2010 annual report Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annual report Edith Cowan UnivErsity

Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annual report

2

JOONDALUP CAMPUS

270 Joondalup Drive

JOONDALUP WA 6027

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: (08) 9300 1257

MOUNT LAWLEY CAMPUS

2 Bradford Street

MOUNT LAWLEY WA 6050

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: (08) 9370 2910

SOUTH WEST CAMPUS

Robertson Drive

BUNBURY WA 6230

Phone: 13 43 28

Fax: (08) 9780 7800

ECU EMAIL and WEB ADDRESS

[email protected] www.ecu.edu.au

This report is available in PDF format from the ECU website: www.ecu.edu.au/pr/annualreports.html

.

To minimise download times and reduce printing, the report is provided in chapters, as well as a single document. ECU encourages you to use recycled paper and double-sided formats when printing the report or its sections.

This document can be made available in alternative formats on request.

Official correspondence relating to the Annual Report should be addressed to:

Council Secretary

Edith Cowan University

270 Joondalup Drive

JOONDALUP WA 6027

CONTENTS

SECTION 1 - OVERVIEW

Statement of Compliance

Chancellor’s Foreword

Vice-Chancellor’s Commentary

About ECU

ECU Organisational Structure

ECU Governance Structure

Council Membership for 2010

University Committees

Work of the University Council

SECTION 2 - AGENCY PERFORMANCE

Engaging and Serving Our Communities

Providing Programs to Meet the Needs of Our

Communities, in a Supportive and Stimulating

Learning Environment

Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact

Building Organisational Sustainability

Summary Statistics

Student Enrolments (persons)

Student Load

Teaching Performance

Student Outcomes

Other Inputs

Research Inputs

Summary Comment on Performance Against

Financial and Key Performance Indicator Targets

Performance against Financial Targets

Performance against Key Performance

Indicator Targets

5

10

11

8

9

6

7

11

13

14

16

17

37

37

38

31

31

33

34

20

24

27

35

35

36

SECTION 3 – SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND TRENDS 39

Significant Issues and Trends

Economic Conditions

Australian Government Policy

State Government Policy

Legislative Impacts

40

40

40

41

42

SECTION 4 – DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL

COMPLIANCE 44

Auditor General’s Statement

Certification of Financial Statements

Annual Financial Statements

Key Performance Indicator Report Certification

Key Performance Indicators

45

47

48

116

117

Other Financial Disclosures

Pricing Policies

Major Capital Projects

Employees and Employee Relations

Occupational Safety, Health and Injury

Management

Governance Disclosures

Corporate Standards and Risk Management

Compliance with Relevant Written Laws

124

124

124

124

Other Legal Requirements

Advertising

129

130

Recordkeeping 130

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes 131

125

126

126

128

3

4

FIGURES AND TABLES

Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at

31 December 2010

Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2010 13

Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2006-2010 34

Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2005-2009 34

Table 1: Enrolments by Type of Attendance,

2006-2010 31

Table 2: Enrolments by Gender, 2006-2010

Table 3: Enrolments by Course Level, 2006-20

Table 4: Enrolments by Campus, 2006-2010

Table 5: Enrolments by Citizenship and Broad

Course Level, 2006-2010

10

31

31

32

32

Table 6: Enrolments by Citizenship, 2006-2010 32

Table 7: Enrolments by Equity Group, 2006-2010 32

Table 8: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding

Category, 2006-2010

Table 9: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field of

Education, 2006-2010

33

33

Table 10: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty,

2006-2010 33

Table 11: Completions by Course Level, 2006-2010 35

Table 12: Library Holdings, 2006-2010 35

Table 13: Revenue ($’000), 2006-2010 35

Table 14: Research Block Funding by Category,

2006-2010 ($m)

Table 15: Research Funding by Category,

2006-2010 ($m)

Table 16: Higher Degree by Research Student

Load, 2006-2010

36

36

36

Table 17: Financial Ratios, 2010 37

Table 18: Summary of Performance against

KPI Targets 39

Table 19: Retention Commencing Bachelor

Pass Students 118

Table 20: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction 118

Table 21: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching

Scale 119

Table 22: Domestic Bachelor Course Level

Graduates in Full-time Employment 120

Table 23: Undergraduate Share of First

Preferences 120

Table 24: Teaching-related Expenditure per

Student Load

Table 25: Research Income ($m)

121

122

Table 26: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10

Academic FTE 122

Table 27: Research and Development Weighted

Publications per 10 Academic FTE 123

Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2010 124

Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2010 124

Table 30: Academic Staff Headcount by Contract

Type, 2006-2010

Table 31: General Staff Headcount by Contract

Type, 2006-2010

Table 32: Performance against 2009/10 Injury

Management Targets

Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2010

124

124

125

130

Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annUal rEport sECtion 1 -

oVerVIeW

5

6

STATEMENT OF

COMPLIANCE

The Hon Dr Elizabeth Constable, MLA

Minister for Education

19th Floor, Governor Stirling Tower

197 St Georges Terrace

PERTH WA 6000

10 March 2011

Dear Minister

In accordance with section 61 of the Financial Management

Act 2006, we hereby submit for your information and presentation to Parliament the Annual Report of Edith

Cowan University for the year ending 31 December 2010.

The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006 and is made in accordance with a resolution of the University’s

Council.

Yours sincerely

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

On behalf of the University Council

Edith Cowan University

270 Joondalup Drive

JOONDALUP WA 6027

CHANCELLOR’S

FOREWORD

During 2010, the University Council and the senior management of the University continued to work together to ensure that the

University focuses on its strategic priorities in order to achieve its long-term objectives.

A number of key initiatives were progressed during the year, including the opportunity to be the lead partner in the proposed Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, the commencement of the construction of the new Engineering building on the Joondalup Campus and the completion of a student housing complex at Mount Lawley in partnership with a private service provider.

The announcement of Professor Ralph Martins as the

WA Australian of the Year underscored the important and valuable research contribution made by ECU in

Alzheimer’s disease research and other fields that are of relevance to the community.

In a dynamic sector such as higher education there are always challenges. Of note during 2010 were the debates around the function and purpose of the Tertiary Education

Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA), the potential volatility in student load due to the ‘uncapping of places’ and the implementation of new performance based funding arrangements through Commonwealth-University

Mission-based Compacts. Council has monitored these and other developments within the sector, and is satisfied that the University has taken the necessary steps to position it for the opportunities these changes will bring.

Concerns regarding the international student market grew during 2010. Any negative impact on international student demand is of concern to the sector as a whole.

The confluence of the increasing strength of the dollar, negative publicity about the safety of Australia as a place to study and government changes to visa requirements has had an impact on all Australian universities.

Fortunately, ECU’s student demographic and breadth of source countries has helped the University to deal with a changing international student market.

Council noted that there was little success in introducing a compulsory student services and amenities fee. This has meant that the ECU Student Guild continues to rely upon the University in order to continue to offer a range of services to students. The Senior Leadership Team of the University has been working with the Guild to assist it develop strategies to encourage students to pay the voluntary amenities and services fee.

At the end of 2009, Council agreed a set of ambitious goals for the University for 2010 across ECU’s four strategic priorities. At its December 2010 meeting, Council received a report which indicated that the University had made good progress against the majority of these goals.

Importantly, the University achieved its 2010 financial targets. The Budget for 2011 was approved at the

December 2010 meeting of Council, and will provide a sound financial basis to support the strategic goals of the

University for 2011.

Council retains great confidence in the University’s Senior

Leadership Team. It was therefore pleasing that the

Vice-Chancellor has accepted a new contract with the

University which will ensure continuity and stability over the next few years.

Committees of Council are actively involved in oversight of the University, particularly in the areas Resources, Quality and Audit and Governance areas. Council is fortunate to have amongst its members some outstanding community and business leaders. At the end of 2010, Council bid farewell to one such member when Ms Karen Macdonald concluded her third term on Council.

It is an honour to continue to serve as Chancellor of Edith

Cowan University and to work with outstanding students, staff and Council members. As will be seen from the Annual

Report, our students, staff and graduates continue to achieve great outcomes.

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

10 March 2011

7

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S

COMMENTARY

8

The last twelve months have seen many changes at ECU. A major initiative:

“One University: Students First” (Operational

Excellence) was undertaken. Not without difficulties, this extensive review has resulted in refined, streamlined and more cost-effective administrative services and processes that are already better supporting the delivery of our teaching, learning and research functions.

Whilst this review has had an internal focus on the delivery of our services and on our people (both students and staff), our work with the community at large has not stopped. This important community engagement has not only been recognised, but also awarded, by the national body BHERT (Business / Higher Education Round Table), the only organisation with members who are leaders in higher education, business, industry bodies and research institutions. It was my pleasure to accept BHERT’s 2010

Ashley Goldsworthy Award on behalf of the whole ECU community, for our long-term collaborative arrangements with businesses, government, professional bodies and community groups.

ECU’s Facilities and Services Centre was recognised as a foundation winner in the 2010 Australian Business

Excellence Award for its commitment to business excellence.

ECU was a recipient of the Federal Government’s

Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency

“Employer of Choice” Award for 2010 (one of only five

Western Australian organisations receiving the recognition), and it is therefore fitting that the topic of this year’s

Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Oration was gender equity.

It was my pleasure to welcome to ECU, Professor Cheryl de la Rey, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of

Pretoria as the 2010 Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Orator.

This year also saw the last joint Western Australian

Vice-Chancellors’ Oration that coincided with Harmony

Week and which was hosted in 2010 by ECU at our

Joondalup Campus. On behalf of my fellow Western

Australian Vice-Chancellors, I had the honour of welcoming to ECU and to Western Australia, the Governor-General,

Her Excellency, Ms Quentin Bryce AC as the Orator. Her

Excellency spoke of the history of combating racial discrimination.

Our University community has continued to achieve much during 2010 and a sample of the many and varied successes by our students, staff, and the University in general, are highlighted in the relevant sections throughout this Annual Report.

To all ECU students, here in Australia and internationally, and in particular those who have graduated during 2010,

I congratulate you on your fine achievements. As graduates of ECU I encourage you to retain your links with our University community through our Alumni Association and continue to share your success stories with us. For those who are continuing their studies, I encourage you to work hard and wish you every success in 2011 and beyond.

I acknowledge and thank all ECU staff for their hard work and commitment. You can be assured that no matter what your position or area of work at ECU, your contributions are important and valued. I also thank you for your perseverance and contributions to the “One University: Students First” project. At the senior level, Dr Susan King, Executive

Director (Governance and Planning) leaves ECU early in

2011. I acknowledge her many contributions over ten years, as Executive Director and as Council Secretary, and on behalf of the whole ECU community, wish her well in her future endeavours.

Led by our exceptional Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy Cowan, we are indebted to members of our Council for their continued work on behalf of the University. I also acknowledge the many valuable inputs of members of all of ECU’s committees.

The successes of our University cannot be achieved without the dedication and commitment of all members of the ECU community and at every level. It has been my pleasure to lead

ECU as Vice-Chancellor since March 2006 and I am honoured to have been offered, and to accept, a new contract to continue in this role. I look forward to working with you all in 2011.

Professor Kerry O. Cox

16 February 2011

ECU is a large multi-campus institution

ABOUT ECU

serving communities in Western Australia and internationally.

Awarded university status in 1991, ECU has since developed innovative and practical courses across a wide range of disciplines, established a vibrant research culture and attracted a growing range of quality research partners and researchers, many working at the cutting edge of their fields.

Much effort is also being invested to ensure that ECU has productive and mutually beneficial partnerships with a variety of groups.

ECU has more than 24,000 students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Approximately 5,600 of these are international students originating from over 90 countries.

More than 400 courses are offered through four faculties:

„ „

Business and Law;

„ „

Computing, Health and Science;

„ „

Education and Arts, which includes the Western

Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA); and

„ „

Regional Professional Studies.

The University has two metropolitan campuses at

Mount Lawley and Joondalup, and also serves Western

Australia’s South West Region from a campus in Bunbury,

200km south of Perth.

ECU is committed to breaking down barriers that restrict entry to education and continues to work on the enhancement and development of alternative entry pathways to higher education.

MISSION, VISION and VALUES

Mission

To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of

Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships.

Vision

For our staff, students and graduates to be highly regarded as ethical and self-reliant contributors to more prosperous, inclusive and sustainable communities.

Values

„ „

Integrity – behaving ethically and pursuing rigorous

intellectual positions

„ „

Respect – valuing individual differences and diversity

„ „

Rational inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning

„ „

Personal Excellence – striving to realise potential

ECU’s strategic direction, as approved by Council, is outlined in: Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds;

Engaging Communities. Towards 2020. This can be viewed online http://www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/ppas/ docs/2009_ECU_Engagement_Strategic_Plan.pdf

The document includes the following strategic priorities:

„ „

Engaging and serving our communities;

„ „

Providing programs to meet the needs of our communities, in a supportive and stimulating learning environment;

„ „

Developing research focus, depth and impact; and

„ „

Building organisational sustainability.

9

10

ECU ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

& Law (FBL) Prof. A

Planning) Dr S King

(GPS) Dr S King

(International) Prof. A

Centre (LSC) Mr

(Academic) Prof. A

(FRPS) Mr R Irvine

& Advancement) Prof. J Finlay-Jones

School (GRS) Professor J Luca

Centre (SSC) Dr G Jackson

Centre (FSC) Mr Office (CMO) Mrs

ECU GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

Council Membership for 2010

Member

Chancellor (ECU Act, section 12(1))

Hon Hendy Cowan

Term

01.01.2011 – 30.01.2013

01.01.2008 – 31.12.2010

01.01.2005 – 31.12.2007

Members appointed by the Governor (ECU Act, section 9(1)(a))

Mr Steve Abbott

(Pro-Chancellor since 20.05.06)

30.08.2008 – 29.08.2011

30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008

14.05.2002 – 13.05.2005

Ms Leslie Chalmers

Date term commenced / ended

Current

Current

Council meetings attended

6

5(5)*

*Leave of Absence granted for one meeting

5

Hon Hendy Cowan

Mr Kempton Cowan

Ms Karen Macdonald

27.04.2008 – 26.04.2011

12.04.2005 – 26.04.2008

31.01.2010 – 30.01.2013

02.03.2007 – 30.01.2010

29.02.2004 – 01.03.2007

19.12.2009 – 18.12.2012

19.12.2006 – 18.12.2009

Current

Current

Current

6

3 (5)*

* Leave of Absence granted for one meeting

4 (5)

Dr Pamela Garnett

07.12.2007 – 06.12.2010

07.12.2005 – 06.12.2007

17.12.2002 – 19.11.2005

21.09.2009 – 21.09.2012

Term ended

06.12.2010

Current 6

11

12

Member Term

30.08.2008 – 29.08 2011

30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008

Date term commenced / ended

Member nominated by Minister charged with administration of the ‘School Education Act 1999’

(ECU Act, section 9(1)(aa))

Dr Norman Ashton Current

Council meetings attended

5 (5)*

* Leave of Absence granted for one meeting

Chief Executive Officer – ex-officio (ECU Act, section 9(1)(b))

Professor Kerry O. Cox Ex-officio

Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(c))

Professor Ron Oliver 01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012

01.10.2006 – 30.09.2009

01.10.2002 – 30.09.2006

Dr Alan Needham 01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012

21.11.2007 – 30.09.2009

Salaried Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(d))

Ms Valentina Bailey 01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012

01.04.2009 – 30.09.2009

Enrolled Students – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(e))

Mr Shane Cucow 11.10.2009 – 10.10.2010

11.10.2008 – 10.10.2009

Mr Ayaz Qaiser 11.10.2009 – 10.10.2010

Current

Current

Current

Current

Ms Christine Hamilton-Prime

Ms Katharine Hawkins

21.10.2010 – 10.11.2011

21.10.2010 – 10.11.2011

Term ended

10.10.2010

Term ended

10.10.2010

Term commenced

21.10.2010

Term commenced

21.10.2010

Alumni – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(f))

Ms Julie Proud

Mr Henry Heng

20.09.2010 – 19.09.2013

01.04.2009 – 19.09.2010

20.12.2008 – 21.12.2011

Current

Current

Members co-opted by Council (ECU Act, section 9(1)(i))

Ms Janet Curran 20.09.2009 – 21.09.2012

Current

Mr Neil Douglas 18.03.2009 – 17.03.2012

18.03.2006 – 17.03.2009

Current

(nb: previously held one term as a Member appointed by the Governor, 28.11.2003 – 01.03.2006)

Mr Simon Holthouse Current

Justice Rene Le Miere

Ms Denise McComish

12.09.2010 – 11.09.2013

12.09.2007 – 11.09.2010

18.08.2008 – 17.08.2011

18.08.2005 – 17.08.2008

01.01.2005 – 17.08.2005

22.03.2010 – 21.03.2013

22.03.2007 – 21.03.2010

Current

Current

6

5

6

5

4 (4)

3 (4)

2 (2)

1 (2)

6

5

6

4

6

5

1(5)*

* Leave of Absence granted for one meeting

* Council held 6 regular meetings during the year. The bracketed figures indicate the potential number of attendances for members whose term of office did not cover the full year, or who had leave of absence during the year.

Additional Council membership information can be viewed at Members of Council during 2010

UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES

Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2010

University Council

Council

Executive

Resources

Committee

Quality Audit and

Risk Committee

Nominations

Committee

Legislative

Committee

Remuneration

Committee

Governance

Committee

Honorary Awards

Committee

South West Campus

(Bunbury) Advisory

Board

WA Academy of

Performing Arts

Board

ECU Foundation

Board

Fees Allocation

Committee

Academic Board

Academic Services

Committee

Curriculum Teaching and

Learning Committee

Research and Higher

Degrees Committee

Student Appeals Committee

Human Research Ethics

Committee

Animal Ethics Committee

Vice Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor’s Planning and Management Group

Equity Committee

Disability Access

Working Party

Indigenous Consultative

Committee

Indigenous Employment

(Development &

Implementation)

Sub-committee

ICT Advisory Group

Vice-Chancellor’s Student

Advisory Forum

Occupational Health and

Safety Policy Committee

Institutional Bio-safety

Committee

13

14

WORK OF THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

ECU’s enabling Act provides that the Council is the governing authority of the University.

The fundamental responsibilities of the Council are to determine the strategic direction and governance framework of the University. The

Council is chaired by the Chancellor and consists of the Vice-Chancellor (ex-officio) and members drawn from the community and the University’s alumni, staff and students. Council members fulfil an important duty for the University and the community and do so on an honorary basis.

Under the chairmanship of its Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy

Cowan, the Council met on eight occasions during 2010, holding six regular meetings, and two workshops.

The major activities of Council in 2010 fell into four categories:

„ „ strategic direction of the University;

„ „ self-governance of the Council;

„ „ governance of the University; and

„ „ compliance.

Strategic Direction of the University

Major strategic issues considered by Council in

2010 included:

„ „ the University’s lead role in a submission to the

Commonwealth Government for the Wanneroo

GP Super Clinic;

„ „ international activities and the effect of changes in the international student market; and

„ „ the impact of changes within the higher education sector, particularly in relation to student numbers, the social inclusion agenda, increasing participation and the proposed role of the Tertiary Education Quality and

Standards Agency.

To inform and enhance Council’s role in shaping the strategic direction of the University, presentations on key issues and themes were included in the Council’s meeting program in 2010. These presentations included:

„ „ the ‘Half Cohort’ – the implications for ECU of the reduced school-leaver enrolments in 2015;

„ „

Australian Universities Quality Agency – briefing on

ECU’s Cycle 2 Audit preparations;

„ „ the Building Strategic Asset Management Plan;

„ „

Campus Master Plans;

„ „

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts;

„ „ a briefing on the Faculty of Regional and

Professional Studies (to coincide with the visit of Council to Bunbury);

„ „

Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA);

„ „

Research and Research Training Functional Plan;

„ „

Teaching and Learning Functional Plan; and

„ „ outcomes of the 2010 Council Evaluation.

Two strategic workshops were held during the year.

The first workshop focused on the Role of the University

Governing Council in the Australian Higher Education

Sector. This workshop identified key themes emerging from initiatives in Higher Education, and included discussion of: engagement activities at ECU, and an assessment by Council of ECU against of a set of key success factors for universities.

A second Council workshop, ECU: Students First, took place in September and provided an opportunity for

Council to consider the student experience and future plans and strategies in relation to how ECU teaches and supports students.

At its December 2010 meeting, Council considered and approved the Budget for 2011.

Governance of the Council

Council developed a Corporate Governance Statement in 2002 to assist current members of Council, executive management and senior staff of the University in carrying out their roles. It also informs staff and student members of the broader University community of the governance processes at the University, and serves a similar purpose for the external community, including stakeholders from

Government, the non-profit sector and industry.

Commonwealth Higher Education Support Amendment

Act 2003 amendments, passed in 2008, removed provisions imposing the national Governance Protocols for Higher Education Providers as a specific condition of

Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding. The protocols have been replaced by a Voluntary Code for university governance.

ECU’s governing Council has affirmed a commitment to monitor its performance against the Voluntary Code and continues to do so on an annual basis. The Corporate

Governance Statement can be viewed online: www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/committees/corp_gov_stmt.html

.

Council Evaluation

In 2010 Council engaged an external consultant to conduct an evaluation of the operation and effectiveness of Council.

The review comprised an online survey (to enable the consolidated results to be benchmarked with the Insync

Surveys Index of Australian Boards), individual interviews with each Council member and key University staff and a review of the Council induction pack and other materials.

A report was presented to Council at its November 2010 meeting. The review conclusions were very positive overall, and an action plan reflecting improvement opportunities will form part of the work program for the Governance

Committee in 2011.

Governance of the University

Key Council activities in 2010 relating to the governance of the University included the following:

„ „

Regular meetings of Council Committees. Reports from these committees were subsequently provided to Council to keep it informed of activities across the academic and operational areas of the University.

„ „

The Vice-Chancellor provided a mid-year and end-ofyear report on the achievements of the University in relation to its key performance indicators.

„ „

In June and December 2010, the Vice-Chancellor reported on progress against the annual goals of the

University, as previously approved by Council.

„ „

Revisions to University Statute No. 6 – Vice-Chancellor were approved.

„ „

A number of amendments to the University Admission,

Enrolment and Academic Progress Rules were approved.

„ „

All members of Council were offered professional development opportunities throughout the year.

Compliance

The 2009 Annual Report was approved by Council and submitted to the State Minister for Education in accordance with the required timelines.

The Council’s monitoring of the University, particularly through the Resources Committee and the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee (formally known as the Quality and

Audit Committee), provided assurance to Council that the

University has appropriate risk management, financial and quality controls in place.

At its August 2010 meeting Council confirmed that it continued to comply with the National

Governance Protocols.

15

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Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annUal rEport sECtion 2 -

agency performance

ENGAGING AND SERVING

OUR COMMUNITIES

HIGHLIGHTS

Engagement at ECU

ECU seeks to be recognised for embedding its

Engagement activities into its core functions, providing a point of differentiation for ECU and aiming to realise mutual benefits and productive relationships with the University’s various communities.

In 2010 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority were:

„ „ to build a reputation for academic outreach, research and creative output which impact and serve the needs of ECU’s communities;

„ „ to ensure that ECU’s programs demonstrate engaged practice; and

„ „ to build engagement throughout the student experience.

Engaged Practice at ECU

Key achievements and outputs in this area include:

Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care

. The Centre’s Director, Professor Ralph

Martins, was WA Australian of the Year for 2010.

The Centre brings together researchers from different disciplines such as physiologists and brain imaging specialists to lower the burden of Alzheimer’s disease on the community and to enhance the quality of life of people affected by the disease.

Child Health Promotion Research Centre

won the Curtin

University of Technology Research and Education

Category award at the Mental Health Good Outcomes

Awards 2010. The award was received for its nationally and internationally recognised work in bullying prevention research.

yourtutor

. In partnership with the cities of Stirling and

Bunbury and Mission Australia, online tutorial and learning assistance was provided to over 100,000 school students and community members.

ECU’s Kurongkurl Katijin Centre

for Indigenous Australian

Education and Research ran a number of projects, including Stronger Smarter Learning Communities, that are improving outcomes within Indigenous communities.

Australian Indigenous HeathInfoNet

, a national project funded in 2010 by the Commonwealth Department of

Health and Ageing for a further three years ($3.8m) provides the knowledge-base to inform Australia-wide policy and practice in Indigenous health.

ECU Education student receives Governor-General’s

Indigenous Student Teacher Scholarship

ECU student Lisa Capewell was the first West Australian to be awarded the Governor-General’s Indigenous Student Teacher

Scholarship. This award assists one Indigenous student in every state and territory to undertake teacher education studies with a higher education provider.

Professor helps create national voice for Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islanders

ECU’s Head of Kurongkurl Katitjin,

Professor Colleen Hayward, will contribute to a national voice for Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islanders through her appointment as a Director of the National Congress of

Australia’s First Peoples and member of the

National Executive. more

Wanneroo GP Super Clinic to be led by ECU

A contract was signed by ECU to be the lead organisation in the development of the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, which is being jointly funded by the Commonwealth and Western Australian governments. The GP Super Clinic will provide infrastructure in which teams of professionals such as GPs, nurses and allied health professionals’ work together to deliver services in the community. more

Governor-General delivers presentation on combating racial discrimination

The 2010 Vice-Chancellors’ Oration was delivered by

Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce AC, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, and addressed the history of combating racial discrimination in Australia. more

17

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Business Higher Education Round Table

(B-HERT) Ashley Goldsworthy Award for

Sustained Collaboration between Business and Higher Education

ECU was awarded the Business Higher Education

Round Table (B-HERT) Ashley Goldsworthy Award for

Sustained Collaboration between Business and Higher

Education. The Ashley Goldsworthy Award recognises

a sustained effort by a university, business or individual to foster collaboration between the sectors, resulting in significant benefits to higher education, business and the broader community.

ECU received the award for its long-term collaborative arrangements with a range of businesses, industry groups, government departments, professional bodies and community groups. These partnerships have led to better outcomes in diverse areas, including health services, education, small and medium enterprises, aviation security, agriculture, legal services in the community, and many other areas.

Research Week

was held in August attracting many researchers, students, staff and community members with free public lectures, seminars and workshops held throughout the week.

International Advertising

. The International Advertising

Association (IAA) has established the first Student Chapter,

[email protected], previously winners of the IAA Dentsu

InterAd XI Global Student Competition.

ECU Health and Wellness Institute

. ECU staff and students work with external partners in this multi-disciplinary, cutting-edge health and wellness facility located at ECU

Joondalup Campus. The Institute provides services for up to 1200 people each week.

Rio Tinto Partnership

. ECU, Rio Tinto, the Fogarty

Foundation and the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts partnership developed a pilot program to allow primary and secondary schools to engage with professional artists in contemporary arts practices.

The SECAU Security Research Centre

is one of the leading digital security and forensics groups in the world.

The Centre is headed by Professor Craig Valli, who was selected as a finalist for the WA Innovator of the Year

Award, 2010. The Centre’s research is in the area of

Computer and Digital Forensics, Network and Wireless

Security, Information Warfare, Physical Security, Risk

Management and Aviation Security.

University Certificate in Maintenance Engineering

. The first students to undertake this course commenced in 2010.

The course was developed in close collaboration with BHP

(Nickel West).

ECU and the Student Experience

The following teaching programs illustrate ECU’s commitment to an engaged student experience and developing job-ready graduates.

„ „

Through the

Northern Suburbs Community Legal Centre

and

ECU Psychological Services Centre

ECU students and staff continued to provide valuable services to the community.

„ „

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts

(WAAPA) celebrated its 30th Anniversary in 2010 by holding a showcase at the Perth Playhouse Theatre and a free birthday event in the Perth CBD. This is comprised of

30, 30 minute performances across 30 locations.

„ „

ECU’s

Teacher Residency Program

, has been selected by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations to be part of a national promotional campaign for the Smarter Schools;

National Partnerships program.

„ „

Social Work online

and

Law online.

In 2010, ECU became the only university in Western Australia to offer the Bachelor of Social Work (and continued to provide the

Bachelor of Laws) in off-campus mode which provides the necessary specialist skills and knowledge for working in a rural, regional and remote setting.

ECU’s Facilities and Services Centre recognised for business excellence

ECU’s Facilities and Services Centre has been recognised as a foundation winner in the 2010

Australian Business Excellence Awards for its

commitment to business excellence. The Australian

Business Excellence Awards celebrates and showcases

exceptional business practices against internationally recognised business principles.

ECU is adopting the Business Excellence framework to provide the University with an integrated leadership and management system that describes the elements essential to sustainable organisational excellence, was based on drawing together a number of diverse services. It is one of the leading edge facilities for management and planning to ensure the success of

ECU as a vibrant and progressive university. The next step will be to implement the business excellence framework across ECU’s service centres.

19

HIGHLIGHTS

20

PROVIDING PROGRAMS TO

MEET THE NEEDS OF OUR

COMMUNITIES, IN A SUPPORTIVE

AND STIMULATING LEARNING

ENVIRONMENT

ECU team winners in Google Challenge

Undergraduate students Georg Widschwendter, Micheal

Allbeury and Marjorie Fouquereau won the Google

Challenge Asia Pacific Region category for their online marketing campaign for local business

Busta Moves Dance studio. more

ECU Broadcasting student a finalist in prestigious national award

Broadcasting student, Ann Jones, was named one of three finalists in the

National Media Super Student Journalist

of the Year Awards, for her radio story,

Chile Emergency Measures. more

Five-star student experience

The 2011 edition of the Good Universities Guide rates

ECU’s student experience as one of the best in Western

Australia. ECU again received a five-star rating for teaching quality, generic skills and overall student satisfaction. For the first time, ECU’s MBA received a five-star rating from the Graduate Management

Association of Australia.

Working with Clarkson schools to address literacy

ECU’s Fogarty Learning Centre launched a research project in the Clarkson district, funded by ECU, the West

Coast District Education Office and five of the schools, to provide training and support for students who do not meet key reading milestones in Year 2. more

Promoting equity and diversity

ECU hosted a wide range of equity and diversity based events for students, staff and the community including celebrating Harmony Week, International Women’s

Day, NAIDOC Week, International Day of People with a

Disability, Pride Month and Mental Health Week.

The

Get Set Saturday

initiative was implemented following a successful trial in 2009. The project provides an opportunity for new students to access enrolment help, bookshops, ID Cards, faculty course advisers and library facilities all on the one day. The sessions attracted more than 1100 students in Semester 1.

Teaching at ECU

ECU seeks to be recognised for providing highquality and fulfilling educational experiences.

In 2010 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority were:

„ „ to enhance the quality of teaching;

„ „ to be responsive to students and employers through a relevant and engaged curriculum; and

„ „ to enhance student support services and learning experiences.

Teaching and Learning

In 2010 ECU focused on providing greater opportunities for staff to grow the quality of learning and teaching outcomes. This has been achieved through:

„ „ the development and roll-out of a University-wide lecture capture system that has provided greater flexibility for staff and students;

„ „ the application of enhanced delivery strategies for professional development to ensure that professional development activities lead to improved outcomes and improved practices;

„ „ the provision of targeted professional development opportunities for sessional staff; and

„ „ professional development and up skilling of staff to improve and enhance assessment processes and procedures.

ECU has embarked on developing the ECU 2012

Undergraduate Curriculum Framework. The framework will deliver consistency in the quality of, and outcomes from, all undergraduate courses, and will reflect the distinctive features of ECU courses aligned to the

University’s Mission and Vision.

Marketing and Recruitment

ECU launched a new marketing campaign, ‘The road is open’, in May 2010 comprising television advertising, press, radio, cinema, and online components. Feedback from prospective students and the general public showed a very positive attitude towards the campaign, reinforcing the growth of the ECU brand.

In 2010 ECU focused on improving the University’s presence in the social media arena. Following the launch of

ECU’s YouTube channel ECU launched a Facebook page and Twitter feed for prospective students. These various methods of promotion have accompanied a growth in the

YouTube channel upload views to over 25,000 and ECU channel views to 17,000. The ECU Facebook page has grown to around 1300 fans and the Twitter channel now has

367 (future-student) followers who actively participate and engage in conversations around the ECU brand.

ECU Teaching and Graduate Outcomes

ECU again performed well on national measures of teaching excellence in 2010. The performance data is derived from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), the Graduate

Destinations Survey (GDS) and ECU’s own online Unit and

Teaching Evaluation Instrument (UTEI) (results for the CEQ and UTEI can be viewed in the

Summary Statistics page 31

).

The Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) ranked ECU at 6th nationally for Overall Course Satisfaction. On Good

Teaching satisfaction ECU was ranked 2nd nationally and for the third consecutive year ECU had the highest rating for

WA universities. On Generic Skills satisfaction ECU ranked

3rd out of the Australian universities.

ECU Curriculum 2012

ECU completed a comprehensive strategic review of its curriculum to address the needs of a more diverse and expanded cohort with a clear career-orientation.

As a result, a significant curriculum change will focus on increasing support for student success while at university and after graduation through positive employment outcomes.

ECU’s 2012 Undergraduate Curriculum Framework will focus on embedding engaged teaching and learning in all courses at ECU through:

„

Employability orientation: a focus on preparing

graduates for work and lifelong learning.

„

Student-focused environment: viewing the student

experience from a ‘whole person’ perspective

(i.e.cognitive, social, emotional, physical, spiritual, cultural) and enabling successful learning in a culture of care and ease of transition.

„

Learner-centred teaching: an approach that

considers students’ social and educational backgrounds and their learning goals, needs and capabilities within an environment that actively supports and engages students in knowing, doing, and being.

More information is available at:

ECU Curriculum 2012

21

22

ECU’s graduate full-time employment rate for the latest

Graduate Destination Survey showed a decline, as did all WA universities, this is a reflection of the prevailing economic conditions at the time the graduates were surveyed (See

Key Performance Indicators page 118

).

ECU is developing new approaches to improve its graduate employment outcomes and increase its ranking from the lowest of the WA universities. Some of the approaches include:

„ „ increasing the practicum components of courses;

„ „ increasing the role of Workplace Integrated Learning in courses;

„ „ developing new and expanded internship opportunities;

„ „ the recent procurement of CareerHub software to support students in their search for employment by bringing students, new graduates and prospective employers together; and

„ „ employment workshops and Career Expos.

ECU’s graduates fare well for further study. ECU ranked

2nd of the WA universities in the latest survey, and continued to be above the WA average.

Strategies to aid in the attraction and retention of students during 2010

Since 2007 ECU has continued to experience growth in student enrolments. Student enrolments increased from

22,274 in 2009 to 24,241 in 2010 (see

Summary Statistics page 31 ). This growth can be attributed, at least in part, to

the implementation of new strategies to attract prospective students to its programs and to increase the retention of current ECU students. The retention rate for students who commenced in 2009 and were retained into 2010 remained

relatively stable on the previous year’s results (see Key

Performance Indicators page 117

). ECU continues to seek ways to improve retention and during 2010:

„ „

Connect Officers developed individual intervention strategies for students identified as at-risk;

„ „

ECU developed technology-based activities including: an

ECU Twitter account for current students; a dynamic page to answer frequently asked questions; online recordings of orientation activities; Ask Us, a self-service system to allow students to make enquiries at any time; and an online application for advanced standing to help those wishing to move to ECU from other institutions; and

„ „

International Emergency Loans were introduced to provide short-term interest-free funds for any international students at risk of not completing their studies at ECU.

During 2010 ECU introduced new course offerings to respond to the needs of the community including:

„ „ an undergraduate degree in Security; and

„ „ postgraduate programs in Broadcasting, Paramedical

Science, Women’s Health Care, Public Health, Business

Innovation and Enterprise, Event Management,

Executive Leadership and Management, Engineering

Science; Accounting, Finance, Criminal Justice, Human

Resource Management, Management, Management

Information Systems, Hospitality Management,

Marketing, Tourism Management and Sport

Management; and Physiotherapy.

The Western Australian Academy of

Performing Arts (WAAPA)

is recognised nationally and internationally for the quality of its graduates and provides the most comprehensive range of performing arts training in Australia. WAAPA provide rigorous and specialised training of the highest order. This is demonstrated below in the awards presented to WAAPA staff:

Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Citations for Outstanding Contributions to

Student Learning

„

Associate Professor Andrew Lewis received a citation for the design and implementation of an innovative cross-disciplinary approach to screen and theatre acting that is successfully engaging students and achieving positive employment outcomes.

„

Mr Michael McCarthy for the development and implementation of a unique approach to aural training that inspires students and provides sound music training.

Finalist in the 2010 Australian Teachers of

Media-Teacher’s Award

The Director of ECU’s WA Screen Academy, Mr John

Rapsey, was nominated as a finalist in the 2010

Australian Teachers of Media (ATOM) - Teacher’s

Award. The ATOM - Teacher’s Award recognises the

outstanding commitment, dedication and inspiration of a teacher, or school, to their students’ development and is open to primary, secondary and tertiary media educators. Under the guidance of Mr Rapsey, two documentaries and one film by WA Screen Academy students were chosen as finalists in the tertiary category of the awards.

23

24

DEVELOPING

RESEARCH FOCUS,

DEPTH AND IMPACT

Research at ECU

ECU seeks to be recognised for high impact research providing social, economic, environmental and cultural benefits.

In 2010 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority were:

„ „ to build areas of research concentration, depth and sustainability;

„ „ to increase research collaboration within and external to ECU;

„ „ to stimulate knowledge transfer and commercialisation;

„ „ to strengthen research culture, training and support; and

„ „ to increase Research Higher Degree student enrolments and completions.

Research Profile

ECU is committed to growing its research capacity, and develop a vibrant research culture which aligns with, and informs, its teaching and learning activities. ECU has identified eight areas of research strength, each with a unique research opportunity within the context of a nationally and internationally competitive environment. Details can be viewed at www.research.ecu.edu.au/profile/ .

Collaboration is strongly encouraged both across faculties and schools within ECU and through engagement with external partners. New research partnerships have been established through State and Commonwealth Centres of Excellence, CSIRO Collaborative Flagships and the

Australian Research Council (ARC) Research Networks.

These collaborations contribute to growing the concentration of expertise in research at ECU.

ECU is a participant in the Collaborative Research Network

(CRN) initiative and during 2010 developed a proposal with six sub-projects intended to build research capacity through visiting and staff fellowships, dedicated research development officers, student and staff exchange, and workshops. The sub-projects would see ECU partnering with nine research-intensive Australian universities.

Research Achievements

ECU’s research performance has improved on a number of key measures, including research income and publications.

Research income increased from $12.8m in 2009 to $13.8m

(unaudited figure) in 2010, attributable to the growth in the

Industry, Public Sector and Other Funding category (see

Summary Statistics page 36

).

Additionally in 2010:

„ „

ECU’s strategic research investment was increased by 8 per cent to $8.1m. These funds are applied to key

State, national and international initiatives, fellowships, scholarships, infrastructure, fostering industry linkages and commercialisation in areas of research priority.

„ „

ECU’s Research Commercialisation income increased again in 2010 and a newly revised commercialisation process was fully implemented.

„ „

ECU-funded Postdoctoral Fellowship program has increased its total funding provision from $651,000 to

$720,000 and funded 16 Postdoctoral Fellows in 2010.

Research Training 2010

ECU supports those studying for higher degrees by research and their supervisors through the ECU Graduate

Research School. In 2010:

„ „

Funding for scholarships increased by 18 per cent and the number of scholarships rose from 50 to 61.

The number and quality of scholarship applications also increased, leading to a significant rise in the cut-off scores for scholarship eligibility.

„ „

A number of academic support initiatives were introduced, including: Academic English workshops for non-English speaking students; a welcome pack to assist higher degree by research students prepare for research studies; a community site in the ECU

‘Blackboard’ application with tools to help students avoid unintentional plagiarism; and facilitators for research training seminars.

HIGHLIGHTS

Professor Donna Cross awarded more than $1m for bullying research

Professor Donna Cross, Director of the Child Health Promotion

Research Centre, received in excess of $1m in research grants for two research projects to reduce bullying and cyber bullying among young people. more

ECU and Huntington’s WA launch $330,000 research project

Researchers launched a collaborative study into improving the quality of life of patients with Huntington’s disease. The pilot program investigates to what extent physical activity, occupational therapy and other lifestyle factors, when combined with traditional disease management strategies, improve the quality of life for patients with the disease. more

Working towards national health innovation and reform

ECU researchers investigated the validity and application of simulated learning environments in nursing education.

The research project, comprised of a national and international team of inter-professional simulation experts, will engage with all relevant professional groups. more

ECU professor finalist in WA Innovator of the

Year Awards

Professor Craig Valli, Director of the SECAU – Security

Research Centre, and his team were named finalists in the

2010 WA Innovator of the Year Awards. The Centre was nominated in the Start up Category, for the development of an initial response software tool entitled SiMPLE, which is used by police to help gather evidence in computer-related crimes.

Research Week success

ECU’s annual Research Week was a great success with a number of events held to showcase the important research carried out at ECU, and to promote higher degrees and research programs at the University. Research Week was launched with an industry engagement event, followed by a program of seminars and workshops.

Univation WA 2010

ECU joined forces with Curtin University, Murdoch

University and the University of Western Australia to present UNIVATION, a showcase of exciting new research innovations and developments from top researchers in the resources, life sciences, green-tech, and information communication technology sectors. The landmark event was the first of its kind in Australia, providing a platform for researchers to present their work to industry, investors and partner organisations. more

25

Video-based classroom research

The ECU-Fogarty Professional Learning Centre is a collaborative initiative between ECU, the WA

Department of Education and the Fogarty Foundation.

This major research facility uses video technology in the classroom to analyse how effectivesly teachers engage students in learning. The facility was opened at the Roseworth Primary School by State Education

Minister Dr Liz Constable, linking primary school science classes in Australia, Taiwan and Germany.

The research into teaching and learning practices and reasoning in science will have significant implications for teacher professional learning and student outcomes. The project received an Australian

Research Council Discovery grant of $310,000 for

2011 to 2013.

26

Professor Ralph Martins awarded Melvin

Jones Fellowship

ECU’s Foundation Chair of Ageing and Alzheimer’s disease, Professor Ralph Martins, was awarded the Lions International Melvin Jones Fellowship for dedicated humanitarian services and in particular his research on Alzheimer’s disease. Professor Martins is only the second person in 25 years to have received this award.

Named after the Founder of the Lions Club International, the award is the highest form of recognition by the Lions

Club for individual commitment to humanitarian work.

„ „

ECU helped research students to build social networks and peer support by running regular events such as: “Brainstorm Your Research” peer review and feedback lunch time sessions; international student welcome sessions; student BBQs; coffee mornings; and orientation events. More formal peer support was provided through the HDR SOAR

(Support, Opportunities, Advice Resources) Centre, which employs higher degree by research student ambassadors to provide peer-to-peer research training, a referral point for information, services and support for career development for higher degree by research students.

„ „

ECU led a national benchmarking exercise comparing completion rates and time to completion of higher degrees by research. The findings are being used to develop improvement strategies for ECU.

„ „

ECU amended its policy on supervision of higher degree by research students and increased the frequency of training for supervisors.

The success of ECU’s research training events and initiatives is reflected in the results of the

Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire, which is administered to recent graduates as part of the Australian Graduate Survey. The results from the latest survey indicate that ECU postgraduate research students were generally satisfied with most aspects of their study experience and rated ECU close to the national average. The 2009 survey results, published in 2010, showed significant improvements across all categories, and overall satisfaction increased from

81 per cent to 87 per cent. Improvement in the skill development category from 86 per cent to 90 per cent was particularly notable.

BUILDING

ORGANISATIONAL

SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainability at ECU

This Strategic Priority comprises three elements:

Staffing, Financial Positioning and Infrastructure and Services.

Staffing

In 2010 ECU’s goal in relation to staffing is:

„ „ to attract, develop and retain staff required for ECU to achieve its strategic priorities.

The University undertook a number of staffing-related initiatives during 2010, including:

„ „

Reforms and efficiencies in the delivery of services to students, international operations, research and finance.

The necessary changes to staffing arrangements were implemented through a process that sought to minimise the impact on staff and without the need for enforced redundancies.

„ „

The development of staffing action plans which cover: succession planning and talent management; workload to support growth and performance in research.

„ „

Structured leadership development plans for early to midcareer staff and renewal and end of career arrangements to manage the ageing staff profile.

„ „

The development and approval by the Vice-Chancellor of the ECU Indigenous Australian Employment Strategy and Action Plan. 2010 also saw the approval of the implementation of Faculty / Centre Indigenous employment targets and a centrally funded entry-level employment program (Aboriginal School Based Trainee (ASBT),

Traineeship, and Cadetship program) and Study Program.

„ „

In early 2010 ECU had an Indigenous staff representation of 1.1 per cent and recruitments during the year enabled the University to reach its 2010 target of 1.5 per cent representation.

„ „

The review of HR policies and guidelines to ensure compliance with the new Fair Work Act 2009 (Cwlth).

Centre for Learning and Development

Through the Centre for Learning and Development, the

University has made significant progress in its support for ongoing development of staff. Key to this was the development of a role-based training framework. The framework defines the professional development requirements (mandatory, optional and desirable) for each staff role at ECU. Other initiatives included:

„ „ the development of resources to inform and guide staff undertaking benchmarking;

„ „ the implementation of technology drop-in sessions to provide staff with ‘just-in-time’ training;

HIGHLIGHTS

ECU recognised for helping women reach their potential

ECU received an Employer of Choice for Women citation from the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency in March 2010. The citation recognised the University’s commitment to help female staff reach their potential. more

Health and Wellness

ECU’s commitment to staff health and wellbeing is evidenced by Live Life Longer program, which provides resources, activities and support to staff to maintain their physical and emotional wellbeing.

Green Office Program

In 2010 ECU launched its Green Office Program.

This aims to increase staff awareness and education on the environmental impacts of our daily work practices, and to encourage and facilitate environmentally responsible alternatives.

27

28

KEY APPOINTMENTS

ECU’s leadership capacity was strengthened by a number of appointments across key areas.

These included:

„

Professor Cobie Rudd, appointed

Pro-Vice-Chancellor, (Health Advancement)

„

Professor Atique Islam, appointed

Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Executive Dean,

Faculty of Business and Law

„

Professor Gensheng Shen, appointed Dean of ECU International

„

Professor Di Twigg, appointed Head of the School of Nursing Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine,

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

„

Professor Christine Ure, appointed Head of the

School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts

„

Professor Rowena Barrett, appointed Head of the

School of Management, Faculty of Business and Law

„

Professor Daniel Galvao, appointed Director of the ECU Health and Wellness Institute, School of

Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences. Faculty of Computing Health Sciences

„

Professor Johanna Badcock, appointed Professor of

Human Biology in the School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences. Faculty Computing Health

Sciences

„

Associate Professor Helen Vella-Bonavita, appointed Associate Dean (International) Faculty of Education and Arts.

„ „ a new online professional development module to assist staff to enhance their online teaching; and

„ „ the implementation of sessional staff specific professional development, provided ‘out of hours’ to accommodate their working patterns.

Strong Financial Position

In 2010 ECU’s goals in relation to financial positioning were:

„ „ to maintain a strong position and ensure that its financial resources continued to be managed efficiently and effectively; and

„ „ over time, to build alternative sources of revenue such as fee-paying courses, commercial activities, fundraising and its investment portfolio.

ECU adopts a prudent approach to financial management.

Its overall financial position remains sound and the

University received a “clean bill of health” from the

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace

Relations, which undertakes an annual review of the financial position of Australian universities.

The University once again received an unqualified external audit opinion for 2010.

Total revenue for the University in 2010 was $330m, which was an increase of $21m from 2009 ($309m).

The University posted a 2010 operating result of $21m for the year, which was an increase of $2m from the original budget ($19m). The 2010 operating result excluding non-operating items was $19m, which was an increase of

$5m from the original budget of 2010 ($14m). Non-operating items include the net Churchlands result and capital grants.

In terms of performance against the 2010 financial targets set by Council, the following financial ratios were achieved:

„ „ operating margin of 6.4 per cent, (favourable), in excess of the target of 4 per cent;

„ „ interest cover on borrowings of six times, (favourable) against a target of three times;

„ „ current ratio of 1.3, above the target of 1.0; and

„ „ debt to equity ratio of 5.5 per cent against a maximum agreed level of 30 per cent.

Managing ECU’s Financial Resources

The University’s four strategic priorities are reflected in

University-wide strategic budget allocations, as well as the expenditure plans of individual business units. ECU has implemented a number of strategies at both the Universitywide and business unit level to ensure that ECU is in a position to respond quickly to change and to progress its

Mission, Vision and Values.

These budget initiatives work in parallel with complementary initiatives designed to:

„ „ continue to focus ECU’s academic activities and staff profile in areas of strength;

„ „ improve the quality of activities, services and outcomes in teaching and research; and

„ „ ensure that ECU remains financially viable through a combination of cost saving strategies and improved efficiencies, but particularly through the achievement of revenue targets.

Throughout 2010 ECU operated within the key budget parameters approved by Council.

Council approved the ECU Budget for 2011 at its December

2010 meeting.

Student Demand

Despite Western Australia’s positive economic position and labour market, demand for higher education remained strong in 2010, counter to an established recent trend of low demand for higher education when employment opportunities are most favourable.

There was a significant increase in student demand for places at ECU. ECU’s full-year total student load for 2010

(estimated as at 3 February 2011) was 18,711 EFTSL, some

6 per cent above total student load for 2009 (17,610 EFTSL)

(see

Summary Statistics page 33

).

The Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) load target agreed with the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for 2010 was 11,242 EFTSL and estimates (as at 3 February 2011) indicate that CGS load was

12,609 EFTSL, around 12 per cent or 1367 EFTSL above the agreed target. This is also considerably above the CGS load for 2009 (11,409 EFTSL).

International students are of fundamental importance to ECU as they make a critical contribution to the internationalisation of the university experience that is, so necessary for all students. ECU’s international student load was 4,506 EFTSL

(as at 3 February 2011), a slight decline on the 2009 result.

The additional income that international students bring to the University also helps to fund enhancements in academic programs and activities, and thus the University’s on-going

competitive positioning (see Summary Statistics page 33

).

Construction of the new Computing,

Engineering and Technology Building

ECU commenced construction of the new

Computing, Engineering and Technology Building in February 2010. The $39m project will provide new facilities for the School of Engineering, the

School of Computing and Security Science and the Electron Science Research Institute.

more

Infrastructure and Services

In 2010 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority in relation to quality infrastructure and services is:

„ „ to provide quality infrastructure and services which reflect sustainability principles.

Building Infrastructure

ECU’s Strategic Asset Management Framework delivers a structured and consistent approach to the management of high value assets. The framework supports the University’s goals through the delivery of building infrastructure to support its core business.

All major building projects were within project budget and milestones in 2010 and include:

„ „

Construction of the Computing, Engineering and

Technology Building at the Joondalup Campus. The project budget was reduced by $6m following successful construction procurement and is progressed to schedule

(See above).

29

30

„ „

Construction of a 357 bed student accommodation facility at the Mount Lawley Campus. This is funded through a Public Private Partnership with Campus

Living Villages and remains on schedule for completion by Semester 1 2011.

„ „

The crèche at the Mount Lawley Campus was completed and operations commenced in July 2010.

„ „

Construction commenced for additional Western

Australian Academy of Performing Arts infrastructure at the Mount Lawley Campus. This will be completed in 2011.

„ „

Finalisation of the design and documentation for the

Joondalup Sports and Fitness Centre expansion, ahead of tendering for construction.

IT Infrastructure

Several major information technology projects were completed in 2010, including:

„ „

Two upgrades to the student management system ‘Callista’.

„ „

The implementation of ‘MyLecture’ (lecture capture and delivery system), together with desktop video conferencing to enable teaching staff to communicate through online meetings and conferences and record these sessions for later use through the Blackboard

Learning Management System.

Environmental sustainability

ECU works with staff and students, and provides programs and advice on a wide range of issues to educate, inform and change behaviour on environmental issues.

ECU has an energy management team which meets regularly to implement energy saving initiatives and this is proving to have an effect on the overall carbon emissions at the University, which are in decline.

As part of ECU’s commitment to improving environmental sustainability the University embarked on a number of projects in 2010:

„ „

A new waste management system to reduce the amount of recyclable campus waste that goes to landfill.

35 recycling bins were places the Joondalup and Mount

Lawley campuses rand 6 bins were situated at the South

West Campus.

„ „

ECU has installed water refill stations on its campuses to encourage the re-use of water containers. It is estimated that the water refill stations have diverted 38,000 plastic bottles from being consumed.

„ „

As part of National Recycling Week, ECU held its first E-waste (Electronic Waste) Collection, collecting electronic goods ranging from computers, printers, keyboards and monitors to scientific machines, phones, kettles. The University collected 773kg of e-waste at the Joondalup Campus and 760kg at the

Mount Lawley Campus.

SUMMARY STATISTICS

Student Enrolments (persons)

Table 1: Enrolments by Type of Attendance, 2006-2010

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 10/12/2010.

Table 2: Enrolments by Gender, 2006-2010

Female

Male

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 10/12/2010.

Table 3: Enrolments by Course Level, 2006-2010

Doctorate by Research

Doctorate by Coursework

Master by Research

Master by Coursework

Graduate Diploma

Postgraduate Diploma

Postgraduate / Graduate Certificate

Bachelor Honours

Bachelor Pass

Associate Degree

Advanced Diploma / Diploma

VET

Other

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 10/12/2010.

2006

15,415

5,678

21,093

2007

14,408

5,657

20,605

2008

15,116

5,912

21,028

2009

16,152

6,122

22,274

2010

17,708

6,533

24,241

2006

12,696

8,397

21,093

2007

12,347

8,258

20,605

2008

12,642

8,386

21,028

2009

13,471

8,803

22,274

2010

14,676

9,565

24,241

2006

347

98

157

1,973

1,110

177

705

164

15,263

61

83

425

530

21,093

2007

357

65

124

2,242

889

218

832

206

14,595

48

75

397

557

20,605

2008

341

57

130

2,547

844

311

728

182

14,359

85

72

417

955

21,028

2009

385

43

127

3,029

862

335

782

168

14,973

103

78

465

924

22,274

2010

438

39

154

3,216

994

312

794

187

16,285

120

47

567

1088

24,241

31

32

2007

6,978

6,426

974

2,611

3,616

20,605

2008

8,772

6,575

975

870

3,836

21,028

2009

9,504

7,584

943

0

4,243

22,274

2010

10,959

7,938

1,004

0

4,340

24,241

2007

2,954

13,253

843

1,736

930

889

20,605

2008

2,896

13,273

959

1,730

1,103

1,067

21,028

2009

3,283

13,119

1,120

2,066

1,160

1,526

22,274

2010

3,619

15,019

1,199

1,902

1,129

1,373

24,241

2008

16,169

469

344

831

582

295

168

154

154

1,456

311

32

63

21,028

2009

16,402

583

506

881

603

257

356

129

228

1,655

368

53

253

22,274

2010

18,638

757

494

842

561

278

169

71

287

1,523

339

21

261

24,241

2008

1,779

2,531

170

336

2009

1,842

2,554

163

397

2010

1,810

2,474

188

704

Student Load

Table 8: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2006-2010

Commonwealth Grant Scheme

Research Training Scheme and ECU-funded

Fee-paying Overseas On-shore

Fee-paying Overseas Off-shore

Domestic Tuition Fee

Vocational Education and Training

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 03/02/11.

2006

10,868

264

2,248

1,012

962

393

15,748

Table 9: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field of Education, 2006-2010

Agriculture, Environmental and Related

Architecture and Building

Creative Arts

Education

Engineering and Related Technologies

Food, Hospitality and Personal Services

Health

Information Technology

Management and Commerce

Mixed Field Programs

Natural and Physical Sciences

Society and Culture

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 03/02/11.

2006

92

0

2,188

3,253

207

1

1,929

1,274

2,677

5

936

3,186

15,748

Table 10: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty, 2006-2010

Business and Law

Computing, Health and Science

Education and Arts

Regional Professional Studies

Other

Total

Notes: 2010 data is as at 03/02/11.

2006

3,557

5,371

5,809

798

214

15,748

2007

90

2

2,163

3,002

234

1

2,016

1,173

2,704

5

879

2,986

15,254

2007

10,279

247

2,220

1,202

919

388

15,254

2007

3,450

5,447

5,359

731

268

15,254

2008

10,622

249

2,390

1,659

640

418

15,978

2009

11,409

287

2,665

2,069

731

449

17,610

2010

12,609

326

2,725

1,781

781

489

18,711

2008

88

11

2,207

3,246

290

1

2,012

1,092

3,103

4

947

2,977

15,978

2009

92

29

2,330

3,357

393

1

2,100

1,196

3,746

5

1,091

3,270

17,610

2008

3,991

5,509

5,376

710

390

15,978

2009

4,758

6,081

5,645

661

465

17,610

2010

101

30

2,458

3,582

503

1

2,452

1,210

3,711

4

1,229

3,431

18,711

2010

4,718

6,770

6,068

667

488

18,711

33

34

Teaching Performance

Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2006-2010

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

Teaching Quality

Unit Content

S1

2006

S2

2006

S1

2007

S2

2007

S1

2008

Semester / Year

S2

2008

S1

2009

S2

2009

S1

2010

Notes: Mean overall satisfaction is measured on a scale of -100 to +100. The measure includes all ECU student cohorts and all coursework units.

Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2005-2009

96

94

92

90

88

86

84

82

80

78

Good Teaching

Generic Skills

Overall Satisfaction

2005

2006 2007 2008 2009

Year of Survey

Notes:The three measures record the percentage of ECU Bachelor level graduates who, in responding to the relevant Course Experience

Questionnaire survey items ‘broadly agree’ with those statements. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses that are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.

Student Outcomes

Table 11: Completions by Course Level, 2006-2010

Higher Degree by Research

Master by Coursework

Other Postgraduate

Bachelor (Pass and Honours)

Other Undergraduate

VET

Total

2006

92

877

1,239

3,787

131

127

6,253

2007

84

894

1,136

3,499

77

79

5,769

2008

93

1,245

1,004

3,393

44

68

5,847

2009

64

1,424

1,070

3,500

61

73

6,192

2010

Notes: 1) Year is defined as a DEEWR Completions Reporting Year i.e. 1st April to 31st March and excludes retrospective Completions after the date.

These are assigned to the year of transaction. 2) Completions only include AQF Awards 3) Government Reportable enrolments only.

Other Inputs

Table 12: Library Holdings, 2006-2010

Library Volumes

Serial Subscriptions

2006

651,829

32,003

2007

643,561

33,982

2008

637,931

36,044

2009

653,575

52,078

2010

638,912

58,465

Table 13: Revenue ($’000), 2006-2010

Commonwealth Government

State Government

Student Tuition Fees (HECS-HELP, FEES-HELP)

Other Fees and Charges

Investment Income

Royalties, Trademarks and Licences

Consultancy and Contract Research

Other

Total Revenue

2006

108,548

8,959

57,732

53,477

2,683

5,404

6,208

13,028

256,039

2007

107,068

10,697

58,512

52,460

2,945

6,338

5,207

23,886

267,113

2008

125,904

11,499

59,195

56,369

4,032

7,370

5,914

25,069

295,352

2009

133,337

13,317

65,461

66,240

5,322

9,536

3,352

18,715

315,280

2010

137,325

12,996

76,789

69,688

6,407

9,497

3,286

20,645

336,633

Notes: Total revenue for Edith Cowan University and its subsidiary (consolidated entity). Previous Annual Reports provided total income for the

General University (parent) only. Revenue for 2006, 2007 and 2009 varies from that reported in the financial statements of those years, due to changes in accounting treatments.

35

36

Research Inputs

Table 14: Research Block Funding by Category, 2006-2010 ($m)

Joint Research Engagement Program

Research Training Scheme

Research Infrastructure Block Grant

Total

2006

1.83

4.07

0.55

6.45

2007

1.94

4.22

0.54

6.70

Notes: The 2010 income figures are preliminary (unaudited) and are as at 31/12/10.

2008

1.92

4.33

0.46

6.71

2009

1.87

4.38

0.39

6.63

2010

2.03

4.41

0.37

6.81

Change

2009-2010

8.6%

0.7%

-5.1%

2.7%

Table 15: Research Funding by Category, 2006-2010 ($m)

National Competitive Research Grants

Other Public Sector Research Funding

Industry and Other Funding

Co-operative Research Centre Funding

Total

2006

2.03

4.83

3.07

0.09

10.02

2007

1.62

5.51

2.34

0.11

9.58

2008

2.15

7.24

2.93

0.075

12.39

2009

2.91

7.71

2.01

0.18

12.81

2010**

2.59

8.23

2.73

0.27

13.82

Change

2009-2010

-10.87%

6.77%

35.69%

48.35%

7.88%

Notes: The 2010 income figures are preliminary (unaudited) and are as at 1/02/11. The 2009 income figures are final (audited) figures and differ from those quoted in the Report on Operations in the ECU Annual Report for 2009.

Table 16: Higher Degree by Research Student Load, 2006-2010

Commonwealth-supported

ECU Funded

International

Domestic Tuition Fee

Total

2006

188

78

80

4

350

2007

186

61

84

4

335

2008

185

64

82

6

337

2009

205

81

88

5

380

Note: Student load, expressed in Equivalent Full-time Student Load (EFTSL), is for the full year. 2010 figures are estimates as at 3/02/11.

2010

256

69

110

4

439

SUMMARY COMMENT ON PERFORMANCE AGAINST

FINANCIAL AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR TARGETS

Performance against Financial Targets

2010 Operating Result

The University posted a 2010 operating result of $21m for the year, representing an increase of $2m from the original budget

($19m). The 2010 operating result excluding non-operating items (such as Churchlands land sales and capital grants) was

$19m, which is an increase of $5m from the original 2010 budget of $14m.

2010 Revenue

Total revenue for the University in 2010 is $330m, which represents an increase of $21m compared to 2009 ($309m).

Operating revenue for 2010 excluding non-operating items is $326m which compares favourably to the 2010 original budget of $299m. Non-operating revenue for 2010 is $4m which also compares favourably to the 2010 original budget of $3m due to higher than forecast capital grants.

2010 Financial Ratios

Table 17: Financial Ratios, 2010

Operating Margin

Interest cover on borrowings

Liquidity – Current Ratio

Debt to equity ratio

Cash Reserves (no. of weeks)

Actual

6.4%

6.3x

1.3

5.5%

20

Target Variance / Comment

At least 4% The operating margin is above the Target set for 2010.

At least 3x The interest cover on borrowings is above the Target set for 2010.

At least 1 The current ratio is above the target set for 2010.

The debt to equity ratio is within the Target set for 2010.

Not more than 30%

At least 4 The number of week’s revenue in cash assets is above the Target set for 2010.

The Financial Statements begin on page 49 of this Annual Report.

37

38

Performance against Key Performance Indicator Targets

The Key Performance Indicator Report begins on page 117 of this Annual Report and gives detailed information on the

University’s performance against nine Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). These are a sub-set of the KPIs in ECU’s KPI

Framework, which is used for performance monitoring purposes.

A summary of performance using the latest audited data against KPI targets is provided in Table 18 below.

Table 18: Summary of Performance against KPI Targets

Performance Indicator

Retention (%) – 2009 commencements

Course Satisfaction (%) –

2009 survey

Quality of Teaching (%) –

2009 survey

Graduate Employment (%) –

2009 survey

Share of First Preference (%) –

2010 Admissions

Actual

78.2

92.6

89.1

78.0

20.1

Target

80.0

93.0

91.0

87.0

21.0

Variance / Comment

The retention rate declined by 0.7 of a percentage point and was 1.8 percentage points below Target.

Nevertheless it remained above the 2007 rate.

Performance improved by 0.5 of a percentage point but was 0.4 of a percentage point below Target. ECU’s graduate Course Satisfaction is above both the National

Average and the State Average.

Performance declined by 0.5 of a percentage point and was 1.9 of a percentage point below Target. ECU’s Good

Teaching satisfaction is above both the National Average and the State Average.

Performance declined by 6.7 percentage points and was 9 percentage points below Target. This is consistent with the declines in the National Average and the State

Average.

ECU’s share of first preference applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree courses processed through TISC increased by 0.6 of a percentage point, but was 0.9 of a percentage point below Target.

Teaching-related expenditure per student load decreased and was below the Target, indicating greater efficiency.

Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load ($/ EFTSL)

– 2010

Research Income ($m) – 2009

14,813 14,572

Higher Degree Research

Completions (per 10

Academic Staff FTE) – 2009

Research Publications

(per 10 Academic Staff FTE)

– 2009

12,809

1.3

11.2

13,629

2.2

12.8

ECU’s total research income increased but was $0.82m below Target.

Higher degree research completions per 10 academic staff FTE declined and the result was below Target.

Longer completion times and lower enrolments in early years have contributed to this decline.

Weighted Research Publications per 10 Academic Staff

FTE declined and the result was below Target. Staff FTE increased by 10 per cent between 2008 and 2009, while productivity for these new staff is yet to be recorded.

Notes: Actual results are for the most recent data available. Full definitions are provided in the Key Performance Indicator Report.

Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annUal rEport sECtion 3 -

SIgnIfIcant ISSueS & trendS

39

40

SIGNIFICANT ISSUES

AND TRENDS

Economic Conditions

The impact in Australia of the Global Financial Crisis eased in late 2009 and the Australian economy recovered quickly and avoided recession. Growth in exports, steady consumer spending, and government infrastructure spending contributed to economic growth with the recovery led by the construction and mining industries. The Australian labour market showed strong improvements in 2010. Strong economic conditions and increased employment often lead to a reduced demand for university places.

Australia, like many other developed countries, has an ageing population and will continue to face important challenges in health care provision, as well as increased pressure on other services. The ageing population and the decisions of by those close to retirement will impact on the make-up of the workforce, the need for re-training, levels of skills shortage and the demand for goods and services.

Australian Government Policy

Following the Federal Election in August 2010, a minority

Labor Government was formed with the support of three independent members and one Green Party member in the House of Representatives. The previous Rudd Labor

Government embarked on an ambitious reform agenda for primary, secondary and tertiary education and made significant funding commitments to the higher education and research sectors. Since the Gillard minority Labor

Government is also focused on returning the Budget to surplus and has signaled additional emphasis on regional priorities, it is expected the education reform agenda will be delivered.

Australian Government policy reforms of relevance in

2010 included the following:

„ „

Higher Education Participation and Partnership

Program Funding (HEPPP) equivalent to 3 per cent of teaching grants was distributed to universities based on their enrolments of students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. ECU received $1.27m in low SES funding for 2010 and will increase to $1.39m for 2011.

„ „

Development of Compact templates for 2011-2013, further development of the Performance Funding

Framework, a review of base funding and further development of provider standards and the role of

Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency (TEQSA).

Other changes previously announced to take effect in 2011, with indirect, or as yet unknown, resource implications include:

„ „

The Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) will continue to fully fund enrolments up to 110% of agreed funding targets.

„ „

Structural Adjustment Funding, totalling $400m over four years, is expected to be allocated in early 2011 to help institutions develop distinctive and diversified missions.

ECU submitted an expression of interest for funding to assist with implementation of the 2012 Undergraduate

Curriculum Framework.

„ „

Improved indexation of teaching grants from 2011, where institutions agree performance targets as part of

Compact negotiations. In 2011 an amount equivalent to the increase in indexation (2-3 per cent) will be paid as a facilitation payment.

„ „

Increased indexation of research grants from 2011, with progressive increases in Research Infrastructure

Block Grants and Joint Research Engagement funding, to reduce cross-subsidisation from teaching grants.

Funding for Collaborative Research Networks will be allocated from 2011. ECU has submitted an application for $5.62m funding under this program.

„ „

Revised regulatory and quality auditing arrangements following the establishment of a national regulator,

TESQA. This will bring additional compliance costs to universities and potentially increase competition within the sector, as more private providers attain ‘Specialist

University’ or ‘University College’ status.

„ „

A further lowering of the age of independence to 23 from

2011 for eligibility for Youth Allowance and changes to the workforce participation criterion for independence for regional and remote students from 2011.

State Government Policy

While the Australian Government is the main funding provider and policy determiner for higher education, the

State Government’s role in the primary and secondary school education and VET provision is of direct relevance to

ECU. This is particularly in terms of school-leaver transition to higher education, articulation from VET to higher education and ECU’s Teacher Education programs.

The following issues and trends are relevant:

„ „

In the State Government Budget for 2010/11, expenditure on education and training included approximately $98m over four years for 428 additional teachers, education assistants and school support staff and $1bn for school infrastructure. The increased demand for teachers should result in increasing numbers of students in teaching and teaching-related courses at universities.

„ „

State Government and employer groups continue to be concerned about skills shortages and the State

Government Budget for 2010/11 made provision for

$19.4m over two years to respond to unmet training demand through the purchase of an additional 7,600 training places in industry priority areas. ECU’s ability to develop greater and more meaningful VET linkages will depend on Government support for collaboration, rather than competition, with higher education.

41

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LEGISLATIVE

IMPACTS

The main legislative impacts on ECU’s operations in 2010 were from the following existing and new legislation:

„ „

Fair Work Act 2009 (Cwlth)

The Fair Work Act 2009 replaced the Workplace

Relations Act 1996 and Work Choices Amendments

2006. Some of the provisions of the Fair Work Act came into effect during 2009, but the remainder came into effect on 1 January 2010. ECU made all necessary preparations for these changes, and the smooth transition to the new arrangements was achieved.

„ „

Student Income Support

Student Income Support (Youth Allowance and

ABSTUDY) amendments were introduced in 2010.

The parental income test threshold was raised and the age of independence will be lowered incrementally from 24 in 2010, to 23 in 2011 and 22 from 2012 onwards. A tightening of the workforce participation criterion for financial independence was planned for January 2010, but was delayed by six months following concerns that those currently working in their gap year were disadvantaged. The intended increase in personal income threshold from 2010 was delayed until July 2011, to maintain the cost-neutrality of the changes.

„ „

Education Services for Overseas Students [ESOS]

Act 2000 (Cwlth)

Amendments to the ESOS Act were passed in 2010:

– all Providers were required to be re-registered by

31 December 2010;

– new registration requirements stipulate that a provider’s principal purpose is education and that they have sufficient capacity; and

– all providers are required to list their education agents. ECU was re-registered under the ESOS

Act in early 2010.

„ „

Education Service Providers (full fee overseas

students) Registration Act 1991 (WA)

In early 2010 ECU was also re-registered (until

1 December 2014) under WA’s Education Service

Providers (Full fee overseas students) Registration

Act 1991 (ESPRA) legislation.

Further legislative developments likely to impact upon ECU’s operations in the future include those listed below:

„ „

Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student

Services and Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill

2009 (Cwlth)

Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student

Services and Amenities) Bill 2010 passed the House of Representatives on 18 November 2010. The Bill proposes to allow higher education providers the option to charge a compulsory student services and amenities fee up to $250 (indexed to $254 in 2011).

The Senate will not debate the Bill until the 2011 autumn sittings. Commencement is subject to the passage of legislation and if passed, will not impact ECU before mid

2011 at the earliest.

„ „

Information Privacy Bill 2007 (WA)

The Information Privacy Bill 2007 that will amend the

Freedom of Information Act 1992 (WA) and the Freedom

of Information Amendment Bill 2007 are still awaiting passage through State Parliament, following the second reading of both acts in 2007. ECU has put in place policy and supporting documentation for staff in anticipation of the passing of the Bill.

„ „

Edith Cowan University Act (1984) (WA)

In anticipation of the changes to the Higher Education

Legislation Amendment (Student Services and

Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill 2009 (Cwlth) outlined above, all four public universities have worked with the WA Department of Education Services to progress amendments to their university enabling acts to facilitate the implementation of the proposed

Student Services and Amenities Fee. ECU has taken this opportunity to progress other amendments to its Act and has been working with the Department of Education

Services to progress these. It is hoped that this work will be finalised during 2011.

„ „

Education Services for Overseas Students [ESOS] Act

2000 (Cwlth)

A range of new legislative measures are expected to be introduced in 2011. These include:

– increases in financial penalties for breaches of ESOS

Act; and

– the creation of an Overseas Students Ombudsman to hear complaints from student studying with private education providers.

„ „

National Review into Model Occupational Health and

Safety (OHS) legislation.

Harmonisation of the health and safety legislation across Australia will result in new work health and safety legislation to be enacted from 1 January 2012. ECU has reviewed the impacts of the proposed laws and has undertaken significant activity to prepare itself for the changes. Once finalised, there will be a new Work Health and Safety Act in WA. ECU will be well prepared to meet the requirements of any new legislation.

„ „

Trade Practices Amendment (Australian Consumer Law)

Act (No. 1) 2010

From 1 January 2011, Australia will have a single, national consumer law: the Australian Consumer Law

[ACL], applying at a Commonwealth level to corporations under the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cwlth), which is to be amended and renamed the Competition and Consumer

Act 2010 (Cwlth). Equivalent legislation will be enacted at State level to apply the ACL to individuals. In Western

Australia, the Fair Trading Act 1987 will be amended and renamed the Fair Trading Act 2010. Under the ACL, the University will continue to observe its general trade practices and consumer protection obligations to act fairly, reasonably and not unconscionably when dealing with students, consumers and other suppliers.

„ „

Autonomous Sanctions Bill 2010

Autonomous Sanctions Bill 2010, introduced by the

Minister for Foreign Affairs in September, is intended to extend and supplement sanctions imposed by the United

Nations Security Council.

Under these changes, individuals and bodies corporate, including universities, may be liable if they conduct transactions prohibited under the autonomous sanctions, or deal with persons or regimes in a manner that contravenes the imposed sanctions. Universities must be able to prove that they have taken reasonable precautions, and have exercised due diligence, to avoid contravening the sanction law or relevant permit conditions. It is expected that the Bill will be passed in early 2011.

The University has procedures in place to ensure compliance with existing UN sanction requirements and will undertake a review of these practices and effect any necessary enhancements that may be required as a consequence of the new legislation.

43

44

Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annUal rEport sECtion 4 -

dIScloSureS and legal complIance

AUDITOR GENERAL’S STATEMENT

Auditor General

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Parliament of Western Australia

EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY

Report on the Financial Statements

I have audited the accounts and financial statements of Edith Cowan University and the consolidated entity.

The financial statements comprise the Statement of Financial Position as at 31 December 2010, the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Income Statement, Statement of Changes in Equity and Statement of Cash Flows of the University and the consolidated entity for the year then ended, and Notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.

University Council’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

The University Council is responsible for keeping proper accounts, and the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Treasurer’s Instructions, and for such internal control as the University Council determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility

As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements based on my audit. The audit was conducted in accordance with Australian

Auditing Standards. Those Standards require compliance with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and that the audit be planned and performed to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the University’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the University Council, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

I believe that the audit evidence obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements are based on proper accounts and present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Edith Cowan University and the consolidated entity at 31 December 2010 and their financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

They are in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Treasurer’s Instructions.

Page 1 of 2

4 th

Floor Dumas House 2 Havelock Street West Perth 6005 Western Australia Tel: 08 9222 7500 Fax: 08 9322 5664

45

46

AUDITOR GENERAL’S STATEMENT

Edith Cowan University

Report on Controls

I have audited the controls exercised by Edith Cowan University. The University Council is responsible for ensuring that adequate control is maintained over the receipt, expenditure and investment of money, the acquisition and disposal of public and other property, and the incurring of liabilities in accordance with the Financial Management Act 2006 and the

Treasurer’s Instructions, and other relevant written law.

As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the controls exercised by the University Council based on my audit conducted in accordance with

Australian Auditing Standards.

Opinion

In my opinion, the controls exercised by Edith Cowan University are sufficiently adequate to provide reasonable assurance that the receipt, expenditure and investment of money, the acquisition and disposal of property, and the incurring of liabilities have been in accordance with legislative provisions.

Report on the Key Performance Indicators

I have audited the key performance indicators of Edith Cowan University. The University

Council is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the key performance indicators in accordance with the Financial Management Act 2006 and the Treasurer’s

Instructions.

As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the key performance indicators based on my audit conducted in accordance with Australian

Auditing Standards.

Opinion

In my opinion, the key performance indicators of Edith Cowan University are relevant and appropriate to assist users to assess the University’s performance and fairly represent indicated performance for the year ended 31 December 2010.

Independence

In conducting this audit, I have complied with the independence requirements of the Auditor

General Act 2006 and the Australian Auditing Standards, and other relevant ethical requirements.

GLEN CLARKE

ACTING AUDITOR GENERAL

10 March 2011

Page 2 of 2

CERTIFICATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The accompanying financial statements of ECU and the accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in compliance with the provisions of the Financial

Management Act 2006 from proper accounts and records to present fairly the financial transactions for the financial year ended 31 December 2010 and the financial position as at

31 December 2010.

At the date of signing we are not aware of any circumstances which would render the particulars included in the financial statements misleading or inaccurate.

Certification of financial statements required by DEEWR

I declare that:

„ „ at the time of this certification there are reasonable grounds to believe that ECU will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due; and

„ „ the amount of Commonwealth financial assistance expended during the financial year ended 31 December

2010 was for the purpose(s) for which it was provided.

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

7 March 2011

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

7 March 2011

Mr Warren Snell

Acting Vice-Chancellor

7 March 2011

7 March 2011

Mr Warren Snell

Acting Vice-Chancellor

7 March 2011

Mr Brad Francis

Acting Chief Finance Officer

7 March 2011

47

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

31 DECEMBER 2010

Contents

Income Statements

Statements of comprehensive income

Statements of financial position

Statements of changes in equity

Statement of cash flows

Notes to the financial statements

Page

49

50

51

52

53

54

48

This financial report covers both Edith Cowan University as an individual entity and the consolidated entity consisting of Edith Cowan University and its subsidiary. The financial report is presented in the Australian currency.

The financial report was authorised for issue by the Council on 10th day of March 2011. The Group has the power to amend and reissue the financial statements.

INCOME STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Notes

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Revenue from continuing operations

Australian Government financial assistance

Australian Government grants

HECS-HELP Australian Government payments

FEE-HELP

State and local Government financial assistance

HECS-HELP – Student payments

Fees and charges

Investment revenue

Royalties

Consultancy and contracts

Sale of goods

Other revenue

Total revenue from continuing operations

Gains on disposal of assets

Other investment income

Other income

Total revenue and income from continuing operations

Expenses from continuing operations

Employee related expenses

Repairs and maintenance

Depreciation and amortisation

Borrowing costs

Impairment of assets

Investment losses

Cost of goods sold

Other expenses

Total expenses from continuing operations

Operating result before income tax

Income tax expense

Operating result attributable to members of Edith Cowan University

4

4

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

7

10

12

13

14

15

16

7

17

18

34(b)

137,325

57,521

7,455

12,996

11,813

69,688

4,986

9,497

3,286

7,758

7,168

329,493

3,231

1,421

2,488

336,633

183,061

6,339

19,732

3,981

1,382

626

4,143

95,870

315,134

21,499

10

21,509

165,002

7,354

18,929

4,387

773

709

4,232

87,312

288,698

26,582

(241)

26,341

133,337

50,148

5,365

13,317

9,948

66,240

2,205

9,536

3,352

8,160

8,519

310,127

1,187

3,117

849

315,280

The above statements of financial performance should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

2010

$’000

137,325

57,521

7,455

12,996

11,813

69,688

4,908

5,902

3,273

7,758

4,851

323,490

3,233

1,421

2,332

330,476

180,453

6,335

19,713

3,981

1,382

626

4,143

92,867

309,500

20,976

20,976

-

Parent

2009

$’000

133,337

50,148

5,365

13,317

9,948

66,240

2,170

5,900

3,304

8,160

6,044

303,933

1,194

3,117

679

308,923

162,577

7,354

18,871

4,387

720

709

4,232

84,192

283,042

25,881

25,881

-

49

50

STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Operating result after income tax for the period

Gain / (loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment, net of tax

Gain on value of available for sale financial assets, net of tax

Cash flow hedges, net of tax

Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations

Impairment adjustments

Total comprehensive income

Total comprehensive income attributable to members of Edith Cowan University

Notes

34

34

34

34

34

34

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

21,509

(25,129)

26,341

5,195

778

(23)

(93)

1,245

(23,222)

(1,713)

2,983

36

(60)

50

8,204

34,545

The above statements of comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

20,976

(25,129)

25,881

5,195

778

(23)

1,245

-

(23,129)

(2,153)

2,983

36

50

8,264

34,145

-

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2010

Notes

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

ASSETS

Current assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Receivables

Inventories

Derivative financial instruments

Other financial assets

Non-current assets classified as held for sale

Other non-financial assets

Total current assets

Non-current assets

Receivables

Other financial assets

Property, plant and equipment

Investment properties

Deferred tax assets

Total non-current assets

Total assets

LIABILITIES

Current liabilities

Trade and other payables

Borrowings

Derivative financial instruments

Provisions

Other liabilities

Total current liabilities

Non-current liabilities

Trade and other payables

Borrowings

Provisions

Deferred tax liabilities

Total non-current liabilities

Total liabilities

Net assets

EQUITY

Reserves

Retained earnings

Total equity

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

20

23

26

27

28

30

31

22

32

33

30

31

32

28

34(a)

34(b)

57,177

12,977

2,505

218

50,781

262

12,675

136,595

24,548

20,600

822,193

12,908

59

880,308

1,016,903

13,917

29,754

242

28,091

29,920

101,924

44,558

64,459

74

109,091

211,015

805,888

385,921

419,967

805,888

-

15,754

5,899

80

23,341

19,309

64,383

The above statements of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

25,972

20,726

822,769

13,534

147

883,148

970,009

33,361

13,146

2,392

79

13,484

14,318

10,081

86,861

85

57,588

40,453

77

98,203

162,586

807,423

430,217

377,206

807,423

2010

$’000

55,017

12,319

2,065

218

50,772

262

12,371

133,024

24,548

20,600

822,090

12,908

880,146

1,013,170

-

13,158

29,754

242

27,956

29,473

100,583

44,558

64,338

108,896

-

209,479

803,691

386,109

417,582

803,691

-

Parent

2009

$’000

25,972

20,726

822,661

13,534

882,893

966,529

-

31,433

12,381

2,029

79

13,475

14,318

9,921

83,636

15,006

5,899

80

22,944

18,861

62,790

57,588

40,307

-

97,895

-

160,685

805,844

430,312

375,532

805,844

51

52

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Balance at 1 January 2009

Profit or loss (restated)

Gain on revaluation of property, plant and equipment (restated)

Gain on available for sale financial assets

Cash flow hedges

Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations

Impairment adjustments

Transfers between reserves

Total comprehensive income

Balance at 31 December 2009

Reserves

$’000

424,995

-

Consolidated

Retained surplus

$’000

347,883

26,341

Total

$’000

772,878

26,341

5,195

2,983

36

(60)

50

(2,982)

5,222

430,217

2,982

29,323

377,206

-

-

-

-

5,195

2,983

36

(60)

50

34,545

807,423

-

Parent

Retained

Reserves earnings

$’000

425,030

$’000

346,669

25,881

5,195

2,983

36 -

-

-

50

-

(2,982)

5,282

430,312

2,982

28,863

375,532

-

-

Total

$’000

771,699

25,881

5,195

2,983

36

50

-

34,145

805,844

-

Balance at 1 January 2010

Retrospective adjustment

Balance as restated

Profit or loss

Loss on revaluation of property, plant and equipment

Gain on available for sale financial assets

Cash flow hedges

Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations

Impairment adjustments

Transfers between reserves

Total comprehensive income

Balance at 31 December 2010

Reserves

$’000

430,217

430,217

-

-

Consolidated

Retained surplus

$’000

377,206

178

377,384

21,509

Total

$’000

807,423

178

807,601

21,509

(25,129)

778

(23)

(93)

1,245

(21,074)

(44,296)

385,921

21,074

42,583

419,967

-

-

-

-

-

(25,129)

778

(23)

(93)

1,245

(1,713)

-

805,888

The above statements of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Parent

Retained

Reserves earnings

$’000

430,312

$’000

375,532

430,312

-

-

375,532

20,976

-

(25,129)

778

(23)

1,245

-

(21,074)

(44,203)

386,109

21,074

42,050

417,582

-

-

-

-

-

Total

$’000

805,844

805,844

20,976

-

(25,129)

778

(23)

1,245

-

(2,153)

-

803,691

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Cash flows from operating activities

Australian Government Grants received

OS-HELP (net)

Superannuation Supplementation

State and Local Government Grants received

HECS-HELP – Student payments received

Receipts from student fees and other customers

Dividends and distributions received

Interest received

Payments to suppliers and employees

(inclusive of goods and services tax)

Interest and other cost of finance paid

Income taxes paid

Net cash provided by operating activities

Cash flows from investing activities

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale

Payments for property, plant and equipment, non-current assets held for sale

Payments for financial assets

Proceeds from sale of financial assets

Proceeds from loans to related parties

Proceeds from other financial assets

Net cash used in investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds from borrowings

Repayment of borrowings

Net cash provided by / (used in) financing activities

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

Financing arrangements

Non-cash financing and investing activities

Notes

4(i)

4(i)

4(i)

5

43

19

31

44

The above statements of cashflows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

40,308

(42,464)

(37,543)

1,150

(38,549)

-

-

16,723

(5,898)

10,825

23,909

33,361

(93)

57,177

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

201,616

2

2,796

12,996

11,813

105,061

800

4,212

(283,691)

(4,031)

59

51,633

185,879

8

3,455

13,317

9,948

95,747

2,060

2,205

(265,392)

(4,387)

(11)

42,829

4,319

(27,462)

(1,188)

-

3,045

-

(21,286)

(6,778)

-

(6,778)

14,765

18,656

(60)

33,361

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

201,616

2

2,796

12,996

11,813

98,998

800

4,134

(277,826)

(4,031)

-

51,298

185,879

8

3,455

13,317

9,948

89,757

2,060

2,167

(259,731)

(4,387)

-

42,473

40,305

(42,451)

(37,543)

1,150

(38,539)

-

-

16,723

(5,898)

10,825

23,584

31,433

55,017

-

4,319

(27,437)

(1,188)

-

125

3,045

(21,135)

(6,778)

-

(6,778)

14,560

16,873

-

31,433

53

54

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

31 DECEMBER 2010

CONTENTS OF THE NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note

1 University Organisation

2 Summary of significant accounting policies

3

4

5

6

Critical accounting estimates and judgements

Australian Government financial assistance

State and local government financial assistance

Fees and charges

7 Investment revenue and income

8 Royalties

9 Consultancy and contracts

10 Other revenue and income

11 Gains on disposal of assets

12 Employee related expenses

13 Repairs and maintenance

14 Depreciation and amortisation

15 Borrowing costs

16 Impairment of assets

17 Other expenses

18 Income tax

19 Cash and cash equivalents

20 Receivables

21 Inventories

22 Derivative financial instruments

23 Other financial assets

24 Non-current assets classified as held for sale

25 Other non-financial assets

26 Property, plant and equipment

27 Investment property

28 Deferred tax assets and liabilities

29 Intangible assets

30 Trade and other payables

31 Borrowings

32 Provisions

33 Other liabilities

34 Reserves and retained surplus

35 Restricted funds

36 Key management personnel disclosures

37 Remuneration of auditors

38 Contingencies

39 Commitments

40 Related parties

41 Subsidiaries

42 Events occurring after the reporting date

43 Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities

44 Non cash financing and investing activities

45 Financial risk management

46 Write-offs

47 Superannuation

48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance

Page

55

55

92

92

93

84

88

90

83

83

83

80

82

82

98

99

100

100

95

96

97

76

77

77

75

75

76

77

78

78

80

74

74

74

70

70

73

73

100

101

102

102

102

103

103

106

107

110

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

31 DECEMBER 2010

1 UNIVERSITY ORGANISATION

Edith Cowan University (the University) is a Statutory Authority of the Government of Western Australia and is domiciled in

Australia. The address of its registered office is 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia.

The University is a public not-for-profit institution of higher education, funded primarily through Commonwealth grant funding.

Established in 1902, when it began as a teaching college, the University gained university status in 1991. Its principal activities cover teaching, learning and research.

The University Council is the governing body which controls the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the

University. The Vice-Chancellor has been delegated the responsibility of managing the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the University.

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the annual financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. The annual financial statements includes separate financial statements for Edith Cowan University as an individual entity and the consolidated entity consisting of Edith Cowan University and its subsidiaries.

General Statement

The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial report which has been prepared in accordance with Australian

Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board as applied by the Treasurer’s instructions. Several of these are modified by the

Treasurer’s instructions to vary application, disclosure, format and wording.

The Financial Management Act and the Treasurer’s instructions are legislative provisions governing the preparation of financial statements and take precedence over Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting

Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board.

Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

Reporting Entity

The reporting entity comprises the University and its controlled entity, E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL).

Specific details of controlled entities appear in note 41.

(a) Basis of preparation

The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting using the historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation of available-for-sale financial assets, financial assets and liabilities (including derivative instruments) at fair value through profit and loss, certain classes of property, plant and equipment and investment properties.

The consolidated financial report is presented in Australian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($’000).

Critical accounting estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgements in the process of applying the Group’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements are disclosed in note 3.

55

56

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

(b) Basis of consolidation

Subsidiary

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared by combining the financial statements of all entities that comprise the consolidated entity, being the University (the parent entity) and its controlled entities, in accordance with AASB 127

Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements and modified by Treasurer’s instruction 1105. A list of controlled entities appears in note 41 – Subsidiaries. Consistent accounting policies have been applied and all inter entity balances and transactions, and unrealised profits arising within the consolidated entity are eliminated in full.

Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities together are referred to in this financial report as the Group or the consolidated entity.

(c) Income

Revenue recognition

The Group recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the Group and specific criteria have been met for each of the Group’s activities as described below.

The amount of revenue is not considered to be reliably measurable until all contingencies relating to the sale have been resolved. The Group bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specifics of each arrangement.

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Revenue is recognised for the major business activities as follows:

(i) Grants, donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions

The Group treats operating grants received from Australian Government entities as income in the year of receipt.

Grants received from Government are recognised as revenue when the Group obtains control over the asset comprising the contribution, it is probable that economic benefits will flow to the Group and it can be measured reliably. When the

University does not have control over the contribution, does not have the right to receive the contribution or, in case of reciprocal grants, has not fulfilled grant conditions, the grant contribution is treated as a liability in the statement of financial position as deferred income.

Donations, gifts and other contributions are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions, it is probable that economic benefits will flow to the Group and it can be measured reliably.

(ii) Student fees and charges

Fees and charges are recognised as income in the year of receipt, except to the extent that fees and charges relate to courses to be held in future periods. Such income is treated as income in advance. Conversely, fees and charges relating to debtors are recognised as revenue in the year to which the prescribed course relates.

(iii) Rendering of services

Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction.

(iv) Interest revenue

Revenue is accrued on a time proportion basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable.

(v) Sale of goods

Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and the revenue can be measured reliably.

(vi) Royalties

Royalty income is recognised on an accrual basis in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.

Income recognition

(vii) Land development and resale

Land is not sold until the development work is completed, and income is recognised when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably.

(viii) Gains

Gains may be realised or unrealised. Realised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the sale proceeds received or receivable and the carrying amount of the non-current asset. Unrealised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of an asset.

The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of gains are as follows:

Realised gains on disposal of non-current assets

Gains arising on the disposal or retirement of a non-current asset are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and rewards of ownership transfer to the purchaser. Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.

Unrealised gains associated with investment property at fair value

Gains arising from changes in the fair value of an investment property are included in income for the period in which they arise.

Gains or losses associated with financial assets

Gains arising on the retirement of financial assets are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and rewards of ownership transfer from the Group. Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.

(ix) Parking and library fines

Income from parking and library fines are recognised on a cash basis, as the purpose of the fine is to act as a deterrent and not for raising revenue. Non-payment of these fines is not actively pursued.

(x) Lease income

Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

(xi) Service Concession Income

Service concession income generated from the consumption of access rights by the operator is recognised on a straight line basis over the life of the service concession arrangement being 36.5 years. This represents the amortisation of the service concession provision. Refer to Note t(iii) for further details regarding this provision.

57

58

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

(d) Income tax

The Group is exempt from income tax in Australia under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

The Group is subject to foreign income tax for overseas operations. Deferred tax assets are only recognised where it is probable that future amounts will be available to utilise those temporary differences and unused tax losses.

The taxation expense represents the sum of tax currently payable and is measured at 31 December each year.

Taxable profit differs from net profit as reported in the statement of financial performance because it excludes items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and it further excludes items that are never taxable or deductible. The liability for current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted by the reporting date.

The income tax expense or revenue for the period is the tax payable on the current period’s taxable income based on the national income tax rate for each jurisdiction adjusted by changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities attributable to temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements, and to unused tax losses.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised using the liability method, for temporary differences at the tax rates expected to apply when the assets are recovered or liabilities are settled, based on those tax rates which are enacted or substantively enacted for the jurisdiction where the entity is situated. The relevant tax rates are applied to the cumulative amounts of deductible and taxable temporary differences to measure the deferred tax asset or liability. An exception is made for certain temporary differences arising from the initial recognition of an asset or a liability. No deferred tax asset or liability is recognised in relation to these temporary differences if they arose in a transaction, other than a business combination, that at the time of the transaction did not affect either accounting profit or taxable profit or loss.

Deferred tax liabilities and assets are not recognised for temporary differences between the carrying amount and tax bases of investments in controlled entities where the parent entity is able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary differences and it is probable that the differences will not reverse in the foreseeable future.

Current and deferred tax balances attributable to amounts recognised directly in equity are also recognised directly in equity.

(e) Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs that have been incurred for the construction of any qualifying asset are capitalised during the period of time that is required to complete and prepare the asset for its intended use or sale. Other borrowing costs are expensed when incurred.

(f) Impairment of assets

Property, plant and equipment, investment properties, intangible assets, non-current assets held for sale and financial assets are tested for any indication of impairment at each reporting date. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, and the decline in the carrying value is considered significant and prolonged, the asset is considered impaired. The asset is written down to the recoverable amount and an impairment loss is recognised. As the Group is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified as a surplus asset, the recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and depreciated replacement cost.

The risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an asset’s depreciation is materially understated, where the replacement cost is falling or where there is a significant change in useful life. Each relevant class of asset is reviewed annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation / amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of the asset’s future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs.

The recoverable amount of assets identified as surplus assets is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and the present value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Surplus assets carried at fair value have no risk of material impairment where fair value is determined by reference to market-based evidence. Where fair value is determined by reference to depreciated replacement cost, surplus assets are at risk of impairment and the recoverable amount is measured.

Surplus assets at cost are tested for indications of impairment at each reporting date.

(g) Cash and cash equivalents

For cash flow statement presentation purposes, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and short-term deposits with financial institutions with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

(h) Restricted funds

Endowment and bequest funds are classified as restricted funds. Endowment and bequest funds have been received from benefactors who, by the terms of their conveying instruments, have stipulated that the use of funds is limited in future years to the purposes designated by the benefactors.

(i) Receivables

Receivables are recognised and carried at the original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts.

The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis and any receivables identified as uncollectible are written-off against the allowance for impairment. The allowance for impairment (doubtful debts) is raised for all amounts overdue more than 90 days. The carrying amount is equivalent to the fair value as it is due for settlement within 30 days.

(j) Inventories

Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost comprises direct materials and where applicable, import duties, transport and handling costs that have been incurred to bring the inventories to their present location and condition. Cost is calculated using the weighted average method. Net realisable value represents the estimated selling price less all estimated costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and distribution.

(k) Investments and other financial assets

Classification

The Group classifies its investments in the following categories: loans and receivables, held-to-maturity investments and available-for-sale financial assets. The classification depends on the purpose for which the investments were acquired.

Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition and, in the case of assets classified as held-to-maturity, re-evaluates this designation at each reporting date.

(i) Loans and receivables

Receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market.

They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after the statements of financial position date which are classified as non current assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables in the statements of financial position (note 20).

(ii) Held-to-maturity investments

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities that the Group’s management has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity.

(iii) Available-for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets unless management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the statements of financial position date.

Regular purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on trade-date – the date on which the Group commits to purchase or sell the asset. Available-for-sale financial assets are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction costs.

Available-for-sale financial assets are derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial assets have expired or have been transferred and the Group has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership.

In circumstances, where an investment is liquidated and capital distributions are received, the capital distributions are accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investment.

When securities classified as available-for-sale are sold, the accumulated fair value adjustments recognised in equity are included in the Statements of financial performance as gains and losses from investment securities.

59

60

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Subsequent measurement

Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Held-to-maturity investments are carried at cost and interest is accrued on a monthly basis until that interest is recorded at maturity. Loans and receivables are recorded at the transaction cost or face value because there is no interest rate applicable and subsequent measurement is not required as the effect of discounting is not material.

Changes in the fair value of securities classified as available-for-sale are recognised in equity.

Fair value

The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the Group establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These include reference to the fair values of recent arm’s length transactions, involving the same instruments or other instruments that are substantially the same, discounted cash flow analysis, and option pricing models refined to reflect the issuer’s specific circumstances.

Impairment

The Group assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity securities classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of a security below its cost is considered as in determining whether the security is impaired. If any such evidence exists for available-for-sale financial assets, the cumulative loss – measured as the difference between the acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously recognised in profit and loss – is removed from equity and recognised in the statements of financial performance. Impairment losses recognised in the statements of financial performance on equity instruments are not reversed through the statements of financial performance.

(l) Property, plant and equipment

All items of property, plant and equipment are initially recognised at cost. For items of property, plant and equipment acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Each class of property, plant and equipment are subsequently measured at cost or fair value as indicated, less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. For asset classes carried at fair value, increases in the carrying amount arising on revaluation of the asset class are recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in the revaluation surplus in equity. Revaluation decreases that offset previous revaluation increments of the same class of assets are also recognised in other comprehensive income as a reduction in the revaluation surplus reserve. All other revaluation decrements are charged to the statement of comprehensive income as an expense of the period.

Items of property, plant and equipment (excluding Works of Art) costing $5,000 or more are recognised as assets and the cost of utilising assets is expensed (depreciated) over their useful lives. Items of property, plant and equipment costing less than

$5,000 are expensed direct to the income statement (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The assets residual values and useful lives are reviewed each year and adjusted where appropriate at the end of each reporting period.

Land and Buildings

Land and buildings are measured at fair value based on periodic valuations by an external independent valuer, less subsequent depreciation for buildings. Fair value of land is determined on the basis of current market values with reference to recent transactions whereas the fair value of buildings is determined on the basis of depreciated replacement cost which is equivalent to the current replacement cost of an asset less, where applicable, accumulated depreciation calculated on the basis of such cost to reflect the already consumed or expired future economic benefits of the asset.

Buildings are depreciated on a straight line basis over their useful life to the Group commencing from the time that the building is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.

Leasehold improvements

Leasehold improvements are capitalised at amounts directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended for the Group. Such assets are depreciated over the shorter of the lease term and the assets useful life. Where lease arrangements contain options for renewal and extension of the lease term, such extensions are only taken into account for the purposes of determining an appropriate depreciation period when, at inception of the lease, it is reasonably certain that the Group will exercise the option.

Service Concession Assets

The University has entered into arrangements with respect to the development and refurbishment of student accommodation.

Such arrangements provide for the appointment of an operator responsible for construction, asset upgrades and subsequent operation and management of the assets for an extended period. It is deemed that the University continues to control such assets primarily due to the University, as grantor:

(i) ultimately controlling or regulating the services that may be provided by the operator with respect to the student accommodation assets, the pricing of such services, and to whom such services may be provided; and

(ii) controlling the significant residual interest in the infrastructure at the end of the term of the arrangement.

Existing University buildings that form part of the arrangement with the external operator have been transferred from Land and Buildings into the Service Concession Assets class of assets. Capital improvements to such assets are capitalised at cost which is equivalent to their fair value.

Service concession assets under construction at reporting date are recognised at cost, which will be an amount equivalent to fair value based on depreciated replacement cost. Subsequent to initial recognition, service concession assets are measured at cost and depreciated of their useful life.

Works of art

All Works of art are initially recognised at fair value and continue to be measured at fair value, such value being based on current market values determined by a qualified independent valuer. Works of Art are not subject to depreciation having regard to their indefinite life and the expectation of increasing value over time. Such assets controlled by the University are classified as heritage assets and are protected and preserved for public exhibition, education, research and the furtherance of public service. They are neither disposed of for financial gain nor encumbered in any manner.

Library Collections

Library Collections are carried at a value equivalent to the cost of the last three years’ acquisitions of library books. In this regard, the current period’s acquisitions are capitalised to the carrying value whilst the cost of books acquired during the financial year that ended three years prior to the current financial year end are expensed to the statement of comprehensive income.

61

62

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

Depreciation

The depreciable amount of all fixed assets including buildings and capitalised lease assets, but excluding freehold land and

Works of Art, are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the asset’s useful life to the Group commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.

The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable assets are:

Asset category

Buildings

Service concession assets – buildings

Computing equipment

Other equipment and furniture

Motor vehicles

Works of art

Leasehold improvements

Library collections

Life

50 years

50 years

4 years

6-10 years

4-6 years

Not depreciated

Refer to policy above

Refer to policy above

(m) Investment properties

Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of the University and comprises of land and / or buildings which are held to earn rentals and / or capital appreciation.

Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is probable that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the University.

Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its cost shall be deemed to be its fair value, as at the date of acquisition.

Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment property is carried at fair value, which is based on active market prices, adjusted, if necessary, for any difference in the nature, location or condition of the specific asset. Changes in fair values are recorded in the income statement as part of other investment income. The properties are not depreciated.

Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the statement of financial performance in the periods in which it is receivable and is accounted for on a straight line basis over the lease term.

(n) Leases

Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases (note 39).The Group leases certain property and equipment by way of operating leases. Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) are charged to the income statements on a straight-line basis, over the period of the lease.

(o) Intangible assets

Computer software

Intangible assets comprise of externally acquired computer software that is customised by the Group. All acquired and internally developed intangible assets are initially measured at cost. For assets acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, where appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Group and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the statement of financial performance during the financial period in which they are incurred.

Computer software is amortised using the straight line method, over its estimated useful life of 2-5 years.

(p) Unfunded superannuation

In accordance with the 1998 instructions issued by the Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs (DETYA) now known as the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR), the effects of the unfunded superannuation liabilities of the Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities were recorded in the Statements of financial performance and the Statements of financial position for the first time in 1998. The prior years’ practice had been to disclose liabilities by way of a note to the financial statements.

An arrangement exists between the Australian Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the Edith Cowan University’s beneficiaries of the State Superannuation Scheme on an emerging cost basis. This arrangement is evidenced by the State Grants (General Revenue) Amendment Act 1987, Higher Education Funding Act

1988 and subsequent amending legislation. Accordingly, the unfunded liabilities have been recognised in the statements of financial position under Provisions with a corresponding asset recognised under Receivables. The recognition of both the asset and the liability consequently does not affect the year-end net asset position of the Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities.

(q) Non-current assets held for sale

Non-current assets classified as held for sale are stated at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell where the carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use.

An impairment loss is recognised for any initial or subsequent write down of the asset to fair value less costs to sell. A gain is recognised for any subsequent increases in fair value less costs to sell of an asset, but not in excess of any cumulative impairment loss previously recognised. A gain or loss not previously recognised by the date of the sale of the non-current asset is recognised at the date of derecognition.

Non-current assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised and are presented separately from other assets in the statement of financial position.

(r) Payables

Payables are recognised when the consolidated entity becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services. Accounts payable are not interest bearing and are stated at their nominal value.

The carrying amount is equivalent to its fair value, as they are generally settled within 30 days.

(s) Borrowings

Interest-bearing loans are recorded at cost when the proceeds are received, net of direct issued costs. Finance charges are accounted for on an accrual basis.

Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the Group has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the statements of financial position date.

63

64

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

(t) Provisions

Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and amount and are recognised where there is a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date.

(i) Employee benefits

Annual leave

The liability for annual leave expected to be settled within 12 months after the reporting period is recognised and measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled.

Annual leave not expected to be settled within 12 months after the reporting period is recognised and measured at the present value of amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled using the remuneration rate expected to apply at the time of settlement.

When assessing expected future payments consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels including non-salary components such as employer superannuation contributions, as well as the experience of employee departures and periods of service. The expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the end of the reporting period on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.

The provision for annual leave is classified as a current liability as the Group does not have an unconditional right to the defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period.

Long service leave

A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed one year of service based on remuneration rates current as at the end of the reporting period.

An actuarial assessment of long service leave undertaken by PriceWaterhouseCoopers Securities Ltd at 31 July 2010 determined that the liability measured using the short-hand measurement technique above was not materially different from the liability determined using the present value of expected future payments. This calculation is consistent with the Group’s experience of employee retention and leave taken.

Unconditional long service leave provisions are classified as current liabilities as the University does not have an unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period. Conditional long service leave provisions are classified as non-current liabilities because the Group has an unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability until the employee has completed the requisite years of service.

Other compensated absences

Liability for sick leave is recognised as the related service is provided by the employees and which increases their sick leave entitlement. The accumulated sick leave entitlement is measured at the additional undiscounted amount expected to be paid as a result of the unused entitlement that has accumulated at the end of the reporting period. The past history of leave utilisation is taken into account in the estimation process.

Employment on-costs

Employment on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance and payroll tax, are not employee benefits and are recognised as liabilities and expenses when the employment to which they relate have occurred. Employment on-costs are not included as part of the Group’s employee related expenses and the related liability is included in the employment on-costs provision.

Termination benefits

Termination benefits are payable when employment is terminated before the normal retirement date, or when an employee accepts voluntary redundancy in exchange for these benefits. The Group recognises termination benefits when it is demonstrably committed to either terminating the employment of current employees according to a detailed formal plan without possibility of withdrawal or providing termination benefits as a result of an offer made to encourage voluntary redundancy. Benefits falling due more than 12 months after balance date are discounted to present value.

(ii) Superannuation

The Group contributes to a number of superannuation schemes, including both defined contribution and defined benefit schemes. Payments to defined contribution schemes are charged as an expense as they fall due. The University’s obligation is limited to these contributions.

Defined benefit schemes provide a defined lump sum benefit to scheme members based on years of service and final average salary. A defined benefit liability is included in the statement of financial position equal to the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the reporting date (less any past service costs not yet recognised) less the fair value of scheme assets at the reporting date.

Actuarial gains and losses are recognised immediately as income or expense in the statement of financial performance in the year in which they occur.

For details relating to the individual schemes, refer to note 47.

(iii) Service Concession Provision

The University has recognised a service concession provision in the statement of financial position. The liability reflects the performance obligation the University has incurred to allow the operator access to, and the right to generate revenue from, service concession assets. The liability incurred is initially recognised at an amount equivalent to the value of service concession assets delivered to the University and is amortised to the statement of comprehensive income over the duration of the service concession arrangement. As a provision, it is subsequently measured at the best estimate of the amount that the

University would rationally pay to settle the obligation at the reporting date or to transfer it to a third party. This will generally equate to the unamortised balance at each reporting date.

(u) Foreign currency translation and hedge accounting

Transactions denominated in currencies other than Australian dollars are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the dates of the transactions. At each reporting date, monetary assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rate of exchange prevailing at the reporting date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at the reporting date when the fair value was determined. Exchange gains and losses arising on retranslation are included in the statement of financial performance for the period.

Forward foreign exchange contracts are entered into as hedges to avoid or minimise possible adverse financial effects of movements in exchange rates. Such derivative financial instruments are stated at fair value. Changes in the fair value of derivative financial instruments that are designated and effective as hedges of future cash flows are recognised directly in equity and the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the statement of financial performance.

When the hedged firm commitment results in the recognition of an asset or a liability, then, at the time the asset or liability is recognised, the associated gains or losses that had previously been recognised in equity are included in the initial measurement of the acquisition cost or other carrying amount of the asset or liability. For all other cash flow hedges, the gains or losses that are recognised in equity are transferred to the statement of financial performance in the same year in which the hedged firm commitment affects the net profit and loss, for example when the future sale actually occurs.

65

66

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

(v) Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense.

Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included with other receivables or payables in the statements of financial position.

Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the taxation authority, are presented as operating cash flow.

(w) Comparative figures

Comparative figures are, where appropriate, reclassified to be comparable with the figures presented in the current financial year.

(x) New accounting standards and Interpretations

Certain new Accounting Standards and Interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for 31 December 2010 reporting periods. The Edith Cowan University’s assessment of the impact of these new Standards and Interpretations is set out below:

(i) AASB 2009-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards Classification of Rights Issues [AASB 132] (effective from 1 January 2011)

The amendment provides relief to entities that issue rights in a currency other than their functional currency, from treating the rights as derivatives with fair value changes recorded in profit or loss. Such rights will now be classified as equity instruments when certain conditions are met. The Group does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.

(ii) AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures (December 2009) and AASB 2007-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting

Standards arising from AASB 8 (effective from 1 January 2011)

The revised AASB 124 simplifies the definition of a related party, clarifying its intended meaning and eliminating inconsistencies from the definition, including:

(a) The definition now identifies a subsidiary and an associate with the same investor as related parties of each other

(b) Entities significantly influenced by one person and entities significantly influenced by a close member of the family of that person are no longer related parties of each other

(c) The definition now identifies that, whenever a person or entity has both joint control over a second entity and joint control or significant influence over a third party, the second and third entities are related to each other.

A partial exemption is also provided from the disclosure requirements for government related entities. Entities that are related by virtue of being controlled by the same government can provide reduced related party disclosures.The Group will consider these provisions when applicable.

(iii) AASB 9 Financial Instruments and AASB 2009-11 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9

[AASB 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 101, 102, 108, 112, 118, 121, 127, 128, 131, 132, 136, 139, 1023 & 1038 and Interpretations 10 & 12]

(effective from 1 January 2013)

AASB 9 and AASB 2009-11 are effective to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013 with the aim of replacing AASB 139 Financial instruments: Recognition and Measurement. AASB 9 simplifies the classification of financial assets into those to be carried at amortised cost, and those to be carried at fair value. It also simplifies requirements for embedded derivatives and removes the tainting rules associated with held-to-maturity assets. Entities will be required to reclassify their financial assets when there is a change in the entity’s business. The Group will consider adopting these provisions when it is applicable.

(iv) AASB 2009-12 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards [AASBs 5, 8, 108, 110, 112, 119, 133, 137, 139, 1023 &

1031 and Interpretations 2, 4, 16, 1039 & 1052] (effective from 1 January 2011)

This amendment makes numerous editorial changes to a range of Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations.

In particular, it amends AASB 8 Operating Segments to require an entity to exercise judgement in assessing whether a government and entities known to be under the control of that government are considered a single customer for the purposes of certain operating segment disclosures. It also makes numerous editorial amendments to a range of

Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations, including amendments to reflect changes made to the text of IFRS by the IASB.

(v) AASB 2009-14 Amendments to Australian Interpretation Prepayments of a Minimum Funding Requirement (effective from 1 January 2011)

These amendments arise from the issuance of Prepayments of a Minimum Funding Requirement (Amendments to

IFRIC 14). The requirements of IFRIC 14 meant that some entities that were subject to minimum funding requirements could not treat any surplus in a defined benefit pension plan as an economic benefit. The amendment requires entities to treat the benefit of such an early payment as a pension asset. Subsequently, the remaining surplus in the plan, if any, is subject to the same analysis as if no prepayment had been made. The Group does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.

(vi) AASB 2010-1 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards Limited Exemption from Comparative AASB 7

Disclosures for First time Adopters (effective from 1 January 2011)

First-time adopters of Australian Accounting Standards are permitted to use the same transition provisions permitted for existing preparers of financial statements prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards that are included in AASB 2009-2. The Group does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.

(vii) AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2 Amendments to Australian

Accounting Standards arising from reduced disclosure requirements (effective from 1 January 2014)

This Standard establishes a differential financial reporting framework consisting of two Tiers of reporting requirements for preparing general purpose financial statements:

(a) Tier 1: Australian Accounting Standards

(b) Tier 2: Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements

Tier 2 comprises the recognition, measurement and presentation requirements of Tier 1 and substantially reduced disclosures corresponding to those requirements.The following entities apply Tier 1 requirements in preparing general purpose financial statements:

(a) For-profit entities in the private sector that have public accountability (as defined in this Standard)

(b) The Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.

The following entities apply either Tier 2 or Tier 1 requirements in preparing general purpose financial statements:

(a) For-profit private sector entities that do not have public accountability

(b) All not-for-profit private sector entities

(c) Public sector entities other than the Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.The Group will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.

(viii) AASB 2010-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project [AASB 3,

AASB 7, AASB 121, AASB 128, AASB 131, AASB 132 & AASB 139] (effective 1 January 2011)

Limits the scope of the measurement choices of non-controlling interest to instruments that are present ownership interests and entitle their holders to a proportionate share of the entity’s net assets in the event of liquidation. Other components of NCI are measured at fair value. Requires an entity (in a business combination) to account for the replacement of the acquiree’s share-based payment transactions (whether obliged or voluntarily), in a consistent manner i.e. allocate between consideration and post combination expenses. Clarifies that contingent consideration from a business combination that occurred before the effective date of AASB 3 Revised is not restated. Clarifies that the revised accounting for loss of significant influence or joint control (from the issue of IFRS 3 Revised) is only applicable prospectively.

67

68

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

(ix) AASB 2010-4 Further Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project

[AASB 1, AASB 7, AASB 101, AASB 134 and Interpretation 13] (effective from 1 January 2011)

Emphasises the interaction between quantitative and qualitative AASB 7 disclosures and the nature and extent of risks associated with financial instruments. Clarifies that an entity will present an analysis of other comprehensive income for each component of equity, either in the statement of changes in equity or in the notes to the financial statements.

Provides guidance to illustrate how to apply disclosure principles in AASB 134 for significant events and transactions.

Clarifies that when the fair value of award credits is measured based on the value of the awards for which they could be redeemed, the amount of discounts or incentives otherwise granted to customers not participating in the award credit scheme, is to be taken into account. The Group will consider the improvements when applicable.

(x) Interpretation 19 Interpretation 19 Extinguishing Financial Liabilities with Equity Instruments (effective from

1 January 2011)

This interpretation clarifies that equity instruments issued to a creditor to extinguish a financial liability are “consideration paid in accordance with paragraph 41 of IAS 39. As a result, the financial liability is derecognised and the equity instruments issued are treated as consideration paid to extinguish that financial liability. The interpretation states that equity instruments issued as payment of a debt should be measured at the fair value of the equity instruments issued, if this can be determined reliably. If the fair value of the equity instruments issued is not reliably determinable, the equity instruments should be measured by reference to the fair value of the financial liability extinguished as of the date of extinguishment. The Group will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.

(xi) AASB 2010-5 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards [AASB 1, 3, 4, 5, 101, 107, 112, 118, 119, 121, 132, 133,

134, 137, 139, 140, 1023 & 1038 and Interpretations 112, 115, 127, 132 & 1042] (effective from 1 January 2011)

This Standard makes numerous editorial amendments to a range of Australian Accounting Standards and

Interpretations, including amendments to reflect changes made to the text of IFRS by the IASB. These amendments have no major impact on the requirements of the amended pronouncements.

(xii) AASB 2010-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards Disclosures on Transfers of Financial Assets [AASB 1 &

AASB 7] (effective from 1 January 2012)

The amendments increase the disclosure requirements for transactions involving transfers of financial assets.

Disclosures require enhancements to the existing disclosures in IFRS 7 where an asset is transferred but is not derecognised and introduce new disclosures for assets that are derecognised but the entity continues to have a continuing exposure to the asset after the sale. The Group will consider the ammendments when applicable.

(y) Change in Accounting Policies

The Group changed its accounting policy in relation to the timing of recognition of construction work-in-progress as it relates to service concession assets for the year ended 31 December 2010. Such work-in-progress was previously not recognised on the basis that it was deemed that substantial construction risk remained with the developer. The Group has now elected to recognise such assets on the basis that reflecting such construction provides a more accurate reflection of the anticipated outcome of the service concession arrangement and the control of service potential inherent in such assets. A provision is also recognised to reflect the consequential obligation to the operator to allow access to the sites for the purposes of construction and the rights granted to the operator to general rental income. Such provision is measured at the fair value of the construction asset recognised.

A consequential impact of this accounting policy change is to recognise that the service concession arrangement has commenced from the date that construction began to be recognised as an asset under the revised policy. In this regard, the

University’s existing land and buildings that are subject to the arrangement with the operator have been reclassified as service concession assets. Since the University has elected to measure service concession assets at cost, revaluations occurring between the period commencing from the start of the service concession period and each reporting date have been unwound.

Adjustments to depreciation have also resulted.

Income reflecting the granting of access rights to the operator commencing from the date of construction is also recognised.

The aggregate effect of the change in accounting policy on the annual financial statements for the years ended 31 December

2010 and 31 December 2009 is as follows:

31 December

2010

$’000

Increase /

(Decrease)

$’000

31 December

2010 (Restated)

$’000

Statements of comprehensive Income (extract)

Income – service concession income

Depreciation and amortisation

Operating result before income tax

Statement of financial position (extract)

Service concession assets – land

Service concession assets – buildings

Provision for service concession liabilities – non-current

Net assets

Reserves

Retained earnings

Total equity

19,742

20,541

8,682

53,598

33,658

802,675

384,135

418,540

802,675

948

(10)

958

2,467

(676)

(1,422)

3,213

1,786

1,427

3,213

948

19,732

21,499

11,149

52,922

32,236

805,888

385,921

419,967

805,888

31 December

2009

$’000

Increase /

(Decrease)

$’000

31 December

2009 (Restated)

$’000

Statement of comprehensive Income (extract)

Income – service concession income

Depreciation and amortisation

Operating result before income tax

Gain on revaluation of land and buildings

Total comprehensive income

Statement of financial position (extract)

Work-in-progress

Land

Buildings

Service concession assets – land

Service concession assets – buildings

Provisions – service concession assets – current

Provisions – service concession assets – non-current

Net assets

Reserves

Retained earnings

Total equity

18,924

26,113

3,409

32,290

17,982

177,353

567,813

805,168

428,431

376,737

805,168

-

-

-

-

-

474

5

469

1,786

2,255

9,600

(8,211)

(19,380)

10,678

18,693

948

8,178

2,255

1,786

469

2,255

474

18,929

26,582

5,195

34,545

27,582

169,142

548,433

10,678

18,693

948

8,178

807,423

430,217

377,206

807,423

69

70

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

3 CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES AND JUDGEMENTS

Estimates and judgements are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that may have a financial impact on the Group and that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

(a) Critical accounting estimates and assumptions

The key assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimating uncertainty at the reporting date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year include:

„ „

Allowances for impairment of financial assets;

„ „

Estimating useful life of key assets – the useful life reflects the consumption of the key assets’ future economic benefits.

Defined benefit superannuation plans

In determining the Group’s ultimate cost of its defined benefit superannuation plans, actuarial assumptions are required to be made. The principal actuarial assumptions used are disclosed in note 47.

(b) Critical judgements in applying the entity’s accounting policies

The judgements that have been made in the process of applying accounting policies which have the most significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial report include:

„ „

Estimating the useful life of key assets;

„ „

Impairment of property, plant and equipment, investment properties, receivables and other financial assets;

„ „

Classification of financial assets;

„ „

Discount rates used in estimating provisions;

„ „

Long service retention rates and discount rates.

4 AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Notes

48.1

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

(a) Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other grants

Commonwealth Grant Scheme

#1

Indigenous Support Program

Partnership and Participation Program

#2

Disability Support Program

Workplace Reform Program

Workplace Productivity Program

Learning and Teaching Performance Fund

Capital Development Pool

Improving the Practical Component of

Teacher Education Initiative

Transitional Cost Program

Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants

116,947

624

1,362

72

-

-

1,042

-

118

-

120,165

830

800

105,955

97,263

719

198

24

1,252

265

2,838

1,766

2010

Parent

$’000

116,947

624

1,362

72

-

-

1,042

-

118

-

120,165

2009

$’000

97,263

719

198

24

1,252

265

2,838

1,766

830

800

105,955

(b) Higher Education Loan Programs

HECS-HELP

FEE-HELP

#3

Total Higher Education Loan Programs

(c) Scholarships

Australian Postgraduate Awards

International Postgraduate Research

Scholarships

Commonwealth Education Cost

Scholarships

#4

Commonwealth Accommodation

Scholarships

#4

Indigenous Access Scholarships

Total Scholarships

(d) DIISR Research

Joint Research Engagement Program

#5

Research Training Scheme

Research Infrastructure Block Grants

Implementation Assistance Program

Australian Scheme for Higher Education

Repositories

Sustainable Research Excellence

(SRE) Program

Commercialisation Training Scheme

Total DIISR Research Grants

(e) Voluntary Student Unionism

VSU transition fund

Total VSU

(f) Other Capital Funding

Teaching and Learning Capital Fund

Total Other Capital Funding

(g) Australian Research Council

(i) Discovery

Project

(ii) Linkages

Projects

Total Australian Research Council

Notes

48.2

48.3

48.4

48.5

48.6

48.7

48.7(a)

48.7(b)

2,034

4,412

371

41

451

47

7,356

-

1,392

168

161

52

106

1,879

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

57,521

7,455

64,976

50,148

5,365

55,513

1,865

4,380

385

85

197

46

-

6,958

1,056

164

1,481

1,598

71

4,370

-

-

-

-

925

925

10,902

10,902

82

784

866

233

957

1,190

2,034

4,412

371

41

451

47

7,356

-

1,392

168

161

52

106

1,879

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

57,521

7,455

64,976

50,148

5,365

55,513

1,865

4,380

385

85

197

46

-

6,958

1,056

164

1,481

1,598

71

4,370

-

-

-

-

925

925

10,902

10,902

82

784

866

233

957

1,190

71

72

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

4 AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (CONTINUED)

Notes

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

(h) Other Australian Government financial assistance

National competitive

Other research grants

Other non-research grants

Total Other Australian Government financial assistance

Total Australian Government financial assistance

1,726

3,084

2,249

7,059

202,301

967

1,899

171

3,037

188,850

1,726

3,084

2,249

7,059

202,301

2009

$’000

967

1,899

171

3,037

188,850

#1 Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS – Regional Loading and CGS – Enabling Loading and Science and Maths Transitional Loading.

#2 Includes Equity Support Program.

#3 Program in respect of FEE-HELP for Higher Education only.

#4 Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.

#5 Includes Institutional Grants Scheme.

Reconciliation

Australian Government grants

[(a) + (c) + (d) + (e) + (f) + (g) + (h)]

HECS-HELP payments

FEE-HELP payments

Total Australian Government financial assistance

(i) Australian Government Grants received – cash basis (Ref note 48)

CGS and Other DEEWR Grants

Higher Education Loan Programs

Scholarships

DIISR Research

Voluntary Student Unionism

Other Capital Funding

ARC grants Discovery

ARC grants Linkages

Other Australian Government Grants

Total Australian Government Grants received – cash basis

137,325

57,521

7,455

202,301

120,165

64,323

1,857

7,356

72

784

7,059

201,616

-

-

133,337

50,148

5,365

188,850

106,013

52,484

4,370

6,958

925

10,902

233

957

3,038

185,880

137,325

57,521

7,455

202,301

120,165

64,323

1,857

7,356

72

784

7,059

201,616

-

-

133,337

50,148

5,365

188,850

106,013

52,484

4,370

6,958

925

10,902

233

957

3,038

185,880

OS-Help (Net)

Superannuation Supplementation

Total Australian Government funding received – cash basis

2

2,796

204,414

8

3,455

189,343

2

2,796

204,414

8

3,455

189,343

5 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

State financial assistance

WA State Department of Education and Training*

WA State and local government research grants

Total State and local government financial assistance

7,725

5,271

12,996

7,586

5,731

13,317

* The funding relates to West Australian Academy of Performing Arts ([email protected]).

6 FEES AND CHARGES

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Course fees and charges

Continuing education

Fee-paying overseas students

Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students

Fee-paying domestic undergraduate students

Fee-paying domestic non-award students

Total course fees and charges

595

60,020

3,542

5

2

64,164

415

57,099

3,199

48

60,761

-

Other non-course fees and charges

Amenities and service fees

Course consumable fees

Examination, registration and photocopying fees

Late fees

Library fines

Other fees and charges

Parking fees

Rental charges

Student accommodation

Seminar and workshop fees

Total other non-course fees and charges

Total fees and charges

1,523

1,430

618

-

5,524

69,688

191

36

470

280

51

925

1,410

645

1,045

760

5,479

66,240

97

57

468

170

61

766

1,523

1,430

618

-

5,524

69,688

191

36

470

280

51

925

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

7,725

5,271

12,996

7,586

5,731

13,317

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

595

60,020

3,542

5

2

64,164

415

57,099

3,199

48

60,761

-

1,410

645

1,045

760

5,479

66,240

97

57

468

170

61

766

73

74

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

7 INVESTMENT REVENUE AND INCOME

Investment revenue

Interest revenue from loan to subsidiary

Interest revenue from operating account

Interest revenue from bank bills

Total investment revenue

Other investment income

Dividends received

Distributions from managed funds

Rental income from investment properties

Total other investment income

Other investment losses

Change in fair value of investment properties

Net investment income

8 ROYALTIES

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

415

4,571

4,986

-

293

1,912

2,205

-

79

721

621

1,421

626

5,781

1,209

852

1,056

3,117

709

4,613

Royalties

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

9,497

$’000

9,536

9 CONSULTANCY AND CONTRACTS

Research

Consultancy

Contract research

Total consultancy and contracts

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

277

3,009

3,286

385

2,967

3,352

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

337

4,571

4,908

-

3

255

1,912

2,170

79

721

621

1,421

626

5,703

1,209

852

1,056

3,117

709

4,578

2010

Parent

$’000

5,902

2009

$’000

5,900

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

264

3,009

3,273

337

2,967

3,304

10 OTHER REVENUE AND INCOME

Other revenue

Donations and bequests

Prizes, contributions and scholarships

Proceed from sale of non-capitalised equipment

Professional development courses

Commissions, recoveries and rebates received

Expense recoups

Box office – WAAPA

Sundry Income

Medical practitioners fees

Other revenue

Total other revenue

Other income

Bad debts recovered

Insurance claims

Service concession income

Other income

Total other income

Total other revenue and income

11 GAINS ON DISPOSAL OF ASSETS

643

132

948

765

2,488

9,656

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

463

414

120

2,317

1,931

116

564

701

98

444

7,168

585

1,254

380

2,475

1,998

108

387

842

87

403

8,519

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

(a) Disposal of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale

Carrying amount of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale sold

Net gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale

40,659

(37,428)

3,231

10,177

(8,990)

1,187

18

-

474

357

849

9,368

40,659

(37,426)

3,233

643

132

948

609

2,332

7,183

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

463

414

120

-

1,931

116

564

701

98

444

4,851

585

1,254

380

-

1,998

108

387

842

87

403

6,044

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

18

-

474

187

679

6,723

10,177

(8,983)

1,194

75

76

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

12 EMPLOYEE RELATED EXPENSES

Academic

Salaries

Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes

Long service leave expense

Annual leave

Redundancy costs

Other

Total academic

Non-academic

Salaries

Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes

Long service leave expense

Annual leave

Redundancy costs

Other

Total non-academic

Total employee related expenses

The employment on-costs expense is included at note 17.

13 REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE

75,538

10,712

4,630

1,417

538

340

93,175

183,061

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

71,750

10,331

2,061

330

2,609

2,805

89,886

67,159

9,330

1,620

360

242

2,418

81,129

70,750

9,992

1,889

385

508

349

83,873

165,002

Buildings maintenance

Grounds maintenance

Other equipment maintenance

Total repairs and maintenance

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

4,893

$’000

5,754

545

901

6,339

532

1,068

7,354

73,134

10,470

4,655

1,471

538

340

90,608

180,453

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

71,750

10,331

2,061

330

2,609

2,764

89,845

67,159

9,330

1,620

360

242

2,418

81,129

2010

Parent

$’000

4,893

545

897

6,335

2009

$’000

5,754

532

1,068

7,354

68,588

9,776

1,836

391

508

349

81,448

162,577

14 DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION

Depreciation

Buildings

Service concession assets

Leasehold improvements

Other equipment and furniture

Computing equipment

Motor vehicles

Library collections

Total depreciation

Amortisation

Intangible assets

Total amortisation

Total depreciation and amortisation

15 BORROWING COSTS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

11,175

377

934

2,795

1,407

61

2,983

19,732

11,072

189

901

2,650

1,397

46

2,652

18,907

19,732

-

-

22

22

18,929

Interest paid

Less: Amount capitalised

Total borrowing costs expensed

16 IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

4,253

$’000

4,387

(272)

3,981

4,387

-

Bad and Doubtful Debts

Impairment of investments

Impairment of property, plant and equipment

Impairment of intangibles

Total impairments of assets

*Additional details on impairments of receivables are included at note 20.

Consolidated

2010

$’000

-

1,245

137

1,382

-

2009

$’000

670

50

53

773

-

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

11,175

377

931

2,791

1,395

61

2,983

19,713

11,072

189

897

2,641

1,375

45

2,652

18,871

19,713

-

-

18,871

-

-

2010

Parent

$’000

4,253

(272)

3,981

2009

$’000

4,387

4,387

-

2010

$’000

-

1,245

137

1,382

-

Parent

2009

$’000

670

50

-

720

-

77

78

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

17 OTHER EXPENSES

Advertising and marketing expenses

Audit fees, bank charges, legal costs and insurance

Computer software and maintenance

Employment on-costs*

General consumables

Hire and lease Costs

Non-capitalised equipment

Operating lease rental expenses

Printing, postage and stationery

Professional and consulting fees

Student related expenditure

Telecommunications

Travel, staff development & entertainment

Utilities and rates

Write-offs during the year**

Other

Total other expenses

459

3,403

13,652

15,065

1,517

7,015

6,278

32

8,381

95,870

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

9,504

1,577

9,080

$’000

5,927

2,290

7,339

10,006

10,626

3,995

1,513

3,773

4,834

1,779

3,296

437

3,434

11,035

14,527

1,814

7,418

5,480

45

7,651

87,312

*Includes workers’ compensation insurance, payroll tax and other employment on-costs. The on-costs liability associated with the recognition of annual leave and long service leave liability is included at note 32. Superannuation contributions accrued as part of the provision for leave are employee benefits and are not included in employment on costs.

**Additional details on write-offs during the year are included at note 46.

414

3,283

13,502

15,065

1,487

6,648

6,022

30

7,800

92,867

2010

Parent

$’000

9,262

1,396

9,059

10,397

3,216

1,513

3,773

2009

$’000

5,586

1,263

7,308

9,803

4,229

1,777

3,296

385

3,324

10,921

14,527

1,779

7,071

5,227

45

7,651

84,192

18 INCOME TAX

(a) Income tax expense / (benefit)

Current tax

Deferred tax

Adjustments for current tax of prior periods

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

25

(35)

(10)

-

236

2

3

241

Income tax expense is attributable to:

Operating result from continuing operations

Aggregate income tax (benefit) / expense

Deferred income tax (revenue) / expense included in income tax expense comprises:

Decrease / (increase) in deferred tax assets (note 28)

Increase in deferred tax liabilities (note 28)

(10)

(10)

(45)

10

(35)

241

241

77

(75)

2

Income tax is only in relation to the controlled entity ECURL which includes overseas branches.

18 INCOME TAX (CONTINUED)

(b) Numerical reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable

Operating result from continuing operations before income tax expense

Less: Non taxable operating result from australian operations

Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30% (2009 – 30%)

Difference in overseas tax rates

Adjust for current tax of prior years

Changes in rates during the reporting period

Deferred tax under-provision

Previously unrecognised tax losses used to reduce deferred tax expense

Previously unrecognised tax losses used to reduce current tax expense

Tax effect of amounts which are not deductible (assessable) in calculating taxable income:

Depreciation and amortisation

Sundry items

Income tax expense adjusted for permanent differences

Tax losses carried forward not recognised

Total income tax expense

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

21,499

(21,443)

56

17

(26)

-

10

-

(17)

-

26,582

(25,412)

1,170

210

(7)

59

-

(65)

-

-

(10)

-

(10)

16

(10)

16

3

19

25

241

(c) Amounts recognised directly in equity

Aggregate current and deferred tax arising in the reporting period and not recognised in net profit or loss but directly debited or credited to equity

Net deferred tax – credited directly to equity

(7)

(7)

(12)

(12)

(d) Tax losses

Unused tax losses for which no deferred tax asset has been recognised

Potential tax benefit @ 30%

All unused tax losses were incurred by the New Zealand branch.

228

68

223

67

79

80

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

19 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash at bank and on hand

Bank Bills

Cash held in imprests

Total cash and cash equivalents

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

8,950

48,202

25

$’000

11,260

22,077

24

57,177

33,361

2010

$’000

7,816

47,176

25

55,017

Parent

2009

$’000

9,332

22,077

24

31,433

Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year

The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the cash flow statement as follows:

Unrestricted cash

Restricted funds (note 35)

Balances per cash flow statement

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

51,638

5,539

57,177

27,720

5,641

33,361

2010

$’000

49,478

5,539

55,017

Parent

2009

$’000

25,792

5,641

31,433

20 RECEIVABLES

Current

Trade receivables and student fees

Less: Provision for impaired receivables

Deferred Government contribution for superannuation

GST and withholding tax receivable

Total current receivables

Non-current

Deferred Government contribution for superannuation

Total trade and other receivables

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

8,761

(511)

8,250

3,144

1,583

12,977

9,906

(1,268)

8,638

3,106

1,402

13,146

24,548

37,525

25,972

39,118

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

8,103

(511)

7,592

3,144

1,583

12,319

9,141

(1,268)

7,873

3,106

1,402

12,381

24,548

36,867

25,972

38,353

20 RECEIVABLES (CONTINUED)

Impaired receivables

As at 31 December 2010 current receivables of the group with a nominal value of $0.5m (2009: $1.3m) were impaired.

It was assessed that a portion of the receivables is expected to be recovered.

3-6 months

Over 6 months

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

314

$’000

933

197

511

335

1,268

As of 31 December 2010, trade receivables of $2.9m (2009: $2.5m) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of independent customers for whom there is no recent history of default.

The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:

Not more than 3 months

More than 3 months but less than 6 months

More than 6 months but less than 1 year

More than 1 year

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2,746

203

2,949

-

-

2009

$’000

2,164

280

12

76

2,532

Movements in the provision for impaired receivables are as follows:

At 1 January 2009

Provision for impairment recognised during the year

Receivables written off during the year as uncollectible

Amounts recovered during the year

At 31 December 2010

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

1,268

$’000

875

670

(114)

-

(643)

511

(258)

(19)

1,268

The creation and release of the provision for impaired receivables has been included in ‘Impairment of assets’ in the income statements. Amounts charged to the provision account are generally written off when there is no expectation of recovering additional cash.

The other amounts within receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history, it is expected that these amounts will be received when due.

81

82

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

21 INVENTORIES

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Current

Trading stock

– at cost

2,505

2,392

2,065

2,029

22 DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Current assets

Forward foreign exchange contracts – cash flow hedges

Total derivative financial instruments (asset)

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

218

218

79

79

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

218

218

79

79

Current liabilities

Forward foreign exchange contracts – cash flow hedges

Total derivative financial instruments (liability)

Net derivative financial instruments

242

242

(24)

80

80

(1)

242

242

(24)

80

80

(1)

(a) Instruments used by the Group

The Group is party to derivative financial instruments in the normal course of business in order to hedge exposure to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates in accordance with the University’s financial risk management policies

(refer to note 45).

Forward exchange contracts – cash flow hedges

In order to protect against exchange rate movements, the University has entered into a forward exchange contract to purchase United Stated Dollars and Great British Pounds.

These contracts are hedging obligations for payments for the ensuing financial year. The contracts are timed to mature when payments for major shipments of component parts are scheduled to be made.

The portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument that is determined to be an effective hedge is recognised directly in equity. When the cash flows occur, the University adjusts the initial measurement of the component recognised in the balance sheets by the related amount deferred in equity.

(b) Interest rate and foreign exchange risk

For an analysis of the sensitivity of derivatives to interest rate and foreign exchange risk refer to note 45.

23 OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Current

Held to maturity

Term deposits

Total current other financial assets

50,781

50,781

13,484

13,484

50,772

50,772

13,475

13,475

Non-current

Available for sale investments

Investment in shares

Investment in managed funds*

Total non-current other financial assets

1,544

19,056

20,600

1,640

19,086

20,726

1,544

19,056

20,600

1,640

19,086

20,726

Total other financial assets 71,381

34,210

71,372

34,201

*During 2010, the University received $1.1m (2009: $3.0m) capital distributions from a fund that is in the process of being gradually wound-up.

These capital distributions have been accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investment. Fair value changes of this fund continue to be recognised in equity (refer note 34). The cumulative gains and losses of this fund will be included in the statement of financial performance once the winding up of the fund is completed and the investment in the fund is derecognised.

24 NON-CURRENT ASSETS CLASSIFIED AS HELD FOR SALE

Plant and equipment

Land

Total non-current assets classified as held for sale

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

262

$’000

-

262

-

14,318

14,318

25 OTHER NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

Current

Accrued income

Advances and prepayments

Total current other non-financial assets

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

9,488

3,187

12,675

8,498

1,583

10,081

2010

Parent

$’000

262

262

-

2009

$’000

14,318

-

14,318

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

9,444

2,927

12,371

8,389

1,532

9,921

83

84

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

85

86

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

87

88

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

26 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (CONTINUED)

(a) Valuations of land, buildings and works of art

Land, buildings and leasehold improvements were revalued as at 31 December 2010 by independent professional valuers.

The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings and leasehold improvements have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits, refer to note 2(l).

Works of art are heritage assets and have been valued as at 31 December 2009 by independent professional valuers, the fair value of works of art has been determined by reference to recent market transactions.

(b) Service Concession Assets

The University has entered into a Service Concession Arrangement with Campus Living Villages (‘CLV’), an entity that specialises in the construction, operation and maintenance of long-term student accommodation services. As part of this arrangement, CLV will construct a 355 bed student village at the Mount Lawley Campus and will undertake refurbishment of existing accommodation at Mount Lawley, Joondalup and Bunbury campuses. CLV will assume management of all such accommodation. CLV is compensated for the provision of capital works to the University through the granting of rights by the

University to CLV allowing CLV to operate and enjoy full access to such assets, including the retention of all rental income.

The term of the arrangement is for 36.5 years in total, at which time CLV management and operational rights will cease, and the full operation and management will return to the University. The financial statements reflect the control of all such assets by the University pursuant to the principles of service concession accounting.

A breakdown of service concession assets at reporting date is:

Construction work in progress

Land

Buildings

Net book amount

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

-

$’000

9,600

11,149

52,922

64,071

10,678

18,693

38,971

2010

Parent

$’000

-

11,149

52,922

64,071

2009

$’000

9,600

10,678

18,693

38,971

27 INVESTMENT PROPERTY

At fair value

Opening balance at 1 January

Gain / (loss) on revaluation

Closing balance as at 31 December

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

13,534

(626)

12,908

14,243

(709)

13,534

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

13,534

(626)

12,908

14,243

(709)

13,534

27 INVESTMENT PROPERTY (CONTINUED)

(a) Amounts recognised in profit and loss for investment properties

Fair value of investment property

Net rental income

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

(626)

$’000

(709)

621

(5)

1,056

347

2010

Parent

$’000

(626)

621

(5)

2009

$’000

(709)

1,056

347

(b) Valuation basis

The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits. The investment properties have been valued as at 31 December 2010 by independent professional valuers.

(c) Leasing arrangements

The investment properties are leased to tenants under long-term operating leases with rentals payable monthly. Minimum lease payments receivable on leases of investment properties are as follows:

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases of investment properties not recognised in the financial statements are receivable as follows:

Within one year

Later than one year but not later than 5 years

Later than 5 years

-

-

-

-

666

2,872

773

4,311

-

-

-

-

666

2,872

773

4,311

89

90

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

28 DEFERRED TAX ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Deferred tax assets

Total deferred tax assets

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

59

59

147

147

The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:

Amounts recognised in operating result

Employee benefits

Provision for employee on costs

Accrued expenses

Accounts payable

Customer deposits

Sundry other

Tax losses

15

6

30

61

6

4

-

-

15

8

14

179

93

25

23

1

Amounts recognised directly in equity

Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance

Net deferred tax assets

Deferred tax assets to be recovered within 12 months

Deferred tax assets to be recovered after more than

12 months

(2)

59

29

30

59

(32)

147

30

117

147

Movements

Movements

At 1 January 2009

Charged to the income statements

Charged directly to equity

At 31 December 2009

At 1 January 2010

Credited to the income statements

Charged directly to equity

Retrospective adjustments

At 31 December 2010

2010

Parent

$’000

-

-

2009

$’000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Consolidated

$’000

-

-

-

-

-

257

(78)

(32)

147

147

45

(2)

(131)

59

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28 DEFERRED TAX ASSETS AND LIABILITIES (CONTINUED)

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Deferred tax liabilities

Deferred tax liability

Total deferred tax liabilities

74

74

77

77

The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:

Amounts recognised in operating result

Accounts receivable

Accrued income

Sundry other

Accelerated capital allowance

Depreciation

38

23

13

3

6

83

63

44

3

5

6

121

Amounts recognised directly in equity

Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance

Net deferred tax liabilities

(44)

77

Deferred tax liabilities to be settled within 12 months

Deferred tax liabilities to be settled after more than

12 months

(9)

74

74

74

-

77

77

-

Movements

Movements

At 1 January 2009

Charged to the income statements

Charged directly to equity

At 31 December 2009

At 1 January 2010

Charged to the income statements

Charged directly to equity

Retrospective adjustments

At 31 December 2010

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Consolidated

$’000

-

-

-

-

-

196

(75)

(44)

77

77

10

(9)

(4)

74

-

-

-

-

-

-

91

92

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

29 INTANGIBLE ASSETS

Cost

Accumulated amortisation

Net book amount

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

7,224

(7,224)

-

$’000

7,224

(7,224)

-

2010

Parent

$’000

7,149

(7,149)

-

2009

$’000

7,149

(7,149)

-

30 TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

Current

Trade and other payables

CGS liability to Australian Government

OS HELP and Superannuation Supplementation Liability to

Australian Government

Department of Education and Training

GST Payable

Total current payables

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

12,834

111

25

418

529

13,917

14,735

-

271

440

308

15,754

2010

$’000

12,542

111

25

480

13,158

-

Parent

2009

$’000

Non-current

Department of Education and Training

Total non-current payables

Total trade and other payables 13,917

-

-

85

85

15,839

13,158

-

-

15,006

The fair value of trade and other payables is equal to their carrying value.

Foreign currency risk

The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s trade and other payables are denominated in the following currencies:

Australian Dollars

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

13,830

$’000

15,794

2010

$’000

13,120

GB Pounds

US Dollar

36

51

13,917

31

13

15,838

38

13,158

For an analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other payables to foreign currency risk refer to note 45.

-

Parent

2009

$’000

14,997

3

5

15,005

-

-

14,484

-

271

-

251

15,006

31 BORROWINGS

Current – unsecured

WA Treasury Corporation

Total current borrowings

Non-current – unsecured

WA Treasury Corporation

Total non-current borrowings

Total borrowings

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

29,754

29,754

5,899

5,899

44,558

44,558

74,312

57,588

57,588

63,487

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

29,754

29,754

5,899

5,899

44,558

44,558

74,312

57,588

57,588

63,487

(a) Financing arrangements

Unrestricted access was available at balance date to the following lines of credit:

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Credit standby arrangements

Total facilities

WA Treasury Corporation

Bank facilities

Total facilities

101,059

17,608

118,667

63,487

19,328

82,815

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

101,059

17,608

118,667

63,487

19,328

82,815

Used at balance date

WA Treasury Corporation

Bank facilities

Total used at balance date

74,312

1,126

75,438

63,487

1,221

64,708

74,312

1,126

75,438

63,487

1,221

64,708

Unused at balance date

WA Treasury Corporation

Bank facilities

Total unused at balance date

26,747

16,482

43,229

18,107

18,107

-

26,747

16,482

43,229

18,107

18,107

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

Bank loan facilities

Total facilities

Used at balance date

Unused at balance date

118,667

75,438

43,229

82,815

64,708

18,107

118,667

75,438

43,229

82,815

64,708

18,107

The WATC Loan facility is fully drawn as at the reporting date.

The current interest rates on loans from WATC range between 4.84% and 7.10%, depending on the type of borrowing

(2009: 5.39% and 7.10%).

A majority of the used bank facilities of $1.126m (2009 – $1.221m) represent credit card balances outstanding as at year end which are included in trade payables.

-

93

94

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

31 BORROWINGS (CONTINUED)

(b) Fair value

The carrying amounts and fair values of borrowings at balance date are:

Consolidated

Carrying amount

$’000

2010

On statement of financial position*

Non-traded financial liabilities

WA Treasury Corporation

74,312

74,312

Fair value

$’000

74,312

74,312

Parent

Carrying amount

$’000

2010

Fair value

$’000

On statement of financial position*

Non-traded financial liabilities

WA Treasury Corporation

74,312

74,312

74,312

74,312

Carrying amount

$’000

2009

Fair value

$’000

63,487

63,487

63,487

63,487

Carrying amount

$’000

2009

Fair value

$’000

63,487

63,487

63,487

63,487

*The fair value of borrowings equals their carrying amount, as the impact of discounting is not significant.

(c) Risk exposures

The exposure of the consolidated entity’s borrowings to interest rate changes and the contractual repricing dates at the balance dates are as follows:

6 months or less

6 – 12 months

1– 5 years

Over 5 years

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

22,722

$’000

4,934

965

7,032

44,438

120

74,312

57,343

245

63,487

2010

Parent

$’000

22,722

7,032

44,438

120

74,312

2009

$’000

4,934

965

57,343

245

63,487

These borrowings are classified as follows:

Current borrowings

Non-current borrowings

29,754

44,558

74,312

5,899

57,588

63,487

The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s borrowings are denominated in Australian Dollars.

For an analysis of the sensitivity of borrowings to interest rate risk refer to note 45.

29,754

44,558

74,312

5,899

57,588

63,487

32 PROVISIONS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Parent

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Current provisions expected to be settled within

12 months

Employee benefits

Annual leave and other compensated absences

Long service leave

Deferred government benefits for superannuation

Staff bonuses

Superannuation

Provision for Income Tax

Employee on-costs

Provision for service concession liabilities

Subtotal

Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months

Employee benefits

Annual leave and other compensated absences

Long service leave

Superannuation

Employee on-costs

Subtotal

Total current provisions

5,357

7,013

3,144

850

1,621

25

862

948

19,820

2,804

1,303

3,106

732

641

233

283

948

10,050

5,247

7,013

3,144

850

1,621

862

948

19,685

-

468

6,521

794

488

8,271

28,091

1,453

9,270

1,790

778

13,291

23,341

468

6,521

794

488

8,271

27,956

1,453

9,270

1,790

778

13,291

22,944

Non-current

Employee benefits

Long service leave

Deferred government benefits for superannuation

Provision for deferred salary

Superannuation

Provision for service concession liabilities

Employee on-costs

Total non-current provisions

Total provisions

6,213

24,548

376

664

32,236

422

64,459

92,550

4,906

25,972

255

797

8,178

345

40,453

63,794

6,092

24,548

376

664

32,236

422

64,338

92,294

4,760

25,972

255

797

8,178

345

40,307

63,251

Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months represents a current obligation of the Group, however it is the view of the management that they are expected to be settled after more than 12 months.

Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least

12 months after reporting date.

Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after the reporting date.

2,640

1,303

3,106

732

641

283

-

948

9,653

95

96

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

32 PROVISIONS (CONTINUED)

The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on costs including workers’ compensation premiums and payroll tax. The provision is measured at the present value of expected future payments. The associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is included at note 17.

(a) Movements in provisions

Movements in provision during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below:

Provision for

Income Tax

$’000

Employment on costs

$’000

Service concession liabilities

$’000

Consolidated – 2010

Current

Carrying amount at start of year

Additional provisions recognised

Amounts incurred and charged

Unused amounts reversed

Carrying amount at end of year

233

-

(211)

22

-

1,061

289

1,350

-

-

948

948

(948)

948

-

Consolidated – 2010

Non-current

Carrying amount at start of year

Additional provisions recognised

Carrying amount at end of year

33 OTHER LIABILITIES

-

-

-

345

77

422

8,178

24,058

32,236

Fees and grants received in advance

Financial assistance received in advance

Accrued expenses

Total other liabilities

Consolidated

2010

$’000

13,661

3,087

13,172

29,920

2009

$’000

8,800

3,450

7,059

19,309

2010

$’000

13,363

3,087

13,023

29,473

Parent

2009

$’000

8,515

3,450

6,896

18,861

34 RESERVES AND RETAINED SURPLUS

(a) Reserves

Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve

Investments revaluation reserve

Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges

Foreign currency translation reserve

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

381,478

4,655

(24)

(188)

385,921

427,681

2,632

(1)

(95)

430,217

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Movements:

Reserves

Balance 1 January

Revaluation – gross

Transfers to retained surplus

Balance 31 December

Investments revaluation reserve

Balance 1 January

Gain/(loss) on revaluation

Impairments

Balance 31 December

Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges

Balance 1 January

Revaluation – gross

Transfer to inventory and other assets gross

Balance 31 December

Foreign currency translation reserve

Balance 1 January

Currency translation differences arising during the year

Balance 31 December

427,681

(25,129)

(21,074)

381,478

2,632

778

1,245

4,655

(1)

(24)

1

(24)

(95)

(93)

(188)

425,468

5,195

(2,982)

427,681

(401)

2,983

50

2,632

(37)

(1)

37

(1)

(35)

(60)

(95)

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

381,478

4,655

(24)

-

386,109

427,681

2,632

(1)

-

430,312

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

427,681

(25,129)

(21,074)

381,478

425,468

5,195

(2,982)

427,681

2,632

778

1,245

4,655

(1)

(24)

1

(24)

-

-

-

(401)

2,983

50

2,632

(37)

(1)

37

(1)

-

-

-

97

98

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

34 RESERVES AND RETAINED SURPLUS (CONTINUED)

(b) Retained surplus

Movements in retained surplus were as follows:

Retained surplus at the beginning of the year

Operating result for the period

Transfer from property, plant and equipment reserve*

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

377,384

21,509

21,074

$’000

347,883

26,341

2,982

2010

$’000

375,532

20,976

21,074

Parent

Retained surplus at 31 December

419,967

377,206

417,582

*Transfer from revaluation reserve of $2,982,000 (2009: $2,982,000) represents realisation of revaluation surplus on assets retired.

2009

$’000

346,669

25,881

2,982

375,532

(c) Nature and purpose of reserves

(i) Property, plant and equipment reserve

The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of non-current assets, as described in note 2(l).

(ii) Investments revaluation reserve

Changes in the fair value and exchange differences arising on revaluation of investments, such as equities, classified as available-for-sale financial assets, are taken to the investments revaluation reserve, as described in note 2(k). Amounts are recognised in profit and loss when the associated assets are sold or impaired.

(iii) Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges

The hedging reserve is used to record gains or losses on a hedging instrument in a cash flow hedge that are recognised directly in equity, as described in note 2(u). Amounts are recognised in profit and loss when the associated hedged transaction affects profit and loss.

(iv) Foreign currency translation reserve

Exchange differences arising on translation of the foreign controlled branches of the University’s subsidiary are taken to the foreign currency translation reserve, as described in note 2(u).

35 RESTRICTED FUNDS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Restricted funds

ECU Foundation

5,539

5,641

5,539

5,641

The purpose of the ECU Foundation is to hold funds received from external sources. These funds are appropriated for a variety of educational and research purposes ranging from scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs.

The Foundation was established to aid and promote excellence in educational and research activities by seeking, receiving and administering private gifts for the benefit of the University and its community.

36 KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL DISCLOSURES

Remuneration of members of the accountable authority

For the purposes of the Financial Management Act the University Council is the accountable authority of the University.

The number of members of the accountable authority, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are:

Nil to $10,000

$100,001 to $110,000

$130,001 to $140,000

$140,001 to $150,000

$260,001 to $270,000

$270,001 to $280,000

$550,001 to $560,000

$620,001 to $630,000

Consolidated

2010

2009

18

1

17

1

1

-

-

1

1

1

-

1

-

1

-

-

2010

18

1

1

1

-

1

-

-

Parent

2009

17

1

1

The total aggregate remuneration of members of the accountable authority (‘000) $ 1,139

$ 1,059

$ 1,139

$ 1,059

Council members include University employees who may be ex officio members or elected staff members. No council member has received any remuneration in his/her capacity as a council member. 18 members (2009:17 members) of the accountable authority receive no remuneration, fees, superannuation or benefits.

The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of members of the accountable authority.

1

-

1

-

-

No members of the accountable authority are members of the pension scheme.

Remuneration of senior officers

The number of senior officers, other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority, whose total fees, salaries, superannuation, non monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are:

$190,001 to $200,000

$200,001 to $210,000

$240,001 to $250,000

$250,001 to $260,000

$280,001 to $290,000

$300,001 to $310,000

$310,001 to $320,000

$320,001 to $330,000

$330,001 to $340,000

$340,001 to $350,000

$350,001 to $360,000

$420,001 to $430,000

1

1

-

2

-

1

-

1

-

1

1

-

1

-

1

1

1

1

2

1

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

The total aggregate remuneration of senior officers (‘000) $ 2,377

$ 2,460

$ 2,377

$ 2,460

1

-

1

-

1

-

1

1

2

-

1

-

The superannuation included here represents the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority.

One senior officer is a member of the pension scheme.

99

100

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

37 REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS

Remuneration to the Auditor General and non-related audit firms for the financial year is as follows:

Consolidated

2010

2009

$000

$000

Assurance services

Audit services

Office of the Auditor General (OAG)

Auditing the accounts, financial statements and performance indicators

Non-OAG audit firms for the audit or review of financial reports of any entity in the Group

Total remuneration for audit services

278

23

301

255

31

286

2010

$000

Parent

219

219

-

2009

$000

209

209

-

38 CONTINGENCIES

Contingent liabilities

In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, the Group has the following contingent liabilities:

Native title claims

Native title claims have been made on the University land for which judgement was handed down on 19 September 2006.

It was held that Native Title exists in the area which was the subject of the claim. The existence of these Native Title rights is currently being appealed.

Workers compensation claims

The Group may have some potential liability towards workers compensation claims. The process of defending the claims are still at an early stage, however the claims are not material and sufficient insurance is in place to cover the potential liability.

39 COMMITMENTS

(a) Capital expenditure commitments

Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the financial statements, including amounts for infrastructure, are payable as follows:

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Property, plant and equipment

Within one year

21,815

21,815

1,152

1,152

21,815

21,815

1,152

1,152

39 COMMITMENTS (CONTINUED)

(b) Lease commitments : The Group as lessee

(i) Operating leases

Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised in the financial statements as liabilities, are payable as follows:

Within one year

Later than one year but not later than five years

Later than five years

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

459

$’000

513

560

32

1,051

564

81

1,158

2010

Parent

$’000

297

342

-

639

2009

$’000

287

159

446

-

Cancellable operating lease

1,051

1,158

639

446

(c) Other expenditure commitments

Commitments in relation to purchase orders in existence at the reporting date, but not recognised as liabilities, are payable as follows:

Within 1 year

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

8,076

$’000

6,606

2010

Parent

$’000

8,076

2009

$’000

6,606

40 RELATED PARTIES

Subsidiaries

The University had one related party during the financial year. Interests in subsidiaries are set out in note 41.

Loans to related parties

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

Loans to subsidiaries

Beginning of the year

Loan repayments received

Fair value adjustment for loan advanced

End of year

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2009

$’000

122

(125)

3

-

101

102

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

41 SUBSIDIARIES

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiary in accordance with the accounting policy described in note 2(b):

Equity holding

Name of entity

E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL)*

Country of incorporation

Australia

Class of shares

Australian public company limited by guarantee

2010

100%

2009

100%

* The address of ECURL is 234 Great Eastern Highway, Ascot. WA 6104.

42 EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER THE REPORTING DATE

No events have occurred since the reporting date that are likely to have a material impact on the financial statements or notes of the consolidated entity.

43 RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING RESULT AFTER INCOME TAX TO NET CASH

FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Operating result for the period

Non-cash items:

Depreciation and amortisation expense

Revaluation of investment property

Provision for impairment of receivables

Service concession income

Profit on sale of assets

Net loss on asset write-offs

Profit on sale of investments

Impairment of investments

Impairment of intangibles

Impairment of property, plant and equipment

Subtotal

Change in assets and liabilities

(Increase) / decrease in receivables

(Increase) / decrease in tax assets

(Increase) / decrease in inventories

Increase / (decrease) in accounts payable

Increase / (decrease) in tax liabilities

Increase/(decrease) in provisions

Subtotal of change in operating assets and liabilities

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

21,509

26,341

19,732

626

(948)

-

(3,235)

30

1,245

-

137

-

39,096

(647)

88

(137)

8,361

(3)

4,875

12,537

18,929

709

670

(474)

(1,187)

45

50

-

53

-

45,136

2,194

110

(459)

(2,573)

(119)

(1,460)

(2,307)

2010

Parent

$’000

20,976

19,713

626

(948)

-

(3,233)

30

1,245

-

137

-

38,546

(608)

-

(60)

8,437

4,983

-

12,752

2009

$’000

25,881

2,242

-

(378)

(2,198)

(1,751)

-

(2,085)

18,871

709

670

(474)

(1,194)

45

50

-

44,558

-

-

Net cash provided by / used in operating activities 51,633

42,829

51,298

42,473

44 NON CASH FINANCING AND INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Consolidated

2010

2009

2010

Parent

2009

Proceeds accrued from sale of property, plant and equipment

$’000

8,365

$’000

8,011

$’000

8,365

$’000

8,011

During the financial year, there were sales of Churchlands property that has been sold but not yet settled and therefore not reflected in the cash flow statement.

45 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT

The Group is exposed to the following financial risks as a result of its activities:

Consolidated

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

2010

$’000

Parent

2009

$’000

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Trade and other receivables

Derivative financial instruments

Available-for-sale financial assets

Held-to-maturity investments

57,177

8,250

218

20,600

50,781

137,026

33,361

8,638

79

20,726

13,484

76,288

55,017

7,592

218

20,600

50,772

134,199

31,433

7,873

79

20,726

13,475

73,586

Financial liabilities

Trade and other payable

Borrowings

Derivative financial instruments

13,388

74,312

242

87,942

15,531

63,487

80

79,098

12,678

74,312

242

87,232

14,755

63,487

80

78,322

(a) Market risk

(i) Foreign exchange and interest risk

The Group does not trade in foreign currency and is not materially exposed to other price risks (for example, equity securities or commodity price changes). The University’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the long term debt obligations. The University’s borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian Treasury Corporation

(WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through portfolio diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than as detailed in the interest rate sensitivity analysis table below, the University has limited exposure to interest rate risk because it has no borrowings other than the WATC borrowings.

(ii) Price risk

The Group investment portfolios’ are exposed to fluctuations in the prices of equity securities. The University’s investment policy provides strategies for minimisation of price risk with the diversification of that risk through a number of investment managers and regular independent expert monitoring to ensure that there is no concentration of risk in any one area.

103

104

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

45 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)

(iii) Summarised sensitivity analysis

The following table summarises the sensitivity of the Group’s financial assets and financial liabilities to interest rate risk, foreign exchange risk and other price risk.

Consolidated

31 December 2010

Interest rate risk Foreign exchange risk Other price risk

-1% +1% -10% +10% -10% +10%

Carrying amount Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Accounts receivable

AFS investments

Held to maturity investments

Derivatives – cash flow hedges

Sub Total

Financial liabilities

Derivatives – cash flow hedges

Trade payables

Borrowings

Sub Total

Total increase /

(decrease)

57,177

8,250

20,600

50,781

218

242

13,388

74,312

(572)

-

-

(508)

(572)

-

-

(508)

-

(1,080) (1,080)

-

(178)

(178)

-

-

(178)

(178)

-

-

(1,258) (1,258)

572

-

-

508

1,080

-

178

178

-

-

1,258

572

-

-

508

1,080

-

178

178

-

-

1,258

(41)

(26)

-

(1)

(22)

(90)

(9)

-

(9)

-

(99)

(41)

(26)

-

(1)

(22)

(90)

(9)

-

(9)

-

(99)

41

26

-

1

22

90

9

-

9

-

99

9

-

9

-

41

26

-

-

- (2,060) (2,060)

-

-

1 -

22 -

90 (2,060) (2,060)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,060

-

-

2,060

-

99 (2,060) (2,060) 2,060

-

-

-

-

-

2,060

-

-

2,060

-

2,060

-

-

-

-

-

Consolidated

31 December 2009

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Accounts receivable

AFS investments

Held to maturity investments

Derivatives – cash flow hedges

Sub Total

Financial liabilities

Derivatives – cash flow hedges

Trade payables

Borrowings

Sub Total

Total increase /

(decrease)

Interest rate risk Foreign exchange risk Other price risk

-1% +1% -10% +10% -10% +10%

Carrying amount Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity Profit Equity

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

33,361

8,638

20,726

13,484

79

80

15,531

63,487

(334)

(135)

(469)

(13)

(13)

(482)

-

-

-

-

-

(334)

(135)

(469)

(13)

(13)

(482)

-

-

-

-

-

334

135

469

13

13

482

-

-

-

-

-

334

135

469

13

13

482

-

-

-

-

-

(57)

(10)

(1)

(8)

(76)

(4)

(4)

(80)

-

-

-

(57)

(10)

(1)

(8)

(76)

(4)

(4)

(80)

-

-

-

57

10

1

8

76

4

4

80

-

-

-

57

10

1

8

76 (2,073) (2,073)

4

-

4

-

-

-

- (2,073) (2,073)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,073

2,073

80 (2,073) (2,073) 2,073

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,073

-

-

-

-

2,073

-

-

2,073

-

-

45 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)

(b) Credit risk

Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the Group’s receivables defaulting on their contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the University. The Group measures credit risk on a fair value basis and monitors risk on a regular basis.

The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the gross carrying amount of those assets inclusive of any provisions for impairment.

The Group trades only with recognised, credit worthy third parties. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the Group’s exposure to bad debts is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk.

Provision for impairment of financial assets is calculated based on past experience, and current and expected changes in client credit ratings. For financial assets that are either past due or impaired, refer to note 20.

(c) Liquidity risk

The Group is exposed to liquidity risk through its trading in the normal course of business. Liquidity risk arises when the

University is unable to meet its financial obligations as they fall due.

The Group’s objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility through the use of bank loans and finance leases. The Group has appropriate procedures to manage cash flows by monitoring forecast cash flows to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments.

The tables below analyse the Group’s financial assets and liabilities based on the remaining period at the reporting date to the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows. Balances due within 12 months equal their carrying balances, as the impact of discounting is not significant.

Consolidated – At 31 December 2010 Less than 1 year

$’000

Between 1 and 2 years

$’000

Between 2 and 5 years

$’000

Over 5 years

$’000

Total

$’000

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Trade and other receivables

Derivative financial instruments

Available for sale financial assets

Held to maturity investments

Financial liabilities

Trade and other payables

Borrowings

Derivative financial liabilities

57,177

8,250

218

-

50,781

13,388

29,754

242

2,170

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

42,268

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20,600

-

-

-

-

120

-

-

57,177

8,250

218

20,600

50,781

13,388

74,312

242

Consolidated – At 31 December 2009

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

Trade and other receivables

Derivative financial instruments

Available for sale financial assets

Held to maturity investments

Financial liabilities

Trade and other payables

Borrowings

Derivative financial liabilities

Less than 1 year

$’000

33,361

8,638

79

13,484

-

15,446

5,899

80

Between 1 and 2 years

$’000

85

13,030

-

-

-

-

-

-

Between 2 and 5 years

$’000

44,313

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Over 5 years

$’000

20,726

-

-

-

-

245

-

-

Total

$’000

33,361

8,638

79

20,726

13,484

15,531

63,487

80

105

106

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

45 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)

The following are the average interest rates for the above financial assets and liabilities as at 31 December 2010:

Financial assets

1. Cash and cash equivalents – 5.48% p.a (2009: 4.41%)

2. Trade and other receivables – Non interest bearing financial asset

3. Available for sale financial assets – Non interest bearing financial asset

4. Held to maturity investments – 6.31% p.a (2009: 4.74%)

Financial liability

1. Trade and other payable – Non interest bearing financial liability

2. Borrowings – 6.28% p.a (2009: 6.52%)

The Group’s derivative financial instruments will be settled on a gross basis within the next 12 months.

(d) Fair value estimation

The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement or for disclosure purposes.

The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives, and trading and available for sale securities) is based on quoted market prices at the reporting date. The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the Group is the current bid price.

The fair value of forward exchange contracts is determined using forward exchange market rates at the reporting date.

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of their fair values due to the short-term nature of trade receivables.

46 WRITE-OFFS

Consolidated

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

2010

Parent

$’000

2009

$’000

Total write-offs as approved by the accountable authority during the financial year

Receivables written off against provision*

Receivables directly written off to the statement of financial performance

Property plant and equipment

Inventory

Total additional note 6

114

7

24

145

-

258

8

37

303

-

114

7

24

145

-

258

8

37

303

-

* The vast majority of the receivables write offs are relating to international student debts incurred in 2009 and before which have been identified as irrecoverable.

47 SUPERANNUATION

(a) Unisuper Limited

Defined Benefit Division (DBD) / Investment Choice (ICP)

The vested benefit and accrued benefit liabilities were determined by the Fund’s actuary, Russell Employee Benefits, using the actuarial demographic assumptions outlined in their report dated 12 June 2009 on the actuarial investigation of the DBD as at 31 December 2008. The financial assumptions used were:

Gross of tax investment return

Net of tax investment return

Consumer price index

Inflationary salary increases long term

Vested benefits

7.25% p.a

6.75% p.a

2.75% p.a

3.75% p.a

Accrued benefits

8.50% p.a

8.00% p.a

2.75% p.a

3.75% p.a

Assets have been included at their net market value, i.e. allowing for realisation of costs.

(b) Government Employees Superannuation Board

Unfunded Pension and Unfunded Gold State (Lump sum) Schemes

The University has in its staffing profile a number of employees who are members of the Government Employees

Superannuation Board (GESB) Scheme. As the Employer, the University is required to contribute to the scheme as employees are paid a pension or lump sum pay out. Consequently, an unfunded liability has been created.

The Commonwealth Government is committed to reimbursing the University for payments actually made to the scheme for these emerging costs.

Pension Scheme

Pension Scheme members receive pension benefits on retirement, death or invalidity. The Fund Share of the pension benefit, which is based on the member’s contributions plus investment earnings, may be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

The employers do not bear the cost associated with indexation of any pension arising from the Fund Share. The State Share of the pension benefit, which is fully employer-financed, cannot be commuted to a lump sum benefit.

Gold State Super (transferred benefits)

Some former Pension Scheme members have transferred to Gold State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the members receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment.

Reconciliation of the assets and liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position

Defined benefit obligation

(+) Fair value of assets

Deficit / (surplus)

(-) Unrecognised past service cost

(-) Unrecognised net (gain) / loss

Liability / (asset)

Pension Scheme

2010

2009

$’000

26,611

$’000

27,931

-

26,611

-

26,611

-

-

27,931

27,931

-

-

Gold State Super

2010

2009

$’000

1,081

$’000

1,147

-

1,081

-

1,081

-

-

1,147

1,147

-

-

107

108

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

47 SUPERANNUATION (CONTINUED)

Reconciliation of the present value of the defined benefit obligation

Balance at the beginning of the year

Current service cost

Interest cost

Contributions by plan participants

Actuarial (gains) and losses

Benefits paid

Past service cost

Balance at the end of the year

Pension Scheme

2010

2009

$’000

27,931

$’000

31,777

1,402

-

-

1,400

-

-

106

(2,828)

26,611

-

(2,243)

(3,003)

27,931

-

Gold State Super

2010

2009

$’000

1,147

$’000

1,098

56

-

-

47

-

-

46

(168)

1,081

-

2

1,147

-

-

These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no Assets. The employer contributes, as required, to meet the benefits paid.

Pension Scheme

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Gold State Super

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Reconciliation of the fair value of plan assets:

Balance at the beginning of the year

Expected return on plan assets

Actuarial gains and (losses)

Contributions by employers

Contributions by plan participants

Benefits paid

Balance at the end of the year

2,828

(2,828)

-

-

-

-

-

3,003

(3,003)

-

-

-

-

-

168

(168)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Pension Scheme

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Gold State Super

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Superannuation expense / (income) recognised in the income statement

Current service cost

Interest cost

Expected return on plan assets

Net actuarial losses (gains) recognised in year

Total included in employee benefits expense

1,402

-

106

1,508

-

1,400

-

(2,243)

-

(843)

56

-

46

102

-

47

-

2

-

49

Scheme Assets

There are no assets in the pension scheme or Gold State Super for current employees to support the transferred benefits.

Hence, there is

„ „

No fair value of Scheme assets;

„ „

No asset allocation of Scheme assets;

„ „

No assets used by the employer;

„ „

No expected return of Scheme assets;

„ „

No actual return on Scheme assets.

The principal actuarial assumptions used were as follows:

Discount rate (active members)

Discount rate (pensioners)

Expected salary increase rates

Expected pension increase rates

Pension Scheme

2010

2009

5.48%

5.48%

5.30%

5.30%

4.50%

2.50%

4.50%

2.50%

Gold State Super

2010

2009

5.48%

5.48%

5.30%

5.30%

4.50%

2.50%

4.50%

2.50%

The discount rate is based on the 10 year Government bond rate at the relevant date. The decrement rates used

(e.g. mortality and retirement rates) are based on those used at the last actuarial valuation for the Schemes.

(c) Historic summary

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

2008

$’000

2006

$’000

Present value of defined benefit plan obligation – pension scheme

Fair value of scheme assets – pension scheme

Present value of defined benefit plan obligation – gold state super

Fair value of scheme assets – gold state super

(Surplus) / deficit in scheme

Experience adjustments loss -scheme liabilities – pension scheme

Experience adjustments loss -scheme liabilities – gold state super

26,611

1,081

27,692

-

452

56

-

27,931

1,147

29,078

-

(1,536)

45

-

31,777

1,098

32,875

-

2,541

63

-

28,509

1,308

29,817

-

790

53

-

2005

$’000

30,742

2,050

32,792

-

874

223

-

The experience adjustment for Scheme liabilities represents the actuarial loss due to a change in the liabilities arising from the Scheme’s experience (e.g. membership movements, unit entitlements) and excludes the effect of the changes in assumptions (e.g. movements in the bond rate and changes in pensioner mortality assumptions).

Expected contributions

Expected employer contributions

Pension scheme

2010

$000

2,983

Gold state super

2010

$000

161

109

110

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

48.1 DEEWR – CGS and Other DEEWR Grants

Parent entity

Commonw’lth

Grant Scheme

1

Indigenous

Support

Program

Partnership &

Participation

Program

Disability

Support

Program

Workplace

Reform

Program

Workplace

Productivity

Program

Learning &

Teaching

Performance

Fund

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

116,947 97,321

-

(58)

116,947 97,263

624

624

-

719

1,362

-

719

1,362

-

198

198

-

72

72

-

24

24

-

-

1,252

-

-

1,252

-

-

-

-

265

265

-

-

2,838

-

-

2,838

-

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

-

116,947 97,263

(116,947) (97,263)

(624)

(719) (1,412) (148)

-

-

-

624

-

-

719

-

-

50

1,412

-

198

50

-

(53)

19

(56)

(37)

(77)

(53)

24

-

-

-

1,252

-

-

- (1,252)

-

190

190

(55)

135

265

-

(75)

190

-

-

2,838

-

-

- (2,838)

-

48.1 DEEWR – CGS and Other DEEWR Grants (continued)

Parent entity

Capital Development

Pool

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Improving the

Practical Component of Teacher Education

Initiative

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian

Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

1,042

1,042

-

1,766

1,766

-

-

-

-

830

830

-

Transitional Cost

Programme

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

118

118

-

Total

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

800

800

-

120,165

120,165

-

106,013

(58)

105,955

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

1,042

(1,042)

-

-

1,766

(1,766)

-

-

-

-

-

-

830

(830)

-

-

1

Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS Regional Loading, CGS Enabled Loading and Science and Maths Transition Loading.

118

(118)

-

-

-

187

800

120,352

105,955

(800) (120,254) (105,768)

-

98

187

-

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

(CONTINUED)

48.2 Higher Education Loan Program

Parent entity

HECS-HELP

(Australian Government payments only)

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian

Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

57,816

(295)

57,521

49,512

636

50,148

FEE HELP

1

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

6,507

948

7,455

2,972

2,393

5,365

Total

2010

$’000

64,323

653

64,976

2009

$’000

52,484

3,029

55,513

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

1

Program is in respect of FEE HELP for Higher Education only.

57,521

-

(57,521)

-

50,148

-

(50,148)

-

7,455

-

(7,455)

-

5,365

-

(5,365)

-

48.3 Learning scholarships

Parent entity

Australian

Postgraduate

Awards

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

International

Postgraduate

Research

Scholarship

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Commonwealth

Education Cost

Scholarships*

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Commonwealth

Accommodation

Scholarships*

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Indigenous

Access

Scholarships

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

1,392

-

1,392

1,056

-

1,056

168

-

168

164

-

164

155

6

161

1,481

-

1,481

36

16

52

1,598

-

1,598

106

-

106

71

-

71

64,976

-

(64,976)

-

55,513

-

(55,513)

-

Total

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

1,857

22

1,879

4,370

-

4,370

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

368

1,760

(1,427)

333

423

1,479

(1,111)

368

30

198

(196)

2

73

237

(207)

30

130

291

(265)

26

1,481

(1,351)

130

-

132

184

(161)

23

1,598

(1,466)

132

-

106

(97)

9

* Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.

-

71

-

660

2,539

496

4,866

(71)

(2,146)

(4,206)

-

393

660

111

112

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

(CONTINUED)

48.4 Commonwealth research

Parent entity

Joint Research

Engagement

Research

Training Scheme

Research

Infrastructure

Block Grants

Implementation

Assistance

Program

Australian

Scheme for Higher

Education

Repositories

Commercialisation

Training Scheme

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

2009

Sustainable

Research

Excellence

(SRE) Program

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

2,034

1,865

4,412

4,380

-

-

-

2,034

1,865

4,412

4,380

-

371

371

-

385

385

-

41

41

-

85

85

-

-

-

-

197

197

-

47

47

-

46

46

-

451

451

-

-

-

-

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

Parent entity

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

2,034

-

(2,034) (1,865) (4,412) (4,380)

(371)

(400)

-

1,865

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programs)

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

-

-

4,412

-

-

4,380

-

-

371

-

-

15

400

-

27

68

96

181

125

125

128

325

10

57

46

-

451

-

(68)

(154)

(125)

(200)

-

27

-

125

(13)

44

(36)

(451)

10

-

2010

$’000

Total

7,356

-

7,356

2009

$’000

6,958

-

6,958

-

-

162

7,518

(7,474)

44

239

7,197

(7,035)

162

-

-

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

(CONTINUED)

48.5 Voluntary Student Unionism and Better Universities

Parent entity VSU Transition Fund

2010

$’000

2009

$’000

Total

2010

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the

Australian Government for the Programs)

Revenue for the period

-

-

925

925

-

-

2009

$’000

925

925

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

-

-

-

-

925

(925)

-

-

-

-

-

-

925

(925)

-

-

48.6 Other Capital Funding

Parent entity

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

Better University

Renewal Funding

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

Teaching and Learning

Capital Fund

2010

2009

$’000

$’000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10,902

-

10,902

894

894

(894)

-

7,364

7,364

(6,470)

894

10,902

10,902

(3,000)

7,902

10,902

-

10,902

-

Total

2010

$’000

-

-

-

2009

$’000

10,902

-

10,902

11,796

11,796

(3,894)

7,902

7,364

18,266

(6,470)

11,796

113

114

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

(CONTINUED)

48.7 Australian Research Council Grants

(a) Discovery

Parent entity

2010

Project

$’000

2009

$’000

2010

$’000

Total

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

72

10

82

233

-

233

72

10

82

2009

$’000

233

-

233

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

77

159

(112)

47

102

335

(258)

77

77

159

(112)

47

102

335

(258)

77

48.7 Australian Research Council Grants (continued)

(b) Linkages

Parent entity Projects

2010

$’000

Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programs)

Net accrual adjustments

Revenue for the period

784

784

-

2009

$’000

957

-

957

Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year

Total revenue including accrued revenue

Less expenses including accrued expenses

Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

475

1,259

(916)

343

176

1,133

(658)

475

2010

$’000

Total

2009

$’000

784

784

-

475

1,259

(916)

343

957

-

957

176

1,133

(658)

475

48 ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

(CONTINUED)

48.8 OS HELP

Cash Received during the reporting period

Cash Spent during the reporting period

Net Cash received

2010

$’000

232

(230)

2

Cash Surplus / (deficit) from the previous period

Cash Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period

1

3

48.9 Superannuation Supplementation

Cash Received during the reporting period

University contribution in respect of current employees

Cash available

Cash Surplus / (deficit) from the previous period

Cash available for current period

Contributions to specified defined benefit funds

Cash Surplus / (deficit) this period

2010

$’000

2,796

357

3,153

270

3,423

(3,401)

22

2009

$’000

3,455

297

3,752

(256)

3,496

(3,226)

270

2009

$’000

62

(54)

8

(7)

1

115

116

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR REPORT CERTIFICATION

We hereby certify that the key performance indicators are based on proper records, are relevant and appropriate for assisting users to assess ECU’s performance, and fairly represent the performance of ECU for the financial year ended

31 December 2010.

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

7 March 2011

Mr Warren Snell

Acting Vice-Chancellor

7 March 2011

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

INTRODUCTION

ECU’s Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) focus on the University’s core business (teaching, learning and research) and key stakeholders (students). The KPIs are informed by the functions of the University as set out in Section 7 of the Edith Cowan

University Act 1984 (ECU Act), particularly:

„ „

S7(a) “to provide…courses of study appropriate to a university to meet the needs of the community in this State.”

„ „

S7(c) “to support and pursue research and scholarship and aid the advancement, development, and practical applications to education, industry, commerce and the community, of knowledge or any techniques.”

The University’s strategic directions document: Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities.

Towards 2020 specifies ECU’s mission and four strategic priorities which articulate the University’s commitment to the communities it serves.

ECU’s Mission is:

To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and research inspired by engagement and partnerships.

ECU’s four Strategic Priorities are:

1. Engaging and Serving Our Communities;

2. Providing Programs to Meet the Needs of Our Communities, in a Supportive and Stimulating Learning Environment;

3. Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact; and

4. Building Organisation Sustainability.

The Annual Report’s Report on Operations section has been structured around these strategic priorities, reflecting their importance in setting direction for the University’s operations.

In this Key Performance Indicator Report, the functions specified in the ECU Act and reflected in ECU’s current strategic priorities, provide the basis for the following outcomes, against which the University’s performance is measured:

Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community, through the practical application of knowledge.

For each KPI, the Key Performance Indicator Report provides:

„ „

ECU’s performance over the last four or five years;

„ „ a comparison to Target for the most recent year; and

„ „ wherever possible, comparisons to the overall performance of universities in Australia (“National Average”) and to public universities in Western Australia (“State Average”).

Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

This outcome has the following measures:

Key Effectiveness Indicators

Key Efficiency Indicator

1. Retention

2. Course Satisfaction

3. Quality of Teaching

4. Graduate Employment

5. Share of First Preferences

6. Teaching-Related Expenditure per Student Load

117

118

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

1. Retention

Many factors influence whether students decide to remain in their studies (Retention), including the relevance of those studies to their needs, and the learning environment in which that study takes place. Student retention is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

Retention is here defined as the percentage of all domestic and international students who commence a Bachelor Pass course in a given year (Year of Commencement) and either complete, defer or are still enrolled in the same course or another

ECU course one year later.

Table 19: Retention Commencing Bachelor Pass Students

ECU

Target

National Average

2006

79.6%

80.9%

Year of Commencement

2007

76.2%

80.0%

82.7%

2008

78.9%

80.0%

84.0%

2009

78.2%

80.0% n/a

2

2010

1

Notes: 1. Retention data for students commencing in 2010 will not be available until March 2011. 2. The National Average for 2009 will not be available until mid-2011.

The retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2009 declined slightly (by 0.7 percentage points) compared with the retention rate for those who commenced in 2008. The 2008 and 2009 retention rates are close to the levels of 2005 and 2006, after a decline in 2007. The retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2009 is 1.8 percentage points below Target and is again below the National Average.

2. Course Satisfaction

Graduates are more likely to rate their course highly, in terms of overall satisfaction, if the course was relevant to their needs, provided in a supportive learning environment and has proven useful and relevant in an employment context following graduation. Graduate satisfaction with the quality of their course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of their courses is available from responses to the Course

Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of graduates conducted four to six months after course completion.

Course Satisfaction is here defined as the percentage of all domestic and international Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass,

Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates who ‘broadly agree’ with the statement: “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this course” from the Course Experience Questionnaire. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses which are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) or 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point

Likert scale.

Table 20: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction

ECU

Target

National Average

State Average

2006

89.7%

89.5%

90.1%

2007

92.2%

90.0%

89.8%

91.2%

Year of Survey

2008

92.1%

93.0%

88.5%

90.0%

2009

92.6%

93.0%

88.1%

89.9%

2010

1

Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2010 survey was not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.

2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector. 3. For the 2009 survey 3029 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1765 responded to this item, equating to a response rate of 58.3%.

ECU graduates’ Course Satisfaction level in the 2009 survey increased slightly (by 0.5 of a percentage point), compared with the 2008 survey. The latest result is the highest of the last seven years (2003-2009). The 2009 survey result is 0.4 of a percentage point below Target.

ECU’s Course Satisfaction results are consistently above both the National Average and the State Average.

3. Quality of Teaching

Graduates are more likely to rate highly the quality of the teaching in their course, if the content and teaching style was relevant to their needs and the course was provided in a supportive learning environment. Graduate satisfaction with the teaching they experienced during their course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of the teaching they experienced is available from responses to the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of graduates conducted four to six months after course completion. Six items in the CEQ make up the Good Teaching Scale which is used to indicate how satisfied graduates were with the teaching experience during their course.

The Good Teaching Scale is here defined as the average of survey respondents’ percentage Broad Agreement.

Percentage Broad Agreement is the proportion of a respondent’s scores on the six items which are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) or 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale and expressed as a percentage. Respondents are domestic and international Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates.

Table 21: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching Scale

ECU

Target

National Average

State Average

2006

86.6%

82.3%

84.1%

2007

88.3%

86.6%

83.4%

85.4%

Year of Survey

2008

89.6%

90.0%

82.8%

85.0%

2009

89.1%

91.0%

82.8%

85.5%

2010

1

Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2010 survey were not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.

2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector. 3. For the 2009 survey 3029 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1771 responded to this item, equating to a response rate of 58.5%.

ECU graduates’ level of satisfaction with the quality of teaching for the 2009 survey declined slightly (by 0.5 percentage points), compared with the 2008 survey. The latest result is well above those in the survey years 2003-2007. The level of satisfaction in the 2009 survey year is slightly below Target by 1.9 of a percentage point.

ECU’s Good Teaching Scale results are consistently above both the National Average and the State Average.

4. Graduate Employment

There is strong evidence that many students undertake higher education for employment-related reasons (i.e.to gain employment, or to advance their career). The employers, on whom the job prospects of graduates largely depend, seek employees who have the skills and attributes needed in their professions and occupations. Graduate employment is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.

Comparative data on employment outcomes for ECU graduates is available from the Graduate Destination Survey (GDS), a national survey of graduates, conducted four to six months after course completion.

Graduate Employment is here defined as the percentage of domestic Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and

Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates in full-time employment as a proportion of all domestic Bachelor level graduates in, or seeking, full-time work (including those who were working part-time or on a casual basis while seeking full-time employment).

119

120

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

Table 22: Domestic Bachelor Course Level Graduates in Full-time Employment

ECU

Target

National Average

State Average

2006

73.4%

82.4%

80.2%

2007

85.7%

85.0%

85.2%

88.0%

Year of Survey

2008

84.7%

87.0%

86.1%

87.9%

2009

78.0%

87.0%

81.1%

82.2%

2010

1

Notes: 1. GDS data for the 2010 survey were not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.

2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector. 3. For the 2009 survey 2540 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1548 responded to this item, equating to a response rate of 60.9%.

The proportion of ECU graduates in full-time employment at the time of the 2009 survey declined by 6.7 percentage points, compared with those surveyed in 2008. The 2009 survey result is 9.0 percentage points below Target and is below both the

National Average and the State Average.

The decline in ECU’s Full-time Employment results for the 2009 survey are consistent with the State Average decline between the surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009 (5.7 percentage points) and reflects the prevailing economic and employment conditions in Western Australian for the year in which the graduates were surveyed. Unemployment rose sharply in early 2009

– the survey year – with a marked decrease in employment opportunities as a result of the Global Financial Crisis. In addition, there was reduced graduate recruitment into secondary schools due to an over-supply of teachers in 2009, a discipline area in which the University has large numbers of graduates.

5. Share of First Preferences

The relevance of courses and quality of the learning environment in which they are taught, as perceived by prospective students and the wider community, will influence demand for places at a university. ECU’s Share of First Preferences, processed through the Western Australian Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC), is an indicator of the level of demand for the University’s undergraduate courses within the broader competitive market in the State. It is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community.

Share of First Preferences is here defined as the number of first preference applications for ECU’s undergraduate courses, expressed as a percentage of all first preference applications to Western Australia’s public universities as processed by TISC.

Data is taken at the end of the applications process for that year’s entry to university. A definitional change was applied from

2010 to limit the data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree courses only.

Table 23: Undergraduate Share of First Preferences

ECU

Target

Curtin

2006

18.7%

32.9%

2007

17.7%

33.6%

Entry Year

2008

18.9%

20.0%

31.6%

2009

19.5%

21.0%

31.6%

2010

20.1%

21.0%

34.0%

Murdoch

UWA

16.6%

31.7%

15.6%

33.1%

15.2%

34.2%

14.5%

34.4%

13.6%

32.3%

Notes: From 2010 a revised definition, approved by ECU’s Council at its meeting of December 2009, has been applied. The change in definition provides better comparisons between the universities by limiting the data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree courses only.

Therefore figures for 2006-2009 inclusive vary from those reported in earlier Annual Reports. Data for individual courses is available at

http://www.tisc.edu.au/static/statistics/statistics-index.tisc?cid=102608

ECU’s share of first preference applications for undergraduate courses processed through TISC increased by 0.6 of a percentage point between the 2009 and the 2010 entry years.

Curtin University also increased its share of first preference applications, while the share of first preferences at the other two

Western Australian public universities declined.

ECU’s first preference share in 2010 was below Target by 0.9 of a percentage point.

6. Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load

Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load shows the cost associated with providing teaching and learning support to a full-time equivalent student in a given year. Over time, the measure shows whether such costs are decreasing or increasing, which could be interpreted as indicating, respectively, either increased efficiency or reduced efficiency.

This measure must, however, be interpreted in the context of other KPIs associated with Outcome 1. A decrease in cost does not necessarily indicate improved efficiency if it leads to, for example, lower retention, graduate satisfaction or graduate employment outcomes. For example, a substantial increase in class size (student: staff ratio) may reduce costs, but might adversely impact on performance against other indicators.

Trends on this measure can also be affected by factors such as changes in the overall ECU student load, the proportion of costs which are fixed, and the proportion of student load in higher cost disciplines.

Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load is here defined as the total expenditure less research-only expenditure, divided by total full-time equivalent students (EFTSL) in the year.

Table 24: Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load

Teaching-Related Expenditure ($’000)

Total Student Load (EFTSL)

Teaching-Related Expenditure / Total Student

Load ($)

Target ($)

2006

222,541

15,747

14,132

2007

228,321

15,254

14,968

2008

246,399

15,978

15,417

15,619

2009

252,064

17,583

14,336

14,756

2010

277,172

18,711

14,813

14,572

Teaching-Related Expenditure/Total Student

Load (2010 $ equiv)

4

Target (2010 $ equiv)

15,750

16,202

16,099

16,306

14,657

15,087

14,813

14,572

Notes: 1. 2010 student load figure is as at 3 February 2011 (the sum of the March, August and preliminary post-August census date load) and includes VET course load. 2. Target for 2010 is derived from Teaching-Related Expenditure based on the Original 2010 Full year Budget

($256,162,000) divided by the total Student Load (17,579 EFTSL) from the 2010 Budget. 4. Prior year expenditure is indexed for current costs, based on CPI for December Qtr 2010.

1

2

Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load (2010 $ equivalent) increased slightly between 2009 and 2010. The 2010 figure is slightly higher than targeted.

Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community, through the practical application of knowledge.

This outcome has the following measures:

Key Effectiveness Indicator

Key Efficiency Indicators

7.

8.

9.

Research Income

Higher Degree Research Completions

Research Publications

7. Research Income

Universities attract research income as a result of their: historical competitiveness in winning grants; previous research outcomes; and perceived ability to deliver quality research and scholarship. Research income, across the four categories listed below, reflects the relevance and potential impact of ECU’s research as perceived by various funders. It is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community.

Research Income is here defined as the level of external research funding obtained during a year, in total and in each of the four categories defined by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR).

121

122

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

(continued)

31 DECEMBER 2010

Table 25: Research Income ($m)

Category

1 - National Competitive Research Grants

2 - Other Public Sector Research Funding

3 - Industry and Other Funding for Research

2006

2.025

4.829

3.069

2007

1.619

5.512

2.341

4 - Co-operative Research Centre Funding

Total

Target

0.091

10.015

0.112

9.584

10.015

Note: 1. Research income for 2010 is unavailable until verified by audit in June 2011.

2008

2.154

7.235

2.926

0.075

12.390

10.015

2009

2.907

7.709

2.012

0.182

12.809

13.629

2010

1

Between 2007 and 2009, total research income has increased by $3.225m. Between 2008 and 2009 research income increased in three of the four categories defined by DIISR. Total research income in 2009 was below Target by $820,000.

8. Higher Degree Research Completions

Doctorate and Master by Research completions is a measure of ECU’s success in training new researchers who will undertake research activity and scholarship, to advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community.

Higher Degree Research Completions per 10 Academic FTE is a measure of the efficiency of ECU’s higher degree research programs in providing new researchers to education, industry, commerce and the community.

Higher Degree by Research Completions is defined here as the number of Research Doctorates and Masters by Research theses passed in a year. Completions are also expressed per 10 full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and research’ or ‘research only’.

Table 26: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE

Doctorate by Research

Master by Research

Total Completions

Total State Completions

Total National Completions

Academic Staff FTE

Completions per 10 FTE

Target

2006

61

29

90

685

7,103

482

1.9

2007

53

28

81

746

7,141

444

1.8

1.8

2008

58

35

93

639

7,178

448

2.1

1.9

2009

41

23

64

659

7,092

2

2

494

1.3

2.2

Notes: 1. Research completions for 2010 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2011. 2. State and National Higher Degree by

Research completions for 2009 are from table 8 of the 2009 Award Course Completions listings on the DEEWR website at http://www.deewr.gov.au/HigherEducation/Publications/HEStatistics/Publications/Pages/Students.aspx

2010

1

Total completions for both Research Doctorates and Research Masters declined between 2008 and 2009. Completions per

10 Academic Staff FTE also declined (from 2.1 to 1.3) and was below Target by 0.9 completions per 10 Academic Staff FTE.

The decline in completions in 2009 is attributed to a combination of lengthening average times to complete, as well as a drop in continuing Higher Degree by Research enrolments in 2004 and 2005. This has been particularly noticeable in the

Education and Communications and Arts disciplines.

A range of factors will have influenced these changes, including opportunities for employment in the strong labour market conditions which prevailed at that time.

9. Research Publications

The number of recognised research and development publications produced in a year, as reported to the Department of

Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR), is a direct measure of research output.

The number of weighted research and development publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE is a measure of the efficiency of research output and an indicator of how efficiently ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community.

Research and Development “Weighted Publications” is defined as the number of publications in the DIISR-defined categories

A1, B, C1, E1 and J1 in a year. The number of publications is assessed annually in a rigorous, externally audited system prior to submission to DIISR. Weighted publications are expressed per 10 full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and research’ or ‘research only’.

Table 27: Research and Development Weighted Publications per 10 Academic FTE

2006 2007

Unweighted Publications per 10 FTE

A1 – Authored Research Books

B – Book Chapter

C1 – Articles in Scholarly Refereed Journal

E1 – Full Written Paper - Refereed Proceedings

J1 – Major Original Creative Works

Total Unweighted Publications

Total Weighted Publications

Academic Staff FTE

Weighted Publications per 10 FTE

Target

0.14

0.89

4.78

4.25

0.0

484.2

510.6

482

10.6

0.21

1.16

5.00

3.91

0.0

456.2

493.2

444

11.1

10.6

Note: 1. Research publications figures for 2010 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2011.

2008

0.37

0.59

5.48

4.25

0.0

479.0

545.8

448

12.2

11.5

2009

0.36

1.03

5.02

3.32

0.0

480.9

552.9

494

11.2

12.8

20101

Both Total Unweighted Publications and Total Weighted Publications increased in number between 2008 and 2009, by 1.9 and 7.1 publications respectively. Weighted Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE decreased between 2008 and 2009

(from 12.2 to 11.2), and was below Target by 1.6 publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE in 2009.

123

124

OTHER FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES

31 DECEMBER 2010

Pricing Policies

ECU sets the level of the student contribution for Commonwealth-supported places at the maximum allowed under the

Higher Education Support Act 2003, as is the case for most Australian universities. Fees for fee-paying courses are determined on the basis of cost and market conditions and take into account Australian Government requirements regarding fees set for non-Commonwealth-supported places.

Major Capital Projects

Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2010

Project

Campus Renewal Program

Joondalup Campus Engineering Laboratories

Mount Lawley Campus Crèche

Joondalup Campus Car Parking

Estimated total cost ($m)

2.000

2.000

1.000

1.200

Actual total cost ($m)

6.243

1.598

1.015

1.212

Note: The actual total cost of the Campus Renewal Program exceeded the estimated total costs by $4.243m, due to the increase scope of work resulting from the University’s implementation of its Operational Excellence initiatives.

Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2010

Project

Joondalup Computing, Engineering and Technology Building

Joondalup Campus Sports and Fitness Centre Expansion

Mount Lawley Campus WAAPA Infrastructure

Campus Access Control System

Estimated total cost ($m)

46.000

12.000

4.500

2.000

Actual total cost to complete ($m)

39.400

7.500

4.950

2.000

Expected year of completion

2011

2012

2011

2014

Employees and Employee Relations

Table 30: Academic Staff Headcount by Contract Type, 2006-2010

Staff

Full-time Ongoing

Full-time Contract

Part-time Ongoing

Part-time Contract

Casual

Total

2006

413

100

41

61

1,720

2,335

2007

384

82

41

47

1,472

2,026

Table 31: General Staff Headcount by Contract Type, 2006-2010

Staff

Full-time Ongoing

Full-time Contract

Part-time Ongoing

Part-time Contract

Casual

Total

2006

655

136

190

137

965

2,083

2007

584

134

181

128

880

1,907

2008

592

160

167

148

624

1,671

2008

370

105

42

50

1,426

1,993

2009

615

163

171

153

621

1,723

2009

371

142

49

66

1,602

2,230

2010

632

144

183

137

637

1,733

2010

371

141

50

74

1,617

2,253

Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management

Commitment to Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management

ECU places a high priority on maintaining a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff and visitors; one that is conducive to study, job satisfaction and productivity and is proactive in preventing and minimising the potential for, injury and harm. ECU aims to exceed the requirements for compliance with the State Government’s Code of Practice: Occupational

Safety and Health in the Western Australian Public Sector. The University’s target is for zero lost time injuries.

Formal Mechanism for Consultation with Employees on Occupational Safety, Health and Injury

Management Matters

ECU’s committee structure for occupational safety and health matters comprises four levels:

„ „

Occupational Safety and Health Policy Committee (reporting to the Vice-Chancellor);

„ „

Institutional Bio-safety Committee / Radiation Committee (reporting to the Occupational Safety and Health

Policy Committee);

„ „

Occupational Safety and Health Campus Working Groups (reporting to the Director, Facilities and Services); and

„ „

Faculty-level and Service Centre-level Occupational Safety and Health Committees and special working parties

(reporting to senior business managers and the University Occupational Safety & Health Policy Committee).

Each of these committees engages with elected safety and health representatives and employee representatives to ensure consultation at all levels. Information on university committees is available here http://www.hr.ecu.edu.au/osh/html/os_h_reps_home_page.cfm

In addition to statutory responsibilities, the University expects all managers and supervisors to provide information, instruction, training and supervision on safety and health procedures and work practices to ensure a safe and healthy working environment. This responsibility is achieved via the consultative committee process where hazards, risks and all matters relating to occupational safety and health are discussed and aligned to the business unit’s operational safety plan.

A Statement of Compliance with the Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act

ECU has a formal Occupational Safety and Health and Injury Management Policy developed in consultation with employees and elected safety and health representatives. ECU’s safety and injury management programs are communicated via its safety committees and incorporated into the operational plans of all business units. The University’s goal is to achieve a zero lost time injury rate. The University’s Workers’ Compensation and injury management policy is available here http://www.ecu.edu.au/GPPS/policies_db/policies_view.php?rec_id=0000000201

Table 32: Performance against 2009 / 10 Injury Management Targets

Indicator

Number of fatalities

Lost time injury / diseases incident rate

1

Lost time injury severity rate

Percentage of injured workers returned to work within 28 weeks

Target 2009 / 10

Zero (0)

Zero or 10% reduction on previous year

Zero or 10% improvement on previous year

Result

2009 / 10

0

0.09

0

100% 100%

Percentage of managers trained in occupational safety and health and injury management

2

See Note 2 n/a

Note 1: Lost time injury/disease incident rate and lost time injury severity rate are defined as the incidents per 100 employees.

Result

2008 / 09

0

0.15

0

100% n/a

Note 2: ECU does not provide training specifically in Injury Management and occupational Health and Safety (OSH), obligations for these activities are incorporated into broader OSH briefings and training and information sessions provided to managers.

Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems

ECU has implemented a mandatory internal self-assessment occupational safety and health management system based on the primary functions and supporting principles of the Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4801:2001. All business units of the University have developed strategic and operational plans and strategies to achieve best practice. A number of business units have elected to be formally accredited against the Standard. ECU’s occupational safety and health performance statistics are reported to two committees of Council: the Resources Committee and the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee.

Additionally, staff attitudes and perceptions about the safety of their work environment are monitored through a bi-annual staff survey and the latest results were reported in the ECU Annual Report for 2009.

125

126

GOVERNANCE DISCLOSURES

31 DECEMBER 2010

Corporate Standards and Risk Management

Equity

ECU adopts a whole-of-University approach to mainstreaming equity principles and practices to improve outcomes for students and staff. ECU’s Equity Action Plan, together with the separate, but linked, Indigenous Action Plan, are monitored

through the University’s committee structures (see ECU Committees page 13

) and standard review processes.

ECU also supports two volunteer equity networks available to both staff and students. University Contact Officers help to resolve equal opportunity issues by providing referral advice on equity policies and practices, while “Allies” provide a network of trained contacts for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students and staff.

Equity Initiatives and Activities in 2010

ECU’s commitment to equity was demonstrated in 2010 by a number of initiatives, plans and activities as described below.

The University continued to deliver against its commitments outlined in ECU’s Disability Access and Inclusion Plan

2006-2010, and held a Disability Round Table to engage with practitioners, policy makers, students and the wider community on the development of the new five-year plan.

During 2010, ECU became one of only five organisations in Western Australia to be named an Employer of Choice for

Women by the Australian Government’s Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (EOWA). This citation recognises the University’s efforts to support and encourage female staff in the workplace, such as the [email protected] initiative that offers support to female staff through seminars, coffee conversations, networking opportunities, speakers and special events.

In line with the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA) (EEO Act), ECU maintains an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)

Management Plan 2009-2011. The EEO Management Plan is linked to other relevant ECU plans to ensure effective implementation and reporting. As stipulated by Section 146 of the EEO Act, ECU also provided a yearly demographic report to the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity during 2010.

During 2010, the University set in place arrangements for the development of an Indigenous Reconciliation Action Plan

(RAP), which will further engage the University in a national effort to improve the well-being of Indigenous Australians.

Kurongkurl Katitjin, ECU’s Centre for Indigenous Australian Education and Research, hosted a commemorative event to recognise Sorry Day and to mark the beginning of Reconciliation Week.

ECU’s School of Education delivered an inaugural teaching unit in Indigenous Knowledge and Culture, and became one of only four universities to win a national grant to conduct a cultural competency pilot during 2010. The grant, which is administered through Universities Australia on behalf of DEEWR and the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council, aims to develop a model that helps to give university graduates the skills to work effectively and confidently with Indigenous communities; and to create a better work and study environment for Indigenous students and staff.

ECU continued to deliver the Retention and Persistence Transition Support Peer Mentoring Program which helps new students achieve successful, productive and positive experiences by assisting them to build and maintain social and academic networks with other students. The roll-out of the program across the University expanded in 2010, and now includes the School of Computing and Security Science, Faculty of Regional Professional Studies, School of Nursing, Midwifery and

Postgraduate Medicine, School of Education, School of Engineering, and School of Psychology and Social Science.

Quality

ECU’s Quality and Equity Unit provides leadership and strategic advice in the planning, and management of quality matters within the University, while ECU’s [email protected] model, consisting of the Plan, Do, Review, Improve cycle provides a holistic approach to continuous improvement and quality. The ECU Quality Review Policy supports the various quality review processes and defines the purpose, function and frequency of all Annual, School, Research Centre and Off-shore program reviews. In 2010, the guidelines were updated and processes aligned to provide a more consistent and robust approach to the review process at ECU.

As part of the five-yearly cycle of external school reviews, four schools were reviewed in 2010. Four off-shore partners and two research centres were also reviewed in 2010. The annual review process in 2010 reflected a more robust and

evidence-based approach, and continues to be refined and improved as part of our focus on quality.

In preparation for the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) Cycle 2 Audit in October 2011, ECU has convened a Quality Steering Group to guide audit preparations. During 2010, in consultation with AUQA, the two themes selected for ECU’s Cycle 2 Audit were ‘Internationalisation’ and ‘Engagement’.

For more information on quality visit http://www.ecu.edu.au/equ/index.html

ECU’s operational agreement with MDIS in Singapore expired in November 2010 and has not been reviewed. The University will be negotiating a “Teach-Out” Agreement to ensure all ECU students in programs at MDIS are given the opportunity to complete their course.

Risk Management

A major component of corporate governance at ECU is effective risk management. To this end, during 2010 ECU revised the Integrated Risk Management Policy to comply with ISO Standard 31000 Risk Management. Following this, ECU’s risk management tools were revised to incorporate risk management plans for major activities.

Fraud risk assessment training was delivered across all three campuses during 2010. Council approved an updated Fraud and Misconduct Management and Prevention Policy based on feedback from the fraud risk assessment training.

In respect of legislative compliance, ECU assessed its operations with respect to the Privacy Act 1988 (Cwlth) and the

Working with Children (Criminal Record Checking) Act 2004 (WA). In both instances, the University was assessed as being materially compliant with both acts.

Business Continuity Plans are now in place for all ECU campuses. The plans for ECU’s South West Campus were tested in

2010, as were plans for parts of the Joondalup Campus. The documentation and testing of IT disaster recovery plans and key

IT systems continued during 2010. All critical IT systems were tested during the year.

For more information on Risk Management, visit www.ecu.edu.au/RMAA/index.html

Risk Management Statement

This statement is consistent with National Governance Protocol 9. The following statement complies with the National

Governance Protocol:

„ „

ECU has an Integrated Risk Management Framework and Policy. These were revised and then approved by the University

Council in October 2010. It is compliant with ISO Standard 31000: Risk Management.

„ „

Strategic oversight of risk management is included in the terms of reference for the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee, as well as in the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee Charter approved by Council in December 2010. A Risk Reference

Forum, chaired by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), assists with the exchange of experiences of best practice and dissemination of risk management-related material within the University.

„ „

Functionally, the Office of Risk Management and Audit Assurance is responsible for the development and implementation of risk management strategies, methods and tools, legislative compliance, business continuity and fraud and misconduct prevention and management.

„ „

The Finance and Business Services Centre is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the insurance portfolio.

The Human Resources Services Centre is responsible for the day-to-day operation of occupational safety and health strategies and workers’ compensation. The Legal Services Office is responsible for legal risk.

127

128

COMPLIANCE WITH RELEVANT WRITTEN LAWS

In the performance of its functions during the year ended 31 December 2010 the University has operated within the provisions of the Edith Cowan University Act 1984.

Having made or caused to be made on our behalf all relevant enquiries, but noting the very broad extent of application of written laws to the University, to the best of our knowledge, information and belief, the University has complied with all relevant written law.

We are aware of no fact or circumstance apparent or existing at the date of signing this statement, to lead us to conclude otherwise.

The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan

Chancellor

7 March 2011

Mr Warren Snell

Acting Vice-Chancellor

7 March 2011

Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2010 annUal rEport sECtion 5 -

other legal requIrementS

129

130

OTHER LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

Advertising

In accordance with the requirements of section 175ZE of the Electoral Act 1907 (WA) the University is required to report all expenditure incurred by, or on behalf of, the

University on advertising, market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising during the financial year.

Advertising expenditure in 2010 totalled $5,918,678. The amount in each expenditure class and the organisations paid, are listing in Table 33 below.

Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2010

$’000

1,886 Advertising agencies

303 Group Pty Ltd

Hobsons Australia Pty Ltd

Market research organisations

Customer Service Benchmarking Australia

Other

Polling organisations

Direct mail organisations

Media advertising organisations

Mitchell and Partners Australia Pty Ltd

Media Decisions |OMD

Anita Chauhan

Starcom Worldwide (WA) Pty Ltd

Total Expenditure

79

0

0

3,954

5,919

Recordkeeping

The Electronic Document and Records Management

System (EDRMS) is the University’s approved record keeping system, allowing emails and documents from the

Microsoft Office Suite to be saved electronically. A project is in train to roll out EDRMS across the University.

State Records Commission Standard 2 Record

Keeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance

ECU is subject to the requirements of the State Records

Act 2000 (WA) and is committed to compliance in its record keeping activities. ECU’s activities under each of the requirements include:

The efficiency and effectiveness of the organisation’s record keeping system is evaluated not less than once every 5 years.

„ „

ECU’s Record Keeping Plan was submitted to the

State Records Office in December 2005. The plan was approved for a five-year term and will be reviewed in early 2011.

„ „

Under the Universities Retention and Disposal Schedule collaborative work is underway to develop a common

Disposal Schedule, for Western Australia’s public universities and will be completed by May 2011.

„ „

The ECU-wide Disaster Recovery Plan has been completed and is can be accessed by ECU staff through the ECU intranet.

„ „

Record keeping surveys have been conducted as part of the EDRMS project roll out.

The organisation conducts a record keeping training program.

ECU has two record keeping training programs:

1. A basic record keeping induction training package is available and is integrated into the University’s overall professional development and training program.

2. The Records Awareness Training System was implemented in 2008 to raise record management awareness for staff and continues to be offered to staff.

Since implementation, over 70 per cent of staff have completed, or are working through, the course.

3. Monthly training courses on the University’s record keeping software (TRIM) are provided at Basic and

Intermediate levels.

The efficiency and effectiveness of the record keeping training program is reviewed from time to time.

The outcomes of the Records Awareness Training are monitored and staff feedback is collected through a questionnaire. The feedback is reviewed to ensure that the training is effective. An intermediate user course was introduced as a result of the feedback.

The organisation’s induction program addresses employees’ roles and responsibilities with regards to their compliance with the organisation’s record keeping plan.

All new ECU employees undergo an induction course which addresses employee roles and responsibilities in regard to the compliance aspects of the Record Keeping Plan.

Additionally, this material is included in a handbook issued to employees when they commence work at ECU.

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes

During 2010, ECU reported on achievements against its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for the 2009/10 reporting year, as required under Schedule 3 of the Disability Services Regulations 2004. It is important to acknowledge that ECU’s

DAIP covers a five-year period (2006-2011) and many of the strategies will continue throughout that period. Some examples of achievements against ECU’s DAIP Outcomes in 2009/10 are listed below.

Outcome One: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the University.

„ „

The layout of the student Learning and Assessment Plan was reviewed to streamline the negotiation process between staff and students.

„ „

ECU’s e-Learning Policy and Policy for Inclusive Curriculum Design and Delivery were finalised.

Outcome Two: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the University.

„ „

A successful funding bid was finalised and criteria were established for the development of Access and

Mobility Maps at ECU.

„ „

An assessment of the provision of accessible bus stop shelters and taxi drop off and pick up locations for each campus was undertaken.

Outcome Three: People with disabilities receive information from the University in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

„ „

ECU’s Corporate Style Guide was reviewed to incorporate Disability Service Commission guidelines on printed information.

„ „

ECU’s Little Red Book was updated and now contains further information on Inclusive Curriculum Design and Delivery.

Outcome Four: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the

University as other people receive from the staff of the University.

„ „

Disability Awareness Training was delivered to 18 staff from key customer service areas, including the Library.

„ „

Mental Health Workshops were developed and delivered with maximum attendance in all cases (waiting lists were applied).

Outcome Five: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the University.

„ „

The Student Complaints Policy was revised to indicate that equity/discrimination complaints can be lodged via one central area.

„ „

Ten new University Contact Officers were appointed and trained in Equal Opportunity legislation and complaints.

Outcome Six: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the University.

„ „

ECU’s five year DAIP was published on ECU’s Quality & Equity Unit web site along with its Annual Implementation Plan.

„ „

ECU held a Round Table on Disability to consult with people with disabilities, non-for-profit organisations, and community partners on the development of the University’s revised five-year Disability Access and Inclusion Plan.

Outcome Seven: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment and work experience placements with the University.

„ „

A meeting was held between Employment Edge and ECU’s HR Account Managers.

„ „

A review of online induction processes progressed. The changes will be consistent with University guidelines on accessibility.

Outcome Eight: The University promotes an inclusive culture that values diversity, does not tolerate harassment or discrimination and encourages a secure and safe environment for all students and staff.

„ „

Annual ECU events were held to commemorate International Day of People with a Disability and Mental Health Week.

„ „

A link to the University’s ‘EEO Online’ training program was established in ECU’s online induction program.

131

Contact ECU by phone on

134 ECU (134 328)

For calls outside Australia phone

(61 8) 6304 0000

For calls regarding south west region phone

(61 8) 9780 7709

Email us at [email protected] or visit

reachyourpotential.com.au

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this brochure is correct at the time of printing. The information is subject to change from time to time and the University reserves the right to add, vary or discontinue courses and impose limitations on enrolment in any course. The publication constitutes an expression of intent and is not to be taken as a firm offer or understanding.

CRICOS IPC 00279B key2design_31906_04/11

GREENING ECU: Edith Cowan University is committed to reducing the environmental impact associated with its operations by conducting its activities in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. This includes implementing strategies and technologies that minimise waste of resources and demonstrate environmentally sensitive development, innovation and continuous improvement.

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