.
Press the track’s TRACK STATUS button so it flashes red.
Press REC so it flashes red.
Press PLAY.
If you want to dual-monitor the track (Page 191), press the track’s TRACK STATUS
button again—it blinks red and amber and you can hear the recorded track and
your source signal.
When the timeline reaches the punch-in point recording automatically begins and
the TRACK STATUS and REC buttons light solidly red. When the timeline gets to
the punch-out point, recording automatically stops and the TRACK STATUS and
REC buttons resume flashing.
To turn Auto Punch off, press A.PUNCH so it’s not lit.
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14—Working with Track Channels
The VS-2480’s track channels control the sound of its hard disk recorder’s tracks. When
you’re recording a track, you listen to its source signal through the corresponding track
channel to ensure you’re hearing what the hard disk recorder is capturing. When you
play back a track, you play it through its track channel.
To learn how to:
•
•
•
select a V-Track for playback, see Page 123 and Page 151.
shape a track’s sound, see Chapter 11, starting on Page 149.
add effects to the track’s sound, see Page 213.
In this chapter, we’ll discuss a few things you might want to do with recorded tracks.
We’ll discuss bouncing. We’ll explain how to route a track channel to a Direct bus. We’ll
also provide some guidance on how to prepare your recorded tracks for a final mix.
You might also want to send recorded tracks directly to the VS-2480 outputs and on to
external devices. This topic is discussed on Page 289.
Bouncing
“Bouncing” is the process of submixing
one or more already recorded tracks and
recording that submix onto a new track or
a new pair of tracks. There are many
reasons to bounce:
•
•
•
•
•
Track 3
Track 6
Track 1
Tracks 7 and 8
Track 4
Track 2
Track 5
You bounce when you record your final mix onto your mastering tracks (Page 340).
You might want to combine a group of related tracks—such as a large set of
individually recorded background vocals, or a couple of instruments whose
textures you’re combining—so that you can work with them as a single object when
you create the final mix.
You can make your available effects processing power go farther by bouncing tracks
with their intended effects. Once the tracks and effects have been bounced, you’ll
be free to use the effect processors for other jobs in the final mix.
You might want to create an different-sounding version of a track.
You can compile the best parts of multiple tracks into a single great one by
bouncing their best pieces together.
When you bounce, you copy the bounced tracks, so the original tracks remain safe and
sound unless you manually erase them. You can return to the original tracks if you need
to do the bounce again or to do some editing or re-recording of the original material.
Though we refer to “bouncing tracks” for simplicity’s sake, what you’re really doing
when you bounce is bouncing V-Tracks.
While the following sections describe performing a single bounce, you use the same
methods to perform multiple, separate bounces simultaneously to save time.
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The Mechanics of Bouncing
For most of the things you do with tracks in the VS-2480, you can think of a track in the
hard disk recorder and its corresponding track channel as pretty much the same
thing—the track plays through its track channel, which provides the parameters that
determine how the track will play and sound.
In bouncing, however, it’s important to remember the difference between the two so
you remain clear about what you’re doing. When you bounce, here’s what happens:
•
•
•
•
The hard disk recorder plays one or more tracks through their track channels. We’ll
call these the “source track channels.”
You send the output of the source track channels to a new track, or pair of linked
tracks, on the hard disk recorder we’ll call the “destination track or linked tracks.”
You monitor the destination track or linked tracks through their own track channels
during recording and playback—each of these is a “destination track channel.”
You record the bounce onto the destination track or linked tracks.
Mono and Stereo Bouncing
You can bounce anything you’ve recorded, including single mono tracks or linked
tracks that contain stereo recordings. You can also bounce in mono or stereo:
•
•
To perform a mono bounce—bounce to a single, unlinked track.
To perform a stereo bounce—bounce to a pair of linked tracks (Page 152).
If your tracks are stereo but you bounce in mono, the stereo audio on the original tracks
is combined into mono during the bounce.
Think about your final mix to decide if you should bounce in mono or stereo:
•
•
•
•
•
•
If you’re combining multiple single-track instruments that’ll be positioned in the
same place in the final stereo mix, bounce them in mono.
If you’re bouncing stereo instruments that’ll be positioned together in the mix,
bounce in stereo to retain their stereo imaging.
If you want the bounced tracks to be heard in different left/right locations in the
final mix, bounce in stereo and position them as desired in the bounce.
If you’re bouncing a single-track instrument to add a mono effect, bounce in mono.
If you’re bouncing one or more single-track instruments to add a stereo effect,
bounce in stereo.
If you’re compiling bits and pieces of a mono performance, bounce in mono; if it’s a
stereo performance—of a pianist or a horn section, for example—bounce in stereo.
First Things First
In order to ensure success, perform the bounce in the following order:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
196
If you want to perform a stereo bounce, link the pair of tracks you’ll be bouncing to.
Route the source track channels to the destination track or linked tracks.
Set up your monitoring so that you’re listening to the destination track channel(s).
Create a submix of the source track channels. If you want to add effects, route them
to the destination track or linked tracks (see Chapter 16).
Perform the bounce.
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14—Working with Track Channels
Link the Destination Tracks For a Stereo Bounce
To link the adjacent odd/even tracks on which you’ll be recording a stereo bounce:
1.
2.
3.
Press the FADER button that selects the group of track channels containing those
that correspond to the desired destination tracks.
Press either destination track channel’s CH EDIT button.
Turn ChLink on.
Routing Tracks for a Bounce
To set up track bouncing, you can use any of three methods:
•
•
•
You can use Quick Routing—see below. (For Quick Routing basics, see Page 172.)
You can use the EZ ROUTING VIEW screen, described on Page 198.
You can also use a destination track’s ASSIGN screen, described on Page 167.
Each pair of stereo linked track channels or hard disk recorder tracks appears as a
single stereo object with a single virtual connection wire during routing. Therefore,
when the following sections describe the bouncing of mono source track channels to
mono destination tracks, the steps apply equally to linked source track channels and
linked destination tracks—they act just like their unlinked counterparts when you’re
setting up routing.
You can also include input channels, Aux and Direct busses and FX return channels in a
bounce. When you bounce tracks and live input signals, it’s called a “live bounce.”
You can save any routing you create as an EZ Routing template. See Chapter 23 to learn
about EZ Routing templates.
Quick-Routing a Bounce
1.
2.
Press the FADER button for the group of track channels that contains the channel
that corresponds to the desired destination track.
Hold down the destination track channel’s TRACK STATUS button for a second or
so until the QUICK ROUTING screen appears. (If you’re bouncing in stereo, hold
down either TRACK STATUS button belonging to the destination linked tracks.)
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks 1-24
Track 1 is flashing to
show it’s selected.
Track
Channels
1-24
The FADER button you pressed in Step 1 and the TRACK STATUS button you held
down in Step 2 light solidly to show the currently selected group of SELECT
buttons and the current destination track or linked tracks. If any channels are
already routed to the destination track, their SELECT buttons also light solidly.
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14—Working with Track Channels
To clear all of the current connections to a destination track, hold down its TRACK
STATUS button and press CLEAR. To quickly clear all of the QUICK ROUTING
screen’s connections, press F4 (AllClr).
3.
4.
Press the FADER button for the set of track channels that contains a
source track channel.
Press the source track channel’s SELECT button—a virtual wire
appears on the screen to show the connection you’ve made.
We pressed
Track Channel
5’s SELECT
button
5.
TR 17-24
FX RTN
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
When you’re bouncing
tracks, signal flows up
from the track
channels to the hard
disk recorder tracks.
If you want to break the connection, press SELECT again.
Repeat Step 3, if necessary, and Step 4 for any other tracks you want to bounce.
We pressed the
SELECT buttons
for Track Channels
6 and 7—we’re
now bouncing
Track Channels 5-7
to Track 1 on the
hard disk recorder
6.
TR 1-16
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
When you’re bouncing
tracks, signal flows up
from the track
channels to the hard
disk recorder tracks.
When you’re done, press F6 (EXIT) to confirm the routing and leave Quick Routing.
Setting Up EZ Routing for a Bounce
1.
Press EZ ROUTING.
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks 1-24
Track
channels
1-24
2.
198
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
When you’re bouncing
tracks, signal flows up
from the track
channels to the hard
disk recorder tracks.
If the ROUTING VIEW screen doesn’t appear, and you see “VIEW” above F1, press
F1 (VIEW). If you don’t see “VIEW” above F1, press PAGE and then F1 (VIEW).
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14—Working with Track Channels
3.
4.
5.
Use ", #, $ and/or % to select a source track channel’s output along the upper
edge of the TRACK MIXER block. We’ve selected Track Channel 1’s output in the
illustration on the previous page.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise—as you turn it, a wire appears that connects
the track channel to one track after another in the RECORDING TRACKS block.
Turn the dial in either direction to select the desired destination track.
We’ve selected linked
stereo Tracks 9 and
10 as our destination.
6.
To break the connection between a track channel and a track, repeat Steps 3 and 4,
and turn the TIME/VALUE dial counter-clockwise until no connection exists.
To clear all track-to-track connections, press PAGE until “ClrTrA” appears above F4,
and then press F4 (ClrTrA).
7.
Repeat Steps 3-5 to route other track channels’ outputs to the destination track.
We’ve connected a
combination of mono and
stereo source track channels
to our stereo destination
linked tracks.
Source Tracks 1 and 16 are
mono track channels, and
Track Channels 23 and 24
are linked in stereo.
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14—Working with Track Channels
Listening as You Bounce
When you bounce tracks, it’s important to know what you’re hearing:
•
•
You don’t want to listen directly to the source track channels.
You only want to listen to your destination track channel(s).
By listening only to the destination track channel(s), you can be confident that what you
hear is what you’ll get in the final recorded bounce. The VS-2480 helps you monitor a
bounce properly by removing the source track channels from the MASTER mix when
you arm your destination track or linked tracks for recording.
It’s a good idea to bounce while listening to all of the project’s other track channels.
This’ll give you a better idea hear how the bounce will sound in the final mix.
Listening to the Destination Track Channels
Make sure that:
•
•
the CH EDIT MIX parameter for any destination track channel is turned on.
any destination track channel fader is set to its 0 position. You can adjust the fader’s
position to make the bounce fit into your mix if you need to.
Set Up the Destination Tracks
Arm the destination track or linked tracks for recording in order to listen to the source
track channels through the destination track channel(s) as you mix the bounce.
Record-enable the destination track(s):
1.
Hold down REC and press the destination track’s TRACK STATUS button so that it
flashes red. With linked tracks, press either one’s TRACK STATUS button.
Set RECORD MONITOR so you can hear the bounce as you rehearse its mix:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press UTILITY.
If “PlyRec” doesn’t appear above F4, press PAGE until it does.
Press F4 (PlyRec).
Set RECORD MONITOR to Source so you can hear what you’ll be bouncing as you
play the project. (With this parameter set to Auto, you won’t hear the bounce as the
project’s playing until you actually record the bounce.)
You may want to re-set RECORD MONITOR to Auto when you’re done bouncing. To
learn more about the what RECORD MONITOR parameter does, see Page 191.
Mixing the Bounce
Make sure you’ve set the TRACK STATUS button for each source track so that it’s
green, and that you’ve selected the V-Tracks that contain the audio you want to bounce
(Page 151). Likewise, select the V-Track(s) on which you want to record the bounce in
the destination track or track pair.
Since you’ll be listening to each destination track through its track channel, it’s
important that you set each destination track channel so that it doesn’t color the sound
of the bounce. If it does, you may be fooled into making EQ mistakes or other errors as
you mix together the tracks you’re bouncing. Turn off all EQ, dynamics processing and
Aux sends in each destination track’s channel.
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14—Working with Track Channels
Rehearse the bounce by playing the project a few times, blending together the track
channels you’re bouncing. Use each source track channel’s CH EDIT screens to make
any desired changes to its sound. Adjust its EQ or dynamics processing values as
needed. If you’re bouncing in stereo, pan the source tracks as you want them to be
placed in the final mix. Make any changes you want to make while you still have
individual control of each track channel’s signal—once they’re combined in the bounce,
they’re all locked together. Add any effect you want to use by routing the effect
processor’s output to the destination tracks, and by sending the desired tracks to the
effect using their track channel CH EDIT Aux Send controls (Page 152).
You can use Automix when you bounce. This is handy if you need to make a lot changes
to your source track channel settings during the course of the bounce. See Chapter 26.
Setting the Overall Bounce Level
As you blend your source track channels in the bounce, make sure their combined level
is suitable for recording. You can do this by keeping your eye on the level meter for the
destination track or linked track. You’ll find this meter on the Home screen:
1.
2.
3.
Press HOME•Display.
If necessary, press PAGE until “TR Mix” appears above F3.
Press F3 (TR Mix).
If you’ve got the bounce mix the way you want it but the overall level is too loud, lower
the value of the REC ATT (“Record Attenuate”) parameter:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “OUTPUT” doesn’t appear above F3, press PAGE until it does.
Press F3 (OUTPUT).
Adjust the REC ATT value as necessary.
Once you’ve completed the bounce, re-set REC ATT to -6.0 dB—its default setting—
since this parameter affects all of your hard disk recording levels.
Performing the Bounce
Once you’ve complete the procedures described in the previous section, you’re ready
to actually perform the bounce. Since your destination track or linked tracks are
already armed for recording, all you have to do is:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Press ZERO to return to the beginning of the project. If you’re only bouncing a
section of the project, navigate to a location shortly before that section.
Press REC.
Press PLAY—the bounce is recorded on the destination track or linked tracks.
When the bounce is finished, press STOP.
Hold down STOP and press the TRACK STATUS button for the destination track or
either TRACK STATUS button for linked destination tracks. The TRACK STATUS
button(s) for the destination track or linked tracks turns green.
Turn off the TRACK STATUS buttons for the tracks you’ve bounced so you don’t
hear them along with the destination track or linked tracks as you listen back.
Play back the bounce to make sure it’s satisfactory.
If you need to perform the bounce again, hold down REC and press the destination
track’s TRACK STATUS button so that it flashes red. With linked tracks, press
either one’s TRACK STATUS button. This re-arms the track(s) for recording.
Repeat Steps 1-6.
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You can punch in and out during bouncing just as you can during any other recording.
Punching’s described on Page 191.
Don’t erase you’re original source tracks—that way, you’ll be able to redo the bounce at
a later time if you need to.
Sending a Track Channel’s Signal to a Direct Bus
While you can send a track channel’s signal directly to an output using the track direct
outs (Page 289), doing so requires the disabling of all bus connections to your output
jacks. If you need to send Aux bus signals to outputs—perhaps for headphone mixes—
at the same time as you send your track channel signals there, send each track to an
output using a Direct bus. To learn more about Direct busses, see Chapter 15.
Routing a Track to a Direct Bus
TR 1-16
1.
2.
3.
Press the desired TR 1-16 or TR 17-24/FX RTN button.
Press the desired track channel’s CH EDIT button.
Turn on the desired Direct bus’s on/off switch (Page 156).
TR 17-24
FX RTN
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
To learn about routing a Direct bus to a VS-2480 output, see Chapter 15.
Mixing
The most important place to send a track channel’s signal is, of course, to the MASTER
mix bus when you create your final mix. While a complete discussion of how to mix is
far beyond the scope of the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, here’s a very brief overview of the
process to get you started, since track channel signals—the sound of your recorded
tracks—are the main ingredient of most VS-2480 mixes.
Any discussion of mixing has to mention a mix’s other elements: effects and any live
input signals you’re using. Discussions of these topics can be found in other chapters.
The Mechanics of Mixing
A final mix is nothing more—or less—than the combining of all of the project’s audio
into a single stereo audio signal. That includes your recorded tracks, effects you add to
those recordings and any live input signals (such as MIDI instruments) required to
complete the project’s sound.
If you’ve connected your VS-2480 to a pair of Roland DS-90A or DS-50A Digital
Reference Monitors, you can try out your mix on a variety of different virtual speakers
to make sure your project sounds great wherever it’s played—see “Speaker Modeling”
on Page 225.
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To create the final mix, send all project elements to the stereo MASTER bus.
•
•
•
Recorded tracks—are sent to the MASTER mix from their track channels. If you’ve
inserted effects on any track channels, they go along for the ride as well.
Loop effects—are sent to the MASTER mix from the FX return channels.
Live input signals—are sent to the main mix from the input channels.
Make sure that the CH EDIT MIX parameter (Page 154) for any desired track, FX or
input channel is turned on if you want its signal to be sent to the MASTER bus.
Since you listen to the MASTER bus during most VS-2480 operations, you’re really
already mixing as you balance the levels of your track channels just to make things
sound good as you work. The final mix may only mean a refinement of what you’ve
been listening to all along.
Since track channel EQ and dynamics processing affect only the playback of your
tracks—and don’t alter their actual recordings—why not experiment with the tracks’
sound throughout the recording process? This can give you a great head-start on the
final mix.
During the final mix, you’ll want to:
•
•
•
•
use the track channels’ CH EDIT parameters to make each of the project’s tracks
sound exactly the way you want as you hear them in context with the project’s other
tracks, effects and so on. Adjust EQ settings, levels, panning and dynamics
processing until you’re satisfied.
insert any effects into individual track channels as desired.
send signals from your track channels to any desired internal loop effects
(Page 213), and return the outputs of the effects to the MASTER bus.
If you’re incorporating any live signals, use their input channel CH EDIT
parameters to refine their sound. Apply effects to them as needed.
Take advantage of the VS-2480’s easy-to-use Automix feature. Automix captures
changes you make to your tracks’ settings as you mix, and plays them back at your
command. This lets you build your mix, element-by-element, getting one thing just
right, and then another, taking your time as you craft the perfect mix. To learn about
Automix, see Chapter 26, starting on Page 325.
Once you’ve got everything fed into the MASTER bus, and sounding the way you want,
the mix can be:
•
•
recorded—bounced—down to a pair of mastering tracks for burning onto an audio
CD (see Chapter 27).
sent to any pair of the VS-2480’s analog or digital outputs for recording onto an
external analog or digital device, respectively.
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15—The Aux and Direct Busses
The VS-2480 has two types of multi-purpose busses: Aux busses and Direct busses.
•
•
An Aux bus is a traditional bus. It carries multiple signals to a common destination.
A Direct bus carries just one signal at a time—it’s not a bus in the classic sense.
The eight Aux busses and the eight Direct busses share a chapter in the VS-2480
Owner’s Manual because they serve similar purposes. They can both carry signals to the
VS-2480’s internal effects, to the VS-2480’s outputs or to hard disk recorder tracks. In
this chapter, we’ll discuss both types of busses individually and then offer some
guidance on how to decide which type of bus to use in a variety of situations.
It’s likely you’ll use Aux busses more frequently than Direct busses since Aux busses
have more diverse capabilities:
Feature:
Aux bus:
Direct bus:
Carries multiple signals
Yes
No
Receives signal from pre-or post-fader
Yes
Yes
Has individual send level controls
Yes
(not applicable)
Can be linked in stereo
Yes
No
Master level control
Yes
Yes
Front-panel knob control
Yes
No
However, by taking advantage of your Direct busses, you can leave the Aux busses free
for other jobs that only they can perform.
Aux Busses
Aux Bus Overview
The eight Aux busses, or “Aux sends,” offer a number of useful capabilities:
•
•
•
•
•
They can carry multiple signals at a time.
Each input, track and FX return channel has its own Aux send control that lets you
set how much of the channel’s signal goes to the Aux bus.
You can send signals to an Aux bus pre- or post-fader.
You can link odd/even Aux busses to create a stereo Aux bus and pan signals across
its stereo field.
Each Aux bus has its own master fader for setting its overall level.
When Would You Use an Aux Bus?
Aux—for “Auxiliary”—busses are well-named. Since each Aux bus can carry multiple
signals, they’re useful any time you want to send a group of signals to a common
destination. The most common use for an Aux bus in the VS-2480 is to send signals to
one of the VS-2480’s internal effects. An Aux bus can also carry signals to an external
effect for outboard processing, or to a headphone amplifier for your performers (see
“Creating a Headphone Mix Using an Aux Bus” on Page 211).
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Sending a Signal to an Aux Bus
You can send an input, track or FX return channel’s signal to an Aux bus in two ways:
•
•
Each input, track and FX return channel has a set of CH EDIT AUX send controls
that let you send a copy of the channel’s signal to any of the eight Aux busses. These
controls, and how to use them, are described on Page 206.
In addition, you can send signals from your input, track and FX return channels to a
selected Aux bus using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs. See “Activating Knob or
Fader Control of Aux Send Levels” on Page 141.
You can configure any Aux bus to receive channel signals from before or after a
channel’s fader level control. See Page 207.
Stereo Aux Busses
The VS-2480 allows you to link odd/even pairs of Aux busses so that each pair acts as a
single stereo object. You can send a channel’s signal to a pair of linked Aux busses and
use a panning control to place the signal’s position within the stereo field they create.
This is a great tool when you’re using two Aux busses to create a stereo headphone mix
for performers—when the busses are linked, you’ll have full control of the stereo
imaging in the mix (Page 211). It can also be handy when you’re sending signals to an
internal—or external—effect that has discreet left and right signal paths (see the
algorithm drawings in the VS-2480 Appendices for the structures of its internal effects.)
With linking, an Aux bus is linked to the Aux bus next to it. If the Aux bus is:
•
•
odd-numbered—it’s linked to the even-numbered Aux bus to its right.
even-numbered—it’s linked to the odd-numbered Aux bus to its left.
Each Aux bus’s configuration determines whether or not it’s linked to its odd/even
partner. See “Configuring an Aux Bus” on Page 207.
Aux Bus Levels
As with any other signal, you need to make sure that the Aux bus’s level isn’t too quiet
or loud. Rather than having to return to the individual channels’ AUX send controls to
solve a problem, you can simply adjust the Aux bus’s master level fader.
Metering Aux Bus and Direct Bus Levels
1.
2.
3.
Press HOME•DISPLAY.
If “AUXDIR” isn’t visible above F4, press PAGE until it is.
Press F4 (AUXDIR)—meters for the eight Aux busses appear at the left of the
meters display. Just to their right are meters for the eight Direct busses.
Aux bus
meters
Direct bus
meters
Chapter 8 discusses how the Home screen’s meters work.
For guidelines on setting Aux bus levels, see “How Do I Get Good Levels?” on Page 58.
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Adjusting an Aux Bus’s Master Level
1.
Press IN 17-24/AUX MST button so that the channel strips control Input Channels
17-24 and the Aux master levels.
The eight right-most channel strips—labeled “AUX MST 1-8”—control the master
levels of the eight Aux busses.
Move the AUX MST 1-8 fader to set the master level of the desired Aux bus.
You can also adjust an Aux bus’s master level on its MASTER EDIT screen—see below.
Configuring an Aux Bus
An Aux bus’s configuration determines its behavior. You can set an Aux bus so that:
•
•
it receives each channel’s signal before its fader (“pre-fader”) or after its fader
(“post-fader”). To learn about pre- and post-fader Aux sends, see Page 83.
it’s linked to its odd/even partner. See Page 206.
You can configure an Aux bus in either of two places:
•
•
its MASTER EDIT screen—allowing you to set up all of your Aux busses at once.
a CH EDIT VIEW screen—letting you quickly configure the Aux bus as you set up a
channel’s other parameters.
Configuring an Aux Bus from a MASTER EDIT Screen
1.
While holding down SHIFT, press TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT.
Eight master
control strips for
the eight Aux
busses
2.
3.
Set the Aux bus’s Pre/Pst switch to the desired value.
To link the bus to its odd/even partner, turn its LINK switch on.
You can adjust the Aux bus’s master level by moving the fader
underneath its Pre/Pst and LINK switches—this is the same thing
as moving its Aux master channel fader.
Pre-Pst
switch
LINK
switch
Configuring an Aux Bus from a CH EDIT VIEW Screen
1.
2.
If you’re not already on the CH EDIT VIEW screen for the desired input, track or FX
return channel, press the channel’s CH EDIT button.
Cursor to the desired Aux bus send or click it with your mouse.
ENTER/YES starts to flash to show that further options are available.
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15—The Aux and Direct Busses
3.
Press ENTER/YES—the following dialog box appears.
4.
5.
Select Pre or Pst for the POSITION parameter, as desired.
Turn BUS LINK on or off as desired.
When Aux busses are linked, their controls on the CH EDIT screen change—see
Page 152 for details.
Direct Busses
Here’s what the eight Direct busses can do:
•
•
•
•
They can carry a single signal.
Each input, track and FX return channel has its own Direct bus assignment switch
that lets you send its signal to any Direct bus.
You can send channel signals to a Direct bus pre- or post-fader.
Each Direct bus has a final level control.
When Would You Use a Direct Bus?
Wherever you might use an Aux bus to carry a single signal somewhere, you can just as
easily use a Direct bus—this’ll save your Aux busses for other tasks. You can route a
Direct bus to an internal effect. You can also route it to an output jack (Chapter 22) on its
way to an external device such as an external digital recorder, effect processor or
computer.You can send the VS-2480’s metronome output as a click track to a drummer’s
headphone amp using a Direct bus.
Sending Tracks to Outputs
You can route track channels directly to outputs via the track direct outs (Page 289).
However, when the track direct outs are active, Aux and Direct bus connections to
outputs are de-activated. If you need to use these busses to send signals to outputs,
send your tracks to the desired outputs using Direct busses instead of track direct outs.
External Insert-Like Effects
While you can’t directly insert an external effect into an input, track or FX return
channel, you can use a Direct bus to accomplish much the same result:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
208
Configure a Direct bus so that it accepts the channel’s signal post-fader (Page 209).
Route the Direct bus to a digital output—see Chapter 22 for details.
Connect the input of the external processor—or a computer with an effect plugin—to the digital output to which you’ve routed the Direct out.
Assign the desired input, track or FX return channel to the Direct bus (Page 156).
Turn off the channel’s CH EDIT MIX parameter to remove it from the main mix.
Return the external processor’s—or computer’s—output to one of the VS-2480’s
digital inputs. (See Chapter 9.)
Select the digital input as the VS-2480’s master clock (Page 133).
Activate the digital input if necessary and route it to an input channel (Chapter 9).
Send the input channel’s signal into the MASTER mix or to a track (Chapter 12).
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Sending a Signal to a Direct Bus
Send an input or track channel’s signal to a Direct bus from the channel’s CH EDIT
VIEW screen—see Page 156. Page 229 describes sending an effect to a Direct bus.
When you send an FX return channel’s stereo signal to a Direct bus, its left and right
sides are mixed together in the mono Direct bus.
When you send a channel’s signal to a Direct bus, it’s done using a simple on/off
switch. There’s no separate send level control for sending the signal to a Direct bus.
Direct Bus Levels
While each Direct bus’s level is nominally a carbon copy of the input, track or FX return
channel signal it carries, you can adjust the final level of a Direct bus on its MASTER
EDIT configuration screen, as described in “Configuring a Direct Bus” below. This can
be helpful if you’re sending a channel’s signal somewhere else in addition to the Direct
bus, or to multiple Direct busses.
Metering Direct Bus Levels
You can see each Direct bus’s level on in the AUXDIR meters on the VS-2480’s home
page. See Page 206 to learn how to view these meters.
Configuring a Direct Bus
Each Direct bus can receive signals from an input, track or FX return channel before or
after—pre or post—the channel’s fader level control. Generally, you’ll want to use the
post-fader send, though the pre-fader send can be handy when you’re using a Direct
bus for adding an insert-like external effect to a channel’s signal (Page 208).
1.
While holding down SHIFT, press TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT.
Eight master
control strips for
the eight Direct
busses
2.
3.
Set the Direct bus’s Pre/Pst switch to the desired value.
Adjust the final level parameter at the bottom of its control
strip.
The SRC readout shows the input or track channel signal
currently assigned to the Direct bus.
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Pre-Pst
switch
SRC
channel
Final level control
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Aux Bus/Direct Bus Strategy
Sending Signals to Internal Effects
As shipped from the factory, Aux Busses 1-8 are routed to the VS-2480’s internal effects
so that you can send multiple input, track or FX return channel signals to any internal
effect. However, if you just want to send one signal to an effect—thus freeing up an Aux
bus—you can send it to the effect on a Direct bus.
Routing Aux and Direct Busses to Internal Effects
1.
2.
3.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “EFFECT” doesn’t appear above F4, press PAGE until it does.
Press F4 (EFFECT). The LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN screen appears.
4.
Press " and/or # to select an internal effect.
If the VS8F-2 card required for an effect processor hasn’t been installed in your
VS-2480, the screen shows “No FX Board” for that effect.
5.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the Aux or Direct bus you want to use for
sending signals to the selected effect.
You can change the factory default assignments of Aux Busses 1-8 to Effects 1-8 if some
other arrangement is more convenient for you.
You can route the same Aux or Direct bus to multiple effects in order to save busses.
While those effects will all have the same input levels, you can adjust each effect’s
output level to create the desired balance between the effects.
Sending Signals to External Devices
Both Aux and Direct busses can carry signals to the VS-2480’s outputs on their way to
an external device. Here again, any time you’re sending a single signal, use a Direct bus
so as not to use up your more-powerful Aux busses.
Sending Signals to Tracks
If you wish to, you can route Aux and Direct busses directly to VS-2480 hard disk
recorder tracks. With Aux busses, you can use the same Quick Routing method you use
for input channel signals (Page 172). You can also use EZ Routing (Chapter 23) to route
both Aux and Direct busses to tracks.
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Creating a Headphone Mix Using an Aux Bus
Probably the second most common use of an Aux bus—aside from using it to carry
signals to an internal effect—is to use the bus to carry input and/or track channel
signals to performers’ headphones so they can hear what’s going on during recording.
You can send performers’ live input signals along with already recorded tracks to any
headphone mix you create.
Since you have eight Aux busses in the VS-2480, you can create up to eight separate
mono, or four stereo, headphone mixes for your performers.
To temporarily free up all eight Aux busses for use as headphone mix busses, you can
use your Direct busses to send individual signals to your effects during recording.
To Set Up an Aux Bus Headphone Mix
The following steps describe how to create a stereo headphone mix. If you want to
create a mono mix, skip Steps 1 and 8.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Link the odd/even pair of Aux busses you plan to use, as described on Page 207.
Set either bus’s Pre/Pst switch to Pre—the settings for both Aux busses change.
You’ll want to use a pre-fader send so that you can adjust your individual channel
faders as you record without your performers being distracted by changes you
make. Their pre-fader levels will remain constant as you adjust your faders’
positions.
Route the linked Aux busses to a pair of VS-2480 outputs connected to the stereo
inputs of your external headphone amplifier—Chapter 22 describes output routing.
Press the FADER button that selects the group of input or track channels
containing the first channel you want to include in the headphone mix.
Press the desired input or track channel’s CH EDIT button.
Turn on the channel’s send to the Aux bus by setting its switch to Pre. (See Page 152)
Set the amount of signal you want to send to the headphone mix by adjusting the
send level to the linked Aux busses you’re using.
If you prefer, you can also set your Aux send levels using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8
knobs—see Page 141.
8.
9.
Adjust the stereo placement of the channel’s signal in the headphone mix.
Repeat Steps 4-8 for any other input or track channel signals you want to send to
the headphone mix.
10. Press IN 17-24/AUX MST.
11. Use the Aux bus’s AUX MST 1-8 fader to adjust the headphone mix’s overall level.
You can also use effects in the headphone mix. See “Adding Effects to a Headphone
Mix” on Page 234.
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16—Using Effects
In this chapter, we’ll describe how to use the VS-2480’s effect processing power. We’ll
detail how to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
set up a loop effect.
insert an effect on an input or track channel, or the MASTER bus.
add effects to a headphone mix.
select effects.
edit effects.
save effects.
For the basics on the VS-2480’s effects and why they’re useful, see Chapters 3 and 5.
Using Loop Effects
When you want to add reverb or a delay to your input, track or FX
return signals, use a loop effect. Loop effects add effect processing
to a signal—they don’t replace it—so that you end up with a
combination of the original dry signal and the effect.
The following sections explain how to set up an internal and
external loop effect. Whether you’re recording a loop effect on
tracks or adding them during a mix, the process is the same—the
only difference is where you send the effect’s output signal when
you’re done, as described in Chapter 17, “Working with FX Return
Channels.”
Dry signal
Copy of dry signal
Effect
Dry signal Wet signal
Setting Up an Internal Loop Effect
Play Now, Learn Later
If you’ve just created a new project and would like to quickly start experimenting with
loop effects—and learn about their mechanics later on—you can. When you create a
new project that doesn’t copy the settings of the currently loaded project (Page 96), the
VS-2480 routes Aux Busses 1-8 to Effects 1-8, respectively. Therefore:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press the FADER button that selects the group of channels containing the input or
track channel you want to use.
Press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button.
Use one of the channel’s Aux send controls (Page 152) to send some of the channel’s
signal to the same-numbered effect—use the first set of controls to send the signal
to Effect 1, for example. Try a send level of 0.0 dB as a start.
Press TR 17-24/FX RTN.
Adjust the effect’s level in the MASTER mix using its FX return channel fader
(Page 227).
Select the desired effect—see “Selecting Effect Patches” on Page 221.
Repeat Steps 1-3 for any other input or track channels you want to send into the
effect.
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16—Using Effects
The Mechanics of a Loop Effect
There are six steps to setting up an internal loop effect:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Choose one of the internal effect processors as the one you’ll use.
Route an Aux or Direct bus to the selected effect.
Configure the Aux or Direct bus as desired.
Send signals to the Aux bus or Direct bus, and, as a result, to the effect.
Return the output of the effect to the desired destination.
Select and edit—if necessary—the desired effect patch.
Select the desired patch—and edit it, if necessary—as a last step since you won’t be
able to hear it, and what you’re doing, until the previous steps have been performed.
Choose an Effect Processor
As shipped from the factory, the VS-2480 has two stereo effect processors, Effect 1 and
Effect 2. With three optional VS8F-2s installed, Effects 3-8 become available. Some
algorithms work only with certain processors—see Page 222 for more information.
Route an Aux or Direct Bus to the Selected Effect
By default, the VS-2480’s Aux Busses 1-8 are routed to Effects 1-8, respectively. If you
have no particular reason to change this arrangement, you can skip this step.
You can route any Aux bus or Direct bus to any effect—Page 210 in Chapter 15
describes how to do this.
Configure the Aux or Direct Bus
You’ll need to decide whether you want to send signals from your input, track or FX
return channels to the Aux or Direct bus before or after the channel faders. Unless
you’re planning an unusual effect whose level stays constant as the dry signal level
changes, configure the bus so that it’s set to Pre.
You can link odd/even Aux busses to create a stereo send into an effect. Check out the
algorithm diagram in the VS-2480 Appendices for the effect you want to use to see if
accepts stereo input signals. If it doesn’t, use a single unlinked Aux bus. Most VS-2480
produce stereo effects from a mono input signal.
Page 207 describes how to configure an Aux bus. To learn how configure a Direct bus,
see Page 209.
Send Signals to the Effect
You can send an input, track or FX return channel’s signal to an Aux bus using its PAN/
AUX SEND 1-8 knob, described on Page 139—or by using its CH EDIT Aux send
controls.
Each input, track and FX return channel provides eight sets of CH EDIT Aux send
controls with which you can send the channel’s signal to any of the Aux busses. Each of
the eight modules sends the channel’s signals to the corresponding Aux bus, and
therefore, to the corresponding effect.
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16—Using Effects
To send a channel’s signal to an effect, adjust the Aux send controls for the Aux bus
you’re using:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select the desired channel and press its CH EDIT button to
display its CH EDIT VIEW screen.
Send Status
Turn on the Aux send control’s send status switch by setting
Send Level
it to the available Pre or Pst value.
Set its send level as desired—use 0.0 dB as a starting value.
If you’re using linked Aux busses, adjust the Aux send panning control to place the
channel’s signal in the effect’s stereo field.
Send Status
Send Level
Send Pan
If you’re sending the channel’s signal to an effect on a Direct bus, turn on
the channel’s send to the Direct bus as described on Page 156.
Return the Output of the Effect
The output of each of the eight internal effects has its own channel in the VS-2480’s
digital mixer. These are the eight FX return channels, which are the subject of Chapter
17, starting on Page 227. Their faders set their levels, and each has its own CH EDIT
parameters with which you can control the sound and destination for the
corresponding effect processor.
In a new default project, the eight FX return channels are routed into the MASTER mix.
Select an Effect Patch and Edit It if Necessary
We’ll explain how to do both of these things in “Selecting Effect Patches” on Page 221
and “Editing Effect Patches” on Page 223.
Setting Up an External Loop Effect
You can use an Aux or Direct bus to send a signal to an external effect processor.
Although the effect is produced by an external device, the usual loop effect send-andreturn logic still applies. In fact, a few of the steps are exactly the same:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Route an Aux or Direct bus to the desired analog output jack or digital output
connector—see Page 288 to learn how to assign Aux or Direct busses to outputs.
Configure the Aux or Direct bus as we’ve already described on Page 214.
Send signals to the Aux bus or Direct bus, and, therefore, to the external effect. You
can also learn how to do this on Page 214.
Return the effect processor’s output or outputs to one or two of the VS-2480’s
analog or digital inputs. Chapter 9 describes working with input signals.
Route the input signal(s) to one or two input channels. See Chapter 9.
Send the input channels’ signals to the desired destination as described in Chapter
12.
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16—Using Effects
Inserting an Effect
About Insert Effects
Dry signal
Where They’re Used
Insert effects can be inserted on individual input and track
channels. They can also be inserted on the MASTER bus when you
want to run your entire mix through an effect, such as when you’re
mastering a project’s final mix.
It’s important to budget your insert effect processing power as you
work because an insert effect can only work with one or two signals
at a time:
•
•
Effect
Wet signal
When you insert an effect on an input or track channel, you can dedicate the whole
processor to the channel’s signal, or only its left or right side, leaving the other side
free for use by another channel.
If an effect processor is inserted on the MASTER bus, it’s unavailable for other use
since the MASTER bus’s stereo signal always occupies both sides of the processor.
Since each insert effect is injected directly into the channel’s signal flow, no Aux or
Direct bus is required for bringing the channel’s signal into the effect.
Insert Effect Chains
Effect
1
Effect
2
Effect
3
Effect
4
Effect
5
Effect
6
Effect
7
Effect
8
If you’d like to use more than one insert effect on a signal, you can chain multiple
effects together to create an insert effect chain. With an insert effect chain, a signal
flows from one processor to another before resuming its normal signal flow. This can be
a great way to immediately take the signal through a series of sonic changes.
You can chain as many effects together in an insert effect chain as you have available
processors. The order of the effects is always the same: Effect 1 first, then Effect 2 and so
on. If you use non-consecutive effects in a chain—such as Effect 1 and then Effect 4—
the signal still flows through them according to the effect processors’ numerical order.
Input and Track Channel Insert Effects
Where Effects are Inserted
When you insert an effect on an input or track channel, the channel’s signal is diverted
into the effect just after its dynamics processor. This means that you can perform
dynamics processing on a signal before its insert effect, allowing you to shape its
volume contour before insert effect processing is applied. The signal exits the insert
effect and resumes its normal signal flow through the channel just before the CH EDIT
ATT parameter and the channel EQ so you can EQ the effected signal if you wish to.
In the lower-right corner of the Info Display’s CH VIEW screen, you can
see the effect processors inserted on the currently selected channel.
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16—Using Effects
Inserting Effects on an Input or Track Channel
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select the group of channels that contains the desired input or track channel by
pressing its FADER button.
Press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button.
Select the FX INS parameter—the ENTER/YES button begins to flash.
Press ENTER/YES, or press PAGE and then F1 (FX Ins), to display the EFFECT
INSERT screen.
Effects 7 and 8 are
unavailable since this
VS-2480 has only
two optional VS8F-2
effect expansion
boards installed.
Effect 5 is
already inserted
on Track
Channel 4
If a processor is tied up elsewhere, you’ll see an arrow pointing to the input or track
channel it’s inserted on, as with Effect 5 above. To change this assignment, press CH
EDIT for the channel on which it’s inserted to access its EFFECT INSERT screen.
5.
Insert assign switch
Each processor has its own set of insert controls. You
can select any available effect processor—depending on
the patch you want to use (Page 222)—and insert it on
the current input or track channel.
Each of the effect processors is a stereo processor with
left and right sides. You can insert both sides of an
effect, one or the other, or both sides one-after-another,
Send level
Return
as explained below.
Select an effect’s insert assign switch and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the
desired insert routing. You can select OFF, so that the effect isn’t inserted on the
channel, or you can select:
L
L
L
FX
R
L
L
FX
FX
R
R
Ins—the channel’s
signal is processed
by both sides of the
stereo effect.
InsL—the channel’s
signal is processed
by the effect’s left
side only.
L
FX
R
R
InsR—the channel’s
signal is processed
by the effect’s right
side only.
R
InsS—the channel’s
signal is processed
first by the effect’s
left side, and then
by its right side.
When you select an insert routing, a symbol representing the processor’s currently
selected effect patch appears to show you the effect you’ve inserted. Lines in and out of
the symbol show the selected signal flow in and out of the inserted effect.
Ins
InsL
InsR
InsS
The INSERT EFFECT section of the Info Display’s CH EDIT screen—Page 216—also
shows the routing of each effect inserted on the channel.
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16—Using Effects
6.
7.
You can adjust the level of the signal going into the insert effect using the effect’s
Snd control. You can also adjust the Rtn level of the signal as it leaves the effect.
With a single insert effect, you’ll typically adjust these settings only if there’s a
problem with the sound of the effect.
If you’re constructing an insert effect chain, repeat Steps 5 and 6 for each desired
insert effect.
The Snd and Rtn levels become more important when you’re using more than one
insert effect, since multiple insert effects do more to affect the signal’s level. If any
effect in the chain sounds distorted, lower the effect’s Snd level or the Rtn level of the
preceding effect. The Rtn setting for the very last insert effect in the chain sets the final
volume of the signal as it resumes its normal signal flow through the channel.
8.
Once you’ve set up your insert effects, select the desired effect patch for each—see
“Selecting Effect Patches” on Page 221.
Insert Routing Tips
Here are some tips to help you choose the most suitable of the four possible insert
routings—Ins, InsL, InsR and InsS—for your input or track channel signal. In general,
the type of routing you should select depends on the effect patch you’ll be using.
Specifically, it depends on how the patch’s algorithm treats its left and right sides. Refer
to the algorithm diagrams in the VS-2480 Appendices to see how each algorithm works.
The Ins Routing
Many of the VS-2480’s effect algorithms combine their left and right inputs into a single
signal for processing. The Ins routing is therefore an excellent candidate for effect
patches based on these algorithms. You can insert the left and right side of these effects
on different channels, but since both sides will end up being processed as single sound,
there’s not much point in doing so.
The InsL and InsR Routings
When an effect patch’s algorithm processes its left and right sides independently, you
can treat the processor as if it’s two mono processors rather than a single stereo
processor.You can insert each side of the processor on different channels using the InsL
or InsR insert routing. A number of the VS-2480’s algorithms are designed for this kind
of use.
The InsS Routing
The InsS routing sends the channel’s signal into and out of the left side of an effect, and
then into the right side. When you use this routing with an effect patch whose
algorithm treats the left and right sides independently, you essentially double the
effect’s power. For example, if you use InsS with an effect that uses the Parametric
Equalizer (“PEQ”) algorithm, the signal goes through its four-band EQ on the left, and
then the four-band EQ on its right, turning the algorithm into an eight-band equalizer.
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16—Using Effects
MASTER Bus Insert Effects
Where Effects are Inserted
MASTER bus insert effects are inserted onto the MASTER bus just before its final level
control—the MASTER fader. Use an insert effect on the MASTER bus if an entire mix
needs a particular type of processing.
When you master your final mix in preparation for burning an audio CD or for transfer
to a computer or other external digital audio device, you can apply an insert effect to
the whole mix from within the VS-2480’s Mastering Room. The VS-2480 offers a large
collection of Mastering Tool Kit (“MTK”) effect patches designed for just this purpose:
to apply the finishing touches to a great mix.
If your VS-2480 is connected to Roland DS-90A or DS-50A monitors (Page 75), you can
insert a Speaker Modeling effect patch on the MASTER bus—see Page 225 for details.
Inserting Effects on the MASTER Bus
1.
2.
While holding down SHIFT, press TR 1-16•MASTER EDIT.
Press F2 (FXIns)—the MASTER EFFECT INSERT appears.
Effects 7 and 8 are
unavailable since this
VS-2480 has only
two optional VS8F-2
effect expansion
boards installed.
Effect 5 is
already inserted
on Track
Channel 4
3.
4.
5.
6.
The MASTER EFFECT INSERT screen operates in much the same way as the input and
track channels’ EFFECT INSERT screen, though it’s a bit simpler: only one insert
routing is needed for each effect since a MASTER bus insert effect always uses both
sides of its processor.
Select the desired effect’s insert assign switch and select:
Insert assign switch
• OFF—so that the effect is not inserted on the
MASTER bus.
• Ins—to insert the effect on the MASTER bus.
As necessary, use the insert effect’s Snd and Rtn controls
to adjust the level of the signal coming into the insert
effect or out of it, respectively.
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for any other effects you want to
Send level
Return level
insert on the MASTER bus.
Once you’ve set up your insert effects, select the desired
effect patch for each—see “Selecting Effect Patches” on
Page 221.
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16—Using Effects
Selecting, Editing and Saving Effect Patches
You’ll find the screens on which you select, edit and save effect patches in the EFFECT
menu. To view the EFFECT menu, press the EFFECT button.
MENU
PROJECT
TRACK
EFFECT
UTILITY
The EFFECT VIEW Screen
When you press the EFFECT MENU button, the EFFECT VIEW screen appears. This
screen shows you a menu of your effect processors, and provides basic information
about each, as well as a BYPASS switch.
There’s a box on the screen for each of the eight possible internal effects—if you
haven’t installed the optional VS8F-2 board required for an effect, you’ll see “No
EFFECT Board” in its box, as is the case with Effects 7 and 8 in the illustration above.
Information in the Effect Boxes
Each effect’s box on the EFFECT VIEW screen shows:
•
•
•
the name of the effect processor
the name of its currently selected effect patch, along
with a symbol representing the algorithm on which
it’s based.
whether the effect is currently available as a loop
effect or is currently in use as an insert effect—if it is,
you can see where’s it’s inserted, as show below.
Processor
BYPASS
Current use
Patch
This processor is currently
inserted on Track Channel 1.
About the BYPASS Switch
The BYPASS switch on the EFFECT VIEW screen also appears as F5 (BYPASS) on other
effect screens. It behaves the same way everywhere.
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16—Using Effects
When a processor’s Bypass feature is turned on, any signals sent to the processor go
around it instead of through it, so the signals are not processed. In essence, the effect is
turned off. Therefore, if BYPASS is:
•
Off—the effect processor is on.
•
On—the effect processor is off.
When a processor is bypassed, it remains that way until you reset its BYPASS switch.
Setting Up an Effect Processor
At the bottom of the EFFECT VIEW screen are
a pair of tabbed layers containing an F button
for each of the eight effect processors.
Press PAGE, if necessary, to view the F button for the effect you want to work with.
Press an effect’s F button to view its Algorithm View screen.
The Algorithm View Screen
The Algorithm View screen is each effect processor’s home page. It shows you a
diagram of the algorithm on which the effect’s currently selected patch is based. It also
acts as the gateway to the screens on which you select, edit and save effect patches.
On the Algorithm View screen, press:
•
•
•
•
•
F1 (PATCH)—to select an effect patch for the processor
F2 (EDIT)—to edit the selected patch’s parameters.
F4 (SAVE)—to save the patch’s current settings as a new effect patch.
F5 (BYPASS)—to bypass the processor (see Page 220).
F6 (EXIT)—to return to the EFFECT VIEW screen.
Selecting Effect Patches
When you press F1 (PATCH) on an effect processor’s Algorithm View screen, its PATCH
SELECT screen appears.
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16—Using Effects
Preset and User Effect Patches
The VS-2480’s memory contains 250 “preset” patches designed to meet a wide range of
effect-processing needs. The preset patches can’t be erased or modified—though you
can use them as the basis for your own patches—so they’re always there for you to use.
You can also store 200 of your own “user” patches in the VS-2480’s memory.You can
create these patches starting with the onboard effect algorithms—see “Starting from
Scratch” below—or customize preset patches for your own use and save them as your
own new user patches. Your collection of user patches is available in any project.
As shipped from the factory, the VS-2480’s user patches are copies of the first 200 preset
patches. Since they’re only copies, you can replace them with your own user patches
without fearing that you’re losing anything.
Starting from Scratch
The VS-2480’s 36 effect algorithms (Page 54) are the foundation on which effect patches
are built. To build your own effect patch from scratch, begin with one of the first 36
preset patches: P000-P035. These patches use each algorithm’s default settings.
Effect Patch Prefixes, Numbers and Names
Each effect patch is named using a specific set of naming conventions that provides
information about the patch. Each patch has a:
•
•
•
prefix—that tells you if it’s a preset patch or a user patch. If the patch’s name starts
with a “P,” it’s a preset patch. If it starts with “U,” it’s a user patch.
number—that shows you the patch’s position in the patch list.
name—that describes the patch. If the patch isn’t a default patch (see above), its
name is preceded by an abbreviation that tells you the algorithm it’s based on. A
default patch’s name is the name of its algorithm.
Match the Patch to the Processor
Due to the processing requirements of some of the effect algorithms, not all patches
can be used by all of the processors.
Effect patches based on the following algorithms can’t be selected for the evennumbered effect processors, Effect 2, 4, 6 and 8:
•
•
Reverb
•
Voice Transformer •
Gate Reverb
Mastering Tool Kit
•
Vocoder2 (19)
In the patch list for the even-numbered processors, any patches based on these
algorithms are grayed-out and unselectable.
Since the following algorithms require two effect processors, they can only be selected
for odd-numbered processors—Effect 1, 3, 5 or 7—and the selected processor’s evennumbered partner—Effect 2, 4, 6 or 8, respectively—becomes unavailable for other use:
•
Vocoder2 (19)
•
Voice Transformer
•
Mastering Tool Kit
If on odd-numbered processor uses a patch based on one of these algorithms, the
EFFECT VIEW box and F button for its even-numbered partner is grayed-out.
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16—Using Effects
Match the Patch to the Project
When a project’s sampling rate is 64 kHz or higher—see Page 96—patches based on the
following algorithms become grayed out and can’t be used:
•
•
•
Reverb
•
Voice Transformer •
Mastering Tool Kit
Gate Reverb
Mic Modeling
•
•
Vocoder2 (19)
Speaker Modeling
Selecting an Effect Patch
To navigate to an effect’s PATCH SELECT screen if you’re not already there:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press EFFECT.
If the F button for the desired effect processor isn’t visible, press PAGE.
Press the processor’s F button to display its Algorithm View screen.
Press F1 (PATCH).
To select an effect patch on the PATCH SELECT screen:
1.
2.
3.
Press F1 (PRESET) to jump to the first preset effect patch in the patch list, or press
F2 (USER) to jump to the first user patch.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired patch. You can use the dial to scroll
through all of the preset and user patches if you want to.
Press F5 (SELECT) to load the selected effect patch.
The VS-2480 Appendices contains an effect patch list that tells you whether a patch is
designed for use as a loop or insert effect. The list also tells you if the patch has stereo
inputs—so it treats its left and right sides independently—or if its input is mono.
The BYPASS switch is explained on Page 220. Press F6 (EXIT) to return to the
processor’s Algorithm View screen.
Editing Effect Patches
Press F3 (EDIT) on an effect processor’s Algorithm View screen to view the first editing
screen for the selected effect patch. In the illustration below, you can see the two
editing screens for the first effect patch, P000 Reverb.
Each algorithm provides a set of parameters with which you can change the effect
processing it produces. To learn about each algorithm’s parameters, see the
VS-2480 Appendices. When you edit a patch, you edit the values for the algorithm—or
algorithms—on which the patch is based.
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16—Using Effects
It’s not uncommon for a patch to have more parameters than will
fit on one screen. When this is the case, you can navigate between
the patch’s screens by pressing F2 (NEXT) to move to the next
editing screen, or F1 (PREV) to move back.
All changes you make to a patch can be heard as soon as the next signal is sent into the
effect processor.
Editing an Effect Patch
To navigate to an effect’s first editing screen if you’re not already there:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press EFFECT.
If the F button for the desired effect processor isn’t visible, press PAGE.
Press the processor’s F button to display its Algorithm View screen.
Press F3 (EDIT).
To edit an effect patch on any of its editing screens:
1.
2.
Select a parameter you want to edit.
Set its value as desired.
Effect and Direct Level Settings
Many effect patches offer FX Lvl (“effect level”) and DirLvl (“direct level”) parameters.
These two parameters are of special importance since they set the balance between wet
and dry signals. FX Lvl sets the level of the processed signal, while DirLvl sets the level
of the original signal. Both parameters have a range from -100 to 100, with 0 silencing
the effected or original signal, respectively.
If a patch is designed for use as a loop effect, it’ll be added to the dry input or track
channel signal in the MASTER mix or on tracks.Therefore, FX Lvl is typically set to 100,
the maximum volume, and DirLvl is set to 0.
With an insert effect, on the other hand, the effect’s output replaces the original signal,
so the FX Lvl and DirLvl values are more similar. While great care has been taken to
pre-program the right FX Lvl/DirLvl balance for each patch, you may wish to adjust
these settings for your project.
Preserving Patch Edits
There are two ways you can preserve an effect patch edit. You can:
•
•
Save your current mixer settings—including your effect settings—as a scene, as
described in “Scenes” on Page 144.
Save your effect patch edits as a new user patch, as described below.
Saving Effect Patches
From an effect processor’s Algorithm View screen or any of its edit screens, you can
press F5 (SAVE) to store the patch’s current parameter values as your own user effect
patch (see “Preset and User Effect Patches” on Page 222).
When you press F5 (SAVE), the EFFECT PATCH SAVE screen appears, and the list of
200 user patches is presented. You can replace any of the current user patches with your
new effect patch.
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16—Using Effects
Until you begin saving your own patches, all of the user effect patches are merely
copies of the first 200 preset patches, so feel free to replace any of them—you won’t be
losing anything you don’t already have as a preset patch.
Saving an Effect Patch
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press EFFECT.
If the F button for the desired effect processor isn’t visible, press PAGE.
Press the processor’s F button to display its Algorithm View screen.
Press F3 (EDIT).
Edit the patch as desired.
Press F5 (SAVE) to view the EFFECT PATCH SAVE screen.
To save an effect patch on the EFFECT PATCH SAVE screen:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select one of the 200 user effect patch memory
locations. The patch currently residing the selected location will be replaced with
the new patch you’re saving.
If you’d like to cancel the patch-saving operation, press F6 (CANCEL).
Press F5 (OK) to store your current patch settings as a new user patch in the
selected user memory location.
Press F1 (NAME) and name the new patch—to learn about naming, see Page 73.
Press F5 (OK) when you’re done.
Speaker Modeling
If you’re using Roland’s DS-90A or DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors, you can take
advantage of the VS-2480’s Speaker Modeling feature. Speaker Modeling allows your
DS-90As or DS-50As to simulate the sound of a wide range of speakers, including
popular studio monitors and consumer stereo speakers. Since the trickiest part of
mixing is making sure your audio sounds good no matter where it’s heard, Speaker
Modeling great because it lets you to try out your mix on a variety of virtual systems.
Using Speaker Modeling
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Insert an effect on the MASTER bus as described on Page 219.
Press EFFECT.
Press the F button for the effect you selected in Step 1.
Press F1 (PATCH).
The Speaker Modeling effects patches are P220-P-230. Each patch is an emulation
of a different kind of speaker—the patch’s icon shows you the speaker it’s based on.
See the VS-2480 Appendices for a list of the Speaker Modeling patches.
6.
Press F (SELECT) to choose the desired model.
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16—Using Effects
Microphone Modeling
Microphone modeling can make audio captured by an inexpensive mic sound like it’s
been captured by one of the world’s best studio mics.
In order to create a realistic microphone model, the VS-2480 needs to know the sonic
characteristics of the mic you’re really using. The VS-2480’s Microphone Modeling
effect patches are designed to work with several different mics:
•
•
Roland DR-20
SM-10 (headset mic)
•
•
AKG C3000B
•
Lavalier (necklace) mic
Shure SM-57
If you have one of these mics, you can insert an effect on your mic’s input channel and
select the desired Microphone Modeling effect patch to transform the sound of your
microphone.
Using Microphone Modeling
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Insert the desired effect on your mic’s input channel as described on Page 217.
Press EFFECT.
Press the F button for the effect you selected in Step 1.
Press F1 (PATCH).
The Microphone Modeling effects patches are P110-P-138. Select a patch based on
the kind of mic you’re using.
See the VS-2480 Appendices for a list of the Microphone Modeling patches.
6.
226
Press F (SELECT) to choose the desired model.
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17—Working with FX Return Channels
When you press TR 17-24/FX RTN•V-FADER, the eight right-most channel strips—
labeled “FX RTN 1-8”—are FX return channels that control the stereo outputs of Effects
1-8, respectively, when they’re set up as loop effects.
PAN / AUX SEND 1-8
18
AUX
SEND
RATIO
THRESHOLD
ATTACK
RELEASE
LEVEL
Dynamics
FREQ
GAIN
Filter
PHRASE SEQ
/ AUTOMIX
FREQ
GAIN
EQ Low
FREQ
Q
GAIN
EQ Lo - Mid
FREQ
Q
GAIN
PRM
EDIT
FREQ
EQ High
EQ Hi - Mid
CH EDIT / SELECT / PHRASE SEQ STATUS / AUTOMIX STATUS
IN 1-16
MANUAL
WRITE
PHRASE
PAD PLAY
PHRASE
SEQ
IN 17-24
AUX MST
READ
FROM
TRACK STATUS / PHRASE PAD
SOLO
MUTE
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
TO
TR 17-24/FX RTN
•V-FADER is lit.
FX RTN
TRACK
REC
PLAY
OFF
PHRASE
PAD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
9
10
AUX1MST AUX 2
FX1RTN
FX 2
11
12
13
14
15
16
AUX 3
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
AUX 7
AUX 8
FX 3
FX 4
FX 5
FX 6
FX 7
FX 8
(dB)
R
FADER
MASTER
(dB)
6
6
4
R
4
0
0
4
4
8
8
12
12
18
18
24
24
42
42
L
L
When an effect is inserted on an input or track channel, or the MASTER bus, it requires
no FX return channel. Therefore, if this is the case, the effect’s FX return channel is deactivated.
When the VS-2480 is shipped from the factory, Effects 1 and 2 are available. Each
optional VS8F-2 effect expansion board you install adds another pair of stereo effects to
your VS-2480, up to a total of eight stereo effects with three optional VS8F-2s installed.
What Does an FX Return Channel Do?
Each FX return channel provides a set of controls for the stereo signal produced by its
corresponding effect processor, Effect 1-8. An FX return channel has a stereo fader with
which you can set the level of the effect. It also provides a set of CH EDIT tools that let
you manage the effect and send it to the MASTER mix, print the effect to hard disk
recorder tracks, or to Aux or Direct busses.
The FX Return Channel Fader
An FX return channel fader sets the level of the corresponding effect’s stereo
output as it’s sent to the desired destination—most often either the MASTER
mix or one or two tracks in the hard disk recorder. The position of the fader is
reflected in the FX return channel’s CH EDIT FADER parameter value.
Changing the FADER value is the same as moving the physical fader.
FX Return CH EDIT Tools
Each FX return channel has three FX return CH EDIT screens. It has a:
•
•
main CH EDIT screen (see Page 228)
Parameter View screen (Page 231)
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17—Working with FX Channels
The Main FX Return CH EDIT Screen
1.
2.
Press TR 17-24/FX RTN•V-FADER to activate channel strip control of FX Return
Channels 1-8.
Press the desired FX return channel’s CH EDIT button—its main CH EDIT VIEW
screen appears.
9.
1.
3.
4.
10.
2.
5.
11.
6.
7.
8.
12.
13.
1. ASSIGN
The ASSIGN selector designates the Aux bus that carries signals to the FX
return channel’s effect processor. This parameter interacts with, and
reflects the setting of, the EZ ROUTING EFFECT screen described on
Page 210.
2. EFFECT Algorithm Display
The EFFECT algorithm display shows the algorithm on
which the effect’s currently selected patch is based. When
the display is selected, the ENTER/YES button flashes—
press the ENTER/YES button to jump to the effect’s
Algorithm View screen (Page 221).
3. MONO Sw
The MONO Sw (“Mono Switch”) allows you to collapse the left and right
sides of the stereo effect into a mono signal. To restore the effect to stereo,
turn Mono Sw off.
When the effect’s output is mono, you can use its BAL (Page 229) parameter to pan the
effect to the desired location.
4. GROUP
You can assign the effect’s output to any of the VS-2480’s 16 fader groups that
allow you to control the levels of multiple input, track and/or FX return channels. The
parameter operates in exactly the same way as the input and track channel GROUP
parameter—see Page 155.
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5. DIR 1-8
Using the DIR 1-8 parameters, you can route the effect to an output
after sending in to any of the eight Direct busses (Page 208). You can use
a pre- or post-fader Direct bus, as explained on Page 209. Chapter 22
describes working with the VS-2480 outputs.
DIR Bus 1 is
selected and
highlighted here.
To send an effect to a Direct bus from its FX return channel:
1.
2.
Select the desired DIR parameter box.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial so that the desired Direct bus becomes highlighted.
Only one channel’s signal can be routed to a Direct bus at a time. When you assign a
channel to a Direct bus, it replaces the channel that had previously been routed to the
bus. For a list of the channels currently routed to the Direct busses, press ENTER/YES.
Press EXIT/NO to close the list.
6. SOLO
Turn SOLO on to quickly isolate the effect by turning off any other channels
whose SOLO switched is not turned on. When you want to solo multiple
signals, use Solo Mode (Page 143)—it’s faster.
When an effect is soloed in Solo Mode, its SOLO switch is automatically turned on.
7. MUTE
Use the MUTE switch to quickly silence the effect’s output. To mute more than
one channel, you’ll probably find it easier to use Mute mode (Page 143).
When an effect is muted in Mute Mode, its MUTE switch is automatically turned on.
8. BAL
The BAL (“Balance”) control sets the stereo placement of the effect when
it’s sent to a stereo destination such as the MASTER mix or a pair of linked
tracks. The BAL parameter shifts the effect’s entire stereo image leftward
or rightward while maintaining the positions of its left and right sides in
relation to each other. The parameter can be set from L63 to R63.
When Mono Sw is turned on, BAL acts as a simple pan control of the effect’s mono
signal.
9. Effect Output Meter
10. Effect Output Meter Pre/Pst Switch
The Effect output meter shows the effect’s output level as it’s sent to the
selected destination. The meter can show pre- or post-fader levels. Most of
the time, you’ll want to view post-fader levels to see the effect’s true output
level. If you’re sending the effect pre-fader to one or two Aux busses
(Page 230) or Direct busses (Page 229), you may want to view its pre-fader
level to see what you’re sending.
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11. MIX
When MIX is turned on, the effect is sent to the MASTER bus. When it’s off, it’s
not. To add the effect to a mix, make sure MIX is turned on.
Listen to an effect as you record a track—without recording the effect—by sending the
track channel’s signal to the effect, setting MIX to On and making sure the effect isn’t
routed to the track (Page 231). You’ll hear the effect in the MASTER mix as you record.
12. FADER
The FADER parameter’s value sets the output level of the effect. The FX return
channel’s physical fader and this parameter serve the same purpose, and
changing the setting for one changes the setting for both.
13. AUX Send Controls
Each FX return channel has a set of eight Aux send controls with which you can send
the effect to any Aux bus or pair of linked Aux busses.
You can use these controls to send the effect to:
•
•
•
headphone mixes—You can send the effect to an Aux bus routed to an output that’s
connected to a performer’s headphone amplifier input. This procedure is described
in detail in “Adding Effects to a Headphone Mix” on Page 234.
another effect—You can create a chain of effects in the VS-2480 by sending one
effect’s output to an Aux bus routed into another effect’s input. If you want, you can
repeat the process by sending the second effect to a third and so on.
external devices—Send the effect to Aux busses routed to outputs connected to an
external device.
Though the VS-2480 doesn’t prevent you from doing so, sending an effect’s output to
the Aux bus routed to its input can produce unpredictable results.
The Aux send controls provide the following parameters:
•
Send Status
Send Status—turns the Aux send to the Aux bus on or off.
Send Level
You can select:
• OFF—so that the effect isn’t sent to the Aux bus.
• Pre or Pst (depending on the Aux bus’s current configuration)—to turn on the send to
the Aux bus from the channel. See below for more details.
The Send Level parameter sets the amount of the channel’s signal to be sent to the Aux
bus. The range is from -∞ to 6 dB.
You can also set the effect’s send level using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs—see
“Activating Knob or Fader Control of Aux Send Levels” on Page 141.
Each Aux bus can receive signals pre- or post-fader, and can be linked to its odd/even
partner. When you select an Aux send control’s send status parameter, ENTER/YES
flashes—press ENTER/YES to configure the Aux bus as described on Page 207.
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The FX Return Parameter View Screen
Selected channel
and parameter
The FX return channels’ Parameter View feature lets you view, and adjust the value of,
the currently selected parameter for all of the FX return channels at once.
To activate Parameter View, press F6 (PRM.V) from an FX return channel’s main CH
EDIT screen. F6 (PRM.V) is available only when the currently selected parameter can
be displayed in Parameter View. The F2 (Surrnd) button is active only when the
UTILITY menu’s SURROUND MIX Sw parameter (Page 321) is turned on.
To return to the main FX return CH EDIT screen, press F6 (CH.V).
If you edit a parameter while in Parameter View, its channel automatically becomes the
currently selected channel.
At the bottom of the Parameter View screen are four tabbed layers on which you’ll find
an F button for each of the parameters that can be shown using Parameter View. To
reveal a parameter on a layer that’s hidden, press PAGE until the layer appears.
The Eight Aux Send Controls in Parameter View
The Parameter View screen can’t fit all eight FX return channel Aux send controls
onscreen at the same time. You can press % or $, or click either arrow with your
mouse, to scroll through the Aux send control parameters for each of the eight Aux
busses. At the top of the PRM.V section of the display, you’ll see the name of the
currently displayed Aux send .
Routing Effects to Tracks
You can route an FX return channel’s output to a pair of tracks, or a single track, to
record the effect, by itself or mixed in with the signal(s) it’s processing. The FX return
channel’s fader—and FADER parameter—set the effect’s recording level.
You can add an effect to tracks you’re bouncing by routing its FX return channel’s
output to your bounce destination track or track pair—see Page 197.
Each FX return channel’s stereo output appears during routing as a single connection,
with a single virtual wire you can connected to a pair of linked tracks. If you route an FX
return channel to a single track, the effect is recorded as a mono signal containing both
its left and right sides.
In the following sections, we describe how to route an FX return channel’s stereo
output to a pair of tracks, the most common scenario. You can use the same steps to
route an effect in mono to a single, unlinked track.
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17—Working with FX Channels
Quick Routing an FX Return Channel
1.
2.
Press TR 1-16 or TR 17-24/FX RTN to select the group of channels that contains the
track channels for the linked pair of tracks to which you want to send the effect.
Hold down either destination track channel’s TRACK STATUS button for a second
or so until the QUICK ROUTING screen appears.
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks 1-24
We pressed the TRACK
STATUS button for
linked Track 17. Tracks
17 and 18 are flashing
to show they’re
selected as our
destination.
FX Return
Channels 1-8
The FADER button you pressed in Step 1 and the pair of TRACK STATUS buttons
you lit in Step 2 light solidly to show the currently active group of SELECT buttons
and the linked tracks you’ve chosen as the destination for your effect. If any
channels are already routed to the tracks, their SELECT buttons also light solidly.
To clear all connections to a destination track, hold down its TRACK STATUS button
and press CLEAR. To quickly clear all of the QUICK ROUTING screen’s connections,
press F4 (AllClr).
3.
4.
Press TR 17-24/FX RTN•V-FADER.
Press the FX return channel’s SELECT button—a virtual wire appears
on the screen to show the connection you’ve made.
TR 17-24
FX RTN
V.FADER
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows. When
you’re recording effects
onto tracks, signal flows
up from the FX return
channels to the hard disk
recorder tracks.
We pressed FX
Return Channel 1’s
SELECT button.
5.
6.
232
If you want to break the connection, press SELECT again.
When you’re done, press F6 (EXIT) to confirm the new connection and to leave
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17—Working with FX Channels
FX Return Routing on the EZ Routing VIEW Screen
1.
Press EZ ROUTING.
The gray arrows at the
left edge of the screen
show the direction in
which signal flows.
When you’re recording
effects onto tracks,
signal flows up from
the FX return
channels to the hard
disk recorder tracks.
Hard Disk
Recorder
Tracks 1-24
FX Return
Channels 1-8
2.
3.
4.
5.
If the ROUTING VIEW screen doesn’t appear, and you see “VIEW” above F1, press
F1 (VIEW). If you don’t see “VIEW” above F1, press PAGE and then F1 (VIEW).
Use ", #, $ and/or % to select the FX return channel’s output along the upper
edge of the FX RTN block. We’ve selected FX Return Channel 1’s output in the
illustration above.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial clockwise—a wire appears that connects the FX return
channel to one track after another in the RECORDING TRACKS block.
Turn the dial to select the desired pair of destination linked tracks.
We’ve selected linked
stereo Tracks 17 and
18 as our destination.
6.
To break the connection, repeat Steps 3 and 4, and turn the TIME/VALUE dial
counter-clockwise until no connection exists.
To clear all FX effect-to-track connections, press PAGE until “ClrTrA” appears above F4,
and then press F4 (ClrTrA).
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17—Working with FX Channels
Adding Effects to a Headphone Mix
When you’ve created a headphone mix using an Aux bus, it’s easy to add an effect to
any of its signals. Send each channel’s signal to the effect as desired. The following
steps describe how to route the effect to the Aux bus:
1.
2.
3.
Press TR-17-24•FX RTN to select the group of channels that includes the eight FX
returns channels.
Press the CH EDIT button for the FX return channel belonging to the effect you want to
send to the headphone mix. The FX return channel CH EDIT parameters appear.
Set the Send Status parameter for the Aux bus you’re using to its available Pre or Post
value, depending on the Aux bus’s configuration (Page 207).
Aux 1’s
Send Status
parameter
4.
Set the amount of the effect to be sent to the headphone mix.
For the effect to sound its best, use a linked pair of Aux busses for a stereo headphone
feed. In Steps 4 and 5 above, you’ll be setting up both linked Aux busses
simultaneously—use the linked Aux busses’ balance control to position the stereo
effect as desired in the mix.
You can also set the send level using the PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs—see “Activating
Knob or Fader Control of Aux Send Levels” on Page 141.
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18—Editing Tracks
This chapter provides an introduction to the editing of audio data on VS-2480 tracks.
The first part of the chapter explains important editing concepts. The second part
explains how to use the various available editing methods.
Chapter 6 explains how audio data is recorded on the VS-2480, and provides
explanations for some important terms: take, phrase, V-Track and track. See Page 86.
Remember that when you’re editing a track, what you’re really editing is its currently
selected V-Track.
Editing Concepts and Overview
Phrases and Regions
In editing a track, you can work:
•
pre-defined chunks of audio called “phrases.”You can work with one phrase at a time
on each track, or you can work with phrases on multiple tracks at the same time.
Chapter 19 discusses the things you can do with phrases.
Each rectangle in the Home screen’s playlist is a phrase
•
a specified time “region” in one or more tracks. Region editing operations are
described in detail in Chapter 20.
Edit region
To master the powerful editing features of the VS-2480, it’s important to understand
exactly what a phrase is. See “What’s Pointer-Based Playback?” on Page 87 if you
haven’t already read it.
If you want to edit multiple phrases on a track at the same time, you can define a region
that includes the phrases.
Earlier V-Studios referred to regions as “tracks.” Some of the VS-2480’s editing features
also use this word instead of “region.”
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18—Editing Tracks
Edit Points
The VS-2480 provides a set of special markers just for editing—these markers are called
“edit points.”The IN and OUT edit points define regions of data. The FROM and TO
edit points help you accurately position phrases and regions you’re moving or copying.
Use the VS-2480’s Scrub feature for the most precise positioning of the timeline when
you’re placing edit points. Scrub is described on Page 184.
Edit Point Flags
IN
FROM
OUT
TO
In the playlist, each edit point is shown as a dotted line with
a flag at its top. Each point has its own flag.
The FROM point is set to the same location as the IN
point by default—you won’t see its flag when it’s behind
the IN flag. You can manually move the FROM point to a
different location, as described in this chapter.
IN and OUT
In region editing, the process begins with selecting the portion of the project you want
to edit. You define this time range by placing the IN and OUT edit points:
This edit point:
Sets:
IN
the beginning of the section of data you want to work with.
OUT
the end of the section of data you want to work with.
You should never place your OUT edit point at an earlier location in the project than
your IN edit point.
FROM and TO
Whenever you move or copy a phrase or region, you begin by designating a specific
reference point within the phrase or region—a “time anchor,” if you will. (The VS-2480
does this for you automatically, as described below.) This anchor can be the beginning
of the phrase or region, or it can be an event somewhere in the middle of it.
When you select a location to which you want to move or copy a phrase or region, what
you’re really doing is selecting a location to which you want to move or copy its anchor.
This edit point:
Sets:
FROM
the time anchor within a phrase or region.
TO
the location to which you want to move or copy the time anchor.
Most often when you move or copy a phrase or region, you’ll want to place the front of
the moved or copied data at the desired time destination.
FROM
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18—Editing Tracks
Therefore, as a convenience:
•
•
when you select a phrase, the VS-2480 automatically places the FROM point at the
beginning of the phrase. If you select multiple phrases, FROM is placed at the front
of the first phrase you select.
when you place an IN point to define the beginning of a region, the VS-2480
automatically sets FROM to the same location. If you select multiple regions,
FROM is placed at the front of the first region you select.
You can manually reset FROM to any location you desire using the methods described
later in this chapter.
If you set FROM at an event within a phrase or region, you can use the event’s target
location as a way to position the entire phrase or region.
FROM
TO
For example, when:
•
•
you’re copying a one-measure drum loop and can’t find the exact start of the downbeat —
Place FROM at an easily identified, loud, repeated event, such as a snare drum hit
on the second beat. Place TO at the second beat of the destination measure. When
you copy the loop, the snare—along with the rest of the loop—lands in the pocket.
you’re moving a music cue with a passage that has to occur at a specific time—Place
FROM at the beginning of the passage. Place TO where you want the passage to
start. Move the entire cue and the passage lands in exactly the right place.
FROM and TO also make it easy to accurately position sound effects you’ve recorded or
imported.
Performing Edits
The Appearance of Selected Tracks, Phrases and Regions
Depending on the method you use to select a phrase or region in the playlist—we’ll
describe these methods later in this chapter—the process can have two steps:
1.
2.
Select the track on which the desired phrase or region resides.
Select the phrase or region.
When a track, phrase or region is selected, its appearance changes. When a track is
selected, a triangle appears to its left and the track turns white.
Triangle
Track turns white
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18—Editing Tracks
When a phrase or region is selected, it’s outline becomes dotted.
Selected phrases
Selected regions
When audio is selected, it has a dotted outline. If its
track is also selected, it’s white. If not, it’s black.
If you select audio on one of a pair of linked tracks, the audio on the other linked track
is also selected.
Where Editing Takes Place
You’ll edit tracks on the VS-2480’s Home screen—see Chapter 8—or on the wave
display, described on Page 238. Each screen offers a different view of a project’s audio.
The Wave Display
The wave display is a companion to the Home screen’s playlist and can be opened
whenever the Home screen is visible.
Press STOP before opening or closing the wave display. The WAVE DISPLAY button is
disabled when a project is playing.
To open and close the wave display:
1.
2.
Press HOME•DISPLAY.
Press WAVE DISPLAY—the button lights and the wave display fills the bottom of
the screen, with the upper part of the Home screen and its F buttons still visible.
To close the wave display, press WAVE DISPLAY again—its light turns off and the
lower portion of the Home screen reappears.
3.
The wave display provides a highly magnified view of a track’s audio in which you can
often literally see the audio event you’re looking for. The waveform in the display is the
track’s audio interpreted in graph form. The graph’s vertical axis represents volume, or
“amplitude.” Its horizontal axis represents project time.
Track name
Phrase name
Vertical
magnification
Horizontal
magnification
Track
number
Timeline
Position bar
Here’s how to get around on the wave display.
238
To:
Do this:
view the desired track
Use the % and $ buttons.
zoom in or out vertically
Hold down SHIFT and press $ or %, respectively
zoom in or out horizontally
Hold down SHIFT and press # or ", respectively
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18—Editing Tracks
The track that’s currently selected for editing remains selected as you scroll through—
and view—different tracks in the wave display. You can see the name of the currently
selected track in the top left corner of the display, a portion of the Home screen that’s
still visible. The wave display itself tells you which track you’re viewing there.
By combining different vertical and horizontal zoom settings, you can view the selected
track’s audio with almost any degree of detail. You can also hold down SHIFT and press
HOME•DISPLAY to toggle on and off a full-screen view of the wave display.
You can move through the project while you’re on the wave display using the current
time location display (Page 126)—which is still visible above the wave display—the
transport buttons, SHUTTLE ring, position bar, Jump feature, locators or markers.
The wave display has its own position bar located beneath the displayed waveform. You
can drag its handle with your mouse to move through the project. You can also click on
the arrow at its left end to move slowly backward through the project—in steps of about
17-18 subframes—or on the arrow at its right to move slowly forward.
Choosing the Right Editing Screen
Use the screen that best suits the job at hand:
•
If you need to see the project’s other tracks, or to see an entire project section at
once, edit in the Home screen’s playlist (Page 122). The Home screen is best suited
to making larger edits: moving audio around in a project, or from track to track and
so on. You’ll find a variety of views and magnifications, as described on Page 123.
On the Home screen, you can jump from the start to the end of a selected track’s
phrases, one after another, by pressing NEXT when the PREVIOUS/Next Sw (Page 363)
is set to PHRASE. Press PREVIOUS to jump in the opposite direction.
•
Use the wave display when you need an up-close, detailed view of a track’s audio.
It’s the best choice when precision is critical and when you’re performing edits on
tiny bits of audio. The wave display’s especially handy when you’re using Scrub
(Page 184) to pinpoint audio events.
You can switch back and forth between the Home and wave display screens—and use
different views and magnifications—as you edit.
Editing Methods
The VS-2480 lets you edit a project’s phrase and regions three different ways:
•
mouse
•
TRACK EDIT buttons
•
TRACK menu
You can use any of these methods exclusively, or use any combination of them. Some
people like a mouse, some like buttons, some like menus and some like them all. You
can perform many of the same phrase or region editing operations regardless of the
method you decide to use, though each method presents your options a bit differently.
The mouse and TRACK EDIT buttons provide fast access to seven of the most common
phrase editing operations and region operations. The TRACK menu offers additional
editing operations as well.
No matter which method you use, switch between phrase and region editing by
pressing PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX. When it’s green, you’re editing phrases.
When it’s red, you’re editing regions.
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What Each Editing Method Offers
Your Mouse
Mouse editing provides an enjoyably tactile editing experience. When
you edit with a mouse, you can select phrases or regions by clicking and
dragging. You can move them by simply dragging them to the desired
locations, and even copy them as you drag—a set of placement cursors
help you position moved or copied phrases and regions where you wish
them to go.
When you want to perform other editing related operations, a right-click of the mouse
on the playlist opens the Edit Pop-Up menu—when you select an operation from the
pop-up, an edit message appears (see below) in which you can use your mouse to set
up the details of the edit and then execute it.
The TRACK EDIT Buttons
TRACK EDIT
COPY
MOVE
TRIM IN
TRIM OUT
DELETE
SPLIT
NEW
The TRACK EDIT buttons offer speed in editing.
Select phrase or regions using the VS-2480’s toppanel controls. To perform an edit, press the desired
TRACK EDIT button—as with mouse editing, an edit message appears (see below) in
which you can use the controls to set the operation’s parameters and then execute it.
COPY
The TRACK Menu
MOVE
INSERT
CUT
ERASE
IN
OUT
FROM
TO
COMP / EXP.
IMPORT
GRADATION
PHRASE
REGION
AUTOMIX
MENU
PROJECT
TRACK
EFFECT
UTILITY
The TRACK menu offers parameter-based editing. When you select an
edit operation from the TRACK menu, use the VS-2480’s controls to select the desired
phrases or regions, set the relevant parameters and then execute the operation. This
form of editing allows you to edit slowly and carefully. The TRACK menu also provides
access to some editing operations that aren’t available anywhere else.
Edit Messages
When you edit using your mouse or the TRACK EDIT
buttons, the VS-2480 is set by default to display edit
messages that let you refine and confirm the edit you’re
performing.
The edit messages you see when you edit with a mouse or the TRACK EDIT buttons are
the same. In fact, the parameters presented in track editing messages are also found in
the TRACK menu. All phrase editing operations—and thus the parameters you see in
the edit messages and in the TRACK menu—are explained in Chapter 19. All of the
region editing operations are described in Chapter 20.
You can edit the displayed parameters with your mouse or the cursor buttons and
TIME/VALUE dial. An edit isn’t executed until press ENTER/YES. To cancel the edit,
press EXIT/NO.
You can turn edit messages off to speed up the editing process if you wish by resetting
the UTILITY menu’s EDIT MESSAGE parameter (Page 364).
You can also toggle the Edit Messages feature on and off by holding down SHIFT and
pressing PHRASE•REGION• AUTOMIX—a message appears briefly to tell you that
edit messages are now turned on or off. If you’re using a mouse, you can also turn the
messages on and off in the Edit Pop-Up menu, described on Page 241.
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Editing with a Mouse
The Edit Pop-Up Menu
The mouse works in conjunction with the Edit Pop-Up menu
during phrase and region editing. You can set edit points from
the menu—see Page 242—and perform quite a few other
editing-related actions as described below.
In this
illustration,
the IN point
is selected.
To view and use the Edit Pop-Up menu:
1.
2.
3.
Right-click the mouse anywhere on the Home screen playlist
or in the wave display—the Edit Pop-Up menu appears.
Scroll to the desired menu item. If the required edit points
for an item in the menu haven’t been set, the item is grayedout.
Click the left mouse button.
To close the Edit Pop-Up menu without selecting an item, click on the playlist.
To:
Right-click and:
Zoom in or out
select ZOOM ↑↓ or ZOOM ↔. In either case, a dialog
appears in which you can select the desired
magnification.
View the wave display from
the Home screen
select WAVE.
View the Home screen from
the wave display
select P.LIST.
Move the timeline to the
position line’s location
select GOTO.
Set IN, OUT, FROM and TO
see Page 242.
Activate the VS-2480’s Scrub
feature (Page 184)
select SCRUB and click to checkmark it.
Use Scrub to preview audio
select SCRUB TO to hear the audio just before the
position line, SCRUB THRU to listen to audio just
before and after the position line, or SCRUB FROM to
listen to a small chunk of audio starting at the
position line.
Select a track
Sel Trk selects the track on which you’ve right-clicked
if no IN and OUT points have been set. (You can also
select a track with your mouse by clicking on it. See
Page 242).
Select a region
Sel Trk selects the region of data between the IN and
OUT points on the track you’ve right-clicked if IN and
OUT points have been set. (You can also select a
region by dragging across it. See Page 243).
Select a phrase
Sel Phr selects the phrase you’ve right-clicked. (You
can also select a phrase by clicking on it (Page 243) or
from the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up menu (Page 243).
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To:
Right-click and:
Perform seven of the most
common phrase or region
editing operations (Page 246)
select the desired operation from the menu. You can
select only those operations for which the required
edit points have been set.
Switch from region to phrase
editing and back
select PHRASE or REGION, as desired—the
PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX button lights in green
(phrase) or red (region)
UNDO
select the desired Undo level from the Undo list
(Page 73).
REDO
reverse the last Undo operation.
Activate snapping to a
measures or beats grid
select GRID. Choose the desired grid from the dialog
that appears to activate the grid.
Edit Msg
turn on (checked) or off edit messages that are
displayed when you edit audio with your mouse or
perform a TRACK EDIT button operation (Page 248).
Edit messages are explained on Page 240.
If you hold down CLEAR or SHIFT, additional options appear in the pop-up.
To:
First:
Then right-click and:
Clear region edit points
Press and hold CLEAR
select the desired edit point.
Move the timeline
Press and hold SHIFT
select the desired edit point or
choose GOTO to move to the
current location of the position
line.
Placing Edit Points with Your Mouse
To place an edit point with your mouse:
1.
Click the mouse at the desired time location in the project. A dotted vertical line
appears. This is called the “position line.”
Position line
2.
3.
4.
Click the right mouse button on the track playlist. The Edit Pop-Up menu appears and
offers a variety of options.
Drag to the name of the desired edit point so that it’s highlighted in the pop-up
menu.
Click the left mouse button—the selected edit point is set. You can see its flag
(Page 236) at the top of the position line above the playlist.
Selecting a Track with Your Mouse
To select a track with your mouse, click the track in the playlist, or click the track’s
number to the left of the playlist.
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Selecting Phrases By Clicking or Dragging Your Mouse
When PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX is lit green, you can select a phrase using the
mouse by clicking on the desired phrase or dragging across it. In addition, you can drag
vertically or diagonally across multiple tracks to select one phrase on each, or you can
hold down SHIFT and click the phrase on each track you’d like to select. To unselect all
selected phrases, click in an empty area of the playlist. To unselect one of a group of
selected phrases, hold down SHIFT and click the phrase again.
When you drag with your mouse to select a phrase, make sure you start dragging on
the playlist after the beginning of the project, Time 00h00m00s00f00.
If you click or drag across a phrase on a linked track, the phrase on the other linked
track is also selected if there are phrases on both tracks at the location where the cursor
first touches the phrase.
Selecting Phrases from the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up Menu
To select one or more phrases using the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX repeatedly until it’s lit green.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to move the timeline over the phrase(s).
Right-click any track number to the left of the playlist.
In the SELECT PHRASE Pop-Up menu, you can see which tracks
contain a phrase at the timeline’s current position. Click each desired
track to select its phrase. Click a track again to unselect its phrase.
Click ALL to checkmark all of the tracks, or click it again to un-check all of the tracks.
5.
Click EXIT when you’re done—the phrases you’ve selected are ready to be edited.
If you select a phrase on one of a pair of linked tracks, the phrase on the other linked
track is also selected if it’s touching the timeline.
Selecting Regions by Dragging Your Mouse
When you drag with your mouse to select regions, make sure you start dragging on the
playlist after the beginning of the project, Time 00h00m00s00f00.
1.
2.
3.
Press PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX repeatedly until it’s lit red.
Click and hold the left mouse button at the desired IN point, making sure to click
after the start of the project.
Drag rightward across the display and release the button at the desired OUT point.
4.
To re-do the operation, repeat Steps 2 and 3.
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You can also drag from right to left, setting the OUT and then the IN and FROM points.
As you drag, any data that you drag across is also selected. To unselect any of this data,
cursor to its track and press ENTER/YES.
The FROM point is placed at the start of the earliest data you select. You can move the
FROM position manually using any method described late in this chapter.
If you select an audio region on one of a pair of linked tracks, the region on the other
linked track is also selected.
Selecting Regions From the SELECT TRACK Pop-Up Menu
To select one or more regions using the SELECT TRACK pop-up:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX repeatedly until it’s lit red.
Make sure your IN and OUT points are set as desired.
Right click on any track number to the left of the playlist—the
SELECT TRACK Pop-Up menu appears.
Click each track that contains a region you want to select, or click the
track again to unselect its region.
Click ALL to checkmark all of the tracks, or click it again to un-check all of the tracks.
5.
Click EXIT when you’re done—all audio that falls between the IN and OUT points
on the selected tracks is now ready to be edited.
If you select a region on one of a pair of linked tracks, the region on the other linked
track is also selected.
Moving Data by Dragging with Your Mouse
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Set the PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX button as desired.
Select the desired phrase(s) or region(s).
The FROM point is automatically placed at the front of the earliest data you
select. Reset the FROM point to another location if you want to.
Move your mouse cursor over the desired data. The cursor changes to an
opened hand to show that you can grab the data.
Click on the desired data and hold the mouse button down—the cursor
changes to a closed hand to show the data is ready to be dragged.
The TO point is automatically reset to the current position of the FROM
point—you’ll be setting a new TO location as you drag.
Drag the data to the desired location.
You see the TO flag move as you drag, as well as a light gray copy of the data to
show you where you’re dragging it. Watch the closed hand for the appearance of
any desired position cursors described on Page 246.
If edit messages—see “Edit Messages” on Page 240—are:
• turned off—the data is moved to the new location, and you’re done.
• turned on—you can set the operation’s parameters as desired and press ENTER/
YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
To learn how to snap dragged audio to a measures or beats, see “Snapping to Grid” on
Page 245.
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Copying Data by Dragging with Your Mouse
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Set the PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX button as desired.
Select the desired phrase(s) or region(s).
The FROM point is automatically placed at the front of the earliest data you
select. Reset the FROM point to another location if you want to.
Move your mouse cursor over the desired data. The cursor changes to an
opened hand to show that you can grab the data.
Click on the desired data and hold the mouse button down—the cursor
changes to a closed hand to show the data is ready to be dragged.
The TO point is automatically reset to the current position of the FROM
point—you’ll be setting a new TO location as you drag.
Hold down SHIFT—a plus sign appears in the closed-hand cursor icon.
While continuing to hold SHIFT, drag the data to the desired location.
You see the TO flag move as you drag, as well as a light gray copy of the data to
show you where you’re dragging it. Watch the closed hand for the appearance of
any desired position cursors described below.
Release the mouse button and then release SHIFT.
If edit messages—see “Edit Messages” on Page 240—are:
• turned off—the data is moved to the new location, and you’re done.
• turned on—you can set the operation’s parameters as desired and press ENTER/
YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
Snapping to Grid
When you’ve set up a tempo map (Page 312) for your project, you can turn on the Home
screen’s Track Edit Grid feature.
This illustration shows
measure gridlines.
When the grid is active, the front edge of a phrase or region you’re dragging “snaps” to
the nearest gridline as you drag. You can have a gridline for every measure or beat. To
place the audio at the gridline, release the mouse button after the snap. If you’re
dragging a group of phrase or regions, the first one you select snaps to the grid, and the
others retain their positions relative to that first phrase or region.
To turn on the Track Edit Grid feature:
1.
2.
3.
Right-click on the Home screen’s playlist.
Select GRID from the Edit Pop-Up menu——the Grid Options window opens.
Select the desired grid setting. You can select:
• Off—so that the grid is turned off.
• Measure—so that there’s a gridline for every measure in the
project.
• Beat—so that there’s a gridline for every beat in the project.
4.
If you select Measure or Beat, the grid appears immediately in the playlist.
If you can’t see the grid, hold down SHIFT and press " or # to zoom in or out until the
gridlines appear.
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Position Cursors
As you drag phrases or regions in the playlist to move or copy them, watch the closedhand cursor. It changes to help you place the moved or copied data precisely by
showing you when the moving TO point (Page 236) is touching certain key locations:
When the closed hand turns to:
The TO point is precisely placed at:
the original position of the front edge of the selected
data if you haven’t dragged up or down.
the original position of the back edge of the selected
data if you haven’t dragged up or down.
the IN point.
the OUT point.
the original FROM location.
the timeline.
The position cursors are very precise, so watch the closed hand carefully. A position
cursor lights only when the FROM point is precisely at one of the above locations. This,
in fact, is what makes the position cursors so useful.
If the position cursors are appearing and disappearing too quickly for you to react, hold
down SHIFT and press # to zoom in on the playlist’s time axis.
If you’re moving audio and would prefer not to see the position cursors, hold down
CLEAR as you drag. (The cursors are always visible when you’re drag-copying audio.)
When you’re editing phrases, you can place the IN and OUT points—otherwise unused
in phrase editing—at locations where you think you may want to place dragged audio.
Watch for the position cursors to show you when the TO point touches them.
Performing an Edit Operation From the Edit Pop-Up Menu
To perform seven of the most commonly used editing operations on
selected phrases or regions from the Edit Pop-Up menu:
1.
2.
3.
246
Select the desired operation from the Edit Pop-Up menu (Page 241).
ENTER/YES flashes. If the desired operation is grayed out, make sure
you’ve selected a phrase or region, and that all of the operation’s
required edit points are set.
Press ENTER/YES.
If edit messages—see “Edit Messages” on Page 240—are:
• turned off—the selected operation is performed, and you’re done.
• turned on—you can set the operation’s parameters as desired and press ENTER/
YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
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Editing with the TRACK EDIT Buttons
This section describes how to perform seven of the
most common track phrase and region edits using
the TRACK EDIT buttons, the cursor buttons, SHIFT
and the TIME/VALUE dial.
TRACK EDIT
COPY
COPY
MOVE
TRIM IN
TRIM OUT
SPLIT
NEW
PHRASE
COMP / EXP.
IMPORT
GRADATION
REGION
AUTOMIX
DELETE
MOVE
INSERT
CUT
ERASE
IN
OUT
FROM
TO
Placing Edit Points Using the IN, OUT, FROM and TO Buttons
To set edit points for the first time in a project using the VS-2480’s buttons:
1.
2.
3.
Position the timeline at the desired location.
Press the IN, OUT, FROM or TO button.
To clear an edit point, hold down CLEAR and press the desired IN, OUT, FROM or
TO button.
Once you’ve set a project’s IN, OUT, FROM and TO points, their buttons can be
configured so that pressing an edit point’s button:
•
•
moves the timeline to its position.
resets the edit point to the current position of the timeline.
Configuring the Behavior of the IN, OUT, FROM and TO Buttons
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press UTILITY.
If “GLOBAL” doesn’t appear over F2, press PAGE until it does.
Press F2 (GLOBAL).
The EDIT POINT Sw TYPE parameter sets the behavior of the IN, OUT, FROM and
TO buttons for resetting your IN, OUT, FROM or TO edit points. You can choose:
• Same as LOCATOR—so that pressing an edit point’s button moves the timeline
to the edit point’s location in the project.
• OVERWRITE—so that pressing an edit point’s button resets the edit point to the
current position of the timeline.
5.
Press F6 (EXIT) to confirm your changes and to leave the GLOBAL Param1 screen.
If EDIT POINT Sw TYPE is set to OVERWRITE, you can still move the timeline to an
edit point—hold down SHIFT and press the desired IN, OUT, FROM or TO button.
Selecting a Track Using the VS-2480’s Buttons
1.
Press $ or % to move the cursor to the desired track.
Selecting Phrases and Regions with the VS-2480’s Buttons
To select a phrase:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Position the timeline so that it’s touching the desired phrase.
Press $ or % to cursor to the track on which the phrase resides.
Press ENTER/YES to select the phrase.
To unselect the phrase, press ENTER/YES again.
To select a region:
1.
2.
3.
Set the boundaries of the desired region by placing the IN point at its beginning
and the OUT point at its end.
Press $ or % to cursor to the track on which the region resides.
Press ENTER/YES to select the region. To unselect it, press ENTER/YES again.
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If you select a phrase or region on one of a pair of linked tracks, the phrase—if it’s
touching the timeline—or region on the other linked track is also selected.
You can use the steps above to select or unselect phrases or regions on different tracks,
one at a time.
Moving or Copying Data Using the TRACK EDIT Buttons
When you copy or move data, you can use the VS-2480’s buttons to select the desired
destination track, or tracks:
1.
2.
3.
When you’ve selected the data you want to move or copy, press the desired TRACK
EDIT button.
If you haven’t yet set a TO edit point, the TO button
Selected data
flashes to remind you to do so—move the timeline to the
desired location and press TO.
Once a TO point has been set, a gray copy of the selected
data appears at TO’s location.
Press $ or % to cursor to the desired destination track—
the gray area moves to show the new destination.
Destination
If you prefer, you can cursor to the desired destination track(s) before pressing the
TRACK EDIT button.
If the data you’re copying or moving comes from multiple tracks, select the lowestnumbered destination track you want—the remaining destination tracks are selected
automatically. If the data comes from non-adjacent tracks—for example, Tracks 1 and
3—non-adjacent destination tracks are selected. (The gray background spans the space
between selected non-adjacent destination tracks.)
Performing an Editing Operation with the TRACK EDIT Buttons
The TRACK EDIT buttons provide quick access to the most commonly used phrase and
region editing operations. When the PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX is:
•
•
green for phrase editing—the label above each button shows the phrase editing
operation with which it’s associated.
red for region editing—the label below each button shows the region editing
operation with which it’s associated.
Phrase
operations
Region
operations
TRACK EDIT
COPY
MOVE
TRIM IN
TRIM OUT
DELETE
SPLIT
NEW
PHRASE
COPY
MOVE
INSERT
CUT
ERASE
COMP / EXP.
IMPORT
GRADATION
REGION
AUTOMIX
IN
OUT
FROM
TO
To perform an edit operation using the TRACK EDIT buttons:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
248
Set the PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX button as desired.
Set the edit points required for the desired editing procedure.
Select the desired phrase or region—the operation’s TRACK EDIT button lights.
Press the operation’s lit TRACK EDIT button—the ENTER/YES button flashes.
If edit messages—see “Edit Messages” on Page 240—are:
• turned off—the VS-2480 executes the selected editing operation.
• turned on—you can set the operation’s parameters as desired and press ENTER/
YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
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Editing from the TRACK Menu
MENU
PROJECT
TRACK
EFFECT
UTILITY
You can perform any phrase or region editing operation from the TRACK menu.
The parameters unique to each phrase or region editing operation are described in
Chapters 19 and 20, respectively.
How the TRACK Menu Is Organized
The TRACK menu presents all phrase and region editing operations in two sub-menus:
•
The TRACK PHRASE EDIT MENU
•
The TRACK REGION EDIT MENU
The large PHRASE and REGION symbols that appear at the right side of the screen tell
you at a glance which menu is currently displayed.
If you’re viewing:
Switch to the:
By pressing:
TRACK PHRASE EDIT MENU
TRACK REGION EDIT MENU
F6 (Ph→Reg)
TRACK REGION EDIT MENU
TRACK PHRASE EDIT MENU
F6 (Reg→Ph)
You can also select the desired menu by pressing PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX until
it turns the desired green or red.
The Appearance of TRACK Menu Screens
TRACK menu screens, as shown on the previous page, don’t fill the entire display—
parts of the Home screen remain visible to make editing easier. You can move around a
project using the current time location display (Page 126). The playlist is visible in most
edit screens. The meters display—or the fader/pan displays—may also remain in view.
When the playlist is visible during editing, you can press WAVE DISPLAY to replace
the playlist with the wave display.
Sources and Destinations in the TRACK Menu
When you’re moving or copying phrases and regions, or if you’re swapping regions on
different tracks in the TRACK menu, designate the:
•
•
source track—the track you’re moving or copying audio from.
destination V-Track—the track to which you’re moving or copying the audio.
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Performing an Edit Operation from the TRACK Menu
1.
2.
3.
Press the TRACK menu button.
If the desired edit menu isn’t displayed:
• press F6 (Ph→Reg) to switch to the TRACK REGION EDIT MENU screen.
• press F6 (Reg→Ph) to switch to the TRACK PHRASE EDIT MENU screen.
Begin the desired edit operation by:
• clicking its F button—Each menu’s available operations are arranged on a set of
tabbed layers. If the desired operation’s F button isn’t visible, press PAGE until
it appears, and then press its F button.
• selecting it from the displayed menu—Use the cursor buttons to select the desired
operation and press ENTER/YES.
The operation’s main screen appears. The TRACK STATUS buttons—and the
SELECT buttons in some operations—flash. See Page 250 to learn about quickselecting tracks, phrases and regions.
An operation may have more than one screen. For details on all of the phrase editing
operations, see Chapter 19. Chapter 20 explains all of the region editing operations.
Placing Edit Points on a TRACK Menu Operation Screen
Each edit operation’s main screen allows you to place the
edit points the operation requires. They’re presented as
parameters. When you first begin an edit operation, the
parameters show the time location of any edit point that’s
already been placed. You can set an edit point by:
•
•
•
selecting its parameter and entering the desired location using the cursor buttons
and TIME/VALUE dial (or your mouse).
selecting the edit point’s parameter and moving the timeline to the desired
location. To lock in the new location, unselect the parameter by selecting some
other parameter on the screen.
using the current time location display to move the timeline to the desired location,
selecting the edit point’s parameter and pressing F2 (GetNow).
You can move the timeline to any already set edit point by selecting the edit point’s
parameter box and pressing F3 (GO TO).
About Selection in the TRACK Menu
The TRACK menu offers two ways to select tracks, phrases and regions. You can use the:
•
•
Quick-Selection feature—that lets you quickly select the tracks you want to edit.
onscreen selection tools—that provide more information about your selection, and let
you select destination V-Tracks when you’re copying, moving or exchanging audio.
When you’re moving, copying or exchanging audio, you need to select source and
destination tracks. In other edit operations, you need only select the phrase(s) or
region(s) upon which you want to perform the operation.
Quick-Selecting from the TRACK Menu
You can use Quick Selection for all phrase and region operations except the phrase
Take Manager, and the region IMPORT and ARRANGE edit operations.
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When you select and begin an editing operation that requires the selection of phrases
or regions, the TRACK STATUS buttons—and sometimes the SELECT buttons—start to
flash. You use these buttons to quick-select the tracks that contain the desired phrases
or regions. When you select the track:
•
•
any phrase on the track that’s touching the timeline is selected. If there’s no phrase
touching the timeline, the track will not let itself be selected. Move the timeline so it
touches the desired phrase, and then select it.
any region of audio on the track between the IN and OUT points is selected—see
“Placing Edit Points on a TRACK Menu Operation Screen” on Page 250. If there’s
no audio on the track between the IN and OUT points, the track cannot be selected.
If you quick-select a phrase or region on one of a pair of linked tracks, the phrase or
region on the other linked track is also quick-selected.
To quick-select source tracks and destination tracks when moving, copying or exchanging audio:
1.
2.
3.
4.
If necessary, press TR 1-16 or TR 17-24 to display the track channels that
include the track you want to select.
Press the SELECT button of a source track—it lights solidly in green to
show that the audio comes from that track.
By default, the same track is selected as the destination track. Its
TRACK STATUS buttons light red to show this.
If you want to select a different destination track, press its TRACK
STATUS button so it turns red.
To include another set of source and destination tracks, press the new
source track’s SELECT button.
Each time you select a new source track, subsequent destination track selections apply
to that source—you can’t go back and select a different destination track for a source
you selected earlier.
5.
6.
Press the new destination track’s TRACK STATUS button.
To remove a set of source and destination tracks, press the source track’s SELECT
button—the source and destination tracks’ SELECT and TRACK STATUS buttons
flash to show they’re no longer selected.
If you’d like to change an earlier set of source/destination tracks, press the source
track’s SELECT button, and then set it up again the way you want it.
The V-Track map on the display shows you the V-Tracks that are currently
selected for editing. Any V-Track with a wide, flashing black box is a source. Any
V-Track with a wide, flashing white box is a destination.
Quick Selection always select the destination track’s currently active V-Track. To select a
different destination V-Track, use the onscreen selection tools.
To quick-select phrase and regions for all other quick-selectable edit operations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
If necessary, press TR 1-16 or TR 17-24 to display the track channels that
include the track you want to select.
Press the desired track’s TRACK STATUS button—it lights solid red to
show it’s targeted for editing.
Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for any other tracks you want to include.
To unselect a track, press its TRACK STATUS button again—it flashes
green to show it’s no longer selected.
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The V-Track map on the display shows you which V-Tracks are currently selected
for editing. Any V-Track with a flashing, wide white box is selected for editing.
After you’ve selected the desired phrase(s) or regions(s), set up the rest of the edit
operation on the display.
Selection Using the TRACK Menu’s Onscreen Selection Tools
For most of the TRACK menu’s editing operations, when you want to select a phrase or
region using the TRACK menu onscreen selection tools, you press:
•
F1 (SelPhr)—to select a phrase
•
F1 (SelTrk)—to select a region
When you press F1 (SelPhr) or F1 (SelTrk), the phrase or region selection display
appears in the upper part of the screen—just beneath the current time location
display—while the playlist is visible in the lower part of the screen.
Phrase
selection
display
Region
selection
display
You can select tracks that
have a phrase touching the
timeline.
You can select any track—whether it
contains audio in the defined region or
not—since regions can contain silence.
When you’re performing phrase deletion, normalization or naming, or region
exchanging or naming, there’s no need to press F1—the desired selection display
appears on the edit operation’s main screen.
There are no phrase or region selection displays for creating a new phrase, importing a
region from another project or re-arranging the order of regions in a project.
If you select a phrase or region on one of a pair of linked tracks, the phrase—if it’s
touching the timeline—or region on the other linked track is also selected.
To select a phrase or region using the TRACK menu’s onscreen tools:
1.
2.
Use the cursor buttons to select the track containing the desired phrase or region.
Press F3 (MARK) to select the track’s phrase or region—a
checkmark appears to the track’s left to show it’s selected.
When you’re selecting phrases, only tracks containing a phrase that’s touching the
timeline can be marked. You can mark additional phrases on the other tracks by
cursoring up to the current time location display and turning the TIME/VALUE dial to
move the timeline to the desired phrases. You can then mark their tracks.
3.
To unselect a track, press F3 (MARK) again—the checkmark is removed.
If the editing operation involves moving or copying audio
between tracks, you see an arrow to the right of the track you’ve
selected. This arrow points to a destination V-Track.
On many editing screens, you can see each track’s name. On selection screens that
allow you to choose V-Tracks, only track numbers are shown to make room.
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4.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired destination V-Track.
Be careful not to select the same V-Track as a destination for more than one source.
You can use the onscreen tools together with the Quick Selection feature to jump from
one track’s currently selected V-Track to another track’s currently selected V-Track
without having to turn the TIME/VALUE dial to get there. While the source track is
highlighted onscreen, you can press any track’s TRACK STATUS button to make the
onscreen V-Track value jump to that track’s currently selected V-Track.
5.
6.
Repeat Steps 1-4 for any phrase or region you wish to select.
Press F1 (<<BACK) to return to the edit operation’s main screen, or F6 (EXIT) to
return to the TRACK PHRASE EDIT MENU or the TRACK REGION EDIT MENU.
You can select or unselect all of the displayed phrase or regions at once by pressing F2
(ALL). If any phrase or regions are selected, they become unselected. If none are
selected, they all become selected. If they’re all selected, they all become unselected.
Press F2 (ALL) repeatedly to toggle selection on and off for all phrases or regions.
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19—Phrase Editing Operations
This chapter describes the phrase-based editing operations you can perform in the
VS-2480. Most of the operations can be performed using a mouse, the TRACK EDIT
buttons or the edit commands presented in the TRACK menu. Some can be performed
only from the TRACK menu. We’ll list the way(s) each operation can be performed.
Chapter 18, “Editing Tracks,” explains:
•
•
•
•
•
important editing concepts you need to know—see Page 235.
all about the FROM and TO edit points—see Page 236.
how to edit using a mouse—see Page 241.
how to edit using the TRACK EDIT buttons—see Page 247.
how to edit from the TRACK menu—see Page 249.
You can find step-by-step editing instructions in the Step-by-Step Instruction Finder
that starts on Page 19.
When copying or moving phrases, or creating a new phrase, don’t mix project
recording modes. If your project uses a recording mode other than CDR, and you’ve
recorded mastering tracks (Page 340) in CDR mode, their phrases can’t be used on
other project V-Tracks. Likewise, non-CDR phrases can’t be used on CDR-recorded
V-Tracks. If you attempt either action, the VS-2480 displays “Found Illegal Track Pair!”
Press ENTER/YES. You can easily spot CDR-recorded tracks—see Page 341.
COPY
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
Phrase COPY makes a copy of each selected phrase and pastes the copy
at the desired location. You can copy a phrase to a new time location
and/or to another track. You can copy it to a currently selected V-Track,
or to a V-Track that isn’t currently selected.
TRACK menu
F1 (COPY)
The TRACK menu’s phrase COPY operation lets you copy phrases to V-Tracks that
aren’t currently selected.
Why You’d Use Phrase COPY
You can use COPY to build a track from a short musical segment such as a drum
pattern. By pasting the pattern end-to-end the desired number of times, you can create
a seamless drum loop. COPY also allows you re-use performances that occur multiple
times in a project—perfectly performed chorus background vocals, for example. You
can also create a safety copy of a phrase on a spare V-Track before editing the original.
You can loop rhythm patterns even more easily using the VS-2480’s phrase sequencer,
described in Chapter 21.
Edit Points
•
•
FROM—sets the location of the phrase’s time anchor.
TO—sets the time location at which you want to paste the time anchor.
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Times
This sets the number of copies to be pasted, one after another, at the TO point.
Quantize
When Times is set to a number other than 1, Quantize lets you paste the copied phrases
precisely on the first beat of the tempo map’s measures. You can set Quantize to:
•
•
Off—so that copies are pasted according to the Overlap setting described below.
On—so that the TO point for the first copy is shifted to the first beat of the measure
in which TO is currently placed. Each subsequent copy is pasted the same number
of measures away from the FROM point, at the first beat of the measure.
With Quantize off
FROM
With Quantize on
TO
Bar 1
Bar 2
Bar 3
Bar 4
FROM
TO
Bar 1
Bar 2
Bar 3
Bar 4
This allows you to keep pasted copies in time no matter what the tempo of the audio in
the project is, even if it speeds up or slows down.
To take advantage of the Quantize feature, you’ll need to established a tempo map for
your project. See Page 312.
Overlap
When the Times parameter is set to a number other than 1, the Overlap parameter sets
the timing relationship between pasted copies. When Overlap is:
•
Off—the front of each copied phrase is pasted to the end of the preceding copy. The
copied phrases’ timing can grow more and more incorrect with each copy.
When the phrase is shorter than the
distance between FROM and TO.
FROM
•
TO
FROM
TO
On—each copy is pasted at the same time distance from the start of the previous
copy as the distance between FROM and TO. If the length of the phrase is different
than the distance between FROM and TO, Overlap keeps the pasted copies in time.
When the phrase is shorter than the
distance between FROM and TO.
FROM
256
When the phrase is longer than the
distance between FROM and TO.
TO
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When the phrase is longer than the
distance between FROM and TO.
FROM
TO
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19—Phrase Editing Operations
MOVE
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
Phrase MOVE lets you place a selected phrase in a new location. You
can move a phrase to a new time location and/or to another track. You
can move it to a currently selected V-Track, or to a V-Track that isn’t
currently selected.
TRACK menu
F2 (MOVE)
The TRACK menu’s phrase MOVE operation lets you move phrases to V-Tracks that
aren’t currently selected.
Why You’d Use Phrase MOVE
If there’s a timing error in a performance, MOVE can shift it into correct musical time.
You can also move a great performance from one spot in a project to another more
useful location—for example, if a guitarist plays a great lick at the end of your fadeout,
you can move the lick into the project’s intro, or into the solo section in the middle of
the project.
Edit Points
•
•
FROM—sets the location of the phrase’s time anchor.
TO—sets the time location to which you want to move the time anchor.
Quantize
Quantize lets you move a phrase exactly to the first beat of a measure when you’ve set
up a tempo map for your project (see Page 312). Set it to:
•
•
Off—so that the phrase is moved to the TO location.
On—so that the phrase is moved to the first beat of the measure in which TO is
currently placed.
Quantizing works when you’re moving a phrase much the way it works when you’re
copying multiple phrases, as illustrated on Page 256.
TRIM IN
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
TRIM IN allows you to adjust the location at which a selected phrase
begins without changing the timing of its audio content.
TRACK menu
F3 (TrmIn)
Why You’d Use Phrase TRIM IN
You can use TRIM IN to make sure that a phrase starts exactly where its audio begins by
cleaning off unwanted silence or noise from its beginning. This can make it easier to
move or copy the phrase. Use TRIM IN to clean up the front of your mastering tracks
(Page 346).
Edit Points
•
TO—sets the desired beginning of the phrase. Any part of the phrase that occurs
before the TO point is trimmed from the phrase.
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TRIM OUT
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
TRIM OUT allows you to adjust the location at which a selected phrase
ends without changing the timing of its audio content.
TRACK menu
F4 (TrmOut)
Why You’d Use Phrase TRIM OUT
Use TRIM OUT to remove unwanted audio from the end of a phrase. You can also use
TRIM OUT to get rid of unwanted studio noise and conversation after the audio you
want to keep. Use TRIM OUT to clean up the ends of your mastering tracks (Page 346).
You can use TRIM OUT when you need to trim a rhythm pattern to exactly the right
length to help ensure that it loops properly.
Edit Points
•
TO—sets the desired end of the phrase. Any part of the phrase that occurs after the
TO point is trimmed from the phrase.
DELETE
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
Use the phrase DELETE command to remove a phrase from a project.
Remember: When you delete a phrase from a project, you’re not erasing
its audio from your hard drive unless you optimize the project
(Page 100). If you haven’t optimized the project, you can get the audio
back at any time using Undo or by creating a new phrase (Page 259)
from the take on which the phrase was based.
TRACK menu
F5 (DELETE)
Why You’d Use Phrase DELETE
Phrase DELETE allows you to get rid of unwanted phrases so you don’t have to bother
silencing them when you mix, and so they don’t clutter up your playlist.
SPLIT
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
You can split a currently selected phrase into two phrases using the
phrase SPLIT command.
TRACK menu
F1 (SPLIT)
Why You’d Use Phrase SPLIT
Phrase SPLIT lets you break up longer phrases into two separate pieces to turn musical
ideas, sound effects or anything else into individual objects. This makes it easier to
move each element, copy it, or subject it to any other editing operation.
If you plan to be moving a lot of audio around in a project, taking the time to split your
elements into separate phrases can make editing much easier in the long run. DIVIDE
can break up a long phrase into multiple components automatically—see Page 260.
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Edit Points
TO—sets the point at which a selected phrase is split.
Here’s an easy way to set the SPLIT TO point: move the timeline to the desired location
and press F2 (GetNow).
NEW
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
You can create a new phrase from any of the project’s takes stored on
your hard drive—to learn about takes, see Page 86.
TRACK menu
F2 (NEW)
Why You’d Use Phrase NEW
Phrase NEW lets you retrieve a project recording that you’ve discarded. This recording
can be a phrase you’ve deleted, or a performance that you originally thought you didn’t
want to use. If you’ve deleted a portion of a phrase that you want to restore—and can’t
remember its Undo level—you can go back to the take on which the phrase is based,
and make a whole new phrase you can re-edit.
Edit Points
•
TO—sets the time location at which the start of the new phrase is placed.
If you’d like the new phrase to be created at the same location in the project at which
the take was originally recorded, press F4 (Orignl).
Take
Highlight the Take parameter and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through all of the
project’s available takes to select the one you want. Beneath the Take parameter you can
see information about the selected take, including the location in the project where
recording began and ended, and when the take was recorded.
Take
information
Press F1 (TAKE) to jump to the Take Manager (Page 262). In the Take Manager, you can
preview takes. To leave the Take Manager and resume editing, press F1 (<<BACK).
If you’ve already optimized the project, unused takes recorded before optimization will
have been erased from the hard drive.
If you attempt to use a CDR-recorded take on a V-Track recorded in another mode—or
vice versa—the VS-2480 displays “Found Illegal Track Pair!” Press ENTER/YES to
continue, and select a non-CDR take. You can identify a CDR-recorded take by the
asterisk in its number, as shown on Page 341.
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Track
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select any V-Track in the project as the V-Track on which
the new phrase is to be created.
You can quick-select any currently active V-Track as a destination for the new phrase by
selecting its track—press the track’s TRACK STATUS button so it lights solidly.
NORMALIZE
Use: TRACK menu
Normalization raises the level of a phrase to its optimal volume.
TRACK menu
F3 (Normlz)
Before normalization
After normalization
The main NORMALIZE screen provides a phrase selection display in which you can
mark the phrase you want to normalize. If the phrase you want isn’t available, move the
timeline so that it touches the phrase.
Why You’d Use Phrase NORMALIZE
Phrase NORMALIZE allows you to increase the level of a phrase that was recorded at
too low a volume to give you more signal to work with during bouncing and/or mixing.
While NORMALIZE can help a weak recording level, it’s not a perfect substitute for
recording the signal properly in the first place since it raises the volume of background
noise along with the desired audio content in the phrase.
DIVIDE
Use: TRACK menu
Phrase DIVIDE analyzes the level of the signal in the phrase and
automatically divides it into smaller phrases wherever the signal level
falls below a specified volume.
TRACK menu
F4 (DIVIDE)
Phrase DIVIDE analyzes the levels
in the original phrase...
...and divides the phrase up into
smaller phrases.
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Why You’d Use Phrase DIVIDE
Phrase DIVIDE breaks up a longer phrase into smaller phrases so that you can more
easily work with the elements of a recording on an individual basis. It seeks to achieve
the same result as phrase SPLIT (Page 258), but it does so automatically, and by
working with an entire phrase in a single editing operation.
IN Threshold
The IN Threshold sets the level at which a new phrase begins. As the VS-2480 searches
for its next phrase, it considers a level higher than the IN Threshold parameter’s value
to signify the start of a new phrase. IN Threshold can be set from -84 dB to +6 dB.
In Margin
The VS-2480 adds the amount of time selected by the IN Margin parameter to the front
of a newly created phrase to ensure that the phrase doesn’t start too abruptly in the
middle of a signal on its way up to the IN Threshold level.
OUT Threshold
OUT Threshold sets the level at which a phrase ends. When a phrase’s signal falls
below the level set by the OUT Threshold parameter, the VS-2480 considers the current
phrase to be complete, and starts searching for the next phrase. OUT Threshold can be
set from -84 dB to +6 dB.
OUT Margin
The VS-2480 adds the amount of time selected by the OUT Margin parameter to the
end of a newly created phrase to ensure that its audio isn’t cut off prematurely as its
signal drops down in level below the OUT Threshold.
NAME
Use: TRACK menu
You can name any phrase. The main NAME screen provides a phrase
selection display in which you can select the desired phrase. If the
phrase you want isn’t available in the display, move the timeline so that
it touches the phrase and press F1 (NAME). To learn about the
VS-2480’s naming tools, see “Naming” on Page 73.
TRACK menu
F5 (NAME)
Why You’d Use Phrase NAME
When you name a phrase, it becomes easier to identify in the playlist and when you’re
selecting phrases during editing.
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Take Mngr
Use: TRACK menu
The Take Mngr (“Take Manager”) shows you all of the project’s takes
currently on your hard drive.
A black box to
the left of a
take means
that it’s used by
a phrase in the
project.
TRACK menu
F1 (TAKE)
The numbers and
letters to the right of
a take’s name are its
hexadecimal file
identification.
If you’re not sure what a take is, see Page 86.
You can do a variety of things with the takes you see in the Take Manager screen—use
the % and $ buttons or the TIME/VALUE dial to scroll through the list. Press:
•
•
•
•
F1 (NAME)—to rename the selected take in order to make it easier to identify. For
more on naming, see Page 73.
F2 (INFO)—to toggle the information shown for the takes. The Take Manager can
show each take’s size and session information, or its start and end time.
F3 (SORT)—to switch among the list’s available sorting orders. You can select:
• Hist—to sort the list by recording date and time.
• V.Tr—to sort the list in V-Track order.
• Name—to sort the list alphabetically by name.
F4 (DELETE)—to delete the currently selected take.
When you delete a take, it’s permanently erased from your hard drive. Use this feature
cautiously. It cannot be undone.
•
•
262
F5 (Previw)—to listen to the selected take. Press EXIT/NO to halt playback.
F6 (EXIT)—to leave the Take Manager and return to the TRACK PHRASE EDIT
MENU.
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20—Region Editing Operations
This chapter explains the editing operations you can perform on regions in the VS-2480.
Since region editing operations work on a chunk of time within a track, you can think of
them as track editing operations—some of them do, in fact, affect an entire track.
You can perform most region operations using a mouse, the TRACK EDIT buttons or
the edit commands presented in the TRACK menu. Some are available only in the
TRACK menu. We’ll list how each operation can be performed in its description.
Chapter 18, “Editing Tracks,” explains:
•
•
•
•
•
important editing concepts you need to know—see Page 235.
all about the FROM and TO edit points—see Page 236.
how to edit using a mouse—see Page 241.
how to edit using the TRACK EDIT buttons—see Page 247.
how to edit from the TRACK menu—see Page 249.
You can find step-by-step editing instructions in the Step-by-Step Instruction Finder
that starts on Page 19.
About Tracks Recorded with the CDR Recording Mode
When moving audio between tracks, take care not to mix project recording modes. If
your project uses a recording mode other than CDR, and you’ve recorded mastering
tracks (Page 340) using CDR mode, their audio can’t be used on other project V-Tracks.
Likewise, non-CDR audio can’t be used on CDR-recorded V-Tracks. If you attempt
either action, the VS-2480 displays “Found Illegal Track Pair!” and the operation will not
proceed. Press ENTER/YES to resume editing. You can easily spot CDR-recorded tracks
by their appearance—see Page 341.
COPY
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
With region COPY, you can copy an audio region in a selected track
and paste the copy at a new location. You can copy a region to a new
time location and/or to another track. You can copy it to a currently
selected V-Track, or to a V-Track that isn’t currently selected.
TRACK menu
F1 (COPY)
The TRACK menu’s region COPY operation lets you copy phrases to V-Tracks that
aren’t currently selected.
Why You’d Use Region COPY
You can use COPY to build a track from a short musical segment such as a rhythm
pattern. By pasting the pattern end-to-end the desired number of times, you can create
a seamless drum loop. COPY also allows you re-use performances that occur multiple
times in a project, such as perfectly performed chorus background vocals. You can also
create a safety copy of a track’s audio on a spare V-Track before editing the original.
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You can also easily loop rhythm patterns using the VS-2480’s phrase sequencer, which
is described in Chapter 21.
Edit Points
•
•
•
•
IN—sets the beginning of the audio region to be copied.
OUT—sets the end of the audio region to be copied.
FROM—sets the location of the region’s time anchor.
TO—sets the time location at which you want to paste the time anchor.
Be sure to set the distance between IN and OUT to a length of time greater than .5
seconds. Regions smaller than that will be copied, but won’t properly play back.
Times
This parameter sets the number of copies to be pasted, one after another, at the TO
point.
+Insert
The +Insert parameter lets you choose whether you want the copied region to be
pasted over any audio already at the TO location, or inserted before it.
Before COPY
IN
FROM
OUT
TO
COPY with +Insert off
IN
FROM
OUT
TO
COPY with +Insert On
IN
FROM
OUT
TO
Set it to:
•
•
264
Off—so that the copied audio is pasted over any audio already present at the
destination location.
On—so that the copied audio is inserted at the TO point, moving all subsequent
audio on the track to the end of the pasted copy, or copies.
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20—Region Editing Operations
MOVE
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
The region MOVE edit operation moves the selected audio to a new
location. You can move a region to a new time location and/or to
another track. You can move it to a currently selected V-Track, or to a
V-Track that isn’t currently selected.
TRACK menu
F2 (MOVE)
The TRACK menu’s region MOVE operation lets you move phrases to V-Tracks that
aren’t currently selected.
Why You’d Use Region MOVE
Region MOVE is a great way to move a segment of audio to a more useful location in a
project.
Edit Points
•
•
•
•
IN—sets the beginning of the audio region to be moved.
OUT—sets the end of the audio region to be moved.
FROM—sets the location of the region’s time anchor.
TO—sets the time location to which you want to move the time anchor.
Be sure to set the distance between IN and OUT to a length of time greater than .5
seconds. Regions smaller than that will be moved, but won’t properly play back.
+Insert
The +Insert parameter for region MOVE works the same way as region COPY’s +Insert
parameter—see Page 264. Set it to:
•
•
Off—so that the region you’re moving replaces any audio already present at the
destination location.
On—so that the region you’re moving is inserted at the TO point, moving all
subsequent audio on the track to the end of the moved region.
INSERT
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
The INSERT edit operation adds silent, blank space between the
designated IN and OUT points. Audio that had previously been
there—and all of the audio that comes after it—is slid back to the OUT
point, thus lengthening the track due to the added blank space.
Before region INSERT
IN
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OUT
TRACK menu
F3 (INSERT)
After region INSERT
IN
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Why You’d Use Region INSERT
You’d use region INSERT if you wanted to shift audio to a later time in the project,
leaving empty sonic space before it.
You can use INSERT to add a pause between sections of a musical piece by inserting
the same amount of blank time into all of the project’s tracks.
Edit Points
•
•
IN—sets beginning of the blank space you’re inserting.
OUT—sets the end of the blank space you’re inserting.
Make sure there’s no audio within .5 seconds before the IN point and .5 seconds after
the OUT point to ensure a smooth transition.
AllVTr
Turn AllVTr on if you want to insert the blank space into all of the V-Tracks belonging to
a selected track—this will keep all of the V-Tracks aligned if you’re separating entire
sections of a project by inserting blank space.
CUT
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
Region CUT removes a specified chunk out of the selected track,
moving everything that comes after the chunk forward in time so that
there’s no gap where the audio’s been removed.
Before region CUT
IN
OUT
TRACK menu
F4 (CUT)
After region CUT
IN
OUT
Why You’d Use Region CUT
You can use region CUT when you want to get rid of a portion of a performance,
replacing it with what comes after. For example, if you’ve recorded a soloist playing
over a fadeout, and the first eight bars of the fadeout aren’t as good as the rest—you
can cut the unwanted eight bars and move the best part of the performance forward.
Chop out an entire unwanted section of a project by using CUT on all of its tracks.
Thanks to the VS-2480’s non-destructive editing, audio you cut is still safe and sound on
your hard drive if you want it back, until you optimize the project. You can use Undo to
retrieve it, or create a new phrase from its original take (see Page 259).
Edit Points
•
•
IN—sets the beginning of the audio segment you’re cutting out of the track.
OUT—sets the end of the audio segment you’re cutting out of the track.
Make sure there’s no audio within .5 seconds before the IN point and .5 seconds after
the OUT point to ensure a smooth transition.
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AllVTr
Turn AllVTr on if you want to remove the chunk of time from all of the V-Tracks
belonging to a selected track.
ERASE
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
Erase removes a specified region from a selected track, leaving all of its
other audio where it is.
Before region ERASE
IN
TRACK menu
F5 (ERASE)
After region ERASE
OUT
IN
OUT
Why You’d Use Region ERASE
Region ERASE is a really good way to get rid of unwanted audio—wrong notes, noises,
throat-clearing, unwanted chatter and so on—on a track without affecting the rest of its
audio.
Thanks to the VS-2480’s non-destructive editing, anything you erase is still on your
hard drive if you want it back, until you optimize the project. Use Undo to retrieve it, or
create a new phrase from its original take (see Page 259).
Edit Points
•
•
IN—sets the beginning of the audio segment you’re erasing.
OUT—sets the end of the audio segment you’re erasing.
Make sure there’s no audio within .5 seconds before the IN point and .5 seconds after
the OUT point to ensure a smooth transition.
AllVTr
Turn AllVTr on if you want to remove the audio from all of the V-Tracks belonging to a
selected track. You’ll want to do this if each V-Track contains a different performance
attempt, and they all contain the same mistake.
COMP/EXP.
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
The region COMP/EXP. (“Compression/Expansion”) operation allows
you to time-stretch or time-shrink a region, with or without changing
the region’s pitch.
TRACK menu
F1 (CmpExp)
Time compression and expansion cannot be used on tracks recorded using the CDR
recording mode.
Since the COMP/EXP. operation makes a new copy of any region it’s processing, it can
be performed only when there’s sufficient free space on your hard drive.
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Once you’ve defined the desired region, the location of the TO point determines
whether the region’s audio will be stretched out or shrunk. If the TO point is:
•
•
before the OUT point—the region’s audio is made shorter in duration.
after the OUT point—the region is made longer in duration.
Compression
IN
Expansion
TO OUT
IN
OUT TO
Why You’d Want to Use Region COMP/EXP.
You can use COMP/EXP. to make audio fit a groove in a dance track. You can also use it
to make a region meet the time constraints of a TV or radio commercial or a soundtrack.
You can stretch a region to fill a blank space in the playlist by placing TO at the
beginning of the next audio. Likewise, if a region’s too large to fit in an available gap,
place TO where the region overlaps the audio following it to shrink it to the right size.
Edit Points
•
•
IN—sets the beginning of the region to be stretched or shrunk.
OUT—sets the end of the region to be stretched or shrunk.
The length of time between the IN and OUT points must be greater than .5 seconds.
•
TO—sets the amount of time compression or expansion to be applied, according to
its position before (compression) or after (expansion) the OUT point.
You can compress the region’s length to as little as 75% or expand by as much as 125%.
Be aware that the more extreme the amount of compression or expansion, the more the
region’s audio quality may degrade.
TYPE
To get the best-sounding results, the VS-2480 offers three different time compression/
expansion algorithms. Select the one that most closely describes the region’s audio:
•
A: Vocal, Narration
•
B: Slow-tempo Songs
•
Fast-tempo Songs
Pitch
When Pitch is set to:
•
•
Variable—the region’s pitch is raised or lowered by the same amount that its length
is compressed or expanded, respectively.
Fixed—the region’s pitch stays the same regardless of the change to its length.
Amp
The time compression/expansion process can change a region’s level, and if its level
becomes too high, distortion results. The Amp parameter lets you set the region’s postprocessing loudness. We recommend trying a setting of 60% to start. If the processed
region is too quiet, perform an Undo and try again with a higher percentage. You can
set this parameter to the following level percentages: 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100.
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IMPORT
Use: Mouse, TRACK EDIT buttons, TRACK menu
You can import a track from another project recorded using the same
sampling rate and recording mode as the current project.
TRACK menu
F2 (IMPORT)
You can import CDR-mode disk-image audio (Page 340) into any project, regardless of
its sampling rate or recording mode. If the project uses the CDR mode, you can import
the image to any V-Tracks. Otherwise, you can import it only to unused V-Tracks
belonging to Tracks 23 and 24. CDR-recorded audio is always stereo, so it’s imported to
two tracks—when you select a destination track, its odd/even partner is also selected.
When you select IMPORT, the VS-2480 scans the selected drive and presents you a list
of all projects that contain importable audio.
Select the desired project and press F5 (OK). On the screen that appears, you can select
the track you want to import, and the track in the current project on which you want to
place the imported audio.
The source
project and
source track
The destination
project and
destination track
To return to the main IMPORT screen, press F1 (<<BACK).
Why You’d Use Region IMPORT
IMPORT lets you share favorite recordings between projects, or create new projects
based on previously recorded source materials.
SOURCE
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the track you want to import.
DESTINATION
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the track in the current project on which you want
to place the imported audio.
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20—Region Editing Operations
EXCHANGE
Use: TRACK menu
Region EXCHANGE allows you to swap audio regions between source
and destination tracks.
TRACK menu
F3 (Exchng)
Why You’d Use Region EXCHANGE
Region EXCHANGE lets you re-organize a project’s tracks to make them easier to work
with. Also, you can use EXCHANGE to re-order tracks to facilitate channel linking.
How to Use Region EXCHANGE
On the EXCHANGE main screen, select the desired source track—specifically, the data
on its active V-Track—and the desired destination V-Track using the methods described
in Chapter 18.
Make sure not to use the same destination V-Track(s) for more than one source track or
linked pair of source tracks.
ARRANGE
Use: TRACK menu
Region ARRANGE lets you move regions around within a project to rearrange the order of its sections. When you re-arrange a project’s
sections, you create a new playlist.
TRACK menu
F4 (Arrnge)
ARRANGE identifies each section of a project by the marker placed at the start of the
section and the marker at the end of the section. If one section runs right into the next,
you don’t need to place a separate marker at the end of the first section—the VS-2480
can use the marker at the start of the next section as the end marker for the first section.
Place the markers you need before editing—see Page 188 to learn about markers.
Since region ARRANGE lets you restructure a project without creating any new audio
files on your hard drive, it doesn’t appreciably increase the size of the project, no
matter how long a new playlist you create.
Why You’d Use Region ARRANGE
Region ARRANGE lets you try out different structures for your project. If you’re
recording a song, you can move its pieces around until you’re satisfied with the way it
flows. If a project contains multiple pieces or songs, you can re-arrange their order.
You can undo a new project arrangement you’d decided you don’t like.
Edit Points
•
270
TO—sets the start of the newly created playlist.
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20—Region Editing Operations
Creating a New Playlist
On the region ARRANGE main screen:
1.
2.
Press F1 (CREATE) to create the first segment of the new playlist.
Cursor to the segment’s Start marker number.
Start
marker
number
3.
4.
5.
6.
End
marker
number
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the marker at the start of the desired section.
Cursor to the segment’s End marker number.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the marker at the end of the section.
Press F1 (CREATE) to create the next playlist segment.
The VS-2480 creates a new segment with the same settings as the segment before it.
Since you can’t set a Start marker number to be higher than an End marker’s
number, set the new segment’s End marker number first.
If you ever find you can’t raise a segment’s Start marker number, check the segment’s
End marker number to make sure that it’s set higher than the desired Start marker.
7.
8.
Cursor to the segment’s End marker number.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the marker at the end of the section you want
to use in the second segment.
9. Cursor to the segment’s Start marker number.
10. Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the marker at the start of the section.
11. Repeat Steps 6-11 for all of the desired remaining playlist segments.
12. If you need to change the settings for any segment, cursor to the desired settings
and change them.
You can press:
•
•
•
F2 (AllClr)—to clear all of the segments from the playlist.
F3 (DELETE)—to clear the currently selected segment.
F4 (Insert)—to add a new segment above the currently select segment.
Placing and Activating a New Playlist
Once you’ve created the new playlist, you must place it at the desired location in the
project in order to activate it. To do this:
1.
Press F5 (NEXT)—the ARRANGE TO screen appears.
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20—Region Editing Operations
The TO location is the place in the project where the playlist is to start.
If you select a TO location that’s before or somewhere in the middle of the project’s
currently active playlist, the new playlist is placed on top of the older one, taking the
place of the older playlist wherever they overlap. If you position the new playlist after
the currently active playlist, a new marker is automatically placed at the start of the
new playlist to make it easy to navigate to.
2.
Set TO to the desired project location. You can:
• dial in the desired location using the TIME/VALUE dial.
• move the timeline to the desired location using the current time location
display at the top of the screen, and then press F2 (GetNow).
To move the timeline to the current TO location, press F3 (GO TO).
3.
Press F5 (OK) to activate and place the playlist in the project, F1 (<<BACK) to return
to the main ARRANGE screen, or F6 (EXIT) to cancel the ARRANGE operation.
NAME
Use: TRACK menu
The VS-2480 allows you to name any of the tracks in a project. The main
NAME screen provides a track selection display where you can select
the track you want to name. To learn about the VS-2480’s naming tools,
see “Naming” on Page 73.
TRACK menu
F5 (NAME)
Why You’d Use Region NAME
Naming a track allows you to easily identify it on the VGA Info Display and when
you’re selecting tracks during editing.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
When the VS-2480’s Phrase Pad feature is activated, you can use each of the VS-2480’s
24 TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD buttons as a performance device that lets you play a
phrase from its corresponding track.
PAN / AUX SEND 1-8
AUX
SEND
RATIO
THRESHOLD
ATTACK
RELEASE
LEVEL
Dynamics
FREQ
GAIN
Filter
PHRASE SEQ
/ AUTOMIX
FREQ
GAIN
EQ Low
FREQ
Q
GAIN
EQ Lo - Mid
FREQ
Q
GAIN
PRM
EDIT
FREQ
EQ High
EQ Hi - Mid
CH EDIT / SELECT / PHRASE SEQ STATUS / AUTOMIX STATUS
IN 1-16
MANUAL
WRITE
PHRASE
PAD PLAY
PHRASE
SEQ
IN 17-24
AUX MST
READ
FROM
TRACK STATUS / PHRASE PAD
SOLO
MUTE
TR 1-16
TR 17-24
MASTER
EDIT
V.FADER
TO
FX RTN
TRACK
REC
PLAY
OFF
PHRASE
PAD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
9
10
AUX1MST AUX 2
FX1RTN
FX 2
11
12
13
14
15
16
AUX 3
AUX 4
AUX 5
AUX 6
AUX 7
AUX 8
FX 3
FX 4
FX 5
FX 6
FX 7
FX 8
(dB)
R
FADER
MASTER
(dB)
6
6
4
R
4
0
0
4
4
8
8
12
12
18
18
24
24
42
42
L
L
You can record your performance into the VS-2480’s phrase sequencer—once you’ve
recorded a phrase sequence, you can play it back side-by-side with your tracks. You can
also bounce your sequenced performance onto tracks in the current project.
For the sake of clarity, when we refer to phrase sequencer tracks, we’ll call them
“sequencer tracks.”
The TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD buttons and the CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ
STATUS/AUTOMIX STATUS buttons play important roles when you’re working with
the phrase pads and sequencer. In this context, we’ll refer to these buttons as the
“PHRASE PAD” buttons and the “PHRASE SEQ STATUS” buttons.
To get the best response from its phrase pad, trim any extra space from the front of each
phrase you’ll be using to ensure that the phrase plays immediately when you strike its
pad. See “TRIM IN” on Page 257.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Understanding the Phrase Pads
What a Phrase Pad Plays
Beginning of the project
Each phrase pad plays the first phrase that’s on its
corresponding hard disk recorder track. If you want a
phrase pad to play a phrase from somewhere in the
middle of a track, you can:
•
•
Copy the desired phrase to one of the track’s unused
V-Tracks, and then select that V-Track (Page 151) when
you’re using the phrase pads.
Copy the phrase to its own track.
The pad plays this
phrase.
Each phrase pad has a single voice of polyphony. Every time you press a pad, it restarts
playback of its phrase from the beginning. This allows you to play the pad so that its
phrase stutters as it starts.
Phrase Pad Setup
Each track channel has its own phrase pad parameters. Use the parameters to turn on
the channel’s phrase pad and to set the pad to play in any of three different ways.
When a track channel’s phrase pad is turned on, the corresponding hard disk recorder
track doesn’t play when the Phrase Pad feature is active, and the Home screen’s playlist
shows the corresponding phrase sequencer track in its place. (Once you exit Phrase Pad
or Phrase Sequence mode, the track returns to normal operation.) If you want a track to
play back during phrase sequencing—so that you can play other pads along with it—
make sure its phrase pad isn’t turned on.
Setting Up a Phrase Pad
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press the desired TR 1-16 or TR 17-24/FX RTN button.
Press the desired track channel’s CH EDIT button—its CH EDIT VIEW
screen appears. On the left side of the screen are its two phrase padrelated parameters.
Turn the PhrPAD (“Phrase Pad”) parameter on—this activates the track
channel’s phrase pad.
The PlyMod (“Play Mode”) parameter sets the manner in which the
pad’s phrase plays when you strike the pad. You can select:
• Gate—so that the phrase plays for only as long as the PHRASE PAD button’s
held down.
• Trg (“Trigger”)—so that each press of the PHRASE PAD button toggles the
phrase’s playback on or off.
• OneS (“One-Shot”)—so that the phrase restarts and plays in its entirety each
time the PHRASE PAD button is struck.
To turn off the track channel’s phrase pad, set PhrPAD to Off.
When Phrase Pad or Phrase Sequence mode is active, you can return to a track
channel’s CH EDIT VIEW screen to turn off its pad—or make any other desired
change—by holding down SHIFT and pressing its CH EDIT button. Hold down SHIFT
and press CH EDIT again to return to the previous screen.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Activating Phrase Pad Mode
1.
2.
Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ, and:
• the button lights solid green to show that the phrase pads are
now turned on.
• the PHRASE PAD buttons turn amber for each track channel
whose PhrPAD parameter is turned on.
To turn off Phrase Pad mode, repeat Step 1.
PHRASE
PAD PLAY
PHRASE
SEQ
Playing the Pads in Phrase Pad Mode
When the PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button is green—and when all of the
desired PHRASE PAD buttons are lit amber—you can play the pads, either by
themselves or along with your project as it plays back.
Sequencing a Phrase Pad Performance
Activating Phrase Sequence Mode
1.
2.
Hold down SHIFT, and press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ:
• the button lights solid red to show that the phrase sequencer is
now turned on.
• the PHRASE PAD buttons are amber for each track channel
whose PhrPAD parameter is turned on.
To turn off the phrase sequencer, repeat Step 1.
The PHRASE SEQ STATUS Buttons
PHRASE
SHIFT
PAD PLAY
+
PHRASE
SEQ
PHRASE SEQ
STATUS
button
The PHRASE SEQ STATUS buttons set the behavior of the phrase
sequencer’s tracks—each PHRASE SEQ STATUS button controls the
corresponding sequencer track. Every time you press a PHRASE SEQ
STATUS button, its color—and the state of the sequencer track it
controls—changes. When a PHRASE SEQ STATUS button is:
•
•
•
amber—you can manually play the sequencer track’s phrase pad.
red—the sequencer track is armed for recording. When the
sequencer’s recording, anything you play on its PHRASE PAD
button is recorded (or “written”) onto the sequencer track.
green—the sequencer track is set to play back (or “read”) anything
recorded on it.
1
17
PHRASE SEQ
/ AUTOMIX
MANUAL
WRITE
READ
Playing the Pads in Phrase Sequence Mode
To play a phrase pad along with your hard disk recorder tracks in Phrase Sequence
mode, set its PHRASE SEQ STATUS button as follows:
•
•
When you want to play along without recording into the phrase sequencer, press
the pad’s PHRASE SEQ STATUS until it’s lit amber.
To record your phrase pad performance onto its corresponding sequencer track,
press the pad’s PHRASE SEQ STATUS button until it’s lit red.
When a phrase sequencer track’s PHRASE SEQ STATUS button is red, its pad plays
only when the phrase sequencer is actually recording.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
You can record, or “sequence,” your phrase pad performance into the VS-2480’s phrase
sequencer using either of two approaches. You can sequence:
•
•
in realtime—by performing on the phrase pad buttons as your hard disk recorder
tracks play. This method offers the most “musical” sequencing experience.
using “step” entry—by entering phrase-pad strikes, one-by-one, while the phrase
sequencer and your hard disk recorder tracks aren’t playing. While this method is
more mechanical in nature, it allows you to sequence with absolute precision.
We’ll describe how to sequence using either approach starting on Page 278. Use the
phrase sequencer’s editing tools to perfect your sequence after recording (Page 281).
You can combine the two recording approaches by recording some sequence data
realtime and some using step entry.
The phrase sequencer works hand-in-hand with a project’s tempo map (Page 309). We
recommend you set up a tempo map for your project to get the most from the VS-2480’s
phrase sequencer.
The PHRASE SEQUENCE Screens
The VS-2480 provides two PHRASE SEQUENCE screens that contain the tools you’ll
need for step-entering a phrase sequence and for editing a phrase sequence (Page 281).
Navigating to the PHRASE SEQUENCE Screens
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press UTILITY.
Press the PAGE button until “PhrSeq” appears above F1.
Press F1 (PhrSeq)—the first PHRASE SEQUENCE screen appears.
There are two PHRASE SEQUENCE screens. To move between them, press PAGE.
Both PHRASE SEQUENCE screens show the phrase sequencer’s playlist—they differ
only in the F button tools they offer. The PHRASE SEQUENCE screen’s playlist acts a
lot like the Home screen’s. You can zoom in and out just as you can on the Home screen.
Just like the Home screen
playlist, the PHRASE
SEQUENCE screens’
playlist shows all of the
sequencer’s tracks,
arranged from top to
bottom with their
numbers shown to the left
of the playlist.
In this illustration, we’ve
recorded sequencer data
on Sequence Tracks 1-6.
The checkbox to
the left of each
track’s name
targets the track
for phrase and
region editing
(Page 281).
Timeline
Use the current time locator display’s measures and beats counter (Page 126) to
navigate through a project when you’re phrase sequencing.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
What the Appearance of Sequenced Data Means
Each sequencer track in the playlist on the PHRASE SEQUENCE screen and the Home
screen shows its recorded phrase pad performance. You can see where you struck the
pad, and you can see the shape of the phrase playback produced by each strike.
The recorded phrase data produced by each phrase pad strike
is shown as a black box with a bar at either end. The bar at the
front shows where the phrase starts playing. The bar on the
end shows where it stops playing.
When a pad is re-struck while its phrase is still playing, the
bars show where the first strike ends and where the next
strike begins.
Phrase playback starts.
Phrase playback ends.
First
strike
Second
strike
The Phrase Sequencer Grid
The Phrase Sequencer Grid feature allows you to view
the bars and beats of your project’s tempo map in the
phrase sequencer playlist to help you see the timing of
your sequenced data. The grid is a set of vertical lines in
the playlist. You can have a gridline for each measure in
the project’s tempo map or for each beat.
Gridlines
While the grid provides a helpful visual reference when you’re sequencing, it plays an
even more important role when you’re editing a sequence, as described on Page 281.
Turning On the Phrase Sequencer Playlist Grid
Use your mouse to activate and configure the phrase sequencer’s grid.
1.
2.
3.
Right-click your mouse on the playlist in either PHRASE SEQUENCE
SCREEN. The Phrase Sequence Edit Pop-Up menu appears. (We’ll discuss
this menu some more on Page 281.)
Select GRID from the menu—the Grid Options window opens.
Select the desired grid setting. You can select:
• Off—so that the grid is turned off.
• Measure—so that there’s a gridline for every measure in the project.
• Beat—so that there’s a gridline for every beat in the project.
If you select Measure or Beat, the grid appears immediately in the playlist.
Phrase Sequencer Undo
The phrase sequencer has its own one-level Undo feature with which you can reverse
the most recent sequencing or sequence editing action. If you’ve sequenced a series of
phrases, the sequencing of the last recorded phrase is undone. If you’ve edited a group
of phrases, Undo reverses the entire editing action for the entire group. You can also
redo an undone action until you perform a new sequencing or editing action.
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The phrase sequencer’s Undo feature is completely separate from the hard disk
recorder’s. Sequencing actions don’t appear in the standard Undo list, and the
UNDO•REDO indicator doesn’t light when a phrase sequencer redo is available.
The phrase sequencer Undo feature is available on the first PHRASE SEQUENCE
screen. To use it, navigate to a PHRASE SEQUENCE screen and:
1.
2.
3.
If “UNDO” doesn’t appear above F5, press PAGE until it does.
Press F5 (UNDO). Once you’ve undone an action, “REDO” appears above F5 until
you sequence something new or perform another edit.
To redo the action you’ve just reversed, press F5 (REDO).
Realtime Phrase Sequencing
Press HOME•DISPLAY or navigate to a PHRASE SEQUENCE screen to see your
sequenced data. This isn’t absolutely necessary, but it can be instructive.
If you view one of the PHRASE SEQUENCE screens as you sequence, you can turn on
its grid to check the timing of your sequenced data once it’s recorded.
Phrase Sequencing in Realtime
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
If PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ isn’t already lit solid red, hold down SHIFT
and press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it is.
Set the PHRASE SEQ STATUS button for any sequence track you want to record so
that its indicator lights solid red.
Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it flashes red to show that the
phrase sequencer is recording.
Press ZERO to rewind to the start of the project, or move the timeline to the
location in the project at which you want to start sequencing.
Press PLAY, and play the phrase pads as desired.
When you’ve finished, press STOP—your performance appears in the playlist.
In this illustration of the Home
screen, we’ve recorded on
Sequencer Tracks 5-8 while
playing along with Tracks 1-4.
You can select and edit phrase sequencer data only in the PHRASE SEQUENCER
screen’s playlist.
7.
Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it’s lit solid red, ready to play back
what you’ve sequenced.
8. Press ZERO or move the timeline to the desired location.
9. Press PLAY to hear what you’ve sequenced.
10. If you’re satisfied with what you’ve recorded on a sequence’s track, press its
PHRASE SEQ STATUS button so that it’s green. This is to make sure you don’t
record over the sequence track if you record or re-record other sequence tracks.
11. If you’d like to try again—recording over your first attempt—repeat Steps 3-9.
12. You can perform Steps 2-10 to record additional tracks. Make sure, however, that
the PHRASE SEQ STATUS button is green for any sequence track you want to keep
as you continue sequencing.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Step Entry
In step entry phrase sequencing, the VS-2480 doesn’t play through the project as it
normally does—you control when and how the sequencer moves forward in time. With
the sequencer stopped, you enter phrase pad strikes where you want them.
During step entry, you won’t hear your hard disk recorder tracks as you enter phrase
pad strikes. You can hear them when the sequence is played back.
Step entry is great for quickly building a drum loop from a phrase that contains a
rhythm pattern.
With the AutoLoc (“AutoLocate”) feature, the timeline moves forward by a specified
amount each time you strike a pad—after it moves, it waits at the next location for you
to strike a pad and move it forward again. You can also record phrase pad strikes by
manually moving the timeline to a location and playing the pads you want to hear at
that location. You can use either method, turning AutoLoc on and off as desired.
When you’re phrase sequencing a drum loop, use AutoLoc to zip right through the
process. Simply strike the loop’s pad repeatedly until you get to the end of the project.
When you want two phrase pad strikes at the same location, use step entry without
AutoLoc—AutoLoc moves forward one step with each phrase pad strike.
If you view one of the PHRASE SEQUENCE screens as you sequence, you can turn on
its grid to check the timing of your sequenced data once it’s recorded.
Phrase Sequencing Using Step Entry with AutoLoc
1.
2.
3.
Navigate to a PHRASE SEQUENCE screen (Page 276).
If”AutoLoc” isn’t visible above F1, press PAGE.
If AutoLoc isn’t highlighted—turned on—press F1 (AutoLoc) so it is.
When you strike a phrase pad with AutoLoc turned on, the sequencer records the
strike—including how long you hold down the phrase pad after hitting it—and
then moves the timeline forward by one step. You set the size of the step using F2.
4. Press F2 repeatedly to choose from its three possible step values. You can select:
• Length—so that the timeline moves forward after recording by an amount of
time equal to what you’ve just played.
• Meas (“Measure”)—so that the timeline moves forward to the next measure in
the project’s tempo map after recording each phrase pad strike.
• Beat—so that the timeline moves forward to the next beat in the project’s tempo
map after recording each phrase pad strike.
5. If PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ isn’t already red, hold down SHIFT and
press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so it turns red.
6. Press the desired phrase pad’s PHRASE SEQ STATUS button until it’s red.
7. Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ once more—it flashes red to show that
the phrase sequencer’s now recording.
8. If you want to sequence from the top of the project, press ZERO. Otherwise, move
the timeline to the desired location in the project.
9. Play the desired phrase pad—if a pad’s PlyMOD parameter is set to Gate
(Page 274), hold down the pad for as long as you want its phrase to play. When you
release the pad, the timeline moves forward by the amount of time shown above F2.
10. When you’re done, press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it lights solid
red to show that the phrase sequencer’s no longer recording.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
11. Press ZERO, or return the timeline to the location you started at in Step 10.
12. Press PLAY to hear the sequence.
13. If you want to try again, repeat Steps 6-12.
You can edit your sequenced track to perfect it, as described on Page 281.
Phrase Sequencing Using Step Entry without AutoLoc
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Navigate to a PHRASE SEQUENCE screen (Page 276).
If”AutoLoc” isn’t visible above F1, press PAGE.
If AutoLoc is highlighted—turned on—press F1 (AutoLoc) to turn it off.
When AutoLoc is turned off, the timeline stays where it is until you move it. You can
enter as many phrase pad strikes at the timeline’s current location as you want.
If PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ isn’t lit red, hold down SHIFT and press
PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it is.
Press the desired phrase pad’s PHRASE SEQ STATUS button until it turns red.
Press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ—it flashes red to show that the phrase
sequencer’s now recording.
Move the timeline to the desired location in the project.
Strike the desired phrase pad(s)—what you play is recorded at that location.
If a pad’s PlyMOD parameter is set to Gate (Page 274), hold down the pad for as long as
you want its phrase to play.
9.
When you’ve finished entering all of the phrase pad strikes you want at the
timeline’s current location, move it forward to the next location and repeat Step 8.
10. When you’ve finished sequencing, press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so
that it lights solid red to indicate that the phrase sequencer’s no longer recording.
11. Move the timeline to the desired location and press PLAY to hear your sequence.
Phrase Pad Button Summary
280
If PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ is:
You know:
unlit
Phrase Pad and Sequence modes are off.
green
You can play the phrase pads.
solidly red
the phrase sequencer is on and you can play its
tracks. You can play a phrase pad if its PHRASE
SEQ STATUS button is amber.
flashing red
the phrase sequencer is ready to record.
When a PHRASE SEQ STATUS button is:
You know:
unlit
you can play its phrase pad if the PHRASE PAD
PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button is green.
amber
you can play its phrase pad if the PHRASE PAD
PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button is solid red.
red
what you play on its phrase pad will be recorded
if the PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button
is flashing red.
green
its phrase sequencer track plays back if the
PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ button is
solid red and you play the project.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Editing a Phrase Sequence
Edit your sequenced data using the PHRASE SEQUENCE screens. You can perform
many standard phrase and region editing operations on phrase sequencer data using
the mouse and TRACK EDIT buttons—TRACK menu commands apply only to hard
disk recorder tracks.
Phrase and Region Editing of Phrase Sequenced Data
You can perform some of the same phrase- and region-based editing operations on
phrase sequencer data that can be performed on hard disk recorder tracks. The
following operations can be applied to sequenced data:
Available phrase editing operations:
Available region editing operations:
COPY
COPY
MOVE
MOVE
TRIM IN
INSERT
TRIM OUT
CUT
DELETE
ERASE
These operations are explained in Chapters 18-20.
In addition, you can use your mouse to drag and drag-copy data much the same way as
you can edit hard disk recorder data with your mouse, as described on Page 241.
If you drag one or more phrases with your mouse when the grid is turned on, the front
edge of the phrases you’re dragging snaps to the nearest gridline, allowing you to place
it perfectly in time.
If you click on the PHRASE SEQUENCE window’s playlist, the Phrase Sequence Edit
Pop-Up menu appears. This menu acts just like the Edit Pop-Up menu (Page 241),
allowing you to select from among the available editing operations. The only phrasesequencer-specific item in the menu is GRID, explained on Page 277.
Just as with the Edit Pop-Up menu, hold down CLEAR when the Phrase Sequence Edit
Pop-Up menu is open to view options for clearing your edit points. Hold down SHIFT
for GO TO options.
Phrase Sequence Editing Tools
You can edit your sequenced data when the PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE SEQ is lit
solid red. If you attempt to perform an edit when the sequencer’s in Record mode—
flashing red—the VS-2480 displays:
Press ENTER/YES to dismiss the message and press PHRASE PAD PLAY•PHRASE
SEQ to turn it solid red before attempting the edit again.
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Quantizing Phrase Sequence Data
On the first PHRASE SEQUENCE screen, you’ll see F1 (Qtize) (“Quantize”).
Quantizing moves the start of any selected phrase—or phrase within a selected group
of phrases—to the nearest 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 or 1/32 note to correct performance
timing errors.
You can select one or more phrases you want to quantize
the same way you’d select them in track editing: as phrases
or as regions. As with standard phrase editing, you can
select one phrase on each sequence track. To select a group
of phrases on the same sequence track, define a region that
includes all of the desired phrases. When you select a
phrase on a linked track, the phrase on its partner track is
also selected.
When a sequence track—
and its phrase or
region—is selected for
editing, it has checkmark
to the left of its number.
You can select a desired phrase or region using your mouse or the VS-2480’s buttons.
Mouse selection works the same way as with hard disk recorder tracks.
To select a sequenced phrase using the VS-2480’s buttons:
1.
2.
3.
Move the timeline so that it touches the phrase.
Use $ or % to cursor to the sequence track, as shown by the arrow to the left of its
number.
Press F3 (MARK) to target the sequence track and its phrase for editing. A
checkmark appears in the box to the left of the sequence track’s number.
To select a sequenced region using the VS-2480’s buttons:
1.
2.
3.
Set the desired IN and OUT points using the usual methods (Chapter 18).
Use $ or % to cursor to the desired sequence track, as shown by the arrow to the
left of its number.
Press F3 (MARK) to target the sequence track and any phrases it contains that fall
between the IN and OUT points for editing. A checkmark appears in the box to the
left of the sequence track’s number.
Quantizing a selected phrase or region:
1.
2.
Press F1 (Qtize). A window opens in which you can select the desired nearest note
value to which you want to move the selected phrase sequencer data.
Select:
• 1/1 note
• 1/2 note
• 1/4 note
• 1/8 note
• 1/16 note
• 1/32 note
Press ENTER/YES to move the beginning of all selected phrases to the selected
note value, or press EXIT/NO to cancel the quantizing operation.
To undo the quantization operation before moving on to other sequencing or sequence
editing operations, press F5 (UNDO).
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Micro-Editing Sequencer Data
On the first PHRASE SEQUENCE screen, press F4 (MICRO) to view the MICRO EDIT
screen. On this screen, you can manually change the start time and the length of each
sequenced phrase. You can also delete phrases on this screen.
To view the desired track’s sequenced data, press F1 (Tr Inc) or F2 (Tr Dec) to move
higher or lower, respectively, through the phrase sequencer’s list of sequence tracks.
The current track’s name and data is shown above the list of its phrases.
To change a phrase’s:
•
•
start time—press $ or % to select the phrase in the list. Use " and # to select the
desired unit of time measurement in the Start column—you can select time code or
measures/beats/ticks. Turn the TIME VALUE dial to select the desired start location.
length—press $ or % to select the phrase in the list. Use " and # to select the
desired unit of time measurement in the Duration column—you can select time
code or measures and beats. Turn the TIME VALUE dial to set the phrase’s length as
desired.
You can see the changes you make in the data window above the phrase list.
To delete a phrase:
1.
2.
Press $ or % to select the phrase in the list.
Press F4 (DELETE) to erase the phrase.
To undo a micro-edit:
1.
Press F5 (UNDO). Until you perform a new edit or sequence more data, you can
press F5 (REDO) to reverse the undo.
To leave the MICRO EDIT screen, press F6 (EXIT).
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
Using Tie, Rest and BackStep
On the second PHRASE SEQUENCE screen, the Tie and Backstep features use the
position of the timeline to change the duration of the closest phrase on the selected
track within a specified time window to the left of the timeline. Rest moves the timeline
by the selected amount.
The arrow to the left of
the playlist selects the
sequence track whose
phrase is affected by Tie
or BackStep. To select a
different track, press $
or %.
If the selected track is
linked, Tie and BackStep
affects both tracks.
•
F3 (TIE)—the timeline moves forward in time by the specified amount, increasing
the duration of the closest phrase within the time window so that it reaches the
timeline’s new position.
Before Tie
After Tie
With F2 (Beat), Tie stretches the phrase to the next beat.
•
F4 (REST)—the VS-2480 moves the timeline ahead by the specified length.
Before Rest
After Rest
With F2 (Beat), Rest moves the timeline to the next beat.
•
F5 (BckStp)—the timeline moves back in time by the specified amount, shortening
the duration of the closest phrase within the time window so that it extends no
further than the timeline’s new position.
Before BackStep
After BackStep
With F2 (Beat), BackStep shrinks the phrase to the previous beat.
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21—Using the Phrase Pads
If the timeline backsteps beyond the start of a phrase it’s touching, the entire phrase is
deleted.
The amount of time by which the timeline moves and the time window are determined
by F2’s setting. When:
•
•
•
F2 (Length)—the timeline moves forward or back by an amount of time equal to the
shortest phrase it’s touching.
F2 (Meas)—the timeline moves forward or back to the next measure, changing the
duration of the nearest phrase that’s located a measure or less to its left.
F3 (Beat)—the timeline moves forward or back to the next beat, changing the
duration of the nearest phrase that’s located a beat or less to its left.
It’s a good idea to turn on the grid when you’re using Tie, Rest and BackStep to help
you visually keep track of what you’re doing.
Controlling the Sound of Sequenced Tracks
Each phrase sequencer track borrows the corresponding track channel when the
VS-2480’s in Phrase Sequence mode—in essence, it becomes a sequence track channel.
The track channel’s fader and all of its CH EDIT tools—including its dynamics
processor and EQ—are available for shaping the sound of the sequencer track. You can
even add effects, just as if you were working with a hard disk recorder track.
When you’re in Phrase Pad mode—and not using the phrase sequencer—the CH EDIT
tools control the sound of the live phrase pads.
Since the CH EDIT buttons act as PHRASE SEQ STATUS buttons in Phrase Pad and
Phrase Sequencer mode, there’s a special way to get to the sequence track’s CH EDIT
screen, which we mentioned in passing earlier:
•
Hold down SHIFT and press CH EDIT. Do the same thing again to exit the CH
EDIT VIEW screen and return to the previous screen.
Phrase Sequence Bouncing
You can bounce what you’ve recorded on your phrase sequence tracks to tracks in the
hard disk recorder. Once you’ve performed the bounce, you can hear your phrase
sequence—now converted to audio recorded on project tracks—without entering
Phrase Sequence mode.
The process of bouncing phrase sequence tracks is a lot like normal bouncing, except
that you bounce from source sequence tracks to destination hard disk recorder tracks. For
a detailed explanation of normal bouncing, see Page 195.
When bouncing phrase sequencer tracks, you can link source sequence tracks or
destination hard disk recorder tracks for stereo bouncing, as usual.
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Bouncing Phrase Sequence Tracks
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
286
If you’re not in Phrase Sequence mode, hold down SHIFT and press PHRASE PAD
PLAY•PHRASE SEQ so that it lights solid red to indicate that the phrase sequencer
is ready to play back its data.
Make sure that the PHRASE SEQ STATUS button for any sequence track you want
to bounce is green.
If you want to change any CH EDIT settings for a sequence track—including
adding effects or linking the sequence track to its odd/even partner—hold down
SHIFT, press its CH EDIT button and make the desired changes. If you’re adding
effects, make sure to route the FX return channels to your destination hard disk
recorder tracks, and bring up the necessary FX return channel faders.
If you want to change the destination V-Track for any of your destination hard disk
recorder tracks—or if you want to link the track to its odd/even partner—hold
down SHIFT, press the desired track channel’s CH EDIT button and make the
desired changes.
Route the source sequence tracks to the destination hard disk recorder tracks as
you would for a normal bounce—the sequence tracks look just like standard tracks
on the Quick Routing screen and in the EZ ROUTING VIEW screen.
Arm each destination track for recording by holding down REC and pressing the
track’s TRACK STATUS button.
Hold down REC and press PLAY to perform the bounce.
When the bounce is complete, hold down SHIFT and press PHRASE PAD
PLAY•PHRASE SEQ to leave Phrase Sequence mode.
Hold down STOP, press TRACK STATUS for your destination tracks and listen to
the bounce.
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22—Working with the VS-2480 Outputs
The VS-2480 offers a wide range of analog output jacks and digital connectors from
which you can send its audio signals to external devices. This chapter discusses how to
route signals to them and how they can be used.
The VS-2480 Outputs
Output Pairs
The VS-2480’s analog and digital outputs are managed as left/right or odd/even output
pairs when you’re routing signals to them. These pairs are fixed, and can’t be altered.
Analog Output Jacks
The VS-2480 has eight 1/4” analog output jacks that you can connect to external devices
when you want to send audio signals out of the VS-2480. You can use the jacks for the
jobs suggested by their names or for any other purpose in which you need to get a
VS-2480 audio signal to an external device that has analog inputs.
When you’re routing busses to them, the eight 1/4“mono analog output jacks are
divided into the following four sets of stereo jacks:
•
MASTER L/R
•
AUX A L/R
•
AUX B L/R
•
MONITOR L/R
When you’re routing track signals directly to the analog jacks—perhaps to send them
to tracks on an external multitrack recorder with analog inputs—they’re divided into
the following four pairs of output jacks:
•
•
ANALOG MULTI 1 and 2
ANALOG MULTI 5 and 6
•
•
ANALOG MULTI 3 and 4
ANALOG MULTI 7 and 8
You can also route any pair of busses to the two stereo 1/4” PHONES jacks.
Digital Output Connectors
The VS-2480 provides both S/P DIF-format and R-BUS digital output connectors.
S/P DIF Stereo Output Connectors
The VS-2480 has one coaxial and one optical stereo S/P DIF output connector (Page 49).
If you’ve connected a VS-2480 S/P DIF output to a device that’s using a lower bit rate,
you can dither the VS-2480’s output down to the desired bit depth—see Page 366.
You can activate digital copy-protection to prevent the making of digital copies of audio
you’ve recorded on a connected external DAT or MiniDisc recorder—see Page 366.
For a detailed discussion of master clock considerations when sending digital audio
from device to device, see Page 132.
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R-BUS Connectors
The VS-2480’s two R-BUS connectors each provide eight input and eight output
channels of digital audio. (During routing we refer to each channel as a “connector.”)
You can send signals out of the VS-2480 digitally to any R-BUS device.
You can find setup instructions for R-BUS devices in the “Supplemental Information”
chapter at the back of the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual.
With a Roland DIF-AT interface, you can digitally send individual VS-2480 track signals
to tracks on an ADAT™ or Tascam® T-DIF™ recorder.
Output Signal Routing
You can route bus signals or track signals to the VS-2480’s analog and digital outputs.
We’ll discuss these two topics separately.
You can route busses or tracks directly to outputs, but not both simultaneously, with the
exception of the MONITOR bus, which can always be sent to outputs.
Bus Routing
The VS-2480’s output jacks and connectors can transmit MASTER, MONITOR, Aux
and Direct bus signals from the VS-2480’s outputs to external devices. With the
exception of the MASTER and MONITOR analog outputs, you can route any pair of
busses—or a stereo bus—to any pair of output jacks or connectors.
•
•
The MASTER analog jacks always carry the stereo MASTER bus signal.
The MONITOR analog jacks always carry the stereo MONITOR bus signals—you
can, however, send the signals from any pair of busses into the stereo MONITOR
bus feeding the MONITOR jacks.
Though busses are routed to outputs in pairs, you can send completely different signals
on each bus pair’s odd/even busses. If you’re using Aux busses, the busses can be
linked in stereo (Page 206) or not, as desired.
Routing a Pair of Busses to a Pair of Outputs
1.
2.
3.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “OUTPUT” isn’t above F3, press PAGE repeatedly until it is.
Press F3 (OUTPUT)—the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen appears.
In this illustration, we’ve
selected the Aux A analog
jacks.
Aux Busses 1 and 2 are
routed to the Aux A jacks,
as shown by the thick
black connection line.
Each bus runs from left to right
across the display. When you
select an output and turn the
TIME/VALUE dial, a connection
box moves down the screen to
reach the desired bus.
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If the TRACK DIRECT OUT parameter is turned on, turn it off to activate bus routing.
When you do this, routings between tracks and outputs are de-activated, though their
connections remain in place.
The output jack and connector pairs run along the top of the screen, and the bus
pairs run up and down its left edge.
4. Use " or # to select the desired pair of output jacks or digital connectors.
5. Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the desired pair of busses to be routed to the
selected output pair—as you turn the dial, the connection box moves up and down
the display, showing you what’s routed to the selected pair of outputs.
If you prefer, you can route busses to outputs by dragging an output pair’s connection
box down to the desired bus pair with your mouse.
Routing a Pair of Busses to the Stereo MONITOR Bus
1.
2.
3.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “OUTPUT” isn’t above F3, press PAGE repeatedly until it is.
Press F3 (OUTPUT)—the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen appears.
In this illustration, we’ve
selected the MONITOR
bus assignment junction,
and the stereo MASTER
bus is selected as the
signal being sent to the
stereo MONITOR bus.
MONITOR bus
assignment
junction
The assignment of a pair of busses—or a stereo bus—to the stereo MONITOR bus
is shown by the MONITOR bus assignment junction at the left of the output
routing area on the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen as shown above.
MONITOR bus assignment is unaffected by the setting of the TRACK DIRECT OUT
parameter—you can route signals to the MONITOR bus at any time.
4.
5.
Press " to highlight the MONITOR bus assignment junction.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the pair of busses to be sent to the stereo
MONITOR bus—as you turn the dial, the connection moves up and down through
the busses on the left side of the display, showing what’s being sent to the bus.
Track Direct Outs
You can route any odd/even pair of the VS-2480’s tracks directly to a pair of outputs on
the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN screen. By default, the screen is set up for bus
routing, so you’ll need to activate the track direct outs when you want to send tracks to
outputs without using busses. You can select whether the tracks’ signals are to be sent
to outputs before or after their track channel faders.
When the track direct outs are turned on, Aux and Direct bus output connections aren’t
available. If you need to send a combination of tracks and Aux or Direct busses to
outputs, send the tracks via Direct busses instead of the track direct outs—see Page 202.
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Track direct outs are a great way to transfer tracks to a TASCAM DA series recorder or
ADAT multitrack recorder connected via R-BUS and DIF-AT to the VS-2480. You can
also route a track to an R-BUS output to digitally transfer the track’s audio to a
computer with an RPC-1 PCI card for editing or effect processing.
Routing a Pair of Tracks to a Pair of Outputs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “OUTPUT” isn’t above F3, press PAGE repeatedly until it is.
Press F3 (OUTPUT)—the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen appears.
Press % to select the TRACK DIRECT OUT parameter.
Turn the TRACK DIRECT OUT parameter on—the screen changes to show track
output routing connections.
In this illustration, we’ve
selected R-BUS 1’s 1/2
connection.
Tracks 9 and 10 are
currently routed to R-BUS
1’s first and second digital
output channels.
When you do this, routings between busses and outputs are de-activated, though their
connections remain in place behind the scenes.
6.
7.
On the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen, you can route any pair of tracks to the desired
pair of outputs. The output jack and connector pairs run along the top of the screen,
and the track pairs run up and down its right edge.
Use " or # to select the desired pair of output jacks or digital connectors—they
become highlighted.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to choose the pair of tracks you want to route to the
selected output pair—as you turn the dial, the connection moves up and down the
display, showing you what’s currently routed to the selected pair of outputs.
If you prefer, you can route tracks to outputs by dragging an output pair’s connection
box down to the desired track pair with your mouse.
When the track direct outs are active, the MASTER bus can’t be routed directly to
outputs. However, you can send it into the MONITOR bus, which can be.
Setting Up Pre or Post Track Direct Outputs
1.
2.
290
At the bottom right of the OUTPUT ASSIGN screen—see the previous section—
select the TRACK DIRECT SOURCE.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select:
• PreFader—so that track signals are sent to outputs unaffected by the positions of
their track channel faders.
• PostFader—so that the tracks’ track channel faders control their output levels.
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23—EZ Routing
The EZ ROUTING screens are where you go to set up the connections that allow
signals to travel within the VS-2480. This chapter provides an overview of the EZ
ROUTING screens we’ve been discussing all along, and describes the VS-2480’s helpful
EZ Routing tools.
The EZ ROUTING Screens
There are four EZ ROUTING screens on which routing is performed:
EZ ROUTING VIEW
PATCH BAY
OUTPUT ASSIGN
LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN
Navigating the EZ ROUTING Screens
To view the EZ ROUTING screens, press EZ ROUTING.
The EZ ROUTING screens have two pages that are identical except for the F buttons
displayed at the bottom of the screen. Press PAGE to toggle between these two sets of F
buttons. One page has a set of F buttons for each EZ ROUTING screen:
•
F1 (VIEW)
•
F2 (P.BAY)
•
F3 (OUTPUT)
•
F4 (EFFECT)
Press a screen’s F button to view the screen.
The other page provides tools for resetting input and hard disk recorder track routings:
•
F1 (IniPB)
•
F2 (ClrPB)
•
F3 (IniTrA)
•
F4 (ClrTrA)
We’ll discuss these on Page 295.
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EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen
The EZ ROUTING VIEW screen shows—and allows you to interconnect—all of your:
•
•
•
•
input jacks and connectors
Aux busses
hard disk recorder tracks
FX return channels
•
•
•
input channels
Direct busses
track channels
The gray arrows at
the left edge of the
screen show the
direction in which
signal is flowing.
Input jacks and
connectors
Input channel inputs
Input channel outputs
Direct busses
Hard disk recorder
track inputs
Aux busses
FX return
channel outputs
Track channel outputs
The area of the EZ ROUTING VIEW screen that includes the input jacks and
connectors is called the “patch bay”—it’s identified by a dotted outline. The patch bay
has its own screen, described below.
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING VIEW Screen
1.
2.
Use ", #, $ or % to select the desired input or output connection. You can select:
• pairs of input channel inputs
• input channel outputs
• Aux bus outputs
• Direct bus outputs
• Track channel outputs
• FX return channel outputs
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to create the desired connection.
We’ve already described various EZ ROUTING VIEW connections in detail in other
parts of the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual.
To learn how to route:
See:
input channels to tracks for recording
Page 174
track channels to tracks for bouncing
Page 198
FX return channels to tracks for recording and bouncing
Page 233
Patch bay connection descriptions are discussed in the following section.
The EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY Screen
You can jump to the PATCH BAY screen by holding down SHIFT and pressing EZ
ROUTING.
The primary purpose of the EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY screen is the connection of
analog input jacks and digital input connectors to the VS-2480’s input channels. Input
connections are described in Chapter 9, which starts on Page 129.
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23—EZ Routing
On the PATCH BAY screen, you can route the following jacks and connectors to input
channels:
•
•
•
•
the 16 analog input jacks (XLR and 1/4”)
The R-BUS 1 and R-BUS 2 connectors’ total of 16 digital channels
the stereo coaxial S/P DIF digital connector
the stereo optical S/P DIF digital connector
The gray arrows at
the left edge of the
screen show the
direction in which
signal is flowing.
Input jacks and
connectors
Input channel
inputs
You can also turn phantom power on or off for the XLR input jacks, and activate the
desired digital inputs on this screen, as described on Page 130 and Page 131,
respectively.
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY Screen
For the purposes of routing, input jacks and connectors and input channels are treated
as odd/even pairs. These pairs cannot be altered.
1.
2.
Use ", #, $ or % to select the desired pair of input channels.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to create the desired connection.
Chapter 9 describes in detail how to route inputs to input channels—see Page 136.
The EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN Screen
On the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN screen, you can route any of the VS-2480’s
busses or tracks to output jacks or connectors. The screen’s appearance changes slightly
for the two types of routing.
Outputs
Tracks
Busses
Outputs
When routing busses
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On this screen, you can also configure the track direct outputs so that they’re pre-fader
or post fader (Page 290), and adjust the overall hard disk recorder track recording level
using the REC ATT parameter (Page 201).
Making Connections on the EZ ROUTING OUTPUT ASSIGN Screen
For the purposes of routing, busses are treated as odd/even pairs that can include two
mono busses or one stereo bus. Tracks are also routed in pairs. Outputs are divided into
odd/even, left/right pairs as well. These pairs cannot be altered.
1.
2.
Use " or # to select the desired pair of outputs.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to create the desired connection.
If you cursor all the way to the left, you’ll select the MONITOR bus assignment
junction. Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the pair of busses—or stereo bus—you’d
like to send into the stereo MONITOR bus.
Output routing is described in detail in Chapter 22. In addition, on Page 75, you’ll find a
detailed set of steps for setting up digital monitoring through a pair of Roland DS-90A
or DS -50A Digital Reference Monitors.
The EZ ROUTING LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN Screen
Busses
On the EZ ROUTING LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN screen, you can select the Aux or Direct
bus that carries signals to each of the VS-2480’s internal effect processors. You can also
see a symbol for each processor’s currently selected effect patch.
If there’s no optional
VS8F-2 effect expansion
board installed for an effect
processor, “No FX Board”
appears instead of an effect
patch symbol.
Effect
processors
If an Aux bus is linked to its odd/even partner (Page 206), “L” and “R” are attached to
the end of their names.
Making Connections on the LOOP EFFECT ASSIGN Screen
1.
2.
Use " or # to select the desired internal effect processor.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired Aux bus or Direct bus.
Linked Aux busses are routed to an internal effect as a single stereo source.
The routing of Aux busses and Direct busses to the internal effects is discussed in detail
on Page 210.
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23—EZ Routing
EZ Routing Tools
The EZ Routing tools that appear at the bottom of the EZ ROUTING VIEW, PATCH
BAY, OUTPUT and EFFECT screens allow you to clear and initialize connections
between inputs and input channels—patch bay connections—and the routing of any
signals to the hard disk recorder tracks.
When the patch bay connections are:
•
initialized—analog input jacks 1-16 and R-BUS 1 connectors 1-8 are connected to
input channels 1-24.
•
cleared—no inputs are connected to input channels.
When the hard disk recorder track connections are:
•
initialized—Input Channels 1-24 are routed to Tracks 1-24.
•
cleared—no input channels, Aux busses, Direct busses, track channels or FX return
channels are routed to tracks.
To:
Press:
initialize all input-to-input channel routings
F1 (IniPB)
clear all input-to-input channel routings
F2 (ClrPB)
initialize all routings to hard disk recorder tracks
F3 (IniTrA)
clear all routings to hard disk recorder tracks
F4 (ClrTrA)
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Saving and Loading EZ Routing Templates
As you use your VS-2480, you’ll spend lots of time creating routing setups for the
various situations in which you’ll be recording and mixing. You can save a routing
setup—along with a host of other parameters—as an EZ Routing template that you can
use in any project. When you recall a template, all of the routings and parameter values
it contains are instantly restored, saving you lots of setup time. You can save up to 20 EZ
Routing templates.
While some of the parameters saved in an EZ Routing template are also stored in
scenes, a scene belongs to a particular project, while an EZ Routing template is always
available.
The VS-2480 ships with seven always-available EZ Routing templates for recording,
bouncing, mixdown and Surround mixing. You can find a list of the connections and
parameters each of these templates installs on Page 397.
The Type of Settings a Template Contains
An EZ Routing template remembers everything that pertains to routing and
configuration-related parameters—including input channel, track channel and Aux bus
linking, V-Track selection and the current settings of the hard disk recorder’s TRACK
STATUS buttons.
Saving an EZ Routing Template
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set up your VS-2480 as desired.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “SAVE” isn’t visible above F6, press PAGE until it is.
Press F6 (SAVE)—the EZ ROUTING TEMPLATE SAVE screen appears.
5.
6.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the desired user template memory location.
Press F1 (NAME) to name the template you’re saving. See Page 73 to learn about
naming. If you’d don’t want to name the new template, skip this step.
When you’re ready to finish saving the template, press F5 (OK), or press F6 (EXIT)
to cancel the operation.
7.
8.
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Press ENTER/YES to save the template, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
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Loading an EZ Routing Template
Before loading an EZ Routing template, it’s a good idea to turn your listening level
down all the way in case the template’s new connections and settings cause feedback,
result in unwanted noises or cause other problems.
1.
2.
3.
Press EZ ROUTING.
If “LOAD” isn’t visible above F5, press PAGE until it is.
Press F5 (LOAD)—the EZ ROUTING TEMPLATE LOAD screen appears.
4.
5.
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the template you want to load.
Press F5 (OK). The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to proceed.
6.
Press ENTER/YES to load the template, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation. If you
press ENTER/YES, the template—and all of the routings and configuration settings
it contains—loads.
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This chapter discusses the VS-2480’s MIDI capabilities. The VS-2480 can:
•
•
•
act as a MIDI control surface that lets you manipulate parameters in an external
MIDI device.
be operated remotely from an external MIDI device.
transmit its internal settings via MIDI to an external MIDI storage device.
We’ll discuss the related topic of synchronization in the chapter’s second half,
explaining how to successfully sync the VS-2480 with external devices such as MIDI
sequencers, video editing systems and other analog and digital recorders.
MIDI Operations
If you’re new to MIDI, see “About MIDI” in the VS-2480 Appendices. Advanced MIDI
users can find complete documentation of the VS-2480’s MIDI features—including a
MIDI implementation chart—in the VS-2480 Appendices.
The VS-2480 boasts a wide range of MIDI features that enhance its interaction with
other MIDI devices in your system. We’ll begin by discussing the basics of how MIDI
works in the VS-2480.
VS-2480 MIDI Basics
The MIDI PARAMETER Screen
You’ll find all of the VS-2480’s basic MIDI parameters on the UTILITY menu’s MIDI
PARAMETER screen. To get there:
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
If “MIDI” isn’t visible above F5, press PAGE until it is.
Press F5 (MIDI)—the MIDI PARAMETER screen appears.
4.
Select the desired MIDI parameter and adjust its value.
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MIDI OUT or THRU?
The VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU parameter sets the behavior of the MIDI OUT/THRU
jack on the VS-2480’s rear panel. It can be set to:
•
•
Out—so that MIDI data produced by the VS-2480 is transmitted to connected
external MIDI devices. This is the typical setting.
Thru—so that MIDI data received by the VS-2480 passes through and exits the
VS-2480 unchanged. Use this setting only if you’ve arranged multiple MIDI devices
in a daisy-chain and won’t be transmitting any data from the VS-2480 itself.
For all of the operations described in this chapter in which you’re transmitting any kind
of MIDI data from the VS-2480, set this parameter to OUT.
In the following sections, we describe connecting the VS-2480 to a single external MIDI
device. If you’re using a MIDI patchbay, consult its documentation to learn how to
route the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT data to a desired MIDI device, and how to route a
desired MIDI device’s data to the VS-2480’s MIDI IN jack.
Turning Fader Control On or Off
The setting of the MIDI PARAMETER screen’s CONTROL LOCAL Sw determines
whether or not the 16 channel strip faders are active. You may want to disable the faders
when you’re controlling the VS-2480 remotely—see Page 301—or simply want to protect
your level settings from being accidentally changed. You can set the parameter to:
•
•
Off—so that channel strip fader movements have no effect on the levels of the
currently selected input, track, Aux master or FX return channels.
On—so that the faders set the levels of the currently selected input, track, Aux
master or FX return channels. This is the default setting, since most often, you’ll
be controlling the VS-2480’s levels locally, not via MIDI.
A Note About SysEx ID Numbers
If you’re using multiple VS-2480s, it’s important to assign each VS-2480 its own System
Exclusive, or “SysEx,” ID number. Since VS-2480 SysEx messages (Page 301) can be
understood—and acted upon—by any VS-2480, only this ID number embedded in the
SysEx data lets the VS-2480 know if it’s supposed to act on a SysEx message it receives.
In order to respond to a SysEx message, the VS-2480’s ID number must be the same as
the ID number embedded in the message—if the VS-2480 is set to another ID, it ignores
the SysEx data. If you decide to change the VS-2480’s ID, make note of its previous
setting so that you’ll still be able to receive any SysEx data created with the older ID.
If you’re working with a single VS-2480, there’s no need to reset the MIDI PARAMETER
screen’s DEVICE ID parameter. With multiple VS-2480s, set each one to a different ID
number—you can select any SysEx Device ID number from 1-32. ID 17 is the default.
V.Fader—The VS-2480 MIDI Control Surface
The V.Fader (“Virtual Fader”) feature turns the VS-2480 into a MIDI control surface
with which you can adjust parameter values in an external MIDI device. In V.Fader
mode, each of the 16 channel strip faders and PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs becomes a
V.Fader. When you move a fader or knob, it transmits MIDI Control Change values
from the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack.
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Using the VS-2480 as a MIDI Control Surface
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the MIDI IN of
the device you want to control from the VS-2480.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Set MIDI OUT/THRU to Out.
Press F6 (EXIT).
Press PAGE once.
Press F6 (V.FDR)—the first V.FADER/USER screen appears.
On the three V.FADER/USER screens, you can select the Control Change
transmitted from the VS-2480 when a fader or PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob is moved.
To move between the V.FADER/USER screens, press F1 (Param1), F2
TR 17-24
FX RTN
(Param2) or F3 (Param3).
Hold down SHIFT and press V.FADER to activate the V.Fader feature—the
V.FADER
V.FADER button lights red.
The VS-2480’s faders and PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs now transmit the selected
Control Change messages—their movements have no effect in the VS-2480 itself.
To exit V.Fader mode, press V.FADER—its indicator goes out, and the faders return
to normal operation.
For a list of the Control Change messages the V.Faders can send, see “V-Fader Control
Messages” on Page 409.
Remote MIDI Control of the VS-2480
The VS-2480 can be controlled from an external MIDI device. Three types of MIDI
messages can be used for this purpose. You can use:
•
•
•
System Exclusive (“SysEx”) messages—that can control most VS-2480 functions.
Program Change and Bank Select messages— to select scenes and effect patches.
Control Change messages—that adjust important input channel, track channel, FX
return channel, Aux bus, Direct bus, MASTER bus and MONITOR bus parameters.
You can also adjust effect parameters and other parameters using NRPNs.
The various types of MIDI messages are described in the VS-2480 Appendices. In the
Appendices, System Exclusive messages are called “Exclusive” messages.
When sending and receiving SysEx or Control Change messages that affect the
VS-2480’s behavior or parameter values, take care to avoid MIDI loops. In a MIDI loop,
the same MIDI messages are sent and received by the connected devices over and over,
spiraling into nonsensical settings in either or both devices. In many sequencers, a
Thru feature passes MIDI data back to the device from which it came—this feature
should be turned off when working with VS-2480 SysEx and Control Change messages.
NRPN
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Remote Control of the VS-2480 with SysEx Messages
You can control the VS-2480 using SysEx messages in either of two ways.
Create SysEx Messages Manually
You can manually program the SysEx messages in an external MIDI device for
transmission to the VS-2480. This method requires an in-depth understanding of MIDI
programming—see the VS-2480 Appendices for details.
Capture and Return SysEx Messages
Every VS-2480 button-press, knob turn, fader move and so on can generate a SysEx
message that you can transmit from the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU connector. This
data can be captured by an external MIDI recording device and transmitted back to the
VS-2480. When you’re using the VS-2480 with a sequencer—as described later in this
chapter—the sequencer can record any actions you perform on the VS-2480, going
beyond even the extensive automation capabilities of the VS-2480’s Automix feature.
When the sequencer plays back, your moves are faithfully reproduced on the VS-2480.
You can also store VS-2480 settings in an external MIDI device using the VS-2480’s
SysEx bulk dump capabilities—see Page 304.
To transmit SysEx data from the VS-2480:
1.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the MIDI IN
jack of the device in which you want to capture the VS-2480’s SysEx data.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Set MIDI OUT/THRU to Out.
Turn on the SysEx. Tx Sw (“SysEx Transmit Switch”)—this determines whether or
not SysEx data is transmitted from the VS-2480 as you operate its controls.
MIXER CONTROL TYPE sets the type of messages generated by the VS-2480’s
controls. Set it to Excl so that the VS-2480 generates SysEx messages.
Every move you make on the VS-2480 produces a SysEx message that’s transmitted
from the MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the external MIDI device.
You can record the SysEx data on a track in a sequencer you’re synchronizing with the
VS-2480, as discussed later in this chapter.
To receive SysEx Data from an external MIDI device:
1.
2.
3.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480 MIDI IN jack to the MIDI OUT jack of the
device from which you want to receive SysEx data.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Turn on SysEx. Rx Sw so that the VS-2480 responds to received SysEx data.
Changing Scenes via MIDI
You can send the VS-2480 Program Change values on MIDI Channel 16 to recall scenes
in the current project. Program Change Numbers 00-99 recall Scenes 00-99.
The VS-2480 can’t switch scenes while its hard disk recorder is playing back. When it
receives a Program Change on MIDI Channel 16 during playback, playback pauses, the
requested scene is recalled, and playback then resumes.
Received Program Changes on MIDI Channel 16 are ignored during recording.
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Changing Effect Patches via MIDI
You can remotely select effect patches by sending the VS-2480 the appropriate Bank
Select and Program Change messages on the effect’s MIDI channel. Effects 1-8 respond
to messages received on MIDI Channels 1-8, respectively.
Bank MSB (C.C. 0):
Bank LSB (C.C. 32):
Program Change Numbers:
Selects Patches:
0
0
0-99
Preset 000-099
0
1
0-99
Preset 100-199
0
2
0-39
Preset 200-239
0
3
0-99
User 000-099
0
4
0-99
User 100-199
You can change effect patches using program changes sent to the VS-2480 when the
hard disk recorder is playing, recording or stopped.
Remote Control of the VS-2480 with Control Change Messages
You can set a variety of VS-2480 parameters from a remote MIDI device by sending the
VS-2480 Control Change messages. These include:
•
•
input, track, FX return channel parameters
MASTER and MONITOR bus parameters
•
•
Aux and Direct bus parameters
effect parameters
You can also send the VS-2480 Control Change messages to set its hard disk recorder’s
TRACK STATUS buttons.
Certain important parameters have their own Control Change numbers. You can set
one of these parameters by simply sending the VS-2480 the desired value for the
parameter’s Control Change number. For a list of the MIDI channels used by the input,
track, FX return channels and Master Edit area—as well as charts of Control Change
numbers and the parameters they set—see “MIDI Channels and Control Change
Maps” on Page 406.
Other parameters—such as effect parameters—can be adjusted using NRPNs, a special
category of Control Change messages. For details on using NRPNs for editing effects
and other parameters, see the MIDI Implementation section of the VS-2480 Appendices.
When you adjust these parameters on the VS-2480 itself, the VS-2480 can transmit
Control Change values that can be recorded in an external MIDI device and then sent
back to the VS-2480 as desired.
To enable Control Change transmission on the VS-2480:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the external
device’s MIDI IN jack.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Set MIDI OUT/THRU to Out.
Set MIXER CONTROL TYPE to C.C. (“Control Change”).
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To enable Control Change reception on the VS-2480:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI IN jack to the external device’s
MIDI OUT jack.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Set MIXER CONTROL TYPE to C.C. (“Control Change”).
If you want to edit effects using NRPNs, turn on the EFFECT C.C. Rx Sw (“EFFECT
Control Change Receive Switch”) parameter.
Remote MIDI Storage of VS-2480 Settings
You can transmit scenes, EZ Routing templates and user effect patches from the
VS-2480 as SysEx bulk dump data that can be stored in an external MIDI storage
device—or a sequencer—and loaded back into the VS-2480 at a later time. The
VS-2480’s bulk dump operations are performed on its MIDI BULK DUMP screen.
Bulk-dumping scene, EZ Routing or effect patch data doesn’t remove it from the
VS-2480’s memory. It merely allows you to store a copy of the data externally.
In order to transmit MIDI bulk dump data, the SysEx. Tx Sw parameter on the MIDI
PARAMETER screen (Page 299) must be turned on. To receive bulk dump data, the
SysEx. Rx Sw parameter on the same screen must also be turned on.
To ensure the successful re-loading of bulk dump data, read “A Note About SysEx ID
Numbers” on Page 300.
Sending SysEx Bulk Dump Data
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
304
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the device to
which you want to transmit the SysEx bulk dump.
Navigate to the MIDI PARAMETER screen ((Page 299).
Set MIDI OUT/THRU to Out.
Press F5 (BlkDmp)—the MIDI BULK DUMP screen appears.
When you bulk-dump data from the VS-2480, all data selected for transmission on
this screen is included in the dump. Therefore, you’ll need to select what you want
to transmit in the dump. The screen is divided into three parts: SCENE, EZR Usr
TMplt (“EZ Routing User Templates”) and Usr FX (“User Effect Patches”). Each
section has a BULK Tx (“Bulk Transmit”) Sw on/off parameter, and a BULK Tx
TARGET (“Bulk Transmission Target”) parameter.
To include scene data in the dump, turn on the SCENE section’s BULK Tx Sw.
Set the SCENE section’s BULK Tx TARGET parameter to:
• ALL—to include all of the current project’s scenes in the dump.
• (Scene XX)—to select a single scene to dump.
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7.
8.
9.
If you want to include EZ Routing user template data in the dump, turn on the EZR
Usr Tmplt section’s BULK Tx Sw and select a single EZ Routing template or ALL
templates for its BULK Tx TARGET parameter.
To include one or all of your user effect patches, turn on the Usr FX section’s BULK
Tx Sw parameter and set its BULK Tx TARGET to ALL or a selected user effect
patch.
When you’ve configured the contents of the bulk dump, press F1 (BULKTx) for
“Bulk Transmit.”
The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to transmit the bulk dump.
10. Press ENTER/YES to transmit the SysEx bulk dump, or EXIT/NO to cancel the
operation.
A progress bar appears on the screen as the dump occurs. When the dump is
complete, the VS-2480 displays “Done!”
Receiving SysEx Bulk Dump Data
When you reload a scene, EZ Routing template or user effect patch, it’s restored to its
original memory location in the VS-2480, replacing anything that’s currently stored
there. Before receiving bulk dump data, make sure the memory locations you’ll be
loading data into don’t contain anything you want to keep—if they do, re-save their
current contents to new memory locations before proceeding.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI IN jack to the MIDI OUT of the
device from which you want to transmit the SysEx bulk dump.
Navigate to the MIDI PARAMETER screen ((Page 299).
Press F5 (BlkDmp)—the MIDI BULK DUMP screen appears.
Press F2 (BULKRx) for “Bulk Receive.”
The VS-2480 tells you it’s awaiting the bulk dump data.
5.
6.
If you wish to cancel the operation at this point, press ENTER/YES.
When the data has been received, press ENTER/YES.
The VS-2480 asks if you wish to restore the data to its original scene, EZ Routing
template and/or user effect patch memory locations.
7.
Press ENTER/YES to restore the data, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
MIDI Metronome
The VS-2480 has a full-featured internal metronome that allows you to create several
types of reference rhythms during recording and playback—see Page 369. The
metronome can also send its MIDI notes to an external MIDI sound module or
keyboard, allowing you to use the module’s sounds for your reference rhythm.
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Setting Up a MIDI Metronome
Prepare the external MIDI device that’ll be producing your metronome sounds by
configuring it to receive data on a MIDI channel of your choice, and by selecting a
rhythm kit-type sound that plays a different percussion sound on each note.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU jack to the MIDI IN
jack of the device whose sounds you want to use as a metronome.
Navigate to the MIDI parameter screen (Page 299).
Set MIDI OUT/THRU to Out.
Press F6 (EXIT).
Press PAGE once.
Press F2 (Metro)—the METRONOME screen appears.
7.
8.
Set METRONOME OUT to MIDI.
Set METRONOME MIDI Ch to the MIDI channel on which the external MIDI
device is set to receive data.
The metronome can play two types of notes. It can play:
• accent notes—that signify the start of each measure to help you keep track of
where you are.
• normal notes—that play on each measures’ other beats. This note typically has a
lower pitch than the accent note.
9. Select the desired accent note on your external MIDI device by setting ACCENT
NOTE to its MIDI note number.
10. Select the desired normal note by selecting its MIDI note number for the NORMAL
NOTE parameter.
It’s customary for the accent note to be somewhat louder than the normal notes—
this loudness is determined by the note’s MIDI velocity value.
11. Once you’ve had a chance to hear your MIDI metronome, you may want to adjust
the ACCENT VELOCITY and NORMAL VELOCITY parameters to set a pleasing
volume balance between the two types of notes.
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Synchronization
Why Sync the VS-2480?
The ability to synchronize the VS-2480—specifically, its hard disk recorder—with other
devices can be useful in a variety of situations.
Working with a MIDI Sequencer
You can sync the VS-2480 to any kind of sequencer—a standalone hardware sequencer,
a computer sequencing program or the sequencer in a beat box. Live stage productions
with sequencer-driven lighting cues can also be synchronized to house sounds
generated by the VS-2480.
In music, synchronizing the VS-2480 with a sequencer allows you to record MIDI
instruments as audio on the VS-2480’s tracks. It also lets you create a finished musical
work without ever recording your MIDI instruments as VS-2480 tracks, perfecting your
sequenced tracks as you listen to them alongside your recorded VS-2480 tracks. The
sequencer can play its MIDI instruments live through the VS-2480’s input channels
during the final mixdown.
As described earlier in this chapter, you can record all of your VS-2480 actions into a
sequencer as SysEx data, and have the sequencer play them back during a project. A
sequencer can also adjust VS-2480 parameters in realtime using Control Change
messages (Page 303) as a project plays or during recording.
Working with a Video or Film Editing System
Since you can synchronize the VS-2480 to any system that uses MTC or SMPTE
synchronization (described later in this chapter), The VS-2480 can be a great asset in
video or film soundtrack, commercial spot production or post-production work.
Synchronization lets you place the musical scores, narration or sound effects you’ve
recorded on the VS-2480 perfectly to picture, thanks to the VS-2480’s accurate frame/
subframe synchronization precision.
Basic Synchronization Concepts
Master/Slave
When two devices are synchronized with each other, one devices is always designated
as the “master” and the other the “slave,” as we mentioned back in Chapter 9 in the
discussion of digital audio’s master clocking. In synchronization, the:
•
•
master—generates the timing reference that both devices use.
slave—operates using the master’s timing reference.
The VS-2480 can operate as master and/or slave, depending on the situation, as
described in the following sections.
What Do We Mean By “Timing Reference?”
A timing reference is a kind of message continuously transmitted from master to slave
to keep the devices synchronized. The VS-2480 works with two types of timing
references when synchronizing its hard disk recorder with another device.
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SMPTE/MTC
The film and video industries use a steady stream of timing data called “SMPTE time
code” to keep devices tightly synchronized with each other as they play. A form of
SMPTE called “MIDI Time Code,” or “MTC” can be transmitted and received through
MIDI cables along with other MIDI data. Both SMPTE and MTC provide very accurate
synchronization. The time code area of the VS-2480’s current time location display
(Page 126) shows MTC/SMPTE hours, minutes, seconds frames and subframes.
The VS-2480 can be synchronized to any device that generates either SMPTE or MTC.
Since most VS-2480s are used with MIDI devices, MTC is used more frequently than
SMPTE. Most sequencers support MTC, for example—not as many support SMPTE.
The VS-2480 itself generates MTC.
MIDI Beat Clock
MIDI beat clock—or “MIDI Clock” for short—is a pulse embedded in a stream of MIDI
data that can be used for synchronizing MIDI devices. MIDI clock synchronization isn’t
as accurate as MTC-based synchronization. It does have one important use, however.
MIDI clock, along with MIDI Song Position Pointer (“SPP”) messages, passes along
tempo and time signature information that can be used by the VS-2480 in the creation
of sync tracks and tempo maps, which we’ll discuss in a moment.
The VS-2480 can record received MIDI clock information as a sync track that lets it act
as a master to slave devices that understand MIDI clocks and Song Position Pointer.
While the VS-2480 can generate MIDI clocks to slave devices that use this form of sync,
the VS-2480 itself can’t be synchronized to MIDI clocks, since it’s not an accurate
enough form of synchronization for the VS-2480’s precise operation.
Song Position Pointer
About MTC/SMPTE Frame Rates
When you use MTC or SMPTE for synchronizing the VS-2480 with an external device,
you’ll need to make sure that the two devices are set to operate at the same MTC/
SMPTE speed, called the “frame rate.”The “frame” refers to how many frames of film or
video occur in each second.
MTC and SMPTE can run at a few different frame rates, depending on the devices
being synchronized and the materials they’re producing. It can run at:
•
•
•
•
•
30 fps (‘frames per second”)—This speed is used by most MIDI sequencers and audio
devices. Black and white video also runs at this speed.
29.97N (“non-drop”) fps—This is the speed at which United States’ NTSC format
color video runs in non-time-critical situations, such as offline production work.
29.97D (“drop”) fps—This is the speed at which United States’ NTSC format live
color video runs during broadcasts and other time-critical situations.
25 fps—This is the speed at which European SECAM or PAL film, video and audio
equipment operates.
24 fps—Film, cell animation and certain audio devices run at this speed.
What are Non-Drop and Drop Frame Rates?
When a time counter display tries to show the frames passing by at the 29.97 fps color
video frame rate, it has a problem: The counter can’t show exactly 29.97 counter
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numbers per second. It can either show 29 per second or 30, but there’s no way to
display only a fraction of a counter number—a number’s either shown or it isn’t.
A technique called the “drop frame” was devised by the video industry to deal with
this. With a frame rate called “29.97 drop,” the first two frames in every minute are
discarded except for the first minute and every tenth minute. This keeps the time code
and a counter roughly together. In fact, they’re always a little bit off from each other,
but each time the frames are dropped, the time code leaps ahead to catch up to the
counter temporarily. This form of time code isn’t completely continuous—since it has to
keep skipping over frames to catch up—but it’s useful in situations where the counter,
and the clock on the wall, has to match the time code as closely as possible. It’s
therefore the most commonly used time code in the live broadcasting of color video.
29.97 non-drop time code is its continuous cousin. It doesn’t drop any frames and is the
preferred frame rate when the counter’s accuracy doesn’t matter so much. Continuous
time code is theoretically smoother than time code that jumps around skipping frames.
Which Frame Rate Should You Use
If you’re syncing and there’s no video or film involved, use the 30 fps frame rate unless
one of your devices doesn’t support it. This frame rate’s continuous and has the finest
possible resolution, being the fastest speed available. If you’re syncing the VS-2480 to
an external device that has to use another frame rate—for example, a video editing
system—simply set the VS-2480 to the frame rate the external device uses. We’ll
describe setting the VS-2480’s FRAME RATE parameter in the following sections.
MMC
MMC, short for “MIDI Machine Control,” is a set of MIDI messages that controls the
transport buttons—PLAY, STOP, etc.—of an MMC-supporting device. MMC also
contains information that tells each device the current location of its transport. In the
VS-2480, this would be the position of its timeline. MMC’s not a form of sync—it’s
about button-presses: When you press the PLAY button on a master MMC device, an
MMC slave device acts as if its PLAY has been pressed as well. The VS-2480 can act as
an MMC master or slave.
In order for MMC to work, the master device’s SysEx transmission must be enabled—
in the VS-2480, this is the SysEx. Tx Sw parameter on the MIDI PARAMETER screen
(Page 299). The slave device’s SysEx reception must also be turned on. For the VS-2480,
this is the SysEx. Rx Sw parameter, also on the MIDI PARAMETER screen.
Synchronization with Tempo Changes
Its’ not uncommon for a piece of music to use more than a single tempo or time
signature. Since MTC/SMPTE speeds are unaffected by tempo or time signature, MTC/
SMPTE time code doesn’t contain tempo or time signature information. If you want a
sequencer you’re syncing to the VS-2480 to speed up or slow down—or change time
signatures—in order to follow what’s recorded in a project, you can synchronize the
two devices using MIDI clock and Song Position Pointers (Page 308).
The VS-2480 can transmit this form of synchronization as a:
•
sync track—a single, uneditable stream of MIDI clock/SPP synchronization data.
The VS-2480 can record a sync track comprised of captured MIDI clock and Song
Position Pointer data received from an external MIDI device. This lets an external
sequencer “teach” the VS-2480 a song’s tempo and time signature changes. The
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•
data can then be sent back to the sequencer, slaving it to the VS-2480. You can also
construct a sync track for a new or already recorded project using markers. In
addition, the VS-2480 can use information you provide about an already recorded
project to create a new sync track. See Page 311 for details on using a sync track.
tempo map—an editable stream of MIDI clock/SPP synchronization data. Each
VS-2480 project has its own a tempo map in which you can view and edit a project’s
tempo and time signature changes. You can build a tempo map for a new or already
recorded project on the VS-2480 manually or by using markers, or convert an
existing sync track into a tempo map. For details, see Page 312.
The primary difference between a sync track and a tempo map in synchronization
operations is that a tempo map lets you see and edit tempo and time signature changes.
A project’s tempo map also provides the basis for the Home screen’s track editing grid.
The phrase sequencer uses it for quantization, step entry and editing.
To synchronize an external MIDI device to the VS-2480 using a sync track or tempo
map, the device must recognize MIDI clock and Song Position Pointer messages.
The VS-2480 has an area of memory set aside for a sync track—it isn’t recorded on a
project track and doesn’t take up any recording or phrase sequencer tracks.
It’s important to understand that a sync track or a tempo map has no effect on the
speed at which a project plays back—this speed is determined by the project’s
sampling rate and its VARI PITCH setting, or by received MTC/SMPTE time code. A
sync track and tempo map merely transmit tempo and time signature information that
describes what’s going on in a project to a MIDI device synchronized to the VS-2480.
The SYNC PARAMETER Screen
The VS-2480’s synchronization parameters can be found on its UTILITY menu SYNC
screen. To get there:
1.
2.
Hold down SHIFT and press the EXT SYNC button—the SYNC
screen appears.
SHIFT
EXT SYNC
+
Select the desired sync parameter and adjust its value.
Some synchronization operations also involve parameters on the MIDI PARAMETER
screen (Page 299).
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Working with a Sync Track
Recording a Sync Track from an External Device
Prepare the external device that’s supplying the sync track data by setting it to transmit
MIDI clocks.
1.
2.
3.
Using a MIDI cable, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI IN jack to the MIDI OUT of the
device from which you want to transmit the MIDI clocks.
Navigate to the SYNC screen (Page 310).
Press F1 (STrRec) for “SyncTrack Record”—the VS-2480 tells you it’s awaiting data.
As the VS-2480 receives the incoming sync track data, its display shows what’s
being captured.
If you want to interrupt and cancel the operation, press EXIT/NO. When the
incoming data’s been recorded, the VS-2480 displays “Done!”
The VS-2480’s timeline doesn’t move during sync track recording, nor do the project
tracks play.
4.
If you need to re-record the sync track, repeat Steps 1-3, and
when the VS-2480 asks if you want to overwrite the previously
recorded sync track data, press ENTER/YES to proceed or
EXIT/NO to cancel.
Generating a Sync Track from Markers
When a project contains music and uses a single time signature, you can create a sync
track from markers placed on every beat in the project. To learn about placing markers,
see Page 188.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Hold down SHIFT and press TAP—the TEMPO MAP screen appears.
Press F1 (TM Cnv) to display the TEMPO MAP CONVERT window.
Set CONVERT TYPE to Tap → SyncTrk.
Set BEAT to the desired time signature.
Set TAP BEAT to the number of markers in each measure.
Press ENTER/YES to convert the markers into a sync track, or EXIT/NO to cancel
the operation.
Creating a Sync Track Automatically
When a project contains music and has a completely steady tempo and no time
signature or tempo changes, the VS-2480 can create a sync track from the project’s start
and end times, its time signature and the number of measures it contains.
You’ll need to note the following before proceeding: the precise start and end times of
the project’s audio, the number of measures in the project, and its time signature.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Hold down SHIFT and press TAP—the TEMPO MAP screen appears.
Press F1 (TM Cnv) to display the TEMPO MAP CONVERT window.
Set to CONVERT TYPE to Time → SyncTrk.
Set the START TIME parameter to the time at which the project’s audio starts.
Set the END TIME parameter underneath it to the time at which the project ends.
Enter the number of measures and the project’s time signature.
Press ENTER/YES to create the new sync track, or EXIT/NO to cancel the
operation.
Working with a Tempo Map
The Tempo Map Screen
All editing of a project’s tempo map takes place on the UTILITY menu’s TEMPO MAP
screen. You can also view a project’s tempo and time signature details on this screen when
you’ve generated a tempo map from a sync track or markers.
1.
Hold down SHIFT and press TAP—the TEMPO MAP screen
appears.
SHIFT
+
The TEMPO MAP CONVERT Window
When you press F1 (TM CNV)—for “Tempo Map convert”—on the TEMPO map screen,
the TEMPO MAP CONVERT window appears.
In this illustration, the
parameters for the operation
that converts markers into a
sync track are displayed.
On this screen—as we saw earlier in “Working with a Sync Track”—you can perform a
variety of sync track and tempo map conversion operations. When you set CONVERT
TYPE to the desired operation, the operation’s parameters are displayed.
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The Elements of a Tempo Map
A map
In a tempo map, each tempo or time signature change in a project is
represented by a group of parameters collectively called a “map.”The maps
are numbered starting with “1” in the order in which they occur in the
project. A map contains the following parameters:
•
•
•
Meas (“Measure”)—the measure at which the map’s settings take effect.
Beat—the time signature at the start of the selected measure.
—the tempo, in BPM (“Beats Per Minute”), at the start of the selected
measure.
At the bottom of each map is a graphic display of its tempo relative to the entire
possible range of tempos, from 25 BPM to 250 BPM.
Map 1 shows the project’s initial tempo and time signature and can’t be deleted.
Shaping a Tempo Map By Hand
If you’ve only got a few tempo or time signature changes in a project, you can manually
create an entire project tempo map on the TEMPO MAP screen (Page 312) by placing a map
at every tempo or time signature change:
•
•
•
Begin by editing the first map’s parameters to reflect the project’s starting tempo
and time signature—there’s usually no need to change Map 1’s Meas parameter
since it represents the project’s starting tempo and time signature.
Create additional maps at all of the locations in the project at which a tempo or
time signature change occurs.
Edit the maps’ values as desired.
You’ll need to determine the desired BPM tempo values for your project to construct an
accurate tempo map, or to edit the tempos in an existing one.
You can also edit the individual maps in an already-created tempo map.
To:
Do this:
create a new map
Press F2 (NEW)
select a map
Cursor to its number or any of its
parameters. When a map is selected, the
line at its left edge darkens.
insert a new map after the currently
selected map
Press F3 (INSERT)
Erase the currently selected map
Press F4 (DELETE)
To edit an existing map:
1.
2.
3.
Cursor to the map’s Meas parameter to move the map to a new location, and select
the desired number of the measure at which you want to place the map.
Press % and set the Beat parameter to the desired time signature.
Press % and select the desired tempo for the map.
You can’t move a map to the same measure as the previous map, or to an earlier
measure.
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Hold down SHIFT as you turn the TIME/VALUE dial to move through BPM values in
whole-BPM-number steps.
A project’s audio rarely starts at Time 00h00m00s00f00, and when the tempo map starts,
so will a sequencer slaved to the VS-2480. You can use the SYNC OFFSET TIME
parameter on the SYNC PARAMETER screen (Page 310) to delay the start of the tempo
map. Move the timeline to the beginning of the project’s audio, note the timeline’s time
code location in the current time location display, and copy the time into the SYNC
OFFSET TIME parameter’s box.
Creating a Tempo Map from Markers
When a project contains music and has a single time signature, you can create a tempo
map from markers you’ve placed on every beat. To learn about placing markers, see
Page 188.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Hold down SHIFT and press TAP—the TEMPO MAP screen appears.
Press F1 (TM Cnv) to display the TEMPO MAP CONVERT window.
Set to CONVERT TYPE to Tap → Tempo Map.
Set BEAT to the desired time signature.
Set TAP BEAT to the number of markers in each measure.
Press ENTER/YES to convert the markers into a tempo map, or EXIT/NO to cancel.
Converting a Sync Track to a Tempo Map
When you’ve recorded a detailed sync track—one that contains tempo changes and
uses a single time signature—from an external device, you can convert it into a project
tempo map.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Hold down SHIFT and press TAP—the TEMPO MAP screen appears.
Press F1 (TM Cnv) to display the TEMPO MAP CONVERT window.
Set to CONVERT TYPE to Sync Trk → Tempo Map.
Set SYNC TRACK BEAT to the project’s time signature.
Press ENTER/YES to convert the sync track into a tempo map, or EXIT/NO to
cancel the operation.
Syncing an External Device to the VS-2480
The VS-2480 can generate MTC or MIDI clocks that allow you to synchronize another
device to the VS-2480, with the VS-2480 as master and the external device as slave.
MIDI clocks are always carried to an external device through a MIDI cable. MTC, on
the other hand, can be carried through a MIDI cable to a MIDI device, or through an
R-BUS cable to a connected R-BUS device (Page 49). To learn how to set up R-BUS
communication with the VS-2480, see “R-BUS Remote Control” on Page 387.
The following describes synchronizing a single device to the VS-2480. If you have a way
of distributing VS-2480-generated sync—a MIDI patchbay can do this—you can slave
multiple devices to the VS-2480 as long as they’re all capable of responding to the
selected form of synchronization.
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Setting Up the VS-2480 as the Sync Master
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Navigate to the MIDI PARAMETER screen (Page 299).
If the VS-2480 is connected to the slave device with a MIDI cable, set MIDI OUT/
THRU to Out. If you’re using an R-BUS connection, skip this step.
If the device you’re syncing to the VS-2480 supports MMC (Page 309), turn on the
SysEx. Tx Sw parameter and set MMC MODE to MASTER.
Hold down SHIFT and press EXT SYNC to jump to the SYNC PARAMETER screen.
Set SYNC MODE to INT, for “Internal” so that the VS-2480 uses its own timing.
If you’ll be using MTC, select a FRAME RATE value—see Page 308 for guidance.
If you’ll be using MTC, and the material in the slave device doesn’t begin at
00h00m00s00f00, enter its start time as the Sync OFFSET TIME parameter’s value—
when the VS-2480’s project plays from the top, the slave plays from this location.
Select the type of sync you want the VS-2480 to generate. If you’re syncing to:
• a MIDI device that recognizes MTC—set MIDI OUT SYNC Gen. to MTC.
• a MIDI device that recognizes MIDI clocks—set MIDI OUT SYNC Gen. to
MIDIClk (“MIDI Clock”) if you want to synchronize the external device to a
project tempo map. To synchronize the device to a sync track, select SyncTr.
• an R-BUS device connected to the R-BUS 1 jack—set R-BUS1 Sync Gen. to MTC.
• an R-BUS device connected to the R-BUS 2 jack—set R-BUS2 Sync Gen. to MTC.
Complete the setup by configuring the slave device so that it’s set to:
• use an external timing source.
• receive the type of sync you’re sending it from the VS-2480.
• receive MMC if the device recognizes MMC.
• receive SysEx data if the device recognizes MMC.
Consult the slave device’s documentation for synchronization setup details.
Starting Synchronized Playback with the VS-2480 as Master
1.
2.
3.
Set the slave device—as detailed in its documentation—so that it’s awaiting sync.
Press the VS-2480’s PLAY button.
To halt synchronized playback, press STOP on the VS-2480.
Syncing the VS-2480 to an External Device
The VS-2480 can be synchronized to a master device that generates MTC or SMPTE
time code. The VS-2480 can receive MTC through its MIDI IN jack or through an R-BUS
connection (Page 49). It can receive SMPTE time code via its SMPTE IN jack (Page 47).
For details on setting up successful R-BUS communication with the VS-2480, see
“R-BUS Remote Control” on Page 387.
Setting Up the VS-2480 as a Sync Slave
1.
2.
3.
4.
Navigate to the MIDI PARAMETER screen (Page 299).
If the master device transmits MMC (Page 309), turn on the VS-2480’s SysEx. Rx Sw
parameter, and set the MMC MODE parameter to SLAVE.
Set the MMC SOURCE parameter to:
• MIDI—if the VS-2480 is connected to the master device via MIDI.
• R-BUS1—if the master device is connected to the VS-2480’s R-BUS 1 jack.
• R-BUS2—if the master device is connected to the VS-2480’s R-BUS 2 jack.
Hold down SHIFT and press EXT SYNC to jump to the SYNC PARAMETER screen.
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5.
Set SYNC MODE to EXT, for “External” so that the VS-2480 uses the master device’s
timing to operate.
If you prefer, you can wait until you’re ready to begin synchronized playback and press
the EXT SYNC button to activate the VS-2480’s use of external sync.
6.
7.
8.
The SYNC with GAP parameter determines how the VS-2480 responds to small
gaps, or “dropouts,” that often occur in time code for a variety of reasons. Set it to:
• Off—if you want the VS-2480 to stop if there’s any gap in the time code.
• On—if you want the VS-2480 to continue playing, or “freewheel,” at the last
synchronized speed until time code is again received.
Set EXT Sync SOURCE to the jack that’s receiving time code from the master
device. You can select:
• MIDI IN
• R-BUS1
• R-BUS2
• SMPTE IN
Set FRAME RATE to the master device’s frame rate.
Set Sync ERROR LEVEL to adjust the VS-2480’s tolerance of dropouts in the time
code. Lower values make the VS-2480 less tolerant of time code problems, causing
it to cancel synchronization by stopping the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder. Higher
values make the VS-2480 more patient with problems in the time code, giving it
more time to recover before canceling synchronization.
The best setting for the both the SYNC with GAP and Sync ERROR LEVEL parameters
is a personal judgement call. When SYNC with GAP is turned off and SYNC ERROR
LEVEL is set to a lower value, you can be sure that your sync is rock-solid when
synchronization is successful. On the other hand, it’s more likely that synchronization
will fail. If you turn SYNC with GAP on and use a higher Sync ERROR LEVEL value,
it’s more likely that synchronization will succeed, but it may not be as tight. You may
need to experiment with various settings to find the one that’s most satisfactory.
9.
Complete the setup by configuring the master device so that it’s set to:
• send MTC or SMPTE time code to the corresponding VS-2480 jack.
• the same frame rate as the VS-2480.
• generate MMC.
• transmit SysEx data.
Consult the master device’s documentation for synchronization setup details.
If the time code produced by the master device starts before 00h00m00s00f00—that is,
it’s a negative value—the project playback on the VS-2480 pauses at 23h.59m.59s.29f.99.
Be sure not to record any audio in the project at this time location.
Shifting the Project Start Time
It’s not uncommon to be syncing a VS-2480 project to material on a master device that
doesn’t begin at 00h00m00s00f00 MTC/SMPTE time. You might be syncing the project
to a song somewhere in the middle of a digital tape, for example. When you begin
playback, the VS-2480’s timeline shoots ahead to the same time location—the
beginning of the material on the master starts in the middle of the VS-2480’s project.
If you’ve already recorded at the beginning of your project, it won’t play along with the
master’s material. If you haven’t yet recorded on the VS-2480, any audio you record
during synchronization will begin somewhere within the project. When you want to do
unsynchronized work, you’ll need to navigate to the middle of the project to begin
playback each time instead of just being able to hit the ZERO button.
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You can shift, or “offset,” the project’s start time to solve this problem so that whenever
the master starts over, your project begins at the top. To offset the project start time:
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
If “Proj” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (Proj).
The DISPLAY OFFSET TIME parameter shifts the
project’s start time. To find the value you want,
subtract the desired project start time—typically
00h00m00s00f00—from the master’s start time. Enter
this amount as the DISPLAY OFFSET TIME.
Master start time
—desired project start time
DISPLAY OFFSET TIME
This formula is especially helpful if your project’s audio starts somewhere other than
zero. Use the location at which the audio begins as your desired start time. If you get a
negative result, add 24.00.00.00.00 to the master’s start time and do the math again.
4.
Set the TIME DISPLAY FORMAT parameter to REL, for “Relative Time,” so that the
current time location display shows the project’s shifted start time instead of ABS
(absolute) MTC/SMPTE time during playback.
Starting Synchronized Playback with the VS-2480 as Slave
1.
2.
On the VS-2480, if the EXT SYNC indicator isn’t already flashing, press it
EXT SYNC
so that it is—this is the same thing as setting the SYNC MODE
parameter to EXT (Page 315).
Press PLAY on the VS-2480—its indicator flashes green to indicate that it’s awaiting
external time code.
Sync-related parameters can’t be adjusted while the PLAY indicator is flashing.
3.
4.
Start playback on the master device—the VS-2480 begins playback as well. If you’ve
shifted the project’s start time, the VS-2480’s timeline jumps to the desired location.
To halt playback, stop playback on the master. If you’ve shifted the project start
time, the VS-2480’s timeline jumps to its actual MTC/SMPTE time code location
when playback stops.
Exchanging Digital Audio Data During Synchronization
You can exchange digital audio between the VS-2480 and its sync partner. You might, for
example, want to move audio tracks from one V-Studio to another. To learn about digital
connectors, see Page 49. To learn about clocking digital audio, see Page 132.
When the VS-2480 is the Master
You can set its MASTER CLOCK parameter (Page 132) to INT to send digital audio to
the slave device with the VS-2480 controlling the audio’s timing.
When the VS-2480 is the Slave
You can receive digital audio from the master device by setting the VS-2480’s MASTER
CLOCK to EXT TIME CODE. The received digital audio’s clocking is computed from,
and controlled by, the master device’s time code.
You can also send digital audio from the VS-2480 to the master device by setting the
VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter to INT—with this setting, the VS-2480
generates its own master clock based on the time code received from the master device.
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25—Surround
The VS-2480 can generate Surround mixes in three popular Surround formats, allowing
you to place input, track or FX return channel signals anywhere in Surround’s threedimensional space. This chapter describes how to set up for Surround mixing on the
VS-2480, and how to deliver output signals for Surround encoding.
What is Surround?
In a conventional stereo system, audio is presented to the listener through two
speakers: a left and a right speaker. Individual signals can be sent to one speaker or
another in varying amounts, creating the illusion that the signal is occurring
somewhere between the two speakers, in the two-dimensional, left/right stereo field.
Surround sound creates a three-dimensional—left/right and front/back—audio image
using four to six speakers, depending on the Surround format. These speakers are
placed in front of and behind the listener. While Surround is gaining popularity in
private homes and live performance spaces, it’s especially significant for its
contributions to theatrical films—most mainstream movies employ Surround.
The VS-2480 provides total control of signals’ apparent positions in the threedimensional Surround field.
Surround Formats
Sub-woofer
The listener can be sitting anywhere within the
dotted square. “+” marks its center.
Left
Center
Left Side
Right
Right Side
2+2 Surround
Left
Center
Right
Rear Center
3+1 Surround
Left
Right
Left Side
Right Side
3+2+1 (“5.1”) Surround
In Surround, the rear speakers are sometimes referred to as “side” speakers.
If you’re not sure which Surround format you should use, check with the facility that’ll
be performing the Surround encoding, or with your client if you’re doing a mix for hire.
If you’re mixing for yourself, use the format that utilizes your available speakers.
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How the VS-2480 Delivers Surround
When its Surround mode is active, the VS-2480 assigns an Aux bus to each of the
Surround speakers, or “stems,” in the currently selected Surround format. Signals
panned to a stem are automatically sent to its Aux bus.
The Aux busses are routed by default to the VS-2480’s analog output jacks and digital
connectors. You can re-route any of the Aux busses to other outputs if you wish—see
Chapter 22 to learn how to set up the desired output routing.
On the CH EDIT screens, the Aux bus send controls for these busses are replaced by
Surround position parameters. The busses’ names change on the CH EDIT and EZ
Routing OUTPUT screens to reflect their Surround roles.
2+2 Surround
Speaker/stem:
Aux bus:
Analog output:
Digital output:
Front left (L)
Aux 5
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 5
R-BUS1 5
Front right (R)
Aux 6
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 6
R-BUS1 6
Left side (Ls)
Aux 7
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 7
R-BUS1 7
Right side (Rs)
Aux 8
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 8
R-BUS1 8
Speaker/stem:
Aux bus:
Analog output:
Digital output:
Front left (L)
Aux 5
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 5
R-BUS1 5
Front right (R)
Aux 6
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 6
R-BUS1 6
Front center (C)
Aux 7
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 7
R-BUS1 7
Rear center (RC)
Aux 8
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 8
R-BUS1 8
Speaker/stem:
Aux bus:
Analog output:
Digital output:
Front left (L)
Aux 3
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 3
R-BUS1 3
Front right (R)
Aux 4
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 4
R-BUS1 4
Front center (C)
Aux 5
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 5
R-BUS1 5
Sub-woofer (SW)
Aux 6
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 6
R-BUS1 6
Left side (Ls)
Aux 7
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 7
R-BUS1 7
Right side (Rs)
Aux 8
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT 8
R-BUS1 8
3+1 Surround
3+2+1 (5.1) Surround
You can connect the analog jacks or digital connectors to which the Surround Aux
busses are routed to an external recorder for delivery to a production facility that does
Surround encoding for theatrical or other commercial releases. You can also connect
them directly to a Surround encoding device.
With an R-BUS DIF-AT interface (purchased separately) connected to one of the
VS-2480’s R-BUS connectors, you can transfer your Surround mix digitally to an ADAT
or Tascam T-DIF recorder, popular devices used in Surround production facilities.
If you’re creating a Surround mix for your own studio monitors—and don’t need to
Surround-encode the mix—you can connect the Aux busses’ digital outputs to the
inputs of Roland DS-90A or DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors, or the analog outputs
to your standard monitor amplifiers’ inputs.
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Turning on Surround Mode
To create a Surround mix, you must be in Surround mode.
1.
2.
3.
Press UTILITY.
If “Surrnd” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (Surrnd) to view the SURROUND screen.
4.
5.
Set SURROUND MIX MODE to the desired Surround format.
Turn the SURROUND MIX Sw parameter on. The VS-2480 reminds you that it’s
about to re-configure your Aux busses, and asks if you’re sure you want to switch to
Surround mode.
This message also appears if you change Surround formats when Surround mode is
already turned on.
6.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the activation of Surround
mode.
If you’ve got mixer settings you’d like to preserve, press EXIT/NO, save them as a scene
and then activate Surround mode.
If you pressed ENTER/YES in Step 6, the VS-2480 reminds you that your current
channel panning settings will also be affected by the switch to Surround mode.
7.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the change into Surround
mode.
When you switch to Surround mode, connections are broken between any Aux busses
required by the selected Surround format and the VS-2480’s internal effects in order to
prevent confusion. You can re-route the Aux busses to the effects if you wish (Page 294).
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Certain parameter values change when you turn on Surround mode.
Parameter type:
What Happens:
Input and track channel CH
EDIT parameters
•
•
FX return channel CH EDIT
parameters
•
MASTER EDIT parameters
•
ChLink is turned off for any linked channels.
Surround placement controls replace the Aux bus send
controls for any Aux busses used by the selected
Surround format.
The ASSIGN parameter is turned off for any Aux
busses used by the selected Surround format.
• Surround placement controls replace the Aux bus send
controls for any Aux busses used by the selected
Surround format.
The level controls of Aux busses used by the selected
Surround format become Surround speaker master
level controls.
• If any Aux busses used by the selected Surround
format are linked, they become unlinked.
Positioning a Signal in the Surround Field
Each input, track and FX return channel has its own Surround controls that let you
place its signal at the desired location within the three-dimensional Surround field. You
can position a channel’s signal from its CH EDIT VIEW page, or from its dedicated CH
EDIT SURROUND screen that presents a large graphic representation of the signal’s
Surround position.
1.
2.
Press the FADER button that selects the group of channels containing the one
whose Surround position you want to set.
Press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button.
At the bottom of the CH EDIT VIEW screen, you see that Surround parameters
have replaced the Aux bus send controls for the Aux busses used by the selected
Surround format.
Input and track channels
FX return channels
3+2+1 Surround position parameters
3.
4.
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These parameters are the same as those found on the channel’s CH EDIT
SURROUND screen—they’re available here to provide a quick way to adjust a
channel’s Surround position as you work with its other CH EDIT parameters. We’ll
describe how the Surround parameters work in our discussion of the CH EDIT
SURROUND screen.
If “Surrnd” isn’t visible above F2, press PAGE until it is.
Press F2 (Surrnd) to view the CH EDIT SURROUND screen.
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25—Surround
Position ball
This illustration shows the
CH EDIT SURROUND
screen for 3+2+1
Surround.
The channel’s output level.
This is the same as moving
the channel’s fader or
adjusting its CH EDIT
FADER parameter.
The amount of signal sent from the channel
to the Surround Aux busses.
5.
The position ball shows the current Surround placement of the channel’s signal.
Move the channel’s signal to the desired location by dragging the position ball with
your mouse, or by adjusting the:
• PAN—to move the signal to the left or right. You can set PAN anywhere from
L63—all the way to the left—to R63—all the way to the right.
• DEPTH—to move the signal to the front or the rear. You can set DEPTH
anywhere from F63—all the way to the front—to R63—all the way to the rear.
An even better way to perform Surround panning is to connect a Roland VE-7000
channel edit controller (purchased separately) and use its joystick to set each signal’s
Surround position.
6.
7.
When you’re doing 3+1 or 3+2+1 Surround, the LR:C parameter allows you to set
the amount of the channel’s signal to be handed to the front center speaker. In
stereo mixing, the center position is the result of an equal amount of signal being
sent to the left and right speakers. In Surround, there can be a separate center
speaker so that signals panned to the center are reinforced by their own speaker
and have their own level control—this is Aux Bus 7 with 3+1 Surround, and Aux
Bus 5 with 3+2+1 Surround.
Set the desired LR:C value from 0% to 100%:
• With 0%—signals are positioned in the center between the left and right front
speakers by sending an equal amount of signal to both speakers.
• With 100%—signals panned to the center are handled completely by the center
speaker.
When you’re mixing 3+2+1 Surround, send the desired amount of the channel’s
signal to the front subwoofer by adjusting the Sub. W (for “SubWoofer”)
parameter’s value.
Adjusting Master Surround Bus Levels
You can adjust the master level for each Surround stem. Since signal is carried to the
stem using one of the VS-2480’s Aux busses, simply move the Aux bus’s master fader to
adjust the stem’s level. You can also change its level on the MASTER EDIT VIEW screen.
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26—Automix
This chapter describes how to perform automated mixing on the VS-2480 using its
Automix feature. Automix allows you to create and perfect automated mixes.
The Benefits of Automix
Automated Mixdown
Mixing is a challenging art, a delicate balance of attention to detail and artistic vision.
It’s both a creative and clerical activity in which your project is turned into a final work
that can be heard by other people. It’s the time when everything you’ve been meaning
to tend to, and every enhancement you’ve been planning, has to be addressed. As such,
there’s a lot to get right. Mixing is really the project’s final, ultimate performance.
Automix allows you to build up your mix, element by element, by recording each
adjustment and perfectly playing it back. This lets you take your time, enjoying the
process of crafting your project’s final sound. Since Automix remembers what you do,
you can work on a mix over a period of time—at the start of each mixing session, your
project mix is exactly as you left it and ready to be worked on some more.
When you think you may be done with a mix, and are listening to it on different
systems and playing it for friends and associates, Automix removes the worry that if
you find something wrong in the mix you’ll have to start all over. With Automix, you
can fix any individual problems while preserving the rest of the mix.
Automated Recording
While most people use Automix during mixdown, you can also use it during recording,
since you can automate input channel parameters. If you’re recording something
repeatable that requires changes during the course of the project—perhaps you’re
recording synchronized sequencer tracks—you can automate those moves and play
them back as you’re recording your tracks.
How Automix Works
How is Automix Recorded?
Automix captures and remembers changes made to a parameter’s value over the
course of a project, and remembers where each change occurs. What Automix records
is Automix data, not audio data, and it’s saved with the project. Automix records on its
own tracks in its own area of the VS-2480’s memory. It doesn’t use any of your project’s
tracks. This means two important things:
•
•
Using Automix doesn’t reduce the number of available tracks in a project.
Automix data is independent of audio data—you can alter either one without
affecting the other.
Because Automix data and audio data are separate, when you move audio to a new
location, you’ll have to also remember to move the corresponding Automix data.
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How Do Automix Tracks Work?
For every input, track, Aux bus and FX return channel there’s a dedicated Automix
track. When Automix mode is active, a channel’s Automix track can capture or play
back changes you make to its parameters. There are also Automix tracks for the
MASTER bus, the Direct busses and for Effects 1-8.
Which Parameters Can be Automated?
Automix works with a wide array of input, track and FX return CH EDIT parameters, as
well as important MASTER EDIT, Aux bus and Direct bus parameters. For a list of the
parameter values you can automate, see “Automix Parameter List” on Page 410.
You can also automate most VS-2480 actions with MIDI SysEx messages (Page 301).
Automix is easier to work with since it doesn’t require an in-depth knowledge of MIDI.
Automix also memorizes and plays back effect patch changes. When you select a new
patch as the project plays—see Page 221—the new selection is captured by Automix.
The AUTOMIX Screen
Navigating to the Automix Screen
AUTOMIX
SHIFT
1.
While holding down SHIFT, press AUTOMIX—the AUTOMIX
screen appears.
+
We’ll describe the AFTER PUNCH OUT and RETURN TIME parameters in our
discussion of punching Automix data on Page 329. We’ll describe F1 (EDIT) in “Editing
Automix Data” on Page 331.
The WRITING PARAMETER Area
The WRITING PARAMETER area of the AUTOMIX screen shows various parameter
groups. When a parameter group is checkmarked, changes made to its parameters are
captured when you record Automix data, both in realtime (Page 329) and in Automix
snapshots (Page 330). Check only the parameters you want to automate to streamline
your Automix data and minimize visual clutter in the AUTOMIX EDIT screen.
To toggle a WRITING PARAMETER group’s checkmark on or off, turn the TIME/
VALUE dial to select the desired group and press ENTER/YES.
•
•
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LEVEL
AUXSend
•
•
PAN/Bal (“Pan/Balance”)
InsFXLev (“Insert FX Level”)
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•
EQ
SURROUND
•
MUTE
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26—Automix
The AUTOMIX STATUS Area
The Automix track is set to:
In the AUTOMIX STATUS area, select each Automix
track and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to set it as
desired. The appearance of each Automix track’s box
shows you its current status.
Write
An Automix track can be set to:
•
•
•
Manual
Read
Manual—so the corresponding input, track, Aux master or FX return channel,
MASTER fader or Direct bus doesn’t use Automix. Its parameters are set manually.
Write—so that the Automix track records changes made to the corresponding
input, track, Aux bus or FX return channel, MASTER fader or Direct bus.
Read—so that the Automix track plays back its recorded Automix data.
You can also change the status of most Automix tracks using the AUTOMIX STATUS
buttons, as described below.
The F3 (ERASE) Button
To erase all of the project’s Automix data at once, press F3 (ERASE).
Activating Automix Mode
AUTOMIX
1.
2.
3.
Stop project playback.
Press AUTOMIX—it lights amber to show Automix mode is active.
To turn Automix mode off, press AUTOMIX again—its light turns off.
The AUTOMIX STATUS Buttons
When Automix mode is active, each CH EDIT/SELECT/PHRASE SEQ STATUS/
AUTOMIX STATUS button can set the status of its corresponding Automix track.
For the remainder of this chapter, we’ll refer to these buttons as simply “AUTOMIX
STATUS” buttons.
You can change the status of the MASTER bus, Direct bus and effect patch Automix
tracks only on the AUTOMIX screen.
Using the AUTOMIX STATUS Buttons
1.
2.
3.
Press the FADER button for the group of channels containing the one that
corresponds to the desired Automix track.
In Automix isn’t already lit solid amber—press AUTOMIX.
While holding down AUTOMIX, press the desired AUTOMIX STATUS button.
Each press changes the Automix track’s status, as reflected by the button’s color.
If AUTOMIX STATUS is:
Its Automix track is set to:
amber
Manual mode
red
Write mode
green
Read mode
The color of each AUTOMIX STATUS button is mirrored in the AUTOMIX STATUS
area of the AUTOMIX screen—changing an Automix track’s status in either place
changes it in both.
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Recording Automix Data
You can record Automix data two ways:
•
•
Realtime Automix—Realtime Automix records changes you make to mix settings as
the project plays. This method captures every subtle change you make, and is the
best method to use when you’re making constant adjustments to your parameter
values over the course of a project. You can also punch in new parameter value
changes in realtime.
Snapshot Automix—Snapshot Automix, as its name suggests, captures your mix
settings at a particular moment. Whenever the timeline travels back to that
moment when Automix is turned on, the snapshot’s settings are instantly recalled.
Snapshots are great for sudden changes to a mix—at the beginning of a solo, for
example, when a guitarist’s level has to be made louder. You can smooth the
transition to a snapshot’s settings using Automix GRADATION (Page 337).
You can use the two approaches for different parts of the same mix if you like.
In order to automate a parameter’s value, its parameter group must be checkmarked in
the AUTOMIX screen’s WRITING PARAMETER area—see Page 326.
If you’re working on a project that you’ll turn into an audio CD, you’ll eventually cut
unwanted extra space off the front of the project. You can do this by trimming your
mastering tracks. However, if you plan to trim the project before recording your
mastering tracks, consider doing it before recording your Automix data so you don’t
have to move the corresponding Automix data after cleaning up the front of the audio.
Realtime Automix Recording
1.
2.
Press AUTOMIX to turn Automix mode on if AUTOMIX isn’t already lit amber.
Set the desired Automix tracks to Write mode in either of two ways. You can:
• hold down AUTOMIX and press the AUTOMIX STATUS button for any input,
track, Aux master or FX return channel you want to automate until AUTOMIX
STATUS turns red to indicate that its Automix track is ready to record.
• hold down SHIFT and press AUTOMIX to view the AUTOMIX screen, and set
each Automix track you want to record to Write. You can change the status of
the MASTER bus, Direct bus and effect patch Automix tracks only on the
AUTOMIX screen.
3. Press ZERO to rewind to the top of the project or move the timeline to the location
at which you want to begin recording Automix data.
4. While holding down AUTOMIX, press AUTOMIX REC—the AUTOMIX button
flashes to show that Automix data can now be recorded.
5. Press PLAY and perform your mix—the changes you make are recorded onto the
Write-enabled Automix tracks.
6. Press STOP when you’re done—Automix recording is automatically turned off.
7. Change the status of the Automix tracks you’ve just recorded to Read mode by:
• holding down AUTOMIX and pressing the AUTOMIX STATUS buttons for
your automated input, track, Aux bus or FX return channels until they’re green.
• holding down SHIFT, pressing AUTOMIX, and setting each automated track to
Read mode.
8. Press ZERO or move the timeline to the location at which you started mixing.
9. Press PLAY to hear your automation—if you made changes to the positions of your
faders during the writing of Automix data, you’ll see them move during playback.
10. To re-do your automation—or to record new Automix data—repeat Steps 2-9.
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26—Automix
Realtime Punching of Automix Data
You can re-record sections of your automated mix by punching in new Automix data on
any Automix tracks that are set to Write mode.
If you want to redo a section of automation at the very beginning of the project, use the
recording procedure described on Page 328 and press STOP where you want the newly
recorded automation to end.
Merging New and Old Automix Data
When you insert new Automix data by punching in on an
Automix track, the AFTER PUNCH OUT parameter on the
AUTOMIX screen lets you determine what happens to
parameter values after you punch out. When you set it to:
•
•
Return—parameters return to their previously recorded
values after the punch-out.
Keep—parameter values at the end of the punch-out
remain in effect for the rest of the project, or until you
perform another punch-in later in the project.
Punch with Return
Punch
Punch with Keep
Punch
Set AFTER PUNCH OUT to Return when you want to insert some Automix changes
without affecting the rest of your automation data. Set it to Keep when you want the
punch-in to change parameter values for the remainder of the project.
When you set AFTER PUNCH OUT to Return, the RETURN TIME parameter helps
smooth the transition between the punch’s final parameter values and those already
recorded after the punch ends. You can set RETURN TIME to a value between 0ms and
1000ms—lower settings make transitions more abrupt.
If you decide at a later time that a punch-out transition is too noticeable, you can use
the GRADATION Automix editing operation to smooth it out.
Automix offers two different ways to punch—you can use either method. The idea is to
choose the method that requires the fewest button-presses for what you’re doing:
•
•
AUTOMIX STATUS Button Punching—Turn on Automix recording and toggle the
desired Automix track(s) in and out of Write mode as the project plays.
AUTOMIX Button Punching—Set the desired Automix tracks to Write mode, and
toggle Automix recording on and off as the project plays.
AUTOMIX STATUS Button Punching
This punching method works best when you’re punching bits and pieces of different
Automix tracks as the project plays.
Make sure that the AUTOMIX STATUS button for each Automix track you don’t want
to punch is green so you don’t accidentally erase its data as you punch on other
Automix tracks.
1.
2.
3.
4.
If the AUTOMIX button isn’t lit solid amber, press it so that it is, to signify that
Automix mode is on.
While holding down AUTOMIX, press AUTOMIX REC—the AUTOMIX button
flashes to show that Automix is recording.
Press ZERO or move the timeline to a location shortly before the place you want the
punch to start.
Press PLAY.
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26—Automix
5.
Hold down AUTOMIX, and at the location you want the punch to begin, press the
desired Automix track’s AUTOMIX STATUS button—its indicator turns red to
show that you’ve punched in and are now recording Automix data.
6. Perform the new parameter changes you want to automate.
7. To punch out, hold down AUTOMIX and press the Automix track’s AUTOMIX
STATUS button again—its indicator turns green to show you’ve punched out.
8. Repeat Steps 6-9 for any other Automix track you want to punch as the project
plays.
9. When you’re done, press STOP—the AUTOMIX button stops flashing.
10. Make sure that all of your Automix tracks’ AUTOMIX STATUS buttons are green so
that they play back.
11. Press ZERO or move the timeline to the desired location and press PLAY to hear
your punched automation.
AUTOMIX Button Punching
This punching method works best when you’re punching in and out on a group of
Automix tracks at the same time, and there’s not enough time to toggle their individual
AUTOMIX STATUS buttons into and out of Write mode as the project plays.
1.
2.
If Automix isn’t already turned on, press AUTOMIX so that it lights solid amber.
Set the AUTOMIX STATUS button of each Automix track you want to punch so that
it’s red, ready to write new Automix data.
3. Press ZERO or move the timeline to a location shortly before the place you want the
punch to start.
4. Press PLAY.
5. Hold down AUTOMIX as you get close to the location where you want to punch in.
6. At the desired punch-in point, press AUTOMIX REC—the AUTOMIX button
flashes to show you’ve that punched in and are now recording.
7. Perform the new parameter changes you want to automate.
8. To punch out, hold down AUTOMIX and press REC again—the AUTOMIX button
stops flashing to show that you’ve punched out.
9. Repeat Steps 5-8 for any other sections of the project you want to punch as the
project plays.
10. When you’re done, make sure that all of your Automix tracks’ AUTOMIX STATUS
buttons are green so that they play back.
11. Press ZERO or move the timeline to the desired location and press PLAY to hear
your punched automation.
Snapshot Recording of Parameter Values
A snapshot registers the position of the timeline and captures the
current parameter values on all Automix tracks that are Writeenabled. When you play back the project with Automix turned on—
and the Automix tracks set to play back—the parameter values
stored in the snapshot are recalled when the timeline reaches the
location at which the snapshot was taken.
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26—Automix
Taking a Snapshot
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Move the timeline to the location at which you want to take a snapshot.
If Automix isn’t already turned on, press AUTOMIX so that it lights solid amber.
Hold down AUTOMIX and press the AUTOMIX STATUS button for any Automix
track whose settings you want to capture so that the button turns red to signify that
the Automix track is in Write mode.
While holding down AUTOMIX, press AUTOMIX REC—AUTOMIX starts flashing
to signify that it’s ready to take the snapshot.
While holding down AUTOMIX, press TAP—the current parameter values for the
Write-enabled tracks are captured in the snapshot.
Hold down AUTOMIX and press REC so that AUTOMIX lights solid amber to show
it’s no longer ready to record.
Hold down AUTOMIX and press the AUTOMIX STATUS button for each Writeenabled Automix track to set it to green for playback.
Playing Back Automix Data
To play back Automix data:
1.
2.
3.
If AUTOMIX isn’t lit solid amber, press it so that it is to show that Automix mode is
on. If it’s flashing amber, hold down AUTOMIX and press REC so that AUTOMIX
lights solid amber.
Hold down AUTOMIX and set the AUTOMIX STATUS button for each of your
Automix tracks to green so it plays back.
Play the project.
Editing Automix Data
Automix Editing Concepts
The AUTOMIX EDIT Screen
Automix editing takes place on the AUTOMIX EDIT screen. To get there:
1.
2.
While holding down SHIFT, press AUTOMIX.
Press F1 (EDIT)—the AUTOMIX EDIT screen appears.
When you cursor
to an Automix
track, and arrow
appears to its
left.
Currently
targeted
Automix data
Automix playlist
The AUTOMIX EDIT screen presents a playlist that shows the currently targeted
Automix data—we’ll explain targeting on the next page. Familiar Home screen tools
appear at the top of the screen (Chapter 8). Edit-related F buttons are visible beneath
the playlist. You can zoom in and out as desired.
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Targeting Automix Data
Automix can record and play back more data than can possibly fit onscreen at once.
Targeting allows you to select the Automix data and tracks you want to see and edit.
1.
On the AUTOMIX EDIT screen, press F1 (TARGET)—
the TARGET SELECT window appears.
2. Turn the TIME VALUE dial to highlight the desired
target data.
When you select a target, you choose both the desired
Automix track and the parameter whose Automix data
you want to edit.
3. Press ENTER/YES to select the new target data, or EXIT/NO to return to the
AUTOMIX EDIT screen without changing the targeted Automix data.
4. If you pressed ENTER/YES in Step 3, the newly targeted Automix tracks and data
appear in the playlist.
What Automix Data Looks Like
Every time you change a targeted parameter’s value during
Automix recording, the change is captured as an “Automix
event.” Each event appears as a vertical black line on the
AUTOMIX EDIT screen’s playlist—the higher the line, the
higher the parameter value.
When Automix events are selected for editing on the
AUTOMIX EDIT screen, they appear in reverse: an event is
white, and its background is dark.
This illustration shows a
level parameter’s fade-in.
Selected
How Does Automix Editing Work?
Automix editing is very much like the region editing you perform on project audio
tracks, or on phrase sequencer tracks. You define a region by setting IN and OUT edit
points, and you copy and move regions using FROM and TO. See Chapter 18 if you
need to refresh your memory on the way region editing works.
F2 (ALL) and F3 (MARK)
As with audio region editing, to select the events on an Automix track that fall between
the IN and OUT points, you must select the track. You can cursor to an Automix track
and press ENTER/YES or F3 (MARK) to select it for editing—this places a checkmark to
its left. To simultaneously toggle the selection of all of the displayed Automix tracks on
or off, press F2 (ALL).
Automix Undo
Automix offers a single level of Undo for both Automix recording and editing. You can
undo the most recent editing action until you perform another action. You can reverse
the most recent Undo by performing a Redo until a new Automix recording or editing
action is performed.
To undo the most recent Automix action, navigate to the AUTOMIX EDIT screen and
press F5 (UNDO). To reverse the Undo, press F5 (REDO).
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26—Automix
Automix Editing Methods
You can perform any Automix editing operation using your mouse or the TRACK EDIT
buttons. Both operate much the same as they do in track and phrase sequencer editing.
Before editing Automix data, you must target the desired Automix tracks and the type
of Automix data with which you want to work, as described on Page 332.
Automix Editing with the Mouse
Select and edit Automix data using the usual region editing methods. You can:
•
•
•
•
set edit points using the position line (Page 242).
define an Automix region by dragging (Page 243).
drag selected Automix data to move or copy it (Page 244).
perform various operations using the Automix Pop-Up menu.
To learn more about editing with a mouse, see “Editing with a Mouse” on Page 241.
The SELECT TRACK Pop-Up menu used in audio region editing is not available for
Automix editing.
In addition to many of the same items found in the Edit Pop-Up menu
(Page 241), you’ll find the following in the Automix Pop-Up menu:
•
•
•
•
MICRO—opens the AUTOMIX MICRO EDIT window.
COMP/EXP. (Compress/Expand)—allows you to lower or raise the
value of selected automated parameter values. See Page 336.
GRAD (Gradation)—helps smooth transitions between automated
parameter values. See Page 337.
TARGET—opens a dialog in which you can select the kind of
Automix data you want to edit.
As with the Edit Pop-Up menu, you can hold down CLEAR and rightclick to view options for deleting edit points, or hold down SHIFT to
GO TO the desired edit point.
Automix Editing with the TRACK EDIT Buttons
Whenever you’re on the AUTOMIX screen or the AUTOMIX EDIT screen, the
PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX button lights amber to show that the buttons are
assigned to Automix editing operations.
The TRACK EDIT buttons act as they do in track editing and phrase sequencer track
editing—see Page 247 for information on the TRACK EDIT buttons. To learn how to:
•
•
set edit points, see Page 247.
select the destination for moved or copied Automix data, see Page 248.
When an Automix track is selected for editing, it has a checkmark to its left.
Each TRACK EDIT button’s Automix editing operation is printed beneath the button.
We’ll describe Automix editing operations starting on Page 334.
To perform phrase or region track editing, exit the AUTOMIX and AUTOMIX EDIT
screens and press PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX as desired.
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Automix Editing Operations
Since all Automix edit operations affect regions of Automix data, they all use the IN
and OUT edit points. We’ll note how FROM and TO are used where applicable.
About Moving and Deleting Automix Data
When you move or delete Automix data, the location from which you move or delete
the data no longer contains its changes. What this means is that the value set by the
final Automix event before the now-missing data stays in effect until the timeline
reaches the next event, after the missing data’s original location.
-1.0dB
-4.0dB
-6.0dB
1.0dB
-1.0dB
-4.0dB
Data being moved
-6.0dB
1.0dB
Data gone
This illustration shows how a Level parameter’s values might change when Automix
data is moved—the dotted line shows the resulting signal level.
COPY
You can copy Automix data from one part of a project to another, or from one Automix
track to another. This allows you to re-use any chunk of automation at multiple
locations in a project. This can be especially handy when the same section of audio—
such as a chorus—appears more than once. When you perfect the automation for the
section, you can re-use it each time it occurs in the project.
IN
OUT
TO
IN
OUT
TO
FROM is set to
the same
location as IN.
Before
After
Edit point:
What it does:
FROM
sets the location of the Automix data region’s time anchor
TO
sets the destination location for the time anchor
When you copy Automix data to a new location, it replaces any Automix data already
present in the destination location.
MOVE
Automix MOVE allows you to move already-recorded Automix data to a new location
on the same Automix track or to another Automix track. You’d most often use MOVE
when you’ve changed the position of track audio and need to move its automation to
the same location.
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IN
OUT
TO
IN
OUT
TO
FROM is set to
the same
location as IN.
Before
After
Edit point:
What it does:
FROM
sets the location of the Automix data region’s time anchor
TO
sets the destination location for the time anchor
When you move Automix data to a new location, it replaces any Automix data already
present in the destination location.
INSERT
Insert adds an area of blank space at the IN location equal to the length of the selected
Automix region—all data at the IN point and onward is moved so that it starts at the
end of the inserted blank space. When you’ve inserted empty space in an audio track,
you’ll want to insert space in the accompanying Automix track as well so that your
Automix events line up properly with their corresponding audio data.
IN
OUT
IN
Before
OUT
After
CUT
CUT deletes the Automix events between the IN and OUT points and moves the
remaining data forward so that it starts at the IN point. You might cut Automix data
when it occurs just a bit later than you want it to, or when you need to re-align it with
audio you’ve moved forward in the project.
IN
OUT
IN
Before
OUT
After
ERASE
Automix ERASE cleans out Automix events between the IN and OUT points. This can
be useful when you’ve recorded parameter value changes you decide you don’t want,
preferring to let an earlier parameter value remain in place until the OUT point.
IN
OUT
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26—Automix
COMP/EXP.
The Automix COMP/EXP. (“COMPRESS/EXPAND) edit operations allow you to lower
or raise parameter values in the selected region. COMP/EXP. actually contains three
separate operations:
•
Compression and Expansion—change parameter values according to their distance
from a specified threshold value (“T” stands for “Threshold” in the illustrations
below). Use compression to make value changes in the selected Automix data
region less extreme while retaining their basic character. Expansion makes the
difference between your highest and lowest values more extreme.
IN
OUT
T
IN
T
IN
OUT
T
Before
•
OUT
Compression
Expansion
Shift—subtracts or adds a single specified amount to all parameter values in the
selected region. You’d use Shift to simply raise or lower the selected values by the
same amount.
IN
OUT
Before
IN
OUT
Positive Shift value
IN
OUT
Negative Shift value
Parameter Value Percentages
The COMP/EXP. edit operations identify a parameter’s values based on where they sit
within the entire 100% range of the parameter’s possible values. This allows you to
identify the desired threshold value for compression/expansion, and helps you know
how much shift to apply to an Automix region’s parameter values, regardless of the
kind of automated parameter you’re working with.
Compression and Expansion
Compression and expansion decrease or increase, respectively, the distance between
the region’s parameter values and a threshold parameter value. You can select as your
threshold any of the parameter’s possible values, from 0 for its lowest value, to 50 for its
middle value, to 100 for its maximum value. Set Expand to the amount by which you
want to multiply the distance between the region’s values and the threshold value. You
can use:
•
•
Compression—Expand settings less than 1.0 bring parameter values closer to the
threshold value.
Expansion—Expand settings greater than 1.0 increase the distance between
parameters values and the threshold value.
Parameter values exactly equal to the threshold value are not changed by Compression
and Expansion.
An Expand value of exactly 1.0 causes no change in the selected parameters’ values.
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Shift
Shift allows you to raise or lower all parameter values in the selected region by a
percentage of the parameter’s entire range of values. You can set Shift anywhere from
-50—which reduces the parameters’ values by 50% of the parameter’s entire range—to
50, which increases them by 50%.
You can shift a value only within its parameter’s stated range. Once a parameter has
reached its minimum or maximum value, Shift has no further affect on its value.
You can use Compression/Expansion and Shift together. The selected Automix data is
compressed or expanded first, and then the Shift value is subtracted from or added to
the resulting values.
GRADATION
GRADATION smooths out Automix data in order to help make transitions between
varying values sound more natural. It does this by forcing the selected Automix data to
conform to a shape, or “gradation curve,” you select.
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
In this illustration,
we’ve applied a Linear
gradation curve.
Before
After
Set Gradation Curve to the desired shape. You can select:
•
•
•
Linear—for a flat ascending or descending shape to the selected data.
Exp+—for an upward convex exponential curve to the selected data.
Exp-—for a downward convex exponential curve to the selected data.
With ascending parameter values
Linear
Exp+
Exp -
With descending parameter values
Linear
Exp+
Exp -
Micro-Editing Automix Data
On the AUTOMIX EDIT screen, press F4 (MICRO) to display the AUTOMIX MICRO
EDIT screen.
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On the AUTOMIX MICRO EDIT screen, you can individually edit the location and
value of any Automix event. You can also delete any events you no longer want, and
create new ones if you so choose.
To leave the AUTOMIX MICRO EDIT screen, press F6 (EXIT).
Micro-Editing Automix Data
1.
2.
To view the desired Automix track’s data, press F1 (Tr Inc) or F2 (Tr Dec) to move
higher or lower, respectively, through the currently targeted Automix tracks. The
current track’s name and data is shown above the list of its Automix events.
Press $ or % to select the desired event in the list, and:
• To change an Automix event’s location—Use " and # to select the desired unit of
time measurement. You can select time code or measures/beats/ticks. Turn the
TIME VALUE dial to select the desired start location.
• To change an Automix event’s value—Use " and # to highlight the event’s value
and turn the TIME VALUE dial to select the desired value.
You can see the changes you make in the data window above the phrase list.
Deleting an Automix Event
1.
2.
Press $ or % to select the event in the list.
Press F4 (DELETE) to erase the selected Automix event.
Creating a New Automix Event
1.
Press $ or % to select an Automix event of the type you want to create.
If you can find an event at the desired location that’s the same type of Automix event as
the one you want to create, select it to save time.
2.
3.
Press F3 (CREATE) to place a copy of the currently selected Automix event at the
selected event’s location.
Edit the new Automix event’s location and value as desired.
If you create a new event on an Automix track with no other events, the VS-2480 creates
a Level event.
Undoing an Automix Micro-Edit
1.
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Press F5 (UNDO). Until you record more Automix data or perform a new Automix
edit, you can press F5 (REDO) to reverse the undo.
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Mastering
Mastering is the process of turning your mix into a final, polished stereo recording,
suitable for writing, or “burning,” onto an audio CD for your private use or for massduplication. The VS-2480’s Mastering Room and Mastering Tool Kit provide all the
mastering tools you need.
Even if you just want to make a mix that you’ll record onto a cassette for friends, the
VS-2480’s mastering tools can help you make the project sound its best.
You can also digitally transfer your mastered project to an external device—such as a
DAT deck or computer—for storage, for further editing or for additional processing.
Mixing for Mastering
Take a few moments to check your project’s tracks for noises—coughing, hum or
unwanted notes—before you mix. Use your track editing tools (Chapter 18) to get rid of
anything bothersome that you might forget to mix around.
While the VS-2480 allows you to mix while you’re mastering, we recommend that you
perfect your mix before entering the Mastering Room. This way, you’ll be able to more
easily take advantage of the VS-2480’s extensive suite of mixing tools. First and
foremost are your track channel CH EDIT tools (Chapter 11) that let you shape each
signal using dynamics processing and multi-band EQ. Handy tools such as fader
grouping allow you to manage related groups of tracks with ease.
We also encourage you to use Automix (Chapter 26), which can transform the entire act
of mixing. With Automix, you don’t need to rehearse and rehearse tricky mix moves—
just capture them once with Automix and you’re done. The fact that you can record
Automix data for a track at a time means that you can pay attention to mix details in a
way that’s just not otherwise possible.
Important Mastering Concepts
What Kind of Audio Can Be Burned on a CD
Only audio from a project that uses a 44.1k sampling rate can be written onto an audio
CD. A project’s sampling rate is chosen when a project is first created (Page 96). You can
create a 44.1 kHz project using any VS-2480 recording mode, but we recommend the
MTP, CDR, MAS or MT1 recording modes for the best audio quality.
If your project uses a sampling rate other than 44.1 kHz, you can still master the project
on the VS-2480 and export the result as .WAV files to a computer for sample-rate
conversion to 44.1 kHz—see “Exporting Tracks and Phrases as .WAV Files” on Page 356.
You can then re-import the files into a 44.1kHz project and write your audio CD.
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CD audio is recorded at bit depth of a 16 bits. If you’ve recorded a project at 24 bits, the
VS-2480 dithers its audio down internally to the required 16 bits during mastering—if
you’re using the CDR recording mode (Page 340)—or during CD burning.
Dither
What’s Recorded on an Audio CD
It’s important to understand that an audio CD contains just that: audio. None of your
VS-2480’s settings are written to an audio CD, only the audio that the settings produce.
It’s therefore critical that your final mix sound exactly as you want it to—with all of the
desired tracks, effects, live elements and so on—since that’s what the audio CD will
contain.
An audio CD can hold up to about 74 minutes worth of audio.
What is the Mastering Room?
An audio CD contains just two tracks of audio: a left and a right track. Your project must
therefore be mixed down to just two V-Tracks that can be burned onto a CD. On the
VS-2480, these two V-Tracks are called your “mastering tracks.”The Mastering Room is
where you create mastering tracks.
With its normal MTP recording mode (Page 97), the VS-2480 has a maximum of 24
tracks. When the Mastering Room is turned on, however, the VS-2480 has 26 tracks: 24
normal project tracks plus the two mastering tracks.
The Mastering room has two operating modes. When it’s set to:
•
•
Record—You can listen to the signals from all of your input, track, Aux master and
FX return channels as you refine your mix and record it onto your mastering tracks.
Play—You can play back your recorded mastering tracks. Input, track, Aux master
and FX return channel signals are silenced since their audio can now be heard in
the final mix recorded on the mastering tracks.
About Mastering Tracks
The mastering tracks that contain your final mix are always a pair of V-Tracks that
belong to Tracks 23 and 24. The 16th V-Tracks of Tracks 23 and 24 are selected as
mastering tracks by default, but you can select any same-numbered pair of V-Tracks
from Tracks 23 and 24 as long as they don’t contain audio you want to include in your
mix. We’ll describe how to select the desired V-Tracks on Page 344.
If all of the V-Tracks for Tracks 23 and/or 24 already contain audio you don’t want to
lose, copy that audio to other V-Tracks to make room for your mastering tracks—
mastering tracks can be recorded only on V-Tracks belonging to Tracks 23 and 24.
CD Disk Images
All commercially produced audio CDs conform to a set of standards called the “Red
Book” standards. The VS-2480 produces Red Book audio CDs.
Before the VS-2480 can burn audio onto a CD, it converts the audio into a Red Bookcompliant form of data called a “disk image file,” and stores the file on your internal
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hard drive. It’s this stereo file that actually gets written onto the CD. A disk image file
can be as large as 700MB depending on how much audio you’re packing onto a CD.
The disk image file can be stored only on the VS-2480’s internal hard drive. A VS-2480
without an internal hard drive, therefore, can’t burn an audio CD.
The VS-2480 can use any free space on your hard drive for creating a CD disk image—
the free space doesn’t have to be in the currently selected drive partition.
There are two times during the mastering process at which you can create a disk image
file. You can:
•
•
record your mastering tracks using the CDR recording mode—This records your
mastering tracks as a disk-image file. When you save the project, the file is saved
with it. If you want to create additional audio CDs at a later time, when you load the
project, the disk image file loads as well, ready for burning.
create a temporary disk image on the fly as you burn a CD—The VS-2480 can create a
temporary disk image file as you burn an audio CD if your mastering tracks weren’t
recorded using CDR mode. This takes a bit longer. In addition, as soon as you’re
done burning CDs, the temporary disk image is discarded. If you want to burn
more CDs at a later date, the VS-2480 has to create another temporary disk image.
You can always spot
a CDR-recorded
track by the asterisk
in its name.
CDR-recorded audio
is always stereo.
If an entire project is recorded in CDR mode—so each of its audio files is a disk image
file—you can burn any pair of its tracks to an audio CD without using the Mastering
Room’s tools.
Multi-Project Compilation CDs
Many VS-2480 users treat each song—or other type of audio creation—as a separate
project. When you want to create a CD from multiple projects, you’ve got to bring all of
the audio from those projects together onto a single pair of mastering tracks. There are
a few ways to do this.
Imported Mastering Tracks
Probably the best method is to mix and master each project separately using the CDR
recording mode, and then use Region IMPORT (Page 269) to import all of their
mastering tracks into a single CDR-mode compilation project. You can then do either of
two things. You can:
•
•
edit them into the desired order—Each imported set of mastering tracks appears as a
pair of phrases in the playlist. It’s a simple matter to use phrase editing to copy
them all to the same pair of tracks and move them into the desired positions with
the desired spacing between each pair of phrases. The compilation project thus
presents the contents of the audio CD from start-to-finish on the same pair of
tracks. By investing some editing time, you can create an edited set of CDRrecorded tracks that can be burned immediately onto an audio CD.
master them one-by-one—You can place the imported mastering tracks on any
V-Tracks you want, and then build a new CDR-mode mastering track selection-byselection (see “Building Mastering Tracks Selection-by-Selection” on Page 344).
This method requires less editing time, but means that you have to re-master all of
your elements.
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Using Project COMBINE
You can also use the Project COMBINE operation (Page 104) to combine all of the
projects into a single compilation project. If you’re doing a full-length CD, this project
will be very large, and require lots of disk space. As with the first approach, you can
edit each selection into position on the same pair of tracks—with 24 tracks to move, this
can be a lot of work. A better idea is to leave them where they are and build your final
mastering tracks one selection at a time.
To use this approach, all of the projects must use the same recording mode.
Unless all of the projects were recorded in CDR mode, you’ll need to create CDR-mode
mastering tracks whether you edit your selections into the desired order or not.
Use an External Recorder
You can also record each project’s mix on an external digital recorder and then rerecord each one into a single CDR-mode compilation project on the VS-2480. You can
then re-order your selections on a single pair of CD-ready tracks, or build your
mastering tracks selection-by-selection.
Understanding CD Track Markers
When you play an audio CD, you can jump from song to song by entering the desired
song’s number. Each song, or individual selection, on a CD is technically called a
“track.” A CD can contain up to 99 tracks.
Don’t be confused by the use of the word “track” here—a CD track is different from a
track on the VS-2480. On the VS-2480, a track contains a single mono signal. On a CD, a
track is a stereo audio selection or song.
A CD player identifies each of its tracks by the numbered CD track marker placed at
the front of the track. When you create an audio CD, the VS-2480 automatically places
the first CD track marker at the start of the mastering tracks, at Time 00h00m00s00f00.
As the VS-2480 encounters each CD track marker in a project you’re burning on a CD, it
sends a command to the CD burner to move to its next-numbered track.
It’s not possible to write a CD with track numbers in anything but normal numerical
order, nor is it possible to skip track numbers.
When you’re recording mastering tracks selection-by-selection, the Mastering Room
can automatically write a CD track marker at the beginning of each new selection you
record after the first one—see “Building Mastering Tracks Selection-by-Selection” on
Page 344.
Once you’ve performed any editing you need to do on your finished mastering tracks,
the final stage of mastering before you actually burn an audio CD is the placing of your
remaining CD track markers in the desired positions. We’ll describe how to do this on
Page 348.
According to audio CD standards, CD track markers must be at least four seconds apart
from each other. For this reason, every numbered track on a CD must be at least four
seconds long. If you try to set CD track markers too close together, the VS-2480 displays
“Can’t Set Marker.”
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Working in the VS-2480 Mastering Room
Navigating to the Mastering Room
1.
While holding down SHIFT, press CD-RW/MASTERING. The
MASTERING ROOM screen appears.
CD-RW
SHIFT
MASTERING
+
Mastering room
parameters
Project playlist
Navigation buttons
Turning On the Mastering Room
To turn on the Mastering Room:
1.
2.
Set the MASTERING ROOM on/off switch to On.
To de-activate the Mastering Room, set its switch to Off.
When the Mastering Room is turned on, the CD-RW/MASTERING button flashes.
Selecting the Mastering Room Operating Mode
The Mastering Room’s operating mode is determined by the setting of its STATUS
parameter. You can select:
•
•
Play—to play back already recorded mastering tracks.
Record—to record new mastering tracks.
Selecting the Mastering Tracks’ Recording Mode
When the CDR Rec Mode parameter is turned on, your mastering tracks are recorded
as disk image files that can be immediately burned to an audio CD (Page 340). When it’s
turned off, the mastering tracks are recorded using the project’s recording mode.
Typically, you’ll want to set CDR Rec Mode to On. Set CDR Rec mode to Off when you
need to master your mix in stages to get the most from limited effect resources, as
described in “Stretching Effects” on Page 346.
When you’re mastering a project that was recorded using CDR mode, the CDR Rec
Mode parameter’s value makes no difference—the mastering tracks are recorded using
CDR mode in any event.
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Selecting the Mastering V-Tracks
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the V-Tracks on which you
want to record your mastering tracks. You can select any samenumbered pair of tracks belonging to Track 23 and 24, (Page 340).
The currently selected mastering tracks appear as diamonds in
the V-Track map shown in the Mastering Room and elsewhere.
Building Mastering Tracks Selection-by-Selection
When you’re creating an audio CD with multiple audio selections—such as an album
of songs or a collection of jingles or soundtrack cues—you can record its mastering
tracks one selection at a time.
“Multi-Project Compilation CDs” on Page 341 discusses the various ways in which you
can assemble an audio CD from multiple projects.
Positioning Mastered Selections
After mastering the first selection, master the next selection, and so on, placing each
new selection behind the previous one on the mastering tracks. The resulting
mastering tracks contain a string of phrases, with each phrase playing the audio for one
of the selections. You can edit these phrases later to refine their spacing, trim unwanted
audio or change the selections’ order (Page 346).
The Mastering Room’s After Rec parameter places each new selection. Its values are:
•
•
•
•
•
to ZERO—records the new mastered audio at Time
00h00m00s00f00
00h00m00s00f00, the beginning of the CD. Use this
setting when you’re creating a single-selection CD, or
when you’re recording the first selection in a multiselection CD.
0 sec.
to Last Phrs:0s—places the new mastered audio at the end
of the audio already recorded on the mastering tracks,
with no space between them.
2 sec.
to Last Phrs:2s—places the new mastered audio at the end
of the audio already recorded on the mastering tracks,
with a two-second space between them.
4 sec.
to Last Phrs:4s—places the new mastered audio at the end
of the audio already recorded on the mastering tracks,
with a four-second space between them.
Stay HERE—records the new mastered audio in the same location in the project as
its source data. Use this setting if you’ve created a compilation project, have moved
its selections so that they play one after another, and are mastering each selection
individually in order to be able to individually concentrate on each selection’s mix.
Placing Markers Automatically
When you add a new selection to already mastered audio, the Mastering Room’s Auto
Marker feature can place a CD track marker at the new selection’s beginning to save
you time later on. (The CD marker at the very start of the mastering tracks is added
automatically during CD burning.) To turn on this feature, set Auto Marker to On.
Auto Marker places a CD track marker only at the beginning of a new selection—it
doesn’t place markers after pauses in the audio within the selection.
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Use Auto Marker only if you’re sure your mastering tracks will require no editing after
they’ve been recorded—otherwise, you’ll have to delete and re-place the CD track
markers after moving your audio.
To make your CD track markers line up numerically with your selections, place two
standard markers as dummy markers in the first selection, as described on Page 348.
Using the Mastering Tool Kit
In the Mastering Room, you can insert any of the VS-2480’s Mastering Tool Kit (MTK)
effects onto the MASTER bus to add the final touch of processing to your mix.
The MTK effect patches cover a wide variety of mastering situations, and are all fully
editable so that you can customize them for your particular needs. Each MTK effect is a
powerful stereo effect that requires the resources of two effect processors.
You can chain together as many MTK effects as your effect processing power allows,
though a single MTK effect is likely to be all you’ll need. If you chain MTK effects, the
MASTER bus signals flows through them one after another in numerical order, as with
a single-channel insert chain (Page 216).
To insert a Mastering Tool Kit effect:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the Mastering Room, select the FX Ins (“Effect Insert”) parameter—the ENTER/
YES button begins to flash.
Press F2 (FX Ins) or ENTER/YES to display the MASTER EFFECT INSERT screen.
This is the same screen we described in “Inserting Effects on the MASTER Bus” on
Page 219.
Select any available odd-numbered effect’s insert assign switch.You can assign an MTK
effect only to an odd-numbered effect since it also requires the processing power of the
effect’s even-numbered partner.
Set the switch to Ins to insert the effect on the MASTER bus. If you wish to return to
the Mastering Room, you can press F1 (Param) or F6 (EXIT).
Press the flashing ENTER/YES button to display the effect’s Algorithm View screen
from which you can select the desired MTK effect patch or edit the effect’s
currently selected patch (Page 221).
Technically, you can insert any effect patch on the MASTER bus, but we recommend
using one of the MTK effect patches for mastering—that’s what they’re designed for.
6.
To return to the Mastering Room, hold down SHIFT and press CD-RW/
MASTERING.
In addition to being able to edit an MTK effect as desired, you can also adjust the
MASTER EFFECT INSERT screen’s Send and Return parameters to adjust the level of
the MASTER bus’s signal going into, and coming out of, the MTK effect.
Recording Mastering Tracks
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
On the Mastering Room screen, set MASTERING ROOM to On.
Set STATUS to Record.
Set your other Mastering Room parameters as desired.
Press ZERO or move the timeline to the beginning of the mix you want to record
onto your mastering tracks.
Hold down REC and press PLAY.
When the mix has finished playing, press STOP.
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7.
8.
9.
To hear your mastering tracks, set STATUS to Play.
Press PLAY.
If you’d like to re-do the mastering tracks, Repeat Steps 2-8
Stretching Effects
If you’re using all of your effects in your mix, you won’t have any processing power left
over for an MTK effect. Solve this dilemma by using the Mastering Room twice:
•
•
The first time, you’ll create mastering tracks of your mix with the desired effects.
The second time, you’ll process those mastering tracks using the desired MTK
effect, creating final mastering tracks.
On your first visit, you’ll use the Mastering Room only for its ability to mix all of your
project’s tracks down to a pair of mastering tracks, leaving its other tools for your
second visit. Here’s what you can do to stretch your effects:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Set up the Mastering Room for your first visit as follows:
• Set STATUS to Record.
• Set CD Rec Mode to off so that the mastering tracks are recorded using the
project’s recording mode.
• Set Auto Marker to Off.
• For V. Track, select any pair of Track 23 and 24’s unused V-Tracks. Make sure you
still have another pair left to use as your final mastering tracks.
• Set FX Ins to Off.
• Set After Rec to ZERO.
Record your mix onto the selected mastering V-Tracks.
Select a new pair of V-Tracks for your final mastering tracks.
Press Track Channel 23’s CH EDIT button.
Set ChLink to On to link Tracks 23 and 24.
Select the V-Track you used for mastering in Step 1.
While holding down CLEAR, press Track Channel 23’s CH EDIT button to set both
track channels to 0dB.
Return to the Mastering Room and set the Mastering Room parameters—adding
the desired MTK insert effect—for the recording of your final mastering tracks.
Turn off the TRACK STATUS buttons for all tracks other than Tracks 23 and 24.
Editing Mastering Tracks
You can edit mastering tracks to trim unwanted space from before and after the audio,
between sections, and to remove unwanted audio or outtakes.
If you’re editing CDR-recorded mastering tracks in a project that uses some other
mode, turn on the Mastering Room and set it to Play to hear what you’re editing.
1.
2.
3.
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Go to the CH EDIT VIEW screen for Track Channel 23.
Set ChLink to On to link Tracks 23 and 24.
Select the V-Track you used as a mastering track.
If you’ve:
• created a single-piece mastering track—its data appears as a single pair of phrases
in the project’s playlist.
• constructed a mastering track from individual selections one-by-one—each selection
appears as a pair of phrases in the playlist.
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4.
Use phrase editing to trim any extra space from the very beginning of the
mastering track. During the actual burning of your audio CD, the VS-2480 places
the first CD track marker at the beginning of the mastering track—trimming its
front ensures that the CD track marker lines up with the first audio you want to
hear, not silence, a countoff or other unwanted sounds.
We recommend leaving about 15 frames of time before the audio actually begins so
that your CD plays correctly even on slower CD players.
5.
If the mastering track contains multiple selections, make sure that they’re in the
right order and the spaces between them are as you want them. Perform any phrase
edits you need to in order to make the entire mastering track flow as desired.
Once you’ve completed the editing of your mastering tracks, you can move on to the
final preparatory step: adding CD track markers.
Placing CD Track Markers
“Understanding CD Track Markers” on Page 342 describes the purpose of CD track
markers. This section describes the mechanics of placing them in your mastering
tracks.
Though they have a very different purpose, you can work with CD track markers in
much the same way you work with the VS-2480’s project markers (Page 188).
What CD Track Markers Look Like
Once placed, CD track markers appear above the playlist as downwardpointing triangles, just like normal markers. you can identify them as CD
track markers in the current time location display’s Markers counter—in
the counter, each CD track marker has a “C” to its right.
CD track markers appear in the Locate to Marker window along with the rest of the
project’s markers (Page 189). You can identify a CD track marker in this window by its
location.
About CD Track Marker Numbering
Each marker in a project—including each CD track marker—is identified by its
number, as described on Page 189. As you add each new marker, it assumes its place in
the project’s marker list, and all subsequent markers’ numbers go up by one.
If your project contains no other markers, here’s how they’ll be numbered when you’re
creating an audio CD with four selections—we’ll use four songs in our example:
Location:
CD Track Marker is numbered as:
CD Track:
Beginning of Song #1
none needed—placed automatically
1
Beginning of Song #2
000c
2
Beginning of Song #3
001c
3
Beginning of Song #4
002c
4
Obviously, this can be confusing—starting with the second selection, the CD track
number’s marker is lower than the CD track’s by two. If your project contains other
markers, numbering can become really baffling.
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You’ll find the process of placing CD track markers much simpler if the numbers of the
CD track markers you place correspond to the numbering of the CD’s audio selections.
There are a couple of things you can do to make this happen.
Delete all of the project’s other markers
When you do this, your marker numbering starts with a clean slate. If you don’t want to
lose your markers, make a second copy of the project (Page 101). Remove the markers—
and burn your CD—from one of the project copies. See Page 190 to learn how to delete
all of a project’s markers.
Place a pair of dummy markers in the first selection
Since your CD burner ignores the VS-2480’s normal project markers, you can place two
“dummy” markers somewhere in the middle of the first selection—it doesn’t matter
where, as long as they’re at least four seconds after the start of the selection and at least
four seconds before its end. These two markers push the remaining CD track marker
numbers back into line with the CD’s track numbers. To use our example again:
Location:
CD Track Marker is numbered as:
CD Track:
Beginning of Song #1
none needed—placed automatically
1
Middle of Song #1
(Normal Marker #000)
(ignored by CD-R/RW)
Middle of Song #1
(Normal Marker #001)
(ignored by CD-R/RW)
Beginning of Song #2
002c
2
Beginning of Song #3
003c
3
Beginning of Song #4
004c
4
Placing CD Track Markers
1.
2.
Press HOME•DISPLAY to view the Home screen.
Position the timeline at the beginning of the second selection on your mastering
tracks. (Remember, the first selection’s CD track marker is set automatically).
Use the VS-2480’s Scrub feature (Page 184) to place the timeline as precisely as you can,
about 15 frames before the start of the selection’s audio. The placement of the CD track
marker determines what happens when a listener selects the track on a CD player, so
make sure you’ve set the CD track marker where you want it.
3.
4.
While holding down CD-RW/MASTERING, press TAP to place
the CD track marker.
Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for any other CD track markers you want to
place in your mastering tracks.
CD-RW
MASTERING
+
When you’re done, you can jump from marker to marker to check their positions using
the PREVIOUS and NEXT buttons—see “Using PREVIOUS and NEXT” on Page 189. If
you need to clear and re-place a CD track marker, use PREVIOUS or NEXT to move the
timeline to the marker, hold down CLEAR and press TAP.
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CD-R/RW Operations
CD operations on the VS-2480 require a connected Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive.
If you’re creating CDs, you’ll also need blank CD-R or CD-RW discs.
All CD-R/RW operations described in the following sections start on the CD-RW
MASTERING MENU screen. To get there:
1.
Press CD-RW—the CD-RW MASTERING MENU screen appears.
To learn how to connect a Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive to your VS-2480, see
Page 381.
One of the most important CD-R/RW operations is the PROJECT menu’s BACKUP
operation, described in Chapter 7, on Page 105.
If you encounter error messages while using your CD-R/RW drive, see Page 353 or the
VS-2480 Appendices for explanations of the VS-2480’s error messages.
Creating an Audio CD
Track at Once or Disk at Once?
The VS-2480 allows you to select the way you want to write an audio CD:
•
•
adding tracks to a CD one at a time—This can be a great way to compile a CD of work
mixes to listen to. As you create each new mix, burn it onto your work CD. This
method of creating a CD is called “Track at Once” or “TAO” for short. You can create
Track at Once CDs only with CD-R disks.
writing all of the tracks in a single CD-burning process—When you’ve created
mastering tracks that contain all of a CD’s selections positioned as you want them,
you can burn the entire “Disk at Once,” as this method’s called, or “DAO” for short.
If you plan to mass-duplicate your CD when it’s done, check with the duplication
service you’re going to use—some duplicators accept only DAO-created CDs.
Finalizing
Before a CD can be played on an ordinary CD player, certain important information
must be written onto the CD, including track numbers and a Table of Contents, or
“TOC.”This last step in the CD-creation process is called “finalizing.” Until then, the
CD can be played only on your VS-2480 or another Roland V-Studio with a connected
Roland-approved CD-R/RW drive—see “The CD Player Feature” on Page 353.
Once a CD-R’s been finalized, no more audio can be added to it—you can erase a CDRW and start over. You can finalize a CD during the CD creation process. To finalize a
CD without adding audio, use the procedure on Page 349, setting Finalize to OnlyFin.
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Making Sure You Have Enough Space
Before burning an audio CD, you’ll want to make sure your audio is going to fit on the
blank CD-R or CD-RW. In addition, if your mastering tracks were created using any
recording mode other than CDR mode, the VS-2480 will need the same amount of free
space on your hard drive to create the necessary disk image file (Page 340) during the
CD-burning process.
Before starting the CD-burning process, figure out how much free space is available on
your internal hard drive:
1.
2.
Press PROJECT—the VS-2480 scans your connected drives and displays
information about each drive.
The VS-2480 can use any free space on your internal hard drive for the creation of a
disk image, not just the currently selected drive, or partition.
Add up all of the free space left on your IDE drives. This is the amount of free space
you have available.
Drive
Free space
Once you’ve started burning the CD, the CD-R WRITE screen provides the information you
need to calculate the amount of room you need:
1. On the CD-R WRITE screens, locate the length of your project
in minutes and seconds.
2. Multiply the minutes by 60, and add the result to the seconds to
arrive at the length of the project in seconds.
3. Apply the following formula:
44,100
Sample rate
x
2
Tracks
x
16
Bits
x
seconds
Project length
x
1/8
Bits to bytes
The result is roughly the amount of space you’ll need on
the CD and on your internal hard drive. Compare this to
the amount of free space on the CD as shown in the
lower right corner of the CD-R WRITE screen, and to the
amount of free hard drive space you have available.
Burning an Audio CD
The following describes how to burn mastering tracks onto an audio CD. In fact, you
can burn any two tracks onto an audio CD, as long as they use a 44.1kHz sample rate.
You can create an audio CD using either CD-R or CD-RW disks. Note, however, that
not all CD players can play CD-RW disks, nor will all mass-duplicators accept them.
We recommend using CD-R disks only when you’re creating final CDs for other people
or for mass duplication.
If your mastering tracks were created in a recording mode other than CDR, press
PROJECT and add up the remaining free space on your IDE drives as described above
before proceeding—you’ll need to know this information as you burn your CD.
1.
2.
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Verify that your CD-R/RW drive is properly connected to the VS-2480.
Insert a blank CD-R or CD-RW disk into the drive.
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3.
4.
5.
Press CD-RW/MASTERING.
Press F2 (CDWrit)—”Store Current?” appears on the display.
Press ENTER/YES to store the most recent changes to your
project—including any mastering tracks you’ve just created—or
F2 (CDWrit)
press EXIT/NO to proceed without re-saving your project.
After your press the desired button, the VS-2480 performs a few
setup operations—this takes a few moments. When the VS-2480 has finished
setting itself up for CD burning, the CD-R WRITE screen appears.
Drive info
Project
info
Disk info
If you’ve got a CD-RW disc in your burner, the VS-2480 displays a reminder that
that many CD players can’t play an audio CD-RW:
CD-RW (ReWritable)!!
Can’t be Played back
with Audio CD Player.
Are You Sure?
6. Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
7. If you’re re-using a CD-RW disk that you want to erase, see Page 352.
8. Make sure you have enough room on the CD for your audio, calculating the space
you’ll need as described in “Making Sure You Have Enough Space” on Page 350.
9. If your mastering tracks were recorded using a recording mode other than CDR,
verify that you have enough free space on your internal hard drive to create a disk
image file—again, see Page 350.
If you lack the required space on the CD—or on your hard drive, as in Step 8—press F6
(CANCEL). If the CD is blank and still won’t hold your audio, you’ll need to trim the
audio so that it fits. If the CD has other selections on it already, consider starting a new
CD. If you need to make a disk image and don’t have enough room on your hard drive,
you’ll need to clear some space on the drive before proceeding.
10. Select the mastering tracks—or other pair of tracks—
you want to burn on the CD. You can select these in
either of two ways. To select your tracks:
• at the same time—select the L-Ch SOURCE TRACK
parameter and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to
select the same-numbered V-Tracks on any odd/
even pair of project tracks.
• individually—select a pair of V-Tracks using the
L-Ch SOURCE TRACK parameter, and then use
the R-Ch SOURCE TRACK parameter to select a
different right-side V-Track.
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You can easily spot a
V-Track recorded in CDR
mode—it has an asterisk in
its number instead of a
hyphen.
CDR-recorded V-Tracks
Standard V-Tracks
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11. Select the desired WRITING METHOD: Track at Once or Disk at Once (see
Page 349).
If you select Track at Once, make sure to use a CD-R disk. You can’t write a Track at
Once CD-RW disk.
12. Set Finalize (Page 349) as desired. You can set it to:
• Off—Use this setting when you’re burning audio on a Track at Once CD, and
you’ll to be adding more audio later.
• On—Use this setting when you’re burning a Disk at Once CD, or when you’re
adding the last selection to a Track at Once CD.
• OnlyFin. (“Only Finalize”)—Use this setting when you’ve decided you’re done
adding selections to a TAO CD, but haven’t yet finalized the CD.
13. Select the speed at which the burner is to write the CD. You can select any of the
available speeds—you’ll only be offered choices supported by your burner.
Try using the highest available speed to make the burning operation as brief as
possible. If you have trouble burning the CD, try a lower speed.
14. Press F5 (OK) to begin burning the CD.
The VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to burn the disk with your current
settings, and if you’ve remembered to place the CD’s track markers:
Audio CD-R Write Sure?
(selected writing method)
CD Track No. OK?
15. If you wish to proceed, press ENTER/YES. To cancel the operation, press EXIT/NO.
16. The VS-2480 displays a message about copyrighted material. When you’ve read the
message, press ENTER/YES, or press EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
17. A screen appears that discusses licensing terms. If you agree to these terms, press
ENTER/YES to proceed. Otherwise, press EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
If you press ENTER/YES, the VS-2480 proceeds to burn the CD.
When it’s finished, the VS-2480 asks if you’d like to burn another CD of the same
audio material. If you do, insert a new CD in your burner and press ENTER/YES, or
press EXIT/NO to complete your CD-burning session.
18. If you press EXIT/NO, the VS-2480 displays “Done!”
Erasing a CD-RW Disk
•
•
•
•
•
352
If you attempt to write to a CD-RW that already contains data, the VS-2480 displays:
Finalized Disc! or Not Blank CD!
Press ENTER/YES to proceed. The VS-2480 then displays:
CD-RW (ReWritable)!!
Erase?
All Data on the CD-RW
will be Erased.
Are You Sure?
Press ENTER/YES to erase the current contents of the CD-RW disk. The erase
procedure takes a few moments.
Once the disk’s been erased, the VS-2480 shows the same message as in Step 5 on
Page 351. Press ENTER/YES to proceed or EXIT/NO to cancel.
Finally, the VS-2480 asks if you’re sure you want to proceed, as in Step 13 above.
Press ENTER/YES to proceed, or EXIT/NO to cancel the operation.
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27—Mastering and CD-R/RW Operations
If You Encounter Error Messages During CD Burning
The two error messages you’re most likely to see during CD burning are the following:
•
•
Please Insert CD-R Disc!—If you see this message, there’s no CD-R or CD-RW disk in
the burner, the burner’s tray isn’t closed, or the burner’s not ready for use.
Not 44.1kHz Project!—If you see this, the tracks you’re trying to burn to the CD are
not recorded at the required 44.1kHz sample rate.
The VS-2480 Appendices contain a list of additional error messages and what they mean.
The CD Player Feature
You can use your CD-R/RW burner as a CD player that can play CDs that haven’t yet
been finalized. It can also play any finalized CD, as well as commercial CD releases.
When you’re using the CD Player feature, you can listen through the VS-2480’s
MASTER and MONITOR outputs, as well as the PHONES jacks. The CD Player feature
is for listening only—you can’t route audio from the CD to tracks for recording, or to
additional VS-2480 output jacks or connectors.
When you’re listening to a CD that hasn’t yet been finalized, you won’t be able to hear
approximately the final .5 seconds of each track.
Playing an Audio CD
1.
2.
Press CD-RW/MASTERING.
Press F3 (CDPlyr)—the CD PLAYER screen appears.
F3 (CDPlyr)
Level meter
Drive info
Current
location
Track list
Disk info
3.
Insert the desired CD into the drive.
To:
Press:
Play the CD from your current location
PLAY
Halt playback at the current position
STOP
Rewind to the top of the CD
ZERO
Jump to the start of the next track
NEXT
Jump to the beginning of the previous track
PREVIOUS
Eject the CD
F3 (EJECT)
Turn off the CD Player feature
F6 (EXIT)
When the CD’s not playing, you can use the VS-2480’s SHUTTLE ring to change your
current location on the CD.
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.WAV File Importing
The VS-2480’s WAV Import feature allows you to load .WAV audio files from a data CD.
There are many recordings and samples that use Microsoft’s .WAV format available on
commercial CDs and on the Internet. When you import a .WAV file, you can place it on
any track in the current project.
The VS-2480 imports linear format (PCM) .WAV files.
Both Windows and MacOS computers can read .WAV files.
Converting .WAV Files
The VS-2480 converts .WAV files to the current project’s recording mode when it
imports them. When a .WAV file is at the same sample rate as the project, this
conversion can be quite quick. On the other hand, if it’s not, the conversion can take a
while. You can choose to perform a Normal conversion—for the best audio quality—or
a Quick conversion if you’re in a hurry.
If the .WAV file is at a different sample rate than the project, the file’s sound may
change when it’s imported into the VS-2480.
ISO 9960 CDs
The WAVE Import feature recognizes only ISO 9660-format CDs. If you’re preparing a
data CD of .WAV files on a computer, make sure the CD uses the ISO 9960 format. Both
PCs and Mac can create CDs in this format with the proper CD-burning software.
The WAV IMPORT Screen
All WAV Import operations take place on the WAV IMPORT screen. To get
there:
1.
2.
3.
Insert the CD containing the .WAV files in your CD-R/RW drive.
Press CD-RW/MASTERING.
Press F4 (WaveImp)—the WAV IMPORT screen appears.
F4 (WavImp)
This screen presents you a list of all of the .WAV files and folders in the CD’s currently
selected directory. You can select any item in the list by using % and $ or the TIME/
VALUE dial to highlight it.
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Each file directory on the CD appears in the displayed list as a folder. To open a folder,
select it and press F5 (ChgDir) for “Change Directory.” When you’re inside a folder, an
upward arrow points you back to the folder’s parent directory. To move up and back out
of the folder, highlight “<<Parent Directry>>” and press F5 (ChgDir) again.
The list provides information about each of its .WAV files. The Type column shows the
file’s sample rate, whether it’s mono or stereo, and its bit depth. Press F4 (Info) to toggle
the contents of the middle column on the display. This column can show you each file’s:
•
•
Size—in hours, minutes, seconds and frames.
Last Update—the date on which the file was last modified.
To hear a preview of a .WAV file, select it and press F2 (Previw) for “Preview.”
Importing a .WAV File
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Insert a CD containing .WAV files into your CD-R/RW drive.
Press CD-RW/MASTERING.
Press F4 (WaveImp).
Highlight the .WAV file you want to import.
Press F5 (SELECT)—the WAV Import Destination screen appears.
As on the WAV IMPORT
screen, you can press F4
(Info) to toggle the
display of the selected
file’s size or its last
modification date.
To return to the WAV
IMPORT screen, press
F1 <<BACK). To abort
the procedure, press
F6 (CANCEL).
6.
To select a destination V-Track —or V-Tracks, if you’re importing a stereo .WAV
file—do one of the following:
• Select the TRACK parameter and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the
desired destination V-Track for the imported audio. You can select any V-Track
using this method.
• Press the desired destination track’s flashing TRACK STATUS button to choose
its currently selected V-Track as the destination for your .WAV file—its TRACK
STATUS button lights solidly.
If you’re importing a stereo .WAV file, when you select a destination V-Track, you select
a pair of V-Tracks on odd/even tracks.
7.
You can import the .WAV file to any time location in the project—TO sets the
location at which the beginning of the imported audio is placed. You can move the
timeline to the current TO location by pressing F3 (GO TO).
Set TO by:
• entering it manually—Use the cursor buttons and the TIME/VALUE dial to
manually enter the desired TO location.
• moving the timeline—Cursor up to the current time location display and move
the timeline to the desired location in the project. Once there, press F2
(GetNow) to enter the timeline’s current location as the TO point.
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There’s nothing to prevent you from importing a .WAV file onto a track—and at a time
location—where there’s already data. Be sure to select your destination V-Tracks and
time location carefully—the imported data will replace whatever’s there.
8.
Select the desired type of file conversion, as described in “Converting .WAV Files”
on Page 354.
9. Press F5 (OK) to import the .WAV file to the selected V-Track and time location.
10. When the VS-2480 displays “Done!” press F1 (<<BACK) to return to the WAV
IMPORT screen.
11. Press F6 (EXIT) to leave the WAV IMPORT screen and listen to the imported audio.
Exporting Tracks and Phrases as .WAV Files
If you want to move audio from a project to an external device—such as a computer or
sampler—that reads .WAV files, you can export any track or phrase as a .WAV file. The
exported audio is written onto a data CD.
Since most audio programs can read .WAV files, you can process exported VS-2480
audio using virtually any audio processing or editing software. Afterwards—and after
saving the result as a .WAV file—you can re-import the audio back into the VS-2480.
When you want to export an entire track, use the Track Export feature. To export
portions of a track, use the VS-2480’s phrase editing tools to fashion the audio into a
phrase, and use the Phrase Export feature.
The VS-2480 exports each pair of linked tracks as a stereo .WAV file.
The procedures for exporting tracks and phrase start a bit differently, but end on the
the same CD-burning screen.
Exporting Tracks as .WAV Files
1.
2.
Insert a blank CD-R or CD/RW into your CD burner.
On the CD-RW MASTERING MENU screen (Page 349), press F5
(TrkExp) for “Track Export”—the TRACK EXPORT Select Track screen
appears.
V-Tracks
F5 (TrkExp)
Read-only
V-Track Map
On this screen, you see a list of all of the project’s V-Tracks. To the right is a V-Track
map that shows you which V-Tracks contain data. When you export a track as a
.WAV file, you’re really exporting a V-Track—see Chapter 6 for an explanation of
the relationship between tracks and V-Tracks.
You can select the V-Tracks you want to export on TRACK EXPORT’s Select Track
screen or on its V-Track Map screen, described on the next page. You can mark as
many V-Tracks for export as you want on either screen.
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3.
To select a V-Track for export on the Select Track screen, turn the TIME/VALUE dial
to highlight the V-Track and press F4 (MARK) to place a checkmark next it. You can
toggle on or off the selection status of all V-Tracks that contain data by pressing F3
(ALL)—this can be handy if you want to export all of your tracks as .WAV files.
Turning the TIME/VALUE dial takes you through each of the project’s V-Tracks. Hold
down SHIFT as you turn to jump between same-numbered V-Tracks on different tracks.
4.
5.
To select a V-Track on the V-Track Map screen, press F2 (MAP)—the TRACK
EXPORT V-Track Map screen appears.
Each V-Track with audio appears as a small black square with a checkbox to its left.
To select a V-Track for export, cursor to the V-Track and press F4 (MARK) to check
its checkbox. As on the Select Track screen, you can select and unselect all of the
V-Tracks at once by pressing F3 (ALL).
To quickly select or unselect all of a track’s V-Tracks, cursor all the way to the left so that
the track’s name is highlighted and press F4 (MARK).
6.
When you’ve selected all of the V-Tracks you want to export, press F5 (NEXT) to go
to the WAV Export CD burning screen, described on Page 358.
Exporting Phrases as .WAV Files
1.
2.
Insert a blank CD-R or CD/RW into your CD burner.
On the CD-RW MASTERING MENU screen (Page 349), press F6
(PhrExp) for “Phrase Export”—the PHRASE EXPORT screen appears.
F6 (PhrExp)
Phraseselection
area
Playlist
On this screen, you can select the phrases you want to export as .WAV files. Every
phrase that’s currently touching the timeline appears at the top of the screen in the
phrase-selection area. If a phrase you want to export isn’t available for selection,
turn the TIME/VALUE dial so that the timeline touches the phrase.
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Repeatedly press F4 (INFO) to display any of three types of information about the
displayed phrases: their names, dates of creation, and sizes.
3.
Select a phrase for export by cursoring to it using $ and % and pressing F3
(MARK) to checkmark it.
You can repeatedly press F2 (ALL) to select or unselect all of the currently available
phrases at once.
4.
When you’ve selected all of the phrases you want to export as .WAV files, press F5
(NEXT) to view the WAV Export CD burning screen, described below.
Burning Exported .WAV Files to CD
1.
When you’ve pressed F5 (NEXT) on a TRACK EXPORT or PHRASE EXPORT
screen, the WAV Export CD burning screen appears. This screen is identical for
exporting tracks and phrases, except for its displayed title.
Selected
audio
CD burner
info
Current
drive info
You can see the title of the screen and the currently selected hard drive above the area
shown in this illustration.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
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A list of the selected tracks or phrases is displayed at the left of the screen—you can
scroll up or down through this list to see what you’re exporting by pressing F1
(Scrol↑) or F2 (Scrol↓).
Set Verify as desired. You can set it to:
• Off—to finish the CD-burning process faster.
• On—to make sure the CD has no data errors.
Select the desired drive speed. We recommend trying the MAX setting that uses
your burner’s fastest speed. If you have any trouble burning the CD, try again with
a lower speed.
If you have more than one CD-burner connected, press F4 (SelDrv), scroll to the
desired destination CD-R/RW drive, and press F5 (SELECT).
When you’ve returned to the screen shown above, press F5 (OK) to export your
tracks or phrases as .WAV files to the CD. The process may take a little while,
depending on the amount of audio data you’re exporting.
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28—Utility Menu Parameters
The UTILITY MENU contains a wide array of parameters. Some of its screens present
parameters that set the general behavior of the VS-2480—or its behavior when a
particular project is loaded—while others offer detailed control of specific VS-2480
features. This chapter describes what you’ll find in the UTILITY menu.
We’ve already explained many of the UTILITY menu’s screens and parameters in
earlier chapters—as we go through the UTILITY menu screens, we’ll refer you to
relevant descriptions elsewhere in the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual. They’re noted here for
completeness.
The Main UTILITY Menu Screen
To view the UTILITY menu:
1.
Press UTILITY in the MENU area of the VS-2480’s top panel.
You can display any of the UTILITY menu’s screens by cursoring to it in the UTILITY
menu and pressing ENTER/YES, or by pressing its F button shown on one of tabbed
layers as the bottom of the screen.
If you’re looking for an screen
whose F button is currently
hidden, press PAGE repeatedly
until its F button appears.
The SYSTEM, GLOBAL, PLAY/REC and V.FDR buttons each lead to sets of related
screenfuls of parameters—these sub-screens are called “Param1”, “Param2” and, in the
case of the V.FDR screenset, “Param3.”To navigate between these screens, press F1
(Param1), F2 (Param2) or F3(Param3) as desired.
Many of the other UTILITY menu items also have sub-screens of their own, as
explained in their descriptions.
On some UTILITY menu screens, parameters are arranged in labeled groups. In the
following descriptions, we’ll organize parameters according to these groupings.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
SYSTEM
UTILITY menu
F1 (SYSTEM)
PHANTOM SW
The VS-2480 provides phantom power for its eight XLR inputs, as described on
Page 130. Each input’s phantom power on/off switch is available in two places, on the
EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY screen—described on Page 130—and on the SYSTEM
Param1 screen. Setting an input’s ANALOG INPUT switch on the SYSTEM Param1
screen is the same as setting its PATCH BAY screen PHANTOM POWER on/off switch.
EXT LEVEL METER (MB-24)
Use these parameters to set the behavior of the MB-24 meter bridge (purchased
separately) attached to your VS-2480. If you’re not using an MB-24, you can ignore these
parameters.
To learn how to attach an MB-24, see “Attaching an MB-24 Level Meter” on Page 382.
DISPLAY SECTION
The DISPLAY SECTION parameter selects the type of signals shown in the MB-24’s 24
SECTION level meters. They can be turned off, or set to show:
Parameter Value:
Meters show:
ANALOG INPUT 1-16
the levels received at the VS-2480’s analog inputs
R-BUS/COAX/OPT IN
the levels received at the R-BUS and S/P DIF digital inputs
INPUT MIXER 1-24
input channel levels
TRACK MIXER 1-24
track channel levels
FX1-8 RETURN
effect processor output levels
AUX1-8/DIR1-8
Aux bus and Direct bus levels
ANALOG OUTPUT
analog output jack levels
R-BUS/COAX/OPT OUT
R-BUS and S/P DIF digital output levels
The “Supplemental Information” chapter provides further information regarding the
MB-24. See “Roland MB-24 Notes” on Page 396.
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METER POSITION
This parameter sets whether metered input, track, Aux master and FX return channel
signals are shown before or after their faders on the MB-24.
TIME DISPLAY
TIME DISPLAY determines the time shown by the MB-24’s time counter. It can show:
•
•
•
MEASURE/BEAT—using the current time location display’s (Page 126) measure and
beats counter.
TIME CODE—using the current time location display’s time code counter.
CLOCK/SCENE—so that the current clock time appears at the left of the counter,
and the number of the currently selected scene appears at its right.
METER SCALE
When the METER SCALE parameter is set to x1 (“times 1”), displayed levels are shown
in their actual scale. Set METER scale to x2 to zoom in for more precise metering.
DRIVE
IDE DRIVE
This on/off switch lets you start up from a Zip drive with the VS-2480’s internal drive
turned off. Select the Zip drive as your current drive, turn IDE DRIVE off, and then
restart the VS-2480, making sure a VS-2480-formatted Zip disk is inserted in the Zip
drive. To re-activate the internal drive, turn IDE DRIVE on and restart.
SCSI SELF ID
This sets the VS-2480’s SCSI ID number—see the VS-2480 Appendices. The VS-2480’s
SCSI ID is set to ID7 at the factory. You can set this parameter from 1-7.
Changes made to the SCSI SELF ID parameter take effect after restarting the VS-2480.
VGA
The following parameters let you set up the VS-2480’s output to a connected VGA
monitor—we’ve already described them briefly on Page 64, but here’s some additional
detail. If you’re not using an external monitor, these settings have no effect.
VGA OUT
The VGA OUT switch turns the VS-2480’s feed to a connected monitor on or off.
REFRESH RATE
Every monitor constantly re-draws, or “refreshes,” the image it displays. The faster the
monitor can do this, the less likely you are to notice it doing so. When a monitor
refreshes too slowly, you can see it flicker, which can wear on your eyes. You can set the
parameter to 60Hz, 66Hz, 70Hz or 75Hz.
Consult your VGA monitor’s documentation to learn its recommended refresh rate. If
you select a value the monitor doesn’t support, image quality may be poor, and damage
to the monitor may result.
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H.POSITION
Adjust the H.POSITION (“Horizontal Position”) parameter if you’d like to shift the
image on your VGA monitor to the left (negative values) or to the right (positive values).
You can move as far as -5 to the left or +5 to the right.
V.POSITION
Adjust the V.POSITION parameter if you’d like to shift the image on your VGA monitor
downward (negative values) or upward (positive values) by as much as -11 down or +11
up.
PS/2 MOUSE
For a description of the VS-2480’s mouse settings, see Page 64.
PS/2 KEYBOARD
For a description of the VS-2480’s ACSII keyboard settings, see Page 64.
GLOBAL
UTILITY menu
F2 (GLOBAL)
INPUT PEAK LEVEL
The INPUT PEAK LEVEL parameter sets the level at which the input peak indicators
on the Home screen and elsewhere light, as described on Page 125. You can set the
input peak indicators to light when a signal coming into an input channel reaches -6dB,
-3dB or 0dB—a light gray line across the input meters display (Page 124) shows the
current INPUT PEAK LEVEL value.
FOOT SWITCH ASSIGN
An optional foot switch—such as a Roland DP-2 or BOSS FS-5U—connected to the
VS-2480’s rear panel FOOT SWITCH jack can perform a variety of functions. This
parameter determines what a connected foot switch does. You can set the parameter to:
•
•
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Play/Stop—so you can start and stop project playback with the foot switch.
Record—so you can toggle in and out of Record mode with each press of the foot
switch, allowing for hands-free punching.
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•
•
•
•
TapMarker—so the foot switch acts like the TAP button: A press of the foot switch
places a marker at the timeline’s current position.
Next—so the foot switch acts like the NEXT button, moving the timeline to the next
phrase or marker, according to the setting of the PREVIOUS/NEXT Sw parameter
(see below).
Previous—so the foot switch acts like the PREVIOUS button, moving the timeline to
the previous phrase or marker, according to the setting of the PREVIOUS/NEXT
Sw parameter (see below).
GPI—so the foot switch responds to received Play/Stop instructions from a
connected General Purpose Interface.
GPI
CD DIGITAL REC
This switch enables or disables recording from S/P DIF digital audio sources such as
CD players. See for “Recording S/P DIF-Format Digital Input Signals” on Page 134.
SHIFT LOCK
When SHIFT is held down, many of the VS-2480’s buttons perform their secondary
function, typically—but not always—printed beneath the button in an outline box. If
you’re pressing the SHIFT button frequently, you can lock the SHIFT button on, or arm
it for its next use. Set SHIFT LOCK to:
•
•
•
Off—so the SHIFT button behaves normally, needing to be held down when you
press the button whose behavior it changes.
On—so that each press of the SHIFT button toggles it on or off. When it’s on, each
button you press that has a secondary function performs that function.
Once—so that you can press SHIFT to arm it for its next use. Once you’ve pressed
the next button that has a secondary function, SHIFT turns off.
SWITCHING TIME
This parameter sets the length of time a button must be held down before it performs
its secondary function, allowing you to press such a button quickly when SHIFT is
locked on (see above) without triggering the secondary function. You can select values
between 0.3 and 2.0 sec (seconds).
KNOB/FDR ASSIGN SW
To learn about this parameter, see “To Set What the KNOB/FADER ASSIGN Feature
Controls” on Page 140.
PREVIOUS/NEXT SW
The PREVIOUS/NEXT Sw parameter, discussed on Page 189, sets the behavior of the
PREVIOUS and NEXT buttons. You can set it to:
•
•
PHRASE—so that pressing PREVIOUS or NEXT moves the timeline to the previous
or next edge, respectively, of a phrase.
MARKER—so that pressing PREVIOUS or NEXT moves the timeline to the
previous or next marker, respectively.
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LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE
The LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE parameters activates or de-activates the Safe mode for
selecting locators and scenes, as described on Page 187 and Page 146, respectively.
NUMERICS TYPE
With NUMERICS TYPE set to:
•
•
Up—numbers are entered from the numeric keypad or a keyboard from right to
left, like a calculator.
Down—numbers are entered from left to right.
RETURN TO LOCATE Sw
You can set the VS-2480 so that the keypad defaults to the selection of locators—
automatically exiting Scene mode after a scene is selected—as described on Page 145
and on Page 187.
EDIT POINT Sw TYPE
Edit Point Sw Type sets the behavior of the IN, OUT, FROM and TO buttons. See
“Configuring the Behavior of the IN, OUT, FROM and TO Buttons” on Page 247.
UNDO MESSAGE
This parameter turns the displaying of the Undo list (Page 72) on or off. If you press
UNDO when the parameter’s set to:
•
•
Off—the last action is reversed immediately. This setting lets you undo the most
recent action in the fastest way possible.
On—the Undo list appears, allowing to select the desired Undo level.
EDIT MESSAGE
When you perform various types of editing on the VS-2480, you can view edit messages
that allow you to adjust parameters relating to the edit—see “Edit Messages” on
Page 240.
You can toggle this parameter on and off by holding down SHIFT and pressing
PHRASE•REGION•AUTOMIX.
PAN KNOB AUTODisp
When the PAN-AUX SEND 1-8 knobs are controlling panning (Page 139), the VS-2480
can automatically jump to a screen that displays PAN values as soon as you turn one of
the knobs. Set PAN KNOB AUTODisp to:
•
•
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Off—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to set a channel’s panning doesn’t
cause the display to change.
CH VIEW—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to set a channel’s panning
causes the VS-2480 to jump to the channel’s CH EDIT VIEW screen (Page 150).
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PRM KNOB AUTODisp
When the PAN-AUX SEND 1-8 knobs are controlling the dynamics and EQ parameters
of a selected channel (Page 140), the VS-2480 can automatically jump to a screen that
displays those values when you turn one of the knobs. Set PRM KNOB AUTODisp to:
•
•
Off—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to adjust a channel’s dynamics or
EQ doesn’t cause the display to change.
CH VIEW—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to set a channel’s dynamics
or EQ causes the display to jump to the channel’s corresponding CH EDIT DYN
screen (Page 157) or EQ screen (Page 162).
AUX KNOB AUTO Disp
When you turn a PAN-AUX SEND 1-8 knob to set an Aux send level (Page 141), you can
set the display to automatically jump to a screen that displays Aux send values. Set
AUX KNOB AUTODisp to:
•
•
Off—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to adjust a channel’s Aux send
doesn’t cause the display to change.
CH VIEW—so that turning a PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knob to set a channel’s Aux send
causes the VS-2480 to display the channel’s CH EDIT VIEW screen (Page 150).
OPERATION DISPLAY
DATE/REMAIN Sw
You can replace the clock in the upper right-hand corner of the VS-2480’s LCD display
with a readout of how much free space remains on the currently selected drive. When
you set DATE/REMAIN Sw to:
•
•
Date—the VS-2480’s calendar/clock is displayed.
Remain—the amount of free space left on the current drive is shown.
REMAIN DISPLAY TYPE
When the display is showing the remaining space on the currently selected drive—see
DATE/REMAIN Sw above— REMAIN DISPLAY TYPE sets the manner in which that
information’s presented:
•
•
•
•
Time—shows the remaining recording time based on the current sample rate and
recording mode.
CapaMB—shows the remaining free space in megabytes (MB).
Capa%—shows the amount of free space remaining as a percentage of the current
drive.
Event—shows the remaining number of free project events.
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PROJECT
UTILITY menu
F3 (Proj)
DIGITAL I/0
MASTER CLOCK
To learn about setting the MASTER CLOCK parameter, see “Designating the Master
Clock for Digital Audio Input” on Page 133.
DITHER
If you’re sending audio to a connected external digital recorder that records at a lower
bit depth than the VS-2480 (Page 132), you can dither the VS-2480’s output signal so that
it sounds its best at the bit depth the external device is using. Dithering adds an
inaudible veil of noise to the signal in order to mask audio artifacts that are introduced
when bits are discarded as audio travels from a higher bit-rate device to a lower one. To
set DITHER, select the bit depth of the external digital device.
Turn off DITHER until it’s needed since it affects all audio transmitted from the
VS-2480’s digital outputs, including the audio sent to your connected Roland DS-90A
or DS-50A Digital Reference Monitors.
DIGITAL COPY PROTECT
The VS-2480 allows you to use SCMS (“Serial Copy Management system”) to prevent
additional copies from being made of digital audio you’ve recorded from the VS-2480’s
S/P DIF coaxial or optical outputs onto a DAT tape or MiniDisc. To prevent copying,
turn the DIGITAL COPY PROTECT parameter on before sending the digital audio to
the DAT or MiniDisc recorder.
R-BUS2 COAXIAL Sel
See “Selecting the Desired Digital Inputs” on Page 131 for an explanation of this
parameter, which also appears on the EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY screen.
R-BUS2 OPTICAL Sel
See “Selecting the Desired Digital Inputs” on Page 131 for an explanation of this
parameter, which also appears on the EZ ROUTING PATCH BAY screen.
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DISPLAY
DISPLAY OFFSET TIME
This parameter is explained in “Shifting the Project Start Time” on Page 316.
TIME DISPLAY FORMAT
This parameter is explained in “Shifting the Project Start Time” on Page 316.
PEAK HOLD Sw
You can set the VS-2480’s level meters so that their peak lines “stick” at their highest
positions, remaining there until you press HOME•DISPLAY to release them. This
allows you to look away from the display without worrying that you’ll miss problematic
level peaks. To make the peak lines stick, set PEAK HOLD Sw to On. To return them to
their normal behavior, turn the parameter off.
PLAYREC
UTILITY menu
F4 (PlyRec)
RECORD MONITOR
RECORD MONITOR is explained in “Simple and Dual Monitoring” on Page 191.
MARKER STOP
MARKER STOP lets you set the hard disk recorder so that it automatically stops when
the timeline reaches the next marker. This can be handy when you want the VS-2480 to
stop playback at the end of a section on which you’re working: place a marker at the
desired location and turn this parameter on. When MARKER STOP is off, the hard disk
recorder operates normally.
FADE CURVE
When you record, punch in and out, and edit tracks, the VS-2480 adds a very short
crossfade between pieces of audio to ensure that there are no clicks or pops where they
meet. The FADE CURVE parameter sets the shape of the crossfade. Set it to:
•
•
Linear—so that the crossfade is linear in terms of digital audio data values.
Exp (Exponential)—so that the crossfade is linear in terms of audibility.
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FADE LENGTH
You can set the length of the crossfade described in FADE CURVE on the previous
page. You can select 2ms, 10ms, 20ms, 30ms, 40ms or 50ms. The default setting is 10ms.
VARI PITCH
VARI PITCH Sw and VARI PITCH
The two VARI PITCH parameters are explained in “Vari Pitch Playback” on Page 182.
SOLO/MUTE
SOLO/MUTE TYPE
When you mute a channel—or when it’s silenced as the result of another channel being
soloed—you can set exactly where in the VS-2480 its signal is stopped. This is
determined by the setting of the SOLO/MUTE TYPE parameter. When it’s set to:
•
•
All BUS Send—the signal is stopped before it’s sent to any Aux or Direct busses or
the MASTER mix bus. It’s therefore not sent to the VS-2480’s effects or to outputs
via Aux or Direct busses.
MIX BUS Send—the signal is stopped before it goes to the MASTER bus only. It’s
still sent to the Aux and Direct busses, and thus to internal effects and/or outputs.
PREVIEW
SCRUB LENGTH
This parameter is explained in “Setting Scrub Times” on Page 185.
PREVIEW TO LENGTH and PREVIEW FROM LENGTH
These parameters are described in “Setting the PREVIEW TO and FROM Times” on
Page 184.
MIDI
UTILITY menu
F5 (MIDI)
The VS-2480’s MIDI parameters and operations are described in Chapter 24, starting on
Page 299. See the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual index for page numbers of specific parameter
references.
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SYNC
UTILITY menu
F6 (SYNC)
Synchronization parameters and operations are described starting on Page 307. See the
VS-2480 Owner’s Manual index for page numbers of specific parameter references.
TEMPO
“Synchronization with Tempo Changes” on Page 309 introduces the
project tempo map. “Working with a Tempo Map” on Page 312 explains
how to use it.
UTILITY menu
F1 (TEMPO)
Metronome
UTILITY menu
F2 (Metro)
When you’re using the project tempo map (see above), the VS-2480 provides a built-in
metronome you can use during recording and playback. The metronome’s tempo
comes from the tempo map, so the metronome slows down and speeds up along with
the project tempo.
You can play the metronome internally using a variety of onboard sounds, including a
simple, programmable beat box. You can send the metronome out to performers’
headphones mixes. The metronome can also generate MIDI notes that play percussion
sounds produced by an external MIDI device (Page 306).
When the metronome is used internally, it’s normally sent to the VS-2480’s MONITOR
bus—in order to hear the metronome, therefore, you have to be listening to the
MONITOR bus. You can also send the metronome to other VS-2480’s outputs as
described in “Sending the Metronome to Outputs” on Page 371.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
METRONOME OUT
METRONOME OUT turns on the metronome and configures it for internal use or for
MIDI use. You can set the parameter to Off, INT (“Internal”) or MIDI.
INT LEVEL
When the metronome is being used internally, this parameter sets its volume, from
-∞ to 6.0dB. the default setting is 0.0dB.
METRONOME MODE
You can set when the metronome plays. Set METRONOME MODE to:
•
•
Rec Only—to play only when you’re recording project tracks.
Rec&Play—to play both during recording and playback of project tracks.
TONE TYPE
The metronome can play a variety of built-in sounds, as determined by the TONE TYPE
parameter. Set it to:
•
•
•
•
CLICK1—to play a pair of electronic ticks.
CLICK2—to play a clave-like sound.
CLICK2(Note)—to play a bass-drum like tone that derives its pitches from the
ACCENT NOTE and NORMAL NOTE values in the metronome’s MIDI SETTINGS
area (Page 306).
DRUM—to use the metronome’s programmable beat box. When you select DRUM,
F1 (PtnEdt), for “Pattern Edit,” becomes active, as described below.
Programming the Metronome’s Beat Box
When you’ve selected DRUM as the metronome’s TONE TYPE parameter, you can
press F1 (PtnEdt) to view the METRONOME DRUM PATTERN EDIT screen.
You can play along with
the pattern using the F
buttons—the beat box
pads. The sound each
button plays is shown
above it on the display.
Pattern grid
Beat box pads
The beat box uses a simple grid of one measure’s worth of quarter notes. A shiny black
ball signifies a played note. The beat box has a bass drum (“B.D.”) sound, a snare drum
(“S.D.”), closed and open hi-hat sounds (H.H) and any of three percussion sounds. To
choose the percussion sound, select the PERCUSSION parameter and turn the TIME/
VALUE dial to select Hand Clap, Cowbel or Maracas.
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Each instrument has its own horizontal line of quarter notes. To make an instrument
sound one of its quarter notes, cursor to the quarter note and turn the TIME/VALUE
dial clockwise so that a black ball appears. To silence the note, turn the TIME/VALUE
dial the other way to remove the black ball. For the hi-hat, dial in the black ball for a
closed hi-hat sound, or an empty circle for an open hi-hat sound.
The CURRENT TEMPO MAP settings show the tempo and time signature of the tempo
map at the timeline’s position when you first enter the beat box screen—the map
number isn’t updated when you stop and start playback while on the beat box’s screen.
Selecting, unselecting and re-selecting either the tempo or time signature parameter
causes the tempo map settings to be updated to reflect the tempo map settings at the
timeline’s current position.
Changing the tempo or time signature on the METRONOME DRUM PATTERN EDIT
screen changes it in the tempo map as well, so be careful about any changes you make
to these settings if you’re using the Tempo Map feature for other purposes.
Sending the Metronome to Outputs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
On the metronome’s screen, set METRONOME OUT to INT.
Set its level, mode and sound as desired.
Press F6 (EXIT).
Press PAGE once.
Press F4 (OscAna)—the GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR screen appears.
Set the SOURCE parameter to METRONOME.
Set Sw, just above SOURCE, to On.
With these settings, the generator produces the metronome’s output signal. As you
can see, the generator has its own set of CH EDIT-like parameters (Page 150) with
which you can send the metronome to an Aux bus feeding a headphone mix, to the
MASTER mix, or to a Direct bus routed to a VS-2480 output.
When the generator is producing the metronome’s sound, the metronome is no longer
routed directly to the MONITOR bus.
AUTO PUNCH/LOOP
The AUTOPUNCH/LOOP screen provides parameters for setting
Auto Punch and Loop start and stop times. To learn about using its
parameters for:
•
•
UTILITY menu
F3 (A.P/LP)
Auto Punch—see “Editing Auto Punch IN and OUT Points Manually” on Page 193.
Loop—see “Editing Loop FROM and TO Points Manually” on Page 182.
MARKER
Learn how to use the UTILITY menu’s MARKER screen in “Editing
Markers” on Page 190.
UTILITY menu
F4 (MARKER)
LOCATE
The LOCATE screen is described in “Editing Locators” on Page 186.
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F5 (LOCATE)
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
V.FDR
At the top of the V.FADER/USER screen is the USER KNOB/FDR
ASSIGN to parameter, described in “Controlling a Parameter of Your
Choice” on Page 141.
UTILITY menu
F6 (V.FDR)
“V.Fader—The VS-2480 MIDI Control Surface” on Page 300 describes how to use the
V.Fader feature that turns the VS-2480 into a MIDI control surface.
SCENE
To learn how to use the SCENE screen, see “Editing Scenes” on
Page 145.
UTILITY menu
F1 (SCENE)
AUTOMIX
See “The AUTOMIX Screen” on Page 326 to learn about using the
AUTOMIX screen.
UTILITY menu
F2 (A.MIX)
SURROUND
The SURROUND screen, and the use of Surround sound in the
VS-2480, is described in Chapter 25. See “Turning on Surround Mode”
on Page 321.
UTILITY menu
F3 (Surrnd)
Oscillator/ANALYZER
Pressing the OscAna button reveals the GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR
screen and the VS-2480’s test-signal generator. You can press F1
(Anylzr) to display the VS-2480’s spectrum analyzer, described on
Page 374. To exit either of the screens, press F6 (EXIT).
UTILITY menu
F4 (OscAna)
Generator
Meters
display
Generator
on/off
switch
When you press the UTILITY menu’s OscAna button, the GENERATOR/
OSCILLATOR screen appears. This screen controls the VS-2480’s generator that
produces various test signals and can produce the metronome’s output.
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When using the generator, start by choosing the desired test signal. Select the SOURCE
parameter and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select:
•
•
•
•
Pink Noise—a static-like noise comprised of the frequencies at each octave of the
frequency spectrum sounding together at equal volume. Useful for testing
speakers in conjunction with the VS-2480 spectrum analyzer. See Page 375.
WhiteNoise—a static-like noise comprised of all frequencies in the frequency
spectrum sounding together at equal volume. Useful for testing speakers in
conjunction with the VS-2480 spectrum analyzer. See Page 375.
Sin Wave (“Sine Wave”)—the generator acts as an oscillator, producing a pure tone
useful as a reference when you need to set levels using a fixed reference point. It’s
also helpful as a reference when sharing audio between multiple recorders to make
sure they reproduce different frequencies similarly—the sine wave can be set to
play at different frequencies. To set the sine wave’s frequency, adjust the tuning
knob that appears to the right of SOURCE when Sin Wave is selected.
METRONOME—the VS-2480’s internal metronome. “Sending the Metronome to
Outputs” on Page 371 describes using the METRONOME setting.
When the generator is producing the metronome’s sound, the metronome is no longer
routed directly to the MONITOR bus.
To turn on the selected signal, turn the generator’s on/off switch on. The GENERATOR/
OSCILLATOR screen provides a variety of controls that let you adjust and send the
generator’s output to the desired destination:
•
•
ATT—attenuates the level produced by the generator from -42.0dB to 0.0dB.
AUX 1-8 sends—let you send the generator’s output to an effect or to an output,
allowing you, for example, to send the metronome to an Aux bus feeding a
headphone mix, as described on Page 371.
All of the generator’s Aux sends are always after its fader regardless of the Aux bus’s
Pre/Pst configuration.
•
•
•
•
DIR 1-8—let you route the generator’s output to any Direct bus.
PAN—lets you adjust the panning of the generator’s mono output when you’re
sending it into the MASTER mix.
MIX—lets you send the generator’s output into the MASTER mix (On), or remove it
from the MASTER mix (Off).
FADER—allows you to set the generator’s final output level.
Metering on the GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR Screen
The GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR’s meters display always shows the MASTER and
MONITOR bus levels at the right. For the left part of the display, press:
•
F3 (AUXDIR)—to view the eight Aux and eight Direct bus levels.
1.
2.
3.
4.
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Aux Busses 1-8
Direct Busses 1-8
Stereo MONITOR bus
Stereo MASTER bus
4.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
•
F4 (OUTPUT)—to view the stereo analog Aux A and B outs, R-BUS 1 and 2 outs, and
the coaxial and optical outs.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5. 6. 7.
8.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Stereo
Stereo
R-BUS
R-BUS
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Stereo
Aux Output A
Aux Output B
1 Digital Outputs 1-8
2 Digital Outputs 1-8
digital coaxial outputs
digital optical outputs
MONITOR bus
MASTER bus
You can select pre- or post-fader Aux bus and Direct bus metering by pressing:
•
•
F5 (To Pre)—to select pre-fader metering before the Aux bus and Direct bus master
level controls. See Page 207 and Page 209.
F5 (To Pst)—to select post-fader metering, after the Aux bus and Direct bus master
level controls.
Analyzer
Spectrum analysis
display
Level
meter
The analyzer performs a Fourier Fast Transform (FFT) analysis of a selected signal—the
result of the analysis is shown in realtime on the spectrum analysis display.
Powering the Spectrum Analysis Display
The spectrum analysis display requires one of the VS-2480’s VS8F-2 effect expansion
boards to operate. Select the Use EFFECT board parameter, and turn the TIME/VALUE
dial to select the VS8F-2 you want to use. Press ENTER/YES to assign the effect board to
the spectrum analyzer display.
When an effect board is being used by the spectrum analyzer display, it’s unavailable
for other use. For this reason, make sure to re-set Use EFFECT Board to Off—by
selecting Off and pressing ENTER/YES—when you’re done using the analyzer.
Understanding the Spectrum Analysis Display
Each frequency the spectrum analyzer displays is represented by a vertical bar on the
screen—the frequency each bar represents is shown beneath it. A bar shows how loud
its frequency is at the present moment in relation to the dB level scale shown up and
down the left edge of the analyzer. If a frequency is completely absent from a signal, its
bar doesn’t light.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
Setting Up the Spectrum Analysis Display
Select the SOURCE parameter and turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select the signal you
want to analyze. The analyzer works with any of the following mono signals:
•
•
•
•
•
individual input and track channel signals
the left or right side of the stereo FX return channel signals
the generator/oscillator
the left or right side of the stereo MASTER and MONITOR busses
individual Aux bus and Direct bus signals
When input or track channels or Aux busses are linked, the spectrum analyzer looks at
each of the linked channels or busses individually.
The level meter at the left of the display shows the level of the signal being analyzed.
You can configure the analyzer to suit your needs. Set:
•
•
•
AVERAGE TIMES—to set the smoothness of the display by causing it to update
more frequently with shorter values, or less frequently with longer values. Lower
values show fast frequency peaks more accurately, while longer values give you a
broader view of the signal’s frequency content.
TYPE—to determine the type of analysis that’s displayed. Generally, you’ll want to
use the Normal setting. Use Exp (“Exponential”) for percussive signals.
F2 (PkHold) (“Peak Hold”)—press F2 (PkHold) so that it’s highlighted to cause the
analyzer to show a thin black bar representing each frequency’s loudest peak. To
turn off this feature, press F2 (PkHold) again.
As you analyze a signal, you can freeze the display by pressing F1 (PAUSE). To unfreeze it, press F1 (PAUSE) again.
Analyzing Your Speakers and Room
If you own or can borrow or rent a microphone designed for the measurement of
frequency characteristics, you can use the spectrum analyzer to check the accuracy of
your speakers in a specific listening environment.
You’ll need to play pink noise—a sound that’s a lot like static on a radio—loudly
through your speakers when you analyze a listening environment. It’s best to do this
with no one around who hasn’t explicitly agreed to participate in the process.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
On the GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR screen (Page 372), set SOURCE to Pink Noise
and turn the generator on/off switch (Sw) to On.
Set the generator’s PAN to C, MIX to On, and set the FADER parameter to 0.0dB.
Connect a microphone to one of the VS-2480’s inputs, and set up the microphone in
the center of the listening space, where you—if you’re analyzing your recording
space—or a typical audience member—if you’re analyzing a live performance
venue—might sit.
Set the mic’s signal level as you would any normal signal (Page 130).
Return to the GENERATOR/OSCILLATOR screen and press F1 (Anlyzr).
Set up the analyzer as described above, and set SOURCE to the input channel to
which the mic’s connected.
Examine the spectrum analyzer display to see if any frequencies are too loud or
quiet. You can temporarily set SOURCE to Gen/Osc to see what the pink noise
should look like.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
Correcting Problems
You can correct most problems by inserting a stereo graphic EQ—such as Effect Patch
P031—on the VS-2480’s MASTER bus. You can adjust the sound of the speakers using
the graphic EQ’s settings, returning frequently to the analyzer to check your work.
If you’re having trouble correcting a problem, try analyzing the sound of each monitor
by pointing the mic straight at it. Return to the center perspective for a final check.
DATE/TIME
To learn how to set the VS-2480’s calendar and clock that time-stamp
your recordings, see “Setting the VS-2480’s Clock” on Page 65.
UTILITY menu
F5 (DATE)
Parameter Initialization
UTILITY menu
F6 (PrmIni)
Use the MIXER/UTILITY PARAMETER INITIALIZE screen to reset many of the
VS-2480’s mixer and/or UTILITY menu parameters to their default factory settings. You
may want to do this to start over with a clean slate, or if your VS-2480 is behaving oddly,
and you suspect that some unknown parameter value may be the cause.
This screen doesn’t initialize all mixer and/or UTILITY menu settings. Your basic
project settings remain, including your current IDE drive selection. Scenes, the tempo
map and sync track, SCSI ID, LOCATOR/SCENE TYPE, SHIFT LOCK and NUMERICS
TYPE parameters are among the settings that aren’t initialized.
Resetting Mixer and UTILITY Parameters
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “PrmIni” appears above F6.
Press F6 (PrmIni).
Turn the TIME/VALUE dial to select:
• MIXER & UTILITY—to initialize both the mixer and UTILITY parameters.
• MIXER—to initialize only the mixer parameters.
• UTILITY—to initialize only the UTILITY parameters.
Press F5 (OK)—a confirmation screen appears.
If you’re sure you want to proceed, press ENTER/YES. To cancel the operation,
press EXIT/NO.
If this procedure doesn’t cure your VS-2480’s odd behavior, call Roland Product
Support at 323-890-3740, x3741.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
Phrase Sequencer
The phrase sequencer and phrase pads are described in Chapter 21.
See Page 276 to learn about the PHRASE SEQUENCE screens.
UTILITY menu
F1 (PhrSeq)
R-BUS
UTILITY menu
F2 (R-BUS)
On this screen, you can activate remote control of an R-BUS device connected to
R-BUS Jacks 1 and/or 2 (Page 49). You can also set the device’s configuration
parameters. To turn on remote control of an R-BUS device, turn on the remote control
parameter for the R-BUS jack to which it’s connected.
If a Roland RPC-1 (R-BUS PCI card) is connected to an R-BUS connector, turn its
remote control parameter off if it isn’t turned off already.
Once you’ve activated the device’s remote control, you can display its setup parameters
by pressing:
•
•
F1 (R-BUS1)—to display the configuration screen for the device connected to the
first VS-2480 R-BUS jack.
F4 (R-BUS2)—to display the configuration screen for the device connected to the
second VS-2480 R-BUS jack.
F1 (R-BUS1) and F4 (R-BUS2) appear only when a remote-controllable R-BUS device is
connected to the corresponding R-BUS jack, and remote control is turned on.
In the “Supplemental Information” chapter, you’ll learn how to set each R-BUS device’s
configuration parameters. See:
•
•
“DIF-AT Settings” on Page 387.
“AE-7000 Settings” on Page 390.
•
•
“ADA-7000 Settings” on Page 389.
“VSR-880 Settings” on Page 392.
If you’re using a DIF-AT, see “Using a Roland DIF-AT” on Page 388.
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28—UTILITY Menu Parameters
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
Installing a VS8F-2 Effect Expansion Board
The VS-2480 ships from the factory with one VS8F-2 effect expansion board—this board
produces stereo Effects 1 and 2. You can install an additional three VS8F-2s—sold
separately—for a total of eight stereo effects, or 16 mono effects.
Installation Precautions
To avoid damaging internal components as a result of static electricity, please carefully
observe the following precautions whenever you handle a VS8F-2.
•
•
•
•
•
Before you touch the board, always first touch a metal object—such as a water
pipe—so you’re sure any static electricity you may have been carrying is discharged
before you touch the VS8F-2.
When handling the board, grasp it only by its edges. Avoid touching any of its
electronic components or connectors.
Save the bag in which the VS8F-2 was shipped, and put the board back into the bag
should you need to store or transport the board.
Use the correct Phillips screwdriver—a Number 2 screwdriver—for the size of the
VS-2480’s screws. The head of the screw may become stripped if you use the wrong
screwdriver.
To remove a screw, turn the screwdriver counter-clockwise. To tighten a screw, turn
the screwdriver clockwise.
Loosen
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tighten
When installing a VS8F-2 effect expansion board, remove only the specified screws.
Be careful that the screws you remove do not drop into the interior of the
VS-2480.
Re-attach the VS-2480’s bottom cover after the installation—do not leave its internal
components exposed.
Do not touch any printed circuit pathways or connection terminals.
Be careful not to cut your hand on the edge of the installation bay.
Never use excessive force when installing a VS8F-2. If it doesn’t fit properly on the
first attempt, remove the board, re-position it and try again.
When the VS8F-2 installation is complete, double-check your work before replacing
the VS-2480’s bottom cover.
Before turning the VS-2480 upside-down to install a VS8F-2, obtain some newspapers
or magazines and place them under the four corners of the VS-2480—or at both ends—
to prevent damage to the buttons and controls. Position the VS-2480 carefully to avoid
scratching or damaging it.
Install your VS8F-2 boards in order—Effect B, Effect C, Effect D—don’t skip slots.
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Installation Procedure
1.
2.
Before installing the VS8F-2, turn off the power of the VS-2480 (Page 80) and all
connected devices, and disconnect all cables from the VS-2480.
Turn the VS-2480 over onto its back, and remove only the screws shown in the
following diagram.
EFFECT B
EFFECT D
EFFECT C
When turning the unit
upside-down, handle with
care to avoid dropping it, or
allowing it to fall or tip over.
EFFECT A
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Inside the VS-2480, there are four connectors and 12 plastic pins. Insert the
connectors of the VS8F-2 into the internal connectors, and simultaneously insert
the plastic pins into the holes of the VS8F-2 to fasten the unit in place.
Use the screws that you removed in Step 2 to re-fasten the bottom cover.
Connect the cables that you disconnected earlier.
Turn on the power, as described on Page 63.
After powering up the VS-2480, press EFFECT and confirm that you see effect patch
symbols for Effects 1 and 2. If you’ve installed one VS8F-2, make sure that effect
patch symbols for Effects 3 and 4 are also visible. If you’ve installed two VS8F-2s,
you should see Effects 5 and 6 as well. Finally, if you’ve installed three VS8F-2s, you
should see effect patch symbols for all eight effect processors.
In this illustration, we’ve
installed two VS8F-2 effect
expansion boards.
Effects 7 and 8, therefore,
show “No EFFECT Board.”
If the effect produced by an installed VS8F-2 is missing—and the screen shows “No
EFFECT Board” instead—the VS-2480 is not correctly recognizing the VS8F-2. Re-install
the VS8F-2.
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
Connecting a CD-R/RW Drive to the VS-2480
Before connecting a CD-R/RW drive to the VS-2480, turn off power to all of your
devices—including your speakers—to prevent damage to your equipment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Double-check to make sure that both the CD-R/RW
drive and the VS-2480 are turned off. If there are any
other SCSI devices connected to the VS-2480, make
sure they’re powered down as well.
Connect a SCSI cable from one of the CD-R/RW’s
SCSI jacks to the VS-2480’s SCSI jack (Page 48), as
shown here.
If the CD-R/RW is the only SCSI device connected to
the VS-2480, make sure its terminator switch is turned
on. If the drive has no terminator switch, plug a
terminator plug into its second SCSI jack.
The factory setting for the VS-2480 is SCSI ID 7. The
factory SCSI ID for a Roland VS-CDRII and CD-RACK
is ID 4.
If you’ve changed either device’s ID, make sure that
the CD-R/RW’s SCSI ID number is set to a different
number than the VS-2480.
Turn on the power to the CD-R/RW drive.
Turn on the VS-2480’s power.
SMPTE
IN
PS / 2
KEYBOARD MOUSE
MIDI
OUT// THRU
SCSI
IN
VGA OUT
You should always power up its SCSI devices before turning on the VS-2480.
7.
Turn on the remainder of your equipment.
Connecting a Zip Drive to the VS-2480
Before connecting a Zip drive to the VS-2480, turn off power to all of your devices—
including your speakers—to prevent damage to your equipment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Double-check to make sure that both the Zip drive and
the VS-2480 are turned off. If there are any other SCSI
devices connected to the VS-2480, make sure they’re
powered down as well.
Connect a SCSI cable from one of the Zip drive’s SCSI
jacks to the VS-2480’s SCSI jack (Page 48), as shown.
If the Zip drive is the only SCSI device connected to
the VS-2480, make sure its terminator switch is on.
Make sure that the Zip drive’s SCSI ID number is set
to a different ID number than the VS-2480. The factory
setting for the VS-2480 is SCSI ID 7.
Turn on the power to the Zip drive.
Turn on the VS-2480’s power.
SMPTE
IN
PS / 2
KEYBOARD MOUSE
SCSI
MIDI
OUT// THRU
IN
VGA OUT
You should always power up its SCSI devices before
turning on the VS-2480.
7.
Turn on the remainder of your equipment.
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
Attaching an MB-24 Level Meter
For instructions on attaching the MB-24 meter bridge to the VS-2480 using VS-24MBA
brackets, see the instruction sheet included with the brackets.
Connect the MB-24’s AC IN jack to a grounded AC outlet.
Connecting the MB-24 to the VS-2480
1.
2.
3.
With the power to the VS-2480 and the MB24 turned off, connect the VS-2480’s
MIDI OUT to the MB-24’s MIDI IN using a MIDI cable.
If you want to connect another MIDI device to the VS-2480, connect its input to the
MB-24’s MIDI THRU jack using a MIDI cable.
Turn on the power to your devices.
When using the MB-24, set the VS-2480’s MIDI OUT/THRU parameter to Out
(Page 300). To learn how to configure the meter bridge, see the “EXTERNAL LEVEL
METER” parameter section on Page 360.
Replacing the VS-2480’s Battery
The VS-2480 contains a lithium battery that powers its time-keeping features, and also
provides the power for the area of the VS-2480’s memory that stores certain parameter
values. When the battery weakens, the VS-2480’s time-keeping features may not
operate correctly, and it may not properly remember various settings upon power-up. If
the battery needs to be replaced, the VS-2480 shows the following message when you
power up:
Before turning the VS-2480 upside-down to install a new battery, obtain some
newspapers or magazines and place them under the four corners of the VS-2480, or at
both ends, to prevent damage to the buttons and controls. Position the VS-2480
carefully to avoid scratching or damaging it.
When installing a new battery, follow the precautions listed on Page 379.
Installation Procedure
1.
2.
382
Power down the VS-2480 (Page 80), saving any recent changes you’ve made to the
currently loaded project.
Turn off all connected devices, and disconnect all cables from VS-2480.
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
3.
Turn the VS-2480 over onto its back, and remove only the screws shown in the
following illustrations.
4.
The battery should now be visible, as shown here.
CR2032
5.
6.
Remove the VS8F-2 for Effect A.
Replace the old battery with a new one.
The VS-2480 uses a lithium CR2032 battery that you can purchase at most electronics
stores.
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
7.
Reinstall the effect expansion board (VS8F-2) removed in Step 5. Insert the plastic
pins into the VS8F-2’s holes, making sure the board is securely fastened in place.
8. Use the screws that you removed in Step 3 to re-fasten the VS-2480’s bottom cover.
This completes the process of exchanging the lithium battery.
9. Connect the cables that you disconnected earlier.
10. Turn on the power, as described in “Powering Up” on Page 63.
11. Confirm that the message saying the lithium battery is depleted no longer appears
in the display.
12. Press EFFECT and verify that effect patch symbols for Effects 1 and 2 are visible. If
they’re not, re-install the VS8F-2 card you removed in Step 5 (see Page 379 for help).
The VS-2480’s clock is powered by its battery. Changing the battery may stop the clock
or cause it to display the wrong time or date.
13. Reset the VS-2480’s clock and calendar (Page 65).
Installing A New Internal Hard Drive
You can purchase and install a new internal hard drive for your VS-2480 in order to gain
additional storage space—you can swap internal hard drives as desired.The
requirements for a VS-2480 drive are noted on Page 85. Mount the new drive in the
required HPD35-K20 mounting kit according to the HPD35-K20’s instructions prior to
its installation in the VS-2480.
Installation Precautions
•
•
Use the correct Phillips screwdriver—a Number 2 screwdriver—for the size of the
VS-2480’s screws. The head of the screw may become stripped if you use the wrong
screwdriver.
To remove a screw, turn the screwdriver counter-clockwise. To tighten a screw, turn the
screwdriver clockwise.
Loosen
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tighten
When installing a hard drive, remove only the specified screws.
Be careful that the screws you remove do not drop into the interior of the
VS-2480.
Re-attach the VS-2480’s front panel after the installation—do not leave its internal
components exposed.
Do not touch any printed circuit pathways or connection terminals.
Be careful not to cut your hand on the edge of the installation bay.
After you’ve installed the hard drive, double-check your work.
Installation Procedure
1.
2.
384
Power down the VS-2480 (Page 80) and all connected devices, and disconnect all
cables from the VS-2480.
Remove the drive cover from the VS-2480, as shown in the following illustration.
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
3.
With the warning label on the hard disk caddy facing upward, slide it gently into
the installation bay as far as it will go. Fit the indentation on the drive caddy over
the ridge on the chassis of the VS-2480.
4.
After you install the hard disk, lock it in place. Fit a coin into the
lock’s slot and turn it clockwise until the lock clicks and it the
drive caddy is secured.
LO
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29—Expanding the VS-2480
386
5.
Reattach the front panel cover.
6.
7.
Turn on the VS-2480’s power (Page 63) to verify that it powers up correctly.
If the display shows “Not Found any Drives,” the new internal hard drive is not
being recognized by the VS-2480. Power down the VS-2480 (Page 80) and re-install
the hard drive.
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Supplemental Information
R-BUS Remote Control
You can remotely control a variety of connected R-BUS devices right from the VS-2480.
To learn how to activate remote control of an R-BUS device, see Page 377. The following
sections describe the parameters in each device that you can set from the VS-2480.
To leave any of the remote control screens described in these sections—and return to
the VS-2480’s R-BUS CONFIG screen—press F6 (EXIT).
The parameters discussed in the following sections appear on the VS-2480’s R-BUS
screen only when remote control of the respective device has been activated, as
described on Page 377.
When you’ve connected an RPC-1 card to one of the VS-2480’s R-BUS jack, disable
remote control of that R-BUS jack.
DIF-AT Settings
INPUT CH STATUS 1-8
You can set the status of each track on the connected recorder connected to the DIF-AT.
You can choose:
•
•
PLY—to set the track so that it plays back any audio recorded on the track.
REC—to arm the track for recording.
INPUT SELECT
INPUT SELECT chooses the desired type of digital recorder. You can select:
•
•
ADAT—to use the DIF-AT with an ADAT-format recorder.
TDIF—to use the DIF-AT with a T-DIF-format recorder.
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Supplemental Information
Using a Roland DIF-AT
With an ADAT
With a Roland DIF-AT, audio can be digitally exchanged between the VS-2480 and an
ADAT recorder, controlling the ADAT from the VS-2480.
1.
With the power to all devices turned off, connect the ADAT to the
DIF-AT, and the DIF-AT to the VS-2480.
Connect the ADAT’s SYNC IN connector to the SYNC connector on the DIF-AT. This
connection is required for controlling the ADAT remotely from the VS-2480/DIF-AT,
and to transmit MTC from the VS-2480.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Turn on the ALESIS ADAT, and then turn on the VS-2480.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “R-BUS” appears above F2.
Press F2 (R-BUS)—the R-BUS CONFIG screen appears (Page 377).
Activate remote control of the R-BUS jack to which your DIF-AT—and hence the
ADAT—is connected.
Press the F button for the DIF-AT’s R-BUS jack to
display the DIF-AT’s settings.
Set INPUT SELECT to ADAT.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “Proj” appears above F3.
Press F3 (Proj)—the PROJECT PARAMETER screen
appears.
Set MASTER CLOCK to INT.
Press UTILITY.
Press F5 (MIDI)—the display switches to the MIDI PARAMETER screen.
Set MMC MODE to MASTER.
Press UTILITY.
Press F6 (SYNC)—the SYNC PARAMETER screen appears.
Set SYNC MODE to INT and set the R-BUS SYNC Gen. parameter for the R-BUS
jack you’re using to MTC.
With a TASCAM DA Series Device
With a Roland DIF-AT, audio can be digitally exchanged between the VS-2480 and a
DA Series—T-DIF—device, with the VS-2480 being controlled by the DA Series device.
A TASCAM DA Series device’s word clock cannot be slaved to the VS-2480. It must
provide the master word clock for both devices.
1.
With the power to all devices turned off, connect the DA series device to the
DIF-AT, and the DIF-AT to the VS-2480.
Connect the DA Series device’s SYNC IN connector to the SYNC connector on the
DIF-AT—its SYNC OUT connector cannot be connected to the DIF-AT.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
388
Turn on the TASCAM DA Series device, and then turn on the VS-2480.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “R-BUS” appears above F2.
Press F2 (R-BUS)—the R-BUS CONFIG screen appears (Page 377).
As described on Page 377, activate remote control of the R-BUS jack to which your
DIF-AT—and hence the DA Series device—is connected.
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Supplemental Information
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Press the F button for the DIF-AT’s R-BUS jack to
display the DIF-AT’s settings.
Set INPUT SELECT to TDIF.
Press UTILITY.
Press PAGE until “Proj” appears above F3.
Press F3 (Proj)—the PROJECT PARAMETER screen
appears.
Set MASTER CLOCK to the R-BUS jack to which the
DIF-AT is connected.
Press UTILITY.
Press F5 (MIDI) to display the MIDI PARAMETER screen.
Set MMC MODE to MASTER.
Press UTILITY.
Press F6 (SYNC)—the SYNC PARAMETER screen appears.
Set SYNC MODE to INT.
ADA-7000 Settings
INPUT SENS 1-8
Each INPUT SENS parameter sets the input sensitivity of the corresponding ADA-7000
input jack—changing a parameter’s value is the same thing as turning the
corresponding input sensitivity knob on the front panel of the ADA-7000.
FRONT PANEL CONTROL
You can disable front-panel control of the ADA-7000 so that it can be set only from the
the VS-2480. To do this turn FRONT PANEL CONTROL off. If you want to retain control
of the ADA-7000 in both places, leave FRONT PANEL CONTROL on.
When front-panel control of the ADA-7000 is turned on, the values reflect by the
position of its knobs may not agree with its actual current values, as shown on its
R-BUS REMOTE CONTROL screen.
PHANTOM +48V 1-8
Turn on an input jack’s PHANTOM +48V 1-8 when you need to supply phantom power
to a condenser mic connected to the input.
Turn a jack’s phantom power on only when the device—typically a condenser mic—
connected to the jack requires phantom power. Activating phantom power when other
devices are connected to the jack may result in damage to the connected device.
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Supplemental Information
CLOCK SOURCE
CLOCK SOURCE selects the master clock timing reference for the ADA-7000. This
parameter interacts with the VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter (Page 132).
•
•
When the VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter’s value is the R-BUS jack to
which the ADA-7000 is connected, the ADA-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE is
automatically set to INTERNAL.
When the VS-2480 MASTER CLOCK is set to INT, COAXIAL IN, OPTICAL IN,
WORD CLOCK or EXT TIME CODE, the ADA-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE should be
set to R-BUS. However, if a separate word clock generator is supplying word clock
directly to the ADA-7000, set the ADA-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE to WORD CLOCK.
Turn down the volume for all connected equipment before changing the CLOCK
SOURCE value to avoid damage to your equipment.
The following table explains the CLOCK SOURCE values and tells you how to set the
VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter with each ADA-7000 CLOCK SOURCE value.
If the ADA-7000
CLOCK SOURCE is:
This means that
the ADA-7000:
Set the VS-2480’s
MASTER CLOCK to:
INTERNAL
uses its own master clock and sample
rate (see “SAMPLING FREQ” below).
the ADA-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
WORD CLOCK
derives its clocking from the word
clock device connected to its rear-panel
WORD CLOCK jack.
the ADA-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
R-BUS
derives master clock from the VS-2480.
a clock source other
than the ADA-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
SAMPLING FREQ
SAMPLING FREQ provides a readout of the sample rate at which the ADA-7000 is
operating and capturing audio through its input jacks. When the ADA-7000’s CLOCK
SOURCE parameter is set to INTERNAL, SAMPLING FREQ automatically switches to
the current project’s sample rate, unless the project uses the 88.2k or 64k sample
rates—the ADA-7000 doesn’t support the use of these two sample rates.
When the ADA-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE is set to any value other than INTERNAL, it
derives its sample rate from the selected master clock source.
AE-7000 Settings
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Supplemental Information
INPUT STATUS A-D
The INPUT STATUS display provides information about input signals received by the
AE-7000’s A/D input converters. There are four kinds of information displayed
regarding each of the four inputs, A, B, C and D. The displayed information is explained
in the following sections.
TYPE
Shows the format of the received digital audio:
•
•
•
TYPE1—is AES/EBU-format digital audio.
TYPE2—is S/P DIF-format digital audio.
“--”—means that there’s no input signal.
COPY PROTECT
COPY PROTECT reveals the presence of SCMS copy-protection in the input signal.
•
•
•
On—means that SCMS copy-protection data is present in the input signal.
Off—means that no SCMS copy-protection data is present in the input signal.
“--”—means that there’s no input signal.
EMPHASIS
Emphasis boosts the high-frequency content of digital audio signals. If EMPHASIS is:
•
•
•
On—emphasis signals are present in the digital audio.
Off—there’s no emphasis applied to the digital audio.
“--”—means that there’s no input signal.
SAMPLING FREQ
SAMPLING FREQ shows the sample rate of the received digital audio, from 32k to 48k.
“Unlock” is displayed if:
•
•
there’s no signal.
• there’s no master clock
the signals are outside the supported sample frequency range.
CLOCK SOURCE
CLOCK SOURCE selects the master clock timing reference for the AE-7000. This
parameter interacts with the VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter (Page 132).
•
•
When the VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter’s value is the R-BUS jack to
which the AE-7000 is connected, the AE-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE is automatically
set to INPUT A.
When VS-2480 MASTER CLOCK is set to INT, COAXIAL IN, OPTICAL IN, WORD
CLOCK or EXT TIME CODE, the AE-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE should be set to
R-BUS. However, if a separate word clock generator is supplying word clock
directly to the AE-7000, set the AE-7000’s CLOCK SOURCE to WORD CLOCK.
Turn down the volume for all connected equipment before changing the CLOCK
SOURCE value to avoid damage to your equipment.
The following table explains the CLOCK SOURCE values and tells you how to set the
VS-2480’s MASTER CLOCK parameter with each AE-7000 CLOCK SOURCE value.
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Supplemental Information
If the AE-7000’s
CLOCK SOURCE is:
This means that
the AE-7000:
Set the VS-2480’s
MASTER CLOCK to:
R-BUS
derives master clock from the VS-2480.
a clock source other
than the AE-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
WORD CLOCK
derives its clocking from the word clock
device connected to its rear-panel
WORD CLOCK jack.
the AE-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
INPUT A
uses the master clock received by its
INPUT A jack.
the AE-7000’s
R-BUS jack.
DIGITAL OUT TYPE
This parameter selects the type of digital audio signals to be output from the
AE-7000. You can select:
•
•
TYPE1—to produce digital audio that conforms to AES/EBU standards for use by
professional broadcast and recording studios. Use this setting if you wish to send
digital audio from the VS-2480 to a ProTools™ system.
TYPE2—to produce S/P DIF digital audio for devices such as DAT and MiniDisc
recorders.
COPY PROTECT
When COPY PROTECT is on, SCMS copy-protection is embedded in S/P DIF digital
audio transmitted from the AE-7000—to transmit this type of audio, TYPE2 must be
selected as the DIGITAL OUT TYPE (see above). This copy-protection prevents the
creation of further copies of the digital audio. To disable copy-protection, turn COPY
PROTECT off.
VSR-880 Settings
CH STATUS 1-8
You can set the status of each track on an R-BUS-connected VSR-880. You can choose:
•
•
•
•
392
SRC—to listen to the track’s source signal.
PLY—to set the track so that it plays back any audio recorded on the track.
REC—to arm the track for recording.
MUT—to turn the track off.
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Supplemental Information
Using the VS-2480 with a VM-7000 Mixing System
You can transfer audio between a VS-2480 and an R-BUs equipped Roland VM-7000
mixing system.
To add R-BUS connectivity to a VM mixing system, install a VM-24E I/O expansion
board—purchased separately—in your master processor for 24 channels of digital I/O.
1.
2.
With all devices turned off, use an R-BUS cable to connect a VM-7000 R-BUS
connector to a VS-2480 R-BUS connector.
Turn on the VM-7000, and then the VS-2480.
Setting Up the VS-2480
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press UTILITY.
If “Proj” isn’t visible above F3, press PAGE until it is.
Press F3 (Proj)—the PROJECT PARAMETER screen appears.
Set MASTER CLOCK to INT.
Press F6 (EXIT).
Press F5 (MIDI)—the MIDI PARAMETER screen appears.
Set MMC MODE to SLAVE and MMC SOURCE to the R-BUS jack to which the
VM-7000 is connected.
8. Press F6 (EXIT).
9. Press F6 (SYNC) to display the SYNC PARAMETER screen.
10. Set SYNC MODE to INT.
11. Set the SYNC Gen. parameter for the R-BUS jack to which the VM-7000 is
connected to MTC.
12. Set FRAME RATE to the same frame rate the VM-7000’s using. Unless you have a
reason to select another frame rate, use 30 fps since it offers the fastest available
continuous time code.
Setting Up the VM-7200/VM-7100
1.
2.
3.
4.
Hold down SHIFT and press PROJECT.
Press % if necessary to select the row of icons containing DIGITAL I/O.
Press F1 (DIGITAL I/O).
Set:
• WORD CLOCK SOURCE to the R-BUS jack to which the VS-2480’s connected.
If the VS-2480’s connected to the VM-7000’s first R-BUS jack, select MULTI 1-8.
If it’s connected to its second R-BUS jack, select MULTI 9-16. If it’s connected to
its third R-BUS jack, choose MULTI 17-24.
• INTERNAL SAMPLING RATE to the VS-2480 project’s sample rate.
5. Hold down SHIFT and press PROJECT.
6. Press F3 (SYNC CLOCK).
7. Set:
• SYNC MASTER to EXT and the R-BUS jack to which the VS-2480’s connected
(see Step 4 above).
• FRAME TYPE to the VS-2480’s frame rate.
• MMC MASTER to INT
• MACHINE TYPE to HD.
You can now send audio in either direction between the two devices and control the
VS-2480’s transport from the VM-7000 console.
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Supplemental Information
Using a Roland VE-7000
The optional Roland VE-7000 Channel Edit Controller provides physical knobs and
buttons with which you can quickly edit any input, track or FX return channel’s CH
EDIT parameters. These parameters are explained in detail in Chapters 11 and 17.
Connecting the VE-7000
1.
2.
With the power to all devices turned off, connect the VS-2480’s MIDI IN to the
VE-7000’s MIDI OUT using a MIDI cable.
Turn on the power to the devices.
Using the VE-7000
The following sections list the CH EDIT parameters associated with each knob and
button on the VE-7000, grouped as they are on the VE-7000’s front panel. These
parameters are explained in detail in Chapters 11 and 17.
Press the desired channel’s CH EDIT button to set its CH EDIT parameters with the
VE-7000.
PREAMP, DELAY/DYN Areas
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 9
Preamp Area
VE-7000 knob or button:
Acts as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
1. GAIN
ATT
2. PHASE
PHASE on/off switch
3. EDIT
Displays CH EDIT VIEW screen
DELAY/DYN Area
394
VE-7000 knob or button:
Same as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
4. DIRECT/THRESHOLD
DYN screen Threshold
5. DELAY LEVEL/RATIO
DYN screen Ratio
6. FEEDBACK/ATTACK
DYN screen Attack
7. DELAY TIME/RELEASE
DYN screen Release
8. ON/OFF
Dynamics processor on/off switch
9. EDIT
Displays DYN screen
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Supplemental Information
FLEX BUS Area
10
11
12
VE-7000 knob or button:
Same as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
10. 1-8 Knobs
Corresponding AUX Send Levels 1-8
11. 1-8 ON/OFF
Corresponding AUX Send Status
12. EDIT (Set ALL to 0dB)
Displays CH EDIT VIEW screen, Aux send selected
Hold SHIFT and press 1-8 ON/OFF to set the corresponding Send Level to 0 dB. Hold
SHIFT and press Set ALL to 0dB (EDIT) to set all Aux Send Levels to 0 dB.
EQ Area
13 14 15
16 18 17 19
VE-7000 knob or button:
Same as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
13. HI/HI-MID/LO-MID/LO
GAIN
Corresponding EQ band gain
14. HI/HI-MID/LO-MID/LO
FREQ.
Corresponding EQ band frequency
15. HI-MID/LO-MID Q
Hi-mid and lo-mid EQ band Q
16. HPF ON/OFF
Selects filter type: LPF, BPF, BEF, HPF
17. HPF FREQ.
Filter frequency
18. EQ ON/OFF
EQ on or off
19. EDIT (RESET)
Displays EQ screen
Hold down SHIFT as you turn an EQ HI/HI-MID/LO-MID/LO FREQ knob to change
values by larger increments.
Hold down SHIFT and press RESET (EDIT) to reset the EQ to its default values.
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Supplemental Information
SURROUND, CH VIEW, MAIN CUE Areas
20
21
22
23
Hold down SHIFT as you
turn a VE-7000 knob to
activate its TURBO EDIT
feature. When TURBO
EDIT is turned on, a knob
scrolls through values in
smaller or larger
increments, depending on
the parameter.
24
26
25
SURROUND Area
VE-7000 knob or button:
Acts as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
20. Joystick
Surround pan and depth
21. EDIT
F2 (Surrnd)
CH VIEW Area
VE-7000 knob or button:
Same as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
22. EDIT
CH EDIT button—displays CH EDIT VIEW screen
23. SHIFT
Performs same function as VS-2480 SHIFT button
MAIN/CUE Area
VE-7000 knob or button:
Same as CH EDIT parameter or F button:
24. PAN
PAN
25. ON/OFF
MIX on/off switch
26. EDIT (Set CENTER)
Displays CH EDIT VIEW screen, PAN selected
Hold SHIFT and press MAIN/CUE EDIT•Set CENTER to set PAN to its C (center)
value.
Hold SHIFT and press MAIN/CUE ON/OFF•CH LINK to link or un-link the currently
selected channel with its odd/even partner.
Roland MB-24 Notes
The optional MB-24 Level Meter Bridge adds a full-sized meter array to your VS-2480.
To learn how to connect and MB-24 to your VS-2480, see Page 382. “EXT LEVEL METER
(MB-24)” on Page 360 explains how to configure the MB-24 for use with the VS-2480.
When used with the VS-2480, the MB-24 does not use its PRE EQ, SECTION (1st UNIT/
2nd UNIT), MULTI OUT, FLEX BUS, MULTI IN, INPUT, DIM,” or TALKBACK
indicators. Also, you may occasionally notice that PRE EQ and 1st UNIT light
immediately after the MB-24 is turned on. This does not indicate a malfunction.
The MB-24’s tick indicator—when the TIME DISPLAY
parameter is set to MEASURE/BEAT—shows one-tenth
the actual number of ticks since there are only two digits
available for this purpose, as shown here.
396
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For Measure 29, Beat 3,
Ticks 470-479 are shown
as simply Tick 47.
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Supplemental Information
Factory EZ Routing Templates
The VS-2480 ships with seven EZ Routing templates—see Page 296 for information on
EZ Routing templates. The settings contained in the factory templates are as follows.
Recording Template
ANALOG
INPUT 1-16
1 2 3
. . . 14 15 16
Input
Patch Bay
INPUT
MIXER 1-16
...
TRACK
ASSIGN
RECORDING
TRACK
V.Track
1-1
...
TRACK
MIXER 1-16
...
MASTER L/R
MIX
Patch Bay:
Input Mixer:
Recording Track:
ANALOG INPUT 1
1
1
:
:
ANALOG INPUT 16
16
16
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
LINK:
Ch Link
Off (IN1–16, TR1–16)
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
REC
:
:
TR16
REC
TR17
Off
:
:
TR24
Off
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Supplemental Information
Bouncing Template
INPUT
MIXER 1-24
TRACK
MIXER 1-22
FX 1-8
Return Mixer
V.Track
23-1
RECORDING
TRACK
TRACK
MIXER
MIX
MASTER L/R
TRACK ASSIGN:
IN1
To bounce track*
:
:
IN24
To bounce track*
TR1
To bounce track*
:
:
TR22
To bounce track*
To bounce track*
Cannot be assigned
FX1 RTN
To bounce track*
:
:
FX8 RTN
To bounce track*
AUX1
Not in Use
:
:
AUX8
Not in Use
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
TRACK STATUS:
398
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR22
PLAY
Bounce Track *
REC
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Supplemental Information
*Bounce destination tracks are:
•
•
•
•
TR 23/24—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 15/16—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 11/12—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
TR 7/8—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
Mixdown Template
Playback
TRACK
V.Track
1-1
AUX 1-8
...
TRACK
MIXER 1-16
...
Effect 1
FX 1
RETURN
MASTER L/R
MIX
TRACK ASSIGN:
IN1
Not in use
:
:
IN24
Not in use
FX1 RTN
Not in use
:
:
FX8 RTN
Not in use
AUX1
Not in use
:
:
AUX8
Not in Use
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR24
PLAY
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Supplemental Information
Mastering Template
Playback
TRACK
V.Track
1-1
AUX 2-8
...
TRACK
MIXER 1-16
...
AUX
SEND Level
Effect 2
FX 2
Return
MIX
MST L
Effect 1
Mastering
Tool Kit
Master
Level
MASTER L/R
Mastering
Track L/R
TRACK ASSIGN:
IN1
Not in Use
:
:
IN24
Not in Use
TR1
Not in Use
:
:
TR24
Not in Use
FX1 RTN
Not in Use
:
:
FX8 RTN
Not in Use
AUX1
Not in Use
:
:
AUX8
Not in Use
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR24
PLAY
Others:
MASTERING Sw
400
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On
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Supplemental Information
Others:
MASTERING MODE
Rec
FX1 Patch
P231:MTK:Mixdown
Surround 2+2 Template
L
R Ls Rs
Analog Multi
Output
5
6
INPUT
MIXER 1-24
TRACK
MIXER 1-20
FX 1-8
Return MIXER
7
Surround
Pan/Depth
8
Surround
Pan/Depth
Surround
Pan/Depth
Recording
Track
TR21
TR23
TR22
TR24
Surround Mix Mode
2+2
TRACK ASSIGN:
IN1
Not in Use
:
:
IN24
Not in Use
TR1
Not in Use
:
:
TR24
Not in Use
FX1 RTN
Not in Use
:
:
FX8 RTN
Not in Use
AUX1
Not in Use
:
:
AUX4
Not in Use
L (AUX 5)
Record Track A*
R (AUX 6)
Record Track B*
Ls (AUX 7)
Record Track C*
Rs (AUX 8)
Record Track D*
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Off
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401
Supplemental Information
LINK:
Bus LINK
Off (AUX 4-8)
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR24
PLAY
Record track*
REC
Others:
SURROUND MIX Sw
On
SURROUND MIX MODE
2+2
*Recording tracks are:
•
•
•
•
TR 21/22/23/24—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 13/14/15/16—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 9/10/11/12—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
TR 5/6/7/8—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
Surround 3+1 Template
R
L
Analog Multi
Output
C RC
5
6
7
INPUT
MIXER 1-24
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
TRACK
MIXER 1-20
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
FX 1-8
Return MIXER
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
8
Recording TR21
Track
TR23
TR22
TR24
Surround Mix Mode
3+1
TRACK ASSIGN:
402
IN1
Not in Use
:
:
IN24
Not in Use
TR1
Not in Use
:
:
TR24
Not in Use
FX1 RTN
Not in Use
:
:
FX8 RTN
Not in Use
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Supplemental Information
TRACK ASSIGN:
AUX1
Not in Use
:
:
AUX4
Not in Use
L (AUX 5)
Record Track A*
R (AUX 6)
Record Track B*
C (AUX 7)
Record Track C*
RC (AUX 8)
Record Track D*
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
LINK:
Bus LINK
Off (AUX 4-8)
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR24
PLAY
Record track*
REC
Others:
SURROUND MIX Sw
On
SURROUND MIX MODE
3+1
*Recording tracks are:
•
•
•
•
TR 21/22/23/24—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 13/14/15/16—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 9/10/11/12—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
TR 5/6/7/8—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
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Supplemental Information
Surround 3+2+1 Template
L
C Sw Ls Rs
R
Analog Multi
Output
3
4
5
6
INPUT
MIXER 1-24
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
7
8
Sub Woofer
Level
TRACK
MIXER 1-20
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
Sub Woofer
Level
FX 1-8
Return Mixer
Surround
Pan/Depth/
LR:C
Sub Woofer
Level
Recording TR19
Track
TR21
TR20
TR23
TR22
TR24
Surround Mix Mode
3+2+1
TRACK ASSIGN:
404
IN1
Not in Use
:
:
IN24
Not in Use
TR1
Not in Use
:
:
TR24
Not in Use
FX1 RTN
Not in Use
:
:
FX8 RTN
Not in Use
AUX1
Not in Use
AUX2
Not in Use
L (AUX 3)
Record Track A*
R (AUX 4)
Record Track B*
C (AUX 5)
Record Track C*
Sw (AUX 6)
Record Track D*
Ls (AUX 7)
Record Track E*
Rs (AUX 8)
Record Track F*
DIR1
Not in Use
:
:
DIR8
Not in Use
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Supplemental Information
OUTPUT ASSIGN:
Track Direct Out
Off
LINK:
Bus LINK
Off (AUX 2-8)
TRACK STATUS:
TR1
PLAY
:
:
TR24
PLAY
Record track*
REC
Others:
SURROUND MIX Sw
On
SURROUND MIX MODE
3+2+1
*Recording tracks are:
•
•
•
•
TR 19/2021/22/23/24—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 11/12/13/14/15/16—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 48k or lower
TR 7/8/9/10/11/12—MTP, MT1, MT2, LIV or LV2, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
TR 3/4/5/6/7/8—M24, M16 or CDR, and a sample rate of 64k or higher
VS-2480 Tick Resolution Table
Use this table to convert beats to ticks when using the Measures and Beats counter.
Traditional Name:
Length of Note:
Number of Ticks:
Whole Note
One Whole Bar
1920
Half Note
Half of a Bar
960
Half Note Triplet
Third of a Bar
640
Quarter Note
Quarter of a Bar
480
Quarter Note Triplet
Sixth of a Bar
320
Eighth Note
Eight of a Bar
240
Eighth Note Triplet
Twelfth of a Bar
160
Sixteenth Note
Sixteenth of a Bar
120
Sixteenth Note Triplet
24
of a Bar
80
32nd Note
32nd of a Bar
60
32nd Note Triplet
48th of a Bar
40
64th Note
64th of a Bar
30
64th Note Triplet
96th of a Bar
20
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Supplemental Information
MIDI Channels and Control Change Maps
Channels and Master Edit Area MIDI Channels
MIDI Channel
Input Channel
Track Channel
FX Return Channels
1
1/17
1
1
2
2/18
2
2
3
3/19
3
3
4
4/20
4
4
5
5/21
5
5
6
6/22
6
6
7
7/23
7
7
8
8/24
8
8
9
9
9/17
10
10
10/18
11
11
11/19
12
12
12/20
13
13
13/21
Master Edit Area
14
14
14/22
Direct busses
15
15
15/23
Aux busses
16
16
16/24
MASTER/MONITOR
Control Change Numbers—Input Channel Parameters
Input Channels 1-16
406
Input Channels 17-24
Control Change
Parameter
Control Change
Parameter
7
Fader Level
71
Fader Level
10
Pan
74
Pan
12
Aux 1 Send Level
76
Aux 1 Send Level
13
Aux 2 Send Level
77
Aux 2 Send Level
14
Aux 3 Send Level
78
Aux 3 Send Level
15
Aux 4 Send Level
79
Aux 4 Send Level
16
Aux 5 Send Level
80
Aux 5 Send Level
17
Aux 6 Send Level
81
Aux 6 Send Level
18
Aux 7 Send Level
82
Aux 7 Send Level
19
Aux 8 Send Level
83
Aux 8 Send Level
20
Aux 1/2 Send Pan
84
Aux 1/2 Send Pan
21
Aux 3/4 Send Pan
85
Aux 3/4 Send Pan
22
Aux 5/6 Send Pan
86
Aux 5/6 Send Pan
23
Aux 7/8 Send Pan
87
Aux 7/8 Send Pan
24
Offset Fader Level
88
Offset Fader Level
25
Offset Pan
89
Offset Pan
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Supplemental Information
Control Change Numbers—Track Channel Parameters
Track Channels 1-16
Track Channels 17-24
Control Change
Parameter
Control Change
Parameter
35
TRACK STATUS
67
TRACK STATUS
39
Fader Level
71
Fader Level
42
Pan
74
Pan
44
Aux 1 Send Level
76
Aux 1 Send Level
45
Aux 2 Send Level
77
Aux 2 Send Level
46
Aux 3 Send Level
78
Aux 3 Send Level
47
Aux 4 Send Level
79
Aux 4 Send Level
48
Aux 5 Send Level
80
Aux 5 Send Level
49
Aux 6 Send Level
81
Aux 6 Send Level
50
Aux 7 Send Level
82
Aux 7 Send Level
51
Aux 8 Send Level
83
Aux 8 Send Level
52
Aux 1/2 Send Pan
84
Aux 1/2 Send Pan
53
Aux 3/4 Send Pan
85
Aux 3/4 Send Pan
54
Aux 5/6 Send Pan
86
Aux 5/6 Send Pan
55
Aux 7/8 Send Pan
87
Aux 7/8 Send Pan
56
Offset Fader Level
88
Offset Fader Level
57
Offset Pan
89
Offset Pan
TRACK STATUS Buttons—The Effects of Control Change Values
You can change the current setting of a TRACK STATUS button by sending Control
Change messages to the VS-2480. Tracks 1-16 respond to Control Change 35. Tracks
17-24 respond to Control Change 67. The following table shows how a TRACK STATUS
button’s setting changes in response to various received Control Change values .
Values from 0-41
Values from 42-83
Values from 84-127
With the
Off → same
Off → Record-ready
Off → Play
VS-2480
Play → Off
Play → Record-ready
Play → same
stopped
Record-ready → Off
Record-ready → same
Record-ready → Play
X=ignored
Values from 0-41
Values from 42-83
Values from 84-127
During
Off→ X
Off → X
Off → Play
playback &
Play → Off
Play → X
Play → X
recording
Record → X
Record → X
Record → X
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Supplemental Information
Control Change Numbers—FX Return Channel 1-8 Parameters
Control Change
Parameter
Control Change
Parameter
102
Fader Level
109
Aux 6 Send Level
103
Balance
110
Aux 7 Send Level
104
Aux 1 Send Level
111
Aux 8 Send Level
105
Aux 2 Send Level
112
Aux 1/2 Send Pan
106
Aux 3 Send Level
113
Aux 3/4 Send Pan
107
Aux 4 Send Level
114
Aux 5/6 Send Pan
108
Aux 5 Send Level
115
Aux 7/8 Send Pan
Control Change Numbers—Master Edit Parameters
MIDI Channel 14
MIDI Channel 15
Control Change
Parameter
Control Change
Parameter
102
Direct 1 Level
104
Aux 1 Level
103
Direct 2 Level
105
Aux 2 Level
104
Direct 3 Level
106
Aux 3 Level
105
Direct 4 Level
107
Aux 4 Level
106
Direct 5 Level
108
Aux 5 Level
107
Direct 6 Level
109
Aux 6 Level
108
Direct 7 Level
110
Aux 7 Level
109
Direct 8 Level
111
Aux 8 Level
110
Direct 1/2 Balance
112
Aux 1/2 Balance
111
Direct 3/4 Balance
113
Aux 3/4 Balance
112
Direct 5/6 Balance
114
Aux 5/6 Balance
113
Direct 7/8 Balance
115
Aux 7/8 Balance
MIDI Channel 16
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102
MASTER Level
103
MASTER Balance
104
MONITOR Balance
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Supplemental Information
V-Fader Control Messages
The V-Fader feature—Page 300—allows you to send the following Control Change
messages from the VS-2480’s faders and PAN/AUX SEND 1-8 knobs.
Control Change:
Range:
Control Change:
Range:
CC 0 (BankSelMSB)
0-127
CC66 (Sostenuto)
0-127
CC1 (Modulation)
0-127
CC67 (Soft)
0-127
CC2 (Breath)
0-127
CC68
0-127
CC69 (Hold 2)
0-127
0-127
CC3
—
CC4 (Foot)
0-127
CC70
CC5 (Porta Time)
0-127
:
CC6 (DataEntryMSB)
0-127
CC83
0-127
CC7 (Volume)
0-127
CC84 (Porta Ctrl)
0-127
CC8 (Balance)
0-127
CC85
0-127
CC9
—
:
:
:
CC10 (Pan)
0-127
CC90
0-127
CC11 (Expression)
0-127
CC91 (Reverb Send)
0-127
CC12
0-127
CC92 (EFFECT 2)
0-127
CC93 (Chorus Send)
0-127
:
:
CC31
0-127
CC94 (EFFECT 4)
0-127
CC32 (BankSelLSB)
0-127
CC95 (EFFECT 5)
0-127
CC33
0-127
CC96
0-127
:
CC97
0-127
:
CC37
0-127
CC98 (NRPN LSB)
0-127
CC38 (DataEntryLSB)
0-127
CC99 (NRPN MSB)
0-127
CC39
0-127
CC100 (RPN LSB)
0-127
:
CC101 (RPN MSB)
0-127
:
CC63
0-127
:
CC64 (Hold 1)
0-127
CC119
CC65 (Portamento)
0-127
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:
0-127
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Supplemental Information
Automix Parameter List
The VS-2480’s Automix feature can record and playback changes to the values of the
following parameters.
Input and track channel parameters
Automix name:
Description:
Automix name:
Description:
LEVEL(Fader)
Mix Send Level
EQ Low Gain
EQ Low Gain
PAN
Mix Send Pan
EQ Low Freq
EQ Low Frequency
OFFSET LEVEL
Offset Level *1
EQ LoMid Gain
EQ Low Mid Gain
OFFSET PAN
Offset Pan *2
EQ LoMid Freq
EQ Low Mid Frequency
MUTE
Mute
EQ LoMid Q
EQ Low Mid Q
AUX1 Send Sw
AUX1 Send Switch
EQ HiMid Gain
EQ High Mid Gain
AUX2 Send Sw
AUX2 Send Switch
EQ HiMid Freq
EQ High Mid Frequency
AUX3 Send Sw
AUX3 Send Switch
EQ HiMid Q
EQ High Mid Q
AUX4 Send Sw
AUX4 Send Switch
EQ High Gain
EQ High Gain
AUX5 Send Sw
AUX5 Send Switch
EQ High Freq
EQ High Frequency
AUX6 Send Sw
AUX6 Send Switch
EQ Fltr Sw
EQ Filter Switch
AUX7 Send Sw
AUX7 Send Switch
EQ Fltr Freq
EQ Filter Frequency
AUX8 Send Sw
AUX8 Send Switch
EQ Fltr Q
EQ Filter Q
AUX1 Send Lev
AUX1 Send Level
InsFX1 SndLev
Insert Effect 1 Send Level
AUX2 Send Lev
AUX2 Send Level
InsFX2 SndLev
Insert Effect 2 Send Level
AUX3 Send Lev
AUX3 Send Level
InsFX3 SndLev
Insert Effect 3 Send Level
AUX4 Send Lev
AUX4 Send Level
InsFX4 SndLev
Insert Effect 4 Send Level
AUX5 Send Lev
AUX5 Send Level
InsFX5 SndLev
Insert Effect 5 Send Level
AUX6 Send Lev
AUX6 Send Level
InsFX6 SndLev
Insert Effect 6 Send Level
AUX7 Send Lev
AUX7 Send Level
InsFX7 SndLev
Insert Effect 7 Send Level
AUX8 Send Lev
AUX8 Send Level
InsFX8 SndLev
Insert Effect 8 Send Level
AUX1/2SendPAN
AUX1/2 Send Pan *3
InsFX1 RtnLev
Insert Effect 1 Return Level
AUX3/4SendPAN
AUX3/4 Send Pan *4
InsFX2 RtnLev
Insert Effect 2 Return Level
AUX5/6SendPAN
AUX5/6 Send Pan *5
InsFX3 RtnLev
Insert Effect 3 Return Level
AUX7/8SendPAN
AUX7/8 Send Pan *6
InsFX4 RtnLev
Insert Effect 4 Return Level
Surnd PAN
Surround Pan
InsFX5 RtnLev
Insert Effect 5 Return Level
Surnd DEPTH
Surround Depth
InsFX6 RtnLev
Insert Effect 6 Return Level
Surnd LR:C
Surround LR:C Ratio
InsFX7 RtnLev
Insert Effect 7 Return Level
Surnd SubWLev
Surround Sub Woofer
Level
InsFX8 RtnLev
Insert Effect 8 Return Level
EQ Sw
EQ Switch
*1 When ChLink or FLink is on.
*3 When Aux Busses 1 and 2 are linked.
*5 When Aux Busses 5 and 6 are linked.
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*2 When ChLink is on
*4 When Aux Busses 3 and 4 are linked.
*6 When Aux Busses 7 and 8 are linked.
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Supplemental Information
FX return channel parameters
Automix name:
Description:
Automix name:
Description:
LEVEL (Fader)
Effect Return Level
AUX2 Send Lev
AUX2 Send Level
BALANCE
Effect Return Balance
AUX3 Send Lev
AUX3 Send Level
MUTE
Mute
AUX4 Send Lev
AUX4 Send Level
AUX1 Send Sw
AUX1 Send Switch
AUX5 Send Lev
AUX5 Send Level
AUX2 Send Sw
AUX2 Send Switch
AUX6 Send Lev
AUX6 Send Level
AUX3 Send Sw
AUX3 Send Switch
AUX7 Send Lev
AUX7 Send Level
AUX4 Send Sw
AUX4 Send Switch
AUX8 Send Lev
AUX8 Send Level
AUX5 Send Sw
AUX5 Send Switch
Surnd PAN
Surround Level
AUX6 Send Sw
AUX6 Send Switch
Surnd DEPTH
Surround Depth
AUX7 Send Sw
AUX7 Send Switch
Surnd LR:C
Surround LR:C Ratio
AUX8 Send Sw
AUX8 Send Switch
Surnd SubWLev
Surround Sub Woofer
Level
AUX1 Send Lev
AUX1 Send Level
Master Edit
Automix name:
Description:
Automix name:
Description:
LEVEL
Master Level
Balance
Master Balance
Aux bus parameters
Automix name:
Description:
Automix name:
Description:
LEVEL
AUX Master Level
POSITION
AUX Position
BALANCE
AUX Master Balance
POSITION
DIR Position
Direct bus parameters
LEVEL
DIR Master Level
BALANCE
DIR Master Balance
Effect 1-8 parameters
PATCH
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Effect Patch Number
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Supplemental Information
V-Studio Song/VS-2480 Project Compatibility
Recording Mode Tables
A project using the following recording modes can be converted into a VS-2480 project
using the project IMPORT operation.
Recording mode:
VS-1880:
VS-1680:
VS-890/VSR880:
VS-880EX:
VS-880:
MTP
OK
OK
VSR*
—
—
CDR
OK
—
OK
—
—
M16 (MAS)
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
MT1
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
MT2
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
LIV
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
LV2
OK
OK
—
—
—
*Imported VSR-mode songs are converted to MTP mode.
A project using the following recording modes can be exported as an earlier V-Studio
song using the project EXPORT operation.
Recording mode:
VS-1880:
VS-1680:
VS-890/VSR880:
VS-880EX:
VS-880:
M24
—
—
—
—
—
MTP
OK
OK
VSR*
—
—
CDR
OK
—
OK
—
—
M16 (MAS)
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
MT1
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
MT2
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
LIV
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
LV2
OK
OK
—
—
—
*Exported MTP-mode songs are converted to VSR mode.
Parameter Translations
The VS-2480’s parameters differ from those found in earlier V-Studios. The following
tables list the correspondence of VS-2480 parameters to earlier V-Studio parameters.
Level Values
When an earlier V-Studio’s song is imported, and when a VS-2480 project is exported,
level values are translated as follows.
412
Earlier V-Studio:
VS-2480:
0
-∞dB
100
0dB
127
+6dB
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Supplemental Information
Busses
When importing earlier V-Studio songs into the VS-2480, busses are re-assigned as
follows.
VS-880:
VS-880EX/890, VSR-880:
VS-1680/1880:
VS-2480
AUX A/B
AUX1 L/R
FX1 L/R
AUX 1/2
FX1 A/B
AUX2 L/R (FX1 L/R)
FX2 L/R
AUX 3/4
FX2 A/B
AUX3 L/R (FX2 L/R)
AUX1 L/R (FX3 L/R)
AUX 5/6
—
—
AUX2 L/R (FX4 L/R)
AUX 7/8
—
—
AUX3 L/R (AUX L/R)
DIR 1/2
EQ
When importing earlier V-Studio songs into the VS-2480, EQ parameters are remapped as follows.
VS-880/880EX/890, VSR-880:
VS-1680/1880:
VS-2480:
EQL
EQ Low
Lo
EQM
EQ Mid
Lo-Mid
EQH
EQ High
Hi
Effect Patches
This table notes the existence of certain VS-2480 effect patches in earlier V-Studios.
VS-880:
VS-880EX v. 1.x*
VS-1680 v. 1.x*:
VS-880EX/890/1680/1880,
VSR-890:
VS-2480:
—
—
OK
Speaker Modeling
—
—
OK
Mastering Tool Kit
—
OK
OK
3Band Isolator
—
OK
OK
Tape Echo
—
OK
OK
Analog Flanger
—
OK
OK
Analog Phaser
* Speaker Modeling and the Mastering Tool Kit effects are available in the current VS-880EX and VS-1680
operating system versions. Visit www.rolandus.com or call Roland Product Support for more info.
Attenuator
When an earlier V-Studio’s song is imported, and when a VS-2480 project is exported,
attenuator values are translated as follows.
Earlier V-Studio:
VS-2480:
Earlier V-Studio:
VS-2480:
-42dB
-42.0 to -39.1dB
-12dB
-15.0 to -9.1dB
-36dB
-39.0 to -33.1dB
-6dB
-9.0 to -3.1dB
-30dB
-33.0 to -27.1dB
0dB
-3.0 to +2.9dB
-24dB
-27.0 to -21.1dB
+6dB
+3.0 to +6.0dB
-18dB
-21.0 to -15.1dB
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Supplemental Information
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Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Glossary
Throughout the VS-2480 Owner’s Manual, we’ve noted terms that may be unfamiliar to
beginners, using the symbol to the left. This glossary provides basic definitions for these
terms. You’ll find a second glossary in the VS-2480 Appendices with definitions for additional
terms with which you may not be familiar.
24-bit
The VS-2480 captures and plays audio digitally as 24-bit data. 24-bit recording is the current
industry standard for pro-quality digital audio. See “Bit depth.”
Analog audio
Analog audio is a type of electrical signal in which sound is represented by varying
amounts of voltage. Cassettes and vinyl records contain analog audio. Analog audio signals
are converted back into sound by speakers.
ASCII
Short for “American Standard Code for Information Exchange.” A universally recognized
standard for representing characters, numbers and symbols. Most computer keyboards are
ASCII keyboards.
Audio
A technical word for “sound.”
Automix
Automix is the VS-2480’s automated mixing system. It records and plays back changes you
make to the VS-2480’s mixer settings. See Chapter 26.
Auto Punch
The VS-2480’s Auto Punch feature automatically starts and stops recording for you when
you’re punching, by storing your punch-in and -out points. See “Punching.”
Aux bus
An Aux bus—short for “Auxiliary bus”—is a pathway that can carry multiple signals to a
destination. In the VS-2480, an Aux bus is used most often as the pathway input and track
channel signals travel to get to the VS-2480’s internal effects. The VS-2480’s eight Aux
busses can also carry signals to outputs on their way to external devices such as headphone
amplifiers and external effect processors.
Back up
To “back up” is to make a copy of project data and to store the copy on an external
medium—such as a CD-R or CD-RW disk—for safekeeping. This copy is called a “backup.”
Backing up is extremely important to safeguard against unexpected events. To play or work
on a project that’s been backed up, it must be “recovered” by the VS-2480.
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Glossary
Balanced
Balanced cables and connectors produce low-noise signals by using all three of the cable’s
wires. In a balanced connection, two copies of the signal travel through the cable—one
copy is 180 degrees out of phase. If the two signals have picked up any noise along the way,
the noise is eliminated due to phase cancellation when the out-phase-signal is flipped back
into phase at the destination connector. The third wire is the ground. Use balanced cables
and connectors if possible. See “Phase cancellation.”
Bit depth
Digital recording can capture audio using number strings of varying lengths—a longer
string allows more detail in the description of level changes in the signal. The size of a
string is referred to as its “bit depth.” Most often, digital devices record and play audio
using bit depths of 16 or 24 bits. Audio CDs use 16 bits.
Bouncing
Bouncing is the copying of tracks onto another tracks. Typically, this is done to combine a
greater number of tracks into a fewer tracks, though there are other reasons to bounce.
Some people call bouncing “ping-ponging.”
Burn
“Burn” is music industry slang for writing data onto a CD.
Bus
A bus is a pathway down which one or more signals travel to a common destination.
CD-R/RW drive
A CD-R/RW drive—short for “CD-Recordable/ReWritable”—is a device that can burn
audio onto CD-R (“CD-Recordable”) or CD-RW (“CD-ReWritable”) discs. You can write
unerasable, permanent data onto a CD-R one time. A CD-RW disk can be reused: You can
erase a CD-RW and write new data onto the disk.
Channel
A channel is a set of tools for managing and shaping an audio signal. The VS-2480 has input
channels, track channels, Aux master channels and FX return channels.
Channel strip
A channel strip is a physical set of channel controls. In the VS-2480, there are 16 channel
strips that can be assigned to the control of the various channels (see “Channels” above).
Compressor
A device that can reduce the level of signals that are louder than a specified volume.
dB, dBu
Units of measurement for the levels of audio signals.
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Glossary
Dither
Dither is a process that deliberately adds a tiny amount of noise to a signal in order to mask
unwanted sounds that can be introduced when the signal’s original bit depth is reduced.
Dithering is recommended when transferring audio to an external device that uses a lower
bit depth. See “Bit depth.”
Dry
A signal to which no effect processing has been applied.
Digital audio
A form of computer-based data that represents audio as strings of binary numbers—that is,
digits. When audio is captured by a digital recorder, it’s converted into numbers. Digital
audio sounds great and can be subjected to a wide array of processes without any
unwanted degradation to its quality.
EQ
Abbreviation for “equalization.”
Equalization
The process of adjusting the volumes of individual sound waves within an audio signal in
order to shape the signal’s overall character. Bass and treble controls on a stereo system are
equalizers.
Fader
The handle in each channel strip that you can slide forward or back to raise or lower,
respectively, the corresponding signal’s level—the fader is a channel’s volume control. On
the VS-2480, you can also raise or lower parameter values using its faders.
Frame
In SMPTE and MTC time codes, seconds are divided into frames as determined by the
current frame rate.
GPI
GPI is short for “General Purpose Interface,” a control jack found on some video editing
devices. By connecting this jack to the VS-2480’s FOOT SWITCH jack, you can stop and
start VS-2480 project playback remotely from the video device.
Hard drive
A device that stores data on a rigid platter mounted inside its case. The VS-2480’s hard drive
stores all of your project data, including its audio and all related data.
High impedance
Impedance is the amount of force with which analog audio voltages are sent into jacks or
accepted by jacks. High-impedance devices include electric guitars and basses, and some
semi-pro microphones. Connect high-impedance devices to the VS-2480’s GUITAR HI-Z
(for “High Impedance”) jack.
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Glossary
IDE
Short for “Integrated Device and Electronics.” A set of data transmission standards
employed by high-speed disk drives. The VS-2480 has an internal IDE hard drive.
Limiter
A limiter is a compressor with a ratio setting of 10:1 or greater. This has the effect of
preventing all but the fastest signals from exceeding the threshold volume, forcing them
into the desired level range.
Line level
The high-level signal produced at the outputs of synths, samplers, beat boxes, turntable
preamps, CD players, multitrack recorders, cassette decks and so on.
Locator
A bookmark for a time location within a project. Locators are fast and easy to recall, and are
ideal for navigating a project, which can have up to 100 locators.
Loop
As a verb, the act of playing the same project section over and over until STOP is pressed.
As a noun, the section of the project that’s played when the VS-2480’s Loop feature is
turned on.
Low Impedance
Impedance is the amount of force with which analog audio voltages are sent into jacks or
accepted by jacks. Low-impedance devices include pro-quality mics, as well as synths,
samplers, beat boxes, effect processors and so on. Connect low-impedance devices to the
VS-2480’s XLR or 1/4”TRS jacks.
Marker
A bookmark for a specific time location within a project. You can have up to 1,000 markers
in a project. Markers are best used for events within a project that you want to pinpoint, but
that you won’t often need to return to.
Mastering
The final step in the process of preparing your project mix for publication and/or massduplication.
Mastering tracks
The pair of V-Tracks belonging to Tracks 23 and 24 onto which a project’s final mix is
recorded. Mastering tracks can be burned onto an audio CD. See “V-Tracks.”
Mic level
The low-level signal produced by microphones and electric instruments such as electric
guitar or bass.
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Glossary
MIDI
For “Musical Instrument Digital Interface,” the wiring and message protocol that allows the
VS-2480 and other MIDI devices to communicate by exchanging instructions called “MIDI
messages.”
MIDI control surface
A hardware device that transmits MIDI messages, and whose purpose is the control of a
second MIDI device.
MIDI Control Change messages
A type of MIDI message that’s permanently assigned to a particular parameter. When you
send a MIDI Control Change value, it sets the value of the parameter in the MIDI device
that receives it.
MMC
Short for “MIDI Machine Control.” MMC messages are a type of MIDI message that
communicates button-press instructions—PLAY, STOP, etc.—between MIDI devices.
MTC
For “MIDI Time Code,” a form of SMPTE time code that travels between MIDI devices
through MIDI cables.
Pad
“Pad” has two meanings in the VS-2480. An input pad lowers an input jack’s signal by 20dB.
In Phrase Pad and Phrase Sequencer modes, each TRACK STATUS/PHRASE PAD button
acts as a phrase pad that you can strike with your fingers to play a phrase on the
corresponding hard disk recorder track.
Panning
Panning controls how much of a signal is sent to the left and/or right speaker in a stereo
system, creating the illusion that the sound is occurring at a physical location between the
two speakers.
Phase Cancellation
Each sound wave is a series changes in air pressure that your ears interpret as sound. It’s
possible to have two identical or very similar sound waves that conflict: at the exact
moment when one is increasing air pressure, the other is lowering it. The result is that the
two sound waves cancel each other out, and neither is heard. This is called “phase
cancellation.”The problem can be solved by turning the air pressure changes of one of the
signals upside down so that both soundwaves agree—this is referred to as “inverting,” or
“flipping,” the signal’s “phase.”
Phrase
A phrase is a set of pointers that instructs the VS-2480 when and how to play a take—an
audio file—stored on its hard drive. See “Take.”
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Glossary
Playlist
A list of all of the data to be played in a project, arranged along a horizontal, left-to-right
axis. On the Home screen and phrase sequencer screens, a playlist presents the project’s
phrases. On the AUTOMIX EDIT screen, Automix data is listed.
Project
All of the audio and settings for a recorded work in the VS-2480, stored as a project disk file
on the VS-2480’s hard drive.
PS/2
PS/2 is a wiring standard for computer peripheral devices developed by IBM.
Punch
The process of re-recording sections of a previously recorded track. The act of starting a
punch is called “punching in.” Ending a punch is called “punching out.”
Realtime
A realtime process is one that occurs while you’re recording or playing back a project
without requiring you to stop either action, since it takes place in “real time.”
Redo
You can reverse an undo by performing a “redo.” See “Undo.”
Region
A region is a section of time within a project, defined by the placement of IN and OUT edit
points—it’s the portion of the project that falls between these two edit points.
Removable disk drive
A hard drive device whose disk platter resides on a cartridge that can be removed from the
device and replaced with another cartridge. A Zip drive is a removable drive.
Recover
To reload a project you’ve backed up, use the project RECOVER operation. When you
recover backup data, the VS-2480 re-converts it back to its original form.
Routing
The connection of a component’s output to the input of another component. For example,
you can route input jacks to input channels, input channels to tracks, Aux busses to effects
or to output jacks, and so on.
Sample rate
Digital audio recorders don’t actually capture sound continually—they sample the sound
many, many times per second. When the samples are played back, the ear perceives what
it’s hearing as continuous audio. The number of times per second that a digital recorder
samples its audio is referred to as its “sample rate.” CDs use a 44.1kHz sample rate—44,100
samples per second. The VS-2480 can record at various sample rates.
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Glossary
Scene
A scene is an object that stores all of the mixer’s current settings. Each project can hold 100
scenes. You can instantly recall a scene to restore the settings it contains.
SCSI, SCSI Bus
Short for “Small Computer System Interface.” SCSI is a set of cabling and data standards
for the passing of data between storage devices. The SCSI cabling that connects a series of
SCSI devices.
Slave
One device controls the timing of synchronized devices. That device is the master. Any
device controlled by the master is a slave device.
Signal flow
The journey a signal takes from one place to another, including all of the components it
passes through along the way.
SMPTE
Short for “Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers.” SMPTE is a form of time
code data that’s sent from a master device to a slave device(s)—see “Slave” above. It allows
you to synchronize the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder with external devices.
Snapshot
An Automix object that stores the values of all automatable parameters at a particular
moment in a project. When the project is played, Automix re-installs the parameters’
values when the timeline reaches the location at which the snapshot was taken.
Song Position Pointer (SPP)
A type of MIDI message that communicates song/sequence/project location information by
transmitting the number of 16th notes since the beginning of the song/sequence/project.
Subframe
A subdivision of a SMPTE or MTC frame equaling 1/98th of a frame.
Synchronization
The process of coordinating the timing of two devices.
Take
In the VS-2480, a take is an audio file recorded on your hard drive. In general studio usage,
“take” refers to an attempt to record a performance, successful or otherwise.
Tick
One 480th of a quarter note at the current project tempo.
Timeline
The dark vertical line at the center of a playlist that represents your current position in the
playlist. Also called a “now line.”
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421
Glossary
TRS
Short for “Tip/Ring/Sleeve.” A type of 1/4” audio cable connector that uses three wires for
carrying audio signals and for grounding. The wires are attached to the connector’s tip, ring
and a second ring called a “sleeve.”
Track
In the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder, a track is a collection of 16 V-Tracks, any one of which
can be active at a time. In the phrase sequencer, a track is a set of phrases played on a
phrase pad and recorded. With the Automix feature, a track is a string of parameter values
for a mixer channel or bus recorded as Automix data. See “V-Track.”
Unbalanced
A type of audio cable and connector that uses two wires, one for the audio and one for the
ground—a third wire isn’t used.
Undo
The VS-2480’s Undo feature allows you to reverse up to 99 of your most recent recording
and editing actions in a project. The act of reversing an action is referred to as “undoing”
the action.
V-Track
A V-Track (“Virtual Track”) is a string of phrases arranged one after another in the order in
which they’re to be played back by the VS-2480’s hard disk recorder. Each VS-2480 track
contains 16 V-Tracks, any one of which can be played back or recorded on at any given time.
Virtual Track
See “V-Track.”
Waveform data
Waveform data is an audio signal displayed in a grid. The horizontal axis shows elapsed
time, and the vertical axis shows volume, or “amplitude.”
Wet
A “wet” signal is a signal to which an effect has been applied.
Word clock
A type of timing information carried within a digital audio signal that keeps multiple
digital recording devices precisely synchronized when exchanging digital audio.
XLR
Also called “Cannon connectors.” XLR connectors are found on almost all studio-quality,
low impedance microphones and other professional audio equipment. XLR connectors are
male-type or female-type. XLR connections can carry phantom power to condenser mics
that require it. XLR audio cables are typically balanced—see “Balanced.”
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Index
Symbols
+Insert ................................................................. 264, 265
.WAV files
exporting
overview ............................................................. 356
phrases ............................................................... 357
tracks .................................................................. 356
importing
converting files ................................................... 354
ISO 9960 CDs ...................................................... 354
overview ............................................................. 354
previewing .......................................................... 355
procedure ........................................................... 355
WAV IMPORT screen ........................................ 354
Numerics
2+2 Surround ...................................................... 319, 320
3+1 Surround ...................................................... 319, 320
3+2+1 Surround .................................................. 319, 320
5.1 Surround........................................................ 319, 320
64 channels .................................................................... 52
A
A.MIX .......................................................................... 372
A.P/LP ......................................................................... 371
A.PUNCH button .................................................. 38, 192
ABS .............................................................................. 317
AC IN jack ..................................................................... 46
ACCENT NOTE .......................................................... 306
ADA-7000 ...................................................................... 49
remote control ........................................................ 389
ADAT
operating with VS-2480 .......................................... 388
sending tracks to ..................................................... 290
AE-7000 ......................................................................... 49
remote control ........................................................ 391
AFTER PUNCH OUT.................................................. 329
After Rec ..................................................................... 344
AKG C3000B................................................................ 226
Albums ........................................................................ 341
Alesis. See ADAT
Algorithm ...................................................................... 54
Algorithm View screen ............................................... 221
ALL
.WAV export ................................................... 357, 358
Automix .................................................................. 332
track editing ............................................ 243, 244, 253
AllVTr .................................................................. 266, 267
Amp (time-stretching) ................................................ 268
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Analog inputs
connecting .............................................................. 129
setting levels ................................................... 125, 130
See also Input signals
ANALOG MULTI OUTPUT jacks ................................ 48
Analog outputs
and Surround ......................................................... 320
names ...................................................................... 287
overview ................................................................. 287
routing
busses to ............................................................. 288
tracks to .............................................................. 289
Analyzer. See Spectrum analyzer
Analyzing your speakers and room ........................... 375
correcting problems ............................................... 376
Archive ........................................................................ 110
ARRANGE .................................................................. 270
Arrow buttons ............................................................... 28
See also Cursor buttons
ASSIGN....................................................................... 228
Asterisk in name ................................................. 255, 263
ATT
channel EQ ............................................................. 164
input and track channel parameter........................ 153
Oscillator/Analyzer ................................................ 373
Attack .......................................................................... 160
Attenuation
channel EQ ............................................................. 164
input and track channel signals ............................. 153
Audio CD
burning ................................................................... 350
playing .................................................................... 353
See also CD-R/RW operations
Audio CD-R Write Sure? ............................................ 352
Auto Punch ................................................................. 192
clearing punch points ............................................. 193
performing an Auto Punch .................................... 194
setting punch points
during playback ................................................. 193
editing manually ................................................ 193
using locators ..................................................... 193
using markers ..................................................... 193
when playback is stopped .................................. 192
AutoGain..................................................................... 160
AutoLoc ....................................................................... 279
Automated mixing. See Automix
Automatic punching. See Auto Punch
Automix............................................................... 325–338
activating ................................................................ 327
automatable parameters ........................................ 410
AUTOMIX screen ................................................... 326
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Index
AUTOMIX STATUS buttons ................................. 327
benefits of ............................................................... 325
editing
about moving, deleting data .............................. 334
appearance of Automix data ............................. 332
AUTOMIX EDIT screen .................................... 331
methods ............................................................. 333
mouse ............................................................ 333
TRACK EDIT buttons .................................... 333
MICRO EDIT screen.......................................... 337
creating events .............................................. 338
deleting events .............................................. 338
Undo .............................................................. 338
operations .......................................................... 334
COMP/EXP. ................................................... 336
COPY ............................................................. 334
CUT ............................................................... 335
ERASE ........................................................... 335
GRADATION ................................................ 337
INSERT .......................................................... 335
MOVE ............................................................ 334
targeting data ..................................................... 332
erasing .................................................................... 327
how it works ........................................................... 325
in demo .................................................................... 78
playback of Automix data ...................................... 331
punching ................................................................ 329
merging new and old data................................. 329
using AUTOMIX button .................................... 330
using AUTOMIX STATUS buttons ................... 329
recording
realtime
described ....................................................... 328
procedure ...................................................... 328
snapshots ........................................................... 330
described ....................................................... 328
taking a snapshot .......................................... 331
selecting parameters .............................................. 326
setting Automix track status .................................. 327
tracks
described............................................................ 325
Undo and Redo ...................................................... 332
AUTOMIX button ........................ 39, 326, 327, 330, 331
AUTOMIX STATUS buttons................................ 34, 327
AUX 1-8 keypad buttons .............................................. 46
Aux busses.......................................................... 205–211
compared to Direct busses .................................... 205
configuring ............................................................. 207
on CH EDIT screen ............................................ 207
on MASTER EDIT screen .................................. 207
creating headphone mix ........................................ 211
for Surround .......................................................... 320
introduction ............................................................. 58
levels
adjusting ............................................................ 207
metering ............................................................. 206
linking .................................................................... 206
on CH EDIT screen ............................................ 207
on MASTER EDIT screen .................................. 207
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overview ................................................................. 205
pre or post
on CH EDIT screen ............................................ 207
on MASTER EDIT screen .................................. 207
routing
to external devices ............................................. 210
to internal effects ............................................... 210
to outputs ........................................................... 288
to tracks.............................................................. 210
sending signals to .................................. 206, 215, 373
stereo ...................................................................... 206
strategies ................................................................ 210
uses......................................................................... 205
AUX KNOB AUTODisp ............................................. 365
Aux master channels
introduction ............................................................. 52
using ....................................................................... 207
See also Aux busses
AUX SEND•PRM EDIT button .................................... 34
Aux sends ..................................................................... 82
configuration .......................................................... 153
FX return channel controls .................................... 230
input and track channel controls ........................... 152
Oscillator/Analyzer ................................................ 373
See also Aux busses
AUXF/P....................................................................... 127
B
BACKUP ..................................................................... 105
Backup
importance of ........................................................... 59
introduction ............................................................. 59
performing ............................................................. 105
Backup battery replacement ...................................... 382
BAL ............................................................................. 229
Balance. See Panning
Band. See EQ
Bandwidth of EQ ........................................................ 163
Bank Selects. See Program Changes and Bank Selects
Battery, replacing ....................................................... 382
BckStp (BackStep) ...................................................... 284
Beat ............................................................. 245, 279, 285
Beat box
programming ......................................................... 370
Beat slicing. See Dividing a phrase
Beat-to-ticks table ...................................................... 405
BEF.............................................................................. 164
Bit depth
CD audio requirements ......................................... 340
digital input signals ............................................... 132
project ...................................................................... 97
Blank space. See INSERT
BlkDmp ...................................................................... 304
Bouncing............................................................. 195–202
adjusting overall level ............................................ 201
listening as you bounce ......................................... 200
mechanics of .......................................................... 196
mixing the bounce ................................................. 200
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Index
mono and stereo ..................................................... 196
overview.................................................................. 195
performing the bounce ........................................... 201
phrase sequencer tracks ......................................... 285
preparation ............................................................. 196
routing .................................................................... 197
EZ Routing .......................................................... 198
Quick Routing .................................................... 197
BPF .............................................................................. 164
BULK Tx Sw ................................................................ 304
BULK Tx TARGET ...................................................... 304
Busses
defined ...................................................................... 57
introduction .............................................................. 57
types in VS-2480 ....................................................... 58
Button labels ................................................................. 68
Button names ................................................................ 28
BYPASS ....................................................................... 220
C
Cans. See Headphones
CC. See Control Change
CD DIGITAL REC ....................................................... 134
CD Player .................................................................... 353
CD Speed .................................................................... 106
CD track markers
about numbering .................................................... 347
appearance in Marker counter ............................... 347
clearing ................................................................... 348
described ................................................................ 342
numbering trick ...................................................... 348
placing automatically ............................................. 344
placing manually .................................................... 347
CDR recording mode .................................................... 97
CD-R WRITE screen ........................................... 350, 351
CD-R/RW drive
connecting .............................................................. 381
CD-R/RW operations.......................................... 349–358
.WAV files
exporting
burning to CD ................................................ 358
overview ......................................................... 356
phrases ........................................................... 357
tracks .............................................................. 356
importing
converting files ............................................... 354
ISO 9960 CDs ................................................. 354
overview ......................................................... 354
procedure ....................................................... 355
WAV IMPORT screen .................................... 354
backing up a project ............................................... 105
burning an audio CD .............................................. 350
CD player ................................................................ 353
concepts
CD track markers ............................................... 342
Disk at Once ....................................................... 349
disk images ......................................................... 340
finalizing ............................................................. 349
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
space requirements ............................................ 350
Track at Once ..................................................... 349
error messages ........................................................ 353
exporting projects as songs .................................... 110
recovering
project backup data ............................................ 107
V-Studio song archives ...................................... 107
See also Mastering
CD-RACK, connecting................................................ 381
CDR-recorded tracks .................................. 255, 263, 269
appearance ............................................................. 341
CD-RW (ReWritable)!!........................................ 351, 352
CD-RW button ............................................................ 349
CD-RW disk, erasing .................................................. 352
CD-RW•MASTERING button...................................... 40
CDs. See CD-R/RW operations
CH EDIT ASSIGN screen ........................................... 167
CH EDIT buttons .......................................... 34, 138, 149
CH EDIT DYN screen ................................................. 157
CH EDIT EQ screen .................................................... 162
CH EDIT FX return channel screen............................ 228
CH EDIT P.BAY screen ............................................... 166
CH EDIT parameters
FX return channels
ASSIGN .............................................................. 228
AUX send controls ............................................. 230
BAL ..................................................................... 229
DIR 1-8 ................................................................ 229
EFFECT algorithm display ................................. 228
FADER ................................................................ 230
GROUP ............................................................... 228
meters ................................................................. 229
MIX ..................................................................... 230
MONO Sw .......................................................... 228
MUTE ................................................................. 229
screens
CH EDIT screen ............................................. 228
Parameter View.............................................. 231
SOLO .................................................................. 229
input and track channels ................................ 149–169
ATT ..................................................................... 153
ATT (EQ) ............................................................ 164
Attack ................................................................. 160
AutoGain ............................................................ 160
AUX send controls ............................................. 152
ChLink ................................................................ 152
CpyPRM ............................................................. 169
DIR 1-8 ................................................................ 156
DYN Type ........................................................... 158
DYNAMICS on/off ............................................. 153
Dynamics Sw ...................................................... 158
EQ meters ........................................................... 164
EQ on/off ............................................................ 153
EQ Sw ................................................................. 164
F.LINK ................................................................ 155
FADER ................................................................ 154
Filter Sw.............................................................. 164
FX INS ................................................................ 156
GROUP ............................................................... 155
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Index
High EQ band .................................................... 165
Hi-Mid EQ band ................................................ 165
interactive EQ display ....................................... 164
KeyIn .................................................................. 160
Level ................................................................... 160
Lo EQ band ........................................................ 165
Lo-Mid EQ band ................................................ 165
meters ................................................................ 154
MIX .................................................................... 154
MUTE ................................................................. 156
PAN
PHASE ............................................................... 154
Ratio ................................................................... 158
Release ............................................................... 160
resetting dynamics ............................................ 169
resetting EQ ....................................................... 169
screens ............................................................... 149
DYN screen ................................................... 157
EQ screen ...................................................... 162
Parameter View screen ................................. 167
VIEW screen .................................................. 150
SOLO ................................................................. 156
Threshold ........................................................... 159
input channels
P.BAY screen...................................................... 166
phrase pads ............................................................ 274
track channels
ASSIGN screen .................................................. 167
PhrPad ............................................................... 151
PlyMod ............................................................... 151
STATUS ............................................................. 151
V.Trk .................................................................. 151
CH EDIT VIEW screen ............................................... 150
Chain effects
insert effects ........................................................... 216
loop effects ............................................................. 230
Changing channels..................................................... 137
Channel Pop-Up menu ................................................ 69
Channel strips
assigning to channels ............................................. 137
faders ........................................................................ 34
introduction ............................................................. 52
Channels
changing ................................................................. 137
copying parameters ............................................... 169
faders
Aux send levels .................................................. 141
channel levels .................................................... 138
KNOB/FADER ASSIGN .................................... 140
selected parameter ............................................ 141
introduction ............................................................. 52
muting and soloing ................................................ 142
parameters ..................................... 149–169, 227–234
resetting
fader and pan ..................................................... 138
parameters ......................................................... 147
Checking a drive/partition ......................................... 116
ChgDir ........................................................................ 355
ChLink ........................................................................ 152
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CLEAR button .............................. 44, 145, 186, 190, 247
Clearing
a drive/partition ..................................................... 115
edit points ...................................................... 242, 247
locators ................................................................... 186
markers .................................................................. 190
scenes ..................................................................... 145
Clipping ........................................................................ 58
Clock/calendar
displaying ............................................................... 365
setting ....................................................................... 65
Clock/Calendar Backup Battery Low ........................ 382
Clocking digital inputs. See Master clock
ClrPB .......................................................................... 295
ClrPrt .......................................................................... 115
ClrTrA ........................................................................ 295
COAXIAL connectors .................................................. 49
COMBINE .................................................................. 104
Combining two projects ............................................. 104
Comment ...................................................................... 99
COMP/EXP.
Automix.................................................................. 336
track region ............................................................ 267
Compander ................................................................ 158
Compilation CDs........................................................ 341
Compressor ................................................................ 157
Configuring
Aux busses ............................................................. 207
Direct busses .......................................................... 209
Connecting
a CD-R/RW drive ................................................... 381
a VE-7000................................................................ 394
a Zip drive .............................................................. 381
an MB-24 ................................................................ 382
CONTRAST knob ........................................................ 32
Control Change messages
received by VS-2480 ............................................... 406
remote control of VS-2480 ..................................... 301
transmitted by VS-2480.......................................... 409
CONTROL LOCAL Sw .............................................. 300
Cooling fan exhaust vent ............................................. 46
COPY
Automix.................................................................. 334
phrase..................................................................... 255
project .................................................................... 101
regions.................................................................... 263
COPY button ................................................................ 37
Copy Mixer/Scene Prm ................................................ 98
Copy System Prm ......................................................... 98
Copying
a project .................................................................. 101
Automix data.......................................................... 334
channel parameters ............................................... 169
digital audio ........................................................... 366
phrases ................................................................... 255
phrases and regions ....................................... 245, 248
regions.................................................................... 263
Copy-protection of digital audio ............................... 366
CpyPRM ..................................................................... 169
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
Index
Creating
a new phrase ........................................................... 259
a new project............................................................. 96
Current Channel display ............................................ 120
CURRENT TEMPO MAP ........................................... 371
Current time location display
explained ................................................................ 126
navigating project using ......................................... 126
Cursor buttons ........................................................ 28, 42
explained .................................................................. 66
Cursors .................................................................. 68, 246
Customer Service. See Product Support
CUT
Automix .................................................................. 335
region ...................................................................... 266
Cutting
Automix data .......................................................... 335
track regions ........................................................... 266
D
DAO ............................................................................ 349
DATE/REMAIN Sw ............................................ 127, 365
Defrag.......................................................................... 113
DELETE ....................................................................... 258
DELETE•ERASE button ............................................... 37
Deleting phrases ......................................................... 258
Demos
"Don’t Stop" ............................................................. 80
"What You Don’t Know" .......................................... 76
about ......................................................................... 76
playing ...................................................................... 76
DEPTH ........................................................................ 323
DEVICE ID .................................................................. 300
DIF-AT
and ADAT ............................................................... 388
and Tascam DA Series............................................ 388
remote control ........................................................ 387
Digital audio
copy-protection....................................................... 366
exchanging during synchronization....................... 317
receiving ......................................................... 132–134
sending ................................................................... 287
DIGITAL I/O ............................................................... 366
DIGITAL COPY PROTECT .................................... 366
DITHER .................................................................. 366
MASTER CLOCK ................................................... 366
R-BUS 2 COAXIAL Sel ........................................... 366
R-BUS 2 OPTICAL Sel............................................ 366
Digital inputs
activating desired inputs ........................................ 131
connecting .............................................................. 131
considerations
bit depth ............................................................. 132
sample rate ......................................................... 132
master clock ............................................................ 132
See also Input signals
Digital outputs ............................................................ 287
and Surround.......................................................... 320
Roland VS-2480 Owner’s Manual
coaxial ..................................................................... 287
copy-protection ...................................................... 366
dithering ................................................................. 366
optical ..................................................................... 287
overview ................................................................. 287
R-BUS ..................................................................... 288
routing
busses to ............................................................. 288
tracks to .............................................................. 289
S/P DIF .................................................................... 287
DIR 1-8 ........................................................ 156, 229, 373
Direct busses ....................................................... 205–211
compared to Aux busses ........................................ 205
configuring ............................................................. 209
introduction .............................................................. 58
levels ....................................................................... 209
metering ............................................................. 206
setting ................................................................. 209
overview ................................................................. 208
pre or post ............................................................... 209
routing
effect returns to .................................................. 229
input channels to ................................................ 175
Oscillator/Analyzer to ........................................ 373
signals to ............................................................. 209
to external devices .............................................. 210
to internal effects ................................................ 210
to outputs ........................................................... 288
to tracks .............................................................. 210
track channels to ................................................ 202
SRC ......................................................................... 209
strategies ................................................................. 210
uses ......................................................................... 208
DirLvl .......................................................................... 224
Disk at Once CDs ................................................ 349, 352
Disk ima