Antares | ATR-1 | User`s manual | Antares ATR-1 User`s manual

Antares ATR-1 User`s manual
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©2001 Antares Audio Technologies.
All Rights Reserved.
Antares Audio Technologies
231 Technology Circle
Scotts Valley, California 95066 USA
voice: (831) 461 7800
fax: (831) 461 7801
service: (831) 461 7814
web: www.antarestech.com
Printed in USA
Rev 1.0-02/01
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The Obligatory Legal Mumbo-Jumbo
The Antares Auto-Tune 3 software and this User’s Manual are
protected by copyright law. Making copies, adaptations, or
derivative works without the prior written authorization of
Antares Audio Technologies, is prohibited by law and constitutes
a punishable violation of the law.
Antares Audio Technologies retains all ownership rights to the
Auto-Tune 3 software and its documentation. Use of Auto-Tune 3
is limited by the following license agreement.
Please carefully read all the terms and conditions of this license
agreement. At the time of installation of the Auto-Tune 3 software
you will be presented with a copy of the agreement and asked
whether or not you agree to it. Continuing with the installation
process beyond that point constitutes such agreement.
Auto-Tune 3 License Agreement
Antares Audio Technologies grants you a non-transferable, nonexclusive license to use Auto-Tune 3 under the terms and conditions
stated in this agreement. Use of Auto-Tune 3 indicates your
agreement to the following terms and conditions.
License
You may:
1. Use Auto-Tune 3 on only one computer.
You may not:
1. Make copies of Auto-Tune 3 or of the user manual in whole or in
part except as expressly provided for in this agreement. Your
right to copy Auto-Tune 3 and the user manual is limited by
copyright law. Making copies, verbal or media translations,
adaptations, derivative works, or telecommunication data
transmission of Auto-Tune 3 without prior written authorization
of Antares, is prohibited by law and constitutes a punishable
violation of the law.
2. Make alteration or modifications to Auto-Tune 3 (or any copy)
or disassemble or de-compile Auto-Tune 3 (or any copy), or
attempt to discover the source code of Auto-Tune 3.
3. Sub-license, lease, lend, rent, or grant other rights in all or any
portion of Auto-Tune 3 (or any copy) to others.
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Term of the Agreement
This agreement is effective until terminated by you or Antares. You
may terminate the agreement at any time by notifying Antares and
destroying all copies of the manual, and erasing Auto-Tune 3 from
all machine-readable media, whether on-line or on archival copies.
In the event of breach of any of the terms of this agreement, you
shall pay the attorney’s fees of Antares that are reasonably
necessary to enforce the agreement plus resulting damages.
Limited Warranty and Disclaimer
AUTO-TUNE 3 AND ACCOMPANYING MATERIALS ARE PROVIDED
“AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Antares Audio Technologies does not warrant that the functions
contained in the program will meet your requirements. The entire
risk as to the use, quality, and performance of Auto-Tune 3 is with
you.
SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG
AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY
NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL
RIGHTS. YOU MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM
JURISDICTION TO JURISDICTION.
Limitation of Liability
IN NO EVENT WILL ANTARES BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES,
INCLUDING LOSS OF DATA, LOST PROFITS OR OTHER SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR INDIRECT DAMAGES ARISING
FROM THE USE OF AUTO-TUNE 3 OR ACCOMPANYING MATERIALS.
THIS LIMITATION WILL APPLY EVEN IF ANTARES OR ITS AUTHORIZED
AGENT HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
YOU ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THE LICENSE FEE REFLECTS THIS
ALLOCATION OF RISK. SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW
LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT
APPLY TO YOU.
Whew! Now that that’s over, let’s get on to the good stuff.
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Contents
Getting Started
Chapter 1
What’s New in Auto-Tune 3
Installing Auto-Tune 3
Authorizing Auto-Tune 3
Technical Support
2
3
4
5
Introducing Auto-Tune 3 Chapter 2
Some background
A little bit about pitch
Some pitch terminology
How Auto-Tune 3 detects pitch
How Auto-Tune 3 corrects pitch
Automatic Mode
Graphical Mode
Auto-Tune 3 Controls
6
7
8
9
10
10
13
Chapter 3
Common Controls
Sample Rate Display
Input Type
Correction Mode
Select Pitch Reference
Bypass
Automatic Mode Controls
Knobs
Key Selection
Scale Selection
The Scales
The Edit Scale Display
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18
18
20
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Bypass
Remove
Cents
Set Major/Minor Scale
Target Notes via MIDI
Learn Scale from MIDI
Scale Detune
Retune Speed
Tracking
the Vibato Section
The Pitch Change Indicator
Graphical Mode Controls
The Playback Controls
The Pitch Graph Display
The Graphical Tools
Tracking
Retune Speed
The Use Cursor Button
Auto-Tune 3 Tutorial
Creative Applications
Chapter 4
Tutorial 1: Automatic Mode
Tutorial 2: Graphical Mode
Tutorial 3: Precision
Tutorial 4: The Make Curve Function
Tutorial 5: The Make Auto Function
40
42
44
45
48
Chapter 5
51
Index
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Welcome!
On behalf of everyone at Antares Audio Technologies, we’d like to offer
both our thanks and congratulations on your decision to purchase AutoTune 3, the most powerful intonation correction tool in the world. Before
you proceed any farther, we’d like to strongly encourage you to register
and authorize your copy of Auto-Tune 3. (You can skip ahead to the
Authorization and Installation instructions on page 4. We’ll wait.) Also, if
you’re planning on discarding that lovely Auto-Tune 3 box, it’s probably a
good idea to write down the serial number that appears on the bottom of
the box for future reference. (The inside cover of this manual would be a
good place.)
As an Auto-Tune 3 owner, you are entitled to receive notification of any
software upgrades, technical support, and advance announcements of
upcoming products. But we can’t send you stuff unless we know who and
where you are. So please, register.
At Antares, we are committed to excellence in quality, customer service,
and technological innovation. With your purchase of Auto-Tune 3, you
have created a relationship with Antares which we hope will be long and
gratifying. Let us know what you think. You can count on us to listen.
Again, thanks.
The Whole Antares Crew
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Chapter 1: Getting Started
What’s New in Auto-Tune 3
If you are upgrading from a previous version of Auto-Tune, you will find
that most all of what you’re already doing will continue to work in AutoTune 3, only better.
The following are the key new features that have been added in AutoTune 3:
• A revised core pitch detection algorithm that greatly improves pitch
detection reliability in both Automatic and Graphical Modes.
• “Source Specific” pitch detection and correction algorithms. Choices
include Soprano Voice, Alto/Tenor Voice, Low Male Voice, Instrument,
and Bass Instrument. Matching the appropriate algorithm to the input
results in even faster and more accurate pitch detection and correction.
• Phase-coherent pitch correction of stereo tracks.
• A Bass Mode that lowers the lowest detectable frequency by about one
octave to 25Hz. Since the lowest E string on a bass guitar is approximately 41Hz, Bass Mode allows the user to apply pitch correction to
fretless bass lines as well as other low bass range instruments.
• The ability to set target pitches in real-time via MIDI from a keyboard or
sequencer track.
• A new Make Scale From MIDI function for occasions when it is not clear
exactly what key a melody line is in, or where the line has too many
accidentals to fit comfortably into a conventional scale. For those
occasions, the Make Scale From MIDI function allows you to simply play
the line from a MIDI keyboard or sequencer and let Auto-Tune 3
construct a custom scale containing only those notes that appear in the
line.
• High sample rate (88.2kHz, 96kHz) compatibility (depends upon host
application and audio hardware support).
• Enhanced MIX chip usage efficiency for more instantiations per MIX
chip (TDM only)
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• An AudioSuite version (TDM only).
• A spiffy new user interface.
How To Use This Manual
Auto-Tune 3 has a very friendly user-interface and is extraordinarily easy
to use. However, because Auto-Tune 3 does things that have never been
done before, a few aspects of the user-interface may not be immediately
obvious. You should read either Chapter 3, Auto-Tune 3 Controls, or
Chapter 4, Auto-Tune 3 Tutorial, to learn the essential information you will
need to operate Auto-Tune 3.
The Contents Of This Manual
Chapter 1: Getting Started
The chapter you are reading.
Chapter 2: Introducing Auto-Tune 3
This chapter explains basic facts about pitch and how Auto-Tune 3 functions to correct pitch errors. The basic functionality of Auto-Tune 3 is
discussed, and information you need in order to use it effectively is
provided.
Chapter 3: Auto-Tune 3 Controls
This chapter is reference information for all of the controls used in the
Auto-Tune 3 interface. Much of the information in this chapter is also
presented in Chapter 4, however some of the less important controls are
only explained in Chapter 3.
Chapter 4: Auto-Tune 3 Tutorial
This chapter introduces you to details of how Auto-Tune 3 works by
guiding you through several tutorials. The tutorials will give you insight
into how and when to use each of Auto-Tune 3’s key functions.
Chapter 5: Creative Applications for Auto-Tune 3
Some cool, but not-so-obvious stuff you can do with Auto-Tune 3.
Installing Auto-Tune 3
Instructions for installing Auto-Tune 3 for your specific plug-in format are
located in the Auto-Tune 3 Read Me file that accompanies the plug-in. This
file may also contain any last-minute Auto-Tune 3 information that didn’t
make it into this manual.
Auto-Tune 3 is designed to work with a wide variety of digital audio
applications. Please refer to your host application’s user manual for more
information on installing and using plug-ins.
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Authorizing Auto-Tune 3
Authorization (the process by which this software is allowed to run on
your computer) is accomplished by a technique called “Challenge/Response.” Basically, the first time you launch this software you will be
presented with a string of words (the Challenge) and will be asked to
enter another string of words (the Response).
Note: When initially installed, this software will run for ten days
without authorization.
So even if you can’t authorize it right away you can still use your software
in the meantime. (During this period, click the “Try It” button whenever
you are presented with the Trial Period screen at launch.) But don’t
procrastinate too long. After those ten days are up, you will no longer be
able to launch this software until the correct Response is entered.
Challenge/Response Authorization:
If you have internet access, you can authorize your software using our
automated web form by doing the following:
• Access Challenge/Response authorization by pressing “Next” at the Trial
Period screen. This will take you to the iLok screen. Be sure to uncheck
the box that says “Use my iLok key” and then press “Next” to access the
Challenge screen.
The Challenge screen displays the Challenge string. To receive the
appropriate Response you will need to provide us with both the Challenge string and the Registration Code that was included on the yellow
card in your software package (if you bought a retail package) or
supplied with your download.
• To obtain your Response, have your Registration Code and Challenge
string at hand. (If you will be accessing the web from the same computer that will be running your software, you can press “Copy Challenge” at the Challenge screen and then simply paste the Challenge
into the appropriate field on the web page below.)
• Point your web browser to:
http://www.antarestech.com/register/
and simply follow the directions there. (Be extremely careful to enter
the Registration Code and Challenge string accurately.) You will receive
your Response, which you should carefully copy into the appropriate
field on Auto-Tune 3’s Challenge/Response screen. You should also copy
the Response in a safe place - like the inside front cover of this manual
— so that you can refer to it if it is ever necessary to reinstall your
software.
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If, for some reason, you do not have access to the web but do have email,
copy and paste your Challenge string and Registration Code into an email
along with your name and the product name (e.g., Auto-Tune 3 for MAS),
and send it to:
register@antarestech.com.
You will receive your Response by return email, typically within one
working day (unless you have registered on a weekend, in which case you
should receive it the following Tuesday).
If you do not have access to the web or email, fax your Challenge string
along with your Registration Code to us at 831.461.7801. Be sure to
include your fax number. We will fax the Response string back to you at
that number.
Technical Support
In the unlikely event that you experience a problem using Auto-Tune 3, try
the following:
1. Make another quick scan through this manual. Who knows? You may
have stumbled onto some feature that you didn’t notice the first time
through.
2. Check our web page for tips, techniques, or any late-breaking information:
http://www.antarestech.com
3. Call your local Antares dealer.
4. Email our tech support department by pointing your web browser to:
http://www.antarestech.com/support/etech.shtml
and filling in the form there.
5. Call us at (831) 461-7814 Monday through Friday between 9am and
5pm USA Pacific Standard Time.
For options 3, 4, or 5, please be prepared to provide the Registration Code
of your copy of Auto-Tune 3.
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Chapter 2: Introducing Auto-Tune 3
Some background
In 1997, Antares Audio Technologies first introduced the ground-breaking
Auto-Tune Pitch Correcting Plug-In. Auto-Tune was a tool that actually
corrected the pitch of vocals and other solo instruments, in real time,
without distortion or artifacts, while preserving all of the expressive
nuance of the original performance. Recording Magazine called AutoTune a “holy grail of recording.” And went on to say, “Bottom line, AutoTune is amazing... Everyone with a Mac should have this program.” (In
fact, we know of quite a few people back then who bought kilo-buck
ProTools™ systems just to be able to run Auto-Tune. )
In the intervening years, Auto-Tune has become available for most every
major plug-in format and has established itself as the worldwide standard
in professional pitch correction. Today, it’s used daily by thousands of
audio professionals to save studio and editing time, ease the frustration of
endless retakes, save that otherwise once-in-a-lifetime performance, or
even to create unique special effects.
Now, never content to leave a good thing alone, Antares has created
Auto-Tune 3. Preserving the great sound quality, transparent processing,
and ease of use of Auto-Tune, Auto-Tune 3 adds significant new features
as well as a spiffy new user interface.
So what exactly is Auto-Tune 3?
Auto-Tune 3 is a precision tool for correcting intonation errors or creatively modifying the intonation of a performance. Auto-Tune 3 employs
state-of-the-art digital signal processing algorithms (many, interestingly
enough, drawn from the geophysical industry) to continuously detect the
pitch of a periodic input signal (typically a solo voice or instrument) and
instantly and seamlessly change it to a desired pitch (defined by any of a
number of user-programmable scales or through the use of graphical
editing tools.).
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To take maximum advantage of the power of Auto-Tune 3, you should
have a basic understanding of pitch and how Auto-Tune 3 functions to
correct pitch errors. This chapter presents basic terminology and introduces Auto-Tune 3’s operating paradigm, giving you information you need
to use it effectively.
A little bit about pitch
Pitch is typically associated with our perception of the “highness” or
“lowness” of a particular sound. Our perception of pitch ranges from the
very general (the high pitch of hissing steam, the low pitch of the rumble
of an earthquake) to the very specific (the exact pitch of a solo singer or
violinist). There is, of course, a wide range of variation in the middle. A
symphony orchestra playing a scale in unison, for example, results in an
extremely complex waveform, yet you are still able to easily sense the
pitch.
The vocalists and the solo instruments that Auto-Tune 3 is designed to
process have a very clearly defined quality of pitch. The sound-generating
mechanism of these sources is a vibrating element (vocal chords, a string,
an air column, etc.). The sound that is thus generated can be graphically
represented as a waveform (a graph of the sound’s pressure over time)
that is periodic. This means that each cycle of waveform repeats itself
fairly exactly, as in the periodic waveform shown in the diagram below:
Because of its periodic nature, this sound’s pitch can be easily identified
and processed by Auto-Tune 3.
Other sounds are more complex. This waveform:
is of a violin section playing a single note in unison. Our ears still sense a
specific pitch, but the waveform does not repeat itself. This waveform is a
summation of a number of individually periodic violins. The summation is
non-periodic because the individual violins are slightly out of tune with
respect to one another. Because of this lack of periodicity, Auto-Tune 3
would not be able to process this sound.
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Some pitch terminology
The pitch of a periodic waveform is defined as the number of times the
periodic element repeats in one second. This is measured in Hertz (abbreviated Hz.). For example, the pitch of A3 (the A above middle C on a
piano) is traditionally 440Hz (although that standard varies by a few Hz. in
various parts of the world).
Pitches are often described relative to one another as intervals, or ratios of
frequency. For example, two pitches are said to be one octave apart if
their frequencies differ by a factor of two. Pitch ratios are measured in
units called cents. There are 1200 cents per octave. For example, two tones
that are 2400 cents apart are two octaves apart. The traditional twelvetone Equal Tempered Scale that is used (or rather approximated) in 99.9%
of all Western tonal music consists of tones that are, by definition, 100
cents apart. This interval of 100 cents is called a semitone.
The twelve equally-spaced tones of the Equal Tempered Scale happen to
contain a number of intervals that approximate integer ratios in pitch. The
following table shows these approximations:
INTERVAL
CENTS
NEARBY
RATIO
RATIO IN
CENTS
minor second
100
16/15
111.75
major second
200
9/8
203.91
minor third
300
6/5
315.64
major third
400
5/4
386.31
perfect fourth
500
4/3
498.04
tritone
600
perfect fifth
700
3/2
701.65
minor sixth
800
8/5
813.69
major sixth
900
5/3
884.36
minor seventh
1000
16/9
996.09
major seventh
1100
15/8
1088.27
octave
1200
2
1200.00
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As you can see, the intervals in the Equal Tempered Scale are NOT equal to
the harmonious integer ratios. Rather, the Equal Tempered Scale is a
compromise. It became widely used because once a harpsichord or piano is
tuned to that scale, any composition in any key could be played and no
one chord would sound better or worse than that same chord in another
key.
How Auto-Tune 3 detects pitch
In order for Auto-Tune 3 to automatically correct pitch, it must first detect
the pitch of the input sound. Calculating the pitch of a periodic waveform
is a straighforward process. Simply measure the time between repetitions
of the waveform. Divide this time into one, and you have the frequency in
Hertz. Auto-Tune 3 does exactly this: It looks for a periodically repeating
waveform and calculates the time interval between repetitions.
The pitch detection algorithm in Auto-Tune 3 is virtually instantaneous. It
can recognize the repetition in a periodic sound within a few cycles. This
usually occurs before the sound has sufficient amplitude to be heard. Used
in combination with a slight processing delay (typically about 1 to 10
milliseconds), the output pitch can be detected and corrected without
artifacts in a seamless and continuous fashion. (Although it must be kept
in mind that some plug-in protocols introduce a certain amount of inherent and unpredictable delay that depends largely on what else your CPU is
doing at the time.)
Auto-Tune 3 was designed to detect and correct pitches up to the pitch C6.
(If the input pitch is higher than C6, Auto-Tune 3 will occasionally interpret the pitch an octave lower. This is because it interprets a two cycle
repetition as a one cycle repetition.) On the low end, Auto-Tune 3 will
detect pitches as low as 25Hz (when the Bass Instrument Input Type is
selected). This range of pitches allows intonation correction to be performed on virtually all vocals and instruments.
Of course, Auto-Tune 3 will not detect pitch when the input waveform is
not periodic. As demonstrated above, Auto-Tune 3 will fail to tune up
even a unison violin section. But this can also occasionally be a problem
with solo voice and solo instruments as well. Consider, for example, an
exceptionally breathy voice, or a voice recorded in an unavoidably noisy
environment. The added signal is non-periodic, and Auto-Tune 3 will have
difficulty determining the pitch of the composite (voice + noise) sound.
Luckily, there is a control (the Tracking control, discussed in Chapter 3)
that will let Auto-Tune 3 be a bit more casual about what it considers
“periodic.” Experimenting with this setting will often allow Auto-Tune 3
to track even noisy signals.
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How Auto-Tune 3 corrects pitch
Auto-Tune 3 provides two separate and distinct ways to approach pitch
correction: Automatic Mode and Graphical Mode. The basic functionality
of each is described below.
Automatic Mode
Auto-Tune 3’s Automatic Mode works by continuously tracking the pitch
of an input sound and comparing it to a user-defined scale. The scale tone
closest to the input is continuously identified. If the input pitch exactly
matches the scale tone, no correction is applied. If the input pitch varies
from the desired scale tone, an output pitch is generated which is closer to
the scale tone than the input pitch. (The exact amount of correction is
controlled by the Retune Speed parameter, described below and in Chapter 3.)
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Scales
The heart of Automatic Mode pitch correction is the Scale. Auto-Tune 3
lets you choose from major, minor, chromatic or 26 historical, ethnic and
microtonal scales. Individual scale notes can be bypassed, resulting in no
pitch correction when the input is near those notes. Individual scale notes
can also be removed, allowing a wider range of pitch correction for
neighboring pitches. The scale can be de-tuned, allowing pitch correction
to any pitch center.
For added flexibility, you can also select the target pitches in real time via
MIDI from a MIDI keyboard or a pre-recorded sequencer track.
Retune Speed
Auto-Tune 3 also gives you control over how rapidly, in time, the pitch
adjustment is made toward the scale tone. This is set with the Retune
Speed control (see Chapter 3 for more details).
• Fast Speed settings are appropriate for short duration notes and for
mechanical instruments, like an oboe or clarinet, whose pitch typically
changes almost instantly. A fast enough setting will also minimize or
completely remove a vibrato, as well as produce the infamous “Cher
effect.”
• Slow Speed settings, on the other hand, are appropriate for longer
notes where you want expressive pitch gestures (like vibrato) to come
through at the output and for vocal and instrumental styles that are
typified by gradual slides (portamento) between pitches. An appropriately selected slow setting can leave expressive gestures intact while
moving the average pitch to the correct tonal center.
Vibrato
Auto-Tune 3 can also apply a vibrato to the input sound. You can program
the vibrato depth, vibrato rate and the onset delay of the vibrato. You can
also choose the shape of the pitch variation in the vibrato (sine, square or
sawtooth). By combining a fast Retune Speed setting with Auto-Tune 3’s
Vibrato settings, you can even remove a performer’s own vibrato and
replace it with Auto-Tune 3’s programmed vibrato, all in real time. Also,
unusual combinations of Vibrato Waveform, Rate and Depth settings can
be used for some interesting special effects.
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An Example of Automatic Mode Correction
As an example, consider this before-and-after graphic representation of
the pitch of a vocal phrase that contains both vibrato and expressive
gestures.
CORRECTED BY
AUTO-TUNE 3
D3
C 3
ORIGINAL
PERFORMANCE
B2
10.0
10.5
11.0
In the original performance, we can see that although the final note
should be centered around D, the vocalist allowed the tail of the note to
fall nearly three semitones flat. The “after” plot is the result of passing
this phrase through Auto-Tune 3’s Automatic Mode programmed to a D
Major Scale (with C # and B set to ”Remove”) and a Retune Speed setting
of 25. That Retune Speed causes the pitch center to be moved to D, while
still retaining the vibrato and expressive gestures. (Setting C # and B to
”Remove” is necessary to keep Auto-Tune 3 from trying to correct the
seriously flat tail of the last note to those pitches. See Chapter 3 for more
details.)
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Graphical Mode
The Graphical Mode is similar to the Automatic Mode in that it also
continuously tracks the pitch of the incoming sound and modifies the
output pitch to be closer to a desired pitch. But in the Graphical Mode, the
desired pitch is not a predefined scale tone, but rather is a graphical
representation of your desired pitch.
As in Automatic Mode, the rate of change towards the desired pitch is
controlled by the Retune control.
The key feature of Graphical Mode is the Pitch Graph display. On this
display, the vertical axis represents pitch (with higher notes towards the
top) while the horizontal axis represents time.
The red curve represents the original pitch contour of the input track,
while the desired target pitch or pitch contour is indicated in yellow.
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The horizontal grid lines represent scale pitches. The key annotation, scale
name, scale pitches and Scale Detune value are those defined in the
Automatic Mode. They do not affect the computations of the Graphical
Mode in any way. They are merely a reference to guide you in setting the
target pitches. If you wish to change them, you can select the Automatic
Mode and change the Key pop-up, Scale pop-up, or the Scale Detune
setting, respectively. (Changing the Scale Detune setting will also result in
the scale pitch graph lines moving up or down relative to the tracked
pitch.) Then, return to Graphical Mode.
The Graphical Mode also includes the Envelope Graph, which displays the
amplitude (loudness) envelope of the sound whose pitch is shown in the
Pitch Graph. The horizontal scale of this graph will either 1) show the
envelope of the entire extent of the pitch-detected sound or 2) align with
the horizontal scale and position of the Pitch Graph above it.
In Graphical Mode, you can draw the desired target pitches using line and
curve drawing tools. Complete image scaling and scrolling controls are
provided. A graphical editor allows easy editing, including cut, copy and
paste functions.
The basic steps you will perform in Graphical Mode are:
• In your host application, select some sound for processing.
• Bring up Auto-Tune 3. Set the buffer length for at least the number of
seconds from the beginning of the track to the end of the audio you
are going to tune. Press the Track Pitch button, then play back the
sound. The pitch will be detected and then displayed in the Pitch Graph
as a red curve.
• Create a target pitch function using the graphical tools and adjust the
Retune Speed for the desired effect.
• Press Correct Pitch and play back the sound. The pitch will be corrected
as specified.
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Chapter 3: Auto-Tune 3 Controls
This chapter is a reference for all of the controls used in the Auto-Tune 3
interface. This chapter describes the function of each control. How these
controls are used together for intonation correction is demonstrated in
Chapter 4, Auto-Tune 3 Tutorial. Much of the information in this chapter is
also presented in Chapter 4. However, a few of the less commonly used
controls are only explained here.
Common Controls
The following controls and displays are visible regardless of which operating mode is selected. Their settings affect both Automatic and Graphical
Modes.
Sample Rate Display
This display indicates the sample rate of the current audio file as
reported to Auto-Tune 3 by the host application.
Note: Auto-Tune 3 is high sample rate compatible. If your host
application and audio hardware are capable of dealing with
88.2 kHz and 96 kHz files, Auto-Tune 3 will process them
correctly. However, it’s important to remember that high sample
rate files require twice the DSP power of 44.1 kHz and 48 kHz
files, so the number of possible simultaneous Auto-Tune 3
instantiations will be halved.
Another Note: If you are using external A/D converters with
independently selectable sample rates, it can be possible to
establish a mismatch between the actual conversion sample rate
and what the host application thinks is the sample rate. If this
happens, Auto-Tune 3 will appear to be correcting pitch to the
“wrong” key. If this seems to be happening, check to be sure
that your converter sample rate and your host application
sample rate (as displayed by Auto-Tune 3) match.
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Input Type
As a result of Antares research into the unique characteristics of various types of audio signals, Auto-Tune 3
offers a selection of optimized processing algorithms for
the most commonly pitch-corrected inputs. Choices
include Soprano Voice, Alto/Tenor Voice, Low Male Voice, Instrument, and
Bass Instrument. Matching the appropriate algorithm to the input results
in even faster and more accurate pitch detection and correction.
To select the desired Input Type, click on the Input Type pop-up and then
select the desired type from the pop-up list.
Note: Choosing the wrong Input Type (or just forgetting to set
it at all) can result in compromised performance. Pay attention.
Another Note: When any Input Type other than Bass Instrument
is selected, Auto-Tune 3 is reliably able to detect pitches down
to A0 (55Hz). Selecting Bass Instrument lowers the lowest
detectable frequency by about one octave to 25Hz. Since the
lowest E string on a bass guitar is approximately 41Hz, Bass
Instrument (as its name so ably implies) allows you to apply
pitch correction to those pesky fretless bass lines as well as
other low bass range instruments. However, when Bass Instrument is selected, pitches above A4 may be incorrectly tuned by
a perfect fifth, so be sure to select Bass Instrument only when
correcting bass range tracks.
Correction Mode
Click the appropriate button to select either Automatic
or Graphical Mode.
Select Pitch Reference
Auto-Tune 3 provides the ability to pitch correct stereo
tracks while maintaining the tracks’ phase coherence.
(Refer to your host application’s manual for instructions
on assigning a plug-in to a stereo track.) Click the appropriate button to select which of the two stereo tracks (left
or right) Auto-Tune 3 will use as a pitch reference.
Note: If there is a marked difference in the two tracks, pick the
cleanest, most isolated track. For example, if one track is a close
mic’d vocal while the other is mic’d from farther away for
ambience, or is heavily processed, select the close mic’d track.
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Another Note: Auto-Tune 3 will only pitch correct true stereo
tracks. If the second track (i.e., the track not selected as a pitch
reference) is simply an independent unrelated track, unpredictable
(and potentially unpleasant) sounds may result. On the other
hand, something interesting might happen. You never know.
Bypass
Auto-Tune 3 does not include a dedicated Bypass control as that function
is typically provided by the host application’s plug-in interface. However, it
is worth noting that Auto-Tune 3 is designed such that switching the
bypass state will not cause any audio artifacts. It can safely be used in
performance or in the middle of a recorded track.
Automatic Mode Controls
Knobs
All of Auto-Tune 3’s continuous parameters are represented as
knobs. To “turn” a knob, position the cursor over the desired
knob, press and hold the left mouse button (or the only mouse
button, if you’re using a one-button mouse) and move the cursor
up to turn the knob clockwise or down to turn the knob counterclockwise. The current value of each parameter appears in its associated
numeric display.
Double-clicking on a knob will return it to its default value. In some host
applications, Command/Control clicking on a knob will also reset it to
default (see the Auto-Tune 3 Read Me and/or your host application
manual for details).
Key Selection
To select the desired key, click on the Key pop-up and
then select the desired note from the pop-up list. This
determines the pitch of the first note of the scale
according to the standard A3 = 440 Hertz.
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Scale Selection
To select a scale, click on the Scale pop-up and then
select the desired scale from the pop-up list.
Note: To avoid having to deal with scales containing those
annoying double flats, double sharps and notes like Cb, E#, Fb
and B#, Auto-Tune 3 will automatically choose the simpler of
two enharmonically equivalent scales. For example, if you select
Db Major, the Edit Scale Display will duly display the Db Major
scale. However, if you then go to the Scale selection pop-up and
select Minor, the Key will automatically be changed to C# and
the Edit Scale Display will, in fact, display the much friendlier C#
Minor scale. This will also be reflected on the Pitch Graph
Display in the Graphical Mode.
The Scales
Auto-Tune 3 comes with 29 preprogrammed scales. The first three scales
are equal tempered. These are the ubiquitous scales typically found in
Western tonal music. The other scales are historical, ethnic, and microtonal
scales. An in-depth discussion of these scales and their history is beyond
the scope of this manual. The interested reader will find more information
in Tuning In — Microtonality In Electronic Music by Scott R. Wilkinson,
published by Hal Leonard Books.
The following is a brief synopsis of the scales:
Modern equal temperament:
• major: a seven-tone equal tempered major scale.
• minor: a seven-tone equal tempered minor scale.
• Equal Tempered chrom.: a twelve-tone equal tempered chromatic scale.
Historical tunings:
• Ling Lun: a twelve-tone scale dating from 2700 B.C. China.
• Scholar’s Lute: a seven-tone scale dating from 300 B.C. China.
• Greek diatonic genus: a seven-tone scale from ancient Greece.
• Greek chromatic genus: a seven-tone scale from ancient Greece.
• Greek enharmonic genus: a seven-tone scale from ancient Greece.
• Pythagorean: a twelve-tone scale dating from 600 B.C. Greece. This
scale is derived by tuning twelve pure perfect fifths upward and adjusting the octaves downward. This leads to some pure intervals and some
very impure intervals.
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• Just (major chromatic): a twelve-tone scale. Just intonation tunes the
most frequently used intervals to be pure (integer ratios in frequency).
These tunings depend on the mode (major or minor) and the key. This
scale is tuned for major mode.
• Just (minor chromatic): (See Just (major chromatic), above)
• Meantone chrom.: a twelve-tone scale. This tuning is a combination of
Pythagorean and just tunings so that music in a wider variety of keys
could be usable.
• Werckmeister III chrom.: a twelve-tone scale. This scale was a first
attempt (about Bach’s time) to allow an instrument to be played in any
scale. It was in response to this scale that Bach wrote Well-Tempered
Clavier.
• Vallotti & Young chrom.: a twelve-tone scale. Another derivative of the
Pythagorean scale designed to allow arbitrary keys.
• Barnes-Bach (chromatic): a twelve-tone scale. A variation of the Vallotti
& Young scale designed to optimize the performance of Bach’s WellTempered Clavier.
Ethnic Tunings:
• Indian: This 22 tone scale is used in India to perform ragas.
• Slendro: This five-tone Indonesian scale is played by ensembles called
gamelans.
• Pelog: This seven-tone Indonesian scale is more interesting than Slendro
and is now the primary scale in Balinese music.
• Arabic 1: This 17 tone scale is the original Arabic scale adopted from the
Pythagorean scale.
• Arabic 2 (chromatic): This twelve-tone scale is the modern version of the
Arabic scale popular in Arabic music today.
Contemporary Tunings:
Equal tempered scales with a large number of tones are typically used to
play common tonal harmony with greater purity of intervals and chords.
The typical approach is to analyze a passage (or less) of music and select
tones from a scale that will best approximate the desired pure intervals.
• 19 Tone: This scale has greater purity of minor thirds and major thirds
(and conversely, minor and major sixths) than twelve-tone equal temperament. A disadvantage is that perfect fifths are narrower than those
found in twelve-tone equal temperament.
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• 24 Tone: Also know as the quarter tone scale, this scale is used for
variety but has no advantage in terms of ratios that better approximate
pure intervals.
• 31 Tone: In addition to intervals that better approximate pure intervals,
this scale also contains good approximations to Indonesian pelog and
slendro scales.
• 53 Tone: Related mathematically to the cycle of fifths, the 53-tone scale
has very pure major and minor thirds, and fifths and fourths.
• Partch: Harry Partch is considered the father of modern microtonality.
This scale was devised by him and used in instrument building and
performances.
• Carlos Alpha: Wendy Carlos performed extensive computer analysis to
devise a number of equal tempered scales with good approximations
for the primary harmonic intervals and their inversions. This scale is
good at approximating the primary intervals including 7/4. This scale
divides the octave into 15.385 steps forming intervals of 78.0 cents.
• Carlos Beta: This scale divides the octave into 18.809 steps forming
intervals of 63.8 cents.
• Carlos Gamma: This scale achieves perfect purity of the primary intervals 3/2, 4/3 and 5/4. This scale divides the octave into 34.188 steps
forming intervals of 35.1 cents.
• Harmonic (chromatic): This twelve-tone scale is created in the partials in
the fifth octave of the harmonic series. The scale degrees that correspond to the classic just intervals are the major second, major third,
perfect fifth and major seventh.
The Edit Scale Display
The Edit Scale Display is
used to create custom
scales or to modify any of
the preset scales. Edits
made using this display
are associated with each
scale. That is, each scale
retains its own edits
independent of the other
scales. For example, if you
select C Major and
Remove or Bypass certain
notes and then change to
C Minor and make other edits, when you return to C Major your previous
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edits associated with C Major will be restored.
The Edit Scale window displays each note of the currently selected scale in
the currently selected key. If the selected scale includes more than twelve
notes, Up and Down arrows will appear to allow scrolling through all of
the available notes.
Beside each note name are two buttons: a Bypass button and a Remove
button. Click on a button to toggle its state. The button will light to
indicate that its mode is active.
If neither of these buttons are lit, Auto-Tune 3 treats this note as a normal
scale note, i.e., when the input pitch is close to this note, Auto-Tune 3 will
correct the pitch to this note at the rate set by the Retune Speed control.
Bypass
If the Bypass button is lit, when the input pitch is close to this
note the input will be passed through with no correction.
Why set Scale notes to “Bypass?”
There are two main reasons to set one or more scale notes to
“Bypass.”
1. If a performance includes pitch gestures around one or
more specific notes that you want to preserve with no
modification whatsoever, you can set just those notes to
Bypass. This lets Auto-Tune 3 correct any pitch problems
elsewhere in the scale but passes everything near the
bypassed notes completely unprocessed.
2. If a performance contains only a single error, you can set all notes to
Bypass except the one “sour” note. Auto-Tune 3 will then pass the
entire performance through unprocessed except for the sour note,
which will be corrected.
Remove
If the Remove button is lit, then the note is simply removed
from the current scale. For example, selecting the Chromatic
scale and then setting setting C#, D#, F#, G#, A# to Remove
would cause a C Major scale to remain. In that case AutoTune 3 would always retune the input to the closest note of
the C Major scale.
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Why set Scale notes to “Remove?”
To understand why it is sometimes necessary to set even correct scale notes
to ”Remove,“ let’s look again at the example from Chapter 1.
CORRECTED BY
AUTO-TUNE 3
D3
C 3
ORIGINAL
PERFORMANCE
B2
10.0
10.5
11.0
This phrase is in D Major and, if all the pitch errors were no greater than
about 49 cents, would work fine with a standard D Major scale (D, E, F#, G,
A, B, C# ). However, the pitch error of three semitones at the end of the
last note is so large that with B and C # present in the Scale, as the pitch
fell, Auto-Tune 3 would see first C# and then B as the target pitch and
therefore allow the error to remain. With C# and B removed from the
Scale, Auto-Tune 3 continues to see D as the target pitch for the entire
duration of the note and therefore pulls the phrase up to the correct
pitch.
Cents
The number in the Cents column is the associated note’s interval,
in cents, from the root note of the scale. It’s provided for reference purposes and to help you choose which notes of a
microtonal scale to include or remove.
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Set Major Scale/Set Minor Scale
When any scale that includes more than seven notes
(i.e., any non-diatonic scale) is selected, the Set Major
Scale and Set Minor Scale buttons will appear. Clicking
on either of these buttons will “Remove” all notes
from the scale except for those notes closest to the
notes of a traditional diatonic major or minor scale
(depending, of course, on which button you clicked).
Auto-Tune 3 MIDI Functions
Auto-Tune 3 contains two new functions that require it to receive MIDI
data from the host application. Depending on your intent, this data could
come in real time from a MIDI controller (typically a keyboard) or from a
pre-recorded MIDI sequencer track. Refer to your host application’s
manual for details on how to route MIDI to Auto-Tune 3.
Please note that some host applications may not support the routing of
MIDI information to plug-ins. In that case the following two functions will
not be selectable.
Target Notes Via MIDI
To use the Target Notes Via MIDI function, ensure that the
desired MIDI source is routed to Auto-Tune 3, then click the
Target Notes Via MIDI button. Its associated “LED” will light and
the Edit Scale display will automatically be set to a chromatic
scale with all of the notes set to Remove. While in this mode,
Auto-Tune 3 continuously monitors its MIDI input for Note On
messages. At any instant, the scale used for correction is defined by all
MIDI notes that are on. For example, if MIDI notes A, C and E are held,
Auto-Tune 3’s input will be retuned to an A, C or E, whichever is closest to
the input pitch.
The source of the MIDI input would typically be a MIDI keyboard or
sequencer track, and could consist of chords, scales, or, most powerfully,
the exact melody that the input should be corrected to.
Important Note: If you will not be defining Auto-Tune 3’s target
pitches via MIDI, be sure that the Target Notes Via MIDI button
is off. If it is left on and no MIDI note data is present, Auto-Tune
3 will pass through all audio unprocessed — giving the impression that Auto-Tune 3 is not functioning.
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Learn Scale From MIDI
In most cases, you will probably tell Auto-Tune 3 which notes to
correct to using the Edit Scale Display described above. However,
there may be occasions when it is not clear exactly what key a
melody line is in, or where the line has too many accidentals to
fit comfortably into a conventional scale. For those occasions,
the Make Scale From MIDI function allows you to simply play the
line into Auto-Tune 3 from a MIDI keyboard or sequencer track and let
Auto-Tune 3 construct a custom scale containing only those notes that
appear in the line.
To use the Make Scale From MIDI function, ensure that the desired MIDI
source is routed to Auto-Tune 3 and then click the Make Scale From MIDI
button. Its associated “LED” will light and the Edit Scale display will
automatically be set to a chromatic scale with all of the notes set to
Remove.
Now simply play the melody to be corrected from your keyboard or
sequencer. Tempo and rhythm don’t matter, so take your time and make
sure you don’t play any wrong notes. As each note is played, the corresponding Remove button in the Edit Scale Display is turned off. Assume,
for example, that your melody starts with D, B, and then A. After playing
those notes the display would look like this:
When you have played the entire melody, press the Make Scale From MIDI
button again to end the process. The Edit Scale Display will now contain a
scale containing only those notes that appeared in your melody.
If you happen to make an error during note entry, or want to try again for
any other reason, simply click the Make Scale From MIDI button and start
the process again.
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Note: When you start the process by pressing the Make Scale
From MIDI button, all notes are first Removed from the chromatic scale in preparation for adding just the notes you play. If
you then press the Make Scale From MIDI button again without
playing any notes, you will be left with a chromatic scale with
all notes removed. In this state, Auto-Tune 3 will pass all notes
with no correction applied. So don’t do that.
Another Note: We realize that there is some possibility of
confusion between the Make Scale From MIDI function and
Target Notes Via MIDI function described above. To clarify:
Target Notes Via MIDI is used to specify target pitches in real
time while pitch correction is occurring, while Make Scale From
MIDI is used in advance of correction to create a custom scale.
Scale Detune
The Detune parameter allows you to change the pitch standard of AutoTune 3 from the default A = 440Hz. The values are cents (100 cents = 1
semitone). The range of adjustment is from -100 to +100 cents. The
Detune function can be used to tune a vocal performance to some irreparably out-of-tune instrument (a piano or organ, for example), or to allow
correction to other than the conventional 440Hz standard.
Refer to the following table to convert cents to Hertz relative to 440Hz.
DETUNE SETTING
A=HERTZ
-20
435
-16
436
-12
437
-8
438
-4
439
0
440
+4
441
+8
442
+12
443
+16
444
+20
445
This table can be extended in either direction by adding or subtracting 4
cents per Hertz, as appropriate.
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If you have a tone that you want to use as the pitch standard, select that
tone and play it in a loop. Adjust Scale Detune until the Change meter
reads zero. (You may be required to use the Edit Scale dialog to remove
adjacent notes so that Auto-Tune 3 doesn’t tune to the wrong note.)
The default Scale Detune setting is 0 cents. Double-clicking the Scale
Detune knob will reset it to that value.
Retune Speed
Retune Speed controls how rapidly the pitch correction is applied to the incoming sound. The units are
milliseconds. A value of zero will cause instantaneous
changes from one tone to another and will completely suppress a vibrato (note that any related
volume changes will remain). Values from 10 to 50 are typical for vocals
(unless you’re going for the now-infamous “Cher effect,” in which case
use 0). Larger values let through more vibrato and other interpretative
pitch gestures but also slow down how rapidly pitch corrections are made.
Although the above suggestions can be used as starting points, finding
the correct Speed setting for a particular performance is largely a matter
of trial-and-error and depends on such attributes as song tempo, note
duration and vocal style, among others. As always, let you ears be your
guide.
The default Retune Speed is 20. Double-clicking the Retune Speed knob
will reset it to that value.
Tracking
In order to accurately identify the pitch of the input,
Auto-Tune 3 requires a periodically repeating waveform, characteristic of a voice or solo instrument. The
Tracking control determines how much variation is
allowed in the incoming waveform for Auto-Tune 3
to still consider it periodic.
If you are working with a well-isolated solo signal (e.g., tracking in a
studio or off of a multi-track tape) you can typically set the Tracking
control to 25 and forget it.
If, on the other hand, your signal is noisy or not well-isolated (as might be
more common in a live performance situation) or you are dealing with a
particularly breathy or guttural voice, it may be necessary to allow more
signal variation (higher Tracking numbers). However, under these circumstances tracking is not guaranteed and a too “relaxed” setting may
introduce distortion and popping.
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The default Tracking setting is 25. Double-clicking the Tracking knob will
reset it to that value.
Note: The improved pitch detection algorithm in Auto-Tune 3
(in combination with the new Input Type selection described
above) results in noticeably more reliable pitch detection
compared to previous versions of Auto-Tune. If you have used
older versions of Auto-Tune, you may find that situations that
previously required constant modifications of the Tracking
control now track perfectly at the default setting.
The Vibrato Section
The Vibrato Section contains one pop-up and three
knobs. The Vibrato pop-up allows you to select the
shape of the vibrato’s pitch variation. The choices are:
(no vibrato), sine wave, square and sawtooth. Depth,
which controls the amount of pitch variation in the
vibrato, varies from 0 to 100 cents. The Rate varies from
.1 to 10.0 Hz and controls the speed of the vibrato.
Delay varies from 0 to 3000 milliseconds, controlling the
speed of onset of the vibrato. For example, if it is set to
1000, the first 500 milliseconds of a new tone will
contain no vibrato and the next 500 milliseconds will
make a transition from no vibrato to the full vibrato.
The vibrato is re-started every time the Auto-Tune 3
matches the incoming pitch to a different scale tone.
Also, the vibrato is applied after the effects of the
Retune Speed control. Hence, even with a slow retune value of 50, a
square wave vibrato will make instantaneous changes in pitch.
Note: Although we perceive vibrato primarily as a variation in
pitch, in most cases there is also a matching variation in amplitude. Setting Auto-Tune 3’s Retune Speed to 0 will remove an
existing vibrato’s pitch variation, but the amplitude variation
will remain. If you then apply a new vibrato using Auto-Tune 3’s
Vibrato section, the results may be less than convincing. AutoTune 3’s Vibrato section is more often useful for adding a
vibrato to an input that originally had none, or for various
special effects.
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The Pitch Change Indicator
The Pitch Change Indicator
shows you how much the
pitch is being changed,
measured in cents (100 cents
= one semitone). For example,
if the indicator bar has moved to the left to -66, it indicates that the input
pitch is 66 cents too sharp and Auto-Tune 3 is lowering the pitch by 66
cents to bring the input back to the desired pitch.
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Graphical Mode Controls
The Playback Controls
Track Pitch
The Track Pitch function is used to detect the pitch of the
audio to be processed so that it can be displayed on the
Pitch Graph Display.
Locate the desired audio and press the Track Pitch button. Its
“LED” will flash to indicate that Auto-Tune is waiting for
audio. Next, start playback of the audio. (The Track Pitch LED
will light steadily.) When all of the audio you want to correct
has played, stop playback. Track Pitch is automatically
deactivated and the detected pitch is displayed on
Note: If the length of the audio to be processed exceeds the
currently set size of the buffer (see below), playback will stop
when the buffer is full. If this happens, increase the buffer size
as necessary.
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Correct Pitch
After you have used the graphical tools (as described below) to create a
target pitch contour, this button is used to apply the pitch correction to
the audio.
In all cases, pressing the Correct Pitch button and then starting playback
will cause the pitch correction to be applied to the audio. In some host
applications, starting playback when the Pitch Graph contains any yellow
pitch correction contour will automatically engage the Correct Pitch
function. Check your Auto-Tune 3 Read Me file for details.
Set Buffers
Set Buffers controls the number of seconds of memory buffer space that
are permanently reserved for pitch tracking and pitch correction data.
(There is a separate buffer for each plug-in occurrence.) To change the
buffer allocation, click on the Set Buffers data field and enter the required
amount into the resulting dialog box.
Note: As buffer memory is typically allocated from within your
host application, for large buffers, it may be necessary to
increase the memory allocation of your host.
Another Note: Some host applications allow Auto-Tune 3 to
display all tracked pitch information at their correct times
within the track (see the Auto-Tune 3 Read Me file for details).
If your application supports this capability, setting the buffer to
the length of the entire song and tracking the pitch in one pass
will allow you to quickly and easily move to each section of
audio to be corrected as necessary.
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The Pitch Graph Display
The Pitch Graph displays the pitch contour of the audio to be processed as
well as the target pitch contour objects that you create. On this display,
the vertical axis represents pitch (with higher notes towards the top) while
the horizontal axis represents time.
The red curve represents the original pitch contour of the input track,
while the desired target pitch or pitch contour is indicated in yellow.
The horizontal grid lines represent scale pitches. The key annotation, scale
name, scale pitches and Scale Detune value are those defined in the
Automatic Mode. They do not affect the computations of the Graphical
Mode in any way. They are merely a reference to guide you in drawing the
target pitches. If you wish to change them, select the Automatic Mode
and change the Key pop-up, Scale pop-up, or the Scale Detune setting,
respectively. (Changing the Scale Detune setting will also result in the scale
pitch graph lines moving up or down relative to the tracked pitch.) Then,
return to Graphical Mode.
Pitch Graph Scale
The Pitch Graph Scale Buttons control the horizontal (time) and vertical
(pitch) scaling of the graph. Clicking the appropriate “+” button causes
the view to zoom in, while clicking a “-” button causes it to zoom out.
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Note: The horizontal scale buttons always control the Pitch
Graph. They also control the Envelope Graph when it is set to
“Tie” (see below).
The Envelope Graph Display
The Envelope Graph displays the amplitude (loudness) envelope of the
sound whose pitch is shown in the Pitch Graph.
Envelope Graph Scale
The “+” and “-” buttons next to the Envelope Graph control the vertical
scale as expected, while the horizontal (time) scale is controlled by the
“All” and “Tie” buttons.
Clicking the All button causes the envelope graph to display the entire
time scale represented by the current buffer setting. This is useful for
locating and selecting various portions of audio spread over the duration
of a song.
Clicking the Tie button slaves the position of the Envelope Graph to that
of the Pitch Graph. When this setting is selected, the horizontal scale of
the Envelope Graph is controlled by the Pitch Graph horizontal scale
buttons.
The Graphical Tools
The graphical tools are used in conjunction with the edit
buttons to create the desired target pitch contour.
The Line Tool
The Line Tool is used to draw multi-segment straight lines
on the Pitch Graph.
Start the process by selecting the Line Tool and clicking anywhere on the Pitch Graph to set an anchor point. As you move
the cursor, a line will extend from the anchor point to the
cursor position. Click again to set a second anchor point and
define the first segment of your pitch contour. Continue clicking and
defining lines until your contour is complete. End the process by doubleclicking on the final anchor point or pressing <esc> on your keyboard.
If you move the cursor outside the Pitch Graph during point entry, the
graph will automatically scroll.
To delete the last anchor point entered, press <delete> on your keyboard
(you can do this repeatedly back to the very first anchor point).
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Pressing Option/Alt on your keyboard during line entry will force the
current segment to be perfectly horizontal.
Only one pitch contour object (line or curve) can exist at any time point on
the Pitch Graph. When you complete the entry of a line object, any
object(s) that previously existed at the same time will be deleted.
The Curve Tool
The Curve Tool is used to draw arbitrary curves on the Pitch Graph.
Start the process by selecting the Curve Tool and clicking anywhere
on the Pitch Graph to set an anchor point. Hold down your mouse button
and move the cursor to draw the desired pitch contour curve. End the
process by releasing your mouse button.
Unlike the Line Tool, the Pitch Graph will not scroll if you attempt to move
the Curve Tool cursor outside the current display area.
Only one pitch contour object (line or curve) can exist at any time point on
the Pitch Graph. When you complete the entry of a curve object, any
object(s) that previously existed at the same time will be deleted.
The Pointer Tool
The Pointer Tool is used to select and drag existing target pitch
contour objects (yellow lines and curves).
The Pointer Tool behaves as follows:
• Clicking on the background of the Pitch Graph and dragging horizontally selects objects’ anchor points. Shift-clicking extends the selection.
• Dragging beyond the Pitch Graph boundaries automatically scrolls the
graph.
• Moving the Pointer Tool over a pitch contour object causes the cursor to
change to the object cursor (a horizontal bar). Clicking on an
unselected curve or line segment with the object cursor causes
the curve or segment and its anchor points to become selected
and allows that object to be dragged. Clicking on an already selected
curve or line segment with the object cursor allows that object, along
with all other selected objects, to be dragged.
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• Moving the Pointer Tool over a pitch contour object anchor point
(whether that point is currently selected or not) causes the cursor to
change into the anchor point cursor (four diagonal arrows).
Clicking on an anchor point with the anchor point cursor deselects
all other objects and anchor points and selects that anchor point
so that it can be dragged. Dragging an anchor point stretches or
compresses the pitch contour object relative to the nearest unselected
anchor point(s).
• The extent to which you can drag selected objects is constrained by the
position of neighboring unselected objects.
• In some host applications, holding down the Option/Alt key and then
clicking to drag will restrict the cursor to vertical movements only
(the cursor will change to indicate this state). The effect of this is
to allow you to modify the pitch contour while preserving the
object’s location in time. This is particularly handy after using the
“Make Curve” button, discussed below.
• Clicking on the background of the Pitch Graph de-selects all selected
objects.
While the above may seem a bit mind-boggling on first reading, in practice it’s quite intuitive. Spend a minute or two playing with the Pointer
Tool and all will become clear.
The Zoom/Select Tool
The Zoom/Select Tool serves two purposes, depending on whether it
is used in the Pitch Graph or the Envelope Graph.
In the Pitch Graph, use the Zoom/Select Tool to click and drag a box
around an area of interest. Dragging off the Pitch Graph automatically
scrolls the graph. When you release the mouse button, the scale and
position of the Pitch Graph will be changed to display the area enclosed
by the box.
In the Envelope Graph, click and drag with the Zoom/Select Tool to select a
range of time containing audio. This causes the Make Curve button to
become active (see below). Clicking Make Curve will create a pitch contour
curve with anchor points at the selection boundaries.
Note: The Zoom/Select Tool can also be used to add new anchor
points in the middle of an existing curve previously created by
the Make Curve function. Simply select a range of time such
that one or both boundaries of your selection fall at the
point(s) where you would like a new anchor point and then
click Make Curve. Voilá.
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The Undo Button
The Undo button becomes active whenever you move or
modify a target pitch contour object. Clicking the Undo button
allows you to alternately undo and redo the last change.
The Cut and Copy Buttons
The Cut and Copy buttons become active whenever a pitch
contour object is selected. Cut removes selected objects. Both
Cut and Copy copy selected objects to the Auto-Tune 3 clipboard. You can then paste the objects elsewhere in the Pitch Graph
display.
The Paste Button
The Paste button becomes active whenever an object has been
Cut or Copied to the clipboard. Clicking Paste places the
contents of the clipboard in the center of the current Pitch Graph view.
Note: Since only one pitch contour object (line or curve) can
exist at any time point on the Pitch Graph, any object(s) that
previously existed at the time where an object is Pasted will be
deleted. Hence, before you press Paste, be sure that the Pitch
Graph view does not contain any pitch contour object(s) that
you want to keep.
The Select All Button
The Select All button causes all pitch contour objects, whether
currently visible on the Pitch Graph view or not, to become
selected.
Keyboard Equivalents
Some host applications support the following keyboard command equivalents for the above Edit Buttons. Consult the Auto-Tune 3 Read Me file or
your host application’s manual for details (or just try them and see if they
work).
Command/Control-Z
undo/redo
Command/Control-X
cut
Command/Control-C
copy
Command/Control-V
paste
Command/Control-A
select all
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The Make Curve Button
The Make Curve button is enabled whenever there is any red
input pitch contour data present in the Pitch Graph (whether it
is displayed in the current Pitch Graph view or not). Pressing the Make
Curve button causes yellow target pitch contour objects (curves for short)
to be created from the input pitch contour data. These curve objects can
then be dragged and stretched for very meticulous pitch correction. This is
the central technique of Auto-Tune 3’s Graphical Mode and is described in
more detail in Chapter 4.
Note: If a range of time has been selected by using the Zoom/
Select Tool in the Envelope Graph, the Make Curve button
works only in the selected time range.
The Make Auto Button
The Make Auto button is enabled whenever there is any red
input pitch contour data present in the Pitch Graph (whether it
is displayed in the current Pitch Graph view or not).
Pressing the Make Auto button causes yellow target pitch contour objects
(curves for short) to be created from the red input pitch contour data. The
yellow curve(s) created by the Make Auto function is a precise representation of the pitch correction that would result from processing the tracked
input pitch through the current settings of Auto-Tune 3’s Automatic
Mode. These include the Automatic Mode’s Key and Scale selections, the
Edit Scale settings, and the Scale Detune, Retune Speed and Vibrato
settings.
Note: If a range of time has been selected by using the Zoom/
Select Tool in the Envelope Graph, the Make Auto function
works only in the selected time range.
Another Note: The Automatic Mode Tracking control is not
involved the Make Auto function. In Graphical Mode, the input
pitch has already been determined, (i.e., the red input pitch
contour), hence the Automatic Mode Tracking setting is not
needed for the Make Auto computation.
Once you have used the Make Auto function to create a yellow target
pitch curve, setting the Graphical Mode Retune Speed to 0 and clicking
Correct Pitch will result in exactly the same output as you would have
gotten by processing the audio through Automatic Mode. Alternatively,
you can adjust the Retune Speed or further edit the yellow curve using
any of the Graphical Mode tools to get precisely the effect you want.
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If you aren’t satisfied with the results of the Make Auto function, simply
switch to Automatic Mode, modify any of the settings as desired, and then
return to Graphical Mode and click Make Auto again.
Note: In addition to its use as a Graphical Mode correction tool,
the Make Auto function can also be used to provide an informative visual representation of the results of Automatic Mode
settings. If there are times when you’d prefer to use Automatic
Mode, but can’t quite zero in on the ideal settings, examining
the results of various settings with the Make Auto function can
give you a visual picture of exactly what’s going on. This will
often make it readily apparent which Automatic Mode settings
need to be changed to give your desired results.
Another Note: One potentially confusing aspect of the Make
Auto function is the relationship between the Automatic Mode
Retune Speed setting and the Graphical Mode Retune Speed
setting. To summarize:
• The Automatic Mode Retune Speed controls how the input
audio would be processed in Automatic Mode. Changing this
setting will change the shape of the yellow curve that will be
created by the Make Auto function.
• The Graphical Mode Retune Speed controls how quickly the
pitch of the input audio will be changed to that of the yellow
target pitch curve by the Correct Pitch function. As mentioned
above, to precisely duplicate the results of Automatic Mode, set
the Graphical Mode Retune Speed to 0.
Tracking
The Graphical Mode Tracking control is similar in
function but separate from the Tracking control in
Automatic Mode.
In order to accurately identify the pitch of the input,
Auto-Tune 3 requires a periodically repeating waveform, characteristic of a voice or solo instrument. The
Tracking control determines how much variation is allowed in the incoming waveform for Auto-Tune 3 to still consider it periodic.
If you are working with a well-isolated solo signal (e.g., tracking in a
studio or off of a multi-track tape) you can typically set the Tracking
control to 25 and forget it.
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If, on the other hand, your signal is noisy or not well-isolated (as might be
more common in a live performance situation) or you are dealing with a
particularly breathy or guttural voice, it may be necessary to allow more
signal variation (higher Tracking numbers). However, under these circumstances tracking is not guaranteed and a too “relaxed” setting may
introduce distortion and popping.
The default Tracking value is 25. Double-clicking the Tracking knob will
reset it to that value.
Note: Be cautious about changing the Tracking value after
performing the Track Pitch function. Auto-Tune 3 uses the
Tracking setting during both the Track Pitch and the Correct Pitch
functions. Changing the Tracking setting after Tracking Pitch, but
before Pitch Correction, may result in unpredictable pitch modifications or strange (though possibly interesting) artifacts.
Retune Speed
The Retune setting is used only during the Correct
Pitch process. It’s similar in function but separate
from the Retune control in Automatic Mode.
In Graphical Mode, the target pitch is not the scale
tone nearest to the input, but rather the yellow
target pitch curve. The Retune Speed control allows you to specify how
quickly Auto-Tune 3 will change the pitch of the input to that of the
target pitch curve. A value of zero will cause the output pitch to precisely
track the target pitch curve. Depending on the target pitch curve, this may
or may not provide the desired results. Slower values will have the effect
of “smoothing out” the target pitch curve. As ever, you should let your
ears be your guide to selecting the proper value for a particular performance.
The default Retune Speed is 20. Double-clicking the Retune Speed knob
will reset it to that value.
Note: Slower Retune Speed values may also allow you to use
simple horizontal line segments to define the target pitches
while still preserving the natural pitch gestures of the original
performance. See Chapter 4 for details.
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The Use Cursors Button
Normally, Auto-Tune 3 displays different cursor shapes in
the Pitch Graph Display to help you grab and drag objects
(e.g., the object cursor, the anchor point cursor, etc.).
However, some host applications mistakenly think that they own the
cursor when it is in a plug-in window. This may cause the cursor to flash as
the host and Auto-Tune 3 alternately try to set the cursor shape. If this
annoys you, click the Use Cursors button. It will stop the flashing, but you
will no longer see Auto-Tune 3’s custom cursors.
Note: Some plug-in formats never present this problem. In
those versions of Auto-Tune 3, the Use Cursors button does not
appear.
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Chapter 4: Auto-Tune 3 Tutorial
This chapter introduces you to how Auto-Tune 3 works by guiding you
through a a number of brief tutorials.
The Auto-Tune 3 installer installs a number of tutorial files which, depending on your plug-in format and host application, may be provided as
separate audio files or together in a project file. (We will assume that you
are familiar with loading audio files into your host application.)
Tutorial 1: Automatic Mode
This tutorial will guide you through the basic Automatic Mode functions
using the file “A2-A3-A2 sweep.” This is a simple synthesized waveform
sweeping slowly from A2 up to A3 and back to A2. While it is unlikely that
you’d ever need to process such an input with Auto-Tune 3, it provides a
very clear example of what each of the main Auto-Tune 3 controls do.
Begin the tutorial by doing the following:
1. Load or import “A2-A3-A2 sweep” into a track of your host program.
Play the track so that you are familiar with the original audio.
2. Set up Auto-Tune 3 to be an insert effect on that track.
3. Set Auto-Tune 3 to Automatic Mode.
4. Set the Key to “A” and the Scale to “Major.”
5. Set the Retune Speed to zero.
6. Set “A2-A3-A2 sweep” to loop continuously and put your host program
into Play mode.
What you will hear is an A major scale. This is because Auto-Tune 3 is
continuously comparing the input pitch to the notes of the A major scale
and instantaneously correcting the output pitch to the nearest of the scale
tones.
Now do the following:
1. In the Edit Scale Display, click the Remove buttons next to the notes B,
D, F# and G#.
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2. Play “A2-A3-A2 sweep” again.
You will now hear an arpegiated A Major triad because you have removed
all the other notes from the scale.
To continue:
1. In the Edit Scale Display, click the Bypass button next to E.
2. Play “A2-A3-A2 sweep” again.
You will now hear the effect of not correcting the E. During the time that
Auto-Tune 3 would normally be tuning the input to E, Auto-Tune 3 instead
enters bypass mode and passes the input through uncorrected.
To continue:
1. Set the Retune Speed to about 30.
2. Play “A2-A3-A2 sweep” again. Compare the 30 setting to the 0 setting.
3. Try various other Speed settings.
The setting of 0 is fast: Auto-Tune 3 makes instantaneous pitch changes.
The setting of 30 is slower. Auto-Tune 3 makes gradual pitch changes. This
parameter controls how rapidly the pitch correction is applied to the
incoming pitch. The units are milliseconds. A value of zero will cause
instantaneous changes from one tone to another and will completely
suppress a vibrato (note that related volume changes will remain). Retune
values from 10 to 50 are typical for vocals.
To continue:
1. Set the Retune Speed to 0
2. In the Edit Scale Display, click the Remove buttons next to to all the
notes except F#.
3. Play “A2-A3-A2 sweep” again. As the sound is playing, move Scale
Detune knob.
The output pitch will be locked to F#, however, you will hear the output
pitch change with the Detune slider movement. This is because the Detune
knob is changing the pitch standard of the scale.
Finally:
1. Select “sine wave” from the Vibrato Type pop-up.
2. Play “A2-A3-A2 sweep” again.
3. Experiment with the vibrato controls to hear their effects.
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Tutorial 2: Graphical Mode
This tutorial will introduce you to the basic Graphical Mode functions,
again using the “A2-A3-A2 sweep” file from Tutorial 1.
Begin the tutorial by doing the following:
1. Load or import “A2-A3-A2 sweep” into a track of your host program.
Play the track so that you are familiar with the original audio.
2. Set up Auto-Tune 3 to be an insert effect on that track.
3. Set Auto-Tune 3 to Automatic Mode.
4. Set the Key to “A” and the Scale to “Major.”
5. Set Auto-Tune 3 to Graphical Mode.
6. Click the Track Pitch button.
7. Play the sweep signal through Auto-Tune 3.
8. Stop playback (depending on your host application, you may also have
to click the Track Pitch button again to stop the tracking function).
A red curve will appear in the Pitch Graph. This is the pitch contour of the
sweep signal.
To Continue:
1. Select the Zoom/Select tool and drag out a box on the Pitch Graph that
encloses the red curve. The result will be something like the following:
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2. Select the Line tool and enter a line similar to that below. By clicking
multiple anchor points on the Pitch Graph, line segments joining the
points will be drawn.
When done, double-click the last point or press <esc> on the keyboard.
To erase the last point entered, press <delete> on the keyboard (you
can press <delete> repeatedly to erase back to the first anchor point).
3. Set the Retune Speed to 0. Click the Correct Pitch button and play back
the sound to hear the effect.
4. Select the Curve tool and create a curve similar to the one shown
below. Click and hold the mouse button and drag to draw the curve.
When done, release the mouse button.
5. Press Correct Pitch and play back the sound to hear the effect.
6. Vary the Retune Speed between 0 and 50 and note the effect.
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Now that we have some yellow lines and curves on the Pitch Graph
Display, this would be a good time to become familiar with the functions
of the Pointer Tool. (Refer back to Chapter 3 for a detailed description of
the Pointer Tool’s behavior.)
7. Select the Pointer Tool.
8. Drag the Pointer Tool across the Pitch Graph to select objects.
9. Move the cursor over curves and anchor points. Practice selecting entire
curves and individual anchor points.
10. Use the Pointer Tool to drag selected curves and individual anchor
points. Option/Alt-drag to constrain movement to vertical only.
11. Press Correct Pitch and play back the file to hear the effect of each
movement.
12. Select one or more objects and play with the Edit Buttons (Undo, Cut,
Copy, Paste, Select All).
This would also be a good time to see if the Edit Button keyboard
equivalents:
Command/Control-Z
undo/redo
Command/Control-X
cut
Command/Control-C
copy
Command/Control-V
paste
Command/Control-A
select all
work in your host application.
Tutorial 3: Precision
This lesson is actually more of a demonstration to show the extraordinary
precision with which Auto-Tune 3 can track and correct intonation problems. If this doesn’t sound interesting, feel free to proceed to Lesson 4
below.
(By this time, we’ll assume you’re comfortable loading files and calling up
Auto-Tune 3.)
1. Arrange the files “C2 Ahhh v3” and “C2 Ohhh v1” so that they are on
separate tracks and can be played simultaneously.
2. Assign a separate instance of Auto-Tune 3 to each of the two tracks and
select Automatic Mode for each of them.
3. In each Auto-Tune 3, set the Retune slider to 0.
4. In each Auto-Tune 3, set the Key pop-up to B-flat.
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5. Do whatever your host application requires to bypass both instances of
Auto-Tune 3.
6. Play back the files so you can hear them together without processing.
Believe it or not, these vocal samples from a sample CD are supposed to be
the same pitch. Yikes!
7. Now enable Auto-Tune 3 on each of the tracks and play the files again.
If you’ve done everything right, you will hear the samples so well in tune
that they sound like one voice.
Tutorial 4: The Make Curve Function
This tutorial will introduce you to the Make Curve function. The Make
Curve function gives you by far the most precise control over pitch accuracy and inflection.
1. Setup to process the file “Crowd All” through Auto-Tune 3.
2. Select Graphical Mode.
3. Press the Track Pitch button.
4. Play the “Crowd All” file.
5. Select the Zoom/Select tool and drag out a box on the Pitch Graph
that encloses the red curve for the “-gether” part of the last word,
“to-gether.” You will see something like the following:
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6. Use the Zoom/Select tool to drag a selection of “-gether” in the Envelope Graph. The result will be something like the following:
7. Click the Make Curve button. Auto-Tune 3 will compute a new yellow
curve object from the existing pitch data. (The new curve may be
difficult to see at first because it will exactly overlay the red curve.) Click
the Zoom/Select tool on the background of the Envelope Graph to
cancel the area selection.
8. Both anchor points of the new curve will be selected. Select the Pointer
Tool and click precisely on the left end of the curve to select only the
left anchor point (you’ll know you’re over the anchor point when the
cursor changes to the four-pointed arrow cursor). Drag this straight up,
stretching the curve so it is centered around the D3 graph line. (If you
press Option/Alt on your keyboard before clicking the anchor point,
your movement will be constrained to the vertical, assuring that you
maintain the time relationship of the curve.)
9. Move the Pointer Tool over the body of the yellow curve so that the
cursor changes to the horizontal bar. Press and hold Option/Alt on your
keyboard (to constrain movement to the vertical) and click and drag the
curve straight down so it is centered on the C3 graph line. The Pitch
Graph should now appear as follows:
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10. Set the Retune Speed to 0 and play back the sound. Note that the
errant note is now in tune.
To continue, here is an alternative approach to the same pitch problem
using the Line Tool.
1. Click the Select All button and then the Cut button to delete the yellow
curve created above.
2. Use the Line Tool to draw a horizontal line as shown below (press the
Option/Alt key to constrain the line to horizontal):
3. Set the Retune Speed to 20 and play back the sound. Experiment with
other Retune Speeds to hear their effects.
Vibratos and other pitch gestures typically occur with related loudness
gestures. Specifically, with vibratos, some vocalists produce mostly pitch
variations and little loudness variations while others produce small pitch
variations and a lot of loudness variations (the latter is often called
tremolo). Nonetheless, almost all voices seem to produce a combination of
both pitch and related loudness variations. Therefore, trying to take an
existing vibrato and change it (say speed it up) often sounds unnatural
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because the new pitch variation does not correspond to the original (and
still present) loudness variation.
These considerations are also important when correcting pitch. It’s rarely
effective to draw in a new pitch gesture at the desired pitch, even though
that gesture may have worked well in another performance.
As this tutorial has demonstrated, the following two techniques are the
most commonly successful approaches to Graphical Mode pitch correction:
• The first technique uses the Make Curve button to create a curve of the
existing pitch, allowing you to drag that curve up or down, or stretch it
by dragging one end vertically. The Retune slider can then be set very
fast (0 to 5). This will force a precise re-tuning, but will sound extremely
natural since the target pitch curve will precisely synchronize with the
original loudness gestures of the voice.
• The second technique is to draw a flat line segment across the duration
of a tone at the desired pitch and then set the Retune Speed in the
range of 20 to 40. This has the effect of gently moving the input pitch
towards the desired pitch. The slower values of 20 to 40 will let through
a vibrato but still draw the overall pitch closer to being in tune. The
average pitch will eventually settle to the given line and the pitch
gestures will occur both sharper and flatter relative to that line. The
settling time is about twice the Retune Speed setting (in milliseconds).
20 to 40 will let through about one-half of a typical vibrato. Slower
settings will let through more vibrato but will cause the new pitch to be
reached more slowly.
Tutorial 5: The Make Auto Function
The Make Auto function allows you to display and edit the pitch corrections that would result from specific Automatic Mode settings.
1. Setup to process the file “Crowd All” through Auto-Tune 3.
2. Select Automatic Mode and set the Key and Scale to C Major and the
Retune Speed to the default of 20.
3. Select Graphical Mode.
4. Press the Track Pitch button.
5. Play the “Crowd All” file.
6. Select the Zoom/Select tool and drag out a box on the Pitch Graph that
encloses the red curve for the words “crowd all rushed.” You will see
something like the following:
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7. Use the Zoom/Select Tool to drag a selection in the Envelope Graph as
shown:
8. Click the Make Auto button. Auto-Tune 3 will compute a new yellow
curve object from the existing pitch data:
PITCH DRAWN TO
NEIGHBORING
TONE
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Assuming that this entire phrase should be centered around E3, there are
several problem spots, indicated above, where the pitch is being incorrectly adjusted towards neighboring tones.
9. To hear the pitch corrections that would be produced in Automatic
Mode, set the Graphical Mode Retune Slider to 0, (fast) and play back
the file.
10. Switch to the Automatic Mode and click the Remove buttons next to C,
D and F.
11. Return to the Graphical Mode and use the Zoom/Select tool to drag out
a selection in the Envelope Graph, as in Step 7.
12. Press the Make Auto button. Auto-Tune 3 will compute a new yellow
curve from the existing pitch data:
RAISED
PITCH
Note how the pitch errors from the previous curve have been removed.
Also, note the “raised pitch” indicated above. This occurs because the
Automatic Mode Retune slider value of 20 is slow compared to the rapidly
increasing pitch that is occurring at that point in time. But even with the
raised pitch, the average output pitch is centered on E3 and the phrase
sounds in tune.
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Chapter 5:
Creative Applications for Auto-Tune 3
Auto-Tune 3 works on vocals so well you may think that’s all it can do.
Actually, lots of instruments can use it to great advantage. Fretless bass,
electric violin, trombone, even the theremin, all feature continuous pitch
potential, unconstrained by frets or keys. Here are some other ideas for
using Auto-Tune 3:
• Produce instant double tracking in one take! Record onto two tracks,
processing only one of the tracks through Auto-Tune 3. If you’re going
for a tight double track, set Retune Speed rather fast and Detune AutoTune 3 slightly. Increase both of these parameters to broaden the
doubled effect. You can also use some Vibrato to make a more dynamic
effect (small depth and rate values are best, with medium delay). Of
course, you can also decide to record a single virgin track, and bounce
that to another, processing through Auto-Tune 3. This way you can dial
in the effect while auditioning the mix.
• Recording with two mics (as above) while improvising can also produce
heterophonic effects (the effect of two players and instruments playing
the ‘same’ melody, which actually varies with some different pitch
material). The more constrained your scale is in Auto-Tune 3, the more
variation there will be between the two performances.
• To set up a drone or ambient aura behind a melodic performance, try
sending some of the signal to Auto-Tune 3 with an extremely constrained scale (for example, in the key of C: C, F, G, A#) and then on to a
lush, long reverb. The effect produced will be a steady backdrop of
chanting tones behind the main melodic material.
• Don’t be afraid to use just as little of Auto-Tune 3 as you need. It’s
quite possible that a performer has really quite good intonation, but
fails consistently on one or two notes. In this case, use Auto-Tune 3’s
individual Bypass function (in the Edit Scale display) to bypass all the
notes except the one(s) which need the retuning. This way, Auto-Tune 3
is working in a completely transparent mode, and only when needed.
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Index
A
Antares Audio Technologies
contacting ii
Authorizing Auto-Tune 3 4
Auto-Tune 3
background 6
creative applications 51
installation 3
serial number 1
Tutorials 40
what it is 6
Automatic Mode 10, 11
Automatic Mode Controls 17
B
Bass Mode 2
Bypass 17, 21
Why set Scale notes to “Bypass?” 21
C
Cents 22, 25
Challenge/Response 4
Controls 15
Bypass 17
common 15
Correct Pitch 30
Correction Mode 16
Edit Scale Display 20
Envelope Graph Display 32
Envelope Graph Scale 32
Graphical Mode Controls 29
Graphical Tools 32
Input Type 16
Key Selection 17
Knobs 17
Pitch Change Indicator 28
Pitch Graph Display 31
Playback Controls 29
Retune Speed 26, 38
Sample Rate Display 15
Scale Detune 25
Scale Selection 18
Select Pitch Reference 16
Set Buffers 30
Track Pitch 29
Tracking 26, 37
Use Cursors button 39
Vibrato Section 27
Correct Pitch 30
Correction Mode 16
Creative applications 51
Curve Tool 33
Cut and Copy buttons 35
E
Edit Scale Display 20
Envelope Graph Display 32
Envelope Graph Scale 32
Equal Tempered Scale 8
G
Graphical Mode 13, 14
Graphical Mode Controls 29
Graphical Tools 32
Curve tool 33
Cut and Copy buttons 35
Line tool 32
Make Auto button 36
Make Curve button 36
Paste button 35
Pointer tool 33
Select All button 35
Undo button 35
Zoom/Select tool 34
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I
R
Input Type 16
Alto/Tenor Voice 16
Bass Instrument 16
Instrument 16
Low Male Voice 16
Soprano Voice 16
Installing Auto-Tune 3 3
Registering Auto-Tune 3 5
Remove 21
Why set Scale notes to
“Remove?” 22
Retune Speed 11, 26, 37, 38
K
Key Selection 17
keyboard equivalents 35, 44
Knobs 17
L
Learn Scale From MIDI 24
License Agreement iii
Line Tool 32
M
Make Auto button 36
Make Curve button 36
MIDI Functions 23
Learn Scale From MIDI 24
Target Notes Via MIDI 23
P
Paste button 35
Pitch 7, 8
how Auto-Tune 3 corrects pitch 10
how Auto-Tune 3 detects pitch 9
Pitch Change Indicator 28
Pitch Graph Display 31
Envelope Graph Display 32
Envelope Graph Scale 32
Pitch Graph Scale 31
Playback Controls 29
Correct Pitch 30
Set Buffers 30
Track Pitch 29
Pointer tool 33
S
Sample Rate Display 15
Scale Detune 25
Scale Selection 18
Scales 11, 18, 23
Contemporary Tunings 19
Equal Tempered Scale 8
Ethnic Tunings 19
Historical Tunings 18
Modern equal temperament 18
Select All button 35
Select Pitch Reference 16
serial number 1
Set Buffers 30
Set Major Scale/Set Minor Scale 23
T
Technical support 5
Track Pitch 29
Tracking 26, 37
Tutorials 40
1: Automatic Mode 40
2: Graphical Mode 42
3: Precision 44
4: The Make Curve Function 45
5: The Make Auto Function 48
U
Undo button 35
Use Cursors button 39
V
Vibrato 11, 27
Vibrato Section 27
W
What’s new 2, 23
Z
Zoom/Select tool 34
53
40-54 AT3 man layout RGB
53
03/05/2001, 1:32 pm
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