Euroheat | Nestor Martin 43 | Operating instructions | Euroheat Nestor Martin 43 Operating instructions

Euroheat Nestor Martin 43 Operating instructions
This Manual Must Always be Available to the Stove Operator
Euroheat
Natural Energy Company
Operating Instructions
Nestor Martin
C23,C33
C43
Q13,D33,O23,NM33
Smoke
Control
Exempt
IN1213 Edition B June 2010
PART NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
IMPORTANT

The installation of this appliance must comply with all local regulations, including those referring to
national and European Standards before it can be operated. The stove is not suitable for a shared flue.

Improper adjustment, alteration, maintenance or the fitting of replacement parts not recommended by
the manufacturer can cause injury or property damage. Do not operate the stove with faulty seals or
damaged glass.

Ensure all manuals are kept safely and are available for the user at all times.

Do not store or use petrol or other flammable vapours and liquids in the vicinity of this or any other heating appliance. Do not burn anything but natural wood or approved coals on this appliance.

Due to high operating temperatures of this appliance it should be located away from pedestrian traffic
and away from furniture and draperies. Do not store paper or wood near the appliance. Any mats and
rugs put in front of the stove should be fire proof and secured to prevent the possibility of tripping.

Advise all persons as to the stove’s high surface temperatures, including visitors. If it is possible for
children or infirm adults to come into contact with the stove, fit a suitable fire guard. Never let children
“help” with the stove in any way, even when the stove is cold.

It is imperative that all air passageways into, out of, and within the appliance are kept clean. All
permanent ventilation into the room provided for the stove must remain clear and unobstructed at all
times. Consideration must be given to the need for extra ventilation if another heating source needing
air is to be operated simultaneously. If an extraction fan is proposed to be fitted to a connecting area of
the house, after the stove has been installed, professional advice should be sought from a qualified
engineer.

If a flue blockage or adverse weather conditions cause the stove to emit smoke, do not treat it as
merely a nuisance, this smoke will indicate that carbon monoxide is being emitted into the room. Turn
the stove to its minimum firing rate, open windows and allow the stove’s fuel to burn out before closing
the windows. Do not re-light the stove without consulting a qualified engineer.

In the event of a chimney fire the stove should be turned to its minimum setting and the fire brigade
informed. Do not re-light the stove until the complete installation has been inspected by a qualified
engineer.

The appliance should be inspected regularly and the chimney cleaned at least annually. More frequent
cleaning may be required and the advice of a qualified chimney sweep should be sought. Always check
for any flue blockage before lighting the stove after a prolonged shut down.
This stove has been carefully designed and constructed to give clean burning with optimum efficiency and safety,
but as with all stoves these standards will not be achieved unless the stove is installed and maintained regularly
by qualified engineers. It must also be operated strictly with the procedures given in this manual.
If you are unsure about anything concerning your stove please seek professional advice.
Useful Organizations
Solid Fuel Association
The National Association of Chimney Sweeps
HETAS Ltd.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
0845 601 4406 01785 811732
0845 634 5626
1
www.solidfuel.co.uk
www.chimneyworks.co.uk
www.hetas.co.uk
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
The Model Range Explained
Thank you for purchasing your stove and helping to protect our environment. Nestor Martin and Euroheat insist
on progressive development to produce products which are market leading. Our aims are to produce stoves with
the latest innovations, user friendly operation and high efficiency for lower cost operation.
This operation manual offers user information for the range of NESTOR MARTIN C23,C33,C43,D33,O23,Q13 and
NM33. In some cases you find references in this document to the model size rather than the models exterior
design. There are four sizes of appliances, 13, 23, 33, 43. The 13 is the smallest and the 43 the largest. Although
the exterior clothes change between model ranges, for example the C23 and the O23, the internal workings are
the same.
Model Identification
You will see on the front page of this document a label which confirms which model you have. This label also
advises you of the stoves unique serial number. This information is also attached to your stove for reference.
Important
Please ensure the warranty registration form is returned to Euroheat. In this way the model and its history will
be recorded for reference in the future.
HETAS
The reference to use of smokeless coal and other fuels in these instructions may not be covered by current Hetas
approval. For HETAS approval model information see the last page of this document. Under the HETAS approval
scheme stoves which are listed as intermittent (see technical table at the end of this document) cannot be
referred to as slow combustion appliances. Also see the HETAS web site www.hetas.co.uk
Stoves supplied through Euroheat authorized retailers.
For England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland
Euroheat Distributors (H.B.S). Ltd.
Unit 2,
Court Farm Business Park,
Bishops Frome,
Worcestershire. WR6 5AY.
www.euroheat.co.uk
info@euroheat.co.uk
Whilst we are always happy to assist you, please make sure you have read this manual before requesting
support.
First contact your supplying retailer. If you find this not successful contact the Euroheat Technical support team.
Technical support telephone Number 01885 491117. E-mail tech@euroheat.co.uk. Before telephoning ensure
you have your stove’s serial number to hand. This can be found on the front of either the operating, installation,
warranty registration, or on the stove identification label.
Euroheat unfortunately are unable to offer support for appliances which were not supplied by Euroheat.
Stoves supplied through Eireheat authorized retailers.
www.eireheat.com
For Eire
Sean Murphy Heating Ltd
Kinvara
Co Galway
Eire
sales@eireheat.com
(091)637701 Fax: (091)637797
International +353 91637701
For support for appliances supplied through Eireheat in Ireland please contact using the
details listed above.
Thermic Distribution Europe Sa
11 Rue De Lion
B-5660
Frasnes Les Couvin, Belgium.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
www.nestormartin.com
2
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Operating Items Supplied with the Stove
Operating Tool
For Plexus Control Operation
and Ash Pan Removal
(Not Q13 Ash Pan Tool)
Heat Resistant Glove
Please note that the die is not colour
fast and if damp may leach out and be
absorbed into porous surfaces.
Poker
Ash Pan Tool Q13
Ash Pan Removal
Q13 models only
Instruction Manuals
Stove Registration
This Manual Must Always Be Available To The Stove Operator
Euroheat
Natural Energy Company
Operating Instructions
Nestor Martin
Q13,C23,C33,C43
D33,O23,NM33
IN1213 Edition A Sept 2009
Euroheat
Natural Energy Company
Installation &
Servicing Instructions
Nestor Martin
Q13,C23,C33,C43
D33,O23,NM33
Please complete the form on pages 3 and 4 and return it with a copy
of your sales receipt for proof of purchase date from your Euroheat
approved supplier to obtain your
Free 10 Year Technical Support
Stove
Registration
Form
IN1210 Edition A September 2009
PART NUMBER
PART NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
If any of the Instructions or the Warranty Registration form are missing please contact Euroheat quoting
the stoves serial number and a replacement will be despatched immediately.
Before Operating this Appliance
The paint used on the stove is a heat resistant paint capable of withstanding 650°C, but it needs to be heated
for several hours to allow it to cure and attain its full hardness. The lighting procedure should be followed and
the stove’s first fire limited to a small fire for one hour, after which its size can be gradually increased to allow
the stove to reach its operating temperature. As the temperature of the paint increases a blue hazy smoke will
be apparent as the solvents in the paint are driven out. These fumes may activate a smoke detector, if fitted,
and during this period the room must be ventilated by leaving the windows open and it should not be occupied
by people or pets. The time taken for the paint to be fully cured will be dependant upon the temperature but
you should allow at least six hours. If you re-paint or fit new parts to your stove, another period of curing will be
necessary but the curing time will be very much shorter.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Internal Plexus Stove Construction
(Schematic drawing of the combustion chamber)
Pre Heated
Primary Air
Top Flue Option
Top Chamber Baffle
Rear Flue Option
Internal Cast Iron
Protection Plates
Riddling Actuating Rod
(Position and Shape of the
Rod Varies with Model)
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
Air Entering through the
Plexus Control Assembly
Below the Combustion
Chamber
Cast Iron
Riddling Grate
Ash Pan Door
4
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Multifuel and Wood Stoves
Gas and oil are consistent fuels and stoves can be designed to obtain the maximum heat from them with the
user having to do no more than choose a heat setting. Solid fuels are almost infinitely variable and however well
a stove has been designed, its performance will ultimately depend on the way the user operates it. Whilst we
have endeavoured to make the stove as simple to operate as possible, understanding just a little about the fuels
and the way your stove was designed to burn them will be rewarded by your being able to achieve the best from
your stove with the least effort.
As a fuel, wood is visually exciting, environmentally friendly, and a renewable source of energy but it is one of
the most complex fuels to burn. Wood contains two sorts of components which burn. The fixed carbons which
burn as the glowing embers, and the compounds that vaporize when heated to burn as volatile gasses, giving
the endlessly changing flame patterns. The fixed carbon, which is charcoal, is a virtually trouble free fuel and
needs little assistance to burn cleanly, but it would be difficult to describe it as visually entertaining.
When set to its wood burning position, your stove heats the incoming air to ensure it has the minimum cooling
effect on any volatiles. The air is supplied as slowly as possible so as not to blow out any established flames
and it comes in across the full width of the stove ensuring that all parts of the stove receive an equal air supply.
Because the air enters slowly over a curved blade the air is directed towards the burning volatiles rather than the
bed of the fire, this allows the tar laden volatile components to use the incoming air as a priority. By placing a
log or two towards the front of the fire whenever the flames from previous logs die down, a bed of charcoal will
build up. This will be virtually pure carbon and capable of burning for incredibly long periods without causing any
tar deposits on the stove’s glass even when the air supply is reduced to minimal setting.
Always put logs on to the fire before flames from previous logs have extinguished, this will ensure that when the
new logs begin releasing gasses it will ignite. Unburned gasses will cause smoke and tar deposits and wastes
potential heat. Putting on too much wood at one time will both restrict the air supply and cool the combustion
chamber making it more difficult for the gasses to burn cleanly.
Never put on fresh wood whilst operating the stove with a minuscule air supply as a technique for operating
for long periods without attention, it will cause both chilling and air restriction. Properly controlling the rate at
which wood burns is not simply a matter of restricting the air supply, nor running the stove with a very small
fire, it is maintaining the temperature and ignition flames in the stove whilst balancing the release of gasses to
match the chosen air supply.
No two woods have the same burning characteristics but all wood contains water. It is difficult to quantify the
amount of water any log might hold whilst its exterior feels dry but it would not be unreasonable to estimate a
mug full from a good sized, poorly seasoned log. Imagine pouring that onto your fire every time you introduce
a new log and you will realize its obvious effect of cooling the fire. What is not so obvious is that the moisture
mixing with the vaporized gasses is cooling them, possibly below their ignition temperature. So the water within
a wet log cools the stove,plus it has prevented much of the potential heat from the log being realized and the
unburned combustible products will be deposited as tars within the stove and flue. Advice on how to dry wood
can be found on the DVD “User Guide” supplied with the stove.
Coal suitable for stoves has only a very small proportion of components that vaporise, a far higher fixed carbon
content and when the stove is set to its coal burning position, air is supplied through the grate to the underside
of the fire bed to supply the carbon directly. There will be sufficient spare air travelling through the fire bed to
reach the limited gasses being released and this air will have been heated as it passed the burning coals.
Because coals suitable for stoves have so little vaporizing content they are virtually trouble free fuels to use, but
if you are using one of the manufactured smokeless coals take care to ensure the ash pan is checked regularly
because some of them have a very high ash content; this is especially important if you change “brands” because
the ash contents can vary dramatically.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Always riddle the grate before putting on loadings of coal to give the initial release of gasses sufficient air with
which to burn; failure to do so may allow the stove and flue to fill with gasses ready to ignite.
A stove is very much safer than an open fire, but if you have children or infirm people in the house please ensure
it is suitably guarded, and consideration should also be given to accidental contact with the stove if you are
entertaining with a busy houseful of guests. If you have a remotely operated stove please ensure you keep the
remote operating handset well away from the stove, children and dogs.
Choice of Fuels
Use of fuels in smoke exempt areas. (See data table for exempt models)
If you are operating this stove within a smoke exempt area it is approved for use for the following fuels only.
Seasoned dry wood. With a moisture content of 20% or less
Smokeless coal approved for use in smoke exempt areas.
Other fuels such as house coal, briquettes, waste wood, peat, wood over 20% moisture must not be used unless
approved for use in smoke exempt areas.
Wood
All wood will burn slightly differently, but the most important differences between woods is their moisture
content. Until the moisture has been driven off from the wood it will remain below its combustion temperature.
When the outer skin has dried and beginning to burn, much of this heat energy will be wasted having to boil off
the water remaining in the core of the wood. Copious amounts of water vapour, in all but the most insulated flue,
will condense and mix with the products of combustion to form creosote and other undesirable substances which
will eat away the fabric of the flue, and eventually build up to block the flue. At any time this build up of tar will
be capable of causing a chimney fire.
The advice to burn only “dry” wood is sometimes confusing because the atmospheric moisture will prevent wood
ever becoming “dry”. It is acceptable to burn wood with a moisture content of less than 20%, which can be
achieved by splitting the wood, stacking it so as to allow air to circulate within the stack and storing it under cover
for between 18 months and 30 months, depending on prevailing climatic conditions. The use of a wood moisture
content meter will confirm the amount of water remaining in the wood easily. The practice of drying wood by the
stove should be discouraged, firstly because it should be unnecessary, and secondly because stored wood will
invariably become the home to many varieties of insects, many of whom enjoy eating wood. To introduce them
into your house and encourage them with heat and time to make new homes in your furniture and structural
timbers is not recommended.
Smokeless Coal
We recommend burning deep mined anthracite, a natural hard coal which is classified as being a smokeless fuel;
specifying the sizes of “small nuts” or “large nuts” will give most visually attractive and efficient burning. Smaller
sizes than this will tend to choke the air flow too easily making long burning times without attention problematic.
Various manufactured smokeless coals are available giving differing burning characteristics and the manufacturers
or your coal merchant will advise you as to their suitability for stoves. The difficulties and dangers associated
with burning ordinary bituminous coal (house coal) with its relatively high volatile content make it totally
unsuitable and potentially dangerous for burning in any stove.
Lignite (also known as solid mineral fuel)
Lignite is obtainable in briquette form and is best described as young coal. It behaves very much like coal and
should be burned as smokeless manufactured coal.
Peat
Peat burns very well, but it is bulky and its distinct aroma will pervade your home and everything in it, but
otherwise peat can be burned as wood.
DO NOT BURN petroleum based fuels such as petro-coke, they may seriously damage your stove. The manufacturers
of other blended coal products, containing a proportion of petro-coke, should be approached to confirm the
suitability of the product for use within an enclosed appliance that does not have a chrome steel grate.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
6
Choice of Logs
Never burn wood that is not dry or wood that has been subject to a manufacturing process, such as chipboard,
as these contain resins of uncertain toxicity when burned. For the same reasons, wood that has been painted or
treated with a preservative should never be burned.
Natural wood is described as being either “hardwood” or “soft wood”. Typically all broad leaf trees that lose their
leaves in the winter are called hard woods, and the evergreen conifers are called soft woods. Whilst the wood
from the two groups have structural differences, the terms do not define the density or hardness of the wood.
Balsa, one of the softest and lightest of woods is classified as being a hardwood and Hemlock, a soft wood, is
extremely hard.
The less density wood has, the more its structure is made up of open spaces meaning it will season faster and
because of these voids it will burn faster because it will expose more surface area as it disintegrates. This makes
light woods suitable for kindling or a rapidly developing fire but unless you enjoy putting wood onto a fire every
few minutes it is unsuitable for burning over long periods. Although there is a difference in the speed at which
woods burn, equal weights of wood will give very similar amounts of heat.
Because logs are concentric tubes of cells they season faster if they are split, halving the tubes and allowing the
moisture to evaporate more easily. Similarly it also allows the volatile gasses given off when the wood is heated
in a stove to be emitted along its full length rather than at the log’s ends. This helps the gasses to be distributed
more evenly within the stove and improves not only the efficiency and emission reduction of wood burning, but
gives a more attractive fire.
Putting logs onto the fire, bark side down and laying them, well spaced, in random orientation, rather than
uniformly horizontally, will also help to increase the efficiency and attractiveness of the fire. To make this easier
the ideal log length will be the length the stove’s combustion chamber can accommodate in all directions, and
of proportionate cross-section, to allow you to load wood in a “higgledy-piggledy” manner.
LOG SIZES. All logs should be split and ideally, quartered.
Stove model
Ideal Log Length
Maximum Log Length
Size 13
8 inches, 200mm
12 inches, 300mm
Size 23
8 inches, 200mm
13 inches,
330mm
Size 33
9 inches, 220mm 15 inches,
367mm
Size 43
10 inches, 250mm
17 inches,
432mm
DO NOT BURN
Anything but dry, natural wood. Wood that has been painted, treated or has hinges, nails or any plastic attached
will almost certainly emit toxic matter when burned. For similar reasons bonded wood products such a chipboard,
plywood or fibre board must never be burned.
DO NOT BURN
Household waste. Many seemingly innocuous items like box packaging have been coated with glazes
which will produce toxic matter when burned. One old video tape put on the fire will cause more
pollution in a few minutes than a life time of wood burning. Not only will a fire burning rubbish pollute,
the stove is not designed to contain such an assortment of sizes and weights and a flaming box falling
from the stove when the door is opened will present an unacceptable fire hazard.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
7
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
The Plexus Air Control
Your stove will have one of these control panels, allowing you to adjust both the air volume, by rotating the
round right hand control knob, and the direction from which air enters the stove, by rotating the left hand control
knob.
Air Direction Control
Air Volume Control
Air Direction Control
When the direction control is rotated to the fully clockwise position, 3 o’clock, the air enters the stove above the
fire, and when rotated to the fully anti-clockwise position, 9 o’clock, air enters the stove from beneath the grate.
Rotating the control to its mid position will supply air both over and under the fire and this position is used when
lighting a fire or burning manufactured smokeless coals. It should be set to the fully anti-clockwise position when
burning natural smokeless coal such as anthracite and set to the fully clockwise position when burning wood.
LIGHTING AND
MANUFACTURED
COALS
WOOD
ANTHRACITE
ALWAYS USE THE STOVE TOOL
TO MAKE AIR DIRECTION
ADJUSTMENTS.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Air Volume Control
The air volume should be set to maximum, 6 O’clock, only when lighting and the flue is cold. Settings giving
normal operating temperatures will usually be between 3 O’clock and 12 O’clock, with slow burning being
achieved when the control is set between 12 O’clock and 9 O’clock.
Do not expect the stove’s performance to match any setting repeatedly because it will be affected by so many
other factors such as fuel quality and weather conditions.
Lighting and when
the Flue is Cold Only
Maximum Operating
Temperatures
Minimum Operating
Temperatures
Slow Burning
To enable the air volume control knob to be rotated
to the lighting position, press the air volume control
knob inwards then the knob can be rotated to the
lighting position.
Push in Control
Knob
ALWAYS USE THE STOVE
OPERATING TOOL TO MAKE AIR
VOLUME ADJUSTMENTS.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
9
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Ash Collection
The grate can be riddled to encourage ash to fall into the ash pan by locating the right angled end of the stove
tool into the riddling actuating rod and using a push pull action to cause the grate to oscillate. The riddling rod is
located to either the left or right of the ash pan door dependant upon the model.
Position of the Riddle Rod
Either Left or Right of the Ash Pan Door
If it becomes necessary to riddle the stove while it is
operating, always riddle the stove before adding new
fuel. It is normal practice to riddle the grate and add
more fuel as one operation but it is very important
that the grate is riddled before adding more smokeless
coal. Putting a supply of coal, which will inevitably
contain some very small and easily heated pieces,
onto the fire will be putting it onto the hottest part
of the fire when the air supply is restricted by ash.
Although the volatile content is small it will, because
of the very restricted air flow, be undiluted and within
a few minutes quite a large volume may have been
produced, especially if something interrupts the
operation. The sudden ignition of this when the grate
is riddled and both air and heat are increased can at
best be alarming.
As well as being used to rearrange the fire bed, the poker is designed
to be used for clearing ash through the grate slots and this will be
found to be the most effective way of clearing wood ash when the fire
has burned out. If the fire has been running on anthracite coal, and the
stove has been over filled and under riddled, the poker may have to be
used to clear the grate of ash and partially burned coals.
Important
Do not allow the ash pan to over fill. This will cause ash to fall behind the ash pan as it is removed
and can prevent the ash pan from fitting correctly. Over filling the ash pan can prevent under
grate air reaching the fire which can cause poor operation and damage to the grate.
Available Accessories
Euroheat offer a range of accessoriy items which may assist with your day to day operation. These
include fire tool sets for cleaner operation, log stores for storing wood and other items. Ask your
euroheat retailer for the “every thing but the stove brochure” or visit the Euroheat web site.
www.euroheat.co.uk
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Ash Pan Removal: C23,C33,C43,D33,O23,NM33
Your ash pit door has a hexagon key slot
visible. Using the operating tool undo the
latch and swing the door open.
The stove tool right angle end is used to engage the ash pan
socket. Care should be taken to ensure the tool is fully engaged
before removing the ash pan. The glove should always be
worn on the hand not operating the stove tool so that the
ash pan can be securely held. Do not put the ash into, or
with, anything combustible; even seemingly cold ashes may
contain small glowing embers capable of igniting items they
come in contact with.
Ash Pan Removal: Q13
Your ash pan is held shut by the main door of the stove. Using the ash pan tool the right angle end is used
to engage the ash pan socket. Care should be taken to ensure the tool is fully engaged before removing the
ash pan. The glove should always be worn on the hand not
operating the stove tool so that the ash pan can be securely
held. Do not put the ash into, or with, anything combustible;
even seemingly cold ashes may contain small glowing embers
capable of igniting items they come in contact with.
Important:
Ensure that the ash pan is pushed fully in, so as to form a good
seal, and that the door closes onto the two adjusting screws
on the front face of the ash pan. These screws can be adjusted
so that the stoves door, when pushed closed, will maintain a
good seal on the ash pan.
Ash Pan Adjustment Screws
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
The ash pan door should be closed, or the ash pan pushed in firmly in the case of the Q13, before lighting a fire
in the stove and it should remain closed whilst the stove is operating. Opening the ash pan door when the stove
is operating may cause flames to be directed fiercely at the glass and the intense heat will turn the areas of glass
hit by the flames, irrevocably, opaquely white.
The stove is capable of continuous operation and if it is being operated continuously it will therefore be necessary
to empty the ash pan whilst the stove has a burning fire. If the ash pan door is to be opened and the ash pan
removed safely the following procedure should be followed.
Allow the fire to burn down as low as practicable and check that no embers will fall from the stove when the
door is opened. Wearing the glove, open the stove door, turn the handle to its closed position, and gently push
the door back until the latch just touches the stove body. Take care to do so gently, especially if your stove is
enamelled. This will let air into the stove above the fire and limit air being drawn in through the grate but prevent
smoke from spilling into the room.
The ash pan door can now be opened and the ash pan removed. The ash pan door must be closed immediately
the ash pan is removed and the stove door must also be closed securely. When re-installing the empty ash pan
the stove door must again be opened before opening the ash pat door. Never open the ash pat door without the
stove door being ajar and never leave either the stove door or the ash pat door open for longer than absolutely
necessary.
ACME
ACME
Preparation must be made for the safe handling and disposal of the burning embers in the ash pan before
beginning this operation. Good practice would be to have an empty metal container brought to the stove so the
ash pan can be emptied directly into it.
Never leave the stove unattended without both its doors being securely closed.
Always check, meticulously, that no embers have been spilled whenever any stove
door has been opened.
Always use the glove supplied with the stove when carrying the ash pan, even when
you think the ash is cold.
Do not empty ash into a plastic waste bin or any bin containing combustible waste.
There will be hot embers in the stove, long, even days, after the fire appeared to extinguish. Never clean out
ashes onto paper, never use a plastic bristled brush or a vacuum cleaner to remove ash.
Never let children “help” with the stove in any way,
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Getting Started With Wood
Having learned where to find the controls, you are now ready to light a wood
fire in the stove, without filling the stove or neighbourhood with smoke. You
will need two pieces of newspaper, a small bundle of kindling wood and
several split logs. All of these should be as dry as possible; never use wet
wood, it will cause smoke, deposit tar in the stove and flue to become a
potential fire hazard.
Remember that your stove needs the help of a gentle push start in the right
direction until it warms. Do not expect it to be on auto pilot until it reaches its
operating temperature.
Ensure the ash pan is fitted and empty, then
securely close the ash pan door.
ACME
Set the Plexus control to maximum air volume by rotating the right hand control clockwise until it reaches a stop,
at the large flame icon, then pushing the control knob inwards and turning another quarter turn clockwise to the
lighting, 3 o’clock, position. The left hand air direction control to its mid, 12 o’clock, position, supplying air above
and below the grate.
Set to Lighting position
Set to Mid Position
Lightly crumple two tabloid sized pieces of newspaper and
lay them in the middle of the grate.
Resist the temptation to use more paper than this, or
to crumple it too tightly; doing either will prevent the
rapid development of flames and will cause smoke to be
produced.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
The kindling wood should be placed over the paper so as to rest
against each other in a conical formation, leaving space between
each piece.
Light the paper using a long match or spill and close the stove door.
The lightly crumpled paper will begin burning rapidly and the space
between the kindling will allow the long bright flames to pass
between and over the wood raising it to its ignition temperature.
As the cone of kindling burns it will collapse and the inner
ends of the wood will begin to char and glow.
Wait until a substantial amount of the kindling is charring
before moving onto the next stage.
Wearing the stove glove place a log to either side of the burning
kindling and larger than kindling wood over, but not smothering,
the kindling.
If your stove is a larger model it will be possible to put a log either
side of the kindling before lighting the fire.
Rotate the air direction control fully clockwise, 3 o’clock position,
and do not be alarmed if the fire appears die, or be tempted to
move it back to its middle position.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
14
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
When the previous loading of wood is burning brightly
add another log to bridge the fire. Always avoid putting
wood directly onto wood burning with flame because
the new, cold, log will tend to cool the flame giving
gasses below their ignition temperature.
Conversely, you should try and position new logs directly
onto glowing embers.
Reduce the air volume control when the fire is established. Never leave it
in its lighting position continuously. It can then be set to the required burn
rate between the 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock positions.
Putting new logs, bark side down, towards the front
of the grate will give you both maximum efficiency
and best visual effect as it begins to burn.
Never put more than a layer of wood on at a time as
the logs will become unstable and may roll against
the glass, making it difficult to open the door.
If you lit your fire in the stove cleanly and you are now feeling it
becoming hot, congratulations, you have passed the lighting test
and are no longer a total novice. You can throw away your “L” plates
and move on to become an advanced driver. See page 17.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
15
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Why Did You Fail?
Not everyone will pass with flying colours at the first attempt, indeed even some
experienced stove users will fail their test because producing smoke and tar was
historically acceptable.
Before checking your technique, make absolutely certain that the wood you are using is
dry, not “seasoned”, “barn stored” or “ready for burning”. It must be dry if you want to
burn it successfully, cleanly and efficiently. (See the Euroheat document Number IN1172
for further information.)
The Fire Went Out
Do not put wood onto the kindling too soon or without allowing vents for the flames. The quality of the wood
will determine how much fuel can be loaded at one time but remember you are lighting the stove and wanting
it to reach its operating temperature as quickly as possible; all smoke is a pollutant and wasted fuel.
X
X
The Glass Blackened
See the above. The fire may not have extinguished, but smoke and staining are unburned fuel gasses from the
wood. Until the flue has warmed, air supply to the stove will be limited and only allow the complete combustion
of limited amounts of wood. Too much wood, too soon, will only serve to cool the gasses below their ignition
temperature.
X
X
THE FIRE NEVER DEVELOPED ENOUGH SIZE OR BECAME HOT ENOUGH
Once the fire is well alight the air volume
must be reduced from its maximum position.
Leaving it at maximum will allow too much
air into the stove. Air which is not needed will
only serve to cool the stove, air travelling too
quickly will blow some of the flames out.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
16
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Advanced Driving With Wood
Once the stove is at its operating temperature it is capable of burning cleanly
and efficiently with little or no intervention from you beyond periodic loading
of wood.
Two reasons for a stove failing to operate cleanly and efficiently make all other
reasons virtually insignificant. One is the use of wet wood, which should never
be used, and the other, which we will be discussing now, is the inappropriate
intervention by an operator failing to understand a few simple principles.
When to Put on More Wood
When the fire in the stove has become established you will find that the stove seems, initially, to consume wood
quite quickly. This is because the stove was designed to burn off the wood’s volatile matter first, leaving the
charcoal to form a hot bed above the grate. The charcoal helps maintain a constant heat output from the stove
between loading of wood and aids the rapid ignition of new loading, thus minimizing smoke emissions. The
depth to which the charcoal should be let to accumulate will depend upon the length of time you are expecting
to operate the stove for and the heat output you need. Never load more wood than can be contained safely by
the log guard.
Putting new wood on immediately the flames of the previous loading have almost extinguished will result in a
very hot stove with a deep charcoal bed capable of being controlled to burn very slowly, without staining the
glass, for many hours. If only a low heat output or limited burning time is required the charcoal will be producing
much of the heat with an occasional log being loaded for interest. Letting the bed become too small, or putting
on a new log when all the flames from a previous loading have extinguished will cause smoke as the new loading
struggles to ignite. Always add wood to the stove before flames from a previous loading have extinguished. If
there are no flames, only glowing embers, add a small amount of kindling wood and set the stove to its ignition
setting. Never put logs onto a fire without flames, they will smoulder and emit smoke.
X
X
How to Put on More Wood
Wood needs not only heat but also air to burn and putting an enormous amount of logs at one time or interlocking
them like bricks will both stifle the existing fire, causing it to cool; it will also limit the air available for the new
wood. This will result in delayed ignition of the loading and unacceptable levels of smoke emission.
Always try to keep ends of logs away from the combustion chamber walls so that gasses emanating will have
good access to air. If you are having to burn unsplit logs, they will release most of their initial gasses only from
their ends, it is important to rake embers so that the log ends are over the charcoal bed to heat the gasses to
promote rapid ignition. Avoid burning un-split logs if you can. If the logs are split it is better to put the log on the
fire bark side down because the bark will ignite rapidly when placed on the charcoal and gasses from the split
surfaces will have an unrestricted air supply.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
17
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Always try to position new logs so that they are in the path of existing flames by bridging the flames where
possible. Do not over fill the stove with wood expecting it to burn for an extended time, it will produce little but
smoke and tar. If the stove is running with a low air volume setting, turning up the volume for a few minutes
whenever you load new logs will encourage them to ignite faster. Do not be afraid to put logs towards the front
of the fire, the glass will stay clean and the visual interest will be increased.
X
X
LOG ENDS TOO CLOSE
TO STOVE WALLS.
NO SPACE BETWEEN THE
LOGS
TOO MANY LOGS
TOO LITTLE SPACE BETWEEN
THE LOGS.
CORRECTLY LOADED
Setting the Burning Rate
Setting the air volume rate on the Plexus should always be done with reference to the condition of the fire. You
cannot expect to turn the air to maximum and the stove increase its heat output if the fire in the stove is ash
with a few glowing embers. Neither should the stove be expected to shut down a huge fire immediately the air
supply was restricted, without producing copious amounts of smoke. Unlike driving a car that accelerates and
brakes, wood burning should be regarded as something that gathers and losses momentum gracefully, and all
adjustments to the burning rate should be made accordingly.
Putting a large quantity of wood into the stove and turning the air setting to low will inevitably result in smoke
as the wood is heated with insufficient air to burn with. Always wait until the wood is producing flames before
turning down the air volume in stages. If the fire has become very lethargic after a long period of slow burning, or
has no flames, set the air controls to their lighting position and place a few pieces of
dry kindling onto the fire bed to ensure rapid ignition. Once the kindling has ignited
the air direction lever should be set to its wood burning position, fully clockwise,
and the volume control set to the 3 O’clock position, large flame icon, before adding
one or two logs. Never allow wood to smoulder, it wastes heat and pollutes the
atmosphere.
If you have fitted a remotely controlled burner rate adjustment, please read Technical
Guide IN1203 Thermostatic Remote Control (pictured), for advice on making the
most of its facilities.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
18
+
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Slow, Overnight Burning
Wood releases its volatile gasses when heated, if insufficient air is available,
or the temperature is below the ignition temperature of these gasses, they
will deposit themselves as tar and other undesirable substances on the
stove body, glass and in the flue. Filling the stove with wood and restricting
the air supply may be the only option available to many who want to keep
the stove warm for extended periods but it is not necessary for you to
adopt this ant-social practice.
Your stove has been designed to burn all the gasses from the wood as a
priority, leaving the charcoal to burn later. Good quality charcoal, which
is what the stove will produce, has the ability to burn slowly and cleanly
with a restricted air supply, and by allowing the charcoal to build up in
the stove it will provide many hours of clean gentle heat. The amount of
charcoal needed to burn for any length of time is surprisingly small but the
quantities can be increased by putting new loading of wood to the front of the stove.
Of great importance is that the stove’s air is not reduced to a very low setting if flames are still visible; reducing
the air to a minimum will extinguish any flames and cause tar and smoke to be produced. Always wait until no
more flames are evident before you can safely turn the air volume to a minimum setting with no fear of staining
the glass. The actual setting needed will depend upon the performance of your flue setting, and by raking the
ashes through the grate in the morning will reveal either no charcoal remains which means the setting was too
high, or a cold stove and an abundance of charcoal indicating the setting was too low. If any charcoal remains
never assume it not to be burning. If you rake any charcoal over the grate, close the stove door and set the air
controls to their lighting position it will almost always begin to glow even when it gave no sign of burning.
Placing wood, whose size is in proportion to the amount of charcoal remaining, over the burning charcoal will
rapidly produce a good fire because the stove and flue will have retained some residual heat. This technique of
using only the charcoal to burn should be used whenever the stove is to be left unattended for long periods.
If you have managed to run your stove overnight, without staining the glass, you have achieved the highest
achievement possible as a stove operator and you should award yourself an enormous gold star.
Smoke Exempt Areas
The stoves to which this instruction manual applies are not approved for overnight burning of wood in
smoke exempt areas and should not be used for this purpose.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
19
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Getting Started With Coal (solid mineral fuel)
Having learned where to find the controls, you are now ready to light
a coal fire in the stove, without filling the stove or neighbourhood
with smoke. To light the fire with wood you will need two pieces of
newspaper, a small bundle of kindling wood, and smokeless coal.
Remember that your stove needs your help to gently push start it in the
right direction until it warms. Do not expect it to be on auto pilot until it
reaches its operating temperature.
Ensure the ash pan is fitted and empty,
then securely close the ash pan door.
ACME
Set the Plexus control to maximum air volume by rotating the right hand control clockwise until it reaches a stop,
at the large flame icon, then pushing the control knob inwards and turning another quarter turn clockwise to the
lighting position. The left hand air direction control to mid, 12 o’clock, position, supplying air above and below
the grate.
Set to Lighting position
Set to Mid Position
Lightly crumple two tabloid sized pieces of newspaper and lay
them in the middle of the grate.
Resist the temptation to use more paper than this, or to crumple
it too tightly; doing either will prevent the rapid development
of flames and will cause smoke to be produced.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
20
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
The kindling wood should be placed over the paper so as to rest
against each other in a conical formation, leaving space between
each piece.
Light the paper using a long match or spill and close the stove
door.
The lightly crumpled paper will begin burning rapidly and the space
between the kindling will allow the long bright flames to pass
between and over the wood raising it to its ignition temperature.
Wait until the kindling fire core has lost its large flames and
is glowing then, wearing the glove, lay several pieces of
kindling on the top of them followed by pieces of coal.
Try to leave open spaces between pieces of coal with some bridging
others rather than a single layer. Putting on too much at this stage
will only cause smoke and hinder the fire’s development.
When the loading of coal is burning brightly, the air
volume should be reduced and set to the 3 O’clock
position, indicated by the large flame icon, or lower
depending on the burn rate required.
If you are burning one of the manufactured smokeless
coals the air direction lever should always remain in
the mid, 12 o’clock, position.
If you are burning Anthracite, the air direction control
should now be rotated fully ant-clockwise, 9 o’clock
position, to the small arrow icon pointing upwards.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
Anthracite
21
Manufactured
Smokeless Coal
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
New loading of coal should be placed to cover only coals which
are glowing. It will delay the ignition of coal not already burning
if further layers of coal are added to them. Smoke production will
be reduced if new coals are added only when the coal has stopped
emitting flames but is glowing brightly.
Lighting Coal With Firelighters
Fire lighters perform well only if the blocks are
protected from fast air flow. Setting the air volume
to a position between 12 o’clock and 3 o’clock will
provide sufficient air for the firelighters to burn
without causing the flames to be blown out. The
air direction control should be set to its mid, 12
o’clock, position.
Placing a layer of coal on the grate for the firelighters to sit
on will help to defuse the air flow.
Bridge the firelighters with coal trying to avoid coal actually touching
the firelighters.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
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Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
The coal should be at least glowing by the time the firelighters have
extinguished and may even be producing flames.
If the fuel is manufactured smokeless coal the air
direction control should remain in the mid position.
If the fuel is anthracite the control should be set
to fully anti-clockwise position, small arrow icon
pointing upwards. Which ever coal is being used
the air volume control should now be set to the 3
o’clock position, large flame icon.
Anthracite
Manufactured
Smokeless Coal
New loading of coal should be placed to cover only coals which
are glowing. It will delay the ignition of coal not already burning
if further layers of coal are added to them. Smoke production
will be reduced if new coals are added only when the coal has
stopped emitting flames but is glowing brightly.
If you lit your fire in the stove cleanly and you are now feeling
it becoming hot, congratulations, you have passed the lighting
test and are no longer a total novice. You can throw away your
“L” plates and move on to become an advanced driver.
See page 25
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
23
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Why Did You Fail?
Coal is generally a simple, trouble free fuel which lights easily, but slowly. Before
looking again at your lighting procedure examine the coal for evidence of moisture.
Many of the manufactured coals will absorb water and this will prevent the coal
from igniting or burning properly for a considerable time.
The Fire Went Out
If you are used to lighting a fire with “house coal” you will find smokeless coal needs
heating for a considerably longer time before it begins to burn. Disturbing the fire before
the coals are burning brightly will often take the parts of coal that have just ignited away
from the heat, allowing them to extinguish. If you have used firelighters it must be remembered that they are
petroleum based and have only flames to heat the coal. If coals are placed directly over them or the coals were
piled too high the vapours will burn above and, often seemingly detached from the fire bed, rather than under
the coals. Ensure that the air settings were correct because too high a draught will cause a similar effect. If the
fire was lit with wood it is probable that too much coal was placed on the fire, too soon.
COALS TOO HIGH OR
SMOTHERING THE
FIRELIGHTERS
TOO MUCH AIR THROUGH
THE GRATE
TOO MUCH COAL OVER THE
KINDLING
The Glass Blackened
See the above, Do not put too much coal on at one time and never turn the stove air volume down other than by
gradual increments. Do not add new loading of coal if the previous loading is still producing significant flames.
The Fire Never Developed Enough Size or Became Hot Enough
Ensure the air settings are adjusted correctly, always riddle the fire before putting on new loadings of coal. Try
and avoid putting on new coal over any coals from a previous loading that have not ignited, or are still burning
vigorously.
Anthracite
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
Manufactured
Smokeless Coal
24
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Advanced Stove Driving With Coal (also known as solid mineral fuel)
Because it is the volatile gasses that produce smoke, all coals defined as being
“smokeless” either naturally have low volatile content or have had their volatile
content reduced during their manufacturing process and so many of the problems
associated with solid fuels are eliminated. Some of the manufactured coals produce
more ash than might be expected, and have additives binding the coals into
symmetrical shapes which tend to leave residues on the stove glass, but this can
easily be avoided.
When To Put On More Coal
Smokeless coals will produce flames when they initially begin burning. The amount of flame will diminish at a
rate depending on the specific coals being burned but all smokeless fuels give almost all their heat from being a
red hot mass. While it is acceptable to add more coals when the fire bed reaches this uniform red glow, unless you
are building the fire up to produce the stove’s maximum heat output the fire should be left until ash is forming
on the tops of the coals before adding more coals.
How To Put On Coal
If ash formation makes it necessary to riddle the stove, always riddle before adding new coals. It is only necessary
to riddle if ash is restricting air passing through the grate to the fire. Putting new coals onto a fire that has a
restricted air flow risks gasses being released from the coals with insufficient air to burn and suddenly introducing
air by riddling the grate may cause the accumulated gasses to ignite suddenly and startlingly. New coals should
be loaded onto the fire as an even layer rather than a central mound so that it ignites rapidly and evenly. Never
load more coal than is contained by the
Maximum Loading Height
log guard; this is especially important if
rounded formed coals are being burned.
Setting The Burning Rate
If a substantial loading of coals has been placed on the stove it is good practice to increase the air volume a little
until the flames diminish to ensure the majority of volatiles have burned. Once the flames have diminished the
stove’s burning rate can be adjusted to a lower setting of your choice, but doing so in several increments is the
better practice.
Slow, Overnight Burning
The stove will burn gently for extended periods simply by reducing the air volume to a very low setting with
little or no preparation. Once again it is important not to
reduce the air volume until almost all the flames have
disappeared and if the fire is to be kept in overnight it
is advisable to give the stove a thorough riddling before
leaving it to ensure the ash does not prevent the limited
air supply reaching all the burning coals.
Coal may be easier to manage than wood but if you
have managed to run your stove overnight, without
staining the glass, you will still have achieved the highest
achievement possible as a coal stove operator and you
should award yourself an enormous gold star.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
25
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Cleaning the Stove
Cleaning The Glass
Properly operated, with the correct fuel, your glass will remain clean. Slight staining may appear when the stove
is lit and below its operating temperature. This will normally clear as the stove’s temperature rises.
If it becomes necessary to clean the glass by hand do not attempt to do so unless the stove is cold. Proprietary
glass cleaning agents are available but they must specifically state its suitability for stove glass before being used
because the glass in you stove is not ordinary glass and may be damaged with an unsuitable cleaner.
Newspaper moistened with water to which a little vinegar has been added will normally remove most staining,
but for really stubborn marks, gentle polishing with fine steel wool lubricated with a few drops of dish washing
detergent will need to be employed. Great care must be taken not to clean the glass too vigorously as particles
of grit may have adhered with the stain and these could cause scratching if dragged across the glass. However
well the stove burns it will eventually become necessary to clean the glass, but if cleaning becomes necessary
too often we advise you to review your operating procedures to determine whether cleaner and more efficient
combustion can be achieved.
The Stove Body
Dusting the stove may be carried out when the stove is at its minimum heat output temperature, using light
strokes of a real bristle paint brush. Thorough cleaning, or any attempt to remove marks on the stove body must
only be done when the stove is cold. Stoves with an enamel finish should be cleaned with a damp cloth, or very
gentle use of a cleaner recommended for enamel finishes. It should be noted that even approved cleaners will
damage the highly polished finish of the stove if used too vigorously. All traces of the cleaner must be removed
before the stove is lit and no finishing polishes must ever be used as these will leave unsightly streaks on the
stove when it becomes hot.
Stoves with a cast black finish should never be cleaned with a cloth as the texture of the paint will abrade and
collect lint from the cloth which will be almost impossible to remove. Vigorous brushing with a stiff real bristle
paint brush will remove all dust, but where the paint is marked, the stains are better obliterated with a spray of
suitable stove paint rather than attempts made to clean them off. Suitable paint may be purchased from a stove
shop or direct from Euroheat.
Simple Maintenance
The stove must be cleaned of ash and any tarring as often as your use of the stove and fuel dictate. All deposits
on the stove interior will insulate the stove body from the fire and will reduce the stove’s efficiency. Flue ways
which become choked will not only reduce the stoves performance but can become a serious health risk if the
flue is not taking away all the products of combustion. Do not use a vacuum cleaner unless it is fitted with an
additional hot ash filter bin.
The Flue
Even if your flue is correctly lined it is advisable to run your stove at a high setting to thoroughly warm the flue
periodically and ensure it is swept regularly. If the stove has not been used for some time it will be necessary
to ensure the flue has not been blocked with twigs from home building birds or blocked with other obstructions
before the stove is lit. Lighting a small piece of paper within the stove will determine the flue’s ability to remove
any products of combustion. Warming the flue after a long period of inactivity may be required, as the flue may
be cold and damp, and the initial light up after this time may cause the stove to stall and die and even smoke to
be emitted into the room. For further information see Technical Document IN1088 Spring Autumn Syndrome.
National Chimney Sweeps Association The Solid Fuel Association © EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
01785 811732
0845 6014406 .
26
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Removing Top Chamber Baffle
Periodically the stove should be thoroughly cleared of all combustion deposits which will necessitate the
removal of the vermiculite baffle and cast protection plates. (Note take care vermiculite baffle is fragile)
Model size 13
Lift the back of the vermiculite baffle and push backwards over the
cast angled back plate until the front of the baffle clears the front
locating supports. Bring the baffle front below these supports and
pull baffle towards the stove front.
Model size 23
Push the vermiculite baffle backwards causing the cast
angled back plate to move backwards until the front of the
baffle clears the front locating supports. Bring the baffle front
below these supports and pull baffle towards the stove front.
Model size 33
Lift one end of the vermiculite up and over the cast side plate
allowing the other end of the baffle to come below the front locating
support. Guide the end of the baffle downwards as you pull the
baffle back from over the side plate. The baffle will now clear the
other front locating support and the baffle can be brought towards
the front of the stove.
Model size 43
The vermiculite baffle is removed by removing the bolt from the
locating plate on the left side cast plate.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
27
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Removing Other Internal Components
For stoves other than the 43 models the sloping cast back plate is
removed by lifting upwards and towards the front of the stove.
Top Flue Outlet Baffle
The cast side internal plates
are removed by lifting and
bringing the rear of the
plates towards the centre
of the stove. The back cast plate is removed by pulling the top
towards the front of the stove.
Stoves with a top flue outlet may have an additional stainless steel baffle vane. This can be removed by pulling
the tab at the front towards the front of the stove to remove the baffle from its locating rails, giving access to
the flue way. See installation instructions for more detailed information.
Spigot protector
Spigot protector
Baffle plate
Baffle plate
Summer Shutdown.
At the end of each heating season the entire installation should be thoroughly cleaned and examined for
soundness; this should include having the flue examined by a registered sweep. The stove interior should be
treated with a moisture repellent such as WD40 and all operating mechanisms lubricated with a suitable oil, or
again with WD40. The door and glass seals should be inspected and replaced if showing signs of damage, as
uncontrolled air entering the stove could damage the glass and cast iron components within the stove.
ALWAYS CHECK FOR ANY FLUE BLOCKAGE BEFORE LIGHTING
THE STOVE AFTER A PROLONGED SHUTDOWN.
Faulty Operation
Always seek the advice of a qualified engineer if your stove is not operating correctly. Never use the stove with
any damaged or malfunctioning components.
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
28
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Technical Details Intermittent Operation
Intermittent operation is when the appliance is used for short firing periods for example 45 minutes to 2 hours.
This is a common operation in warmer weather such as cold spring evenings. The information provided below
where indicated as HETAS approved is from the current CE standards EN 13240:2001 and EN 13240 A2:2004. The
test fuel for wood burning, beech, for coal burning anthracite.
Model
Number
Heat
Output
Nominal
Wood
Nestor Martin Q13
Wood
Q13
4.6kW
Nestor Martin Q13
Coal
Q13
Model Name
Nestor Martin C23
Nestor Martin C33
Nestor Martin C43
Nestor Martin O23
Nestor Martin D33
Nestor Martin
NM33
Weight
KG
Flue
Draught
Nominal
Flue Gas
Mass Flow
g/s
Flue Gas
Temperature
Down Stream
of Flue Spigot
deg C
Efficiency
with
Top Flue
Connection
74
12pa
4.9
293
77.1% Net
70.2% Gross
3.6kW
74
12pa
3.8
210
82.8% Net
75.4% Gross
Heat Output
Nominal Coal
C23
7.7kW
7.7kW
180
12pa
7.7
326
77.2% Net
70.0% Gross
C33
9.2kW
9.2kW
185
12pa
6.5
357
80.0% Net
72.8% Gross
C43
10.5kW
10.5kW
224
12pa
6.5
392
79.7% Net
72.5% Gross
O23
7.6kW
6.1kW
104
12pa
7.7
326
77.2% Net
70.0% Gross
D33
9.0Kw
8.4kW
108
12pa
6.5
357
80.0% Net
72.8% Gross
NM33
9.0Kw
8.4kW
200
12pa
6.5
357
80.0% Net
72.8% Gross
Technical Details Continuous Operation
Continuous operation is when the appliance is used for long firing periods for example several hours and for
overnight operation. This is a common operation in cold weather as experienced in deep winter. The information
provided below is from the current CE standards EN 13240:2001 and EN 13240 A2:2004. The test fuel for wood
burning, beech, for coal burning anthracite.
Model
Number
Model Name
Nestor Martin Q13
Wood
Q13
Nestor Martin Q13
Coal
Q13
Heat Output Heat Output Weight
Nominal
Nominal
KG
Wood
Coal*
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD.June 2010
5.4kW
3.5kW
Flue
Draught
Nominal
Flue Gas Flue Gas
Mass
Temperature
Flow g/s Down Stream
of Flue Spigot
deg C
Efficiency
with
Top Flue
Connection
74
12pa
4.9
293
83.4% Net
75.9% Gross
74
12pa
3.8
210
78.3% Net
71.2% Gross
29
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed.B
Declaration
The information provided for the room heater fuelled by wood and smokeless coal, has been measured as
specified in EN13240:2001 and EN 13240-A2:2004.
Warranty
Thank you for choosing a Euroheat/Nestor Martin stove. It has been constructed with the utmost care and with
the finest materials; we hope it gives you many years of pleasurable warmth. If your stove has an enamel finish
you will notice, after the stove has been used several times, it develops what is called a “crackle” pattern in the
enamelling. This is caused by the different expansion rates between the enamel and the cast iron, it is normal
and should not be regarded as a fault or indicating that the stove is beginning to shed its finish.
Any modification to the appliance, or the fitting of non approved parts, will cancel any warranty and may make
it unsafe.
Warranty Registration
Please ensure this is fully completed by your installing engineer with details of your approved Euroheat supplier
and returned to Euroheat within 28 days of installation. The free 10 year technical telephone help can only
be authorized, if the stove is registered, fitted by an approved engineer and the registration form returned to
Euroheat. Euroheat reserve the right to reject the extended support if the requirements are not met.
Euroheat & Nestor Martin have a policy of continual research and development and reserve the right to modify its
appliances without prior notice. We make every effort to ensure that the information provided in this document
is correct and accurate at the time of printing, but continued updates occur to adapt documents to appliance
changes and customer feedback. For the latest editions of all Euroheat documentation visit our web site www.
euroheat.co.uk.
We would welcome any comments or information which you feel is not provided in this document which would
assist other users in the future. E-mail tech@euroheat.co.uk
Welcome to the World of Real Stoves
Euroheat Technical Team
Information from the Euroheat Technical Team
Euroheat and Nestor Martin have a policy of continual research and development and reserve the right to modify
its appliances without prior notice.
We make every effort to ensure that the information provided in this document is correct and accurate at the
time of printing. Continued updates occur to adapt documents to customer requirements and appliance changes.
For the latest editions of all Euroheat documentation visit our web site www.euroheat.co.uk.
We would request that you inform Euroheat of information which you feel is not provided in this document which
would assist other users in the future.
The Euroheat Technical Team
© EUROHEAT DISTRIBUTORS (H.B.S) LTD. June 2010
30
Instructions Part Number IN1213 Ed B
Need more info?
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www.euroheat.co.uk
Court Farm Business Park, Bishops Frome,
Worcestershire WR6 5AY
Pre sales: 01885 491112
Technical: 01885 491117
Reception: 01885 491100
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