Emerson | 755A | Specifications | Emerson 755A Specifications

Emerson 755A Specifications
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
AC Power
For Business-Critical Continuity™
Liebert® Series 610™ UPS
Operation & Maintenance Manual - 100-1000kVA, 60Hz, Three Phase Multi-Module
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
BATTERY CABINET PRECAUTIONS
The following warning applies to all battery cabinets supplied with UPS systems. Additional warnings and cautions applicable to battery cabinets may be found in Important Safety Instructions
and 4.4 - Battery Maintenance.
!
WARNING
Internal battery strapping must be verified by manufacturer prior to moving a battery cabinet
(after initial installation).
• Battery cabinets contain non-spillable batteries.
• Keep units upright.
• Do not stack.
• Do not tilt.
Failure to heed this warning could result in smoke, fire or electric hazard.
Call 1-800-LIEBERT prior to moving battery cabinets (after initial installation).
CONTACTING LIEBERT FOR SUPPORT
To contact Liebert Global Services for information or repair service in the United States, call
1-800-LIEBERT (1-800-543-2378). Liebert Global Services offers a complete range of start-up
services, repair services, preventive maintenance plans and service contracts.
For repair or maintenance service outside the 48 contiguous United States, contact Liebert Global
Services, if available in your area. For areas not covered by Liebert Global Services, the authorized
distributor is responsible for providing qualified, factory-authorized service.
For LGS to assist you promptly, please have the following information available:
Part numbers: _________________________________________________________________
Serial numbers:________________________________________________________________
kVA Rating: ___________________________________________________________________
Date purchased: _______________________________________________________________
Date installed:_________________________________________________________________
Location: ______________________________________________________________________
Input voltage/frequency: ________________________________________________________
Output voltage/frequency: ______________________________________________________
Battery reserve time:___________________________________________________________
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BATTERY CABINET PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSIDE FRONT COVER
CONTACTING LIEBERT FOR SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INSIDE FRONT COVER
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
System Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reliability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modes of Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
4
5
5
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.4.3
1.4.4
1.4.5
1.4.6
1.4.7
1.4.8
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
Normal—Load on UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Power Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redundant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bypass—Internal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Bypass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off-Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5
1.6
Operator Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.0
THEORY OF OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1
General Component Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.2
System Control Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
UPS Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Battery Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Detailed Component Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
2.2.4
2.2.5
2.2.6
Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rectifier/Charger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Charging Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Static Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redundant Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
13
14
15
16
19
3.0
OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
3.1
3.2
Display Screen and Operator Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Menu Tree Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
3.2.6
3.2.7
3.2.8
3.2.9
3.2.10
3.2.11
3.2.12
3.2.13
3.2.14
3.2.15
Master Menu Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCC Monitor/Mimic Display Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Monitor/Mimic Display Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Walk-In Display Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Reports Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Configuration Screens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm Limit Settings Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Load Transfer Procedures Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start-Up Procedures Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shutdown Procedures Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Time Screen (Module Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meter Calibration Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Equalize Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm and Status Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i
26
28
30
37
38
44
52
54
55
56
58
61
62
63
70
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PRODUCT
3.3
Modes of Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
3.3.5
3.3.6
3.3.7
3.3.8
3.3.9
3.3.10
3.4
4.1
4.2
4.3
84
88
91
92
93
Overloads (Without Transfer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Transfers to Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Retransfers to UPS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Module Off-Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Emergency Modules Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
96
97
97
97
MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Liebert Global Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.4
SCC Start-Up Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Module Start-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Load Transfer Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Bypass Load Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shutdown Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
3.5.1
3.5.2
3.5.3
3.5.4
3.5.5
4.0
74
74
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
82
Manual Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.5
3.5
Load on Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OK to Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Momentary Overloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Power Failure—Load on Battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One Module Off-Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Modules Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Emergency Power Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Bypass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Record Log. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Air Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Limited Life Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Battery Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
4.4.1
4.4.2
Battery Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Torque Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
Detection of Trouble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reporting a Problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corrective Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommended Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upstream Feeder Circuit Breaker Setting Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.0
SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
Rating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ii
106
107
107
107
107
108
109
110
110
111
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
FIGURES
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
Figure 27
Figure 28
Figure 29
Figure 30
Figure 31
Figure 32
Figure 33
Figure 34
Figure 35
Figure 36
Figure 37
Figure 38
Figure 39
Figure 40
Figure 41
Figure 42
Figure 43
Figure 44
Figure 45
Figure 46
Figure 47
Figure 48
Figure 49
Multi-Module UPS, 100-500kVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Multi-Module UPS, 500-750kVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
System Control Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
SCC controls and display screen with example of the Monitor/Mimic screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Module controls and display screen with example of the Monitor/Mimic screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
UPS module block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
System Control Cabinet block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Typical operator controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Operator controls, typical SCCT System Control Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Switches behind SCC control panel door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Menu tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
SCC and module master menu screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
SCC Monitor/Mimic display screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Module Monitor/Mimic display screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Monitor/Mimic display example: Normal power flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Monitor/Mimic display example: Utility fail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Monitor/Mimic display example: Load on bypass, UPS modules on and charging battery . . . . . 34
Monitor/Mimic display example: Load on UPS, one UPS module off line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Monitor/Mimic Display example: Load on bypass, all UPS modules off line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Walk-in display screen during start-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Status reports screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Present status report screens, SCC (above) and module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Event history report screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
History status report screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Battery cycle monitor screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Battery cycle monitoring summary screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Typical data on discharge cycles of 91 to 240 seconds duration during the recording period . . . 43
SCC system configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Date screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Time screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Auto dial setting screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Modem baud rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Maximum auto-retransfer attempts screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
SCC system options screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
MMU system options screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Battery test screen—MMU only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Battery test results screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Monitor/Mimic display example: Continuous Duty Static Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Module alarm limit settings screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Load transfer procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
SCC start- up procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Module start- up procedures screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
SCC shutdown procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Module shutdown procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Battery time screen (15 minute discharge) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Battery time screen (45-minute discharge) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Accuracy range of values for calculated battery times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Meter calibration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
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Figure 50
Figure 51
Figure 52
Figure 53
Figure 54
Figure 55
Figure 56
Figure 57
Figure 58
Figure 59
Figure 60
Figure 61
Figure 62
Figure 63
Figure 64
Figure 65
Figure 66
Figure 67
Figure 68
Figure 69
Figure 70
Battery equalize screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
SCC status and alarm message areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Load on bypass, UPS not available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Load on bypass, UPS available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Load on UPS, bypass available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Momentary overload, pulsed static bypass switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Input power fail—load on battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
One module off-line, load on UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Load on UPS—battery not available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Emergency modules off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Emergency power off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
System shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Load on maintenance bypass, two breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Load on maintenance bypass, three breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
SCC start-up procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Module start-up procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Load transfer procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
SCC shutdown procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Module shutdown procedures screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Current-versus-time curves of module overload capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Output power envelope for 0.8 and 0.9 pf rated units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
TABLES
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
Table 13
Table 14
Table 15
Table 16
Table 17
Typical operator controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Typical SCCT System Control Cabinet operator controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Alarm conditions that freeze history data gathering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
SCC and module remote monitor indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Other alarms that activate summary alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Abbreviations used in alarm messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Alarm messages - meaning and corrective action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Alarm messages - summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Liebert Series 610 terminal commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Circuit breaker abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Battery retorque values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Battery voltage record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Torque specifications (unless otherwise labeled) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Recommended test equipment and tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Specifications applicable to environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
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IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
This manual contains important instructions that should be followed during installation and maintenance of your Liebert Series 610 UPS and batteries.
!
WARNING
Exercise extreme care when handling UPS cabinets to avoid equipment damage or injury to
personnel. Refer to separate installation manual for equipment handling information and
installation procedures.
Follow all battery safety precautions in 4.0 - Maintenance when installing, charging or
servicing batteries. In addition to the hazard of electric shock, gas produced by batteries can
be explosive and sulfuric acid can cause severe burns.
In case of fire involving electrical equipment, use only carbon dioxide fire extinguishers or
others approved for use in electrical fire fighting.
Extreme caution is required when performing maintenance.
Be constantly aware that the UPS system contains high DC as well as AC voltages. With
input power off and the battery disconnected, high voltage at filter capacitors and power
circuits should be discharged within 30 seconds. However, if a power circuit failure has
occurred, you should assume that high voltage may still exist after shutdown. Check with a
voltmeter before making contact.
AC voltage will remain on the system bypass, the UPS output terminals and the static bypass
switch, unless associated external circuit breakers are opened.
Check for voltage with both AC and DC voltmeters prior to making contact.
When the UPS system is under power, both the operator and any test equipment must be
isolated from direct contact with earth ground and the UPS chassis frame by using rubber
mats.
Some components within the cabinets are not connected to chassis ground. Any contact
between floating circuits and the chassis is a lethal shock hazard. Exercise caution that the
test instrument exterior does not make contact either physically or electrically with earth
ground.
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Introduction
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
System Description
The role of the parallel-redundant multi-module UPS system is to supply uninterruptible, clean
power to the critical load. The UPS maintains a full-voltage, low-distortion output, even if the utility
source power sags, becomes distorted or fails.
If there is an outage of the source power, the UPS maintains power to the load until an alternate
source of power is activated or until the original power source is restored. If input AC power is not
restored, the UPS maintains the load (with a storage battery plant) long enough that the critical
equipment can be shut down in an orderly manner or an alternate power source (e.g., Genset) can be
brought on line. The Liebert Series 610 UPS module displays the rate of battery discharge and calculates the amount of battery time remaining based on the actual connected load. The time that the battery will maintain the load depends on the capacity of the battery backup plant and the size of the load.
The system control logic automatically manages critical bus operation. System logic is resident in digital control logic for precise control and improved reliability.
If the critical load current exceeds the rated load of the Liebert Series 610 UPS system, the control
logic determines the magnitude of the overload and reacts appropriately. Overloads are usually the
result of inrush current requirements. The UPS system supports loads that are 150% of the rated load
for up to 30 seconds and 125% of the rated load for up to 10 minutes. If the system is operating in the
non-redundant mode (e.g., a UPS module is off line), the overload limits are automatically adjusted.
Figure 1
Multi-Module UPS, 100-500kVA
100-500kVA
If the load surpasses the overload capacity of the UPS, the load is automatically transferred to bypass
without interruption. When the load returns to within the UPS rating, it is either automatically or
manually returned (retransferred) to the UPS. How and when the load is returned to the UPS
depends on several factors: how long the overload lasted, how many overload conditions occurred
before transfer, whether there is an imminent failure of any part of the UPS, etc. Refer to 3.5 - Automatic Operations.
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In the unlikely event of a fault within the UPS, the SCC control logic, which continuously monitors all
critical circuits within the UPS system, transfers the load to bypass without interruption and simultaneously activates local and remote alarms. If a fault is detected in an individual UPS module, that
module is automatically disconnected from the critical bus and shut down. A Module Off Line status
message will appear at the SCC display. The module can be manually returned to service when the
fault has been corrected.
If the multi-module UPS system is operating in the redundant mode (at least one extra module is
available for the connected critical load), the load will remain on the UPS system if one individual
module is disconnected from the critical bus (off line). If the UPS system is operating in the nonredundant mode, the load will be automatically transferred to bypass if a module goes off line.
The Liebert Series 610 UPS display system provides precise monitoring of the UPS, fast alarm
response and quick troubleshooting. For easy manual operations, menu-driven software provides
access to several step-by-step help screens. All operator functions are performed using menuprompted displays and a minimum number of operator controls. The System Control Cabinet includes
external communication capability with both automatic transmit and receive features for early warning and diagnosis of abnormal conditions.
System software allows the operator or Liebert Global Services to enter application specific information. Overload, overvoltage, battery discharge and shutdown limits can be set by the operator. In
effect, UPS operations are tailored for each site.
The UPS system protects critical equipment from source power disturbances and outages, load faults
and UPS malfunctions. This triple protection virtually eliminates computer and computing equipment downtime as a result of utility source power problems.
Figure 2
Multi-Module UPS, 500-750kVA
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Introduction
Figure 3
System Control Cabinets
Types of System Control Cabinets (SCCs)
• SCCT—A stand-alone cabinet containing system control logic for up to six UPS modules, a static
bypass switch, manually operated disconnects for the static bypass switch and two motor-operated system circuit breakers.
• SCCI—System control logic and static bypass switch are integrated into a switchboard cabinet
manufactured by others, which also includes the system circuit breakers.
• SCCC—An integrated configuration like the SCCI, but with a static switch rated for continuous
duty.
1.2
Reliability
Reliability is the most important design goal for Uninterruptible Power Systems. Liebert Series 610
UPS systems have demonstrated reliability by achieving a field-proven critical bus MTBF in excess of
2 million hours. In addition, our Quality Assurance program is certified to the requirements of
ISO 9001 standards.
Liebert Large UPS systems are ETL listed to the requirements of UL 1778. All equipment and components are manufactured to applicable UL, NEC, NEMA, ANSI, IEEE and CSA standards and guidelines.
Designed for Success
The keys to reliability in the design of the UPS system are using conservatively rated components,
minimizing transfers to bypass, making operator controls understandable and providing easy access
for maintenance and repair. Liebert UPS systems lead the industry in all these areas.
For example, the Liebert Series 610 can handle substantial overloads through the solid state static
bypass switch without transferring to the bypass source. By minimizing transfers to bypass, the Liebert Series 610 minimizes operation of motor-operated circuit breakers and enhances system reliability.
As another example, the system control logic has been packaged into digital control logic to eliminate
the failure-prone discrete logic boards used in other brands of UPS products. Furthermore, the logic is
isolated from heat-generating components to ensure optimal operating temperatures.
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Introduction
Other Factors to Consider
Reliability depends on more than just UPS module design. Improper installation can cause any system to fail. To prevent this, customer engineers from Liebert Global Services thoroughly inspect the
installation of all our systems to ensure they are installed properly and operating within performance
specifications.
Once a UPS is properly installed, you—the on-site equipment operator—are the most important factor in preventing critical bus failures or unplanned transfers to bypass. To make your task easier, the
Liebert Series 610 UPS provides easy-to-follow, prompted instructions on the industry’s largest operator display screen.
If you ever need help, call Liebert Global Services (24 hours a day at 1-800-LIEBERT). Your attention
to proper installation, operation and periodic maintenance will ensure that your mission-critical operations receive the best possible protection from electrical disturbances and outages.
1.3
Safety Precautions
Read this manual thoroughly, paying special attention to the sections that apply to you, before working with the UPS. Also refer to the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s
Web site, before working on or near the battery.
Under typical operation and with all UPS doors closed, only normal safety precautions are necessary.
The area around the UPS system and battery should be kept free from puddles of water, excess moisture or debris.
Special safety precautions are required for procedures involving handling, installation and maintenance of the UPS system or the battery. Observe precautions in the separate Installation Manual
before handling or installing the UPS system. Observe precautions in 4.0 - Maintenance before as
well as during performance of all maintenance procedures on the UPS system or battery. Observe all
battery safety precautions in 4.0 - Maintenance before working on or near the battery.
This equipment contains circuitry that is energized with high voltage. Only test equipment
designated for troubleshooting should be used. This is particularly true for oscilloscopes. Always
check with an AC and DC voltmeter to ensure safety before making contact or using tools. Even when
the power is turned Off, dangerously high voltage may exist at the capacitor banks. Observe all battery precautions when near the battery for any reason.
ONLY qualified service personnel should perform maintenance on the UPS system. When
performing maintenance with any part of the equipment under power, service personnel and test
equipment should be standing on rubber mats. The service personnel should wear insulating shoes for
isolation from direct contact with the floor (earth ground).
Unless all power is removed from the equipment, one person should never work alone. A second person should be standing by to assist and summon help in case an accident should occur. This is particularly true when work is performed on the battery.
1.4
Modes of Operation
Refer to 2.0 - Theory of Operation and 3.0 - Operation for more details.
1.4.1
Normal—Load on UPS
The utility AC source provides power to the rectifier/charger in each UPS module. Each rectifier/
charger converts the utility AC power to DC and supplies DC power to the UPS module inverter while
simultaneously float charging the battery plant. Each UPS module inverter converts DC to AC and
furnishes AC power to the critical bus. The System Control Cabinet (SCC) is the tie point for the paralleled modules and monitors and controls the critical bus performance.
1.4.2
Input Power Failure
If the utility source power fails or is outside the acceptable range, the battery plant becomes the primary supplier of DC power to the inverter.
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Introduction
1.4.3
Recharge
After the utility source power is restored or an alternate power source becomes available, each rectifier/charger slowly walks-in to once again power the inverters and recharge the battery plant.
1.4.4
Overload
Overloads in critical systems may be caused by inrush currents during connected equipment start-up
or by faults in the critical load or distribution network. The Liebert Series 610 UPS system can maintain full output voltage regulation while sustaining the following overloads:
• Up to 150% for 30 seconds
• Up to 125% for 10 minutes
• Up to 104% for an indefinite period of time
For momentary faults above 155% of rated SCC current, the static switch turns on for 40 milliseconds
to supply power from the bypass source. Up to 1000% of the rated current can be supplied for less
than one cycle, while up to 500% of rated load can be sustained for the full 40 milliseconds of pulsedparallel operation.
The critical load remains on the UPS modules for the above conditions. If the UPS system overload
capacity is exceeded, an automatic transfer to bypass is initiated, which closes the system bypass circuit breaker (SBB) and opens the UPS output circuit breaker.
!
1.4.5
CAUTION
Whenever an overload occurs, it is imperative to determine the cause of the overload.
Redundant
If the multi-module UPS system includes one more module than the number required to supply the
critical load, the UPS system can operate in the redundant mode. This means that the load will
remain on the UPS system if one of the modules is disconnected because of an overload, an internal
fault or for maintenance. If the additional module is not included in the system design or if the additional module is disconnected from the critical bus, the UPS system operates in the non-redundant
mode.
1.4.6
Bypass—Internal
The SCC control logic initiates an automatic transfer to the bypass source if the overload-current-versus-time curve is exceeded or if specified UPS system faults occur. You can also manually transfer the
load to the bypass (without interruption) if you must take the UPS module out of service for maintenance.
The SCC internal bypass will allow most key components and operating modes to be checked without
disturbing the critical bus. However, certain key power-carrying components, such as the output and
bypass circuit breakers, will require isolation through an external maintenance bypass cabinet or
complete system shutdown to maintain 100% critical load operation.
1.4.7
Maintenance Bypass
The installation of a Maintenance Bypass Cabinet, Panelboard or Switchboard is recommended to
allow you to totally isolate the UPS from all power sources. Use of the Maintenance Bypass is
described in 3.0 - Operation.
1.4.8
Off-Battery
The battery plant can be disconnected from the rectifier/charger by using an external Module Battery
Disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker. The UPS module continues to function normally, though it does
not have power outage back-up capability until the battery plant is reconnected.
1.5
Operator Controls
The Liebert Series 610 UPS System Control Cabinet (SCC) and each individual module are equipped
with a microprocessor-based Operator Display Screen and Control Panel designed for convenient and
reliable operation.
The front panel location of the monitoring and control system enables the user to quickly identify the
current status of the UPS and to perform most of the manual operations. The operator display screen
(a backlit liquid crystal display or LCD) is driven by an easy-to-follow menu-prompted software program that controls and monitors the UPS system.
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Introduction
Figure 4
SCC controls and display screen with example of the Monitor/Mimic screen
© 1989-2003
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Introduction
The operator controls and Monitor/Mimic screen for the System Control Cabinet (SCC) are shown in
Figure 4. The controls and display screen for each UPS module are shown in Figure 5. Each cabinet
(SCC or module) has the displays and controls required to monitor and perform its functions.
Figure 4 shows a three-module system designed for redundant operation. A multi-module UPS system may include up to six (6) modules for each SCC.
Detailed instructions on how to interpret the displays and use the controls are in 3.0 - Operation.
Figure 5
Module controls and display screen with example of the Monitor/Mimic screen
© 1989-2003
1.6
Options
A number of options are available from Liebert for your UPS system. (Some options are not available
for all ratings.) Described below are the most frequently provided options. Note that the battery items
( 1- 3) are required to complete the UPS system. The remaining options provide improved system performance or convenience. Other options are available. Contact your Liebert sales representative for
more information.
1. Battery
The batteries provide power in the event of a power outage. The Liebert UPS can use a variety of
battery types, provided the battery plant is designed for the UPS DC voltage range and the load
requirements of your application.
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Introduction
2. Battery Racks or Cabinets
The battery racks are specifically designed for stationary service batteries. They are painted with
electrolyte-resistant paint for corrosion resistance. Battery cabinets are available for 150 through
600kVA modules.
3. Module Battery Disconnect
The UPS system utilizes a separate Module Battery Disconnect for remotely located batteries. A
sensing circuit in the UPS module, set at the battery low voltage limit, trips the Module Battery
Disconnect to safeguard the battery from excessive discharge. The Module Battery Disconnect has
an undervoltage release mechanism designed to ensure that during any shutdown or failure mode
all battery potential is removed from the UPS system.
4. Input Current Distortion Filter
This filter reduces rectifier input current reflected harmonic distortion to less than 7% reflected
THD and less than 4% reflected THD for modules with the optional 12-pulse rectifier. The filter is
factory installed within the UPS. This filter also improves the input power factor to better than
0.92 lagging.
5. 12-Pulse Rectifier
All 500-750kVA models may be ordered with the optional 12-pulse rectifier section; this feature is
standard in 1000kVA models. This provides input isolation and reduces input current reflected
THD to less than 9% or less than 4% with optional input filter.
6. Isolation Transformers
An optional rectifier input isolation transformer is available in a matching transformer cabinet;
this feature is standard in 1000kVA models. A bypass isolation transformer is also available.
7. Three Breaker Maintenance Bypass
This switchboard provides make-before-break maintenance bypass. It includes: UPS Bypass
Input Breaker (BIB), Maintenance Bypass Breaker (MBB) and Maintenance Isolation Breaker
(MIB).
8. Two Breaker Maintenance Bypass
This switchboard provides make-before-break maintenance bypass. It includes: Maintenance
Bypass Breaker (MBB) and Maintenance Isolation Breaker (MIB).
9. Load Bus Synchronization (LBS)
The Load Bus Sync (LBS) option keeps two independent UPS systems (and therefore their critical
load buses) in sync, even when the modules are operating on batteries or asynchronous AC
sources. This means that critical loads connected to both load buses through a Static Bus Transfer
Switch can be switched seamlessly between the two.
10. SiteScan Central Monitoring System
Liebert manufactures a central monitoring system that automatically displays key UPS measurements and alarms, as well as data from a variety of sensors. This monitoring system activates
alarms so corrective action can be taken. Events and data can be printed in hard copy. Data can
be logged for analysis.
11. Remote Monitor Panel
The UPS system may also be provided with an optional Remote Monitor Panel. This Panel provides eight LED indicators and may be placed at a convenient location near the critical load. A
functional description of the Remote Monitor Panel is provided in 3.0 - Operation of this manual.
12. Customer Alarm Interface
This optional interface board allows the input and display of 8 alarms from customer-supplied
contacts, each with a customer-selected name of up to 16 characters. The following attributes can
be user programmed for each alarm: latching, summary, freeze history, sound horn, auto-dial and
time delay (0 to 999.9 seconds).
13. Temperature-Compensated Charging
When battery temperature climbs above a preset limit (typically 77 degrees F), this optional circuit proportionally reduces float charging voltage to prevent overcharging the battery.
14. Battery Load Testing
When activated, this option forces the battery string to assume the load for a short period of time.
The UPS then compares the test results to data collected during the UPS commissioning to see if
the battery system appears to meet specifications.
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2.0
THEORY OF OPERATION
2.1
General Component Descriptions
The UPS system includes all of the equipment necessary to continuously provide computer-grade AC
power to a critical load, even when there is an interruption of the utility power. It consists of a System
Control Cabinet (SCC), UPS modules and a back-up battery plant. Refer to Figure 6 and Figure 7.
Except where otherwise noted, the configuration is presumed to be parallel-redundant (with at least
one more UPS module than required to support the rated load).
2.1.1
System Control Cabinet
The System Control Cabinet (SCC) includes system controls, static bypass switch, load transfer control, protective devices and other accessories. The system controls simultaneously monitor two or
more parallel UPS modules sharing a critical load for increased capacity and/or redundancy. The two
(2) motor-operated system circuit breakers (system bypass breaker—SBB and UPS output breaker)
may be contained within the SCC, depending on the configuration designed for your installation.
System Controls: The system control logic automatically manages critical bus operation and monitors performance of the UPS modules. Microprocessor technology and dedicated firmware provide
advanced logic control and a comprehensive display of information. The system control logic synchronizes the output of the UPS system to the bypass source. The SCC includes ports for communicating
with external devices. Liebert Multi-Module Units do not require an SCC for load sharing. Automatic,
parallel module load sharing is a function built into the modules themselves; however interconnection
through the SCC enables the modules to share data for more precise control. Modules do not require
master clocks or controls in order to load share or free-run at 60.0 Hz.
Static Bypass Switch: The static (solid-state) bypass switch immediately transfers the load from
the inverter to the bypass AC power source in the event of a severe overload on the system or a failure
within the UPS. This transfer takes place without any interruption of the power supplied to the load.
In all SCCT control cabinets 1600A or larger and in all SCCI and SCCC control cabinets, the system
includes redundant circuits to detect and isolate shorted SCRs in the static switch.
Fuses are installed in series with the static bypass circuit (with the exception of the continuous duty
static switch installed in the SCCC control cabinet) to ensure reliable overload protection in the
unlikely event of a catastrophic output condition (e.g., a dropped wrench) electrically close to the output of your UPS system. The static switch SCRs themselves are rated to easily handle the fuse-blowing current.
Bypass Circuit: The bypass circuit consists of electrically operated circuit breakers and associated
synchronizing and control circuitry to transfer the load to/from the bypass source.
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Theory of Operation
Figure 6
UPS module block diagram
MULTI-MODULE UPS SYSTEM
Control
Wiring
To SCC
CONTROL POWER
Controls
Utility
Input
Power
Input
CB
Rectifier/
Charger
Inverter
Output
CB
MBD
Output
Power
To SCC
Battery
CB - Circuit Breaker
MBD - Module Battery Disconnect
SCC - System Control Cabinet
2.1.2
UPS Module
The UPS module consists of module controls, a rectifier/charger, an inverter, protective devices and
other accessories.
Module Controls: The module control logic monitors performance of the UPS module. The UPS
module status is displayed locally and is also sent to the System Control Cabinet.
Rectifier/Charger: The rectifier/charger converts utility power from AC to DC to charge the battery
and provide the DC input to the inverter. Its design limits reflected harmonic current distortion to
source power and provides low-ripple DC power for charging batteries. Multiple rectifier/chargers can
share a common battery plant, if that configuration is preferred for your application.
Inverter: The inverter converts DC power into the precise AC power required to supply a sensitive
critical load. The inverter converts DC power into a pulse-width-modulated (PWM)/six-step waveform
that is easily filtered into a clean sine wave output. The PWM/stepwave also minimizes the harmonic
voltage distortion caused by typical switching power supplies and other non-linear load components
used in computers and related electronics.
2.1.3
Battery Plant
The battery is used as the alternate source of power to supply DC power to the inverter if the AC supply voltage is outside the acceptable range. The battery supplies power to the inverter until the utility
power is restored or until an alternate power source is available. If AC source power is not restored or
an alternate power source is not available, the battery can be sized to provide power long enough for
an orderly shutdown of the load.
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2.2
Detailed Component Descriptions
2.2.1
Controls
Hardware
The Liebert Series 610 UPS Operator Interface Display System is designed to provide all of the information that is required for the operation of each UPS cabinet (the System Control Cabinet and each
module). The following is a list of the hardware features:
1. The control logic performs automatic operations with minimal operator interface. The limited
number of manual controls are easy-to-use.
2. Each Liebert Series 610 UPS cabinet is equipped with an easy-to-read 640 x 200 pixel backlit
liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. It presents information in a way that is easy to understand at
an eye-level front panel location.
3. The display is controlled by a dedicated microprocessor with a flash-updatable program, nonvolatile static RAM and a battery-backed system clock.
4. The Liebert Series 610 System Control Cabinet (SCC) has communication ports (terminal board
connections) for:
a. Transmission of present status information to remote terminals via a resident auto-dial
communications program and an optional internal or external modem. This port also
responds to inquiries of the UPS system status and history from the remote terminal.
b. Reporting UPS system status and history information in response to inquiries from a local
terminal (no modem required).
c. Reporting to a local monitor the information requested from the local terminal.
d. Reporting information to a Liebert SiteScan central monitoring system.
e. Relaying selected alarm messages to a Liebert Remote Monitor Panel and to a separate
terminal board for customer use.
f. Relaying performance and status information to your network monitoring system via SNMP
interface (optional).
Software
The operator interface display system software enables the operator to monitor the UPS system status, to control the power flow through the UPS, to monitor all of the meter readings, to execute the
start-up, shutdown and load transfer procedures, to access the event history files and to make adjustments to the programmable parameters. The following is a list of the software features:
1. The menu-driven software prompts the operator for input.
2. Step-by-step instructions assist the operator during the start-up, shutdown and load transfer
procedures. This helps to eliminate operator errors.
3. Graphics-based mimic diagrams illustrate circuit breaker status and the power flow through the
UPS system.
4. The Present Status screen reports information about the system’s present status. The History
Status screen chronicles the events leading up to and immediately after a fault. The Event
History screen lists all of the alarm messages that have been logged over a period of time.
5. The Battery Cycle Monitor records information on up to 132 battery discharge events.
Information includes date, time, length of discharge, highest current demand, lowest battery
voltage and cumulative battery amp hours discharged.
Refer to 3.0 - Operation for a description of the controls and indicators located on the Operator Control Panel.
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2.2.2
Rectifier/Charger
The UPS module rectifier/charger consists of an input circuit breaker, AC current limiting circuit,
battery equalize charge circuit, DC filter, battery charge current limiting circuit and bridge rectifiers.
Optional items are an isolation transformer and a 12-pulse rectifier (these are standard on 1000kVA
units).
Operation
The rectifier/charger converts the AC input power to DC power. This conversion is accomplished by
3-phase bridge rectifiers using SCRs. All phases are individually fused. Input current reflected THD is
less than 7% at full load with optional input filter or 30% without. For modules 500kVA and larger, the
optional 12-pulse rectifier reduces reflected THD to less than 4% with optional filter or 9% without.
The filtered output of the rectifier/charger provides regulated DC power to drive the inverter and
charge the battery.
Input Circuit Breaker
The input circuit breaker (CB1) is sized to allow enough current to recharge the battery and supply a
full rated load at the same time. The circuit breaker contains a thermal magnetic trip mechanism and
an undervoltage release that interrupts power, preventing damage to the system, if there is an internal AC overcurrent condition or a short circuit. The circuit breaker also opens during certain alarmed
faults. This circuit breaker must be closed manually.
Isolation Transformer
The optional input isolation transformer—standard with 1000kVA models and with the 12-pulse rectifier option—has a dry type core and copper windings with Class H insulation. The transformer on
modules with standard 6-pulse rectifier has wye primary and delta secondary windings. For models
with the optional 12-pulse rectifier, the transformer has a delta primary, with delta and wye secondary windings. The isolation transformer provides the initial step of critical bus isolation. This reduces
the AC shock hazard at the battery and at other DC components and prevents a DC fault from disrupting upstream AC circuitry.
The transformer has a nominal tap and one tap 6% below the rated nominal input voltage (normally
used for 460 VAC input).
Input Current Limit
AC input current-sensing transformers (CTs) are used to measure current levels. Control circuitry
connected to the CTs restricts the AC current to less than 125% of the full input current rating by
reducing the battery charging voltage. This current limit is adjustable from 100 to 125% and is factory-set at 115%.
An optional second level of input current limit is initiated by an external contact closure (field supplied for use with back-up generator) and is adjustable from 85 to 100% (factory-set at 100%). This
second level of input current limit may be used to set the maximum amount of input current permitted under all operating conditions of connected load and battery recharge.
During a start-up procedure, the current slowly ramps up (walks-in) from 20% of the rated input current to 100% over 15 to 20 seconds. The maximum rate of change of the AC input current is 15% per
second. The input current walk-in reduces the start-up surge effects on all other equipment connected
to the same source and prolongs the service life of internal components.
Input Current Inrush
The maximum sub-cycle of inrush current due to the optional input isolation transformer is typically
less than five times the rated input current for the first 1/2 cycle with the optional input filter. Without this transformer, inrush current is typically less than three times nominal.
Input Power Factor
The rated input power factor is not less than 0.85 lagging at the nominal input voltage and the full
rated UPS load. The optional input filter will improve the power factor to better than 0.92 lagging at
full load. Refer to your submittal package or installation drawings in the installation manual for your
specific model.
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2.2.3
Battery Charging Circuit
The UPS module charging circuit is capable of recharging the battery plant to 95% of full capacity
within 10 times the discharge time. Recharging the last 5% takes longer because of characteristics
inherent in the battery. DC ripple voltage is limited to less than 0.5% RMS to preserve battery life
during long-term float charging while the UPS system is operating on utility source power.
Multiple UPS module rectifier/chargers can share a common battery plant, if that configuration is
preferred for your application.
Operation After Discharge
When commercial power is interrupted, the battery continues to supply DC power to the inverter
without interruption to the critical load. If the AC source power is restored before the battery has
fully discharged, the rectifier automatically restarts and resumes carrying the inverter and battery
recharge load requirements.
Operation After End-of-Discharge
The battery time screen displayed on the control panel enables you to estimate when battery shutdown will occur. If the battery plant discharges to the shutdown point during an outage, the UPS
automatically disconnects the load, the AC input and the battery. After AC input power is restored,
the rectifier can be manually restarted by the user.
Battery Disconnect
The external module battery disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker is used to isolate the UPS module from
the battery during maintenance and to automatically disconnect the battery from the inverter at the
end of battery discharge. The MBD circuit breaker can be opened or tripped automatically, from the
control panel or manually. It must be closed manually.
Battery Charge Current Limiting
The battery recharge current, after a battery discharge, is limited to between 1 and 25% (adjustable)
of the full load discharge current. An additional (optional) charge-limiting circuit can be activated by
external dry contact closure (field supplied) for use when operating on a back-up generator. These two
levels of control regulate the amount of current that flows from the power source to the battery while
the battery is recharging.
The battery charge current limit is factory-set at 10% for normal operation and at 1% for alternate
power source recharge operation.
Battery Equalize Charge Circuit
The battery equalize charge feature can be manually initiated or it can be programmed to operate
automatically. Either can be selected from the battery equalize screen displayed on the control panel.
The battery equalizing charge circuit increases the rectifier/charger output voltage to charge the battery any time there is a power outage of 30 seconds or longer. The equalizing voltage is slightly higher
than the float voltage. Equalize charging is primarily used in flooded battery systems to boost individual cells that are at a low state of charge, per the battery manufacturer's specification and recommendations.
NOTE
Do not use equalize charging with valve-regulated lead-acid batteries.
Consult the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for
specific information about equalize charging.
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2.2.4
Inverter
The inverter is a solid state device that converts the DC output of the rectifier/charger or the battery
to AC power.
Operation
The inverter converts DC power—from either the battery or the rectifier/charger—into three pulsewidth-modulated/six-step waveforms. These waveforms are filtered into low-distortion sine wave
power. The inverter is controlled by digitally controlled logic. This logic controls the precise synchronization, amplitude and frequency of the output voltage.
In addition to the inverter efficiently supplying a regulated AC output from a DC source, the output
isolation transformer acts as a second stage of isolation between the critical load bus and the commercial source power. The inverter is configured to handle most critical load inrush surges. It maintains
output voltage Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) within specifications even when handling non-linear
computer loads. Refer to Non-Linear Load Characteristics.
Output Regulation and Overload Performance
The inverter is capable of sustaining full output voltage (±2% of the nominal voltage) for up to 150%
overload at the output for as long as 30 seconds without reducing the output voltage. It can also handle at least 125% of the rated current for up to 10 minutes and 104% of the rated current continuously. The System Control Cabinet (SCC) will transfer the critical load to the bypass source if the
overload exceeds the system capacity or the capacity of the modules on-line. The multi-module overload capacity (in terms of percent of rated full load current of modules on-line) is 140% for 20 seconds,
108% for 10 minutes and 104% continuously.
Note that in normal operation the SCC will transfer the load to bypass before a UPS module exceeds
its overload capacity. If an individual module overload condition is sustained (beyond inverter capacity) the UPS module is automatically taken off-line (disconnected from the critical bus) and is shut
down. If the UPS system is operating in the redundant mode, the load may remain on the UPS system. Refer to 3.5 - Automatic Operations.
Non-Linear Load Characteristics
Computers and computer equipment with switching power supplies generate non-linear currents rich
in fifth and seventh harmonics.
The inverter pulse-width-modulated/six-step waveform, coupled with the output filter, provides a natural path for reducing the fifth and seventh harmonic currents produced by the load. The inverter/filter limits the output voltage THD to less than 5% with up to 100% typical electronic data processing
(EDP) loads. EDP equipment characteristically includes both non-linear and linear load components.
Unbalanced Load Characteristics
Unbalanced loads are actively regulated. The phase-to-phase voltage balance is maintained to within
2%, even with a 50% load imbalance.
The three-phase, root mean square (RMS—approximately 70% of the peak) average voltage is also
regulated through a separate control circuit (phase-to-phase sensing).
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2.2.5
Static Bypass
A static bypass is an integral part of the UPS System Control Cabinet (SCC). Refer to Figure 7. The
static bypass consists of two reverse-paralleled SCRs (silicon-controlled rectifiers) per phase and
solid-state switching devices working in conjunction with the motor-operated System Bypass Breaker
(SBB). An automatic transfer control circuit senses the status of the operator controls, UPS logic signals and alarm messages and critical bus operating conditions. If the UPS modules can no longer supply the critical load, the static bypass switch (in conjunction with the SBB and UPS Output Breaker)
automatically transfers the critical load to the bypass source without interruption.
Figure 7
System Control Cabinet block diagram
Gate
Driver
Static
Bypass
Switch
Static Switch
Disconnects
Static Bypass Breaker
Bypass Line
Sync &
Transfer
UPS
System
Modules
Control
Power
Supply
Transfer
Control
System
Monitor
Voltage
Adjust
Alarms
UPS Output
To Critical
Load
Fuse Protection
The static bypass switch path uses two back-to-back SCRs per phase. Each phase is individually protected by a fuse sized to clear only in the event of a catastrophic fault (with the exception of the continuous duty static switch used in the SCCC control cabinet). This is a more reliable method than
depending on external protection devices. The fuses are in the circuit to protect the critical bus distribution equipment against catastrophic faults. The static switch SCRs are oversized to easily handle
any current surges that may blow the fuses.
Shorted SCR Monitoring
In all SCCI and SCCC control cabinets, and all SCCT control cabinets 1600A and larger, the static
bypass system has redundant shorted SCR sensing circuits and disconnects. This will prevent UPS
output power backfeed to the distribution system even if two component failures exist simultaneously. If a shorted SCR is detected, the static bypass switch is isolated and annunciated at the SCC
control panel, and the critical load remains on UPS output power.
In all SCCT control cabinets smaller than 1600A, the static bypass system is equipped with redundant disconnect circuits that prevent backfeed of lethal voltage to a de-energized bypass input in the
event of a shorted static switch SCR. If the bypass input power is interrupted, the static switch disconnect devices will open, preventing backfeed of inverter voltage to the bypass input terminals.
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Static Switch Isolation
The motor-operated system bypass circuit breaker (SBB), wired in parallel with the static switch,
automatically closes in approximately 200 milliseconds after the load is transferred to the bypass
power source, removing the static switch from the power flow.
Also, if required for maintenance, the static switch can be isolated from the bypass line by opening (to
the OFF position) the Static Switch Disconnects. For maintenance, this should only be done with the
UPS system critical load on bypass power.
Pulsed Parallel Operation
When an overload condition such as magnetic inrush current or a branch load circuit fault exceeds the
overload capacity of the connected modules, the static bypass switch pulses on for 40 milliseconds.
This allows up to 1000% of the rated full load current from the bypass line to clear the overload without closing the bypass circuit breaker. The bypass source is briefly in parallel with the UPS system,
permitting the bypass source to carry the initial overload current. If the overload clears before 40 milliseconds, a load transfer to bypass is not made. If the overload condition continues, the automatic
transfer is made (maintaining the load voltage within the specified limits).
This pulsed static switch operation reduces nuisance operation of motor-operated circuit breakers for
such short-term conditions and serves, under some circumstances, as a backup in the event that an
external bypass feeder breaker trips open during this pulse-paralleling period.
Load Transfers
Transfers to (transfer) or from (retransfer) the bypass may be performed automatically or manually in
a make-before-break sequence. This is accomplished through the overlapping operation of the UPS
output and the system bypass power switching devices.
Manual load transfers and retransfers are initiated by the operator from the System Control Cabinet
(SCC).
In a manual operation or an automatic retransfer, the two motorized circuit breakers—UPS output
and system bypass—are both closed simultaneously for a short period of time (overlap).Should the
overlap period exceed the design limits, the condition is alarmed and protective action is initiated.
Automatic transfers are initiated by the SCC system control logic when an overload is beyond the
specified capabilities of the UPS system or when a fault occurs within a non-redundant UPS module.
An automatic retransfer is initiated if this function is enabled and if system conditions for a retransfer are present.
In an automatic transfer, the circuit breakers do not overlap, but, during the short time gap, bypass
power is supplied to the critical load through the solid state static switch. In an SCCC control cabinet
with a continuous duty static switch, if for some reason the Static Bypass Breaker (SBB) fails to close,
the static switch will carry the load continuously.
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Transfer and Retransfer Conditions
1. Automatic Transfers to Bypass
Critical bus conditions that will initiate an automatic transfer of the critical load from the UPS
system to the bypass source are:
a. System Overload: overcurrent condition in excess of the overload rating of the System Control
Cabinet (SCC).
b. Output Overload: overcurrent condition in excess of the current-versus-time overload capacity
of UPS modules ON LINE.
c. Overvoltage/Undervoltage (OV/UV): critical bus voltage is outside the allowable tolerance.
d. Non-redundant UPS Module Inoperative: an essential UPS module is taken OFF LINE for
one of the reasons below.
1. Battery discharged to the shutdown voltage.
2. Inverter overload capacity exceeded.
3. Inverter or rectifier fault condition (power, logic or overtemperature) present or
imminent.
4. Failure of UPS module logic or logic power.
e. SCC Logic:
1. Emergency Module Off (EMO) circuit activated.
2. Failure of UPS system logic or logic power.
2. Manual Transfers
Manual transfers may be initiated at any time provided no transfer inhibition conditions are
present.
3. Transfer Inhibited
A manual transfer to the bypass source will be inhibited if any of the following conditions exist:
a. UPS system to bypass voltage difference (ΔV) exceeds a predetermined percentage (normally
5%).
b. Static switch disconnects open.
c. OK to Transfer signal from the control logic is not present.
NOTE
A load transfer to the bypass line will be completed whenever an automatic transfer to bypass
is initiated. If the Static Switch Unable alarm message is present for any reason (including a
±20° phase lock synchronization error), the automatic transfer will be interrupted for
40-120 milliseconds. Because of the reliability of the UPS components, an interrupted load
transfer is a very unlikely occurrence.
4. Automatic Retransfers to UPS
Critical bus conditions that must be present to initiate an automatic retransfer (Auto-Rexfer) of
the critical load from the bypass source to the UPS system are:
a. The number of Auto-Rexfer Attempts selected must be greater than zero (0). If zero (0) is
selected, no automatic retransfer will occur.
b. Critical load was initially transferred to the bypass source due to a system overload only.
c. Overload has since dropped below 100% of the rated SCC current.
d. Enough UPS modules are ON LINE to supply the critical load.
e. OK to Transfer signal received from the control logic for at least 10 seconds, within 5 minutes
of the overload transfer. (A manually initiated retransfer from bypass is required for
overloads lasting 5 minutes or more.)
f. Cyclic-type system overloads, which occur up to five (select range is 0 to 5) times in
60 minutes, are automatically returned to the UPS system for each event including the Nth
overload. A manually initiated retransfer from bypass is required for the N+1 overload.
5. Manual Retransfers
Manual retransfers may be initiated at any time provided no retransfer inhibition conditions are
present.
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6. Retransfer Inhibited
A retransfer from the bypass source to the UPS system shall be inhibited if any of the following
conditions exist:
a. Manual (and Automatic) Retransfer Inhibitions:
1. UPS system-to-bypass voltage difference (ΔV) exceeds a predetermined percentage
(normally 5%).
2. System circuit breaker (UPS output or SBB) is inoperative.
3. OK to Transfer signal from the control logic is not present.
4. Not enough UPS modules are ON LINE to supply the connected critical load.
b. Automatic Retransfer Inhibitions (in addition to those above):
1. The load transfer to bypass was not caused by a system overload.
2. Excessive cyclical overloads within a one-hour period.
3. Retransfer conditions are not satisfied within 5 minutes of the initial transfer.
2.2.6
Redundant Mode
The typical multi-module UPS system is configured with a back-up (redundant) UPS module, connected in parallel to share the critical load with the other module(s). This parallel redundant system
includes one more module than is required to supply the full critical load.
A parallel redundant system will always be in the Redundant Mode if all modules are ON LINE. In
addition, if the critical load is reduced so that not all ON LINE modules are required, the UPS system
can also operate in the Redundant Mode with one or more modules OFF LINE. The critical load will
remain on the UPS system—even if one or more of the modules is taken OFF LINE for maintenance
or because of an internal fault—as long as the remaining ON LINE modules can carry the full connected system load.
The system control logic monitors the connected critical load and the number of UPS modules ON
LINE. If the UPS system is operating in the Redundant Mode, the REDUNDANT status message will
be displayed at the System Control Cabinet (SCC). If the UPS system is operating in the Non-Redundant Mode (redundant module is OFF LINE or was not included in the system configuration), the
NON-REDUNDANT status message is displayed at the SCC. In the Non-Redundant Mode, the critical load will be transferred to bypass if any UPS module goes OFF LINE and the remaining ON LINE
module(s) cannot carry the connected load without being overloaded.
The system control logic, located in the SCC, automatically adjusts the allowable overload limits
based on the connected load and the number of modules ON LINE.
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Operation
3.0
OPERATION
3.1
Display Screen and Operator Controls
Each Liebert Series 610 UPS cabinet is equipped with a microprocessor-based Operator Control Panel
and Display Screen and System Control Panel designed for convenient and reliable operation. The
System Control Cabinet (SCC) performs different functions than the UPS modules. Each cabinet has
the controls and displays required to operate and monitor its functions. The locations of operator controls are shown in Figure 8 through Figure 11.
The front location of the control panel enables the user to quickly identify the current status of the
UPS system and to perform most of the manual operations. The operator display screen is driven by
an easy-to-follow menu-prompted software program.
Features
The Liebert Series 610 interface display system enables the operator to easily perform the following:
• Obtain a quick indication of operational status:
• Is the critical bus OK?
• Is the UPS system OK?
• Which UPS modules are available?
• Is the battery available?
• Is the bypass line available?
• Monitor the power flow through the UPS system and monitor all meter readings:
• Is the critical load being supplied power from the UPS system or bypass?
• Are input, battery and output voltage, frequency and current readings at nominal levels?
• How much battery time is still available during an outage?
• Is the battery recharging after discharge?
• Execute operational procedures:
• Perform critical bus transfer/retransfer between the UPS system and the bypass line.
• Start up and shut down the UPS system and each module.
• Shut down the system and all modules instantly in the event of an emergency.
• Access status reports and history files:
• Obtain a complete listing of the present status of the UPS system and all modules (input, output and battery voltage, frequency and current readings and any alarms that may be
present).
• Review a complete history report of all events leading up to and immediately after a fault condition.
• Examine an archive listing of all alarm conditions that have occurred over a period of time.
• Make adjustments to programmable parameters (access limited by Security Access function):
• Set the date and the time functions.
• Change the auto-dial phone number and the modem options.
• Select the number of auto-retransfer attempts.
• Make adjustment to the UPS output voltage before performing a manual load transfer.
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Operation
Figure 8
Typical operator controls
2
100kVA500kVA
5
5
4
1000kVA
3
5
2
1
Table 1
Item
Typical operator controls
Description
Function
1
Input Circuit Breaker (CB1)
This manually operated circuit breaker provides power to the UPS module rectifier. In
625-750kVA modules and some 500kVA modules, this breaker is located in the
transformer cabinet.
2
Module Output Circuit
Breaker (CB2)
This manually operated circuit breaker connects the UPS module inverter output to the
UPS System Control Cabinet.
3
Operator Control Panel
Refer to Figure 10 for controls available on this panel.
4
Control Disconnect
(behind inner door)
These two fuses provide power to the controls. They are normally closed (ON). Turn
Control Power OFF (by opening the two fuse holders) only for maintenance procedures.
5
Interlock Button
(on rear of Control Panel)
Press this button to make authorized changes to any parameter protected by the
Security Access function. This includes time, date, auto-dial phone numbers, etc.
21
DISCONTINUED
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Operation
Figure 9
Operator controls, typical SCCT System Control Cabinet
Table 2
Item
Typical SCCT System Control Cabinet operator controls
Description
Function
1
UPS Output Circuit
Breaker
This motorized circuit breaker connects the critical load to the UPS system
output.
2
System Bypass Circuit
Breaker
This motorized circuit breaker connects the critical load to the bypass line.
3
Operator Control Panel
Refer to Figure 10 for controls available on this panel.
4
Interlock Button
(on rear of Control Panel)
Refer to Figure 11.
5
Close Bypass Switch
(behind door)
Refer to Figure 11.
6
Bypass Reset Switch
(behind door)
Refer to Figure 11.
7
Static Switch Disconnects
(behind door)
These manually operated switches disconnect the static switch from the
bypass line and from the critical load. They are normally ON (closed). Turn
them OFF (open) only to isolate (disconnect) the static switch for
maintenance procedures. For SCCT less than 1600A, the static switch
disconnects are contactors that open automatically upon loss of bypass input
power and close automatically when bypass power is restored. Control power
fuse disconnects are used to manually open the contactors for maintenance.
8
Reset Switches (SW1) for
Static Switch Disconnects
(behind door)
Press these two switches before closing Static Switch Disconnects when
recovering from a shutdown that includes loss of Control Power. Green LED
on means Control Power is available. Red LED on means Reset Switch
needs to be pushed. Only SCCI and SCCC control cabinets and SCCT
1600A and larger.
9
Control Power Disconnect
(behind door)
Normally ON. Fuseblocks that are labeled F7 through F10. Turn OFF Control
Power only when required for maintenance procedures.
22
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 10 Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels
Numbers are used
as keys to data in
Table 3, below.
Table 3
Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels
Item Description (Location)
1
Display Screen
(SCC and modules)
2
Up
(SCC and modules)
3
Down
(SCC and modules)
4
Select
(SCC and modules)
5
Alarm Reset
(SCC and modules)
6
Voltage Adjust
(SCC only)
7
UPS
(SCC only)
8
Bypass
(SCC only)
9
Control Enable
(SCC and modules)
10
Horn Off
(SCC only)
11
Alarm Horn and
Red LED (SCC only)
12
Emergency Module
Off (SCC only)
13
Battery Trip
(modules only)
14
Output Trip
(modules only)
Function
This screen displays all vital UPS information in one convenient location. All of the
UPS monitoring functions and conditions are indicated here.
This touch-sensitive pad (button) is used to move the cursor up through various
selections present on the display screen. Note that all pads on this control panel
have touch-sensitive switches behind them.
Similar to the Up pad, this pad is used to move the cursor down through the
various selections present on the display screen.
After choosing the desired item (with highlighted cursor) from the display screen
with the Up and Down pads, pushing this pad tells the microprocessor to go to the
highlighted selection.
This pad is used to clear all of the alarm conditions that are no longer present.
However, all active alarms remain in memory and on the applicable screens until
they are corrected.
This push-to-turn knob permits adjustment of the UPS output voltage to meet load
requirements or to match the bypass voltage before transferring the load to or from
bypass.
This pad activates the circuits that connect the UPS to the critical load (a
retransfer). When this pad is pushed (along with Control Enable), the UPS output
circuit breaker closes and the bypass circuit breaker opens.
This pad activates the circuits that connect the bypass line to the critical load (a
transfer). When this button is pushed (along with Control Enable), the bypass
circuit breaker closes and the UPS output circuit breaker opens.
This pad must be pressed simultaneously with the UPS, Bypass, Battery Trip or
Output Trip pads to activate them.
This pad is used to silence the alarm horn after it is activated. When this switch is
pressed, the alarm horn is silenced but the active and latched alarm messages
remain on the screen. The alarm messages still displayed stop flashing to indicate
they have been acknowledged.
This electronic horn sounds to alert nearby personnel whenever a new alarm
occurs. A red LED (light emitting diode) is located in the middle of the alarm horn.
During an emergency, pressing this guarded switch will transfer the load to bypass
and then shut down the UPS modules. The load will remain on bypass power.
(Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures.)
This pad can be used (along with Control Enable) to trip the module battery
disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker open (disconnecting the battery from the UPS
module).
This pad can be used (along with Control Enable) to trip the module output circuit
breaker open (disconnecting the module from the UPS system).
23
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 11 Switches behind SCC control panel door
Numbers are used
as keys to data in
Table 4, below.
Table 4
Liebert Series 610 UPS and SCC operator control panels
Item
Description (Location)
Function
1
Interlock Button
(on rear of Control Panel)
Press this button to make authorized changes to any site parameter protected
by the Security Access function. These include the time, date, auto-dial phone
number and other site parameters.
2
Bypass Reset Switch
(SW1, on Transfer
Relay Board)
Press this button to reset the transfer relays during start-up, after an
Emergency Power Off shutdown. You must press this button before the Close
Bypass Switch (Item 3).
3
Close Bypass Switch
(SW1, on System
Interface Board)
Press this button to close the Bypass circuit breaker during a start-up
procedure, if it remains open after a shutdown procedure (refer to 3.4.1 - SCC
Start-Up Procedure). Note that the Static Switch Disconnects must be OFF to
reset the Bypass circuit breaker. See also Bypass Reset Switch (Item 2).
24
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2
Menu Tree Navigation
The Operator Interface Display is a blue-background display with white text. The display is always
on, but the backlight will remain lit for 15 minutes following any display activation. After 15 minutes,
the backlight will go out and the display may appear very dim. To reactivate the backlight, push any
key. The backlight will again be active for 15 minutes after the last interaction or alarm. If any screen
other than the mimic screen has been activated, after 5 minutes with no further interaction, the
screen will revert to the basic mimic screen.
Figure 12 Menu tree
Master Menu
Monitor
Mimic
Display
Status
Reports
Walk-In
Display
System
Configuration
Load
Transfer
Present
Status
Date
Event History
Time
History
Status
Auto Dial
System
Status
Max. Auto
Rexfer
Attempts
Battery Cycle
Monitor
Start-Up
Procedures
Limit Settings
Battery
Equalize
Battery Time
Shutdown
Procedures
Meter
Calibration
System
Current
Rating
Lang.
Selection
System
Options
LCD Contrast
Backlight
Brightness
Customer
Alarm
Definitions
Battery
Exercise
25
Batt. Temp.
Charging
Compensation
Auto Restart
Continuous
Duty Static
Switch
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 12 illustrates the primary screens that you can access through the Operator Interface Display
System. The liquid crystal display (LCD) screen provides a full 80 characters by 25 lines of information for easy readability. The following sections describe what these screens display and how and
when to use them.
Module status information is available on the display screen, provided Control Power is ON, even
when the UPS module is not operating. System status information is available on the SCC display
screen and at local and remote terminals when at least one module is on-line or when the bypass
source is available.
The screen will automatically display the Monitor/Mimic during normal operation. The System configuration screen will be displayed during start-up and whenever a system reset is required.
If a module display screen is blank, either power is not available, the Rectifier Input (RIB) circuit
breaker (external to the UPS module) is open or the Control Power switch is OFF. If power is available and a display is blank, contact Liebert Global Services (1-800-LIEBERT). Note that status information may be available at local and remote terminals. Use control touch pads at the SCC to
manually transfer the critical load to the bypass line if the SCC display goes blank while load is on
UPS (a very unlikely event).
3.2.1
Master Menu Screen
The Master Menu contains the primary menu selections that monitor and control the operation of the
UPS.
Figure 13 SCC and module master menu screens
UP : CURSOR UP
DOWN : CURSOR DOWN
SELECT : CHOOSE
© 1989-2003
MASTER MENU
MONITOR/MIMIC DISPLAY
START-UP PROCEDURES
STATUS REPORTS
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
METER CALIBRATION
LIMIT SETTINGS
BATTERY EQUALIZE
LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURES
CUSTOMER ALARM DEFINITIONS
SCC Master Menu
UP : CURSOR UP
DOWN : CURSOR DOWN
SELECT : CHOOSE
© 1989-2003
MASTER MENU
MONITOR/MIMIC DISPLAY
START-UP PROCEDURES
WALK-IN DISPLAY
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
STATUS REPORTS
BATTERY TIME
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
METER CALIBRATION
LIMIT SETTINGS
BATTERY EQUALIZE
Module Master Menu
26
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
From any primary screen (accessed directly from the Master Menu), pushing the Select pad once will
return you to the Master Menu. From any secondary screen, pushing the Select pad twice will return
you to the Master Menu.
Please note that some screens have multiple pages. However, in each case, instructions appear for
accessing other pages.
• Monitor/Mimic Display—This graphic mimics the power flow through the UPS system. Input
voltage and current readings, battery status, UPS ratings, load readings, circuit breaker indications, system status and alarm messages are all displayed on this screen.
• Walk-In Display (Modules Only)—This is a bar graph that shows DC bus voltage, input currents and UPS module output voltage (all in percent of nominal). This screen typically is utilized
during start-up procedures.
• Status Reports—This display consists of four submenu selections: present status, event history,
history status and system status. These screens display data on the system’s present and past
performance. They also display information about any faults that have occurred in the system and
total operating hours for the controls.
• System Configuration—This screen displays the current configuration of the UPS system. It
also enables the operator to reset the date, time and dial-out phone numbers. The SCC current
rating can also be adjusted lower than design maximum. The operator can view, but cannot
change, any of the settings unless the Interlock (Security Access) button is pressed.
• Limit Settings—This security access display shows the present UPS system alarm limit settings. The operator can view the settings, but they should not be changed without consulting Liebert Global Services.
• Load Transfer Procedures (SCC Only)—This screen specifies all of the steps required to manually transfer the critical load between the UPS system and the bypass source. Comparisons of
the voltage, frequency and phase synchronization of the UPS system output and the bypass line
are also illustrated to aid in the transfer or retransfer procedure.
• Start-Up Procedures—This two-page screen lists step-by-step procedures to start the UPS system and the modules.
• Shutdown Procedures—This two-page screen lists the proper sequence of steps to shutdown
the UPS system and the modules for maintenance or repairs. The steps instruct the operator to
transfer the critical load to bypass, open the battery circuit breakers and open the UPS module
output and input circuit breakers to shut down and isolate the modules. The critical load will
remain on bypass power unless circuit breakers outside the UPS system are also opened.
• Battery Time (Modules Only)—This graph displays the projected battery voltage drop caused
by a battery discharge over time. During a period of battery discharge, the Liebert Series 610 calculates the battery time remaining based on battery rating, initial battery condition and actual
connected load. The UPS continues to update and display both rated (theoretical) and calculated
time every 6 seconds. This enables the operator to immediately see the effects of load shedding on
time remaining and to accurately assess his power resources.
• Meter Calibration—This security access screen enables an authorized Liebert field-service
engineer to adjust and calibrate the UPS metered functions. The operator can view, but should
not change, any of the settings.
• Battery Equalize—The battery equalize screen lets the operator change the battery equalize
recharging mode from manual to automatic and to observe or change the equalize time. Battery
equalize charge voltage is higher than battery float (constant) charge voltage. Automatic and
manual equalizing can be controlled from the SCC, while only manual equalizing can be controlled from the module.
NOTE
Do not use battery equalize charging with sealed-cell batteries. Refer to the battery
manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for specific information
about equalize charging.
• Customer Alarm Definitions (SCC Only)—This optional screen allows the operator to define
alarms for conditions external to the UPS, battery or switchgear.
27
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
• Battery Test (MMU Only)—The optional battery test screen allows the operator to perform
manual battery tests to determine the general condition of the battery system. The results of the
last 10 tests are recorded in non-volatile storage and can be retrieved through the battery test
results screen.
• Battery Temp Compensation Charging (MMU Only)—The optional battery temperature
sensing unit, when installed, automatically reduces the float charge voltage in response to
increases in battery temperature. The nominal float voltage is 540VDC (2.25 volts per cell) at
25°C. This float voltage is automatically reduced 5VDC for each temperature rise of 5°C. The LCD
indicates whether the temperature compensation circuit is active.
3.2.2
SCC Monitor/Mimic Display Screen
From SCC Master Menu move the highlighted cursor to MONITOR/MIMIC DISPLAY. Press the
Select pad and the Monitor/Mimic screen is displayed.
The Monitor/Mimic display screen is a simplified block diagram of the UPS system. This screen gives
the operator an overall view of the power flow through the UPS system. The screen consists of three
major sections: the input/UPS metering section, the load metering section and the status and alarm
message areas. The metered parameter values on the Monitor/Mimic screen are updated at one-second intervals.
Figure 14 SCC Monitor/Mimic display screen
1
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
LOAD
627 KVA / 502 KW
2
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
MOD 1 ON LINE
MOD 2 ON LINE
MOD 3 ON LINE
4
© 1989-2003
3
UPS RATINGS
SCCB 1600
5
B
C
755A
755A
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
A
755A
REDUNDANT
6
7
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
Input Metering Displays
NOTE
All voltage readings are phase-to-phase measurements (A-B, B-C and C-A). All current
readings are phase measurements (A, B and C).
Item 1 - Bypass Input: This block displays the bypass input voltage and the bypass input frequency.
The System Bypass Breaker is shown to the right of this block. The status of the circuit breaker is
illustrated as open or closed.
Item 2 - UPS Input Pwr: This block displays the input voltage to the UPS modules. This data is
received serially from the modules.
Output Metering Displays
Item 3 - UPS Ratings: The SCC current rating is specified at the top of this block. The UPS system
output voltage and frequency are also displayed in this block. The UPS Output Breaker is shown to
the right of this block. The status of the circuit breaker is illustrated as open or closed.
Item 4 - Load: This block displays the total output power to the critical load in kVA and kW. The
critical load current per phase is also displayed in this block. Note that kW is not displayed when the
load is on the bypass line.
The load block also indicates the number of modules connected and whether the UPS system is operating in the redundant or non-redundant mode.
During an overload condition, the time remaining before shutdown or transfer is displayed at the bottom of the load box.
28
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Operation
Status/Alarm Message Areas
The status/alarm message areas display vital information about the operation of the UPS system.
During normal operation no alarm messages should be present. Changes in the status of the system
and possible alarm conditions can be monitored. Both the status and the alarm messages are displayed in reverse video (highlighted—light on dark). The alarm messages continue flashing until the
Horn Off pad is pressed. To clear a latching alarm, you must also press the Alarm Reset pad after
the alarm condition is corrected.
The following lists show the status and alarm messages that may be displayed in these areas. For
more information and the corrective actions for these messages, refer to Table 9 in this section.
Item 5 - Module Status Messages
Module On Line
Module Off Line
Module Summary Alarm
Module Communication Failure
Item 6 - System Status Messages
Static Switch Connected
Static Switch Disconnected
OK To Transfer
Not OK To Transfer
Item 7 - Alarm Messages
Load On Bypass
Auto Retransfer Primed
Manual Reset/Retransfer
Static Switch Unable
Bypass Not Available
Bypass Phase Sequence Wrong
Control Power Fail
Output Over/Underfrequency
Output Undervoltage
Output Overvoltage
Overload
Overload Transfer
Emergency Off
Module Summary Alarm
Battery Cycle Buffer Warning
Transfer Fail
29
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2.3
Module Monitor/Mimic Display Screen
From module Master Menu move the highlighted cursor to MONITOR/MIMIC DISPLAY. Press the
Select pad and the Monitor/Mimic screen is displayed.
The Monitor/Mimic display screen is a simplified block diagram of the UPS module and power connections. This screen gives the operator an overall view of the power flow through the UPS module. The
screen consists of three major sections: the input/UPS metering section, the load metering section and
the status and alarm message areas. The metered parameter values on the Monitor/Mimic screen are
updated at one second intervals.
Figure 15 Module Monitor/Mimic display screen
4
© 1989-2003
LOAD
270 KVA / 217 KW
1
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
350A 350A 350A
2
UPS RATINGS
AP648-84
RATED 400 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
480V
B-C C-A
480V 480V
60.0 Hz
BATTERY
3
A
B
325A 325A
C
325A
5
VOLTS 540
AMPS 15 CHARG
NOTE
All voltage readings are phase-to-phase measurements (A-B, B-C and C-A). All current
readings are phase measurements (A, B and C).
Input Metering Displays
Item 1 - UPS Input Pwr: This block displays the UPS module input voltage and current. The Module Input breaker is shown to the right of this block. The status of the circuit breaker is illustrated as
open or closed.
Item 2 - Battery: The battery block displays the DC bus voltage and the charge or discharge current
to or from the battery. This block reads MODULE DC BUS when the battery circuit breaker is open
and BATTERY when the battery circuit breaker is closed during normal operation. This block reads
BATTERY EQUALIZE when the battery equalize charge voltage is used to recharge the battery.
This block also shows BATTERY TEMPERATURE when the battery temperature sensor option is
installed. The Module Battery Disconnect (MBD) is shown to the right of this block. The status of the
circuit breaker is illustrated as open or closed.
Output Metering Displays
Item 3 - UPS Ratings: The module part number and kVA rating are specified at the top of this block.
The UPS output voltage and frequency are also displayed in this block. The Module Output breaker is
shown to the right of this block. The status of the circuit breaker is illustrated as open or closed.
Item 4 - Load: This block displays the module output power to the critical load in kVA and kW. The
critical load current per phase is also displayed in this block.
30
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Operation
Alarm Messages
The alarm message area displays vital information about the operation of the UPS system. During
normal operation no alarm messages should be present. Alarm conditions can be monitored. The
alarm messages are displayed in reverse video (highlighted— light on dark). To clear a latching
alarm, you must also press the Alarm Reset pad after the alarm condition is corrected.
The following list shows the alarm messages that may be displayed in this area. For more information
and the corrective actions for these messages, refer to Table 9 in this section.
Item 5 - Alarm Messages
Input Fail
Reverse Power
DC Ground Fault
Rectifier Fuse Blown
DC Capacitor Fuse Blown
Inverter Fault
Battery CB Open
Hardware Shutdown
Battery Discharging
Emergency Off
Low Battery Warning
Ambient Overtemperature
Low Battery Shutdown
Fan/Blower Failed
DC Overvoltage Shutdown
Equipment Overtemperature
Input Current Unbalanced
Overtemperature Timeout
Control Power Fail
Battery Cycle Buffer Warning
Inverter Non-Synchronized
Battery Overtemperature
Overload
Battery Exercise
Overload Shutdown
Figures 16 through 20 illustrate how the Monitor/Mimic Display screens on the SCC and on a module depict the power flow through the UPS system.
A three-module system designed for redundant operation is shown. A multi-module UPS system may
include up to six (6) modules for each System Control Cabinet (SCC).
31
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 16 Monitor/Mimic display example: Normal power flow
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
© 1989-2003
A
UPS RATINGS
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
MOD 1 ON LINE
MOD 2 ON LINE
MOD 3 ON LINE
LOAD
627 KVA / 502 KW
SCCB 1600
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
755A
B
C
755A 755A
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
REDUNDANT
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
SCC Display
© 1989-2003
LOAD
270 KVA / 217 KW
A
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
350A 350A 350A
UPS RATINGS
AP648-84
RATED 400 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
410A
B
C
410A 410A
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
BATTERY
VOLTS 540
AMPS 15 CHARG
Module Display
32
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 17 Monitor/Mimic display example: Utility fail
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C
C-A
0V
0V
0V
0 Hz
© 1989-2003
LOAD
627 KVA / 502 KW
A
UPS RATINGS
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C
C-A
0V
0V
0V
755A
SCCB 1600
B
C
755A 755A
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
B-C
C-A
480V
480V
480V
REDUNDANT
60.0Hz
MOD 1 ON LINE SUM ALM
MOD 2 ON LINE SUM ALM
MOD 3 ON LINE SUM ALM
Not OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
Byp Not Avail
Static Sw Unable
Module Sum Alm
SCC Display
© 1989-2003
LOAD
270 KVA / 217 KW
A
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
0V
0V
0V
0A
0A
0A
UPS RATINGS
AP648-84
RATED 400 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
325A
B
C
325A 325A
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
BATTERY
VOLTS 480
AMPS 645 DISCHARG
Not OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
Input Fail
Batt Discharging
Module Display
33
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 18 Monitor/Mimic display example: Load on bypass, UPS modules on and charging battery
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
480V
© 1989-2003
LOAD
B-C
C-A
480V 480V
60.0 Hz
627 KVA / 502 KW
A
UPS RATINGS
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C
C-A
480V 480V
480V
SCCB 1600
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
480V
B-C
C-A
480V 480V
755A
B
755A
C
755A
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
REDUNDANT
60.0 Hz
MOD 1 ON LINE
MOD 2 ON LINE
MOD 3 ON LINE
Load On Bypass
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
SCC Display
© 1989-2003
LOAD
2700 kVA
kW
KVA//217
0 KW
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
390A
90A 390A
90A
90A 390A
UPS RATINGS
AP648-84
RATED 400 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
480V
A
325A
0A
B
325A
0A
C
325A
0A
B-C C-A
480V 480V
60.0 Hz
BATTERY
VOLTS 540
AMPS 75 CHARG
Module Display
34
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 19 Monitor/Mimic display example: Load on UPS, one UPS module off line
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
UPS
UPS INPUT
INPUT PWR
PWR
A-B
A-B B-C
B-C C-A
C-A
380V
480V 380V
480V
480V 380V
75A 75A 75A
BATTERY
MOD 1 ON LINE
VOLTS
540 LINE SUM ALM
MOD
2 OFF
AMPS
MOD
3 75
ONCHARG
LINE
© 1989-2003
LOAD
6270KVA
KW
KVA//502
0 KW
A
UPS RATINGS
AP658-71
SCCB
1600
RATED 500 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
380V
480V
B-C C-A
380V
480V 380V
340V
50.0
60.0 Hz
Hz
0A
755A
B
C
0A 755A
0A
755A
2 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
NON-REDUNDANT
Module Sum Alm
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
SCC Display
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C C-A
380V 380V 380V
50.0 Hz
UPS
UPS INPUT
INPUT PWR
PWR
A-B
A-B B-C
B-C C-A
C-A
380V
480V
480V
480V
380V 380V
380V
380V 380V
75A 405A
75A
75A 405A
405A
BATTERY
MOD 1 ON LINE
VOLTS
540 LINE SUM ALM
MOD
2 OFF
AMPS
75
MOD
3 15
ONCHARG
LINE
© 1989-2003
LOAD
6270KVA
502
314
KVA//251
0 KW
KW
A
UPS RATINGS
AP648-84
AP658-71
SCCT
1600
RATED 400
500 KVA
KVA
RATED
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
B-C C-A
380V
380V 380V
480V
480V 480V
380V
380V
50.0
60.0Hz
Hz
50.0
Hz
378A
0A
953A
B
C
378A
0A 953A
378A
0A
953A
2 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
NON-REDUNDANT
Module Sum Alm
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
Module Display
35
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 20 Monitor/Mimic Display example: Load on bypass, all UPS modules off line
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0 Hz
UPS
UPS INPUT
INPUT PWR
PWR
A-B
A-B B-C
B-C C-A
C-A
380V
480V 380V
480V
480V 380V
75A
75A
75A
BATTERY
MOD 1 OFF LINE SUM ALM
VOLTS
540 LINE SUM ALM
MOD
2 OFF
AMPS
CHARG
MOD
3 75
OFF
LINE SUM ALM
© 1989-2003
LOAD
6270KVA
KW
KVA//502
0 KW
A
UPS RATINGS
AP658-71
SCCB
1600
RATED 500 KVA
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
380V
0V
B-C C-A
380V
0V 380V
0V
50.0
Hz
0 Hz
Not OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
0A
755A
B
C
0A 755A
0A
755A
0 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
NON-REDUNDANT
Load on Bypass
Static Sw Unable
Module Sum Alm
SCC Display
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C
C-A
380V
380V 380V
380V
380V 380V
50.0 Hz
UPS
UPS INPUT
INPUT PWR
PWR
A-B
B-C
A-B
B-C C-A
C-A
380V
380V
380V
480V
480V
480V
380V 380V
380V
380V
380V
380V
380V 380V
75A
75A
75A
455A
0A 455A
0A 455A
0A
MODULE DC BUS
BATTERY
MOD 1 ON
OFFLINE
LINE SUM ALM
VOLTS 5400
VOLTS
MOD
2 OFF LINE SUM ALM
AMPS
0
AMPS
75
CHARG
MOD
3 15
ON
OFF
LINE
LINE SUM ALM
© 1989-2003
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
627
6270KVA
502
314
KVAKVA
//251
0 KW
KW
A
UPS
UPS RATINGS
RATINGS
AP658-71
AP646-84
SCCT
1600
AP658-71
SCCT
1600
RATED 500
500 KVA
KVA
375
RATED
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
380V
380V
0V
B-C
C-A
380V
380V
380V
0V
0V
50.0
Hz
0 Hz
50.0
Hz
50.0
Hz
380V
Not
OKTransfer
to Transfer
OK to
Static Switch Connected
953A
477A
0A
953A
B
C
953A
953A
477A
0A
477A
0A
0 OF 3 MODULES
2
CONNECTED
NON-REDUNDANT
Input On
Fail
Load
Module
Sum
Bypass
Alm
Batt CB
Static
SwOpen
Unable
Module Sum Alm
Module Display
36
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2.4
Walk-In Display Screen
From the module Master Menu, highlight WALK-IN DISPLAY and then press the Select pad. Note
that this screen is displayed at the UPS modules but is not required at the System Control Cabinet
(SCC).
Figure 21 Walk-in display screen during start-up
SELECT : MASTER MENU
DOWN :
SELECT :
© 1989-2003
D.C. VOLTS
INPUT AMPS
OUTPUT VOLTS
0%
25%
50%
75%
100%
The Walk-In Display screen enables the operator to monitor the UPS module DC bus voltage, the
input currents and the output voltage. This is important during the start-up procedures.
During start-up, the UPS module input circuit breaker is closed and power is applied to the UPS module. The Walk-In Display screen graphically shows the voltage increasing on the DC bus as the UPS
module rectifier begins to walk-in.
The DC Volts bar gradually moves to the right. After the DC Volts bar reaches the 90% level, the
UPS module inverter starts-up and the Output Volts bar also moves to the right. Both the DC Volts
and the Output Volts bars should settle near the 100% line as the UPS module becomes fully energized.
The three Input Amps bars (one for each phase of input current) move to the right during the initial
transformer inrush. They should return to the left after the momentary inrush has subsided, then
increase to about 10% as the DC Volts increase.
Modules equipped with the optional input filter will indicate more than 10% with no connected load.
NOTE
After the critical load is transferred from the bypass line to the UPS modules, the Input Amps
bars continue to indicate the percent of the design input current to the UPS module rectifier.
If any Input Amps bar differs from the average bar length by more than 10%, call Liebert
Global Services.
37
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2.5
Status Reports Screens
Go to the Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to STATUS REPORTS. Press the Select
button and the Status Reports screen is displayed.
The Status Report screen is divided into four submenu reports: PRESENT STATUS, EVENT HISTORY, HISTORY STATUS and SYSTEM STATUS.
To look at any of the reports, do the following:
1. From the Status Reports screen, press the Up or Down pad to move the highlighted cursor to the
desired selection.
2. Press the Select pad to view the desired report page.
3. Use the Up and Down pads to move through a report that includes several screens (frames).
4. Press the Select pad to exit the report.
5. To return to the Master Menu, return to EXIT and press the Select pad.
Each report screen includes the date, time and a frame number. The frame number indicates the relationship sequence of a 4 millisecond time segment. The SCC and each module generate their own
frame numbers independently. The clock in each module is synchronized to the SCC clock.
NOTE
Each of the four Status Reports can be displayed on a remote terminal.
Refer to 3.2.15 - Communication Interfaces.
Figure 22 Status reports screen
UP : CURSOR UP
© 1989-2003
DOWN : CURSOR DOWN
SELECT : CHOOSE
EXIT
PRESENT STATUS
EVENT HISTORY
HISTORY STATUS
SYSTEM STATUS
Present Status
The Present Status screen shows the current status of the UPS system (SCC) or module. This screen
displays any alarm messages that are present and the values of the metered parameters for each cabinet. Battery values are displayed only at the UPS modules.
Each update sequence (every 4 milliseconds) is called a frame. The frame number is displayed in the
upper right corner. The Present Status screen display is updated every two seconds.
Battery Time Remaining (in minutes) is displayed on the module screens during a battery discharge.
The value is on the Battery Volts line in the TIME column (far right side of the screen). For the first
two minutes of discharge, the Rated Time Remaining is displayed. After that, the Calculated Time
Remaining is displayed and updated every six seconds.
All the information on this screen, including Battery Time Remaining, is available to a local terminal
or modem through the communications ports provided in the Liebert Series 610 UPS. Refer to
Table 11 in this manual for keyboard commands to use with the communication ports.
38
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 23 Present status report screens, SCC (above) and module
PRESENT STATUS
ORDER - 000000
MODULE-0
SITE ID - 00000
01/12/98
14:06:26
FRAME 35
SITE TAG - 0000000
**** ACTIVE ALARMS **** Batt Discharging
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
LOAD KVA
BYPASS VOLTS
A
480
325
B
480
325
0
DC
C
480
325
0
LOAD
HERTZ
60.0
270
0
TIME
0:06
END OF REPORT
SELECT : EXIT
SCC Status Report
PRESENT STATUS
ORDER - 000000
MODULE-0
SITE ID - 00000
01/12/98
14:06:26
FRAME 35
SITE TAG - 0000000
**** ACTIVE ALARMS **** Batt Discharging
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
LOAD KVAVOLTS
BATTERY
BYPASS VOLTS
BATTERY
AMPS
INPUT VOLTS
END OF
INPUT
AMPS
REPORT
LOAD KVA
A
480
380
410
325
0
0
0
B
480
380
325
410
0
0
0
C
480
380
325
410
0
0
0
DC
LOAD
480
-645
270
HERTZ
60.0
50.0
TIME
0:09
0:06
270
END OF REPORT
SELECT : EXIT
Module Status Report
Event History
The Event History screen lists the active alarms present in the UPS system (SCC) or modules. This
screen also displays the prior 128 alarm frames, in a first in, first out (FIFO) sequence, that have
taken place along with the date and the time that each alarm frame occurred. Use the Up and Down
pads to look through the different alarm frames.
Figure 24 Event history report screen
PRESENT
STATUS
EVENT HISTORY
MODULE-0
MODULE-0
01/12/98
01/17/98
14:06:26
15:06:41
FRAME175
35
FRAME
ORDER
ID ID
- 00000
TAG
- 0000000
ORDER- -000000
000000 SITE
SITE
- 00000SITE
SITE
TAG
- 0000000
****
****ACTIVE
ACTIVEALARMS
ALARMS****
**** Batt
BattDischarging
Discharging
Low Batt Warning
OUTPUT VOLTS
380
380
380
DC
HERTZ
LOAD
TIME
OUTPUT AMPS
410 A 410 B 410 C
50.0
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
480
LOAD KVAVOLTS
BATTERY
0:09
270
0:06
-480
BYPASS VOLTS
BATTERY
AMPS
0
0
0
INPUT VOLTS
0
0
0
END OF
INPUT
AMPS
REPORT
0
0
0
LOAD KVA
270
UP : NEXT FRAME
DOWN : PREVIOUS FRAME
END OF REPORT
SELECT : EXIT
39
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
History Status
The History Status screen displays 64 frames, of 4 milliseconds each, from the Present Status screen.
Note that the values for output volts and amps are updated once each millisecond. Alarms are listed
in the sequence they occurred, within 1 millisecond resolution. The frames are stored in a buffer (a
computer information storage technique). The buffer stores the frames in a first in, first out sequence.
As a new frame enters the buffer the oldest one is released.
When a designated fault occurs (see list below), the buffer stores information for the next 24 frames
and then freezes (stops gathering information). At that time, the History Status screen contains
40 frames before the fault, the frame when the fault occurred and 23 frames after the fault. This
64-page report is a very useful diagnostic tool for the operator or Liebert Global Services. Use the Up
and Down pads to view the screens.
Figure 25 History status report screens
HISTORY STATUS
MODULE-0
04/10/97
16:49:21
ORDER - 000000
SITE ID - 00000
SITE TAG - 0000000
**** ACTIVE ALARMS **** Output Ov-volts
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
LOAD KVA
BYPASS VOLTS
A
480
420
480
B
480
420
480
C
480
420
DC
LOAD
HERTZ
TIME
60.0
349
480
FRAME 36
UP : NEXT FRAME
DOWN : PREVIOUS FRAME
SELECT : EXIT
HISTORY
HISTORYSTATUS
STATUS
MODULE-0
MODULE-0 04/10/97
01/17/98 16:49:21
11:21:59 FRAME
FRAME
36100
ORDER - 000000
SITE ID - 00000
SITE TAG - 0000000
**** ACTIVE ALARMS **** Output
Batt Discharging
Ov-volts
Low Batt Warning
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
LOAD KVA
OUTPUT
VOLTS
BYPASS VOLTS
OUTPUT
AMPS
BATTERY VOLTS
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUPUT AMPS
BATTERY AMPS
INPUT VOLTS
INPUT AMPS
OUPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
LOAD KVA
A
380
480
530
325
B
380
480
530
325
C
380
480
530
325
480
380
325
480
380
325
480
380
325
480
325
480
325
480
325
0
0
480
325
0
0
480
325
0
0
480
325
DC
LOAD
349
390
HERTZ
TIME
50.0
60.0
0:01
-645
UP : NEXT FRAME
DOWN : PREVIOUS FRAME
270
40
SELECT : EXIT
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Table 5 shows the alarm conditions that stop the History Status buffer from gathering data.
Table 5
Alarm conditions that freeze history data gathering
Alarm in SCC
Alarm in Module
Auto Transfer to Bypass
DC Cap Fuse Blown
Output Overvoltage
DC Overvoltage Shutdown
Output undervoltage
Inverter Fault
Overload Transfer
Low Battery Shutdown
Overload Shutdown
Overtemperature Timeout
Rectifier Fuse Blown
Reverse Power
NOTE
The Emergency Off alarm will also freeze the SCC History Status buffer with the Auto
Transfer to Bypass alarm (if the load is on the UPS system when the alarm condition occurs).
The History Status buffer does not resume collecting new frames until the fault is cleared and the
Alarm Reset pad is pressed for more than 5 seconds (or until the screen clears).
41
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
System Status
The System Status screen displays the module Total Operating Hours, Enable Backlight and the Battery Cycle Monitor.
Battery Cycle Monitor—Module Only
Selecting the Battery Cycle Monitor gives you access to detailed information about the module’s most
recent battery discharge events. Periodic review of this data can give a good indication of battery performance and expected life.
Each battery discharge cycle is put into one of four categories, depending on the length of the event:
•
•
•
•
0-30 Seconds Discharge
31-90 Seconds Discharge
91-240 Seconds Discharge
Over 240 Seconds Discharge
Each discharge cycle is sorted by time duration and tagged with the following system parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
System time and date
Event Number
Duration of cycle (seconds)
Lowest DC Bus Voltage
Highest DC Bus Current
kW carried by the batteries at the start of cycle
Battery Environment Ambient Temperature (when equipped with optional temperature sensor)
Up to 132 discharge cycle events can be stored at any given time. When the buffer approaches its
capacity, a warning message is broadcast via terminal and modem communication channels and a
complete listing of all records (in order of occurrence) is sent to the terminal port. If a serial printer is
attached to the terminal port (see 3.2.15 - Communication Interfaces), the operator can print a
hard copy of the report. If a printer is not available, a terminal emulation program can capture the
report to disk for later review or printing. Once the buffer is filled, new data will replace the old on a
first in, first out (FIFO) basis as new cycles occur.
To view this data, select the BATTERY CYCLE MONITOR option on the System Status screen. At
the next screen (see Figure 26), you can select either the Battery Cycle Monitoring Summary screen
or a screen showing detailed information on any one of the four categories of discharge (0-30 seconds,
31-90 seconds, 91-240 seconds and over 240 seconds).
Figure 26 Battery cycle monitor screen
UP : CURSOR UP
© 1989-2003
DOWN : CURSOR DOWN
SELECT : CHOOSE
EXIT
EXIT
Battery Cycle Monitor
Battery Temperature
...............................................
...............................................
Enable
Enable
Battery Cycle Monitoring Summary
0-30 Seconds Discharge
................................
11
31-90 Seconds Discharge
................................
5
91-240 Seconds Discharge
................................
2
Over 240 Seconds Discharge
................................
1
19
Total Since 02/4/95
42
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
The Summary screen (Figure 27) shows Total Number of Discharge Cycles, Accumulated Battery
Time, Accumulated Battery Amp Hours, Accumulated Battery Kilowatt Hours and Battery Temperature. During a battery discharge event, the screen changes to show information about the present discharge cycle. The screen displays Active Cycle Time in place of Accumulated Battery Time and shows
Active Battery AH and Active Battery kWH instead of accumulated values.
Figure 27 Battery cycle monitoring summary screen
© 1989-2003
SELECT :
EXIT
Battery Cycle Monitoring Summary
Total No. of Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accumulated Battery Time . . . . . . .
Accumulated Battery AH . . . . . . . .
Accumulated Battery KWH . . . . . . .
Battery Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
15 min. 32 sec.
71
34
25°C / 77°F
Figure 28 shows a typical detail screen for the 91-240 Seconds Discharge category. This information
can be collected remotely, through the optional communications board and modem, by a remote terminal or a personal computer equipped with a modem and communications program. See 3.2.15 - Communication Interfaces for more information.
NOTE
This information is applicable to systems with separate batteries for each module. If the
modules share a common battery, select one module to do the monitoring and disregard
the other(s).
Figure 28 Typical data on discharge cycles of 91 to 240 seconds duration during the recording period
UP : CURSOR UP
Total
91-240 se c. Cycl
5
© 1989-2003
DOWN : CURSOR DOWN
SELECT :
CHOOSE
EXIT
Event
15
12
9
5
2
Date
4/12/95
3/25/95
3/13/95
2/07/95
11/24/94
Time
10:31
20:21
7:35
17:22
12:33
Duration
235
98
139
199
95
Min. Volt
477
479
467
478
477
43
Max. Amp Start KW Start Temp
110
70
68
97
37
65
173
69
67
95
40
70
83
39
69
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2.6
System Configuration Screens
Go to the Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to SYSTEM CONFIGURATION. Press the
Select pad and the System Configuration screen is displayed.
The System Configuration screen lists parameters that can be changed to adjust your UPS modules
and the SCC to your site requirements. Some of the information displayed is factory-set and should
only be changed by Liebert Global Services. Parameters that should be adjusted by the user include
date, time, auto dial number and modem baud rate.
The System Configuration screen is one of the displays that has controlled access to limit who is able
to change site parameters. This type of screen is called a Security Access screen. This controlled
access feature allows anyone to review the present parameters, but limits access for making changes.
When you see Security Access displayed on the screen (upper left corner), to make authorized changes
you must open the control cabinet door (key required) and push the Interlock button on the back of
the control panel (Figure 11). Close and lock the control cabinet door after making authorized
changes.
Figure 29 SCC system configuration screen
SECURITY ACCESS
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
EXIT
SELECT: CHOOSE
Part Number ....................................................................... 02-791112-14
Order Number .................................................................... 000000
Site ID Number................................................................... 00000
Site TAG Number ............................................................... 0000000
System Number ................................................................. 1
Number of Modules in System ........................................... 2
Date.................................................................................... 01/17/03
Time ................................................................................... 14:51:59
Auto Dial............................................................................. YES
Max Auto-Rexfer Attempts ................................................. 5
System Current Rating ....................................................... 1600
Language Selection ........................................................... English
System Options
Version 3.02.0
Copyright© 1989-2003
Liebert Corporation
All Rights Reserved
NOTE
If you mistakenly set a site parameter digit to an incorrect value, you must return to the System
Configuration screen and then go to the required screen to reset the value.
Part Number: This is a factory-set part number of the UPS cabinet, which determines many internal
operating parameters. It cannot be changed.
Order Number: This is a factory-set number to identify your particular installation.
System Number: This number is used to identify one or more UPS systems that may be present on
one site.
Number of Modules in System: This shows the total number of modules.
44
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Date
This is the system’s real-time date setting. The system control program sends to each module the date
entered at the System Control Cabinet (SCC). You cannot change the system date from the control
panel of a UPS module.
Figure 30 Date screen
© 1989-2003
DATE
01/17/96
UP : INCREASE VALUE
DOWN : DECREASE VALUE
SELECT :
WALK-THRU/ EXIT
To reset the date, do the following at the SCC.
1. From the System Configuration screen, press the Up or Down pad to move the highlighted cursor
to DATE.
2. Press the Select pad. The Date screen will appear.
3. Press the Select pad to move the arrow to the next digit to the right.
4. When the arrow is on the digit to be changed, press the Up pad to increase the number or the
Down pad to decrease it.
5. Press Select to set the value and move to the next digit.
6. After the correct month/day/year has been set, press the Select pad again to return to the System
Configuration screen.
NOTE
Precise Date and Time functions are required for accurate archival and event history purposes.
Both the Date and Time can be set from a remote terminal. Refer to 3.2.15 - Communication
Interfaces.
45
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Time
This is the system’s real-time clock. The system control program sends to each module the time
entered at the System Control Cabinet (SCC).
You cannot change the system time from the control panel of a UPS module.
Figure 31 Time screen
© 1989-2003
TIME
09:15:00
UP : INCREASE VALUE
DOWN : DECREASE VALUE
SELECT :
WALK-THRU/ EXIT
To reset the time do the following at the SCC:
1. From the System Configuration screen, press the Up or Down pad to move the highlighted cursor
to Time.
2. Press the Select pad. The Time screen will appear.
3. Press the Select pad to move the arrow to the next digit to the right.
4. When the arrow is on the digit to be changed, press the Up or Down pad to increase or decrease
the hour/minute/second number.
5. Press Select to set the value and move to the next digit.
6. After the correct hour/minute/second has been set, press the Select pad again to return to the
System Configuration screen.
NOTE
Precise Date and Time functions are required for accurate archival and event history purposes.
Both the Date and Time can be set from a remote terminal. Refer to 3.2.15 - Communication
Interfaces.
46
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Auto Dial
This is a feature that automatically dials (through a customer supplied PC-compatible modem) a preprogrammed telephone number (up to 12 digits) when specified alarm conditions occur within the
UPS system. The connection for the modem is at the SCC. Automatic dial attempts to the first number are made at periodic intervals for 30 minutes. If unanswered, the system rolls over to the second
number and repeats the process until connection is made.
Upon connection, the system transmits data, in RS-232C format, that includes the system identification code, the present alarm message(s) and the time that the alarm(s) occurred. Refer to 3.2.15 Communication Interfaces.
Refer to the Special Functions column in Table 9 to see which alarm messages will initiate an autodial call.
If the auto-dial numbers were specified at time of order or installation, the numbers are pre-programmed into the system. However, if the numbers need to be changed, follow the steps listed below
to reprogram the auto-dialer at the SCC.
1. From the System Configuration screen, press the Up or Down pad to move the highlighted cursor
to Auto Dial.
2. Press the Select pad. The Auto Dial screen will appear.
3. Move to and select the first Auto Dial Number.
4. Press the Select pad to move the arrow to the next digit to the right.
5. When the arrow is on the digit to be changed, press the Up pad to increase the number or press
the Down pad to decrease it. Press Select to set the value and move to the next digit.
6. After all of the changes have been made, press the Select pad again to return to the System
Configuration screen.
7. If required, go to the Second Number screen and enter the correct number.
Figure 32 Auto dial setting screen
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR
AUTO DIAL SETTING SCREEN
SELECT: CHOOSE
EXIT
Enable Auto Dial .............................................................
Enable Communication Check........................................
Modem Baud Rate ..........................................................
Auto Dial Number............................................................
Second Number .......................................................
Modem Initialization String ..............................................
Set Communication Check Time.....................................
47
YES
NO
2400
1 800 555-1234
0 000 000-0000
xxxxxxxxxxxxx
00:00
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Modem Baud Rate
This sets the transmission rate at which the system relays data to a terminal through the modem.
Figure 33 Modem baud rate
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR
AUTO DIAL SETTING SCREEN
SELECT: CHOOSE
EXIT
Enable Auto Dial .............................................................
Enable Communication Check........................................
Modem Baud Rate ..........................................................
Auto Dial Number............................................................
Second Number .......................................................
Modem Initialization String ..............................................
Set Communication Check Time.....................................
YES
NO
2400
1 800 555-1234
0 000 000-0000
xxxxxxxxxxxxx
00:00
To change the modem baud rate, do the following at the SCC:
1. From the System Configuration screen, press the Up or Down pad to move the highlighted cursor
to Auto Dial.
2. Move to and select the Modem Baud Rate.
3. Press the Up or Down pad to display the desired baud rate.
4. Press the Select pad to set the baud rate and to return to the System Configuration screen.
Maximum Auto-Retransfer Attempts
When a UPS output overload condition exceeds a pre-programmed current-versus-time window
(based on the SCC current rating), the UPS automatically transfers the critical load to the bypass
line. After the overload condition has been corrected, the UPS attempts to automatically retransfer
the critical load to the UPS output (unless zero attempts is selected). The Maximum Auto-Retransfer Attempts limits the number of times (0 to 5) that the UPS attempts to retransfer the load back to
the UPS within a one-hour time period.
If more than the selected number of overloads occurs during one hour, the critical load remains on the
bypass line and must be manually retransferred to the UPS system. Note that you should determine
the cause of any overload condition.
Note that automatic retransfers are initiated only if the critical load was transferred to the bypass
line because of a system overload. If an automatic transfer to bypass occurred for any other reason, an
automatic retransfer will not be initiated. Refer to 3.5.3 - Automatic Retransfers to UPS.
Figure 34 Maximum auto-retransfer attempts screen
© 1989-2003
MAX AUTO-REXFER ATTEMPTS
LOWER INPUT
0
VALUE
UPPER LIMIT
3
5
UP : INCREASE
DOWN : DECREASE
SELECT :
EXIT
48
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
To change the Maximum Auto-Retransfer Attempts parameter, do the following at the SCC:
1. From the System Configuration Screen, press the Up or Down pad to highlight Maximum AutoRetransfer Attempts.
2. Press the Select pad. The screen above will appear.
3. Press the Up pad to increase the value or the Down pad to decrease it.
4. Press the Select pad to set the value and to return to the System Configuration screen.
System Current Rating
System current rating is determined by the part number, which is entered at the factory and cannot
be changed. Once it has been entered, the part number determines the value displayed for the System
Current Rating on the SCC system configuration screen (see Figure 29).
Language Selection
English and Portuguese are supported.
System Options
Figure 35 SCC system options screen
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
SELECT: CHOOSE
SYSTEM OPTIONS
EXIT
LCD Contrast
Backlight Brightness
Customer Alarm Interface Board................................NO
Continuous Duty Static Switch .................................YES
Figure 36 MMU system options screen
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
SELECT: CHOOSE
SYSTEM OPTIONS
EXIT
LCD Contrast
Backlight Brightness
Battery Temp. Compensated Charging...................... NO
Battery Test .............................................................. YES
49
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
Figure 37 Battery test screen—MMU only
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
SELECT: CHOOSE
BATTERY TEST
EXIT
Battery Test Results
Start Battery Test
Stop Battery Test
Select Battery Type...............................................15 min
Figure 38 Battery test results screen
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
SELECT: CHOOSE
End DC
Voltage
End DC
Current
Elapsed
Time
Load
kW
Starting
Date
Starting
Time
Start
Temp.
Test
Result
Continuous Duty Static Switch (Optional)
This option applies to SCC only. This feature requires installation of a Customer Alarm Interface
board. When the CDSS feature is enabled and the Customer Alarm Interface option is installed and
enabled, the mimic display will be modified to include a box in parallel with the bypass circuit
breaker. The box will be labeled CDSS.
50
DISCONTINUED
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Operation
Figure 39 Monitor/Mimic display example: Continuous Duty Static Switch
LOAD
627 KVA / 502 KW
BYPASS INPUT
∅A-B ∅B-C ∅C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0Hz
CDSS
UPS INPUT PWR
∅A-B ∅B-C ∅C-A
480V 480V 480V
MOD 1 ON LINE
MOD 2 ON LINE
MOD 3 ON LINE
∅A ∅B ∅C
755V 755V 755V
UPS RATINGS
SCCB 1600
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
∅A-B ∅B-C ∅C-A
480V 480V 480V
60.0Hz
REDUNDANT
OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
Remote Monitor
The Remote Monitor Panel (optional) displays eight (8) alarms. These alarms are also available for
customer use through a set of contacts on a separate terminal board.
When the New Alarm, System Summary Alarm or Module Summary Alarm is activated, you can get
more information at the Operator Display Panel or through a remote terminal. Refer to 3.2.15 - Communication Interfaces.
Table 6
SCC and module remote monitor indications
SCC Remote Monitor Indications
Load On UPS
Load On Bypass
Battery Discharging
Low Battery Warning
Overload
Ambient Overtemp
System Summary Alarm
New Alarm
Channel
CH1
CH2
CH3
CH4
CH5
CH6
CH7
CH8
Module Remote Monitor Indications
Output CB Open
Battery CB Open
Battery Discharging
Low Battery Warning
Control Failure
Ambient Overtemp
Module Summary Alarm
New Alarm
The following alarms, as well as those listed above, will activate the System Summary Alarm or the
Module Summary Alarm.
Table 7
Other alarms that activate summary alarms
System Summary Alarm
Activation
Control Power Fail
Emergency Off
Module Summary Alarm
Output Over/Under Frequency
Output Overvoltage
Output undervoltage
Overload Transfer
Static Switch Unable
Module Summary Alarm
Activation
Blower Failed
Control Power Fail
DC Capacitor Fuse Blown
DC Ground Fault
DC Overvoltage Shutdown
Emergency Off
Equipment Overtemperature
Inverter Fault
Low Battery Shutdown
Overload
Overload Shutdown
Rectifier Fuse Blown
Reverse Power
51
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Operation
3.2.7
Alarm Limit Settings Screen
Go to the Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to LIMIT SETTINGS. Press the Select pad
and the Limit Settings screen is displayed.
The Alarm Limit Settings screen has Security Access to enable an authorized Liebert field-service
engineer to adjust the UPS system alarm limit settings.
!
CAUTION
All alarm limit settings are application matched and factory-set. They should not be
changed casually. Contact Liebert Global Services for changing the alarm limit settings.
Figure 40 Module alarm limit settings screen
SECURITY ACCESS
UP: CURSOR UP
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
ALARM SETTINGS
SELECT: CHOOSE
EXIT
Overload Alarm................................................................ 104
%
DC Over Voltage.............................................................. 600 VDC
Battery Discharging ......................................................... 480 VDC
Low Battery...................................................................... 437 VDC
Battery Shutdown (15 minutes) ....................................... 384 VDC
Upper Point (60 minutes)................................................. 427 VDC
Battery Rating (100%) ..................................................... 500 KW 15 min
Battery Rating ................................................................. 250 KW 45 min
Battery Float Voltage ....................................................... 540 VDC
Temperature Limit Settings.............................................. 34°C
Overload Alarm (SCC and Modules): This alarm setting initiates an alarm message on the display
screen warning the operator that the UPS system output current has exceeded the specified limit.
This condition only activates an alarm. The UPS does not shut down, but a separate control circuit
will transfer the critical load to bypass if the current and time of the overload condition exceeds system capability.
DC Overvoltage (Modules Only): This setting limits the maximum permitted level of the DC bus
voltage. When this setting is exceeded, an alarm indication appears on the module display screen. The
UPS module is taken off-line (the module output circuit breaker is tripped open) and the input and
battery circuit breakers trip open.
Battery Discharging (Modules Only): When the battery voltage on the DC bus falls below this
limit for 5 seconds, a Battery Discharging alarm message is displayed on the module screen. This
means that the battery is discharging due to an input voltage sag or interruption or a module output
overload.
Low Battery (Modules Only): While the battery is discharging, this alarm warns the operator that
the Battery Shutdown level is approaching. This is generally set for a reserve time of approximately 5
minutes (typically 10 volts above the 60-Minute Battery Shutdown voltage), based on full load operation.
Battery Shutdown (15 Minutes) (Modules Only): When the battery voltage decreases to this limit
for five seconds during the first 15 minutes of the discharge, the battery circuit breaker opens to prevent
overdischarge. Note that the rated battery reserve time at your site may be other than 15 minutes.
Battery Shutdown (60 Minutes) (Modules Only): During extended outages or deep sags of more
than 15 minutes, the shutdown voltage limit will ramp up gradually to this 60-minute limit to prevent
lengthy discharge and possible battery damage. The battery circuit breaker opens when the battery
voltage and the shutdown limit are equal for five seconds. See the Battery Time screen for more information. Also refer to the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site.
Battery Rating (100%) (Modules Only). This setting is the full load discharge rating of the battery
in kilowatts for the rated backup period. A typical rating might be 500 kW for 15 minutes.
52
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Operation
Battery Rating (Modules Only): This setting is a battery discharge rating in kilowatts under partial load for an extended period, typically 60 minutes. The UPS uses the two battery shutdown voltage
settings and the two battery discharge ratings in computing rated and calculated time remaining during a discharge event.
Battery Float Voltage
Both the information entered here and the actual float setting in the hardware are determined based
on the battery’s requirements. This information is generally available before factory testing and is set
up at the factory. If the information is not available, it is set to the default of 540VDC.
Temperature Limit Setting (Optional)
This setting is visible when the optional battery-temperature-compensated charging board is
installed. This setting determines the battery temperature that triggers the Battery Overtemp alarm.
The alarm becomes active when the temperature setting is exceeded for more than one minute.
NOTE
The Low Battery alarm setting is designed to be useful at full load battery discharge rates. It is
typically set for 10 volts above the 60-minute Battery Shutdown voltage, to provide some
measure of warning under all circumstances. If the discharge period extends past 15 minutes
(i. e., the load on the UPS is less than full capacity), the Battery Shutdown voltage setting is
gradually and automatically increased to protect the batteries from deep discharge. The Low
Battery alarm setting is not automatically increased and should not be relied upon as an
accurate indicator of battery time remaining. Instead, the operator should consult the Battery
Time screen or Present Status screen to see the calculated time remaining based on actual
usage during the discharge period.
53
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Operation
3.2.8
Load Transfer Procedures Screen
Go to the SCC Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURES. Note that this screen is displayed at the System Control Cabinet but is not required at the
UPS modules. Press the Select pad and the Load Transfer Procedures screen is displayed.
The Load Transfer Procedures screen contains instructions to transfer the critical load between the
UPS system and the bypass line. Comparisons of the UPS and bypass voltage, frequency and phase
synchronization are displayed along with transfer status messages and an indication of circuit
breaker overlap time. The metered parameter values on the Load Transfer Procedures screen are
updated at half-second intervals.
Refer to 3.4.3 - Load Transfer Procedures for more details.
Figure 41 Load transfer procedures screen
1
HISTORY
HISTORYSTATUS
STATUS
MODULE-0
MODULE-0
04/10/97
01/17/98 16:49:21
11:21:59 FRAME
FRAME36100
SELECT : MASTER MENU
2
ORDER - 000000
SITE ID - 00000 SITE TAG - 0000000
VOLTAGE
COMPARISON
**** ACTIVE
ALARMS
**** Output
Batt Discharging
Ov-volts
Low Batt WarningSYNCHRONIZATION
FREQUENCY
A-B B-C C-A
-30
0
+30
DC LOAD
C
TIME
HERTZ
UPS
480 480 A480 B
60.0 Hz
380
380
380
OUTPUT
VOLTS
4
BYPASS 481 480 479
410
410
410
530
OUTPUT AMPS
530
53060.0 Hz
OUTPUT FREQUENCY
LOAD KVA
OUTPUT
VOLTS
ON UPS
BYPASS VOLTS
OUTPUT
AMPS
OK
TO
BATTERYTRANSFER
VOLTS
OUTPUT
VOLTS
TRANSFER
PROHIBIT
OUPUT AMPS
BATTERY AMPS
INPUT VOLTS
INPUT AMPS
OUPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
LOAD KVA
3
380
410
380
1.
380
2.
410
0
3.
0
380
4.
410
50.0
MANUAL
UPS LEAD
=
2 Deg
380
380 INSTRUCTIONS
349
TRANSFER
410
410
380
380
Adjust the UPS voltage (1 - 5 volts) above the
3bypass voltage using the VOLTAGE ADJUST pot.
If the OK
TO TRANSFER message is highlighted,
410
410
simultaneously-583
press the BYPASS and CONTROL ENABLE
buttons.
0
0
Verify that the transfer was successful by checking the
0
0
UP : NEXT
FRAME
breaker status on the "MONITOR/MIMIC"
screen.
380
380
Press the
ALARM RESET button
to clear
alarms whichFRAME
DOWN
:
PREVIOUS
410
410 active
are no longer
270 SELECT : EXIT
Item 1 - Voltage Comparisons: This chart shows the UPS and bypass voltage and frequency comparisons between each of the three phases. If the UPS and bypass voltages are not within specified
tolerances, a manual transfer is not permitted and TRANSFER PROHIBIT is highlighted.
The Voltage Adjust knob (push-to-turn), located on the SCC Operator Control Panel (Figure 10), is
used to adjust the UPS output voltage (1 - 5 volts) above the bypass voltage. When the UPS and
bypass voltages are within the specific tolerance, a manual transfer is possible and OK TO TRANSFER is highlighted.
!
CAUTION
The UPS output voltage responds very slowly to inputs from the Voltage Adjust knob.
Make small adjustments and wait several seconds each time for voltage to stabilize before
continuing.
Item 2 - Synchronization: This display shows the phase synchronization between the UPS output
and bypass power. If the phase displacement is outside of the tolerance, a manual transfer is not permitted and TRANSFER PROHIBIT is highlighted.
During normal operation, the synchronization display should read UPS LEAD from zero to 4 degrees.
Item 3 - Status Messages: Three messages are constantly displayed here. Only the active message
is highlighted. If TRANSFER PROHIBIT is highlighted, manual transfers/retransfers cannot be
performed and automatic retransfers will not be initiated.
Item 4 - Manual Transfer Instructions: These instructions assist the operator in transferring the
critical load between the UPS system and the bypass line.
If the load is on the bypass line, step 2 on the screen will instruct you to press the UPS and Control
Enable buttons to retransfer the load from the bypass line to the UPS system.
54
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Operation
3.2.9
Start-Up Procedures Screen
From the SCC Master Menu, move the highlighted cursor to START-UP PROCEDURES. Press the
Select pad and the SCC Start-Up Procedures screen is displayed (Figure 42).
This screen contains the steps you must follow to start-up the UPS system. The instructions are listed
so you can review them prior to performing the start-up.
Figure 42 SCC start- up procedures screen
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES
1.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
2.
Select "SYSTEM CONFIGURATION" screen to verify that the correct model number is
displayed.
3.
Go to the modules(s) and follow the module "STARTUP PROCEDURES".
4.
Select "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen, verify that the output voltages are at the
proper nominal level and correct number of modules online is displayed.
5.
If the bypass or static switch breakers are open, refer to Start-up Procedures
in the UPS manual for instructions on closing these breakers.
6.
System is now ready to assume load. Select "LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURES"
screen for this procedure.
Prior to this procedure, supply power to the critical load through the bypass line. Start-up each UPS
module according to the module start-up procedures. You can then transfer the load from bypass to
the UPS system per instructions on the SCC Load Transfer Procedures Screen.
Refer to 3.4.1 - SCC Start-Up Procedure for more details.
NOTE
If the system was shut down in response to an “Emergency Off” signal (typically because of a
load fault), there may be alarm messages on the LCD screen that describe system conditions
before (or at the time of) the shutdown. Some or all of the alarm conditions may have already
been resolved. To clear these alarm messages, make sure the critical load is on bypass power
and turn off the control power (see Figure 8 and Figure 9). Wait at least ten minutes for the
control power circuitry to completely de-energize. After ten minutes, turn control power back on
and follow the start-up procedures on the UPS and SCC screens.
From the module Master Menu, move the highlighted cursor to START-UP PROCEDURES. Press
the Select pad and the module Start-Up Procedures screen is displayed (Figure 43).
This two-page screen contains the steps you must follow to start-up each UPS system. The instructions are listed so you can review them prior to performing the start-up.
55
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Operation
Figure 43 Module start- up procedures screens
DOWN :
NEXT PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES
1.
Verify that the control power is applied to the system control cabinet (check the display
on the system control cabinet).
2.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
3.
Select "SYSTEM CONFIGURATION" screen to verify that the correct model is
displayed.
4.
Select "WALK-IN" screen and do the following:
a)
Close module input circuit breaker. Verify that the DC voltage bar on
the display begins to gradually move to the right and the AC input
current bars do not move to the right more than 10% (40% for modules
with input filters) after the transformer inrush has subsided.
UP : FIRST PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES (Cont'd)
b)
Verify that the output voltage bar moves to the right after the DC
bus bar has reached the 90% point. Both bars should settle near
their respective 100% levels.
c)
If anything happens on the display not mentioned in (a) or (b),
immediately open the module input circuit breaker and investigate.
5.
If step 4 is successful, select "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen and verify module
DC bus and output voltages are at proper nominal level. If so, close
module battery circuit breaker.
6.
If no alarms are present on the "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen, the module may be
placed online by closing the module output breaker.
Prior to this procedure, supply power to the critical load through the bypass line (at the SCC). When
you close the UPS module input breaker, power is provided to the UPS rectifier. The module DC bus
voltage ramps up to the nominal battery voltage and the UPS inverter turns on when the DC bus
reaches the proper voltage. You can then close the battery circuit breaker (MBD) and the UPS module
output circuit breaker to place the UPS module on-line.
Refer to 3.4.1 - SCC Start-Up Procedure for more details.
3.2.10 Shutdown Procedures Screen
Go to the SCC Master Menu and move the cursor to SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES. Press the Select
pad and the SCC Shutdown Procedures screen is displayed.
This screen contains the steps you must follow to perform a controlled shutdown of the UPS system.
The instructions are listed so you can review them before performing the controlled shutdown.
56
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Operation
Figure 44 SCC shutdown procedures screen
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
1.
If load is not already being supplied by the bypass line, select the
"LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURE" screen and follow the instructions to transfer
the load to bypass.
2.
Go to the modules(s) and follow the module "SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES."
3.
Press the ALARM RESET button to clear alarms which are no longer active.
4.
If necessary for maintenance purposes, open the static switch disconnect
circuit breakers.
5.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
To perform the shutdown procedure, transfer the critical load from the UPS system to the bypass line.
Shut down each UPS module according to the module Shutdown Procedures.
Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures for more details, including emergency shutdowns.
Go to the module Master Menu and move the cursor to SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES. Press the
Select pad and the module Shutdown Procedures screen is displayed.
This two-page screen contains the steps you must follow to perform a controlled shutdown of each
UPS module. The instructions are listed so you can review them before performing the controlled
shutdown.
Figure 45 Module shutdown procedures screen
DOWN :
SELECT :
NEXT PAGE
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
1.
If load can not be supported by the remaining modules when this module
is taken off line, go to the system control cabinet and select the "LOAD
TRANSFER PROCEDURES" screen. Follow the instructions to transfer
to bypass.
2.
Open the module output breaker by simultaneously pressing the OUTPUT TRIP
and CONTROL ENABLE pushbuttons.
3.
Open the module battery breaker by simultaneously pressing the BATTERY TRIP
and CONTROL ENABLE pushbuttons.
4.
Manually open the input breaker by moving the handle to the OFF position.
UP : FIRST PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES (Cont'd)
5.
Verify breaker status on the "MONITOR / MIMIC" screen.
6.
If necessary for maintenance purposes, turn the control power switch (fuse
disconnect on some models) to the OFF position.
7.
Wait a minimum of two (2) minutes before attempting any other action.
57
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Operation
To perform the shutdown procedure, transfer the critical load from the UPS system to the bypass line
(at the SCC). Then trip open the UPS module output and battery circuit breaker (MBD) and manually
open the UPS module input circuit breaker. The Control Power switch may be turned Off if
required for maintenance procedures.
Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures for more details, including module shutdowns for service and
emergency shutdowns.
3.2.11 Battery Time Screen (Module Only)
At the Master Menu, move the highlighted cursor to BATTERY TIME. Press the Select pad and the
Battery Time screen is displayed.
When AC power is not available to the UPS module, the UPS inverter uses DC power from the battery
to supply the critical load. This screen helps the operator assess his power resources to determine if
and when the critical load shutdown procedures need to be started.
The Battery Time screen is a line graph that tracks the present battery voltage versus the elapsed
time that the battery has been discharging (Figure 46). As the battery voltage decreases, the line
representing it moves closer to intersecting the line that represents the battery shutdown voltage.
When the battery starts to discharge, the screen displays a 15-minute graph. If the battery has been
providing power for more than 15 minutes, the screen displays a 30-minute graph. If battery power is
still available after 30 minutes, a 60-minute graph is displayed (Figure 47).
Figure 46 Battery time screen (15 minute discharge)
500
VDC
SELECT : MASTER MENU
Low Battery Warning
Calculated Time (Hrs:Min)
Total 00:15 Remain 0:01
480
460
440
420
400
380
Battery Shutdown = 384
360
340
Rated Time (Hrs:Min)
Battery Charge = 5%
0
1
2
3
4
Total 00:10 Remain 0:00
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Time (Minutes)
NOTE
If the UPS modules connect to independent battery plants, consult all the individual module
screens to get the complete picture. If the modules share a common battery, select one module
to do the monitoring and disregard the others.
The screen also displays alarm messages (Battery Discharging, Low Battery Warning and Battery
Shutdown) and a set of five parameters that inform the operator of battery condition and time
remaining. The five parameters describing battery resources are:
• Rated Total Time, in hours and minutes, is the amount of battery backup time that should be
available under full rated load, based on system design.
• Rated Time Remaining is the Rated Total Time less the duration of the present discharge
event.
• Calculated Total Time is an estimate of the total battery backup time available, based on the
initial battery condition and actual performance while powering the connected load during the
discharge event.
• Calculated Time Remaining is a real-time estimation of battery time remaining—with the
actual connected load—before battery voltage drops to the Battery Shutdown setpoint.
• Battery Charge is the approximate percentage of total designed ampere hours of battery capacity presently available based on recharge/discharge activity.
58
DISCONTINUED
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Operation
Values for Calculated Total Time and Calculated Time Remaining will appear on the screen approximately two minutes after the beginning of the discharge event. Calculated Time Remaining also
appears on the Present Status Report screen. Both Calculated Total Time and Calculated Time
Remaining will be updated every six seconds, reflecting actual load changes and battery condition.
When the Calculated Times become available, they will be displayed in place of the Battery Discharging message on this screen.
Figure 47 Battery time screen (45-minute discharge)
500
VDC
SELECT : MASTER MENU
Low Battery Warning
Calculated Time (Hrs:Min)
Total 00:45 Remain 0:01
480
460
440
420
400
380
Battery Shutdown = 417
360
340
Rated Time (Hrs:Min)
Battery Charge = 3%
0
10
Total 00:25 Remain 0:00
20
30
40
50
60
Time (Minutes)
The Battery Time Remaining graph and the Calculated times are extremely helpful to the operator who
has the discretionary authority to order load-shedding activities. The Liebert Series 610 automatically
samples battery voltage and load current and recomputes every six seconds. This gives the operator
fast and accurate feedback on efforts to extend battery time remaining by shutting down non-critical
loads.
Figure 48 Accuracy range of values for calculated battery times
Calculated Time Remaining
25
20
15
10
5
0
0
2.5
5
7.5
10
12.5
15
17.5
20
22.5
25
Elapsed Time (Minutes)
Upper Limit
Actual
Lower Limit
NOTE
While every effort has been made to make the Rated and Calculated Time Remaining values as
accurate as practical, these values must be regarded as approximations. At the beginning of the
discharge cycle, the Calculated times could be off by as much as ±20% due to such variables as
battery initial charge, age of battery and the subsequent load-shedding activities of the
operator. Within a few minutes, however, these calculations should settle into their design
accuracy of ±10%, with the end-of-discharge tolerance being +0, -10% of actual observed time.
In addition, the operator can adjust the settings affecting Rated Total Time after gaining
experience with the actual battery and connected load.
59
DISCONTINUED
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Operation
The Liebert Series 610 dynamically adjusts the Battery Shutdown voltage based on battery characteristics and the length of the current discharge event. If a discharge event extends past 15 minutes
(i.e., the load is less than the full design rating), the Battery Shutdown voltage setting is gradually
and automatically increased, to protect the batteries from deep discharge.
When the battery voltage decreases to a preset limit (see 3.2.7 - Alarm Limit Settings Screen), the
Low Battery Warning alarm message appears on the display screen. This warns the operator that the
battery voltage is approaching the Battery Shutdown level—about five minutes of time remaining at
full rated load.
NOTE
The Low Battery alarm setting is designed to be useful at full load battery discharge rates.
Unlike the Battery Shutdown voltage, the Low Battery alarm setting is not automatically
increased and should not be relied upon as an indicator of battery time remaining. Instead, the
operator should consult the Battery Time screen or Present Status screen to see the Calculated
Time Remaining based on actual usage during the discharge period.
If the battery discharges to the Battery Shutdown level, represented by the lower line on the Battery
Time screen, the battery and input circuit breakers trip open and the UPS module is shut down. This
protects the battery from being damaged by an extended deep discharge.
!
CAUTION
When battery shutdown occurs, no power will be supplied to the critical load unless power is
available through the bypass line from the utility source (or from an engine generator set). If
you anticipate a battery shutdown (and an engine generator set is not available), either
transfer the load to bypass (if available) or perform a controlled shutdown of the critical load.
If the Battery Time screen is displayed while the battery is not discharging, it will display the present
Battery Charge percentage and the results of the previous discharge event.
NOTE
1. During initial UPS start-up, the Battery Charge will display 100%, even though actual
state of charge may be slightly less. It will normally take three to four days of operation to
completely charge the battery. After the battery is fully charged the first time, Battery
Charge will be an accurate indication of battery status.
2. If Calculated Time Remaining is less than Rated Time Remaining, a battery problem may
be indicated. Battery maintenance personnel should thoroughly examine the battery plant
for factors that may reduce battery performance, such as:
• Battery age
• Excessive battery discharge/recharge cycles
• Bad or weak cells
• Low acid levels in flooded cells
• Loose electrical connections
• Ambient temperature extremes
• Dirty battery jar covers
3. If the battery plant has been thoroughly examined for proper maintenance and condition
and the Calculated value is still less than 80% of Rated value, contact Liebert Global
Services.
The Liebert Series 610 records information about each discharge event. This data can be reviewed on
the Battery Cycle Monitor screen, as described in 3.2.5 - Status Reports Screens.
60
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Operation
3.2.12 Meter Calibration Screen
Go to the Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to METER CALIBRATION. Press the
Select pad and the Meter Calibration screen is displayed.
The Meter Calibration screen enables a Liebert field-service engineer to adjust the calibration of the
UPS metered functions at each cabinet. Access to these settings is limited by the Security Access control.
NOTE
Bypass volts are calibrated only at the System Control Cabinet (SCC). Input amps, DC volts,
DC amps and temperature are calibrated only at the UPS modules.
!
CAUTION
!
WARNING
Meter calibrations are factory-set and should not require adjustment. Contact Liebert Global
Services for meter calibration.
Do not attempt to calibrate meters without adequate training. Meter calibration requires
special test equipment, access to test points in sensitive circuitry and exposure to hazardous
voltage.
Figure 49 Meter calibration screen
UP: CURSOR UP
SECURITY ACCESS
DOWN: CURSOR DOWN
METER CALIBRATION
INPUT VOLTS
INPUT VOLTS
INPUT VOLTS
INPUT AMPS
INPUT AMPS
INPUT AMPS
D.C. VOLTS
D.C. AMPS
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT VOLTS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT AMPS
OUTPUT AMPS
TEMPERATURE
PHASE A-B
PHASE B-C
PHASE C-A
PHASE A
PHASE B
PHASE C
61
SELECT: CHOOSE
PHASE A-B
PHASE B-C
PHASE C-A
PHASE A
PHASE B
PHASE C
DISCONTINUED
PRODUCT
Operation
3.2.13 Battery Equalize Screen
Go to the Master Menu and move the highlighted cursor to BATTERY EQUALIZE. Press the Select
pad and the Battery Equalize screen is displayed.
The Battery Equalize screen enables the operator to adjust the battery equalize time. It is also used to
choose between auto and manual battery equalize recharging modes. Note that AUTO MODE can be
selected only from the System Control Cabinet (SCC). Selections made at the SCC override previous
selections made at the UPS modules.
When the input utility power is interrupted, the battery supplies DC power to the UPS module inverters so there is no interruption of power to the critical load. When the AC input power is restored, the
battery equalize recharging circuit can be activated automatically or manually to increase the module
rectifier/charger output voltage to recharge the battery. The battery equalize circuit may also be manually activated at any time during normal float (constant) voltage operation. The equalizing time can
be adjusted from 0 to 72 hours.
Figure 50 Battery equalize screen
UP : CURSOR UP
SECURITY ACCESS
DOWN :
© 1989-2003
EXIT
CURSOR DOWN
CHOOSE
BATTERY EQUALIZE RECHARGING
EQUALIZE TIME PERIOD (hrs.) ...........
STOP EQUALIZE CHARGE ...................
MANUAL MODE .....................................
AUTO MODE ..........................................
MANUAL / RESET TO AUTO MODE ......
!
SELECT :
0
NO
NO
YES
NO
CAUTION
Do not use the Battery Equalize mode if you have valve-regulated, sealed-cell
(maintenance-free) batteries. Refer to your battery manufacturer’s manual,
available on the manufacturer’s Web site.
EQUALIZE TIME PERIOD. This selection permits the operator to adjust the battery equalize time
in one hour increments from 0 to 72. The battery equalize time must be greater than zero for the battery to begin recharging in both the AUTO and the MANUAL modes. This period is set by use of the
Up/Down pads and Select pad.
When the battery is at full voltage (not being recharged), this selection reads EQUALIZE TIME
PERIOD (hrs). When the battery is recharging, this selection reads EQUALIZE TIME REMAINING (hrs). After the equalize recharge time has expired, the indication returns to the preset equalize
time.
STOP EQUALIZE CHARGE. This selection lets the operator halt the equalizing charge to the battery at any time, whether the circuit was activated automatically or manually.
MANUAL MODE. This mode enables the operator to manually initiate a battery equalize charge to
raise the DC bus voltage to correct a non-uniformity in the individual cell voltages or specific gravity
readings.
AUTO MODE (SCC only). When the battery recharge control logic is in the AUTO MODE, the UPS
module battery chargers attempt the equalization process only if the EQUALIZE TIME PERIOD is
greater than zero, the battery voltage has been at or below the Battery Discharging alarm limit for
longer than 30 seconds and the battery breakers (MBD) are closed.
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3.2.14 Alarm and Status Messages
Module Status Messages
The module status messages indicate how many UPS modules are included in the system and the
present status of each module.
The following status messages may appear in the module status area.
1. MOD N: A module status message line is displayed for each UPS module in the system. Up to six
(6) modules may be included in a multi-module system. The N in the message will indicate a
specific UPS module number, 1 through 6.
2. ON LINE: The UPS module output circuit breaker is closed and power from the module is available
to the SCC. The module output is sharing the critical load if the UPS Output Breaker is closed.
3. OFF-LINE: The UPS module output circuit breaker is open. More specific alarm messages are
displayed at the UPS module.
4. SUM ALM: The Module Summary Alarm has been activated by one of the alarm messages listed
in two tables—SCC and module remote monitor indications and Other alarms that
activate summary alarms—in 3.2.6 - System Configuration Screens. The specific alarm
message is displayed at the UPS module.
5. COM FAIL: The UPS module is not communicating with the SCC. This could mean loss of power
to the UPS module controls, a disconnected cable or a control logic failure (detected by watchdog
timer. Call Liebert Global Services if you require assistance. To resume communication after
control power is restored, sequence display to Master Menu.
Figure 51 SCC status and alarm message areas
BYPASS INPUT
A-B
B-C
C-A
0V
0V
0V
0 Hz
© 1989-2003
LOAD
627 KVA / 502 KW
A
755A
UPS RATINGS
UPS INPUT PWR
A-B
B-C
C-A
0V
0V
0V
SCCT 1600
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
A-B
480V
MOD 1 ON LINE SUM ALM
MOD 2 ON LINE SUM ALM
MOD 3 ON LINE SUM ALM
MODULE STATUS
MESSAGES
B-C
C-A
480V 480V
60.0 Hz
Not OK to Transfer
Static Switch Connected
SYSTEM STATUS
MESSAGES
LOAD BLOCK
MESSAGES
B
755A
C
755A
3 OF 3 MODULES
CONNECTED
REDUNDANT
Time To Overload
Transfer: XXXX SEC
Byp Not Avail
Static Sw Unable
Module Sum Alm
ALARM
MESSAGES
System Status Messages
The system status messages indicate whether the static bypass switch is connected or disconnected,
through the manually operated Static Switch Disconnects (see Figure 9). The status messages
also advise the operator when a transfer or retransfer between the UPS system and bypass line is permitted, based on matching voltage, frequency and phase.
The following status messages may appear in the system status area.
1. Static Switch Connected: The static switch is connected (the disconnect switches are closed—
ON) and is ready to provide a current path from the bypass input to the load.
2. Static Switch Disconnected: The static switch is disconnected (the disconnect switches are
open—OFF) for maintenance procedures.
3. OK to Transfer: The UPS system voltage, frequency and phase match the bypass line. This
means that a transfer between the bypass line and the UPS system is permitted.
4. Not OK to Transfer: Either the UPS or bypass voltage, frequency or phase is not within the
specified limits or the static bypass switch is not available. Therefore, manually initiated transfer
between the bypass line and the UPS system is not permitted. Emergency or overload transfer to
bypass may still be available provided the “Static Switch Unable” alarm is not indicating.
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Load Block Messages
Status messages in the Load Block indicate how many modules are in the system, how many modules
are ON LINE and whether the system is operating in the redundant mode.
The following status messages may appear in the load block.
1. N OF X MODULES CONNECTED: The number N is the number of UPS modules ON LINE.
This means the module output circuit breaker is closed. X is the number of UPS modules in the
system (connected to this SCC). This number is set from the System Configuration screen.
2. REDUNDANT: The capacity of the UPS modules ON LINE is sufficient to supply the critical
load even if one module is taken OFF LINE. The critical load will remain on the UPS system if
one module goes OFF LINE.
3. NON-REDUNDANT: The critical load will be transferred to bypass if one module goes OFF
LINE and you must transfer the load to bypass in order to perform maintenance on any UPS
module.
4. TIME TO OVERLOAD TRANSFER: During an overload condition, the time remaining before
transfer (in seconds) is displayed at the bottom of the load block. At each Module (MMU), the
message is Time to Overload Shutdown.
Alarm Messages
The alarm message area displays the alarm conditions that are present within the UPS system.
Alarm messages are displayed in flashing reverse video. During normal operation no alarm messages
should be present. Up to four messages are displayed. To see if any additional alarm conditions are
present in the UPS system, display the Present Status screen on the control panel.
Table 9 is a complete list of all alarm messages and corrective actions, if any.
The first column lists the alarm message, with related alarms grouped together.
The third column indicates which special functions (if any) are initiated by the alarm.
D - The alarm initiates an auto-dial call through a user-provided modem to a remote terminal.
E - Message displayed only on Status Report screens including Event History.
F - The alarm freezes the History Status Report memory buffer in the cabinet where the alarm is
displayed. Pressing the Alarm Reset pad for more than 5 seconds will unfreeze the memory
buffer as long as the alarm is no longer active.
L - The alarm latches the displayed alarm message. Some alarm conditions are temporary (transient) and may not last long enough to be noticed. Latching the display (keeping it on) lets you
know that an alarm condition has occurred. A latching display alarm remains on the display
screen until the alarm condition is removed and the Alarm Reset pad is pressed.
R - The alarm is displayed on an (optional) Remote Monitor Panel. This information is also available for customer use through a set of contacts on a separate terminal board.
S - The alarm initiates a summary alarm at the Remote Monitor Panel and at the SCC.
The fourth column provides an explanation of the alarm condition, the critical bus status and the
corrective actions, if any, to remedy the alarm.
Table 8
Abbreviations used in alarm messages
Abbreviation
Definition
Abbreviation
Definition
Auto
Automatic
Ov-temp
Overtemperature
Avail
Available
O-volt
Overvoltage
Batt
Battery
O-volts
Overvoltage
Byp
Bypass
Ph Seq
Phase Sequence
Cap Fuse
Capacitor Fuse
Rect Fuse
Rectifier Fuse
Cont Power
Control Power
Rexfer
Retransfer
Equip
Equipment
Shutdn
Shutdown
H/W
Hardware
Static Sw
Static Switch
Inv Fuse
Inverter Fuse
Un-volts
undervoltage
OF/UF
Over/Under Frequency
Xfer
Transfer
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Table 9
Alarm messages - meaning and corrective action
Alarm
Message
AC INPUT
Input Fail
Cabinet
Location
Special
Functions
MMU
—
DC Ground Fault
MMU
D, L, S
DC Capacitor
Fuse Blown
MMU
D, F, S
Battery CB Open
MMU
D, R, S
Battery
Discharging
MMU
D, R, S
Low Battery
Warning
MMU
D, R, S
Low Battery
Shutdown
MMU
D, F, L, S
DC Overvoltage
Shutdown
MMU
D, F, L, S
SCC
D
Meaning and Corrective Action
The rectifier input line voltage is outside of specified limits or the input
circuit breaker is opened while the battery circuit breaker remains closed.
The battery supplies power to the critical load through the UPS inverter.
Provide an alternate source of AC power or prepare to initiate critical load
procedures when battery reserve time is low.
DC BUS
Either the positive (+) or negative (-) DC bus is grounded. No transfer or
shutdown occurs.
Contact Liebert Global Services at once. Do not attempt to locate or repair
the fault.
At least one DC capacitor fuse has opened. The UPS module is taken offline and the input and battery circuit breakers trip open.
Contact Liebert Global Services at once. Do not attempt to reset the
circuit breakers.
The module battery circuit breaker (MBD) is open. This circuit breaker can
be opened either manually or automatically in a UPS shutdown
procedure. If the UPS is operating with this breaker open, the critical
load is not protected from loss of the utility source power.
After AC power is restored and the DC bus is at 100% operating voltage,
manually close the battery circuit breaker so the rectifier can charge the
battery.
The battery is discharging. This occurs whenever the battery supplies
power to the load for more than 5 seconds because of input power failure,
a rectifier problem or an overload condition. If the input power or a source
of auxiliary power is restored to the UPS module, the UPS automatically
returns to normal operation.
Watch the battery voltage carefully. Reduce the load (begin controlled
shutdown) to extend the battery back-up time. Reset the UPS alarms after
the input power is restored. The message clears after 30 seconds.
The battery voltage is approaching the minimum discharge voltage
(approximately 5 minutes remaining).
Complete the controlled shutdown of the critical load. Reset the alarms if
the input power is restored before shutdown.
The battery voltage has decreased to the minimum discharge value. The
UPS module is taken off-line (no power to the critical load) and the
battery and input circuit breakers trip open.
Perform a UPS system start-up procedure when AC power becomes
available.
The maximum preset value of the DC Bus voltage has been exceeded.
The UPS module is taken off-line and the input and battery circuit
breakers trip open.
Contact Liebert Global Services at once. A fault may have occurred within
the UPS. Do not attempt to reset the circuit breaker.
BYPASS
Load On Bypass
The critical load is being supplied power from the bypass line and is
therefore exposed to utility power disturbances.
Clear all of the alarms before attempting to retransfer the load from the
bypass line to the UPS.
Table 9 Abbreviations
D = auto-dial;
L = latches
E = logs only;
R = remote
F = freezes;
S = summary
D* = auto-dial initiated by Auto Transfer to Bypass if load is on UPS when alarm occurs
D# = auto-dial initiated through Module N (1-6) off-line
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Table 9
Alarm messages - meaning and corrective action (continued)
Alarm
Message
Cabinet
Location
Special
Functions
Meaning and Corrective Action
BYPASS (Cont’d.)
Auto Transfer to
Bypass
SCC
D, E, F
Auto Retransfer
Primed
SCC
—
Manual Reset/
Retransfer
SCC
—
Static Switch
Unable
SCC
D, S
Bypass Not
Available
SCC
—
Bypass Phase
Sequence Wrong
SCC
D, L, S
Transfer Fail
SCC
D, F, L, S
MMU
D, E
SCC
D, L, S
MMU
D, L, S
Output Over/
Under Frequency
SCC
D, L, S
Output
Undervoltage
SCC
D, F, L, S
Output
Overvoltage
SCC
D, F, L, S
SCC
D, R, S
MMU
D, S
The critical load has been automatically transferred to the bypass line.
Use the History Status screen to determine the cause for the transfer.
Clear all of the alarms before attempting to retransfer the load from
bypass to UPS.
An automatic retransfer will be initiated when the OK to Transfer condition
has been present for 10 seconds, if the overload has dropped below
100% of the rated SCC current and if enough UPS modules are on-line.
A manual retransfer is required. Either a system overload condition has
lasted more than 5 minutes or no more auto-retransfer attempts are
available. Note that this alarm is only used if auto-retransfer attempts are
enabled.
Perform a manual retransfer if all necessary conditions are present.
The UPS output is not synchronized to the bypass power source. The
static bypass switch is disconnected or it has failed internally.
Emergency and overload transfer to the bypass source is not available.
Manually set the Static Switch Disconnects to ON (closed) if the static
switch is disconnected. If the alarm conditions are automatically
corrected, reset the alarm to clear it. Contact Liebert Global Services if the
alarm stays on.
The bypass power source voltage is not within specifications.
Correct the bypass AC power source.
The power conductors on the bypass line are not wired to the UPS in the
required sequence. This alarm should appear only during initial start-up or
after a repair to the source power system.
Disconnect power from the bypass line and correct the wiring. A Liebert
Global Services representative must be present during initial start-up of
your UPS System.]
UPS output or system bypass breakers trip failure detected. Critical load
will be transferred to bypass and UPS modules shutdown for isolation
from bypass source. Contact Liebert Global Services at once.
UPS SYSTEM
Input Current
Unbalance
Control Power
Fail
Overload
At least one input phase differs from the average current by 10% or more
for four (4) hours. Contact Liebert Global Services. If the condition
persists, transfer the load to the bypass line.
The logic control power supply from the UPS output is not operating
properly. The UPS module continues operating but will shut down if the
input power fails. The SCC continues operating but will shut down if the
bypass power fails. Contact Liebert Global Services immediately.
Output frequency differs from the nominal (60 Hz) by more than 0.5 Hz.
No transfer or shutdown occurs. Contact Liebert Global Services at once.
The UPS system output voltage is under the minimum (-12%) deviation
from nominal. The load automatically transfers to the bypass line.
If the alarm condition is no longer present, reset the alarm and retransfer
the load from bypass to UPS. Contact Liebert Global Services if alarm
persists.
The UPS system output voltage is above the maximum (+10%) deviation
from nominal. The load automatically transfers to the bypass line. All UPS
modules are taken off-line and are shut down. Contact Liebert Global
Services at once. Do not attempt to reset circuit breakers.
The UPS output current exceeds the rated system load current. This
condition causes an alarm only, the UPS does not shut down.
Determine cause of the overload. Reduce the load until the overload
condition is corrected. Reset the UPS alarm.
Table 9 Abbreviations
D = auto-dial;
L = latches
E = logs only;
R = remote
F = freezes;
S = summary
D* = auto-dial initiated by Auto Transfer to Bypass if load is on UPS when alarm occurs
D# = auto-dial initiated through Module N (1-6) off-line
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Table 9
Alarm messages - meaning and corrective action (continued)
Alarm
Message
Cabinet
Location
Special
Functions
Meaning and Corrective Action
UPS SYSTEM (Cont’d.)
Overload
Transfer
SCC
D, F, L, S
SCC
S
MMU
R
SCC
D
MMU
R
Inverter
Nonsynchronized
MMU
—
Overload
Shutdown
MMU
D, F, L, S
Reverse Power
MMU
D, F, L, S
Rectifier Fuse
Blown
MMU
D, F, S
Inverter Fault
MMU
D, F, S
Communication
Failure
SCC
S
Battery Cycle
Buffer Warning
MMU
D, S
Battery Exercise
MMU
—
Module Summary
Alarm
Module N Off
Line
The load on the UPS has exceeded the current versus time window of
system overload capacity. The UPS system transfers the load to bypass.
Reduce the load. If the system does not initiate an automatic load
retransfer, manually retransfer the critical load from the bypass line to the
UPS. Reset the alarm.
An alarm message (see lists in SCC and module remote monitor
indications and Other alarms that activate summary alarms in 3.2.6 System Configuration Screens) or the watchdog timer has activated the
Module Summary Alarm.
Clear alarm conditions, if possible.
The output circuit breaker of Module N is open. The number N will identify
the module (1 through 6).
Review active alarms at Module N and clear alarm conditions, if possible.
Inverter output is not synchronized with the UPS system critical bus. This
also means the output circuit breaker is open and should not be closed
until the output is in sync. This condition may correct itself. If not, shut
down the UPS module and then perform a start-up procedure.
Contact Liebert Global Services if condition persists.
The UPS output current has exceeded 175% of the rated full load or the
overload capacity has been exceeded. The UPS module is taken off-line
and shut down.
Contact Liebert Global Services at once. Do not attempt to reset circuit
breakers.
Excessive reverse power flow from the critical bus into the UPS inverter
has occurred, probably because of low inverter output voltage or a phase
mismatch. The UPS module is taken off-line and is shut down.
Contact Liebert Global Services immediately. Do not attempt to reset
circuit breakers.
At least one of the fuses has opened or a rectifier fault was detected. UPS
module is taken off-line and is shut down.
Contact Liebert Global Services immediately. Do not attempt to reset
circuit breakers.
At least one of the fuses has opened or an inverter fault was detected.
The UPS module is taken off-line and is shut down.
Contact Liebert Global Services immediately. Do not attempt to reset the
circuit breakers.
The COM FAIL status message is as important as an alarm message.
Refer to 3.2.14 - Alarm and Status Messages.
The optional Battery Cycle Monitor can retain information about the last
132 battery discharge events. When the storage buffer approaches its
capacity, this warning message is broadcast via terminal and modem
communication channels and a complete listing of all records is sent to
the terminal port. The message clears after 30 seconds.
Battery self-test can be enabled from System Options screen. For test to
start, the following conditions must be valid:
1. No Battery Overtemp Alarm must exist.
2. Battery input and output circuit breakers must be closed.
3. All three input volt phases must be within nominal range (+10%, -20%).
4. DC volts must be greater than (DC Ref) -20V. For a 540 bus, the
nominal float voltage for 240 cells (the DC voltage reference setting) the
DC voltage on the battery must be greater than 520VDC.
5. Battery charge must be greater than 90%.
6. Load must be greater than 15%.
Table 9 Abbreviations
D = auto-dial;
L = latches
E = logs only;
R = remote
F = freezes;
S = summary
D* = auto-dial initiated by Auto Transfer to Bypass if load is on UPS when alarm occurs
D# = auto-dial initiated through Module N (1-6) off-line
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Table 9
Alarm messages - meaning and corrective action (continued)
Alarm
Message
Cabinet
Location
Special
Functions
Battery Overtemp
MMU
D, S
Hardware
Shutdown
MMU
D#
SCC
Emergency Off
MMU
D*, L, S
Meaning and Corrective Action
Battery Temp option must be installed and enabled. Battery Temp
exceeds the programmed limit set in Alarm Settings screen for more than
one minutes.
At least one of the following alarm conditions is present: Inverter Fault,
Rectifier Fuse Blown, Reverse Power, Overload Shutdown, logic power
supply failure or inverter output symmetry failure. The UPS module is
taken off-line and is shut down.
Contact Liebert Global Services at once. Do not attempt to reset the
circuit breakers.
The Emergency Module Off (or Emergency Power Off) switch has been
pressed, which caused the UPS system to shut down and transfer the
load to the bypass line (or all power to the critical load has been
shutdown).
Determine the cause of the emergency condition and correct it if possible.
Contact Liebert Global Services if you require assistance.
COOLING
Ambient
Overtemperature
MMU
D, R, S
Blower Failed
MMU
D, S
Equipment
Overtemperature
MMU
D, S
Overtemperature
Timeout
MMU
D, F
The intake air to the UPS module exceeds the specified maximum
temperature.
This condition only causes an alarm, but should be corrected immediately
to prevent damage to equipment due to overheating.
A fault in one or more of the blower motors has occurred. This condition
only causes an alarm, but if not promptly corrected it could cause an
equipment overtemperature condition that would shut down the UPS
module.
Check the blowers for proper operation. Contact Liebert Global Services if
you require assistance.
Sensors on power semiconductor heatsinks detect temperatures above
the steady state limits for these components. The control logic sets off the
alarm but does not shut down the UPS module if the condition lasts less
than 10 minutes.
Check the air intake, air exhaust and filters. Reduce the load or transfer it
to bypass. Contact Liebert Global Services if the alarm persists.
An Equipment Overtemperature condition has persisted for more than 10
minutes. The UPS module is taken off-line and is shut down.
Check the air intake, air exhaust and filters before attempting to start-up
the UPS.
REMOTE MONITOR PANELS
(Refer also to SCC and module remote monitor indications and Other alarms that activate summary alarms in 3.2.6 System Configuration Screens)
Load On UPS
SCC
R
The UPS is operating properly. No corrective action is necessary.
SCC
R
Another new alarm message has been registered on the UPS system.
New Alarm
Clear the new alarm condition, if possible.
MMU
R
One or more of the UPS system alarm messages has been activated or a
System Summary
control logic failure has been detected by a watchdog timer.
SCC
R
Alarm
Use the Present Status screen to determine which alarms are active.
Clear the new alarm condition if possible to do so.
One or more of the UPS module alarm messages has been activated.
Module Summary
MMU
R
Use the Present Status screen to determine which alarms are active.
Alarm
Clear the new alarm condition, if possible to do so.
Table 9 Abbreviations
D = auto-dial;
L = latches
E = logs only;
R = remote
F = freezes;
S = summary
D* = auto-dial initiated by Auto Transfer to Bypass if load is on UPS when alarm occurs
D# = auto-dial initiated through Module N (1-6) off-line
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Table 10
Alarm messages - summary
Alarm Message
Input Fail
MMU
SCC
Special Functions
X
—
—
DC Ground Fault
X
—
D, L, S
DC Capacitor Fuse Blown
X
—
D, F, S
Battery CB Open
X, R
—
D, S
Battery Discharging
X, R
R
D, S
Low Battery Warning
X, R
R
D, S
Low Battery Shutdown
X
—
D, F, L, S
DC Overvoltage Shutdown
X
—
D, F, L, S
Load On Bypass
—
X, R
D
Auto Transfer to Bypass
—
E
D, F
Auto Retransfer Primed
—
X
—
Manual Reset/Retransfer
—
X
—
Static Switch Unable
—
X
D, S
D, L, S
Bypass Not Available
—
X
Bypass Phase Sequence Wrong
—
X
—
Transfer Fail
—
X
D, F, L, S
E
—
D
X, R
X
D, L, S
Input Current Unbalanced
Control Power Fail
Output Over/Under Frequency
—
X
D, L, S
Output Undervoltage
—
X
D, F, L, S
Output Overvoltage
—
X
D, F, L, S
Overload
X
X, R
D, S
Overload Transfer
—
X
D, F, L, S
Inverter Non-Synchronized
X
—
—
Module N (1-6) Off Line
R
X
D
Overload Shutdown
X
—
D, F, L, S
Reverse Power
X
—
D, F, L, S
Rectifier Fuse Blown
X
—
D, F, S
Inverter Fault
X
—
D, F, S
Hardware Shutdown
X
—
D#
D*, L, S
Emergency Off
Ambient Overtemperature
Blower Failed
X
X
X, R
R
D, S
X
—
D, S
Equipment Overtemperature
X
—
D, S
Overtemperature Timeout
X
—
D, F
Load On UPS
—
R
—
New Alarm
R
R
—
Module Summary Alarm
R
X
S
System Summary Alarm
—
R
—
Battery Exercise
X
—
—
X
—
D, S
Battery Overtemp
D = Auto-Dial initiated
D* = Auto-Dial initiated through Auto Transfer to
Bypass if load is on UPS
D# = Auto-Dial initiated through Module N (1-6)
off-line
E = message displayed on Status Report screens
F = freezes the History Status Report memory buffer
L = latches the displayed alarm message
R = Remote Alarm Contact (optional on MMU)
S = Summary Alarm (System or Module) initiated
X = message displayed on Monitor/Mimic screen
and audible alarm
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3.2.15 Communication Interfaces
Your Liebert Series 610 UPS includes the following communication ports:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Worldwide reporting to a remote terminal through a modem
Reporting to a local terminal (no modem required)
Reporting to a local monitor only
Site reporting to Liebert SiteScan or other central monitoring system
Reporting through an SNMP interface to a building management or network management system
Selected alarm messages to a Liebert Remote Monitor Panel and to contact closures for customer
use
All external communication devices, including the modem, are optional equipment. Connections to
communication ports are made by wiring cables to terminal boards at the SCC. Connection points are
shown on the Control Wiring Interconnect Diagram in the installation manual. Contact Liebert Global Services for assistance when attaching an external device to your UPS system.
Any terminal that accepts the standard 7-bit ASCII codes and conforms to the data link requirements
can be used to interface with the Liebert Series 610 UPS. If a printer is used, the terminal must support it. The UPS does not send or receive any printer control commands.
Data link requirements are:
• Asynchronous RS-232 communication
• Terminals may be configured as DTE or DCE
• Baud Rate:
Modem: 1200 or 2400
Terminal: 2400 only
• Data Bits: 8
• Stop Bits: 1
• Parity: None
• Handshaking: Not required
• Full Duplex
Worldwide Reporting
The Liebert Series 610 transmits UPS system status and history information to a remote terminal in
RS-232 format through a PC-compatible modem.
Auto-Dial
The Liebert Series 610 UPS communication program will automatically dial a pre-programmed (customer-selected) phone number when specified alarm conditions occur. The auto-dial phone number,
an alternate number and the modem baud rate are programmed by using the SCC System Configuration screen. The alarm messages that initiate an auto-dial call are identified in Table 9.
When the auto-dial function is initiated, automatic dial attempts to the first phone number are made
at periodic intervals for 30 minutes. If unanswered, the system rolls over to the second number and
repeats calling until connection is made or returns to first phone number after 30 minutes.
Once a connection is made to a terminal, the system transmits the information on the Present Status
Report screen, then hangs up. The Present Status Report includes the UPS system identification
number, date, time, alarm messages and metered parameter indications.
Requesting Information
If your Liebert Series 610 is equipped with a modem and telephone line, you can call the UPS and
receive system status and historical information on discharge events. You can place the call from
either a remote terminal or a personal computer with a communications program.
Follow the instructions for your terminal or your communications program to call the UPS. When you
make connection, the UPS will send you the greeting: “Hello, you are connected to a Series 610.” At
this point, the UPS will respond to your specific requests for information, according to Table 11.
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For example, to see a copy of information on the Present Status Report screen from the SCC (see
Present Status in this manual), press the “A” key (either uppercase or lowercase can be used for all
except the date and time commands) and then the Enter key. The Liebert Series 610 will send the
data, which will be displayed on your screen. To see the Present Status Report screen from, say, Module 1, type A1 and press the Enter key. Please note that the data on the screen is like a snapshot—the
status of the UPS at the moment you requested the information. The information sent remotely is not
updated, although you can repeat the process at intervals to request the present information.
Some screens, like the Battery Cycle Monitor information, contain data that you may wish to import
into a spreadsheet for further calculations. To put this data into a usable format, use the screen-capture feature of your communications software (or a separate screen-capture program) to save all or
part of the data to disk.
NOTE
If you save the file with an extension of “.txt,” it can then be imported into a spreadsheet
program and converted to worksheet format.
To terminate your connection to the Liebert Series 610, press the “H” key and then the Enter key. The
UPS will hang up its modem and await your next call.
Local Reporting to a Terminal
The Liebert Series 610 sends UPS system status and history information to a local terminal in RS232 format. No modem is required. The Present Status Report screen is sent to the local terminal
whenever a new alarm occurs. Commands for requesting information and for changing the date and
time are in Table 10.
Local Reporting to a Monitor
A monitor connected to this port will display the same alarm information being sent to the local terminal. This monitor does not display information going out through the modem port.
Site Reporting: SiteScan or SNMP
The SiteScan port sends UPS system information to a Liebert SiteScan Central Monitoring System.
UPS operation, environmental control systems and facility security can all be monitored from a single
location. This information can also be sent via SNMP interface to a local network or building management system.
If your site has SNMP communications, the optional Liebert SiteNet Integrator allows you to monitor
the status of all the dry-contact outputs of the Liebert Series 610. The Integrator module monitors up
to 10 digital inputs and two temperature/humidity sensors and can control two external devices with
contact closure outputs. It can be programmed to activate local audible and visual alarms in addition
to network “traps.”
Other communications options include the use of an Ethernet-based Liebert Network Management
System. Contact your local Liebert representative for further details.
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Remote Monitor Panel
The Liebert Remote Monitor Panel provides an LED indication of the following conditions:
• Load On UPS
• Load On Bypass
• Battery Discharge
• Low Battery Warning
• Overload
• Ambient Overtemp
• System Summary Alarm
• New Alarm
This information is also available for customer use through a set of contacts on a separate terminal
board.
Alarm messages that activate the System Summary Alarm are listed in Table 6 and Table 7.
The Remote Monitor Panel housing is a NEMA Type 1 enclosure, available for either surface-mount
or flush-mount installations.
Separate / Simultaneous Outputs
The RS-232 interface can support a modem plus either a local terminal or a local monitor. The
SiteScan port can support either SiteScan or SNMP communications. Whatever communication
options are installed in the Liebert Series 610 UPS can all be used simultaneously.
Table 11
Liebert Series 610 terminal commands
Key(s)
Function
A, return
AN (N=1 to 6), return
Displays Present Status Report screen. NOTE: For all three report screens, a numeral 1
through 6 in place of N will access an individual UPS module. If no numeral is entered,
you will get a report from the SCC.
^B (control-B), return
^BN (N=1 to 6) return
Displays Event History Report screen, starting with the most recent frame and then
scrolling back through earlier frames.
C, return
^CN (N=1 to 6), return
Displays History Status Report screen starting with the most recent frame and then
scrolling back through the earlier frames.
F (no return)
Freezes data output. This stops the data scrolling on the monitor to allow closer study or
a printout. This is a toggle switch command. Press the F key again to resume data
scrolling.
G, return
Resets (unfreezes and clears) the History Status Report memory buffer. This erases the
alarm messages and meter indications that were stored immediately before and after a
significant system fault. NOTE: Do not reset the History Status Report memory buffer
until operation and maintenance personnel have reviewed it as a troubleshooting tool.
Q (no return)
The data output stops (quits). The UPS communication system remains on stand-by,
ready to receive the next communication command. NOTE: To return to the beginning of
the Event History or History Status Report, press Q, then request your desired report
again.
d mm/dd/yy, return
This entry sets the date (month/day/year) in the UPS system clock. You must include the
slash (/) as you key in the date. Note that the d command must be lower case.
t hh:mm:ss, return
This entry sets the time (hour:minute:second) in the UPS system clock. You must include
the colon (:) as you key in the time. Note that the t command must be lower case.
H, return
Prompts the UPS system to hang up its modem (only applicable to the modem
communications port).
I, return
Display Battery Cycle Monitor information for 0-30 second discharge events.
J, return
Display Battery Cycle Monitor information for 31-90 second discharge events.
K, return
Display Battery Cycle Monitor information for 91-240 second discharge events.
L, return
Display Battery Cycle Monitor information for over 240 second discharge events.
M, return
Display Status Summary screen of battery discharge events.
N, return
Show detail information on all battery discharge events in order of occurrence
(last in, first out).
backspace
Moves cursor left to cancel previous entry or command.
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3.3
Modes of Operation
This section illustrates the flow of power through circuit breakers, switches and UPS components
during various modes of operation. An SCCT with three modules is shown. The same modes of operation apply to all configurations of the Liebert Series 610 UPS multi-module system. Highlighted
(thick) lines in the diagrams indicate power flow and power availability.
These illustrations show a three-breaker maintenance bypass because it is commonly used. Your installation may have a two-breaker, three-breaker or four-breaker maintenance bypass or none at all.
These illustrations do not show an alternate power source (generator) and automatic transfer switch
(external to the UPS) that might be present at your installation.
Table 12 below lists abbreviations for circuit breakers used in this manual.
Table 12
Circuit breaker abbreviations
Abbreviation
Circuit Breaker
BFB
Bypass Feeder Breaker
BIB
Bypass Input Breaker
CB1
Module Input Breaker
CB2
Module Output Breaker
MBB
Maintenance Bypass Breaker
MBD
Module Battery Disconnect
MIB
Maintenance Isolation Breaker
RIB
Rectifier Input Breaker
SBB
System Bypass Breaker
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3.3.1
Load on Bypass
Load on Bypass, with the UPS not available, is shown in Figure 52. The UPS system could be in this
mode of operation during either initial start-up or UPS system shutdown and isolation for maintenance.
NOTE
When the critical load is being supplied power from the bypass line, it is exposed to utility
power disturbances.
Figure 52 Load on bypass, UPS not available
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
BIB
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
CB2
I
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
3.3.2
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
OK to Transfer
The OK to Transfer status message will be displayed when the bypass line and UPS system output
power are both available, their voltage, frequency and phase synchronization are matched within
specifications and the Static Switch Disconnects are closed (ON). An alarm message may be displayed
to indicate Load On Bypass. If no alarm is displayed, the operating status is Load On UPS.
When the OK to Transfer message is displayed, you can perform a manual transfer of the load from
the UPS system to bypass or a manual retransfer of the load from bypass to the UPS system.
Use the Load Transfer Procedures screen at the SCC when performing a manual transfer. Refer to
3.4.3 - Load Transfer Procedures.
The UPS system control logic at the SCC will initiate an automatic transfer to bypass if an overload
condition exceeds the system current versus time window or if a UPS module is taken off line while
the system is operating in the non-redundant mode. An automatic retransfer to the UPS system may
be initiated when recovering from system overloads lasting less than five minutes. Refer to 3.5 Automatic Operations.
NOTE
When the critical load is being supplied power from the bypass line, it is exposed to utility
power disturbances.
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Figure 53 Load on bypass, UPS available
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
UPS
CB1
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
MBD
MBD
Battery
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
Figure 54 Load on UPS, bypass available
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.3
Momentary Overloads
An overload in the critical load will continue to be supplied by the UPS system if the overload condition does not exceed the current versus time curve of overload capacity for either the SCC rating or for
the number of modules on-line.
For momentary overloads exceeding 155% of rated system (SCC) current, the static switch turns on
for 40 milliseconds to provide current from the bypass line in parallel with current from the UPS system output. Up to 1000% of rated current can be supplied for less than one cycle, while up to 500% of
rated load can be sustained for the full 40 milliseconds of pulsed-parallel operation. By providing two
power sources simultaneously, high current can be supplied to the critical load with full output voltage regulation. The critical load can be supported through inrush currents and momentary faults
without operating the motorized circuit breakers. Pulse paralleling also serves, under some circumstances, as a backup in the event that an external bypass feeder breaker (e.g., BFB) trips open during
this pulse-paralleling period, retaining the UPS inverter connection with the critical load.
If an overload condition exceeds 40 milliseconds, the UPS system continues to supply power to the
critical load if it remains within the current-versus-time curve of overload capacity. If the system
overload capacity is exceeded, the UPS control logic at the SCC initiates an automatic transfer to the
bypass line by operating the static bypass switch and the motorized system circuit breakers (SBB and
UPS Output). Refer to 3.5 - Automatic Operations.
Figure 55 Momentary overload, pulsed static bypass switch
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
BIB
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
CB2
I
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.4
Input Power Failure—Load on Battery
If the utility AC power source fails or is outside the acceptable range, the battery plant becomes the
power source for the UPS module inverters. The UPS system continues to supply power to the critical
load and also to the controls of the UPS modules and the SCC.
You can use the Battery Time screen at the UPS modules to monitor the present battery voltage compared to the shutdown value. The length of time the battery can sustain the load depends on the size
of the load and the size and condition of the battery plant. The battery plant is usually large enough
to supply a 100% rated load for 15 minutes.
Alarm messages that indicate battery status are Battery Discharge, Low Battery and Battery Shutdown. The voltage limits for these alarms are displayed on the UPS module Alarm Limit Settings
screen. These limits were selected for your installation by Liebert Global Services during initial startup.
The battery block in the UPS module Monitor/Mimic Display indicates Charge or Discharge and the
current in Amperes. Maximum battery discharge current ranges from 326 amps (for 150kVA) to 1620
amps (for 750kVA). Refer to the separate Installation Manual or drawings for specific data on your
system.
Figure 56 Input power fail—load on battery
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.5
One Module Off-Line
A multi-module UPS system can be supplied with a back-up (redundant) UPS module, which is the
typical configuration. A redundant system includes one more module than the number required to
supply the critical load. A redundant system operates in the redundant mode if all modules are ON
LINE. Note that the UPS system can also operate in the redundant mode with one module OFF
LINE if the critical load is reduced so that not all ON LINE modules are required. The UPS modules
share the load and the critical load will remain on the UPS system if any one of the modules is disconnected (goes OFF LINE) for maintenance or because of an internal fault.
The system control logic monitors the connected critical load and the number of UPS modules ON
LINE. If the UPS system is operating in the redundant mode, the REDUNDANT status message
will be displayed at the System Control Cabinet (SCC). If the UPS system is operating in the nonredundant mode (redundant module is OFF LINE or was not included in the system configuration),
the NON-REDUNDANT status message is displayed at the SCC. In the Non-Redundant mode, the
critical load will be transferred to bypass if any UPS module goes OFF LINE and you must transfer
the load to bypass in order to perform maintenance on any UPS module.
Figure 57 One module off-line, load on UPS
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
CB1
SBS
R
R
BIB
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
CB2
I
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.6
Off Battery
The battery plant can be disconnected from the UPS modules, if required for battery maintenance, by
opening the module battery disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker(s). In this situation the UPS system
will continue to supply conditioned power to the critical load, but if input power fails the UPS system
cannot supply power to the load.
!
CAUTION
When the UPS system is operating with the module battery disconnect (MBD) circuit
breaker(s) open, the critical load is not protected from loss of the utility source power.
For battery maintenance on multi-module systems, Liebert recommends taking the
module requiring maintenance off-line before beginning the work. This precaution will
minimize disturbances on the system bus if input power fails during the maintenance
work.
Figure 58 Load on UPS—battery not available
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
BIB
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
CB2
I
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.7
Emergency Modules Off
The Local Emergency Modules Off (LEMO) mode is used to remove power from all UPS system components and the critical load will continue to be supplied through the bypass line.
The Emergency Module Off control is a guarded pad on the SCC Control Panel (see Figure 10).
Lift the cover and press the pad. The load will be transferred to bypass and the battery (MBD), input
and output circuit breakers will be opened (tripped). This will remove power from all UPS system
components except the controls, system bypass circuit breaker and the static switch.
Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures.
Figure 59 Emergency modules off
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
BIB
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
CB2
I
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.8
Remote Emergency Power Off
The Remote Emergency Power Off (REPO) mode is used to remove all power from the critical load.
The Remote Emergency Power Off control is a switch located remotely from the UPS system. It will
normally be in the same room as the critical load equipment. This mode can also be initiated by an
automatic contact closure in the same external circuit as the manually operated switch.
When you operate the Remote Emergency Power Off switch, all UPS circuit breakers are opened,
including the bypass circuit breaker. All power through the UPS is removed from the load. Typically,
the REPO circuit also opens the circuit breakers that provide power to the bypass lines and the UPS
controls.
Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures.
Figure 60 Emergency power off
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
RIB
#2
CB1
UPS
BFB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
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3.3.9
System Shutdown
Perform a System Shutdown procedure when you must disconnect the UPS system components from
all power sources when required for maintenance procedures.
Use the Shutdown Procedures screen when performing a manual System Shutdown.
Refer to 3.4.5 - Shutdown Procedures.
Refer to 3.3.10 - Maintenance Bypass.
Before performing any maintenance on your Liebert Series 610 UPS System, observe ALL of the
WARNINGS in 4.0 - Maintenance.
!
WARNING
Lethal voltages are present within this system even when it is not on or when power is not
being supplied. Observe all cautions and warnings in this manual. Failure to do so could
result in serious injury or death. Do not work on or operate this equipment unless you are
fully qualified to do so! Never work alone.
Figure 61 System shutdown
RIB
UPS
RIB
UPS
#3
CB1
#2
CB1
BFB
RIB
UPS
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
MBD
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
3.3.10 Maintenance Bypass
Maintenance Bypass switchgear (cabinet, panelboard, switchboard or custom switchgear) allows you
to totally isolate the UPS system from all power sources, while you maintain power to the critical
load.
Your installation may have a two-breaker, three-breaker or four-breaker maintenance bypass or none
at all. The main differences are the locations of the Rectifier Input Breaker and the Bypass Input
Breaker (BIB).
Another option that may be present at your site is an alternate power source (generator) and an automatic transfer switch (ATS).
Note that to totally isolate the UPS system from all power sources, the Main Input switchgear and
battery circuit breakers must also be opened
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.
!
CAUTION
Instructions for operating the Maintenance Bypass circuit breakers are on the Maintenance
Bypass cabinet. Make sure you understand the proper sequence before operating any circuit
breaker. Operating a Maintenance Bypass circuit breaker out of sequence could cut off power
to the critical load.
Figure 62 Load on maintenance bypass, two breakers
RIB
UPS
RIB
UPS
#3
CB1
RIB
#2
UPS
CB1
BFB
BIB
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
SBB
MBB
I
I
CB2
I
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
To Critical Load
MBD
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
SCCT
Battery
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
Figure 63 Load on maintenance bypass, three breakers
STANDBY GENERATOR
AUTOMATIC
TRANSFER SWITCH
RIB
UPS
RIB
#3
UPS
CB1
BFB
RIB
UPS
#2
CB1
#1
CB1
SBS
R
R
R
I
I
I
BIB
SBB
MBB
CB2
CB2
System
Controls
CB2
SKRU
Output
MIB
SCCT
MBD
Battery
MBD
Battery
To Critical Load
MBD
SCCT
(can accommodate up to 6 UPS modules)
Battery
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3.4
Manual Procedures
The Liebert Series 610 UPS system is designed to function while unattended by an operator. The system control logic at the System Control Cabinet (SCC) monitors the performance of the UPS system,
the availability of power sources and the current required by the critical load.
The system control logic at the SCC:
1. Determines what overload conditions can be sustained without a transfer to bypass.
2. Initiates an automatic transfer to bypass to sustain an overload.
3. Can initiate an automatic retransfer to the UPS after a system overload has been cleared.
4. Initiates an automatic transfer to bypass and emergency module shutdown when a specified UPS
fault occurs.
The control logic at each UPS module:
1. Determines what overload conditions can be sustained by the module while it is on-line.
2. Automatically takes the UPS module off line and initiates an emergency module shutdown when
selected UPS faults occur.
Refer to 3.5 - Automatic Operations for more details.
Manual procedures available to the operator include Start-Up, Load Transfers and Shutdowns. These
procedures are performed by using the operator control panel and some manually operated circuit
breakers and switches.
The LCD at each UPS cabinet includes a screen to help you with each manual procedure by listing
each step you must perform.
This section lists step-by-step controls to operate and conditions to observe in the following manual
procedures:
1. Start-Up: including initial start-up, recovering from input power failure, recovering from battery
shutdown and recovering from shutdowns for emergencies or maintenance procedures.
2. Load Transfers: including transfers from UPS system to bypass and retransfers from bypass to
the UPS system.
3. Shutdowns: including module shutdowns for maintenance procedures and emergency
shutdowns.
3.4.1
SCC Start-Up Procedure
When the UPS system has been shut down for any reason, use this procedure to start-up the UPS system to provide filtered, reliable power to the critical load. This procedure gives step-by-step instructions for controls to operate and conditions to observe. Your present situation could be initial start-up
or recovering from input power failure, battery shutdown, maintenance shutdown or an emergency
shutdown.
NOTE
The following procedure assumes that the UPS installation inspection and initial start-up
have been performed by Liebert Global Services. A Liebert-authorized representative must
perform the initial system start-up to ensure proper system operation.
!
CAUTION
The following procedure provides power to the critical load distribution system. Verify that
the critical load distribution is ready to accept power. Make sure that personnel and
equipment are ready for the critical load distribution system to be energized.
If your installation includes a Maintenance Bypass, you may already be supplying power to the critical load equipment through the Maintenance Bypass. If there is no power to the critical load, apply
power through the UPS bypass line per the following procedure.
During a start-up procedure, power is supplied to the critical load through the UPS (internal) bypass
line while the UPS system is being energized. Depending on the reason for your UPS system shutdown, you may already have power through the bypass line. You can determine this by observing the
Monitor/Mimic Display screen at the System Control Cabinet (SCC) after Control Power is available.
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Step 1. Before you apply power to the UPS modules, determine the position of the following circuit
breakers and switches:
a. Bypass Input Breaker (BIB) - If this circuit breaker is closed, you may already have power
to the critical load through the bypass line. If this breaker is closed, leave it closed. If it is
open, leave it open until you are ready to energize the bypass line.
b. System Bypass Circuit Breaker (SBB) - This motorized circuit breaker (Figure 9) should
be closed unless you are recovering from a Remote Emergency Power Off. You may already be
supplying power to the critical load through this breaker. If this breaker is open, you will be
instructed to reset it later in this procedure.
c. UPS Output Circuit Breaker - This motorized circuit breaker (see Figure 9) should be
open.
d. Static Switch Disconnect - This manually operated disconnect (see Figure 9) will be in the
ON (closed) position unless you are recovering from a shutdown. If the disconnect is OFF
(open), you will be instructed to reset it and turn it on later in this procedure.
NOTE
Depending on SCC model, the static switch disconnects can be one or two circuit breakers or
two contactors. The location could be at the front, right or rear of the cabinet. Refer to the
drawing of the SCC cabinet selected for your UPS system.
NOTE
If the system was shut down in response to an “Emergency Off, there may be alarm messages on
the LCD screen that describe system conditions before (or at the time of) the shutdown. Some or
all of the alarm conditions may have already been resolved. To clear these alarm messages,
turn off the control power (see Figure 8 and Figure 9). Wait at least 10 minutes for the control
power circuitry to completely de-energize. After 10 minutes, turn control power back on and
wait two minutes before continuing.
e.
!
Control Power - The fuses for the SCC control power (labeled F7 through F10, located below
the SCC control boards in Figure 9) should be ON (pushed in) unless you are recovering from
a maintenance shutdown. If control power is OFF (fuseholders pulled open), leave it OFF
until you are ready to apply power to the UPS controls.
CAUTION
If you are recovering from a UPS system shutdown for maintenance procedures, verify that all
of the SCC doors are closed and latched. All test equipment must be removed from the system.
All electrical connections must be secure.
Power must be provided to the UPS controls so the operator can use the LCD and so the system logic
can perform its control functions. Note that you can use the LCD to monitor UPS system status, even
when the UPS modules are not operating.
During a start-up procedure, power is supplied to the critical load through the UPS (internal) bypass
line while the UPS modules are being energized. Depending on the reason for your UPS system shutdown, you may already have power through the bypass line. You can determine this by observing the
Monitor/Mimic Display screen at the System Control Cabinet (SCC).
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Step 2. If the bypass line is not supplied to the SCC, the LCD screen will be blank. Energize the
bypass line by operating the following controls:
a. Close the Bypass Input Breaker (BIB). This breaker may be in your Maintenance Bypass
cabinet.
NOTE
Wait two minutes after applying bypass power before you operate any other UPS controls.
!
CAUTION
DO NOT assume that the UPS System Bypass Breaker (SBB) is closed.
Instructions for operating the Maintenance Bypass circuit breakers are on the Maintenance
Bypass cabinet.
Make sure you understand the proper sequence before operating any circuit breaker.
Operating a Maintenance Bypass circuit breaker out of sequence could cut off power to the
critical load.
Operations involving MIB and MBB MUST only be done when the UPS system is on internal
bypass.
b. Ensure the SCC Control Power Disconnect is ON. Open the door to the SCC control section
and locate the fuseblock F7 through F10 (see Figure 9). If they are not connected already,
push the fuseholders in to turn ON control power, then reclose the SCC control door.
c. Observe the Monitor/Mimic Display screen to determine if your System Bypass circuit
breaker (SBB) is closed and whether the UPS Bypass line is supplying power to the critical
load.
If your System Bypass circuit breaker is open (as in recovering from an Emergency Power Off
or Low Battery Shutdown), close this circuit breaker as follows:
1. Open the SCC control panel door and find the Transfer Relay Board (Figure 11). If the
red LED (CR18) labeled TOT S/D (Total Shutdown) is on, press the Bypass Reset switch
(SW1) on this board. The red LED should turn off.
2. Set the Static Switch Disconnects (Figure 9) OFF (open), if not off already.
NOTE
Depending on SCC model, the static switch disconnects can be one or two circuit breakers or
two contactors. The location could be at the front, right or rear of the cabinet. Refer to the
drawing of the SCC cabinet selected for your UPS system.
3. Find the Close Bypass switch (SW1) on the System Interface Board (Figure 11, Item 3).
Press this switch to reset the System Bypass circuit breaker. Check the Monitor/Mimic
screen to verify the breaker is closed.
d. If currently OFF, close the Static Switch Disconnects.
NOTE
Depending on SCC model, the static switch disconnects can be one or two circuit breakers
or two contactors. The location could be at the front, right or rear of the cabinet. Refer to the
drawing of the SCC cabinet selected for your UPS system.
4. Press two Reset Switches for Static Switch Disconnects behind door below SCC
control panel (see Figure 9). Note that in an SCCT less than 1600A, there is no Reset
Switch for the Static Switch Disconnect, so this step is not necessary.
5. Set the Static Switch Disconnects to ON (closed).
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e.
!
If the UPS Bypass line is available, but not yet supplying power to the load, close the circuit
breakers (external to the UPS) required to provide power to the critical load equipment.
Follow the three steps shown below.
CAUTION
Be sure to operate Maintenance Bypass circuit breakers in the proper sequence.
1. Verify the Bypass Input Breaker (BIB) and System Bypass circuit breakers are closed.
2. Close the Maintenance Isolation Breaker (MIB).
3. Open the Maintenance Bypass Breaker (MBB).
Observe the Monitor/Mimic Display screen to confirm that the UPS Bypass line is energized and supplying power to the critical load equipment.
At the System Control Cabinet (SCC), press the Select pad to put the Master Menu on the LCD.
Move the highlighted cursor to Start-Up Procedures (use the Up and Down pads). Press the Select
pad to display the Start-Up Procedures screen. Return to this screen whenever you need to see the
start-up instructions.
Perform a module start-up procedure at each module in your UPS system until all required modules
are on-line. Refer to 3.4.2 - UPS Module Start-Up for instructions. After the module start-up is complete, return to the SCC (see 3.4.3 - Load Transfer Procedures) to complete your UPS system
start-up.
Figure 64 SCC start-up procedures screen
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES
1.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
2.
Select "SYSTEM CONFIGURATION" screen to verify that the correct model number is
displayed.
3.
Go to the modules(s) and follow the module "STARTUP PROCEDURES".
4.
Select "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen, verify that the output voltages are at the
proper nominal level and correct number of modules online is displayed.
5.
If the bypass or static switch breakers are open, refer to Start-up Procedures
in the UPS manual for instructions on closing these breakers.
6.
System is now ready to assume load. Select "LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURES"
screen for this procedure.
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3.4.2
UPS Module Start-Up
When a UPS module has been shut down for any reason, use this procedure to start-up the UPS module to provide filtered, reliable power to the critical bus. This procedure gives step-by-step instructions for controls to operate and conditions to observe. Your present situation could be initial start-up
or recovering from input power failure, battery shutdown, maintenance shutdown or an emergency
shutdown.
Perform this module start-up procedure at each module in your UPS system until all required modules are on-line.
Step 1. Before you apply power to the UPS module, determine the position of the following circuit
breakers and switches:
a. Rectifier Input Breaker (RIB) - If this external circuit breaker is closed, you already have
power to the UPS cabinet and possibly power to the controls. If this breaker is closed, leave it
closed. If it is open, leave it open until you are ready to apply power to the UPS cabinet.
b. Input Circuit Breaker (CB1) - Verify that this breaker on the front of the UPS module
cabinet (Figure 8) is in the OFF position.
c. Module Battery Disconnect (MBD) - Verify that this external breaker is open or tripped.
d. Module Output Circuit Breaker (CB2) - Verify that this breaker on the front of the UPS
module cabinet (Figure 8) is in the OFF position.
e. Control Power - The fuses labeled Control Disconnect should be ON (pushed in) unless you
are recovering from a maintenance shutdown. If control power is OFF (fuseholders pulled
open), leave it OFF until you are ready to apply power to the UPS controls.
Power must be provided to the UPS module controls so you can use the LCD and so the system logic
can perform its control functions. Note that you can use the LCD to monitor UPS status, even when
the UPS module is not on-line. If the LCD is operating, you already have Control Power. This will be
the usual condition, unless you are recovering from a maintenance shutdown.
Step 2. If the LCD is not operating, energize Control Power by operating the following two controls:
a. Close the Rectifier Input Breaker (RIB), which is outside the UPS cabinet. This will provide
power to the UPS cabinet but not to any UPS components.
b. Open the UPS cabinet door and close the Control Disconnect fuseholders to turn the Control
Power ON. See Figure 8. Close the UPS cabinet door.
NOTE
Wait 2 minutes after applying control power before operating any other UPS module controls.
Press the Select pad on the UPS module to put the Master Menu on the LCD. Move the highlighted
cursor to Start-Up Procedures (use the Up and Down pads). Press the Select pad to display the
Start-Up Procedures screen. Return to this screen whenever you need to see the start-up instructions.
Select the Monitor/Mimic Display on the LCD. In the ALARM MESSAGES block (see Figure 15), the
only alarm present should be Battery CB Open. If any other alarm messages are present, do not proceed with the module start-up. Contact Liebert Global Services (LGS) for assistance.
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Figure 65 Module start-up procedures screen
DOWN :
NEXT PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES
1.
Verify that the control power is applied to the system control cabinet (check the display
on the system control cabinet).
2.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
3.
Select "SYSTEM CONFIGURATION" screen to verify that the correct model is
displayed.
4.
Select "WALK-IN" screen and do the following:
a)
Close module input circuit breaker. Verify that the DC voltage bar on
the display begins to gradually move to the right and the AC input
current bars do not move to the right more than 10% (40% for modules
with input filters) after the transformer inrush has subsided.
UP : FIRST PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
START-UP PROCEDURES (Cont'd)
b)
Verify that the output voltage bar moves to the right after the DC
bus bar has reached the 90% point. Both bars should settle near
their respective 100% levels.
c)
If anything happens on the display not mentioned in (a) or (b),
immediately open the module input circuit breaker and investigate.
5.
If step 4 is successful, select "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen and verify module
DC bus and output voltages are at proper nominal level. If so, close
module battery circuit breaker.
6.
If no alarms are present on the "MONITOR/MIMIC" screen, the module may be
placed online by closing the module output breaker.
Select the Walk-In screen on the LCD.
Step 3. To energize the UPS module, manually close the input circuit breaker (CB1, Figure 8). This
will provide power to the rectifier. Use the Walk-In screen to monitor the Module DC Bus voltage.
!
WARNING
If any abnormal situation occurs during this walk-in procedure, open the input circuit breaker
and investigate the problem. Each input amps bar should be within 25% of the average bar
length. Call Liebert Global Services if you need help.
The Input Amps bars should settle at 25% or less after the momentary inrush current has subsided.
Verify that the DC Voltage bar begins to gradually move to the right.
Verify that the Output Voltage bar moves to the right after the DC Voltage bar has reached the 90%
level. Both bars should settle near the 100% line.
Select the Monitor/Mimic display from the Master Menu and confirm that the module DC bus and
AC output are at their proper operating voltages.
Step 4. When the Module DC Bus voltage is at 100%, you can manually close the module battery disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker (external to the UPS).
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The Battery block in the Monitor/Mimic Display indicates the battery voltage and charge current.
NOTE
The battery charge current may increase quickly, but then should slowly decrease. If you are
recovering from a battery shutdown or an input power failure, the UPS rectifier will be
recharging the battery. Recharge current can be more than 100 Amps. The maximum allowable
recharge current for your unit will depend on the kVA rating and your factory-set battery
recharge current limit.
!
CAUTION
Do not use equalize charging with valve-regulated, sealed-cell batteries. Refer to the battery
manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for specific information
about equalize charging.
Use the Monitor/Mimic Display screen to determine the condition of the UPS module. Press the
Alarm Reset pad to clear the Alarm Messages. Refer to Table 9 for an explanation of any remaining
alarm messages. Call Liebert Global Services if you cannot clear the remaining alarm messages.
If no alarm messages are displayed, the UPS module is now ready to provide filtered, uninterruptible
power to the critical bus. Manually close the module output circuit breaker (CB2, Figure 8) to place
this UPS module on-line.
When all required UPS modules are on-line, return to the SCC (see 3.4.3 - Load Transfer Procedures) to complete your UPS system start-up.
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3.4.3
Load Transfer Procedures
Use the Monitor/Mimic Display at the SCC to determine the operating condition of the UPS system.
Press the Alarm Reset pad to clear the Alarm Messages. If all UPS modules are on-line, the only
message remaining should be Load On Bypass. Refer to Table 9 for an explanation of any other
remaining alarm messages. Call Liebert Global Services if you cannot clear any remaining alarm
messages.
If the only alarm message displayed is Load On Bypass (or no alarms), you can perform a manual
transfer of the load between the UPS system and the UPS bypass line. Changing the load from the
UPS system to the UPS bypass is called a transfer. Changing the load from UPS bypass to the UPS
system is called a retransfer. Note that the UPS system control logic can initiate automatic load
transfers and retransfers. Refer to 3.5 - Automatic Operations.
Press the Select pad to display the Master Menu on the LCD of the SCC. Move the highlighted cursor
to Load Transfer Procedures (using the Up and Down pads). Press the Select pad to display the
Load Transfer Procedures screen.
Step 1. Verify that the OK TO TRANSFER message is highlighted. If not (if the TRANSFER PROHIBIT message is highlighted instead), slowly rotate the Voltage Adjust knob (Figure 10, item 6)
to adjust the UPS system voltage (1 - 5 volts) above the bypass voltage.
NOTE
1. UPS output voltage changes VERY slowly in response to movements of the Voltage Adjust
knob. To avoid overshooting, allow at least a minute for UPS output voltage to stabilize
before proceeding to the next step.
2. If the TRANSFER PROHIBIT message remains, refer to Table 9 for corrective action for
any alarm messages. Call Liebert Global Services if you cannot solve the problem.
Figure 66 Load transfer procedures screen
SELECT : MASTER MENU
SYNCHRONIZATION
VOLTAGE COMPARISON
UPS
BYPASS
-
A-B
380
381
B-C
380
380
C-A
380
379
TRANSFER PROHIBIT
50.0 Hz
50.0 Hz
MANUAL
TRANSFER INSTRUCTIONS
ONON
BYPASS
UPS
OK TO TRANSFER
FREQUENCY
1.
2.
3.
4.
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UPS LEAD
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+30
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Verifythat
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Step 2. Perform Step 2 on the Load Transfer Procedures Screen.
a. If the load is on internal bypass, simultaneously press the UPS and Control Enable
pads (Figure 10). This will close the motorized UPS Output circuit breaker and open the
motorized System Bypass circuit breaker (SBB) in a make-before-break sequence.
b. If the load is on the UPS system, simultaneously press the Bypass and Control Enable
pads (Figure 10). This will close the motorized System Bypass circuit breaker (SBB) and
open the motorized UPS Output circuit breaker in a make-before-break sequence.
Return to the Monitor/Mimic Display screen to monitor the operation of the UPS system. Press the
Alarm Reset pad to clear any latched alarm messages removed by the new load status. Refer to
Table 9 if an alarm message other than Load On Bypass is still displayed. Contact Liebert Global
Services if you require assistance.
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3.4.4
Maintenance Bypass Load Transfers
To manually transfer the load between Maintenance Bypass and the UPS system bypass line, carefully follow these instructions. Do not transfer the load between Maintenance Bypass and the UPS
system (module inverters) output. Use the SCC Monitor/Mimic Display screen to verify the UPS system bypass line is available.
!
CAUTION
!
CAUTION
Make sure you understand the proper sequence before operating any circuit breaker.
Operating a Maintenance Bypass circuit breaker out of sequence could cut off power to the
critical load.
The UPS system (SCC) must be on internal bypass before performing the following
procedures and operating MIB or MBB or damage to the UPS may occur and the critical load
may be lost.
If the load is on the UPS System Bypass:
a. If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has an optional 2-key interlock system,
press the button on the maintenance bypass cabinet to remove the key from the solenoid.
NOTE
If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has any other type of custom interlock, follow
the specific instructions for that interlock system to remove the key.
b. If using a key interlock system, insert the key into the lock for the Maintenance Bypass
Breaker (MBB) to enable it to be closed.
c. Close the Maintenance Bypass Breaker (MBB).
d. Verify closure of the MBB. Then open the Maintenance Isolation Breaker (MIB). The UPS
system is now isolated from the critical load and the load is now on Maintenance
Bypass.
e. If using a key interlock system, remove the key from the lock for the Maintenance Isolation
Breaker (MIB) to lock it open.
f. If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has an optional 2-key interlock system,
replace the key into the solenoid.
g. If UPS bypass shutdown is required, open the Bypass Input Breaker (BIB).
If the load is on Maintenance Bypass:
a. Close the Bypass Input Breaker (BIB) or verify BIB is closed. Note that UPS System Bypass
circuit breaker (motorized) must also be closed. Refer to 3.4.1 - SCC Start-Up Procedure.
b. If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has an optional 2-key interlock system,
press the button on the maintenance bypass cabinet to remove the key from the solenoid.
NOTE
If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has any other type of custom interlock,
follow the specific instructions for that interlock system to remove the key.
c.
If using a key interlock system, insert the key into the lock for the Maintenance Isolation
Breaker (MIB) to enable it to be closed.
d. Close the Maintenance Isolation Breaker (MIB).
e. Verify closure of the MIB. Then open the Maintenance Bypass Breaker (MBB). Load is now
on UPS Internal Bypass.
f. If using a key interlock system, remove the key from the lock for the Maintenance Bypass
Breaker (MBB) to lock it open.
g. If the maintenance bypass cabinet or switchboard has an optional 2-key interlock system,
replace the key into the solenoid.
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3.4.5
Shutdown Procedures
System Shutdown Procedure
Perform a System Shutdown Procedure when you want to remove power from the UPS system and
System Control Cabinet (SCC) when required for maintenance or if you need to perform maintenance
on a UPS module in a non-redundant system.
Before performing any maintenance on your Liebert Series 610 UPS, observe ALL of the WARNINGS in 4.0 - Maintenance.
Use the SCC Monitor/Mimic Display to determine the operating condition of the UPS system.
From the SCC Master Menu, select the Shutdown Procedures screen.
Figure 67 SCC shutdown procedures screen
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
1.
If load is not already being supplied by the bypass line, select the
"LOAD TRANSFER PROCEDURE" screen and follow the instructions to transfer
the load to bypass.
2.
Go to the modules(s) and follow the module "SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES."
3.
Press the ALARM RESET button to clear alarms which are no longer active.
4.
If necessary for maintenance purposes, open the static switch disconnect
circuit breakers.
5.
Wait approximately two (2) minutes before attempting any other action .
Step 1. If the UPS system is supplying power to the load (Load On UPS), select the Load Transfer
Procedures screen at the SCC and perform a manual transfer to the bypass line (Load On Bypass),
see 3.4.3 - Load Transfer Procedures. This will open the motorized UPS Output circuit breaker
(see Figure 9) and close the motorized System Bypass circuit breaker (SBB, Figure 9).
Step 2. If maintenance is required on the Static Bypass Switch, set the Static Switch Disconnects
to OFF (open). Refer to Figure 9.
NOTE
Depending on SCC model, the static switch disconnects can be two circuit breakers, contactors
or plug-in connections on a drawout carriage assembly. The location could be at the front, right
or rear of the cabinet. Refer to the drawing of the SCC cabinet selected for your UPS system.
!
CAUTION
The UPS bypass line is still energized.
Step 3. If maintenance is required in the area of the SCC controls or the motorized system circuit
breakers (UPS Output and SBB), transfer the load to the Maintenance Bypass, if available (see 3.4.4 Maintenance Bypass Load Transfers).
!
CAUTION
!
WARNING
If your installation does not include a Maintenance Bypass, power must still be isolated from
both sides of the UPS circuit breakers if maintenance is required. This will result in loss of
power to the critical load. Perform an orderly load shutdown before isolating power.
Lethal voltages are present within this unit even when it is not on or when utility is not being
supplied. Observe all cautions and warnings in this manual. Failure to do so could result in
serious injury or death. Do not work on or operate this equipment unless you are fully
qualified to do so! Never work alone.
Before performing any maintenance on your Liebert Series 610 UPS, observe ALL of the WARNINGS in 4.0 - Maintenance.
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Module Shutdown Procedure
Perform a Module Shutdown Procedure when you want to remove power from a UPS module when
required for maintenance.
Before performing any maintenance on your Liebert Series 610 UPS, observe ALL of the WARNINGS in 4.0 - Maintenance.
Use the module Monitor/Mimic Display to determine the operating condition of the UPS module.
From the module Master Menu, select the Shutdown Procedures screen. Note that this is a two-page screen.
Figure 68 Module shutdown procedures screen
DOWN :
SELECT :
NEXT PAGE
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES
1.
If load can not be supported by the remaining modules when this module
is taken off line, go to the system control cabinet and select the "LOAD
TRANSFER PROCEDURES" screen. Follow the instructions to transfer
to bypass.
2.
Open the module output breaker by simultaneously pressing the OUTPUT TRIP
and CONTROL ENABLE pushbuttons.
3.
Open the module battery breaker by simultaneously pressing the BATTERY TRIP
and CONTROL ENABLE pushbuttons.
4.
Manually open the input breaker by moving the handle to the OFF position.
UP : FIRST PAGE
SELECT :
MASTER MENU
© 1989-2003
SHUTDOWN PROCEDURES (Cont'd)
5.
Verify breaker status on the "MONITOR / MIMIC" screen.
6.
If necessary for maintenance purposes, turn the control power switch (fuse
disconnect on some models) to the OFF position.
7.
Wait a minimum of two (2) minutes before attempting any other action.
Step 1. If the UPS module is on-line, simultaneously press the Output Trip and Control Enable
pads (Figure 10). This will open the UPS module output circuit breaker (CB2, Figure 8).
Step 2. Open the module battery disconnect (MBD) circuit breaker by simultaneously pressing the
Battery Trip and Control Enable pads (Figure 10).
Step 3. Open the UPS input circuit breaker by moving the handle to the OFF position (Figure 8).
Return to the Monitor/Mimic Display to verify status of the circuit breakers. Press the Alarm Reset
pad to clear alarm messages.
Step 4. If maintenance is required on the UPS controls, turn the Control Power switch to the OFF
position (Figure 8). You may also want to open the Rectifier Input Breaker (RIB), external to the
UPS cabinet.
!
WARNING
Lethal voltages are present within this unit even when it is not on or when utility is not being
supplied. Observe all cautions and warnings in this manual. Failure to do so could result in
serious injury or death. Do not work on or operate this equipment unless you are fully
qualified to do so! Never work alone.
Before performing any maintenance on your Liebert Series 610 UPS, observe ALL of the WARNINGS in 4.0 - Maintenance.
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Local Emergency Modules Off (LEMO)
The UPS controls at the SCC include an Emergency Module Off pad (Figure 10, item 12). When
this guarded pad is pressed, the load is automatically transferred to the bypass line and the
module output, battery and input circuit breakers trip open to isolate and shut down all the UPS
modules. Control Power for indicators and alarms remains On.
Remote Emergency Power Off (REPO)
The Remote Emergency Power Off control (REPO) is a switch located remotely from the UPS system.
It will normally be in the same room as the critical load equipment.
The Remote Emergency Power Off switch removes all power to the critical load.
When you trip the Remote Emergency Power Off switch, all UPS circuit breakers are opened, including the System Bypass circuit breaker (SBB). All power through the UPS is removed from the
load. You will still have power to the UPS controls, and you may have power to the static switch.
3.5
Automatic Operations
The Liebert Series 610 UPS system is designed to function while unattended by an operator. The system control logic monitors the performance of the UPS, the availability of power sources and the current required by the critical load.
The system control logic at the SCC:
•
•
•
•
Determines what overload conditions can be sustained without a transfer to bypass.
Initiates an automatic transfer to bypass to sustain an overload.
Can initiate an automatic retransfer to the UPS after a system overload has been cleared.
Initiates an automatic transfer to bypass and emergency module shutdown when a specified UPS
fault occurs.
The control logic at each UPS module:
• Determines what overload conditions can be sustained by the module while it is on-line.
• Automatically takes the UPS module off line and initiates an emergency module shutdown when
selected UPS faults occur.
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3.5.1
Overloads (Without Transfer)
The UPS system is capable of sustaining full output voltage (±2% of the nominal voltage) for overload
conditions that remain within (under) the current versus time curve of system overload capacity and
the capacity of modules on-line (Figure 69). Note that the time scale is not linear. Load On UPS is
illustrated in Figure 54.
For high current demands of short duration (momentary overloads) the critical load is supplied simultaneously by both the UPS system and the bypass line. Whenever the critical load requires more than
155% of the capacity of the modules on-line, the bypass line will supply up to 1000% rated system current through the solid state static switch for 40 milliseconds. Refer to 3.3.3 - Momentary Overloads.
Whenever an overload condition occurs, you should determine the cause of the overload.
If an overload condition exceeds the UPS system overload capacity or the capacity of the modules online, the UPS system initiates an automatic load transfer to the bypass line.
Figure 69 Current-versus-time curves of module overload capacity
% Load
% Load
INVERTER OVERLOAD
PULSED-PARALLEL
(FAULT-CLEARING)
1000%
150%
150%
125%
104%
100%
100%
40ms
3.5.2
30s
10m
40ms
Automatic Transfers to Bypass
The UPS system will initiate an automatic load transfer to the bypass line if an overload condition
exceeds the current-versus-time curve of system overload capacity or capacity of the modules on-line
or if specified UPS system faults occur. Note that when the UPS system is operating in the nonredundant mode, an automatic transfer to bypass will be initiated when any UPS module is taken off
line, either automatically or manually. Load On Bypass is illustrated in Figure 53.
The Overload Transfer and Output Undervoltage alarm messages will initiate an automatic transfer
to bypass and the Load On Bypass message will be displayed. The status report screens will include
the Automatic Transfer to Bypass message. Other UPS system faults will initiate an automatic transfer to bypass followed immediately by the shutdown and isolation of the UPS modules. Refer to 3.5.5 Automatic Emergency Modules Off.
In an automatic transfer to bypass the UPS Output and System Bypass circuit breakers do not overlap as they do in a manual transfer. The static bypass switch is fired (closed), the UPS Output circuit
breaker is opened and the System Bypass circuit breaker is closed.
Bypass power is supplied to the critical load through the static bypass switch during the short time
while both circuit breakers are open.
NOTE
A load transfer to the bypass line will be completed whenever an automatic transfer to bypass
is initiated. If the OK to Transfer condition is present, the load transfer will be uninterrupted.
If the Static Switch Unable alarm message is present for any reason, the automatic transfer
will be interrupted for 40 to 120 milliseconds. Because of the reliability of the UPS components,
an interrupted load transfer is a very unlikely occurrence.
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3.5.3
Automatic Retransfers to UPS
Automatic Retransfer to UPS is an option that you can select from the SCC System Configuration
screen. If you do not want the UPS system to initiate any automatic retransfers, set Max Auto-Rexfer
Attempts to zero (0).
In an automatic retransfer, the two motorized circuit breakers (System Bypass and UPS Output) are
both closed simultaneously for a short period of time (overlap).
The following critical bus conditions must be present to initiate an automatic retransfer of the critical
load from the bypass source to the UPS system:
1. The number of Auto-Rexfer Attempts selected must be greater than zero (0). If zero (0) is selected,
no automatic retransfers will occur.
2. Critical load was initially transferred to the bypass source due to a system overload only. (A
manually initiated retransfer from bypass is required if the critical load exceeded the capacity of
the modules on-line or if a UPS fault occurred.).
3. Overload has since dropped below 100% of the rated SCC current.
4. Enough UPS modules are on-line to supply the critical load.
5. OK to Transfer signal received from the control logic for at least 10 seconds, within 5 minutes of
the system overload transfer. (A manually initiated retransfer from bypass is required for
overloads lasting 5 minutes or more.)
6. Cyclic-type overloads, which occur up to five (select range is 0 to 5) times in 60 minutes, are
automatically returned to the UPS system for each event including the Nth overload. A manually
initiated retransfer from bypass is required for the N + 1 overload.
3.5.4
Automatic Module Off-Line
For specified UPS module faults, the control logic will initiate an automatic isolation and shutdown of
the UPS module. In the Module Off-Line mode the output, battery (MBD) and input circuit breakers
are open. If the UPS system was operating in the redundant mode when the module was taken offline, the critical load will remain on the UPS system. If the UPS system was operating in the nonredundant mode, an automatic transfer to bypass will be initiated. Note that the bypass line is usually not available during Low Battery Shutdown. One Module Off-Line is illustrated in Figure 57.
The following UPS module faults will initiate an automatic Module Off-Line:
DC Overvoltage Shutdown
Hardware Shutdown
Inverter Fault
Low-Battery Shutdown
Overload Shutdown
Overtemperature Timeout
Rectifier Fuse Blown
Reverse Power
Refer to Table 9 for more information regarding these alarm messages.
3.5.5
Automatic Emergency Modules Off
For the specified UPS system fault, the control logic will initiate an automatic transfer to bypass followed immediately by a shutdown and isolation of the UPS system. In the Emergency Modules Off
mode the output, battery (MBD) and input circuit breakers at each UPS module are open. The System
Bypass Breaker (SBB) will be closed if the bypass line is available. Emergency Modules Off is
illustrated in Figure 59.
The following UPS system fault will initiate an automatic Emergency Modules Off: Output Over Voltage
Refer to Table 9 for more information regarding alarm messages.
NOTE
A load transfer to the bypass line will be completed whenever an automatic transfer to bypass
is initiated and the bypass line is available. If the OK to Transfer condition is present, the load
transfer will be uninterrupted. If the Static Switch Unable alarm message is present for any
reason, the automatic transfer will be interrupted for 40 to 120 milliseconds. Because of the
reliability of the UPS components, an interrupted load transfer is a very unlikely occurrence.
Your installation may include a Remote Emergency Power Off mode that can be initiated automatically
by a contact closure in the critical load equipment. Refer to 3.3.8 - Remote Emergency Power Off.
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Maintenance
4.0
MAINTENANCE
4.1
Safety Precautions
Observe the safety precautions in Important Safety Instructions on page 1 and in 1.3 - Safety
Precautions.
ONLY qualified service personnel should perform maintenance on the UPS system.
Observe ALL of the WARNINGS below before performing ANY maintenance on the UPS System and
associated equipment. Also observe the manufacturer’s safety precautions pertaining to the battery,
along with the battery safety precautions in this section.
!
CAUTION
Always identify connecting wiring prior to disconnecting any wiring.
Do not substitute parts except as authorized by Liebert Corporation.
Maintain the UPS cabinets free of foreign materials such as solder, wire cuttings, etc.
Contact Liebert Global Services if you are not sure of the procedures to follow or if you are not
familiar with the circuitry.
!
WARNING
Extreme caution is required when performing maintenance.
Be constantly aware that the UPS system contains high DC as well as AC voltages. With
input power off and the battery disconnected, high voltage at filter capacitors and power
circuits should be discharged within 30 seconds. However, if a power circuit failure has
occurred, you should assume that high voltage may still exist after shutdown. Check with a
voltmeter before making contact.
AC voltage will remain on the bypass and output circuit breakers and the static bypass
switch, unless associated external circuit breakers are opened.
Check for voltage with both AC and DC voltmeters prior to making contact.
Be sure to read the battery manufacturer’s manual before working on or near the battery.
Battery terminals will constantly be energized, regardless of whether the UPS is operating or
not.
When the UPS system is under power, both the operator and any test equipment must be
isolated from direct contact with earth ground and the UPS chassis frame by using rubber mats.
Some components within the cabinets are not connected to chassis ground.
Any contact between floating circuits and the chassis is a lethal shock hazard. Use differential
oscilloscopes when measuring a floating circuit. The differential input should have at least
800 vrms common mode input rating and a common mode rejection ratio of at least 80dB.
Exercise caution that the test instrument exterior does not make contact, either physically or
electrically, with earth ground.
In case of fire involving electrical equipment, use only carbon dioxide fire extinguishers or
others approved for use in fighting electrical fires.
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Maintenance
4.2
Liebert Global Services
Start-up, UPS maintenance, battery maintenance and training programs are available for the
Series 610 UPS through your Liebert sales representative.
Professional Start-Up
UPS Start-Up - Liebert’s Customer Engineers perform a thorough non-powered inspection of the
units and will then conduct a complete electrical checkout which includes calibrating all components
to published specifications. The battery installation is also inspected and placed on an initialization
charge to ensure cell equalization. Customer Operation training will be conducted during battery
charge time.
Load Bank Testing and Full Site Acceptance Testing are additional services that can be performed
during a UPS Start-Up. One Preventive Maintenance Service Call can be added to the initial UPS
Start-Up Agreement.
Battery Installation/Start-Up - When purchased with a UPS Start-Up, this Agreement provides
consistent, professional service for your entire UPS system. This one-source approach avoids conflicts
that may occur during a multisource installation. Note that Liebert requires a mandatory installation
inspection for all batteries not installed by Liebert Customer Engineers.
Battery IEEE Certification Inspection - The Battery Specialist will perform a detailed inspection
of the entire battery system to ensure it meets current IEEE standards.
Maintenance Agreements: The Signature Program
UPS Service Agreements - Liebert Global Services (LGS) has a variety of available maintenance
agreements, depending on specific site needs. Choose the level of support appropriate for each installation. Mission-critical sites can have the standard parts-and-labor, around-the-clock coverage for
their UPS, with or without scheduled preventive maintenance visits. Other sites can benefit from a
variety of money-saving options.
As a rule of thumb, Liebert recommends two preventive maintenance visits per year for the UPS. The
first can be conducted with the UPS operational and includes an infrared scan of key UPS components. The annual visit will require taking the UPS off-line for a thorough nonpowered inspection.
These visits are in addition to the general housekeeping tasks (changing air filters, etc.) that can be
performed by customer personnel.
Battery Service Agreements - The same flexible Signature Program can also be applied to contracts for battery maintenance. Again, the coverage needed will depend on the type of battery purchased and the degree of support required from Liebert Global Services.
Training
Customer training courses include the proper operation of the system, emergency procedures, preventive maintenance and some corrective maintenance.
Warranties
Contact Liebert Global Services if you have any questions regarding the warranty on your Series 610
UPS or the batteries.
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Maintenance
4.3
Routine Maintenance
You are encouraged to become thoroughly familiar with the equipment, but at no time should you go
beyond the specific procedures in this manual while performing maintenance or correcting a malfunction. If you have any doubt as to what must be done, call Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT
for further instructions.
The UPS is designed for unattended operation, but does require some common sense maintenance.
• Keep good records.
Troubleshooting is easier if you have historical background.
• Keep it clean.
Maintain the UPS free of dust and any moisture.
• Keep it cool.
Battery systems must be kept in the range of 72-77°F (22-26°C) in order to meet design specifications for capacity and longevity.
The UPS will reliably meet all performance specifications at temperatures up to 104°F (40°C) and
can be slightly derated for operation at even higher temperatures or higher altitudes. However,
performance and longevity will be optimized when the UPS is operated at the same temperature
as the batteries. Contact your local Liebert sales representative or call 1-800-LIEBERT for further details.
• Keep connections tight.
Tighten all connections at installation and at least annually thereafter. (See torque requirements,
Table 15.)
• Periodically inspect external upstream and downstream circuit breakers to assure that the trip
current settings are correct.
• Periodically inspect surroundings and ancillary equipment.
Become familiar with typical ambient conditions surrounding equipment so that abnormal conditions may be more quickly recognized. Know what typical meter readings are and where adjustable settings should be.
4.3.1
Record Log
Set up a maintenance log to record scheduled checks and any abnormal conditions.
The log should have space for all metered parameter indications including phase readings, alarm
messages, UPS mode of operation, air filter replacement date and observation notes. A second log
should be maintained for the battery module as directed by the battery manufacturer.
A periodic walk-through inspection of the UPS and battery rooms is advised to check for visible and
audible indications of problems. Log the inspection, metered parameter indications and any discrepancies.
4.3.2
Air Filters
The air filters must be inspected and serviced on a regular schedule. The period between inspections
will depend upon environmental conditions. Under normal conditions, the air filters will require
cleaning or replacement approximately every two months.
All Liebert Series 610 models have replaceable filter elements built into the full-width grille across
the front of the unit. This element can be changed from the front, with the UPS operating.
Liebert Series 610 models rated 300kVA and higher also have recyclable filters built into the front of
their base assemblies. These metal filter elements can be removed, washed in water, dried and
returned to service.
!
CAUTION
Be certain recyclable filter elements are dry before reinstalling them in the UPS.
Abnormal or dusty conditions will require more-frequent cleaning and replacement of air filters.
Inspect installations in new buildings more often, then extend the inspection period as experience dictates.
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Maintenance
4.3.3
Limited Life Components
Your Liebert UPS has a design life well in excess of 10 years. Well-maintained units can continue to
provide economic benefits for 20 years or more. Long-life components are used in your UPS wherever
practical and cost-effective. However, due to current component material and manufacturing technology limitations, a few components in your Liebert UPS will wear out and require replacement in less
than 10 years.
The following limited-life components are utilized in your UPS system. To prevent a wear-out failure
of one of these components affecting your critical load operations, Liebert recommends these components be periodically inspected and replaced before their expected wear-out life. Individual users may
have site-specific requirements that differ from these typical life expectations.
Component
Expected Life
Replace in:
Power AC filter capacitors
> 7 years
(~62,000 hours)
5 to 6 years
Power DC filter capacitors
> 7 years
(~62,000 hours)
5 to 6 years
Low-profile fans
> 7 years
(~62,000 hours)
5 to 6 years
Squirrel-cage blowers
10 years
(~87,600 hours)
8 to 9 years
1 to 3 years
Check four times
per year
10 years
(~87,600 hours)
8 to 9 years
Lead-acid wet-cell
(user selection)
10 to 20
years
1 to 2 years
prior to end-of-life
Valve-regulated lead-acid
(VRLA)
5 years
3 to 4 years
10 years
6 to 8 years
Air filters, disposable
(see also 4.3.2 - Air Filters)
Battery, lithium
Logic memory backup
Battery, storage
Power capacitors are considered “failed” when their measured capacitance is -5% below their nameplate rating. Typically, storage batteries are “worn out” when their full-load reserve time is -20%
below rated. Site-specific battery plants may have different end-of-life requirements. Fans and blowers typically will stop rotating or rotate slower than expected.
In most cases, replacement components must exactly match the original component specifications and
are not readily available from third-party component distributors. For assistance with your specific
component specifications, replacement component selection and sourcing, call 1-800-LIEBERT.
For customers using Liebert Global Services (LGS) Preventive Maintenance Services, periodic inspection of these components is part of this service, as well as recommending replacement intervals to customers to avoid unanticipated interruptions in critical load operations.
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Maintenance
4.4
Battery Maintenance
!
WARNING
These maintenance procedures will expose hazardous live parts. Refer servicing to qualified
personnel.
DC fuses operate at the rated battery voltage at all times. A blown DC bus fuse indicates a
serious problem. Serious injury or damage to the equipment can result if the fuse is replaced
without knowing why it failed. Call Liebert Global Services for assistance.
4.4.1
Battery Safety Precautions
Servicing of batteries should be performed or supervised by personnel knowledgeable of batteries and
the required precautions. Keep unauthorized personnel away from batteries.
When replacing batteries, use the same number and type of batteries.
!
WARNING
Lead-acid batteries contain hazardous materials. Batteries must be handled, transported and
recycled or discarded in accordance with federal, state and local regulations. Because lead is a
toxic substance, lead-acid batteries must be recycled rather than discarded.
Do not dispose of battery or batteries in a fire. The battery may explode.
Do not open or mutilate the battery or batteries. Released electrolyte is harmful to the skin
and eyes. It is toxic.
A battery can present a risk of electrical shock and high short circuit current. The following
precautions should be observed when working on batteries:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Remove watches, rings and other metal objects.
Use tools with insulated handles.
Wear rubber gloves and boots.
Do not lay tools or metal parts on top of batteries.
Disconnect charging source prior to connecting or disconnecting battery terminals.
Determine if battery is inadvertently grounded. If inadvertently grounded, remove source
of ground. Contact with any part of a grounded battery can result in electrical shock. The
likelihood of such shock will be reduced if such grounds are removed during installation
and maintenance.
Lead-acid batteries can present a risk of fire because they generate hydrogen gas. In addition,
the electrical connections must be protected against accidental short circuits which can cause
sparks. The following procedures should be followed:
• DO NOT SMOKE when near batteries.
• DO NOT cause flame or spark in battery area.
• Discharge static electricity from body before touching batteries by first touching a grounded
metal surface.
• After replacing battery jars in a battery cabinet, replace the retaining straps that hold the
jars in place on the shelves. This will limit accidental movement of the jars and connectors
should the cabinet ever need to be repositioned or relocated. Regular maintenance of the
battery module is an absolute necessity. Periodic inspections of battery and terminal voltages, specific gravity and connection resistance should be made. Strictly follow the procedures outlined in the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web
site.
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Maintenance
Battery Safety Precautions In French Per CSA Requirements
Instructions Importantes Concernant La Sécurité
Conserver Ces Instructions
!
AVERTISSEMENT
Respecter toutes les consignes de sécurité applicables à l'installation, le chargement ou
l'entretien des batteries. En plus du danger de chocs électriques, le gaz produit par les
batteries peut exploser dégageant de l'acide sulfurique qui peut entraîner de très graves
brûlures.
Toute opération d'entretien/réparation des batteries doit être exécutée ou supervisée par un
personnel qualifié dans le domaine et en prenant toutes les précautions nécessaires. Tenir le
personnel non autorisé à l’écart des batteries.
!
ATTENTION
Les batteries acide-plomb contiennent des substances toxiques dangereuses. Les batteries
doivent être manipulées, transportées et recyclées ou jetées conformément à la
réglementation en vigueur aux niveaux national et local. Le plomb étant toxique, les batteries
acide-plomb doivent être recyclées et non jetées.
Ne pas ouvrir ni endommager la ou les batteries. Les électrolytes diffusés sont dangereux
pour la peau et les yeux. Ils sont toxiques. Ne pas jeter la ou les batteries dans le feu. Risque
d'explosion.
Ne jamais installer de batteries avec des cellules fissurées ou endommagées. Contacter
Liebert Global Services ou le représentant agréé Liebert local.
Une batterie peut poser un risque de choc électrique et de courant élevé provoqué par un
court-circuit. Respecter les précautions suivantes lors de travaux sur les batteries:
•
•
•
•
•
Enlever montres, bagues ou autres objets métalliques.
Utiliser des outils dont les poignées sont isolées.
Porter des gants et des bottes en caoutchouc.
Ne pas poser d'outils ou d'objets métalliques sur les batteries.
Déconnecter la source de chargement avant de connecter ou de déconnecter les bornes de
batterie.
• Vérifier que la batterie n'a pas été mise à la masse par inadvertance. Si elle est mise à la
masse, éliminer la source de masse. Tout contact avec des composants de batterie mise à la
masse peut entraîner un choc électrique. Éliminer le risque de chocs électriques potentiels
en retirant les sources de masse avant l'installation et la maintenance.
Les batteries acide-plomb peuvent représenter un risque d'incendie puisqu'elles génèrent de
l'hydrogène. Respecter les procédures suivantes:
• NE PAS FUMER près des batteries.
• NE PAS générer de flammes ou d'étincelles près des batteries.
• Éliminer l'électricité statique du corps avant de manipuler les batteries en touchant d'abord
une surface métallique mise à la terre.
L’électrolyte est un acide sulfurique dilué qui est dangereux au contact de la peau et des yeux.
Ce produit est corrosif et aussi conducteur electrique. Les procédures suivantes devront être
observées:
• Porter toujours des vêtements protecteurs ainsi que des lunettes de protection pour les yeux.
• Si l’électrolyte entre en contact avec la peau, nettoyer immédiatement en rincant avec de l’eau.
• Si l’électrolyte entre en contact avec les yeux, arroser immédiatement et généreusement
avec de l’eau. Demander pour de l’aide médicale.
• Lorsque l’électrolyte est renversée, la surface affectée devrait être nettoyée en utilisant un
agent neutralisant adéquat. Une pratique courante est d’utiliser un mélange d’approximativement une livre (500 grammes) de bicarbonate de soude dans approximativement un gallon (4 litres) d’eau. Le mélange de bicarbonate de soude devra être ajouté jusqu’à ce qu’il n’y
ait plus apparence de réaction (mousse). Le liquide résiduel devra être nettoyé à l’eau et la
surface concernée devra être asséchée.
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Maintenance
Regular maintenance of the battery module is an absolute necessity. Periodic inspections of battery
and terminal voltages, specific gravity and connection resistance should be made. Strictly follow the
procedures outlined in the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site.
Valve-regulated lead-acid (sealed-cell) batteries do require periodic maintenance. Although maintenance of electrolyte levels is not required, visual inspections and checks of battery voltage and connection resistance should be made.
NOTE
Do not use cleaners on the batteries. Solvents can make the battery cases brittle. Use only a dry
cloth or a cloth moistened in water.
Since individual battery characteristics are not identical and may change over time, the UPS module
is equipped with circuitry to equalize battery cell voltages. This circuit increases charging voltage to
maintain flooded type battery cells at full capacity.
NOTE
Do not use equalize charging with valve-regulated lead-acid batteries. Consult the battery
manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for specific information
about equalize charging.
The equalizing charge time period is adjustable from zero to 72 hours and can be initiated automatically or manually. Refer to 3.0 - Operation.
Matching Battery Cabinets (Optional)
Although the individual battery cells are sealed (valve-regulated) and require only minimal maintenance, the Battery Cabinets should be given a periodic inspection and electrical check. Checks should
be performed at least annually to ensure years of trouble-free service.
Voltage Records: With the Battery Cabinet DC circuit breaker closed and the connected UPS operating, measure and record battery float voltage. With the DC circuit breaker open, measure and
record the nominal (open circuit) voltage. Both these measurements should be made across the final
positive and negative terminal lugs. Compare these values with those shown below. The recorded
nominal voltage should be no less than the value shown, while the recorded float voltage should be
within the range shown. If a discrepancy is found, contact Liebert Global Services.
Number of Cells
240
Battery Voltage (VDC)
Nominal
Float
480
527 - 576
Power Connections: Check for corrosion and connection integrity. Visually inspect wiring for discolored or cracked insulation. Clean and/or retighten as required. Refer to torque specifications in
Table 15.
Battery Cell Terminals: Check for discoloration, corrosion and connection integrity. Clean and
tighten if necessary. Note that when installing a new battery, the initial torque value is 5 lb.-in. more
than the retorque value. Table 13 shows battery retorque values.
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Maintenance
Table 13
Battery retorque values
Battery
Manufacturer
Dynasty
C&D Batteries
Enersys
Battery
Model No.
UPS12-270(FR)
UPS12-310(FR)
UPS12-370(FR)
UPS12-475(FR)
LS12-100
12G-17
HX205
HX300
HX370
HX400
HX500
Retorque
Value
32 lb-in.
52 lb-in.
52 lb-in.
100 lb-in.
100 lb-in.
100 lb-in.
60 lb-in.
60 lb-in.
60 lb-in.
60 lb-in.
60 lb-in.
If you have a different model battery, contact Liebert Global Services for the required torque value.
To access battery cell terminals, disconnect the inter-tier cable and two shelf retaining screws. Once
disconnected, insulate (with protective boot or electrical tape) the cables to prevent accidental shorts.
The battery shelf can now be pulled out. Tighten each terminal connection to the retorque value.
When replacing a battery, the terminal connections must be cleaned and tightened. Disconnect and
insulate the cables connected to the battery. Secure each battery shelf with retaining screws when
maintenance is complete.
Rack-Mounted Batteries
If the UPS system uses a battery other than a factory-supplied Matching Battery Cabinet, perform
maintenance on the battery as recommended in the battery manufacturer’s maintenance manual,
available on the manufacturer’s Web site.
Table 14
Date
Battery voltage record
Float Voltage (Volts DC)
Nominal Voltage (Volts DC)
Ambient Temp. (°F)
(To be completed by Liebert Global Services customer engineer at time of start-up)
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Maintenance
4.4.2
Torque Requirements
All electrical connections must be tight. Table 15 provides the torque values for the connections in
the UPS. Use these values unless the equipment is labeled otherwise.
NOTE
Refer to the battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for
the proper torque values required for the battery.
Table 15
Torque specifications (unless otherwise labeled)
Nut And Bolt Combinations
Grade 2
Standard
Electrical Connections
with Belleville Washers
Bolt Shaft Size
Lb-in
N-m
Lb-in
N-m
1/4
53
6.0
46
5.2
5/16
107
12
60
6.8
3/8
192
22
95
11
1/2
428
48
256
29
Circuit Breakers with Compression Lugs (For Power Wiring)
Current Rating
Lb-in
N-m
400 - 1200 Amps
300
34
Circuit Breakers with Compression Lugs (For Control Wiring)
4.5
AWG Wire Size or Range
Lb-in
N-m
#22 - #14
3.5 to 5.3
0.4 to 0.6
Detection of Trouble
It is important that the operator check the instrument readings if abnormal equipment performance
is suspected. Any metered value that differs appreciably from normal could mean an impending malfunction and should be investigated.
Items to check include:
• Output voltage of all phases should be within 2% of normal voltage. Output currents on each
phase should not normally differ by more than 20%. If a greater difference is noted, the load is
unbalanced and corrective action should be taken to redistribute the load, if possible.
• If the UPS has not operated on battery power during the last 10 hours, the batteries should
require little charging current. Battery mimic should indicate normal DC voltage with the battery
charge current no more than 31 Amperes.
• Input current on each phase should be within 10% of the average input current.
• Alarm messages indicate malfunction or impending malfunction. A daily check of the Operator
Control Panel will help to provide an early detection of problems. Refer to Table 9 and Table 10
to interpret alarm messages.
• Tracing a problem to a particular section is facilitated by alarm messages and the metered
parameter indications. These are stored in the Status Reports and can be displayed at the Operator Control Panel or at an optional terminal. A Liebert Global Services engineer will be familiar
with test points inside the unit.
NOTE
If the UPS system has a blown fuse, determine the cause should be determined before replacing
the fuse. Contact Liebert Global Services for assistance.
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Maintenance
4.6
Reporting a Problem
If a problem occurs within the UPS, review all alarm messages along with other pertinent data. This
information should be given by telephone to the Liebert service representative’s office nearest you.
This information can be downloaded to Liebert Global Services by using the optional modem. Contact
Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT to report a problem or to request assistance.
4.7
Corrective Actions
For each alarm message on the Operator Control Panel and the Remote Monitor Panel, you can find
the recommended corrective action in Table 9.
4.8
Recommended Test Equipment
A list of recommended test equipment and tools required to maintain, troubleshoot and repair the
UPS module is given in Table 16. You may substitute instruments of equivalent range and accuracy.
All instruments should be calibrated and be within the current calibration cycle. Calibration data for
the instruments should be maintained in equipment-history files and the instruments labeled for
audit and verification.
Table 16
Qty
4.9
Recommended test equipment and tools
Test Equipment
Manufacturer
Model or Type
1
Oscilloscope
Tektronix, H-P or Fluke
DC to 50 MHz
2
Voltage Probes
Tektronix, H-P or Fluke
10X, with 10 ft. cable
2
Voltage Probes
Tektronix, H-P or Fluke
100X, with 10 ft. cable
1
Digital Multi-meter
Fluke
87, with test leads
1
Tool Kit
N/A
Standard electrical contractor tools
Upstream Feeder Circuit Breaker Setting Inspections
During normal UPS operations, short-term overload current demand from the bypass source may
reach 10 times the UPS output current rating. This overload current demand may be caused by the
magnetizing inrush current of one or more downstream transformers (i.e., PDUs—Power Distribution
Units) or faults on downstream branch circuits. The instantaneous trip point(s) of the upstream
bypass feeder breaker(s) must be set to support these temporary overloads. The magnitude of shortterm overload bypass current demand is typically six to eight times the UPS current rating, but must
be determined by analysis on a per-site basis. This analysis, generally known as an End-to-End Fault
Coordination Study, must be done by a Registered Professional Engineer experienced in this activity
and familiar with local codes and related requirements.
Liebert strongly recommends periodic inspections of the bypass feeder breaker instantaneous trip settings, as well as the module input (rectifier) feeder breaker trip settings, to ensure that they are correct. For a variety of reasons, although typically during circuit breaker maintenance procedures by
others, trip settings have been known to be inadvertently left improperly set. Correct trip setting of
these circuit breakers is most important to achieving high-availability from your Liebert UPS system.
For further information regarding proper trip settings for your feeder breakers, call 1-800-LIEBERT.
NOTE
The instantaneous trip setting of the breaker feeding the UPS bypass input should be high
enough to accommodate short-duration overloads. The bypass static switch power path inside
the UPS can draw up to 10 times the system’s rated current for up to three cycles.
NOTE
While Liebert can provide typical guidelines, the responsibility for the proper breaker trip
settings outside the Liebert-manufactured UPS equipment resides with the owner. Contact
Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT for further details.
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Specifications
5.0
SPECIFICATIONS
5.1
Rating
The kVA and kW ratings and the nominal voltages and currents for continuous operation are listed on
the unit nameplates (inside Operator Control Panel door) and on the System One-Line Diagram. The
rated output power envelope of the UPS is illustrated in Figure 70. The UPS is rated to deliver rated
kVA and rated kW at 0.8 lagging power factor (pf), or 0.9 lagging pf for some models. However, the
UPS will operate connected loads with power factors ranging from 0.7 lagging through 1.0 (unity).
Connected load kW and kVA are both displayed on the LCD screen when the UPS is powering the
load. The approximate connected load power factor may be easily calculated by kW ÷ kVA = pf.
For load power factors between 0.7 lagging and the rated power factor (usually 0.8 or 0.9), the full
kVA rating of the unit is available. However, above the rated pf the kW rating will become the limiting factor. Note that some models are specifically rated for a 0.9 lagging output power factor.
For loads with power factors below 0.7 lagging or with leading power factors, the UPS output is kVA
limited and the UPS System may not meet all of its output performance specifications. Contact Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT to request assistance for these applications.
Figure 70 Output power envelope for 0.8 and 0.9 pf rated units
kW
1.0
0.9 x kVA
LEADING
power factor (pf)
0.9
LAGGING
power factor (pf)
0.8
0.8 x kVA
0.7
0.7 x kVA
Contact Liebert for
load operation in this
area
Contact Liebert for
load operation in this
area
Rated
kVA
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Specifications
5.2
Environmental Conditions
Table 17
Specifications applicable to environment
Enclosure
The UPS is housed in a NEMA-1 enclosure. The enclosure is designed for indoor use only
and is not to be subjected to falling objects or precipitation.
Recommended Operating
Temperature
25°C ambient
Maximum Operating
Temperature
40°C ambient (design temperature) without derating (see Notes 1- 3).
Minimum Operating
Temperature
0°C
Storage Temperature
-20°C to 70°C
Typical Battery
Temperature Requirements
Average annual temperature shall not exceed 27°C. Peak temperature shall not exceed
43°C during any 24-hour period. See battery manufacturer’s recommendations.
Relative Humidity
0 to 95% without condensation
Operating Elevation
Sea level to 1219 meters (4000 ft.) without derating
Storage Elevation
Sea level to 15,000 meters (50,000 ft.)
Audible Noise, measured
5 feet from unit
62-69 dBA typical for 100-450kVA units
72 dBA typical for 500-750kVA units
75 dBA typical for 1000kVA units
98% at 45°C
Derating for Higher
Ambient Temperatures
(see Note 3)
Derating for Higher
Elevations
(see Note 4)
96% at 50°C
93% at 55°C
Consult your Liebert sales representative regarding applications in high ambient
temperatures or call 1-800-LIEBERT. Special temperature sensors must be installed at the
factory.
Elevation-ft. (m)
% Derating @ 104°F (40°C)
Ambient (see Note 3)
% Derating @ 95°F (35°C)
Ambient (see Note 3)
5000 (1524)
98%
100%
5249 (1600)
98%
100%
5906 (1800)
97%
99%
6562 (2000)
96%
98%
7218 (2200)
95%
97%
7874 (2400)
94%
96%
8530 (2600)
93%
95%
9186 (2800)
92%
94%
9843 (3000)
90%
92%
NOTES
1. This category of electronic equipment is agency rated for use in an atmosphere free of conductive particles. Some industrial facilities
may require a room air filtration system to keep the UPS free of excess moisture and contaminants.
2. The UPS system is designed to operate continuously at 40°C. However, design equipment life expectancy will be extended with lower
temperatures (25°C is recommended).
3. Ambient temperature is the maximum ambient temperature during any 24-hour period. For operation at higher ambient temperatures,
consult your Liebert sales representative or call Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT.
4. Exercise care during installation to ensure unimpeded airflow through the UPS system. For operation at higher elevations, consult your
Liebert sales representative or call Liebert Global Services at 1-800-LIEBERT.
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5.3
Adjustments
All adjustments are set at the factory or during start-up and normally do not have to be field readjusted.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
5.4
Input Current Limit: Normal, 115%; on generator (with optional circuit), 100%
Battery Charge Current Limit: Normal, 10%; on generator, 1%
Battery Equalize Charge: Set at start-up dependent on battery characteristics
DC Overvoltage: 600 volts
Overload Alarm: 104% normal load.
Output Frequency Tolerance: ±0.5 Hz
Output Voltage: Nominal - operator adjustable ±5%
Line Drop Compensation: 0 to +5% - set at start-up to match load characteristics; if significant
additional loads are connected, call Liebert Global Services
Battery Operation
The separate battery manufacturer’s manual, available on the manufacturer’s Web site, provides the
necessary information for the installation, operation and maintenance of the battery. Use the battery
manual in conjunction with this manual.
The float charge voltage for a battery is equal to the number of cells in series making up the battery
multiplied by the charge voltage for each cell.
Since the charging voltage level is critical to proper battery operation, refer to your battery manual,
available on the manufacturer’s Web site, for information regarding your system.
For 150-750kVA models with nominal 240 cell battery, the DC bus nominal voltage range is 527 to
576 VDC. For 100-125kVA models (with 240 cell battery only), the DC bus nominal voltage range is
534-574 VDC. Maximum equalize voltage is 585 VDC. Battery voltage at end of discharge is 386 VDC
at the UPS terminals (389 VDC at the battery). The number of battery cells required will range from
236 to 244, depending on the UPS model and your application.
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Specifications
5.5
Electrical Specifications
RECTIFIER INPUT
Input Voltage
Voltage Range
Frequency Range
Subcycle Magnetization Inrush
Input Current Walk-In
Current Limit
Current Distortion
Power Factor
BYPASS INPUT
Input Voltage
Voltage Range
Frequency Range
Voltage Transient
CRITICAL LOAD OUTPUT
Output Voltage
Voltage Regulation
Voltage Adjustment Range
Line Drop Compensation Range
Frequency
Slew Rate
Phase Balancing
Voltage Imbalance
20% Unbalanced Load
50% Unbalanced Load
Voltage Transient
20% Load Step
50% Load Step
100% Load Step
Loss or Return of AC Input Power
Manual Transfer of 100% Load
Voltage Transient Recovery Time
Voltage Harmonic Content
Module Overload Capacity
at Full Output Voltage
(System overload capacity depends on
the configuration of on-line modules.)
Fault Clearing
Standard voltages for 100 - 450kVA units: 208, 480 and 600VAC
Standard voltages for 500 - 1000kVA units: 480 and 600VAC
Other voltages available on request. 3-phase, 3-wire plus ground.
+10%, -15% (no battery discharge at -20%)
57 Hz to 63 Hz
Less than 3 times normal full load input current for UPS models without optional
input isolation transformer. Less than 8 times normal full load input current for
models with optional input isolation transformer and optional input filter
From 20% to 100% in 15-20 seconds
Maximum of 125% normal full load input current
Less than 30% reflected THD typical at normal full load input current. Less than 7%
reflected THD typical at normal full load input current with optional input filter
500kVA to 750kVA models with optional 12-pulse rectifier: Less than 9% reflected
THD typical at normal full load input current. Less than 4% reflected THD typical at
normal full load input current with optional input filter
0.85 minimum lagging at full load
0.92 minimum lagging at full load with optional input filter
Standard voltages - 208/120 VAC, 480/277 VAC, 600/346 VAC. 3-phase, 4-wire
plus ground or 3-phase, 3-wire plus ground. Other optional voltages available.
Optional voltages - 208 VAC, 480 VAC, 600 VAC. 3-phase, 3-wire plus ground
(ungrounded or corner grounded delta). Other optional voltages available.
±5% for manually initiated bypass transfer
±10% for automatically initiated uninterrupted transfer
59.5 Hz to 60.5 Hz
±4% for manually initiated bypass transfer
Standard voltages - 208/120 VAC, 480/277 VAC, 600/346 VAC. Other optional
voltages available.
SCC output: 3-phase, 3-wire plus ground or 3-phase, 4-wire plus ground
Module output to SCC: 3-phase, 4-wire plus ground (neutral required)
Optional voltages - 208 VAC, 480 VAC, 600 VAC. 3-phase, 3-wire plus ground
(ungrounded or corner grounded delta). Other optional voltages available.
±0.5% for balanced load
±2% for unbalanced load
±5% manually
Up to +5% automatic load dependent
595 Hz to 605 Hz
0.01 to 1 Hz per second, adjustable
120° ±1° for balanced loads
120° ±3° for 50% unbalanced loads
±1% from the arithmetic average of the 3 phases
±2% from the arithmetic average of the 3 phases
±4% RMS
±4% RMS for 100-750kVA units; ±5% RMS for 1000kVA units
±5% RMS for 100-750kVA units; ±8% RMS for 1000kVA units
±1% RMS
±4% RMS
To within 1% of steady state output voltage within 50 milliseconds
Maximum 5% RMS total, for any combination of linear and nonlinear loads
Maximum 3% RMS single, for linear loads
104% of full load rating continuously
125% of full load rating for 10 minutes
150% of full load rating for 30 seconds
(with ±2% voltage regulation)
Up to 300% of normal full load current subcycle; up to 500% of normal full load
current for up to 40 milliseconds with bypass available; up to 1000% of normal full
load current for up to 16 milliseconds with bypass available
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Ensuring The High Availability
Of Mission-Critical Data And Applications.
Emerson Network Power, the global leader in enabling business-critical
continuity, ensures network resiliency and adaptability through
a family of technologies—including Liebert power and cooling
technologies—that protect and support business-critical systems.
Liebert solutions employ an adaptive architecture that responds
to changes in criticality, density and capacity. Enterprises benefit
from greater IT system availability, operational flexibility and
reduced capital equipment and operating costs.
Technical Support / Service
Web Site
www.liebert.com
Monitoring
liebert.monitoring@emerson.com
800-222-5877
Outside North America: +00800 1155 4499
Single-Phase UPS & Server Cabinets
liebert.upstech@emerson.com
800-222-5877
Outside North America: +00800 1155 4499
Three-Phase UPS & Power Systems
800-543-2378
Outside North America: 614-841-6598
Environmental Systems
800-543-2778
Outside the United States: 614-888-0246
Locations
United States
1050 Dearborn Drive
P.O. Box 29186
Columbus, OH 43229
Europe
Via Leonardo Da Vinci 8
Zona Industriale Tognana
35028 Piove Di Sacco (PD) Italy
+39 049 9719 111
Fax: +39 049 5841 257
Asia
29/F, The Orient Square Building
F. Ortigas Jr. Road, Ortigas Center
Pasig City 1605
Philippines
+63 2 687 6615
Fax: +63 2 730 9572
While every precaution has been taken to ensure the accuracy
and completeness of this literature, Liebert Corporation assumes no
responsibility and disclaims all liability for damages resulting from use of
this information or for any errors or omissions.
© 2009 Liebert Corporation
All rights reserved throughout the world. Specifications subject to change
without notice.
® Liebert is a registered trademark of Liebert Corporation.
All names referred to are trademarks
or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Emerson Network Power.
The global leader in enabling Business-Critical Continuity.
Embedded Computing
AC Power
Embedded Power
Connectivity
DC Power
Monitoring
Outside Plant
Power Switching & Controls
Precision Cooling
EmersonNetworkPower.com
Racks & Integrated Cabinets
Services
Surge Protection
Business-Critical Continuity, Emerson Network Power and the Emerson Network Power logo are trademarks and service marks of Emerson Electric Co.
©2009 Emerson Electric Co.
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SL-25115_REV03_11-09
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