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Wisconsin standards for
Health Education
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Wisconsin Standards for
Health Education
Jon Hisgen, MS, CHES
Health and Physical Education Consultant
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Tony Evers, PhD, State Superintendent
Madison, Wisconsin
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This publication is available from:
STUDENT SERVICES/PREVENTION AND WELLNESS TEAM
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
125 South Webster Street
Madison, WI 53703
(608) 266-8960
http://www.dpi.wi.gov/sspw/healtheducation.html
Bulletin No. 20210
© November 2011 Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
ISBN NUMBER 978-1-57337-149-0
The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race,
color, religion, creed, age, national origin, ancestry, pregnancy, marital status
or parental status, sexual orientation, or disability.
Printed on recycled paper
Copyrighted Materials
Every effort has been made to ascertain proper ownership on copyrighted materials and to obtain
permission for this use. Any omission is unintentional.
The standards and parts of the learning continuum were reprinted with permission from the American
Cancer Society, National Health Education Standards: Achieving Excellence, Second Edition
(Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society).
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Foreword
I
magine a Wisconsin in which all students are fit, healthy, and ready to learn;
where all students have the essential skills to live a healthy and productive
life. Imagine that young people successfully apply the skills they learn in
health education to real-life, challenging situations throughout their teen and
adult years. At a time when many forces pressure students to make decisions
that can compromise their well-being, health-related skills and knowledge are
important parts of ensuring every child graduates prepared for success.
To clearly identify what students should know and be able to do in order to
lead healthy lives, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction created the
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education. This document builds upon earlier
efforts, including the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards (1997) and the
National Health Education Standards (2006).
The Wisconsin Standards for Health Education provides a framework for
aligning health education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. In the fall
and winter of 2010/11 a team of elementary, middle school, high school, higher
education health educators, and administrators created this document with the
assistance of Wisconsin Health and Physical Education (WHPE); the Wisconsin
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development; the Association of
Wisconsin School Administrators; and the Wisconsin Education Association
Council. This team built upon the national standards and developed a rigorous
K–12 learning continuum. The new health education standards include the
following components:
•Broad statements of essential student knowledge and skills.
•A rationale for each of the eight health education standards.
•Learning priorities to help school districts develop effective K–12 health
education curricula.
•Focus areas to guide teachers regarding the types of health education
instruction that will best help students meet the standards.
•A PK–12 learning continuum that provides grade band descriptions for
each learning priority.
Taken together, the components of this standards document can help parents,
school personnel, and other community members in their work to teach students
what they need to be able to do to lead healthier lifestyles.
Tony Evers, PhD
State Superintendent
Foreword
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Acknowledgments
The Wisconsin Standards for Health Education would not have been possible without the efforts of many
people. Members of the task force freely gave their time and expertise in developing the academic standards.
In addition, their employing agencies generously granted them time to work on this initiative. The task force
members are:
Eric Blake
Principal
Waterford Union High School
Waterford, Wisconsin
Steve Borgman
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Westside Elementary School
Sun Prairie, Wisconsin
Tracy Caravella
Associate Professor
Health Education
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
La Crosse, Wisconsin
Cristy Jefson
Associate Professor
Health Education
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Whitewater, Wisconsin
Pam Pinahs-Schultz
Professor
Health and Physical Education
Carroll University
Waukesha, Wisconsin
Kim Leupold
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Brookfield East High School
Brookfield, Wisconsin
Lisa Strauss
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Templeton Middle School
Sussex, Wisconsin
Maredda Magnus
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Somers Elementary School
Kenosha, Wisconsin
Marcus Wenzel
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Milwaukee Public Schools
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Crystal Gorwitz
Health and Physical
Education Teacher
Hortonville Middle School
Hortonville, Wisconsin
Department of Public Instruction Staff
Jon W. Hisgen, Consultant
Health and Physical Education
Jill Camber Davidson, Consultant
Nutrition Education
Emily Holder, Consultant
HIV/STI Prevention and Human Growth and
Development
Linda Carey
Office Operations Associate
Douglas White, Director
Student Services/Prevention and Wellness
Development of this document was supported in part by Cooperative Agreement #5U87DP001204-3 with the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health.
Acknowledgments
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Table of Contents
Foreword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Aligning for Student Success. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Guiding Principles for Teaching and Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Reaching Every Discipline: Wisconsin’s Approach to Disciplinary Literacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Guide to the Wisconsin Standards for Health Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Coding System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Why Children Need Health Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education: Critical Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Section 1 Vertical Alignment of the Standards-Based Learning Continuum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Standard 1: Students will comprehend concepts related to health promotion.
and disease prevention to enhance health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Standard 2: Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media,.
technology, and other factors on health behaviors.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Standard 3: Students will demonstrate the ability to access valid information.
and products and services to enhance health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Standard 4: Students will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication.
skills to enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Standard 5: Students will demonstrate the ability to use decision-making skills.
to enhance health.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Standard 6: Students will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting.
skills to enhance health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Standard 7: Students will demonstrate the ability to use health-enhancing.
behaviors and avoid or reduce health risks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Standard 8: Students will demonstrate the ability to advocate for personal,.
family, and community health.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Section 2 Grade Band Alignment of the Standards-Based Learning Continuum. . . . . . . . . . . 35
Section 3 Appendices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Glossary of Terms
Health Resources
Health Education and Literacy: Making Connections
Common Core State Standards for Literacy in All Subjects
Table of Contents
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Aligning for Student
Success
To build and sustain schools that support every student in achieving success,
educators must work together with families, community members, and business
partners to connect the most promising practices in the most meaningful
contexts. Major statewide initiatives focus on high school graduation, Response
to Intervention (RtI), the Common Core State Standards for English Language
Arts, Disciplinary Literacy, and Mathematics, and academic standards. While
these are often viewed as separate efforts and initiatives, each of them is
connected to a larger vision of every child graduating college and being careerready. The graphic below illustrates how these initiatives function together
for a common purpose. Here, the vision and set of guiding principles form the
foundation for building a supportive process for teaching and learning rigorous
and relevant content. The following sections articulate this integrated approach
to increasing student success in Wisconsin schools and communities.
The greatest wealth is
health.
—Virgil
A Vision: Every Child a Graduate
In Wisconsin, we are committed to ensuring every child is a graduate who has
successfully completed a rigorous, meaningful, 21st century education that
will prepare him or her for careers, college, and citizenship. Though our public
education system continues to earn nation-leading graduation rates, a fact we
can be proud of, one in ten students drop out of school, achievement gaps are
too large, and overall achievement could be even higher. This vision for every
child a graduate guides our beliefs and approaches to education in Wisconsin.
Aligning for Student Success
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Guided by Principles
All educational initiatives are guided and impacted by important and often
unstated attitudes and principles for teaching and learning. The Guiding
Principles for Teaching and Learning emerge from research and provide the
touchstone for practices that truly affect the vision of every child a graduate
prepared for college and career. When made transparent, these principles inform
what happens in the classroom, the implementation and evaluation of programs,
and most importantly, remind us of our beliefs and expectations for students.
Ensuring a Process for Student Success
To ensure that every child in Wisconsin graduates prepared for college and
career, schools need to provide high quality instruction, balanced assessment,
and collaboration reflective of culturally responsive practices. The Wisconsin
Response to Intervention (RtI) framework helps to organize the components
of a system designed to support student learning. Below, the three essential
elements of high quality instruction, balanced assessment, and collaboration
interact with a multi-system of support to ensure each student receives what he
or she needs to access higher levels of academic and behavioral success.
At the school or district level, programs, initiatives, and practices related to
high quality instruction, balanced assessment, and collaboration can be more
powerful when organized or braided to function systemically to support all
students. The focus must be on a comprehensive approach to student learning.
Health education is a key component of a coordinated school health program.
Such programs include a healthy and safe school environment, health-related
instruction in a variety of courses, extracurricular student programs, pupil
services, health-related programs for families and staff, and strong connections
with families and the broader community.
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Guiding Principles for
Teaching and Learning
These guiding principles are the underpinnings of effective teaching and learning
for every Wisconsin teacher and every Wisconsin student. They are larger than
any one initiative, process, or set of standards. Rather, they are the lens we look
through as we identify teaching and learning standards, design assessments,
and determine what good instruction looks like. These principals recognize that
every student has the right to learn and are built upon three essential elements:
high quality instruction, balanced assessment, and collaboration. They are meant
to align with academic excellence, rigorous instruction, and college and career
readiness for every Wisconsin student.
Every student has the right to learn.
It is our collective responsibility as an education community to make certain
each child receives a high-quality, challenging education designed to maximize
potential; an education that reflects and stretches his or her abilities and interests.
This belief in the right of every child to learn forms the basis of equitable
teaching and learning. The five principles that follow cannot exist without this
commitment guiding our work.
Instruction must be rigorous and relevant.
To understand the world in which we live, there are certain things we all must
learn. Each school subject is made up of a core of essential knowledge that is
deep, rich, and vital. Every student, regardless of age or ability, must be taught
this essential knowledge. What students learn is fundamentally connected to
how they learn, and successful instruction blends the content of a discipline
with processes of an engaging learning environment that changes to meet the
dynamic needs of all students.
Purposeful assessment drives instruction and
affects learning.
Assessment is an integral part of teaching and learning. Purposeful assessment
practices help teachers and students understand where they have been, where
they are, and where they might go next. No one assessment can provide
sufficient information to plan teaching and learning. Using different types of
assessments as part of instruction results in useful information about student
understanding and progress. Educators should use this information to guide
their own practice and, in partnership with students and their families, to reflect
on learning and set future goals.
Guiding Principles for Teaching and Learning
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Learning is a collaborative responsibility.
Teaching and learning are both collaborative processes. Collaboration benefits
teaching and learning when it occurs on several levels: when students, teachers,
family members, and the community collectively prioritize education and
engage in activities that support local schools, educators, and students; when
educators collaborate with their colleagues to support innovative classroom
practices and set high expectations for themselves and their students; and when
students are given opportunities to work together toward academic goals in
ways that enhance learning.
Students bring strengths and experiences to learning.
Every student learns. Although no two students come to school with the same
culture, learning strengths, background knowledge, or experiences, and no two
students learn in exactly the same way, every student’s unique personal history
enriches classrooms, schools, and the community. This diversity is our greatest
education asset.
Responsive environments engage learners.
Meaningful learning happens in environments where creativity, awareness,
inquiry, and critical thinking are part of instruction. Responsive learning
environments adapt to the individual needs of each student and encourage
learning by promoting collaboration rather than isolation of learners. Learning
environments, whether classrooms, schools, or other systems, should be
structured to promote engaged teaching and learning.
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Reaching Every Discipline:
Wisconsin’s Approach to
Disciplinary Literacy
Background
In Wisconsin, we hold the vision that every child must graduate ready for postsecondary education and the workforce. To achieve this vision, students must
develop the skills to think, read, communicate, and perform in many academic
contexts. If students must develop these specific skills, every educator must
then consider how students learn to read, write, think, speak, and listen in their
discipline.
The kinds of reading, writing, thinking, speaking, and listening required in a
marketing course are quite different when compared with the same processes
applied in an agriculture, art, or history course. For example, a student may
have successfully learned the vocabulary and content needed to score an A
on a freshman biology test, but finds he still struggles to understand relevant
articles from Popular Science Magazine, or use his science vocabulary to post
respected responses on an environmental blog he reads at home. This student
knows biology content, but lacks the disciplinary literacy to think, read, write,
and speak with others in this field. Without this ability, his content knowledge is
limited only to the classroom, and cannot extend to the real world around him.
Teaching for disciplinary literacy ensures that students develop the skills to use
the deep content knowledge they learn in school in ways that are relevant to
each of them, and to the world around them. In 2009, the State Superintendent’s
Adolescent Literacy Plan offered recommendations for how to begin
professional conversations about disciplinary literacy in Wisconsin. The plan
recommended Wisconsin write standards for literacy that were specific to each
discipline, and emphasized the need to accompany these literacy standards with
discipline-specific professional learning.
Wisconsin’s Approach to Disciplinary Literacy
In 2010, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) responded to this
need for standards by publishing Common Core State Standards for Literacy
in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects in grades 6–12.
These standards were adopted by State Superintendent Tony Evers in June
2010. Wisconsin applauds this bold move to begin a national conversation on
disciplinary literacy, and recognizes the need to broaden this effort to include
all disciplines and every educator in every grade level.
The ability to read, write, think, speak, and listen in different ways and for
different purposes begins early and becomes increasingly important as students
pursue specialized fields of study in high school and beyond. These abilities
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are as important in mathematics, engineering, and art courses as they are in
science, social studies, and English. To further solidify Wisconsin’s expanded
approach to disciplinary literacy, a statewide leadership team comprised of
K–16 educators from diverse subject areas was convened.
A set of foundations was established and directs Wisconsin’s approach to
disciplinary literacy. This document begins the conversation about literacy in
all subjects. It will come to life when presented to teachers who will be able
to showcase their subjects’ connection to literacy in all subjects, bringing the
literacy standards to life for their community of learners.
Wisconsin Foundations for Disciplinary Literacy
To guide understanding and professional learning, a set of foundational
statements, developed in concert with Wisconsin’s Guiding Principles for
Teaching and Learning, directs Wisconsin’s approach to disciplinary literacy.
•Academic learning begins in early childhood and develops across all
disciplines.
•Content knowledge is strengthened when educators integrate disciplinespecific literacy into teaching and learning.
•The literacy skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical
thinking improve when content-rich learning experiences motivate and
engage students.
•Students demonstrate their content knowledge through reading, writing,
listening, and speaking as part of a content literate community.
Wisconsin’s Common Core Standards for Literacy in
All Subjects
With the Wisconsin Foundations for Disciplinary Literacy, Wisconsin expands
the Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies,
Science, and Technical Subjects, to include every educator in every discipline
and at every level. The Common Core State Standards for English Language
Arts include the Literacy Standards in History/Social Studies, Science, and
Technical Subjects as well as other relevant standards materials, resources, and
research that support discipline-specific conversations across all content areas
and grade levels.
The Common Core State Standards for Literacy in All Subjects is included
as part of every set of Wisconsin standards as each discipline is reviewed in
accordance with the process for Wisconsin standards revision http://www.dpi.
wi.gov/standards. This document includes relevant resources and research that
may be helpful in advancing school and district conversations, and can also
be downloaded at www.dpi.wi.gov/standards or purchased as a stand-alone
document through http://dpi.wi.gov/pubsales/index.html.
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Guide to the Wisconsin
Standards for Health
Education
The Wisconsin Standards for Health Education reflects and expands upon the
National Health Education Standards (NHES) (2007) and Wisconsin’s Model
Academic Standards for Health Education (1997). These standards have been
extensively used across the state and nation and served as models for schools
and institutions of higher education in Wisconsin. Wisconsin’s standards for
health education include the following components:
•Broad statements of essential skills, knowledge, behavior, and attitudes
for students PK–12. These are identified as Standards 1 through 8.
So many people spend
their health to gain
wealth and then have
to spend their wealth to
regain their health.
—A.J. Reb Materi
Our Family
•A narrative description of the standard as it applies to PK–12 students in
Wisconsin.
•Learning priorities for each standard by grade band describing the
specific aspects of the standard to be developed. These can be used to
guide curriculum development.
•Focus areas for each standard by grade band. These can be used to guide
classroom instruction.
•Examples of specific skills or knowledge for each focus area. Referred
to as a learning continuum, these can be used to guide assessment.
Taken together, these components provide consistent, developmental guidance
for curriculum, instruction, and assessment in PK–12 health education.
This standards document is organized as follows. This introductory section
provides an overview and offers guidance on using the standards, including
issues of identifying critical knowledge and skills. Section 1, beginning on
page 3, provides each standard, standard narrative, learning priorities, focus
areas, and learning continuum. Some professionals would use this for vertical
alignment of the curriculum. Section 2, beginning on page 21, provides each
standard, and for each grade band, the standard narrative, the learning priority,
focus areas, and learning continuum.
A glossary of terms follows on page 53. Appendices include a description of
how to connect literacy strategies to health education.
Guide to the Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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Coding System
When using this document in curriculum development, one can use a coding
system that specifies the standard, the learning priority, the focus area, and the
learning continuum strategies. The coding system is as follows:
•The first number represents the standard that is being addressed
(Standards 1–8).
•The second number refers to the grade band being addressed (1 for
grades PK–2; 2 for grades 3–5; 3 for grades 6–8; and 4 for grades 9–12).
•The letter refers to the focus area that is being addressed (A–B are used
in the document).
•The final number refers to the learning continuum example listed in the
document.
Example: 1:3:A3 The first number (1) refers to Standard 1, the second number
(3) refers to the 6–8 grade level, the letter (A) refers to the first focus area
under that grade level, and the second number (3) refers to the first learning
continuum item.
1:3:A3 Describe how family history can affect personal health.
Coding System
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Why Children Need
Health Education
Health education is an integral part of the total education of every child in
kindergarten through grade 12.
Quality health education programs are needed to increase student knowledge
on various age-appropriate contemporary health issues and to apply appropriate
skills to take action that promotes or restores health. Health education helps
youth become health literate people who are critical thinkers, creative problem
solvers, self-directed learners, effective communicators, and ultimately
responsible and productive citizens. Health education programs provide these
benefits only if they are carefully planned, implemented, and assessed for
outcomes. Quality health education contains the following:
Critical Health Information
Provides age-appropriate health information that effectively connects with the
skill standard to improve student health outcomes.
Personal Values that Support Healthy Behaviors
Provides strategies to help students explore personal, family, and community
values that might enhance health outcomes.
Norms on Health Issues
Health is a state of
complete harmony of
the body, mind, and
spirit. When one is
free from physical
problems and mental
distractions, the gates
of the soul open.
—B.K.S. Iyengar
Provides strategies for students to learn about their peers’ health-related
behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs, and how such factors may influence them.
Skill Development
Provides opportunities for students to learn, practice, and apply health
information and related skills to current, relevant health issues.
Health Behavior Practice
Provides strategies that help students to adopt and sustain behaviors that
promote, maintain, and restore health.
The result of effective health education is health literacy. Health literacy
has been defined as the capacity of an individual to “obtain, interpret, and
understand basic health information and services, and the competence to use
such information and services in ways which are health enhancing” (Joint
Why Children Need Health Education
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Committee on Health Education Terminology 2001). A 2004 report on health
literacy by the Institute of Medicine states that “the most effective means to
improve health literacy is to ensure that education about health is part of the
curriculum at all levels of education.”
In today’s rapidly changing world, health literacy is very important for personal
health and active citizenship. With emerging health issues and large amounts of
new information available annually, the ability to access accurate information,
think critically about health issues, and apply such information to important
health-related decisions has never been more important. These include personal
decisions and those affecting communities and nations.
Health education is a key component of a coordinated school health program.
Such programs include a healthy and safe school environment, health-related
instruction in a variety of courses, extracurricular student programs, pupil
services, health-related programs for families and staff, and strong connections
with families and the broader community.
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Wisconsin Standards
for Health Education:
Critical Questions
Defining The Standards
What are health education standards?
Standards specify what students should know and be able to do. Standards in
health education describe the essential skills and types of health information
that will contribute to a student’s ability to practice behaviors that protect and
promote health.
Why are health education standards necessary?
Standards serve as goals for health education instruction and learning. Setting
quality standards enables students, parents, educators, and citizens to know
what students should have learned at a given point in a student’s education. The
inclusion of standards has consequences similar to establishing goals in any
pursuit. With clear goals and outcomes, students and teachers will know exactly
what students should be achieving.
Health is like money,
we never have a true
idea of its value until
we lose it.
—Josh Billings
Our 21st century society is placing increased importance on standards-based
curriculum, instruction, and assessment in all content areas. Clear statements
about what students must know and be able to do are essential to ensure that
Wisconsin schools offer students the opportunities to acquire the knowledge and
skills necessary to develop, maintain, and enhance a healthy lifestyle. Standards
guide the development of assessments to permit students to demonstrate skill
and knowledge attainment.
Why are state-level academic standards for health education
important?
Public education is a state responsibility. The state superintendent and
legislature must ensure that all children have equal access to high quality health
instruction. At a minimum, this requires clear statements of what all children in
the state should know and be able to do.
Why does Wisconsin need its own standards for health
education?
The citizens of Wisconsin are very serious and thoughtful about education. They
expect and receive very high performance from their schools. While health
education needs may be similar among states, values differ. Health education
Critical Questions
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standards should reflect the collective values of the citizens and be tailored to
developing, maintaining, and enhancing a healthy lifestyle.
Developing The Academic Standards
How were Standards for Health Education developed?
A coalition of health education organizations and professionals wrote the first
National Health Education Standards in 1995 and a second edition in 2007.
Wisconsin’s Model Academic Standards for Health Education was published
in 1997. The ten-person standards writing team, chosen by the Department of
Public Instruction, began its deliberations in December 2010 with adoption of
the eight broad national standards.
Over the next five months, various components of the standards document were
designed to help schools address standards-based curriculum, instruction, and
assessment. The next step required electronic public review and comment over a
six-week period. Based on public comment, the final document was developed.
Who wrote the standards for health education and what
resources were used?
The health education subject area standards were drafted by a team of leading
teachers and professors, curriculum and instruction directors, and principals.
This work was done after reviewing national standards in the subject area
developed by the National Health Education Standards and Review Panel and
standards developed by other states.
How was the public involved in the standards development
process?
The Department of Public Instruction provided an opportunity for public review
of the health education standards document by putting the draft copy online for
public review and comment.
Using The Academic Standards
How will local districts use the standards for health education?
Adopting these standards is voluntary, not mandatory. Using the standards
can lead to developmentally appropriate, quality health education programs.
Districts may use this document as a guide for developing curriculum.
Implementation of the standards may require some school districts to change
their school and district health education curriculum. In some cases, this may
result in significant changes in instructional methods and materials, local
assessments that meet the needs of all learners, and professional development
opportunities for the teaching staff and appropriate administrators.
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What is the difference between academic standards and
curriculum?
Standards are statements about what students should know and be able to do,
what they may be asked to do to give evidence of learning, and how well they
should be expected to know or perform it. Curriculum is the program devised
by local school districts used to prepare students to meet the health education
standards. It consists of activities and lessons at each grade level, instructional
materials, and various instructional techniques. In short, standards define what
is to be learned at certain points in time and, from a broad perspective, what
performances will be accepted as evidence that the learning has occurred.
Curriculum specifies the details of the day-to-day schooling at the local level.
Who should use these standards?
The standards provide a road map to lifetime skills. Programs based on
these standards provide numerous opportunities for real, performance-based
assessments for grading and program evaluation. Teacher preparation programs
may use these in educating prospective teachers regarding common educational
goals and focus areas in high quality health education programs. The standards
will assist prospective teachers in learning about curriculum, instruction, and
evaluation. Community agencies and organizations may use this document in
designing health education programs for their school-age populations.
How do educators determine essential concepts and knowledge
for the health education curriculum?
As in many other subject areas, educators use standards, locally developed
curricula, and professional judgment to determine which concepts and
knowledge are essential for students to learn. In building health education
units of instruction and lessons, educators should identify the essential health
concepts and knowledge needed to make health-enhancing decisions and
practice health-enhancing behaviors. This is important because there are many,
many health concepts that could be learned. If much of the limited time in
health education is spent on learning health concepts, little will be available
to learn skills that are also essential for health-related decisions and behaviors.
The facts related to many health concepts are evolving with new research. Now
more than ever, young people need skills to think critically, access valid health
information to prepare them to learn, and apply health information that will be
available only in the future.
The appearance of
a disease is swift
as an arrow; its
disappearance slow…
—Chinese Proverb
When determining which health concepts are essential, educators can consider
the following:
•Which health decisions and behaviors are important for the desired
health outcome(s)?
•What health concepts are required to make these health-related decisions
and to practice healthy behaviors?
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•What depth of understanding of those concepts is required for such
health-related decisions and behaviors?
•Which concepts are not essential for health decisions and behaviors?
Can these be omitted from the curriculum without sacrificing the
necessary depth of understanding or opportunities for skill development?
•How can the essential concepts be taught in lessons and strategies that
also enhance critical health-related skills?
The following is a sample process educators could use to determine essential
health concepts for a unit of instruction.
1. Determine the long-term health behavior outcome that a unit is designed
to support. Examples include decreasing youth obesity rates, youth
tobacco use, or sexually transmitted infection rates.
2. Referencing Wisconsin Standards for Health Education, determine
the skill-based learning outcomes for the unit. Select one or more
skills that are aligned with the health outcome. Examples include:
demonstrating how to access accurate health information regarding
food choices and beneficial activity levels; analyzing external and
internal factors that can influence a student’s behavior related to tobacco
use; and communicating boundaries and limits with your partner in a
relationship.
3. Based on these skills, determine the essential concepts needed to
effectively learn, practice, and apply the skills in appropriate life
situations. Critical content can be determined through data collection,
health issues that are covered in the media, or research articles. It
also can be determined by community interest in a topic or state
statute. Critical health concepts which may be determined from within
the following content areas include those related to alcohol/drugs,
consumer health, environmental health, healthy eating, physical activity,
interpersonal violence, personal health, mental health, safety, and other
health issues.
Another way to determine essential concepts is to choose an appropriate
performance assessment to assess one or more of the learning outcomes. Based
on the skills and levels of competency to be demonstrated, identify the health
concepts that are essential for a high quality response to the performance task.
Reviewing health-related data may also help educators determine which
concepts are essential, based on local health needs. Examples of such healthrelated data include results of: the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, state or local;
the state Youth Tobacco Survey; and needs assessments by health departments
or other community organizations.
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How do educators assure that all skills identified in the
standards are adequately addressed in health instruction?
Seven of the eight health education standards describe skills. Educators need
to determine how all skills will be addressed across the curriculum and which
skills are appropriate for each major health topic. These topics generally include
nutrition; physical activity; intentional and unintentional injury; family life and
sexuality; mental health; personal health; consumer health; community and
environmental health; and alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Effective educators
use the skill-based standards and other information to set intended learning
outcomes. It is more effective to spend more time teaching fewer skills than to
teach each skill for each content area. Another factor that affects determination
of learning outcomes is that some skills are more complex than others.
Educators can select a broad set of skills across the curriculum and a small
number of skills for each unit. Many educators consider a progression of skills,
where some skills form the basis for developing others. For example, accessing
accurate health information and analyzing influences may serve as base skills,
upon which decision making and goal setting can be developed. Interpersonal
communication, self-management, and advocacy may require acquisition
of the previous, lower level skills for effective development. School districts
are also encouraged to identify how instruction in these skills is coordinated
and reinforced across years and courses, including health education, physical
education, family and consumer sciences, and other health-related instruction.
Following identification of skills to be addressed, skill-building activities can
be selected and ordered for each unit. Having determined essential concepts and
key skills, educators can develop or select learning activities for the following
elements of effective, skill-building units of instruction.
1. Engage students in learning. Establish the relevance of the topic, and
assess students’ prior knowledge and, if appropriate, skills.
2. Introduce or review the key skill(s). Review the units’ assessments to
be sure that appropriate skills are included in unit lessons.
3. Provide ample opportunities for skill practice. Practice of skills may be
intertwined, as the skills are often related in life. For example, decision
making may lead to needs for communication and advocacy.
4. Actively engage parents or guardians. Include at least one activity
that involves student communication with parents, guardians, or other
trusted adults.
5. Assess student skills. Provide one or more opportunities for students
to demonstrate skill attainment, and appropriately use accurate health
concepts.
For more information and resources on using Wisconsin Standards for Health
Education to build units of instruction and appropriate assessments, please refer
to: http://dpi.wi.gov/sspw/healtheducation.html.
Critical Questions
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Applying the Academic Standards across the Curriculum
Cross-curricular connections make learning relevant and meaningful to students.
Health education is a critical element in the development of these connections.
One of the appendix items provides the Common Core State Standards for
English Language Arts. Another provides information and a well-developed
example for connecting health education to literacy development. Literacy is a
part of every aspect of life. Research is linking consistent learning experiences
to improved literacy. The National Literacy Strategy seeks to raise awareness
of the contribution health education can make to literacy through the teaching
of real-life issues in which students will be naturally engaged by increasing
reading experiences, enhancing speaking strategies, and adapting meaningful
writing prompts.
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Section I
Vertical Alignment of the
Standards-Based Learning Continuum
I
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
Grades PK–12
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Standard 1: Students will comprehend concepts
related to health promotion and disease prevention to enhance health.
Everyone who is born
holds dual citizenship,
in the kingdom of
the well and in the
kingdom of the sick.
Rationale
The acquisition of basic health concepts and functional health knowledge
provides a foundation for promoting health-enhancing behaviors among youth.
This standard includes essential concepts that are based on established health
behavior theories and models. Concepts that focus on both health promotion
and risk reduction are included in the learning continuum.
—Susan Sontag
Illness as
Metaphor, 1977
1. Grades PK–2
Learning Priority: Develop age-appropriate cognitive
understanding of health promotion concepts to improve
health behaviors.
A. Describe healthy behaviors.
1:1:A1 Describe ways to prevent common childhood accidents
and injuries.
1:1:A2 Describe healthy behaviors that impact personal health.
1:1:A3 List ways to prevent communicable disease.
B. Apply knowledge of healthy behaviors.
1:1:B1
Describe why it is important to seek health care.
1:1:B2
Describe why it is important to participate in healthy behaviors.
1:1:B3
Use multiple dimensions of health (e.g., physical, social,
environmental, and emotional) in everyday life.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Develop age-appropriate cognitive
understanding of health promotion concepts to improve health
behaviors and prevent disease.
A.Describe basic concepts related to health promotion and disease
prevention.
1:2:A1 Describe ways to prevent common childhood accidents, injuries,
and communicable and chronic diseases. These may include but
are not limited to: refraining from alcohol, tobacco, and other
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drug use; engaging in physical activity; demonstrating healthy
eating; applying social behaviors to prevent or reduce violence;
safety and related behaviors.
1:2:A2 Describe the relationships among the environment, healthy
behaviors, and personal health.
1:2:A3 Explain ways to prevent the spread of communicable diseases.
B. Apply health knowledge to health-related situations.
1:2:B1
Describe when it is important to seek health care.
1:2:B2
Describe personal and environmental barriers to practicing
healthy behaviors.
1:2:B3
Compare various dimensions of health (e.g., emotional, mental,
physical, social, environmental, and occupational).
3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Comprehend and apply concepts related to
health promotion and disease prevention.
A. Identify the components of health promotion and disease
prevention.
1:3:A1 Describe specific behaviors that can reduce or prevent injuries
and communicable or chronic diseases. These may include but are
not limited to: refraining from alcohol, tobacco, and other drug
use; engaging in physical activity; demonstrating healthy eating;
sexual behaviors; applying social behaviors to prevent or reduce
violence; safety and related behaviors.
1:3:A2 Describe the negative consequences of engaging in unhealthy
behaviors.
1:3:A3 Describe how family history can affect personal health.
1:3:A4 Describe how physical and social environments can affect
personal health.
B. Analyze the benefits of and barriers to practicing healthy
behaviors.
1:3:B1
Analyze the relationships between healthy behaviors and personal
health.
1:3:B2 Examine healthy behaviors and consequences related to a health
issue.
1:3:B3
Predict the outcomes of a variety of unhealthy behaviors.
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4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Examine and apply health concepts related to
health promotion and disease prevention.
A. Analyze the impact of determinants of health.
1:4:A1 Analyze how genetics and family history can affect personal
health.
1:4:A2 Examine the interrelationships of various dimensions of health
(e.g., emotional, mental, physical, social, environmental, and occupational).
1:4:A3 Analyze the impact of unhealthy behavior on various dimensions
of health (e.g., emotional, mental, physical, social, environmental,
and occupational).
1:4:A4 Predict how personal behaviors and access to appropriate health
care can affect health.
1:4:A5 Analyze how environment and personal health are interrelated.
B. Explore factors that impact health status.
1:4:B1
Investigate the relationship between access to health care and
health status.
1:4:B2 Compare the benefits of and barriers to practicing a variety
of health behaviors. These may include but are not limited to:
refraining from alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use; physical
activity; healthy eating; social behaviors to prevent or reduce
violence; safety and related behaviors.
1:4:B3
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Examine susceptibility to and severity of injury and illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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Standard 2: Students will analyze the influence of
family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other
factors on health behaviors.
Rationale
Health is affected by a variety of positive and negative influences within society.
This standard focuses on identifying and understanding the diverse internal and
external factors that influence health practices and behaviors among youth,
including personal values, beliefs, and perceived norms.
1. GRADES PK–2
The mind has great
influence over the
body, and maladies
often have their origin
there.
—Moliere
Learning Priority: Know what an influence is and how it could
affect behaviors.
A. List influences on health behaviors.
2:1:A1 Identify internal and external factors that may influence health
behaviors.
B. Analyze various influences on health behaviors.
2:1:B1
Discuss how family, emotions, peers, and media can influence
health behaviors.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Identify how influences can impact health
behaviors.
A. Identify influences.
2:2:A1 Describe external factors, including family, peers, culture, media,
technology, school environments, physical environments, and
health care, which can influence health behaviors.
2:2:A2 Give examples of messages from external factors that can
influence health behaviors.
2:2:A3 Describe internal factors, such as personal values, beliefs, and
emotions, which can influence health behaviors.
B. Explore possible impacts of influences.
2:2:B1
Describe how internal and external factors interact to influence
health behaviors.
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3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Examine how internal and external factors
influence personal health behaviors.
A. Examine impact of influences.
2:3:A1 Examine how external and internal factors can influence health
behaviors.
2:3:A2 Provide examples of how factors can interact to influence health
behaviors.
2:3:A3 Examine how one’s family, culture, and peers influence one’s
own personal health behaviors.
2:3:A4 Examine how media and technology influence one’s own
personal health behaviors.
2:3:A5 Examine how one’s values and beliefs influence one’s own
personal health behaviors.
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Evaluate how influences impact health
behaviors.
A. Analyze the impact of external and internal influences on the
health behavior of individuals and populations.
2:4:A1 Analyze how external influences, individually and in combination
with others, can influence individuals’ health behaviors and that
of certain populations.
2:4:A2 Analyze how internal influences, including perception of social
norms among peers, can influence individuals’ health behaviors
and that of certain populations.
2:4:A3 Examine how social policies can influence health behaviors.
2:4:A4 Estimate the impact of internal and external influences on one’s
own personal health behavior.
2:4:A5 Predict how various external and internal influences will interact
and impact the health behavior of populations.
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Standard 3: Students will demonstrate the ability to
access valid information and products and services to
enhance health.
Rationale
Access to valid health information and health-promoting products and services
is critical to prevention, early detection, and treatment of health problems.
This standard focuses on how to identify and access valid health information
resources and how to reject unproven sources. Application of the skills of
analysis, comparison, and evaluation of health resources empowers students to
achieve health literacy.
1. GRADES PK–2
It is a lot harder to
keep people well than it
is to just get them over
sickness.
—DeForest
Clinton Jarvis
Learning Priority: Identify individuals who provide valid health
information to enhance health behaviors.
A. Identify where to get help to promote health.
3:1:A1 Identify trusted adults and professionals who can help promote
health.
3:1:A2 Describe ways to locate school and community health
individuals.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Identify valid sources of health information.
A. List sources of valid health information.
3:2:A1 Identify characteristics of valid health information, products, and
services.
3:2:A2 Discuss ways to locate valid health information.
B. Identify valid health information to promote health.
3:2:B1
Identify valid sources of health information.
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3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Demonstrate and apply strategies to access
valid sources of health information.
Doctors are always
working to preserve
our health and cooks to
destroy it, but the latter
are the more often
successful.
—Denis Diderot
A. Identify criteria for choosing accurate sources of information.
3:3:A1 Describe situations that require accurate health information.
3:3:A2 Locate sources of valid health information from home, school,
and community.
3:3:A3 Describe criteria for evaluating resources.
B. Apply models to analyze sources of information for validity and
reliability.
3:3:B1
Analyze the validity of information about health issues, products,
and services.
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Examine strategies to access valid and
reliable sources of health information.
A. Continue to apply criteria for choosing accurate sources of
information.
3:4:A1 Determine the availability of information, products, and services
that enhance health.
3:4:A2 Access health information, products, and services that improve
health outcomes.
3:4:A3 Determine when professional health services may be needed and
how to access them.
B. Analyze sources of information for validity and reliability.
3:4:B1
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Evaluate the validity of sources of health information using key criteria.
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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Standard 4: Students will demonstrate the ability to use
interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and
avoid or reduce health risks.
Rationale
Effective communication enhances personal, family, and community health.
This standard focuses on how responsible individuals use verbal and nonverbal
skills to develop and maintain healthy personal relationships. The ability to
organize and convey information and feelings is the basis for strengthening
interpersonal interactions and reducing or avoiding conflict.
1. GRADES PK–2
Learning Priority: Identify and apply effective interpersonal
communication skills.
A. Identify communication skills that can improve health and
reduce health risks.
Health and
cheerfulness naturally
beget each other.
—Joseph Addison
4:1:A1 Identify ways to communicate.
4.1:A2
Identify ways to express needs, wants, and feelings.
B. Apply communication skills that can improve health and reduce
health risks.
4:1:B1
Describe ways to respond when in an unwanted, threatening, or
dangerous situation.
4:1:B2
Use refusal skills including firmly saying no and getting away
from the situation.
4:1:B3
Explain how to communicate to a trusted adult if threatened or
harmed.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Demonstrate interpersonal communication
skills.
A. Demonstrate communication skills that can improve health.
4:2:A1 Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills
to enhance health.
4:2:A2 Describe how to ask for assistance.
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B. Demonstrate communication skills that prevent, resolve, or
reduce health risks.
4:2:B1
Demonstrate ways to prevent health risks and conflict through
communications.
4:2:B2
Identify refusal skills that avoid or reduce health risks.
4:2:B3
Discuss nonviolent strategies to reduce, manage, or resolve conflict.
3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Examine and demonstrate communication
skills that enhance health and avoid health risks.
A. Examine communication strategies in various health-related
settings.
4:3:A1 Examine appropriate communication strategies.
4:3:A2 Examine the outcomes of using effective and ineffective
strategies of communication.
B. Apply appropriate communication skills in various healthrelated settings.
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4:3:B1
Demonstrate refusal and limit setting skills that avoid health
risks.
4:3:B2
Demonstrate effective conflict resolution skills.
4:3:B3
Demonstrate ways, such as restorative justice practices, to manage or resolve interpersonal conflicts without harming self or others.
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Analyze various communication skills that
enhance health and avoid health risks.
A. Continue to analyze communication skills in various healthrelated settings.
4:4:A1 Analyze communication strategies for effective interaction among
family, peers, and others to enhance health.
4:4:A2 Reflect on the impact of communication on enhancing health.
4:4:A3 Demonstrate how to ask for and offer assistance to enhance the
health of self and others.
A bad cold wouldn’t
be so annoying if it
weren’t for the advice
of our friends.
—Kin Hubbard
B. Demonstrate communication skills in health-related situations.
4:4:B1
Demonstrate refusal, negotiation, and collaboration skills to
enhance health and avoid or reduce health risks.
4:4:B2
Demonstrate strategies to prevent interpersonal conflicts.
4:4:B3
Demonstrate ways, such as restorative justice practices, to manage or resolve interpersonal conflicts without harming self or others.
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Standard 5: Students will demonstrate the ability to
use decision-making skills to enhance health.
Rationale
Decision-making skills are needed to identify, implement, and sustain healthenhancing behaviors. This standard includes the essential steps that are needed
to make healthy decisions. When applied to health issues, the decision-making
process enables individuals to collaborate with others to improve their quality
of life.
It’s bizarre that the
produce manager is
more important to my
children’s health than
the pediatrician.
—Meryl Streep
1. GRADES PK–2
Learning Priority: Identify when a decision-making process is
needed to choose a healthy option.
A. List health situations where a decision-making process could be
used.
5:1:A1 Identify steps in the decision-making process.
5:1:A2 Provide an example of a situation when a health-related decision
is needed to keep one safe.
5:1:A3 Create a decision-making plan with family members or trusted
adult.
B. Apply a decision-making process to various situations to
enhance health.
5:1:B1 Provide an example of when a health-related decision can be
made individually.
5:1:B2
Provide an example of when assistance is needed to make a
health-related decision.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Apply a decision-making process to evaluate
health options.
A. Continue to identify health-related situations that require a
decision.
5:2:A1 Identify situations that require a thoughtful decision.
5:2:A2 List healthy options to health-related issues or problems.
5:2:A3 Choose the healthiest option when making a decision.
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B. Examine and apply how a decision-making process can enhance
health.
5:2:B1
Determine when assistance is needed in making a health-related
decision.
5:2:B2
Examine the potential outcomes of each option when making a
health-related decision.
3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Apply a decision-making process in various
health-related situations.
A. Identify situations where effective decision-making skills are
implemented.
5:3:A1 Determine when individual or collaborative decision making is
appropriate.
Sometimes I get
the feeling the
aspirin companies
are sponsoring my
headaches.
—Terri Guillemets
B. Assess the impact of a decision-making process on healthrelated situations.
5:3:B1
Demonstrate decision making in a health-related situation.
5:3:B2
Predict the impact of each decision on self and others.
5:3:B3
Analyze the outcome of a health-related decision.
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Examine the use of a decision-making process
in various health-related situations.
A. Evaluate the impact of a decision-making process on healthrelated situations.
5:4:A1 Identify situations in which using a thoughtful decision-making
process would be health-enhancing.
5:4:A2 Justify when individual or collaborative decision making is
appropriate.
B. Apply effective decision-making skills to enhance health.
5:4:B1 Demonstrate effective decision-making processes related to
various complex and relevant health-related situations. These may
include but are not limited to: decisions about personal behaviors,
decisions related to social behaviors, and use of the health care
system.
5:4:B2
Generate alternatives for health-related issues or problems.
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5:4:B3
Examine barriers that can hinder healthy decision making.
5:4:B4
Predict the potential short-term and long-term impacts of each
alternative on self and others.
5:4:B5
Defend the healthy choice when making decisions.
5:4:B6
Evaluate the effectiveness of a health-related decision.
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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Standard 6: Students will demonstrate the ability to use
goal-setting skills to enhance health.
Rationale
Goal-setting skills are essential to help students identify, adopt, and maintain
health behaviors. This standard includes the critical steps that are needed to
achieve both short-term and long-term health goals. These skills make it
possible for individuals to have aspirations and plans for the future.
1. GRADES PK–2
Learning Priority: Know the parts of a personal health goal.
A. List personal health goals.
The part can never be
well unless the whole
is well.
—Plato
6:1:A1 Identify a personal health goal.
6:1:A2 Identify steps to achieve a goal.
6:1:A3 Discuss a health goal with a family member or trusted adult.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Apply goal-setting skills to improve health.
A. Identify ways to achieve a personal health goal.
6:2:A1 Identify resources to assist in achieving a personal health goal.
6:2:A2 Identify key family, school, and community members that can
assist in achieving a personal health goal.
B. Practice appropriate goal-setting skills to achieve a personal
health goal.
6:2:B1
Choose a clear and realistic personal health goal.
6:2:B2
Develop a plan for reaching the goal.
6:2:B3
Track progress toward goal achievement.
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3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Apply goal-setting skills to health situations.
A. Identify additional steps to setting and achieving realistic
health goals.
6:3:A1 Establish a baseline of personal health behaviors and health status.
6:3:A2 Identify strategies and behaviors needed to maintain or improve
health status.
6:3:A3 Identify strategies that might be utilized to overcome barriers or
setbacks.
B. Apply goal-setting skills to various health-related situations.
6:3:B1
Examine how personal health goals can be impacted by various
abilities, priorities, and responsibilities that may change
throughout the lifespan.
6:3:B2
Develop goals to maintain or improve personal health status.
6:3:B3
Assess the effectiveness of strategies to reach personal health
goals.
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Apply goal-setting skills.
A. Analyze issues that impact setting a goal.
6:4:A1 Assess personal health practices and their impact on overall
health status.
6:4:A2 Evaluate potential barriers or setbacks that may impede one’s
ability to reach his/her health goal.
6:4:A3 Identify strategies that might be utilized to overcome barriers or
setbacks.
B. Apply goal-setting skills to various health-related situations.
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6:4:B1
Formulate an effective long-term personal health goal.
6:4:B2
Develop a plan to reach a personal health goal that addresses
strengths, needs, and risks.
6:4:B3
Implement a plan and monitor progress in achieving a personal
health goal.
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Standard 7: Students will demonstrate the ability to
use health-enhancing behaviors and avoid or reduce
health risks.
Rationale
Research confirms that the practice of health-enhancing behaviors can
contribute to a positive quality of life. In addition, many diseases and injuries
can be prevented by reducing harmful and risk-taking behaviors. This standard
promotes the acceptance of personal responsibility for health and encourages
the practice of health behaviors.
Health is a relationship
between you and your
body.
—Terri Guillemets
1. GRADES PK–2
Learning Priority: Demonstrate health-enhancing behaviors.
A. Demonstrate health-enhancing behaviors.
7:1:A1 Demonstrate health-enhancing practices and behaviors. These
may include but are not limited to: proper hygiene, physical
activity, and healthy eating.
7:1:A2 Demonstrate behaviors that avoid or reduce health risk. These
may include but are not limited to: looking both ways before
crossing the street, wearing a seat belt, wearing a bike helmet,
and removing oneself from threatening situations.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Demonstrate a variety of health-enhancing
behaviors.
A. Identify health-enhancing behaviors.
7:2:A1 Identify responsible personal health behaviors. These may include
but are not limited to: proper hygiene, physical activity, healthy
eating, and safety-related behaviors.
B. Demonstrate health-enhancing behaviors.
7:2:B1
Demonstrate behaviors that will maintain or improve personal
health. These may include but are not limited to: engaging in
regular, age-appropriate physical activity; making complex food
choices that constitute healthy eating; and following medical
instructions during illness.
Vertical Alignment of the Standards–Based Learning Continuum
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7:2:B2
Demonstrate behaviors that avoid or reduce health risks. These
may include but are not limited to: looking both ways before
crossing the street; wearing a seat belt; wearing a bike helmet;
and refraining from alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.
3. GRADES 6–8
When it comes to
eating right and
exercising, there is no
“I’ll start tomorrow.”
Tomorrow is disease.
—Terri Guillemets
Learning Priority: Apply health-enhancing behaviors that
maintain or improve the health of self and others.
A. Explain the importance of self-responsibility for personal
health behaviors.
7:3:A1 Evaluate behaviors that maintain or improve the health of self and
others. These may include but are not limited to: refraining from
risky sexual behaviors; refraining from alcohol, tobacco, and
other drug use; engaging in regular and varied physical activity;
meal planning that leads to healthy eating; applying social
behaviors to prevent or reduce violence; practicing safety-related
behaviors in various complex settings; and appropriate use of the
health care system.
B. Demonstrate the role of self-responsibility in enhancing health.
7:3:B1
Demonstrate health-enhancing practices and behaviors that help
maintain or improve the health of self and others.
7:3:B2
Demonstrate behaviors that avoid or reduce health risks to self
and others.
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Demonstrate age-appropriate, healthenhancing behaviors to reduce health risks.
A. Examine health-enhancing behaviors.
7:4:A1 Determine behaviors that will protect and promote health in
high risk situations. These may include but are not limited to:
refraining from risky sexual behaviors; refraining from alcohol,
tobacco, and other drug use; engaging in various forms of
physical activity appropriate to current and future life stages;
making complex food choices in various food environments to
support healthy eating; applying social behaviors to prevent or
reduce violence in settings relevant to one’s culture; practicing
safety-related behaviors in high risk situations; and appropriately
accessing health care services for routine preventive care and for
illnesses and injuries.
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7:4:A2 Analyze the roles of individual responsibility and the health care
system in enhancing health.
B. Demonstrate a variety of health-enhancing behaviors.
7:4:B1
Demonstrate a variety of health practices and behaviors that will
maintain or improve the health of self and others. These include,
but are not limited to: personal behaviors such as regular and
health-enhancing physical activity, healthy eating, and accessing
appropriate preventive health care services.
7:4:B2
Demonstrate a variety of behaviors that avoid or reduce health
risks to self and others. These include, but are not limited to:
various complex safety-related behaviors, appropriately accessing
mental and physical health care services, and carefully following
medical advice and instructions.
Vertical Alignment of the Standards–Based Learning Continuum
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Standard 8: Students will demonstrate the ability to
advocate for personal, family, and community health.
Rationale
Water, air, and
cleanliness are the
chief articles in my
pharmacopoeia.
—Napoleon
Advocacy skills help students promote healthy norms and healthy behaviors.
This standard helps students develop important skills to target their healthenhancing messages and to encourage others to adopt healthy behaviors.
1. GRADES PK–2
Learning Priority: Recognize the differences between health
needs and personal wants.
A. Identify ways to express health needs and personal wants.
8:1:A1 Define health needs and personal wants.
8:1:A2 Express health needs and personal wants with family members or
trusted adults.
B. Develop strategies to communicate personal differences
between health needs and personal wants that affect health.
8:1:B1
Communicate knowledge of healthy and unhealthy behaviors to
family members, trusted adults, or friends.
8:1:B2
Identify role models for healthy habits.
8:1:B3
Encourage friends and classmates to make healthy choices.
2. GRADES 3–5
Learning Priority: Describe advocacy and health-related
situations for which it is appropriate.
A. Define advocacy.
8:2:A1 State opinions about health issues.
8:2:A2 Discuss factual information about health issues with family
members or trusted adults.
8:2:A3 Define advocacy.
B. Describe situations where advocacy is appropriate.
8:2:B1
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Discuss situations where advocacy may be used.
Wisconsin Standards for Health Education
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8:2:B2
List types of situations in which one could model health-
enhancing behaviors.
8:2:B3
Encourage family members to engage in health-enhancing
behaviors through actions or suggestions.
3. GRADES 6–8
Learning Priority: Develop health-promoting strategies that
support family or friends to make positive health choices.
A. Develop an advocacy plan to promote health.
8:3:A1 Develop an age-appropriate definition of advocacy.
8:3:A2 Plan ways to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and
schools.
8:3:A3 Incorporate accurate information as it relates to a health-
enhancing position to advocate for self and others.
8:3:A4 Discuss the barriers that could be involved in an advocacy effort.
B. Implement an advocacy plan pertaining to a health issue.
8:3:B1
Predict how an advocacy plan will influence and support the
health status of others.
8:3:B2
Apply a plan to advocate for a health issue for people that
experience health disparities.
8:3:B3
Defend a position relating to a health issue.
8:3:B4
Describe ways to adapt health messages for different audiences.
Happiness lies, first of
all, in health.
—George William Curtis,
Lotus-Eating
4. GRADES 9–12
Learning Priority: Apply skills to advocate for a health issue.
A. Develop strategies to advocate for a health issue.
8:4:A1 Apply societal norms to formulate a health-enhancing message.
8:4:A2 Adapt health-enhancing messages and persuasive communication
techniques to a specific target audience.
8:4:A3 Apply accurate information to support a health-enhancing
message.
8:4:A4 Develop strategies to overcome barriers or resistance to desired
health action or behavior.
Vertical Alignment of the Standards–Based Learning Continuum
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B. Implement an advocacy plan pertaining to a health issue.
8:4:B1
Develop a plan to advocate for a personal, family, or community
health issue.
8:4:B2
Implement an advocacy plan for a health issue.
8:4:B3
Demonstrate conviction in encouraging others to make positive
health choices.
He who has health has
hope; and he who has
hope has everything.
—Arabic Proverb
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