Injury and Illness Prevention Program Manual

Injury and Illness Prevention Program Manual
Long Beach Unified School District
Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Manual
This manual is revised to meet State of California safety orders as administered by CalOSHA. Updated: 06/01/2011.
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Contents
I - Introduction – LBUSD Injury and Illness Prevention Program ............................................ 5 Injury and Illness Prevention Program Safety Statement and Philosophy ....................................... 5 Identification of Plan Administrators ................................................................................................... 6 II - Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) ...................................................................... 7 Support of IIPP ....................................................................................................................................... 7 Administrative Responsibilities ............................................................................................................. 7 Compliance .............................................................................................................................................. 7 Disciplinary Procedures ......................................................................................................................... 7 Emergency Drills and Disaster Preparedness ...................................................................................... 7 III -.................................................................................................................................................. 8 Safety Training ............................................................................................................................... 8 New Employees and Positions ............................................................................................................... 8 Summary table of specific additional required training ..................................................................... 8 IV - Communication .................................................................................................................... 11 Site Safety Committee .......................................................................................................................... 11 Site Safety Committee Duties .............................................................................................................. 12 A. Chairperson ................................................................................................................................................... 12 B. Secretary ........................................................................................................................................................ 12 C. Committee Member ....................................................................................................................................... 12 Inspecting, Reporting, and Correcting Hazards ................................................................................ 13 A. Inspection for Workplace Hazards ................................................................................................................ 13 B. Hazard Reporting .......................................................................................................................................... 13 C. Hazard Correction ......................................................................................................................................... 13 Record Keeping..................................................................................................................................... 13 VI - Accident Investigation .......................................................................................................... 14 Accident Investigation and Root Cause Analysis .............................................................................. 14 A. Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................... 14 B. Policy............................................................................................................................................................. 14 C. Procedure ....................................................................................................................................................... 14 Accident Investigation and Root Cause Analysis .............................................................................. 15 FINDING THE ROOT CAUSES ........................................................................................................ 16 PERSON ............................................................................................................................................................ 16 TASK ................................................................................................................................................................. 16 Accident/Incident Investigation Procedures ...................................................................................... 17 Instructions for Completing the Accident/Incident Investigation Report ....................................... 18 Sample Supervisor’s Accident/Incident Investigation Report.......................................................... 19 Supervisor’s Accident/Incident Investigation Report ....................................................................... 21 Page 2 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Student Behavioral Emergency Report .............................................................................................. 22 Appendix A - Glossary of Terms ......................................................................................................... 23 Bibliography/References ...................................................................................................................... 24 Appendix B - FORMS .......................................................................................................................... 25 Safety Meeting Sign-in Log .................................................................................................................. 26 Safety Committee Forms...................................................................................................................... 27 A. Site Safety Committee Sample Minutes Form .............................................................................................. 27 B. SAMPLE COMPLETED Site Safety Committee Minutes – TRAINING CONCERN ............................... 28 C. SAMPLE COMPLETED Site Safety Committee Minutes – HAZARD CONCERN .................................. 29 Employee Safety Orientation Checklist ............................................................................................................. 30 Auto Loss Notice ............................................................................................................................................... 33 Hazards and Correction Record ......................................................................................................... 34 Appendix – C – Safety and Health Rules .................................................................................... 35 Safety and Health Rules .............................................................................................................. 36 A. Office ............................................................................................................................................................ 36 B. School Site..................................................................................................................................................... 36 C. Nutrition Services (staff includes warehouse, maintenance, drivers, production/kitchen, and office
personnel) ........................................................................................................................................................... 37 D. Maintenance .................................................................................................................................................. 38 E. Warehouse and Storage Operations ............................................................................................................... 41 F. Ladder Use ..................................................................................................................................................... 41 Employees should be instructed and trained by their supervisor on proper ladder selection for the task at hand
as well as safe use of that specific ladder as necessary. ..................................................................................... 41 G. Safe Driving .................................................................................................................................................. 41 Heat Illness Prevention Program ........................................................................................................................ 42 Precautions to Prevent Heat Illness .................................................................................................... 48 Hazard Communication Program....................................................................................................... 49 A. Scope ............................................................................................................................................................. 49 B. Definitions ..................................................................................................................................................... 49 C. Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................................. 49 D. Hazard Determination ................................................................................................................................... 50 E. Labeling ......................................................................................................................................................... 50 F. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) ............................................................................................................ 50 G. Reducing Employee Exposure to Chemicals ................................................................................................ 50 H. Employee Information and Training ............................................................................................................. 51 I. Informing Contractors or Vendors .................................................................................................................. 52 Chemical Storage Policy ...................................................................................................................... 52 Workplace Security – Preventing Violence in the Workplace ................................................... 53 A. Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 53 B. Responsibility ................................................................................................................................................ 53 C. Compliance.................................................................................................................................................... 53 D. Communication ............................................................................................................................................. 53 E. Hazard Assessment ........................................................................................................................................ 54 F. Incident Investigations ................................................................................................................................... 54 G. Hazard Correction ......................................................................................................................................... 55 H. Training and Instruction ................................................................................................................................ 56 School Safety and Emergency Preparedness (Workplace Security) .......................................... 58
Page 3 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Standard Operating Procedures ......................................................................................................... 59 9.102 Guidelines for District Staff in Handling Bomb Threats ........................................................................ 59 9.105 Emergency Communication Radios – KKJZ F.M. 88.1......................................................................... 61 9.106 Handling Combative Students ................................................................................................................ 62 9.107 Emergency Lockdown Procedure .......................................................................................................... 64 9.108 School Site Emergency Procedure for State-3 Power Shortage Rolling Blackouts ................................. 66 9.111 Emergency Procedure for School-Site Shootings .................................................................................... 67 9.112 Guidelines for Handling Suspicious Mail .............................................................................................. 68 9.118 Safe School Plan Administrative Reporting ........................................................................................... 69 9.121 Barring Disruptive Persons from School Sites (Stay-Away Letter) ......................................................... 71 9.123 Report of Assault on School Employer by Student .................................................................................. 76 9.129 Request for Intervention ........................................................................................................................... 77 Page 4 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
I - Introduction – LBUSD Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Injury and Illness Prevention Program Safety Statement and Philosophy
One of Long Beach Unified School District's (LBUSD) highest priorities is the safety and
welfare of our employees. Administration and management recognizes the need to comply with
regulations governing injury, accident prevention, and employee safety. Everyone is expected to
maintain a safe working environment and to follow all safety rules while on LBUSD premises.
As safety is a broad topic and ever-changing, employees are encouraged to note or voice any
concerns that they may have pertaining to unsafe working conditions, or to suggest ideas for
improved safety within LBUSD without recrimination. An effective safety program plan is one
that is understood and supported by all!
Christopher J. Steinhauser, Superintendent of Schools
Page 5 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Identification of Plan Administrators
The Long Beach Unified School District educates nearly 85,000 students in 95 public schools in
the cities of Long Beach, Lakewood, Signal Hill, and Avalon on Catalina Island. As certificated
and classified personnel are hired, relocate, retire, or leave employment, office administrators
and/or department heads with a classification of manager or above (as applicable) or their
designee, are identified to introduce, ensure understanding, and provide process implementation
of the District's Injury and Illness Prevention Program to their assigned and/or newly hired
employees.
Page 6 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
II - Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP)
Support of IIPP
The Long Beach Unified School District’s IIPP will be supported by all staff as required.
Administrators will lead by example whenever possible to support loss control and safety for the
District. Administrators will provide resources and leadership as needed in implementing
elements of the program for their department, site, or operations. Non-management employees
will support the District’s IIPP by following the rules and guidelines as stated in the written
program and supporting documents.
Administrative Responsibilities
Each Site Administrator, director, or manager is responsible for the implementation of, and will
hold those under his/her supervision accountable for, the day-to-day program of safety education,
accident and fire prevention, emergency drills, inspection, and documentation. A copy of this
IIPP is available in at each schools Administrative Office, on the District website and by
contacting the Office of Risk Management at (562) 997-8234.
Compliance
The District’s IIPP will comply with the requirements of appropriate State of California safety
orders, administered by Cal-OSHA. These requirements include industrial accident prevention
regulations, training requirements, and applicable local and state regulations concerning safety.
All employees are responsible for using safe work practices, for following all directives, policies
and procedures, and for assisting in maintaining a safe work environment.
Disciplinary Procedures
Any employee who fails to comply with the District’s safety rules, regulations, and other
procedures will be subject to disciplinary action according to the current Rules and Regulations
of the Classified Service, Board Policy, and the Education Code. No employee will be retaliated
against for reporting hazards or for making safety suggestions.
Emergency Drills and Disaster Preparedness
Emergency drills and disaster preparedness will be according to the District’s Emergency
Preparedness Plan, and in accordance with the School’s Emergency Plan and Drill Report.
Page 7 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
III - Safety Training
New Employees and Positions
Training and instruction will be provided by the appropriate area supervisor to all new or
transferred employees in their area under the following circumstances:
1. Employees given new job assignments for which training has not been received
previously;
2. Whenever new substances, processes, procedures, or equipment are introduced to the
workplace and represent new hazards;
3. Whenever the District is made aware of a new or unrecognized hazard; and
4. For administrators, directors, managers and supervisory employees to familiarize them
with the safety and health to which employees under their immediate supervision and
control may be exposed.
5. Following an accident or incident with “lessons learned” and preventative actions.
6. All District employees, managers, and supervisors will have initial training on:
a) The District’s IIPP
b) The District’s Hazard Communication Program
c) The Departmental or duty-specific safety rules that apply to their job.
d) The District’s Emergency Evacuation and Contingency Plan.
Summary table of specific additional required training
A summary of required training follows, with regulatory citation, affected employees, and
frequency of training required.
Safety Training Topic
Cal-OSHA
Regulatory
Citation
Frequency of
Training
Who Should Have Training
Accident Prevention
Signs and Tags
8 CCR 3340(c)
Initial
Employees exposed to
Signs/Tags
Acetylene / Fuel Gas
Safety
8 CCR 1740(k)(1)
Initial
Acetylene / Fuel Gas User
Aerial Devices (with
employee elevated)
8 CCR 3648(l)(7)
Initial
Elevated Employee and
Operator-Driver
Asbestos Operations /
Asbestos Awareness /
Class I-IV Operations
8 CCR
1529(k)(9)(A),
8 CCR
5208(j)(7)(B)
8 CCR 1529(o)(4)
Prior/ Initial/
Annual
Exposed employees
Initial
Competent Person8
Asbestos Operations
8
Title 8 CCR Section 1529 “Competent person" means, in addition to one who is capable of identifying existing and
predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to
employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them, one who is capable of
identifying existing asbestos hazards in the workplace and selecting the appropriate control strategy for asbestos
exposure, who has the authority to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them: in addition, for Class I and
Class II work who is specially trained in a training course which meets the criteria of EPA's Model Accreditation
Plan (40 CFR part 763) for supervisor, or its equivalent and, for Class III and Class IV work, who is trained in a
manner consistent with EPA requirements for training of local education agency maintenance and custodial staff as
set forth at 40 CFR 763.92 (a)(2). Note: For operations involving more than 100 square feet of asbestos containing
construction material as defined in subsection (r) of this section the competent person may fulfill the requirement
contained in Section 341.9 to specify a certified supervisor for asbestos related work.
Page 8 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Back Safety / Lifting
Safety
8 CCR 5110(b)(3)
Initial
Employees whose duties include
lifting
Battery Handling /
Storage- Clean &
Charge (Acid Spills)
8 CCR 5185(a)
Initial
District Vehicle Maintenance
Employees
Bloodborne Pathogens
8 CCR
5193(e)(5)(C) and
(g)(2)(A)
Initial/Annual
Laboratory, School Security and
SRO personnel, and Designated
School Nurse or Sports First Aid
Personnel
Chain Saw Safety
8 CCR 6283(m)
Initial
Chain Saw Users (Landscape
Maintenance Employees only.)
Chemical Hygiene for
Laboratories
8 CCR 5191(f)
Initial
School Site Employees
Confined Spaces
8 CCR 5157(g)(1)
or 8 CCR
5158(c)(2)
8 CCR
2320.2(a)(2),
2940(b)
Initial & Update
Entrant / Attendant / Entry
Supervisor / Rescuer
Initial
Elevating Work
Platforms and Aerial
Devices (Scissor Lifts,
Boom Lifts)
8 CCR 3648(l)(7),
8 CCR 3646
Initial
Electricians and Maintenance
employees exposed to live
electricity (Purchasing
Warehouse, Operations,
Nutrition Services,
Transportation, etc.).
All users
Emergency Action Plan
8 CCR 3220(e)(1)
Initial/Update
All District employees
Ergonomics
8 CCR 5110(b)(3)
Initial
Employee in a job where a
repetitive motion injury has
occurred to more than one
employee
Excavation / Trenching
/ Shoring
8 CCR 1540, 1541
Initial
Employees in and around
trenches deeper than 5 feet deep
etc.
Fall Protection
8 CCR 1670,
3209, 3210
Initial
Employees who work 30 inches
or more above floor with no
guardrail
Portable Fire
Extinguishers
8 CCR 6151(g)(1)
& (3)
Initial/Annual
Employees with “access to”
portable fire extinguishers
Fire Prevention Plan
8 CCR 3221(d)
Initial & Update
First Aid / CPR
8 CCR 3400(b),
6251, 3439(b),
1512(b)
8 CCR 1599(f)
Initial and Biannual
Employees and off-school
personnel exposed to fire
hazards
Any district employees required
to provide First Aid
Electrical Safety
Flaggers (Traffic
Control)
Initial
Page 9 of 79
Flaggers / Field / Grounds
Worker/Valet
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Forklift Safety
8 CCR 3668(a)(1)
Initial & every
three years
Forklift Drivers
Forklifts Lifting
Employees
8 CCR 3657(h)
Initial
Forklift Drivers
Hazard Communication
8 CCR 5194(b)(1)
Initial
Employees using/exposed to
chemicals
Hearing Conservation
8 CCR 5099(a)(1)
Initial/Annual
Employees exposed to 85 db or
above
Hearing Protection
8 CCR 5098(a)(4)
Initial
Hearing Protection Users
Inert Gas-Shielded
Metal-Arc Welding
8 CCR 8357
Prior / Initial
Employees Operating
Equipment
Injury and Illness
Prevention Program
(IIPP)
8 CCR 3203, 1509
Initial
All District employees
Laboratory Safety
8 CCR 5191(f)
Laser Equipment
8 CCR 1801(a)
Initial/New
Exposure
Initial
District employees who instruct
in laboratory sciences
Employees who install, adjust,
operate laser equipment
Lock Out / Tag Out
8 CCR 3314
Initial
Medical Records,
Access to
8 CCR 3204(g)(1)
Initial/Annual
Natural Gas Fuel Tanks
on Vehicles
8 CCR 544(o)
Initial
Electricians, Maintenance
workers
All District employees with
access to medical / exposure
records
Drivers of natural gas fueled
vehicles
Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
8 CCR 3380(c),
Initial
PPE Users
Pesticide Safety
8 CCR 5194(h)(1)
Initial/Annual
Field/Grounds Worker,
Applicators
Poisonous Plants and
Harmful Animals
8 CCR 3421(f)
Initial
Respiratory Protective
Equipment
8 CCR 5144(c)
and (k); 1531
Initial/Annual
Employees doing tree work,
maintenance, removal
(Operations)
(if used) Field/Grounds Worker
& Maintenance Worker
Roof Hazards
8 CCR 1730(a),
(b)(7)
Initial
Any employees involved with
roofing repair or inspection
operations
Rope Access
Equipment
8 CCR 3270.1(c)
(2) & (3)
Initial/Annual
Exposed employees
Seat Belts (In Vehicles
with ROPS)
8 CCR 3653(a);
6309
Initial
Users of Vehicles with Roll
Over Protective Systems (ROPS)
Tree Work
8 CCR 3421(c);
3423(a); 3428(a)
Initial (Prior to
Exposure)
Exposed employees
Page 10 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
IV - Communication
Site Safety Committee
1. Each District school site, office, or alternate location will establish a Site Safety Committee.
2. When the Site Administrator, director or manager organizes the Site Safety Committee at their
school campus, business or office site, such will committees routinely assume the following
responsibilities:
3. Perform needed duties in safety education and accident prevention. These duties include, but are not
limited to:
a) Evaluating accident investigation reports to determine whether an unsafe act or unsafe
condition was the proximate cause and recommend action to prevent recurrence.
b) Establishing, reviewing, and making recommendations to improve accident reporting
procedures.
c) Assisting in conducting fire and safety inspections and in obtaining the essential
information for the preparation and filing of the required reports, and
d) Recommending on-site and or facility-related corrections which are necessary for the
removal of hazards found during inspections. The Site Administrator will take the
necessary action to correct such hazards.
4. The Site Safety Committee will include as applicable:
a) One representative of CSEA Units A and B;
b) One representative of TALB;
c) One Plant Supervisor;
d) One Site Administrator or designee.
The following are suggested guidelines for committee activities
1. The Site Safety Committee should meet at least quarterly and review the following:
a)
Minutes of the previous meeting;
b)
Unfinished business of the previous meeting;
c)
All serious accidents9 and corrective action taken;
d)
Inspection reports referred to the committee;
e)
Any employee safety concerns or hazard reports;
f)
All employee injury reports. Any personal or private information about
injured employees will be ‘whited out’ prior to review.
g)
Injury trends.
2. The Site Safety Committee will review new and outstanding recommendations submitted by
outside agencies such as:
a)
Local fire departments;
b)
Cal-OSHA;
c)
Health department;
d)
Safety or loss control consultants;
9
Defined as accidents involving District employee(s) resulting in:
(1) Amputation of a limb, loss of an eye or
(2) One or more employees hospitalized as a result of an injury or illness, or
(3) One or more job-related fatalities or potentially fatal injuries or illnesses.
(4) Property damage of >$100,000.
Page 11 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Site Safety Committee Duties
A. Chairperson
1. Arranges for meeting place;
2. Notifies members of meeting;
3. Prepares agenda and program;
4. Makes time schedule for meeting;
5. Arranges for seating all members;
6. Reviews previous minutes;
7. Prepares materials for meetings;
8. Provides forum for new business.
B. Secretary
1. Prepares minutes of meeting;
2. Distributes and posts minutes to committee members;
3. Reports status of recommendations;
4. Secretary may assume chairman’s duties.
C. Committee Member
1. Establishes measurable safety objectives and policies. Works to accomplish these objectives
and policies by obtaining site management’s support with District’s concurrence.
2. Reviews major accident reports and investigations to monitor thoroughness and to determine,
develop and monitor adequate corrective action.
3. Oversees investigations and recommends actions to prevent recurrence.
Summary
An effective committee positively influences attitudes toward safety by stimulating awareness and
participation in activities designed to control losses and prevent injuries and accidents. The District Site
Safety Committee provides a forum for discussion of topics relevant to safety issues and provides a
vehicle through which concerns can be expressed for the well being of employees.
Page 12 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Inspecting, Reporting, and Correcting Hazards
A. Inspection for Workplace Hazards
At least quarterly inspection to identify and evaluate workplace hazards will be performed by the Site
Administrator or his or her designee. Inspections will also occur when:
1. New equipment or operating procedures are used;
2. New hazards are identified;
3. Accidents occur;
4. New personnel are involved;
5. Required by workplace conditions;
6. Non-routine tasks are performed.
B. Hazard Reporting
It is the site’s responsibility to report all hazardous conditions to the Maintenance Branch either by phone
or through the TMA10 system. In emergency situations, the Maintenance Branch should be contacted
immediately by phone, followed by a TMA submission. Additionally, all hazards that potentially affect
the health and safety of students, staff, or the public must be reported immediately. Sites should submit
work orders to the Maintenance Branch to track the progress of the report. Each site should designate an
employee who is responsible for reporting work order repairs.
C. Hazard Correction
Hazards will be corrected in a timely manner11 based on the severity of the hazard. When observed, or as
soon as safely possible, all hazard reporting, hazard correction actions and dates will be documented and
filed with the appropriate District department. All such actions taken and dates they are completed shall
be documented on the attached Hazards and Correction Record.
Record Keeping
All tasks associated with this IIPP (Safety Program) will be documented and filed in the Site Safety file
by the Site Administrator or their designee. Included are:
1. Periodic and quarterly workplace inspections;
2. Name of person doing inspection;
3. Unsafe items found and corrective action taken;
4. Safety Meeting minutes and employee comments;
5. Copies of training materials used;
6. All safety and health training will be documented with:
a) Date;
b) Name of leader or instructor;
c) Topic covered;
d) Employee participants.
7. All safety program records shall be kept for a period of three (3) years, after which they may be
discarded.
10
TMA is the District’s maintenance management software.
Timely means: operation stopped, area barricaded to prevent access with the hazard corrected within 24 hours if a hazard
could result in potential loss of life or limb. If the hazard is not immediately dangerous to life or health then the area or
operation should still be stopped and barricaded but the hazard may be corrected within 90 days as long as the operation has
been stopped and or as access to the hazard has been blocked.
Page 13 of 79
11
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
VI - Accident Investigation
All accidents and or injuries will be reported in compliance with the Risk Management Branch procedures
and policies. Injuries will be reported using the forms and procedures listed in each site’s “Workers’
Compensation Claim Kit” typically located in the site’s main office.
Accident Investigation and Root Cause Analysis
A. Purpose
Root cause analysis is based on the concept that underlying every accident there are factors that directly
contribute to the accident’s occurrence. The primary goal of a root cause analysis program is to first
identify these underlying factors, or “root causes” of accidents, and then apply corrective countermeasures
to help reduce and ultimately eliminate accidental losses from occurring in the workplace.
B. Policy
A root cause analysis is performed on an individual loss, accident, or incident. Typically, larger losses
and accidents that are frequent occurrences are good candidates for root cause analysis. The performance
of a root cause analysis should be used as a tool to help employers prevent accidents rather than as a
means of investigating or adjusting specific injury claims.
C. Procedure
To reveal the root causes behind an accident or unsafe condition, the following questions will be asked of
District management, supervisors, fellow employees, and any injured parties:
1. What was the employee doing? Describe the activity as well as the equipment, materials, people
and environmental conditions involved in the accident. Use the attached flow chart to help isolate
the conditions responsible for the accident or injury. Be specific. Examples: “climbing a ladder
while carrying roofing materials”; “unfastening a chlorine hose from a spray nozzle”.
2. What happened? Describe how the injury or illness occurred. Indicate in detail what took place:
describe the accident, the type of injury, if the employee was wearing appropriate safety equipment,
etc. Examples: “when ladder slipped worker fell 20 feet and broke her leg”; “Worker was sprayed in
the face with chlorine, and was not wearing any eye protection”.
3. What caused the accident? Explain in detail the condition, act, malfunction, etc., that caused the
accident. Remember that it is possible to have more than one reason or cause for an accident. Use
the attached flow chart. Examples: “Rainwater had entered through a hole in the roof and caused the
floor to be wet and the ladder then slipped out from under the worker”; “Worker was repairing a
gasket, which broke during replacement, the line had not been drained and de-pressurized prior to
performing the maintenance”.
4. What can be done to prevent a similar accident? Indicate corrective action to prevent recurrence.
Page 14 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Results of the root cause analysis will be recorded on the attached District Accident Investigation and
Root Cause Analysis Form.
Accident Investigation and Root Cause Analysis
Name:
Department – Shift:
Site:
Age:
Job:
Time:
How long on job?
Date:
What was employee doing?
Describe the activity, equipment, materials, people and environmental conditions involved in the accident.
What happened?
Indicate in detail what took place. Describe the accident, the type of injury, if the employee was wearing
appropriate safety equipment, etc.
What caused the accident?
Explain in detail the condition, act, malfunction, etc., that caused the accident.
Page 15 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS (continued)
What caused the accident?
Use the attached flow chart to help isolate the conditions responsible for the accident or injury.
FINDING THE ROOT CAUSES
Root Cause Factors
UNSAFE
WORK
PRACTICE
TASK
UNSAFE
CONDITION
And / or
PERSON
TRAINING
MATERIAL
ENVIRONMENT
SELECTION &
QUALIFICATIONS
TYPES
EQUIPMENT &
SUPPLIES
INDOORSADEQUACY OF FACILITY
ARRANGEMENT


Work Process
Time Demands
on Employees
COMMUNICATION

Written
Procedures
Verbal
Procedures
Understandable






-


BEHAVIOR
Did the employee
follow established work
rules and procedures?
CONTROL


Mentally
Physically
Emotionally
Supervisory
Positive
Corrective
Administrative
Rewards
Corrective
Action
Initial
Work
Skills
Work Rules
& Procedures
Update
Remedial


Needed
Available
MAINTENANCE




Operational
Supervisory
Managerial
MACHINE DESIGN


Inspection
Lighting
Ventilation
Temperature
Noise




Inspection
Weather
Temperature
Noise
Inspection
Repair
Reporting
TARGET







Guarding
Protection
OUTDOORS
Once the “ROOT CAUSES” are identified,
establish and implement corrective/preventive measures
Corrective action recommended:
Investigated by:
Date:
Page 16 of 79
Reviewed by:
Date:
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Accident/Incident Investigation Procedures
An accident investigation will be performed by the supervisor at the location where the accident
occurred. The Department/Site Manager is responsible for seeing that the accident investigation
reports are being filled out completely, and that the recommendations are being addressed.
Supervisors will investigate all accidents and injuries using the following investigation
procedures:
1. Implement temporary control measures to prevent any further injuries to employees.
2. Review the equipment, operations, and processes to gain an understanding of the accident
situation.
3. Identify and interview each witness and any other person who might provide clues to the
accident's causes.
4. Investigate causal conditions and unsafe acts; make conclusions based on existing facts.
5. Complete the accident investigation report.
6. Provide recommendations for corrective actions.
7. Indicate the need for additional or remedial safety training.
Accident investigation reports must be submitted to the appropriate Site Administrator within 24
hours of the accident or incident. For vehicle accidents, refer to the District’s Accident Report
Form (LBUSD Auto Loss Notice Form – BD801, 12/04) available through the Risk Management
Branch (extension 8234). A copy of the form is located on page 69.
Page 17 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Instructions for Completing the Accident/Incident Investigation Report
Important Note
The District’s accident/incident investigation procedure is not designed to find fault or place
blame but is an analysis of the accident or incident to determine causes that can be controlled,
minimized, or eliminated.
Items 1-12 - Identification: This section is self-explanatory.
Item 13 - Nature of injury and/or property damage: Describe the injury, e.g., strain, sprain, cut,
burn, fracture, etc. Injury Type: First aid -injury resulted in minor injury/treated on premises;
Medical - injury treated off premises by physician; Lost time -injured missed more than one day
of work; No Injury - no injury, near-miss type of incident. Part of the Body: Part of the body
directly affected, e.g., foot, arm, hand, head.
Item 14 - Describe the accident: Describe the accident, including people involved, exactly what
happened, and where and how it happened. Describe the equipment or materials involved.
Item 15 - Cause of the accident: (Refer to the Root Cause diagram and outline) Describe all
conditions or acts which contributed to the accident, i.e.
 Unsafe conditions - spills, grease on the floor, poor housekeeping or other physical
conditions.
 Unsafe acts - unsafe work practices such as failure to warn, failure to use required
personal protective equipment.
Item 16 – Contributing factors.
Item 17 - Witness(es): List name(s), address(es), and phone number(s).
Item 18 – Was safety training provided? Was any safety training provided to the injured related
to the work activity being performed?
Item 19 - Interim corrective action: Measures taken by supervisor to prevent recurrence of
incident, i.e., barricading accident area, posting warning signs, shutting down operations.
Item 20 - Permanent corrective action: self-explanatory
Item 21-23 - Date, prepared by and supervisor signature: self-explanatory
Item 24-25 - Follow-up: Once the investigation is complete, the supervisor will review and
follow-up the investigation to ensure that corrective actions recommended and approved by
District are taken, and risk control measures have been implemented.
Item 26 - Review and signature by Site Administrator/Department Manager: Once the
investigation report is complete, the Site Administrator/Department Manager will review the
report to assess the appropriateness of findings and corrective actions recommended and to
provide management support for risk control measures that have been or are to be implemented.
Page 18 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Sample Supervisor’s Accident/Incident Investigation Report
CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY/CLIENT WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGE
This report is to be completed by Supervisor. This is a confidential report for transmission to
and use by attorneys for Long Beach Unified School District.
1. Site Name: Redwood High School
2. Address: 555 Valley St., Redwood, CA 90555
3. Name of injured: Mitchell Smith
4. S.S.# 555-55-5555
5. Sex: M
F
6. Age:31
7. Date of accident: 9-26-06
8. Time of
AM
PM
9. Day of the week on which accident occurred
accident: 10:00
M
T
W
Th
F
Sat
Sun
10. Employee’s Job Title: Teacher/Dept. Head
11. Length of experience on job
Years: 2
Months: 6
12. Address of location where accident occurred: 555 Valley St., Redwood, CA 90555
13. Nature of property damage, injury, injury type, and part of the body affected: Broken left
wrist and torn tendon in left arm.
14. Describe the accident and how it occurred: An employee submitted a work order to have a
light bulb replaced in his office. When a second bulb burned out he could not see his ading materials
so he attempted to change both bulbs himself. He did not have a step ladder so he stood on a chair to
reach the light fixture. The chair collapsed under his weight and he fell to the floor, injuring himself.
15. Root Cause of the accident (Refer to Root Cause Analysis): An investigation determined that
the work order had been received in maintenance, but that the maintenance worker assigned to this
site was “swamped” with other requests and had not had time to complete this one, which he
considered low priority. The maintenance department also did not have a means to flag work order
requests based on safety hazard.
16. List any Contributing Factors to this Incident/Accident: Standing on chair, using the chair in
an inappropriate manner, attempting a task employee is not trained to do safely. Facility Maintenance
department had no means to prioritize work order requests on basis of safety that includes severity of
hazard.
Yes
No
If “no”, explain: N/A
Yes
No
If “no”, explain:
Was personal protective
Yes
equipment being used?
Was it being used as trained by Yes
supervisor or designated
trainer?
17. List Witness(es): No witnesses
No
If "no", explain:
No
If "no", explain:
Was personal protective
equipment (PPE) required?
Was PPE provided?
Page 19 of 79
LBUSD - Injury and Illness Prevention Program
18. Was safety training
Yes
No If "no", explain: Employee had been trained to
contact maintenance for all repairs.
provided to the injured?
19. Interim corrective actions taken to prevent recurrence: All employees were reminded to
contact maintenance for all repairs, even minor ones.
20. Permanent corrective action recommended to prevent recurrence: Prioritization system for
work orders must be developed by school facilities maintanence so that maintenance personel know
which work orders require immediate attention to correct a safety hazard.
21. Date of report: 9-27-06
22. Prepared by: John Doe
23. Supervisor (Signature):
24. Status and follow-up action taken by Supervisor:
25. Supervisor (Signature):
26. Reviewed by Manager/Site Administrator (Signature):
Page 20 of 79
Date:
Date:
Date:
Supervisor’s Accident/Incident Investigation Report
CONFIDENTIAL ATTORNEY/CLIENT WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGE
This report is to be completed by Supervisor. This is a confidential report for transmission to
and use by attorneys for Long Beach Unified School District.
1. Site Name:
2. Address:
3. Name of injured:
5. Sex: M
F
8. Time of
AM
accident:
4. S.S.#
6. Age:
7. Date of accident:
PM
9. Day of the week on which accident occurred
M
T
W
Th
F
Sat
10. Employee’s Job Title:
11. Length of experience on job
Years:
12. Address of location where accident occurred:
Months:
13. Nature of property damage, injury, injury type, and part of the body affected:
14. Describe the accident and how it occurred:
15. Root Cause of the accident (Refer to Root Cause Analysis):
16. List any Contributing Factors to this Incident/Accident:
Was personal protective
equipment (PPE) required?
Was PPE provided?
Was personal protective
equipment being used?
Was it being used as trained by
supervisor or designated
trainer?
17. List Witness(es):
Yes
No
If “no”, explain:
Yes
No
If “no”, explain:
Yes
No
If "no", explain:
Yes
No
If "no", explain:
18. Was safety training
Yes
No If "no", explain:
provided to the injured?
19. Interim corrective actions taken to prevent recurrence:
20. Permanent corrective action recommended to prevent recurrence:
21. Date of report:
22. Prepared by:
23. Supervisor (Signature):
24. Status and follow-up action taken by Supervisor:
25. Supervisor (Signature):
Page 21 of 79
26. Reviewed by Manager/Site Administrator (Signature):
Date:
Date:
Date:
Sun
Student Behavioral Emergency Report
(School Support Services – Division of Special Education)
To document and report a Special Education student behavioral emergency, please refer to the
Special Education Handbook, Standard Operation Procedure (SOP), Special Education Student
Safety Plan, dated February 2004.
Page 22 of 79
Appendix A - Glossary of Terms
Administrative Controls - (or work practice controls) are changes in work procedures such as written
safety policies, rules, supervision, schedules, and training with the goal of reducing the duration,
frequency, and severity of exposure to hazardous chemicals or situations.
Chemical - Any element, chemical compound or mixture of elements and/or compounds.
Contributing factor - is a circumstance contributing to an unplanned result (accident). Without this
factor, the unplanned result would not exist but the factor by itself, cannot produce the accident.
Engineering Controls - eliminate or reduce exposure to a chemical or physical hazard through the use or
substitution of engineered machinery or equipment. Examples include self-capping syringe needles,
ventilation systems such as a fume hood, sound-dampening materials to reduce noise levels, safety
interlocks, and radiation shielding.
Flammable liquid: Any liquid having a flash point below 140 deg. F. and a vapor pressure not greater
than forty (40) PSI (absolute) at 100 deg. F.
Hazardous chemical - Any chemical or material which is a physical hazard or a health hazard.
Health hazard - Any chemical or material that has been shown to cause acute or chronic health effects.
IIPP – Injury and Illness Prevention Program Title 8, CCR Section 3203
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) - Written or printed material prepared by the manufacturer of a
hazardous chemical containing information about the hazards of the chemical and the appropriate work
practices required for use.
Personal Safety Devices: Safeguards so designed with strength and quality as to eliminate, preclude or
mitigate exposure to hazard.
Physical hazard – Any chemical or material that has been shown to be combustible, explosive,
flammable, reactive, compressed gas, organic peroxide, or an oxidizer.
Red Tag: A warning tag denoting an unsafe or hazardous condition.
Root cause - Agent, failure, or fault, from which a chain of effects or failures originates.
Safety Container: An approved container of not over five (5) gallons capacity having a self-closing lid
and spout cover designed for safe storage of flammable liquids.
Page 23 of 79
Bibliography/References
ANSI A14 series on Ladder and Ladder Stands, American National Standards Institute:
http://ansi.org/
Commercial Drivers License Requirements, Department of Motor Vehicles:
http://www.dmv.org/ca-california/commercial-license.php
Emergency Evacuation and Contingency Plan, LBUSD
Emergency Preparedness Plan, LBUSD
Hazard Communication Program, LBUSD
Manual Lifting Guide, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, January 1994:
http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/PrevGuid/p0000427/p0000427.asp
Passenger Transportation Safety Handbook (82.7), California Highway Patrol:
http://ntlsearch.bts.gov/tris/record/tris/00443361.html
Rules and Regulations of the Classified Service, LBUSD
Special Education Handbook, Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), Special Education Student
Safety Plan, LBUSD, February 2004
Title 8, California Administrative Code, General Industry Safety Orders
TMA Systems (LBUSD Maintenance Management Software Work Request System)
Page 24 of 79
Appendix B - FORMS
Page 25 of 79
Safety Meeting Sign-in Log
LOCATION:
INSTRUCTOR:
SUBJECT:
The employees listed have satisfactorily participated in and fulfilled all requirements of the
above training.
NAME (Print)
DEPARTMENT
Page 26 of 79
NAME (Signature)
DATE
Safety Committee Forms
A. Site Safety Committee Sample Minutes Form
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Department: ________________________
Location: __________________________
Meeting presented by: ________________________
Date of Meeting: ________________________
Quarter of Meeting: ________________________
Subject of Meeting: ________________________
Attendees:
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
______________________________
Employee suggestions / comments on the subject:
Items requiring review or corrective actions after the meeting:
Employee suggestions, comments, or concerns for the safety program:
Who is responsible for the recommended corrective actions:
Page 27 of 79
B. SAMPLE COMPLETED Site Safety Committee
Minutes – TRAINING CONCERN
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Department: ABC High School
Location: Faculty Lounge
Meeting presented by: Principal Ms. Jones
Date of Meeting: 9-4-08
Quarter of Meeting: Fall 2008
Subject of Meeting: Results of summer 8-15-08
accident investigation
Attendees:
Jose Rodriguez-Cusodial Supervisor
Irene Davis, Faculty Rep. (Science
Dept)
Mike Schneider, Equipment
Supervisor-PE/Athletics Dept.
Ms. Cherise Jones, Principal
Employee suggestions / comments on the subject:
1. Jose Rodriguez reviewed an accident investigation form about a slip related injury that had occurred
while the summer custodial crew was stripping floors. Investigation indicated that several custodians had
skid resistant shoes but had never been training in certain aspects of safe movement and walking on
floors with liquid on them.
Items requiring review or corrective actions after the meeting:
2. Jose Rodriguez asked for Ms Jones to contact the District risk management office to arrange for the
District’s loss control advisor to perform “Safe Movement” and slip and fall prevention training for the
entire custodial crew. Mike Schneider also mentioned that the high school tile shower area floors can be
slippery for PE staff and others to walk on at certain times. Jose and Mike will look at the shower areas to
see if it is a safety hazard concern or a training concern to teach school employees how to safely navigate
wet and slippery floors.
Employee suggestions, comments, or concerns for the safety program:
3. Irene Davis recommended that the current list of chemicals stored in the school physical science
storage area be reinventoried as the current list is not accurate or complete. She asked for approval from
school management to pay science teachers for the 6 hours she estimates it will take to complete the
inventory and update the list. Ms. Jones will submit the required paper work to approve the overtime.
Work will be performed after normal school hours.
Who is responsible for the recommended corrective actions:
Ms. Jones will contact District Risk Management and follow-up with Jose as to when the slip fall training
prevention can be arranged for.
Page 28 of 79
C. SAMPLE COMPLETED Site Safety Committee
Minutes – HAZARD CONCERN
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Department: ABC High School
Location: Faculty Lounge
Meeting presented by: Principal Ms. Jones
Date of Meeting: 5-4-08
Quarter of Meeting: Spring 2008
Subject of Meeting: Results of outside loss control
inspection from District property insurance firm
Attendees:
Jose Rodriguez, Cusodial Supervisor
Irene Davis, Faculty Rep. (Science
Dept)
Mike Schneider, Equipment
Supervisor-PE/Athletics Dept.
Ms. Cherise Jones, Principal
Employee suggestions / comments on the subject:
1. Ms. Jones showed the safety committee a copy of the recommendation from the loss control rep to
take a household toaster oven in the faculty lounge out of service because it has no overheating cut off
mechanism or fuse. Apparently another California school had an entire wing burn down due to an
overheating household toaster oven.
Items requiring review or corrective actions after the meeting:
2. Jose R mentioned that he thought the school could pick up a commercial toaster oven with overcurrent
protection from E-bay.
Employee suggestions, comments, or concerns for the safety program:
3. Jose recommended that the fire prevention program be revised to include a statement prohibiting all
small heat generating household appliances from school premises (like toasters, toaster ovens, coffee
pots etc.)
Who is responsible for the recommended corrective actions:
Jose R. will take the household toaster oven out of service and will research where the school can locate
a commercial toaster oven through E-bay or elsewhere and will submit to Ms. Jones for approval of the
purchase.
Page 29 of 79
Employee Safety Orientation Checklist
The supervisor must provide thorough instruction for each employee in the safety requirements
of the job. This checklist is provided as a general guideline and means to document this activity.
Check each of the items on this form at the time they are reviewed, and when completed sign the
form and return it to the Site Office file for placement in the employee’s file. This process will
be completed within one week of initial hiring date to meet Cal-OSHA compliance.
Employee’s Name:
Date Hired:
Position:
Manager:
Instructions
1. Employee Safety Rules
a. Provided access to District IIPP.
b. Review District Discipline
Procedures (p. 6, IIPP).
c. Provided copy of additional, Area
Safety Rules (as applicable).
d. Discussed a, b, and c.
2. Unsafe Conditions
a. Discussed examples of unsafe
conditions.
b. Discussed correction and/or
reporting of unsafe conditions
3. Lifting Techniques
a. Discussed common lifting/strain
injury hazards.
b. Discussed material handling
equipment availability/use.
c. Reviewed correct lifting
techniques and guidelines.
4. Accidents and Incidents
a. Reviewed accident reporting
requirements.
b. Discussed incident (“near miss”)
reporting.
c. Reviewed and discussed
accident/injury reporting
procedures.
5.Medical Aid
Identified location(s) of District
industrial medical clinics and/or
Nursing Services staff.
Reviewed location of emergency
first aid materials, (i.e. kits/eye
wash stations).
Discussed notifying manager of first
Date When Done
Page 30 of 79
Supervisor Initials
aid injuries.
6. Emergency Preparedness
a. Discussed emergency telephone
number.
b. Reviewed procedures for
fire/medical/weather.
c. Discussed procedures for other
emergencies.
7. Personal Protective Equipment
Requirements (if applicable)
a. Foot Wear
b. Eye Protection
c. Hard Hats
d. Gloves/Aprons/Arm Protection
e. Respirators
8. Department/Area
Housekeeping
a. Discussed common
problems/corrective measures
b. Discussed materials storage areas
and practices.
9. Fire Prevention and Protection
a. Reviewed District’s No Smoking
Policy.
b. Identified location of fire
extinguishers and fire alarm units.
10. Hazard Communication/Right
To Know Compliance
a. Discussed requirements of the
law.
b. Discussed container labeling and
MSDS information.
c. Identified hazardous material
used in the work area.
d. Conducted hazardous materials
training.
e. Discussed location & How to
Read an MSDS sheet.
f. Discussed chip labeling program.
11. Driver Safety Orientation if
applicable. (See p. 18 of IIPP)
12. Bloodborne Pathogens
a. Discussed requirements of the
law.
b. Reviewed District procedures
regarding bloodborne pathogens.
c. Discussed universal precautions
d. Discussed location of Exposure
Control Plan
Page 31 of 79
13. Other Cal-OSHA Programs (if
applicable)
a. Lock-Out/Tag-Out
b. Confined Space
c. Hazardous Material Clean-Up
Page 32 of 79
Auto Loss Notice
Page 33 of 79
Hazards and Correction Record
This form is to be completed when a hazard or dangerous situation has been noted by an employee. It is the
responsibility of the Site Administrator to ensure that follow-up and corrective measures are taken.
Employee
To:
[Insert Site Administrator’s Name]
This is a request that the following safety hazard be investigated and/or corrected.
Dept. ___________________________ Bldg. ___________________ Room ________________
Location of hazard: _______________________________________________________________
Description of hazard: ____________________________________________________________
Were measures/actions taken to temporarily control the hazard?
[ ] Yes
[ ] No
If yes, What? ____________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
If no, give reason _________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Signed: ______________________________
Employee
___________________________
Date
Site Administrator
[ ]
1. Recommendation:____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
[ ]
2. Referred to the Office of Risk Management, 1515 Hughes Way, Long Beach, CA,
CA 90810, (562) 997-8234
[ ]
3. Referred to Maintenance and Operation.
[ ]
4. Other (specify) _____________________________________________________
Signed: ______________________________
Site Administrator
___________________________
Page 34 of 79
Appendix – C – Safety and Health Rules
Page 35 of 79
Safety and Health Rules3
Safety and Health Rules are to be reviewed by the appropriate supervisor with each new or
transferred employee on the start of work at a new site or for a new operation.
A. Office
1. All employees will learn the location and correct operations for any exits and emergency
equipment they may be called upon to use.
2. Employees will ask a supervisor or another trained team member for help when lifting
heavy objects.
3. Place all litter in the proper containers and immediately wipe up all spills.
4. Horseplay will not be tolerated.
5. Personal protective equipment will be worn where and when required.
6. Know the location of the nearest fire exit, fire extinguisher, fire call box, stretcher, first aid
kit, and/or medical facility.
7. Do not walk faster than the area surface and/or traffic safely allow.
8. Safe and appropriate attire, especially shoes, will be worn in all working areas.
9. Exits, hallways, and aisles will be kept clear of all obstructions.
10. Handrails will be used when ascending or descending stairways.
11. Chairs, boxes, desks, tables, or any unstable material will not be used in place of a ladder or
step stool.
12. Desk drawers and file cabinet drawers will be closed when left unattended.
13. No more than one file drawer in a given file cabinet will be opened at any time.
14. File cabinets will be appropriately loaded from the bottom drawer up to prevent tipping.
15. Office equipment will not be operated without proper training and instructions.
16. Office equipment and appliances will be maintained free of slivers, burrs, or other
conditions which might cause an accident or personal injury.
17. Portable electrical equipment and appliances will be securely placed and grounded.
18. Daisy chained outlet strips will not be used.
19. No person is permitted to operate any machine/equipment where a safety guard has been
altered.
B. School Site
1. All employees will learn the location and correct operations for any exits and emergency
equipment they may be called upon to use
2.Employees will ask a supervisor or another trained team member for help when lifting
heavy objects.
3. Place all litter in the proper containers and immediately wipe up all spills.
4. Horseplay will not be tolerated.
5. Personal protective equipment will be worn where and when required.
6. Know the location of the nearest fire exit, fire extinguisher, fire call box, stretcher, first
aid kit or medical facility.
7. Do not walk faster than the area surface and/or traffic safety will allow.
8. Safe and appropriate attire, especially shoes, will be worn in all working areas.
9. Exits, hallways, and aisles will be kept clear of all obstructions.
10. Handrails will be used when ascending or descending stairways.
11. Chairs, boxes, desks, tables, or any unstable material will not be used in place of a ladder
or step stool.
Page 36 of 79
12. Desk drawers and file cabinet drawers will be closed when left unattended.
13. No more than one file drawer in a given file cabinet will be opened at any time.
14. File cabinets will be appropriately loaded from the bottom drawer up to prevent tipping.
15. Office equipment will not be operated without proper training and instructions.
16. Office equipment and appliances will be maintained free of slivers, burrs, or other
conditions which might cause an accident or personal injury.
17. Portable electrical equipment and appliances will be securely placed and grounded.
18. Daisy chained outlet strips will not be used.
19. No person is permitted to operate any machine/equipment where a safety guard has been
altered.
C. Nutrition Services (staff includes warehouse, maintenance, drivers, production/kitchen,
and office personnel)
1. The District’s Nutrition Services will follow regulations of Cal-OSHA, the Long Beach
Fire Department, and the National Food Services Management Institute.
2. In-service training will be conducted every 10 days per OSHA regulations.
3. All employees will learn the location and correct operations for any exits and emergency
equipment they may be called upon to use.
4. Employees will ask a supervisor or another trained team member for help when lifting
heavy objects.
5. Place all litter in the proper containers and immediately wipe up all spills.
6. Horseplay will not be tolerated.
7. Personal protective equipment will be worn where and when required.
8. All safety measures as stated in the current must be adhered to. Specific precautions and
instructions should be given to employees who operate machines.
9. Student cafeteria workers (minors under l6 years of age) are not to be employed on any job
involving moving machinery or in work dangerous to life or limb. (Labor Code examples
of prohibited work include operation of electric meat slicers or electric mixers.)
10. No one is permitted to operate a garbage disposal unless the point of operation guard is in
place.
11. Cafeteria personnel will safely dispose of cracked or chipped china or glass.
12. Every food storage room will be equipped with at least one commercially rated step ladder
(ANSI rated II, I or IA) to be used for climbing purposes. Household type ANSI4 III rated
ladders are prohibited. Improvised climbing surfaces are not permitted.
13. The cafeteria manager will be responsible for reporting and controlling additions of
equipment in the cafeteria which make work areas unsafe due to inadequate passageways
around equipment extensions, such as open oven doors, tabletop extensions, movable carts,
and other equipment.
14. Cold storage rooms will have adequate safety design as provided. In California
Administrative Code, Title 8, General Industry Safety Orders:
a) Illumination will be provided in the room either automatically or by a lamp
switch control located near the door(s).
b) One door will be capable of being opened from the inside although locked
from the outside with the exceptions provided below:
i. Doors padlocked from the outside will bear a sign near the door jam
reading: "Do Not Lock This Door Until You Are Positive No One Is
Inside.”
4
American National Standards Institute
Page 37 of 79
ii. If a room is provided with electrically operated audible and visible signal
system, which may be actuated from inside the room and be seen and
heard outside the room, then both systems will be on a single switch and
tested daily while in use.
c) Instead of (i) and (ii) above, doors may be locked, provided the room is
equipped with an inside release mechanism which will release the padlocked
door.
13. Manual Handling (Lifting)
a) Get a firm footing with feet slightly apart.
b) Do not lift objects heavier than ½ of body weight.
c) Pivot or shift feet with load; do not twist.
a) Pile or stack materials in such a way that the pile or stack is “tied in” – one
level resting securely on the one below it. Use proper blocking and never
exceed a safe height.
b) Stand on a firm work surface, such as an appropriate ladder or step stool.
Boxes, chairs, pallets, tables, desks, etc. are not appropriate for use as
platforms.
14. Daisy chained outlet strips will not be used.
15. No person is permitted to operate any machine/equipment where a safety guard has been
altered.
D. Maintenance
1. All school employees will learn the location and correct operations for any exits and
emergency equipment they may be called upon to use
2. Employees will ask a supervisor or another trained team member for help when lifting
heavy objects.
3. Place all litter in the proper containers and immediately wipe up all spills.
4. Horseplay will not be tolerated.
5. Personal protective equipment will be worn where and when required.
6. Manual Material Handling (Lifting):
a) Get a firm footing with feet slightly apart.
b) Do not lift objects heavier than ½ of body weight.
c) Pivot or shift feet with load; do not twist.
d) Pile or stack materials in such a way that the pile or stack is "tied in"- one
level resting securely on the one below it. Use proper blocking and never
exceed a safe height.
e) Stand on a firm work surface, such as an appropriate ladder or step stool.
Boxes, chairs, pallets, tables, desks, etc. are not appropriate for use as
platforms.
7. Hand Tools:
a) Never use a tool without proper training. Only use tools that are appropriate
and safe for the job.
b) Other employees and pupils must be clear of the tool’s hazard range.
c) Report defects of handle, working surfaces, cutting edges, joints, springs,
grips, etc., for repair or replacement. Never use defective equipment or tools.
d) Tools will only be used for their intended use.
e) Cutting tools will be sheathed or otherwise safely placed when not in use.
f) Hand tools will be stored in designated areas or containers to prevent
accidental damage or misuse by unauthorized persons.
8. Electrically Powered Machines and Equipment:
Page 38 of 79
a) Frayed or damaged electrical cords or extension cords will not be used until
repaired or replaced.
b) Cords will not be stressed by stretching, or by being pulled out of plugs by
jerking on the wire.
c) Cables and cords will be protected from oil, chemicals, and hot or sharp
objects to prevent damage.
d) Arrange equipment cords and cables away from foot traffic.
e) Report any electrical problems to the supervisor or Maintenance Department
as soon as possible.
f) Equipment with grounded (3-wire) cords will be used.
g) Daisy chained outlet strips will not be used.
h) No machine or piece of equipment will be used until the operator has been
instructed in its safe operation.
i) No machine will be operated without appropriate guards in place.
j) Machinery will not be adjusted, repaired, or tampered with while it is in
motion. The starting switch will be locked out while machinery is being
repaired, adjusted, or cleaned.
k) District provided protective clothing and equipment that are furnished must be
worn by pupils and employees whenever required.
l) Eye protection equipment will be worn at all times while soldering, welding,
grinding, chipping, riveting, operating power edgers, and on all other jobs
where there is a danger of eye injury.
m) Safety guards will not be removed from any piece of machinery except to
repair, clean, or adjust the guard or machine. Such machines will not be
returned to operation unless the required guard is in place.
n) Safety precautions will be taken at all times.
9. Compressed Air:
a) The use of compressed air for cleaning machines, tools, or parts thereof will
be limited to nozzles restricted to < 30 PSI, to remove the possibility of eye
injury. (General Industry Safety Orders.)
b) Compressed air will not be used to clean clothes nor will it be directed at any
person.
10. Personal Safety Devices and Safeguards:
a) Safety devices or safeguards, which may include personal protective
equipment, will be acceptable as to proper type, design, strength, and quality
equivalent to those complying with the standards approved by ANSI or other
recognized authorities.
b) Employees working in locations where the hazards of flying or falling objects
or substances are inherent in the work or the environment will be safeguarded
by means of approved head protection.
c) Where there is the risk of injury from hair entanglement in moving parts of
machinery, employees will confine their hair (e.g. hairnets, hats, scrunchies,
etc.) to eliminate the hazard.
d) Employees working in locations with eye hazards due to flying particles,
hazardous substance(s), or hazardous light rays are a part of the work or
environment will be safeguarded by means of ANSI rated eye protection.
Suitable screens or shields isolating the hazardous exposure may be
considered adequate safeguarding for nearby employees. The following are
shade numbers for recommended lens densities.
Page 39 of 79
i. Clear lenses and filter lenses up to and including Shade No.2 filter lenses
may be used for resistance welding and for stray light from nearby
cutting and welding operations, metal pouring and furnace work and
reflected light from snow and water and similar injurious rays of low
intensity.
ii. Shade No.5 filter lenses are intended for light gas cutting and gas
welding.
iii. Shade No.6 filter lenses are intended for gas cutting, medium gas
welding, and for arc welding up to 30 amperes.
iv. Shade No.8 filter lenses are intended for heavy gas welding and for arc
cutting and welding exceeding 30 but not exceeding 75 amperes.
v. Shade No. 10 filter lenses are intended for arc welding and cutting
exceeding 75 but not exceeding 200 amperes.
vi. Shade No. 12 filter lenses are intended for arc welding and cutting
exceeding 200 but not exceeding 400 amperes.
e) Body protection may be required for employees whose work exposes parts of
their body to hazardous or flying substances or objects. Clothing appropriate
for the work being done will be worn. Loose sleeves, tails, ties, lapels, cuffs,
or other loose clothing which can be entangled in moving machinery will not
be worn. Clothing saturated with flammable liquids, corrosive substances,
irritants, or oxidizing agents will be removed and will not be worn until
properly cleaned. Employees will wear appropriate footwear when exposed to
potential foot injuries from:
i. Hot, corrosive, or poisonous substances;
ii. Falling objects;
iii. Use of pneumatic tools;
iv. Abnormally wet locations.
f) ANSI-rated steel toed shoes may be required to prevent potential foot injuries
from falling objects. If footwear is defective or inappropriate to the extent that
its ordinary use creates the possibility of foot injuries, it will not be worn.
g) Wrist watches, rings, or other jewelry should not be worn while working in
close proximity to moving machinery.
11. Spraying Hazardous Chemicals
a) Spraying will not be performed without appropriate employee training, safety
procedures, notifications, and protective equipment. Contact the Operations
Branch if you have any questions.
i. It will be the responsibility of the person in charge to provide adequate
ventilation on all jobs where there is danger of inhalation of toxic gases,
fumes, or dense nuisance dusts.
ii. The person in charge must ensure that all loads of hazardous chemicals are
safely secured against accidental shifting or spilling.
12. Warning Signs and Barricades
a) At every job site where warning signs or barricades are required for the
protection of pupils, employees, or the general public, such signs and
barricades must be erected and remain in place during the time that the hazard
exists. The party creating hazards at District locations is responsible for the
warning signage. (For example, if an independent contractor creates a trip
hazard during construction (e.g. holes in sidewalks), they are responsible for
providing warnings and/or barricades.)
13. Job Site Precautions
Page 40 of 79
a) It is the duty of the person in charge at every job site to take reasonable
precaution to prevent dangerous tools or materials from being accessed or
used by students or unauthorized adults.
14. No person is permitted to operate any machine/equipment where a safety guard has been
altered.
E. Warehouse and Storage Operations
1. Unsafe or defective pallet parts will be replaced. Pallets upon which employees customarily
walk in the course of employment will have no surface opening greater than two inches in
dimension. 5
2. Warehouses Only authorized personnel are allowed in the warehouses.
3. Ensure safe use of electrically powered dock plates according manufacturer’s instructions
and Title 8, 3337 Dock Plates and Loading Ramps. 6
4. Daisy chained outlet strips will not be used.
F. Ladder Use
Employees should be instructed and trained by their supervisor on proper ladder selection for the
task at hand as well as safe use of that specific ladder as necessary.
G. Safe Driving
The District and other agencies have established safe driving standards that are followed and
monitored in the District as appropriate. These standards will be implemented by the appropriate
supervisor and enforced for all affected employees. District driving policies include:
1. The Safe Driving Standard as defined within Rules and Regulations of the Classified
Service as follows: An acceptable safe driving record is defined as meeting all of the
following criteria: (a) no more than three moving violations within the past three years; (b)
no more than one at fault accident within the past three years; (c) no conviction for failure
to report an accident within the past three years; (d) no conviction for failure to appear
within the past three years; (e) no conviction for driving under the influence, or driving
while intoxicated, or reckless driving within the past five years.7
2. Specific District departmental driving procedures.
3. California Highway Patrol, Passenger Transportation Safety Handbook (82.7)
4. Department of Motor Vehicles, Commercial Drivers License requirements.
5
CA General Industry Safety Orders, Title 8 Section 3338
A dock plate is a metal plate used on a loading dock to bridge the gap (created by rubber bumpers) between a truck
and a building or loading area floor.
6
7
Safe Driving Standard, Ch. 1, p. 8
Page 41 of 79
Heat Illness Prevention Program
Reference Standard
California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 3395
Purpose
The purpose of the Heat Illness Prevention Program is to meet the requirements set forth in
the Standard and to serve as a required supplement of the Injury and Illness Prevention (IIP)
Program. The Program establishes procedures and provides information to ensure that
LBUSD employees are knowledgeable in the prevention and recognition of heat stress to
ensure their own safety and the safety of others.
Definitions
Acclimatization: The temporary adaptation of the body to work in the heat that occurs
gradually when a person is exposed to it. Acclimatization peaks in most people within four
to 14 days of regular work for at least two hours per day in the heat.
Heat Illness: Refers to a serious medical condition resulting from the body’s inability to
cope with a particular heat load, and includes heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
Environmental Risk Factors for Heat Illness: Working conditions that create the
possibility that heat illness could occur, including air temperature, relative humidity, and
radiant heat from the sun and other sources, conductive heat sources such as the ground, air
movement, workload severity and duration, protective clothing and personal protective
equipment worn by workers.
Personal Risk Factors for Heat Illness: Risk factors such as an individual’s age, degree of
acclimatization, health, water consumption, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and
use of prescription medications that affect the body’s water retention or other physiological
responses to heat.
Potentially Impacted Employees: Employees whose job tasks expose them to
environmental risk factors for heat illness.
Preventative Recovery Period: A period of time to recover from the heat in order to
prevent heat illness.
Shade: The blockage of direct sunlight. Canopies, umbrellas and other temporary structures
or devices may be used to provide shade. One indicator that blockage is sufficient is when
objects do not cast a shadow in the area of blocked sunlight. Shade is not adequate when
heat in the area of shade defeats the purpose of shade—allowing the body to cool.
Responsibilities
Health & Safety Coordinator
 Establish and update the written Heat Illness Prevention Program.
 Provide consultation/training to departments who fall within the Program.
 Assist departments in determining when, where, and how shade and water is provided.
Supervisors
 Identify and maintain records of tasks/employees that are required to work outdoors
where potential heat illness could occur.
Page 42 of 79






Require that potentially impacted employees receive proper training on heat illness
prevention and comply with appropriate procedures.
Maintain training records.
Ensure that adequate water is available at the beginning of each shift and throughout the
work day.
Ensure access to shade to prevent illness or recover from heat is available during the
work day.
Follow proper procedures to contact emergency medical services in the event medical
assistance is required.
Ensure access to a shaded area is available to recover from heat-related symptoms.
Employees
 Comply with appropriate heat illness prevention procedures while performing assigned
duties.
 Drink adequate amounts of hydrating fluids when the environmental risk factors for heat
illness are present.
 Inform their supervisor if shade and/or water are inadequate.
 Report symptoms of heat-related illness promptly to their supervisor.
 Follow proper procedures in the event medical assistance is required.
Basic Requirements
Provision of Water
Employees shall have access to potable drinking water. Where water is not plumbed, or
otherwise continuously supplied, it shall be provided in sufficient quantity at the beginning
of the work shift to provide one quart per employee per hour for drinking for the entire shift.
Employees should be encouraged to drink water frequently as described in the training
section.
Access to Shade
Employees suffering from heat illness, or believing a preventative recovery period is
needed, shall be provided access to an area with shade that is either open or provided with
ventilation or cooling for a period of no less than five minutes. Such access to shade shall be
permitted at all times.
Training
Training shall be provided for potentially impacted employees working where
environmental risk factors for heat illness are present. Training information shall include the
topics listed in the training section of this program. All potentially impacted employees, and
supervisors who supervise these employees, must be trained on the risks and prevention of
heat illness, including how to recognize heat illness symptoms and how to respond when
they appear.
Recordkeeping
A record of training given to employees and supervisors shall be retained by the company
for a minimum of 5 years. This can be accomplished by requiring employees to sign their
name to a training roster when they receive the required training (see Appendix A).
Page 43 of 79
Access to Records
All records shall be provided upon request to employees, former employees and
representatives of employees.
Procedures
Identification of Hazard
Employees who are required to work where environmental risk factors for heat illness are
present will be identified at the department level. The Health & Safety Coordinator will be
provided this information.
Potentially Impacted Employees
Training shall be provided for potentially impacted employees, and their supervisors,
working where environmental risk factors for heat illness are present. Training information
shall include the topics listed in the training section of this written program. All potentially
impacted employees and their supervisors must be trained on the risk and prevention of heat
illness, including how to recognize symptoms and how to respond should symptoms be
present.
Employee Protection
 One quart per hour of drinking water shall be available at all times, for each employee,
for the duration of their shift, while working outdoors in the heat. Supervisors shall
remind employees to drink frequently.
 Employees shall have access to a shaded area to prevent or recover from heat illness
symptoms and where they can take rest breaks.
 If an employee feels unusual discomfort from the heat, they should be instructed to cool
down in the shade to prevent the onset of heat illness.
Training
Employees and supervisors working on job tasks where environmental risk factors for heat
illness are present shall receive training.
Supervisors
Supervisors shall receive training on the following topics prior to being assigned to
supervise outdoor employees:
 The training information required of the employees, detailed below.
 Procedures the supervisor is to follow to implement the provisions of this program.
(located under Responsibilities –Supervisors and Basic Requirements).
 Procedures the supervisor shall follow when an employee exhibits symptoms consistent
with possible heat illness, including emergency response procedures, found in Appendix
B and C.
Page 44 of 79
Employees
Training shall be provided for affected employees prior to being assigned to work tasks to
include the following:
 Procedures for identifying, evaluating, and controlling exposure to environmental risk
factors for heat illness.
 The importance of frequent consumption of hydrating fluids, up to four cups of water
per hour, when environmental risk factors for heat illness are present.
 The importance of acclimatization.
 Different types of heat illness and the common signs and symptoms of heat illness (see
appendix B).
 The importance of immediately reporting symptoms or signs of heat illness, in
themselves or in co-workers, to their supervisor.
 Understanding the procedures for contacting emergency medical services, and if
necessary, for transporting employees to a point where they can be reached by
emergency medical service.
 Procedures for ensuring that, in the event of an emergency, clear and precise direction to
the work site can and will be provided to emergency responders.
Program Audits
 An audit of the Heat Illness Prevention Program shall be performed annually to ensure
that heat illness prevention procedures are in place and are being properly followed.
Page 45 of 79
Overview of Heat Illness Types, Symptoms & Prevention
This describes the three major forms of heat illness, how to recognize them, and what actions to take to
provide first-aid before medical care is provided.
Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are the most common type of heat-related injury. Heat cramps are muscle spasms
which usually affect the arms, legs or stomach. Heat cramps are caused by heavy sweating,
especially when water is not replaced quickly enough. Frequently they do not occur until after
work, at night or when relaxing. Although heat cramps can be quite painful, they usually don't
result in permanent damage.
Prevention/First-Aid: Drink an electrolyte solution, such as sports drink, or plenty of water during
the day and try eating more fruits to help keep your body hydrated during hot weather.
Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is more serious than heat cramps. It occurs when the body's internal temperature
regulating system is overworked, but has not completely shut down. In heat exhaustion, the surface
blood vessels and capillaries, which originally enlarged to cool the blood, collapse from loss of
body fluids and necessary minerals. This happens when you do not drink enough fluids to replace
what you are sweating away.
Symptoms Include: Headache, heavy sweating, intense thirst, dizziness, fatigue, loss of
coordination, nausea, impaired judgment, loss of appetite, hyperventilation, tingling in hands or
feet, anxiety, cool moist skin, weak and rapid pulse (120-200), and low to normal blood pressure.
Prevention/First Aid: The employee suffering these symptoms should be moved to a cool location
such as a shaded area or air-conditioned building. Have them lie down with their feet slightly
elevated. Loosen their clothing, apply cool, wet cloths or fan them. Have them drink water or
electrolyte drinks. Try to cool them down, and have them checked by medical personnel. Victims of
heat exhaustion should avoid strenuous activity for at least a day, and they should continue to drink
water to replace lost body fluids. Call 9-1-1 if the person becomes non-responsive, refuses water,
vomits, or loses consciousness
Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening illness with a high death rate. It occurs when the body has depleted
its supply of water and salt, and the victim's core body temperature rises to deadly levels. A heat
stroke victim may first suffer heat cramps and/or heat exhaustion before progressing into the heat
stroke stage, however this is not always the case. It is important to note that heat stroke symptoms
are similar to those of a heart attack. Therefore, it is very important to know how to recognize the
signs and symptoms of heat stroke and to check for them anytime an employee collapses while
working in a hot environment.
Symptoms include: A high body temperature (103 degrees F); a distinct absence of sweating
(usually); hot red or flushed dry skin; rapid pulse; difficulty breathing; constricted pupils; any/all of
the signs or symptoms of heat exhaustion such as dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, or
confusion, and possibly more severe systems including; bizarre behavior; and high blood pressure.
Advance symptoms may be seizure or convulsions, collapse, loss of consciousness and a body
temperature of over 108 degrees F.
Page 46 of 79
Prevention/First Aid: It is vital to lower a heat stroke victim's body temperature.
Quick actions can mean the difference between life and death. Pour water on them,
fan them, or apply cold packs. Call 9-1-1 to get the person medical aid as soon as
possible.
Page 47 of 79
Precautions to Prevent Heat Illness

Condition yourself for working in hot environments. Start slowly and build up to more
physical work. Allow your body to adjust over a few days (acclimatization).

Drink plenty of liquids. Hydration is a continuous process. Do not wait until you are thirsty!
By then, there is a good chance that you are already on your way to being dehydrated.
Electrolyte drinks, such as a sports drink, are good for replacing both water and minerals lost
through sweating. Never drink alcohol, and avoid caffeinated beverages like coffee and soda,
as these liquids can have the opposite effect and can actually increase the level of
dehydration.

Take frequent breaks, especially if you notice you are getting a headache or you start feeling
overheated.

Assure that adequate water and shade are available at the job site before work is to begin.

Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing when working out in the sun.

You should immediately report all unsafe conditions and/or concerns to your supervisor or
area manager.

For additional information on heat illness prevention, contact your supervisor.
Page 48 of 79
Hazard Communication Program
The goal of the District is to reduce the occurrence of employee occupational illness and injury due to
hazardous chemicals. Each administrator, manager, or supervisor will evaluate the potential chemical
hazards at their site(s) and will communicate that information along with appropriate protective
measures and safe working procedures to their employees.
A. Scope
This program applies to District employees who may be exposed to hazardous materials under normal
working conditions or in an unforeseen emergency.
B. Definitions
1. Chemical - Any element, compound, or mixture of elements and/or compounds.
2. Hazardous chemical - Any chemical or material which is a physical hazard or a health hazard.
3. Health hazard - Any chemical or material that has been shown to cause acute or chronic health
effects.
4. Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) - Written or printed material prepared by the manufacturer
of a hazardous chemicals containing information about the hazards of the chemical and the
appropriate work practices required for use.
5. Physical hazard – Any chemical or material that has been shown to be combustible, explosive,
flammable, reactive, compressed gas, organic peroxide, or an oxidizer.
C. Responsibilities
1. Site management is responsible for:
a) Monitoring compliance with the Cal-OSHA Standard;3
b) Providing general Hazard Communication training; and
c) Providing appropriate training for supervisors.
2. Site supervisors are responsible for:
a) Ensuring employee compliance with all the procedures outlined in this program;
b) Ensuring employees with potential exposure to hazardous chemicals receive proper
site or operation-specific training and proper personal protective equipment (PPE)
before working with those chemicals;
c) Maintaining a chemical inventory and identifying and listing hazardous chemicals in
their work area4;
d) Obtaining an MSDS for each hazardous chemical from suppliers;
e) Ensuring that chemical containers are labeled properly.
f) Forwarding an MSDS copy to Environmental Health and Safety Office
(Maintenance Branch)
3. Site employees are responsible for:
a) Following all procedures outlined in this program;
3
Title 8, California Code of Regulations (CCR), Section 5194
The Middle/High School department heads (e.g., science, art, etc.) also work with these types of materials and are also
responsible for keeping copies of the appropriate MSDSs in their classrooms in case accidents occur.
Page 49 of 79
4
b) Reporting hazardous conditions and work related injuries or exposures to their
supervisors; and
c) Using PPE where and when required.
D. Hazard Determination
The District will rely on the hazard evaluation performed by the manufacturer or importer of the
chemical as the official hazard assessment for commercially acquired chemicals.
E. Labeling
1. Every container of hazardous material delivered to or used at District facilities must be labeled
with the following information:
c) Name of the chemical;
d) Name and address of the manufacturer (MSDS); and
e) Appropriate hazard warnings such as physical hazards, health hazards, target organ
effects.
2. The labels must be maintained in a readable condition. Manufacturer labels must not be defaced
or removed unless the container is immediately relabeled with the required information. Any
container without a label should not be received, and should be reported to the supervisor
immediately. If chemicals are transferred out of the original container, the secondary container
must be labeled with the information listed above.
3. Labeling is not required for portable/service containers into which hazardous chemicals are
transferred from labeled containers. These service containers are intended only for the
immediate use of the individual who performs the transfer on that work shift. They may not be
stored or left out after the work shift without required labeling
F. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
1. Site management or supervisors will request MSDSs when placing orders from vendors through
the Purchasing Branch. Immediately upon receipt, supervisors who obtain MSDSs directly from
vendors are to fax a copy of the MSDS to the District’s Maintenance Branch, Environmental
Health and Safety, for inclusion in the MSDS master file. Each Manager, Site Administrator, or
designee is required to maintain current MSDSs for each hazardous material used at their
location or in their operations.
2. MSDSs must be readily accessible to employees during all work shifts. It is the responsibility of
management to ensure that employees review the MSDS prior to working with the chemical.
Supervisors must notify employees of any changes in MSDSs.
G. Reducing Employee Exposure to Chemicals
2. Engineering Controls - When possible, mechanical or area ventilation will be used to reduce
employee chemical vapor exposures.
3. Substitution - When possible, District supervisors or managers will substitute a less hazardous
material or process to reduce or eliminate chemical exposures in operations.
4. Administrative Controls - If engineering controls cannot be implemented, alteration of work
practices will be used to reduce chemical exposures for District employees. This could include
limiting the amount of time employees spend working in high exposure areas by rotating
personnel.
Page 50 of 79
5. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - Contact with the eyes or skin by chemicals will be
prevented by the use of protective garments and equipment which are impervious to the
chemicals used. The type of PPE necessary will vary depending on the concentration, amount
used, and the potential for splashing. The manufacturers’ labels and MSDSs will be consulted
and PPE recommendations will be followed. All PPE must be inspected by employees prior to
each use. PPE must be stored in a clean and sanitary manner.
6. Respirators - Only when engineering controls, material substitution, and administrative controls
cannot be used will respirators be used, but only with proper medical surveillance, fitting, and
training. Respirator recommendations will be made based upon air monitoring results from a
qualified safety professional or industrial hygienist. For the purposes of this plan a nuisance
dust mask such as a 3M 8710 is not considered to be a fitted respirator. Please refer to the sitespecific respirator program for further details (i.e. Paint Shop, Haz Mat team, etc.).
7. Hygiene - To prevent the accidental ingestion of chemicals, eating, drinking, and smoking are
prohibited in areas where chemicals are used. Employees must also wash their hands after using
chemicals.
8. Emergency Eyewash and Shower - If there is a possibility that employees’ skin or eyes may be
splashed by chemicals, an emergency shower/drench hose and plumbed emergency eyewash
should be provided within 15 feet of the chemical exposure/work area. Employees must be
instructed on the proper use of the eyewash and emergency showers. If employees’ eyes or skin
are splashed, the employee must flush them immediately and continue for 15 minutes.
Employees should then seek medical attention.
H. Employee Information and Training
2. Every District employee will receive a basic orientation and training from their supervisor to the
District Hazard Communication Program. It will include the following:
b) Requirements of the Cal-OSHA Standard;
c) Explanation of the District’s Hazard Communication Program, including labeling
system, MSDSs, and how employees can obtain hazard information;
d) Description of the various methods and observations that may be used to detect the
presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area;
e) General guidance on the selection of protective measures to reduce chemical
exposure;
f) Information on safety resources; and
g) Emergency procedures to be used in the event of accidental exposure to hazardous
chemicals, including emergency phone numbers.
3. In addition to the general Hazard Communication training, employees at all of the District’s
locations must be provided with area-specific, on-the-job training. This training is to be
conducted by the supervisor and will inform employees of the following:
a) The location of the District’s written Hazard Communication Program and MSDSs
for their work area and operations;
b) The specific physical and health hazards present in their work area;
c) The operations in their work area where hazardous chemicals are used;
d) The specific protective measures required when using the chemicals in their work
area, including the procedures that have been implemented to protect them from
exposure to hazardous chemicals;
Page 51 of 79
e) The specific methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or
release of a hazardous chemical in the work area; and
f) The location of eye washes and safety showers (as applicable), to be used in the
event of a chemical exposure.
4. The general Hazard Communication training will be conducted at the time of the employee’s
initial assignment and refreshed annually thereafter. Area-specific training will be conducted
whenever a new chemical hazard is introduced into the work area, when the employee transfers
to another job and whenever the employee demonstrates behavior that indicates a lack of
understanding of the safe handling of chemicals.
5. Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that employees with potential exposure to hazardous
chemicals receive the appropriate training before working with those chemicals.
6. Supervisors must provide employees with the hazard information for non-routine tasks before
they are performed. This includes reviewing the MSDSs and explaining the appropriate work
practices to be followed. An example of a non-routine task which requires special training and
PPE would be entering a confined space where an oxy-acetylene torch will be used to cut metal.
7. All training records and documentation must be kept on file by the appropriate supervisor.
I. Informing Contractors or Vendors
1. If chemicals are to be used by District personnel in the same area that contractor or outside
vendor employees are assigned, the appropriate District supervisor or manager has the
responsibility of informing the contractor or outside vendor employees of the potential hazards in
the work area. The District supervisor will inform the contractor of:
a) The District’s hazardous chemicals or hazardous materials to which the contractor or
outside vendor may be exposed while working in the area;
b) Precautionary measures the contractor/vendor employees should take to lessen the
risk of exposure and the steps District has taken to lessen the risks;
c) The location of MSDSs for the products used by District personnel;
d) The District's written Hazard Communication Program; and
e) The District's secondary container chemical labeling system.
Chemical Storage Policy
1. Containers- Containers will be stored on a platform, shelf, pallet, or skid.
2. Storage of Chemicals -Storage of chemicals will be maintained so that incompatible chemicals
will be prevented from mixing.
3. Toxic Materials - Toxic materials will be stored in such a manner as to prevent unreasonable
danger to life by reason of storage, accessibility, or use.
4. Water-Reactive Materials - Water-reactive materials, when not in use, will be kept in sealed
containers.
Page 52 of 79
Workplace Security – Preventing Violence in the Workplace
A. Introduction
The District's program for Workplace Security addresses the hazards known to be associated with the
three major types of workplace violence:
1. Type I: Workplace violence involves a violent act by an assailant with no legitimate relationship
to the workplace who enters the workplace to commit a robbery or other criminal act.
2. Type II: Involves a violent act or threat of violence by a recipient of a service provided by the
District, such as a parent, student, community member, or other.
3. Type III: Involves a violent act or threat of violence by a current or former employee, supervisor,
manager, or another person who has some employment-related involvement with the District,
such as an employee's spouse or lover, an employee's relative or friend, or another person who
has a dispute with a District employee.
B. Responsibility
The District has assigned responsibility for the security in our workplace to each Site Administrator,
director, or manager who has the authority and responsibility for program implementation.
C. Compliance
The District has established the following policy to ensure compliance with the rules on workplace
security.
1. Site Management is committed to ensuring that all workplace security policies and procedures are
clearly communicated and understood by all employees.
2. All employees are responsible for using safe work practices, for following all directives, policies
and procedures, and for assisting in maintaining a safe and secure work environment.
3. The District’s system of ensuring that all employees, including supervisors and managers, comply
with work practices, and do not engage in threats or physical actions that create a, security hazard
for others in the workplace, includes:
a) Informing employees, supervisors, and managers of the provisions for IIP Program
for Workplace Security.
b) Evaluating the performance of all employees in complying with our District's
workplace security measures.
c) Recognizing employees who perform work practices which promote security in the
workplace.
d) Providing training and/or counseling to employees whose performance is deficient in
complying with work practices designed to ensure workplace security.
e) Disciplining employees for failure to comply with workplace security practices.
D. Communication
The District recognizes that to maintain a safe, healthy and secure workplace, there must be open, twoway communications between all employees, including managers and supervisors, on all workplace
safety, health and security issues. The District has a communication system designed to encourage a
continuous flow of safety, health and security information between management and District
employees without fear of reprisal and in a form that is readily understandable. The District’s
communication system consists of the following items:
Page 53 of 79
1. New Employee Orientation on the District's workplace security policies, procedures and work
practices.
2. Periodic review of our IIP Program for Workplace Security with all personnel.
3. Regularly scheduled safety meetings with all appropriate personnel that include workplace
security discussions as applicable.
4. A system to ensure that all employees, including managers and supervisors, understand
workplace security and emergency preparedness.
5. Posted or distributed workplace security information.
6. Employees will inform management about workplace security hazards or threats of violence.
7. Employees who report threats will not be retaliated against by the District.
8. Addressing security issues at Site Safety Committee meetings.
9. Other:_____________________________________________________________
E. Hazard Assessment
The site will assess workplace security hazards. Periodic workplace security inspections are intended to
identify and evaluate workplace security hazards and threats of workplace violence. The following
observer(s) in the following areas are:
Observer
Area
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
Periodic inspections are performed to the following schedule:
1. Regularly, but not less than quarterly;
2. When IIPP for workplace security was initially established;
3. When new, previously unidentified security hazards are recognized;
4. When occupational injuries or threats of injury occur;
Periodic inspections for security hazards consist of identification and evaluation of workplace security
hazards and changes in employee work practices, and may require assessing for more than one type of
workplace violence by using the methods specified below to identify and evaluate workplace security
hazards. Inspections for Type I workplace security hazards include assessing:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The exterior and interior of the workplace for its attractiveness to criminal activity.
The need for security surveillance measures, such as mirrors and cameras.
Posting of signs notifying the public that no cash is kept on premises.
Procedures for employee response during a robbery or· other criminal act.
Procedures for reporting suspicious persons or activities.
Posting an emergency telephone numbers for law enforcement, fire and medical services.
Other: _____________________________________________________
F. Incident Investigations
The District has established the following policy for investigating incidents of workplace violence. The
District’s procedure for investigating incidents of workplace violence, which includes threats and
physical and injury include:
1. Reviewing trends of previous incidents.
2. Visiting the scene of an incident as soon as possible.
3. Interviewing threatened or injured employees and witnesses.
Page 54 of 79
4. Examining the workplace for security risk factors associated with the incident, including any
previous reports of inappropriate behavior by the perpetrator.
5. Determining the cause of the incident.
6. Taking corrective action to prevent the incident from recurring.
7. Recording the findings and corrective actions taken.
8. Other:_______________________________________________________
G. Hazard Correction
Hazards, which threaten the security of employees, will be corrected in a timely manner based on
severity when they are first observed or discovered.
Corrective measures for Type I workplace security hazards can include:
1. Making the workplace unattractive to robbers.
2. Utilizing surveillance measures, such as cameras or mirrors to provide information as to what is
going on outside and inside the workplace.
3. Procedures for the reporting suspicious persons or activities.
4. Posting of emergency telephone numbers of law enforcement, fire, medical services where
employees have access to a telephone with an outside line.
5. Posting of signs notifying the public that no cash is kept on premises.
6. Employee, supervisor and management training on emergency action procedures.
7. Other:__________________________________________________________
Corrective measures for Type II workplace security hazards include:
1. Controlling access to the workplace and freedom of movement within it, consistent with business
necessity.
2. Ensuring the adequacy of workplace security systems, such as door locks, security windows, and
physical barriers.
3. Training employees in recognizing threatening or minor hostile situations that may lead to violent
acts by District employees and/or service recipients of the site.
4. Warning others of a security danger at a District site and provide the means to summon
assistance, e.g. alarms or panic buttons.
5. Providing procedures for a "buddy" system for specified emergency events.
6. Ensuring adequate employee escape routes.
7. Other:___________________________________________________________
Corrective measures for Type III workplace security hazards include:
1. Effectively communicating District's anti-violence policy to all employees, supervisors and
managers.
2. Improving District communication between management and employees.
3. Increasing employee awareness of the warning signs of potential workplace violence.
4. Controlling access to and freedom of movement within the workplace by non-employees,
including recently discharged employees or persons with whom one of our employee's is having a
dispute.
5. Providing counseling to employees who exhibit behavior that presents strain or pressure which
may lead to physical or verbal abuse of co-employees.
6. Ensure that all reports of violent acts, threats of physical violence, verbal abuse, property damage
or other signs of strain or pressure in the workplace are handled effectively by management and
that the person making the report is not subject to retaliation by the person making the threat.
7. Ensure that employee disciplinary and discharge procedures address the potential for workplace
violence.
Page 55 of 79
8. Other: __________________________________________________________
H. Training and Instruction
The District has established the following policy to train all employees with respect to workplace
security:
1. All employees, including managers and supervisors, will have training and instruction on general
and job-specific workplace security practices. Training and instruction will be provided when the
IIPP for Workplace Security is first established and periodically thereafter.
2. Training will also be provided to all new employees and to other employees for whom training
has not previously been provided and to all employees, supervisors and Managers given new job
assignments for which specific workplace security training assignment has not previously been
provided. Additional training and instruction will be provided to all personnel whenever the
District is made aware of new previously unrecognized security hazards.
3. General workplace security training and instruction includes, but is not limited to, the following:
a) Explanation of the IIP Program for Workplace Security including measures for
reporting any violent acts or threats of violence.
b) Recognition of workplace security hazards including the risk factors associated with
the three types of workplace violence.
c) Measures to prevent workplace violence, including procedures for reporting
workplace security hazards or threats to managers and supervisors.
d) Ways to defuse hostile or threatening situations.
e) Measures to summon others for assistance.
f) Employee routes of escape.
g) Notification of law enforcement authorities when a criminal act may have occurred.
h) Emergency medical care provided in the event of any violent act upon an employee.
i) Post-event trauma counseling for those employees desiring such assistance.
4. In addition, the District provides specific instructions to all employees regarding workplace
security hazards unique to their job assignment, to the extent that such information was not
already covered in other training.
Page 56 of 79
The District has identified the following items for Type I training and instruction for managers,
supervisors and employees:
1. Crime awareness
2. Location and operation of alarm systems
3. Communication procedures
4. Proper work practices for specific workplace activities, occupations or assignments, such as night
work.
5. Other: _______________________________________________________________
The District has identified the following items for Type II training and instruction for managers,
supervisors, and employees:
1. Self-protection
2. Dealing with angry, hostile or threatening individuals.
3. Location, operation, care, and maintenance of alarm· systems and other protective devices.
4. Communication procedures.
5. Determination of when to use the "buddy" system or other assistance from co-employees.
6. Awareness of indicators that lead to violent acts by service recipients.
7. Other: ________________________________________________________________
The District has identified the following items for Type III training and instruction for managers,
supervisors, and employees:
1. Pre-employment screening practices.
2. Employee Assistance Programs
3. Awareness of situational indicators that lead to violent acts.
4. Managing with respect and consideration for employee well being.
5. Review of anti-violence policy and procedures.
6. Other:___________________________________________________
___
Page 57 of 79
VIII – School Safety and Emergency Preparedness (Workplace Security)
The Office of School Safety and Emergency Preparedness has established Standard Operation
Procedures (SOPs) for the following emergency and workplace security events:
1. 9.102 Guidelines for District Staff in Handling Bomb Threats
2. 9.105 Emergency Communication Radios – KKJZ F.M. 88.1
3. 9.106 Handling Combative Students
4. 9.107 Emergency Lockdown Procedure
5. 9.108 School Site Emergency Procedure for State-3 Power Shortage Rolling Blackouts
6. 9.111 Emergency Procedure for School-Site Shootings
7. 9.112 Guidelines for Handling Suspicious Mail
8. 9.118 Safe School Plan Administrative Reporting
9. 9.121 Barring Disruptive Persons from School Sites (Stay-Away Letter)
10. 9.123 Report of Assault on School Employer by Student
11. 9.129 Request for Intervention
Page 58 of 79
Standard Operating Procedures
9.102 Guidelines for District Staff in Handling Bomb Threats
The Long Beach Unified School District, Office of the Superintendent, School Safety and Emergency
Preparedness Division has prepared the following guidelines to assist school staff in dealing with bomb
threats received at school or support sites. Please distribute to employees who handle incoming calls
and place in appendix of the Emergency Procedures Manual.
A. Upon receiving a bomb threat by telephone:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Complete the “bomb threat checklist” on the following page.
Listen closely to the caller’s voice and to any noises in the background.
Immediately notify a site administrator or supervisor.
Notify the School Safety Communications Center at (562) 997-8101 (School Safety will notify
law enforcement).
5. Prepare to evacuate if so ordered by public safety personnel.
B. Upon receiving a bomb threat in writing:
1. Immediately notify School Safety Communications Center at (562) 997-8101 (School Safety
Communications Operator will notify law enforcement).
2. Avoid any unnecessary handling of the note.
3. Place note in a plastic bag if possible.
4. Give note to the responding law enforcement personnel.
Any questions regarding this guideline should be directed to the School Safety and Emergency
Preparedness Division at (562) 997-8446.
Approved: _____Signature On File________
Thomas W. Hickman
Emergency Preparedness Manager
Ref: Manual Section 8.109
Page 59 of 79
Date: October 16, 2001
BOMB THREAT CHECKLIST
Keep This Checklist Near Your Phone
1. INITIAL ACTIONS
Don’t Hang Up
Note Time of Call
Keep the caller talking
2. QUESTIONS TO ASK
WHICH
building are you talking about?
WHEN
is the bomb going to explode?
WHERE
exactly is the bomb?
WHAT
does the bomb look like?
WHAT
will make the bomb explode?
WHY
have you done this?
WHO
are you?
WHERE
are you?
WHAT
is your address and telephone number?
3. WHAT TO LISTEN FOR
VOICE
Accent/Impediment/Tone/Speech/Diction/Manner
LANGUAGE Polite/Incoherent/Irrational/Taped/Read/Cut/Abusive
NOISES
Traffic/Voices/Machinery/Music/Noises on the line
OTHER
Sex of Caller/Estimate Age
4. EXACT WORDING OF THREAT
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………
5. POST-CALL
Person Receiving the Call:
Complete this checklist
Notify your School Safety Communications Center
Hand completed checklist to School Safety/Law Enforcement
School Safety:
Notify Police
Notify any other Emergency Response Officers on site and confirm action.
Time of Call……………………Name of Person Receiving Call…….…….……………
Duration of Call………………..Telephone Number………………………………………
Date…………………………….Signature…………………………………………………
Page 60 of 79
9.105 Emergency Communication Radios – KKJZ F.M. 88.1
The School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division and Office of Multi-Media Services have
developed a system to keep the Long Beach Unified School District sites better informed in case of an
emergency or disaster. KKJZ, F.M. 88.1 has been configured to allow the Long Beach Unified School
District unrestricted one–way communications to any site which has a pre-set district emergency
communications radio.
All sites should include these receivers as part of their emergency communications package (along with
cellular telephone, fax suitcase, radio, etc.) to be incorporated into their Emergency Preparedness Plan.
With approval of the Incident Commander/Supervisor at the District’s Emergency Operations Center
(E.O.C.)/Communication Center, one-way communications will be initiated via the KKJZ frequency.
The system will broadcast information to sites regarding pending or in-progress incidents and will be
used to keep the sites abreast of any pertinent emergency information. This should alleviate
unnecessary use of other communication assets to obtain information.
A. KKJZ F.M. 88.1 Emergency Communications Procedure
1. Turn on emergency radio (radio is preset to F.M. 88.1).
2. Ensure radio is switched to “MX” position.
3. Monitor radio for emergency information.
B. Example of Emergency Broadcast
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
This is a Long Beach Unified School District Emergency Broadcast.
Please stand by.
The area of (perimeter destination) is locked down due to an (incident), or
An (event) has occurred in the (N/S/E/W) area of (Long Beach/Lakewood/Signal Hill).
Please perform the following steps:
a. Lock Down.
b. Deploy Incident Command System.
c. Monitor Emergency Radio.
d. Any other information, etc.
6. Please continue to monitor this radio.
7. Further emergency broadcast information will be announced every (#) minutes.
Approved:
Signature On File
Date: Feb. 25, 2003
Thomas W. Hickman
Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Reference: Manual Section 8.104
Page 61 of 79
9.106 Handling Combative Students
The School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division frequently receives requests for guidance and
assistance when students are out of control, combative or acting in a bizarre manner. School
Administrators may ask School Safety personnel to restrain students. When a student is harming
himself or others, there is an absolute duty to control the behavior. Controlling student behavior is
primarily a site responsibility and, when feasible, administrators should exercise their own procedures.
If the administrator feels the student is a danger to himself or others, School Safety Communications
Center should be called immediately at ext. 8101 or (562) 997-8101.
No employee should wait for injury or property damage before restraining a combative student.
Restraining a student who is out of control, combative and destructive to property is not Corporal
Punishment. In all cases, school district staff should attempt to control the student's behavior without
excessive restraint or use of force.
Site administrative staff will take the lead in controlling students assigned to their school or program
who are exhibiting aggressive, combative or out of control behavior. Some district employees have
had specialized training in this area. In these cases, Crisis Prevention/Intervention-trained staff should
assist.
The following are general guidelines for controlling students who are exhibiting combative
behavior:
1.
Site staff who are most familiar with the student should make every attempt to control the
student and their behavior. If the number of site staff is inadequate, an administrator should call
more site personnel to assist. If possible, personnel trained in Crisis Prevention Intervention
should be called to intervene.
2.
Site staff should consider calling for mental evaluation personnel such as the Psychological
Evaluation Team (P.E.T.) of Los Angeles County. The P.E.T. Team can be accessed by calling
the following phone numbers:
a. 310-618-9687: Area #8 South Bay Region stationed at Harbor General Hospital. This unit
will respond to “house calls” during normal working hours daily. They operate on a priority
basis with suicidal/homicidal patients having first priority. Depending on workload, their
response time may vary.
b. 800-854-7771: P.E.T. response for after hours, holidays, and weekends.
c. Assistance may also be obtained from Long Beach Mental Health at
562-599-9280. The Long Beach Mental Health Unit does not make “house calls” but can
give advice over the phone.
3.
The site administrator should consider if site staff can alleviate the problem by administering
prescribed medication.
Page 62 of 79
4.
School Safety staff should immediately evaluate several factors in assisting
site personnel with out-of-control student behavior such as:
a. If a crime is being committed, local law enforcement should be called immediately. While
waiting for law enforcement to respond, the student should be detained by site staff and
School Safety staff using minimum force. School Safety staff should ask site personnel the
following clarifying questions:
1) “Has anyone been injured?”
2) “Has the student destroyed or damaged property?”
3) “Do you want the student arrested for this behavior?”
b. If a crime is being committed, inform the student immediately, stating, “If you do not stop
what you are doing, you will be arrested.”
c. Local law enforcement should be called immediately if the student, as a result of a mental
disorder, is a danger to himself, others or is gravely disabled as described in Section 5150 of
the Welfare and Institutions Code. School Safety staff should assist the site personnel in
detaining the student.
d. If the student is violently destructive to him/herself or to site personnel, assist staff in
controlling the student with the minimum use of force.
5.
If a crime has not occurred and the situation is not a law enforcement problem, the student
should be removed from the school site as quickly as possible.
6.
Site administrators are to consider the following actions:
a. Call parents or guardians to remove the child immediately.
b. If parents or guardians are unavailable or unable to respond in a reasonable period of time,
consider transporting the student to a responsible adult as soon as possible.
Several transportation options are:
1) Site personnel transports the student.
2) School Safety staff transports the student. If this option is used, site staff will
accompany School Safety personnel during the transport.
3) Law Enforcement transports the student.
7.
When the incident has been concluded, site staff will file a mandatory Incident Report with
Attendance Services.
School Safety staff will file a detailed Incident Report. If law
enforcement action has been taken, appropriate report numbers will be detailed in these reports.
Approved: _____Signature on File_________________ Date: December 20, 2001
Thomas Hickman, Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Ref: Manual Section 2.304
Page 63 of 79
9.107 Emergency Lockdown Procedure
Authority:
Education Code Section 35294 – Schools are responsible for ingress and egress.
Definitions:
Attendance Area – Geographical area where students attend school. Transportation Branch prepares
maps which show the area of student attendance for each site.
Lockdown – To “Shelter in Place” in response to an internal or external event which places students
and staff at risk of exposure to injury or death.
Perimeter – Geographical area to which an event or emergency is confined.
Receiving School – A site that has students bussed from “sending schools” in other geographical areas
of the district to attend school daily. The students are returned to their “sending schools” at the end of
the day.
Sending School – A site where busses pick up students close to their home to transport to “receiving
schools”. Students are returned to their “sending school” at the end of the school day.
I. LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES
A. School-Site Initiated
An administrator can initiate “Sheltering in Place” at any time when:
1. There is a perceived threat.
2. The site is notified of a threat.
3. There is an actual event/emergency/disaster.
B. Notification Of Lockdown Or Shelter In Place:
1. School Safety Communications Center – Ext. 8101
2. Superintendent – Ext. 8242
3. Deputy Superintendent – Ext. 8034
4. Asst. Superintendents - Elem. (x8247), Mdl. (x8100), H.S. (x8114)
5. School and Community Relations Office – Ext. 8250
6. Transportation Branch Dispatch – Ext. 1515 or 426-6176
7. Business Services Office – Ext. 1530
8. Catholic Archdioses, Area 20 – (562) 432-5946
II. AREA LOCKDOWN OF SCHOOL SITES
A. Other Agencies Who May Notify School Sites:
1. LBUSD School Safety Branch
2. Police/Sheriffs
3. Long Beach/L.A. County Fire Departments
4. Air Quality Management District
5. Other emergency service entity/agency
B. Area Lockdown Procedure
Page 64 of 79
1.
2.
3.
4.
All schools within a specific area perimeter identified.
All schools within police/sheriff geographical reporting districts.
Schools likely to be affected by conditions (i.e. down wind from haz-mat spill).
Schools in attendance area of event/emergency
a. Children who live within perimeter area
b. Children bussed into or out of perimeter area
c. Children who attend school in perimeter area
III. LOCKDOWN RESPONSIBILITY
A. School Sites Involved in Lockdown will:
1. Implement Incident Command System.
2. Protect students, staff and facilities.
3. Prepare for instructions on student security.
a. Receiving school is always responsible for the student until they reach home.
4. Prepare for instructions on student movement .
a. Receiving school may be requested to staff sending school during a lock-down event to
release students to responsible adults.
b. Receiving school may be directed to bus students out of a lockdown perimeter by the
Transportation Branch.
5. Sending schools may receive bussed students during a lockdown.
a. Students will be held until released by the Transportation Branch.
b. If additional staff is necessary, receiving schools will be contacted.
c. If further staffing is necessary, a “Safety Team” will be activated.
B. School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division will:
1. Provide communication between all agencies during lockdown.
2. Provide assistance to any agency or school site during lockdown.
3. Provide windshield survey checking all schools in lockdown area when needed.
C. Transportation Branch will:
1. Activate a Department Operations Center to coordinate student movement.
2. During a hostile moving event, busses will park and “Shelter in Place” or go to nearest
school site.
3. During a major event or disaster, the receiving school will be notified to:
a. Hold students until directed to release.
b. Release students to Transportation Branch to be bussed to sending school.
4. Kindergarten classes may be held at the receiving school until an area lockdown is cleared.
5. Advise all agencies of attendance area and bus routes.
6. Provide on-site instruction and direction and windshield surveys of situations.
Approved: ________Signature On File______________ Date: Nov. 5, 1999
Thomas Hickman, Chief of School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Ref: Manual Section 8.103
Page 65 of 79
9.108 School Site Emergency Procedure for State-3 Power Shortage Rolling Blackouts
The Long Beach Unified School District recognizes the possibility of rolling blackouts due to declared
Stage-3 Power Shortages that may impact District school sites. Every effort should be made to
continue the educational process with the primary goal being the safety of students and staff. The
following procedure should be used as a guideline to prepare for and deal with blackouts affecting
school sites.
A. School sites should do the following to prepare for possible power outages:
1. Include a contingency for a power outage in the site’s emergency plan.
2. Obtain and stockpile resources to be utilized in case of a power outage (i.e. flashlights,
battery-powered lanterns, etc.).
3. Identify areas of the site that do not benefit from ambient natural light and prepare to relocate students and staff to more suitable locations (i.e. outdoors, another classroom, etc.).
4. Identify possible communication assets to be used during a power outage (i.e. cellular
telephones, emergency suitcase radio, etc.).
5. Brief staff on contingency plan to be initiated in the event of a power outage.
6. If site is equipped with a standby generator, identify areas that will be powered.
7. Be prepared for a power outage of at least one hour in length.
B. School sites should do the following in the event of a power outage:
1. Notify School Safety Communications Center at (562) 997-8101, or ext. 8101, that a power
outage has occurred.
2. Students and staff located in areas without emergency lighting or sufficient ambient lighting
should be re-located to more suitable locations.
3. Utilize all emergency lighting assets (i.e. flashlights, battery-powered lanterns and generator,
etc.).
4. Communicate additional resource requirements to School Safety Communications Center.
Approved: ________Signature On File__________________ Date: January 11, 2001
Thomas W. Hickman, Chief of School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Ref: Manual Section 8.106
Page 66 of 79
9.111 Emergency Procedure for School-Site Shootings
RECENT
EVENTS INVOLVING SHOOTINGS ON SCHOOL CAMPUSES HAVE INCREASED AWARENESS OF THE
POTENTIAL THREAT THAT EXISTS ON EVERY SCHOOL CAMPUS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES.
ALTHOUGH THE POSSESSION OF FIREARMS ON OR AROUND OUR SCHOOLS IS RELATIVELY RARE, THE
INCREASE IN FIREARM AVAILABILITY AND THE RISE IN VIOLENCE AS A MEANS OF DEALING WITH
EVERYDAY SOCIAL PROBLEMS DICTATES THE NEED FOR A PROCEDURE TO DEAL WITH VIOLENT EVENTS OF
THIS NATURE.
A. IF A SHOOTING OCCURS:
1. CALL 911. IDENTIFY YOUR SCHOOL
ANSWER THE OPERATOR’S QUESTIONS.
SITE AND EXACT LOCATION.
REMAIN
CALM AND
STUDENTS TO DROP TO THE GROUND IMMEDIATELY, LAYING FACE DOWN AS FLAT
AS POSSIBLE. IF WITHIN 15-20 FEET OF A SAFE PLACE, COVER, DUCK AND RUN TO IT.
2. INSTRUCT
OR CRAWL AWAY FROM GUNFIRE, UTILIZING OBSTRUCTIONS BETWEEN YOU AND THE
GUNFIRE. BE AWARE THAT MANY PLACES YOU HIDE BEHIND MAY NOT BE BULLETPROOF.
3. MOVE
4. GO INSIDE OR BEHIND A BUILDING AND STAY DOWN.
YOU REACH A LOCATION OF RELATIVE SAFETY, STAY DOWN AND DO NOT MOVE.
NOT RAISE YOUR HEAD IN AN EFFORT TO SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING.
5. WHEN
DO
6. IF POSSIBLE, NOTIFY THE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL OF THE SITUATION.
7. WAIT AND LISTEN FOR DIRECTIONS FROM LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS.
B. IF SUSPECT IS OUTSIDE:
1. DUCK AND COVER. KEEP STUDENTS INSIDE THE CLASSROOM
MOVE BEHIND AVAILABLE COVER INSIDE THE CLASSROOM.
2. CLOSE
AND LOCK THE CLASSROOM DOOR IF POSSIBLE.
WINDOWS TO SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING.
DO
AND DOWN ON THE FLOOR.
NOT PEEK OUT THE DOOR OR
3. IF POSSIBLE, CALL THE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND REPORT LOCATION OF THE ASSAILANT.
Date: March 9, 2001
Approved: ______Signature On File_____________________
Thomas W. Hickman, Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Ref: Manual Section 8.110
Page 67 of 79
9.112 Guidelines for Handling Suspicious Mail
The Long Beach Unified School District, Office of the Superintendent, School Safety and Emergency
Preparedness Division has prepared the following guidelines to assist District staff in dealing with
suspicious mail received at schools or support sites. Please distribute to employees who handle
incoming mail and then place in the Appendix of the Emergency Procedures Manual (red binder.)
A. What makes a letter or package “suspicious”:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
It is from an unfamiliar or unexpected source.
It has no return address.
It is lop-sided, oddly-shaped or has an unusual weight given its size.
It is marked with restrictive endorsements not usually seen.
It has a strange odor or stains on outside of parcel.
The postmark does not match the return address.
B. If a suspicious letter or package is received :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Do not open the package or envelope.
Isolate the parcel.
Place in a plastic bag if possible.
Notify the Security Communications Center at ext. 8101.
Make a note of all people believed to have had contact with the parcel.
Prepare to follow directions from responding public safety personnel.
Any questions regarding this guideline should be directed to the School Safety and Emergency
Preparedness Division at (562) 997-8446.
Date: October 17, 2001
Approved: _______Signature On File_________
Thomas W. Hickman, Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Ref: Manual Section 8.111
Page 68 of 79
9.118 Safe School Plan Administrative Reporting
Education Code Section 35294.8 requires a public meeting prior to a school site implementing a Safe
School Plan. Senate Bill 1667 has amended Section 35294.8 to include more involved notifications to
individuals and groups. This Standard Operating Procedure will bring the Long Beach Unified School
District into compliance with SB1667 requirements.
1. The Superintendent of Schools will send letters in December of each school year to the following
groups and individuals notifying them of the time line for preparing Safe School Plans:
a. Local mayors
b. School employee organization representatives
c. Local Police, Sheriff and Fire Departments
2. Each LBUSD school will send copies of the Superintendent’s letter to the following groups or
individuals:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Representatives of each parent organization at the school site
Representatives of each teacher organization at the school site
Student body government representatives at the school site
Persons that have indicated they want to be notified to include:
1. Representatives of local churches
2. Local civic leaders
3. Representatives of local business organizations
3. The School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division will notify each school site on January 1st
of each school year of the following Safe School Reporting Requirements:
a. Schedule a public meeting to discuss the site Safe School Plans prior to implementation (March
1st of each year).
b. The meeting will be scheduled in February to comply with the March 1st timeline.
c. The agenda for the meeting, along with any minutes of the meeting, will be attached to the Safe
School Plan submitted to the School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division on March 1st
of each school year.
Page 69 of 79
4. On March 1st of each school year, the Safe School Plan will be delivered by the site to the School
Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division. A copy of the plan will be sent to the Assistant or
Deputy Superintendent of the school site.
5. The School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division will present the plans to the Board of
Education at the first regularly scheduled meeting in May of each year. The following actions will
take place:
a.
b.
c.
d.
The Board Agenda will be posted 72 hours prior to the meeting.
The Safe School Plan item will not be on the consent calendar.
All parties in Items #1 and #2 above will be notified in writing of the meeting.
The annual school site plans will be discussed at the Board Meeting. The discussion shall be
limited to three items described in Education Code Section 35294.21:
1) Assuring each pupil a safe physical environment
2) Assuring each pupil a safe, respectful, accepting and emotionally nurturing environment
3) Providing each child with resiliency skills
Approved: ______Signature on File___________________
Thomas Hickman, Chief
School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Page 70 of 79
Date: Dec. 16, 2002
9.121 Barring Disruptive Persons from School Sites (Stay-Away Letter)
The following guideline is prepared to assist site administrators in dealing with disruptive persons who
interfere with the normal course of business at school sites. Numerous laws and regulations give the
site administrator the absolute right to insist on good order on their campus. This guideline lists the
steps necessary to bar disruptive persons from the campus.
Definitions:
Common Area - A legal term that defines where routine business is conducted in the school office.
The common area would include the walkway to the office from the sidewalk and the area at the
counter in the office. The common area does not include any offices behind the counter such as the
principal, nurse or counselor’s office. This area was defined to separate a common area (the office)
from those areas where the educational process takes place (classrooms, hallways, auditoriums,
cafeterias, etc.). An officer will use different probable cause for arrests in “common areas” than that
used in “educational areas”.
Posting - A legal term requiring all schools to post certain information in a place where people can see
the posted signs from the sidewalk. Schools are required to post certain instructions, such as “behavior
that is legal on campus” and “instructions to all visitors to report to the office before conducting
business on the site”. The Maintenance Branch Paint Shop has appropriate approved signs available
for “posting”.
A. Important facts to remember are:
1. No person has the right to interfere with the orderly delivery of instruction.
2. Parents and guardians have a constitutional right to participate in the education of their
children.
3. A parent’s right is at all times tempered with the need to preserve order and tranquility at their
children’s school.
B. Parents and guardians who have been restricted from their children’s school site can only legally
remove children for the following reasons:
1. Disciplinary situations
2. Medical attention
3. Family emergencies
The restricted parents/guardians can only enter the “common area” or school office to request
release of their children. They will not be allowed in other areas of the site.
C. In all cases of conflict, the District desires a positive outcome for all parties involved. If a
parent/guardian or other person causes a systematic disruption of the educational environment, their
access onto the school site will become limited and/or restricted. Administrative authority to
restrict access is clearly identified in the California Education and Penal Codes.
Page 71 of 79
The following are general guidelines for dealing with parents/guardians who are disruptive to the
educational process on school sites. Although other individuals can be disruptive at times,
parents/guardians usually cause the most problems.
1.
When staff reports that a person is disruptive to the educational environment, that person
should be immediately escorted to the school office. The school office is considered a
“common area” where public business is conducted. An administrator will talk to the
reported offender to determine if a productive solution can be found for the problem. The
school’s “Visitor Log-In Book” should be checked to see if the individual signed in. If not,
the disruptive person will be informed that all visitors to the campus are legally required
to report to the office prior to entering the campus for any reason. This discussion should
be conducted as firmly as possible to convince the person that any disruption will not be
tolerated.
In all cases, if the disruption is extreme or involves any threat of violence, the School Safety
Division Communications Center should be called immediately at extension 8101. Also, if
appropriate, call local law enforcement at 911. An Incident Report about the problem will
be filed by the site administrator.
2.
If the situation is not resolved on the first encounter, documentation will be prepared to
track the problem behavior. This documentation is essential should the problem escalate
and enforcement action (an arrest) is necessary. The administrator will consider some of
the following steps as he/she attempts to resolve the problem.
a. Meet with the parent/guardian and school staff and attempt to resolve the problem. Set
up a specific set of guidelines to govern behaviors while the person is on campus.
b. Consult with the School Safety Division regarding the behaviors exhibited by the
disruptive person. By making the School Safety Division aware of the situation, it helps
guarantee a more rapid response if there are continuing problems.
c. Send a “stay away letter”, or legally described “626 letter”, which is designed to
require a meeting prior to the disruptive person being allowed back on the school site.
A sample of this letter is attached to this S.O.P. Send copies to the Superintendent,
appropriate Deputy/Assistant Superintendent, Legal Services Advisor and Chief of
School Safety. The meeting required in the “626 letter” process accomplishes the
following objectives:
(1) Requires the person to always report to the office, sign in and contact an
administrator prior to conducting business at the site. Remember the office is a
“common area” for conducting business.
(2) Forbids the person from going directly to a classroom or playground without being
escorted.
(3) Discusses the specifics of the person’s disruptive behavior and advises them that
they can be arrested for violations of Section 626 of the Penal Code.
(4) In cases of extremely disruptive behavior, a monitor from the School Safety
Division may be assigned to assist the disruptive person with their interaction at the
school site.
(5) The 626 letter is canceled in 14 days. This legal mandate does not relieve the
disruptive person receiving the letter from obeying some fundamental rules and
conditions of access after the 14 days. These would include:
Page 72 of 79
(a) Required reporting to the office or “common area” to sign in prior to conducting
business on site.
(b) Calling and making an appointment prior to arriving on site.
(c) Never going directly to a classroom or playground without an escort. Remember
outside of the office is not a “common area”. Thus, a
classroom or auditorium is not a “common area” and the offender can be
forbidden access to this area.
(d) All behavior while at the school site must be appropriate as defined by the site
administration.
(6) The 626 letter is one of the last efforts made by staff to avoid possible stricter
enforcement action (arrest).
3.
If all efforts have been unable to resolve the behavior, then the appropriate Assistant/Deputy
Superintendent Office should be notified. The Legal Services Office should be contacted
only with prior approval of the Assistant/Deputy Superintendent.
Please consult with the School Safety and Emergency Preparedness Division at ext. 8203 for further
assistance and/or information.
The following California Code Sections will help you evaluate the extent of your authority when
dealing with a disruptive person.
Education Code:
32210 – Disturbing schools
32211 – Trespassing (school access)
44810 – Person on school grounds, 16 or older, willful interference
Penal Code:
415 – Fighting, noise, use of offensive words (challenging to fight)
415.5 – Disturbance of peace of school
626.2 – Unauthorized entry, dismissed employee or student
626.6 – Committing an act likely to interfere with peaceful activities
626.7 – Failure to leave campus, wrongful return penalties (Revised 1/2004)
627.4 – Refusal or revocation (allows admin. to refuse access)
627.7 – Misdemeanor, to refuse to leave on request
Approved:
________Signature on File___________________ Revision Date: 6/28/2005
Thomas Hickman, Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Page 73 of 79
SAMPLE “626” LETTER
(This letter is in digital format. If you need a digital copy, call School Safety at 997-8205 and it will be sent to you via
electronic mail.)
Your School Logo
School Address
(Date)
Certified U.S. Mail
Return Receipt
Requested
(Name of Person Causing Disruption)
(Address)
(City, State, Zip Code)
Re:
Disruptive Conduct at _____________ School on _________ (Date)
Dear _________________________ of ______________________,
Disruptive Parent/Person
Name(s) of Student(s)
On (date and time of disruption), your actions disrupted the educational environment of (name of
school). You were (describe as specifically as possible):
1. Rude and annoying during a phone call (describe behavior/language on phone).
2. Rude, loud and disrespectful on the campus (describe behavior/language). (Remember
“common area” definition. Probable cause for arrest is different in the “common area”.)
3. Using vulgar unacceptable language to students and staff (describe).
4. Confrontational and challenged people to fight with you (describe).
5. Slammed doors or caused damage to the site and LBUSD property (describe).
6. Appeared to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
Your conduct is a continuation of incidents which are unacceptable for the peaceful educational
environment of (name of school). School administrators have attempted to assist you with resolving
the problems. However, your conduct has reached a point where it can no longer be tolerated.
Students and staff have witnessed and feel threatened by your behavior.
Based on the above information, I am withdrawing your permission to be unsupervised while at (name
of school). Until further notice, you will be required to report to the office and to be accompanied by
school staff while at (name of school). I will meet with you to discuss this matter. Please make an
appointment by calling the school secretary at (school phone number) to meet with me to discuss this
matter.
Hopefully, a resolution can be reached to stop your disruptive behavior and allow you normal access to
(name of school). This is in the best interest of both you and your children.
Page 74 of 79
Should you choose to violate this notice, you will be subject to criminal charges which may be
filed under California Penal Code Sections 415.5 and 626, et seq. These charges could result in
your arrest for violations of the Penal Code.
Sincerely,
School Principal
c: Superintendent
Assistant Superintendent (Elem. or Mdl. & K-8)
Legal Services Advisor
Chief of School Safety
Page 75 of 79
9.123 Report of Assault on School Employer by Student
A. A school district employee who is assaulted by a student must do the following as soon as possible:
1. Report the incident to the school principal or site administrator.
2. Call the LBUSD School Safety Communications Center at ext. 8101.
3. Call their local law enforcement agency (phone numbers are listed below).
B.
Education Code Section 44014 (a) states in part that “Whenever any employee of a school
district...is attacked, assaulted or physically threatened by any pupil, it shall be the duty of the
employee, and the duty of any person under whose direction or supervision the employee is
employed...who has knowledge of the incident, to promptly report the incident to the appropriate
law enforcement authorities of the county or city in which the incident occurred. Failure to make
the report shall be an infraction punishable by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars
($1,000.00).”
C. The report to law enforcement is mandatory. Compliance with school procedures does not exempt
a person from making a report to the local law enforcement. No sanctions shall be taken against
any employee for reporting the incident. It is a misdemeanor for any school district employee to
impede the making of such a report. Whether or not the employee presses charges is a separate
issue to be decided by the employee.
D. The appropriate law enforcement agency to be called is based on the location of the incident, as
follows:
Long Beach (562) 435-6711
Lakewood
(562) 866-9061
Signal Hill (562) 436-7311
Avalon
(310) 510-0174
Approved: ____Signature on File__________________ Date: ____3-12-2004_____
Thomas Hickman, Chief School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Page 76 of 79
9.129 Request for Intervention
I. Form
The "Request for Intervention" form is used to request service from School Safety Staff for
various reasons (see attached sample form). This form replaces the 3-part Request for Counseling
(RC) form used in the past.
To request the form in digital format, call School Safety at ext. 8429 or email a request to
[email protected] The form will be sent by email.
II. Submittal Procedure
Schools can submit the “Request for Intervention” form the following four ways:
A. Complete the form in digital format and e-mail
[email protected] (recommended method).
it
as
an
attachment
to
B. Complete the digital form, print a copy and send it in the “school mail" to School Safety
Division – Los Coyotes Site.
C. Complete the digital form and give it to the Field Assistant assigned to your school site and it
will be delivered to School Safety.
D. Complete the digital form, print a copy and fax it to the School Safety Division at (562) 4946390.
III. Task Assignment
A hard copy of the form will be given to the appropriate School Safety staff member. The School
Safety staff member will complete the requested assignment and provide feedback to the
initiating person/school site. A copy of the completed "Request for Intervention" form will be
returned to the initiating person/site with results and recommendations.
Approved: ______Signature on File___ _______ Revised Date: _ January 29, 2008__
Thomas W. Hickman, Chief of School Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Page 77 of 79
REQUEST FOR INTERVENTION
Service Requested
Address Verification
SARB Subpoena
RIA Packet Delivery
Truancy Check
SARB Hearing Translation (SP)
SARB Hearing Translation (CAM)
Expulsion Hearing Translation (SP)
Expulsion Hearing Translation (CAM)
#
Student Name:
Student ID #:
Sex:
Birth-date:
Address:
Apt.:
Zip:
Phone:
Parent Name:
Guardian Name:
Does student reside w/parent?
School:
Grade:
Last
Middle
Initial
First
Ethnicity:
Yes
No
Track:
Yes
RSP
LD
ED
No
Special Ed.
If yes, has an “Individualized Education Plan” (I.E.P.) been completed?
No
Yes
Requested By:
Primary Language:
Date of Request:
Current
Absences:
Total
Absences:
Total
Tardies:
Reason for Request:
Action Taken by School:
Page 78 of 79
Last School Attended:
Student’s Last Address:
Who did student
reside with at this location?
Siblings Under Age 18:
Name:
Address:
City:
City:
Name
School
Zip:
Zip:
Grade
Person Interviewed, Findings
and Recommendations:
Assigned To:
Investigation Completed:
Time Spent on Investigation:
Investigation Forwarded To:
Supervisor Approval:
Yes
No
Person:
Site:
Attach site print-out of Absences/Tardies
Page 79 of 79
ID#
Date:
Date:
Date:
Date:
DOB
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement