2015 - 2016 Rend Lake College Catalog

2015 - 2016 Rend Lake College Catalog
Rend Lake College
468 N Ken Gray Pkwy
Ina, IL 62846
Telephone (618) 437-5321
Toll-free (In-district only) 1-800-369-5321
Fax (618) 437-5677
Visit us online at www.rlc.edu.
View our updated catalog and explore the
opportunities awaiting you at Rend Lake College!
ESTABLISHED 1967
(Originally founded – Mt. Vernon Community College, 1955)
ACCREDITATION
Higher Learning Commission
(Rend Lake College received the maximum 10-year accreditation for the third time in a row following the
most recent HLC evaluation, held in November 2008. The college has been accredited by HLC since 1969.)
Higher Learning Commission
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
http://hlcommission.org
Phone
(312) 263-0456
Toll-free 1-800-621-7440
Fax
(312) 263-7462
APPROVAL
Illinois Community College Board
Illinois Board of Higher Education
Illinois Approval Agency for Training of Veterans / War Orphans
Illinois Department of Professional Regulations
LISTING
Part III (Higher Education) of the Educational Directory,
Published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare
Published by the
Board of Trustees, Community College District 521 / January, 2015
NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY
Rend Lake College, as an equal opportunity / affirmative
action employer in compliance with applicable federal and
state laws regarding affirmative action, nondiscrimination
and anti-harassment, and in its commitment to promote an
environment that extends equal opportunity to all persons,
does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, religion,
national origin, sex (including pregnancy and parenting status),
disability, age, veteran status, sexual orientation, marital status
or genetic information or other legally protected status in its
programs or activities, including employment, admissions
and educational programs. It is Rend Lake College’s intent for
all persons to have the same opportunity to obtain the same
high-quality education and / or training.
Inquiries may be directed thusly:
• From students & staff:
Kim Rogers, Affirmative Action Officer
Administration Building, Room 138 – Ext. 1201
and / or
Chad Copple, Affirmative Action Officer
Administration Building, Room 118 – Ext. 1237
• Re: Americans with Disabilities Act
Susan Cunningham, Section 504 Coordinator / Title II
North Oasis, Room 130 – Ext. 1204
• Title IX
Lisa Price, Vice President of Student Services
Administration Building, Room 110 – Ext. 1205
On the Cover: RLC students, FROM LEFT, Nick Jones of Mt. Vernon, Devin Riley of Salem, Josh Moyer of Mt. Vernon,
Kortnie Bailey of Coello, Savannah Prince of McLeansboro, Christine South of Enfield, Lillian King of Joliet, Devin
Howton of McLeansboro, and Will Timpner of Pinckneyville.
COLLEGE MISSION
PHILOSOPHY:
Rend Lake College’s philosophy outlines the manner in which the college fulfills
its mission:
The college is committed to offering programs and services of the highest
quality that are affordable to its constituents. The college will maintain a
student-friendly atmosphere, making its services as accessible as possible.
Courses and programs offered by the college will be transferable or lead
to attractive employment opportunities. The college will provide these
programs and services in an effective manner while maintaining financial
responsibility.
MISSION:
The mission statement is the essential purpose of the college from which all
college activities originate:
Rend Lake College provides educational opportunities across cultural and
economic boundaries to the diverse student population that we serve. In
addition to our commitment to fulfill all our education and communityfocused program objectives, we are committed to every degree-completing
student demonstrating the fundamental skills of effective critical thinking,
problem-solving, oral communication, and written communication. In
fulfilling its mission, Rend Lake College will be an active leader in our
region’s development. Our students’ success is our own success.
INSTITUTIONAL OUTCOMES:
Rend Lake College has adopted four essential learner outcomes, fundamental
learning objectives embedded in every program of study, that all degreecompleting students should be able to demonstrate. They are as follows:
Critical Thinking: Demonstrate the ability to think in a self-directed,
reflective manner when understanding, evaluating and solving problems.
Problem-Solving: Demonstrate the ability to resolve computational
problems.
Oral Communication: Demonstrate the ability to communicate clearly,
concisely, and effectively through verbal and non-verbal language.
Written Communication: Demonstrate the ability to communicate clearly,
concisely, and effectively through written language.
STATEMENT ON GENERAL EDUCATION
To be educated and worthy of a diploma is not only a mastery of one discipline
area or technical skill, but also includes learning a broad range of knowledge
and skill sets. General Education is one way in which students prepare
to function in a diverse and changing world. Upon graduation, a degreecompleting student will be expected to demonstrate the competencies
outlined in the college’s mission and by the student’s respective program
outcomes as well as the following:
• Knowledge – It is important for students to have a knowledge base from
a variety of disciplines. In addition to demonstrating an understanding
of the fundamental concepts and vocabulary of their specific programs,
degree-completing students will demonstrate basic and broad knowledge of
science, social science, math and the arts.
• Skills – With a broad-based knowledge, students should have specific
skills. In addition to the institutional outcomes of effective oral and written
communication, problem-solving and critical thinking skills, degreecompleting students will demonstrate an understanding of the modes of
discovery, cooperate as a member of a team to complete assignments and
use applicable technology proficiently.
WHO WE ARE
The college history and other background documents define the college
from the perspective of organization and assets; however, the personnel
that operate within the college systems and manage those assets are the
primary element for successful education. Rend Lake College believes that
all employees, regardless of their job description, are part of each student’s
education. Administrative, community outreach, student service, and
physical plant personnel all support the student learning process. More
than 65 full-time, 160 part-time, and 85 dual-credit instructors are primary
points of contact with the Rend Lake College educational experience. These
educators are generally organized into five divisions: Allied Health; Applied
Science & Technology; Community & Corporate Education; Liberal Arts;
and Math & Sciences. Whether in a supporting role or as a direct point
of contact, each college employee draws upon professional expertise and
academic accomplishment in the hope of success for every student.
WHO WE SERVE
Student-centered colleges are best defined by who they serve. An
understanding of the distinctiveness of our college’s student population
allows us to effectively meet the goals of our programs and succeed in our
mission.
Diversity of Culture
Traditionally, Rend Lake College can be characterized as serving a
relatively homogenous rural, small-town culture. This population’s cultural
distinctiveness was centered on age and socioeconomic status more than
diverse ethnic origin. As Rend Lake College has broadened its programs
and the mobility of Americans has diversified the ethnic origin of district
students, the college recognizes that many cultural distinctions are found in
our student population:
• Age
• Race/ethnicity
• Socioeconomic status
•Gender
• Disability
Diversity of Purpose
Rend Lake College provides general education to traditional and nontraditional students who will transfer to universities after their first two
years. We provide training to those wishing to learn a skill or trade that
will ensure gainful employment and economic success. We also serve those
wishing to find personal fulfillment and growth by taking community and
general education classes at Rend Lake College. Often, a student’s purpose
for attending is a combination of all of these:
• General Education, Transfer
• Community Education
• Career-Technical Transfer, Certification, and Retraining
• Personal Growth
Diversity of Origin
The majority of the student population we serve is comprised of in-district,
on-campus traditional and non-traditional students; however, reciprocal
agreements, state-wide educational programs, expansion of our dual-credit
high school classes and international recruitment in our athletic programs
have increased the scope of origin of our students:
• In-District High School Dual Credit
• Out-Of-District •International
• Traditional
• Special Populations
COMMON OUTCOME
Regardless of the diverse cultural backgrounds, purposes and origins of
our students, Rend Lake College serves each student equally with its open
admission policy and an equal opportunity for success. Furthermore, the
shared commitment by student, faculty and staff to meet all the expected
institutional, general education and program objectives unifies all those that
Rend Lake College serves.
• Values – In an evolving global society, students will benefit from the
ability to formulate their own values while remaining open-minded to the
views of others. Degree-completing students will demonstrate an awareness
of a wide range of perspectives as well as have opportunities to appreciate
and understand the fine arts and to explore individual values in a multicultural world.
1
GETTING STARTED
Enrolling in a degree or certificate program at Rend Lake College is simple.
1. Apply for Admission
Complete a New Student Enrollment Form,
available online at www.rlc.edu/application,
at the RLC Office of Student Records or at
in-district high school counselors’ offices.
Submit other documentation as required in
the Registration Procedures section of this
catalog.
2. Speak to an Advisor
Make an appointment in the Academic
Advisement Center to discuss career
development, educational planning, class
scheduling and more.
2
3. Apply for Financial Aid
Complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available online
at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Rend Lake College’s
school code is 007119. Alternatively, arrange
for payment by enrolling in the FACTS Tuition
Management Plan or by making full payment
by established deadlines.
For complete details on how to enroll at Rend
Lake College, visit www.rlc.edu/admissions,
see the Registration Procedures section of this
catalog or contact the Office of Student Records.
CONNECT WITH US!
COME IN & SEE US!
VISIT US ONLINE!
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon-Thurs
8 a.m.-4 p.m. Fri
8 a.m.-4 p.m. Weekdays
during Summer
See our social media sites:
Office hours are:
www.rlc.edu
OUR CAMPUSES
CALL US!
Main Campus, Ina • 618-437-5321
618-437-5321
EMAIL US!
RLC Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus
618-357-3742
RLC MarketPlace, Mt. Vernon
618-244-9525
[email protected]
Rend Lake College
468 N. Ken Gray Pkwy
Ina, IL 62846
3
CONTENTS
Subject
Page
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
College Mission Documents
1
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Getting Started
2
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Connect With Us
3
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Welcome Letter from President Terry Wilkerson
5
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Academic Calendar ~ 2015-2016
6
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Board of Trustees / Administration
7
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Important Phone Numbers
8
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Rend Lake College District / Campus Access Map
9
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Illinois Community College System
10
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The College
11
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Campus Map • College District • Disclaimers • Weather-Related College Closings • The Campus • Rend Lake College
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
History • Rend Lake College Foundation • Endowed Scholarships • Divisions • Off-Campus Credit Classes • Center
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
for Community and Corporate Education • Small Business Development Center • Distance Learning • Adult
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Education & Literacy Programs
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Higher One
20
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Getting Started
21
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Admission Requirements • District Residency • Registration Procedures • Tuition • Fees • Refunds • Diploma and
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Certificate Application Process • Graduation Ceremony • Directory Information • Access to Records • Disclosure of
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Student Information to Parents
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Financial Aid
30
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Student Financial Aid • Types • Loans • Student Employment • RLC Tuition Waivers • Hope Credit • Financial Aid
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Satisfactory Progress Policy • Return of Funds
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Student Services and Activities
33
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Academic Advisement Center • Annual Security Report • Campus Security & Emergency Response •
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Communications Lab • Dining Services • Disability Access • Land of Lincoln AmeriCorps • Learning Enhancement
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Center • Learning Resource Center • Medical & Health Services • Parking • Perkins • RLC Foundation Children’s
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Center • Retail Store • Smoking Policy • STARS • Textbook Rental • Tutoring • Upward Bound • Wireless Emergency
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Notification System • Writing Center • Student Rights and Responsibilities • Student Activities • Recreation Areas •
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Performing Arts • Intercollegiate Athletics
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Academic Information and Policies
41
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interdistrict Comprehensive Agreement Regarding the Expansion of Educational Resources • Reciprocal
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Instructional Program Agreements • Chargeback Tuition • Types of Credit • Dual Credit / Dual Enrollment •
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Programs of Study • First-Year Experience • Academic Policies • Student Classifications • Attendance • Grade Reports
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
• Grading System • GPA • Incompletes • Grade Forgiveness • Withdrawal • Adding / Dropping Courses • Repeating
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
a Course • Overload • Auditing Courses • Pass-Fail Option • College Prep • Good Standing • Transcripts • Academic
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Honors • Academic Probation • Academic Suspension • Transfer Credit • Transfer from Rend Lake College • Illinois
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Articulation Initiative • Illinois Course Applicability System
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Program Requirements
49
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Degree Admissions and Graduation Requirements – AA / AS / AFA / AES • Guarantee of Educational Quality
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Control – AA / AS / AFA / AES • Program Requirements – Associate in Applied Science Degree • Graduation
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Requirements – AAS • Guarantee of Educational Quality Control – Career / Occupational Programs • Program
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Requirements – Career / Occupational Certificates • Graduation Requirement – Occupational Certificates
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Associate Degree Graduation Worksheets
57
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Degree and Certificate Programs
71
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Baccalaureate-Transfer Programs / Career-Technical Programs • Program Outlines by Page Number • Faculty
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Contacts for Programs
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Program Outlines
75
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Course Descriptions
121
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Types of Course Credit / Course Numbering System
122
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Recommended Course Selection Guide for Developmental Students
177
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Faculty and Staff Directory
179
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Index
186
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
4
WELCOME
From Terry Wilkerson,
President of Rend Lake College . . .
Rend Lake College is the place thousands of people turn to each year to
lay the foundation for their future, whether that means continuing on to
a four-year university or getting out into the working world. We’re here to
make sure your journey starts well.
We are the most affordable path to a higher education when compared
to the larger institutions around us, and that is by design. Community
colleges were created to be “commuter colleges,” institutions of higher
learning within driving distance of home. Rend Lake College continues to
uphold its goal of providing affordable, accessible higher education to the
residents of our district.
We have made strides in making higher education more accessible with the continued development of online
and hybrid courses, better suited to students needing flexible class schedules. Our satellite campuses in Mt.
Vernon and Pinckneyville offer additional options for residents of those areas. Most of our students receive
financial aid in some form as well, whether it is grants, scholarships or loans.
It’s proven that a community college education is both an investment and a savings for those who set aside
time to earn a degree or certificate. The rate of return on that investment is well worth it. Graduates enjoy
greater lifetime earnings, and RLC students perform better academically than students who go directly to a
four-year institution.
If the idea of enrolling in college seems a little intimidating, don’t worry. We have the staff and faculty to
help you along the way, and you are likely to find a friend in much the same circumstances as you, whether
you are a young person taking your first steps after high school or a nontraditional student looking for a
fresh start.
As I’ve said before, you’re not a number to us. We want you here, and we welcome you to Rend Lake College.
Your journey starts here.
Terry Wilkerson
President
5
ACADEMIC
CALENDAR
2015-2016
FALL SEMESTER 2015
Jan. 8
Student Learning Day (Faculty)
Jan. 11
First Day of Classes
Jan. 18
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Jan. 22
Last Day to Drop Classes with a Refund
Feb. 11
First Day to File for Student Trustee
Candidate
Feb. 15
Presidents’ Holiday
Feb. 16
Faculty / Staff In-Service (No classes day or
night, on- or off-campus)
Feb. 19
Last Day to File for Student Trustee
Candidacy
Feb. 25
Last Day to Withdraw as Candidate for
Student Trustee
Feb. 27
Student Trustee Ballots Ready for
Inspection
Feb. 28
Scholarship Applications Due
March 2
Student Trustee Absentee Voting
March 3 & 4
Student Trustee Elections
July 31 /
Aug. 7 /
Aug. 15
Warrior Days Orientation Workshops
Aug. 12
Faculty Prep Day
Aug. 13
Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Aug. 14
Student Learning Day (Faculty)
Aug. 17
First Day of Classes
Aug. 28
Last Day to Drop Classes with a Refund
March 4
Midterm
Sept. 4
Fall 2015 Graduation Application
Deadline
March 7-11
Spring Break (offices open Monday-Friday)
March 18
Sept. 7
Labor Day Holiday
Grant & Scholarship Refund Checks
Issued
Sept. 16
Fun Fest (No classes from Noon-3 pm;
morning and night classes will meet)
March 25-26
Good Friday Holiday
April 15
Last Day to Drop Classes
Oct. 9
Midterm
May 6
Oct. 12
Columbus Day Holiday / Faculty & Staff
In-Service
Summer 2016 Graduation Application
Deadline
May 6
Last Day of Regular Classes
Oct. 23
Grant & Scholarship Refund Checks
Issued
May 9-12
Semester Exams
May 14
Commencement
Nov. 11
Veterans Day Holiday
May 15
Nov. 13
Last Day to Drop Classes
Deadline for Summer Term Payments
Before Purge
Nov. 25-29
Thanksgiving Holiday
Dec. 4
Spring 2016 Graduation Application
Deadline
Last Day of Regular Classes
SUMMER TERM 2016
June 6
First Day of Classes
June 10
Last Day to Drop Summer Classes with a
Refund
Dec. 7-10
Semester Exams
Dec. 15
Deadline for Spring Semester Payments
Before Purge
July 1
Midterm
Dec. 24-Jan. 4
Holiday Break (offices closed)
July 4
Independence Day
July 8
Grant & Scholarship Refund Checks
Issued
July 15
Deadline for Fall Semester Payments
Before Purge
July 15
Last Day to Drop Classes
July 29
Last Day of Classes
INTERSESSION
Dec. 14-Jan. 15 Five-Week Intersession (On-line Classes
and Telecourses only)
6
SPRING SEMESTER 2016
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
ERIC BLACK
Chair
Mt. Vernon
2011-2015
DR. DAVID ASBERY
Mt. Vernon
2013-2015
RANDY RUBENACKER
Vice Chair
McLeansboro 2011-2017
RANDALL CROCKER
Sesser2013-2015
JOHN KABAT
Secretary
Scheller2011-2017
LARRY MANNING
Belle Rive
2013-2019
RICK MARLOW
ICCTA Representative
Mt. Vernon 2009-2017
ELI LISKE
Student Trustee
Sesser2014-2015
ADMINISTRATION
TERRY WILKERSON
ANGIE KISTNER
President
CHRISTINA KUBERSKI
Vice President of
Finance & Administration
LISA PRICE
Vice President of
Student Services
Vice President of
Academic Instruction
ANDREA WITTHOFT
Vice President of
Institutional Effectiveness
7
IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Dial 618-437-5321 + Extension
Enrollment Services
Student Records.................................................................................................................. Kelly Downes, Director of Student Records / Registrar
Tyson Ellis, Records Specialist (Ext. 1230)...................................................................................................................Abbi Kash, Records Specialist
Graduation Applications / Diplomas................................................................................ Kelly Downes, Director of Student Records / Registrar
Academic Advisement / Testing
Tony Etnier, Academic Advisor (Ext. 1282).............................................................................................. Jordan Hicks, Academic Advisor
Jena Jensik, Academic Advisor (Ext. 1293)............................................................... Charlotte Loquasto, Testing & Placement Specialist
........................................................................................................................................................................ Beth Stevens, Records Specialist
Office of Financial Aid........................................................................................................................................................ Cheri Rushing, Director
Amy Epplin, Financial Aid Specialist (Ext. 1386)............................................................................ April McCormick, Financial Aid Specialist
...................................................................................................................................Rachel Sveda, Financial Aid & Admissions Coordinator
(Ext. 1361)
(Ext. 1268)
(Ext. 1266)
(Ext. 1238)
(Ext. 1297)
(Ext. 1298)
Administrative Offices
President.........................................................................................................................................................................Terry Wilkerson, President
......................................................................................................................................... Mary Cornett, Executive Assistant to the President
Instruction................................................................................................................ Christina Kuberski, Vice President of Academic Instruction
...............................................................................................Jean Huie, Executive Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Instruction
Student Services................................................................................................................................. Lisa Price, Vice President of Student Services
Institutional Effectiveness.......................................................................................Andrea Witthoft, Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness
Business and Finance............................................................................................. Angie Kistner, Vice President of Finance and Administration
....................................................................................................................................................................................Wendy Smith, Controller
Rend Lake College Foundation / Scholarships......................................................................................... Shawna Bullard, Chief Executive Officer
Caitlin Keele, Scholarship Coordinator (Ext. 1213)...................................................................................Keeli LeVart, Assistant Director
(Ext. 1242)
(Ext. 1243)
(Ext. 1264)
(Ext. 1247)
(Ext. 1205)
(Ext. 1277)
(Ext. 1221)
(Ext. 1216)
(Ext. 1214)
(Ext. 1324)
(Ext. 1327)
(Ext. 1233)
(Ext. 1327)
Academic Divisions
Allied Health..............................................................................................................................Kim Robert, Dean / Title III Project Manager (Ext. 1775)
Applied Science and Technology...................................................................................................................................... Chris Nielsen, Dean (Ext. 1292)
..................................................................................................................................................................... Joy Fitts, Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1261)
Community & Corporate Education................................................................................................................................ Lori Ragland, Dean (Ext. 1367)
.......................................................................................................................................................Stephanie Smith, Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1714)
Liberal Arts.........................................................................................................................................................Henry “Buster” Leeck, Dean (Ext. 1790)
......................................................................................................................................................... Jessica Phillips, Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1263)
Math & Sciences............................................................................................................................................................ Andrea Banach, Dean (Ext. 1258)
......................................................................................................................................................... Arvella Waugh, Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1288)
Adult Education and Literacy / GED® Classes........................................................................................................Christina Hutcheson, Director (Ext. 1220)
Aquatics Center...........................................................................................................................................................Laura Johnston, Coordinator (Ext. 1207)
Athletics......................................................................................................................................................................... Tim Wills, Athletic Director (Ext. 1270)
..............................................................................................................................................................Julie Oxford, Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1250)
Cooperative Education / Employment Services........................................................Erin Morris, Community & Corporate Education Specialist (Ext. 1380)
Distance Learning / Media Technology.......................................................................................................Nathan Burkitt, Computer Technician (Ext. 1344)
Information Technology............................................................................................................................................................................... Help Desk (Ext. 1259)
Learning Enhancement....................................................................................................... Sue Cunningham, Learning Enhancement Specialist (Ext. 1204)
Library Services................................................................................................................................................ Beth Mandrell, Reference Librarian (Ext. 1276)
.................................................................................................................Sandy West, Tech Services / Collection Development Coordinator (Ext. 1249)
Real Estate..................................................................................................................Lori Ragland, Dean of Community & Corporate Education (Ext. 1367)
Recruitment.......................................................................................................... Jason Swann, Dean of Admissions & Enrollment Management (Ext. 1265)
RLC Foundation Children’s Center..........................................................................................................................................Brooke May, Director (Ext. 1393)
RLC MarketPlace (Mt. Vernon Campus).......................................................................................................................... Corey Phillips, Director (Ext. 2003)
RLC Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus.........................................................................................................Heather Bauersachs, Coordinator (Ext. 3001)
Security.........................................................................................................................................................................................Gary McGill, Chief (Ext. 1212)
STARS Program.................................................................................................................................................................. Leah Stallman, Director (Ext. 1366)
Amy Cook, STARS Advisor (Ext. 1720)....................................................................................................................... Megan Rounds, STARS Advisor (Ext. 1326)
................................................................................................................ Marcia Whitehead, Program Specialist / Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1236)
Textbook Sales & Rental / Retail Store................................................................................................................................. Casey Rhine, Manager (Ext. 1281)
Truck Driver Training............................................................................................................................................................Erin Morris, Specialist (Ext. 1380)
Upward Bound Grant Program.......................................................................................................................................... Leah Stallman, Director (Ext. 1366)
Beth Hoffman, Student Advisor (Ext. 1219)..............................................................................................Deidra Traylor, Student Advisor (Ext. 1365)
................................................................................................................ Marcia Whitehead, Program Specialist / Administrative Assistant (Ext. 1236)
8
REND LAKE COLLEGE
COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT 521
WEBBER
TWP.
WOODLAWN
WAYNE CITY
MT. VERNON
WALTONVILLE
REND
LAKE
COLLEGE
– Ina, IL
PINCKNEYVILLE
SESSERVALIER
McLEANSBORO
N.C.O.E.
(ENFIELD)
BENTON
CHRISTOPHER
THOMPSONVILLE
ZEIGLERROYALTON
(Community College District 521 includes all
or parts of eight counties – Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, Perry, Washington, Wayne,
White and Williamson – and the 13 public
high school districts indicated)
Rend Lake College
MarketPlace
321 Potomac Blvd (north of
Holiday Inn) / MT. VERNON

CAMPUS ACCESS MAP
Rend Lake College

468 N. Ken Gray Pkwy / INA
Rend
Lake
Resort

Rt. 51
RLC Murphy-Wall
Pinckneyvville Campus
5680 State Route 154 / PINCKNEYVILLE
9
ILLINOIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM
One year after
graduation, Illinois’
community college
occupational graduates
averaged a full-time
salary of $36,420 in
2012.
America’s oldest public
community college was established
in Joliet, Illinois, in 1901.
Today there are 48 community
colleges and 39 college districts
in Illinois alone.
The average tuition
and fees are only
$3,570 a year at
Illinois community
colleges.
Nearly 74 percent of
Illinois employers
have hired a
community college
student over the last
12 years, and more
than 26 percent of
Illinois employees
have completed a
credit course at a
community college
in that same time
period.
Earning an associate
degree from an Illinois
community college adds
$570,000 in lifetime
earnings; taking just one
course adds $264 per
credit hour per year.
Illinois community
colleges serve nearly
1 million students
each year.
More than two-thirds
(68%) of all minorities
in Illinois public
higher education
attend community
colleges, and nearly
15,000 students
with disabilities
and 62,000 students
with limited English
proficiency are served
each year.
The “typical” Illinois community
college student is female, white,
27 years old, enrolled part-time,
and preparing for transfer to a
four-year institution.
Illinois was the first state in the nation to “guarantee”
its community college occupational graduates; those
graduates who need additional technical training
may enroll in the appropriate courses at no cost to
themselves or their employers.
• www.iccb.org
10
Nine out of 10 Illinois community college
graduates live, work, pay taxes, and raise
their families in Illinois.
REND LAKE COLLEGE
CAMPUS MAP
TO INA AND MT. VERNON

12
N
Parking
1. Dr. Allen Y. Baker Administration Building
2. Student Center (STC)
3. South Oasis (SO)
4. James “Hummer” Waugh Gymnasium (GYM)
5. Aquatics Center (AQU)
6. Science Building (SCI)
7. Academic Building (ACA)
8. Learning Resource Center (LRC)
9. Theatre (THEA)
10. North Oasis (NO)
13
11. Vocational Building (VOC)
12. One-Room “Independence” Schoolhouse
10
11
9
8
Parking
7
Parking
18
6
3
2
17
4
14
15
5
1
24
TO BENTON
16
Parking
23
19
13. RLC Foundation Children’s Center
14. Maintenance Building
15. Advanced Technology Center (ATC)
16. Mark S. Kern Applied Science Center (ASC)
17. Coal Mine Training Center (CMTC)
18. Mine Rescue / Fire Training Facility
19. Aquaculture Pond
20. Track / Soccer Field
21. RLC Recreational Center
22. Baseball Field
23. Softball Field
24. Volleyball Court
12
20
21
22
Parking
TO WAYNE FITZGERRELL STATE
PARK & REND LAKE RESORT
COLLEGE DISTRICT
DISCLAIMERS
The Rend Lake College district, officially known as
Community College District No. 521, came into existence July
1, 1967. The district takes in parts of eight counties, including
the major portion of Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson and Perry
counties. Large areas of Wayne and White counties also are
included, as are very small, unpopulated portions of Washington
and Williamson counties.
Within this area are more than 50,000 households and 13
public high schools served by the college – Benton Consolidated
High School, Christopher High School, Hamilton County Senior
High School, Mt. Vernon Township High School, Norris CityOmaha-Enfield High School, Pinckneyville Community High
School, Sesser-Valier High School, Thompsonville Community
High School, Waltonville High School, Wayne City High School,
Webber Township High School, Woodlawn Community High
School and Zeigler-Royalton High School. The district covers
a total of 1,850 square miles, which represents the 11th-largest
district statewide in terms of area covered.
The population of this area was approximately 90,394 in 2010,
according to the Illinois Community College Board’s summary
profile of all Illinois community colleges. Rend Lake College is
the sixth-smallest district statewide in terms of population, and
has a tax base of equalized assessed valuation of $846,478,346.
The district includes one city with a population greater than
7,500 and eight communities with more than 1,000 residents; i.e.,
approximately half of the district’s residents live in rural settings
or small, unincorporated communities.
This catalog is published for informational purposes. The
Board of Trustees reserves the right to allow changes to any of the
rules and regulations of Rend Lake College at any time, including
those relating to admission, instruction and graduation. The right
to withdraw curricula and specific courses, alter course content,
change the calendar and to impose or increase fees similarly is
reserved.
Furthermore, the Board reserves the right to modify, suspend,
cancel or terminate any class, course or program (or portion
thereof). To the extent the Board decides to terminate an entire
instructional program, a good faith effort will be made to assist
full-time students currently seeking a degree in such program to
receive appropriate recognition for their efforts and, if the student
chooses, to transfer to another public institution offering the
same or similar program. There can be no assurance courses or
programs currently being offered by the college will be available
indefinitely, however.
All such changes are effective at such times as the proper
authorities determine and may apply not only to prospective
students but also to those who already are enrolled. The individual
student will be held responsible for the observance of all
regulations and information contained within the college catalog.
In addition to the institution’s right to modify the course
schedule when necessary, instructors at Rend Lake College have
the freedom to cover course topics as they wish.
WEATHER-RELATED COLLEGE CLOSINGS
In situations where inclement weather may affect the normal
operation of Rend Lake College, or when circumstances beyond
the college’s control may affect working conditions and create a
need to call off classes or close the campus for whatever reason,
students should refer to one of the following radio or television
stations for information. Alerts also will be sent out via the
Wireless Emergency Notification System. This free service alerts
subscribers to school closings via text message and / or email. To
register for WENS, visit www.rlc.edu/wens. Campus closures also
are posted to the college website at www.rlc.edu, on the college’s
Facebook page at www.facebook.com/rendlakecollege and its
Google+ page, and are sent to student Warriormail accounts.
The college will notify the following stations and try to have
information on the air by 6-6:30 a.m. whenever necessary, or as
soon as possible at other times.
Call letters
Frequency/Channel
WSIL-TV
WPSD-TV
KFVS-TV
ESPN
K103
KZIM
WCIL
WDDD
Channel 3
Carterville
Channel 6
Paducah, KY
Channel 12
Cape Girardeau
103.5 FM
Herrin
960 AM / 102.9 FM
Cape Girardeau
960 AM / 1400 AM
Cape Girardeau
1020 AM / 101.5 FMCarbondale
810 AM / 107.3 FMMarion
Location
WDML
WDQN
WFIW
WFRX
WHET
WILY
WJBD
WJPF
WMCL
WMIX
WNSV
WOKZ
WOOZ
WQRL
WROY / WRUL
WRXX
WSIU
WTAO
WUEZ
WVZA
WXAN
106.9 FM
Mt. Vernon
1580 AM / 95.9 FMDuQuoin
1390 AM / 104.9 FMFairfield
1300 AM
West Frankfort
97.7 FM
West Frankfort
1210 AM / 90.7 FMCentralia
1350 AM / 100.1 FMSalem
1020 AM / 1340 AMHerrin
1060 AM
McLeansboro
940 AM / 94.1 FM
Mt. Vernon
104.7 FM
Nashville
105.9 FM
Fairfield
1240 AM / 99.9 FMCarbondale
106.3 FM
Benton
1460 AM / 97.3 FMCarmi
95.3 FM
Centralia
91.9 FM
Carbondale
92.7 FM
Herrin
95.1 FM
Herrin
105.1 FM
Murphysboro
103.9 FM
Ava
13
THE CAMPUS
Rend Lake College is located on the east shore of Rend
Lake, the second-largest man-made lake in the state, with access
provided by Interstate 57 and State Route 37. The college is
centrally located within the community college district it serves.
Campus facilities include the following buildings:
• An Academic Building for academic and business classrooms,
also containing the Textbook and Retail stores and Information
Technology staff offices.
• The Administration Building, named for former board
member Dr. Allen Y. Baker, which includes the President’s Office,
Vice Presidents’ offices, Academic Advisement Center, Business
Office, Career Center, Enrollment Management, Financial Aid,
Information Technology, Institutional Research, Marketing and
Public Information and Student Records.
• The Advanced Technology Center, which houses Computer
Programming, Criminal Justice, Electricity and Electronics,
Industrial Maintenance and Technician programs, IT Systems
programs, Manufacturing Technology, Massage Therapy,
Radiologic Technology, Welding and Wireless Communications
Technology.
• The Aquatics Center, which features a six-lane, 75-foot
pool with access for the physically challenged, therapy pool and
whirlpool. Included are shower and locker room facilities.
• The Coal Mine Training Center, which includes classroom
and office space, operational coal mining equipment, and a mock
mine featuring movable walls and other components, such as
a pitch-black interior to simulate actual mining conditions,
and a smoke machine to be used for mine rescue drills. The
accompanying Mine Rescue and Fire Training Facility is located
just north of the building.
• Two greenhouses for botanical research.
• The restored, one-room Independence Schoolhouse and
natural prairie.
• The South Oasis, which combines lounge areas for students
with faculty offices. The South Oasis includes faculty offices for
two divisions – Allied Health and Math & Sciences – along with
STARS and Upward Bound.
• The Rend Lake College Foundation Children’s Center, which
provides practical laboratory experience for students in the Early
Childhood Education program and child care for infants, toddlers
and preschoolers of students, faculty and staff and other district
residents.
• A Science Building for the sciences and related programs.
• The James “Hummer” Waugh Gymnasium, which includes
the Wayne Arnold Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center, coaches’
offices and locker rooms for both Warrior and Lady Warrior
athletic teams.
• The Rend Lake College Recreational Center, which includes
practice areas for various athletic teams as well as exercise
facilities.
• The Learning Resource Center, which includes a library, fine
arts facilities, an open computer lab, Resource Development, Title
III offices, the Health Studies Student Success Center, and the
Nursing, Art, Theatre and Music programs.
• A Student Center which includes offices for the Center for
Community and Corporate Education, Truck Driver Training,
Rend Lake College Foundation and Security, as well as the Subway
restaurant and accompanying dining area. Culinary Arts lab
facilities and faculty offices also are located here.
• A Maintenance Building.
• The Mark S. Kern Applied Science Center, which houses the
Agricultural Business, Agricultural Production and Management,
Agricultural Mechanics, Heavy Equipment Technology and
Diesel Technology programs.
• The North Oasis, which combines the Learning Enhancement
Center with faculty offices. Included with the LEC are the
Communications Lab, Writing Center and Math Lab. The
North Oasis includes faculty offices for the Applied Science and
Technology Division and the Liberal Arts Division, as well as
the First-Year Experience Coordinator and Adult Education and
Literacy Department offices.
14
• A Truck Driver Training facility.
• A Vocational Building providing classroom, computer and
laboratory space for the Automotive, Architecture, Graphic
Design and Machining Technology programs.
In addition, the college provides a land lab for the natural
sciences and agriculture program, plus recreational facilities for
baseball and softball, a bicycling and walking path and a golf
driving range and short-game practice area. A disc golf course
also is available.
REND LAKE COLLEGE HISTORY
Rend Lake College has been the place “where learning never ends”
for many years, serving thousands of in-district residents annually.
The college was founded in 1955 as Mt. Vernon Community
College and officially became Rend Lake College when it was
organized December 20, 1966, under the Illinois Junior College Act
(Illinois Revised Statutes, 1967; Chapter 122, Sections 101-1 to 108-2).
Mt. Vernon Community College initially was approved by an
overwhelming 25-to-1 vote and was under the supervision of the
local high school board, with boundaries the same as those for High
School District No. 201. The purpose of this two-year college was to
provide postsecondary educational experiences, primarily universityparallel curricula, for the graduates of Mt. Vernon Township High
School. Faculty and facilities were provided by the high school.
The first classes of Mt. Vernon Community College began in
September 1956, with an enrollment of 124 day and 79 evening
students. Expanded curricula offerings in both the baccalaureate
and vocational areas, plus the establishment of a School of Practical
Nursing in 1961, eventually attracted students from surrounding
communities, and by 1966 the college’s enrollment stood at 721
students.
Rend Lake College became a reality shortly after the announcement
of the Master Plan for Higher Education in Illinois. Dramatic changes
in educational purpose and curricula accompanied the name change.
Voters of the eight-county district approved the establishment of
Rend Lake College by nearly an 8-to-1 margin on October 22, 1966,
a new governing board was elected from the district in December
of that same year and on July 1, 1967, Rend Lake College assumed
the assets, liabilities and responsibilities of Mt. Vernon Community
College. The purpose of the new college was to provide universityparallel, occupational and general and adult education for the citizens
of this new district. District 521 includes the majority of Franklin,
Hamilton, Jefferson and Perry counties, parts of Wayne and White
and even reaches into Washington and Williamson. Included are 13
high school districts – Benton, Christopher, Hamilton County, Mt.
Vernon, Norris City-Omaha-Enfield, Pinckneyville, Sesser-Valier,
Thompsonville, Waltonville, Wayne City, Webber, Woodlawn and
Zeigler-Royalton.
In its early stages, Rend Lake College was located on the campus
of Mt. Vernon Township High School. When it began operation on
July 1, 1967, the college had a staff of 29 full-time and eight part-time
faculty members, two full-time administrators and a librarian.
The Board of Trustees of the new college later selected a 350acre site near Ina and employed architects to begin planning a new
campus. The campus was located between Interstate 57 and Rend
Lake. On November 18, 1967, voters approved a bond issue of $3.1
million, which represented the local share of the $9.5 million total.
The Illinois Community College Board allocated $2,230,000 for
construction of the initial phase.
Groundbreaking ceremonies for Phase I construction were held
March 27, 1969 ... the same day the college received word of its first
North Central accreditation. Phase I consisted of five buildings –
Academic, Science, Gymnasium, South Oasis and Maintenance – and
was ready for occupancy by August 1970, with classes on the new
campus beginning that fall. Agriculture, Automotive, Cosmetology
(Beauty Culture) and Practical Nursing programs were still housed in
off-campus facilities in Benton, Bonnie and Mt. Vernon. Permission
was then obtained from the Capital Development Board and the ICCB
to incorporate Phase III construction with Phase II. Construction
of five more buildings – Administration, Vocational, North Oasis,
Student Center and Learning Resource Center – began in Spring 1971.
Administration and Vocational buildings were finished in September
1973, and by 1975 Phase II and III construction was complete. Rend
Lake College thus became the first community college in the state
to complete its entire facilities master plan.
A Stran-Steel building also was erected in 1974, next to the
Maintenance Building, and was equipped for the Mining Technology
program; three separate expansions of this facility later occurred,
along with construction of a new Maintenance Building. In 1989, a
new automotive wing was added to the Vocational Building and the
technology building was renovated.
An Aquatics Center adjoining James (Hummer) Waugh
Gymnasium opened on campus in February 1998. The Aquatics
Center is available for public use and is equipped to fill rehabilitative
needs of area residents. It includes a six-lane, 75-foot by 45-foot pool
which features a ramp for the physically challenged and ranges from
3 feet 6 inches in depth to 7 feet 6 inches. A 10-foot by 20-foot therapy
pool and a whirlpool 10 feet in diameter add to the usefulness of the
facility. In addition to classes, the pool is open during certain time
periods daily for recreational use, and memberships are available to
the public.
A Children’s Center to serve the child care needs of RLC students
and staff, as well as the educational laboratory needs of the Early
Childhood Education program, opened in Fall 1998. Funding for
the Children’s Center was provided entirely by the RLC Foundation.
Major remodeling of the Administration Building took place
during 1999-2000 and nearly doubled its size. This new “Intake
Center” centralizes almost all Student Service functions in one
building.
In 2002, major off-campus changes occurred with the addition of
the Rend Lake College MarketPlace in Mt. Vernon and the Rend Lake
College Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus. In 2003, The Hitting
Zone, a baseball / softball training facility, began operations, and was
renamed in 2014 as the RLC Recreational Center and repurposed.
In Fall 2005, the Mark S. Kern Applied Science Center opened
on the southwest corner of campus. This 22,300-square-feet
facility houses the Agricultural Business, Agricultural Production,
Agricultural Mechanics, Heavy Equipment and Diesel Technology
programs.
Opened in Fall 2009 was the the 20,000-square-feet Coal Mine
Training Center. It includes operational coal mining equipment
and a mock mine with movable walls and other components. The
following year, the adjacent Mine Rescue and Fire Training Facility
was completed.
In Fall 2011, the Science & Computer Center was added to the
Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus, allowing students to earn a
complete associate degree in many disciplines there without the need
to travel to the Ina campus.
15
REND LAKE COLLEGE FOUNDATION
(www.rlc.edu/foundation)
Scholarships totaling more than $450,000 annually are
awarded to Rend Lake College students each academic year.
These scholarships are made possible by generous local businesses
and individuals who care about the future of our students
and community. Scholarships, for the most part, range from
approximately $500 to $1,500 annually.
The Foundation Board invites, and in fact encourages, all
interested students to apply for these scholarships. Each year,
more than 300 scholarships and tuition waivers are awarded by
the Foundation. Scholarship awards include endowed scholarships,
annual scholarships, or one-time scholarships. In addition,
tuition waivers are given by Rend Lake College for outstanding
achievements.
To apply, students must:
• Designate Rend Lake College as their college choice
• Submit a completed online application, transcripts and a
letter of recommendation to the RLC Foundation office
• Apply for student assistance through the Financial Aid office
Applications are available online at www.rlc.edu/foundation.
ORGANIZATION
A Board of Directors comprised of business and professional
persons from the college district governs the RLC Foundation,
meeting regularly throughout the year. All Foundation activities
are reviewed and approved by this board, whose members serve
without compensation. The college President and the Foundation
Chief Executive Officer serve in ex-officio capacities.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
BRAD GESELL (Benton) / Chair
KEVIN PYLE (Hamilton County) / Vice Chair
MARK BALLARD (Mt. Vernon) / Secretary
JOANN JOY (Mt. Vernon) / Treasurer
SHAWNA BULLARD / RLC Foundation Chief Executive Officer
TERRY WILKERSON / Rend Lake College President
MARY ELLEN AIKEN (Benton)
STEVEN BEAL (Mt. Vernon)
HUNT BONAN (Mt. Vernon)
ROBERT BORNHEIMER (Trenton)
BILL BUSH (Mt. Vernon)
MILLIE CALDWELL, Emeritus (Christopher)
MATTHEW FLANIGAN (Mt. Vernon)
PHILIP GUSTAFSON (Mt. Vernon)
BENNY HARMSE (Mt. Vernon)
MARK S. KERN, Emeritus (Ewing)
PAT KERN (Ewing)
JIM LEUTY (Mt. Vernon)
SAM MATEER (Mt. Vernon)
FINNY MATHEW (Mt. Vernon)
HOWARD L. PAYNE, Emeritus (Benton)
MARY PERICOLOSI (Pinckneyville)
DR. WARREN PETTY (Benton)
KEVIN PYATT (Pinckneyville)
DR. CHARLES W. ROE (Pinckneyville)
STEVE ROWLAND (Christopher)
RANDY RUBENACKER (McLeansboro)
GEORGE SLANKARD (Sesser)
ROBIN STOWERS (Mt. Vernon)
SCOTT SPEARS (McLeansboro)
RANDY VENEGONI (Christopher)
J. NELSON WOOD (Mt. Vernon)
RICH YUNKUS (Benton)
16
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS
Endowed scholarships honor special individuals and businesses.
The interest from endowment gifts is used to provide the following
scholarship awards:
Edward Percy Atkinson Scholarship
Austin-Welch Scholarship
Dr. Allen Y. Baker Scholarship
Stella M. Baker Scholarship
Bank of Illinois Scholarship
Dallas Carl and Anna Mae Bargesser Nursing Scholarship
Keith Bauman Memorial Scholarship
Benton BPW Scholarship
Benton Lions Club Scholarship
Bornheimer-Rountree Endowment
Andrea K. Boucher Memorial Scholarship
Joe P. Boyle and Lois Ferne Boyle & His Ancestors who lived in
Belle Rive Scholarship
Venita Brinkley Memorial Scholarship
Brown Family Endowment
Clifton Caldwell Memorial Scholarship
Ceramic / Sculptor Award
Christian Chapel Church Scholarship
Dr. Evelyn Claxton Art Scholarship
Continental Tire the Americas Inc. Scholarship
Brandon Dame Memorial Scholarship
Michael Dean Memorial Scholarship
Delta Theta Tau Vermadel M. Wood Scholarship
Brad and Brian Evilsizer Memorial Scholarship
Mel Farlow Memorial Scholarship
First Cellular of Southern Illinois Scholarship
Wayne Fitzgerrell Memorial Scholarship
Brian C. Fleri Memorial Scholarship
Franklin County Medical Society Scholarship
Fornear Family Scholarship
Norma Harrell RN Scholarship
Thomas B. Harrell Memorial Scholarship
David E. Hill, M.D. Memorial Scholarship
Jim Hinman Memorial Scholarship
International Police Association Endowment
Larry Jacob Memorial Scholarship
Dr. Leslie Johnson / Ed Kownacki Scholarship
Judge Roy O. Gulley Scholarship
Frank and W. Juanita Kern Memorial Scholarship
Mark S. Kern Scholarship
Pat Kern Endowment
Stan and Jean Koziara Scholarship
Leeck Family Scholarship
Doug Leeck Memorial Scholarship
Coyn Mateer Memorial Scholarship
Mt. Vernon Rotary Club S.T.R.I.V.E. Scholarship
Tommy Mundell Memorial Scholarship
North Hamilton County Coal Association Endowment
George/Anna Orshak and Paul/Bernice Petty Memorial
Ribella Palada Family Scholarship
Dr. Robert & Marilyn Parks Scholarship
Howard L. Payne Scholarship
Donald E. Peacock Nursing Scholarship
Henry and Fern Peacock Nursing Scholarship
Emil Perpich Family Memorial Scholarship
Polk Lodge No. 137 Scholarship
Clayton Charles Ragland Memorial Scholarship
Victor and Betty Rapp Scholarship
G. William “Billy” Rector Scholarship
C.H. Reed Memorial Scholarship
Rend Lake College Foundation Scholarship
Rend Lake College LPN Scholarship
Rend Lake College Students for Students Art Scholarship
Robert and Rose Rice Scholarship
John C. Riley IV Scholarship
Dr. Charles and Mary Roe Scholarship
Rubenacker Family Scholarship
Rodney Rubenacker Memorial Scholarship
Craig V. Rudofski Scholarship
Ann Santoro Memorial Endowment
Southern Illinois Farm Association Scholarship
Oliver D. Spitler Memorial Scholarship
Dr. Gary Ray Sweeten Endowment
Thomas J. & Leota L. Sweeten Christian Memorial Fund
Arnistine Tolbert Memorial Scholarship
Carlos and Bonnie Tolbert Scholarship
Tri-County Electric Cooperative Inc. Scholarship
Blake Trout Memorial Scholarship
Julie Trout Memorial Scholarship US Bank Scholarship
Doris Welch Nursing Scholarship
John D. Whittington/Ada D. Whittington Scholarship
NAPA John’s John H. Wininger Scholarship
DIVISIONS
(www.rlc.edu/academics)
Rend Lake College is dedicated to providing its students with
preparation for entry into the job market and a solid academic
base for transferring to a baccalaureate-granting institution, and
to meeting the manpower needs of the college district. Skills and
knowledge requirements are constantly changing for students.
The college keeps pace with these changes through an experienced
faculty with work experience and advanced degrees, up-to-date
technology resources and the advice of industry and business
advisory committees.
ALLIED HEALTH – Encompasses the health field areas of Associate
Degree Nursing, Certified Medical Assistant, Certified Nurse
Assistant, Health Care Coach, Health Information Technology,
Home Health Aide, Medical Coding, Medical Laboratory
Technician, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Personal Care
Coach, Phlebotomy, Radiology, Surgical Technology, Therapeutic
Massage and Veterinary Technology. Training for Emergency
Medical Technician and EMT-Paramedic is available through
the Center for Community and Corporate Education.
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY – Includes Agriculture,
Architectural Technology, Automotive Technology, Criminal
Justice, Diesel Technology, Graphic Design, Green Facilities
Management, Heav y Equipment Technology, Industrial
Technology, Industrial Electronics and Maintenance Technician,
Machining Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mining
Technology, Office Systems Technology, Surveying Technology,
Sustainable Design and Welding.
Also the area for Computer Programming, Computer Science,
IT Systems Assistant, IT Systems Specialist, and Wireless
Communication Technician.
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION – Encompasses the
Cosmetology (also including Barbering and Nail Technology),
Culinary Arts, EMT / EMT-Paramedic, and Truck Driver
Training programs. The American Heart Association Training
Center also is administered here, and Real Estate and Community
Education classes are offered by this division.
LIBERAL ARTS – Offers courses in Oral and Written Communication,
Foreign Languages, Humanities, Social Science, and Performing
and Visual Arts.
MATH & SCIENCES – Offers pre-professional curricula, including
Engineering, and programs of instruction in Early Childhood
Education, Education, Health, Math, Physical Education and
Science, as well as the Aquatics Center and Fitness Center.
OFF-CAMPUS CREDIT CLASSES
Students may enroll in Rend Lake College transfer classes at
locations throughout the college district, allowing students to
earn college credit close to their homes. Off-campus credit classes
follow division-approved course outlines and maintain the same
standards of instruction as the classes offered on the main campus
in Ina. A complete listing of off-campus classes is printed in the
course schedule, available at the college.
CENTER FOR COMMUNITY AND CORPORATE EDUCATION
The Center for Community and Corporate Education (CCCE),
located on the second floor of the Student Center, is dedicated
to serving the needs of both small and large employers within
the college district by providing training programs, workshops
and seminars, cooperative education, workplace skills and
job placement services. Our goal is to provide a better-trained
workforce to meet the needs of area employers and to provide
career development opportunities for our students.
The Community Education facet of the CCCE provides
instructional courses, workshops, youth camps and programs
designed to meet the educational, social and cultural needs of the
college district population. The goal of Community Education
is to provide lifelong learning opportunities for professional
development, personal challenge and leisure enjoyment for
students of all ages. Community Education serves students who
do not want or need transferable credit courses. Community
Education courses do not apply toward a degree or certificate
and are conducted both on- and off-campus.
For more information, contact the CCCE at (618) 437-5321,
Ext. 1714, or in person in the Student Center, Room 204 / 207.
BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY TRAINING
Training courses and programs are available which provide
many unique opportunities for area businesses and industry.
Included are industrial training programs, OSHA training,
management and supervisory skills, communication, customer
sales and service and other topic areas. In addition, the center
will customize training programs specifically designed to meet
employer needs. For more information on training contact the
Dean at Ext. 1367.
COMPUTER WORKSHOPS
The CCCE offers a variety of quick computer workshops
providing instruction in the latest computer software applications,
including Microsoft Office, Adobe and QuickBooks. Workshops
are offered at both the Rend Lake College MarketPlace in Mt.
Vernon and the Rend Lake College Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville
Campus. For more information on computer workshops or
training, contact the CCCE at Ext. 2000.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, or Co-op, is a method of instruction
that places students into jobs relating to their majors and is an
attractive program for both students and employers. Students
receive practical “real world” experience which assists them
in the career decision-making process and they earn college
credit. Co-op students are highly motivated, trainable workers
who are frequently assigned special projects, freeing permanent
staff for other important duties. Prerequisites for enrollment are
completion of a minimum of 12 hours of college credit and a 2.0
17
cumulative grade-point average or better. The maximum number
of credit hours that can be earned through Cooperative Education
is eight.
For more information on enrolling in Cooperative Education
classes or the possibility of hiring a co-op student, contact the
Cooperative Education Specialist at Ext. 1380.
and Commercial Driver’s License classroom test review. Job
placement assistance is included in the training. Recruiters from
several major trucking companies visit each class and present
information about employment opportunities. For class dates,
cost and enrollment information, call toll-free at 1-877-477-4408
or call (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1380.
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SERVICES
The Center for Community and Corporate Education offers a
variety of EMS workshops providing instruction and certification
in emergency response. The Emergency Medical Technician
(EMT) Paramedical Services program provides the opportunity
for an occupational certificate and / or Associate in Applied
Science Degree. Rend Lake College serves as an American Heart
Association Training Center. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR), automated external defibrillator (AED), first aid, Advanced
Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advanced Life Support
(PALS) courses are offered to meet the needs of those in industries
such as healthcare, early childhood, secondary education, coal
mining and protective services.
VOLUNTEERISM
Rend Lake College students may get credit for volunteering
to perform community service. Community service is a noble
act of good citizenship, empathy and commitment to the future
of the area. In addition, four-year schools and employers look
favorably upon students who have performed community service.
A student must have completed at least 12 semester hours with
a 2.0 grade-point average or higher to qualify. Volunteerism can
be taken for a maximum of four credit hours.
More information regarding the Volunteerism program is
available by contacting the Employment Services Specialist at
Ext. 1380.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
The CCCE provides a placement service for the purpose of
helping students, alumni and district residents secure full-time,
part-time or seasonal employment. The center also provides job
seekers with assistance in job search skills, resume preparation,
and interviewing techniques. Employers can also list job openings
with the center at no charge. For more information contact the
Employment Services Specialist at Ext. 1380.
RLC MarketPlace in Mt. Vernon
The Small Business Development Center provides assistance to
all sectors of the local business community. Its goal is to assist small
business in start-ups, expansions and problems, while providing
customized training programs, consultations and economic
development assistance to larger industry. The center utilizes
whatever college resources may be available in order to maximize
this cooperative effort between industry and education. For more
information, call 618-242-5813 or 618-437-5321, Ext. 2001.
INSTITUTE OF LIFELONG LEARNING
(www.rlc.edu/lifelong)
The Institute of Lifelong Learning is an organization of
retirement-age people who share a common interest in lifelong
learning and cultural enrichment.
The only requirement is a desire to learn more about subjects,
including the humanities, performing arts, religion, history,
current events, sciences, personal growth and subjects of interest
requested by the retirement community. No grades are given.
Participation can take many forms – enrolling in classes, going
on day trips or volunteering.
More information regarding Lifelong Learning classes is
available by contacting CCCE personnel.
SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER
SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS
Seminars and workshops are held throughout the year,
furnishing timely information on business planning, marketing,
management, tax preparation, accounting procedures and
economic development. One-day workshops are offered to assist
businesses in developing / maintaining websites, bookkeeping
and accounting and managing their businesses.
BUSINESS START-UP CONSULTATIONS
The center assists those individuals who are investigating the
start-up of a new business by providing information on business
planning, research and proper registration.
PROFESSIONAL CONTINUING EDUCATION
Seminars, workshops and classes are held throughout the year
focusing on requirements in continuing education for professionals.
For more information, contact the CCCE at Ext. 1714.
BUSINESS EXPANSION CONSULTATION
The staff will assist those area business people who are looking
to expand by helping them with their expansion plans and
financing programs.
REAL ESTATE
The Center for Community and Corporate Education offers
a variety of Real Estate credit courses which allow students to sit
for the Illinois Broker’s Examination and the Illinois Real Estate
Managing Broker’s Examination. For more information, contact
the CCCE at Ext. 1714.
BUSINESS PROBLEM CONSULTATION
The center will utilize college faculty and recommend outside
consultants to assist firms suffering problems.
TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING
(www.rlc.edu/truck)
Short-term Truck Driver Training classes are offered on a
regular basis throughout the year. This program, five weeks
in length, features both behind-the-wheel driving experience
18
FEDERAL AND STATE LOAN PACKAGING ASSISTANCE
The center will furnish guidelines / assistance for application
of federal and state loan packaging programs.
DISTANCE LEARNING
Online Courses
At Rend Lake College, an online course is a course which
is 100% online without any face-to-face classroom, laboratory,
clinical or field meeting time required. Students enrolled in online
courses must have access to the Internet and word processing
software. Students must complete Online Navigation Essentials
prior to accessing the course. Students enrolled in RLC online
courses may utilize the open computer lab located in the Learning
Resource Center.
Hybrid Courses
At Rend Lake College, a hybrid course is a course which
substitutes any portion of its face-to-face classroom, laboratory,
clinical or field meeting time with an online component of
teaching and learning. Students enrolled in hybrid courses must
have access to the Internet and word processing software. Students
must complete Online Navigation Essentials prior to accessing
the course.
Videoconferencing
This form of distance learning allows students at participating
Rend Lake College video sites to take courses utilizing a live
video and audio connection. The video system allows students
and instructors to see and hear one another continuously.
Videoconferencing classrooms in the Rend Lake College district
are located in the Academic Building on the main campus, RLC
MarketPlace in Mt. Vernon, RLC Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville
Campus, Continental Tire North America, Benton Consolidated
High School, Waltonville High School, Wayne City High School
and Walgreens Distribution Center in Mt. Vernon.
Telecourses
Telecourses are college-level courses consisting of a
textbook, student study guide, instructor documents, and video
lessons offered on DVD. Telecourses combine video lessons,
related textbook readings, online documentation and various
assignments to form a complete learning experience.
Students may watch the video lessons in the LRC, check out
individual video lessons from the circulation desk for home
viewing, or rent a complete set of video lessons from the Rend
Lake College Bookstore. Viewing also is available during normal
hours of operation at the RLC MarketPlace in Mt. Vernon, RLC
Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus and some in-district public
libraries – Benton Public Library and McCoy Memorial Library
in McLeansboro.
ADULT EDUCATION & LITERACY PROGRAMS
The Adult Education and Literacy programs prepare students
for the GED ® (high school equivalency) tests and help students
develop their skills in basic reading, math, job readiness and the
English language. For more information, call (618) 437-5321 or
toll-free at (800) 369-5321, Ext. 1241 / 1244 / 1220.
ABE / ASE / GED®
Adult Basic Education (ABE) and Adult Secondary Education
(ASE) classes help prepare students to earn a General Educational
Development (GED ®) certificate, enter the workforce, or advance
in their current jobs. Adult Education classes provide a strong
educational foundation in a friendly, supportive atmosphere.
Both day and evening classes are available at convenient locations
throughout the Rend Lake College district in Franklin, Jefferson,
Hamilton and Perry counties.
Adult Volunteer Literacy
You can make a difference! Volunteers are trained to help
individuals 16 and over improve basic math and reading skills.
Volunteer tutors work with students individually or in a group
setting. For more information, call (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1342.
Job Readiness
Transition services help students prepare to enter the workplace
with an increased awareness of what employers expect from them
and what they can expect from employers. Job readiness includes
job searches, job retention skills, team-building, communication
and time management.
English as a Second Language
English as a Second Language tutoring services are provided
to help individuals who do not speak English as their native
language develop their English communication skills. Students
will begin at their present levels of proficiency and develop skills
in English speaking, reading, writing and listening.
Online Navigation Essentials
Any student enrolled in an online or hybrid course will
be required to complete Online Navigation Essentials (ONE
1500), a one-time online orientation. These self-paced lessons
and activities provide necessary and essential skills for online
learning. Students can access their online / hybrid courses only
if ONE 1500 has been completed successfully prior to the first
day of classes.
19
20
GETTING STARTED
21
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
(www.rlc.edu/admissions)
Rend Lake College maintains an open-door admission policy
that provides access to higher education for those individuals
who can benefit from its comprehensive programs. Admission to
the college does not guarantee entrance into a particular course
or program of study since applicants may have to meet specific
requirements for entrance into certain programs. In addition,
students are required to complete specified prerequisites prior to
enrollment in certain courses. There is no discrimination in the
admission or recruitment of students on the basis of age, disability,
marital status, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex
or other legally protected status.
Prospective students should apply to the Student Records
office in advance of their expected starting date as registration
priority is given to early applicants. Applications are available at
the college, on the college’s website (www.rlc.edu) and at district
high schools.
Applicants for a certificate or an associate degree from Rend
Lake College should submit official transcripts from high schools
and colleges they have attended. Students taking college-level
courses must demonstrate college-level competency in language,
reading and mathematics. Students entering a degree program or
enrolling in a math or English course can determine placement
with COMPASS/ASSET scores or ACT/SAT scores.
GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
High School Graduate or GED Recipient
To be admitted to Rend Lake College, the prospective student
needs to:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form.
2. Submit official high school transcript with graduation
posted or GED certificate.
3. Submit ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT placement
scores or make arrangements for placement assessment with the
Academic Advisement Center.
4. Make an appointment with the Academic Advisement
Center for educational planning.
Transfer Student from an Accredited College
To be admitted to Rend Lake College, the prospective student
needs to:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form.
2. Submit official high school transcript with graduation
posted or GED certificate.
3. Submit ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT placement
scores or make arrangements for placement assessment with the
Academic Advisement Center.
4. Submit official transcripts to the Office of Student Records
from all colleges previously attended.
5. Make an appointment with the Academic Advisement
Center for educational planning.
Student Currently Enrolled in High School
To be admitted to Rend Lake College, the prospective student
must be a high school junior or senior or 16 years or older, and
needs to:
22
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form.
2. Submit ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT placement
scores or make arrangements for placement assessment with the
Academic Advisement Center.
3. Secure permission of a high school official to attend Rend
Lake College and submit a completed high school permit form
to the Office of Student Records.
4. Make an appointment with the Academic Advisement
Center for educational planning.
Non-High School Graduate 18 Years of Age or Older
To be admitted to Rend Lake College, the prospective student
needs to:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form.
2. Submit ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT placement
scores or make arrangements for placement assessment with the
Academic Advisement Center.
3. Make an appointment with the Academic Advisement
Center for educational planning.
4. New students who do not have a high school diploma or
GED will be admitted as a pre-college student until high school
equivalency is obtained.
Home-Schooled Student or High School-Age
Student Not Attending High School
A home-schooled student is defined as an applicant who
has officially severed his or her relationship with the district
secondary education provider but is completing or has completed
a home-study program believed to be the equivalent of a high
school diploma or GED certification. This program must include,
but is not limited to, reading, language arts, mathematics, social
science and science. Students must be high school junior or senior
equivalent or 16 years or older to attend Rend Lake College.
To be admitted to Rend Lake College, the prospective student
needs to:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form.
2. Provide yearly documentation stating the student has
never had or has officially severed his or her connection with the
school system. (Document certified by the chief executive officer
or designee of the public school district.)
3. Provide any transcripts available to document credit or
completion of secondary education.
4. Submit ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT placement scores or
make arrangements for placement assessment with the Academic
Advisement Center.
5. Make an appointment with the Academic Advisement
Center for educational planning.
International Students
Prospective international students who wish to apply to Rend
Lake College must have a minimum score of 500 on the paperbased Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 173 on
the computer-based TOEFL or 61 on the Internet-based TOEFL
and must meet all degree program requirements. International
students must provide documentation that the student has met
TOEFL guidelines or provide certification that English is the
student’s first language. For complete information concerning
the TOEFL exam, applicants may write to: TOEFL/TSE Services,
P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ, 08541, or visit the website at www.
ets.org/toefl. In addition, international students must be able to
document their ability to be self-supporting or be financially
sponsored.
A TOEFL exemption may be obtained for students from
countries where English is a main mode of education. These
countries include: American Samoa, Anguilla, Antarctica,
Antigua, Australia, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangledesh, Barbados,
Barbuda, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Indian Ocean
Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Canada, Cayman
Islands, Commonwealth Caribbean, Cyprus, Dominica, Falkland
Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guyana, India,
Ireland, Islas Malvinas, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho,
Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia,
Montserrat, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan,
Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Seychelles, Sierra
Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St.
Christopher and Nevis, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent
and the Grenadines, Swaziland, Tanzania, Tobago, Tonga,
Trinidad, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, Uganda, United
Kingdom, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Virgin Islands, Western Samoa,
Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Students should provide certification
and successful completion (C or better) through translated high
school transcripts.
A committee comprised of the Registrar, Executive Director
of Academic Counseling, the appropriate Vice President of
Instruction, and Dean of Liberal Arts may waive TOEFL
requirements for students who can prove to the satisfaction of
the majority of the committee they have sufficient command of
the English language to succeed at Rend Lake College.
The Office of Student Records at Rend Lake College may issue
an I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility for Non-Immigrant Student
Status) to an international student for the purpose of obtaining a
F-1 or M-1 Visa. An international student will be registered and an
I-20 will be processed through the Student and Exchange Visitor
Information System (SEVIS). In order for the Office of Student
Records to issue an I-20, the international student must complete
the following steps:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form for international students.
2. Provide proof in an English translation of completion of
secondary education.
3. Complete a financial statement which shows evidence that
the student has the resources to be self-supporting or is being
financially sponsored and provide official documentation of
funds and amounts via a current bank statement or letter from
the sponsoring organization.
4. Declare the student’s intention to pursue an A.A., A.S.,
A.E.S., A.F.A. or A.A.S. degree.
5. Provide official documentation indicating the student
has met TOEFL guidelines as previously described or provide
certification that English is the student’s first language.
When the I-20 has been issued, the student must pay the I-901
Student and Exchange Visitor Processing Fee. For information on
the I-901 fee, visit www.fmjfee.com/index. Students must have the
I-20 and proof that the I-901 fee has been paid before a visa can be
obtained.
International students who are residing in the United States
under visa status other than a F-1 or M-1 and wish to take courses
at Rend Lake College must provide proper documentation
indicating the student is registered with the Department of
Immigration. The Office of Student Records requires the following
steps to be completed:
1. Complete and submit a Rend Lake College new student
enrollment form for international students.
2. Provide proof in an English translation of completion of
secondary education.
3. Provide official documentation indicating the student has
met TOEFL guidelines as previously described or certification
that English is the student’s first language.
4. Provide official documentation indicating visa and
passport status.
If an international student has college credit from a country
outside of the United States which the student would like to
have transferred to Rend Lake College, the transfer credit will be
evaluated under the following guidelines:
1. The student asking for the evaluation is a resident of our
college district.
2. The student must be enrolled at Rend Lake College in a
degree-seeking program.
3. The student must present the Office of Student Records
with copies of certificates and diplomas earned, marks / grades,
transcripts (if available) and course descriptions / syllabi for each
course completed. All copies should be translated in English.
EXCEPTION: Students who have prov ided of f icia l
documentation of their permanent residency in the United States.
Students Entering Baccalaureate-Transfer Curricula
The Illinois Board of Higher Education has established
minimum high school subject requirements for admission to
public universities and community college baccalaureate-transfer
curricula.
• 4 years of English (emphasizing written and oral communications
and literature);
• 3 years of social science (emphasizing history and government);
• 3 years of mathematics (introductory through advanced
algebra, geometry, trigonometry or fundamentals of computer
programming);
• 3 years of science (laboratory sciences), and
• 2 years of electives in foreign language, music, vocational
education or art.
Rend Lake College will provide methods to assist students
who do not meet the above criteria so they may be admitted to
baccalaureate-transfer curricula.
For more information regarding admission requirements
to Rend Lake College, prospective students are encouraged to
contact Student Records personnel at (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1230.
SERVICEMEMBERS OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES (SOC)
Rend Lake College is a member of Ser vicemembers
Opportunity Colleges, a consortium of over 1,700 colleges and
universities that provide college-level educational opportunities
for servicemembers and their families. As a Servicemembers
Opportunity Colleges member, Rend Lake College ...
• Recognizes the GED high school equivalency certificate/
diploma;
• Recognizes learning gained from specialized training and
experience in the military services;
23
• Establishes competency by nationally recognized means, such
as standardized tests;
• Maintains a flexible transfer of credits policy for the mobile,
active-duty servicemember;
• Publicizes alternative admissions procedures available to
servicemembers and waives formal admission procedures for
those seeking enrollment in course work for transfer to another
institution;
• Conducts a timely evaluation of the educational records and
relevant experiences of servicemembers,
• Completes a student agreement or degree completion plan for
all degree-seeking servicemembers.
COLLEGE DISTRICT RESIDENCY
All students must provide proof of residency.
IN-DISTRICT COMMUNITIES
Cities, towns and communities within Rend Lake College
District 521 include:
• Akin
• Ewing
• Sesser
• Belle Rive
• Ina
• Sims
• Benton
• Keenes
• Springerton
• Bluford
• Logan
• Tamaroa
• Bonnie
• Macedonia
• Texico
• Broughton
• McLeansboro
• Thompsonville
• Buckner
• Mt. Vernon
• Valier
• Christopher
• Mulkeytown
• Waltonville
• Coello
• Nason
• Wayne City
• Cutler
• Opdyke
• Whittington
• Dahlgren
• Orient
• Woodlawn
• Dale
• Pinckneyville
• Zeigler
• Dix
• Royalton
• Enfield
• Scheller
IN-DISTRICT PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS
Tuition charges at Rend Lake College are based on the
residency of the individual. In-district public high schools are
the following:
• Benton Consolidated High School
• Christopher High School
• Hamilton County Senior High School
• Mt. Vernon Township High School
• Norris City-Omaha-Enfield High School
• Pinckneyville Community High School
• Sesser-Valier High School
• Thompsonville High School
• Waltonville High School
• Wayne City High School
• Webber Township High School
• Woodlawn High School
• Zeigler-Royalton High School
IN-DISTRICT RESIDENT
Students who are United States citizens or permanent residents
of the United States and have occupied a dwelling within the
district for at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester
will be classified as residents of the Rend Lake College district.
The following documents may be presented to verify residency:
• Driver’s license
• Automobile license registration
24
• Voter registration card
• Proof of ownership and / or occupancy of a residence
• Utility or telephone bill, or other billing statement mailed to
an in-district mailing address, postmarked at least 30 days
prior to the beginning of the semester
• Property tax statement
• Documentation pertaining to the student’s current status,
or preceding years status as an in-district student (e.g., high
school transcript).
OUT-OF-DISTRICT RESIDENT
Students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the
United States and whose residence is outside the boundaries of
the Rend Lake College district shall be classified as out-of-district
students.
OUT-OF-STATE RESIDENT
Students who have not occupied a dwelling within the State of
Illinois for at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester
or who declare their permanent residence to be outside the State
of Illinois are classified as out-of-state residents.
SPECIAL RESIDENCY – EMPLOYED FULL-TIME IN DISTRICT
Students who reside outside the Rend Lake College district
but are employed full-time (35 hours a week minimum) by a
business or industry located within the district may qualify for
the in-district residency status. Interested students may obtain
the required form from the Office of Student Records. Employers
must complete a new form each semester.
VETERANS RESIDENCY
Per Public Act 098-0306, students utilizing federal Post-9/11
Veterans Educational Assistance shall be deemed an in-district
resident for tuition purposes. Veterans also will receive priority
advisement and registration.
REGISTRATION PROCEDURES FOR
DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
REGISTRATION FOR FIRST-TIME STUDENTS
1. Apply for admission. Complete a Rend Lake College new
student enrollment form available from:
a. Online at www.rlc.edu/admissions
b. Rend Lake College Office of Student Records
c. In-district high school counselors
2. Submit official high school transcript with graduation
posted or GED certificate.
3. Submit ACT or SAT scores or arrange to take the
COMPASS test in the Academic Advisement Center.
4. Submit official transcripts from other colleges attended.
5. Make an appointment with an advisor in the Academic
Advisement Center or an academic advisor to discuss career
development and goal setting, educational planning, scheduling
of classes and accessing campus services and activities.
6. Arrange for payment of tuition and fees by
a. Applying for financial aid or
b. Making full payment by established deadlines or
c. Enrolling in the FACTS Tuition Management
Plan
7. Obtain a student I.D. from the Learning Resource Center or
from Student Records in the Administration Building. A picture
identification (driver’s license or state issued I.D.) and a schedule
must be presented to obtain a student I.D. Replacement cost is
$5. A student I.D. and current schedule of classes are required to
rent or purchase textbooks.
8. Rent or purchase textbooks at the Textbook Store. Supplies
are available at the Retail Store. Both are located in the Academic
Building.
REGISTRATION FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS
Advisor-Assisted Option
1. Review degree requirements.
2. Create tentative schedule. Questions regarding your
selection of courses can be addressed during the advisement
appointment.
3. Make appointment with an advisor for scheduling of
classes.
4. Arrange for payment of tuition and fees.
5. Rent or purchase textbooks at the Textbook Store. Supplies
are available at the Retail Store. Both are located in the Academic
Building.
Self-Advisement Option
Continuing students who meet the following criteria may
self-advise by completing a registration form and submitting it
to Student Records.
• Completion of or current enrollment in 30 credit hours
• Minimum GPA of 2.5
• Completion of all required college preparatory courses
Students who choose this option do not need an advisor’s
signature, but must indicate acceptance of responsibility for
course selection.
PRIORITY REGISTRATION FOR VETERANS & SERVICE MEMBERS
Priority registration is offered for veterans and service members
in accordance with Public Act 098-0316. Priority registration
periods will be announced each semester. Veterans and service
members can call the Rend Lake College Academic Advisement
Center at 618-437-5321, Ext. 1266, identify themselves as a veteran
or service member, and make an advisement appointment during
these priority registration times.
TUITION AND FEES
IN-DISTRICT TUITION
Current tuition rates for residents of the Rend Lake College
district are available at www.rlc.edu/tuition and are published in
the course schedule. Applicable fees associated with certain classes
also will be charged to the students. There is a technology fee of $3
per credit hour assessed for most classes. Tuition rates are subject
to change with Board of Trustees approval.
OUT-OF-DISTRICT TUITION
Out-of-district Illinois students are charged a tuition fee equal
to 150% of the highest in-district tuition rate of any neighboring
contiguous community college.
The tuition charged will vary from year to year based on the
highest tuition assessed by neighboring community colleges. The
current out-of-district tuition rate is available at www.rlc.edu/
tuition. Applicable fees associated with certain classes also will
be charged to the students.
In addition, the out-of-district tuition may be waived for a
student who is enrolled in a course being provided under terms
of a contract for services between the employer and the college.
OUT-OF-STATE / OUT-OF-COUNTRY TUITION
Current tuition rates for out-of-state and out-of-country
students are available at www.rlc.edu/tuition. The tuition charged
will vary from year to year based on the actual in-district tuition
rate. Applicable fees associated with certain classes also will be
charged to the students.
In addition, the out-of-state tuition may be waived for a
student who is enrolled in a course being provided under terms
of a contract for services between the employer and the college.
SENIOR CITIZEN TUITION AND FEES
In-district residents who are 60 years of age or older qualify
as senior citizens for tuition purposes and are entitled to take
college credit courses tuition-free provided that class has the
required number of tuition-paying students enrolled and that the
classroom has available space. The college reserves the right to use
the qualifying age for senior citizen waivers, as dictated by state
statute, which is 65 years of age or older for specific programs and
departments. This does not include applicable fees charged for credit
classes, nor does it include Community Education classes.
Senior citizens may be charged a fee of $50 or more for repeating
classes more times than credit can be claimed.
AUDIT FEES
Tuition for auditing is the same as taking the course for credit
for in-district students.
SPECIAL PROGRAM FEES
Students in selected programs will have additional expenses,
depending upon the program in which they are enrolled. These
expenses include text and workbooks, uniforms, ID pins, special
equipment, rental equipment, towel fees, expendable materials,
equipment breakage and similar items.
GRADUATION FEES
A fee of $25 will be charged to students applying for an
Associate in Arts Degree, Associate in Science Degree, Associate
in Fine Arts Degree, Associate in Engineering Science Degree or
Associate in Applied Science Degree. An additional $2 fee will be
charged per degree to a person graduating with more than one in
the same school year. There is a $2 fee for each printed certificate.
The graduation application fee will be automatically charged to
the student’s account.
TRANSCRIPT FEES
Student Official Transcripts are $5 per transcript. All requests
for official transcripts are processed online at www.rlc.edu/myrlc.
Your transcript will not be processed if there are any outstanding
balances and / or holds with the College. Transcripts must be
ordered online using any major credit card. Your credit card will
be charged when Rend Lake College sends your transcript(s). You
may also track your transcript order online.
ONLINE FEES
A fee of $20 per credit hour will be charged to students enrolled
in an online or hybrid section of a course.
PAYMENT PLANS
The college offers the FACTS convenient budget plan that
provides a low-cost option for budgeting tuition and fees. You
authorize payments to be made from a checking or savings
account or by credit card. The plan allows you to schedule
your payments over three months for summer term and over
five months for fall or spring semester depending on when you
25
register. The earlier you register the better chance you have to
enroll in the courses you want and the more months you can
schedule to make payments. The only cost to budget monthly
payments through FACTS is a $25-per-semester nonrefundable
enrollment fee or a $2 nonrefundable enrollment fee for the
FACTS one-time pay / full payment option.
If payments are not made as established in the FACTS Payment
Schedule then you may be administratively withdrawn for
nonpayment. The FACTS Payment Plan does not apply to students
enrolled in Community Education courses or unless otherwise
indicated for a specific program.
It is the student’s responsibility to inform the Business Office
in person of any and all needed changes and / or terminations to
FACTS payment plans after the student has successfully enrolled
in the FACTS programs. Failure to inform the Business Office of
changes by the required payments processing deadlines could
result in the processing of payments from students’ accounts.
Any charge incurred by the student as a result of the failure to
inform the Business Office of the needed changes will be the
responsibility of the student and not Rend Lake College.
For more information or to enroll in FACTS, visit our website
at www.rlc.edu, select Online Access, then select FACTS or
contact the Business Office at Ext. 1235.
PAYMENT PLANS – Online Option
Students may make on-line payments for the balance of their
tuition and fees, for graduation fees, or service charges. An individual can authorize on-line payments from either a checking
account or a MasterCard, American Express, or Discover credit
card. A convenience fee will be charged for this service. The convenience fee is not charged or collected by Rend Lake College. To
complete an on-line payment, an individual can visit the Rend
Lake College website at www.rlc.edu and click on the link to the
Online Student Records System or visit www.illinoisepay.com.
NON-PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES
A statement of tuition and fees will be provided to the student
at the time of registration. In addition, depending upon the date
of the student’s registration and the number of days until the
payment is due, the Business Office will mail a statement to the
student informing him / her of the payment deadline and the
current balance of the student’s account. Prior to the payment
deadlines, students must either make full payment to the Business
Office, have financial aid placed upon his / her account, or enroll
in FACTS. Students who have not made payment, completed the
financial aid process, or enrolled in FACTS will be purged from
his / her classes on the date of the payment deadline. The payment
deadline is 15 days prior to the start of the semester.
PAYMENT DUE DATES:
Fall Semester – July 15
Spring Semester – December 15
Summer Term – May 15
Students registering after the date of the payment deadline
are expected to make payment, have financial aid placed on their
account, or enroll in FACTS at the time of registration.
If not, a $15 non-refundable service charge and a hold will be
placed on the student’s account. Before a student is allowed to reenroll in classes, he / she must clear the outstanding balance on
his / her account and the hold will be removed.
26
If a student has enrolled in FACTS and the payments can not
be processed from the account which was provided as part of the
enrollment, the student may be administratively withdrawn from
classes.
REFUNDS
TUITION AND FEE REFUNDS
Refunds are made only if the proper procedures are followed
during the refund periods. Rend Lake College has partnered with
Higher One in order to process refunds (financial aid, dropped
classes, etc.) which are due to the students. Every student receives
an Easy Refund Card in the mail. The Easy Refund Card allows
students to choose from having their refund amounts deposited
onto a debit card or transferred to an existing account, or students
may elect to receive a paper check processed from Higher One.
A student must activate his / her Easy Refund card online at
EasyRefundCard.com in order to receive any refund owed to
him / her by the college. In the event that a student loses his / her
card, a $20 replacement fee will be charged to the student. More
information about Higher One is available in the Business Office,
located in the Administration Building.
Should a student officially withdraw from Rend Lake College
during the semester, the tuition to be refunded shall be based on
the following unless otherwise indicated for specific programs:
FALL AND / OR SPRING SEMESTER WITHDRAWAL
FROM 12- TO 16-WEEK CLASSES
REFUND
Prior to end of second week of classes
During third week of classes and thereafter
100%
0%
SUMMER AND / OR FALL-SPRING WITHDRAWAL
FROM 8-WEEK CLASSES
REFUND
Prior to end of first week of classes
100%
During second week of classes and thereafter
0%
COSMETOLOGY SCHOOL REFUNDS
Cosmetology, nail technology and barbering students should
consult the program handbook for information on withdrawing
from courses and refunds.
COMMUNITY AND CORPORATE EDUCATION REFUNDS
Refunds for Community Education-sponsored classes or
activities will be made if the cancellation is received five business
days prior to the event. Refunds for trips and tours will be made
if the cancellation is received two weeks prior to the trip.
Refunds for quick computer workshops will be made if the
cancellation is received at least two business days prior to the
start of the class.
FINES AND FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS
Students who have past-due financial obligations to Rend Lake
College, including but not limited to library fines or charges, will
not be permitted to register for classes or receive a transcript until
satisfactory arrangements have been made to meet these obligations.
Library Fines – Fines for lost, overdue or damaged materials
a student has borrowed from the Learning Resource Center will
be settled between the student and the Circulation Specialist.
DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE APPLICATION PROCESS
(www.rlc.edu/graduation)
Students must apply to receive their respective diplomas
for an Associate in Arts Degree, Associate in Science Degree,
Associate in Fine Arts Degree, Associate in Engineering Science
Degree, Associate in Applied Science Degree, or a certificate
for Occupational Certificate programs. Students who complete
the Graduation Application form will receive a pre-graduation
academic audit and be informed of any deficiencies.
Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the
responsibility of the student. Students are encouraged to be
familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to
work with their academic advisors in selecting courses.
Students may fulfill degree / certificate requirements:
• Of the catalog in effect at the time of their initial enrollment,
provided they have maintained continuous enrollment, or
• Of the catalog in effect at the time of their graduation.
Students entering under the degree and certificate requirements
cited in this catalog will continue under these requirements as
long as they are continuous students at Rend Lake College.
Standing as a continuous student is lost if either of the following
should occur: 1) The student does not complete credit classes
at Rend Lake College for two consecutive semesters, excluding
summer terms; 2) A period of five years elapses before the degree
or certificate is completed.
If students are unable to complete the requirements within
the five-year time frame, they may appeal to the Vice President
of Student Services to use a specified catalog other than the one
in effect at the time of re-enrollment or at time of graduation.
Students may be required to follow degree requirements
outlined in later catalogs when certificates, degree programs or
courses have been extensively modified from previous catalogs.
The appropriate Vice President of Instruction makes this decision.
Graduation application deadlines are:
First Friday in May – Summer graduation (July)
First Friday in September – Fall graduation (December)
First Friday in December – Spring graduation (May)
GRADUATION CEREMONY
The Commencement ceremony is the culmination of the
student’s program of study. Each May, Rend Lake College conducts
a graduation exercise whereby faculty, staff, family and friends come
together to recognize and honor academic achievements. All eligible
degree and certificate recipients are encouraged to participate in the
Commencement ceremony.
Participation in this ceremony is allowed prior to verification
of completion of final courses. The student should be within
six credit hours of fulfilling graduation requirements, and
requirements should be completed in the summer session
following May graduation. The actual degree or certificate is
posted to the official transcript and the certificate or diploma is
released when all requirements have been met and verified by the
Registrar.
DIRECTORY INFORMATION
Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended
REND LAKE COLLEGE
Under Public Law 93-380 as amended, Rend Lake College may
make accessible to any person external to the college “directory
information” concerning a student, unless that student notifies
the Office of Student Records that he or she objects to the release
of such information. Directory information is considered to be
public in nature and will be released at any time upon request
without prior approval from the student. Notice is therefore given
that directory information listed below in respect to each student
enrolled at Rend Lake College will be available to any person unless
the student files in writing with the Office of Student Records
a request to restrict release of student information to external
sources.
Rend Lake College has designated as “directory information”
for the 2013-2014 school year the following student information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Name
Dates of attendance
Fields of study
Full- or part-time status
Most recent previous institution attended
Photograph
Degrees and awards received
Participation in officially recognized activities / sports
Any student enrolled who does not wish to have released any
or all of the above items of information should contact, in person,
the Office of Student Records in the Administration Building.
Students who elect to restrict release of this information must
sign a statement to that effect. The restriction of the release of
information does not expire unless a student submits a request
in writing to the Office of Student Records.
Students wishing to verify or correct existing student directory
information must submit a request in writing to the Office of
Student Records.
ACCESS TO RECORDS
(www.rlc.edu/osr)
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
affords students certain rights with respect to their education
records. These rights include:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education
records within 45 days of the day Rend Lake College receives a
request for access.
Students should submit to the Registrar, Vice President, head
of the academic division or other appropriate official, written
requests identifying the record(s) they wish to inspect. The college
official will make arrangements for access and notify the student
of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the
records are not maintained by the college official to whom the
request is submitted, that official shall advise the student of the
correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s
education records the student believes are inaccurate.
27
Students may ask Rend Lake College to amend a record
they believe is inaccurate. They should write the college official
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record
they want changed and specify why it is inaccurate.
If Rend Lake College decides not to amend the record as
requested by the student, Rend Lake College will notify the
student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right
to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional
information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided
to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable
information contained in the student’s education records, except
to the extent FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is
disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.
A school official is a person employed by Rend Lake College in
an administrative, supervisory, academic or research or support
staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and
health staff); a person or company with whom Rend Lake College
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent);
a person serving on the Board of Trustees, or a student serving
on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance
committee, or assisting another school official in performing his
or her tasks.
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the
official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his
or her professional responsibility.
4.FERPA rights are transferred to the next of kin or legal
executor for deceased students.
28
5. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of
Education concerning alleged failures by Rend Lake College to
comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address
of the office that administers FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
c/o U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-4605
For more information on FERPA, visit the website at http://
www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html.
DISCLOSURE OF STUDENT INFORMATION TO PARENTS
When a student turns 18 years old or enters a postsecondary
institution at any age, all rights afforded to parents under FERPA
transfer to the student. However, FERPA also provides ways in
which schools may share information with parents without the
students’ consent. For example:
• Schools may disclose education records to parents if the student
is a dependent for income tax purposes.
• Schools may disclose education records to parents if a health
or safety emergency involves their son or daughter.
• Schools may inform parents if the student who is under age
21 has violated any law or its policy concerning the use or
possession of alcohol or a controlled substance.
Information from: Balancing Student Privacy and School Safety:
A Guide to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act for
Colleges and Universities, US Department of Education.
Students may sign and submit a disclosure of information form
to the Registrar allowing parents access to their student records.
FINANCIAL AID
(www.rlc.edu/financial-aid)
Financial aid comes in the form of grants, scholarships, tuition
waivers, employment and loans. Each type of aid is available at
RLC. For students who are eligible, the Financial Aid Office will
defer payment of tuition, fees and books up to the amount of the
scholarship, tuition waiver or grant they are qualified to receive.
Financial aid not used to cover direct costs will be issued to the
student through use of a Higher One debit card approximately
the tenth week of the semester.
Veterans Services are available from staff in the Financial Aid
Office.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
FINANCIAL AID REQUIREMENTS
• Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA). Make sure to release your FAFSA information to
Rend Lake College. The school code for Rend Lake College is
007119. You can fill out the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.
• You must be pursuing a degree or certificate program. Degree
programs include Associate in Arts, Associate in Science,
Associate in Fine Arts, Associate in Engineering Science and
Associate in Applied Science degrees, and certificates include
the one-year Occupational Certificates. The following level
classes are not eligible for financial aid: 1300, 1500, 1600 and
1800 level as well as all COMED classes. Short-term training
programs such as truck driver training and Certified Nurse
Assistant (CNA) are not eligible.
• If you are a male who is at least 18 years of age and born after
December 31, 1959, you must be registered with Selective
Service in order to receive financial aid.
• If you do not have a high school diploma or GED, you are not
eligible to receive federal student aid.
• You must provide any documentation requested by the
Financial Aid Office, including tax forms, if needed to complete
verification.
• Must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen.
• Not in default on student loans or owe a refund on any Title
IV funds.
• Use all funds received from Title IV financial aid programs for
expenses related to study at Rend Lake College.
• You must be enrolled in eligible courses. The amount of aid a
student is eligible to receive is adjusted for different enrollment
statuses. See chart below:
Full-time = 12 or more credit hours
Three-quarter time = 9-11 credit hours
Half-time = 6-8 credit hours
Part-time = 3-5 credit hours
The Financial Aid Office will stop adjusting federal student
aid for class withdrawals once aid is transferred to the Business
Office. Withdrawals prior to transfer may affect the amount of
financial aid a student will receive.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Eligibility to receive financial assistance is based on the
previous year’s income data. However, if your family financial
situation has recently changed for the worse because of a death,
separation / divorce or a loss of a job or benefits, you may meet
30
one of the “Special Circumstances” that will allow financial aid
eligibility to be based on expected gross income rather than
actual prior-year income. If you feel you meet one of these
circumstances, contact the Financial Aid Office.
WHEN TO APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID
For the 2015-16 school year, you can complete the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1,
2015. It is best to apply for financial aid when you have completed
your previous year’s taxes. You can complete the FAFSA at any
time during the school year, but keep in mind there are deadlines
that may eliminate you from eligibility for certain grants and
scholarships.
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID
GRANTS
Federal Grants
Pell Grant – Federa lly funded program that helps
undergraduates pay for a college education. Based on financial
need and does not have to be paid back. Current range: $595$5,730. The Federal Pell Grant provides gift money for collegerelated expenses to students demonstrating financial need. To
apply, a student needs to fill out the FAFSA.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
(FSEOG) – Federally funded program to help students with the
greatest financial need. Current range: $200-$600. All students
who fill out the FAFSA will be considered for FSEOG, with awards
going to students demonstrating exceptional need.
State of Illinois Grants
Monetary Award Program (MAP) – Provides gift money
for payment toward tuition to eligible students who are and have
been Illinois residents for a year prior to the start of the academic
year. This grant is based on financial need as determined from
information obtained from the FAFSA application.
STUDENT LOANS
Student loan opportunities are available at Rend Lake College.
Students should consult the Financial Aid office for information
regarding student loans.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
The Financial Aid Office administers both the Federal WorkStudy and the Institutional Work-Study program. To apply for
student employment, students must complete the FAFSA form
and a Rend Lake College student employment application. Student
employment is available to students enrolled at least half-time,
with priority given to full-time students.
RLC TUITION WAIVERS
Tuition waiver recipients are selected by Deans and sponsors
of some student activities. Tuition waivers are awarded for four
regular academic year semesters and can be extended for two
summer terms (with the exception of Music, Theatre and Welding,
which are one-year awards). The recipient must:
• Be a full-time student
• Maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher for each semester and a 2.0 GPA
overall.
• Must fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) each academic year of the tuition waiver and have a
student aid report on file with the Financial Aid office.
More information is available from the Financial Aid office
in the Administration Building, Ext. 1298.
Free Tuition for In-District High School Students – The cost
of tuition is free for in-district high school students taking Rend
Lake College dual credit classes, and tuition up to eight hours
per semester is waived for in-district high school students taking
dual enrollment classes. Students need to apply to Rend Lake
College and receive permission from a high school official to
enroll in classes at Rend Lake College. Fees and books are still the
responsibility of the student. High school students must be junior
or senior status or 16 years or older to take college classes through
dual credit or dual enrollment. For more information, contact
the Academic Advisement Center at (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1266.
Presidential Scholarship Award – Presidential Scholarships
are awarded to high school seniors within the Rend Lake College
district. To be eligible, a student must have high class rank covering
seven semesters and be in the upper 10% of his / her graduating
class. One waiver may be awarded per in-district high school. This
full tuition waiver may be renewed for a second year as long as the
student maintains a 2.5 GPA. Students should contact their high
school counselor if they believe they may qualify.
High Achievers Scholastic Award – The High Achievers
Scholastic Award covers the cost of tuition and books for two years,
including summers, at Rend Lake College. It is awarded to indistrict high school students scoring a 27 or higher composite score
on the ACT test who enroll at RLC immediately after graduating
high school. For more information, contact the Financial Aid
Office at (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1297.
Foundation – The Rend Lake College Foundation offers a variety
of scholarships each academic year. Please refer to the Foundation
section for more information.
HOPE CREDIT
The Hope Credit is a tax credit. Tax credits are subtracted
directly from the tax a family owes, rather than reducing taxable
income like a tax deduction.
A family may claim a tax credit of up to $1,500 per tax year
for each eligible dependent. This can be done for up to two tax
years. A family may claim up to 100% of the first $1,000 of eligible
expenses and 50% of the next $1,000 for a maximum credit of
$1,500.
The actual amount of the credit depends on the family’s
income, the amount of qualified tuition and fees paid and the
amount of certain scholarships and allowances subtracted from
tuition. The total maximum credit is based on the number of
eligible dependents.
The taxpayer must claim the eligible student as a dependent,
unless the credit is for the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse. To be
eligible, a student must be enrolled at least half-time in an eligible
program leading to a degree or certificate.
*A student may be able to take a tuition and fees deduction
for their educational expenses instead of the Hope credit. You can
choose the one that will give you the lower tax.
For more information regarding eligibility for the Hope Credit,
please contact the RLC Business Office, your tax preparer or the
IRS.
FINANCIAL AID SATISFACTORY PROGRESS POLICY
The Rend Lake College Office of Financial Aid is required
by the United States Department of Education and the Illinois
Student Assistance Commission to monitor the academic progress
for students receiving federal and / or state financial assistance.
Satisfactory Progress Standards are used to ensure that students
who receive any federal or state assistance are satisfactorily
progressing toward their educational goals in an approved
certificate or degree program.
Students must be in compliance with the Financial Aid
Satisfactory Progress Policy regardless of whether the student has
previously received any financial aid. All semesters of attendance
are included in the evaluation. All transfer course work that has
been accepted for credit by Rend Lake College will be considered
in determining eligibility. Students who have not previously
received financial aid will not be notified of their status until they
have applied for financial aid.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS REQUIREMENTS
Satisfactory Progress must include qualitative and quantitative
measurement consistently applied to all students. At Rend Lake
College these measurements are determined by the following
criteria:
1. Cumulative Grade Point Average is at least 2.0
2. Cumulative Completion Rate is no less than 67% (total
credit hours earned divided by total credit hours attempted)
Grades of “A,” “B,” “C” and “D” are considered completed. Grades
of “I,” “W” or “E” are not considered completions. Courses that
have been repeated remain in attempted hours, but are removed
from earned hours and the lowest grades are excluded from the
GPA. No more than 30 remedial / deficiency hours will be allowed
for financial aid benefits.
Financial Aid Warning Status
A student who fails to meet the above-named requirements
for the first time will be placed on Financial Aid Warning
Status. Financial Aid Warning Status will have no impact on the
eligibility for financial aid.
Financial Aid Suspension
Suspension of financial aid occurs when a student who is on
Financial Aid Probation fails to meet the Satisfactory Progress
Requirements criteria during any semester of attendance after being
placed on probation. Students who are suspended are no longer
eligible for financial aid benefits.
Maximum Time Frame
Degree or certificate requirements must be completed within
a specified time period. At Rend Lake College, a student must
complete his / her chosen academic program before attempting
150% of the number of hours required for the program. Students
who have already earned a degree will be considered to have
exceeded this time frame. Appeal Process: Students who are
pursuing an additional degree or certificate or have changed
majors are eligible to file an appeal for an extension. The 150%
appeal forms are available from the Financial Aid and Veterans
Affairs Office. Appeals are reviewed by the Student Services
Appeals Committee.
Satisfactory progress will be evaluated at the end of each
semester.
31
Appeal Process
Students must submit proof that circumstances that were
unforeseen or beyond their control that interfered with the
successful completion of their courses or program. Situations
that are acceptable for an appeal to be considered include:
• Serious injury or illness
• Death of an immediate family member
• Sudden, unexpected employment changes
• Suspension is a result of courses taken during high school
• It has been more than five (5) years since the student last
attended Rend Lake College
Some situations are not acceptable reasons for filing an appeal.
These circumstances include, but are not limited to:
• Conflicts with an instructor
• Incarceration
• Loss of driver’s license
• Failure to drop a class by the posted deadline
• Failure to be adequately prepared for class, such as:
ºº Not purchasing books/supplies
ºº Not having adequate child care arrangements prior to the
start of the semester
ºº Not having reliable transportation established prior to the
start of the semester
ºº Not having access to a computer or the internet for online
courses
ºº Being unprepared for college level coursework
Failing to understand or being unaware of Rend Lake College’s
policies does not constitute a reason for appeal.
Students who do not have a situation that warrants an appeal
may regain financial aid eligibility by enrolling in courses, on a
self-pay basis, until their cumulative GPA is a 2.0 and cumulative
completion rate is 67%.
32
Appeals for Students with a Degree/Certificate or Have
Exceeded Maximum Time Frame
You may appeal for an extension of credit hours if:
• You are pursuing a new degree or certificate at Rend Lake
College
• You have changed your major
• You have taken developmental courses or dual credit courses
• You have mitigating circumstances such as a personal illness
or injury, death of an immediate family member, or an
unavoidable event that was beyond your control
Students who feel they meet the criteria for filing a Suspension
of Maximum Time Frame Appeal may obtain forms from the
Financial Aid Office. Completed forms must be submitted by the
Friday before the applicable semester begins to be considered.
Students will be notified by mail of their appeal status. The
decision of the Appeals Committee is final.
RETURN OF FUNDS
Students who receive Federal Title IV Funds (Pell Grant, SEOG
Grant) and stop attending classes, withdraw from classes, receive
all failing grades, or a combination of withdrawals and failing
grades are subject to a return of Title IV Funds. This may result
in the student owing a refund to the college, the Federal Student
Aid Program, or both.
Example: A student’s financial aid consists of a Pell Grant of
$1,500, and the student’s tuition is $672. The student withdraws
on the 26th day of a 118-day semester. The student is eligible for
22% of $1,500, or $330. The college would return $1,170 ($1,500
- $330) to the U.S. Department of Education, and the student
would owe the college $342 ($672-$330).
INFORMATION
Questions about the college, its programs, courses, services,
activities, current events, registration, faculty and facilities can
be directed to the college’s Communications and Information
Administrative Assistant at (618) 437-5321. Inquiries will then
be directed to the appropriate division or administrative office
to be answered. Brochures about academic programs, academic
support services and student services, catalogs and the Student
Rights and Responsibilities Handbook are available upon request
and also in the Administration Building on campus.
Access to answers to questions students may have also are
available online, as is access to student records. Once students
create an account, they will have access to: grade reports, unofficial
transcripts, transcript requests, class schedules, mailing address
updates, financial aid information and Business Office balances.
Students preparing to register should have a valid email
address, date of birth and college I.D. number. To register, contact
the Academic Advisement Center.
ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT CENTER
Academic Advisement Center staff are available to assist
students with:
• career development and goal setting
• educational planning
• assessment for placement and credit purposes
• scheduling of classes
• linking with campus activities and services
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND GOAL SETTING
The RLC Virtual Career Center is available 24 hours a day,
seven days a week and is accessible at www.rlc.edu/vcc.
EDUCATIONAL PLANNING
Academic advisors are available to assist students with
developing educational plans and learning to monitor progress
toward those plans. Advisors can provide information about
transferring to four-year institutions.
ASSESSMENT FOR PLACEMENT AND CREDIT PURPOSES
•Placement – Students need to take the COMPASS /
ASSET test if they plan to take a math class, an English class or
a class with a reading prerequisite. All students registering for
12 or more credit hours or students who have accumulated 12
credit hours must take the assessment test prior to registration.
For more information, please visit www.rlc.edu/admissions.
They are exempt if they scored at least a 20 in English, a 20 in
Reading and a 22 in Math on the ACT or a 490 in English and a
520 in Math on the SAT. Testing takes place on a daily basis on
campus with other testing dates and times scheduled as needed.
Test scores are valid for five years. Students are allowed to take
the COMPASS / ASSET test a maximum of two times after the
beginning of the student’s senior year in high school.
•College credit by examination – Students may elect to
earn college credit by demonstrating proficiency in subject area
examinations.
CLEP – College-Level Examination Program
General and Subject Examinations
COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
Through the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP),
Rend Lake College provides a means for academically talented
34
students to demonstrate mastery of certain courses or subject
areas. College credit is given for general and subject examinations
taken if a score of 50 or higher is achieved. CLEP rules are subject to
modifications as the college departments change requirements and
as the tests themselves are revised. Since each college determines
its own transfer policies, there is no guarantee that credit granted
by Rend Lake College for CLEP will be accepted at another school.
CLEP tests may be taken on campus in the Developmental Skills
Center. Students must request the Educational Testing Service
(ETS) to send an official copy of the examination results to the
Vice President of Student Services Office.
Students wishing to receive credit through the CollegeLevel Examination Program must obtain the permission of the
appropriate Dean and the Vice President of Instruction prior to
taking the test.
Rend Lake College will allow CLEP credit for scores of 50 or
above as follows:
Receives Credit for
CLEP TEST
Rend Lake College Course
Mathematics
MATH 1107
College Algebra
MATH 1108
Trigonometry
MATH 1109
Algebra/Trigonometry
MATH 1110
Calculus
MATH 1121
Macroeconomics
ECON 2101
Microeconomics
ECON 2102
Biology
BIO 1100
Chemistry
CHE 1101
American Government
POLI 2101
American Literature
ENGL 2111 and 2112
Educational Psychology
PSYC 2103
English Composition (With essay)
ENGL 1101
English Literature
ENGL 2109 and 2110
French
FREN 1101, 1102, 2101 and 2102
German
GRMN 1101, 1102, 2101 and 2102
History of the United States I
HIST 2101
History of the United States II
HIST 2102
Human Growth & Development
PSYC 2102
Humanities
HUMT 1105
Psychology
PSYC 2101
Sociology
SOCI 1101
Spanish
SPAN 1101, 1102, 2101 and 2102
Western Civilization I
HIST 1101
Western Civilization II
HIST 1102
Information Systems & Computer Applications
CSCI 1101
General rules which govern the granting of CLEP credit:
1. Once a student has been enrolled in a course longer than
the normal refund period, the student may not receive CLEP
credit for that course. CLEP credit can not be used to repeat a
course.
2. CLEP credit will be accepted for up to 25% of the credit
hours required for the certificate or degree awarded. No more
than 25% of the hours needed for a certificate or degree can be
earned by CLEP or any combination of Credit By Means Other
Than Classroom Attendance.
3. A student may not take a CLEP exam for a lower-level
course once he / she has received credit for a higher-level course.
4. Students will receive the grade of “CR” on their transcript
for the course for which credit is granted for College Level
Examination Program general and subject examinations. For
specific information, students should consult the Vice President
of Instruction, the Director of the Developmental Skills Center,
or the Academic Advisement Center.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDITS
Through the high school Advanced Placement (AP) Program,
high school students may apply for advanced placement
college credit. Advanced Placement classes are offered in area
high schools in such subjects as English composition, foreign
language, history, biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics.
A national examination administered through the Educational
Testing Service is given in each subject at the end of the year.
Each examination is intended to measure the achievement of
students and to determine at what point students should begin
college study of that subject. To receive Rend Lake College credit,
students must earn a score of 3, 4, or 5, and must request the
Educational Testing Service (ETS) to send an official copy of the
examination results to the Vice President of Student Services
Office. The examination results must be received by Rend Lake
College prior to the student taking the course for which credit
is sought. Credit will be placed on the student’s transcript after
the student successfully completes 12 credit hours of study at
Rend Lake College. Advanced Placement credit is not used in
computing a student’s grade-point average. Students may only
receive credit for one Rend Lake College course per subject area
via Advanced Placement credit. For specific information, students
should consult the Vice President of Instruction.
Rend Lake College will allow Advanced Placement credit for
scores of 3, 4, or 5 as follows:
Advanced Placement Course
AP Language and Composition
AP Literature and Composition
AP Biology
AP American History A
AP American History B
AP Calculus
Receives Credit for
Rend Lake College Course
ENGL 1101
ENGL 1101
BIO 1101
HIST 2101
HIST 2102
MATH 1121
PROFICIENCY CREDIT
Proficiency examinations offer students the opportunity
to obtain credit for experience relevant to certain courses, for
individual study of subjects, or for prior learning including
courses taken at unaccredited institutions.
Credit earned by proficiency examination in a course is
equivalent to credit earned by enrollment in that course for the
purposes of satisfying a requirement.
A student who wants to earn credit by taking a proficiency
exam must obtain a Proficiency Examination Request from
the departmental Dean. The student should complete the form,
obtain necessary signatures and present the completed form to the
Business Office where appropriate charges will be applied to the
student’s account. Once payment is complete the student should
present the form to the instructor. The instructor will administer
the proficiency exam, complete the exam record and submit it to
the Dean. The Dean will submit the form to the appropriate Vice
President, who will then transfer the form to Student Records.
While the college recognizes proficiency credit can be a
legitimate form of assessing student knowledge outside of
the traditional classroom setting, it will be the practice of the
college to grant this form of credit only in rare and extenuating
circumstances. Each request will be evaluated on its own merit
and the decision of the Vice President of Instruction will be final.
Rend Lake College also recognizes there are several varieties
of industry-recognized certifications. The administration
will evaluate whether to grant proficiency credit for industry
certification on a request-by-request basis. There is no guarantee
that the college will grant proficiency credit for industryrecognized certification.
Content of the proficiency credit examination will be
determined solely by the full-time instructor or instructors of
the course and the Dean responsible for the program for which
proficiency credit is sought. In the event the course is only taught
by a part-time instructor, that instructor and the Dean will
determine the content of the examination. A minimum score of
80% will be required to pass any proficiency test given by Rend
Lake College.
General rules which govern the granting of proficiency credit:
1. Once a student has been enrolled in a course longer than
the normal refund period, the student may not take a proficiency
test for that course. Proficiency tests can not be used to repeat
courses and may be taken only one time in a given course.
2. Departmental proficiency examinations are equated to
and evaluated as specific courses.
3. Proficiency credit will be accepted for up to 25% of the credit
hours required for the certificate or degree awarded. No more than
25% of the hours needed for a certificate or degree can be earned by
Proficiency Credit or any combination of Credit By Means Other
Than Classroom Attendance.
4. A student may not take a proficiency test for a lower-level
course once he / she has received credit for a higher-level course.
5. A student taking a proficiency test shall receive a letter
grade. A score of 80% or higher will be required to pass a
Proficiency Examination. A score below 80% will be considered
failing and will be reflected on the transcript as an “E”. Letter
grades will be reflected on the student’s transcript and will be
calculated in the student’s GPA.
SCHEDULING OF CLASSES
Advisors facilitate course selection and scheduling during
individual student appointments. Refer to the Registration
Procedures section for more specific information.
CONTACT INFORMATION
During the fall and spring semesters, advisors are available
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. During the summer term, advisors are
available from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. The
Academic Advisement Center is located in the Administration
Building and can be reached at (618) 437-5321, Ext. 1266.
ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT (CLERY REPORT)
As required by law, the annual security report for Rend Lake
College is available at www.rlc.edu/securityreport. The report
addresses the policies, procedures, and programs concerning
safety and security for Rend Lake College as well as statistics
for certain types of crimes that were reported to have occurred
on campus, in or on off-campus buildings or property owned
or controlled by the school and on public property within or
immediately adjacent to the campus. A paper copy is available
from the Rend Lake College Police Department located in the
Student Center.
35
CAMPUS SECURITY AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE
Security personnel are available to protect campus property,
assist students and staff and to respond to emergency situations
24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Security Office is located
in the Student Center and is headed by the Chief of Police.
Non-emergency information and any other routine, securityrelated matters should be reported by calling Ext. 1212. In
emergency situations, Security may be reached during normal
hours of operation through the switchboard (Ext. “0”) or by calling
Ext. 1911 and at other times by calling 1-618-525-1911 or utilizing
emergency phones provided in campus buildings. Security also
may be reached from any classroom or hallway phone by pressing
the emergency button and waiting at least 30 seconds.
Articles which are found on campus should be turned in to
the Security Office. Students should inquire about lost articles at
the same location.
As noted above, the annual security report for Rend Lake
College is available at www.rlc.edu/securityreport. A paper copy
is available from the Rend Lake College Police Department office.
COMMUNICATIONS LAB
Located in Room 125 of the North Oasis, the Communications
Lab is available to help students through the process of individual
or group presentations. Students can obtain assistance with any
part of the process, from choosing a topic, outlining the speech,
fine tuning and the presentation itself. To set up an appointment,
ask a quick question or find more information, email the
Communications Lab staff at [email protected]
DINING SERVICES
Subway, located in the Student Center, offers breakfast, lunch
and dinner for students and staff. Hours of operation during the
regular academic year are 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
and 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Fridays.
DISABILITY ACCESS SERVICES
The college offers services for students with documented
disabilities. The impact of the disability is individually reviewed
and reasonable accommodations are determined that will provide
equal access to the classes and programs at the college.
If you believe you are eligible for disability services, please
contact the Disability Access Services office, Ext. 1204, in North
Oasis Room 130.
LAND OF LINCOLN / SOUTHERN SEVEN AMERICORPS
Land of Lincoln / Southern Seven AmeriCorps is a community
service project, with the primary goal of its members to meet
educational needs by tutoring and mentoring in local community
grade schools and adult learning centers. Members also provide
additional community service in other areas such as safety
and public health, homeland security, human services and the
environment. They participate in the National Service Days – USA
Freedom Act, Make a Difference Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
and National Youth Service Day and Volunteer Week. Members are
eligible to receive stipends and an education award. The education
award varies from $2,362.50 to $4,725, depending upon whether
a member serves approximately 20 hours or 34 hours each week.
For more information, please contact the AmeriCorps office in the
Advanced Technology Center, Room 109, or call Ext. 1345.
36
LEARNING ENHANCEMENT CENTER
(www.rlc.edu/lec)
The purpose of the Rend Lake College Learning Enhancement
Program is to provide academic support and transition services
to students. The college has a firm commitment to values of
industriousness, honesty, respect and accountability. The
Learning Enhancement Center provides a quiet atmosphere
that fosters a learning environment. Tutors are provided to assist
students in core subject areas and workshops are conducted to
provide transition assistance. The Learning Enhancement Center
also houses test proctoring services for the Rend Lake College
campus. The Learning Enhancement Center is located in the
North Oasis. Learning Enhancement representatives may be
reached at Ext. 1204.
LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER
(www.rlc.edu/lrc)
The Learning Resource Center provides resources and
facilities for study, research, leisure reading, class preparation and
Internet access. The center has a book collection of approximately
20,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 105 periodicals
and 18 daily newspapers. In addition to print materials, the LRC
provides on-line access to more than 83 electronic databases,
journals, reference materials and library catalogs. A collection
of audiovisual materials, including videotapes, CDs and DVDs,
are available. The open computer lab also is located in the LRC.
The Learning Resource Center is a member the Southern Illinois
Learning Resources Cooperative (SILRC), Network of Illinois
Learning Resources in Community Colleges (NILRC), Consortium
of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI) and the
Illinois Heartland Library System. These memberships expand
access to resources and services that support the information needs
of our students, faculty, staff and community users. For additional
information, please call Ext. 1308.
MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES
Security personnel may be reached in emergency medical
situations during normal hours of operation through the
switchboard (Ext. “0”) or by calling Ext. 1911, and at other times
by calling 1-618-527-HELP or utilizing the red emergency phones
provided in buildings on campus. The Security Office is located
in the Student Center.
PARKING
Parking lots on campus are available to faculty, staff, students
and visitors. The college reserves the right to ticket illegally parked
vehicles and / or tow them at the owner’s expense. All students must
obtain a parking decal, available in the Administration Building.
There is a speed limit on all the entrance drives and roads
around the campus. Penalties for parking violations are fines that
may be paid by mail or in person to the cashier in the Business
Office, located in the Administration Building.
Students needing a handicap parking sticker should contact
Security in the Student Center.
PERKINS PROGRAM
The Perkins Program offers assistance to qualified career and
technical education students. Services offered include tutoring,
child care payments, transportation reimbursement, certain lab
fees, books and supplies. In order to qualify, you must receive a
Pell Grant, be a career and technical education major and have
completed 12 semester hours with a grade-point average of 2.0 or
better. More information is available by contacting the Perkins
Coordinator in the Student Center, Room 105, or at Ext. 1267.
REND LAKE COLLEGE FOUNDATION CHILDREN’S CENTER
The Rend Lake College Foundation Children’s Center serves
students as a quality child care facility and doubles as a training
complex for students in the Early Childhood Education program. It
also serves as a model for other child care facilities within the district.
Children 6 weeks through 5 years of age may enroll in the center’s
full-day program that emphasizes developmentally appropriate
curriculum featuring art, music, and indoor / outdoor learning
centers utilizing integrated and cooperative learning techniques.
Pre-enrollment is conducted after each semester’s advisement
period. Rend Lake College students wishing to enroll their
children in the center should contact the RLCF Children’s Center
Director at Ext. 1393.
RETAIL STORE
The Rend Lake College Retail Store, located in the Academic
Building, has classroom supplies such as lab materials,
architecture needs, tapes, computer disks, welding supplies
and art materials available for purchase. Apparel featuring the
college’s logo and name is available in women’s and men’s sizes.
Gifts and miscellaneous items also are stocked.
SMOKING POLICY
Rend Lake College is in compliance with the Smoke Free
Illinois Act, effective January 1, 2008, and Illinois’ Smoke-Free
Campus Act, effective July 1, 2015.
STUDENT TRANSFER AND RETENTION SUPPORT (STARS)
The Student Transfer and Retention Support (STARS)
program is a federally funded TRIO program designed to provide
participants with the support services they need to successfully
complete an Associate Degree and transfer to a four-year college
or university. Services include personal and academic counseling,
assistance with financial aid, study skills workshops, cultural
activities, visits to four-year universities, and transfer assistance.
The STARS program serves 160 students per year.
Rend Lake College students may apply for the STARS program
at any time. Eligibility requirements include meeting low-income
guidelines, being a first-generation college student (i.e., neither
parent has graduated from a four-year college or university) or
a student with a documented disability. More information is
available by contacting the STARS program in the South Oasis
(Rooms 108/110/111/113, Ext. 1366) or at www.rlc.edu/stars.
TEXTBOOK RENTAL CENTER
(www.rlc.edu/bookstore)
Rend Lake College is an innovative regional leader in the
textbook rental program. Having one of the lowest tuitions in
the state and the textbook rental program helps make RLC one
of the most affordable colleges in the state.
The textbook rental program charges $56 per book, $20 of
which is a deposit fee returned to the student when the book is
returned in good condition at the end of the semester. Textbooks
may be purchased or rented; sets of video lessons may be rented
for the semester.
The book return policy is as follows:
• Students must have a sales receipt
•Books must have been purchased for the semester in which
they are being returned
• Books should be in new condition, unless purchased used
• Books must be returned within a specified time (posted prior
to each semester) for a cash refund; after the specified cutoff date,
all books are non-returnable until buyback dates
Used textbook buybacks are conducted at the beginning and
end of each semester. Dates are posted in the Bookstore, which is
located in the Academic Building, and on campus bulletin boards.
TUTORING ASSISTANCE
Tutoring is a free service available to all Rend Lake College
students. Tutoring is designed to help students in their class work
and prepare for tests. Assistance and more information is available
by calling Ext. 1204.
UPWARD BOUND PROGRAM
The Upward Bound program is a federally funded TRIO
college preparatory program designed to provide academic
support, personal / career counseling and cultural enrichment to
eligible participants who have the academic ability to be successful
in college. The ultimate goal of Rend Lake College’s Upward
Bound program is to foster motivation and the pre-collegiate
academic skills necessary for success in education beyond high
school. The program is open to ninth-, 10th- and 11th-grade
students from Benton, Hamilton County, Mt. Vernon and ZeiglerRoyalton high schools.
More information is available by contacting a member of the
Upward Bound staff in the South Oasis, Rooms 108/109/113/115,
and at Ext. 1366/1219/1365/1236, or by visiting www.rlc.edu/
upward-bound.
WIRELESS EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM
(www.rlc.edu/wens)
The Wireless Emergency Notification System (WENS) allows
RLC students, family and friends, as well as faculty, staff and
administration, to receive emergency text and email notifications.
WENS allows an “RLC Alert” to be sent to your cell phone as a
text message and as an email if you choose.
WENS is meant to be used for emergency and significant event
notification only. The message may alert you to an emergency
situation such as weather warnings including flash flood, severe
thunderstorm, winter storm, and tornado warnings, as well as
school closings and emergencies on the campus. The messages
are short and meant only as an initial notification. For more
detailed information, RLC uses redundant systems of emergency
notification such as the telephone, RLC website, email, radio, and
person-to person contact to distribute news and instructions
during an emergency.
WRITING CENTER
The Writing Center is available to students who want
assistance with writing projects, from selecting a topic to
developing ideas to editing. The center is located in North Oasis
138. For an appointment, questions or more information, email
[email protected]
37
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
(www.rlc.edu/student-handbook)
Rend Lake College publishes a separate Student Handbook
which incorporates the college’s Rights and Responsibilities
Policies for students as well as a listing of pertinent college dates
and a student activities calendar. This handbook is available free
of charge to all students and can be obtained in various locations
on campus, including the Administration Building, Retail Store,
Textbook Store and Learning Resource Center, as well as online
at www.rlc.edu.
The regulations contained in the handbook – and the penalties
and sanctions for their violation – are published in order to
assist in the maintenance of a sound educational environment
for students at the college. This handbook applies to conduct on
premises or property owned, controlled or supervised by Rend
Lake College, including all off-campus instructional sites and
extracurricular activities.
The handbook also describes the privileges of student status
at Rend Lake College. Abuse of a privilege may result in the
imposition of sanctions as described in the handbook. The
handbook includes policies on Electronic Network Access, DrugFree Environment and Non-Harassment.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Opportunities for the development of leadership, social
and interpersonal relationships, skills and character are made
available to RLC students through organizations and activities
on-campus.
STUDENT CLUBS and ORGANIZATIONS
The college has many clubs and organizations to meet the
needs of students. Currently, students may participate in such
student organizations and clubs as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
38
AgriAchievers
Agriculture Club
Art League
Automotive Club
Cheer
CMYK Club (Graphic Design)
Community Action Team
Computer Club
College Bowl
Creative Writing Club
Culinary Arts Club
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
International Studies
Lamda Nu (Radiology)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual and Allies
Musical Notes Society
Nursing Club
Outdoor Adventure Klub (OAK)
Business Club
Phi Theta Kappa (Honor Society)
Radiology Club
Skills USA
Society for Leadership and Success
Student Ambassadors
Thespians Club
CHEER
Rend Lake College’s cheerleading squad performs at all home
men’s basketball games. Tryouts are held Spring Semester of the
preceding year. Further information may be obtained from the
Student Services Department in the Administration Building or
on the RLC Athletics web page at www.rlc.edu/warriors.
COLLEGE BOWL
College Bowl is the varsity sport of the mind. The team competes
with schools in the Southern Illinois Collegiate Common Market
(SICCM) conference – Frontier, John A. Logan, Kaskaskia,
Shawnee, Southeastern Illinois and Southwestern Illinois – and
travels to other tournaments as well. Rend Lake College won the
first statewide “Academics Olympics” competition in 1993, and
five more South-East Region championships, including second
in the state in 2000, third in 1996, 2003 and 2010 and fourth in
1999, 2002 and 2009. Rend Lake College also won the SICCM
crown six straight seasons between 1990 and 1995 and 10 of 15
overall through the 1999-2000 season.
PHI THETA KAPPA
Rend Lake College boasts Rho Xi, a local chapter of Phi Theta
Kappa, the International Honor Society for two-year community
colleges. Phi Theta Kappa is the community college equivalent
of Phi Beta Kappa, the honor society at senior institutions.
Membership is available to students who have completed at least
12 credit hours and maintained a cumulative grade-point average
of 3.5 or better.
STUDENT AMBASSADORS
Student Ambassadors represent the college in a variety of
activities. This may include planning and participating in campus
activities such as Fun Fest and Homecoming, as well as assisting
with campus tours, high school visits and career / college fairs.
RECREATION AREAS
A large-screen television, pool tables and a ping-pong table are
available for students to use without charge in the South Oasis.
The Aquatics Center is available to students on a membership
basis or for a small fee during recreational hours. Limited sports
equipment is made available to students, faculty and staff for
participation in other recreational activities. To take advantage of
the available equipment, individuals should check with a member
of the physical education staff in the athletic office, which is located
in Waugh Gymnasium. This includes bicycles for use on the bicycle
trail around the perimeter of the campus and practice golf balls
for use on the driving range on-campus.
Students are permitted to make use of the gym floor when it
does not interfere with classes or other scheduled activities.
Starting just north of the theater, the Rend Lake College Disc
Golf Course spans 9 holes and ranges from 3,800 feet from the
red tees to 4,200 from the blue tees. Disc golf is a sport not unlike
regular golf in that you’re trying to throw a disc – or specialized
Frisbee – into a basket in the fewest number of throws. Discs are
available for purchase at the RLC Bookstore and can be rented for
the day from the Fitness Center with a student ID.
PERFORMING ARTS
Rend Lake College provides opportunities for talented
individuals in the performing arts through various music and
theatre events. For the most part, these performing groups are
open to RLC students as well as the general public.
Instrumental and Choral ensembles are offered in both the
Fall and Spring Semesters. Students may earn college credit for
participation in these ensembles. These groups perform at college
functions as well as a variety of other events (i.e. basketball games,
Christmas and Spring concerts, commencement, etc.). More
information regarding registration, rehearsals, and performances
is available by contacting Ext. 1817.
The Rend Lake College Theatre Department offers classes
in acting and theatre. Each year, the RLC Theatre program is
committed to producing two shows – a fall play and a spring
children’s show. Auditions for the shows are open to students and
community members who want to gain experience and training
on the stage. The Theatre Instructor is responsible for the classes
and producing the RLC shows and can be reached at Ext. 1295.
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
Rend Lake College is a member of the Great Rivers Athletic
Conference (GRAC), comprised of community colleges which
also belong to the National Junior College Athletic Association
(NJCAA) and are in close proximity to one another. Other
members are Kaskaskia College (Centralia), Lake Land College
(Mattoon), Lincoln Trail College (Robinson), John A. Logan
College (Carterville), Olney Central College, Southeastern Illinois
College (Harrisburg), Southwestern Illinois College (formerly
Belleville Area) and Wabash Valley College (Mt. Carmel). Warrior
/ Lady Warrior teams compete in men and women’s basketball;
baseball; softball; men and women’s golf; men and women’s crosscountry; men and women’s track and field (indoor and outdoor);
women’s tennis, and women’s volleyball.
In 2013, the RLC mens’ basketball team won the Division II
national championship.
In just its second year of existence, the Warriors won the 2001
NJCAA Division II Men’s Cross-Country Championship. They
repeated national honors in both 2002 and 2003, and won the
Division I Championship in 2006 and 2009. At the Indoor Track
and Field Nationals, Warriors and Lady Warriors took individual
D-I titles in 2008.
The men’s golf team was runner-up in the 1995 and 2005
NJCAA D-II National Championships, third in 1996, fifth in 1997
and 2000 and sixth in 1998 and 1999. In 2009, golfer David Griffin
became RLC’s first national golf champion (D-II) by winning the
NJCAA Men’s Championship at Scottsboro, Ala. The women’s golf
team has won eight Region XXIV crowns in the last decade and
has advanced to the NJCAA Division I National Championships
nine of the last 10 years, with a high finish of fourth place. The
softball team is a two-time GRAC championship team (1994 and
2000) and advanced to the NJCAA Division I National Fast-Pitch
Championships in 1996. The Women’s Tennis team has advanced
to the NJCAA Championships four of the last five years.
39
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
• Radio/TV Broadcasting
• Telecommunications Technology
Rend Lake College offers programs that include courses in
liberal arts and sciences and general education; adult education
courses; courses in career and technical fields leading directly
to employment; community service and continuing education
programs, and college preparatory programs that meet the needs
of students deficient in fundamental skills.
Illinois Eastern Community Colleges students may take the
following programs at Rend Lake College:
(www.rlc.edu/academic-home)
INTERDISTRICT COMPREHENSIVE AGREEMENT REGARDING THE
EXPANSION OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
Rend Lake College is part of an interdistrict Comprehensive
Agreement Regarding the Expansion of Educational Resources
(CAREER). This agreement among 28 Illinois community colleges
allows students to take a career technical program at another
college if their sending college does not offer that program.
Participating colleges are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Black Hawk College
Carl Sandburg College
Danville Community College
Elgin Community College
Heartland Community College
Highland Community College
Illinois Central College
Illinois Valley Community College
John Wood Community College
Joliet Junior College
Kankakee Community College
Kaskaskia College
Kishwaukee College
Lake Land College
Lewis and Clark Community College
Lincoln Land Community College
McHenry County College
Moraine Valley Community College
Morton College
Prairie State College
Rend Lake College
Richland Community College
Rock Valley College
Sauk Valley Community College
South Suburban College
Southwestern Illiois College
Spoon River College
Waubonsee Community College
RECIPROCAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM AGREEMENTS
The following selected programs are available at in-district
tuition rates at the other community college indicated. Prior
to registration at the cooperating colleges, students should
complete the joint agreement application available online at
www.rlc.edu/student-docs. These agreements are subject to
change with approval of the RLC Board of Trustees.
Illinois Eastern Community Colleges
Rend Lake College students may take the following programs
at Illinois Eastern Community Colleges:
•
•
•
•
•
•
42
Collision Repair Technology
Electrical Distribution Systems
Gunsmithing
Industrial Leadership & Organization
Industrial Maintenance HVAC I
Process Technology
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Architectural CAD
Architectural Technology
Computed Tomography
Culinary Arts Management
Baking & Pastry Arts
Green Facilities Management
MRI
Surveying Technology
John A. Logan College
Rend Lake College students may take the following programs
at John A. Logan College:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Accounting
ASL/Deaf Studies
Automotive Collision Technology
Business Management
Computer Forensics
Construction Management Technology
Construction Trades Technology
Customer Service
Dental Assisting
Dental Hygiene
Diagnostic Cardiac Sonography
Electrical Engineering Technology
Heating/Air Conditioning Technology
Heating/Air Conditioning Installer
Heating/Air Electrical Specialist
Heating/Air Conditioning, Residential Cooling and
Refrigeration
HVAC Energy Efficiency
HVAC Energy Management Systems
HVAC Green Technologies
HVAC Performance Systems
Information Systems and Accounting
Interpreter Preparation
Medical Assistant
Virtual Assistant
All mutually approved interactive courses in the distance
learning program.
All Department of Corrections training courses.
All mutually approved Occupational Safety & Health
Administration (OSHA) training. John A. Logan College students may take the following
programs at Rend Lake College:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Agricultural Business
Agricultural Mechanics
Agricultural Production and Management
Agriculture
Architectural Technology
Architectural CAD
Computer Programming
Programming with Visual Basic
Criminal Justice, Private Protection
Culinary Arts
Culinary Arts Management
Baking and Pastry Arts
Diesel Technology
Ford MLR
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Graphic Web Design
Green Facilities Management
Heavy Equipment Technology
Industrial Electrical & Maintenance Technology
Basic Machining
Industrial Maintenance Technician
IT Systems Assistant
Microsoft User
IT Systems Specialist
Cisco Routing and Switching
PC Maintenance
Windows
Manufacturing Technology
Mining Technology
Advanced Mining
Mine Electricity
Mine Mechanics
Mine Operations
Mine Supervisory
Nail Technology
Phlebotomy
Radiologic Technology
Computed Tomography
MRI
Surveying Technology
Sustainable Design
Truck Driver Training
Heavy Equipment Transportation
Welding – Advanced Metalworking
Welding – Advanced Welding Techniques
Welding – Pipe Welding Technology
All mutually approved Coal Mining training.
All mutually approved interactive courses in the distance
learning program.
All Department of Corrections training courses.
Shawnee Community College
Rend Lake College students may take the following programs
at Shawnee Community College:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Construction Craft Laborer Apprenticeship
Direct Support Provider
Fish & Wildlife Management
Heating / AC Fabrication
Industrial Maintenance Chemical
Multimedia and Gaming
Shawnee Community College students may take the following
programs at Rend Lake College:
• Agricultural Mechanics
• Architectural Technology
• Culinary Arts Management
Baking and Pastry Arts
• Diesel Technology
• Ford MLR
• Graphic Web Design
• Green Facilities Management
• Heavy Equipment Technology
• Heavy Equipment Transportation
• Industrial Electrical & Maintenance Technology
Basic Machining
• Industrial Maintenance
• Mining Technology
Advanced Mining
Mine Electricity
Mine Mechanics
Mine Operations
Mine Supervisory
• Radiologic Technology
Computed Tomography
MRI
• Surveying Technology
• Sustainable Design
Southeastern Illinois College
Rend Lake College students may take the following programs
at Southeastern Illinois College:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Biodiesel Production
Bioenergy Production
Biofuels Production Fast Track
Biofuels Production & Sustainability
Biofuels Technology & Sustainability
Biotechnology
Carpentry and Building Trades
Esthetics
Ethanol Production
Facilities Maintenance
Fire Science
Oil & Natural Gas Technician
Personal Trainer/Fitness Instructor
Pharmacy Technician
All mutually approved SAFELAND and OSHA training
Southeastern Illinois College students may take the following
programs at Rend Lake College:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Agricultural Business
Agricultural Production and Management
Architectural Technology
Automotive Technology
Culinary Arts Management
Baking and Pastry Arts
Ford MLR
Green Facilities Management
Health Information Technology
Horticulture
Industrial Electronics and Maintenance
Information Technology – Health Information
Oil & Natural Gas Technician
Paramedic Services
Radiologic Technology
MRI
Surveying Technology
Sustainable Design
All mutually approved coal miner training courses
All mutually approved SAFELAND and OSHA training
CHARGEBACK TUITION
Individuals who want to enroll in an Associate in Applied
Science degree or certificate program not offered by their own
community college or through the CAREER or Comprehensive
Instructional Program Agreements may apply for a chargeback,
which is financial assistance with the out-of-district portion of
the tuition.
Rend Lake College district residents who desire a degree or
certificate not offered by RLC may apply for chargeback tuition
if they attend another public community college in Illinois that
offers the program. This application must be submitted each year
to the Vice President of Career Technical Instruction no later than
30 days prior to the beginning of the semester.
43
TYPES OF CREDIT
Credit toward a degree, certificate or program area can be earned
in several ways acceptable to the college.
University parallel credit – Credit earned in courses designed
for transfer to another college or four-year university and which
count toward degrees and certificates at Rend Lake College.
Occupational credit – Credit which is specifically designed
for entry into an occupation and may or may not be acceptable
as transfer credit toward a four-year baccalaureate degree.
General studies credit – Credit in general studies courses
which are not transferable and are unrelated to the pursuit of a
degree; this is credit given in self-improvement courses designed
to meet the needs of district residents.
Transfer credit – Credit earned at another institution.
Students must request that official transcripts from other colleges
previously attended be sent to the Registrar for transfer evaluation
at least two weeks prior to registering for classes.
Military service credit – Credit awarded for learning
experiences during military service. Members and former
members of the Armed Services, upon presenting separation
papers (DD-214) or Application for the Evaluation of Learning
Experiences During Military Service (DD-295), may be granted
the following credits:
MILITARY SERVICE
COLLEGE CREDIT
Basic Training
(minimum 90 days)
2 credit hours – HEA 1101
Active Duty
(minimum 180 days)
2 undistributed credit hours
Physical Education in addition to 2
credit hours of Health
Students should contact the Registrar to have the credit evaluated
and posted.
Rend Lake College also grants credit for certain experience and
training in military service. Students must request official AARTS
(Army / American Council on Education Registry Transcript
System) or SMART (Sailor / Marine / American Council on Education
Registry Transcript) transcripts be sent to the Registrar for transfer
evaluation at least two weeks prior to registering for classes.
Illinois State Police Academy Credit – Based upon a
recommendation by the Illinois Community College Board, Rend
Lake College awards credit for training by the Illinois State Police.
A student must present certification that he / she has successfully
completed training to the Registrar. A student may receive the
following credits:
ILLINOIS STATE POLICE
CRJS 2203 – Police Traffic Functions (3)
CRJS 2205 – Police Weapons and Defensive Tactics (3)
PYED 1160 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center (1)
Credit by examination – Students at Rend Lake College are
able to earn college credit by examination through one of the
following:
1.
2.
44
CLEP – College-Level Examination Program General and
Subject Examinations (see Academic Advisement Center)
AP – Advanced Placement Program (High school students
may apply for AP college credit, which can replace IAI
courses; see the Registrar)
3.
Rend Lake College proficiency exams are available for specific
Rend Lake College courses (see Instructor or Dean)
NOTE: No more than one-quarter (25%) of the credit hours needed
for a degree or certificate can be earned by examination, including
CLEP, AP or Rend Lake College proficiency exams, or any
combination of credit by means other than classroom attendance.
DUAL CREDIT
High school juniors and seniors in the Rend Lake College
district have the opportunity to enroll in dual credit courses which
may both fulfill high school graduation requirements and earn
college credit. Students must meet placement requirements and
prerequisites prior to enrolling in courses. Dual credit courses are
taken during the normal high school day and tuition is waived
for these courses. Students taking advantage of this opportunity
may accumulate college credit prior to graduation from high
school. Depending on student performance, grades of A, B, C or
NC (No Credit) will be awarded. For more information, see your
high school guidance counselor.
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Juniors and seniors attending a high school in the Rend
Lake College district may take advantage of dual enrollment
by enrolling in courses which take place after the normal high
school day. Students must meet placement requirements and
prerequisites prior to enrolling in courses. Approval for students
to participate in dual enrollment must be obtained by a high
school official. Students also must adhere to the Rend Lake
College drop policy; failure to drop will result in the student being
awarded a failing grade. Depending on student performance,
grades of A, B, C, D or E will be awarded and will become a
part of the college transcript. Students taking advantage of this
opportunity may accumulate college credit prior to graduating
from high school.
Tuition will be waived for eight hours per semester. Students
will be responsible for any fees, supplies, or textbook costs.
Students wanting to take additional classes beyond the eight credit
hours must receive approval from the Vice President of Student
Services and will be responsible for tuition and other costs.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY
Rend Lake College’s Programs of Study program is part of
a national initiative that incorporates college course work with
a rigorous technical education concentration. This planned
sequence of courses begins in secondary school and is articulated
with the college to lead to an Associate in Applied Science
Degree. Programs of Study prepares students for a lifetime of
learning and the background needed for advanced education at
the baccalaureate level. Contact the Perkins Coordinator at Ext.
1267 for details.
FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE
The First-Year Experience program is designed to help new
students transition to college and expose them to educational
opportunities, support services, and resources available at Rend
Lake College. Students participating in the program will attend a
one-day workshop prior to the beginning of the semester. Students
will learn about academic policies, procedures, requirements and
programs while becoming aware of co-curricular opportunities at
the college.
The First-Year Experience program also includes a semester
long course (ORIE 1101) in which students will learn and practice
strategies imperative to success in college. Successful completion
of the course earns 1.5 elective credits and is a graduation
requirement for all first-time, full-time students enrolling in a
degree-seeking program. Students transferring from another
college and who are first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
are required to complete Orientation 1101 as well.
Students who do not pass Orientation 1101 the first time they
enroll in the course will be required to repeat it the following
semester. A hold will be placed on the student’s account, requiring
them to register for the course again. If a student does not pass the
course a second time, they will not be allowed to register for any
other courses until they complete Orientation 1101. A hold will
be placed on the student’s account until they have successfully
completed the course.
Students who are enrolling at Rend Lake College for the first
time but are not considered freshmen may be approved to be
exempt from the course by filing an Orientation Appeal Form,
available from the First-Year Experience Coordinator.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
(www.rlc.edu/academic-policy)
STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS
Freshman – Student having less than 30 semester hours of
earned credit.
Sophomore – Student having 30 or more semester hours of
earned credit.
Full-Time – Student registered for 12 or more semester credit
hours.
Part-Time – Student registered for less than 12 semester credit
hours.
ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all sessions of each class in
which they are enrolled. When a student is absent for reasons
of illness or emergency, he or she is responsible for course work
missed and should consult with the instructor prior to the next
class meeting following the absence. Each instructor sets his /
her own attendance policy. It is the responsibility of the student
to be aware of the attendance policy for each class.
GRADE REPORTS
Official semester grade reports are recorded on the student’s
permanent record, and a copy of the grades will be available online
at www.rlc.edu. Students on academic probation or academic
suspension from the college will be notified in writing by mail
of their status prior to the beginning of the next semester.
GRADING SYSTEM
An alphabetical grading system is used by Rend Lake College.
Each letter grade denotes a certain level of achievement in a
particular course:
A – Outstanding accomplishment
B – Accomplishment above that attained by the
average student
C – Acceptable performance
D – Work of an inferior quality, barely passing
E – Fail
Other abbreviations often used when grades are noted:
AU – Audit
CR– Credit only, no grade given; Transfer; CLEP;
Proficiency; Military; Advanced Placement;
Correctional / Law Enforcement Academy
I – Incomplete work
NC – No credit given
R –Repeat
TC – Transfer Credit
W – Withdrawal after second week but by end
of the 13th week.
QUALITY POINTS
Quality points are used in computing grade-point averages.
Each letter grade is assigned quality points according to the
following scale:
A =
B =
C =
D =
E =
4 quality points
3 quality points
2 quality points
1 quality point
0 quality points
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE (GPA)
Grade-point averages are used to determine academic standing
and awarding of honors. GPA is computed by multiplying the number
of semester hours of credit given for a class by the number of quality
points for the letter grade achieved, totaling both grade points and
semester hours of all classes taken and dividing the grade-point total
by the total semester hours attempted. Neither quality points nor
semester hours are considered for AU, CR, I, NC, R, TC and W.
Course
Grade Cr.
Quality Grade
Points
Points
ENGL 1101
B
3
x
3 =
9
PSYC 2101
C
3
x
2 =
6
MATH 1108
A
3
x
4 = 12
BOT 1101 C5x2
=
10
HEA 1101
B
2x3
=6
Totals16
43
GPA = 43 ÷ 16 = 2.69
INCOMPLETES
A student may receive an “Incomplete” indicating unfinished
work in a course, provided the work was incomplete because of
circumstances determined by the instructor to be unavoidable.
A student who receives an “Incomplete” must complete the
requirements of the course, unless it is a Math Lab course, by the
end of the next semester (excluding the summer term) in order to
receive credit for the course. Once the requirements are completed,
the instructor shall report the grade of A, B, C, D or E. If the student
does not complete the course requirements by the deadline, the
student will automatically receive a grade of E.
In a Math Lab course, a student must complete at least twothirds of the material by the end of the semester or receive a failing
grade. If two-thirds of the material is completed, the student will
receive an “Incomplete” and will have eight weeks of the next
semester in which to complete the course, provided the student
attends the lab at least two hours per week.
These arrangements must be made in writing with the
instructor before the end of the semester in which the incomplete
is recorded. A copy of the agreement must be forwarded to the
Office of Student Records with the final grade report.
45
GRADE FORGIVENESS
Students may petition for a one-time forgiveness of up to
two consecutive semesters of prior Rend Lake College grades in
accordance with the following guidelines:
• Student must not have attended any college and / or any other
postsecondary institution for a minimum of four years.
• When returning to the college and prior to applying for grade
forgiveness, the student must enroll in and complete a minimum
of 15 consecutive hours of certificate or degree program courses
and earn a “C” or better in each course.
• Forgiven grades remain on the student’s record but are not
computed in the student’s grade-point average for academic
purposes.
• Forgiven grades are counted for financial aid eligibility according
to the guidelines of satisfactory academic progress.
• The forgiveness policy applies to a complete semester of courses
and includes all courses taken in that semester.
• No course(s) in the semester(s) forgiven can be used to meet
graduation requirements.
• Student loses any educational guarantees for the forgiven
courses.
• The college accepts no responsibility for the ways in which a
transfer college or university or an employer might interpret a
student’s use of the forgiveness policy.
• Graduates cannot use the forgiveness policy for any semester(s)
of courses that were used to obtain a certificate or a degree from
Rend Lake College.
• Forgiveness is a one-time event and is irrevocable.
• In consultation with the Vice President of Student Services or a
designee, the student must sign a declaration of understanding
if the petition for forgiveness is granted.
STUDENT-INITIATED WITHDRAWAL
The responsibility for officially withdrawing from a class
rests with the student. Any informal arrangements made with
instructors or other college staff members may result in a failing
grade as well as financial liability for all charges incurred for the
course. Unless otherwise indicated for specific programs, students
may officially withdraw from a 16-week or longer course, with the
exception of College Preparatory courses, up to the 13th week of
the semester. To do so, a Drop form or a written request must be
submitted to the Student Records office. Students will receive
a copy of the Drop form and should retain it as proof of the
official withdrawal. A mark of “W” will be shown on the student’s
permanent record if processed after the last day to withdraw
for 100% refund, indicating no academic penalty for such
withdrawals. (A degree-seeking student in a College Preparatory
class may not withdraw from the course unless withdrawing from
all courses.) From the beginning of the 14th week through the end
of the 16-week semester, students will not be permitted to withdraw
from a class and must accept the grade earned.
* Cosmetology students should consult the program handbook
for information on withdrawing from courses and refunds.
46
OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE
COURSE
LENGTH
IN WEEKS
LAST DAY TO OFFICIALLY
WITHDRAW FOR 100%
TUITION / FEES REFUND
LAST DAY TO OFFICIALLY
WITHDRAW
12 to 16
First two weeks
Three weeks prior to end of class
8 to 11
First week
Two weeks prior to end of class
2 to 7
Prior to 2nd class meeting
One week prior to end of class
1 or less
Prior to 1st class meeting
Prior to last class meeting
The dates indicated above apply unless otherwise indicated
for specific programs. No refunds will be made for Community
Education-sponsored classes or activities unless the event is
canceled or if the withdrawal is made five business days prior
to the event. See the Fee Refunds section for more information.
Students receiving Financial Aid may owe a refund of money if
they withdraw from classes after receiving financial aid funds.
Aid recipients should contact the Financial Aid Office prior to
withdrawing from classes.
ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES
Students may make a change of course (add / drop) during
specific registration periods, provided any prerequisites have
been met and space is available. Changes are not complete until
Registration forms are processed and a new schedule printed. The
appropriate Dean or Vice President must sign the registration form
if a student is enrolling in a class that already has filled to capacity.
REPEATING A COURSE
In instances where a student repeats a given course that is
not specifically designated as “repeatable,” the grade previously
received will be recorded as an “R” grade and will not count in the
computation of the student’s overall grade-point average. The last
grade received will be recorded on the transcript and will count
in the computation of the GPA.
OVERLOAD IN CREDIT HOURS
Students wishing to register for 20 or more credits during the
Fall or Spring Semester or 10 or more credits during the Summer
Term must have the Registration form signed by a Vice President.
AUDITING A COURSE
Auditing of courses is not encouraged; however, it may be
permitted if there is room available in a class. A student auditing
a course will be charged the same tuition as those students who
are taking the class for credit. Audit students will be allowed
to participate in the class to the extent to which they choose.
Instructors are expected to grade all exams, papers and homework
which an audit student submits. Courses that are audited cannot be
used toward graduation requirements for any certificate or degree.
PASS / FAIL OPTION
• Students in good academic standing who elect the Pass / Fail
option must declare their intentions at the point of registration.
Regular tuition and fees will be charged.
• Courses being taken under the Pass / Fail option cannot be
changed to receive a traditional letter grade after the class has
started; and courses being taken to receive a traditional letter
grade cannot be changed to the Pass / Fail option after the class
has started.
• Students may choose to take only one Pass / Fail course per
semester.
• The total maximum number of Pass / Fail credit hours that can
be counted toward any degree is six (6) semester hours.
• The total maximum number of Pass / Fail credit hours that can
be counted toward any one-year certificate is three (3) semester
hours. Pass / Fail credit hours may not be counted toward a
certificate of less than one year or 30 semester hours.
• Courses taken under the Pass / Fail option can count only as
elective credit.
• A grade of “CR” (pass) or “NC” (fail) will be recorded on the
official transcript; it will not be computed in the grade-point
average.
COLLEGE PREPARATORY CLASSES POLICIES
Placement
Students shall be placed into appropriate college preparatory
classes based upon their COMPASS / ASSET scores. Students may
not re-take the COMPASS / ASSET after classes begin and may
test a maximum of two times.
Integrated Reading & Writing Policy
Students placing into READ 2409 and / or ENGL 1412 may be
placed in PREP 1404, Integrated Reading and Writing, instead
of READ 2409 and ENGL 1412. If the student places into PREP
1404 they must register for, attend, and complete the course with
an “A,” “B” or “C” within the first 12 credit hours attempted; this
course will fulfill the reading and English Review requirements.
Students completing the course with a “D” or “E” should repeat
the course the semester immediately following.
A student may not withdraw from PREP 1404 unless the
student is enrolled in a certificate program, or unless the student
is withdrawing from all credit courses.
English Review Policy
Students placing into ENGL 1412 must register for and attend
the 16-week English course within the first 12 credit hours
attempted. Students who successfully complete the course with
an “A,” “B” or “C” will be eligible for ENGL 1101 the following
semester. Students completing the course with a “D” or “E” should
repeat the course the semester immediately following.
A student may not withdraw from English Review unless that
student is enrolled in a certificate program that does not require ENGL
1101, or unless the student is withdrawing from all credit courses.
GOOD STANDING
Students are considered to be in good standing unless disciplinary
sanctions or academic sanctions have been placed against them or
they have overdue financial obligations to the college.
OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS
Student Official Transcripts are $5 per transcript. All requests
for official transcripts are processed online at www.rlc.edu/myrlc.
Your transcript will not be processed if there are any outstanding
balances and / or holds with the College. Transcripts must be
ordered online using any major credit card. Your credit card will
be charged when Rend Lake College sends your transcript(s). You
may also track your transcript order online.
The college reserves the right to withhold transcripts of
persons who have past due monetary obligations such as tuition,
fees, library fines or materials.
ACADEMIC HONORS
A full-time student (12 credit hours or more) whose gradepoint average is 3.5 or better is considered an honor student.
Full-time students who compile a perfect 4.0-point average during
a semester will be named to the President’s List, while those
students compiling GPAs between 3.5 and 3.9 will be named to the
Vice Presidents’ List. A student must have successfully completed
all courses during a semester to be included on the President’s
List or the Vice Presidents’ List. Academic honors are announced
shortly after the end of fall and spring semesters.
ACADEMIC PROBATION
1. A degree- or certificate-seeking student who is enrolled
in three or more credit hours during the Fall or Spring Semester
and whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 2.0 will be
placed on Academic Probation.
2. While on Academic Probation, students may continue to
enroll at Rend Lake College. However, they:
a. Must register with an Academic Advisor in the
Academic Advisement Center.
b. Must maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point average per
semester for courses taken while on Academic Probation.
c. May be required to seek tutoring assistance through
the Learning Enhancement Center upon the recommendation
of an academic advisor.
d. May only enroll in a maximum of fifteen credit hours
during the following Fall or Spring Semester, and one course
in the Summer Term.
3. A student will remain on Academic Probation until a
cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is attained.
ACADEMIC SUSPENSION
1. A degree- or certificate-seeking student who was on
Academic Probation during the previous Fall or Spring Semester
of enrollment and has a current semester and cumulative
grade-point average of less than 2.0 will be placed on Academic
Suspension. Students placed on Academic Suspension:
• Must register with an Academic Advisor in the Academic
Advisement Center.
• Will not be allowed to attend during the following Fall or
Spring Semester and will be withdrawn from classes. However,
a suspended student may enroll in one course during the
Summer Term to attempt to raise his / her cumulative grade
point average. If the suspended student successfully raises his
/ her cumulative GPA to 2.0 after the Summer Term, he / she
may enroll in fall classes and the academic standing will be
changed to Academic Probation.
• May enroll in Adult Education, Community Education and
non-credit courses during the Academic Suspension period.
• When the student enrolls after the suspension period of one Fall
or Spring Semester, he / she will again be placed on Academic
Probation.
• If a student is placed on Academic Suspension more than two
times, he / she will be placed on a one-year suspension period
each time he / she is suspended.
TRANSFER CREDIT PROCEDURE
1. The student must request that the college or university
attended send an official transcript to the Office of Student
Records at Rend Lake College.
2. A minimum of two weeks is required for the Registrar to
evaluate a student’s transcript. A student should contact the Office
of Student Records to confirm that a transcript has been received
and evaluated prior to registration.
3. Rend Lake College will accept transfer credit from postsecondary institutions which are accredited by the North Central
47
Association of Colleges and Schools or from comparable regional
accrediting associations. If Rend Lake College has no equivalent
course, the credit may be accepted as undistributed credit and
will be used as elective credit only at Rend Lake College.
4. Courses from post-secondary institutions which are
classified as junior- or senior-level courses (300 or 400 level) will
not transfer to Rend Lake College.
5. Credit earned in remedial or developmental courses will
not be accepted.
6. Credit for orientation, freshman experience, or first-year
seminars will not be accepted.
7. Grades in courses transferred from other colleges will NOT
be counted in cumulative grade-point average (GPA) calculations
along with grades earned in courses taken at Rend Lake College.
Courses in which the student has earned a grade of “C” or greater
will be accepted for transfer credit. A grade of “TC” will be shown
on the transcript to indicate a transfer credit. Courses in which
the student has earned a grade of “D” or below, a grade of “CR”
or a pass / fail grade will NOT be accepted for transfer credit. In
addition, courses from which the student has withdrawn will
NOT be accepted for transfer credit.
8. The student will transfer the number of credit hours that
were earned for a course at the student’s college or university even
if the comparable course at Rend Lake College earns a different
number of credit hours. However, if the student has transfer
credit that is computed in quarter hours, the transfer credit will
be converted from quarter hours to semester hours. Transfer
credit hours will be counted in earned hours but will NOT be
calculated in cumulative GPA calculations.
9. A copy of the student’s unofficial Rend Lake College transcript
will be available to the student online at www.rlc.edu once the
transcript evaluation process has been completed.
10. APPEALS PROCESS – A student who wishes to appeal
a decision on the awarding of transfer credit may do so by
submitting a written rationale outlining his or her reasons to the
Registrar.
48
TRANSFER FROM REND LAKE COLLEGE
Students who intend to transfer to a four-year institution
should plan their first two years in a program offered by Rend
Lake College in order to assure the smoothest transfer possible.
In Illinois alone, there are eight public and more than 40 private
colleges and universities from which a student may choose. The
selection of a senior college should be an individual decision
based on the compatibility of the student with the academic
programs, facilities, size, student body, location, philosophy
and cost of the senior college. It is the student’s responsibility to
follow the recommendations of the institution to which he or she
intends to transfer upon completion of work at Rend Lake College.
Students preparing to transfer are advised to refer directly to the
official catalog of the institution they plan to attend and meet
those requirements and recommendations for a selected area of
concentration. Assistance is available from RLC advisors.
ILLINOIS ARTICULATION INITIATIVE
General Education Core Curriculum
Rend Lake College is a participant in the Illinois Articulation
Initiative (IAI), a statewide agreement that allows transfer of
the completed Illinois transferable General Education Core
Curriculum between participating institutions. Completion of
the General Education Core Curriculum at any participating
college or university in Illinois assures transferring students that
lower-division general education requirements for an Associate
or Bachelor’s Degree have been satisfied. This agreement is in
effect for students entering an associate or baccalaureate degreegranting institution as a first-time freshman in Summer 1998 (and
thereafter). Students should see an academic advisor for additional
information. The official IAI website is http://www.itransfer.org.
ILLINOIS COURSE APPLICABILITY SYSTEM (CAS)
Rend Lake College is a participant in the Illinois Course Applicability System. The u.select website is available to all RLC
students and the interested public and is designed to guide students through the transfer process. u.select provides information
on courses, course equivalencies, and program requirements at a
CAS institution to anyone who accesses the u.select website. Visit
www.transfer.org to use the service.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE
ASSOCIATE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE
The Associate in Arts Degree, Associate in Science Degree,
Associate in Fine Arts Degree and Associate in Engineering
Science Degree are transferable. These degrees fulfill lowerdivision requirements and qualify students for junior standing
at most four-year institutions. Graduates with these degrees are
prepared for upper-division study in the following:
•Accounting
•Agriculture
•Art
• Athletic Training
• Biological Sciences
•Botany
•Business
•Chemistry
•Communications
• Computer Science
• Criminal Justice
•Economics
•Education
• Engineering Science
• Engineering Technology
•English
•Finance
•History
• Industrial Technology
•Mathematics
•Music
•Nursing
•Pharmacy
• Plant and Soil Science
• Physical Education
•Physics
• Political Science
•Pre-Dentistry
•Pre-Law
•Pre-Medicine
• Pre-Veterinary Medicine
•Psychology
•Recreation
• Secondary Education
• Social Work
•Sociology
•Zoology
A.A. / A.S. / A.F.A. / A.E.S. DEGREE ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
All students wishing to enter the Associate in Arts, Associate
in Science, Associate in Fine Arts or Associate in Engineering
Science degree programs must complete the following steps:
1. Submit a completed Rend Lake College application form to
the Office of Student Records.
2. Submit ACT / SAT or COMPASS / ASSET scores which will
determine the appropriate acceptance category and courselevel placement. Students who need to take the COMPASS
/ ASSET exam should schedule a time with the Academic
Advisement Center. A student may be exempt from taking
this exam if:
a) College-level math and English courses have been taken
and passed with a grade of “C” or better at another college
or university;
b) The student possesses a degree from another college or
university;
c) You are exempt from taking the COMPASS / ASSET if
you scored at least a 20 in English, a 20 in Reading and a 22
in Math on the ACT.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS – A.A. / A.S. / A.F.A. / A.E.S. DEGREE
It is the student’s responsibility to see that all graduation
requirements are satisfied. Students are encouraged to work closely
with an advisor to monitor educational progress through graduation.
The student who elects to earn an Associate in Arts Degree,
Associate in Science Degree, Associate in Fine Arts Degree or
Associate in Engineering Science Degree must:
50
1. Earn a minimum of 64 semester hours of credit, including:
a) 55 semester hours in courses which have a second
digit of “1”;
b) C ou rses f rom each of t he fol low i ng a rea s –
communications, health, arts, humanities, mathematics
and science and social science;
c) A maximum of eight (8) semester hours of one-credit
hour PYED courses (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140 and
1141 may be taken in addition to this eight-hour maximum);
d) No more than nine (9) semester hours of credit from
courses with a second digit of “2,” provided the courses have
been articulated. (See an academic advisor for the approved
courses).
e) Complete a one-credit hour Orientation 1101 course.
Students will choose a one-day session on-campus to attend
and will then be required to complete an online course.
2. Achieve an overall grade-point average of 2.0 (“C”).
3. Must earn a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1101 and 1102.
4. Earn a minimum of 16 semester hours of credit from Rend
Lake College.
5. Submit official documentation of high school or GED
completion.
6. A degree or certificate is not automatically conferred upon
completion of Rend Lake College curriculum requirements.
Candidates must apply for graduation; see the graduation
section for details.
• Applications for graduation are available from the Academic
Advisement Center or the Student Records Office. Graduation
application deadlines are:
First Friday in May – Summer graduation (July)
First Friday in September – Fall graduation (December)
First Friday in December – Spring graduation (May)
• Caps and gowns are ordered from the information included
on the application for graduation. They may be picked up in
the Rend Lake College Retail Store during the week of spring
semester final exams.
• Graduation fees and all other outstanding fees must be paid in
the Business Office. Fees are the same regardless of participation
in the commencement exercises.
• Candidates will receive a status letter indicating that all
requirements for graduation have been met or identifying
requirements which must be completed in order to receive a
degree or certificate. Any deficiencies noted must be corrected
and information requested must be provided before a degree
will be posted to a student’s permanent record.
• Students may request a transcript and indicate the request is
to be held until the degree is posted.
• Diploma covers are distributed at the graduation ceremony;
diplomas are prepared after final degree audits have been
completed and all degree requirements have been verified.
Diplomas will be mailed to the address indicated on the
application for graduation.
Candidates for fall, spring and summer graduation are
encouraged to participate in the annual commencement exercises
held at the end of each spring semester.
GUARANTEE OF EDUCATIONAL QUALITY CONTROL –
A.A. / A.S. / A.F.A. / A.E.S. DEGREE
It is the policy of the Board of Trustees of Rend Lake College that
students graduating with an Associate in Arts Degree, Associate
in Science Degree, Associate in Fine Arts Degree or Associate in
Engineering Science Degree be guaranteed the transferability of
baccalaureate-oriented / university-parallel credit courses to public
Illinois universities. Should such an appropriately approved course
not fully transfer, the student will be offered a refund of the tuition
paid for the non-transferring course credit, subject to the conditions
which follow.
NOTE: Only those courses which are designated as IAI courses
are counted toward general education requirements. Always consult
an academic advisor for assistance in selecting courses.
1.
All course work for the degree must have been completed
at Rend Lake College.
2. The student must have met each semester with an assigned
authorized advisor from Rend Lake College, declared a
major for a specific public Illinois university prior to taking
any Rend Lake College course and carried only those Rend
Lake College courses approved by the advisor.
A. Approved courses must have appeared on the course
equivalency list from the university declared as the transfer
university by the student at the time the student met with
the advisor.
B. The student must have a signed Credit Transfer
Guarantee form and have indicated a specific major and
university. This form must include the signature of the
student and the advisor.
3. The student must have graduated within three years of
initial enrollment at Rend Lake College.
4. The student must have transferred to the declared public
Illinois university within one year after receiving the Associate
in Arts, Associate in Science, Associate in Fine Arts or Associate
in Engineering Science Degree from Rend Lake College.
5. The student must have requested and received an
evaluation by the transfer institution immediately upon
transfer of the Rend Lake College courses.
6. The student must have verified to Rend Lake College
in writing 60 days after being notified by the transfer
institution that a course had been refused for credit and
made a claim for the refund at that time. The written
statement must have stated the reasons for the refusal,
the institution, the name, position, address and telephone
number of the official notifying the student of the refusal
and a copy of the correspondence and / or documentation
provided by the transfer institution of the non-acceptance
of the course.
7. The course must have been completed with a grade of
“A,” “B” or “C.”
8. Any refund would be based upon tuition paid at the time
the course was completed.
9. The student must cooperate with Rend Lake College
personnel in resolving any transfer difficulties by notifying
Rend Lake College and submitting any necessary consent
or releases for student records and / or correspondence.
10. This policy does not guarantee the letter grade earned
at Rend Lake College for the course will be considered
by the transfer institution for determining the student’s
grade-point average, honors or other purposes, but only
that the transfer institution will give at least elective course
credit. This program does not provide for the refund of
tuition for any other course, any fees or any incidental or
consequential expenses or claims whatsoever, but only the
tuition for the course guaranteed for which course credit is
not given by the transfer institution.
11. Students’ rights under this program are personal and may
not be assigned or transferred, voluntarily or involuntarily.
Further, no refund is required or will be made if a
scholarship, financial aid program, loan or other source
was used to pay the tuition.
12. Claims against the Guarantee of Educational Quality Control
for Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Associate in
Fine Arts and Associate in Engineering Science degrees
must be filed with the appropriate Rend Lake College Vice
President of Instruction within the prescribed time limits
as set forth above.
13. Rend Lake College will first attempt to resolve the issue
with the transfer institution. If favorable resolution is not
achieved within 120 days, the reimbursement will be
authorized. This policy becomes effective with students
enrolling for the first time at Rend Lake College for Fall
Semester 1995. The sole recourse available to participants
enrolled pursuant to this guarantee program shall be
limited to the tuition reimbursement of the class at time of
enrollment, with no recourse for damages, court costs or
any associated costs of any kind or right to appeal beyond
those specified by Rend Lake College.
Students who do not seek or receive academic advisement
nullify any educational guarantees.
To ensure articulation with a four-year college or
university, the student should follow the sequence of
courses recommended by representatives of that fouryear institution.
51
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Agricultural Business
Agricultural Mechanics
Agricultural Production and Management
Architectural Technology
Associate Degree Nursing
Automotive Technology
Certified Medical Assistant
Computer Programming
Criminal Justice
Culinary Arts Management
Diesel Technology
Early Childhood Education
Emergency Medical Technician – Paramedical Services
Graphic Design
Health Information Technology
Heavy Equipment Technology
Industrial Electronics & Maintenance Technician
IT Systems Assistant
IT Systems Specialist
Manufacturing Technology
Medical Lab Technology
Mining Technology
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Office Systems Technology – Administrative Assistant
Office Systems Technology – Health Information Assistant
Oil & Natural Gas Technician
Radiologic Technology
Surveying Technology
Veterinary Technician
Welding Technology
Wireless Communications Technology
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING
Admission of a student to the Associate Degree in Nursing
program shall be based solely on the qualifications of that student.
College and state admissions policies are used to determine these
qualifications. All students wishing to enter the ADN program
must meet the following as minimum requirements:
1. Submit a completed Rend Lake College application form.
2. Submit a completed Associate Degree Nursing program
application.
3. Be a graduate from an accredited high school or have
successfully completed the GED exam.
4. Submit official transcripts from all high schools (or official
GED test scores) and post-secondary institutions attended.
5. Achieve a competitive score on the pre-entrance exam for
the ADN program.
6. Complete English 1101 with a grade of “C” or better.
7. Complete Math 1407 or higher unless math placement scores
meet the following criteria:
ASSET Intermediate Algebra Score...............35+
ASSET College Algebra Score........................ 26+
COMPASS Algebra Score................................47+
COMPASS College Algebra Score..................16+
ACT Math Score................................................18+
8. Complete a Basic Training Nursing Assistant program and
ahve passed the Illinois state certification exam.
52
Upon notification of conditional acceptance:
9. Provide proof of sound health as certified by a physician,
physician assistant or nurse practitioner.
10. Prov ide docu mentat ion of hea lt h screenings a nd
immunizations as required by clinical facilities.
11. Demonstrate current competency in American Heart
Association Healthcare Provider CPR.
12. Submit to and pass a background check.
13. Provide proof of current health insurance.
14. Successfully pass a test dealing with the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
15. Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Allied Health
Division’s Substance Abuse Policy. Students will be required
to submit to a drug screening test as per policy.
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY
Admission of a student to the Associate Degree in Radiologic
Technology program shall be based solely on the qualifications
of that student. College and state admissions policies are used to
determine these qualifications. All students wishing to enter the
program must meet the following as minimum requirements:
1. Submit a completed Rend Lake College application form.
2. Submit a completed Radiologic Technology program
application.
3. Be a graduate from an accredited high school or have
successfully completed the GED exam.
4. Submit official transcripts from all high schools (or official
GED test scores) and post-secondary institutions attended.
5. Achieve a competitive score on the pre-entrance PSB exam.
Upon notification of conditional acceptance:
6. Provide proof of sound health as certified by a physician,
physician assistant or nurse practitioner.
7. Prov ide docu mentat ion of hea lt h screenings a nd
immunizations as required by clinical facilities.
8. Demonstrate current competency in American Heart
Association Healthcare Provider CPR.
9. Submit to and pass a background check.
10. Provide proof of current health insurance.
11. Successfully pass a test dealing with the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
12. Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Allied Health
Division’s Substance Abuse Policy. Students are required to
submit to a drug screening test.
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
1. Graduate from an approved high school or demonstrate
equivalent competency (GED examination).
2. Complete general admission procedures for Rend Lake
College.
3. By March 1, file the following OTA, MLT, STP or VET
application information with the Chairperson of the Allied
Health Division at Rend Lake College:
A. Completed OTA / MLT / STP / VET application form;
B. Health Occupations Aptitude Test – Revised results;
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
C. Official transcripts of previous college experience;
D. Completed Rend Lake College application;
E. Official high school transcript or GED results.
Achieve competitive level on a composite selection score
for the college. A predetermined number of top-scoring
applicants are awarded admission. This score is based upon
the Health Occupations Aptitude Test – Revised results
and weighted grades for previous college coursework
taken within, or transferring to, the Occupational Therapy
Assistant, Medical Laboratory Technology, Surgical
Technology or Veterinary Technology required curriculum.
Upon notification and acceptance of admission, complete
a successful physical examination, required vaccination
/ immunization series and job shadowing prior to the
beginning of coursework.
Upon notification and acceptance of admission, a background
check is required.
Demonstrate current competency in American Heart
Association Healthcare Provider CPR.
Submit to a drug screening test as per the Southern Illinois
Collegiate Common Market (SICCM) policy.
Provide proof of current health insurance.
Successfully pass a test dealing with the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Allied Health
Division’s Substance Abuse Policy.
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN - PARAMEDICAL SERVICES
1. Submit proof of current licensure as an Emergency Medical
Technician - Basic.
2. Submit a completed Rend Lake College application form.
3. Provide copy of a physical exam, health screenings and
immunizations as required by clinical facilities.
4. Submit to and pass a background check.
5. Provide proof of current health insurance.
6. Successfully pass a test dealing with the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
7. Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Substance Abuse
Policy. Students will be required to submit to a drug screening
test as per policy.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS – A.A.S. DEGREES
It is the student’s responsibility to see that all graduation
requirements are satisfied. Students are encouraged to work
closely with an advisor to monitor educational progress through
graduation.
1. Satisfy all requirements of a particular curriculum unless an
exception is made by petition.
2. Achieve an overall grade-point average of 2.0 (“C”).
(Exceptions: ADN and VET program requirements are a
grade of “C” or better in each course; SICCM programs,
including a “C” in HIT classes; a “C” in MLT classes and
science, all other classes a “C” average; a “C” in each OTA
class, and a “C” in STP classes, all other classes a “C” average.)
3. Earn a minimum of 64 semester hours of credit.
4. Earn a minimum of 16 semester hours of credit at Rend
Lake College.
5. Successfully complete a minimum of 15 semester hours in
the appropriate areas which follow – mathematics, health,
English, science (including social science). The number of
instructional areas included to meet this requirement varies
according to the specific program.
6. First-time, full-time, degree-seeking students are required to
complete a one-credit hour Orientation 1101 course. Students
will choose a one-day session on-campus to attend and will
then be required to complete an online course.
7. Submit official documentation of high school or GED
completion.
8. A degree or certificate is not automatically conferred upon
completion of Rend Lake College curriculum requirements.
Candidates must apply for graduation.
• Applications for graduation are available from the Academic
Advisement Center or the Student Records Office. Graduation
application deadlines are:
First Friday in May – Summer graduation (July)
First Friday in September – Fall graduation (December)
First Friday in December – Spring graduation (May)
• Caps and gowns are ordered from the information included
on the application for graduation. They may be picked up in
the Rend Lake College Retail Store during the week of spring
semester final exams.
• Graduation fees and all other outstanding fees must be paid in
the Business Office. Fees are the same regardless of participation
in the commencement exercises.
• Candidates will receive a status letter indicating that all
requirements for graduation have been met or identifying
requirements which must be completed in order to receive a
degree or certificate. Any deficiencies noted must be corrected
and information requested must be provided before a degree
will be posted to a student’s permanent record.
• Students may request a transcript and indicate the request is
to be held until the degree is posted.
• Diploma covers are distributed at the graduation ceremony;
diplomas are prepared after final degree audits have been
completed and all degree requirements have been verified.
Diplomas will be mailed to the address indicated on the
application for graduation.
Candidates for fall, spring and summer graduation are
encouraged to participate in the annual commencement exercises
held at the end of each spring semester.
GUARANTEE OF EDUCATIONAL QUALITY CONTROL –
CAREER / OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS
It is the policy of the Board of Trustees of Rend Lake College that
students graduating with an Associate in Applied Science Degree
in a career / occupational program be guaranteed competency in
the technical skills represented in the degree.
Should the graduate not be able to demonstrate the skills
expected by his or her employer, the student will be offered up to 15
credit hours of retraining – tuition free – subject to the following
conditions:
1. All course work for the degree must have been completed
at Rend Lake College.
2. The student must have graduated within three years of
initial enrollment at Rend Lake College.
53
3. The student must have been employed full-time in a job
directly related to his / her program of study within six
months after graduation from a Rend Lake College AAS
degree program.
4. The employer must verify in writing to Rend Lake College
within 90 days of the graduate’s initial employment that
the graduate lacks competency in specific technical skills,
as represented by the degree information printed in the
college catalog.
5. The retraining will be limited to courses regularly offered
by Rend Lake College on the main campus and must be
completed within one calendar year.
6. A written retraining plan must be developed by the
employer, the graduate, the appropriate instructional
administrator and the career / occupational program
coordinator or instructor, specifying the courses needed
for retraining and the competencies to be mastered.
7. Prerequisites and other admission requirements for
retraining courses must be met and are not included in the
courses covered by this guarantee.
8. A maximum of 15 credit hours of occupational coursework
will be provided free of tuition under the terms of this
guarantee. Lab fees and other course costs are not included.
Should the student audit, withdraw or not receive a passing
grade in a course identified in the retraining plan, it will be
included in the offer of 15 credit hours.
9. This guarantee does not imply that the graduate will pass
any licensing or qualifying examination for a particular
career or occupation.
10. Students’ rights under this program are personal and may
not be assigned or transferred, voluntarily or involuntarily.
Further, no refund is required or will be made if a
scholarship, financial aid program, loan or other source
was used to pay the tuition.
11. Claims against the Guarantee of Educational Quality Control
for Career / Occupational Programs will be filed with the
appropriate Rend Lake College Vice President of Instruction
within the prescribed time limits as set forth above.
12. This policy becomes effective with students enrolling in Fall
Semester 1995. The sole recourse available to participants
enrolled pursuant to this guarantee program shall be
limited to retraining in the same class with no recourse for
damages, court costs or any associated costs of any kind
or right to appeal beyond those specified by Rend Lake
College.
Students who do not seek or receive academic advisement
nullify any educational guarantees.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
CAREER / OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
54
Agricultural Mechanics
Agriculture Production and Management
Architectural Technology
Architecture
Computer-Aided Drafting • Green Facilities Management
Sustainable Design
Automotive Technology –
Automotive Air Conditioning • Automotive Brake
Automotive Electrical • Automotive Engine Repair
Automotive Suspension and Steering
Automotive Transmission • Ford MLR
Certified Medical Assistant
Computer Programming – Programming with Visual Basic
Cosmetology
Barbering • Cosmetology Teacher • Nail Technology
Criminal Justice –
Corrections • Cyber Forencics • Police Science • Private Protection
Culinary Arts
Baking & Pastry Arts
Diesel Technology
Early Childhood Education –
Early Childhood Assistant
Early Childhood Certificate – Level 2 / Level 3
Electrician
Emergency Medical Technician
EMT – Paramedic
Graphic Design
Graphic Web Design
Health Care Coach
Heavy Equipment Transportation
Home Health Aide
Industrial Electronics & Maintenance Technician –
Basic Machining • Programmable Logic Controllers
Industrial Maintenance Technician
IT Systems Assistant – Microsoft User Certificate
IT Systems Specialist –
Cisco Routing and Switching • Linux Networking
PC Maintenance • Windows
Manufacturing Technology
Medical Coding
Mining Technology –
Advanced Mining • Mine Electricity • Mine Mechanics
Mine Operations • Mine Supervisory
Nurse Assistant
Office Systems Technology –
Medical Transcriptionist • Medical Transcriptionist
Clerk Office Assistant
Oil & Natural Gas Technician
Phlebotomy
Professional Electrician
Radiologic Technology –
Computed Tomography • MRI
Surgical Technology
Therapeutic Massage
Truck Driver Training
Welding Technology –
Advanced Metal Working
Advanced Welding Techniques
Pipe Welding Technology *
Welding Fundamentals • Welding Technology
* Admissions requirements – Must have Welding Certificate or five
years documented experience
Wireless Communications Technology –
Electronics for Wireless Communication
Land-Based Communications Systems
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN – BASIC
1. Submit a completed RLC application form.
2.
Submit proof of high school graduation or successful
completion of GED.
3.
Provide a copy of physical exam, health screenings and
immunizations as required by clinical facilities.
4.
Be at least 18 years of age before completion of course.
5.
Successfully pass a test dealing with the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
6.
Submit to and pass a background check.
7.
Provide proof of current health insurance.
8.
Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Substance Abuse
Policy. Students will be required to submit to a drug screening
test as per policy.
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT
1. Be at least 16 years of age before completion of course.
2.
Take a reading placement test prior to enrollment in the
class. Must score a 59 or higher on the reading portion of the
COMPASS test.
3.
Submit to background check as mandated by the Illinois
Department of Public Health.
4.
Accept provisions of the Rend Lake College Allied Health
Division’s Substance Abuse Policy. Students will be required
to submit to a drug screening test as per policy.
• Caps and gowns are ordered from the information included
on the application for graduation. They may be picked up in
the Rend Lake College Retail Store during the week of Spring
Semester final exams.
• Graduation fees and all other outstanding fees must be paid in
the Business Office. Fees are the same regardless of participation
in the commencement exercises.
• Candidates will receive a status letter indicating that all
requirements for graduation have been met or identifying
requirements which must be completed in order to receive a
degree or certificate. Any deficiencies noted must be corrected
and information requested must be provided before a degree
will be posted to a student’s permanent record.
• Students may request a transcript and indicate the request is to
be held until the degree is posted.
• Diploma covers are distributed at the graduation ceremony;
diplomas are prepared after final degree audits have been
completed and all degree requirements have been verified.
Diplomas will be mailed to the address indicated on the
application for graduation.
Candidates for fall, spring and summer graduation are
encouraged to participate in the annual commencement exercises
held at the end of each spring semester.
SPECIAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS –
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY ~ MRI & CT
Successful completion of an Associate in Applied Science Degree
in Radiologic Technology OR must be registered by the American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS – OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
It is the student’s responsibility to see that all graduation
requirements are satisfied. Students are encouraged to work
closely with an advisor to monitor educational progress through
graduation.
1. Successfully meet requirements of the declared curriculum
and achieve an overall grade-point average of 2.0 (“C”)
for all courses presented to meet the requirements of the
declared curriculum. (EXCEPTIONS: Practical Nursing and
Therapeutic Massage program requirements are a grade of
“C” or better in each course.)
2. Complete at least half of the required hours of the declared
curriculum as a Rend Lake College student.
3. A degree or certificate is not automatically conferred upon
completion of Rend Lake College curriculum requirements.
Candidates must apply for graduation.
• Applications for graduation are available from the Academic
Advisement Center or the Student Records Office. Graduation
application deadlines are:
First Friday in May – Summer graduation (July)
First Friday in September – Fall graduation (December)
First Friday in December – Spring graduation (May)
55
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE / Page 1
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 64 semester hours of academic work with a grade-point average of not
less than “C” (2.0). Candidates for this degree must complete an organized program of study which meets the following core
DEGREE
GRADUATION
requirements. ASSOCIATE
No more than nine
(9) credit
hours of coursesWORKSHEETS
with a second digit of “2” may be used toward Rend Lake College
graduation requirements.. A maximum of eight (8) credit hours of one-credit hour PYED courses can be used toward graduation
requirements (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140, 1141, 1142 and 1164 may be taken in addition to this eight-hour maximum).
Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) General Education Core Courses (GECC) – www.iTransfer.org – are in bold. Only
those courses which are designated as IAI GECC courses may be counted toward general education requirements.
Always consult an academic advisor for assistance in selecting courses.
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Choose two or more subject areas:
IAI SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
___ ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
___ ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
___ ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
___ GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
___ HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
___ HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
HIST 2107 - Latin American History (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
SOCI 2103 - Intro to Social Work
SOSC 2102 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 1 course (3 hrs.)
IAI MATHEMATICS
___ MATH 1107 - Contemp. College Math (3)
___ MATH 1111 - Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2106 - Finite Mathematics (3)
___ MATH 2110 - Math/Elem. Teachers II (3)
___ MATH 2115 - Business Calculus (4)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
III. SCIENCE – Required 2 courses (7 to 8 hrs.)
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least one laboratory course)
IAI LIFE SCIENCES
___ BIO 1100 - Biology for Non-Majors (4)
___ BIO 1101 - College Biology (5)
___ BIO 1102 - Environmental Biology (4)
___ BOT 1101 - General Botany (5)
___ ZOO 1101 - General Zoology (4)
IAI PHYSICAL SCIENCES
___ AST 1101 - Intro to Astronomy (4) *
___ CHE 1101 - General Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (3)
___ GEOL 1102 - Field Geology (3)
___ PHSC 1101 - Physical Science (5)
___ PHSC 1102 - Princ. of Earth Science (3) *
___ PHY 1101 - College Physics I (5)
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
* Not a laboratory course
IV. HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: One course selected from Humanities, one from Fine Arts and one from either Humanities or Fine Arts
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
IAI HUMANITIES (Required one or two courses)
___ ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
___ ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
___ ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
___ ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
___ ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
IAI FINE ARTS (Required one or two courses)
___ ART 1101 - Art Appreciation (3)
___ HUMT 1104 - Introduction to Film (3)
Hours I _______
58
___
___
___
___
___
___
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Introduction to Drama (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
___ MUSI 1100 - Music Appreciation (3)
___ MUSI 1110 - Intro to American Music (3)
Hours II _______
Hours III _______
Hours IV _______
___
___
___
___
___
___
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
___ THEA 1106 - Theatre Appreciation (3)
TOTAL Pg. 1 __________
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
IAI COMMUNICATIONS
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS – Required 2 courses (3.5 hrs.)
___ HEA 1101 - Health Education (2)
VII. ELECTIVES –
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) *
* Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
May be used to fulfill elective requirements for graduation and for major
transfer to senior institutions. IAI Articulated Majors Courses are in italics.
SOCIAL / BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES **
___ HIST 2103 - Contemporary History (3)
___ HIST 2106 - Black American History (3)
___ POLI 2103 - Public Administration (3)
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2103 - Educational Psychology (3)
PSYC 2104 - Personality Dynamics (3)
PSYC 2106 - Human Relations (3)
SOSC 2101 - Topics in Social Science (3)
___ SOCI 2103 - Intro to Social Work
___ SOSC 2102 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange
MATH ELECTIVES **
___ MATH 1105 - Basic Concepts of Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1108 - College Algebra (3)
___ MATH 1109 - Plane Trigonometry (3)
___
___
___
___
MATH 1110 - College Algebra / Trig (5)
MATH 1119 - Analytic Geometry (3)
MATH 1130 - Math/Elem. Teachers I (4)
MATH 2103 - Business Statistics (3)
___ MATH 2108 - Linear Algebra (3)
___ MATH 2130 - Differential Equations (3)
SCIENCE ELECTIVES **
___ BIO 1104 - College Biology II (5)
___ CHE 1102 - General Chemistry II (5)
___ CHE 1104 - Q.A. / Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ CHE 2101 - Intro / Quantitative Analysis (5)
___ CHE 2120 - Organic Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 2121 - Organic Chemistry II (5)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
CSCI 1101 - Introduction to Computers (3) *
CSCI 1102 - Comp. / Bus. Applications (3) *
CSCI 1104 - Intro to Programming (4) *
CSCI 2104 - Advanced Programming (4) *
PHY 1102 - College Physics II (5)
PHY 1104 - University Physics II (5)
PHY 2101 - Statics (3)
___
___
___
___
COMMUNICATIONS / HUMANITIES / FINE ARTS
ELECTIVES **
___ ARCH 1101 - Architectural Theory/History (3)
___ ART 1103 - Design I (3)
___ ART 1104 - Design II (3)
___ ART 1105 - Drawing I (3)
___ ART 1106 - Drawing II (3)
___ ART 1107 - Painting I (3)
___ ART 1108 - Painting II (3)
___ ART 1111 - Photography I (3)
___ ART 1112 - Photography II (3)
___ ART 2105 - Sculpture I (3)
___ ART 2106 - Sculpture II (3)
___ ART 2108 - Beginning Jewelry (3)
___ ART 2109 - Advanced Jewelry (3)
___ ART 2111 - Art History I (3)
___ ART 2112 - Art History II (3)
___ ART 2113 - Introduction to Ceramics (3)
___ ART 2114 - Advanced Ceramics (3)
___ ART 2115 - Printmaking I (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
ART 2116 - Printmaking II (3)
ART 2117 - Commercial Art (3)
ART 2120 - Life Drawing (3)
ART 2121 - Intro to Stained Glass (3)
ART 2201 - Illustration I (3)
ART 2202 - Illustration II (3)
COMM 1103 - Small Group Commun. (3)
COMM 1104 - Interpersonal Commun. (3)
COMM 1106 - Intercultural Commun. (3)
ENGL 1103 - Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 2103 - Special Topics in Literature (3)
ENGL 2106 - Intermediate Composition (3)
ENGL 2114 - The Novel (3)
ENGL 2115 - Children’s Literature (3)
FREN 1101 - Elementary French I (4) *
FREN 1102 - Elementary French II (4) *
FREN 2101 - Modern French I (4) *
GRMN 1101 - Elementary German I (4) *
GRMN 1102 - Elementary German II (4) *
GRMN 2101 - Modern German I (4) *
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
OTHER ELECTIVES
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
PHY 2102 - Dynamics (3)
PHY 2121 - Electrical Engineer. Circuits (4)
ZOO 1105 - Anatomy / Physiology I (4)
ZOO 1106 - Anatomy / Physiology II (4)
* Not a laboratory course
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE / Page 2
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (cont.)
JOUR 1101 - Mass Media (3)
JOUR 1102 - Introduction to Journalism (3)
JOUR 1103 - Journalism Practicum (1)
LEAD 1101 - PTK Leadership Dev. (3)
MUSI 1101 - Music Theory I (3)
MUSI 1102 - Music Theory II (3)
MUSI 1109 - Music Fundamentals (3)
MUSI 1145 - Piano Class I (1)
PHIL 2102 - Medical Ethics (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 1101 - Elementary Spanish I (4) *
SPAN 1102 - Elementary Spanish II (4) *
SPAN 2101 - Modern Spanish I (4) *
THEA 1101 - Acting (3)
THEA 1102 - Practicum in Theatre (3)
THEA 1103 - Acting II (3)
THEA 1105 - Stage Makeup (3)
* All languages require one full-year
sequence for transfer credit
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
** It is the student’s responsibility to know and observe the requirements for his/her specific curriculum major.
Students should seek the assistance of an advisor.
Total Hours Page 2___________________
VIII. DEFICIENCIES
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
Total Hours Page 1___________________
Total Hours 1 & 2 ____________________
55 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”_________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
59
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE / Page 1
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 64 semester hours of academic work with a grade-point average of not
less than “C” (2.0). Candidates for this degree must complete an organized program of study which meets the following core
requirements. No more than nine (9) credit hours of courses with a second digit of “2” may be used toward Rend Lake College
graduation requirements. A maximum of eight (8) credit hours of one-credit hour PYED courses can be used toward graduation
requirements (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140, 1141, 1142 and 1164 may be taken in addition to this eight-hour maximum).
Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) General Education Core Courses (GECC) – www.iTransfer.org – are in bold. Only
those courses which are designated as IAI GECC courses may be counted toward general education requirements.
Always consult an academic advisor for assistance in selecting courses.
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Choose two or more subject areas:
IAI SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
___ ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
___ ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
___ ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
___ GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
___ HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
___ HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
HIST 2107 - Latin American History (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
___
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
Required: One course from the following list:
IAI MATHEMATICS
___ MATH 1107 - Contemp. College Math (3)
___ MATH 1111 - Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2106 - Finite Mathematics (3)
___ MATH 2110 - Math/Elem. Teachers II (3)
___ MATH 2115 - Business Calculus (4)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
III. SCIENCE – Required 2 courses (7 to 8 hrs.)
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least one laboratory course)
IAI LIFE SCIENCES
___ BIO 1100 - Biology for Non-Majors (4)
___ BIO 1101 - College Biology (5)
___ BIO 1102 - Environmental Biology (4)
___ BOT 1101 - General Botany (5)
___ ZOO 1101 - General Zoology (4)
IAI PHYSICAL SCIENCES
___ AST 1101 - Intro to Astronomy (4) *
___ CHE 1101 - General Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (3)
___ GEOL 1102 - Field Geology (3)
___ PHSC 1101 - Physical Science (5)
___ PHSC 1102 - Princ. of Earth Science (3) *
___ PHY 1101 - College Physics I (5)
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
* Not a laboratory course
IV. HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: One course selected from Humanities and one from Fine Arts
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
IAI HUMANITIES (Required one or two courses)
___ ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
___ ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
___ ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
___ ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
___ ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
IAI FINE ARTS (Required one or two courses)
___ ART 1101 - Art Appreciation (3)
___ HUMT 1104 - Introduction to Film (3)
Hours I _______
60
___
___
___
___
___
___
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Introduction to Drama (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
___ MUSI 1100 - Music Appreciation (3)
___ MUSI 1110 - Intro to American Music (3)
Hours II _______
Hours III _______
Hours IV _______
___
___
___
___
___
___
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
___ THEA 1106 - Theatre Appreciation (3)
TOTAL Pg. 1 __________
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
IAI COMMUNICATIONS
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS – Required 2 courses (3.5 hrs.)
___ HEA 1101 - Health Education (2)
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) *
* Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
VII. ELECTIVES –
May be used to fulfill elective requirements for graduation and for major
transfer to senior institutions. IAI Articulated Majors Courses are in italics.
SOCIAL / BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES **
___ HIST 2103 - Contemporary History (3)
___ HIST 2106 - Black American History (3)
___ POLI 2103 - Public Administration (3)
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2103 - Educational Psychology (3)
PSYC 2104 - Personality Dynamics (3)
PSYC 2106 - Human Relations (3)
SOSC 2101 - Topics in Social Science (3)
___ SOCI 2103 - Intro to Social Work
___ SOSC 2102 - Inside-Out Prison Exchange
MATH ELECTIVES **
___ MATH 1105 - Basic Concepts of Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1108 - College Algebra (3)
___ MATH 1109 - Plane Trigonometry (3)
___
___
___
___
MATH 1110 - College Algebra / Trig (5)
MATH 1119 - Analytic Geometry (3)
MATH 1130 - Math/Elem. Teachers I (4)
MATH 2103 - Business Statistics (3)
___ MATH 2108 - Linear Algebra (3)
___ MATH 2130 - Differential Equations (3)
SCIENCE ELECTIVES **
___ BIO 1104 - College Biology II (5)
___ CHE 1102 - General Chemistry II (5)
___ CHE 1104 - Q.A. / Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ CHE 2101 - Intro / Quantitative Analysis (5)
___ CHE 2120 - Organic Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 2121 - Organic Chemistry II (5)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
CSCI 1101 - Introduction to Computers (3) *
CSCI 1102 - Comp. / Bus. Applications (3) *
CSCI 1104 - Intro to Programming (4) *
CSCI 2104 - Advanced Programming (4) *
PHY 1102 - College Physics II (5)
PHY 1104 - University Physics II (5)
PHY 2101 - Statics (3)
___
___
___
___
COMMUNICATIONS / HUMANITIES / FINE ARTS
ELECTIVES **
___ ARCH 1101 - Architectural Theory/History (3)
___ ART 1103 - Design I (3)
___ ART 1104 - Design II (3)
___ ART 1105 - Drawing I (3)
___ ART 1106 - Drawing II (3)
___ ART 1107 - Painting I (3)
___ ART 1108 - Painting II (3)
___ ART 1111 - Photography I (3)
___ ART 1112 - Photography II (3)
___ ART 2105 - Sculpture I (3)
___ ART 2106 - Sculpture II (3)
___ ART 2108 - Beginning Jewelry (3)
___ ART 2109 - Advanced Jewelry (3)
___ ART 2111 - Art History I (3)
___ ART 2112 - Art History II (3)
___ ART 2113 - Introduction to Ceramics (3)
___ ART 2114 - Advanced Ceramics (3)
___ ART 2115 - Printmaking I (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
ART 2116 - Printmaking II (3)
ART 2117 - Commercial Art (3)
ART 2120 - Life Drawing (3)
ART 2121 - Intro to Stained Glass (3)
ART 2201 - Illustration I (3)
ART 2202 - Illustration II (3)
COMM 1103 - Small Group Commun. (3)
COMM 1104 - Interpersonal Commun. (3)
COMM 1106 - Intercultural Commun. (3)
ENGL 1103 - Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 2103 - Special Topics in Literature (3)
ENGL 2106 - Intermediate Composition (3)
ENGL 2114 - The Novel (3)
ENGL 2115 - Children’s Literature (3)
FREN 1101 - Elementary French I (4) *
FREN 1102 - Elementary French II (4) *
FREN 2101 - Modern French I (4) *
GRMN 1101 - Elementary German I (4) *
GRMN 1102 - Elementary German II (4) *
GRMN 2101 - Modern German I (4) *
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
OTHER ELECTIVES
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
PHY 2102 - Dynamics (3)
PHY 2121 - Electrical Engineer. Circuits (4)
ZOO 1105 - Anatomy / Physiology I (4)
ZOO 1106 - Anatomy / Physiology II (4)
* Not a laboratory course
JOUR 1101 - Mass Media (3)
JOUR 1102 - Introduction to Journalism (3)
JOUR 1103 - Journalism Practicum (1)
LEAD 1101 - PTK Leadership Dev. (3)
MUSI 1101 - Music Theory I (3)
MUSI 1102 - Music Theory II (3)
MUSI 1109 - Music Fundamentals (3)
MUSI 1145 - Piano Class I (1)
PHIL 2102 - Medical Ethics (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 1101 - Elementary Spanish I (4) *
SPAN 1102 - Elementary Spanish II (4) *
SPAN 2101 - Modern Spanish I (4) *
THEA 1101 - Acting (3)
THEA 1102 - Practicum in Theatre (3)
THEA 1103 - Acting II (3)
THEA 1105 - Stage Makeup (3)
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE / Page 2
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE (cont.)
* All languages require one full-year
sequence for transfer credit
___ ________________________________
___ ________________________________
** It is the student’s responsibility to know and observe the requirements for his/her specific curriculum major.
Students should seek the assistance of an advisor.
Total Hours Page 2___________________
VIII. DEFICIENCIES
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
Total Hours Page 1___________________
Total Hours 1 & 2 ____________________
55 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”_________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
61
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (ART) / Page 1
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (ART)
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Completion of the AFA curriculum does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois General
Education Core Curriculum. Therefore, students will need to fulfill the general education requirements of the
institution to which they transfer. Consult with your advisor for more information.
The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 65 semester hours of academic work with a grade-point average
of not less than “C” (2.0). Candidates for this degree must complete an organized program of study which meets the
following core requirements. No more than nine (9) credit hours of courses with a second digit of “2” may be used toward
Rend Lake College graduation requirements. A maximum of eight (8) credit hours of one-credit hour PYED courses can be
used toward graduation requirements (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140, 1141, 1142 and 1164 may be taken in addition to
this eight-hour maximum).
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
Choose two or more subject areas:
___
___
___
___
___
___
ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 1 course (3 to 4 hrs.)
___ MATH 1107 - Contemporary College Math (3)
___ MATH 1111 - Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2106 - Finite Mathematics (3)
___ MATH 2110 - Math/Elem. Teachers II (3)
___ MATH 2115 - Business Calculus (4)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
III. SCIENCE – Required 2 courses (7 to 8 hrs.)
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least one laboratory course)
LIFE SCIENCES
___ BIO 1100 - Biology for Non-Majors (4)
___ BIO 1101 - College Biology (5)
___ BIO 1102 - Environmental Biology (4)
PHYSICAL SCIENCES
___ AST 1101 - Intro to Astronomy (4) *
___ CHE 1101 - General Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___
___
___
___
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (3)
PHSC 1101 - Physical Science (5)
PHSC 1102 - Princ. of Earth Science (3) *
PHY 1101 - College Physics I (5)
IV. HUMANITIES – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
Hours I _______
62
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Hours II _______
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
* Not a laboratory course
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Introduction to Drama (3)
HUMT 1104 - Introduction to Film (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
MUSI 1100 - Music Appreciation (3)
MUSI 1110 - Intro to American Music (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
Hours III _______
___ BOT 1101 - General Botany (5)
___ ZOO 1101 - General Zoology (4)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Hours IV _______
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
THEA 1106 - Theatre Appreciation (3)
TOTAL Pg. 1 __________
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. ART REQUIREMENTS – Required 7 courses (21 hrs.)
___ ART 1103 - Design I (3)
___ ART 1104 - Design II (3)
___ ART 1105 - Drawing I (3)
___ ART 1106 - Drawing II (3)
___ ART 2111 - Art History I (3)
___ ART 2112 - Art History II (3)
___ ART 2120 - Life/Figure Drawing (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
VII. ART ELECTIVES (9 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
ART 1107 - Painting I (3)
ART 1108 - Painting II (3)
ART 1111 - Photography I (3)
ART 1112 - Photography II (3)
ART 2105 - Sculpture I (3)
ART 2106 - Sculpture II (3)
ART 2108 - Metalsmithing I (3)
ART 2109 - Metalsmithing II (3)
ART 2121 - Intro to Stained Glass (3)
ART 2113 - Introduction to Ceramics (3)
ART 2114 - Ceramics II (3)
ART 2115 - Printmaking I (3)
ART 2116 - Printmaking II (3)
ART 2117 - Commercial Art (3)
GRD 1201 - Intro to Graphic Design (3)
VIII. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT – Required 1 course (1.5 hrs.)
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) *
* Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
IX. REQUIREMENT TO TRANSFER TO SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE
___ HEA 1101 - Health Education (2)
Total Hours Page 2___________________
X. DEFICIENCIES
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (ART) / Page 2
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (ART) (cont.)
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
Total Hours Page 1___________________
Total Hours 1 & 2 ____________________
55 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”__________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
63
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – INSTRUMENTAL OPTION) / Page 1
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – INSTRUMENTAL OPTION)
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Completion of the AFA degree does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois General Education
Core Curriculum, nor does it fulfill the requirements for the Associate in Art or Associate in Science degrees.
Therefore, students will need to fulfill the general education requirements of the institution to which they transfer.
The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 64 semester hours of academic work with a grade-point average
of not less than “C” (2.0). Candidates for this degree must complete an organized program of study which meets the
following core requirements. No more than nine (9) credit hours of courses with a second digit of “2” may be used toward
Rend Lake College graduation requirements. A maximum of eight (8) credit hours of one-credit hour PYED courses can be
used toward graduation requirements (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140, 1141, 1142 and 1164 may be taken in addition to
this eight-hour maximum).
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 1 course (3 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
___
ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
HIST 2107 - Latin American History (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 1 course (3 to 5 hrs.)
___ MATH 1107 - Contemporary College Math (3)
___ MATH 1111 - Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2106 - Finite Mathematics (3)
___ MATH 2110 - Math/Elem. Teachers II (3)
___ MATH 2115 - Business Calculus (4)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
III. SCIENCE – Required 2 courses (7 to 8 hrs.)
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least one laboratory course)
LIFE SCIENCES
___ BIO 1100 - Biology for Non-Majors (4)
___ BIO 1101 - College Biology (5)
___ BIO 1102 - Environmental Biology (4)
PHYSICAL SCIENCES
___ AST 1101 - Intro to Astronomy (4) *
___ CHE 1101 - General Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___
___
___
___
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (3)
PHSC 1101 - Physical Science (5)
PHSC 1102 - Princ. of Earth Science (3) *
PHY 1101 - College Physics I (5)
IV. HUMANITIES – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
Hours I _______
64
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Hours II _______
___ BOT 1101 - General Botany (5)
___ ZOO 1101 - General Zoology (4)
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
* Not a laboratory course
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Introduction to Drama (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
Hours III _______
___
___
___
___
___
Hours IV _______
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
TOTAL Pg. 1 __________
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. MUSIC – Required 12 courses (23 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
Required: Two semesters of MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I (Keyboard)
MUSI 1101 - Music Theory I (3)
MUSI 1102 - Music Theory II (3)
MUSI 1103 - Aural Skills I (1)
MUSI 1106 - Aural Skills II (1)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1111 - Music Literature (3)
MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I – Piano (1) x2
MUSI 1145 - Piano Class I (1)
MUSI 1146 - Piano Class II (1)
MUSI 2101 - Music Theory III (3)
MUSI 2102 - Music Theory IV (3)
MUSI 2103 - Aural Skills III (1)
MUSI 2104 - Aural Skills IV (1)
VII. MUSIC ENSEMBLES – Required 4 semesters (4 hrs.)
Required: Two semesters of MUSI 1159 & MUSI 2159 or two semesters of MUSI 1161 & MUSI 2161
___ MUSI 1159 - Concert Choir I (1)
___ MUSI 1161 - Concert Band I (1)
___ MUSI 2159 - Concert Choir II (1)
___ MUSI 2161 - Concert Band II (1)
VIII. APPLIED MUSIC – Required 4 semesters (8 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
Required: Four semesters of principal instrument lessons
MUSI 1120 - Applied Music I – Private Voice (2)
MUSI 1121 - Applied Music I – Woodwinds (2)
MUSI 1122 - Applied Music I – Brass (2)
MUSI 1123 - Applied Music I – Strings (2)
MUSI 1124 - Applied Music I – Percussion (2)
___
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1126 - Applied Music I – Classical Guitar (2)
MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I – Keyboard (2)
MUSI 2120 - Applied Music II – Private Voice (2)
MUSI 2121 - Applied Music II – Woodwinds (2)
MUSI 2122 - Applied Music II – Brass (2)
___
___
___
___
MUSI 2123 - Applied Music II – Strings (2)
MUSI 2124 - Applied Music II – Percussion (2)
MUSI 2126 - Applied Music II – Classical Guitar (2)
MUSI 2127 - Applied Music II – Keyboard (2)
IX. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT – Required 1 course (1.5 hrs.)
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) *
* Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
X. REQUIREMENT TO TRANSFER TO SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE
___ HEA 1101 - Health Education (2)
Total Hours Page 2___________________
XI. DEFICIENCIES
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – INSTRUMENTAL OPTION) / Page 2
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – INSTRUMENTAL OPTION) (cont.)
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
Total Hours Page 1___________________
Total Hours 1 & 2 ____________________
55 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”_________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
65
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – VOCAL OPTION) / Page 1
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – VOCAL OPTION)
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Completion of the AFA degree does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois General Education
Core Curriculum, nor does it fulfill the requirements for the Associate in Art or Associate in Science degrees.
Therefore, students will need to fulfill the general education requirements of the institution to which they transfer.
The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 64 semester hours of academic work with a grade-point average
of not less than “C” (2.0). Candidates for this degree must complete an organized program of study which meets the
following core requirements. No more than nine (9) credit hours of courses with a second digit of “2” may be used toward
Rend Lake College graduation requirements. A maximum of eight (8) credit hours of one-credit hour PYED courses can be
used toward graduation requirements (PYED 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1140, 1141, 1142 and 1164 may be taken in addition to
this eight-hour maximum).
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 1 course (3 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
___
ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
HIST 2107 - Latin American History (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 1 course (3 to 5 hrs.)
___ MATH 1107 - Contemporary College Math (3)
___ MATH 1111 - Statistics (3)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2106 - Finite Mathematics (3)
___ MATH 2110 - Math/Elem. Teachers II (3)
___ MATH 2115 - Business Calculus (4)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
III. SCIENCE – Required 2 courses (7 to 8 hrs.)
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least one laboratory course)
LIFE SCIENCES
___ BIO 1100 - Biology for Non-Majors (4)
___ BIO 1101 - College Biology (5)
___ BIO 1102 - Environmental Biology (4)
PHYSICAL SCIENCES
___ AST 1101 - Intro to Astronomy (4) *
___ CHE 1101 - General Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___
___
___
___
GEOL 1101 - Physical Geology (3)
PHSC 1101 - Physical Science (5)
PHSC 1102 - Princ. of Earth Science (3) *
PHY 1101 - College Physics I (5)
IV. HUMANITIES – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
Hours I _______
66
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
Hours II _______
___ BOT 1101 - General Botany (5)
___ ZOO 1101 - General Zoology (4)
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
* Not a laboratory course
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Introduction to Drama (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
Hours III _______
___
___
___
___
___
Hours IV _______
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
TOTAL Pg. 1 __________
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. MUSIC – Required 12 courses (23 hrs.)
Required: Two semesters of MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I (Keyboard)
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1101 - Music Theory I (3)
MUSI 1102 - Music Theory II (3)
MUSI 1103 - Aural Skills I (1)
MUSI 1106 - Aural Skills II (1)
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1111 - Music Literature (3)
MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I – Keyboard (1) x2
MUSI 1145 - Piano Class I (1)
MUSI 1146 - Piano Class II (1)
___
___
___
___
MUSI 2101 - Music Theory III (3)
MUSI 2102 - Music Theory IV (3)
MUSI 2103 - Aural Skills III (1)
MUSI 2104 - Aural Skills IV (1)
VII. MUSIC ENSEMBLES – Required 4 semesters (4 hrs.)
Required: Two semesters of MUSI 1159 & MUSI 2159 or two semesters of MUSI 1161 & MUSI 2161
___ MUSI 1159 - Concert Choir I (1)
___ MUSI 1161 - Concert Band I (1)
___ MUSI 2159 - Concert Choir II (1)
___ MUSI 2161 - Concert Band II (1)
VIII. APPLIED MUSIC – Required 4 semesters (8 hrs.)
Required: Four semesters of applied voice lessons
___
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1120 - Applied Music I – Private Voice (2)
MUSI 1121 - Applied Music I – Woodwinds (2)
MUSI 1122 - Applied Music I – Brass (2)
MUSI 1123 - Applied Music I – Strings (2)
MUSI 1124 - Applied Music I – Percussion (2)
___
___
___
___
___
MUSI 1126 - Applied Music I – Classical Guitar (2)
MUSI 1127 - Applied Music I – Keyboard (2)
MUSI 2120 - Applied Music II – Private Voice (2)
MUSI 2121 - Applied Music II – Woodwinds (2)
MUSI 2122 - Applied Music II – Brass (2)
___
___
___
___
MUSI 2123 - Applied Music II – Strings (2)
MUSI 2124 - Applied Music II – Percussion (2)
MUSI 2126 - Applied Music II – Classical Guitar (2)
MUSI 2127 - Applied Music II – Keyboard (2)
IX. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT – Required 1 course (1.5 hrs.)
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) *
* Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
X. REQUIREMENT TO TRANSFER TO SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE
___ HEA 1101 - Health Education (2)
Total Hours Page 2___________________
XI. DEFICIENCIES
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – VOCAL OPTION) / Page 2
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (MUSIC – VOCAL OPTION) (cont.)
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
Total Hours Page 1___________________
Total Hours 1 & 2 ____________________
55 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”_________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
67
GRADUATION WORKSHEET ~ ASSOCIATE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE
ASSOCIATE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE
RLC Graduation Requirements Worksheet
Students will not be denied admission because of deficiencies in high school work but must satisfy these deficiencies
before graduation from Rend Lake College. Meeting graduation requirements ultimately is the responsibility of the
student. Students are encouraged to be familiar with the catalog and program requirements and to work with
their academic advisors in selecting courses.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Completion of the AES degree does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois General Education
Core Curriculum. Therefore, students will need to fulfill the general education requirements of the institution to
which they transfer. The student’s total program must contain a minimum of 68 semester hours of academic work
with a grade-point average of not less than “C” (2.0).
I. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – Required 2 courses (6 hrs.)
Choose two subject areas:
___
___
___
___
___
___
ANTH 1101 - Cultural Anthropology (3)
ECON 2101 - Principles of Economics I (3)
ECON 2102 - Principles of Economics II (3)
GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Geography (3)
HIST 1101 - Western Civilization I (3)
HIST 1102 - Western Civilization II (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
HIST 2101 - American History I (3)
HIST 2102 - American History II (3)
POLI 1101 - State / Local Government (3)
POLI 2101 - American Government (3)
POLI 2102 - International Relations (3)
PSYC 2101 - Intro to Psychology (3)
___
___
___
___
___
PSYC 2102 - Child Psychology (3)
PSYC 2105 - Social Psychology (3)
SOCI 1101 - Intro to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2101 - Social Problems (3)
SOCI 2102 - Marriage and Family (3)
II. MATHEMATICS – Required 4 courses (17 hrs.)
___ MATH 1121 - Calculus/An. Geometry I (5)
___ MATH 2122 - Calculus/An. Geometry II (5)
___ MATH 2123 - Calculus/An. Geometry III (4)
___ MATH 2130 - Differential Equations (3)
III. SCIENCE – Required 6 or 7 courses (30 hrs.)
Required: All three Physical Science courses listed and the Computer Programming course;
two or three courses from Engineering Specialties
PHYSICAL SCIENCES (15 hours)
___ CHE 1103 - Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ PHY 1103 - University Physics I (5)
___ PHY 1104 - University Physics II (5)
ENGINEERING SPECIALTIES (12 hours)
Chemical Engineering
___ CHE 1104 - Q.A. / Inorganic Chemistry (5)
___ CHE 2120 - Organic Chemistry I (5)
___ CHE 2121 - Organic Chemistry II (5)
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (3 hours)
___ CSCI 1103 - Intro to Programming (3)
Civil Engineering
___ ENGG 1101 - Engineering Graphics (4)
___ PHY 2101 - Statics (3)
___ PHY 2102 - Dynamics (3)
Electrical Engineering
___ PHY 2121 - Electrical Eng. Circuits (4)
IV. HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS – Required 1 course (3 hrs.)
Required: One course selected from either Humanities or Fine Arts
* All languages require one full-year sequence for transfer credit
ENGL 2109 - British Literature I (3)
ENGL 2110 - British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2111 - American Lit to 1865 (3)
ENGL 2112 - American Lit 1865-Present (3)
ENGL 2113 - Intro to Drama (3)
HUMT 1105 - Humanities thru Arts (3)
PHIL 1101 - Intro to Philosophy (3)
HUMANITIES
___ ENGL 2101 - Classical Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2102 - Intro to Literature (3)
___ ENGL 2104 - The Short Story (3)
___ ENGL 2105 - Introduction to Poetry (3)
___ ENGL 2107 - Mythology (3)
___ ENGL 2108 - Intro to Shakespeare (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
FINE ARTS
___ ART 1101 - Art Appreciation (3)
___ HUMT 1104 - Introduction to Film (3)
___ MUSI 1100 - Music Appreciation (3)
___
___
___
___
___
___
PHIL 2101 - Logic (3)
PHIL 2103 - World Religion (3)
PHIL 2104 - Ethics (3)
PHIL 2105 - Non-Western Philosophy (3)
PHIL 2106 - Philosophy of Religion (3)
SPAN 2102 - Modern Spanish II (4) *
___ MUSI 1110 - Intro to American Music (3)
___ THEA 1106 - Theatre Appreciation (3)
V. COMMUNICATIONS – Required 3 courses (9 hrs.)
Required: Two-course sequence in writing (with grade of “C” or better) (6 hrs.); one course in oral communications
___ COMM 1101 - Principles of Speaking (3)
___ ENGL 1101 - Rhetoric and Comp. I (3)
___ ENGL 1102 - Rhetoric and Comp. II (3)
VI. REND LAKE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT – Required 1 course (1.5 hrs.)
___ ORIE 1101 - Orientation (1.5) Required during first semester in attendance for all first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students
VII. DEFICIENCIES
No single course can be used to fulfill more than one requirement.
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
68
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
___ ______________________________
Total Hours I through VI ______________
56 Hrs. 2nd Digit “1”_________________
OK Graduation? Yes ☐ No ☐
1
2
3
4
EXPECT: 2 YEARS AT RLC,
PLUS 2 ADDITIONAL YEARS
Baccalaureate-Transfer Programs
Transfer programs at Rend Lake College are designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete the
first two years of baccalaureate college programs. At the end of two years, credits from Rend Lake College may be
transferred to a four-year institution without loss of time or credit.
Students who have not selected a four-year institution to attend after completion of the Associate in Arts Degree,
Associate in Science Degree, Associate in Fine Arts Degree or Associate in Engineering Science Degree can follow
the programs in this section of the catalog with assurance that most lower-division requirements will be met for
most schools.
Students who already have selected a four-year institution to which they will be transferring should contact that
school or consult that school’s catalog for any special information or recommendations regarding a particular
program and its requirements. Assistance may be obtained from Rend Lake College’s counseling staff or from
faculty advisors.
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend
to transfer and pursue a four-year degree after
satisfying associate-level requirements at Rend Lake
College. To ensure articulation, the student should
follow the sequence of courses recommended by
the four-year institution.
BaccalaureateAll programs listed in this section are SUGGESTED
guides only. Requirements vary at different four-year
Transfer
Programs
institutions.
To ensure
articulation, the student should
follow the sequence of courses recommended by the fouryear institution. Also, the scheduling of classes may not
be identical to the “ideal” programs suggested for varying
reasons. Students are expected to arrange their actual
schedule with the help of an advisor.
up to
1
2
REQUIRED:
1 SEMESTER TO 2 YEARS AT RLC
Career-Technical
Programs
Career-Technical
Programs
Career-Technical programs at Rend Lake College include those which lead to either an Associate in Applied
Science Degree or an Occupational Certificate. To be effective, occupational programs of this nature must be joboriented; therefore, these one- and two-year programs are designed to prepare students for entry into the working
world immediately after successful completion of the required courses.
Program requirements in this section are for associate degree or occupational certificates from Rend Lake College
only. These programs are not geared for persons wishing to transfer credits to a four-year institution, although
many of the courses and programs will transfer. Students are
encouraged to FOLLOW EXACTLY the desired program as
indicated. However, students should consult with an advisor
for any changes in scheduling which may be necessary due to
scheduling conflicts, changes in program requirements, etc.
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for
either a degree or occupational certificate. CareerTechnical programs are designed to qualify RLC
graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
72
FACULTY CONTACTS FOR PROGRAMS
Students must see a Faculty Advisor or Academic Advisor before registering. When a Faculty Advisor is not
available, or if an advisor is not listed for your major, students should see the Dean or an Academic Advisor.
Academic Advisement Center
Vice President of Student Services
Lisa Price......................................... Ext. 1205 / [email protected] / Admin. 110
Advisors
Tony Etnier...................................Ext. 1282 / [email protected] / Admin. 109
Jordan Hicks.................................Ext. 1361 / [email protected] / Admin. 108
Jena Jensik.................................. Ext. 1293 / [email protected] / Admin. 107
Allied Health Division
Dean / Title III Project Manager
Kim Robert.......................................Ext. 1775 / [email protected] / LRC 129
Medical Coding / Health Information Technology
Lora Phillips....................................Ext. 1287 / [email protected] / ATC 131
Nursing
Melisa Berendson.........Ext. 1705 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 123
Radiologic Technology
Holly Heisner.................................. Ext. 1778 / [email protected] / ATC 198
Advisors for All Other Allied Health Programs
Bria Robinson.....................Ext. 1777 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 116
Nicki Bowlin................................ Ext. 1343 / [email protected] / Admin 105
Applied Science & Technology Division
Dean; Advisor for: Electricity
Chris Nielsen.................................... Ext. 1292 / [email protected] / ATC 138
Agricultural Mechanics
John McKinney........................ Ext. 1758 / [email protected] / ASC 111
Agriculture / Plant & Soil Science
Kathy Craig........................................Ext. 1066 / [email protected] / ASC 113
Architecture / Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD)
Kevin Weston.........................Ext. 1816 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 112
Automotive Technology
Shannon Perkins.....................Ext. 1784 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 108
Nigel Thompson...............Ext. 1806 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 111
Computer Science / IT Systems Specialist & Assistant
Shari Carpenter......................... Ext. 1774 / [email protected] / ATC 180
Ricky Robinson............................Ext. 1789 / [email protected] / ATC 185
Chris Sink.................................................Ext. 1798 / [email protected] / ATC 183
Computer Programming / Computer Science
Brad Helm..........................................Ext. 1814 / [email protected] / ATC 181
Criminal Justice
Ron Meek............................................Ext. 1239 / [email protected] / ATC 136
Diesel Technology
Mike Burris..........................................Ext. 1269 / [email protected] / ASC 112
Graphic Design
Jennifer Tarantino Linsin....Ext. 1716 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 110
Heavy Equipment Technology
Zachary Vahlkamp................ Ext. 7914 / [email protected] / ASC 114
Industrial Electronics & Maintenance Technician
Chris Sink.................................................Ext. 1798 / [email protected] / ATC 183
Mining Technology
Don McBride........................... Ext. 1217 / [email protected] / CMTC 104
Office Systems Technology
Sarah Bilderbeck..................... Ext. 1754 / [email protected] / ATC 130
Sustainable Design / Green Facilities Management
Matt Jackson.................................Ext. 1296 / [email protected] / ATC 106
Welding Technology
Dave Smith......................................... Ext. 1227 / [email protected] / ATC 137
Pete Wilce...........................................Ext. 1272 / [email protected] / ATC 135
Community & Corporate Education
Dean; Advisor for: Real Estate
Lori Ragland................................... Ext. 1367 / [email protected] / STC 207
Cosmetology / Barber / Nail Technology
Daphne Mitchell........Ext. 2031 / [email protected] / RLC MarketPlace
Culinary Arts
Robert Wilson................................Ext. 1332 / [email protected] / STC 132B
Jeff Fairbanks...........................Ext. 1334 / [email protected] / STC 132A
EMT / EMT - Paramedic
Leslie McKenzie................Ext. 1418 / [email protected] / RLC MarketPlace
Truck Driver Training
Erin Morris........................................Ext. 1380 / [email protected] / STC 204
Liberal Arts Division
Dean; Advisor for: English / Foreign Lang. / Journalism
Henry “Buster” Leeck...................Ext. 1790 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 145
Art
Therese Melena..................... Ext. 1747 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 139
Melissa McClement-Engler
..................................... Ext. 1719 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 140
Communications
Dr. Elizabeth Bailey-Smith....Ext. 1493 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 144
History
Nathan Brouwer................Ext. 1792 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 151
Music
Sara Alstat..................................Ext. 1817 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 148
Psychology
Dr. Jeannie Mitchell.................Ext. 1804 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 142
Sociology
Sarah Draper.......................... Ext. 1809 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 149
Theatre
Tracey Webb..............................Ext. 1295 / [email protected] / N. Oasis 113
Math & Sciences Division
Dean; Advisor for: Engineering / Pre-Law / Pre-Med
Andrea Banach..................... Ext. 1258 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 145
Biology
Caroline Ragan.........................Ext. 1378 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 147
Business
Mark Jornd................................Ext. 1273 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 154
Chemistry
Paul Sandrock................... Ext. 1732 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 138
Early Childhood Education
Tina Grounds..........................Ext. 1396 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 153
Brenda Heinzmann.........Ext. 1397 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 152
Education
Brenda Heinzmann.........Ext. 1397 / [email protected] / S. Oasis 152
73
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Agricultural Business (AAS)...............................................................................75
Agricultural Mechanics (AAS)...........................................................................75
Agricultural Production & Management (AAS)..........................................76
Agriculture (AS).....................................................................................................77
Architectural Technology (AAS)......................................................................77
Art (AA).....................................................................................................................79
Art (AFA)...................................................................................................................79
Associate Degree Nursing (AAS).....................................................................80
Automotive Technology (AAS)........................................................................81
Biological Sciences (AS)......................................................................................81
Business (AS)..........................................................................................................82
Certified Medical Assistant (AAS)...................................................................82
Chemistry (AS).......................................................................................................83
Communications (AA).........................................................................................83
Computer Programming (AAS).......................................................................84
Computer Science - Business (AS)..................................................................84
Computer Science - Science (AS)....................................................................85
Criminal Justice (AA)...........................................................................................87
Criminal Justice (AAS).........................................................................................87
Culinary Arts Management (AAS)...................................................................89
Diesel Technology (AAS)....................................................................................89
Early Childhood Education (AAS)...................................................................90
Education
Elementary (AA)...............................................................................................91
Secondary (AA / AS)........................................................................................91
EMT - Paramedic (AAS).......................................................................................92
Engineering Science (AES)................................................................................93
Engineering Technology (AS)...........................................................................93
English (AA)............................................................................................................94
Graphic Design (AAS)..........................................................................................95
Health Information Technology (AAS)..........................................................95
Heavy Equipment Technology (AAS)............................................................96
History (AA)............................................................................................................97
Industrial Electronics & Maintenance Technician (AAS).........................98
Industrial Technology (AAS).............................................................................99
IT Systems Assistant (AAS)..............................................................................100
IT Systems Specialist (AAS).............................................................................100
Manufacturing Technology (AAS)................................................................101
Mathematics (AS)...............................................................................................102
Medical Laboratory Technology (AAS).......................................................103
Mining Technology (AAS)................................................................................104
Music (AFA)
Instrumental Option.....................................................................................105
Vocal Option....................................................................................................106
Occupational Therapy Assistant (AAS).......................................................106
Office Systems Technology (AAS)
Administrative Assistant.............................................................................107
Health Information Assistant....................................................................108
Oil & Natural Gas Technician (AAS)..............................................................110
Pharmacy (AS).....................................................................................................110
Plant & Soil Science (AS)..................................................................................111
Political Science (AA).........................................................................................111
Pre-Dentistry (AS)...............................................................................................112
Pre-Law (AA / AS)................................................................................................112
Pre-Medicine (AS)...............................................................................................112
Pre-Veterinary Medicine (AS).........................................................................112
Psychology (AA)..................................................................................................113
Radiologic Technology (AAS).........................................................................113
Social Work (AA)..................................................................................................114
Sociology (AA).....................................................................................................115
Veterinary Technology (AAS)..........................................................................117
Welding Technology (AAS)..............................................................................118
Wireless Communications Tech (AAS)........................................................119
IMPORTANT! Outlines for the Associate in Arts, Science, Fine Arts and Engineering Science
Degree programs which follow are strictly recommended outlines of coursework for those
majors. Specific coursework will vary depending on transfer institution requirements.
Rend Lake College Associate Degree requirements are outlined in the worksheets found
on Pages 58 through 68 of this catalog. Consult with your counselor or advisor for more
information about your program of study.
74
OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
Agricultural Mechanics...................................................................................... 76
Agricultural Production & Management..................................................... 76
Architectural Technology................................................................................. 78
Computer-Aided Drafting............................................................................ 78
Automotive Technology.................................................................................... 80
Automotive Air Conditioning..................................................................... 80
Automotive Brake........................................................................................... 80
Automotive Electrical.................................................................................... 80
Automotive Engine Repair........................................................................... 80
Automotive Suspension & Steering......................................................... 80
Automotive Transmission............................................................................ 80
Ford Maintenance & Light Repair.............................................................. 81
Certified Medical Assistant............................................................................... 82
Cosmetology......................................................................................................... 85
Barber.................................................................................................................. 85
Cosmetology Teacher.................................................................................... 86
Nail Technology............................................................................................... 86
Criminal Justice..................................................................................................... 88
Corrections........................................................................................................ 88
Cyber Forensics Specialist............................................................................ 86
Police Science................................................................................................... 88
Private Protection........................................................................................... 88
Culinary Arts.......................................................................................................... 88
Baking & Pastry Arts....................................................................................... 88
Diesel Technology............................................................................................... 90
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Assistant............................................................................ 91
Early Childhood Certificate - Level 2........................................................ 90
Early Childhood Certificate - Level 3........................................................ 90
Infant / Toddler Credential................................................................................
Emergency Medical Technician...................................................................... 92
EMT - Paramedic................................................................................................... 92
Graphic Design..................................................................................................... 94
Graphic Web Design........................................................................................... 94
Health Care Coach............................................................................................... 95
Home Health Aide............................................................................................... 97
Industrial Electronics & Maintenance Technician
Basic Machining............................................................................................... 98
PLC........................................................................................................................ 98
Industrial Maintenance Technician............................................................... 98
IT Systems Assistant
Microsoft User.................................................................................................. 99
IT Systems Specialist
Cisco Routing & Switching......................................................................... 101
Linux Networking......................................................................................... 101
PC Maintenance............................................................................................. 101
Windows........................................................................................................... 101
Manufacturing Technology............................................................................ 102
Medical Coding................................................................................................... 103
Mining Technology
Advanced Mining..........................................................................................105
Mine Electricity..............................................................................................105
Mine Mechanics.............................................................................................105
Mine Operations............................................................................................105
Mine Supervisory..........................................................................................105
Office Systems Technology
Medical Transcriptionist.............................................................................109
Medical Transcriptionist Clerk..................................................................109
Office Assistant..............................................................................................109
Oil & Natural Gas Technician..........................................................................109
Personal Care Aide............................................................................................. 110
Phlebotomy...........................................................................................................111
Radiologic Technology
Computed Tomography..............................................................................114
MRI.......................................................................................................................114
Surgical Technology...........................................................................................115
Surveying Technology..................................................................................... 116
Therapeutic Massage....................................................................................... 116
Truck Driver Training..........................................................................................117
Heavy Equipment Transportation...........................................................117
Welding Technology......................................................................................... 118
Advanced Metalworking.............................................................................119
Advanced Welding Techniques............................................................... 118
Pipe Welding Technology.......................................................................... 118
Welding Fundamentals............................................................................... 118
Wireless Communications Technology
Electronics for Wireless Communications............................................119
Land-Based Communications Systems..................................................119
AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS
AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
A two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree. Courses are designed to meet the needs of students
who wish to pursue a career in the broad area of agricultural
business at the mid-management level. Graduates should find
interesting and rewarding opportunities in agricultural sales
and services. Upon completion of this program, the student has
the option to capstone into a participating four-year institution.
▶ Total = 68 Hours
First Semester
AGRI 1181
AGRI 1222
MATH
AGRI 1285
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
HEA 1102
PROGRAM OUTLINES
Introduction to Animal Science
Applied Mathematics 1
or Elective – Mathematics 1
Agricultural Technologies
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Second Semester
AGRI 1141
AGRI 1161
AGRI 1210
AGRI 1221
AGRI 1262
Agricultural Economics
Soil Science
Supervised Occupational Experience
Intro to Agricultural Occupations
Agricultural Chemicals
Cr. Hrs.
Crop Science
Agricultural Finance
Food and Agricultural Policy
Principles of Effective Speaking
Computer Applications
Introduction to Psychology 1
or Human Relations
Fourth Semester
AGRI 1282
AGRI 2210
AGRI 2241
AGRI 2242
Feeds and Feeding
Supervised Occupational Experience
Farm Management
Marketing Agricultural Products
Elective – General Education 1, 2
First Semester
4
AGRI 1205
3
3
3
AGRI 1208
AGRI 1215
AGRI 1225
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
HEA 1102
2
15
3
5
4
1
3
16
Third Semester
AGRI 1263
AGRI 2223
AGRI 2225
COMM 1101
CSCI 1102
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106 A two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree. The program is designed to prepare students for
occupations involving the maintenance and repair of implements
such as tractors, combines and other farm machinery. Upon
completion of the curriculum, the student should have a thorough
knowledge of engine and equipment repair, servicing, sales and
management. Also upon completion, the student has the option
to capstone into a participating four-year institution. ▶ Total =
72 Hours
Assembling, Adjusting and
Reconditioning Farm Equipment
Diesel Engines
Small Engines
or Intro to Agriculture Mechanization
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
or Basic First Aid Second Semester
AGRI 1204
AGRI 1210
AGRI 1221
COMM 1101
DIEL 1202
Physics of Hydraulics
Supervised Occupational Experience
Intro to Agricultural Occupations
Principles of Effective Speaking 1
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Third Semester
4
3
3
3
3
AGRI 1203
AGRI 1222
MATH
AGRI 1285
AGRI 2201
DIEL 1204
3
19
Ignition and Electrical Systems
Applied Mathematics 1
or Elective – Math 1
Agricultural Technologies
Transmission and Power Trains
Intermediate Diesels
Fourth Semester
AGRI 1206
AGRI 2204
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
3
4
3
5
3
18
Fifth Term
AGRI 2210
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
See Division Chairperson for list of approved courses.
1
Ag Air Conditioning Systems
Advanced Major Overhaul
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
Elective – General Education 2
Cr. Hrs.
5
6
3
3
2
19
5
4
1
3
2
15
5
3
3
4
4
19
4
5
3
3
15
Supervised Occupational Experience
4
RECOMMENDED COURSE:
WELD 1270
Introduction to Welding Processes
4
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
See Division Chairperson for list of approved courses.
1
75
Second Semester
AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS
AGRI 1141
AGRI 1161
AGRI 1210
AGRI 1221
Agricultural Economics
Soil Science
Supervised Occupational Experience
Intro to Agricultural Occupations
or Work Ethics
ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I 1
PSYC 2101
Introduction to Psychology 1
PSYC 2106 or Human Relations
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
▶ Total = 27 Hours
First Semester
AGRI 1203
AGRI 1208
AGRI 2201
Ignition and Electrical Systems
Diesel Engines
Transmission and Power Trains
Second Semester
AGRI 1204
AGRI 2204
DIEL 1202
Physics of Hydraulics
Advanced Major Overhaul
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
AGRI 1215
AGRI 1285
WELD 1270
Small Engines
Agriculture Technologies
Introduction to Welding Processes
Cr. Hrs.
5
6
4
15
Assembling, Adjusting and
Reconditioning Farm Equipment
AGRI 1263
Crop Science
AGRI 2225 Food & Agricultural Policy
AGRI 1285
Agricultural Technologies
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
3
3
4
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
AGRI 1181
AGRI 1208
AGRI 1222
MATH HEA 1101
HEA 1102
76
Introduction to Animal Science
Diesel Engines
Applied Mathematics 1
or Math Elective 1
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Elective – General Education
4
6
3
2
3
18
5
4
3
3
3
18
Fourth Semester
AGRI 1262
AGRI 1282
AGRI 2241
AGRI 2242
DIEL 1202
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT
Cr. Hrs.
3
19
Third Semester
Associate in Applied Science Degree
First Semester
1
3
AGRI 1205
5
5
2
12
The two-year Agricultural Production and Management
program leads to an Associate in Applied Science Degree
combining many of the features in mechanical and business
curricula to help students stay abreast with the dynamic, everchanging agriculture industry.
These changes are increasing the need and the opportunities
for individuals who possess both technical knowledge and
management ability. RLC students develop decision-making
abilities by being exposed to such areas as farm management,
economics and marketing. Courses like those dealing with feeds
and feeding, soils and fertilizers and ag chemicals are intended
to help develop technical skills.
Unique to this program are the mechanical courses designed
to develop skills needed to service the machines common in
today’s agriculture.
The Agricultural Production and Management program
originally was designed for students who already have an
opportunity to farm. However, many other employment
opportunities are available as managers and herdsmen on large
grain and livestock farms or as fertilizer, chemical and seed
suppliers to ag service companies.
Upon completion of this program, the student has the option
to capstone into a participating four-year institution. ▶ Total =
71 Hours
3
5
4
Agricultural Chemicals
Feeds and Feeding
Farm Management
Marketing Agricultural Products
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
3
3
3
5
2
16
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
AGRI 2223
WELD 1270
Agricultural Finance 2
Intro to Welding Processes
3
4
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
Highly recommended for students in Ag Production / Management.
1
2
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
▶ Total = 30 Hours
First Semester
AGRI 1181
AGRI 1205
AGRI 1208
Introduction to Animal Science
Assembling, Adjusting and
Reconditioning Farm Equipment
Diesel Engines
Elective (Fall or Spring)
Second Semester
AGRI 1161
AGRI 1263
AGRI 2241
Soil Science
Crop Science
Farm Management
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
AGRI 1262
AGRI 1282
AGRI 1285
DIEL 1202
HORT 1213
Agricultural Chemicals
Feeds and Feeding
Agriculture Technologies
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Pest Management
Cr. Hrs.
4
5
6
3
18
5
4
3
12
3
3
3
2
3
AGRICULTURE
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Science Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Rend Lake College offers general educational courses and five
technical agriculture courses which prepare students for transfer
to four-year institutions. Since requirements of ag schools vary
considerably, students should contact an RLC Ag Advisor to plan
a program of studies. Such courses as biology, zoology or botany,
basic chemistry and technical agriculture usually are included in
the first two years of study.
In addition to courses listed, the student must take a
minimum of 45 hours in general education courses which meet
Associate in Science Degree requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
Ag courses that have been articulated for transfer:
This is a two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree in Architectural Technology. The curriculum has
a 2+2 articulation agreement with Southern Illinois University
Carbondale’s Architectural Studies program. The curriculum
also has transfer options into SIU’s Professional Construction
Management program, Illinois State University’s Construction
Management program and Purdue University’s Building
Construction and Management program. The Architectural
Technology program will provide students the necessary skills and
abilities to enter the workforce in technical support positions in
architectural- or construction-related fields. ▶ Total = 69 Hours
AGRI 1141
AGRI 1161
AGRI 1181
AGRI 1263
HORT 1201
Agricultural Economics
Soil Science
Introduction to Animal Science
Crop Science
Introduction to Horticulture
First Semester
3
5
4
4
3
19
ARCH 1101
ARCH 1208
CAD 1201
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
Intro to Architectural Theory & History
Architectural Drawing
Intro to Computer-Aided Drafting
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health
Elective – Math/Science
Second Semester
ARCH 1209
ARCH 2207
CAD 1203
CAD 1208
Architectural Building Technology
Architectural Rendering
CAD Applications – Architectural
CAD Applications – 3D
Elective – Math/Science
Third Semester
ARCH 2203
ARCH 2206
ARCH 2215
ARCH 2225
COMM 1101
Site Surveying
Architectural Drawing / Design
Mechanical / Electrical Systems
Construction Systems
Principles of Effective Speaking
Elective – General Education 2
Fourth Semester
ARCH 2210
ARCH 2216
ARCH 2218
ARCH 2226
ARCH 2227
ARCH 2230
Architectural Internship
Architectural / Engineering Project
Site Planning
Architectural Doc & Cost Estimating
Architectural Building Codes
Portfolio Review
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
Rhetoric and Composition II (ENGL 1102) will be required for most
baccalaureate-transfer programs.
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
2
3
2
3-5
16-18
3
4
2
3
3-5
15-17
4
4
3
4
3
3
21
3
4
3
3
3
1
17
1
2
77
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY
ARCHITECTURE ~ COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING
Occupational Certificate
Occupational Certificate *
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
▶ Total = 28 Hours
▶ Total = 11 Hours
First Semester
ARCH 1208 Architectural Drawing
ARCH 2203
ARCH 2215
ARCH 2225
CAD 1201
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
3
4
2
16
Site Surveying
Mechanical / Electrical Systems
Construction Systems
Intro to Computer-Aided Drafting
Second Semester
ARCH 1209
ARCH 2216
ARCH 2218
CAD 1203
Architectural Building Technology
Architectural / Engineering Projects
Site Planning
CAD Applications – Architectural
3
4
3
2
12
SUGGESTED GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES:
MATH:
MATH 1107
MATH 1108
MATH 1109
MATH 1110
MATH 1201
SCIENCE:
PHSC 1101
PHY 1101
PHY 1102
PHY 1201
Contemporary College Mathematics
College Algebra
Plane Trigonometry
College Algebra and Trigonometry
Technical Mathematics 2
Physical Science
College Physics I
College Physics II
Technical Physics I 2
Other Recommended Electives:
ARCH 2210 Architectural Internship
ART 1101
Art Appreciation
ENGL 1102 Rhetoric and Composition II
HIST 1101
Western Civilization I
HIST 1102
Western Civilization II
IAI approved.
Minimum requirement – may not transfer.
1
2
1
First Semester
CAD 1201
CAD 1204
Intro to Computer-Aided Drafting
CAD Applications – Mechanical
2
2
4
Second Semester
CAD 1203
CAD 1208
CAD Applications – Architectural
CAD Applications – 3D
2
3
5
Third Semester
CAD 1205
CAD Applications – Civil
2
* Students must demonstrate proficiency in drafting.
NOTE: In order to complete CAD 1201 and 1204 in one semester, students must
enroll in consecutive eight-week sessions.
ARCHITECTURE ~ GREEN FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
3
3
3
5
3
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Green Facilities Management certificate will provide students
with the skills and knowledge to plan and manage green facilities.
They will be able to retrofit existing facilities to make them green
and energy efficient. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
First Semester
GFM 1201
GFM 1202
GFM 1203
GFM 1204
Cr. Hrs.
Planning & Development of Green Facilities
Building Automation & Control Systems
Energy Modeling of Buildings
Green Landscape & Grounds Management
4
4
4
4
16
ARCHITECTURE ~ SUSTAINABLE DESIGN GREEN BUILDING
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Sustainable Design certificate will provide students with the
fundamental concepts of sustainable design and green building
practices. They will understand how global environmental issues
are causing an evolution in the way buildings are designed and
built. ▶ Total = 14 Hours
First Semester
SDGB 1201
SDGB 1202
SDGB 1203
SDGB 1204
78
Cr. Hrs.
Cr. Hrs.
Foundations of Sustainable Building Design
BIM & Sustainable Design
Sustainable Landscape Design
Sustainable Design & Construction Project
3
4
3
4
14
ART
ART
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Fine Arts Degree
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
Rend Lake College offers art courses designed to meet the
needs and interests of students with varied art backgrounds and
experiences. Three options exist within the art program:
1) A professional focus for individuals who wish to pursue
a career in art and transfer to a four-year college or university
majoring in art education, studio art or art history. 2) A humanities
focus for individuals who wish to learn about art in a historical and
social context. (Ex., Art History I, Art History II). 3) A personal
focus for individuals who wish to pursue art interests either as an
adjunct to a career program or as a creative outlet.
Electives include: Ceramics, Commercial Art, Design,
Drawing, Illustration, Jewelr y, Painting, Photography,
Printmaking and Sculpture. ▶ Total = 64-65 Hours
Rend Lake College offers courses applicable to an Associate in
Fine Arts Degree. General education courses are described in the
Illinois General Education Core Curriculum. Because completion
of the A.F.A. curriculum does not fulfill the requirements of the
Illinois General Education Core Curriculum, students will need
to complete the general education requirements of the institution
to which they transfer. Consult with your counselor or advisor
for more information. ▶ Total = 64-66 Hours
First Semester
ART 1101
ART 1103
ART 1105
ENGL 1101
HIST 2101
POLI 1101
POLI 2101
Art Appreciation 1
Design I
Drawing I
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
American History I 1
or State and Local Government 1
or American Government 1
Second Semester
ART 1104
ART 1106
COMM 1101
ENGL 1102 Design II
Drawing II
Principles of Effective Speaking
Rhetoric and Composition II
Science with Lab
Third Semester
ART 1107
ART
HEA 1101
Painting I
Art Elective
Health Education
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Science
Elective – Social Science
Fourth Semester
ART 1108
ART
MATH 1107
MATH
Painting II
Elective
Contemporary College Math 1 (3)
or Higher-Level Math
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Social Science
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4-5
16-17
3-4
3
3
15-16
Design II
Drawing II
Principles of Effective Speaking
Rhetoric and Composition II
Elective – Life Science 4
Third Semester
ART 2111
ART
MATH 1107
MATH
3
3
2
3
3
3
17
3
3
Art Appreciation 2
Design I
Drawing I
Rhetoric and Composition I 2
American History I 2
or State and Local Government 2
or American Government 2
Second Semester
ART 1104
ART 1106
COMM 1101
ENGL 1102 3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
First Semester
ART 1101
ART 1103
ART 1105
ENGL 1101
HIST 2101
POLI 1101
POLI 2101
Art History I 1, 2
Studio Elective 3
Contemporary College Math 2 (3)
or Higher-Level Math
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Social Science
Fourth Semester
ART 2112
ART 2120
ART
ART
Art History II 1, 2
Life Drawing
Studio Elective 3
Studio Elective 3
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Physical Science 4
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
4-5
16-17
3
3
3-4
3
3
15-16
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Art History I will be offered in the Fall of odd years (i.e. Fall 2015); Art History II
will be offered in the Spring of even years (i.e. Spring 2016)
2
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
3
Select studio courses from at least two media in consultation with an art
department advisor.
4
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least
one laboratory course).
1
79
ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Occupational Certificates
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Associate Degree Nursing program is designed to provide
a career mobility path for individuals interested in health care.
The curriculum is a concept-based method of instruction
emphasizing critical thinking, problem solving, decision making,
clinical reasoning and nursing judgment. Graduates will be
prepared to practice professional nursing in a variety of health
care settings.
Students must achieve a grade of “C” or better in each course,
as well as demonstrate competency in dosage calculations and
math skills. The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional
Regulation approves this program. Upon graduation, the student
is eligible to apply to take the NCLEX-RN (National Council
Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses). ▶ Total = 64 Hours
PREREQUISITES
CNA 1201
ENGL 1101
Certified Nurse Assistant
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
7
3
Competency in math (see admission requirements)
A criminal history background check & drug testing are required.
NURSING COURSES
Each course in the ADN curriculum must be completed with a grade
of “C” or better to meet program requirements.
First Semester
NURS 1200
NURS 1201
NURS 1202
NURS 1203
NURS 1204
ZOO 1105
Intro to Health Concepts
Intro to Health Concepts Clinical
Health – Illness Concepts
Health – Illness Concepts Clinical
Tools for Nursing Education
Anatomy & Physiology I 2, 3
Second Semester
NURS 1205
NURS 1206
NURS 1207
NURS 1208
NURS 1209
ZOO 1106
Family Health Concepts
Family Health Concepts Clinical
Holistic Health Concepts
Holistic Health Concepts Clinical
Pharmacology
Anatomy & Physiology II 2, 3
Third Semester
NURS 2212
NURS 2213
NURS 2214
NURS 2215
PSYC 2101
HECO 1201
Health Care Concepts
Health Care Concepts Clinical
Health Systems Concepts
Health Systems Concepts Clinical
Intro to Psychology
or Healthcare Psychology
Fourth Semester
MICR 1101
MICR 1111
NURS 2216
NURS 2217
Basic Microbiology 3
or Microbiology 3
Complex Health Concepts
Complex Health Concepts Clinical
Cr. Hrs.
4
1
4
2
2
4
17
3
2
3
2
4
4
18
3
2
3
2
3
13
4
5
6
6
16-17
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Reading courses may be required. Courses must have been completed with a
“C” or better.
3
ZOO 1105 & 1106 and MICR 1101 or 1111 must have been completed within
the last five years.
1
80
▶ Total = 50 Hours
First Semester
AUTO 1202 Engine Repair
AUTO 1231
AUTO 1232
Intro to Automotive Technology
Electrical Systems A
Second Semester
AUTO 1235
AUTO 1240
AUTO 1245
Engine Performance A
Air Conditioning
Braking Systems
Third Semester
AUTO 2230
AUTO 2232
AUTO 2235
AUTO 2245
Electrical Systems B
Engine Performance C
Engine Performance B
Suspension and Steering
Fourth Semester
AUTO 2214
AUTO 2215
AUTO 2250
Automatic Trans / Transaxles
Manual Drive Train and Axles
Automotive Computer Electronics
RECOMMENDED COURSES:
CSCI 1101
WELD 1270
Intro to Computers
Intro to Welding Processes
Cr. Hrs.
5
2
3
10
5
3
4
12
3
3
5
4
15
5
5
3
13
3
4
AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION CERTIFICATE
Spring Semester
Cr. Hrs.
AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL CERTIFICATE
Fall Semester
Cr. Hrs.
AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE CERTIFICATE
Fall Semester
Cr. Hrs.
AUTO 2214
AUTO 2215
AUTO 1232
AUTO 2230
Automatic Trans/Transaxle
Manual Drive Train and Axles
Electrical Systems A
Electrical Systems B
AUTO 1231
Intro to Automotive Technology
AUTO 1245
Braking Systems
Spring Semester
5
5
10
3
3
6
2
4
6
AUTO SUSPENSION and STEERING CERTIFICATE
Fall Semester
Cr. Hrs.
AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING CERTIFICATE
Fall Semester
Cr. Hrs.
AUTO 1231
AUTO 2245
Intro to Automotive Technology
Suspension and Steering
AUTO 1231
Intro to Automotive Technology
AUTO 1240
Air Conditioning
Spring Semester
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE REPAIR CERTIFICATE
Fall Semester
AUTO 1202
AUTO 1231
Engine Repair
Intro to Automotive Technology
2
4
6
2
3
5
Cr. Hrs.
5
2
7
FORD MLR CERTIFICATE ▶ Total = 18 Hours
First Semester
AUTO 1266 Ford MLR
AUTO 1232
AUTO 2230
AUTO 2245
Electrical Systems A
Electrical Systems B
Suspension and Steering
Second Semester
AUTO 1240
AUTO 1245
Cr. Hrs.
1
3
3
4
11
Air Conditioning
Braking Systems
3
4
7
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Associate in Science Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
A degree in Biological Sciences may lead to such jobs as wildlife
management, fishery biologist and/or biological research scientist,
just to name a few.
The curriculum below 1 is designed to give the student a broad
education in the biological sciences, especially teaching at the
secondary level. A total of 64 hours is required for the Associate
in Science Degree. At the university level, students may decide to
specialize in zoology or botany after having had this sequence of
courses. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
BIO 1101
ENGL 1101 HEA 1101
A two-year program which leads to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree, this curriculum is based on Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE) standards designed to prepare the student
for certification in the automotive industry. The Automotive
Technology program qualifies for Master Certification from the
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF)
and the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence.
Upon completion, the student has the option to capstone into a
participating four-year institution. ▶ Total = 69 Hours
First Semester
AUTO 1202
AUTO 1231
AUTO 1232
ENGL 1101
Engine Repair
Intro to Automotive Technology
Electrical Systems A
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Elective – General Education
Second Semester
AUTO 1235
AUTO 1240
AUTO 1245
COMM 1101
MATH Engine Performance A
Air Conditioning
Braking Systems
Principles of Effective Speaking
Elective – Math 1
Third Semester
AUTO 2230
AUTO 2232
AUTO 2235
AUTO 2245
HEA 1101
HEA 1102
Electrical Systems B
Engine Performance C
Engine Performance B
Suspension and Steering
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Elective – General Education 2
Fourth Semester
AUTO 1210
AUTO 2214
AUTO 2215
AUTO 2250
Supervised Occupational Experience
Automatic Trans / Transaxle
Manual Drive Train and Axles
Automotive Computer Electronics
5
2
3
3
3
16
2
3
20
2
5
5
3
15
Intro to Computers
Intro to Welding Processes
Rhetoric and Composition II
Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 1, 6
General Zoology
Elective
Elective – Social Science 2
Third Semester
BIO 1102
CHE 1103
MATH 1111
Environmental Ecology
Inorganic Chemistry (see prerequisites) 5
Statistics 1, 6
Elective – Social Science 2
Fourth Semester
5
3
4
3
3
18
RECOMMENDED COURSES:
CSCI 1101
WELD 1270
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
MATH 1121
ZOO 1101
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
5
4
College Biology
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Humanities
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
2
3
3
16
3
5
4
3
3
18
4
5
3
3
15
CHE 1104
Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis 55
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
3
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 3, 4
3
Elective – Social Science 2
3
Elective
1
15
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE:
BIO 1104
College Biology II
5
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
If a student is preparing for teaching at the secondary education level,
education courses should be taken.
3
Some schools require a year of foreign language.
4
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
5
To guarantee full transfer of credit, students must complete the entire course
sequence at the same school before transfer.
6
Check with your transfer university for math requirement.
1
3
4
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Consult advisor for choices to consider for transfer / other options.
1
81
BUSINESS
CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Associate in Science Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Distance-Delivered
Option Available
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
This program is for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree
in accounting, business administration, finance, information
systems, management or marketing and parallels the first two
years required by most four-year schools of business. Students
should check with the four-year institution or a Rend Lake College
advisor for any additional requirements. RLC and Southern
Illinois University Carbondale have partnered in a 2+2 program
through which graduates of this program may transfer smoothly
into SIUC's Accounting or Business Management bachelor's
degree programs. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
ACCO 1101 Principles of Financial Accounting
BUSI 1101
ENGL 1101 MATH 1108
PSYC 2101
Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Business
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
College Algebra 1
Introduction to Psychology 1
Second Semester
ACCO 1102
CSCI 1102
Principles of Managerial Accounting
Introduction to Computers with
Business Applications
ENGL 1102 Rhetoric and Composition II
MATH 2106 Finite Mathematics 1
Elective – Business
Elective – Humanities
Third Semester
BUSI 2105
Legal and Social Environment
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
ECON 2101 Principles of Economics I
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Physical Science
Fourth Semester
BUSI 2107
ECON 2102
HEA 1101
Business Communications
Principles of Economics II
Health Education
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 2
Elective – Life Science
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE:
ALH 1202
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101 HECO 1202
3
ALH 1200
ALH 1201
CMA 1201
CMA 1202
CMA 1203
COMM 1101
Principles of Management
Principles of Marketing
Business Statistics
Calculus for Business
Intro to Pharmacology
Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals
Administrative Aspects
Patient Care I
Billing & Coding
Principles of Effective Speaking
Third Semester
CMA 1204
CMA 1205
CMA 1206
CMA 1207
PSYC 2101
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
2
3
5
16
Medical Law & Ethics
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Healthcare Terminology
Elective – Humanities / Fine Arts
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
3
18
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
1
First Semester
3
3
3
3
3
15
Professionalism & Safety
Lab Diagnostics
Patient Care II
Practicum
Introduction to Psychology
Fourth Semester
BUSI 2012
BUSI 2107
HEA 1120
HIT 1202
SOCI 1101
Customer Service
Business Communications
Stress Management
Health Records Systems
Intro to Sociology
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
4
4
4
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
Occupational Certificate
3
3
3
4
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION ▶ Total = 33 Hours
First Semester
ALH 1200
ALH 1201
CMA 1201
CMA 1202
CMA 1203
HECO 1202
Intro to Pharmacology
Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals
Administrative Aspects
Patient Care I
Billing & Coding
Healthcare Terminology
Second Semester
82
Cr. Hrs.
CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Students may be required to take the following math course(s)
based upon their transfer institution:
MGMT 2201
MRKT 2201
MATH 2103
MATH 2115
This program is designed to prepare individuals to take
the national certification examination and earn the Certified
Medical Assistant credential. Medical assistants work under
the supervision of physicians in their offices, clinics and other
facilities. Medical assistants perform both administrative duties
such as scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records
and billing, and clinical tasks such as taking and recording vital
signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination,
drawing blood and administering medications as directed by a
physician. ▶ Total = 66 Hours
ALH 1202
CMA 1204
CMA 1205
CMA 1206
CMA 1207
Medical Law & Ethics
Professionalism & Safety
Lab Diagnostics
Patient Care II
Practicum
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
4
4
4
15
CHEMISTRY
COMMUNICATIONS
Associate in Science Degree
Associate in Arts Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
Chemistry is a science which touches many fields of study.
Employment options for those with a bachelor’s degree in
chemistry are many and varied. Among the new professions
which have arisen because of the increasing complexity
and interdisciplinary nature of scientific and technological
problem-solving is that made up of chemists whose interests
are in management, marketing and production rather than
the conventional research and development. A knowledge of
German and computer programming usually are recommended
for all chemistry majors. Students should consult an advisor
or the university to which they plan to transfer for specific
recommendations. Students may elect to take general education
courses in the summer term. The program listed is generally
recommended. A total of 64 hours is required for the Associate
in Science Degree. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
A pre-concentration in Speech, or a strong core of Speech
Communication courses, prepares a student for teaching, public
relations, broadcast media and a variety of business-related
areas. A Speech major is considered good preparation for some
professional programs. It is recommended that either one of the
Humanities or Social Science electives be representative of a Third
World culture (i.e., ANTH 1101, GEOG 1101, HIST 2107, POLI
2102 or PHIL 2105). ▶ Total = 64-65 Hours
First Semester
CHE 1103
ENGL 1101 Inorganic Chemistry (see prerequisites)
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Elective – Life Science
Elective – Social Science
Second Semester
CHE 1104
Inorganic Chemistry / Qualitative Analysis
ENGL 1102
MATH 1121
Rhetoric and Composition II
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 1
Elective – Social Science
Third Semester
CHE 2120
HEA 1101
MATH 2122
Organic Chemistry I
Health Education
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 2
Elective – Fine Arts
Fourth Semester
CHE 2121
Organic Chemistry II
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 3
Elective – Social Science
First Semester
ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I 1
HIST 2101
American History I 1
POLI 1101
or State and Local Government 1
POLI 2101
or American Government 1
MATH 1107 Contemporary College Math (3) 1
or Higher-Level Math
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Social Science
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
5
3
16
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
COMM 1101
COMM
THEA 1106
5
3
5
3
16
Third Semester
HEA 1101
COMM 5
2
5
3
15
Health Education
Elective – Communications
Foreign Language
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Science with Lab
Fourth Semester
5
3
3
3
3
17
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Must take MATH 2123 as well to guarantee full transfer.
3
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
Rhetoric and Composition II
Principles of Effective Speaking
Elective – Communications
Introduction to Theatre
Elective – Science
Elective
ENGL 2106
COMM 1
Intermediate Composition
Elective – Communications
Foreign Language
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Social Science Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3-4
3
3
15-16
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
2
3
4
3
5
17
3
3
4
3
3
16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
83
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year program leads to the Associate in Applied
Science Degree in Computer Programming. It is designed to
provide students with the necessary information and skills to
seek entry-level employment as a computer programmer in a
business environment. Graduates will be prepared to assist and/
or participate in the software development process of common
business applications such as, but not limited to: user interface,
database access and manipulation, report generation and web
page design. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
PROGRAMMING WITH VISUAL BASIC
This certificate will provide individuals who are in a career
transition and/or desiring to improve their knowledge of
object-oriented programming a method to document their
accomplishments. ▶ Total = 9 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
CSCI 1260
ENGL 1101 MATH 1108
WBM 1220
Introduction to Business
Principles of Effective Speaking Microsoft Access Database
Mastering Visual Basic Fundamentals
Discrete Structures
Third Semester
ACCO 1101
CNS 1210
CSCI 1257
CSCI 1262
Principles of Financial Accounting
Network Fundamentals
SQL Server Database Design
Advanced Visual Basic Development
Elective – Technical
Fourth Semester
CSCI 1264
CSCI 1280
CSCI 1290
COOP 1101
CSCI 2209
PSYC 2101
Web Application Development
Advanced Database Systems
Special Programming Project
or Cooperative Experience I
System Analysis and Design
Introduction to Psychology
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
CSCI 1103
CSCI 1104
CSCI 1267
CSCI 2104
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
5
3
3
4
18
Cr. Hrs.
3
Mastering Visual Basic Fundamentals
Advanced Database Systems
3
3
6
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Associate in Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
BUSINESS OPTION
The Computer Science Business Option provides students with
the background in business necessary for advanced degrees and/
or careers in several areas, including but not limited to business
systems programming, computer operations or information
systems management, computer networking, systems analysis and
web development. A total of 64 hours is required for the Associate in
Science Degree. Students are advised to check with the institution
to which they are transferring or a Rend Lake College advisor for
additional requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours (NOTE: See IT Systems
Specialist curriculum for more options in the computer field.)
First Semester
CSCI 1101
CSCI 1104
ENGL 1101 MATH 1110
3
3
4
3
3
16
Introduction to Programming (C++)
Introduction to Programming (Java)
Introduction to Game Programming
Advanced Programming
Introduction to Visual Basic
Second Semester
CSCI 1261
CSCI 1280
Cr. Hrs.
Introduction to Computers
3
Intro to Programming with Microsoft Visual Basic 3
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
3
College Algebra 1
3
Introduction to HTML
3
15
Second Semester
BUSI 1101
COMM 1101 CSCI 1255
CSCI 1261
CSCI 2100
First Semester
CSCI 1260
Introduction to Computers 1
Introduction to Programming
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
College Algebra and Trigonometry 1
Elective – Humanities
Second Semester
CSCI 2100
CSCI 2104
ENGL 1102
MATH 1121
3
4
3
4
Discrete Structures
Advanced Programming
Rhetoric and Composition II
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
Third Semester
ECON 2101
MATH 1111
PHIL 2101
PHY 1101
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
1
Principles of Economics I
Statistics
Logic
College Physics I
Elective – Social/Behavioral Science
Fourth Semester
BIO 1100
COMM 1101
HEA 1101
PSYC 2101
Biology for Non-Majors
Principles of Effective Speaking
Health Education
Introduction to Psychology
Elective – Fine Arts
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
3
5
3
18
3
4
3
5
15
3
3
3
5
3
17
4
3
2
3
2
14
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
84
COMPUTER SCIENCE
COSMETOLOGY
Associate in Science Degree
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
SCIENCE OPTION
Designed for students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in
Computer Science. This option provides students with the
background in math/science necessary for advanced work in
several areas, including but not limited to hardware/software
development, software engineering, computer network design,
systems analysis and Internet/World Wide Web development. A
total of 64 hours is required for the Associate in Science Degree.
Students are advised to check with the institution to which they
are transferring or a Rend Lake College advisor for any additional
requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours (NOTE: See IT Systems Specialist
curriculum for more options in the computer field.)
A one-year program leading to an Occupational Certificate
in Cosmetology. The program is designed to prepare individuals
for positions in the Cosmetology field. Typical graduates will
work as hair dressers in chain or independent salons or open
their own salons. The curriculum emphasizes practical, hands-on
experience with the latest styles, trends and techniques.
An extended-length evening program also is available.
Students in the day program will be expected to attend class
five days per week for up to eight hours per day. Some Saturday
clinical work is to be expected. Each semester consists of two
courses that are co-requisites and must be taken concurrently.
The program prepares students to take the Illinois
Cosmetologist licensure exam. ▶ Total = 50 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1104
ENGL 1101 MATH 1110
SOCI 1101
Introduction to Programming
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
College Algebra and Trigonometry 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Elective – Humanities
Second Semester
CSCI 2100
CSCI 2104
ENGL 1102
MATH 1121
Discrete Structures
Advanced Programming
Rhetoric and Composition II
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
Third Semester
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
MATH 2122 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
PHY 1103
University Physics I
Elective – Fine Arts
Fourth Semester
BIO 1100
ECON 2101
HEA 1101
PSYC 2101
Biology for Non-Majors
Principles of Economics I
Health Education
Introduction to Psychology
Elective – Humanities / Fine Arts
Cr. Hrs.
4
3
5
3
3
18
3
4
3
5
15
3
5
5
3
16
4
3
2
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
First Semester
COSM 1201
COSM 1202
Cosmetology / Barber Theory I
Cosmetology / Barber Clinic I
Second Semester
COSM 1203
COSM 1204
Cosmetology Theory II
Cosmetology Clinic II
Third Semester
COSM 1205
COSM 1206
Cosmetology / Barber Clinic III
Cosmetology / Barber Internship
Cr. Hrs.
5
16
21
5
16
21
7
1
8
COSMETOLOGY – BARBER
Occupational Certificate
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
Pending Illinois Department of Financial and Professional
Regulation Licensure – A one-year program leading to an
Occupational Certificate in Barbering. The program is designed
to prepare individuals for positions in the Barber field. Typical
graduates will work as barbers in chain or independent shops or
open their own. The curriculum emphasizes practical, handson experience with the latest styles, trends and techniques. The
program prepares students to take the Illinois Barber licensure
exam.
Students in the day program will be expected to attend class
five days per week for up to eight hours per day. Some Saturday
clinical work is to be expected. Each semester consists of two
courses that are co-requisites and must be taken concurrently.
▶ Total = 50 Hours
First Semester
COSM 1201
COSM 1202
Cosmetology / Barber Theory I
Cosmetology / Barber Clinic I
Second Semester
COSM 1207
COSM 1208
Barber Theory II
Barber Clinic II
Third Semester
COSM 1205
COSM 1206
Cosmetology / Barber Clinic III
Cosmetology / Barber Internship
Cr. Hrs.
5
16
21
5
16
21
7
1
8
85
COSMETOLOGY – NAIL TECHNOLOGY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE – CYBER FORENSICS SPECIALIST
Occupational Certificate
Occupational Certificate
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This program is designed to prepare students for a career as a
licensed Nail Technician. Career opportunities exist in the field of
manicurists and pedicurists. Learning will occur in the classroom
and in a clinic setting. Upon successful completion, students will
have gained the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the Illinois
Department of Financial and Professional Regulation licensing
exam. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
The Cyber Forensics Specialist occupational certificate prepares
students to work in the criminal justice field dealing with cyber
crime. The curriculum blends the areas of computer technician
with criminal investigator. Learners are taught the legal and
technical limits of a forensic search of a digital system. State-ofthe-art software enables students to retrieve information from
personal computers, cell phones and tablets. ▶ Total = 24 Hours
First Semester
COSM 1215
COSM 1216
COSM 1217
COSM 1218
Nail Technology Theory I
Nail Technology Clinic I
Nail Technology Theory II
Nail Technology Clinic II
Cr. Hrs.
4
4
4
4
16
COSMETOLOGY TEACHER
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
A short-term Occupational Certificate designed to prepare
individuals for positions teaching Cosmetology. Typical graduates
will work as instructors in Cosmetology programs in either
community colleges or private schools.
Students with two years of practical experience as a Licensed
Cosmetologist are required to complete 500 clock hours of
instruction. Those with less than two years of practical experience
are required to complete 1000 clock hours of instruction.
A limited number of slots will be available to be filled during
any enrollment period. The program prepares students to take the
Illinois Cosmetologist Teacher licensure exam. ▶ Total = 31 Hours
First Semester
Cosmetology Post-Grad Training I 1
Cosmetology Post-Grad Training II 1
Human Relations
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
COSM 1212
COSM 1213
COSM 1214
Cosmetology Teaching Methods
Cosmetology Teaching Methods Application
Cosmetology Student Teaching
Students with two years of practical experience as an Illinois Licensed
Cosmetologist will not be required to take COSM 1210 & COSM 1211.
1
86
CNS 1212 – Hardware & Operating Systems
CSCI 1101 – Intro to Computers *
* Completed with a "C" or better or permission of the Dean
First Semester
CRJS 1201
CRJS 1202
CRJS 1207
CRJS 2206
Intro to Criminal Justice
Criminology
Computer Forensics I
Criminal Procedures
Second Semester
Occupational Certificate
COSM 1210
COSM 1211
PSYC 2106
Prerequisites:
7.5
7.5
3
18
3
4
6
13
CRJS 1205
CRJS 2209
CRJS 2216
CRJS 2217
Cyber Crime & Law
Criminal Law
Cyber Crime & Investigation
Computer Forensics II
5
3
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
12
3
3
3
3
12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate in
Arts Degree. The curriculum is designed for students pursuing
a baccalaureate degree in various areas of criminal justice. It
provides students with the background in criminal justice and
general studies necessary for advanced work at a four-year college
or university. Students are advised to check with the institution
to which they are transferring or an advisor at Rend Lake College
for any additional requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
This two-year program leads to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree in Criminal Justice (64 hours), with specializations
in either police science or corrections. The curriculum is designed
to provide students with a general background in all areas of
criminal justice and prepare them for positions in police science,
private security or corrections. Graduates will be prepared for
jobs in police and sheriff departments, private security firms and
correctional institutions. The curriculum provides those in the
field with a means to upgrade job skills and enhance advancement
potential. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
CRJS 1201
CRJS 1203
ENGL 1101 POLI 1101
SOCI 1101
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Introduction to Corrections
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
State and Local Government 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Second Semester
COMM 1101
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
MATH 1107 PSYC 2101
Principles of Effective Speaking
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
Contemporary College Math 1
Introduction to Psychology
Third Semester
BIO 1101
CRJS 1202
College Biology
Criminology
Elective – Art / Music
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective
Fourth Semester
MATH 1105
Basic Concepts of Statistics
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities Elective – Science
Elective
Elective RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
ANTH 1101
ENGL 2106
POLI 2101
SOCI 2101
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
5
3
3
3
3
17
3
3
3
3
3
15
Cultural Anthropology
Intermediate Composition
American Government Social Problems
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
3
3
3
3
First Semester
CRJS 1201
CRJS 1202
CRJS
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Criminology
Elective – Criminal Justice
Introduction to Computers 1
Rhetoric and Composition I 2
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
15
Second Semester
COMM 1101
CRJS 2208
CRJS
CRJS 2209
HEA 1101
HEA 1102
PSYC 2101
Principles of Effective Speaking
Criminal Investigation
Elective – Criminal Justice
Criminal Law
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Intro to Psychology
Third Semester
CRJS 2204
CRJS 2205
CRJS
POLI 1101
PYED
SOCI 1101
Criminal Justice Administration
Police Weapons / Defensive Tactics
Elective – Criminal Justice
State & Local Government
Elective – Physical Education
Intro to Sociology
Fourth Semester
CRJS 2202
CRJS 2225
CRJS
MATH 1107
Juvenile Justice
Crime Scene Investigation
Elective – Criminal Justice
Contemporary College Mathematics
Elective
3
3
3
3
2
3
17
3
3
3
3
1
3
16
3
4
3
3
3
16
* Any CRJS course not required which is offered may be taken as an elective.
Consult advisor for elective choices to consider for transfer and other
options.
1
Student must pass pre-test prior to enrolling in course.
2
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
87
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CULINARY ARTS
Occupational Certificates
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
CORRECTIONS ▶ Total = 12 Hours
First Semester
CRJS 1203
CRJS 2212
Introduction to Corrections
Correctional Counseling
Second Semester
CRJS 1206
CRJS 2209
Community-Based Corrections
Criminal Law
POLICE SCIENCE ▶ Total = 12 Hours
First Semester
CRJS 2201
CRJS 2206
Police Patrol Tactical Operations
Criminal Procedure
Second Semester
CRJS 2203
CRJS 1204
Police Traffic Functions
Community Policing
PRIVATE PROTECTION ▶ Total = 12 Hours
First Semester
CRJS 1208
CRJS 1220
Private Investigator
Introduction to Private Security
Second Semester
CRJS 2209
CRJS 2220
Criminal Law
Loss Control and Crime Prevention
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
BIO 1100
ENGL 1102
POLI 2101
SPAN 1101
Biology for Non-majors
Rhetoric and Composition
American Government
Elementary Spanish
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
3
3
6
This program is a two-semester certificate designed to prepare
individuals for entry-level positions in the food service industry.
Typical graduates will work in food preparation and line positions
at restaurants, hotels and institutions. The curriculum emphasizes practical, hands-on learning experience in the laboratory
classroom. ▶ Total = 27 Hours
First Semester
CULA 1201
CULA 1207
CULA 2201
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
3
3
6
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
3
3
6
4
3
3
3
Second Semester
CULA 1203
CULA 1205
CULA 2204
Professional Cooking II
Food Sanitation
Garde Manger
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
This program is a two-semester certificate designed to prepare
individuals for supervisory or technical positions in the food service
industry. Certificate holders typically will work in food preparation restaurants, hotels, institutions and bakeries. The curriculum
emphasizes practical experience through laboratory and classroom
opportunities. ▶ Total = 28 Hours
First Semester
CULA 1201
CULA 1207
CULA 2201
CULA 1205
CULA 1208
CULA 2207
CULA 2210
CAREER-TECHNICAL
88
6
2
4
12
Occupational Certificate
Professional Cooking I
Culinary Math 1
Professional Baking Techniques
Second Semester
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
6
3
6
15
CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT ~
BAKING & PASTRY ARTS
3
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
Cr. Hrs.
1
RECOMMENDED CRIMINAL JUSTICE ELECTIVES
Choice of Certificate required courses
CRJS 2210
Criminal Justice Internship
Professional Cooking I
Culinary Math 1
Professional Baking Techniques
Food Sanitation
Professional Artisan Bread
Professional Pastry Principles
Restaurant Production Desserts
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
1
Cr. Hrs.
6
3
6
15
2
3
6
2
13
CULINARY ARTS MANAGEMENT
DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year program leads to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree in Culinary Arts Management. The program is
designed to prepare individuals for supervisory or technical positions in the food service industry. Typical graduates will work in
supervision or food preparation at restaurants, hotels and institutions. The curriculum emphasizes practical experiences through
cooperative education, laboratory and classroom opportunities.
▶ Total = 70 Hours
A two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree. The program is designed to prepare students
for occupations involving the maintenance and repair of diesel
engines. Upon completion of the curriculum, the student should
have a thorough knowledge of servicing diesel systems and their
accessories. Also upon completion, the student has the option to
capstone into a participating four-year institution. ▶ Total = 66
Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
CULA 1201
CULA 1207
ENGL 1101
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
Intro to Computers
Professional Cooking I
Culinary Math 1
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Introduction to Psychology 1
or Human Relations
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
COMM 1101
CULA 1202
CULA 1203
CULA 1205
CULA 2203
Principles of Effective Speaking
Nutrition & Menu Planning
Professional Cooking II
Food Sanitation
Dining Room & Banquet Management
Third Semester
CULA 2201
CULA 2202
CULA 2205
CULA 2209
Professional Baking Techniques
Restaurant Management
Restaurant Cost Control
Professional Cooking III
Fourth Semester
BUSI 1200
COOP 1101
CULA 2204
CULA 2206
CULA 2211
Job Strategy
Cooperative Experience I
Garde Manger
Restaurant Operations
American Regional Cuisine
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
CULA 1208
CULA 2207
CULA 2208
CULA 2210
Professional Artisan Bread
Professional Pastry Principles
Exploring Wines 2
Restaurant Production Desserts
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
21 years of age or older.
NOTE: Reading and Math course(s) may be required based on test scores.
1
2
First Semester
AGRI 1208 Diesel Engines
3
6
3
3
DIEL 1208
ENGL 1101 HEA 1101
HEA 1102
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
3
18
3
3
6
2
4
18
Second Semester
AGRI 1204
COMM 1101
DIEL 1202
DIEL 1210
6
3
3
6
18
Physics of Hydraulics
Principles of Effective Speaking
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Supervised Occupational Experience
Elective – General Education 2
Third Semester
AGRI 1203
AGRI 1222
MATH
AGRI 2201
DIEL 1204
1
1
4
5
5
16
3
6
4
2
Diesel Accessories
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Introduction to Psychology 1
or Human Relations
Ignition and Electrical Systems
Applied Mathematics
or Elective – Math 1
Transmission and Power Trains
Intermediate Diesels
Fourth Semester
AGRI 1206
AGRI 2204
DIEL 1206
DIEL 2210
Ag Air Conditioning Systems 3
Advanced Major Overhaul
Advanced Diesels
Supervised Occupational Experience
RECOMMENDED COURSE
WELD 1270
Introduction to Welding Processes
Cr. Hrs.
6
2
3
2
3
16
5
3
2
4
3
17
5
3
4
4
16
4
5
4
4
17
4
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
See Division Chair for list of approved courses.
3
Highly recommended course for students in the Diesel Technology program.
1
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
89
Third Semester
DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
ECE 1205
ECE 1209
ECE 2205
ECE 2206
ECE 2207
ECE 2208
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
▶ Total = 30 Hours
First Semester
AGRI 1203
AGRI 1208
DIEL 1204
DIEL 1208
Ignition and Electrical Systems
Diesel Engines
Intermediate Diesels
Diesel Accessories
Second Semester
AGRI 1206
DIEL 1202
DIEL 1203
DIEL 1205
Ag Air Conditioning Systems 3
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Heavy Equipment Alignment
or Elective 2
Heavy Equipment Brakes
or Elective 2
Cr. Hrs.
5
6
4
2
17
3
13
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Associate in Applied Science Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
This two-year program leads to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree in Early Childhood Education. The curriculum
provides students with the background in early childhood
and general studies necessary for a career in early childhood
education. Graduates will be prepared for positions as family child
care providers, teachers and directors in child care centers, family
group homes, Head Start programs, and after school programs.
The degree also prepares students for teacher’s aides positions
in public school classrooms and in special education programs.
Additionally, this degree meets the requirements for Gateways
to Opportunities Early Childhood Credential Level 4.
All bolded core ECE courses in this program should be taken
prior to enrolling in additional ECE courses. ▶ Total = 67 Hours
All students in the program must go through a background check as required
by Dept. of Children and Family Services. Additionally, a physical exam proving
the student is free of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis, and
physical or mental conditions which could affect his or her ability to perform
assigned duties is required.
First Semester
ART 1101
ECE 1201
ECE 1202
ENGL 1101 MATH 1107
MATH 1202
Art Appreciation 1
Child Development
Intro to Early Childhood Education
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Math 1
or Business Math 1
Second Semester
COMM 1101
CSCI 1101
CULA 1205
ECE 1206
ECE 1208
ECE 1210
Principles of Effective Speaking
Introduction to Computers
Food Sanitation
Curriculum for Young Children
Family / Community / Staff Relations
Child Study and Observation
continued at top of next column ...
90
Fourth Semester
ECE 1204
ECE 1207
ECE 2202
ECE 2203
ECE 2209
HEA 1102
4
2
4
Creative Arts for Young Children
Language Arts for Young Children
Center-Based Child Care Management
Science and Math for Young Children
Practicum
Basic First Aid
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
4
2
18
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
EARLY CHILDHOOD CERTIFICATE – LEVEL TWO
Occupational Certificate
The Level Two Certificate is designed to lead the early childhood professional to a Level Two Early Childhood Credential
through Illinois Gateways to Opportunity. The certificate fulfills
the coursework requirements. The student must submit required
documentation and fee associated with this credential to Illinois
Gateways to Opportunity. ▶ Total = 12 Hours
Fall Semester
ECE 1201
Child Development
ECE 1202
ECE 1205
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
9
Intro to Early Childhood Education
Health, Safety and Nutrition
Spring Semester
ECE 1206
Curriculum for Young Children
3
EARLY CHILDHOOD CERTIFICATE – LEVEL THREE
Occupational Certificate
The Level Three Certificate is designed to lead the early childhood professional to a Level Three Early Childhood Credential
through Illinois Gateways to Opportunity. The certificate fulfills
the coursework requirements. The student must submit required
documentation and fee associated with this credential to Illinois
Gateways to Opportunity. ▶ Total = 27 Hours
Cr. Hrs.
Fall Semester
ECE 1201
Child Development
3
3
3
3
ECE 1202
ECE 1205
ENGL 1101 MATH 1107
MATH 1202
3
15
3
3
1
3
3
3
16
Health, Safety and Nutrition
Curriculum Lab
Programming / Teaching School-Age
Program. / Teach. Infants and Toddlers I
Child Guidance
Teaching the Child with Disabilities
Intro to Early Childhood Education
Health, Safety and Nutrition
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Math 1
or Business Math 1
Spring Semester
ART 1101
ECE 1206
ECE 1208
ECE 1210
Art Appreciation
Curriculum for Young Children
Family / Community / Staff Relations
Child Study and Observation
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
12
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
continued on next page ...
EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSISTANT
Occupational Certificate
EDUCATION – SECONDARY
These foundation courses provide the student with basic
knowledge needed for entry-level positions in the field of early
childhood education. ▶ Total = 6 Hours
Fall Semester
ECE 1201
Child Development
ECE 1202
Intro to Early Childhood Education
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
EDUCATION – ELEMENTARY
Associate in Arts Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
The schedule of courses suggested will meet education course
requirements at several universities. It also provides a well-rounded
general education for education students. All universities have
specific requirements which are not reflected by the courses below.
Students should check with a counselor for requirements at specific
universities. According to ICCB guidelines, students must earn
a “C” or better in all courses housed in this program. ▶ Total =
64 Hours
First Semester
EDUC 1101
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
PSYC 2101
Intro to Education and Observation
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
Introduction to Psychology 1
Elective – Life Science
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
HIST 2101
HIST 2102
MUSI 1100
PSYC 2102
PHSC 1101
Rhetoric and Composition II
American History I
or American History II
Music Appreciation 2
Child Psychology
Physical Science
Third Semester
ART 1101
COMM 1101
ECE 2208
MATH 1130
POLI 2101
Art Appreciation
Principles of Effective Speaking
Teaching the Child with Disabilities
Algebraic and Arithmetic Systems 2, 3
American Government 2
Fourth Semester
EDUC 1104
ENGL 2101
ENGL 2102
HIST 2107
MATH 2110
PSYC 2103
Educational Technology
Classical Literature 2
or Intro to Literature 2
Latin American History 2
Topics in Math for Elementary Teachers 2, 3
Educational Psychology 2
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
2
3
5
16
Associate in Arts Degree or Associate in Science Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
Individuals planning to teach in high school can obtain
a standard high school certificate in most fields of study.
Typical majors are art, biological sciences, chemistry, English,
mathematics, social studies and speech.
During the first two years of study at Rend Lake College,
students should complete requirements for an Associate in Arts
Degree or Associate in Science Degree in their major areas.
Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 2101), American History
(HIST 2102), American Government (POLI 2101), a literature
course and a third-world culture course are required as part of
the general education requirements. After selecting their majors,
students are advised to refer to that section of the Rend Lake
College catalog and follow the guidelines for their particular
two-year transfer programs.
After transferring to a four-year institution, students will
spend the third and fourth years completing a standard major
and minor, taking a series of professional education courses and
completing a student teaching assignment.
NOTE: All Education majors are required to pass the Constitution exam prior to
graduating from Rend Lake College.
SUGGESTED ELECTIVES *
EDUC 1101
EDUC 1104
PSYC 2102
PSYC 2103
Intro to Education & Observation
Educational Technology
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
17
3
3
3
4
3
16
3
3
3
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Do not register without consulting advisor.
3
MATH 1130 and MATH 2110 must both be taken to meet IAI core requirements
and to guarantee full transfer to a four-year university.
NOTE: All Education majors are required to pass the Constitution exam prior to
graduating from Rend Lake College. Students are encouraged to take and
pass the TAP test prior to RLC graduation. Illinois universities require TAP
completion prior to enrollment in the Teacher Ed program courses.
1
91
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
~ PARAMEDICAL SERVICES
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
Occupational Certificate
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
Associate in Applied Science Degree
This program meets current Illinois Department of Public
Health standards for training as an Emergency Medical
Technician. Successful completers of the certificate may apply
to take the Illinois Department of Public Health EMT-B
examination. Learning will occur in classroom, laboratory,
hospital and field settings. ▶ Total = 9 Hours
Cr. Hrs.
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
EMT 1201
Emergency Medical Technician
9
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
~ PARAMEDICAL SERVICES
This program is designed to prepare students for a career as
a Paramedic. Career opportunities exist in the field of medical
services, including medical and ambulance services, fire
departments and industrial settings. Graduates will be eligible to
apply to take the Illinois Department of Public Health Paramedic
licensure examination. Learning will occur in classroom,
laboratory, hospital and field clinical settings. Students are
required to earn a grade of “C” or better in EMTP courses. ▶
Total = 68 Hours
Prerequisites:
EMT 1250 – Emergency Medical Technician
Occupational Certificate
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
This program meets current Illinois Department of Public
Health standards for training as an Emergency Medical
Technician – Paramedic. Successful completers of the certificate
may apply to take the Illinois Department of Public Health EMT-P
examination. Learning will occur in classroom, laboratory,
hospital and field settings. Students are required to earn a grade
of “C” or better in EMTP courses. ▶ Total = 45 Hours
Prerequisites:
EMT 1250 – Emergency Medical Technician
First Semester
ENGL 1101
ZOO 1105
First Semester
Paramedic Services I
Second Semester
EMTP 1262
EMTP 1272
Paramedic Services II
Paramedical Clinical I
Third Semester
EMTP 1263
EMTP 1273
Paramedic Services III
Paramedic Clinical II
Fourth Semester
EMTP 1264
EMTP 1274
92
Paramedic Services IV
Paramedic Clinical III
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Anatomy and Physiology I
Second Semester
COMM 1101
HECO 1202
PSYC 2101
ZOO 1106
9
Licensure as an Emergency Medical Technician through the
Division of Emergency Medical Services and Highway Safety.
EMTP 1260
9
Licensure as an Emergency Medical Technician through the
Division of Emergency Medical Services and Highway Safety.
Principles of Effective Communication
Health Care Terminology
Intro to Psychology
Anatomy and Physiology II Third Semester
EMTP 1260
Cr. Hrs.
Fourth Semester
6
EMTP 1262
EMTP 1272
12
3
15
Paramedic Services II
Paramedical Clinical I
Fifth Semester
EMTP 1250
EMTP 1263
EMTP 1273
12
3
15
6
3
9
Paramedic Services I
Dosage & Calculations
Paramedic Services III
Paramedic Clinical II
Sixth Semester
EMTP 1264
EMTP 1274
Paramedic Services IV
Paramedic Clinical III
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
7
3
3
3
4
13
6
12
3
15
3
12
3
18
6
3
9
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
NOTE: The Rend Lake College Paramedic program holds a Letter of Review,
which is NOT a CAAHEP accreditation status, but is a status granted by the
Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency
Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP) signifying that a program seeking
initial accreditation has demonstrated sufficient compliance with the
accreditation Standards through the Letter of Review Self Study Report
(LSSR) and other documentation. However, it is NOT a guarantee of eventual
accreditation.
1
ENGINEERING SCIENCE
Associate in Engineering Science
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
The engineer basically is concerned with the application of
scientific principles to practical problems. Engineering spans such
a wide range of activities, including over 25 major specialties,
that employment opportunities for engineers include the entire
spectrum of the work force. In a typical four-year engineering
curriculum, the first two years are spent studying basic sciences,
including math, chemistry and physics; the last two years
emphasize engineering, advanced math and science courses.
Rend Lake College offers courses applicable to the first two
years of such a curriculum. This degree will require a total of
68 credit hours. General education courses are described in the
Illinois General Education Core Curriculum. Because completion
of this engineering curriculum does not fulfill the requirements
of the Illinois General Education Core Curriculum, students
will need to complete the general education requirements of
the institution to which they transfer. RLC has partnered in 2+2
programs with both Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
and Missouri University of Science and Technology, through
which graduates of RLC's program may transfer smoothly into
related programs with these universities. Contact your academic
advisor for further information. ▶ Total = 68 Hours
Consult with your counselor or advisor for more information about
A.E.S. Degree requirements.
First Semester
CHE 1103
ENGG 1101
ENGL 1101
MATH 1121
Inorganic Chemistry (see prerequisites)
Engineering Graphics
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 1, 3
3
Second Semester
COMM 1101
ENGL 1102
MATH 2122
PHY 1103
Principles of Effective Speaking Rhetoric and Composition II
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 1, 3
University Physics I 3
Intro to Programming 2
Principles of Economics I
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 3
University Physics II 3
Statics
Biology for Non-Majors
Differential Equations
Logic
Dynamics
Electrical Engineering Circuits
SUGGESTED ELECTIVES *
CHE 1104
CHE 2120
CHE 2121
Inorganic Chemistry / Qual. Analysis
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Science Degree
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
Engineering Technology combines the analytical approach
to engineering with the practical skills necessary to apply
modern technology. With greater theoretical understanding and
mathematical background than the technicians, the engineering
technologist finds new and better solutions for today’s problems
in the current state of the art, taking the most advanced ideas
from limited use to broad-based acceptance. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
CIVIL / ELECTRICAL / MECHANICAL SPECIALTIES
First Semester
CHE 1101
ENGL 1101
4
5
5
5
General Chemistry I 1
Rhetoric and Composition I 2
Elective – Fine Arts Elective – Social Science
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
MATH 1121
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 2
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Life Science
Third Semester
MATH 2122
PHY 1101
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
College Physics I 3
Elective – Engineering Specialty
Elective – Social Science
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
MATH 2123 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
PHY 2101
Statics
Elective – Social Science
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 4
4
3
3
3
4
17
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Some schools required CSCI 1104; please consult your advisor before
transferring.
3
To guarantee full transfer of credit, students must complete the entire course
sequence at the same school before transfer.
continued at top of next column ...
1
Rend Lake College has an engineering curriculum that has been articulated
with the University of Illinois, University of Missouri at Rolla, Southern
Illinois University Carbondale and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
Students should see an engineering advisor for specific information about
these agreements.
3
3
4
5
3
18
Fourth Semester
BIO 1100
MATH 2130
PHIL 2102
PHY 2102
PHY 2121
5
4
3
5
17
Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering usually are more
extensive than the normal baccalaureate degree. Many, if not most,
students find it takes 4-5 years of study to meet all requirements.
3
3
5
5
16
Third Semester
CSCI 1103
ECON 2101
MATH 2123
PHY 1104
PHY 2101
Cr. Hrs.
Note: The Engineering program listed is a general one. The actual
program of studies the student should follow depends upon: 1) the
student’s educational background prior to entering Rend Lake College;
2) the specific engineering field of interest (such as chemical, electrical,
civil, etc.), and 3) the four-year institution to which the student intends
to transfer. A specific program of studies needs to be devised for each
student by the engineering advisor.
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
ENGG 1101
PHY 2102
Engineering Graphics
Dynamics
5
3
3
3
14
3
2
5
3
5
18
5
5
3
3
16
3
4
3
3
3
16
3
3
May take CHE 140A at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, no lab.
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
3
Student should also take PHY 1102 to guarantee full transfer of College
Physics sequence to a four-year university.
4
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
1
2
93
ENGLISH
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Associate in Arts Degree
Occupational Certificate
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
A major in English, or a strong core of English courses, prepares
a student for teaching, positions in publishing and a wide range
of professional writing jobs. An English major is considered good
preparation for some professional programs. ▶ Total = 64-65 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I 1
HUMT 1105 Humanities through the Arts 1
MATH 1107 Contemporary College Math (3) 1
or Higher-Level Math (3-4)
Elective – Fine Arts *
Elective – Social Science
Second Semester
COMM 1101
ENGL 1102
ENGL 2102
HEA 1101
Principles of Effective Speaking
Rhetoric and Composition II
Intro to Literature
Health Education
Elective – Science with Lab
Third Semester
ENGL 2107 Mythology
HUMT 1104 or Introduction to Film
ENGL 2109 British Literature – Beowulf to 1799
ENGL 2111 or American Literature I
Elective – Foreign Language
Elective – Science
Elective – Social Science
Fourth Semester
ENGL
ENGL 2106
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2112
HIST 2101
POLI 1101
POLI 2101
Any 2000 Level Literature Course
Intermediate Composition
British Literature – 1800 to Present or American Literature II
American History I
or State and Local Government
or American Government
Elective – Foreign Language
Elective
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3-4
3
3
15-16
3
3
3
2
5
16
3
3
4
3
3
16
3
3
3
▶ Total = 31 Hours
First Semester
GRD 1201
GRD 1202
GRD 2201
Introduction to Graphic Design
Typography and Color Theory
QUIPS I (Quark/Illustrator/Photoshop)
Second Semester
GRD 1203
GRD 1206
GRD 2215
Advertising Design
Production Methods I
QUIPS II
Third Semester
GRD 2208
GRD 2220
Electronic Prepress
QUIPS III
Fourth Semester
ARCH 2230
GRD 1215
GRD 2218
Portfolio Review
Web Page Design
Package Design
* Theatre Preferred
1
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
3
3
3
9
3
3
3
9
3
3
6
1
3
3
7
GRAPHIC WEB DESIGN
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This certificate will prepare individuals with the necessary
skills for entry-level positions in the area of Web Design. The
curriculum emphasizes a general knowledge of design elements
and principles, typography, color theory, beginning and
intermediate Adobe software training, web design applications
and mobile platforms in a hands-on learning experience in the
laboratory classroom. ▶ Total = 18 Hours
First Semester (Fall)
3
4
1
17
Cr. Hrs.
GRD 1201
GRD 1202
GRD 2201
Introduction to Graphic Design
Typography and Color Theory
QUIPS I
Second Semester (Spring)
GRD 1215
GRD 2215
Web Design
QUIPS II
Third Semester (Summer)
GRD 1220
Advanced Web Design
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
9
3
3
6
3
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
94
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
HEALTH CARE COACH
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
Graphic design includes planning, analyzing and creating
visual solutions to communication problems. Graphic designers
use print, electronic and film media while using a variety of
methods such as color, type, illustration, photography, animation
and various print and layout techniques. Graphic designers
develop the overall layout and production design of magazines,
newspapers, journals, corporate reports and other publications.
They also produce promotional displays, packaging, marketing
brochures for products and services, and logos for products and
business, and develop signs / signage for systems for design,
interactive media, multimedia projects and may also create the
opening and closing credits of movies and television programs.
Surveys of area businesses indicate a demand for graduates of
this two-year Associate in Applied Science Degree program. ▶
Total = 67 Hours
The Health Care Coach program is a one-semester certificate
designed to prepare students to work in the medical field as a health
coach. A health coach works under the close mentorship of a group
of multidisciplinary health professionals. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101
GRD 1201
GRD 1202
GRD 1205
GRD 1208
GRD 2201
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Introduction to Graphic Design
Typography and Color Theory
Drawing for Communications
History of Graphic Design
QUIPS I (Quark/Illustrator/Photoshop)
Second Semester
COMM 1101
GRD 1203
GRD 1206
GRD 1215
GRD 2215
HEA 1101
Principles of Effective Speaking
Advertising Design
Production Methods I
Web Page Design
QUIPS II
Health Education
Third Semester
ENGL 1102
GRD 2208
GRD 2209
GRD 2220
MATH
PSYC 2101
Rhetoric and Composition II
Electronic Prepress
Computer Type Design
QUIPS III
Math Elective 1
Introduction to Psychology
Fourth Semester
ARCH 2207
ARCH 2230
GRD 2203
GRD 2218
Rendering
Portfolio Review
Digital Illustration
Package Design
Tech Elective
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
2
17
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
4
1
3
3
3
14
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE
GRD 1204
GRD 1207
GRD 1220
GRD 2202
GRD 2210
Digital Photography
Creativity
Advanced Web Design
Advanced Digital Photography
Cooperative Experience I
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
3
3
3
3
3
First Semester
HEA 1103 HECO 1200
HECO 1201
HECO 1202
HECO 1203
Introduction to Nutrition
Introduction to Health Care
Health Care Psychology
Health Care Terminology
Community Health Care
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
3
3
3
16
HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
The Health Information Technology program is a two-year
program designed to provide students with entry-level skills and
competencies.
The Hea lt h information technician possesses bot h
administrative and technical skills necessary to maintain
components of health record systems consistent with the medical,
administrative, ethical, legal, accreditation and regulatory
requirements of the health care delivery system. The individual
plays an important role in ensuring the health care facility
receives maximum reimbursement for treatment rendered. Since
reimbursement is based on the diagnoses listed in the medical
record, this is accomplished by analyzing and coding the medical
record accurately.
Health information technicians traditionally have been
employed in hospitals. However, with changing health care
needs, professionals have chosen careers in physicians’ group
practices, managed care groups, home health care, hospices,
long-term care and ambulatory surgery. Additionally, careers
in health information management go beyond health care
facilities. Professionals work in insurance companies, Peer Review
Organizations, accounting firms, consulting companies, law
firms, computer equipment companies, prisons and contracted
service agencies.
Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all HIT classes
and maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 (“C”) or better. Grades of “D,”
“E” or “F” are considered failing. A student failing any HIT course
must repeat it with a passing grade – “A,” “B” or “C.” HIT courses
are only offered once a year, so the student will have to wait to
take courses until the prerequisite course has been completed
with a passing grade. All courses must be taken in sequence as
specified, unless permission granted by program director.
A background check and drug screening test are required. 
Total = 66 Hours
CAHIIM Accreditation Status
The Rend Lake College Campus Health Information Technology
(HIT) program Associate Degree is in Candidacy Status: pending
accreditation review by the Commission on Accreditation for Health
Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM).
continued on next page ...
95
HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (cont.)
First Semester
CSCI 1102
HECO 1202
HIT 1201
MATH 1111
ZOO 1105
Intro to Computers w/ Business Applications
Health Care Terminology
Introduction to Health Information
Statistics 1
Anatomy and Physiology I
Second Semester
CSCI 1255
ENGL 1101
HIT 1202
HIT 1205
ZOO 1106
Microsoft Access Database
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Records Systems
Pathophysiology for HIT
Anatomy and Physiology II
Third Semester
HIT 2201
HIT 2203
HIT 2205
HIT 2206
HIT 2207
HIT 2208
Health Data and Statistics
Management in Health Care
Pharmacology for Health Information
Medical Coding
Medical Law & Ethics
Electronic Health Records
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
HIT 2202
HIT 2217
HIT 2218
HIT 2219
HIT 2220
Cr. Hrs.
Principles of Effective Speaking
Clinical Practicum I
Quality Management
Reimbursement Management
Procedural Coding
Health Information Review
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
3
3
3
3
4
16
3
3
3
4
4
17
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
A two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied
Science Degree. The program is designed to prepare students for
occupations involving the maintenance and repair of heavy duty
trucks and equipment. Upon completion of the curriculum, the
student should have a thorough knowledge of engine and brake
repair, servicing, sales and alignment. Also upon completion, the
student has the option to capstone into a participating four-year
institution. ▶ Total = 72 Hours
First Semester
AGRI 1208
CSCI 1101
DIEL 1208
ENGL 1101
HEQT 1201
2
3
2
3
3
4
17
Diesel Engines
Intro to Computers
Diesel Accessories
Rhetoric and Composition I 1 Intro to Machine Maintenance
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
AGRI 1204
AGRI 1221
COMM 1101
DIEL 1205
HEQT 1208
HEQT 1211
3
2
3
2
3
2
16
Physics of Hydraulics
Intro to Agriculture Occupations
Principles of Effective Speaking
Heavy Equipment Brakes
Fundamentals of Machine Electronics
Engine Fuel Systems
Third Semester
AGRI 1222
MATH
AGRI 2201
DIEL 1204
HEQT 2203
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
1
Applied Mathematics 1
or Elective – Mathematics 1
Transmissions and Power Trains
Intermediate Diesels
Machine Systems Electronics
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
Fourth Semester
AGRI 2204
DIEL 1203
HEQT 1209
HEQT 1210
HEQT 2207
Advanced Major Overhaul
Heavy Equipment Alignment
Heating, Ventilation and A/C
Supervised Occupational Experience
Machine Systems Diagnosis & Troubleshooting
6
3
2
3
4
18
5
1
3
3
3
3
18
3
4
4
3
3
17
5
4
2
4
4
19
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
See Division Chairperson for list of approved courses.
1
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
96
HISTORY
HOME HEALTH AIDE
Associate in Arts Degree
Occupational Certificate
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate of
Arts Degree. The curriculum is designed for students pursuing
a baccalaureate degree in various areas of history. It provides
students with the background in history and general studies
necessary for advanced work at a four-year institution. Students
should check with the institution to which they are transferring
or an advisor for any other requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
This program is designed to prepare individuals to be home
health aides. Home health aides assist in providing routine
care and support for home-bound disabled, recovering or
elderly people in the patient's home environment. Students will
learn the knowledge and skills necessary to provide routine
individualized health care such as basic nutrition, home
sanitation, infection control, first aid, taking vital signs, personal
hygiene, interpersonal communication skills, supervised home
management, emergency recognition and referral, geriatric care,
and legal and ethical responsibilities. ▶ Total = 28 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
HIST 1101
MATH 1107
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Western Civilization I 1
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
Elective – Science with Lab
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
5
17
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
GEOG 1101
HEA 1101
HIST 1102
PSYC 2101
SOCI 1101
Rhetoric and Composition II
Introduction to Geography
Health Education
Western Civilization II
Introduction to Psychology
or Introduction to Sociology
Elective – Humanities
Third Semester
ANTH 1101
COMM 1101
HIST 2101
MATH 1105
Cultural Anthropology
Principles of Effective Speaking
American History I
Basic Concepts of Statistics
Elective – Fine Arts
Fourth Semester
ENGL 2106
HIST 2102
Intermediate Composition
American History II
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Science
3
3
2
3
3
3
17
First Semester
ALH 1200
ALH 1201
CNA 1201
HECO 1202
Pharmacology
Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals
Certified Nurse Assistant
Health Care Terminology
Second Semester
ALH 1203
COMM 1104
HEA 1103
PSYC 2101
Medical Law & Ethics
Interpersonal Communications
Nutrition
Intro to Psychology
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
7
3
16
3
3
3
3
12
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
97
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS AND
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The program is designed to train students in electronics
and maintenance fundamentals, the associated circuitry and
components, troubleshooting and repair of systems. All courses
contain a balance of the latest theory and hands-on lab experience
that will develop a well-rounded and versatile technician. Students
who complete the Industrial Electronics and Maintenance
Technician program should be qualified for entry-level positions
with a variety of industries. The knowledge gained from these
courses may enable students who are pursuing a four-year degree
to capstone into programs at senior-level institutions. The core
technical classes may prove to be very valuable to those persons
already employed in industry desiring to upgrade their skills. ▶
Total = 72 Hours
First Semester
CNS 1240
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
INEL 1291
MATH 1201
Digital Fundamentals
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Technical Mathematics1 or higher
Second Semester
FLPR 1262
INEL 1250
INEL 1265
IST 2230
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Electric Motors and Control Circuits
Solid State Electronics
Introduction to PLCs
Third Semester
INEL 2230 Industrial Electronics
MACH 1201
IST 2220
IST 2231
WELD 1270
Machining Technology I
Industrial Mechanics
Advanced Programmable Controllers
Introduction to Welding Processes
Fourth Semester
BUSI 1200 Job Strategy
COMM 1101
IST 1230
IST 2258
IST 1221
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
Principles of Effective Speaking
Introduction to Robotics
Automated Control Systems
Industrial Safety
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
Elective – Technical 2
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
CNS 1212
COOP 1101
CSCI 1243
CSCI 1263
ELEC 1210
MACH 1202
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
5
3
17
5
6
4
3
18
3
4
4
3
4
18
1
3
3
4
2
3
3
19
2
Hardware/Operating Systems
Cooperative Educational Experience
Beginning Microsoft Word
Beginning MS Excel Spreadsheet
National Electric Code
Machining Technology II
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW/GTAW Welding
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
98
5
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
BASIC MACHINING CERTIFICATE
This certificate is for those students who are seeking to improve
their skills for the machining industry. Students will learn the
fundamentals of machining using lathes and milling machining.
The basic fundamentals of setting up the machine, selecting the
correct tool, adjusting tool speed, determining depth of cut, and
the use of precision measuring tools will be covered. ▶ Total =
18 Hours
First Semester
MACH 1201 Machining Technology I
MACH 1205 Special Problems in Machining
Second Semester
MACH 1202 Machining Technology II
WELD 1270 Introduction to Welding Processes
Cr. Hrs.
4
3
7
4
4
8
Third Semester
MACH 1203 Machining Technology III
3
PLC CERTIFICATE
This certificate will provide those seeking employment
or current technicians with the fundamental electrical skills
necessary to configure, program, connect sensors, motors, or other
output devices, and troubleshoot Allen Bradley SLC 500 control
systems. PLCs will be configured in a stand-alone and a network
environment using a teach pendant and the computer-based
RSLogic software. ▶ Total = 20 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
INEL 1291
IST 2230
Introduction to Computers
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Introduction to PLCs
Second Semester
INEL 1250
IST 2231
Cr. Hrs.
3
5
3
11
Electric Motors & Control Circuits
Adv. Programmable Controllers
6
3
9
INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This certificate is designed to assist those students desiring a
fundamental set of skills in order to enter the job market quickly.
All courses in this certificate can be used in the Industrial
Electronics and Maintenance degree. ▶ Total = 28 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
INEL 1291
MATH 1201
WELD 1270
Introduction to Computers
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Technical Mathematics 1
Introduction to Welding Processes
Second Semester
MACH 1201
FLPR 1262
Machining Technology I
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Elective – Technical *
Cr. Hrs.
3
5
3
4
15
4
5
4
13
* See technical electives from A.A.S. degree.
1
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY
IT SYSTEMS ASSISTANT
Associate in Science Degree
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
INDUSTRIAL SPECIALTY
Industrial Technology has as its objective the training of
qualified personnel who can develop and direct the manufacture
and distribution of products. The program is a balanced curriculum
of studies drawn from a variety of disciplines relating to the
processes, principles of distribution and concepts of industrial
management and human relations. Communication skills,
humanities and social sciences are studied to develop managerial
abilities. Knowledge of physical science, mathematics, design and
technical skills gained from the program allows the graduate to
cope with technical production problems. A total of 64 hours is
required for the Associate in Science Degree. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
MICROSOFT USER CERTIFICATE
This certificate program prepares students and professionals
by concentrating on the Microsoft Office Suite, namely Word,
Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Topics covered in these courses
help prepare the student for work using the various products
as well as participation in the Microsoft Certified Application
Specialist exams. Exams are not included in this program. ▶
Total = 15 Hours
First Semester
CHE 1101
ENGG 1101
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
MATH 1108
General Chemistry
Engineering Graphics
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
College Algebra 1
Second Semester
CSCI 1102
ENGL 1102
MATH 1109
PSYC 2101
5
4
3
2
3
17
Beginning Microsoft Word
Microsoft PowerPoint
Second Semester (Fall)
CSCI 1263
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet
Third Semester (Spring)
CSCI 1255
CSCI 2245
Microsoft Access Database
Integrating Microsoft Applications
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
6
Intro to Computers w/ Business Applications 3
Rhetoric and Composition II
3
Plane Trigonometry
3
Introduction to Psychology
3
Elective – Humanities
3
15
Third Semester
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
PHY 1101
College Physics
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Social Science
Elective – Biological Science
Fourth Semester
MATH 2115
PHY 1102
Cr. Hrs.
First Semester (Spring)
CSCI 1243
CSCI 1275
Calculus for Business
College Physics II
Elective – Social Science 3
Elective – Technical
2
3
5
3
3
3
17
4
5
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Student must pass pre-test prior to enrolling in course.
3
Social Science elective courses must come from two different areas.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
99
IT SYSTEMS ASSISTANT
IT SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year program leads to the AAS Degree in IT Systems
Assistant. The program is designed to provide students with the
background in technical skills and general studies necessary for
a career as an IT Systems Assistant. Graduates will be prepared
to provide technical assistance and training to microcomputer
system users in business, government and education. The program
lets individuals already employed upgrade job skills and improve
advancement potential. ▶ Total = 65 Hours
The IT Systems Specialist is a two-year program designed
to provide students with the necessary information and skills
to become a computer network technician. Courses contain
a balance of classroom and laboratory activities with modern
hardware and up-to-date software. Students who successfully
complete this program qualify for a variety of entry-level positions
in the computer industry. The program provides a foundation
for those who are seeking Cisco, Microsoft Windows, CompTIA
Security+ and CompTIA A+ certifications. National competency
requirements have been used to develop the curriculum. Students
also will develop a working knowledge of wireless communications
and Voice over IP courses that have been added to better prepare
students for the modern computing job market. These courses may
be used as a basis for a four-year degree with capstone programs
at senior-level institutions. ▶ Total = 67 Hours
First Semester
CNS 1210
CNS 1212
ENGL 1101
OFTC 1203
Network Fundamentals
Hardware / Operating Systems
Rhetoric and Composition I * 1
Building Keyboarding Speed & Accuracy
Elective
Second Semester
BUSI 2107
CSCI 1102
CSCI 1243
MATH 1107
PHIL 2101
PSYC 2101
Business Communications
Intro to Computers w/ Business Applications
Beginning Microsoft Word
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
Logic
Introduction to Psychology
Third Semester
ACCO 1101
CSCI 1260
CSCI 1263
CSCI 2243
ECON 2101
Principles of Financial Accounting
Intro to Programming in MS Visual Basic
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet
Intermediate Microsoft Word
Principles of Economics I
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
CSCI 1255
CSCI 1275
CSCI 2209
CSCI 2245
Cr. Hrs.
Principles of Effective Speaking
Microsoft Access Database
Microsoft PowerPoint
Systems Analysis and Design
Integrating Microsoft Applications
5
5
3
1
3
17
First Semester
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
CNS 1210
CNS 1212
CSCI 1101
ORIE 1101
Network Fundamentals
Hardware/Operating Systems
Introduction to Computers
Orientation
Non-Technical Elective 4
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
3
3
3
3
3
15
CNS 1221
CNS 1231
CSCI 1255
MATH 1201
WCT 2260
3
3
3
3
3
15
CNS 1232
CNS 1234
CNS 2221
CNS 2224
ENGL 1101
Network Router Technology
Windows Professional
Microsoft Access Database
Technical Mathematics 1, 2, 3
Wireless LAN/WAN
Third Semester
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
Windows Server
Linux Networking
Intro to Communications
LAN Switching
Rhetoric and Composition I 1, 2
5
5
3
1
3
17
5
3
3
3
4
18
3
3
3
4
3
16
1
Fourth Semester
CNS 1235
CNS 2230
CNS 2228
COMM 1101
WCT 2200
Linux Server
Network Implementation
Security
Principles of Effective Speaking 2
Voice Over IP
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test results.
Recommend taking class prior to First Semester or during Summer Term
between Second and Third Semesters.
3
Recommended: Students transferring to SIUC should take MATH 1108.
4
Advisory Committee recommends BUSI 1101 - Intro to Business
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
1
2
100
4
3
3
3
4
17
First Semester
IT SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
CNS 1210
Occupational Certificates
Second Semester
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The courses listed in the certificates are included in the IT
Systems Specialist degree. Students who successfully complete
the degree will also receive all of the certificates. Students must
be able to type 25 words per minute for these certificate programs.
CISCO ROUTING AND SWITCHING
The Cisco Routing and Switching certificate provides students
with the necessary information and skills to take the Cisco IT
certification exams. Courses offer a balance of classroom and
laboratory activities on Cisco routers and switches. All courses in
the certificate use official Cisco Networking Academy curriculum.
▶ Total = 14 Hours
First Semester
CNS 1210
Network Fundamentals
Cr. Hrs.
5
Second Semester
CNS 1221
Network Router Technology
5
Third Semester
CNS 2224
LAN Switching
CNS 1231
First Semester
Hardware/Operating Systems
CNS 1235
First Semester
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
MATH 1201
MFG 1201
MFG 1205
CNS 1212
Windows Professional
continued at top of next column ...
Industrial Safety
Blueprint Reading
Introduction to Welding Processes
Elective – Technical 2 Elective – Technical 2 Technical Electives
INEL 1250
IST 2231
MACH 1202
MACH 1203
MACH 1205
MFG 1200
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
5
3
WINDOWS
The Windows Certificate provides students with the necessary
information and skills to become a Microsoft Certified Professional.
The courses contain a balance of classroom and laboratory activities
with modern hardware and up-to-date software. Competency
requirements identified on a national level by the Microsoft
Corporation are used to direct the curriculum. ▶ Total = 11 Hours
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Introduction to PLCs
Machine Technology I
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
Introduction to Quality Control
Fourth Semester
IST 1221
MFG 1230
WELD 1270
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
CNS 1231
Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting
Principles of Effective Speaking
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Industrial Metrology
Production and Inventory Control
Third Semester
INEL 1291
IST 2230
MACH 1201
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
QUAL 1203
4
MicroComp Hardware / Operating Systems
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric & Composition I 1
Technical Math 1
Introduction to Materials
Manufacturing Processes
Second Semester
CAD 1201
COMM 1101
FLPR 1262
MFG 1211
MFG 1220
PC MAINTENANCE
The PC Maintenance Certificate is designed to provide
students with the necessary information and skills to become
a computer and network technician and to take the CompTIA
A+ certification test. Courses contain a balance of classroom
and laboratory activities with modern hardware and up-to-date
software. Students completing this program should be qualified
for a variety of entry-level positions as a technician and provide
a foundation for those seeking to expand their knowledge of
networks. Competency requirements identified on a national level
have been used to develop the curriculum. ▶ Total = 8 Hours
First Semester
3
The Manufacturing Technology program is designed to prepare
graduates for supervisory or technical positions in manufacturing.
Curriculum requirements are broad-based to enable graduates
to obtain employment in a wide variety of manufacturing areas,
such as quality control, production and inventory control,
manufacturing processes and computer-aided manufacturing. The
technician will develop a fundamental knowledge of materials,
manufacturing process, quality processes, and computer,
electrical, mechanical and machine control systems related to
manufacturing disciplines. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
3
Linux Server
3
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
5
Third Semester
5
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Cr. Hrs.
Linux Networking
Windows Server
Cr. Hrs.
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
4
Second Semester
CNS 1234
Windows Professional
Third Semester
CNS 1232
LINUX NETWORKING
The Linux Networking certificate provides students with the
necessary information and skills to be able to configure and install
Linux-based desktops and servers. Courses offer a balance of
classroom and laboratory exercises using Linux virtual machines.
Competency requirements identified on a national level have been
used to develop the curriculum. ▶ Total = 12 Hours
CNS 1212
Network Fundamentals
Electric Motors & Control Circuits
Advanced PLCs
Machine Technology II Machine Technology III
Special Problems in Machining
Manufacturing Employment Skills
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW / GTAW Welding
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
15
2
3
5
3
3
16
5
3
4
3
3
18
2
3
4
3
3
15
6
3
4
3
3
3
4
4
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT, or SAT scores.
NOTE: Reading course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS or
ASSET scores.
101
1
WELD 1282 GMAW / GTAW Welding
MATHEMATICS
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
4
Occupational Certificate
Associate in Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
The Manufacturing Technology program is designed to
prepare graduates for supervisory or technical positions in
manufacturing. Curriculum requirements are broad-based to
enable graduates to obtain employment in a wide variety of
manufacturing areas, such as quality control, production and
inventory control, manufacturing processes and computer-aided
manufacturing. The technician will develop a fundamental
knowledge of materials, manufacturing process, quality
processes, and computer, electrical, mechanical and machine
control systems related to manufacturing disciplines. ▶ Total =
32 Hours
The following suggested curriculum is typical of that required
by many universities for Mathematics majors. Many industries
that hire mathematicians are engineering- or science-oriented,
such as aircraft and missile, chemical, electrical equipment
and petroleum industries. Excellent career opportunities exist
in business- and economic-related positions, statistical and
actuarial work. A strong minor in a related field (such as business,
economics, science, etc.) is helpful in preparing for specific areas
of employment. Students should see an advisor for information
about specific university requirements in mathematics. ▶ Total
= 64 Hours
First Semester
MACH 1201
MFG 1201
MFG 1205
MFG 1211
WELD 1270
Machine Technology I
Introduction to Materials
Manufacturing Processes
Industrial Metrology
Introduction to Welding Processes
Second Semester
IST 2230
MFG 1220
MFG 1230
QUAL 1203
Introduction to PLCs
Production and Inventory Control
Blueprint Reading
Introduction to Quality Control
Elective – Technical 2 Technical Electives
INEL 1250
IST 2231
MACH 1202
MACH 1205
MFG 1200
WELD 1272
Electric Motors & Control Circuits
Advanced PLCs
Machine Technology II Special Problems in Machining
Manufacturing Employment Skills
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
First Semester
ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Cr. Hrs.
4
3
3
3
4
17
MATH 1110
College Algebra and Trigonometry 1
Elective – Life Science
Elective – Social Science
Second Semester
ENGL 1102 Rhetoric and Composition II
MATH 1121
3
3
3
3
3
15
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
Elective – Physical Science 2
Elective – Social Science
Third Semester
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
MATH 2122 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 5
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Social Science
Elective – Fine Arts
6
3
4
3
3
4
Fourth Semester
HEA 1101
Health Education
MATH 2108
MATH 2123
MATH 2130
Linear Algebra
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 5
Differential Equations
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 3, 4
Elective
Cr. Hrs.
3
5
5
3
16
3
5
3
3
14
3
5
3
3
3
17
2
3
4
3
3
2
17
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
One Life Science course and one Physical Science course needed to meet IAI
core requirements.
3
Some four-year colleges/universities suggest foreign language.
4
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
5
To guarantee full transfer of credit, students must complete the entire course
sequence at the same school before transfer.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
102
MEDICAL CODING
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
Occupational Certificate
Associate in Applied Science Degree
The Medical Coding program is a two semester certificate
designed to prepare students to work in the medical field
as a Medical Coder. This certificate is intended to prepare
students to sit for licensing as a Medical Coder. Medical
Coding professionals play a key role in the medical billing
process. Every time a patient is seen in a healthcare setting,
the provider must document the services provided. The
Coder abstracts the information from that documentation,
assigns the appropriate codes and creates a claim to be paid.
The curriculum emphasizes practical hands-on learning
experiences in the laboratory setting. A background check
and drug screening test are required. ▶ Total = 29 Hours
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
(Medical Coding Grade Standards – The student must maintain a
“C” average or better in all Medical Coding courses and maintain
an overall grade-point average of 2.0 [“C”] or better.)
Prerequisites
CSCI 1102
HECO 1202
Intro to Comp. with Business Applications
Health Care Terminology
First Semester
ALH 1201
HIT 1201
HIT 2205
HIT 2207
MEDC 1206
Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals
Intro to Health Information
Pharmacology for Health Information
Medical Law & Ethics
Intro to Medical Coding
Second Semester
HIT 1205
HIT 2218
MEDC 1200
MEDC 1208
MEDC 1210
Pathophysiology for Health Information
Reimbursement Management
Medical Office Procedures
Intermediate Medical & CPT Coding
Coding Practicum
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
6
3
3
2
3
3
14
4
2
3
3
3
15
The Medical Laboratory Technology (two-year) Associate
Degree program is offered through the Southern Illinois Collegiate
Common Market (SICCM) and is a cooperative program with Rend
Lake College, Shawnee Community College (Ullin), Kaskaskia
College (Centralia), Southeastern Illinois College (Harrisburg) and
John A. Logan College (Carterville). The program is accredited by
the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
(NAACLS), 5600 N. River Road, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119;
telephone 1-773-714-8880.
The Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) is employed in
clinical laboratories of hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices and
other health care facilities. The MLT performs testing on blood
and body fluids under the supervision of a medical technologist
and/or pathologist in the areas of hematology, chemistry, blood
bank, urinalysis, serology, coagulation and microbiology. The
MLT performs maintenance on equipment and instruments,
applies basic scientific principles to laboratory techniques and
procedures, recognizes factors that affect procedures and relates
laboratory findings to common disease processes. In addition, the
MLT interacts with physicians and other health care personnel.
Each Spring Semester, five students from each college are
admitted to begin the program the following Fall Semester.
Admission requirements include taking the ASSET test for
admission to the college and the Psychological Services Bureau
(PSB) Health Occupations Aptitude Test - Revised. The PSB is
offered at least four times yearly as announced by the college.
Admission to the program is nondiscriminatory concerning
race, creed, color, religion, sex, national origin, and mental or
physical handicap. Certain personal and physical attributes
are key to success in the profession. These include good general
physical health, good vision (with correction), good color vision,
good manual dexterity and good problem-solving ability.
Once students are admitted to the MLT program, all
general education courses are taken at the home campus, but
MLT core courses are taught at the SICCM facility in Herrin.
Clinical rotations are required in the second year consisting of
two semesters with 240 clockhours in each semester. Clinicals
are completed in area hospital laboratories and clinics. Upon
completion of program requirements, the student will be eligible
to take a certification exam offered by several national agencies.
Retention of the student in the MLT program requires
that the student earn a grade of “C” or better in all MLT and
natural science courses (Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry,
Microbiology). Grades lower than “C” are failing. The student
must maintain a “C” average or better in all courses required in
the MLT curriculum.
Admission requirements for the Medical Laboratory
Technician program are listed under Associate in Applied Science
Degree programs. A background check and drug screening test
are required. ▶ Total = 67 Hours
continued on next page ...
103
Summer Term
ZOO 1105
Anatomy & Physiology I
First Semester
CHE 1101
MATH 1108
MLT 1200
ZOO 1106
General Chemistry I
College Algebra 1
Introduction to Clinical Laboratory
Anatomy and Physiology II
Second Semester
CHE 1102
MICR 1101
MLT 1201
MLT 1202
MLT 1211
General Chemistry II
Basic Microbiology
Serology
Clinical Microscopy 4
Phlebotomy 4
Summer Term
ENGL 1101
PSYC 2101
Clinical Rotation I 3
Immunohematology 1
Hematology and Hemostasis
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
MLT 2205
MLT 2210
MLT 2229
4
5
3
3
4
15
5
4
1.5
1.5
3
15
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Introduction to Psychology 1
Third Semester
MLT 1210
MLT 2203
MLT 2228
Cr. Hrs.
Principles of Effective Speaking
Clinical Chemistry 1
Clinical Rotation II 3
Applied Clinical Microbiology 1
3
3
6
MINING TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Mining Technology is an Associate in Applied Science Degree
for students who plan to work in an underground or surface
coal mine. Students considering Mining Technology should be
capable of working underground in a production environment in
proximity to heavy equipment. This course of study specializes
in the many facets of coal mining operations, maintenance and
safety. Students may find employment in the mining industry
as miners or in support roles as technicians for vendors as well
as regulating agencies like MSHA (Mine Safety and Health
Administration). Wages and benefits for the mining industry have
traditionally been excellent depending on the specific duties and
employer. ▶ Total = 72 Hours
Fall Freshman
INEL 1291
MIN 1220
MIN 1221
MIN 2225
WELD 1270
3
4
5
12
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Mine Atmosphere & Strata Control
Machine Operations
Repair/Maintenance of Prep Plants
Introduction to Welding Processes
Spring Freshman
3
4
3
5
15
FLPR 1262
INEL 1250
IST 2230
MATH 1201
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Electric Motors & Control Circuits
Introduction to PLCs
Technical Math 1
Fall Sophomore
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
First 10.5 weeks
3
Last 6.5 weeks
1
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
FLPR 2255
IST 2220
MIN 1201
PSYC 2101
Pending ICCB approval
4
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric & Composition I 1
Hydraulic Circuitry & Controls 1
Industrial Mechanics
First Responder for Mining
Introduction to Psychology 1
Spring Sophomore
BUSI 1200
COMM 1101
MIN 1210
MIN 2227
MIN 2240
MIN 2245
Electives
ELEC 1260
Job Strategy
Principles of Effective Speaking
Introduction to Mining
Mine Health, Safety & Rescue
Mine Electrical Systems 1
Advanced Mechanical Maintenance 1
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
2
3
4
17
5
6
3
3
17
3
3
4
4
2
3
19
1
3
3
5
4
3
19
Electrical Qualification
6
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
CAREER-TECHNICAL
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
104
MINING TECHNOLOGY
MUSIC
Occupational Certificates
Associate in Fine Arts Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
MINE ELECTRICITY CERTIFICATE
INEL 1291
INEL 1250
IST 2230
MIN 2240
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Electric Motors & Control Circuits
Introduction to PLCs
Mine Electrical Systems 1
MINE MECHANICS CERTIFICATE
FLPR 1262
IST 2220
MIN 2245
WELD 1270
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Industrial Mechanics
Advanced Mechanical Maintenance 1
Introduction to Welding Processes
MINE OPERATIONS CERTIFICATE
MIN 1220
MIN 1221
MIN 2225
Mine Atmosphere & Strata Control
Machine Operations
Repair / Maintenance of Prep Plant
ADVANCED MINING CERTIFICATE
FLPR 2255
MIN 2227
MIN 2245
Hydraulic Circuitry and Controls 1
Mine Health, Safety & Rescue
Advanced Mechanics Maintenance 1
MINE SUPERVISORY CERTIFICATE
MGMT 2201 Principles of Management
MGMT 2207 Supervision
5
6
3
4
18
5
4
3
4
16
MUSIC PERFORMANCE – INSTRUMENTAL OPTION
Rend Lake College offers courses applicable to an Associate
in Fine Arts Degree. This degree will require a total of 64 credit
hours. General Education courses are described in the Illinois
General Education Core Curriculum. Because completion of the
A.F.A. curriculum does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois
General Education Core, students will need to complete the
general education requirements of the institution to which they
transfer. Consult with your counselor or music faculty advisor
for more information. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101
MUSI 1101
MUSI 1103
MUSI MUSI 1145
MUSI 1161
3
2
3
8
4
5
3
12
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Music Theory I
Aural Skills I
Applied Music I (Principal Instrument)
Piano Class I
Concert Band I
Elective
Elective – Social Science Second Semester
ENGL 1102
MUSI 1102
MUSI 1106
MUSI 1111
MUSI MUSI 1146
MUSI 1161
3
3
6
Rhetoric and Composition II
Music Theory II
Aural Skills II
Music Literature
Applied Music I (Principal Instrument)
Piano Class II
Concert Band I
Elective – Life Science 2
Third Semester
MATH 1107
MUSI 1127
MUSI 2101
MUSI 2103
MUSI MUSI 2161
Contemporary College Math 1 (3)
or Higher-Level Math
Applied Music I (Keyboard)
Music Theory III
Aural Skills III
Applied Music II (Principal Instrument)
Concert Band II
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Humanities
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
MUSI 1127
MUSI 2102
MUSI 2104
MUSI
MUSI 2161
Principles of Effective Speaking
Applied Music I (Keyboard)
Music Theory IV
Aural Skills IV Applied Music II (Principal Instrument)
Concert Band II
Elective – Physical Science 2
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
3
15
3
3
1
3
2
1
1
3
17
3-4
1
3
1
2
1
3
3
17-18
3
1
3
1
2
1
4-5
15-16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT, or SAT scores.
2
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least
one laboratory course).
NOTE: It is suggested that students enroll in an ensemble each spring and fall
while in pursuit of the AFA degree.
1
105
MUSIC
NURSE ASSISTANT
Associate in Fine Arts Degree
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
This course is designed to prepare the individual to work in
the role of a Certified Nurse Assistant in a variety of health care
settings. It is approved by the Illinois Department of Public Health.
Upon successful completion of classroom and clinical experiences,
the student will be eligible to apply to take the state CNA registry
examination. ▶ Total = 7 Hours
MUSIC PERFORMANCE – VOCAL OPTION
Rend Lake College offers courses applicable to an Associate
in Fine Arts Degree. This degree will require a total of 64 credit
hours. General Education courses are described in the Illinois
General Education Core Curriculum. Because completion of the
A.F.A. curriculum does not fulfill the requirements of the Illinois
General Education Core, students will need to complete the
general education requirements of the institution to which they
transfer. Consult with your counselor or music faculty advisor
for more information. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101
MUSI 1101
MUSI 1103
MUSI 1120
MUSI 1145
MUSI 1159
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Music Theory I
Aural Skills I
Applied Music I (Voice)
Piano Class I
Concert Choir I
Elective
Elective – Social Science Second Semester
ENGL 1102
MUSI 1102
MUSI 1106
MUSI 1111
MUSI 1120
MUSI 1146
MUSI 1159
Rhetoric and Composition II
Music Theory II
Aural Skills II
Music Literature
Applied Music I (Voice)
Piano Class II
Concert Choir I
Elective – Life Science 2
Third Semester
MATH 1107
MUSI 1127
MUSI 2101
MUSI 2103
MUSI 2120
MUSI 2159
Contemporary College Math 1 (3)
or Higher-Level Math
Applied Music I (Keyboard)
Music Theory III
Aural Skills III
Applied Music II (Voice)
Concert Choir II
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Humanities
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
MUSI 1127
MUSI 2102
MUSI 2104
MUSI 2120
MUSI 2159
Principles of Effective Speaking
Applied Music I (Keyboard)
Music Theory IV
Aural Skills IV Applied Music II (Voice)
Concert Choir II
Elective – Physical Science 2
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
3
15
3
3
1
3
2
1
1
3
17
3-4
1
3
1
2
1
3
3
17-18
3
1
3
1
2
1
4-5
15-16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT, or SAT scores.
2
Required: One Life Science course and one Physical Science course (at least
one laboratory course).
NOTE: It is suggested that students enroll in an ensemble each spring and fall
while in pursuit of the AFA degree.
1
106
Prerequisite: Student must score a 59 or higher on the reading
portion of the COMPASS test.
CNA 1201
Certified Nurse Assistant *
Cr. Hrs.
7
* All students in program must go through background check as required
by the Illinois Department of Public Health.
See also Associate Degree Nursing and Practical Nursing
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
Associate in Applied Science Degree
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
The Associate in Applied Science Degree in Occupational
Therapy Assistant is offered at five community colleges through
the Southern Illinois Collegiate Common Market (SICCM). Five
students are admitted from each institution for an entering total of
25. Admitted students take general education courses on their own
campuses and OTA courses together in a central laboratory. After
classes and fieldwork internship are completed, students graduate at
their entering college.
The OTA courses have both lecture and hands-on laboratory
components. Portions of the lecture section of several courses are
Web-based. During the program, students will develop entry-level
competencies necessary to provide services to persons of all ages
who have functional loss due to physical, neurological, social/
emotional, cognitive or developmental disabilities.
The profession tailors rehabilitation individually for each
client. Through evaluation and treatment, it seeks to restore
or improve function in occupational performance. Treatment
is provided within the context of the client’s life environments
and relationships. Occupation may be defined as the ordinary
things people do each day to work, to play and to take care of
themselves. Occupational therapy is based on the idea that our
personal identity and feeling of value is closely tied to what we
are able to do. We all choose many “occupational” roles that are
important to us and make us excited to engage in life. When our
function becomes impaired, we may lose both our independence
and sense of self-worth.
The practice of OT utilizes the therapeutic use of purposeful
and meaningful occupations in treatment, as well as focusing
on these occupations as the goal of treatment. OT intervention
may include restoration of performance abilities; instruction
in compensatory techniques; adaptation of tasks, processes
or environments; disability prevention techniques, and health
promotion strategies. Occupational therapy assistants, under
the supervision of an occupational therapist, will work directly
with persons to achieve a maximum level of independent living
by developing the capacities that remain after disease, accident
or other disability.
continued on next page ...
Occupational Therapy serves a diverse population in a variety
of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, facilities for rehabilitation,
extended and long-term care, sheltered workshops, schools,
camps, private homes, physicians’ offices, community programs
and private practice.
A background check and drug screening test are required.
Admission requirements are listed under Associate in Applied
Science Degree programs. ▶ Total = 70 Hours
Accreditation Status –
The SICCM Occupational Therapy Assistant program is
accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational
Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational
Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery
Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. ACOTE’s
phone number c/o AOTA is 301-652-AOTA. Program graduates
will qualify to sit for the National Board for Certification in
Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT) national certification
examination. This computer-delivered examination will be
delivered on-demand, after determining eligibility. Successful
completion of this exam confers the title of Certified
Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Illinois – and most
states – requires licensure to practice, usually basing this on
NBCOT exam results. A felony conviction may affect one’s ability
to sit for the NBCOT exam and/or attain state licensure.
Prerequisite:
ZOO 1105
Anatomy & Physiology I
First Semester
ENGL 1101
HECO 1202
OTA 1200
OTA 1210
OTA 1231
OTA 1232
OTA 2210
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Healthcare Terminology
Introduction to Occupational Therapy
Clinical Observation Disease and Impact on Occupation
Occupational Development
Occupational Therapy Theory I
Second Semester
OTA 1212
OTA 1220
OTA 1222
OTA 1233
OTA 2202
PSYC 2101
ZOO 1106
Summer Semester
Third Semester
Clinical Rotation II
Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
Occupational Therapy Theory II
Psychosocial Therapy and Practice
Aging and Impact of Occupation
Child Psychology
Fourth Semester
OTA 2217
OTA 2218
OTA 2250
Cr. Hrs.
Activities of Daily Living
Occupational Therapeutic Media
Occupational Therapy Group Process
Clinical Rotation I
Occupational Therapy in Physical Disabilities
Introduction to Psychology
Anatomy and Physiology II
MATH 1111 Statistics 1
MATH 1201 or Technical Mathematics 1
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
OTA 1214
OTA 2205
OTA 2211
OTA 2220
OTA 2232
PSYC 2102
4
Fieldwork Experience I 2
Fieldwork Experience II 2
Occupational Therapy Administration
3
3
2
2
3
1
4
18
3
3
2
1
3
3
4
19
3
3
6
2
4
1.5
3
1.5
3
15
4.5
4.5
3
12
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Fieldwork Experience must be completed within 18 months of academic
coursework.
NOTE: Reading course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS or
ASSET scores.
NOTE: OTA students must also demonstrate competency in using a computer,
navigating word processing and documentation software, accessing
and using Internet search engines and research sites and databases,
and communicating to faculty and classmates via email and chat rooms.
Assignments will require these skills throughout the program. If the applicant
has not had keyboarding skills, it is strongly suggested that a college class or
a continuing education course in keyboarding be taken prior to beginning
OTA classes. If the applicant has no computer experience, it is also suggested
that a beginning continuing education class in basic computer use be taken.
Further support will be provided by OTA faculty.
NOTE: Students planning to transfer and pursue an advanced degree should,
when given a choice, enroll in the general education course that are IAI GECC
approved and articulated with participating institutions.
1
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
~ ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year program leads to the AAS Degree in Office
Systems Technology / Administrative Assistant. The curriculum
is designed to provide students with the background in
technical skills and general studies necessary for a career as an
administrative assistant in business and industry. It also helps
those already employed upgrade job skills and advancement
potential. ▶ Total = 70 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
OFTC 1202
OFTC 1203
OFTC 1232
OFTC 1252
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Beginning Document Formatting
Building Keyboarding Speed & Accuracy I
Business Data Entry
Records Management Concepts
/ Computerized Applications
Second Semester
COMM 1101
CSCI 1243
MATH 1202
MATH 1107
OFTC 1204
OFTC 1206
OFTC 1233
OFTC 2201
Principles of Effective Speaking
Beginning Microsoft Word 3
Business Mathematics 1, 2
or Contemporary College Mathematics
Building Keyboarding Speed/Accuracy II
Computerized Accounting with QuickBooks
Office Accounting
Advanced Document Formatting
Summer Term
OFTC 2291
BUSI 2203
Cooperative Experience I
or Business Ethics
Third Semester
BUSI 2102
BUSI 2107
CSCI 1263
CSCI 2243
OFTC 2261
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
Cr. Hrs.
Customer Service
Business Communications
Beginning Microsoft Excel 3
Intermediate Microsoft Word
Office Procedures and Technology
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
continued on next page ...
3
3
3
1
3
3
16
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
17
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
107
Fourth Semester
BUSI 1200
CSCI 1255
CSCI 1275
CSCI 2245
OFTC 2262
OFTC 2265
Job Strategy
Beginning Microsoft Access 3
Microsoft PowerPoint 3
Integrating Microsoft Applications 3
Integrated Office Procedures
Office Supervision & Administration
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test results.
Talk to an advisor if transferring to a four-year institution.
3
Successfully completing these five classes results in the Microsoft User
Certificate. See the description under the IT Systems Assistant heading for
more information.
1
2
MICROSOFT USER CERTIFICATE
▶ Total = 15 Hours
CSCI 1243
CSCI 1255
CSCI 1263
CSCI 1275
CSCI 2245
Beginning Microsoft Word
Microsoft Access Database
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet
Microsoft PowerPoint
Integrating Microsoft Applications
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
~ HEALTH INFORMATION ASSISTANT
Associate in Applied Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This two-year program leads to the AAS Degree in Office
Systems Technology / Health Information Assistant. The
curriculum is designed to provide students with the background
in technical skills and general studies necessary for a career as
a health information assistant. Graduates will be prepared for
support positions in medical and allied health facilities. It also
helps those already employed upgrade job skills and advancement
potential. Upon completion of the degree, the student may
apply for both the 34-hour and 14-hour Medical Transcription
certificates. ▶ Total = 72 Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
First Semester
OFTC 1202
OFTC 1203
OFTC 1232
OFTC 1252
OFTC 1280
OFTC 1281
Beginning Document Formatting
Building Keyboarding Speed/Accuracy I
Business Data Entry
Records Management Concepts
/ Computerized Applications
Medical Terminology 3
Medical Transcription 3
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
OFTC 1204
OFTC 1206
OFTC 1233
OFTC 1282
OFTC 2201
Intro to Computers
Rhetoric & Composition I 1
Building Keyboarding Speed/Accuracy II
Computerized Accounting with QuickBooks
Office Accounting
Advanced Medical Term. / Transcription
Advanced Document Formatting
Summer Term
OFTC 2291
BUSI 2203
Cooperative Experience I
or Business Ethics
Third Semester
BUSI 2102
COMM 1101
CSCI 1263
MATH 1202
MATH 1107
OFTC 1284
OFTC 2261
Customer Service
Principles of Effective Speaking
Microsoft Excel
Business Mathematics 1, 2
or Contemporary College Math
Medical Insurance Processing
Office Procedures and Technology
Fourth Semester
BUSI 1200
BUSI 2107
CSCI 1255
OFTC 1285
OFTC 2262
PSYC 2106
PSYC 2101
Job Strategy
Business Communications
Microsoft Access
Coding
Integrated Office Procedures
Human Relations 2
or Introduction to Psychology 2
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test results.
Talk to an advisor if transferring to a four-year institution.
3
In order to complete OFTC 1280 and OFTC 1281 in one semester, students
must enroll in consecutive 8-week sessions.
1
2
108
3
1
3
3
3
3
16
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
17
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
5
3
3
18
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
~ MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
~ OFFICE ASSISTANT
Occupational Certificate
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
A student must successfully complete 34 hours to be granted
a one-year Medical Transcriptionist Certificate. The curriculum
is designed to provide students with the basic skills necessary for
an entry-level position. ▶ Total = 34 Hours
A student must successfully complete 29 hours to be granted a
one-year Office Assistant Certificate. The curriculum is designed
to provide students with the basic skills necessary for an entry-level
position. ▶ Total = 30 Hours
Prerequisite: Completion with a “C” or better – CSCI 1101 or OFTC
1202 – or consent of division chair.
First Semester
MATH 1202 Business Mathematics 1
Cr. Hrs.
MATH 1107 or Contemporary College Math
OFTC 1203 Building Keyboarding Speed/Accuracy I
OFTC 1232 Business Data Entry
OFTC 1252 Records Management Concepts /
Computerized Applications
OFTC 1280 Medical Terminology 2
OFTC 1281 Medical Transcription 2
3
1
3
3
3
3
16
Second Semester
OFTC 1204
OFTC 1233
OFTC 1282
OFTC 1285
OFTC 2201
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
Building Keyboarding Speed / Accuracy II
Office Accounting
Advanced Medical Terminology/Trans.
Coding
Advanced Document Formatting
Intro to Psychology
or Human Relations
1
3
3
5
3
3
18
2
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
~ MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST CLERK
▶ Total = 14 Hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101, or OFTC 1202, or OFTC 2201 with “C” or better
or 35 words/minute, or consent of instructor
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
OFTC 1282
OFTC 1285
Advanced Medical Terminology/Trans.
Coding
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE
BUSI 1200
Job Strategy
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
In order to complete OFTC 1280 and OFTC 1281 in one semester, students
must enroll in consecutive 8-week sessions.
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
15
Job Strategy
Business Communications
Building Keyboarding Speed/Acc. II
Computerized Accounting with QuickBooks
Office Accounting
Advanced Document Formatting
Integrated Office Procedures
1
3
1
1
3
3
3
15
OIL & NATURAL GAS TECHNICIAN
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
GEOL 1101
INEL 1291
SURV 1205
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Medical Terminology 2
Medical Transcription 2
Cr. Hrs.
Second Semester
BUSI 1200
BUSI 2107
OFTC 1204
OFTC 1206
OFTC 1233
OFTC 2201
OFTC 2262
First Semester
Occupational Certificate
First Semester
OFTC 2261
Intro to Computers
Beginning Document Formatting
Business Data Entry
Records Management Concepts
/ Computerized Applications
Office Procedures and Technology
The Advanced Oil and Natural Gas Technician option can
be stacked on the Oil and Natural Gas Technician certificate for
the student wishing only to complete several industry-focused
courses. The certificate option provides the student with the
knowledge and skills required for employment in the petroleum
and natural gas industries but may not want to pursue a degree.
▶ Total = 23 Hours
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on test scores.
In order to complete OFTC 1280 and OFTC 1281 in one semester, students
must enroll in consecutive 8-week sessions.
1
OFTC 1280
OFTC 1281
First Semester
CSCI 1101
OFTC 1202
OFTC 1232
OFTC 1252
3
3
6
3
5
8
1
Second Semester
IST 2230
ONGT 1204
ONGT 2201
ONGT 2202
Cr. Hrs.
Physical Geology
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Intro to Mapping and Geographic Info. Systems
Intro to PLCs
Oil and Gas Production Equipment
Petroleum Refining
Oil and Gas Well Mapping and Logging
3
5
3
11
3
2
4
3
12
CAREER-TECHNICAL
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREES
and OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATES
FOLLOW EXACTLY in order to meet requirements for either a degree
or occupational certificate. Career-Technical programs are designed
to qualify RLC graduates for entry-level positions in the work force.
109
OIL & NATURAL GAS TECHNICIAN
PHARMACY
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Associate in Science Degree
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
The Oil and Natural Gas Technician program is designed
to provide the student with the knowledge and skills required
for employment in the petroleum and natural gas industries.
The program gives the students a broad range of skills which
are essential for technician who want to work in the petroleum
and natural gas service, production, transportation and refining
industries. ▶ Total = 65 Hours
A five-year bachelor’s degree is required of anyone wishing
to practice as a registered pharmacist. Two years of excellent
preparation may be received at Rend Lake College, but some
professional schools prefer that the student transfer at the
beginning of the second year, thus taking four years of training at
the senior institution. Students should select, as early as possible,
the school to which they intend to transfer and follow the specific
guidelines set forth by that institution. If students plan to spend
a second year at RLC, they may be required to attend a summer
session at the professional school to pick up specialized courses
normally taught during the second year. Students should consult
with an advisor for more information concerning this program.
▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
CSCI 1101
DIEL 1202
INEL 1291
MATH 1201
ONGT 1200
ONGT 1201
Intro to Computers
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Technical Mathematics (or higher)
Intro to the Petroleum Industry
Oil and Gas Production I
Cr. Hrs.
3
2
5
3
1
3
17
Second Semester
DIEL 1208
FLPR 1262
GEOL 1101
ONGT 1202
ONGT 1203
ONGT 1204
Diesel Accessories
Fluid Power Fundamentals
Physical Geology
Artificial Lift Systems
Oil and Gas Production II
Oil and Gas Production Equipment
Third Semester
ENGL 1101
IST 2230
ONGT 2203
SURV 1205
WELD 1270
Principles of Effective Speaking
Process Control
Petroleum Refining
Oil and Gas Well Mapping and Logging
Supervised Occupational Experience
BIO 1101
CHE 1103
ENGL 1101
MATH 1110
2
5
3
3
3
2
18
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Intro to PLCs
Safety - SafeLands / OSHA
Intro to Mapping and Geographic Info. Systems
Intro to Welding Processes
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
INEL 2201
ONGT 2201
ONGT 2202
ONGT 2210
First Semester
Second Semester
CHE 1104
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
MATH 1121
3
3
2
3
4
15
ECON 2101
SOCI 1101
3
2
4
3
3
15
Fourth Semester
PERSONAL CARE AIDE
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVE
MICR 1111
Occupational Certificate
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
110
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
7
3
16
Microbiology
Cr. Hrs.
5
5
3
5
18
5
3
2
5
15
5
3
3
3
14
5
3
3
3
3
17
5
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
3
To guarantee full transfer of credit, students must complete the entire course
sequence at the same school before transfer.
1
This program is designed to prepare individuals to be personal
care aides. Personal care aides assist the elderly, convalescents, or
persons with disabilities with daily living activities at a person's
home or in a care facility. Students will learn the knowledge and
skills necessary to provide routine individualized health care such
as basic nutrition and personal hygiene, first aid, taking vital signs
and reporting abnormal findings, geriatric care, and legal and
ethical responsibilities. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
Intro to Pharmacology
Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals
Certified Nurse Assistant
Healthcare Terminology
Principles of Economics I
Introduction to Sociology
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
CHE 2121
Organic Chemistry II 3
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Social Science
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 2
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
First Semester
Inorganic Chemistry / Qual. Analysis 3
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 1
Third Semester
CHE 2120
Organic Chemistry 3
1
ALH 1200
ALH 1201
CNA 1201
HECO 1202
College Biology
Inorganic Chemistry (see prerequisites) 1, 3
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
College Algebra & Trigonometry 1
PHLEBOTOMY
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Occupational Certificate
Associate in Arts Degree
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
The phlebotomy program is a one-semester certificate
designed to prepare students to work in the medical field as
a phlebotomist. A phlebotomist is responsible for collecting
blood specimens as ordered by a physician or other health care
professional. The curriculum emphasizes practical hands-on
learning experiences in the laboratory setting. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate of Arts
Degree and is designed for students pursuing a baccalaureate
degree in political science. The Political Science transfer
curriculum provides students with the background in political
science and general studies necessary for advanced work at a fouryear institution. Students are advised to check with the institution
to which they are transferring or a Rend Lake College advisor for
any additional requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
HECO 1202 Healthcare Terminology
PHLE 1200 Introduction to Phlebotomy 1
PHLE 1201 Phlebotomy Practicum 1
PSYC 2101 Introduction to Psychology 1
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
6
3
16
First Semester
CSCI 1101
ENGL 1101
MATH 1107
POLI 1101
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE
ENGL 1102
GEOG 1101
HEA 1101
POLI 2101
PSYC 2101
SOCI 1101
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
This degree program prepares a student to transfer into a
four-year Plant and Soil Science program. The last two years
of a student’s program concentrate on professional objectives.
Students are encouraged to consult an Academic Advisor for
details regarding this program.
Many job opportunities exist for baccalaureate graduates in
Plant and Soil Science ... soil conservationist, water conservationist,
plant and soil laboratory technologist, production manager, plant
pest control inspector, farm manager, plant breeding expert, plant
pathologist, etc. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
College Biology
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
Introduction to Psychology 1
Elective – Social Science
Second Semester
AGRI 1161
COMM 1101
ENGL 1102
MATH 1107
Soil Science
Principles of Effective Speaking
Rhetoric and Composition II
Contemporary College Math 1
Third Semester
AGRI 1263
CHE 1101
Crop Science
General Chemistry I
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – General Education
Elective – Humanities or Fine Arts
Fourth Semester
BOT 1101
CHE 1102
General Botany
General Chemistry II
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Social / Behavioral Sciences
Third Semester
5
3
2
3
3
16
5
3
3
3
14
4
5
3
3
3
18
5
5
3
3
16
Rhetoric and Composition II
Introduction to Geography
Health Education
American Government
Introduction to Psychology
or Introduction to Sociology
Elective
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
ECON 2101 Principles of Economics I
MATH 1105 Basic Concepts of Statistics 1
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Social Science
Cr. Hrs.
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
5
17
Second Semester
Associate in Science Degree
BIO 1101
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
PSYC 2101
Introduction to Computers
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
State and Local Government 1
Elective – Science with Lab
Fourth Semester
ECON 2102
ENGL 2106
Principles of Economics II
Intermediate Composition
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Science
3
3
2
3
3
3
17
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
111
PRE-LAW
Associate in Science or Associate in Arts Degree
PRE-MEDICINE, PRE-DENTISTRY
AND PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
Associate in Science Degree
A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college and a
satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
are required for admission to most law schools. Applications
for admission are evaluated on several criteria, including
undergraduate grade-point average and score on the LSAT. Most
law schools have no specific requirements with regard to the
courses chosen in pre-legal study.
Students are encouraged to choose fields in which they have
demonstrated interests and abilities. Common majors among prelaw students include business, history, political science, psychology
and sociology. These subject areas help to develop the fundamental
skills of thinking, comprehension and expression. Proficiency of
these skills is considered essential for a career in law.
After selecting their major, students are advised to refer to that
section of the Rend Lake College catalog and follow the guidelines
for that particular two-year transfer program.
MATH & SCIENCES DIVISION
Pre-med students may earn a bachelor’s degree in any major.
Requirements must be met at the time pre-medical requirements
are taken. If a science major is chosen, there will be considerable
overlapping of requirements, thus making it easier for the student
to reach both sets of requirements. Organic chemistry (CHE 2120
and CHE 2121) and physics must be completed before the end of
the third year in preparation for the Medical College Admission
Test that spring. These courses are suggested below, but are not
necessary if a student chooses to take them at the university level.
An advisor can prepare a program for a specific four-year degree.
▶ Total = 64 Hours
First Semester
CHE 1103
ENGL 1101
MATH 1110
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
Inorganic Chemistry (see prerequisites) 1, 3
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
College Algebra and Trigonometry 1
Elective – Social Science
Second Semester
CHE 1104
Inorganic Chemistry / Qual. Analysis 3
COMM 1101 Principles of Effective Speaking
ENGL 1102 Rhetoric and Composition II
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Humanities
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
Third Semester
CHE 2120
MATH 1111
PSYC 2101
BIO 1101
Organic Chemistry 3 I or PHY 1101 3
Elementary Statistics
Introduction to Psychology
College Biology
Fourth Semester
CHE 2121
PHY 1102
HEA 1101
Organic Chemistry II 3
or College Physics II 3
Health Education
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities 2
Elective – Social Science
Elective
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:
ZOO 1105
Anatomy and Physiology I
ZOO 1106
Anatomy and Physiology II
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
5
3
16
5
3
3
3
3
17
5
3
3
5
16
5
2
3
3
2
15
4
4
It is strongly suggested students take PHY 1101 Third Semester and PHY 1102
Fourth Semester. Both should be taken to guarantee full transfer to four-year
institution.
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
One Fine Arts course and one Humanities course needed to meet IAI core
requirements.
3
To guarantee full transfer of credit, students must complete the entire course
sequence at the same school before transfer.
1
112
PSYCHOLOGY
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Applied Science Degree
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate of Arts
Degree and is designed for students pursuing a baccalaureate
degree in psychology.
The Psychology transfer program provides students with
the background in psychology and general studies necessary for
advanced work at a four-year institution. Students are advised
to check with the institution to which they are transferring or a
Rend Lake College advisor for any additional requirements. ▶
Total = 66 Hours
This program is designed to prepare students for careers in
Radiologic Technology. The curriculum includes instruction
in the operation of radiographic equipment, study of human
anatomy and clinical experience. Each course in the Radiologic
Technology curriculum must be completed with a grade of “C”
or better. A criminal history background check is required.
This program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on
Education in Radiologic Technology. ▶ Total = 71.5 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101 MATH 1107
PSYC 2101
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
Introduction to Psychology 1
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Science with Lab
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
PSYC 2102
SOCI 1101
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
Child Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Elective – Humanities
Elective – Science
Third Semester
ANTH 1101
COMM 1101
MATH 1105
PSYC 2105
SPAN 1101
Cultural Anthropology
Principles of Effective Speaking
Basic Concepts of Statistics 1
Social Psychology
Elementary Spanish I
Fourth Semester
ENGL 2106
POLI 2101
PSYC 2103
SPAN 1102
Intermediate Composition
American Government
Educational Psychology
Elementary Spanish II
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Summer Term
Cr. Hrs.
RAD 1200
3
3
3
3
5
17
First Semester
ENGL 1101 HECO 1202
RAD 1201
RAD 1202
RAD 1203
ZOO 1105
3
2
3
3
3
3
17
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Care Terminology
Intro to Radiology
Radiology Procedures
Patient Care
Anatomy & Physiology I
Second Semester
MATH 1107
RAD 1205
RAD 1206
RAD 1207
ZOO 1106
Contemporary College Math
Radiographic Equipment & Imaging I
Intermediate Radiographic Procedures
Radiology Clinical I
Anatomy & Physiology II
Summer Term
3
3
3
3
4
16
RAD 1208
Principles of Effective Speaking
Radiographic Equipment & Imaging II
Radiology Pathology
Radiology Clinical III
Cross-Sectional Anatomy
Fourth Semester
RAD 1212
RAD 1213
RAD 1214
RAD 1216
1
0.5
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
2
3
3
4
18
3
3
3
5
4
18
Radiology Clinical II
Third Semester
COMM 1101
RAD 1209
RAD 1210
RAD 1211
RAD 1215
3
3
3
4
3
16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
Radiologic Technology Orientation
Radiographic Equipment & Imaging III
Radiation Biology
Radiology Clinical IV
Radiology Review
6
3
3
2
7
1
16
3
2
7
1
13
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
113
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY
SOCIAL WORK
Occupational Certificate
Associate in Arts Degree
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY CERTIFICATE
This program is designed to help equip a radiologic
technologist with the knowledge, skills, and competence
necessary to perform CT examinations in the workplace. This
program includes topics on CT physics, CT applications, CT
clinical training and cross-sectional anatomy. The program also
is designed to assist the student in preparing for the ARRT's CT
registry exam. ▶ Total = 16 Hours
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate in
Arts Degree. The curriculum is designed for students pursuing
a baccalaureate degree in social work.
The Social Work transfer program at Rend Lake College
provides students with the background in behavioral science
and general studies necessary for advanced work at a four-year
institution. Students are advised to check with the institution to
which they are transferring or an advisor at Rend Lake College
for any additional requirements. ▶ Total = 64 Hours
Prerequisites: Successful completion of AAS in Radiologic
Technology or must be ARRT registered.
RAD 1220
RAD 1221
RAD 1222
RAD 1223
Computed Tomography Applications
Computed Tomography Clinical
Computed Tomography Physics
Computed Tomography
Cross-Sectional Anatomy
First Semester
BIO 1101
CSCI 1101
4
6
4
ENGL 1101 MATH 1107
SOCI 1101
2
16
Second Semester
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
PSYC 2101
SOCI 2101
MRI CERTIFICATE
The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Certificate prepares
radiographers to work in medical facilities as MRI technologists.
Graduates of the program are equipped with the appropriate
knowledge to take the national MRI certification examination
given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. ▶
Total = 16 Hours
COMM 1101
ECON 2101
MATH 1105
SOCI 2102
Occupational Certificate
MRI Principles
MRI Applications
MRI Cross-Section
MRI Clinical
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
Introduction to Psychology
Social Problems
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective
Third Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of AAS in Radiologic
Technology or must be ARRT registered.
RAD 1232
RAD 1233
RAD 1234
RAD 1235
College Biology
Introduction to Computers
or Elective
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Principles of Effective Speaking
Principles of Economics I
Basic Concepts of Statistics 1
Marriage and the Family
Elective – Humanities
Fourth Semester
4
4
2
6
16
ANTH 1101
POLI 2101
PSYC 2102
Cultural Anthropology
American Government
Child Psychology
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Science
Elective
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
3
3
3
17
3
2
3
3
3
1
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
2
17
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
114
SOCIOLOGY
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
Associate in Arts Degree
Occupational Certificate
LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
This two-year transfer program leads to an Associate in
Arts Degree. The curriculum is designed for students pursuing
a baccalaureate degree in sociology.
The Sociology transfer program at Rend Lake College
provides students with the background in sociology and general
studies necessary for advanced work at a four-year institution.
Students are advised to check with the institution to which they
are transferring or an advisor at Rend Lake College for any
additional requirements. ▶ Total = 66 Hours
The Surgical Technology program is a one-year certificate
program offered through the Southern Illinois Collegiate
Common Market (SICCM). Upon completion of the program, the
technologist will be able to demonstrate entry-level competencies
for Surgical Technologists.
The program is accredited by The Commission on
Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)
by recommendation of the Accreditation Review Committee
on Education in Surgical Technology. Graduates of the Surgical
Technology program must sit for the National Board Certification
Exam for Surgical Technologists. The exam is given one week
before completion of the program. The testing is set up by the
program director at SICCM and is given at the college campus.
Successful completion of this exam confers the title of Certified
Surgical Technologist (CST).
A background check and drug screening test are required. ▶
Total = 42 Hours
First Semester
ENGL 1101
MATH 1107
SOCI 1101
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Contemporary College Mathematics 1
Introduction to Sociology 1
Elective – Fine Arts
Elective – Science with Lab
Second Semester
ENGL 1102
HEA 1101
POLI 1101
PSYC 2101
SOCI 2101
COMM 1101
Rhetoric and Composition II
Health Education
State and Local Government
Introduction to Psychology
Social Problems
Principles of Effective Speaking
Third Semester
ANTH 1101
MATH 1105
PSYC 2105
SPAN 1101
Cultural Anthropology
Basic Concepts of Statistics 1
Social Psychology
Elementary Spanish I
Elective – Humanities
Fourth Semester
ENGL 2106
SOCI 2102
SPAN 1102
Intermediate Composition
Marriage and the Family
Elementary Spanish II
Elective – Fine Arts / Humanities
Elective – Science
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
5
17
3
2
3
3
3
3
17
(Surgical Technology Grade Standards – The student must maintain a
“C” average or better in all courses of the Surgical Technology program.)
Prerequisite:
ZOO 1105 Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
or ZOO 1106 Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Summer Term
ZOO 1105
Anatomy and Physiology I
First Semester
STP 1215
STP 1216
STP 1221
ZOO 1106
3
3
3
4
3
16
3
3
4
3
3
16
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
1
Introduction to Surgical Technology
Principles and Practices of Surgical Technology
Pharmacology for Health Professions
Anatomy and Physiology II
Second Semester
MICR 1101
STP 1217
STP 1219
Basic Microbiology 2
Surgical Procedures I
Clinical Rotation I 3
Third Semester
STP 1218
STP 1220
Cr. Hrs.
Surgical Procedures II
Clinical Rotation in Surgical Technology II
4
3
6
3
4
16
4
5
5
14
3
5
8
Must be completed by the end of the first semester.
Must be completed by the end of the second semester.
3
Student must be certified in Healthcare Provider CPR by October 1.
1
2
TRANSFER PROGRAMS
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS, ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE,
ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS and ASSOCIATE IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREES
SUGGESTED programs for students who intend to transfer and pursue
a four-year degree after satisfying associate-level requirements at
Rend Lake College. To ensure articulation, the student should follow
the sequence of courses recommended by the four-year institution.
115
SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
Associate in Applied Science Degree
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
A two-year program leading to an AAS Degree in Surveying
Technology. Students wishing to pursue a baccalaureate degree
in Advanced Technical Studies at Southern Illinois University
Carbondale may do so with an additional 60 semester hours of
coursework.
Upon completion of the Advanced Technical Studies
Degree, a graduate will be able to take the Surveyor-in-Training
Examination. ▶ Total = 69 Hours
Therapeutic Massage prepares individuals for careers in
massage and bodywork. Practitioners use their hands to apply
various scientific principles to the muscles and soft tissue.
Therapeutic Massage is used to facilitate relaxation, health
improvement and pain relief. The program provides education in
the human body, clinical experience, business, professional and
personal development. Swedish Massage techniques are utilized
as the foundation of practice. Graduates may work in a variety
of settings, including medical facilities, beauty salons, private
practice and sports clinics.
An Illinois State Police background check is required.
Upon successful completion, students are qualified to take
the national certification exam. ▶ Total = 29 Hours
First Semester
ARCH 1101
ARCH 1208
ARCH 2203
CAD 1201
MATH
SURV 1205
Intro to Architectural Theory / History
Architectural Drawing
Site Surveying
Intro to Computer-Aided Drafting
Elective – Math 1
Intro to Mapping / GIS
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
4
2
3
3
18
Second Semester
ARCH 1209
ENGL 1101
HEA 1101
HEA 1102
MATH 1109
Architectural Materials / Building
Technology
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
Health Education
or Basic First Aid
Plane Trigonometry
Elective – Physics
Third Semester
ARCH 2225
CAD 1205
COMM 1101
MATH 2106
SURV 2210
Construction Systems
CAD Applications ~ Civil
Principles of Effective Speaking
Finite Mathematics
GIS / GPS Concepts / Applications
Elective – General Education 2
Fourth Semester
ARCH 2210
ARCH 2216
ARCH 2218
ARCH 2226
SURV 2201
Architectural Internship Architectural / Engineering Project
Site Planning
Architectural Doc. & Cost Estimating
Engineering Surveying
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES:
PHY 1101
PHY 1201
3
3
2
3
5
16
4
2
3
3
3
3
18
3
4
3
3
4
17
College Physics I
or Technical Physics I
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
2
Consult with advisor for recommended courses.
1
116
5
4
First Semester
THM 1201
THM 1202
THM 1203
THM 1204
THM 1208
THM 1209
Introduction to Therapeutic Massage
Therapeutic Massage Techniques I
Human Body for Massage Therapy I
Pathology for Therapeutic Massage
TM Business Practices and Ethics
Responding to Client Emergencies
Second Semester
THM 1210
THM 1211
THM 1212
THM 1222
THM 1223
Human Body for Massage Therapy II
Therapeutic Massage Techniques II
Therapeutic Massage Clinical I
Therapeutic Massage Clinical II
National Certification Exam Review
Cr. Hrs.
2
3
3
3
3
1
15
3
4
4
1
2
14
TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
Occupational Certificate
Associate in Applied Science Degree
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
ALLIED HEALTH DIVISION
This certificate is designed to prepare students for a career
as a Truck Driver. Career opportunities exist in the field of truck
driving, including intrastate and interstate. Learning will occur
in the classroom and in a tractor trailer. The Illinois Secretary
of State’s Commercial Driver’s License Pre-Trip, Skills and Road
Examinations will be administered. ▶ Total = 7 Hours
The Veterinary Technology Associate in Applied Science
Degree program is offered at five community colleges through
the Southern Illinois Collegiate Common Market (SICCM).
The Veterinary Technician possesses both administrative
and technical skills necessary to assist the veterinarian in all
phases of medicine and surgery for small, large, exotic and
lab animals. Technicians typically conduct clinical work in a
private practice under the supervision of a veterinarian – often
performing various medical tests (urinalysis, blood counts, tissue
samples) along with treating and diagnosing medical conditions
and diseases in animals. Veterinary Technicians assisting smallanimal practitioners usually care for companion animals, such as
cats and dogs, but can perform a variety of duties with mice, rats,
sheep, pigs, cattle, monkeys, birds, fish and frogs. The Veterinary
Technician plays an important role in client education, grief
counseling and public relations.
The program curriculum covers small and large animal
breeds, nutrition and husbandry, veterinary terminology, legal
issues and office management, parasitology, surgical nursing,
veterinary pharmacology, anesthesiology, emergency care and
clinical pathology. Students benefit from theoretical-based
classroom learning, as well as extensive hands-on experience
through practicums at a variety of veterinary facilities. Additional
job opportunities include working in animal shelters, zoos,
medical research laboratories and private industry.
Admission requirements are listed under Associate in
Applied Science Degree programs. ▶ Total = 67 Hours
First Semester
TRUK 1201
TRUK 1202
TRUK 1203
Commercial Driver’s License Review
Truck Driver Training I Truck Driver Training II
Cr. Hrs.
1
3
3
7
TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING –
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TRANSPORTATION
Occupational Certificate
COMMUNITY & CORPORATE EDUCATION
This certificate is designed to prepare students for occupations
involving the maintenance, repair, and operation of semi-tractor
trailer units. Upon successful completion of the curriculum, the
student will have a thorough knowledge of engine and brake
repair, servicing, alignment, and operation of a tractor trailer
unit. The Illinois Secretary of State’s Commercial Driver’s License
Pre-Trip, Skills and Road Examinations will be administered. ▶
Total = 26 Hours
First Semester
DIEL 1202
DIEL 1203
TRUK 1201
TRUK 1202
TRUK 1203
Basic Diesel Fuel Systems
Heavy Equipment Alignment
Commercial Driver’s License Review
Truck Driver Training I
Truck Driver Training II
Second Semester
AGRI 1206
DIEL 1205
DIEL 1204
DIEL 1208
Ag Air Conditioning Systems
Heavy Equipment Brakes
Intermediate Diesels
Diesel Accessories
Cr. Hrs.
2
4
1
3
3
13
4
3
4
2
13
Accreditation Status –
The SICCM Veterinary Technology program is accredited by
the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Graduates
of the program will qualify to sit for the national accreditation
examination, which is given annually. Successful completion of
this exam confers the title of Certified Veterinary Technician.
Fall Semester
MATH 1111
MATH 1107
MATH 1201
MICR 1101
VET 1210
VET 1212
VET 1217
VET 1218
Statistics 1
or Contemporary College Math 1
or Technical Mathematics 1
Basic Microbiology
Small Animal Nursing I
Animal Anatomy and Physiology I
Animal Radiography
Veterinary Practice Management
Spring Semester
VET 1211
VET 1213
VET 1216
VET 1219
VET 1233
VET 1238
Small Animal Nursing II
Animal Anatomy and Physiology II
Large Animal Nursing Animal Clinical Lab I
Animal Surgical Tech I
Animal Pharmacology I
Summer Term
VET 2231
Veterinary Technology Internship I
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
3
4
2
2
18
3
3
3
3
3
2
17
3
continued on next page ...
117
Fall Semester
COMM 1101
VET 2219
VET 2233
VET 2238
VET 2239
Principles of Effective Speaking 1
Animal Clinical Lab II
Animal Surgical Tech II
Animal Pharmacology II
Animal Diseases
Elective – Social Science (IAI Approved)
Spring Semester
ENGL 1101 Rhetoric and Composition I 1
VET 2232
Veterinary Technology Internship II
VET 2235
Lab Animals / Exotics
VET 2236
Animal Management / Nutrition
3
3
3
2
2
3
16
3
4
3
3
13
NOTE: Students planning to transfer and pursue a baccalaureate degree, should,
when given a choice, enroll in the general education course that is IAI GECC
approved and articulated with participating Illinois institutions.
NOTE: All courses require a grade of “C” or better.
1
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES:
COOP 1101
IST 1230
IST 2220
MACH 1202
Prerequisite course(s) may be required based on results of COMPASS, ASSET,
ACT or SAT scores.
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
Occupational Certificates
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
Welding programs are designed to provide the student with a
wide range of welding experiences. Programs will cover welding
theory, blueprint reading, metallurgy and inspection and test
procedures. There will be extensive laboratory practice in SMAW,
GMAW, GTAW and oxy-acetylene welding processes. The student
will learn to weld with electrodes and wires in all positions common
to the welding industry. Program completers will have adequate
skills to qualify for employment as a welder. ▶ Total = 24 Hours
WELD 1270
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
WELD 2274
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Welding Technology AAS will provide welding courses
designed to assist welding professionals by expanding their
knowledge base, core competencies and general education. Individually, each course addresses specific workplace situations.
Additionally, successful completion of all courses offered demonstrates the student’s readiness to take the American Welding
Society certification examinations. ▶ Total = 65 Hours
First Semester
Technical Mathematics 1
Introduction to Welding Processes
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW / GTAW Welding
Blueprint Reading
Second Semester
ENGL 1101 WELD 1284
WELD 2240
WELD 2242
WELD 2275
Rhetoric and Composition I 1
GTAW Welding
Metallurgy and Heat Treatment
Weld Inspection for Quality Control
Advanced Welding
Third Semester
COMM 1101
CSCI 1101
INEL 1291
MACH 1201
WELD 2262
Industrial Safety
Introduction to Psychology
or Human Relations
GMAW / GTAW Pipe Welding
Pipe Welding II
Technical Elective
continued at top of next column ...
118
GTAW Welding
Metallurgy and Heat Treatment
Weld Inspection for Quality Control
Advanced Welding
WELDING FUNDAMENTALS CERTIFICATE
WELD 1270
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
Introduction to Welding Processes
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW / GTAW Welding
ADVANCED WELDING TECHNIQUES CERTIFICATE
WELD 1284
WELD 2240
WELD 2242
WELD 2274
WELD 2275
GTAW Welding
Metallurgy and Heat Treatment
Weld Inspection for Quality Control
Blueprint Reading
Advanced Welding 1
Prerequisites: WELD 1270 & 1272
Cr. Hrs.
4
4
4
3
15
3
2
2
2
9
4
4
4
12
3
2
2
3
2
12
1
Principles of Effective Speaking
Intro to Computers
Basic Electronics for Technicians
Machining Technology I
Pipe Welding I
Fourth Semester
IST 1221
PSYC 2101
PSYC 2106
WELD 1283
WELD 2285
3
3
2
2
2
12
Introduction to Welding Processes
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW / GTAW Welding
Blueprint Reading
Second Semester
WELD 1284
WELD 2240
WELD 2242
WELD 2275
Cr. Hrs.
3
4
4
4
3
18
4
3
4
4
1
WELDING TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE
First Semester
Associate in Applied Science Degree
MATH 1201
WELD 1270
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
WELD 2274
Cooperative Education
Intro to Robotics
Industrial Mechanics
Machining Technology II
3
3
5
4
4
19
2
PIPE WELDING TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE
Prerequisite: The Welding Technology Certificate or five years
documented experience as a welder, ability to pass the overhead and
vertical up-bend test and permission of the instructor.
WELD 1283
WELD 2262
WELD 2285
GMAW / GTAW Pipe Welding
Pipe Welding I
Pipe Welding II
3
4
4
3
16
continued on next page ...
4
4
4
12
ADVANCED METALWORKING CERTIFICATE
This certificate is for those students who are seeking to improve
their skills for the metalworking industry. Students will increase
their skills in the welding, machining and layout processes that are
commonly used in the metalworking industry. The skills learned
will provide students with the necessary entry-level skills required
by most small- to medium-sized metalworking job shops.
First Semester
WELD 1270
WELD 1272
WELD 1282
WELD 2274
Introduction to Welding Processes
Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding
GMAW / GTAW Welding
Blueprint Reading for Welders
Second Semester
MACH 1201
Machining Technology I
Cr. Hrs.
4
4
4
3
15
4
WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
The Wireless Communications Technology program
prepares students to enter the dynamic field of wireless
communications. The program emphasizes an understanding of
radio frequency fundamentals, utilizing a systems approach along
with component-level troubleshooting and analysis. Systems
integration and networking are also studied. This multi-faceted
approach to understanding the operation and troubleshooting of
communications systems enables graduates to become effective
technicians in the industry. ▶ Total = 71 Hours
Digital Fundamentals
Introduction to Computers
AC/DC Electronics
Elective
Second Semester
CNS 1221
Network Router Technology
ENGL 1101
INEL 1265
MATH 1201
WCT 1210
Rhetoric and Composition I
Solid State Electronics
Technical Math
Introduction to Communication
Third Semester
CNS 2224
ENGL 1201
PSYC 2106
WCT 1250
WCT 1260
LAN Switching
Technical Writing
Human Relations
Land-Based Communication
Intro to Mobile Telephone Systems
Fourth Semester
COMM 1101
WCT 2200
WCT 2210
WCT 2250
WCT 2260
Principles of Effective Speaking
VOIP
Internship
Cellular Technology
Wireless LAN / WAN
NOTE: Students must be able to type 25 words per minute.
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Electronics for Wireless Communication certificate is
designed to provide students with the necessary background and
skills to troubleshoot and repair a variety of electronic devices
commonly used in communication systems. Classes will offer
a balance between classroom and lab activities using modern
equipment. ▶ Total = 17 Hours
First Semester
CNS 1210
CNS 1240
INEL 1231
INEL 1265
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
CNS 1240
CSCI 1101
INEL 1231
Occupational Certificate
Network Fundamentals
Digital Fundamentals
AC/DC Electronics
Second Semester
Associate in Applied Science Degree
First Semester
CNS 1210
Network Fundamentals
WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ~
ELECTRONICS FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATION
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
3
5
1
17
5
3
4
3
3
18
Solid State Electronics
Cr. Hrs.
5
3
5
13
4
WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY ~
LAND-BASED COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS
Occupational Certificate
APPLIED SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
The Land Based Communications Systems certificate is
designed to provide students with the necessary information and
skills to work with typical land-based communication systems.
Examples include T1, Fiber/SONET, ATM, and SS7. Classes will
offer a balance between classroom and lab activities using modern
equipment. ▶ Total = 18 Hours
First Semester
CNS 1210
Network Fundamentals
Second Semester
CNS 1221
WCT 1210
Network Router Technology
Introduction to Communications
Third Semester
WCT 1250
Land-Based Communications
Cr. Hrs.
5
5
3
8
5
4
3
3
5
3
18
3
4
2
5
4
18
119
COLLEGE CREDIT
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION
College credit courses – those numbered in the 1100-, 1200-,
2100- and 2200-level sequences – include both UniversityParallel Credit courses and Occupational Credit courses
offered at Rend Lake College. One semester hour of
college credit is awarded for 16 hours of actual classroom
(lecture) instruction, 32 hours of lab work or combination
of lecture-lab.
ABE courses help non-high school graduates prepare
for the GED exam and are designed to bring students
to a competency of eighth-grade equivalency. Credit is
non-transferable and does not count toward any degree
or certificate from RLC. Enrollment information and a
complete listing of courses may be
obtained from the Adult Education
and Literacy Department.
TYPES
OFtoward
COURSE
CREDIT
Credit is transferable
and counts
associate
transfer
degrees, vocational-technical degrees and occupational
certificates. A minimum of 64 credits
from these courses is required for any
associate degree awarded by Rend
Lake College.
1100-1200
2100-2200
COLLEGE PREPARATORY
Courses are designed to remedy basic skills (i.e., reading,
writing and arithmetic) deficiencies of new students.
Placement into 1400-level courses (except .5-credit minicourses) is determined by COMPASS, ASSET, ACT or SAT
scores. Completion of the reading and English requirements
is mandatory for all associate degree and some certificate
programs. Completion of English Review and math courses
is prerequisite to taking higher-level courses.
Credit is nontransferable and does not count toward associate
transfer degrees.
1400
2400
1700
ADULT SECONDARY EDUCATION
ASE courses help non-high school graduates prepare for
the GED exam and are designed to bring students to a
competency of 12th-grade equivalency. Credit is nontransferable and does not count toward any degree or
certificate from Rend Lake College. Enrollment information
and a complete listing of courses may
be obtained from the Adult Education
and Literacy Department.
1800
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Courses are designed to help individuals who do not
speak English as their native language develop English
communication skills and a basic awareness of American
government and the legislative system. Credit is
nontransferable and does not count toward any degree or
certificate from Rend Lake College.
1900
Enrollment information and a
complete listing of courses may be
obtained from Adult Education and
Literacy.
VOCATIONAL SKILLS
1600
Courses in this category provide vocational skills training
that is not part of any Associate in Applied Science Degree
or Occupational Certificate program.
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
All courses offered by Rend Lake College are identified by a prefix followed
by a four-digit number (excluding Community Education). The prefix indicates the broad subject area; i.e., mathematics. The first digit indicates the
level, the second digit refers to the general curricular division and the last
two digits indicate the sequential order within the program. Freshman-level
courses generally begin with
the digit “1”
followed by three
more digits.
COURSE
NUMBERING
SYSTEM
Most courses recommended for second-year studies begin with the digit
“2” followed by three digits. The second digit may be interpreted thusly:
1 – Academic (Pre-Baccalaureate and Occupational)
Course credit is not transferable and
does not count toward associate transfer
degrees.
5 – General Studies
Courses are broad in nature and designed to meet individual student
goals for personal improvement and self-understanding.
6 – Vocational Skills
Courses provide vocational skills training that is not part of occupational certificate or AAS degree programs.
7 – Adult Basic Education
Courses are designed to bring non-high school graduates to a
competency of eighth-grade equivalency.
8 – Adult Secondary Education
Traditional academic courses equivalent to the first two years
(lower-division) of baccalaureate study and the academic courses
in occupational curricula.
Courses are designed to bring non-high school graduates to a
competency of 12th-grade equivalency.
2 – Technical / Applied (Pre-Baccalaureate / Occupational)
Services are designed to help individuals who do not speak English
as their native language develop English communication skills.
Courses are postsecondary technical or applied in nature. Although
most were designed mainly for AAS degrees and occupational
certificate programs, technical courses in certain fields (e.g.,
graphic arts, drafting, surveying, child care) are acceptable in
specific AA/AS degrees.
3 – Community Education
Non-credit courses.
4 – College Preparation
Courses are designed to remedy basic skill (i.e., reading, writing
and arithmetic) deficiencies of high school graduates.
122
9 – English as a Second Language
The third digit in the four-digit sequence indicates prerequisites
or degree of difficulty in an ascending order. In general, the fourth
number will indicate first-semester work if it is an odd number and
second-semester work if it is an even number. The purpose of such
a numbering system is to facilitate record keeping and to provide an
easy means of identifying various courses as to their degree of difficulty,
general curriculum, etc.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Accounting................................................................................124
Adult Basic Education (ABE)................................................124
Adult Secondary Education (ASE).....................................124
Agriculture.................................................................................124
Allied Health..............................................................................176
Anthropology...........................................................................125
Architecture...............................................................................125
Art.................................................................................................126
Astronomy.................................................................................127
Automotive Technology.......................................................127
Banking.......................................................................................128
Biology........................................................................................128
Botany.........................................................................................129
Business......................................................................................129
Certified Medical Assistant..................................................130
Certified Nurse Assistant......................................................130
Chemistry...................................................................................130
College Preparatory................................................................130
Communications.....................................................................131
Computer-Aided Drafting....................................................131
Computer Networking Systems.........................................131
Computer Science...................................................................131
Construction Management.................................................134
Continuing Education............................................................134
Cooperative Education..........................................................136
Cosmetology.............................................................................136
Criminal Justice........................................................................137
Culinary Arts..............................................................................139
Diesels.........................................................................................140
Early Childhood Education..................................................140
Economics..................................................................................141
Education...................................................................................141
Electricity....................................................................................142
Emergency Management Systems...................................142
Emergency Medical Technician..........................................143
EMT - Paramedic......................................................................144
Engineering...............................................................................144
English.........................................................................................144
English as a Second Language...........................................145
Enology.......................................................................................145
Environmental / Wastewater Tech.....................................146
Fire Fighter.................................................................................146
Fluid Power................................................................................147
French..........................................................................................147
Geography.................................................................................147
Geology.......................................................................................147
German.......................................................................................147
Graphic Design.........................................................................147
Green Facilities Management.............................................148
Health..........................................................................................148
Health Care Coach...................................................................149
Health Information.................................................................149
Heating, Air Cond. & Refrigeration....................................150
Heavy Equipment Technology...........................................150
History.........................................................................................150
Horticulture...............................................................................151
Humanities................................................................................151
Independent Study.................................................................151
Industrial Electronics..............................................................151
Industrial Maintenance Technology.................................152
Insurance....................................................................................153
IT Systems Specialist...............................................................153
Japanese.....................................................................................154
Journalism..................................................................................154
Leadership.................................................................................154
Machining Technology..........................................................154
Management............................................................................155
Manufacturing Technology.................................................155
Marketing...................................................................................155
Mathematics.............................................................................155
Medical Coding........................................................................156
Medical Laboratory Technology........................................157
Microbiology.............................................................................157
Mining Technology.................................................................157
Music............................................................................................158
Nursing........................................................................................160
Occupational Therapy Assistant........................................161
Office Systems Technology..................................................162
Oil & Natural Gas Technician...............................................164
Orientation................................................................................164
Philosophy.................................................................................164
Phlebotomy...............................................................................165
Physical Education..................................................................165
Physical Science.......................................................................168
Physics.........................................................................................168
Political Science.......................................................................168
Psychology.................................................................................168
Quality Control.........................................................................169
Radiologic Technology..........................................................169
Reading.......................................................................................170
Real Estate..................................................................................170
Restricted Classes....................................................................176
AmeriCorps................................................................................176
Upward Bound.........................................................................176
Social Science...........................................................................170
Sociology....................................................................................171
Spanish........................................................................................171
Surgical Technology...............................................................171
Surveying...................................................................................171
Theatre........................................................................................172
Therapeutic Massage.............................................................172
Truck Driver Training..............................................................173
Veterinary Technology...........................................................173
Viticulture...................................................................................174
Volunteerism.............................................................................174
Webmaster.................................................................................174
Welding.......................................................................................174
Wireless Communications Technology...........................175
Zoology.......................................................................................175
123
ACCOUNTING
ACCO 1101 – Principles of Financial Accounting (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better
An introduction to the concepts of financial accounting, with an emphasis
on the preparation and interpretation of external financial statements. Topics
covered include the accounting cycle, accounting for current and long-term
assets, accounting for current and long-term liabilities and accounting for owner’s
equity/corporations. Statement of cash flows and the analysis/interpretation of
financial statements also are covered. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ BUS 903
ACCO 1102 – Principles of Managerial Accounting (3)
Prerequisite: ACCO 1101
An introduction to the concepts of managerial accounting, with an emphasis on
the use of accounting information for managerial planning, control and decisionmaking. Topics covered include job order and process cost accounting, cost-volumeprofit analysis, segmented reporting, budgeting, standard costing, flexible budgets
and overhead analysis, responsibility accounting, pricing, relevant costs and capital
budgeting. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ BUS 904
ACCO 1202 – Payroll Accounting (2)
This course contains subject matter and learning activities which provide a
foundation in payroll and personnel records. Federal and state laws relating to
payroll preparations are studied to determine the records needed to meet these
requirements. Topics covered include compilation of wages and the accounting
for wages paid and deductions made. Lecture 2 hours.
ACCO 1209 – Computerized Accounting (3)
Introduction to software used for accounting information systems. Use of
general ledger accounting software on the microcomputer, development of a
computerized accounting information system and development of supporting
software applications. Lecture 3 hours.
ACCO 2201 – Intermediate Accounting I (3)
Prerequisite: ACCO 1102
The emphasis of the course is on financial reporting. The following topics are
given detailed coverage: revenue recognition; present value; current and fixed
assets; current, contingent, and long-term liabilities. Lecture 3 hours.
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE)
Courses are designed to develop reading, writing, speaking, math and
other basic skills within an integrated curriculum that includes job skills such
as teamwork, communication and locating information. The skills content is
comparable to that taught in the first- through eighth-grades; however, the
emphasis is on relevant and meaningful engaged learning opportunities and
applications for adult learners. Credit is nontransferable and does not count
toward any degree or certificate from Rend Lake College. Enrollment information
and a complete listing of courses may be obtained from the Adult Education and
Literacy Department. Lecture 1-16.5 hours.
ADULT SECONDARY EDUCATION (ASE)
Courses are designed to develop reading, writing, speaking, math and
other basic skills within an integrated curriculum that includes job skills such
as teamwork, communication and locating information. The skills content is
comparable to that taught in the ninth- through 12th-grades; however, the
emphasis is on relevant and meaningful engaged learning opportunities and
applications for adult learners. Credit is nontransferable and does not count
toward any degree or certificate from Rend Lake College. Enrollment information
and a complete listing of courses may be obtained from the Adult Education and
Literacy Department. Lecture 1-16.5 hours.
AGRICULTURE
AGRI 1100 – Biofuels (3)
The student is introduced to the general theory, production and uses of
methane, ethanol and biodiesel. The laboratory experience will acquaint the
student with nomenclature, production technique and quality control. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
AGRI 1141 – Agriculture Economics (3)
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of
basic economic concepts. Various aspects of macro and microeconomics will
be discussed, including supply and demand, market systems, market models,
inflation, unemployment, money and banking, budget deficits and elasticities.
This is a course in economics; however, examples and illustrations will be from
agriculture whenever possible. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 901
124
AGRI 1161 – Soil Science (5)
This course is an introduction to the principles of soils and fertilizers.
Emphasis is placed on properties of the soil and how they interact with fertility,
how fertility relates to plant growth and on soil/fertilizer management. Topics
covered include tillage, fertilizers, conservation practices, water management,
compaction, soil/plant relationships, soil nutrient relationships, soil testing and
management decisions. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 904
AGRI 1181 – Introduction to Animal Sciences (4)
This course is concerned with the roles of animals in the world. Topics
discussed include genetics, physiology, reproduction, nutrition, selection of
breeding animals, disease, management and animal welfare. Emphasis is on beef,
dairy, swine, poultry and sheep. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 902
AGRI 1191 – Introduction to Aquaculture (5)
Introduction to Aquaculture is a course that covers a growing area of
alternative agriculture in the United States. Specifically Illinois and other
Midwest states are showing a rapid increase in this industry. This course will
cover the history of aquaculture, water quality and management, cultured fish
species, fish nutrition and health, disease, pond site selection and construction,
production, processing, harvesting, marketing, and legal considerations in the
United States and Illinois. This course introduces students to careers in the
aquaculture industry and fisheries management. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
AGRI 1203 – Ignitions and Electrical Systems (5)
Theory, testing and servicing of electrical systems and components common
to ag equipment will be covered. Instruction will include the use of modern
testing equipment and procedures, procedures for home-farm use, rebuilding
of components and safety procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6 hours.
AGRI 1204 – Physics of Hydraulics (5)
A course designed to acquaint the student with basic hydraulic laws and
formulas. The student also will have hands-on experience with components for
disassembly and reassembly. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6 hours.
AGRI 1205 – Assembly, Adjustment and Reconditioning
Farm Equipment (5)
This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of farm
equipment design and adjustments for proper operation. Students will use
operator and service manuals to adjust, maintain and repair agricultural
machinery. Shop activities will develop skills needed for adjustment and
reconditioning of farm-related equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6 hours.
AGRI 1206 – Ag Air Conditioning Systems (4)
This course includes instruction in theory, principles of operation and
construction of present-day agricultural air-conditioning systems. Also included
are information and certification by ASE for the purchase and federal regulations
for 12-12 and R-134a refrigerants. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
AGRI 1208 – Diesel Engines (6)
The student is introduced to the general theory of diesel engine operation
and function. The laboratory experience will acquaint the student with parts
nomenclature, overhauling, diagnostic procedures and bench work operations.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 6 hours.
AGRI 1210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (4)
Prerequisite: Approval from the Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course is offered in the summer for eight weeks following the first year
of the program. The student will be placed with an agricultural business for
full-time job placement. The learning experiences will be supervised by both
the college coordinator and the employer. The student will receive vocational
counseling and individual assistance. Special attention will be given to career
planning, on-the-job problems and current business practices. Lab 20 hours.
AGRI 1215 – Small Engines (3)
The student is introduced to the basic principles of two- and four-cycle
engine operation. The laboratory experience will acquaint the student with parts
identification, overhauling and tune-up procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
AGRI 1221 – Introduction to Agriculture Occupations (1)
The student is introduced to the broad field of agricultural business and its
many employment opportunities. Job titles are described on the basis of duties
performed, knowledge and abilities needed. Included are an orientation to the
Supervised Occupational Experience program and completion of a résumé for
future use and to be filed in the Rend Lake College Cooperative Education and
Job Placement Office. Lecture 1 hour.
AGRI 1222 – Applied Mathematics (3)
A problem-solving course with emphasis on improving the student’s skill in
the fundamental processes of mathematics as used in business. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1223 – Intro to Ag Business (3)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of agriculture
business. Topics included are introductions to agricultural economics,
marketing, sales and management. This course is designed to introduce essential
basics to further the interest of the student to explore the subject matter on more
in-depth levels. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1242 – Microcomputers in Agriculture (3)
This course is an introduction to microcomputers and their uses in
agriculture. Various hardware/software choices and existing software
applications will be discussed, as well as the Internet and e-mail. Emphasis will
be on spreadsheet, word processing and database programs. The student will
learn custom application and problem-solving using the software. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 913
AGRI 1245 – Introduction to Equine Management (3)
This course emphasizes the importance of proper equine selection. The
student will be able to identify unsoundness, vices and confirmation faults.
Selection of proper feed ration for different use and need situations will be
taught. Satisfactory completion of this course will provide the fundamental
knowledge and skills necessary to perform preventive medicine programs and
assess the health of equine. The general anatomy of the horse will be covered.
Facility design and selection, as well as proper choice and maintenance of tack,
also will be covered. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1251 – Intro to Ag Production
PENDING ICCB APPROVAL – This course is an introduction to the
fundamental principles of agronomy. Topics will revolve around essential basics
of crops an soil sciences as they apply to production agriculture. This course is
designed with the intent to build a working knowledge of agronomic principles
in order to prepare for more in-depth subject matter.
AGRI 1262 – Agricultural Chemicals (3)
This course deals with the major weeds and insects which attack field
crops and stored grain and the associated herbicides and insecticides. An
understanding is developed of how and why herbicides function. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1263 – Crop Science (4)
This course concentrates on crop production techniques and marketing
practices. All principles are covered from the initial planning stages of crop
production through marketing the crop. Students will be required to use
knowledge acquired in previous courses, such as agricultural economics, soils
and fertilizers and agricultural chemicals. Emphasis is placed on corn, soybean,
wheat and forage production. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 903
AGRI 1282 – Feeds and Feeding (3)
This course is designed to expose the student to general nutrition concepts
in animals. Emphasis is placed on ration formulation and the various feed
ingredients used in economically balancing diets for various ages and classes
of livestock. Topics discussed include energy, protein and vitamin and mineral
nutrition. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1285 – Agriculture Technologies (3)
This course is a study of the latest technologies applied in agriculture
operations. The student is exposed to modern equipment, strategies for use, career
opportunities and fundamental diagnosis of equipment used for assessing field
conditions, applying chemicals and fertilizers and organizing crop production.
Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 1605 – Agriculture Update (1)
Exploration of new technologies, trends and techniques unique to
agricultural production and management. Lecture 1 hour.
AGRI 1617 – Biofuels (1)
This course is designed to be an introduction to the production and uses of
methane, ethanol and biodiesel. The laboratory experience with acquaint the
student with nomenclature, production technique and quality control. Lab 32
contact hours.
AGRI 2201 – Transmissions and Power Trains (4)
This course provides an in-depth study of the operation and service of
clutches, transmissions, differentials, final drives, hydraulic shift devices and
PTOs. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
AGRI 2204 – Advanced Major Overhaul (5)
Prerequisites: AGRI 1208 or consent of Dean
This course will aid in developing and understanding proper shop
procedures to use in the overhaul and major repair of agricultural and industrial
equipment. Emphasis is placed on safety, proper handling of pollutants,
organization, orderliness and demonstration of mechanical skills. The student
will troubleshoot, repair and tune a power unit for field conditions. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 6 hours.
AGRI 2210 – Supervised Agricultural Occupational
Experience (4)
Prerequisites: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
Similar to AGRI 1210; it will be offered the eight weeks at the end of the
sophomore year. Lab 20 hours.
AGRI 2223 – Agricultural Finance (3)
This course is the study of the importance and proper utilization of credit
in an agricultural business. Topics include the use of financial instruments,
alternative sources of credit, proper record keeping and accounting methods, as
well as the use of equity and debt capital as a management tool. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 2225 – Food and Ag Policy (3)
This course is the study of agriculture and food policy as it affects agriculture
business. Emphasis will be placed on current issues. Topics will also include the
use of policies as management tools in an agriculture business. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 2241 – Farm Management (3)
This course focuses on business aspects of production agriculture.
Emphasis is on balance sheet and income statement analysis, capital and credit
use, enterprise, partial- and whole-farm budgeting and investment analysis.
Economic principles and cost concepts as they relate to agriculture also are
discussed. Students learn to apply these tools to develop a farm management
plan. Lecture 3 hours.
AGRI 2242 – Marketing Agricultural Products (5)
This course acquaints the student with various methods of marketing
agricultural products. Emphasis is placed on marketing strategies and
risk management. Topics include on-farm grain storage, cash contracts,
interpretation of market-driving information, the futures and options market
and price analysis. Lecture 5 hours.
ANTHROPOLOGY
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
ANTH 1101 – Cultural Anthropology (3)
This course provides a survey of anthropology. The course embraces cultures
from all continents, highlights major human subsistence patterns and illustrates
human adaptations to environment from the beginning of human history to
the present. It focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated
culture which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. Lastly, the course
explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human
possibilities. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S1 901N
ARCHITECTURE
ARCH 1101 – Introduction to Architectural Theory / History (3)
An introductory course to the profession of architecture through an
examination of recurrent themes in the history of architecture, with emphasis
upon the problems and achievements in the art of designing the built
environment. Lecture 3 hours.
ARCH 1102 – Architectural Construction Systems (3)
An introductory course to building materials and their use in construction,
with emphasis on their properties, selection criteria and methods of graphic
representation. Examination of the architect’s role in construction and selection
of construction systems: foundation and enclosure systems; interior and exterior
finishes; floor, ceiling, partition and roofing systems, and wood, masonry, steel
and concrete structural systems. Lecture 3 hours.
ARCH 1201 – Architectural Materials and Methods I (5)
Through the use of architectural drafting, this course provides the student
with a knowledge of current materials and methods of construction, their
physical nature, adaptability and limitations. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
ARCH 1202 – Architectural Materials and Methods II (5)
A companion course of ARCH 1201 which deals with masonry, steel frame
and concrete construction. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
125
ARCH 1205 – Introduction to Architectural Drawing (5)
ARCH 2218 – Site Planning (3)
ARCH 1206 – Architecture Independent Study (4)
ARCH 2220 – Structural Design and Analysis (4)
An introduction to the basic principles in the geometry of architectural
drawing, including orthographic projection, axonometric drawing and
perspective drawing. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
Course designed for students desiring a specialized study not available in
regular course offerings. Projects must be planned jointly by the student and
instructor. The maximum credit allowed is four semester hours. Lab 8 hours.
ARCH 1208 – Architectural Drawing (3)
An introduction to the basic principles in the geometry of architectural
drawing including sketching, orthographic projection, axonometric drawings
and perspective drawing. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
ARCH 1209 – Architectural Building Technology (3)
Introduction to basic materials and components used in contemporary
construction. A survey of manufacturing methods, available sizes, performance
characteristics, quality, finishes, and applications. Usage of vendors, brochures
and standard references. Preparation of working drawing in light wood frame
construction to practice current procedures, dimensioning, notation, and design
correlation, with standard and creative detailing. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
ARCH 1601 – Computer Applications ~ Architecture (1)
This course covers new computer software applications in architecture and
related fields. Lecture 1 hour.
ARCH 2203 – Site Surveying (4)
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to provide line
and grade construction layout using the tape, level and transit. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
ARCH 2206 – Architectural Drawing / Design (4)
Prerequisites: ARCH 1101, ARCH 1205 and CAD 1201
An introduction to the fundamentals of architectural design: object,
perception and light. Vocabulary: figure-ground composition, balance and
movement, proportion and rhythm, mass-space organization, multiple viewing
positions, one- and two-point perspective, orthographic projection and freehand
drawing. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
ARCH 2207 – Architectural Rendering (4)
Prerequisite: ARCH 1205 or consent of instructor
A course designed to apply principles learned in ARCH 1203 in preparation
of pictorial drawings for presentation to clients. It involves a study of various
media and techniques, including colored pencil, pen and ink and markers.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
ARCH 2210 – Architectural Internship (3)
This course is designed to study the considerations of site selection, including
survey computations, contours, computations of cut and fill, drainage and
grading. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: None, but PHY 1201 is strongly recommended
An introduction to the structural design process covering the use of
mathematics and physics to determine loads, resolution of force systems and
equilibrium analysis, structural properties of shapes and materials, shear and
bending movements, deflection, column theory and awareness of structural
system behavior. Lecture 4 hours.
ARCH 2224 – Construction Documents (2)
This course will familiarize the student with traditional practices for
architectural construction documents, utilizing the latest recommendations of
the Construction Specification Institute and the American Institute of Architects.
Lecture 2 hours.
ARCH 2225 – Construction Systems (4)
An overview of the major construction materials and methods utilized in
contemporary construction, including hands-on application. The course will
enable an architectural technology student to comprehend the relationship
between architectural drawing and actual construction. Lecture 2 hours. Lab
4 hours.
ARCH 2226 – Architectural Document and Cost Estimating (3)
This course is designed to provide the students with the basic knowledge
and understanding of Architecture Construction Documents and a working
knowledge for making estimates of construction projects. Lecture 3 hours
ARCH 2227 – Architectural Building Codes (3)
Introduction to and overview of building codes, including various related
issues which must be considered by the architect, engineer and builders. Lecture
3 hours.
ARCH 2230 – Portfolio Review (1)
Students will explore presentation and interviewing techniques used to find
employment. Grooming of student portfolios, résumés, cover letters and other
business correspondence is stressed. Oral skills also are reinforced, effective
presentation skills and project refinements are covered. Students learn the
components of business management. Basic record-keeping, licensing, banking,
copyrights, contracts and business ethics are covered. Lecture 1 hour.
ART
ART 1101 – Art Appreciation (3)
Prerequisite: Approval from Dean and Minimum 2.0 GPA
This course provides students an opportunity to gain valuable experience
in their field of study while performing on-the-job training. The learning
experience will be supervised by both a college faculty/staff member and the
employer . Lab 15 hours.
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This course leads the student to a discovery and understanding of the visual
arts. Through readings, discussions, slides and films, the student will examine
the role of the artist and the complex aspects of art as a humanizing element.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ F2 900
ARCH 2212 – Architectural Project (5)
ART 1103 – Design I (3)
Prerequisites: ARCH 1101, 1201, 1205, 2206, 2207; CAD 1201, or consent of Dean
This course familiarizes the student with all phases of the architectural
process while designing a nonresidential project and preparing a working
drawing package. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6 hours.
This course provides an introduction to art’s formal elements of twodimensional design through line, shape, space, texture, color and their visual
inter-relationships. This is the basis for all types of art from drawing to
commercial design. Lab 6 hours.
ARCH 2214 – Cost Estimating (2)
ART 1104 – Design II (3)
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge
and understanding of making quantity takeoffs and working estimates of
construction projects. Lecture 2 hours.
ARCH 2215 – Mechanical and Electrical Systems (3)
This course deals with mechanical and electrical equipment in buildings,
including the design of plumbing, heating and air conditioning equipment,
electrical wiring and illumination. Lecture 3 hours.
ARCH 2216 – Architectural / Engineering Project (4)
The study of materials and practices in document preparation for buildings
using masonry, steel, and reinforced concrete construction. Investigation and
use of local, state and federal codes regulating health and safety. Investigation
of construction techniques relating to criteria of permanence, low maintenance
and budget requirements. Produce a set of working drawings for a two-level, light
commercial/industrial building. Lecture 2 hours. Lab hours 4 hours.
126
Prerequisite: ART 1103
Intended as a follow-up to Design I, this course is an investigation of the
elements of three dimensional design with the emphasis on line, shape, space,
texture and color. Lab 6 hours.
ART 1105 – Drawing I (3)
An introduction to the basic techniques of drawing, with an emphasis on
contour, variation of line, crosshatching, rendering and stippling. A wide range of
media, such as pencil, charcoal, conté crayon and ink, will be used. Lab 6 hours.
ART 1106 – Drawing II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 1105
This course provides further inquiry into the media and techniques used
in Drawing I. Emphasis will be placed on the clothed figure as subject matter.
Lab 6 hours.
ART 1107 – Painting I (3)
A directed studio investigation of fundamental painting methods and
materials. The course gives the student experience in working with watercolor,
oil and acrylic. Emphasis is on development of both skills and personal vision.
Lab 6 hours.
ART 1108 – Painting II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 1107
This continuation of Painting I focuses on the development of individual
expression through understanding of form, color theories and materials. The
student may concentrate on a particular media introduced in Painting I. Lab
6 hours.
ART 1111 – Photography I (3)
This course is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge of blackand-white photography. The course will include experiences in developing film,
paper printing and other darkroom and photographic techniques. Students must
have access to a manual operable 35mm camera Lab 6 hours.
ART 1112 – Photography II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 1111 or consent of the instructor
This course is designed to provide the student with an advanced experience
in black-and-white photography, darkroom and studio techniques. The course
assumes a thorough knowledge of techniques taught in ART 1111. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2105 – Sculpture I (3)
An introduction to some elementary materials, techniques and methods
of sculpture, this course will include techniques of molding and carving. Lab
6 hours.
ART 2106 – Sculpture II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 2105
This course provides further inquiry into the creative handling of materials,
techniques and methods of sculpture as learned and practiced in Sculpture I.
Lab 6 hours.
ART 2108 – Metalsmithing I (3)
An introduction to the tools, techniques and materials used in metals.
Students will explore forming and joining methods such as sawing, piercing,
forging, soldering and riveting. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2109 – Metalsmithing II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 2108
This course is a continuation of learning tools, techniques and materials
used in Metalsmithing I. Students will further explore methods of enameling
and etching techniques, including cloisonné and champlevé. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2110 – Problems in Art ~ Studio (3)
Prerequisite: All available courses offered in the selected area of study
The student will explore special problems in one of the studio areas: drawing,
painting, sculpture, ceramics and jewelry-making. May be repeated in the same
or another studio area. Lab 6 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
ART 2111 – Art History I (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This is a survey of outstanding works of art produced by Western civilizations
from 20,000 B.C. to 1800 A.D. Western civilization art and culture are inseparable
and are a reflection of mankind. Lecture 3 hours.
ART 2112 – Art History II (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
Outstanding work from 1800-present are surveyed from the various
movements of art forms. In addition, their relationships to and contributions
to Western civilizations are covered. Lecture 3 hours.
ART 2113 – Introduction to Ceramics (3)
This course is an introduction to the methods, materials, techniques, and
tools used in making pottery forms. Students will make hand-built and wheelthrown pottery and will explore various traditional glazing, decorating, and
firing techniques. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2114 – Advanced Ceramics (3)
Prerequisite: ART 2113
This course is a continuation of learning the methods, materials, specific
techniques and tools used in making pottery forms. Students will make hand-
built and wheel-thrown pottery and will further explore traditional glazing,
decorating and firing techniques. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2115 – Printmaking I (3)
This course is an introduction into the basic printmaking processes: relief,
intaglio, planographic and stencil. Lectures and film cover all processes. Studio
lab work emphasis will be on relief and intaglio printmaking processes. Lab 6
hours.
ART 2116 – Printmaking II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 2115
This course is a continuation of learning the methods, materials, specific
techniques and tools used in the printmaking processes: relief intaglio,
planographic and stencil. A student may elect to concentrate on a particular
technique studied in Printmaking I. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2117 – Commercial Art (3)
This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of
visual communication, including techniques, processes, terminology and basic
compositional and conceptual skills of commercial art and graphic design. Lab
6 hours.
ART 2120 – Life Drawing (3)
Prerequisites: ART 1105 and ART 1106
Through class lectures and discussion of the various drawing techniques and
media, the student will become familiar with drawing the human figure. Students
will draw using empirical observation of a model, emphasizing various drawing
techniques in conjunction with the human figure. Drawing assignments will
include gesture, facial and full-figure compositions. By the end of the semester,
the student should be able to determine what figure drawing is, how the selection
of medium, techniques and subject matter reflect the student’s aesthetic values
and what the student’s personal involvement is with figure drawing. Lab 6 hours.
ART 2121- Introduction to Stained Glass (3)
Designed for the beginning student, this course covers the basics of stained
glass construction in lead and copper foil. The history of glass tools and supplies,
pattern-making, cutting, grinding, and soldering construction will be covered.
Lab 6 hours.
ART 2201 – Illustration I (3)
Prerequisite: ART 1105
In this studio course, students will study various commercial artists and
illustrators while developing their own individual style. Pen and ink, colored
pencil, water color, scratch board, pastels, pencil and markers will be covered.
Lab 6 hours.
ART 2202 – Illustration II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 2201
This course is a continuation of Illustration I. Development of individual
style, creativity, originality and design will be stressed. Students will be allowed to
explore and refine techniques in illustration using various media. The computer
will be introduced as an illustration tool while researching various computer
illustrators and their styles. Lab 6 hours.
ASTRONOMY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement
AST 1101 – Introduction to Astronomy I (4)
This is a non-mathematical introduction to astronomy, which includes topics
on astronomy history, the planets, the universe, types of stars, our galaxy and
use of star charts. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 906
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
AUTO 1202 – Engine Repair (5)
This course is a study of the diagnosis and repair of cylinder heads and
valve trains, short blocks and lubrication and cooling system components.
General engine diagnosis and engine completion and start-up procedures also
are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6 hours.
AUTO 1210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (2-4)
Prerequisite: Approval from Deanperson and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course is offered in the summer for eight weeks following the first year
of the program. The student will be placed with an automotive business for
full-time job placement. The learning experiences will be supervised by both the
college coordinator and the employer. The student trainee will receive vocational
counseling and individual assistance. Special attention will be given to career
planning, on-the-job problems and current business practices. Lab 10-20 hours.
127
AUTO 1231 – Introduction to Automotive Technology (2)
This course is a study of shop safety, shop operation and career opportunities
in automotive technology. Also covered are basic servicing techniques as applied
to automatic transaxles, electrical systems, air conditioning and engine repairs.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 1232 – Auto Electrical Systems A (3)
This course is a study of the principles of electricity and general electrical
system diagnosis. Battery diagnosis and service and starting system diagnosis
and repair are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 1235 – Engine Performance A (5)
Prerequisite: AUTO 1202 or consent of Dean
This course is a study of ignition systems, beginning with breaker point
systems and covering the evolution through computerized ignition systems.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
AUTO 1240 – Auto Air Conditioning (3)
This course is a study of the automotive air conditioning and climate control
systems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
AUTO 1245 – Braking Systems (4)
This course is a study of the hydraulic principles and application of braking
systems, including drum, disc and power brakes. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
AUTO 1249 – Automotive Maintenance (5)
This course is a study of the operating systems of the modern automobile,
preventive maintenance and troubleshooting procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Lab
6 hours.
AUTO 1266 – Ford MLR (1)
This course provides web-based training using Ford Motor Company’s
Maintenance and Light Repair online training. The areas covered are electrical
systems and power accessories, heating and air conditioning, alignment,
suspension and steering, and automotive brakes. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 2245 – Suspension and Steering (4)
This course is a study of steering systems, front suspension systems, rear
suspension systems and wheel alignment diagnosis and repair. Lecture 1 hour.
Lab 6 hours.
AUTO 2250 – Automotive Computer Electronics (3)
Prerequisite: AUTO 1232 or consent of Dean
This course reviews Ohm’s Law and applies it to the field of electronic
components. Solid state devices, as they apply to the automotive field, are covered.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
BANKING
BANK 1601 – Principles of Banking (3)
A comprehensive introduction to the diversified services offered by the
banking industry. Topics include documents and language, deposit and teller
functions, check processing, bookkeeping, loans and investments, accounting
and profitability, regulation, personnel and bank services. Lecture 3 hours.
BANK 1603 – Law and Banking: Principles (3)
The course provides an overview of the legal aspects of banking and an
understanding of how the legal system directly affects banks. Topics covered
include the court system, consumer protection, negotiable instruments, secured
transactions, partnerships and corporations, sales, commercial paper and bank
transactions. Lecture 3 hours.
BANK 1606 – Money and Banking (3)
The course presents basic economic principles as they relate to banking.
Areas examined include money and economic activity, financial intermediaries,
money creation, the payments mechanism, the business of banking, Federal
Reserve System, fiscal and monetary policy, monetary theory, policy goals and
international banking. Lecture 3 hours.
BANK 1611 – Consumer Lending (3)
AUTO 1604 – Small Gasoline Engines (1.5)
A course to develop a basic understanding of two- and four-cycle gasoline
engines. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1 hour.
Prerequisite: BANK 1601
The course provides an overview of the consumer credit operation. Topics
covered include credit risks, consumer credit policy, loan application, loan
documentation, loan closings, servicing and collection of loans, consumer
compliance and portfolio management. Lecture 3 hours.
AUTO 1608 – Auto Mechanics Review (3)
BANK 1613 – Commercial Lending (3)
This course is designed for the professional automotive mechanic. It provides
a review of eight major areas of automotive mechanics and should provide an
excellent review for anyone planning to take the test for certification by the
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. Lecture 3 hours.
AUTO 1609 – Small Engine Repair (2)
This course is for individuals wanting an understanding of the maintenance
and service of two- and four-cycle small engines. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 2214 – Automatic Trans / Transaxle (5)
This course is a study of automatic trans/transaxle maintenance, diagnosis
and repair. In-car and off-car operations are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 6
hours.
AUTO 2215 – Manual Drive Train and Axles (5)
This course is a study of the diagnosis and repair of clutches, manual
transmissions, manual transaxles and differentials. Drive shafts, CV joints,
front-wheel drive and four-wheel drive components also are covered. Lecture
3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
AUTO 2230 – Auto Electrical Systems B (3)
Prerequisite: AUTO 1232 or consent of Dean
This course is a study of charging system diagnosis and repair, lighting
system diagnosis and repair and gauges and electrical accessories. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 2232 – Engine Performance C (3)
This course is a study of emission control systems. Individual emission
control devices, such as air management, spark timing controllers and EGR,
are covered in detail. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
AUTO 2235 – Engine Performance B (5)
This course is a study of fuel and exhaust systems, including carburetion, fuel
injection and computer-controlled fuel systems. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
128
Prerequisite: BANK 1601
The course examines the role of the commercial lending function within
the banking industry. Areas examined include the role of commercial banking
in the U.S. economy; the analytical aspects of commercial lending to include
the customer, products, pricing, support, documentation and analysis; funding
risks, and the management of the commercial lending function. Lecture 3 hours.
BIOLOGY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement.
BIO 1100 – Biology for Non-Majors (4)
For students who are non-majors but want a general knowledge of biology.
An introduction to biology and the nature of science, as well as historical and
modern applications of biology to other sciences and society. Topics include
organisms and ecology, Mendelian genetics and evolution, bio-chemistry, DNA,
cell organization and energy transformations in cells. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2
hours. ▶ IAI ~ L1 900L
BIO 1101 – College Biology (5)
An introductory biology course for life science, plant and soil science and
pre-professional majors. Topics include cell structure and function, energy
transformations, genetics, reproduction and biotechnology. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ L1 900L / BIO 910
BIO 1102 – Environmental Ecology (4)
A study of ecological concepts, world ecosystems and current environmental
problems. The course includes the interrelationships between living organisms
and their environment, the problems and possible solutions of pollution, the
conservation of natural resources and the reclamation and restoration of spoiled
environments. Class discussions are supplemented by laboratory exercises and
field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ L1 905L
BIO 1103 – Introduction to Marine Biology (4)
This is an introductory level oceanography course designed to bring to
the student the knowledge, theories and predictions of America’s leading
oceanographers. It focuses on the marine environment as a unique feature of the
planet Earth. Among topics addressed: historical perspectives of oceanography,
intertidal zones, platetectonics, islands, plankton, nekton, marine mammals and
pollution. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
BIO 1104 – College Biology II (5)
Prerequisite: BIO 1101 with a grade of “C” or better
This course is an introduction to structure and function of major groups
of microorganisms, fungi, animals and plants. Emphasis on evolutionary
relationships and ecological principles. Laboratory required. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ BIO 910
BOTANY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
BOT 1101 – General Botany (5)
A survey of the plant kingdom, including plant cells and tissues and the
ecology, morphology, physiology and life cycles of representative plants of each
division. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ L1 901L
BUSINESS
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement.
BUSI 1101 – Introduction to Business (3)
A survey of the basic fundamentals of business. The course is designed to give
students exposure to all areas of business and form a solid base for further study
in the field. Topics include: economics; business environments; the organization,
operation and management of the business firm; marketing; finance; accounting;
computer systems; business law, and international business. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 1103 – Business Law I (3)
An examination of law as it relates to the transactions of modern business.
It includes the American legal system, crimes and torts, contracts, agency law,
sales and commercial paper. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 1200 – Job Strategy (1)
This course is designed to provide the student with the skills necessary to
secure an appropriate job in his or her field of study. Topics covered include
career information, job search methods, résumé preparation and interviewing
techniques. Job survival skills also are covered. Lecture 1 hour.
BUSI 1610 – Management Seminar I (1)
The course is designed to introduce new and potential managers to the
basic management functions of planning, organizing, directing and controlling.
Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable – 3 times)
BUSI 1630 – Retail Operations (.5)
This course is designed to familiarize the employee with various aspects of
retail store operations. Topics covered include consumer behavior, store location
and organization, buying and merchandising practices, inventory and pricing
policy, promotion and cost analysis. Lecture .5 hour.
BUSI 2107 – Business Communications (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101
The course is designed to improve the student’s understanding of the vital
role of effective communication in business. Emphasis is on the development of
skill in business writing through the preparation of various forms of memoranda,
letters and reports. Also covered: oral presentations, listening skills, nonverbal
communication, meetings, résumés and job interviews. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2202 – Business Presentation (3)
A study of the essential concepts of writing and presenting information
within a business, with an emphasis on the role of communicating business
information focusing on: effective writing and speaking within the business
center. Major focus will include: effective business writing presentation styles,
illustrating business ideas and concepts using information displays and display
systems, effective business speaking presentations, choosing and designing
effective business visual aids and developing a business platform presence.
Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2203 – Business Ethics (3)
A study of the essential concepts of leadership, business ethics and
organizational integrity, with an emphasis on the role of leaders as they build,
maintain, lead and self-govern organizations. Major focus will include leadership,
moral and ethical responsibility, adherence to principle and constancy of purpose
within the business organization. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2204 – Business Management Law (3)
A study of the essential concepts of business law with an emphasis on the
critical thinking skills: legal environment, business disciplines, marketing
finance and management. Major legal implications are studied focusing on
contracts, liability, property, employment discrimination and labor relations.
Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2205 – E-Commerce (3)
The course is designed as an entry-level Electronic Commerce class for
business majors as well as managers and professional people in any functional
area of the business world. Course topics include the definition of Electronic
Commerce, how it is being conducted and managed and its major opportunities,
limitations, issues and risks. The course includes applications such as electronic
fund transfers, buying and selling stocks on the Internet, retailing operations
and advertising campaigns. Global competition, partnerships and trading
are emphasized. Students should be familiar with basic Windows and Web
navigation skills, as well as fundamental Internet concepts. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2206 – Business Dynamics (3)
A study of the essential concepts of group dynamics with an emphasis on
the strategies of interpersonal communication, verbal and nonverbal messages,
creative and critical thinking and group problem-solving. Major factors affecting
group communication are diversity, managing conflicts productively, leadership,
planning, organizing and presenting information. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2207 – Business Organization (3)
BUSI 1631 – Retail Sales Clerk (3)
This course is designed for those seeking employment as retail clerks.
Students gain knowledge about the dynamics of customer relations, employer/
employee relations, the sales process, merchandising and cash register systems/
procedures. Lecture 3 hours.
A study of the essential concepts of organizational behavior with an emphasis
on the strategies of Managing: the global economy, individuals, organizational
processes and evolutions. Major forces impacting organizational structures
are studied focusing on cultivating organizational culture, decision making,
managing conflict, managing diversity and managing change. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2101 – Business Law II (3)
BUSI 2208 – Intercultural Business (3)
Prerequisite: BUSI 1103
An examination of the law as it relates to the organization and regulation of
business. It includes partnership law, corporate law, property, credit and state
and federal regulations. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2102 – Customer Service (3)
This course provides a study of the essentials of customer service. The course
will include topics dealing with attitude, understanding the customer’s needs,
communication, customer satisfaction, selling skills, and telephone skills.
Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2105 – Legal / Social Environment of Business (3)
An examination of the legal environment as it pertains to business, with an
emphasis on ethics and social responsibility. Areas of study include ethical and
social issues; the U.S. legal system; forms of business organization; contracts
and tort law; employment legislation; antitrust and trade regulation, and debtorcreditor relations. Lecture 3 hours.
A study of the essential concepts of international communication with an
emphasis on the role of language in international business communications
focusing on: cultural knowledge, individuals and groups within business
cultures and organization of messages to other cultures. Major focus will include:
nonverbal language in intercultural communication; information, decision and
solutions; intercultural negotiation; legal and governmental considerations, and
effectiveness of intercultural business communication. Lecture 3 hours.
BUSI 2209 – Inventory Management (3)
This course provides a study of the essentials of inventory management with
an emphasis on the core aspects of inventory control. The course will include topics
dealing with purchasing, forecasting, merchandise assortments, supplier relations,
pricing, and vendor services. Lecture 3 hours.
129
vCERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT
CMA 1201 – Administrative Aspects (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program
This course provides an introduction to the administrative skills needed for a
medical office. Students learn how to maintain medical records (both paper and
electronic), manage appointments and perform routine office duties. This course
focuses on the financial aspects of the medical office, including accounts payable
and accounts receivable. Students examine billing and collection procedures.
Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
CMA 1202 – Patient Care I (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program
This course includes the skills necessary for an entry-level medical assistant.
Aseptic practice of the medical office will be defined and basic patient interaction
such as interviewing, obtaining and recording vital signs, assisting with basic
physical exams and testing will be studied. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
CMA 1203 – Billing & Coding (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program
This course introduces the student to the medical insurance system and
related billing and coding. Students learn how to complete and submit electronic
and paper insurance claim forms, perform referrals and apply the correct
procedure and diagnostic codes. This course is specific to the needs of medical
assisting. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 1 hour.
CMA 1204 – Professionalism & Safety (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program
This course reviews the role and function of the medical assistant and
provides health care professionals with an orientation for their possible future
roles in disaster response and the importance of staying within the scope
of practice of the profession. This course focuses on the basic concept of the
professional practice of medicine and the scope of practice of the medical
assistant. Students discuss the personal and professional characteristics and
legal and ethical standards for medical assistants, explore professional and
personal therapeutic communication, and address time management and goal
setting. Students will be prepared to meet the expectations of their employers, to
volunteer effectively and to be competent and safe responders. Lecture 3 hours.
CMA 1205 – Lab Diagnostics (4)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program
The role and function of the professional in the clinical laboratory is
introduced. Topics include safety in the laboratory, CLIA government regulations
and quality assurance, and microscope procedures and concepts. Students
perform procedures in the different departments of the laboratory, including
specimen collection and performance of CLIA 88 low and moderate complexity
testing. Students demonstrate competency in the wide variety of specimen
techniques used to collect, process and test specimens. Lecture 3 hours. Lab
2 hours.
CMA 1206 – Patient Care II (4)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program and CMA 1202
This course focuses on expanding the knowledge and skills in Patient Care I.
More complex and independent procedures performed by the medical assistant
will be explored. This course addresses surgical procedures, physical therapy,
principles of radiology, emergency procedures and pulmonary function testing,
and includes the performance of an electrocardiogram. Lecture 2 hours. Lab
4 hours.
CMA 1207 – Practicum (4)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Certified Medical Assistant program and CMA
1201, 1202, 1203 and 1204
This course provides the opportunity to apply clinical, laboratory and
administrative skills in a supervised, non-remunerated externship in a
medical facility. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in clinical and
administrative skills necessary for comprehensive patient care and strengthening
professional communications and interactions. Upon completion, students
should be able to function as entry-level health care professionals. Lab 12.5 hours.
CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT
CNA 1201 – Certified Nurse Assistant (7)
Prerequisite: Student must score a 59 or higher on the reading portion of the
COMPASS test.
This is a course designed to teach those individuals basic nursing skills which
would enable them to work as a nurse assistant in various health care facilities.
130
This course is approved by the Illinois Department of Public Health. Upon
successful completion, the student is eligible to apply to take the state registry
exam. Lecture 5 hours. Lab 4 hours.
CNA 1603 – Nursing Aide Skills Recertification (.5-1)
Prerequisite: Current background check and approval from Illinois Nurse Aide
Registry
This course is designed for certified nurse assistants seeking recertification.
Students will review 21 skills and demonstrate competency in a clinical setting
as mandated by the Illinois Department of Public Health. Lecture .5-1 hour.
CHEMISTRY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement.
CHE 1101 – General Chemistry I (5)
Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 1407 or consent of Dean
This beginning course provides a broad overview of inorganic chemistry
for nursing and allied health students, as well as those students desiring a
knowledge of chemistry needed to meet general studies requirements. It is
concept-oriented (rather than mathematical) and covers general inorganic
concepts of measurement, energy relationships, atomic structure and bonding,
chemical equations, equilibria, reaction rates, states of matter, acid base theory
and applications. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 902L
CHE 1102 – General Chemistry II (5)
Prerequisite: CHE 1101 or consent of the Dean
This beginning course provides a broad overview of organic/biological
chemistry to the same student population as CHE 1101. It is concept-based and
covers hydrocarbons, halides, alcohols, ethers, carbonyl groups, carbohydrates,
organic acids, ester, organic nitrogen compounds, lipids, amino acids, enzymes,
nucleic acids, digestion, body fluids, energy, carbohydrates and metabolism.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
CHE 1103 – Inorganic Chemistry (5)
Prerequisites: CHE 1101 or one year of high school chemistry; Two years of high
school algebra or successful completion of MATH 1407 or enrollment in MATH
1108; or consent of the Dean
This is a beginning course for chemistry majors, chemistry minors, preengineering, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary, pre-pharmacy and other
pre-professional majors. It is a detailed study of the atomic structure and bonding,
stoichiometry, thermochemistry, chemical reactions, chemical periodicity and
chemical equilibrium of gaseous systems. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI
~ P1 902L
CHE 1104 – Qualitative Analysis and Inorganic Chemistry (5)
Prerequisite: CHE 1103
Reaction rates, environmental chemistry, acids and bases, ionic equilibrium,
coordination compounds and oxidation-reduction are covered in this
continuation of CHE 1103. A detailed study of qualitative analysis ends the course.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CHM 912
CHE 2120 – Organic Chemistry I (5)
Prerequisite: CHE 1104
A study of the compounds of carbon, the mechanism of organic reactions,
synthesis of organic reactions and synthesis of representative organic
compounds. IR and NMR spectra will be emphasized for representative
compounds. Studied are hydrocarbons, benzene, arenes, alcohols, alkyl halides
and aryl halides. More time is recommended for lab work. Lecture 3 hours. Lab
4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CHM 913
CHE 2121 – Organic Chemistry II (5)
Prerequisite: CHE 2120
A continuation of CHE 2120. Compounds stressed: ethers, epoxides, acides
and derivatives, amines, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, carbohydrates, amino acids
and proteins. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CHM 914
COLLEGE PREPARATORY
PREP 1402 – Study Skills (1.5)
Students in READ 2409 must take this course. This course is designed to
help students learn to study more effectively. Areas of instruction include how to
read a textbook, take notes, take tests and manage time. Students must complete
the course with a “C” or better to satisfy requirement; students earning a “D” or
“E” must repeat the course the following semester. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1 hour.
PREP 1403 – Allied Health ENGL & READ Bridge (3)
This accelerated English course is designed for Allied Health students from
upper-level developmental skills to college-level reading, writing and critical
thinking skills. This course will prepare students for the general rigors of most,
if not all, Allied Health majors. This course is designed to enhance existing
reading, writing and comprehension skills by improving vocabulary, critical and
literal reading, writing, and comprehension skills and reading speed. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
PREP 1404 – Integrated Reading and Writing (3)
CAD 1203 – Computer-Aided Drafting Applications ~
Architectural (2)
Prerequisite: CAD 1201 or consent of the Dean
A practical applications course designed to utilize and extend operations
learned in CAD 1201. It requires completion of drawings related to the
architectural field. Lecture 1 hours. Lab 2 hours.
This course involves comprehensive instruction on basic reading, writing,
and study skills needed to be successful in college course work. Using a
combination of lecture and lab sessions, areas, of instruction will cover review
of basic grammar, vocabulary development, comprehension skills, critical and
literal reading skills, study strategies, paragraph and essay development, and
when appropriate the use of technology to compete assignments. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours. NOTE: Students placing into READ 2409 and / or ENGL
1412 may be placed in PREP 1404, Integrated Reading and Writing, instead of
READ 2409 and ENGL 1412. If the student places into PREP 1404 they must
register for, attend, and complete the course with an “A,” “B” or “C” within the
first 12 credit hours attempted. Students completing the course with a “D” or
“E” should repeat the course the semester immediately following.
A student may not withdraw from PREP 1404 unless the student is enrolled in
a certificate program, or unless the student is withdrawing from all credit courses.
CAD 1204 – Computer-Aided Drafting Applications ~
Mechanical (2)
PREP 1801 – The Federal and Illinois Constitution (.5)
CAD 1208 – Computer-Aided Drafting Applications ~ 3D (3)
This course is designed to prepare students for the Federal and Illinois
Constitution Test as required by Illinois state law in order to receive the GED
certificate. Lecture .5 hour.
COMMUNICATIONS
COMM 1101 – Principles of Effective Speaking (3)
Prerequisite: If English review course(s) are required, student must complete
ENGL 1410, ENGL 1412, or PREP 1404. May be taken concurrently with ENGL
1101; however, completion of ENGL 1101 is recommended. If Reading course is
required, student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
Students learn the theory and practice of speech communication in order
to develop proficiency in various interpersonal and public speaking situations.
Performance required. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ C2 900
COMM 1103 – Small Group Communication (3)
Prerequisite: Any English Review course(s), if required, must be completed. If
Reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
This course examines the processes and techniques appropriate for
purposeful communication in small, face-to-face groups. Included are such
topics as problem-solving, interpersonal communications and decision-making.
This course does not fulfill the communication requirement for the Associate
Degree. Lecture 3 hours.
COMM 1104 – Interpersonal Communication (3)
Prerequisite: Any English Review course(s), if required, must be completed. If
Reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
This is an introductory course in the study of interpersonal communication,
including language processes, types of verbal and nonverbal communication,
oral and visual means of transmitting information, history, means of encoding
information and social consequences. It does not fulfill the communication
requirement for the Associate Degree. Lecture 3 hours.
COMM 1106 – Intercultural Communications (3)
Prerequisite: Any English Review course(s), if required, must be completed. If
Reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
Students learn how culture influences communication beyond just the usage
of language. The study of intercultural communication recognizes how culture
pervades what we are, how we act, how we think and how we talk and listen.
Included are such topics as high and low context cultures, nonverbal messages,
adapting to different cultures and developing intercultural competencies and
effectiveness. This course does not fulfill the communication requirement for the
Associate Degree. Lecture 3 hours.
COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING
CAD 1201 – Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting (2)
An elementary course designed to introduce the student to the basic
operations of computer-aided drafting. These operations include, but are not
limited to, shape descriptions, revisions and modifications of descriptions and
the preservation of completed drawings. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: CAD 1201 or consent of the Dean
A practical applications course designed to utilize and extend operations
learned in CAD 1201. The course requires completion of drawings of machine
parts and assemblies by orthographic section and auxiliary view techniques.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
CAD 1205 – Computer-Aided Drafting Applications ~ Civil (2)
Prerequisite: CAD 1201 or consent of the Dean
A practical applications course designed to use and extend operations
learned in CAD 1201. The course requires the completion of drawings related
to the civil engineering field, such as plots, plans, profiles and standards using a
combination Autocad and Microstation software. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: CAD 1201 or equivalent or consent of the Dean
A practical applications course using the operations learned in Introduction
to CAD. The course will cover the important concepts required to draw in 3D
and will apply these concepts with a variety of drawing projects. These projects
will explore lighting, camera, materials and rendering techniques with several
software packages to provide realistic models. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
CAD 1210 – Computer Applications for Work Place (2)
This course serves as an introduction to various electronic media utilized
within the work place environment. To develop creative and effective skills in the
use of computers for employment in areas such as architecture, engineering and
other fields to meet the demands of today’s job market. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
COMPUTER NETWORKING SYSTEMS
See IT Systems Specialist
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSCI 1101 – Introduction to Computers (3)
Prerequisite: Typing skill
This course is an introduction to the concepts and features of computer
systems. Topics covered include computer hardware, application software,
systems software, networks, Internet, computer applications and social issues,
data security and control. The student will learn basic operations of the personal
computer, general application fundamentals and the basic commands and
operations of Windows. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1102 – Introduction to Computers with Business
Applications (3)
Prerequisite: Typing skill
This course is an introduction to the concepts and features of computer
information systems, with an emphasis on business applications. Topics covered
include computer hardware, file organization and data base, operating systems,
programming languages, application software and systems analysis and design.
Students will learn to use a variety of business application software. Enrollment
is recommended for students pursuing a degree in business. Lecture 3 hours.
▶ IAI ~ BUS 902
CSCI 1103 – Introduction to Programming (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or consent of instructor
This course is an introduction to computers and programming. The emphasis
will be given to the design of algorithms to be used in problem-solving and the
programming techniques required to implement algorithms in a particular
programming language. Students will code programs in the “C/C++” language
and be assigned problems in their field of study. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1104 – Introduction to Programming (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1110 or consent of instructor
This course is an introduction to computers and programming. The emphasis
will be given to the design of algorithms to be used in problem-solving and the
programming techniques required to implement algorithms in a particular
programming language. Students will code programs in the JAVA language and be
assigned problems in their field of study. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CS 911
131
CSCI 1243 – Beginning Microsoft Word (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101 or consent of instructor
This is a beginning-level course in designing and creating documents in
a Windows-based environment. Students will learn to create, print, edit and
format documents. In addition, students learn to use spelling and grammar
tools, manipulate tabs, create headers and footers and create footnotes and
endnotes. The textbook is approved by Microsoft as courseware that teaches
the skills necessary to prepare for the Microsoft certification exam. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1255 – Microsoft Access Database (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101 or consent of instructor
This is a course in designing and creating databases in a Windows-based
environment. Students will plan and design databases, create tables, create forms,
produce reports, perform queries and filter records. Students also will create
relationships between database tables, build and modify advanced tables, forms
and reports. The textbook is approved by Microsoft as courseware that teaches
the skills necessary to prepare for the Microsoft certification exam. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1257 – SQL Server Database Design (3)
This is a course designed to teach students how to effectively design and
develop SQL Server databases. Students will learn how to install, configure, and
maintain SQL Server databases and servers. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1260 – Intro to Programming in MS Visual Basic (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 or equivalent college algebra experience
This course provides an introduction to programming for students with little
or no prior programming experience. Students will gain a strong, accessible,
hands-on foundation in the language and database skills needed to develop
business applications. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1261 – Mastering MS Visual Basic Fundamentals (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1260 or consent of instructor
This course teaches programmers skills necessary to create Microsoft Visual
Basic programming system desktop applications. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1267 – Introduction to Game Programming (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1260 or consent of instructor
This course gives an introduction to the graphics and animation aspects
of computer games. Initial focus is on graphics and animation techniques in
standard Windows-based applications. Secondary focus covers the two standards
of the gaming industry, DirectX and OpenGL. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1270 – Computerized Accounting (3)
This course is an introduction to software used for accounting information
systems. Use of general ledger accounting software on the microcomputer,
development of a computerized accounting information system and development
of supporting software applications. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1273 – Visual Presentation Software (2)
This course is designed to teach the student how to create visual presentations
with various techniques. The course will focus on electronic slide presentation
and desktop publishing software. The student will learn the commands necessary
to create attractive and effective visual presentations. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1275 – Microsoft PowerPoint (3)
This is a course in creating and designing presentations in a Windows-based
environment. The course is designed to identify concepts and terminology
used with electronic slide presentation software and to identify tasks that can
be accomplished with this software. The student will be able to use PowerPoint
to create visual aids and speaker notes for presentations, as well as to learn the
techniques for producing audience handouts. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1280 – Advanced Database Systems (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1257 or consent of instructor
This course will prepare students to build and use advanced database
systems. The course will focus on data server technology and relational databases.
Students will learn to model and design tables, build and run queries using SQL
(Structured Query Language), create client server data systems, and understand
database administration procedures. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1290 – Special Programming Project (4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1261 or consent of instructor
This course teaches Microsoft Visual Basic programmers how to create
database applications using components. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: CSCI 1262 or consent of instructor
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to employ all of
the tools used to create a functioning computer program. Students will present
proposed computer programs to class leaders for approval. Proposals will include
outline, structure, function, and goals of the program page. Lab 20 hours.
CSCI 1263 – Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (3)
CSCI 1600 – Selected Computer Topics (.5-3)
CSCI 1262 – Mastering MS Visual Basic Development (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101 or consent of instructor
This is a course in designing and creating spreadsheets in a Windows-based
environment. Students learn to prepare and format Excel worksheets, move data
within and between worksheets, and insert formulas within a worksheet. In
addition, students create charts, insert clip art images, format numbers and text,
create and use templates, utilize Excel functions, audit and automate worksheets
as well as import from and export to other data sources. The textbook is approved
by Microsoft as courseware that teaches the skills necessary to prepare for the
Microsoft certification exam. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 1264 – Mastering Web Application Development
Using MS Visual Basic (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1260
This course teaches site developers who perform architectural planning,
technology selection or Web site programming tasks how to create enterpriselevel Web sites that use component object model (COM) components on both
the client and server. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1265 – Mastering Enterprise Development Using MS
Visual Basic (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1262 or consent of instructor
This course will teach Microsoft Visual Basic programmers, who currently
build desktop applications and access corporate databases, the basics of how to
build three-tier client/server solutions. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 1266 – Distributed Application Design and
Development Using MS Visual Basic (2)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1260
This course introduces developers to the opportunities and challenges
of creating enterprise-level applications. Students will see how creating such
flexible and scalable applications can be challenging, but they will learn how to
address these challenges by employing appropriate design, tools and technology.
Lecture 2 hours.
132
This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the computer field.
The exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject
studied. The course may be repeated 3 times if different topics are considered.
Lecture .5-3 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1608 – Beginning Computers / Windows (.5-4)
Students will learn the basic fundamentals of computer operating systems
using Windows. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1609 – Intermediate Computers / Windows (.5-4)
Prerequisite: Beginning Computers / Windows Introduction or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of computer operating systems using
Windows. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1612 – Beginning Microsoft Word (.5-4)
Students will learn fundamentals of word processing. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1613 – Intermediate Microsoft Word (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1612 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of word processing. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1614 – Advanced Microsoft Word (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1613 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of word processing. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1615 – Microsoft Word Macros (.5)
Prerequisite: Equivalent experience or coursework
Students will broaden their knowledge of word processing macros. Lecture
.5 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1616 – Beginning Microsoft Excel (.5-4)
Students will learn the fundamental operations of spreadsheets. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1617 – Intermediate Microsoft Excel (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1616 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of spreadsheets. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1618 – Advanced Microsoft Excel (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1617 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of spreadsheets. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1619 – Microsoft Excel Macros (.5)
CSCI 1659 – Computer Programming Fundamentals (.5-4)
This course is designed to meet the needs of student groups that have different
backgrounds in programming. The level of detail that is covered in the class will
be adjusted to meet the needs of the student group. Beginning student groups
will cover the basic concepts that are required of a computer programmer. More
advanced student groups will cover a greater amount of material and more
sophisticated programming concepts. The programming language that will be
utilized will be dependent upon the needs of the student group. Students will
be allowed to participate in more advanced sections of the course for a total of
three times. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Prerequisite: Equivalent experience or coursework
Students will broaden their knowledge of spreadsheet macros. Lecture .5
hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1665 – Beginning Microsoft Publisher (.5-4)
CSCI 1620 – Beginning Microsoft PowerPoint (.5-4)
CSCI 1666 – Beginning Web Page Design (.5-4)
Students will learn the fundamentals of presentation graphics software.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1621 – Intermediate Microsoft PowerPoint (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1620 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of presentation graphics software.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1623 – Intro to Computer Keyboarding (1)
This course offers basic instruction on the computer keyboard. Students
needing to operate a computer keyboard achieve basic skills which will allow
them to input information into a computer using the proper keyboarding
techniques. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1624 – Computer Basics: Getting Started (.5-4)
Students will learn the basics of operating a computer using Microsoft
Windows and Microsoft Word. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1625 – Beginning Microsoft Access (.5-4)
Students will learn the basic operations of databases. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1626 – Intermediate Microsoft Access (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1625 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of databases. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
Students will learn the fundamentals of desktop publishing. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Students will learn to create and edit web pages. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1667 – Intermediate Web Page Design (.5-4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1666 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of creating and managing a visually
pleasing and easy-to-navigate Web site. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1668 – Intermediate Microsoft Publisher (.5-4)
Prerequisite: Beginning Microsoft Publisher or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of the fundamentals of desktop
publishing. Lecture .5-4 (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1686 – HTML Introduction (.5)
Prerequisites: Introduction to Windows and Introduction to the Internet.
Students should be able to manage multiple windows, copy and paste material
from one document to another, and be familiar with the Windows interface.
Students will be introduced to the basics of creating web pages using HTML.
Lecture .5 hours.
CSCI 1687 – HTML Intermediate (.5)
Students will be introduced to additional features of the HTML language.
Lecture .5 hours.
CSCI 1688 – Programming Concepts (.5)
CSCI 1627 – Advanced Microsoft Access (.5-4)
Students will learn fundamentals of programming to write simple programs
through study of common programming structures and languages. Lecture .5 hours.
CSCI 1630 – Beginning Microsoft Outlook (.5-4)
Prerequisite: Beginning Computers/Windows or equivalent experience
Students will learn the fundamentals of using the Internet. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1631 – Intermediate Microsoft Outlook (.5-4)
Students will learn the fundamentals of personal and small business
accounting software. Lecture .5-3 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1626 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of databases. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
Students will learn the fundamentals of information and time management
programs. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1630 or equivalent experience
Students will broaden their knowledge of information and time management
programs. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1632 – Teaching Online with Blackboard (.5)
This course is designed to expand the knowledge of instructors with regards
to teaching online, blended, or Blackboard-enhanced courses. Blackboard is a
course management system used by Rend Lake College to offer online courses and
improve face-to-face courses with electronic content. Topics include distribution
of materials via the Web, organizational and layout techniques, receiving and
grading assignments electronically, administering online tests, using the
Blackboard grade book, and how to create a productive online class. Lab 1 hour.
CSCI 1634 – Computer Basics: Internet & Email (.5-4)
Students will learn the basics of utilizing the Internet and email. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 1657 – Visual Basic Introduction (1)
Students will learn fundamentals of programming Windows applications
utilizing Visual Basic. Lecture 1 hour.
CSCI 1658 – Visual Basic Intermediate (1)
Students will learn techniques involved in creating multiple forms, dialog
boxes, coding events, and debugging. Lecture 1 hour.
CSCI 1693 – Beginning Internet (.5-4)
CSCI 1694 – Beginning QuickBooks (.5-3)
CSCI 1695 – Beginning Photoshop (.5-4)
Students will learn the basics of image manipulation and enhancement;
creating/transforming layers; working with colors and color settings; common
tools and shortcuts; and modifying photographs. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable
3 times)
CSCI 1697 – Scanner & Digital Cameras (.5)
Students will be introduced to scanner technology including the basics of
hardware and software functions. Lecture .5 hour.
CSCI 2100 – Discrete Structures (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 or consent of instructor
This course is an introduction to computer science-related mathematics
and structures. Topics include: sets, relations and functions, various numbering
systems, combinations and permutations, boolean algebra and related logic
design, basic matrix operations and elementary graph theory. Lecture 3 hours.
▶ IAI ~ CS 915
CSCI 2102 – Computer Architecture (3)
This is the first course in computer organization and architecture. Topics
include, but are not limited to: numbering systems, arithmetic and logical
operations, coding schemes, input/output, combinational and sequential logic
circuits and design, memory systems, CPU chips and buses, instruction sets,
microprogramming and some machine and assembly language. Lecture 3 hours.
133
CSCI 2103 – COBOL Programming I (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1104 or consent of the instructor
The student will solve business-oriented problems using the COBOL
programming language. Content will include basic input/output procedures,
arithmetic operations, editing output, basic logic operations and control break
processing. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 2104 – Advanced Programming (4)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1104
This course is a continuation of CSCI 1104. Emphasis will be on blockstructured programming style and advanced features of the JAVA/”C++”
language, including, but not limited to: object-oriented programming data
structures, sorting and searching algorithms. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CS 912
CSCI 2105 – COBOL Programming Il (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 2103
In a continuation of CSCI 2103, COBOL will be studied in greater depth and
the use of both sequential and direct magnetic files will be emphasized. Indexed
sequential and direct files will be created and used. Specialized techniques will be
examined through an extensive project simulating actual business applications.
Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 2107 – FORTRAN Programming (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1121
This course in problem-solving with a digital computer will cover problem
analysis, algorithm development and coding in the FORTRAN language. Students
will be assigned problems relating to engineering/scientific fields. Lecture 3 hours.
▶ IAI ~ EGR 921
CSCI 2109 – Assembly Language Programming (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 2104
This course is an introduction to computer organization using assembly
language. Macros, interrupts, various addressing techniques, the assembly process
and machine instructions will be covered. Binary and hexadecimal systems are
studied to gain an understanding of internal data representation. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 2243 – Intermediate Microsoft Word (3)
Prerequisite: CSCI 1243 with “C” or better or consent of the instructor
This is an intermediate-level course in designing and creating documents
in a Windows-based environment. Emphasis is continued on creating and
formatting documents, such as newsletters, letters, and memos. Students will
learn to utilize Word’s Mail Merge and advanced table features as well as import
data, create charts, macros, styles, outlines, master documents and fill-in forms.
Students will also work with shared documents and create a table of contents,
index and table of figures. The textbook is approved by Microsoft as courseware
that teaches the skills necessary to prepare for the Microsoft certification exam.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 2245 – Integrating Microsoft Applications (3)
Prerequisites: CSCI 1255, CSCI 1263 and CSCI 2243 with “C” or better or consent
of instructor
This is an advanced course in which students will be integrating various
Microsoft applications, namely Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint.
In addition, students will learn to create macros, add ActiveX controls and edit
macros using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
CMTE 1205 – Construction Blueprints (3)
This course enables the student to have a working knowledge of blueprints used
on construction sites. Contents include types of prints, interpretation of prints
showing floor plans, footings, foundations, site plans, elevations and framing.
Math review of fractions, decimals and metrics is included. Lecture 3 hours.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
CNTED 1600 – Selected Topics in Education (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of education. The exact content
will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied. The course
may be repeated 3 times if different topics are considered. Lecture .5–4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CSCI 2201 – Intro to Programming with Perl (3)
CNTED 1601 – A to Z Grant Writing (.5-4)
CSCI 2203 – Advanced Programming with Objects (3)
CNTED 1602 – Big Ideas in Little Books (.5-4)
This course teaches fundamental concepts and techniques of programming
using the Perl Language. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: CSCI 1101, CSCI 1102 or consent of Dean
This course is an introduction to computers and programming. Emphasis
is given to design of algorithms used in problem-solving and programming
techniques required to implement algorithms in programming language.
Students will code programs in the “C” language and be assigned problems in
their field. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 2205 – Basic Computer Maintenance & Support (3)
Prerequisites: CSCI 1200 & CSCI 1201
This course will prepare students to serve in the capacity of office support
specialist. Topics include the installation of microcomputers and peripheral
equipment, loading software, testing systems and diagnosing problems, making
minor equipment repairs and assisting users in troubleshooting and reporting
problems. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CSCI 2207 – Networking (3)
Students will learn how to research and develop relationships with potential
funding sources, organize grant writing campaigns, and prepare proposals.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Students will learn how to increase student performance on standards
important to their district by learning how to self-publish and sell work books,
lab manuals, booklets, activity kits, visual aids, and manipulatives targeting
those standards. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1603 – The Classroom Computer (.5-4)
Develop skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to bring basic integration
and subject-specific activities, based on current technology, into teaching plans.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1604 – The Creative Classroom (.5-4)
This course will help teachers enrich their teaching talents and encourage
students’ creative thinking. Learn creative new approaches to learning labs,
activities, exercises, assignments, field trips, and evaluation methods. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Survey course in network management that provides the foundation of
the theory and design of Local Area Networks (LANs), including hands-on
experience using a current network operating system. Topics include network
topologies, standards and protocols and LANs as nodes in larger networks,
directory structures, system security, installing software, creating users and
user groups, working with files, system utilities and services, printing, menus
and login scripts. Students must be knowledgeable of computer systems and
computer terminology. Lecture 3 hours.
CNTED 1605 – Differentiated Instruction in the Classroom (.5-4)
CSCI 2209 – System Analysis and Design (3)
This course will help teachers discover how children learn to process
language and how they become proficient speakers and thinkers. It will teach
the student how to help children by stimulating their continued speech, brain,
and language development in an enjoyable, age-appropriate, and natural way.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
A working introduction to the principles of information system design.
Topics covered will include problem definition techniques, tools for problem
analysis, project management and presentation. This course will prepare students
to effectively participate as part of a system development team. Lecture 3 hours.
CSCI 2211 – Basics of Electronic Commerce (3)
This course is an introduction to the economic foundations of electronic
commerce, an exploration of technologies and infrastructures necessary to
support electronic commerce and business strategies and basic web page design
considerations to effectively implement electronic commerce. Lecture 3 hours.
134
This course will help teachers learn 10 practical Differentiated Instruction
(DI) strategies. DI is becoming a mainstay in classrooms across the country as
educators are starting to see the ways that the traditional classroom setting limits
their ability to reach diverse learners. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1606 – Enhancing Language Development in
Childhood (.5-4)
CNTED 1607 – Get Assertive! (.5-4)
This course will help students learn how to be more confident and powerful
with family members, friends, bosses, co-workers, professionals, service people,
and even total strangers. Learn how you lose power when you talk and what
you can do to get it back. Learn how to deal with anger and criticism effectively.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1608 – Guided Reading: Strategies for the
Differentiated Classroom (.5-4)
This course is designed for today’s teachers grappling with the question of how
to reach struggling readers. Learn how to combine the principles of differentiated
instruction and guided reading. Mixed in the right proportion, these popular
strategies will help build a balanced literary framework that gets results with even
the most challenged learners. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1609 – Guiding Kids on the Internet (.5-4)
This course for teachers, leaders, and parents will give you the confidence
you need for helping children get the best from Internet access. Step-by-step
instruction will lead the student in discovering various kid-friendly Internet
features. These include web page creation with easy-to-use templates and
examples, kid-safe searches, fun resources for kids; and the many communication
possibilities for schools, clubs, teacher networks, and even extended families.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1610 – Integrating Technology in the K-5
Classroom (.5-4)
Educational technology is advancing at an astounding rate, offering today’s
busy teacher quick and easy solutions for more interactive lesson plans, exciting
WebQuests, and challenging assignments. This course will help students discover
the power and creativity that technology can bring to the classroom. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1611 – Leadership (.5-4)
Contrary to popular belief, leadership skills can be learned and developed.
This course will teach students how to use the principles of great leadership to
achieve success in every aspect of daily life. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1612 – Microsoft Word in the Classroom (.5-4)
Students will learn how mastering Microsoft Word can improve productivity
and creativity in the classroom. Students will learn to create, open, edit, and
save documents as well as create tabs and margins, change alignment and line
spacing, add clip art and tables, and complete other exciting tasks. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1613 – PowerPoint in the Classroom (.5-4)
This course is designed to help students discover the exciting possibilities
of using PowerPoint in the classroom. Students will learn to create compelling
lessons and presentations filled with text, graphics, sounds, and videos. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1614 – MS Excel in the Classroom (.5-4)
Learn the basics of MS Excel and explore ways to use the program in the
classroom. Learn Excel terminology; how to use the toolbars, how to sort data;
how to insert formulas for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; and
how to create charts and graphs. Learn standards-based lesson plans and activities
that can be used in the classroom. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1615 – Solving Classroom Discipline Problems I (.5-4)
Some teachers know the secrets to solving discipline problems. This course
reveals those secrets and presents a step-by-step approach to effective, positive
classroom discipline. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1616 – Solving Classroom Discipline Problems II (.5-4)
Get the teacher training needed to deal effectively with serious discipline
problems and help the most challenging students make more responsible choices.
Learn how to use a new research-based six-step approach to solve severe and
chronic discipline problems such as bullying, fighting, using abusive language,
stealing, and refusing to work. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1617 – Understanding Adolescents (.5-4)
This course will help teachers gain a deep understanding and appreciation
of adolescent development and behavior. Uncover secrets of the adolescent
mind and gain valuable information on how they think, how they feel, how their
identities develop, and what steps to take to ensure that you are prepared to meet
the needs of teens. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1618 – Using the Internet in the Classroom (.5-4)
Learn how to harness the power of the Internet to make textbooks and lessons
come alive! Learn how to teach your students how to locate and evaluate Internet
resources. Discover how to safeguard students and personal information while
using the Internet. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1619 – Introduction to Teaching ESL/EFL (.5-4)
This course will show innovative ways of teaching vocabulary and grammar,
listening and speaking, and reading and writing. It will give teachers a deeper
understanding of students and they can be more reflective and effective English
instructors. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1620 – Selected Topics In Nursing (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of nursing. The exact content will
vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied. The course
may be repeated 3 times if different topics are considered. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1621 – Selected Topics In Healthcare (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of healthcare. The exact content
will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied. The course
may be repeated 3 times if different topics are considered. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1622 – Special Topics in Radiology (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of radiology. The exact content
will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied. The
course may be repeated three times if different topics are considered. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1630 – Special Topics in Emergency Services (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of emergency services. The exact
content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied.
The course may be repeated three times if different topics are considered. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1635 – Principles of Taxidermy (1)
This course will explore the field of taxidermy and the requirements for
becoming a certified taxidermist. Topics covered will include regulations,
ethics, materials used, and basic techniques appropriate for preparing natural
specimens. Lecture .5 hours. Lab 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1640 – Firearm Safety & Marksmanship (.5)
Prerequisite: Valid FOID card and 21+ years of age.
This course will provide firearm training to meet Illinois concealed carry
license requirements. Topics include firearm safety, principles of marksmanship,
loading and unloading, safety and cleaning. Lecture .5 hours.
CNTED 1641 – Concealed Carry Law & Qualification (.5)
Prerequisite: CNTED 1640, valid FOID card and 21+ years of age.
This course will provide firearm training to meet Illinois concealed carry
license requirements. Topics include weapon handling, live fire qualification,
and State and Federal laws relating to firearms. Lecture .5 hours.
CNTED 1650 – Sign Language (.5-4)
This course is a study of the basics of sign language. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1651 – Creating the Inclusive Classroom:
Strategies for Success (.5-4)
This course will provide the training needed to reach the diverse mix of
students in the classroom. Learn proven strategies that turn diversity into
opportunity and learn efficient and effective ways to help students with learning
disabilities, neurobiological disorders, and physical challenges. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1652 – Guided Reading and Writing (.5-4)
Get the professional development training needed to improve student literacy
by learning the secrets of turning guided reading strategies into opportunities
for teaching writing. Find out how to harness the power of the total literacy
framework. Learn how to take students from groans to grins with creative lesson
plans that really work! Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1653 – Survival Kit for New Teachers (.5-4)
Whether you’re already teaching, a newly credentialed graduate, or a
substitute looking to transition to full-time, this course will provide you with
all the time-tested tools, tips, and tricks you need to make your early years in
the classroom a breeze. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
135
CNTED 1654 – Ready, Set, Read! (.5-4)
This course will discuss what the newest research says about how children
really learn to read and write. Gain confidence and knowledge in your ability
to guide a child’s literacy development, and take pleasure in seeing how even
the littlest events can be really big steps in reading and writing success. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1655 – Speed Spanish (.5-4)
This course is designed for anyone who wants to learn Spanish pronto. Learn
six easy recipes for gluing Spanish words together to form sentences. Learn how
to be able to go into any Spanish speaking situation and converse in Spanish.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1656 – Singapore Math Strategies: Model Drawing
Grades 1–6 (.5-4)
In this professional development course for teachers, get the training you
need to start teaching model drawing, the powerful Singapore Math strategy
that gives word problems a visual context. Model drawing will help your students
start to enjoy math in a way they may never have before. Lecture .5-4 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1657 – Working Successfully with Learning
Disabled Students (.5-4)
Learn how to successfully meet the diverse needs of the learning disabled
students in the classroom. Empower yourself by discovering easy, practical, and
creative strategies that you can use to help your struggling students find their light
bulb moments. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1658 – Teaching Students with Autism (.5-4)
This course will show you how to teach children with high-functioning autism
and Asperger’s Syndrome right alongside their neurotypical peers. Reaching and
teaching these students requires a delicate balancing act: understanding how
their brains are wired, helping them turn challenges into opportunities, and
learning to enjoy the rich perspective they bring to the classroom. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1659 – Teaching Math Grades 4–6 (.5-4)
Reinvent math instruction for grades 4–6 by bringing hands-on learning,
inexpensive manipulatives, and real-world connections into the classroom. This
course will help get students excited about math, whether you are a new teacher
or a seasoned pro! Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1660 – Teaching Science Grades 4–6 (.5-4)
Learn about foundational content in physical, life, and earth science, and ways
to teach that content to students. Discover specific teaching methods and science
process skills, and learn how to improve the emotional climate in the classroom.
Several examples and worksheets that can be used in the classroom will be included.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1661 – Teaching Writing Grades 4–6 (.5-4)
In this teacher-training course, learn how to motivate and assist developing
writers. Master strategies for teaching the writing process and find out how to
develop engaging lessons for different writing applications. Explore the benefits of
writing across the curriculum, examine ways to organize writing instruction, and
uncover the secrets of effective assessment. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1690 – Selected Topics for Continuing Education
Professionals (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics for continuing education professionals. The
exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject
studied. The course may be repeated three times if different topics are considered.
Lecture .5–4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CNTED 1691 – Special Topics in Environmental
Sustainability (.5-4)
This course is a study of topics in the field of environmental sustainability.
The exact content will vary from semester depending on the subject studied. The
course may be repeated three times if different topics are considered. Lecture
.5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
COOP 1101 – Cooperative Education I (1-4)
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to obtain further
knowledge and skill in his/her field through a planned and supervised paid-work
136
experience. The instructor may assist the student in finding employment. Lab
5-20 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
COOP 2101 – Cooperative Education II (1-4)
Prerequisites: COOP 1101 and consent of the instructor
This course is a continuation of COOP 1101. It is designed to give the student
an opportunity to obtain further knowledge and skill in his/her field through
a planned and supervised paid-work experience. The instructor may assist the
student in finding employment. Lab 5-20 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
COSMETOLOGY
COSM 1201 – Barber / Cosmetology Theory I (5)
Corequisite: COSM 1202
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of barbering/
cosmetology covering such topics as professional ethics, personal and
professional health, physical presentation, personality development, effective
communication skills, bacteriology, decontamination and infection control,
anatomy and physiology, properties of the hair, scalp, nail care, the skin and
its disorders. Also covered will be hair design, shampooing, rinsing and
conditioning, as well as women’s hair styling, women’s hair cutting, hair coloring,
lightening and hair texture. Lecture 5 hours.
COSM 1202 – Barber / Cosmetology Clinic I (16)
Corequisite: COSM 1201
Students will study draping, shampooing, rinsing, conditioning, scalp hair
care, hair styling, thermal hair styling and facials. Instructors will demonstrate
basic hair design techniques, manicuring, women’s hairstyling, hair cutting,
hair coloring, hair lightening and the theory of scalp massage. Students will
exchange barbering/cosmetology services on each other and perfect barbering/
cosmetology skills on a mannequin. Lab 32 hours.
COSM 1203 – Cosmetology Theory II (5)
Prerequisites: COSM 1201 and COSM 1202 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1204
This course will provide the student with a general understanding of the
principles of chemistry and electricity as applied to beauty science and advanced
beauty techniques such as braiding, extensions, wigs, hair enhancement,
chemical texturing, hair coloring, hair removal, facial makeup and advanced nail
techniques. Also included will be the principles of the business of cosmetology.
Lecture 5 hours.
COSM 1204 – Cosmetology Clinic II (16)
Prerequisites: COSM 1201 and COSM 1202 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1203
This course is a continuation of the previous course, with the additional
study of braiding and braid extension, wig and hair enhancements, chemical
texturing, hair coloring techniques, hair removal techniques, facial makeup and
advanced nail techniques. Students will exchange cosmetology services on each
other, mannequins and clients in the clinic. Lab 32 hours.
COSM 1205 – Barber / Cosmetology Clinic III (7)
Prerequisites: COSM 1203 and 1204 or COSM 1207 and 1208
Corequisite: COSM 1206
This course is designed as a review and to practice skill areas taught in
previous courses, demonstrations and lectures taught by instructors. Students
will study state board preparation, licensing law, on the job training, barbershop/
cosmetology business, a final written and practical exam. Students will practice
skills on each other and clients during clinic time. Each student is responsible
for sanitation duties to be practiced in the clinic as required by the Illinois
Department of Professional Regulations. Lab 14 hours.
COSM 1206 – Barber / Cosmetology Internship (1)
Prerequisites: COSM 1203 and 1204 or COSM 1207 and 1208
Corequisite: COSM 1205
This course will provide the student with on-the-job experience through
observations in a professional salon/barbershop. The learning experience will
be supervised by the employer with site visits by college coordinator. Lab 5 hours.
COSM 1207 – Barber Theory II (5)
Prerequisites: COSM 1201 and COSM 1202 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1208
This course will provide the student with a general understanding of the
principles of chemistry and electricity as applied to the science of barbering and
professional barbering such as men’s hair cutting and styling, shaving and facial
design, men’s hair replacement, and men’s facial treatments. Lecture 5 hours.
COSM 1208 – Barber Clinic II
Prerequisites: COSM 1201 and COSM 1202 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1207
This course is a continuation of the previous course with a general
understanding of the principles of chemistry and electricity as applied to the
science of barbering and professional barbering such as men’s hair cutting
and styling, shaving and facial design, men’s hair replacement, men’s facial
treatments. Students will exchange barbering services on each other, mannequins
and clients in the clinic. Lab 32 hours.
COSM 1210 – Cosmetology Post-Graduate Training I (7.5)
This course is intended for those professionals wishing to teach Cosmetology
but have not had two years of practical experience as a licensed Cosmetologist. It
will present material and information acquired during the first half of the basic
education prior to licensure as a cosmetologist. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 14 hours.
COSM 1211 – Cosmetology Post-Graduate Training II (7.5)
This course is a continuation of COSM 1210 for those professionals wishing
to teach Cosmetology but have not had two years of practical experience as a
licensed Cosmetologist. It will present material and information acquired during
the second half of the basic education prior to licensure as a cosmetologist.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 14 hours.
COSM 1212 – Cosmetology Teaching Methods (3)
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of educational
psychology and teaching methods. The student will learn about educational
objectives, student characteristics and development, the learning process and
classroom evaluation methods. In addition, the student will be exposed to
theory relating to learning styles, lesson planning and design, lesson delivery,
learning assessment, classroom management, classroom climate and student
motivation. Lecture 3 hours.
COSM 1213 – Cosmetology Teaching Methods
Application (4)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJS 1201 – Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
This introductory course deals with the processes, institutions and
administration of criminal justice in the United States. Major topics include:
the crime problem; criminal law; law enforcement; criminal prosecution; courts;
juvenile justice, and corrections. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CRJ 901
CRJS 1202 – Criminology (3)
An introduction to the multi-disciplinary study of the nature, cause(s) and
control of criminal behavior. Both the case-study approach and aggregate data
methods to theory validation are utilized to study criminological theory. Lecture
3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CRJ 912
CRJS 1203 – Introduction to Corrections (3)
This course is an overview and critical analysis of contemporary correctional
theory and practice. Comparison of American corrections with historical, crosscultural, philosophical and nontraditional views of corrections. Institutional
corrections, community corrections, the future of corrections and correctional
careers will be reviewed. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CRJ 911
CRJS 1204 – Community Policing (3)
This course emphasizes developing the interpersonal skills needed to build
good relationships with all those the police have sworn “to serve and protect.”
The course looks at individual projects and programs, including those which
involve coordinated efforts of the police and the community. It discusses past
successes and failures and emphasizes using a problem-oriented approach to
fighting crime and delivering services. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 1205 – Cyber Crime and Law (3)
This course will examine the federal and state laws which address cybercrime
and computer intrusion. The focus will be on legal issues raised by cybercrimes
as well as the skills needed to understand the evolving cyber law. Among the
topics to be addressed are protection of computer software, information access
and control, and privacy and security. The course will explore specific problems
in applying the law to cyberspace in a variety of areas, including content control
and the limits of jurisdiction. Lecture 3 hours.
This course is designed to allow students to apply theory learned in the
Teaching Methods class. It is a field experience for prospective Cosmetology
teachers. Students will be required to identify learning objectives, create lesson
plans and deliver, evaluate and assess lessons that address the various learning
styles and the learning process. In addition, students will be required to
demonstrate effective classroom management techniques and how to deal with
the classroom environment. Lab 12 hours.
CRJS 1206 – Community-Based Corrections (3)
COSM 1214 – Cosmetology Student Teaching (6)
CRJS 1207 – Computer Forensics I (3)
This course is designed as a student teaching experience for prospective
Cosmetology teachers. Students will be required to undertake teaching duties
under the supervision of an Illinois licensed Cosmetology teacher. Lab 18 hours.
COSM 1215 – Nail Technology Theory I
Corequisite: COSM 1216
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of nail
technology, covering such topics as history of cosmetology and nail technology,
career path as a nail tech, professional ethics, personal and professional health,
physical presentation, personality development, effective communication skills,
infection control, anatomy and physiology, nail structure and growth, nail
diseases and disorders, manicuring, pedicuring, and the theory of massage.
COSM 1216 – Nail Technology Clinic I
Corequisite: COSM 1215
This course will provide experience with manicuring, pedicuring, and
massage techniques. Students will exchange nail services on each other,
mannequins, and clients in the clinic.
COSM 1217 – Nail Technology Theory II
Prerequisite: COSM 1215 and COSM 1216 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1218
This course will introduce the student to the advanced principles of nail
technology, covering such topics as electric filing, nail tips and wraps, Monomer
liquid and Polymer powder nail enhancements, and UV gel nails. Job search,
work ethic, and the salon business will also be covered.
COSM 1218 – Nail Technology Clinic II
Prerequisite: COSM 1215 and COSM 1216 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: COSM 1217
This course will provide experience with electric filing, nail tips and wraps,
Monomer / Polymer enhancements, UV gel nails and creative touches. Students
will exchange nail services on each other, mannequins, and clients in the clinic.
This course will provide the student with comprehensive, up-to-date,
objective knowledge of the procedures, practices and personnel that constitute
probation, parole and other community-based sanctions. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisites: CSCI 1101 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the Dean
This course will develop basic computer forensics skills necessary to uncover
digital evidence in an organized and reportable manner. The course will provide a
comparative study of information technology, evidence analysis, chain of custody
and data retrieval. Students will have hands-on laboratory experience using
computer forensic tools, evidence preservation techniques and documentation.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CRJS 1208 – Private Investigator (3)
This course is for individuals desiring to work in the field of private
investigation. This course is an investigator training and firearms qualification
course certified by the State of Illinois Department of Professional Regulations.
Participants who successfully complete this training will be issued the necessary
documentation for state certification. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CRJS 1220 – Introduction to Private Security (3)
This course provides basic information to serve as an overview of the
entire field as well as a solid foundation for future courses. A historical and
philosophical perspective of private security will help students better understand
the present state of private security and its principles, legal authority and effect
on society. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 1250 – Special Topics in Criminal Justice (.5-3)
Designed to encourage students to identify and intensely study some critical
issues facing the criminal justice system. Special topics may include one or more
aspects of complex areas: 1) crime and justice in America; 2) victimology; 3)
police; 4) judicial system; 5) juvenile justice, and 6) punishment/corrections.
Lecture .5-3 hours.
CRJS 1601 – Security Officer Training (3)
This course is designed to train security officers for positions in business
and industry. Topics covered include conduct and ethics, crime prevention, law
enforcement, criminal investigation, weapons and defensive tactics, routine
137
services, hazardous duty and emergency services and interpersonal relations.
Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 1602 – Firearms Retraining and Qualification (.5)
Prerequisite: CRJS 1601 or consent of the instructor
Individuals certified by the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation to
work as armed private investigations and security agents are required to be retrained
periodically in the proper and safe use of firearms. This course will satisfy these
requirements. Lab 1 hour.
CRJS 2201 – Police Patrol Tactical Operations (3)
This course emphasizes the role, responsibilities and duties of uniformed
police officers and detectives. It provides an in-depth examination of patrol
strategies and techniques and crime prevention functions of officers assigned
to field operations. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2202 – Juvenile Justice (3)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the origins, philosophy
and objectives of the juvenile justice system. Other topics include: theoretical
perspectives on delinquency; measures of delinquency; legal processes; roles of
the participants, and current trends within the juvenile justice system. Lecture
3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ CRJ 914
CRJS 2203 – Police Traffic Functions (3)
This course examines the law enforcement responsibilities for traffic
management and collision investigation. Special attention will be given to the
problems of apprehending the alcohol-impaired driver. Other topics include:
enforcement of traffic violation laws; collecting and recording collision evidence;
collision reconstruction, and the skills necessary to take a case to a successful
conclusion. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2210 – Criminal Justice Internship (3)
Prerequisite: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course provides an opportunity for students to have a learning experience
(on-the-job training), intended to correlate theory with practice. The experience
should be stimulating to the point of challenging, examining, questioning and
analyzing those areas to which he/she is exposed. The Internship also will provide
students the opportunity to formalize goals and to better prepare themselves
upon graduation to enter their field of choice Lab 15 hours.
CRJS 2212 – Correctional Counseling (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process of
“correcting” the antisocial behavior of criminally convicted offenders. The topics
include: casework; interviewing and interrogating offenders; case assessment and
classifications; nondirective/directive and group counseling; legal and ethical
issues. Also analyzed will be strategies for dealing with specialized offenders,
including juveniles, females, the elderly, drug/alcohol-dependent offenders, the
mentally ill and mentally deficient and sex-crime offenders. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2213 – Current Issues in Corrections (3)
This course offers incisive, expanded discussions on emerging issues and
trends in contemporary American corrections. Problem areas which have attracted
attention include: jail/prison overcrowding; violent prison gangs; correctional
worker/inmate stress; capital punishment; AIDS/infectious diseases; suicide; jail/
prison disorder and riots; recidivism; prisoner rights; privatization; treatment
versus punishment, and the impact of technology. Debate format with scenario
and role-play exercises. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2214 – Probation and Parole (3)
This course examines the organizational structures and administrative
theories of criminal justice agencies. Other topics include: leadership and
supervisory effectiveness; communication processes; organization conflict;
decision-making, and problem-solving. Organizational effectiveness will be
considered. Lecture 3 hours.
A study that traces the historical, philosophical and legal developments
in the fields of probation and parole. This course describes the objectives of
probation and parole and examines whether these objectives are achieved.
Understanding these philosophies is enhanced through an examination of the
history of parole and probation in the United States. Besides describing probation
and parole programs, various classes of offenders are portrayed. In addition,
several problems associated with the selection and training of probation and
parole officers are highlighted, including their relationship with offender-clients.
Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2205 – Police Weapons and Defensive Tactics (3)
CRJS 2215 – Firearms and Tactics for Corrections (2)
CRJS 2204 – Criminal Justice Administration (3)
This course examines the various defensive weapons and tactics available
to police, correctional and private security officers. Basic training skills will be
taught using a variety of firearms, batons, flashlights, handcuffs, chemical agents,
etc. The course will include an in-depth analysis of the current legal guidelines for
the proper use of force when dealing with a dangerous or potentially dangerous
adversary. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CRJS 2206 – Criminal Procedure (3)
This course deals with the legal steps through which a criminal case passes, from
the initial investigation of the crime to the determination of punishment. The rules
of evidence (search and seizure) and the legally prescribed methods for effecting
the arrest of criminal suspects will be subjected to detailed analysis. Constitutional
guidelines will be emphasized. U.S. Supreme Court decisions in these areas will be
reviewed. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2207 – Criminalistics (4)
The increasing application of scientific principles to difficult court cases
has given rise to the general field of forensic science, or science applied to law.
That particular area of forensic science which describes the services normally
provided by crime laboratories is known as criminalistics. This course introduces
the students to the various ways that a crime lab examines evidence in criminal
cases. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CRJS 2208 – Criminal Investigation (3)
This course provides basic information about the criminal act and its
investigation. Topics include: strategies for investigating crimes against person and
property; fact-gathering and the problem of legally admissible proof; recognition,
collection, identification and preservation of evidentiary matter; note-taking and
narrative report writing. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2209 – Criminal Law (3)
This course explores the history and development of the criminal law as a
system of social control. Emphasis is placed on legal principles and substantive
law. Elements of a crime, specific statutes and various affirmative defenses are
analyzed. Lecture 3 hours.
138
A study designed to acquaint students with the various firearms and tactics
available to correctional personnel. Basic training skills will be taught when using
a handgun, shotgun and rifle. The general and specific safety rules for handling
firearms will be emphasized. The course will include in-depth analysis of the
current legal guideline for the proper use of force when dealing with a dangerous
and potentially dangerous adversary. Lecture 2 hours.
CRJS 2216 – Cyber Crime and Investigation (3)
This course is designed to provide students with the basic understanding
of the cybercrime investigative process. The new and emerging investigative
techniques available to investigate these crimes will be examined. Emphasis will
be on the entire investigative process. Topics to be covered include crime scene
processing; identification, preservation and collection of physical evidence; and
the presentation of digital evidence in court. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2217 – Computer Forensics II (3)
Prerequisite: CRJS 1207
This course will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to use tools to
recover forensic information from Internet artifacts and mobile devices. The
course will provide students with scenarios, logical acquisition, and analysis of
forensic data. Students will have hands-on laboratory experience using advanced
computer forensic tools, evidence preservation techniques and documentation.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CRJS 2220 – Loss Control and Crime Prevention (3)
This course emphasizes basic principles and strategies for reducing or
preventing crime. Its will focus on retail business security issues – vulnerabilities,
losses and practical countermeasures to combat such crimes as internal theft
and shoplifting. Additional topics: environmental design, security surveys, fire
and safety protection, emergency planning, locks, lighting and alarms. Lecture
3 hours.
CRJS 2222 – Crisis Management (3)
This course is an introduction to interpersonal skills and methods of
handling a variety of security situations in a correctional facility. Emphasis will be
placed on the analysis of problems, research that suggests probable solutions and
the correct choice among a variety of alternative strategies. Crisis intervention
techniques and stress management techniques also are included. Lecture 3 hours.
CRJS 2225 – Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) (4)
The role of the crime scene investigator will be examined. Topics will include:
(1) the common types of hazards the investigator may be exposed to at the crime
scene; (2) crime scene search methods and strategies; (3) crime scene photography
methods and strategies; (4) crime scene sketching and demonstrative exhibits; (5)
the recognition of objects possessing evidential value; (6) packaging and preserving
evidence for subsequent laboratory examination; (7) crime scene reconstruction; and
(8) the crime laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CULINARY ARTS
CULA 1201 – Professional Cooking I (6)
This course is an introduction and application of basic fundamental cooking
theories and techniques. Topics of study include matching appropriate methods
in the cooking of vegetables, starches, potatoes and legumes; the preparation of
fruits, salads, salad dressings; and sandwich ala carte production. Additionally,
this course sets a professional foundation by defining culinary professionalism,
basic sanitation practices, kitchen safety, knife skills, palate development and
flavor profiling, identification and use of equipment, product identification,
professional terminology, weights and measures, production timing, station
organization, and outlining the history of the hospitality industry. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 8 hours.
CULA 1202 – Nutrition and Menu Planning (3)
This course is designed to provide the most accurate and current nutritional
information for culinary professionals to use in analyzing recipes, evaluating
and modifying menus, and responding to customer needs. Topics include
characteristics of the major nutrients, how to maximize nutrient retention in
food preparation, applying the principles of nutrition throughout the life cycle,
recipe development and menu design. Lecture 3 hours.
CULA 1203 – Professional Cooking II (6)
Prerequisite: CULA 1201 or consent of the Dean
This course focuses on matching appropriate techniques and applications
to food product categories. Topics of study include the theory and fundamental
cooking methods used in the preparation of stocks, soups, basic sauces, meats,
poultry and seafood; ala carte breakfast production; and skills development in
the fabrication of meats, poultry and seafood. Emphasis is placed on sanitation
practices, kitchen safety, knife skills, palate development and flavor profiling,
identification and use of equipment, product identification, professional
terminology, weights and measures, production timing, and station organization.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 8 hours.
CULA 1205 – Food Sanitation (.5-2)
The course will cover food temperatures, cross-contamination, cleaning,
sanitizing and many other important components of food safety. Students will
gain knowledge in current rules and regulations to assist in passing the required
certification exam for the state (State of Illinois Food Service Sanitation Manager
Certification) and national (ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification)
levels. Lecture .5-2 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CULA 1206 – Selected Topics in Culinary Arts (.5-4)
This course will include an in-depth study of topics in the culinary arts field.
The exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject
studied. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
CULA 1207 – Culinary Math (3)
This course addresses the mathematical formulas and their applications
typically used within the food service industry. Topics of study include
identification and use of accurate measurement, measurement equivalents,
portion controls, yield tests, recipe conversions, calculation of recipe costs, and
food cost percentages. Lecture 3 hours.
CULA 1208 – Professional Artisan Bread (3)
Prerequisite: CULA 2201 or consent of Dean
Professional Artisan Bread introduces the art and sciences of traditional
methods of bread production in the artisanal style. Topics of study include
theory and scientific understanding of the baking process, preparation of yeastraised products consisting of the straight dough, preferment dough, sourdough,
enriched dough and specialty breads. Formula analysis will be emphasized,
as will the alteration of existing formulae and the creation of new formulae.
Additional emphasis is placed on sanitation practices, kitchen safety, bench
skills, identification and use of equipment, product identification, professional
terminology, weights and measures, production timing, and station organization.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
CULA 1605 – Food Sanitation Refresher (.5)
This course is intended to prepare and meet the needs for recertification of
the Food Service Managers Sanitation Managers Certification. This course will
address all the requirements set by the Illinois Department of Health. Students
will gain knowledge in current rules and regulations. The course will cover food
temperatures, cross-contamination, cleaning and sanitizing and many other
important components of food safety. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
CULA 2201 – Professional Baking Techniques (6)
Prerequisite: CULA 1207 or currently enrolled or consent of Dean
This course addresses the fundamental baking skills required in kitchens and
bakeries. Topics of study include identification of ingredients and equipment,
Bakers Math, weight and volume measurement, and professional terminology.
Essential baking techniques include mixing methods and procedures for cookies,
quick breads, pies and tarts, creams and custard-related sauces, meringues, pate
choux, yeast leavened breads, and the basic preparation and decoration of cakes.
Emphasis is placed on sanitation practices, kitchen safety, palate development
and flavor profiling. Bakeshop management, cost control, and workflow will be
included throughout this course. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 8 hours.
CULA 2202 – Restaurant Management (3)
This course focuses on human relations, personnel management, and
leadership styles in the context of hospitality management. Developing schedules
and labor cost, the interview process, effective communication, job descriptions,
training methods, employee evaluations, conflict resolution, time management
and organizational techniques will be addressed. Lecture 3 hours.
CULA 2203 – Dining Room / Banquet Management (4)
This course is an introduction into Dining Room and Bar Management
applied to ala carte and banquet service. Topics of study include the styles of table
service and the skills necessary to achieve quality service goals; the qualities of
a professional server and how to exceed customer needs; communication with
the kitchen; dining room setup and tableside preparation; presentations of food
and beverage; and dining room and beverage management. The study includes
a survey of wine, beer, distilled spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages including
coffee and tea. This is a very practical course in which the student participates
in a full-service restaurant and banquet service Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CULA 2204 – Garde Manger (4)
Prerequisites: CULA 1203 or consent of Dean
This course focuses on developing the skills used in the garde manger kitchen
during the production and presentation of buffets and catered events. Topics of
study include the use of appropriate garnishing and presentation techniques, the
fundamentals of charcuterie, preservation and curing methods, the preparation
of cold soups, condiments and cold sauces, as well as the preparation and study of
cheeses. This course is designed to provide practical knowledge and training in
organization, designing, and presentation of buffets, platters, and centerpieces.
Emphasis is placed on individual as well as team production, sanitation, safety,
knife skills, use of equipment, product identification, professional terminology,
weights and measures, production timing, and station organization. Lecture 1
hour. Lab 6 hours.
CULA 2205 – Restaurant Cost Control (3)
Prerequisites: CULA 1207 or consent of Dean
This course is designed to provide the student with critical knowledge of
food, beverage, and labor cost control procedures and methods. Implementing
control measures, calculating costs, taking corrective action, and evaluation of
the control process will be covered. The course will also stress control tools,
budgets, purchasing and receiving controls, production control, labor and sales
controls. Lecture 3 hours.
CULA 2206 – Restaurant Operations (5)
Prerequisites: CULA 2202, CULA 2205, or consent of Dean
This is a capstone class designed to utilize and strengthen learned skills
needed in the creation, operation, and staffing of a restaurant. Topics of study
include operational concept and design, marketing, financing, the creation of
menus, recipe development, calculation of food and labor costs, workforce and
production schedules, the organization and execution of a multi-course banquet
and ala carte menus. A primary focus will be on training as a line cook preparing
menu items to order. Students rotate through various cooking stations depending
on the methods utilized for a la carte. Along with proper cooking methods,
instruction will focus upon mise en place, organization, timing, sanitation,
safety, and plate presentation. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 8 hours.
139
CULA 2207 – Professional Pastry Principles (6)
Prerequisite: CULA 2201 or consent of Dean
This course provides advanced instruction in the art of professional pastry
techniques. Advanced baking skills used in restaurants, hotels, resorts and
specialty bakeries which feature signature desserts will be studied. Students
will develop skills in the production and use of laminated dough, chocolate
artistry, basic sugar work, pastillage, candies, frozen confections, dessert sauces
and presentation, cold soufflés, advanced cake decorating and wedding cakes,
marzipan and edible confection centerpieces. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 8 hours.
CULA 2208 – Exploring Wines (4)
Prerequisite: 21 years of age or older
An examination in the roles that wines and spirits play as quality beverages
in professional food service operations. The course will emphasize styles of
wine from around the world; theory of matching wine with food, tasting wines,
beers and other beverages and organizing wine service. Subjects to be explored
include purchasing, storing, issuing, pricing, merchandising and serving wines
and spirits in a restaurant setting. Students may also participate in a field trip to
a local winery. Lecture 4 hours.
CULA 2209 – Professional Cooking III (6)
Prerequisite: CULA 1203
The focus of this course is to expose students to a series of international
cuisines through production techniques, preparations and presentations.
Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, f lavor profiles, and techniques
representative of the cuisines studied. The class will also explore culinary history,
how cultural beliefs influence cuisines and their effect on current culinary trends
and menu development. Vegetarian and vegan menus will be introduced as well.
Emphasis is placed on individual as well as team production, sanitation, safety,
knife skills, use of equipment, product identification, professional terminology,
weights and measures, production timing, and station organization. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 8 hours.
CULA 2210 – Restaurant Production Desserts (2)
DIEL 1208 – Diesel Accessories (2)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various accessories and
auxiliary systems unique to diesel engine operations. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
DIEL 1210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (4)
Prerequisites: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course provides eight weeks of diesel experience at a job during the
first year of the program. The student will be placed in the position with an
area business. Both the college coordinator and the employer will supervise the
learning experience. The student trainee will receive technical counseling and
individual assistance. Special attention will be given to career planning, on-thejob problems and current business practices. Lab 20 hours.
DIEL 2210 – Supervised Occupational Experience II (4)
Prerequisites: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course provides eight weeks of employment experience working on
diesel equipment. The student will be employed in the position with an area
business. Both the college coordinator and the employer will supervise the
learning experience. The student will use his/her education to demonstrate
knowledge in the subject area. The student also will receive technical counseling
and individual assistance through this transition. Lab 20 hours.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECE 1201 – Child Development (3)
This course is an introduction to the growth and development of children from
conception through middle childhood. History and trends of human development
will be explored along with the theory of “whole child” development. Physical,
cognitive and psychosocial domains will be emphasized. Norms and deviations of
child development will be addressed. The student will study children in each age/
domain through observation and documentation drills. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 1202 – Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)
This course is an introduction to early childhood education, including the
basic values, structure, organization and programming. Examination of the
student’s personal qualities in relationship to expectations of the field is addressed
throughout the course. This course acquaints students with various career
options, program models, and professional personnel working with children
from birth to age eight. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: CULA 2201, CULA 2207 or currently enrolled
This is a capstone class designed to utilize and strengthen learned skills
needed in the preparation of signature deserts in ala carte and volume
production. Students will focus on complex classical and modern plated desserts,
their creation and concepts. Both hot and cold desserts and novel decorating
techniques will be covered, as well as how to mise en place a pastry station in
a kitchen to prepare desserts to order. Additional topics include identifying
and pairing contemporary flavors and textures, garnishing and presentation
principles, dessert sauce preparation and painting, use of equipment, and
production procedures. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 3 hours.
This course examines art as a creative expression of young children. The focus
is on practical ways in which adults can encourage and foster creative expressions.
The course is also designed to equip students with some introductory competencies
in this area. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CULA 2211 – American Regional Cuisines (5)
ECE 1205 – Health, Safety and Nutrition for Young Children (3)
Prerequisite: CULA 2209
The focus of this course is to expose students to the food culture and cooking
of American regional dishes through production techniques, preparations and
presentations. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, and techniques
representative of the regional cuisines studied. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 8 hours.
DIESELS
DIEL 1202 – Basic Diesel Fuel Systems (2)
This course provides a background on the development and operation of the
diesel engine, Roosamaster fuel injection systems and diagnosis and service of
injection nozzle problems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
DIEL 1203 – Heavy Equipment Alignment (4)
A study of component system operations of steering and suspensions related
to vehicles in the transportation and construction industry. Emphasis will be
placed on diagnostics and alignment of these systems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
DIEL 1204 – Intermediate Diesels (4)
This course provides an in-depth study of the functioning diesel fuel system
and its component parts. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
DIEL 1205 – Heavy Equipment Brakes (3)
A course in hydraulics and air braking systems used in heavy duty vehicles in
the transportation and construction industries. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 3 hours.
DIEL 1206 – Advanced Diesels (4)
This course is an in-depth study of the systems used by diesel engine
manufacturers. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
140
ECE 1204 – Creative Arts for Young Children (3)
This course explores the principles of a healthy lifestyle including nutrition,
health and safety issues. Additionally, health, safety, and nutrition for children
in group care is explored. Preventative health and community health are also
examined. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 1206 – Curriculum for Young Children (3)
Prerequisite: ECE 1201 and ECE 1202
The emphasis in this course is on planning and organizing the curriculum
in early childhood programs. It includes strategies for organizing instruction
and creating integrated curriculum. This course explores children’s interest at
a catalyst for curriculum development. The project approach where children
investigate topic of interest over a period of time is also explored. Documenting
children’s learning as a means for sharing with parents is integrated into the
course. Students will observe and interact with children in a laboratory setting.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ECE 1207 – Language Arts for Young Children (3)
Provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of language development,
the stages involved, the role adults play and the relationship of language to other
aspects of development. Introduces the student to a wide variety of language
activities appropriate for young children and to assist students in developing skills
in preparing, presenting and evaluating each of the language activities included
in the course. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 1208 – Family / Community / Staff Relations (3)
This course concentrates on the teacher’s role in working with the child’s family
and community. Parent education, changing families, and legal responsibilities
are stressed. This course specifies criteria and methods for effective parent-teacher
communications. It will also include an in-depth study of community resources.
Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 1209 – Curriculum Lab (3)
Prerequisites: ECE 1206 and ECE 1210 (may be concurrent with consent of
instructor) and 2.5 GPA
This course provides an opportunity for the student to engage in practical
experiences working with children. Students work in a laboratory setting where
they plan and implement learning experiences with young children and provide
care for the children. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
ECE 1210 – Child Study and Observation (3)
Prerequisite: ECE 1201 and ECE 1202
This course studies observational techniques and behavioral documentation
which facilitate the physical, emotional, social, and mental development of
the young child. Students will use case studies, anecdotal records, diagnostic
tools, supervised observation, and written reports to develop and understand
the relationship between careful observation, assessing young children’s
development, curriculum development, communication, and effective
interaction with children. Thirty-two hours of observation and interaction with
children is required for this course. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ECE 2202 – Center-Based Child Care Management (3)
This course provides an overview of the director’s responsibilities for
starting a new center and maintaining an ongoing program. Students develop
budgets, staffing plans, policies and profit-margin for a center plan. The total
range of administrative demands in different types of early education centers
is included. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2203 – Science and Math for Young Children (3)
Introduces the theory and practice related to the curricular areas of math
and science for young children. Emphasis will be placed on the development and
evaluation of developmentally appropriate activities and instructional materials
that encourage exploration, curiosity and interest. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2205 – Programming and Teaching School-Age (3)
Focuses on planning and organizing programs and activities appropriate for
the school-age child. Emphasis will be placed on implementing developmentally
appropriate activities and setting up a school-age program in a variety of
settings. This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills
necessary to work effectively with this age group. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2206 – Programming and Teaching Infants / Toddlers (3)
INFANT / TODDLER CERTIFICATE
Studies patterns of growth and development in the child from birth to 3
years. The specific needs of infants and toddlers in various child care settings
will be examined, with current research being considered. Students will have the
opportunity to develop skills in managing a safe environment while providing
stimulating activities at appropriate levels. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2207 – Child Guidance (3)
This course provides a comprehensive, caring, developmentally appropriate
approach to guiding children’s personal and social development. Techniques
introduced include conflict management, encouragement, contact talks and
class meetings. It is relevant to preschool and grade school levels. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
ECE 2208 – Teaching the Child with Disabilities (3)
Identifies process and programming considerations for children who are
exceptional in one or more aspects of development. Current issues, including
educational implications related to children with special needs, their families
and the community will be explored. Includes assessment, screening, education,
environments/activities, family-teacher communications, community resources
and relevant legal aspects. Service learning is required. Students participate in a
volunteer experience with an exceptional child. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2209 – Practicum (4)
Prerequisites: Completion of 21 hours in Early Childhood Education,
completion of ECE 1209 and 2.5 GPA
This course provides an opportunity for the student to engage in practical
experiences working with children. Students work in a supervised laboratory
setting where they plan and implement activities with children and provide
quality care for the children. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
ECE 2210 – Leadership in Early Childhood (3)
ILLINOIS DIRECTOR CREDENTIAL LEVEL I
Prerequisites: Completion of 21 hours and current enrollment in AAS Early
Childhood Education and completion of ECE 2202
The emphasis of this course is on directing and leading early childhood
programs. It includes strategies for organizational and financial management.
An overview of effective leadership, professionalism and advocacy are outlined
in the course. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2211 – Management in Early Childhood (3)
ILLINOIS DIRECTOR CREDENTIAL LEVEL I
Prerequisites: Completion of 21 hours and current enrollment in AAS Early
Childhood Education and completion of ECE 2202
The emphasis in this course is on directing and leading early childhood
programs. It includes strategies for personnel management and program
development. An overview of community outreach and marketing principles
is included. Lecture 3 hours.
ECE 2212 – Director Practicum (4)
ILLINOIS DIRECTOR CREDENTIAL LEVEL I
Prerequisites: Completion of 21 hours and current enrollment in AAS Early
Childhood Education and completion of ECE 2202 and ECE 2211 or consent of
instructor
This course provides an opportunity for the student to engage in practical
experiences as a director of a center. Students work in a supervised child care
setting where they assist the center director and perform the daily duties of the
director. This is a practicum of 320 hours. Lab 10 hours.
ECE 2213 – Infant / Toddler Programs II (3)
INFANT / TODDLER CREDENTIAL
Prerequisites: Completion of 21 hours and current enrollment in AAS Early
Childhood Education and completion of ECE 2206
This course outlines how to organize a program of excellent care and
education for infants and toddlers. Included are routines, activities, the learning
environment, health and safety issues, guidance issues, assessing development,
activities, working with families, and independence as they are specifically
related to the very young child. Lecture 3 hours.
ECONOMICS
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 and MATH 1407 with a “C” or better, or equivalent
placement
ECON 2101 – Principles of Economics I (3)
A course designed to introduce the student to economics and the analytical
concepts employed in this discipline. Topics covered include the various sectors
of the economy and their contributions, national income accounting, causes of
cyclical fluctuations in the American economy, government fiscal policy, money
and banking, monetary policy and basic demand-supply analysis. The emphasis
is on macroeconomics. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S3 901
ECON 2102 – Principles of Economics II (3)
A survey of developmental economic activity is conducted. The emphasis is
upon the market structure faced and/or created by the firms within the business
sector of an advanced society. The emphasis is upon microeconomics. Lecture
3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S3 902
EDUCATION
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
EDUC 1101 – Introduction to Education and Observation (3)
Prerequisite: Illinois State Police background check required
This course provides an orientation to the profession of teaching, including
an overview of American public education and responsibilities of a teacher.
Includes historical, philosophical and sociological overview of education, its
organization and structure; finances; curriculum; teaching/learning process;
federal/state/local govern-mental responsibilities, current issues and trends,
and awareness of multicultural issues. Students will be placed in schools in the
district for 32 hours of clinical observation to help confirm a desire to pursue a
teaching career. Lecture 2 hours. Classroom observation 2 hours.
EDUC 1104 – Educational Technology (3)
Prerequisite: Basic skills in word processing, spreadsheet, and database programs,
CSCI 1101, or the consent of the instructor.
This course is an introduction in the use and implementation of technology
in education. An emphasis is placed on demonstrating proficiency in knowledge
and skills related to the current technology standards. The course focuses on
both knowledge and performance skills, and includes hands-on technology
activities. Lecture 3 hours.
EDUC 1601 – Instructor Training (1-9)
This course trains volunteers to work with students in adult education
classrooms or one-on-one settings. Lecture 1-9 hours.
141
EDUC 1603 – Instructional Methods & Strategies (3)
PENDING ICCB APPROVAL – This course, specifically designed for Rend
Lake College faculty and Staff, will examine the pedagogy of the online learning
environment and the technologies involved. Lecture 3 hours.
ELECTRICITY
ELEC 1210 – National Electrical Code (3)
This course introduces the National Electric Code to those practitioners
who desire to expand their knowledge base. Lessons, homework and quizzes
are posted on the Internet.  Subjects include wiring methods and materials,
overcurrent protection, grounding, services, motors and controls and a broad
view of many National Electrical Code topics.  Participants are required to visit
campus for testing purposes unless special arrangements are made. Most current
Code book provides the basis for the course. Lecture 3 hours.
ELEC 1230 – Fundamentals of Direct Current Electricity (3)
This course acquaints the student with direct current electrical theory. It
covers symbols and has students hook up circuits from schematic diagrams.
Students learn to use various electrical testing instruments while testing circuits.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ELEC 1231 – Electrical Blueprint Reading (2)
Prerequisite: ELEC 1230
This course includes a study of conventional and solid-state components and
symbols. Emphasis is on analysis of fundamental industrial wiring diagrams
and schematics. Lecture 2 hours.
ELEC 1236 – Electrical Law for Surface and Underground
Coal Mining (2.5)
This course provides approved instruction that will allow the student to attain
a satisfactory grade on each of the four written MSHA examinations on Federal
Laws for underground and/or surface coal mine electricians. Lecture 2.5 hours.
ELEC 1240 – Basic Electricity for Manufacturing (3)
This course prepares individuals to apply electrical principles and technical
skills in support of manufacturing using automated systems. Includes system safety,
transducers, input elements, output devices, AC / DC motors, solenoids, actuators,
control theory, measurements and controllers. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ELEC 1260 – Electrical Qualification Course (Surface and
Underground) (6)
Course provides electrical instruction approved by the Mine Safety and
Health Administration leading to qualification as an underground or surface
coal mine electrician. Lecture 5 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ELEC 1601 – Basic Electricity (1)
This course is for the student desiring an introduction to the basics of
electrical current transmission, electrical branch circuit wiring methods and
grounding. It emphasizes application of basic electrical principles to residential
installations. It is not intended to train installers or electricians. Lecture 1 hour.
ELEC 1602 – Intermediate Electricity (1)
This course will be a review and continuation of ELEC 1601. It will review Ohm’s
Law, electrical terms and the electrical code. This course will emphasize service
entrance installation, load requirements of different buildings, electric motors and
controls for the motors. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour.
ELEC 1611 – Electrical Qualification Retraining ~
Underground (.5)
Prerequisite: Student must hold current MSHA electrical card (underground)
This course is approved and required by the Mine Safety and Health
Administration (MSHA) for annual electrical qualification retraining
(underground). Lecture .5 hour.
ELEC 1621 – Electrical Qualification Retraining ~ Surface (.5)
Prerequisite: Student must hold current MSHA electrical card (surface)
This course is approved and required by the Mine Safety and Health
Administration (MSHA) for annual electrical qualification retraining (surface).
Lecture .5 hour.
ELEC 1630 – Surface Electrical Qualification (1)
Prerequisite: Qualification for underground electrician
This course is a training plan for qualified underground electricians, enabling
them to receive their surface electrical qualification. Lecture 1 hour.
142
ELEC 1650 – Introduction to the National Electric Code (.5)
This course gives students a basic idea of NEC construction and content.
The course will cover the more common sections of the Code dealing with
general requirements, wiring and protection, wiring methods and materials
and equipment for general use. Lecture .5 hour.
ELEC 2203 – Industrial Electrical Wiring (6)
This course builds upon basic skills developed through previous applications
and directed industrial situations. Emphasis is on installation of electrical service
power, lighting and special systems in new construction; changeovers from old
systems to new; provision of additional electrical capacity, periodic maintenance
and repair. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.
ELEC 2230 – Electronics for Electricians (6)
This course is designed to give a basic knowledge of electronics and provide
a comprehensive overview of solid state devices and systems, including fiber
optics, integrated circuits and light-activated components from an electrical
perspective. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.
ELEC 2236 – Fundamentals of A.C. Electricity (3)
Prerequisite: ELEC 1230
This course is the study of alternating current theory, components and
circuits. Alternating current and direct current motors and electrical wiring
will be covered in a general way. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ELEC 2690 – Conventional and Solid State Equipment (.5)
This course provides information on the identification and solving of special
problems in electrical systems of the coal mining industry. Special emphasis will
be placed on conventional and solid state equipment. Lecture .5 hour.
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SERVICES
EMS 1240 – HAZ/MAT Awareness: EMS (.5-4)
This course is designed to orientate the student to hazardous materials. It
teaches the student to identify if a hazardous material is present in emergency
situations and how to promote the safety of themselves and others. The student
will use the incident command system to navigate a hazardous material situation
by notification of an incident and implementation of hazardous material
response. Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
EMS 1255 – Incident Command for First Responder (.5-4)
This course is designed for students of criminal justice, emergency medical
services and healthcare, coal mining technology and other disciplines where
response to emergencies is part of the job. Topics covered include Incident
Command System organization and functions for personnel who may be
expected to perform as part of an Incident Management Team. Lecture .5-4
hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
EMS 1256 – Incident Command for Managers (.5-4)
Prerequisite: EMS 1255 or consent of instructor
This course is designed for students of criminal justice, emergency medical
services and healthcare, coal mining technology and other disciplines where
response to emergencies is part of the job. Topics covered include Emergency
Operations Center organization and functions for personnel who may be
expected to perform as managers as part of an Incident Management Team.
Lecture .5-4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
EMS 1601 – AHA Core Instructor (.5)
Instructors play a critical role in training people to save lives. For students
to save lives, they must thoroughly learn the skills that instructors teach. This
course provides the opportunity for instructors to improve their instructional
skills. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1602 – CPR for Non-Healthcare Providers (.5)
This course is designed to teach the student skills and provide the knowledge
necessary to become certified in American Heart Association (AHA) Heartsaver
CPR. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1603 – CPR for Healthcare Providers (.5)
Prerequisites: Must be a healthcare professional or in the healthcare field.
This course is designed to teach the student skills and provide the knowledge
necessary to become certified in American Heart Association (AHA) Healthcare
Provider CPR. This course includes advanced basics of cardiopulmonary
resuscitation and use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) in the
healthcare environment. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1604 – AHA Basic Life Support Instructor (1)
Prerequisites: Must be a current BLS Provider having reached Instructor
potential on written exam and at least one practical station. Must have
completed EMS 1601.
This course is designed to train the BLS provider to be a BLS Instructor
according to the American Heart Association Guidelines. Upon successful
completion of this course, a BLS Instructor card from the American Heart
Association will be presented. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1610 – AHA First Aid (.5)
This course is designed to teach the student skills and provide the knowledge
necessary to become certified in American Heart Association (AHA) First Aid.
Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1611 – AHA Pediatric First Aid (.5)
This course is designed to teach the student skills and provide the knowledge
necessary to become certified in American Heart Association (AHA) Pediatric
First Aid. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1612 – AHA First Aid Instructor (1)
Prerequisites: Must be a current First Aid provider having reached Instructor
potential on written exam and at least one practical station. Must have
completed EMS 1601.
This course is designed to train the First Aid provider to be a First Aid
Instructor according to the American Heart Association Guidelines. Upon
successful completion of this course, a First Aid Instructor card from the
American Heart Association will be presented. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1613 – Basic First Aid for Educators (.5)
This course is designed to assist teachers and non-nursing school
personnel to meet state guidelines in assisting with medical needs in the school
setting. Training will include management of diabetes and insulin, seizures,
anaphylaxis and epinephrine, asthma and nebulizers, and MRSA. Lecture .5
hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1614 – CPR and First Aid for Corrections (.5)
This course is designed to instruct correctional center employees with
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid in correctional center settings.
Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1620 – ACLS Preparatory (1)
Prerequisites: Certification in American Heart Association Basic Life Support
Healthcare Provider.
The ACLS Preparatory course is designed to prepare participants for the
ACLS course. This course is designed to assist participants in dysrhythmia
recognition, pharmacology therapy, and algorhythm recognition related to
Adult Basic Life Support (BLS), rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, triage to
definitive care, provision of family support, pharmacological interactions and
precautions, basic arrhythmia, and treatment of cardiac dysrhythmias for the
immediate and emergency situation. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1621 – Advanced Cardiac Life Support (1)
This course is designed to teach the student skills and provide the knowledge
necessary to become certified in American Heart Association Advanced Life
Support. It is open to individuals who come from professional settings where
cardiac arrests occur. This course provides an in-depth review of the core learning
objectives, including review of all 10 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) core
cases, plus increased emphasis on the psychomotor domain of skills training
and practice. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1622 – ACLS Instructor (1)
Prerequisites: Must be a current ACLS Provider having reached Instructor
potential on written exam and at least one practical station. Must have
completed EMS 1601.
This course is designed to train the ACLS provider to be an ACLS Instructor
according to the American Heart Association Guidelines. Upon successful
completion of this course, an ACLS Instructor card from the American Heart
Association will be presented. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1625 – PALS Preparatory (1)
Prerequisites: Certification in American Heart Association Basic Life Support
Healthcare Provider.
The PALS preparatory course is designed to prepare participants for the PALS
course. This course is designed to assist participants in dysrhythmia recognition,
pharmacology therapy, and algorhythm recognition related to pediatric cardiac arrest.
Participants should be able to demonstrate psychomotor skills related to pediatric
basic life support (BLS), rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, triage to definitive
care, provision of family support, pharmacological interactions with indications
and precautions, basic arrhythmia, and treatment of cardiac dysrhythmias for the
immediate and emergency situation. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1626 – Pediatric Advanced Life Support (1)
The Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) provider course is designed
to identify and treat cardiopulmonary arrest in infants and children. Upon
successful completion, the participant will become certified in American
Heart Association Pediatric Advanced Life Support. The course is open to
individuals who come from professional settings where pediatric emergencies
occur. Participants should be able to demonstrate psychomotor skills related to
pediatric basic life support, rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, evaluation and
stabilization of the pediatric trauma victim, triage to definitive care and provision
of family support. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1627 – PALS Instructor (1)
Prerequisites: Must be a current PALS Provider having reached Instructor
potential on written exam and at least one practical station. Must have
completed EMS 1601.
This course is designed to train the PALS provider to be a PALS Instructor
according to the American Heart Association Guidelines. Upon successful
completion of the course, a PALS Instructor card from the American Heart
Association will be presented. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1640 – Child Care Safety and First Aid (.5)
This course is designed to review playgrounds for daycares and schools as
a preparation for state certification. Included is a playground first aid course in
which the educator will be trained as to injuries and basic treatment of injuries on
the playground. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable)
EMS 1641 – Basic Arrhythmias (1)
This course is designed to provide knowledge for health care professionals
regarding basic arrhythmia recognition and 12-lead EKG interpretation. Lecture
1 hour.
EMS 1642– International Trauma Life Support (1)
Prerequisites: Must have a current CPR card and valid EMT, PHRN or
physician’s license.
The primary purpose of the International Trauma Life Support course is to
provide students with the fundamental knowledge and experience necessary
to get the trauma patient to the emergency department in the best possible
condition. Lecture 1 hour.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
EMT 1201 – First Aid / CPR for Correctional Officers (.5)
The material in this course is designed to comply with the American Heart
Association (AHA) basic life support standards. The first aid component is
in accordance with the Illinois Department of Corrections First Aid course.
Lecture .5 hour.
EMT 1202 – First Aid / CPR with AED Training (.5)
The material in this course is designed to comply with the American Heart
Association (AHA) basic life support standards, including instruction in the
operation of automatic external defibrillators (AED). The first aid component
is in accordance with the Illinois Department of Corrections First Aid course.
Lecture .5 hour.
EMT 1204 – Emergency Medical Responder (3)
This course is designed to provide training in aspects of emergency medical
care for first responders to accident scenes. Training time is devoted to practical
aspects of emergency care, initial assessment of the scene and victims and skills
to assist EMS providers. The student will develop skills in assessment and in
initial emergency treatment. Lecture 3 hours.
EMT 1250 – Emergency Medical Technician (9)
This course is designed to present skills required for the position of
Emergency Medical Technician. It emphasizes recognition of signs and
symptoms of injury and illness. Upon completion with a grade of “C” or better,
the student is qualified to apply for the Illinois Department of Public Health
Emergency Medical Technician licensure exam. Lecture 8 hours. Lab 2 hours.
EMT 1601 – EMT Refresher (1.5)
Prerequisite: EMT licensure
This course is a review of principles and procedures in preparation for career
re-entry and/or updating in the field through study of current trends and issues.
Lecture 1.5 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
143
EMT 1602 – Health Care Trends (1.5)
This course deals with issues related to the health care system, trends for
the future, current developments in programs and research, ethical and legal
considerations and responsibilities of the health care team. Lecture 1.5 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
EMT 1605 – Paramedic Refresher (2)
This course is designed to supply information required for the EMT
paramedic to remain current. The course will incorporate lecture and
demonstration/return demonstration of critical procedures. The course is based
on the National Standard Paramedic curriculum. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
(Repeatable 3 times)
EMT 1606 - Special Topics in Emergency Medicine (.5-1)
Prerequisite: Current EMT licensure
This course is a study of topics in the emergency medical field. The exact
content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studies.
The course may be repeated three times if different topics are considered. Lecture
.5-1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
EMT – PARAMEDIC
EMTP 1250 – Drug Dosage & Calculations (3)
This course is designed for students of emergency medical services for
instruction on specific measurements and calculations needed to assist in patient
care. Lecture 3 hours.
EMTP 1260 – Paramedic Services I (6)
EMTP 1274 – Paramedic Clinical III (3)
Prerequisite: EMTP 1273 / Corequisite: EMTP 1264
This course is designed to meet the standards set by the state for clinical
experience in advanced life support ambulance runs. The student will integrate
principles and skills learned in the classroom with hands-on experience in the
field. The learning experience will be supervised by the employer with site visits
by the college coordinator. Lab 11 hours.
ENGINEERING
ENGG 1101 – Engineering Graphics (4)
An integrated study of the basis of mechanical drawing, projection theory
and descriptive geometry. Freehand sketching, instrument drawing and
computer-aided drafting are used to apply theory and conventional practices
in orthographic, multi-view, axonometric, oblique and perspective projections.
Analysis and synthesis made of theoretical and applied problems involving the
size, shape and/or relative positions of geometric magnitudes such as points, lines
and planes in space. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ EGR 941
ENGLISH
ENGL 1101 – Rhetoric and Composition I (3)
Prerequisite: If Reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
or PREP 1404. If English review course is required, student must complete
ENGL 1410, ENGL 1412 or PREP 1404
The general objectives of the first-semester composition course are to prepare
the student for college work through teaching him or her to use the library, to
read more effectively and to write good expository prose based on personal
observation and reading. Grade of “C” or better required for IAI. Lecture 3
hours. ▶ IAI ~ C1 900
Prerequisites: Current Illinois EMT licensure, successful completion of EMT
1250 and CPR certification or consent of Dean
This course is designed to build upon the skills acquired during the EMTBasic course. Information provided deals with emergency medications, airway
maintenance, treatment of trauma and decision-making during emergencies.
Students will obtain experience in starting intravenous lines, administering
medications and nebulizer treatments, drawing blood and performing
intubation. Lecture 5 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better
General objectives of the second-semester composition course are the same
as the first with more advanced application. A research paper is required. Grade
of “C” or better required for IAI. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ C1 901R
EMTP 1262 – Paramedic Services II (12)
ENGL 1103 – Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 1102 – Rhetoric and Composition II (3)
Prerequisite: EMTP 1260 / Corequisite: EMTP 1272
This course is designed to build upon the skills acquired during the EMTBasic course. Information provided deals with medical emergencies and special
populations, including obstetrical and pediatric emergencies. Students will
obtain experience in ECG interpretation, defibrillator use and medication
administration. Lecture 9 hours. Lab 6 hours.
Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better
The purpose of this course is to give students an opportunity, in a workshop
setting, to develop their abilities in fiction writing. Short stories are the focus
of the course, although poetry, drama, and the novel may be addressed as they
relate to the art of writing fiction. Lecture 3 hours.
EMTP 1263 – Paramedic Services III (12)
Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1101 with a “C” or better
An introductory course in written and oral technical communications. It covers
library research methods, elementary business correspondence and technical report
presentations. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EMTP 1262 / Corequisite: EMTP 1273
This course is designed to build upon the skills acquired during previous
EMT courses. Information provided deals with physical examinations in the
field, burns, shock and spinal, thoracic and abdominal trauma. Skills include
making advanced life support ambulance runs. Lecture 9 hours. Lab 6 hours.
EMTP 1264 – Paramedic Services IV (6)
Prerequisite: EMTP 1263 / Corequisite: EMTP 1274
This course is designed to build upon the skills acquired during the previous
EMT courses. Information provided deals with emergencies involving the
neurological, endocrine, gastroenterological, renal or hematopoietic systems,
as well as clients with psychiatric and substance abuse disorders. Skills include
defibrillation and performing phlebotomy. Lecture 5 hours. Lab 2 hours.
EMTP 1272 – Paramedic Clinical I (3)
Prerequisite: EMTP 1260 / Corequisite: EMTP 1262
This course is designed to meet the standards set by the state for clinical
experience in basic life support ambulance runs. The student will integrate
principles and skills learned in the classroom with hands-on experience in the
field. The learning experience will be supervised by the employer with site visits
by the college coordinator. Lab 11 hours.
EMTP 1273 – Paramedic Clinical II (3)
Prerequisite: EMTP 1272 / Corequisite: EMTP 1263
This course is designed to meet the standards set by the state for clinical
experience in intermediate life support ambulance runs. The student will
integrate principles and skills learned in the classroom with hands-on experience
in the field. The learning experience will be supervised by the employer with site
visits by the college coordinator. Lab 11 hours.
144
ENGL 1201 – Technical Writing (3)
ENGL 1410 – English Review (3)
Students must register for English courses within the first 12 credit hours
attempted. Students earning an “A,” “B” or “C” move to ENGL 1101; students
earning “D” or “E” must repeat the course the following semester. This course
utilizes a variety of methods to teach the writing process by paragraph and
essay development, emphasizing drafting and revision. Standard English usage
is reviewed. Lecture 3 hours.
ENGL 1412 – CAI English Review (3)
Students must register for English courses within the first 12 credit hours attempted.
Students earning an “A,” “B” or “C” move to ENGL 1101; students earning “D” or
“E” must repeat the course the following semester
This course utilizes a combination of lecture and lab sessions to teach the
writing process by paragraph and essay development emphasizing drafting and
revision. Standard English usage is reviewed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ENGL 2101 – Classical Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
The student will read representative classics from classical times through
the 18th century and will acquire sufficient tools of literary analysis to speak
and write with clarity about the works read. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 906
ENGL 2102 – Introduction to Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102; however,
completion of ENGL 1102 is recommended
This course is designed to acquaint students with examples of the rich
diversity of prose, poetry, and drama written in Great Britain and America from
the Renaissance through contemporary eras. As a basic introduction to literature,
this course cannot offer a complete chronological survey. It offers instead a series
of literary texts, often thematically related, which appeal to modern readers and
at the same time provide interesting insights into the cultural attitudes and
values of the periods which produced them. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 907
ENGL 2103 – Special Topics in Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
Topics vary but could include women in literature, film and literature and
others not covered by existing courses. Topics may be suggested by students or
faculty. This course will require a volume of reading similar to ENGL 2101 and
2102. It may be taken no more than four times; topics must be different each
time. Lecture 3 hours.
ENGL 2104 – The Short Story (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102;
however, completion of ENGL 1102 is recommended
This course will cover a wide number of short stories ranging from late 19th
century to the present. Students will analyze stories for both ideas and techniques.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 901
ENGL 2105 – Introduction to Poetry (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
The course emphasizes critical analysis of poetry. Students will read, discuss
and write on poems of different types and periods. The basic goal is to equip
the student with the techniques and terminology of literary analysis. Lecture 3
hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 903
ENGL 2106 – Intermediate Composition (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their writing skills
beyond the level of freshman composition. It is especially recommended for
those students who intend to seek bachelor’s degrees at four-year institutions.
Lecture 3 hours.
ENGL 2107 – Mythology (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102;
however, completion of ENGL 1102 is highly recommended.
Students will read and analyze myth to determine the purposes they serve
/ have served in past and current cultures, how members of a society form and
adapt myth to fulfill these purposes, and how the myths themselves then impact
the societies that created them. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H9 901
ENGL 2108 – Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
The course encompasses Shakespeare’s England, samples of his sonnets and
his plays, as well as an examination of some of the criticism of his literary forms.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 905
ENGL 2109 – British Literature ~ Beowulf to 1799 (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102;
however, completion of ENGL 1102 is highly recommended
This course is a survey of British literature from the Middle Ages through the
Restoration and the 18th Century. Students will read and analyze works from these
periods. British history and culture are addressed as they relate to the literature.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 912
ENGL 2110 – British Literature ~ 1800 to Present (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102;
however, completion of ENGL 1102 is highly recommended
This course is a survey of British literature from 1800 to the present, including
Victorian and Romantic works as well as 20th- and 21st-century writings. Students
will read and analyze works from these periods. British history and culture are
addressed as they relate to the literature. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 913
ENGL 2111 – American Literature to 1865 (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
This course is a survey of American literature from the colonies to the Civil
War. Students will read, write about and discuss a wide body of literature. Lecture
3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 914
ENGL 2112 – American Literature, 1865 to Present (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
This course is a survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present.
Students will read, discuss and write about a wide body of literature. Lecture 3
hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 915
ENGL 2113 – Introduction to Drama (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102;
however, completion of ENGL 1102 is highly recommended
This class will involve reading and discussing plays, ranging from classical to
modern, with some attention to philosophical impetus and dramatic criticism.
Students will explore dramatic genres, as well as interpret and analyze content,
style and structure of representative plays. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H3 902
ENGL 2114 – The Novel (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102; however,
completion of ENGL 1102 is recommended.
This course will cover a wide number of novels ranging from early 18th
century to the present. Students will analyze novels for both ideas and techniques.
Lecture 3 hours.
ENGL 2115 – Introduction to Children’s Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101. May be taken concurrently with ENGL 1102; however,
completion of ENGL 1102 is recommended.
The course will cover a wide variety of children’s literature from early picture
books to present-day pre-teen novels. Students will analyze these texts for both
ideas and techniques. Lecture 3 hours.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Beginning, intermediate and advanced instruction in the reading, writing
and speaking of English and in the American governmental legislative system
for persons whose native language is not English. Credit is nontransferable and
does not count toward any Rend Lake College degree or certificate. Enrollment
and course schedule information is available from the Adult Education and
Literacy Department. Lecture 1-9 hours.
ENOLOGY
ENO 1201 – Introduction to Enology (3)
This is an introductory course in the basic science and technology of
winemaking. It is intended for the entrepreneur exploring business opportunities
in the grape wine industry, and/or the prospective small winery employee
interested in career development. The home winemaker that has never undergone
any formal training on the subject may also benefit from this basic course.
Students will make wine at home from a kit, track fermentation, make various
chemical measurements and provide one bottle of finished wine to the instructor
for evaluation at the conclusion of the course. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
ENO 1203 – Winery Sanitation (3)
Prerequisite: ENO 1201 or consent of instructor
This is a course in the basic science and technology of winery sanitation. The
course serves as an introduction to wine microbiology and covers all methods
used for winery sanitation including premises, tanks, pumps, filters, oak barrels
and sampling equipment, including but not limited to chemical agents, reagents,
and thermal treatments leading to sterile bottling. Environmental issues and
compliance are also addressed. Lecture 3 hours.
ENO 1205 – Winery Equipment Operations (2)
Prerequisite: ENO 1201 or consent of instructor
This course covers process technologies and process systems that are used in
modern commercial wineries. The course will include lectures, demonstrations
and a two day workshop. Overview of winemaking systems including work
place safety, cleaning and sanitation procedures, winemaking equipment and
materials, tanks, barrels and barrel alternatives, filtration systems and bottling
equipment. We will also touch on chillers and electrical needs. Lecture 2 hours.
ENO 1207 – Intermediate Enology (3)
Prerequisite: ENO 1201 or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in ENO
1210 is highly recommended
The Intermediate Enology course is built on the fundamentals of science
and technology of winemaking practices taught in the Introduction to Enology
Course ENO 1201. During this course, students will understand how the whole
winemaking process works and learn the scientific background for any decision
made during the process of winemaking. At the completion of the course the
students will understand the winemaking calculations necessary for accurate,
precise and safe additions to the wine. This course is part of the VESTA program
with emphasis on the practical aspects of growing grapes and winemaking.
Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
ENO 1208 – Wine Production Internship (3)
Prerequisites: ENO 1201, ENO 1203, ENO 1205, and ENO 1207 or consent of instructor
This course is designed for the individual anticipating a career in the wine
industry. This course (internship) is designed to provide a student who has
145
completed major course sequences with an intense level of practical and realistic
winery operation experiences, sufficient to equip him/her with sufficient skills
and work experience for an entry-level position in the wine industry. Students
involved in this program will participate in a full time Crush Season internship
at a supporting winery, and are expected to use the time and opportunities to
further their understanding of the winemaking process and common winery
operations. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
FIRE 1602 – Fire Fighter II ~ Module B (4)
ENO 1209 – Cellar Operations Technology (2)
Prerequisite: Associated with a fire department
The third of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training
to become a certified Fire Fighter II. This course will include topics on
communications, sprinkler systems, salvage, fire prevention, public education,
fire causes, ropes and hazardous materials. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: ENO 1201, ENO 1203, ENO 1205, ENO 1207 and ENO 1208 or
consent of instructor
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of enology
with actual and practical exposure to the technology of wine making as is
performed during the passive vineyard periods associated with winter. The
student is expected to improve his understanding of the methods and science
involved by on-site participation in each of the various activities associated with
finished wine production. The course is designed to serve as actual practical
exposure and may qualify as experience for those seeking employment in
commercial enology. Lab 4 hours.
ENO 1210 – Wine and Must Analysis (3)
Prerequisite: ENO 1201 and CHE 1101 or consent of instructor
This course will focus on principles of grape juice and wine analysis and the
reasons for use of each analysis. Analyses of a practical and useful nature are
chosen for the laboratory exercises demonstrating various chemical, physical
and biochemical methods. Students will participate in workshops and hands-on
experiences. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ENO 1211 – Sensory Evaluation (3)
Prerequisite: Associated with a fire department
The second of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training to
become a certified Fire Fighter II. This course will include topics on water supply,
nozzles, fire streams, ventilation, rescue, emergency medical care, forcible entry,
overhaul and building construction. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
FIRE 1603 – Fire Fighter II ~ Module C (3)
FIRE 1604 – Fire Fighter III ~ Module A (4)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department and Fire Fighter II certified
The first of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training
to become a certified Fire Fighter III. This course will include topics on
departmental organization, fire behavior, breathing apparatus, ladders, fire
hoses and appliances, safety and portable fire extinguishers. Lecture 2 hours.
Lab 4 hours.
FIRE 1605 – Fire Fighter III ~ Module B (4)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department and Fire Fighter II certified
The second of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training to
become a certified Fire Fighter III. This course will include topics on water supply,
nozzles, fire streams, ventilation, rescue, emergency medical care, overhaul and
building construction. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
Prerequisite: ENO 1201 or consent of instructor
This is a course intended for those individuals who need to develop an
understanding of the principles of sensory evaluation used in commercial wine
making. It will also be of benefit to the wine enthusiast who is interested in reaching
advanced levels of appreciation as well as to the producer, the wine merchant, and
ultimately the enologist, who by the nature of their profession need to discern
flavors and establish tasting benchmarks. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
FIRE 1606 – Fire Fighter III ~ Module C (3)
ENO 1213 – Introduction to Wine Microorganisms (3)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department and Fire Fighter II certified
A study involving hydraulics of water and its application to fire protection
problems. This course will include topics on calculating water supply capabilities,
sprinkler and standpipe requirements, as well as fire scene calculations. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
This course is an introduction to the variety of microorganisms frequently
encountered in the wine making process, both beneficial and harmful. Topics
include identification, physiology, morphology and biochemistry of various wine
microorganisms. Lecture 3 hours.
ENVIRONMENTAL – WATER /
WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY
EVPA 1601 – Basic Waterworks Operations (3)
Designed to prepare student for the “D” level certification examination.
Lecture 3 hours.
EVPA 1602 – Intermediate Waterworks Operations (3)
Prerequisite: EVPA 1601 or consent of instructor
Designed to prepare students for the “C” and “B” level certification
examination. Lecture 3 hours.
EVPA 1604 – Basic Wastewater Plant Operations (3)
Designed to prepare students for the Class IV certification examination.
Lecture 3 hours.
EVPA 1605 – Intermediate Wastewater Plant Operations (3)
Prerequisite: EVPA 1604 or consent of instructor
Designed to prepare students for the Class III and Class II certification
examination. Lecture 3 hours.
EVPA 1606 – Advanced Wastewater Treatment (3)
Prerequisite: EVPA 1605 or consent of instructor
Designed to prepare students for the Class I certification examination.
Lecture 3 hours.
FIRE FIGHTER
FIRE 1601 – Fire Fighter II ~ Module A (4)
Prerequisite: Associated with a fire department
The first of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training to
become a certified Fire Fighter II. This course will include topics on departmental
organization, fire behavior, breathing apparatus, ladders, fire hoses and
appliances, safety and portable fire extinguishers. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
146
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department and Fire Fighter II certified
The third of three courses designed to prepare a fire fighter in training
to become a certified Fire Fighter III. This course will include topics on
communications, sprinkler systems, fire prevention, public education, fire causes,
ropes and hazardous materials. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
FIRE 1607 – Fire Apparatus Engineer (3)
FIRE 1608 – Fire Prevention Officer (3)
Prerequisites: Fire Fighter III certified
A course of study that will include topics covering prevention, inspection,
investigation, building codes, fire protection systems and devices, as well as
the development and implementation of a fire protection bureau. The course
is designed to meet the requirements of Fire Prevention Officer I. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
FIRE 1609 – Management I (3)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department
This course is an introduction to the principles of management as they
relate to the fire fighting profession. Included are human resource management,
community awareness and public relations, organizational structure and the
budgeting process. Lecture 3 hours.
FIRE 1610 – Management II (3)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department and FIRE 1209
This course is an introduction to the principles of management as they
relate to the fire fighting profession. Areas of instruction include oral and
written communications, human resource management, safety practices and
organizational/government structure. Lecture 3 hours.
FIRE 1611 – Tactics and Strategy I (3)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department
This course is an introduction to the principles of management as they
relate to the fire ground officer. Areas of instruction include an introduction to
tactics and strategy, leadership styles and techniques, strategic considerations,
fire behavior and building construction and engine company operations.
Lecture 3 hours.
FIRE 1612 – Fire and Arson Investigation I (3)
Prerequisites: Associated with a fire department
This course is an introduction to the principles of management as they
relate to the fire origin. This course includes units on fire behavior, building
construction, safety, automatic fire detection and suppression systems,
electrical fire causes determination, accidental and incendiary cause and origin
determination, vehicle fires and sketching. Lecture 3 hours.
FIRE 1620 – Fire Instructor I (3)
Prerequisites: Fire Fighter II certified
This is an introduction to the principles of vocational-level skills training
for people who will be conducting on-the-job fire training in local fire
departments or other work-related fields. Students will gain knowledge and
ability to teach from prepared materials. This course will not teach firemanship,
but will equip firemanship trainers with the basics of adult vocational-level
skills teaching. Areas of instruction include: communication; concepts of
learning; human relations in the teaching-learning environment; methods of
teaching; organizing the learning environment; records and reports; testing and
evaluation; instructor’s roles and responsibilities; teaching techniques, and use
of instructional materials. Lecture 3 hours.
FLUID POWER
FLPR 1240 – Fluid Power for Manufacturing (3)
A hydraulic and pneumatic course designed for workers, supervisors and
managers in manufacturing industries. This course will acquaint the student
with fluid power theory, components, circuitry and control systems used in
manufacturing. Preventive maintenance, troubleshooting procedures and safety
practices are emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
FLPR 1262 – Fluid Power Fundamentals (5)
GEOLOGY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
GEOL 1101 – Physical Geology (3)
This course introduces the student to rocks and minerals, weathering, earth
structure, aerial photographs, topographic maps, geology of the Southern Illinois
basin and coal cyclotherms. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 907L
GEOL 1102 – Field Geology (3)
Field Geology is a three credit hour lab course that is held during the summer
term in an alternating year sequence. The first week will include orientation,
history, field techniques and observations, and safety topics on Rend Lake
College campus that will provide students with the background needed to study
and research in Arizona and New Mexico. The last two weeks will be completed
while traveling throughout Arizona and New Mexico visiting unique geological
sites such as Canyon de Chelly, Painted Desert, Petrified Forest, Grand Canyon,
Sedona, Chiricahuas and Carlsbad Caverns along with others. Field Geology is
a course that introduces learners to the field of geology and geopaleontology.
The course will discuss the field diversity of geological formations of rocks and
minerals; processes that have changed the structure and form of the earth’s
crust; and the evolution of organisms and adjustments that have been made
throughout those processes. Lab 6 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 907L
GERMAN
This course is a study of hydraulic and pneumatic principles, components and
applications, including fluid power theory, graphics, diagrams, air preparation
and fluid conditioning. Hydraulic and pneumatic circuit development will be
an important part of the class. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
GRMN 1101 – Elementary German I (4)
FLPR 2255 – Hydraulic Circuitry and Controls (4)
GRMN 1102 – Elementary German II (4)
Prerequisite: FLPR 1262
Hydraulic system/circuit operation and individual component operation
within circuits are covered, with emphasis on circuit diagramming and print
reading. Additional instruction in electro/hydraulic servo operation and
troubleshooting is included, along with a familiarization of test instruments
used in circuit diagnosis. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
FRENCH
FREN 1100 – French Conversation (2)
This is a conversational course for beginners designed to equip the student
to understand and speak everyday French in common situations often met by
travelers. Lecture 2 hours.
FREN 1101 – Elementary French I (4)
Emphasis is on understanding and speaking skills, as well as reading and
writing skills. Language lab work may be assigned. (No transfer credit unless
FREN 1102 also is taken.) Lecture 4 hours.
FREN 1102 – Elementary French II (4)
Prerequisite: FREN 1101 or one year high school French and consent of
instructor
This course is a continuation of FREN 1101, including oral work. Lecture
4 hours.
FREN 2101 – Modern French I (4)
This course develops speaking, reading and writing skills, with emphasis on
direct presentation and practice in German of basic grammatical structures and
vocabulary. (No transfer credit unless GRMN 1102 is taken.) Lecture 4 hours.
Prerequisite: GRMN 1101
A continuation of GRMN 1101, this course includes oral work. Lecture 4 hours.
GRMN 2101 – Modern German I (4)
Prerequisite: GRMN 1102 or two years of high school German and consent of
instructor
This course provides further development of understanding and speaking
with more emphasis on reading and writing; advanced oral practice and grammar
study. Lecture 4 hours.
GRMN 2102 – Modern German II (4)
Prerequisite: GRMN 2101 or three years of high school German and consent of instructor
A continuation of GRMN 2101, this course includes advanced oral and
written practice in the language. Lecture 4 hours.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
GRD 1201 – Introduction to Graphic Design (3)
Introductory course which offers training in the use of two–dimensional
processes of design, elements and principles, concepts, materials, styles and
terminology. Design projects produced with emphasis on content application,
concept, and composition utilizing creative problem solving through the design
process for visual problems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 1202 – Typography and Color Theory (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 1102 or two years of high school French and consent of
instructor
The course continues the development of speaking and understanding, with
emphasis on reading and writing, including grammar review. French civilization
will be discussed in French. Lecture 4 hours.
Introduction to typography with emphasis on letterform design, analysis
of classical typefaces through the history of type, type anatomy, form and
application utilizing spacing, type color and compositional balance and tension.
The color theory portion discusses the psychological and cultural aspects of
color, color systems with emphasis on color properties and interaction within a
design and end user. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
FREN 2102 – Modern French Il (4)
GRD 1203 – Advertising Design (3)
GEOGRAPHY
Prerequisite: GRD 1201, 1202, 2201
Emphasis on creative strategy and conceptual development. Coursework will
focus on creating effective advertising and solutions to visual design problems
in promotional materials, campaigns and ads and their presentation. Overview
of the advertising industry, terminology and various media outlets. Lecture 1
hour. Lab 4 hours.
GEOG 1101 – Introduction to Geography (3)
GRD 1204 – Digital Photography I (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 2101 or three years of high school French and consent of
instructor
A continuation of FREN 2101, providing practice in more advanced skills.
Lecture 4 hours.
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409
or PREP 1404)
A survey course devoted to the study of the geographical regions of the
world. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S4 900N
Introduction to basic digital photography focusing on skills useful for a
graphic designer. Topics include basic operation of a digital camera, composition,
camera, controls, exposure, and basic image enhancement for creative use.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
147
GRD 1205 – Drawing for Communications (3)
This course is an introduction to drawing fundamentals for graphic designers
which are applicable for logo design, storyboarding, concept development and
finished work. Skills and topics covered include hand-eye coordination, direct
observation, drawing from memory, drawing from reference, proportion,
perspective and composition. Students will apply techniques ranging from quicksketch to rendering while developing drawing skills using line, shape, form and
color of images in a representational format for successful communication in
design. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
GRD 1207 – Creativity (3)
This course will explore creativity and innovation as a tool in both the
sciences and the arts. The focus will be on the use of different techniques, such
as brainstorming, improvisation games and whiteboard techniques, for finding
and developing ideas and applying them in common projects and professional
situations. Using case studies and other examples, we will view the creative
process and its complexity, especially as it fuels innovation. The process involves
developing, managing and presenting those ideas to others. Lecture 3 hours.
GRD 1208 – History of Graphic Design (3)
This course will survey the history of graphic design and is structured for
the graphic designer whose objective is to understand the influence of society,
culture and events on the development and practice of design over time. There
will be insight into influential designers and familiarity with various graphic
styles throughout history. Lecture 3 hours.
GRD 1206 – Production Methods (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1201, 1203, 1204
Printing production is introduced with an emphasis on printing processes,
type specification, file formats, ink analysis, printing substrates-paper stock /
vinyl, product price estimation, printer bids and printing terminology. Current
reproduction methods of print material will be discussed. Emphasis on design
projects that demonstrate these various process techniques. Lecture 1 hour.
Lab 4 hours.
GRD 1215 – Web Page Design (3)
Introductory course with emphasis on design fundamentals relevant to web
publishing. Basic skills for website development, concept, and design applied
through in-class projects. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 1220 – Advanced Web Design (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1215
Overview of techniques utilized to design advanced layouts, apply interaction
to designs through forms and visual feedback, and create unique designs for
mobile platforms. A comprehensive application of these techniques will be
demonstrated via the development of a complete website for a client. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
GRD 2201 – QUIPS I (3)
Basic introduction to use of tools in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign & Illustrator.
Fundamentals of these software programs implemented in two-dimensional
digital designs while applying design fundamentals through individualized
projects to improve creative visual solutions. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 2202 – Advanced Digital Photography (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1213, (recommended GRD 2201) or consent of instructor
Advanced digital photography skills discussed with focus on artistic
composition, analysis of digital works and artistic concepts. Utilization of previous
knowledge of the digital camera settings to capture photographs featuring rules
of composition, light, exposure, colors, focus and depth of field. Adobe Photoshop
will be used to enhance photos with artistic expression of an underlying concept.
A final portfolio will be developed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
GRD 2203 – Digital Illustration (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1201, 1202, 1205, 2201, 2215, 2220
This advanced course examines the use of the computer as a medium and
as an additional tool for illustrators, artists and designers. Through projects,
discussions and lectures, a variety of digital techniques will be explored using
the computer as a tool to illustrate a concept. Assignments will have an emphasis
on concept, creativity, communication, technical achievement and presentation.
Exploration and experimentation encouraged with refinement of familiar methods
and techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
GRD 2208 – Electronic Prepress 3 (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1206 and 2201
This course teaches the preparation of design concepts to electronic
documents in a digital format ready for print production using industry
148
standard software applications. Topics include scanning images, digital image
manipulation, color corrections, saving files in proper formats and preflight.
Includes use of spot color and process color, pre-press methods, printer’s marks,
file formatting to produce files for service bureaus and commercial printers.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 2209 – Computer Type Design (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1202, 1203, 2201
An advanced typography course with problems in combining of typefaces,
type as image, advanced techniques for emphasis, composition and their
applications in a variety of design projects. Emphasis on professional-level
type for print with an emphasis on publication design, grid systems, legibility,
readability, typographic hierarchy, style sheets and multi-page documents.
Introduction to animated type and motion graphic incorporation utilizing
industry standard software. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 2210 – Cooperative Experience I (3)
Prerequisite: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
The Graphic Design student will have an opportunity to receive practical
experience and use acquired skills in a workforce environment. The student
will gain invaluable lessons in a variety of areas within the graphic design field.
GRD 2215 – QUIPS II (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 2201 or consent of Dean
An advanced level of design software application training utilized to
solve practical 2D design problems through individualized projects. Focus on
combining applications and tools for advanced graphic techniques to improve
creative visual design solutions. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 2218 – Package Design (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 1201, 1202, 1203, 1204, 2208, 2215, 2220
Creative project development of three-dimensional designs for packaging,
displays and exhibits through practical and experimental construction techniques
in a variety of media materials and techniques. Emphasis on original design
work will be executed and presented via 3D products with focus on purpose,
identification, branding and communication. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GRD 2220 – QUIPS III (3)
Prerequisite: GRD 2201 and 2215 or consent of Dean
Continues development of advanced-level design software application
training. Focus is on solving design problems while utilizing the tools of the
computer application software for layout image manipulation and creation
through individualized projects. Emphasis on combining applications and
tools for advanced creative visual design solutions. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
GREEN FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
GFM 1201 – Planning & Development of Green Facilities (4)
Using the life cycle of materials and energy to understand how facilities
are managed and operated through green techniques from new construction,
retrofitting existing structures, and surrounding sites. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
GFM 1202 – Building Automation & Control Systems (4)
The course will provide the student a broad introduction to the specific
issues involved with Building Automation Systems (BAS). You will explore the
processes which occur at every level in the air conditioning industry, including
digital controls, energy conservation control strategies and system maintenance.
Lecture 4 hours.
GFM 1203 – Energy Modeling of Buildings (4)
Methods used to evaluate, choose, use, calibrate, analyze and interpret
the results of energy modeling software when applied to building and systems
energy performance and economics competence to model new and existing
buildings and systems with their full range of physics, environmental issues
and orientation. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
GMF 1204 – Green Landscape & Grounds Management (4)
Methods to save energy, lower water consumption and maximize available
resources in developing eco-friendly and aesthetically pleasing environments.
Techniques in managing both products and their grounds care department use.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
HEALTH
HEA 1101 – Health Education (2)
Modern principles and practices of personal and community health are
covered, with sufficient physiology and anatomy to make the study more
understandable to the student. Lecture 2 hours.
HEA 1102 – Basic First Aid (2)
This course will present the theory and practice of first aid for the ill and
the injured. It is designed to teach students the basic skills necessary to handle
everyday emergencies. The American Red Cross First Aid Responding to
Emergencies program will be used. Lecture 2 hours.
HEA 1103 – Introduction to Nutrition (3)
HIT 1205- Pathophysiology for HIT (4)
Prerequisites: HECO 1202 and ZOO 1105
This course is designed to examine alterations in functions affecting
individuals across the lifespan. Students will learn the disease processes affecting
the human body via an integrated approach to specific disease entities, including
the study of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Lecture 4 hours.
A study of the basic principles of nutrition, including their application to
solving nutritional problems. Includes the classification of major nutrients,
food sources, functions in metabolism and daily requirements for different age
groups. Lecture 3 hours.
HIT 2201 – Health Data and Statistics (2)
HEA 1120 – Stress Management (3)
HIT 2202- HIT Practicum (3)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to stress and its
management as it integrates the mental, emotional, physical, social and spiritual
aspects of a healthy life. It emphasizes theoretical concepts regarding the causes
and symptoms of stress, and the practical application of stress management
techniques. Lecture 3 hours.
HEA 2130 – Substance Abuse (3)
An overview of the far-reaching problem of the substance abuser in American
society. It covers causes, symptoms, manifestations and treatment of substance
abuse. Lecture 3 hours.
HEALTH CARE COACH
HECO 1200 – Introduction to Health Care (4)
This course introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices
and issues common in the health care profession. Career opportunities, ethics,
basic human anatomy and essential patient care skills also will be covered.
Lecture 4 hours.
HECO 1201 – Health Care Psychology (3)
This course will cover topics such as enhancing and compromising health
behaviors, death, dying, stress and coping. The course also will explore the role of
personality, gender, interpersonal relations, ethnic and sociocultural influences
and their links to risk, prevention, illness and wellness. Lecture 3 hours.
HECO 1202 – Health Care Terminology (3)
This course introduces students to the principles of medical word
building in order to develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health
care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical
terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. Anatomy,
physiology and pathology diseases also are discussed. Lecture 3 hours.
HECO 1203 – Community Health Care (3)
A study of key issues concerning community health care aimed at developing
practical approaches to supporting patients. Topics include: challenges of
delivering adequate healthcare in communities; population medicine; specific
problems posed by diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease; ethical
dimensions of the concept of “underinsurance”; community medicine and the law;
methods of improving compliance, and measuring outcomes. Lecture 3 hours.
HEALTH INFORMATION
HIT 1200 – Selected Topics in Health Information Tech (.5-4)
The course will include an in-depth study of topics in the Health Information
Technology field. The exact content will vary from semester to semester
depending on the subject studied. Lecture .5-4 hours.
HIT 1201 – Introduction to Health Information (3)
A course that will initiate the student to the field of Health Information
Technology. It will provide an overview of the functions and responsibilities of
the technologist and orientation to the technical skills held by the technologist,
including skills necessary to maintain components of health record systems
consistent with the medical administrative, ethical, legal, accreditation and
regulatory requirements of the health care delivery system. Lecture 3 hours.
HIT 1202- Health Records Systems (3)
Prerequisite: HIT 1201
This course is designed to examine content, format, evaluation, and
completeness of the medical record; licensing, accrediting and regulatory
agencies; electronic medical record systems; filing systems, and records retention,
storage and retrieval. The student will have hands-on experience in evaluating
content, format and completeness of actual medical records. Computer
experience will be utilized as a teaching method. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into HIT program and MATH 1111
A study of the sources and uses of health data, computation of rates and
percentages, vital records registration and reporting and display. Lecture 2 hours.
Prerequisite: HIT 2206 or consent of instructor
This course is for students in the Health Information Technology program
and will integrate classroom theory with practical experience. The student will
be placed in a facility where the skills and knowledge of a health information
management technician will be applied. The practicum will be supervised by a
job-site supervisor. Lab 6 hours.
HIT 2203 – Management in Health Care (3)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into HIT program and HIT 1201
A study of management principles as applied to the health information
department. It includes an introduction to management, the functions of
planning, organizing, controlling, actuating/supervising, problem-solving and
quality assurance. Lecture 3 hours.
HIT 2205- Pharmacology for Health Information (2)
Prerequisite: HECO 1202
This course emphasizes general pharmacology for health information
professions. It introduces basic information about drugs used to treat various
medical conditions and laboratory tests used to diagnose and monitor various
medical conditions. It relates specific drugs and labs to the diagnosis and
treatment of various diseases. Lecture 2 hours.
HIT 2206 Medical Coding (3)
Prerequisites: HECO 1202, ZOO 1105 and HIT 1205
This course covers ICD diagnostic coding conventions and guidelines for
outpatient, inpatient, and ambulatory care. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HIT 2207 Medical Law and Ethics (3)
This course covers legal relationships of health care workers and patients,
contractual agreements, professional liability, malpractice, medical practice acts,
and informed consent. Emphasis is placed on legal terms, professional attitudes,
and the principles and basic concepts of ethic and laws involved in providing
medical services. Lecture 3 hours.
HIT 2208 Electronic Health Records (4)
Prerequisites: HIT 1202
This course will focus on real-world use of electronic health records (EHRs)
through readings and hands-on labs. Students will learn the functionality,
network, and security design of EHRs. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HIT 2217 – Quality Management (3)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into HIT program and HIT 1201
The study of quality management systems includes the philosophy of quality
improvement; utilization management, performance improvement and risk
management in the acute care facility; coordination of quality management
activities with physician credential/reappointment and employee performance
evaluation; quality management requirements for acute care facilities in specific
program areas; quality management in the non-acute facility; confidentiality
of quality management information, and the expanding quality management
function. Lecture 3 hours.
HIT 2218 – Reimbursement Management (2)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into HIT program and HIT 1201
Study of reimbursement as it relates to the healthcare field and specifically
to the Health Information Department. Includes an overview of reimbursement
methodologies, government-sponsored health care programs, coding
compliance, charge description master maintenance, and revenue cycle
management. Lecture 2 hours.
HIT 2219 Procedural Coding (3)
Prerequisites: HECO 1202, ZOO 1105 and 1106, and HIT 1205 and 2206
This course covers procedural coding conventions and guidelines for
outpatient, inpatient, and ambulatory care. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
149
HIT 2220 Health Information Review (2)
This course covers Health Information Technology skills and competencies
pertinent to the professional development of the student. Lecture 2 hours.
HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION
HACR 1210 – Federal Clean Air Act – Section 608 (1)
The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for the Federal Clean
Air Act – Section 608 examination. This examination is required for all persons
who maintain, service, repair or dispose of equipment containing regulated
refrigerants. Lecture 1 hour.
HACR 1607 – Section 608 Certification (.5)
This course is an eight-hour class to prepare students for the mandatory
certification under Section 608 of the Federal Clean Air Act. The material is
designed to prepare the student for the test on Section A; General Knowledge,
Type I, Type II, Type III and Universal certification. A general knowledge of
refrigeration is required before attempting this course. Lecture .5 hour.
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY
HEQT 1201 – Introduction to Machine Maintenance (4)
This course is designed to provide students with a study of the components
and system operations related to heavy equipment technology. Included is
a survey of the chassis, engine, brakes, transmissions, rear and front drives,
transfer case drives, etc. Emphasis will be placed upon general maintenance and
troubleshooting of heavy equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 1204 – Introduction to the Service Industry (2)
This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in the
various skills needed for success in heavy equipment technology industry. This
course provides instruction and laboratory experience in shop safety, shop
operation and how to obtain service information. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1 hour.
HEQT 1205 – Basic Internal Combustion (4)
The principles of compression ignited internal combustion engines are taught
and variations in design are discussed. Heavy equipment engines are used for
laboratory disassembly and assembly. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 1206 – Diesel Engine I (4)
This course introduces the procedure for complete diesel engine rebuild.
It also includes a discussion of combustion chamber types, major components
and component disassembly inspection, and repair. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 1207 – Fundamentals of Hydraulics (3)
This course is a practical study of the basic principles and components of
hydraulic circuits and the application of these principles to heavy equipment
competencies in the areas of servicing and maintaining hydraulic equipment.
Laboratory practices include disassembly and reassembly of components and
tracing circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HEQT 1208 – Fundamentals of Machine Electronics (3)
This course is designed to include electrical concepts as they apply to heavy
equipment electrical systems. It will include the use of electrical test equipment
to diagnose electrical problems found on heavy equipment and engines. Lecture
1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
HEQT 1209 – Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (2)
This course provides an introduction into the basic theory and principles
of heating, ventilation and air conditioning as they relate to heavy equipment.
Use of equipment to diagnose and repair malfunctions, including repair of
component parts and the charging and recharging of systems will be stressed
in the laboratory. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
HEQT 1210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (4)
Prerequisites: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This summer course is offered for eight weeks following the fist year of the
program. The student will be placed with an agricultural business for full-time
job placement. The learning experiences will be supervised by both the college
coordinator and the employee. The student trainee will receive vocational
counseling and individual assistance. Special attention is given to career planning,
on-job problems and current business practices.
HEQT 1211 – Engine Fuel Systems (3)
This course is a study of combustion chamber design, heavy equipment
fuel injection systems and diagnosing faults in fuel injection and combustion
systems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
150
HEQT 2201 – Diesel Engine Performance (4)
Prerequisites: HEQT 1206 and HEQT 1211 or consent of Dean.
A course to provide a thorough understanding of the necessary diagnostic
skills required for troubleshooting heavy equipment engines and fuel systems.
Emphasis will be placed upon knowledge and skills necessary to assure product
reliability and performance. This course is a continuation of HEQT 1206
Diesel Engine I and HEQT 1211 Engine Fuel Systems and will build upon the
fundamentals learned in these courses. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 2202 – Machine Systems - Hydraulics (3)
Prerequisites: HEQT 1207 and HEQT 1208 or consent of Dean.
This course is designed for inspecting, testing, servicing and diagnosing
heavy equipment basic hydraulic systems. This course is a continuation of HEQT
1207 Fundamentals of Hydraulics and HEQT 1208 Fundamentals of Machine
Electronics. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
HEQT 2203 – Machine Systems – Electronics (3)
Prerequisites: HEQT 1208 or consent of Dean.
This course provides the background needed to diagnose and repair the
sophisticated electronics and computerized circuits found on heavy equipment
and heavy equipment engines. This course build upon the fundamentals of HEQT
1208 – Fundamentals of Machine Electronics. The course is a continuation of
electronic concepts, component function and identification of malfunctions and
testing of electronic systems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
HEQT 2204 – Transmissions & Torque Converters (3)
A study is made of the various sliding gear, hydrostatic synchromesh and
power shift transmissions involving planetaries. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
HEQT 2205 – Undercarriage and Final Drives (3)
This course is a continuation of power train systems with emphasis on final
drives and track systems. The course also describes the proper maintenance,
adjustment and installation of undercarriages and final drives. Lecture 1 hour.
Lab 4 hours.
HEQT 2206 – Machine Specific Systems (4)
This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills used to test and
adjust specific heavy equipment machine systems. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 2207 – Machine Systems Diagnosis &
Troubleshooting (4)
This is a course that studies the practical use of diagnostic equipment for
analyzing and repairing heavy equipment machine and engine systems. Lecture
1 hour. Lab 6 hours.
HEQT 2210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (4)
Prerequisites: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course is offered in the summer for eight weeks following the third
semester of the program. The student will be placed with a heavy equipment
business for full-time job placement. The learning experiences will be supervised
by both the college coordinator and the employer. The student trainee will receive
vocational counseling and individual assistance. Special attention will be given
to career planning, on-the-job problems and current business practices.
HISTORY
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
HIST 1101 – Western Civilization I (3)
This course will examine the history of Western Civilization from the first
human civilizations to the birth of the Enlightenment and the “modern” world
in the 18th century. It is an introductory, survey-level course that focuses on
the formation and progression of human societies, exposing students to the
events, people, and institutions that have played important roles in significantly
shaping the history and culture of “Western” societies during the time period
covered. ▶ IAI ~ S2 902
HIST 1102 – Western Civilization II (3)
This course will examine the history of Western Civilization, and its
influence on the rest of the world, from the Enlightenment in the early 18th
century through the present-day. It is an introductory, survey-level course
that focuses on the formation and progression of human societies, exposing
students to the events, people, and institutions that have played important roles
in significantly shaping the political, economic, cultural and social aspects of
“Western” societies during the time period covered. ▶ IAI ~ S2 903
HIST 2101 – American History I (3)
This course will examine the history of the United States from its pre-colonial
roots through the end of the American Civil War in 1865. It is an introductory,
survey-level course that focuses on the formation and progression of American
society, exposing students to the events, people and institutions that have played
important roles in significantly shaping the political, economic and social aspects
of the culture of the United States during the time period covered. Successful
completion of this course is evidence of having passed the State and Federal
Constitution Test. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S2 900
HIST 2102 – American History II (3)
This course will examine the history of the United States from the end of the
Civil War in 1865 to the present-day. It is an introductory, survey-level course
that focuses on the formation and progression of American society, exposing
students to the events, people and institutions that have played important roles in
significantly shaping the political, economic and social aspects of the culture of
the United States during the time period covered. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S2 901
HORT 1215 – Turf Management (3)
An introduction to the management and care of common turf grasses.
Emphasis is placed on identification of turf grasses and related cultural problems
associated with their growth. Topics covered include weed identification, insects,
diseases, fertilizers and equipment usage for the management of turf grasses in
parks, golf courses, home growth and sod farms. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 1216 – Greenhouse Operations (3)
An introduction to the general maintenance and proper use of greenhouse
structures and equipment. Emphasis is placed on growing techniques used in
the production of greenhouse crops. Environmental controls and nutritional
applications are covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 1219 – Specialty Crop Production (2)
A practical, hands-on course in the methods and techniques of small-scale
specialty crop production. Students will select a site, develop a marketing plan,
select a crop, perform cultural practice and market a crop. Lab 4 hours.
HIST 2106 – Black American History (3)
HORT 1220 – Fruit and Vegetable Production (3)
A survey of the history of Black Americans from their African heritage to
the present, with an emphasis on the contributions of Black Americans to U.S.
history. Lecture 3 hours.
An introduction to commercial fruit and vegetable production in the
Midwest. Emphasis will be placed on cultural systems, variety selection and
pest control. Lecture 3 hours.
HIST 2107 – Latin American History (3)
HORT 2201 – Landscape Design (3)
This course will examine the history of Latin America from pre-colonial
times to the present-day. It is an introductory, survey-level course that focuses
on the formation and progression of human societies in Latin America, exposing
students to the events, people and institutions that have played important roles
in significantly shaping the cultural, social, political and economic aspects of the
history and culture of Latin American societies during the time period covered.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S2 910N
HIST 2108 – British History (3)
This course provides students with a sound contextual knowledge of the
formative features of British history as well as an understanding of the events,
movements and individuals that helped comprise this history. The course
begins with the Roman occupation and continues through the beginning of
the modern age in the 18th Century. Because history is a narrative with many
layers, the course will explore the past through various perspectives. Where
possible, students will be given contemporary source material to supplement
the core text. Lecture 3 hours.
HORTICULTURE
HORT 1201 – Introduction to Horticulture (3)
An introductory course to inform students of the principles and practices
involved in the production and use of horticultural crops. Topics covered are
fruits, vegetables, turf, floral, landscape, nursery and greenhouse cultural
principles. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ AG 905
HORT 1205 – Grounds Maintenance (3)
Prerequisite: HORT 1211 or consent of the Dean
An introduction to the graphic presentation and placement of plant materials
in the landscape. Emphasis is placed on layout design and cost calculations.
Topics covered include design concepts, field studies, contracting and landscape
maintenance. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 2202 – Nursery Operations (2)
This course is designed to give students hands-on experience at nursery facilities.
Students will learn planting, pest control, marketing propagation and equipment
usage. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 2203 – Golf Course Operations (2)
Prerequisite: HORT 1215 or consent of the Dean
This course is designed to introduce the student to golf course operations.
Emphasis is placed on maintenance of irrigation equipment, traps, greens,
fairways and trees. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 2204 – Greenhouse Management (2)
This course will acquaint students with the management practices involved
in greenhouse production. Emphasis will be placed on rotations, individual
crop production practices, utilization of greenhouse space and marketing plans.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
HUMANITIES
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
A course dealing with landscaping and maintaining grounds for home and
industry. Course content includes design, planting, maintenance of grounds,
plant selection, site analyzation, soil management, structures and construction
materials. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HUMT 1104 – Introduction to Film (3)
HORT 1211 – Landscape Plants (3)
HUMT 1105 – The Humanities Through the Arts (3)
Students will learn to identify over 200 landscape plants and relate their
adaption and value to design. Emphasis is placed on both common and Latin
names. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 1212 – Introduction to Plant Pruning (1)
An introduction to the principles involved in plant pruning. Emphasis is placed
on pruning for light penetration and obtaining desired shapes. Root pruning
practice also will be covered. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour.
HORT 1213 – Pest Management (3)
A study of the identification and control of insects and diseases that attack
horticultural plants. Emphasis is placed on control (cultural and chemical) and
application procedures, including machinery. Integrated pest management
practices are discussed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
HORT 1214 – Horticulture Mechanics (3)
An introduction to adjustment, repair and maintenance of equipment used
in the horticulture industry. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
The art of film language is examined; i.e. lighting, sound, camera movement.
The understanding of the film as art increases appreciation of the cinema as art.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ F2 908
A survey course of the human condition as seen through film, drama, music,
literature, techniques, meaning and evaluation of individual works of western
art. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ HF 900
INDEPENDENT STUDY
INDP 1101 (1-4)
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and Dean
Courses designed for students desiring a specialized study not available in
regular offerings. Projects must be planned jointly by the student and instructor.
Maximum credit allowed is four semester hours. Lab ratio is one hour of credit
for two hours of lab work.
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
INEL 1231 – AC / DC Electronics (5)
This course is an introduction to basic AC and DC electronics, including
relationships of voltage, current, resistance and power to components and
circuits. Measuring and troubleshooting principles with AC/DC instruments
will be applied. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
151
INEL 1240 – Digital Electronics (6)
This course provides instruction and experience with binary and
hexadecimal number systems, binary codes and numerous digital gates and
circuits, such as flip-flops, counters, shift registers, decoders, multiplexers and
other digital circuitry. In addition, the course provides circuit design techniques
and digital applications. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.  ▶ IAI ~ EGR 932L
INEL 1241 – Digital Electronics (5)
This course provides instruction and experience with binary and
hexadecimal number systems, binary codes and numerous digital gates and
circuits, such as flip-flops, counters, shift registers, decoders, multiplexers and
other digital circuitry. In addition, the course provides circuit design techniques
and digital applications. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours. 
INEL 1250 – Electric Motors and Control Circuits (6)
Prerequisite: INEL 1291 or consent of instructor
This course enables students to work with various electrical circuits,
equipment and tools used in industry. It gives the student an awareness of the roles
of various components used and the maintenance required for proper operation,
with an emphasis on motor control devices. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.
INEL 2230 – Industrial Electronics (3)
Prerequisites: INEL 1250 and INEL 1265
This course familiarizes the student with many devices used in industry,
such as sensors and transducers, variable frequency drives, thyristors, etc., and
other specialized circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY
IST 1200 – Introduction to Industrial Technology (3)
This course covers the principal power systems used in industry. Applied
physics in the context of principles such as force in mechanical systems, fluid
systems, electrical systems and thermal systems will be covered. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
IST 1221 – Industrial Safety (2)
This course familiarizes the student with various applications of industrial
safety. The student will receive current information on a wide range of subjects,
including workman’s compensation laws and the Occupational Safety and Health
Act. Lecture 2 hours.
IST 1230 – Introduction to Robotics (3)
INEL 1260 – Solid-State Devices (6)
Prerequisite: INEL 1230
This course investigates filed effect transistors, bipolar transistors, small-signal
amplifiers, large-signal amplifiers, regulated power supplies, operational amplifiers
and troubleshooting for all circuits studied. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.
An introduction to the history of machine automation and reasons for its
acceleration. It includes physical characteristics of robots and their relationship
to other automated machines; the various control systems available for robots;
power transmission systems; robotic sensing systems, and an overview of robotic
applications. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1265 – Solid-State Electronics (4)
IST 1601 – Industrial Fire Control (.5)
Prerequisite: INEL 1231 or INEL 1291
This course investigates numerous types of solid state devices, diodes,
rectifiers, SCR’s, triac’s, transistors, small-signal amplifiers, large signal amplifiers,
regulated power supplies, operational amplifiers, and troubleshooting for all
circuits studied. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1290 – Electricity / Electronics Troubleshooting (3)
This course exposes the student to basic DC/AC theory, circuits, electrical
math, and components. Hands-on and troubleshooting are stressed. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1291 – Basic Electronics for Technicians (5)
This course covers basic digital gates and binary numbers, AC/DC theory
and troubleshooting of all components and circuits using analog and digital
meters. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
INEL 1601 – D.C. Electronics (1)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of Direct
Current Electronics, components, circuits, theories and laws. Lecture 1 hour.
INEL 1602 – A.C. Electronics (1)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of
Alternating Current Electronics, components, circuits, theories and laws.
Lecture 1 hour.
INEL 1603 – Introduction to Digital Electronics (1)
An introduction to the world of digital electronics, with an emphasis on
basic fundamentals of the subject. Lecture 1 hour.
INEL 1604 – A/C Fundamentals (3)
This course is designed for those interested in exploring Alternating Current
applications to electronics. Components and circuits will be covered. A/C motors
and motor characteristics also will be covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1605 – D/C Fundamentals (3)
This course is designed for those interested in exploring Direct Current
Electricity applications to electronics. D/C theory will be covered and students will
learn to use various electrical testing instruments. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1621 – Introduction to Electronics (2)
Prerequisite: ELEC 1230
This course introduces semiconductors, printed circuit boards, components,
amplifiers, power supplies, operation amplifiers, oscillators, logic circuits and
troubleshooting methods. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
INEL 1622 – Microprocessor Interfacing and Application (4)
This course reviews the 6800 microprocessor and investigates interfacing
methods. Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters are studied. Various
sensors, transducers, stepper motors and phase-locked loops experiments will
be conducted. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
152
Designed to prepare employees of local industrial firms in awareness of fire
potential and techniques and procedures in handling fire emergencies as they
might occur at the work site. Lecture .5 hour.
IST 1605 – Special Topics on Precision Products (4)
Hands-on experience with selected electronic components and devices found
in industry, including switching gears, motors and microprocessors. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 4 hours.
IST 1610 – Robotics and Automation (2)
This course provides a picture of computer-integrated manufacturing found
in industry today. The hardware and software of the course is reviewed and an
audiovisual introduction to Robotics and Automation is included. The course
introduces the computer as well as basic robotic terminology and includes a basic
training robot. Robotic concepts of degrees of freedom, work envelops, axis of
motion and coordinate systems are discussed. Accessories with the basic training
robot allow for practical exercises that demonstrate these concepts. Lecture 2 hours.
IST 1620 – Electronic Devices (2)
Prerequisite: IST 1610
This course discusses basic concepts of electronics with related mathematics
and physics. The concept of electric current and basic calculation of current, voltage,
resistance, power and impedance are shown, and it introduces the ideas and symbols
of basic logic gates. Hands-on exercises include simulation of logic gates as well as
setting up and testing for specific inputs and outputs. Lecture 2 hours.
IST 1630 – Industrial Robotics (2)
Prerequisite: IST 1620
This course introduces the Industrial Training Robot (a robot similar to
those used in industry today) and a computer-controlled interface unit. It enables
experimentation with sensors and other input sources in conjunction with the
interface unit. It also describes drive systems and the computer control of those
systems. The hands-on exercises use various devices, including proximity sensors,
photoelectric sensors and actuators, and it teaches the setting of inputs and outputs
with the computer. Other exercises include using the computer to control stepper
motors and pneumatic cylinders, driving and programming the robot, editing a
program and programming the robot to carry out a sub-routine. Point-to-point
programming and speed and repeatability also are discussed. Analog and digital
signals and their conversion systems are presented. Lecture 2 hours.
IST 1640 – Robotic Applications (2)
Prerequisite: IST 1630
This course is an accumulation of all the information learned in the
other 1600-level Industrial Service Technology courses. This course discusses
information technology within the manufacturing industry. Information on safe
robot usage, factory layout, material flow and robot reliability also are discussed.
Hands-on experience consists of combining the interfacing control editor and
its associated output devices with the Industrial Training Robot on an industrial
simulator. Lecture 2 hours.
IST 1650 – HAZ/MAT: Hazardous Materials Technology (1.5)
An introduction to Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response
(HAZWOPER) Training for the Hazardous Materials Technician. Content
includes an introduction to and characteristics of hazardous materials, risk
assessment, the basics of toxicology, exposure limits and emergency response
organization. Chemical, physical and biological hazards will be discussed
along with the basics. Both general and fire safety, air monitoring, spill control,
decontamination and equipment use in handling emergencies associated with
hazardous materials will be covered. In-plant emergency response personnel,
firefighters and others with emergency response responsibilities should benefit.
Lecture 1.5 hours.
IST 1660 – HAZ/MAT: General Site Worker (2.5)
This course addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response
health and safety training for general site workers. It includes an introduction
to HAZWOPER, industrial hygiene and toxicology, hazardous evaluations,
radiation exposure, protective equipment and respiration. Air monitoring,
instrumentation, site control, decontamination and hazards in confined spaces
also will be covered. It is intended for those working at uncontrolled hazardous
waste sites. Lecture 2.5 hours.
IST 1665 – Hazardous Materials: Annual Review (.5)
An annual refresher course for workers who need to maintain certification
to work with potentially hazardous materials at work on sites where the hazard
may exist. Topics covered will include regulatory review and changes, site safety,
respiratory protection, confined spaces, chemical protective clothing and a review
of basic standard operating procedures. Lecture .5 hour.
IST 1670 – Industrial Safety (1.5)
This course offers an in-depth look at methods and ideas to prevent personal
injury and property damage in a variety of workplaces. Lecture 1.5 hours.
IST 1671 – Industrial Safety (.5)
This course is designed for employees and management in industry who
wish to learn methods and ideas for preventing accidents and property damage
in the workplace. Lecture .5 hour.
IST 1672 – Light Equipment Operation (.5)
This course is designed to instruct students from a variety of industrial
settings on methods and ideas to prevent personal injury or property damage
when operating light industrial equipment. This course is suitable for both initial
and refresher training. Lecture .5 hour.
IST 1675 – Statistical Process Control (1)
This course is designed to familiarize industrial workers and supervisors
with Statistical Process Control concepts of quality control. Lecture 1 hour.
IST 2220 – Industrial Mechanics (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1201 or consent of the instructor
Theory, operation and maintenance practices involving gears, chains,
bearings, seals, couplers and other mechanical components of industrial
equipment will be covered. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
IST 2230 – Introduction to PLCs (3)
Prerequisites: INEL 1230 or INEL 1291 or consent of the instructor
This course explains the operation, construction and uses of a Programmable
Logic Controller. The student will program ladder logic circuits into several
types of PLCs. Using ladder logic diagrams, the course covers troubleshooting
PLC input and output circuit. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
IST 2231 – Advanced Programmable Controllers (3)
Prerequisite: IST 2230
This course is a continuation of the Introduction to Programmable
Controllers class. Programmable Logic Controller communication, data
manipulation instructions, math instructions, sequencer and shift register
instructions will be covered, along with a review of the basic instruction set.
Troubleshooting, editing and hardware and software will be emphasized. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
IST 2258 – Automated Control Systems (4)
Prerequisites: FLPR 1261 and INEL 1291
This course is designed to acquaint students with the control of automated
industrial machinery, including robots. Emphasis will be placed on electrical,
electronic and pneumatic control systems, ladder diagramming and
troubleshooting experiences. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
IST 2264 – Advanced Blueprint Reading (1-3)
This course is a continuation of ELEC 1231 which includes advanced
blueprint reading relative to industrial equipment and systems. Lecture 1-3
hours (variable credit).
INSURANCE
INS 1620 – Insurance and Licensure Review (.5)
This course provides the analysis and solution of problems encountered
in automobile travel and transportation. License renewal requirements and
procedures, dynamics of traffic, compensation of reaction time, specific traffic
laws in the State of Illinois and the changes of driving calisthenics with an aging
society will be presented. Automobile insurance issues regarding safety analysis
and planning will be the emphasis. Lecture .5 hour. (Repeatable 2 times)
IT SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
CNS 1210 – Network Fundamentals (5)
This course develops those skills necessary to design, build and maintain
small to medium- size networks.  This course uses Cisco Networking Academy
curriculum, and helps prepare students for the CCENT (Cisco Certified Entry
Networking Technician) certified exam. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1212 – MicroComp Hardware / Operating Systems (5)
This course will address the nomenclature, installation, configuration and
troubleshooting of Windows operating system, as well as familiarize the student
with the technology, maintenance and repair of microcomputers. Malfunctions
will be diagnosed to the board level. Computer architecture also will be discussed
and examined. Elements of the CompTIA A+ exam will be followed throughout
the course. The class offers a balance of lecture and laboratory time. Lecture 4
hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1213 – Computer Maintenance (3)
This course familiarizes students with the system components found in
microcomputers. Discussion will include terminology, maintenance and repair of
microcomputers. Labs are designed to familiarize the student with a wide variety
of PC and compatibles as well as build basic diagnostic and troubleshooting
skills. Malfunctions are diagnosed to board-level and some can be diagnosed
to chip-level. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1218 – Networking Basics (2.5)
This course familiarizes students with computer networking systems.
Students will develop the skills necessary to build small networks. The course also
helps prepare students for the Cisco CCENT (Cisco Certified Entry Networking
Technician) certification exam. Activities will offer a balance between classroom
and laboratory work. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 1 hour.
CNS 1219 – Routers and Routing Basics (2.5)
Prerequisite: CNS 1218
This course develops those skills necessary to design, build, and maintain
medium-size networks. The course also helps prepare students for the Cisco
CCENT (Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician) certification exam.
Activities will offer a balance between classroom and laboratory work. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 1 hour.
CNS 1221 – Network Router Technology (5)
Prerequisite: CNS 1210
This course uses Cisco Academy Networking Academic curriculum, and helps
prepare students for the Cisco CCNA (Cisco Certified Networking Associate)
certification exam.  Topics to be covered include LAN and WAN design,
segmentation using bridges, routers, switches in a LAN environment, VLANs,
and wide area networking protocols. Cisco router commands and configurations
in a WAN environment will also be covered. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1224 – Operating Systems (4)
This course will address nomenclature, internal and external commands,
batch file construction, installation, and configuration for MS-DOS and Microsoft
Windows. Emphasis will be placed on the current version of Microsoft’s Operating
System.  This course will also introduce students to these operating systems with
special emphasis on Windows installation, setup, modification, and optimization.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1231 – Windows Professional (3)
Prerequisite: CNS 1212
This course will introduce students to Microsoft Windows Professional through
lectures, demonstrations, discussions and hands-on lab exercises. Students will
install Windows Professional using virtualization software. Students will learn
about and use the various tools for administering and configuring Windows.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
153
CNS 1232 – Windows Server (3)
Prerequisite: CNS 1231 or consent of instructor
This course will introduce Microsoft Windows Server through lectures,
demonstrations, discussions and hands-on labs. Students will perform an
attended installation of Windows Server and learn about the various file systems
supported by Windows. Students will install Windows Server using virtualization
software and will learn to use Server Manager and Active Directory tools for
configuring and administering Windows Server. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1234 – Linux Networking (3)
This course develops skills necessary to set up and perform fundamental
system administration activities in the Linux operating system. Lecture 2 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1235 – Linux Server (4)
Prerequisite: CNS 1234 or consent of instructor
This course provides the knowledge and skills students need to install,
configure and administer a Linux server for mission-critical network services.
Students will learn to setup and administer a Linux server through the use of
lectures, demonstrations, discussions and hands-on labs. Lecture 3 hours. Lab
2 hours.
CNS 1240 – Digital Fundamentals (3)
This course provides instruction and experience with binary and
hexadecimal number systems, binary codes and numerous digital gates and
circuits, such as flip-flops, and other digital circuitry. In addition, the course
provides techniques to connect the digital circuits to the real world. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 1620 – Computer Networking Basics (.5)
This course will cover the basics of networking a Small Office / Home Office
(SOHO). Topics include basic components of a network, types of networking
hardware and designing a small network. Lecture .5 hour.
CNS 2221 – Intro to Communications (3)
Focusing on all aspects of telecommunications, this course provides a
comprehensive overview of how information, including voice and data, travels
throughout the world. A high-level overview of telecommunications, the
technical aspects of the field, and applications in telecommunications will
demonstrate the practical uses of telecommunications. Lecture 3 hours.
CNS 2224 – LAN Switching (4)
Prerequisite: CNS 1221
This course develops those advanced skills necessary to design, build and
maintain small to medium-sized networks. The course will follow elements of
the Cisco Certified Network Professional program. Activities will offer a balance
between classroom and laboratory work. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 2228 – Network Security (3)
Prerequisite: CNS 1232, CNS 1234 and CNS 2224, or consent of instructor
This course develops fundamental network security skills necessary to build,
test and deploy a secure network. The course will follow elements of the Comp
TIA Security and professional certification. The course will offer a balance of
lecture and lab experience. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
CNS 2230 – Network Implementation (3)
Prerequisites: CNS 1232, 1235, and 2224
This course will demonstrate the professional skills necessary to design,
implement, document, optimize, and troubleshoot Local and Wide Area
Networks based on a variety of technologies. The student will use the standard
methodology for network design that assures the building of resilient,
manageable networks. Lecture 1 hour on-line. Lab 4 hours.
JAPANESE
JAPN 1103 – Japanese for Business Travelers (3)
This course is designed to assist English-speakers who travel to Japan for
professional purposes. Course content will address survival language skills
such as those used in greetings, transportation and scheduling appointments.
Aspects of Japanese culture that affect business relations also will be discussed.
Lecture 3 hours.
JOURNALISM
JOUR 1101 – Mass Media in Modern Society (3)
If English review course(s) are required, student must complete ENGL 1410,
ENGL 1412, or PREP 1404. If Reading course is required, student must complete
READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
This is a course, applicable to all majors, designed to expose students to the
forms, theories of use and criticism of the mass media as these media operate in
the United States and elsewhere. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MC 911
JOUR 1102 – Introduction to Journalism (3)
Prerequisite: JOUR 1101 or permission of the instructor
The goal of this course is to introduce students to basic news writing and
editing. Lecture 3 hours.
JOUR 1103 – Journalism Practicum (1.5)
Prerequisite: JOUR 1101 or permission of the instructor
Through directed work on the student newspaper, students will practice
writing and editing skills. Hours are arranged with the journalism instructor.
(Repeatable up to 4 hours credit.) Lab 3 hours.
LEADERSHIP
LEAD 1101 – PTK Leadership Development Studies (3)
The Phi Theta Kappa Leadership Development Studies course is designed
to provide emerging and existing leaders opportunities to explore the concept
of leadership and to develop and improve their leadership skills. The course
integrates readings from the humanities, experiential exercises, films and
contemporary readings on leadership. Students will gain a basic understanding
of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of
leadership, an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership
and an awareness of one’s own ability and style of leadership. This course enables
students to develop leadership skills through study, observation and application.
Lecture 3 hours.
LEAD 1102 – Furthering Leadership Potential (3)
This course is designed for students who want to explore leadership at the
organizational level. Students will learn more about the organization, including
philosophy, infrastructure, funding, planning, budgeting, and employee
structure. Students will explore team building, motivating team members,
interviewing, evaluation and retention. Service learning will be integrated into
the course. Lecture 3 hours.
LIBRARY SCIENCE
LIBS 1101 – Information in Society (2)
If English review course(s) are required, student must complete ENGL 1410,
ENGL 1412, or PREP 1404. If Reading course is required, student must complete
READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
This is a two-credit course designed to help students develop research skills
that will assist them in locating, evaluating, and using information effectively
and ethically. Students will also learn to utilize information by developing a
research topic, creating an online learning tool, and documenting sources by
creating citations.
MACHINING TECHNOLOGY
MACH 1201 – Machining Technology I (4)
This course is the first in a series to prepare students to obtain entry-level
positions in the machine trades. The course is designed to introduce the student
to basic skills in lathe operation, mill operation, drill press operation and layout.
Emphasis will be on basic shop skills, machine operation and safe work habits.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
MACH 1202 – Machining Technology II (4)
Prerequisite: MACH 1201
This course is the second in a series in the machine trades. It is designed
to improve the skills developed in MACH 1201. The student also should learn
additional and advanced skills in lathe operation, milling operation, drill press
operation and other types of machinery. Emphasis will be placed on precision
and quality of work. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
MACH 1203 – Machining Technology III (3)
Prerequisite: MACH 1202
This course is the third in a series in the machine trades. The course is
designed to improve the skills developed in MACH 1201 and MACH 1202. The
student also will develop additional advanced skills. Emphasis will be placed on
154
precision, quality, safety, developing machining processes and following written
machining processes. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
MACH 1205 – Special Problems in Machining (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1201 or higher
This course is designed to enable the student to become proficient in solving
problems related to the machine tool trades and machining operations. Using
industry-accepted procedures, students will solve layout and machining problems.
The “Machinery’s Handbook” will be used as the textbook. Lecture 3 hours.
MANAGEMENT
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
MGMT 2201 – Principles of Management (3)
A study of business organizations from management’s viewpoint. All
concepts of management are examined, including basic functions of planning,
organizing, leading, controlling and decision-making skills required of an
effective manager. Lecture 3 hours.
MGMT 2207 – Supervision (3)
The course assists new and potential supervisors in the analysis and solution
of problems encountered by a contemporary supervisor. For experienced
supervisors, it serves as a valuable refresher course. Topics covered include
delegating authority, planning/time management, giving directives, introducing
change, supervising protected groups, work group dynamics, performance
appraisal and budgeting. Lecture 3 hours.
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
MFG 1201 – Introduction to Materials (3)
Studies those materials used in today’s modern manufacturing facilities.
Composites, plastics, metals and rubber characteristics will be studied. The
concepts and procedures used to manufacture products will provide the basis
for this class. Lecture 3 hours.
MFG 1205 – Manufacturing Processes (3)
This course is an introduction to basic processes, equipment and materials
used in a manufacturing environment. Includes plastics, metal removal,
materials joining, casting techniques and current developments in processes.
Lecture 3 hours.
MFG 1211 – Industrial Metrology (3)
This course gives individuals an introduction to the methods and equipment
used in industrial measurement and inspection. Includes destructive and
nondestructive testing, optical devices, vernier calipers, micrometers, lasers,
measuring techniques and standards. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
of a semester may begin another course immediately. An instructor
is available to help students. In addition, a few Math classes are
now available over the Internet. Students should check the Course
Schedule published each semester for these classes.
MATH 1105 – Basic Concepts of Statistics (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
Basic concepts of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (estimating
parameters and testing hypothesis) experimental design, correlation and
regression. This course is designed to help the student understand the language
of statistics and to promote an understanding of statistical concepts and
procedures. Lecture 3 hours.
MATH 1107 – Contemporary College Mathematics (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
This course is designed to fulfill the general education math requirements
for the Associate of Arts degree. Topics covered include set/logic, graph theory,
probability and statistics, geometry, logic and other selected topics. Three or
four of these topics are studied in depth. This course is not a prerequisite for any
other math course. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 904
MATH 1108 – College Algebra (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
This course covers complex numbers, quadratic equations, polynomial
and rational inequalities, the algebra of functions, graphing functions, inverse
functions, rational functions, polynomial functions, systems of equations,
determinants, Cramer’s Rule, the binomial theorem and other selected topics.
Lecture 3 hours.
MATH 1109 – Plane Trigonometry (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 with a “C” or better
A course dealing with definitions of trigonometric functions, graphing,
formulas, identities, solution of triangles using trigonometric functions
and logarithmetric functions, solution of trigonometric equations, inverse
trigonometric functions and their graphs, complex numbers and the solution
of practical problems. Lecture 3 hours.
MATH 1110 – College Algebra and Trigonometry (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
Recommended for students needing to fulfill their five-hour requirement
in College Algebra and Trigonometry in order to be able to complete Calculus
requirements by the end of their fourth semester. It covers all the main topics
in MATH 1108 and MATH 1109, plus other selected topics from these areas.
Students taking this course will not receive credit for MATH 1108 or MATH
1109. Lecture 5 hours.
MATH 1111 – Statistics (3)
This course gives individuals an introduction to production and inventory
control systems. Includes forecasting, master production scheduling, material
requirements planning, capacity requirements planning, inventory management
and production activity control. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
A course recommended for students in such curricula as math, science,
economics, education and business. Topics will include summarization of data,
fundamentals of probability, probability distributions, normal distributions, sample
mean and standard deviation, statistical estimations, Chi-square distributions and
linear correlation and regression. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 902
MFG 1230 – Blueprint Reading (3)
MATH 1121 – Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5)
MFG 1220 – Production and Inventory Control (3)
MARKETING
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 and MATH 1109 with a “C” or better or MATH 1110
with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
A first course in calculus and analytic geometry. This course includes limits,
techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, curve sketching,
introduction to techniques of integration and applications of the definite integral.
Lecture 5 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MTH 901 / M1 900-1
MRKT 2201 – Principles of Marketing (3)
MATH 1130 – Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (4)
This course is designed to enable the student to become proficient in reading
fabrication and assembly blueprints. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
A study of the essentials of marketing management with emphasis on the
strategies of marketing decision making: product, distribution, promotion and
pricing. Major environmental forces which affect marketing decision making
also are studied – economic, legal, social/cultural, competitive and the consumer.
Lecture 3 hours.
MATHEMATICS
The Math Lab gives the self-motivated student flexibility in taking
mathematics courses. Some courses may be taken in the Math Lab
on an individualized, self-paced basis. A student can progress at
his/her own rate and may finish the course before the semester is
over. If more time is needed, students may take an additional eight
weeks to complete the class. Those completing a course in the middle
Prerequisite: MATH 1407 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
Topics include problem-solving, set theory and Venn diagrams, data
collection and analysis, probability, number theory, nondecimal number systems
and mental and electronic computation. It is designed to prepare prospective
teachers for contemporary math concepts presented in elementary school
textbooks. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MATH 1201 – Technical Mathematics (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1401 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
Topics to be covered include: percentage; powers of ten; ratios and
proportions; algebra topics, including polynomials, equations and formulas; an
introduction to trigonometry, including basic right triangle formulas. Practical
applications of math concepts are stressed. Use of a calculator is included.
Lecture 3 hours.
155
MATH 1202 – Business Mathematics (3)
MATH 2110 – Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)
MATH 1401 – Computational Math (3)
MATH 2115 – Calculus for Business (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1401 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
A course primarily offered for students who plan to pursue the business
curriculum in college. It is a problem-solving course with emphasis on improving
skill in the fundamental processes of math as used in business. Included are such
topics as percentage, simple and compound interest, annuities, payrolls, taxes
and deductions, discounts, depreciation and installment sales. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 1130 with a “C” or better. This can not take the place of
MATH 1108. It can count as a Math elective.
This course includes geometric figures, congruence, similarity, symmetry,
transformations, measurement, parallelism, perpendicularity and constructions.
Topics are approached both formally and informally using a laboratory setting
and computer software. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 903
Emphasis is on increasing the student’s skill in the fundamental processes
in arithmetic with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents. In addition
to the review of fundamental operations in arithmetic, the course includes such
topics as ratio and proportion, multiples, prime factorization and applications.
It may be taken in a classroom setting or on an independent study basis through
the Math Lab or in a computer-based classroom. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
The course includes techniques of differentiation, increasing/decreasing
functions, curve sketching, max-min problems in business and social sciences,
partial derivations, La Grange multipliers and elementary techniques of
integration. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 900-B
MATH 1402 – Algebra for College Students (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1121 with a “C” or better
A second course in calculus and analytic geometry. This course includes
transcendental functions, circular functions, techniques of integration and
applications of integration, sequences, infinite series, polar coordinates and
conic sections. Lecture 5 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MTH 902 / M1 900-2
Prerequisite: MATH 1401 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
A course intended for those students who have had little or no training
in algebra or who feel the need for an intensive review in the fundamentals of
algebra. Topics to be covered include elementary algebraic operations, signed
numbers, exponents and polynomials, simple equations, special products and
factors, algebraic fractions and quadratic equations. This course may be taken
in a classroom setting or on an independent study basis through the Math Lab
or in a computer-based classroom. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MATH 1407 – Geometry and Intermediate Algebra (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1402 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement
A course for students who have not taken a geometry course and have a
limited algebra background. Geometry is covered first – basic terms/concepts,
theorems, angles, congruent triangles, parallels and parallelograms, applications
involving area, perimeter, volume circumference, ratio-proportion, similarities
and regular polygons. Algebra topics – factoring, algebraic fractions, systems
of equations, quadratic equations, exponents, radicals and roots, graphing,
functions, inequalities and selected topics. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MATH 1408 – Math for Health Occupations (6)
Prerequisite: MATH 1401 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement and
Allied Health major
A course intended to serve as a bridge for students in the health field who need
an intense study of the fundamental processes in arithmetic and algebra in order
to prepare for the college credit classes in their field. Topics will include whole
numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, algebraic operations, signed numbers,
simple equations, proportions and special products. Lecture 5 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MATH 1601 – Math Review for Nurses
A course intended for nursing students who need an intense review of the
fundamental processes in arithmetic and elementary algebra in order to prepare
for the nursing program entrance exam. Topics will include whole numbers,
fractions, decimals, percents, algebraic operations, signed numbers, simple
equations, and special products. This course will be taught as a pass/fail course.
Lecture .5 hour, repeatable three times.
MATH 2103 – Business Statistics (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 2106 with a “C” or better.
This course is designed to provide the student with the statistical tools
necessary to make effective business decisions. Areas of study include
organizing and summarizing statistical data, probability, sampling, parametric
and nonparametric tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance, regression and
correlation analysis and time series. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 902 / BUS 901
MATH 2106 – Finite Mathematics (3)
MATH 2122 – Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5)
MATH 2123 – Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 2122 with a “C” or better
A third course in calculus and analytic geometry. It includes threedimensional vectors and analytic geometry, multivariable functions and partial
derivatives, integral calculus of multivariable functions, double- and tripleintegration, line and surface integrals and theorems of Green, Stokes and Gauss.
Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MTH 903 / M1 900-3
MATH 2130 – Differential Equations (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 2122 with a “C” or better
A course covering methods of solving ordinary differential equations. Topics:
first-order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant
coefficients, the general linear equation, variation of parameters, undetermined
coefficients, linear independence and the Wronskian, exact equations, separation
of variables, second-order differential equations, LaPlace transforms, systems of
linear differential equations, numerical methods and applications from physics,
engineering, business and other areas. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MTH 912
MEDICAL CODING
MEDC 1200 – Medical Office Procedures (3)
This course will provide life skills that are applicable to all types of health care
occupations. It will help students explore their career options and understand
the skills and education they need to achieve success. Students will learn how to
best market themselves to potential and current employers, tailor their resumes
to match a job opening, search for job opportunities and establish career goals.
Lecture 3 hours.
MEDC 1206 – Introduction to Medical Coding (3)
Prerequisites: HECO 1202 and CSCI 1102
This course covers ICD diagnostics and procedural coding conventions
and guidelines for outpatient, inpatient, and ambulatory care. Lecture 1 hour.
Lab 4 hours.
MEDC 1208 – Intermediate Medical and CPT Coding (3)
Prerequisites: ALH 1201, CSCI 1102, HECO 1202 and MEDC 1206
This course covers ICD diagnostics and procedural coding conventions
and guidelines for outpatient, inpatient, and ambulatory care. It also covers
Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) which is a set of codes, descriptions,
and guidelines that describe procedures and services performed by physicians
and other qualified health care providers. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 1108 with a “C” or better or equivalent placement with
proof of Geometry prerequisite
Covers operation of matrices, math systems, special matrices, determinants,
inverse matrices, systems of linear equations, linear programming, probability,
decision theory, permutations and combinations. Introduces applications in
business administration, economics, agriculture and engineering. Lecture 3
hours. ▶ IAI ~ M1 906
Prerequisites: MEDC 1206 and HIT 2207
This course is for students completing the Medical Coding Specialist Certificate
program. It focuses on directed practice activities and supervised clinical
experience while performing actual tasks and responsibilities. Students will have
the status of learner and will not be considered agency employees. Lab 6 hours.
MATH 2108 – Linear Algebra with Applications (3)
MEDC 1211 – Selected Topics in Medical Coding (.5-4)
Prerequisite: MATH 2122
This is a study of basic concepts and techniques of linear algebra, including
systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear
transformation, eigenvectors and applications, with emphasis on business and
engineering problems. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ MTH 911
156
MEDC 1210 – Coding Practicum (3)
The course will include an in-depth study of topics in the Medical Coding
field. The exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the
subject studied. Lecture .5-4 hours.
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
MLT 1200 – Introduction to Clinical Laboratory (3)
Prerequisites: Admission to MLT Program and ZOO 1105 (can be waived with
consent of Program Director)
Acquaints students with the profession of medical laboratory technology.
Includes an overview of major disciplines in laboratory medicine, basic laboratory
mathematics, collection and handling of specimens, handling and care of
lab equipment, preparation of solutions and media, methods of sterilization
and elements of quality control. Introduces disciplines of hematology,
immunohematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis and microbiology. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MLT 1201 – MLT Serology (1.5)
Prerequisites: MLT 1200 and ZOO 1106
This course covers an introduction to immunology, with emphasis on
applied serology. The immune response, properties and synthesis of antibodies,
antigens, antibody reactions and serological procedures most widely performed
in the clinical laboratory will be covered in the eight-week course. Lecture 1
hour. Lab 1 hour.
MLT 1202 – MLT Clinical Microscopy (1.5)
Prerequisites: MLT 1200 and ZOO 1106
A study of the theory and microscopic examination of urine and other body
fluids (i.e., synovial fluid, thoracentesis fluid, semen and gastric fluid). Lecture
1 hours. Lab 1 hours.
MLT 1210 – Clinical Rotation I (3)
Prerequisites: MLT 2203, MLT 2204 and MLT 2207
Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate in hematology, serology,
immunohematology and clinical microscopy. 240 clinical hours during last 6
1/2 weeks of semester.
MLT 1211 – MLT Phlebotomy (3)
Prerequisites: MLT 1200 or consent of the instructor
This course covers the phlebotomist’s role in health care, confidentiality and
ethics, Patient’s Bill of Rights, Quality Assurance, basic anatomy and physiology
of the circulatory system, safety, infection control, isolation techniques, OSHA
standards, handling accidental needle stick exposures, phlebotomy equipment,
phlebotomy technique such as the routine venipuncture, dermal punctures,
drawing difficult patients, specimen collection and handling, compliance,
customer service, patient identification procedures and competency in phlebotomy.
In addition, the student will learn the theory of arterial punctures, but will only
observe arterial draws in the clinical setting. Lecture 2 hour. Lab 2 hour.
MLT 1600 – Introduction to Phlebotomy (3)
This course is intended for the individual desiring a career as a Phlebotomist.
A phlebotomist is responsible for collecting blood specimens as ordered by a
physician or other health care professional. Requirements for the course include
a completed application, history and physical by the second day of class, as well
as required immunizations, including one dose of Hepatitis B vaccine. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MLT 2203 – MLT Immunohematology (4)
Prerequisites: MLT 1201 and MLT 1202; CHE 1101 and CHE 1102; MATH
1108; ZOO 1105 and ZOO 1106
A study of the blood groups of man and their significance in blood-banking
and transfusion services. Included are the inheritance and properties of blood
group antigens and their corresponding antibodies, methods of detection and
identification, hemolytic disease processes and the collection and processing
of blood and blood components to ensure safe transfusion. Blood group
immunology, record keeping and quality control are stressed. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
MLT 2205 – MLT Clinical Chemistry (4)
Prerequisites: MLT 2203, MLT 2204, MLT 2207; CHE 1101, CHE 1102; ZOO
1105, ZOO 1106; MATH 1108
A study of the diagnostic chemistry tests in the average clinical laboratory. It
includes normal physiology, principles of the reactions and interpretation of test
results. Also includes basic instrumentation, laboratory mathematics and quality
control. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MLT 2210 – MLT Clinical Rotation II (3)
Prerequisites: MLT 1210, MLT 2205 and MLT 2206
Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate in clinical chemistry / clinical
microbiology and clinical microbiology / serology. 240 clinical hours during last
6 1/2 weeks of semester.
MLT 2228 – MLT Hematology and Hemostasis (5)
Prerequisites: MLT 1201 and MLT 1202; CHE 1101 and CHE 1102; ZOO 1105
and ZOO 1106; MATH 1108
This course offers an introduction to the study of clinical hematology and
hemostasis, which emphasizes the basic procedures performed in most clinical
laboratories as well as their uses in the diagnosis and follow-up of hematological
and coagulation disorders. The role of the laboratory in the diagnosis of
anemias, leukemias, myeloproliferative disorders and other diseases affecting
the hematopoietic system is stressed along with the hemostatic component,
coagulation factors, coagulation cascade mechanism, heredity and aquired
bleeding disorders, coagulation factor deficiencies, therapeutic regimes, and
laboratory methods for the analysis of clinical conditions. Lecture 4 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
MLT 2229 – MLT Applied Clinical Microbiology (5)
Prerequisites: MLT 2203, 2204 and 2207; CHE 1101 and 1102; ZOO 1105; ZOO
1106; MATH 1108; MICR 1101
A study of the normal and pathogenic microflora of man, with emphasis on
the methods used for isolation, recognition and identification of microorganisms
of medical significance. Included are the preparation of media, selection and
inoculation of media for initial isolation, descriptive cellular and colonial
morphology, stains and staining reactions, drug susceptibility testing and
procedures used for species identification. Emphasis is on host-parasite
relationships, medical bacteriology, virology, parasitology and mycobacteriology.
Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MICROBIOLOGY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
MICR 1101 – Basic Microbiology (4)
A study of basic principles of microbiology, including morphology,
physiology, cultivation, pathology, reproduction and control of bacteria.
Activities of viruses, protozoa, algae, molds, yeasts and invertebrate parasites
are included. Emphasis is on medically significant microorganisms. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 4 hours.
MICR 1111 – Microbiology (5)
A study of the basic principles of Microbiology, including bacteriology,
virology, phycology, mycology and parasitology. It is designed for students in
allied health careers, dental hygiene, dental technology, respiratory therapy,
animal science and others. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
MINING TECHNOLOGY
MIN 1210 – Introduction to Mining (3)
Students are introduced to mining as it exists in the world today. Emphasis is
placed on creating a true and relatively complete picture of the mining industry
with special concentration on the basics of practical mining from the viewpoint
of health and safety. Lecture 3 hours.
MIN 1220 – Mine Atmosphere and Strata Control (3)
This course will enable students to become proficient in mine ventilation
systems and practices as well as mine, roof and rib control systems and devices.
Lecture 3 hours.
MIN 1221 – Machine Operations (2)
This course is designed to enter all phases of the operation of mining
machinery. All machines and systems involved in the production and hauling of
coal, such as supportive machines involved in water removal, man and materials
handling, and mine blasting will be covered. Emphasis is placed on job safety
analysis and planning. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
MIN 1240 – Mechanics (3)
Prerequisite: MIN 1210
Theory and practice in the mechanical maintenance of the various industrial
machines are covered. This includes drive trains, gears, conveyers, belts, chains
and other mechanical parts of industrial equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
MIN 2225 – Repair / Maintenance of Prep Plant (3)
An introduction to the operation of a coal cleaning and preparation plant in
accordance with approved bureau and state standards. The types of maintenance
and repair needed for preparation plants will be covered. Lecture 2 hours. Lab
2 hours.
157
MIN 2227 – Mine Health, Safety and Rescue (5)
MUSI 1110 – Introduction to American Music (3)
MIN 2240 – Mine Electrical Systems (4)
MUSI 1111 – Music Literature (3)
This course relates knowledge of mine ventilation systems, roof and rib
control systems, dust and noise control devices to practical mining with
emphasis on the health and safety aspects. Intensive instruction in mine gases
and gas detection devices with proper procedures and devices used in a mining
emergency situation is included Lecture 5 hours.
Prerequisites: INEL 1250 and INEL 1291, or consent of instructor
Mine Electrical Systems is designed to cover a broad range of mine power
and control systems from incoming high voltage to the mining equipment.
The mine substation, transmission, distribution and protective equipment and
operation are covered. Mine-wide control systems, atmospheric monitoring,
communication and tracking systems are investigated. Installation, inspection
and testing of permissible and non-permissible equipment are taught. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This course is a historical survey of American popular music and its heritage.
Emphasis is placed on terminology, forms and styles, with special emphasis on
listening. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ F1 904
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This course is a study of performance genres, representative composers
throughout music history and a moderate depth understanding and basic
analysis of their compositions and the styles and forms of the music periods.
Lecture 3 hours.
MUSI 1120 – Applied Music I (Private Voice) (1-2)
Prerequisite: IST 2220
This course includes the advanced diagnosing and repair of malfunctions
in mining machines and how to correct these problems with the least amount
of “down” time. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1140 or consent of instructor
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course will
provide the student with instruction in vocal technique, stylistic interpretation of
assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, guidance in pronunciation
and comprehension of text, and communication through both sound and sight
from the recital stage. Repeatable once. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSIC
MUSI 1121 – Applied Music I (Woodwinds) (1-2)
MIN 2245 – Advanced Mechanics Maintenance (3)
MUSI 1100 – Music Appreciation (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
A course for the non-music major designed to develop an understanding and
appreciation of music. It covers fundamentals, terminologies, forms and styles, with
an emphasis on listening. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ F1 900
MUSI 1101 – Music Theory I (3)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1109 or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in
MUSI 1103 and MUSI 1145 is required
This course is designed to further develop a student’s background in music
theory and provide the student with the foundational knowledge they will need
to be a more effective writer and player. The basic elements of music theory,
including melody, harmony, rhythm and form will be examined. Lecture 3 hours.
MUSI 1102 – Music Theory II (3)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1101 and MUSI 1103; concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1106
and MUSI 1146 is required
A continuation of MUSI 1101, exploring music theory in further depth leading
toward an understanding of the structure and function of chords and the eventual
analysis and composition of music. Lecture 3 hours.
MUSI 1103 – Aural Skills I (1)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1109 or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in
MUSI 1101 and MUSI 1145 is required
A laboratory course designed to compliment Music Theory I. This course
is designed to help develop the skill of sight singing; emphasis in ear training,
sight singing, and keyboarding skills. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1105 – Practicum in Music Theatre (3)
This course is a music practicum course for students involved in the Rend
Lake College Musical Theatre. Through directed work on musical productions,
the student will gain singing, acting, playing in an ensemble, and/or technical
skills. Hours to be arranged with the music director. Repeatable for up to 15
hours credit. Lab 6 hours.
MUSI 1106 – Aural Skills II (1)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1101 and MUSI 1103; concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1102
and MUSI 1146 is required
A laboratory course designed to complement Music Theory II. This course
is designed to help develop the skill of sight singing: emphasis in ear training,
sight singing and dictation. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1109 – Fundamentals of Music (3)
A course for the non-music major designed as an introduction to beginning
notation, ear training, sight singing and fundamental harmonic study. Emphasis
is placed upon practical usage of music theory concepts through the keyboard.
(Recommended as a transfer course for elementary and special education
majors.) Lecture 3 hours.
158
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course
will provide the student with instruction in woodwind technique, stylistic
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
once. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1122 – Applied Music I (Brass) (1-2)
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course will
provide the student with instruction in brass technique, stylistic interpretation
of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and communication
through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable once. Lab .5
hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1123 – Applied Music I (Strings) (1-2)
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course will
provide the student with instruction in string technique, stylistic interpretation
of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and communication
through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable once. Lab .5
hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1124 – Applied Music I (Percussion) (1-2)
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course
will provide the student with instruction in percussion technique, stylistic
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
once. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1126 – Applied Music I (Classical Guitar) (1-2)
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course
will provide the student with instruction in classical guitar technique, stylistic
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
once. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1127 – Applied Music I (Keyboard) (1-2)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1145 & 1146 or consent of instructor
The study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This course
will provide the student with instruction in keyboard technique, stylistic
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
once. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 1140 – Voice Class I (1)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1109 is strongly recommended
An introductory course designed to introduce the student to the mechanics
of good vocal production. Through lecture and discussion of technique and
anatomy, the course will cover vocal exercises, posture, physical and vocal warmups. Materials studied may include vocal exercises, English, Italian and German
or French art songs, popular standards, and musical theater selections. Repertory
will be assigned according to the student’s needs and abilities. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1145 – Piano Class I (1)
MUSI 2108 – Introduction to Jazz (3)
This course is designed for the student to have an opportunity to learn the
basic principles of piano playing. Beginning with note reading, it progresses next
to sight reading, technical exercise to aid in the development of skills used in
the playing of the instrument, and ultimately, the addition of beginning piano
repertoire. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: If reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
A course for the non-music major designed to develop an understanding
and appreciation of the history and nature of jazz music. It covers historical
background, forms, aesthetics, personalities, literature and evolution of jazz and
its influences on art and music. Lecture 3 hours.
MUSI 1146 – Piano Class II (1)
MUSI 2120 – Applied Music II (Private Voice) (1-2)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1145
This course is a continuation of MUSI 1145 (Piano Class I). Student will learn
and review musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific pianorelated terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures;
exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales; exercises and repertoire
using major and minor, diminished, and augmented triads in root position and
inversions; chord progressions; ensemble playing of two to four parts; and use of
the damper pedal. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1159 – Concert Choir I (1)
Auditions will be held during the first week of the semester
An auditioned vocal ensemble that performs in concerts and at college
functions and strives to build a high-quality repertoire representative of
collegiate or semiprofessional organizations. This course is designed to provide
a performing outlet for talented college musicians. Required for all vocal music
majors. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1161 – Concert Band I (1)
Auditions will be held during the first week of the semester
The concert band provides a playing outlet for experienced band musicians.
At least one concert per semester will be given. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1163 – Community Orchestra I (1)
The Community Orchestra performs in concert and at various college
functions, striving to build a high-quality repertoire. The organization is
designed to provide a performing outlet to talented college and community
musicians. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 1164 – Instrumental Ensemble I (1)
This course is open to Rend Lake College students and the community by
permission of the director. It provides an opportunity for continued development
of instrumental performance ability. Functioning every semester, the group
performs in various styles. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1120
The continued study of applied music through a weekly private lesson. This
course will provide the student with continued instruction in vocal technique,
stylistic interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context,
guidance in pronunciation and comprehension of text, and communication through
both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable three times. Lab .5 hour for
each hour of credit.
MUSI 2121 – Applied Music II (Woodwinds) (1-2)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1121
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in woodwind technique, stylistic,
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 2122 – Applied Music II (Brass) (1-2)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1122
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in brass technique, stylistic,
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 2123 – Applied Music II (Strings) (1-2)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1123
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in string technique, stylistic,
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 2124 – Applied Music II (Percussion) (1-2)
Each choral organization performs in concerts and at college functions
and strives to build a high-quality repertoire representative of collegiate or
semiprofessional organizations. They are designed to provide a performing outlet
for talented college and community musicians. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1124
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in percussion technique, stylistic,
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 2101 – Music Theory III (3)
MUSI 2126 – Applied Music II (Classical Guitar) (1-2)
MUSI 1166 – Community Chorus I (1)
Prerequisite: MUSI 1102 and MUSI 1106; concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2103
is required
A continuation of MUSI 1102, with an emphasis on the analysis and writing
of chromatic harmonies. Also included are an introduction to 18th century
counterpoint and the analysis of various classical forms. Lecture 3 hours.
MUSI 2102 – Music Theory IV (3)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1126
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in classical guitar technique,
stylistic, interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context,
and communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage.
Repeatable three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
MUSI 2103 – Aural Skills III (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1127
The continued study of applied music through a weekly, private lesson. This
course will provide the student with instruction in keyboard technique, stylistic,
interpretation of assigned literature, discussion of its historical context, and
communication through both sound and sight from the recital stage. Repeatable
three times. Lab .5 hour for each hour of credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 2101 and MUSI 2103; concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2104
is required
A continuation of MUSI 2101, with an emphasis on the analysis and writing of
extended and Chromatic harmonies. This course will also include an introduction
to the theory, analysis, and practices of nineteenth and twentieth century music.
Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MUSI 1102 and MUSI 1106; this is the third of a four-semester
sequence of courses which should be taken concurrently with MUSI 2101
A laboratory course designed to complement Music Theory III. This course
is designed to further develop the skill of sight singing; emphasis in ear training,
sight singing, and dictation. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 2104 – Aural Skills IV (1)
Prerequisite: MUSI 2101 and MUSI 2103; this is the fourth of a four-semester
sequence of courses which should be taken concurrently with MUSI 2102
A laboratory course designed to compliment Music Theory IV. This course
is designed to further develop the skill of sight singing: emphasis in ear training,
sight singing, and dictation. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 2127 – Applied Music II (Keyboard) (1-2)
MUSI 2159 – Concert Choir II (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1159
A continuation of MUSI 1159. An auditioned vocal ensemble that performs
in concerts and at college functions and strives to build a high-quality repertoire
representative of collegiate or semiprofessional organizations. This course is
designed to provide a performing outlet for talented college musicians. Required
for all vocal music majors. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 2161 – Concert Band II (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1161
The concert band provides a playing outlet for experienced band musicians.
At least one concert per semester will be given. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
159
MUSI 2163 – Community Orchestra II (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1163
A continuation of MUSI 1163. The Community Orchestra performs in
concert and at various college functions, striving to build a high-quality
repertoire. The organization is designed to provide a performing outlet to talented
college and community musicians. Repeatable once. Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 2164 – Instrumental Ensemble II (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1164
A continuation of MUSI 1164. This course provides opportunity for continued
and advanced development of instrumental performance ability. Functioning
every semester, the group performs in various styles. Repeatable three times.
Lab 2 hours.
MUSI 2166 – Community Chorus II (1)
Prerequisite: Two semesters of MUSI 1166
A continuation of MUSI 1166. Each choral organization performs in
concerts and at college functions and strives to build a high-quality repertoire
representative of collegiate or semiprofessional organizations. They are designed
to provide a performing outlet for talented college and community musicians.
Repeatable three times. Lab 2 hours.
NURSING
NURS 1200 – Introduction to Basic Health Concepts (4)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the RLC Associate Degree Nursing program
This is an introductory course focusing on the study of nursing principles
and skills basic to the care of individuals throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is
placed on the concepts within each of the domains of the individual, nursing
and health care. The concepts include medication administration, assessment,
nutrition, ethics, interdisciplinary teams, informatics, evidence-based practice,
individual centered care, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students
should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified
in the course. Lecture 3.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 1201 – Basic Health Concepts Clinical (1)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the RLC Associate Degree Nursing program
This is a clinical course focusing on the study of nursing principles and
skills basic to the care of individuals throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is placed
on the concepts within the three domains of the individual, health care, and
nursing. Upon completion students should be able to provide safe nursing care
incorporating the concepts identified in this course. Lab 2 hours (2 lab hours
= 32 clinical hours).
NURS 1202 – Health & Illness Concepts (4)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of grief / loss, violence, health-wellness-illness, collaboration,
managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, health care systems, ethics,
accountability, and evidenced-based practice. Upon completion, students should
be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts of psychiatric
nursing, leadership qualities and understanding the interdisciplinary health
care team. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 1203 – Health & Illness Concepts Clinical (2)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201
This clinical is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of grief / loss, violence, health-wellness-illness, collaboration,
managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, health care systems, ethics,
accountability, and evidenced-based practice. Upon completion, students should
be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts of psychiatric
nursing, leadership qualities and understanding the interdisciplinary health
care team. Lab 4 hours (2 lab hours = 32 clinical hours).
NURS 1204 – Tools for Nursing Education (2)
Prerequisite: Admission into the RLC Associate Degree Nursing program
This course is designed to prepare nursing students to be successful within
the educational setting of the Associate Degree Nursing program. The course
includes: communication skills, utilizing the Learning Resource Center,
introducing APA format for all nursing-related written assignments, dimensional
analysis for dosage calculations, stress and time management, study skills,
test-taking strategies, and computer skills including use of college email and
Blackboard. Students also will begin to work online with a standardized testing
tool used throughout the nursing program. Lecture 2 hours.
160
NURS 1205 – Family Health Concepts (3)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201, NURS 1202, NURS 1203, NURS 1204
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains
of the individual, nursing, and health care. Emphasis is placed on the concepts
of oxygenation, sexuality, reproduction, grief / loss, mood / affect, behaviors,
development, family, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions,
managing care, safety, and advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able
to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality,
individualized, entry-level nursing care. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 1206 – Family Health Concepts Clinical (2)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201, NURS 1202, NURS 1203, NURS 1204
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing and apply these concepts
into the clinical / lab area. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of oxygenation,
sexuality, reproduction, grief / loss, mood / affect, behaviors, development,
family, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions, managing
care, safety, advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe
nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. Lab 4 hours
(2 lab hours = 32 clinical hours).
NURS 1207 – Holistic Health Concepts (3)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201, NURS 1202, NURS 1203, NURS 1204
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the
concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, inflammation, sensory perception,
stress / coping, mood / affect, cognition, self, violence, health-wellness-illness,
professional behaviors, caring interventions, and safety. Upon completion,
students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts
identified in this course. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 1208 – Holistic Health Concepts Clinical (2)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201, NURS 1202, NURS 1203, NURS 1204
This clinical is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care and nursing. Emphasis is placed on caring
for patients with concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity,
mobility, comfort, behaviors, health-wellness-illness, clinical decision making,
caring interventions, managing care and safety. Upon completion, students
should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified
in this course. Lab 4 hours (2 lab hours = 32 clinical hours).
NURS 1209 – Pharmacology (4)
Prerequisites: NURS 1200, NURS 1201, NURS 1202, NURS 1203, NURS 1204
Emphasizes nursing responsibilities related to pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for health promotion. This course will synthesize
pharmacological concepts including an overview of the history of drugs
along with current issues. Pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacodynamics,
pharmacokinetics, contraindications and precautions for prototype drugs for
multiple body systems will be discussed. Major emphasis will be placed on
nursing management practices as well as adverse drug reactions and drug use
in special populations. Lecture 4 hours.
NURS 1609 – Metrics For Nurses (.5)
This course is a study of calculations required for medication administration.
Students will demonstrate ability at mathematical calculations, ratio and
proportion problems, as well as conversion between systems of measurement.
Lecture .5 hours.
NURS 1616 – Clinical Skills Review (1)
Prerequisites: PNUR 1214 and PNUR 1215
This course will provide a review of basic and advanced nursing skills such
as: sterile techniques, vital signs, medical asepsis, etc. The course will consist
of demonstrations, explanations and return demonstration performances by
students. Lab 2 hours.
NURS 1625 – CNA Instructor (2)
Prerequisite: Must be a registered nurse who meets the nurse aide instructor
requirements in 77 Illinois Administrative Code Section 395.50
This course is designed to prepare registered nurses to teach nurse assistant
students. It includes content related to instructional methods, instructional
materials, learning theory and student evaluation. These areas will be applied to
teaching in a classroom, clinical or laboratory setting. Illinois Department of Public
Health regulations for education of nurse assistants will be covered. Also contained
in the course is a review of Alzheimer’s disease including symptoms, nursing care
and available resources for families and health care providers. Lecture 2 hours.
NURS 1644 – Basic Venipuncture (.5)
This is an introductory course to the theory and practice of venipuncture
for laboratory personnel, emergency medical personnel, and other health care
providers involved in accessing veins for the purpose of drawing specimens,
administering radiologic contrast, and inserting intravenous catheters.
Instruction includes anatomy of the venous system within the upper extremity,
insertion site selection, selection and use of equipment, insertion techniques,
care and on-going assessment of insertion site. Emphasis throughout the course
will be on occupational health hazards and appropriate precautions, including
the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act. Lecture .5 hour.
NURS 2212 – Health Care Concepts (3)
Prerequisites: ZOO 1105, ZOO 1106, NURS 1205, NURS 1206, NURS 1207,
NURS 1208, NURS 1209, or successful completion of an accredited practical
nursing program with the addition of NURS 1211
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility,
comfort, behaviors, health-wellness-illness, clinical decision-making, caring
interventions, managing care, and safety. Upon completion, students should be
able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this
course. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 2213 – Health Care Concepts Clinical (2)
Prerequisites: ZOO 1105, ZOO 1106, NURS 1205, NURS 1206, NURS 1207,
NURS 1208, NURS 1209, or successful completion of an accredited practical
nursing program with the addition of NURS 1211
This clinical is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility,
comfort, behaviors, health-wellness-illness, clinical decision-making, caring
interventions, managing care, and safety. Upon completion, students should be
able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this
course. Lab 4 hours (32 clinical hours = 2 lab hours).
NURS 2214 – Health Care Systems Concepts (3)
Prerequisites: ZOO 1105, ZOO 1106, NURS 1205, NURS 1206, NURS 1207,
NURS 1208, NURS 1209, or successful completion of an accredited practical
nursing program with the addition of NURS 1211
This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of grief / loss, violence, health-wellness-illness, collaboration,
managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, health care systems, ethics,
accountability, and evidenced-based practice. Upon completion, students should
be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts of psychiatric
nursing, leadership qualities and understanding the interdisciplinary health
care team. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 2215 – Health Care Systems Concepts Clinical (2)
Prerequisites: ZOO 1105, ZOO 1106, NURS 1205, NURS 1206, NURS 1207,
NURS 1208, NURS 1209, or successful completion of an accredited practical
nursing program with the addition of NURS 1211
This clinical is designed to further develop the concepts within the three
domains of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on
the concepts of grief / loss, violence, health-wellness-illness, collaboration,
managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, health care systems, ethics,
accountability, and evidenced-based practice. Upon completion, students should
be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts of psychiatric
nursing, leadership qualities and understanding the interdisciplinary health
care team. Lab 4 hours (32 clinical hours = 2 lab hours).
NURS 2216 – Complex Health Concepts (6)
Prerequisites: NURS 2212, NURS 2213, NURS 2214, NURS 2215, PSYC 2101 or
HECO 1201
This course is designed to assimilate the concepts within the three domains
of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts
of fluid / electrolytes, metabolism, perfusion, mobility, stress / coping, violence,
health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, managing
care, health care systems, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students
should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to
provide quality, individualized, care for complex medical issues and demonstrate
leadership in the nursing profession. Lecture 5.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
NURS 2217 – Complex Health Concepts Clinical (6)
Prerequisites: NURS 2212, NURS 2213, NURS 2214, NURS 2215, PSYC 2101 or
HECO 1201
This course is designed to assimilate the concepts within the three domains
of the individual, health care, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts
of fluid / electrolytes, metabolism, perfusion, mobility, stress / coping, violence,
health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, managing
care, health care systems, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students
should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary
to provide quality, individualized, entry-level nursing care. Clinical hours are
incorporated into this course to enhance the knowledge achieved. Lab 12 hours
(32 clinical hours = 2 lab hours).
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
OTA 1200 – Introduction to Occupational Therapy (2)
Prerequisite: Admission to the OTA program and ZOO 1105
Overview of the profession with emphasis on its history, philosophy, and
organization. Explores the role of occupational therapy personnel and domain
of treatment. Students are introduced to the Occupational Therapy Practice
Framework. Lecture 2 hours.
OTA 1210 – Clinical Observation (2)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Assistant program and
ZOO 1105
This Level I Fieldwork experience provides the student introductory contact
with persons of differing age and ability levels. Students will be rotated through
approved agencies and centers and begin, under supervision, to practice: 1)
critical observation of abilities and disabilities within physical, emotional,
cognitive and social domains, and 2) therapeutic communication techniques.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 1212 – Activities of Daily Living (3)
Prerequisites: OTA 1200, OTA 1210, OTA 1231, OTA 1232 and OTA 2210
Basic self-care skills of feeding, hygiene and dressing, independent living
skills of communication, home management, architectural barrier modification
and community resources are stressed. Adaptation to equipment and assistive
devices necessary to perform ADL tasks are reviewed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 1214 – Clinical Rotation II (2)
Prerequisites: OTA 1212, OTA 1220, OTA 1222, OTA 1233 and OTA 2202
This Level I fieldwork experience provides the student with clinical
opportunities (both in-class laboratory and assigned clinical sites) for treatment
of patients / clients of different ages and disabilities. Students will continue
practice of treatment and communication techniques under supervision.
Students will continue to expand the process of developing treatment plans and
procedures, adapting equipment and activities with an emphasis on ethics and
the cultural impact of client-centered treatments. Preparation for participation
in the Level II Fieldwork experiences is provided. Lab 6 hours.
OTA 1220 – Occupational Therapeutic Media (3)
Prerequisites: OTA 1200, OTA 1210, OTA 1231, OTA 1232 and OTA 2210
Theory and practice of selected creative manual arts, includes acquisition of
basic skills, concepts of activity analysis in practical application, instruction of
individuals and groups, problem-solving, therapeutic application and laboratory
and equipment maintenance. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 1222 – Occupational Therapy Group Process (2)
Prerequisites: OTA 1200, OTA 1210, OTA 1231, OTA 1232 and OTA 2210
Exploration of the use of groups in occupational therapy treatment.
Occupational therapy models of practice and protocol across the lifespan are
emphasized. Group leadership, group facilitation and activity selection skills
will be developed. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 1231 – Disease & Impact on Occupation (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Assistant program and ZOO 1105
This course provides an overview of the etiology, clinical course,
management and prognosis of congenital and developmental disabilities, acute
and chronic disease processes, and traumatic injuries; and examines the effects
of such conditions on occupational performance throughout the lifespan, as
well as explores the effects of wellness on the individual, family, culture and
society. Lecture 3 hours.
161
OTA 1232 – Occupational Development (1)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Assistant program and ZOO 1105
Occupational Development is an overview of movement patterns and
movement development required for the participation in occupations. An
introduction to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and theories that
impact movement and occupational participation are also presented. The course
explores the general and more specific aspects to movement development for
occupational performance. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 1233 – Clinical Rotation I (1)
Prerequisites: OTA 1200, OTA 1210, OTA 1231, OTA 1232 and OTA 2210
This Level I Fieldwork experience is designed to build Physical Skills clinical
skills with the student. Students will complete in-class laboratory as well as
assigned clinical rotations in select outpatient physical disability settings.
The course will focus on preparatory (including Physical Agent Modalities),
purposeful and occupational treatment techniques for all orthopedic and
neurological disabilities. In the clinic, students will provide hands-on therapy
under the direct line-of-sight supervision of a qualified occupational therapy
practitioner. Students will begin the process of developing treatment plans and
procedures, adapting equipment and activity. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 2202 – Occupational Therapy in Physical Disabilities (3)
Prerequisites: OTA 1200, OTA 1210, OTA 1231, OTA 1232 and OTA 2210
Overview of occupational therapy theory and techniques as they relate to
medical conditions referred to occupational therapy; coverage of etiology, body
systems affected, residual effects and medical management; study of methods
of prevention, reduction or alleviation of certain aspects of disease or illness
which impede activities and self-care performance. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 2218 – Fieldwork Experience II (4.5)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ALL academic coursework, except OTA 2250
This second Level II Fieldwork experience is designed to provide the ongoing
opportunity for transition from “student to clinician.” As with Fieldwork
Experience I, within the eight weeks students are expected to perform the
functions of a practicing therapist at the second clinical site. It is expected that
at the end of the eight weeks (schools systems minimum 280 hours, all others
minimum 320 hours) the student should be functioning at entry-level with close
supervision needed. General objectives for each experience are the same. However,
specific objectives will be developed by each fieldwork site in conjunction with
the OTA educational program. Fieldwork will include at least one physical
disability site and any of the following for the other section site: physical
disability, psychosocial, pediatric, or hand therapy, or a combination. Psychosocial
experiences will be strongly encouraged within all fieldwork. Students will be
closely supervised by a certified occupational therapy assistant and/or a registered
occupational therapist with at least one year clinical experience.
Fieldwork Experience II must be successfully completed within 18 months
of academic coursework.
OTA 2220 – Psychosocial Therapy and Practice (3)
Prerequisite: OTA 1212, OTA 1220, OTA 1222, OTA 1233 and OTA 2202
Overview of occupational therapy psychosocial theory and techniques as
they relate to various classifications of behavioral disorders and developmental
disabilities. Group leadership, development of communication, observation
skills and use of self as a therapeutic modality are emphasized. Lecture 2 hours.
Lab 3 hours.
OTA 2232 – Aging & Impact on Performance (1.5)
Prerequisites: OTA 1212, OTA 1220, OTA 1222, OTA 1233 and OTA 2202
In analysis of occupational function and dysfunction, this course presents
sequential normal and pathological development from birth through adolescence
across sensorimotor, play/leisure, cognitive, affective and self-care/work
readiness domains. It investigates issues, treatment and service systems in
effective occupational performance. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 3 hours.
Prerequisite: OTA 1212, OTA 1220, OTA 1222, OTA 2233 and OTA 2202
This course introduces the student to the physical, psychological,
socioeconomic and cultural aspects of aging and their relationships to
occupational therapy programs for older adults. The focus is on providing care
to individuals experiencing disorders of aging and uses the occupational therapy
process of evaluation, planning, implementation and community programming.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1.5 hours.
OTA 2210 – Occupational Therapy Theory I (4)
OTA 2250 – Occupational Therapy Administration (3)
OTA 2205 – Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics (4)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Assistant program and
ZOO 1105
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of joint and muscle movement.
Overview of sensory systems, musculoskeletal systems, neuroanatomy, kinesiology,
and basic assessment of previously mentioned. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 3 hours.
OTA 2211 – Occupational Therapy Theory II (1.5)
Prerequisites: OTA 1212, OTA 1220, OTA 1222, OTA 1233 and OTA 2202
Provides an expanded knowledge of development and administration of
selected tests, theoretical basis for treatment, and treatment principles with an
emphasis on clinical reasoning, the OT process and diagnostic-specific techniques
across the life span. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1.5 hours.
OTA 2217 – Fieldwork Experience I (4.5)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ALL academic coursework, except OTA 2250
Development of professional skills through supervised application of
treatment principles. This first Level II Fieldwork experience is designed to
provide the first of two clinical opportunities to make the transition from
“student to clinician.” Within the eight weeks, students are expected to perform
the functions of a practicing therapist at the first of two assigned clinical sites.
It is expected that at the end of the eight weeks (schools systems minimum
280 hours, all others minimum 320 hours) the student should be functioning
at entry-level with close supervision needed. General objectives for each
experience are the same. However, specific objectives will be developed by each
fieldwork site in conjunction with the OTA educational program. Fieldwork
will include at least one physical disability site and any of the following for the
other section site: physical disability, psychosocial, pediatric, or hand therapy,
or a combination. Psychosocial experiences will be strongly encouraged within
all fieldwork. Students will be closely supervised by a certified occupational
therapy assistant and/or a registered occupational therapist with at least one
year clinical experience.
Fieldwork Experience I must be successfully completed within 18 months of
academic coursework.
162
Prerequisite: OTA 1214, OTA 2205, OTA 2211, OTA 2232 and OTA 2220
This class provides an introduction to basic management knowledge
and skills essential to occupational therapy practice. Topics emphasized are
marketing, supervision (both clinical and administrative), communications,
quality assurance, and departmental operations. Students will develop a
resume, practice job interviewing and participate in other activities related to
the professional organization(s). This course will be taught utilizing Web-based
format. Lecture 3 hours.
OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
Those courses which are individualized are indicated in the heading.
Individualized instruction allows the student to progress at his or her own
rate. Each student must attend a two-hour orientation session the first week
of classes. Flexible hours may be arranged through an instructor. The course
is concluded upon successful completion of its requirements.
OFTC 1200 – Professional Keyboarding (1)
This course offers basic instruction on the electronic alphanumeric keyboard.
Students needing to operate a computer keyboard achieve basic skills which will
allow them to input information into a computer using the proper keyboarding
techniques. It is not open to Office Systems Technology students. The student
should be able to key a minimum of 25 words per minute for five minutes, with
a maximum of five errors, by the end of the course. The course will include an
introduction to and use of e-mail. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1202 – Beginning Document Formatting (3)
Emphasis is placed on the production of business correspondence,
tabulations, reports, forms and other administrative documents, from unarranged
and rough-draft copy using word-processing software. The student should be able
to key a minimum of 35 words per minute for five minutes, with a maximum of
five errors, by the end of the semester. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1203 – Building Keyboarding Speed and Accuracy I (1)
This course is designed for students to improve keystroking speed and
accuracy through timed copy analysis, goal-setting and corrective drill practice
using skillbuilding software. Students should type a minimum of 45 words per
minute for five minutes, with five or fewer errors, by the end of the semester.
Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1204 – Building Keyboarding Speed and Accuracy II (1)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1203 with “C” or better
This course is designed for students to improve keystroking speed and
accuracy through timed copy analysis, goal-setting and corrective drill practice
using skillbuilding software. Students should type a minimum of 55 words per
minute for five minutes, with five or fewer errors, by the end of the semester.
Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1205 – Building Keyboarding Speed and Accuracy III (1)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1204 with “C” or better
This course is designed for students to improve keystroking speed and
accuracy through timed copy analysis, goal-setting and corrective drill practice
using skillbuilding software. Students should type a minimum of 65 words per
minute for five minutes, with five or fewer errors, by the end of the semester.
Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1206 – Computerized Accounting with QuickBooks (1)
This course is an introduction to computerized accounting using
QuickBooks, the general ledger software for small- and medium-sized businesses.
Students will learn how to maintain a general ledger, track vendors, customers
and inventory activities, process payroll for company employees, prepare bank
reconciliations and complete other key accounting procedures. Lecture .5 hour.
Lab 1 hour.
OFTC 1211 – Speed Writing (1)
This course is designed for students who wish to develop note-taking skills
for personal or business use. This system utilizes the alphabet in conjunction
with normal writing styles. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hours.
OFTC 1232 – Business Data Entry (3)
This course provides applications and activities to familiarize students with
the procedures for data entry used in modern business offices. Activities will
include building speed and accuracy using the touch system for the numeric
pad. Applications will include calculating payrolls, invoices, purchase orders,
merchandise inventory, interest rates, tax returns and real estate taxes, etc. Speed
tests will be given to develop speeds that will prepare students for data-entry
jobs. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
OFTC 1233 – Office Accounting (3)
This course is designed for the office assistant who needs an understanding
of general office accounting. Emphasis also is placed on accounting problems
and situations encountered in medical and legal offices. The course will include
hands-on experience on the microcomputer. Lecture 3 hours.
OFTC 1241 – Machine Transcription (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1202 with “C” or better or consent of the instructor
This course trains students to type correspondence from the spoken word
into mailable form. A transcribing machine will be used. Emphasis will be on
listening and understanding effectively, spelling, syllabication, proofreading,
punctuation, grammatical usage, proper methods of handling transcribing
materials and developing a marketable transcription speed. Lecture 2 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1252 – Records Management Concepts and
Computerized Applications (3)
This course introduces the student to the field of records management and
will describe job levels in the field. The student will be provided with an overview
of equipment, supplies and methods used for storing paper records. An in-depth
explanation and application of the ARMA simplified filing rules will be provided
through the use of a simulation project covering alphabetic, numeric, subject and
geographic storage and retrieval. These rules also will be applied to computer
applications. Lecture 3 hours.
OFTC 1280 – Medical Terminology (3)
The course is designed to familiarize students with root words, prefixes and
suffixes used to describe the systems of the body in normal and abnormal conditions.
Emphasis is placed on the formation, definition and pronunciation of words used in
the practice of medicine. Lecture 3 hours.
OFTC 1281 – Medical Transcription (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1280 with “C” or better
This course is designed to develop skill in keyboarding/formatting and
in transcribing from machine dictation a variety of medical documents such
as forms, correspondence, consultation and simple reports. Reinforcement of
medical terminology and language skills and use of reference materials will be
emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1282 – Advanced Medical Terminology / Transcription (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1281 with “C” or better
This course, a continuation of OFTC 1280 and OFTC 1281, is designed to
give an intensive emphasis on expanding medical terminology related to various
specialties and on gaining skill in transcribing medical reports: history and
physical examinations, consultations, operative notes, discharge summaries.
Professionalism, decision-making, quality/productivity standards and work priority
will be stressed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 1284 – Medical Insurance Processing (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1280 with “C” or better
The course is designed to teach students how to process medical insurance
forms by abstracting information from patients’ records. Emphasis is placed on
ICD-9-CM and CPT-4 coding. Lecture 3 hours.
OFTC 1285 – Coding (5)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1280
An introduction to concepts of ICD-9-CM and CPT, the medical
classification systems used in the United States for the collection of information
regarding disease and injury. Lecture 5 hours.
OFTC 1610 – Data Entry Training (1)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1202 or consent of instructor
The course is designed to teach the student the basics about data entry
procedures. The student will learn data entry skills as well as upgrade existing
keyboarding and proofreading skills. The importance of good work ethic skills
will also be covered. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour.
OFTC 2201 – Advanced Document Formatting (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1202 with “C” or better, or 35 words/minute, or consent of instructor
This course is a continuation of OFTC 1202. After a brief review of basic
production techniques, each unit places the student in a different office situation
where the emphasis is on such important modern office skills as editing, decisionmaking, abstracting information, setting priorities, work flow, following directions
and working under pressure and interruptions. The course develops speed and
accuracy through various drills. The student should be able to key a minimum of
45 words per minute for five minutes (maximum of five errors) by its conclusion.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 2261 – Office Procedures and Technology (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 1202 with “C” or better or consent of instructor
This course is for both the beginning and the experienced secretary. Basic
keyboarding is assumed; other skills are presented as if they are new. The experienced
secretary will find techniques that will improve efficiency. Some of the topics
which are studied thoroughly include the duties of the office assistant, effective
communications, proper telephone procedures, office reprographics, office mail,
office ethics, software selection, professional growth and development and career
planning. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 2262 – Integrated Office Procedures (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 2261
This course is designed to integrate technological skills with communications,
human relations and records management. Office stimulations utilizing the
model office will be an integral part of the course. Students will be working in
a team-building environment. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
OFTC 2265 – Office Supervision and Administration (3)
This course is designed to acquaint students with management principles
and practices and to develop an understanding of leadership styles of the office
manager. This course introduces planning, organizing, implementing, evaluating
and controlling organizational functions as related to supervisory positions.
Areas covered include human resource management, supervision of employees,
managing electronic systems, decision making, productivity improvement,
information management, financial resource management and ergonomics.
Lecture 3 hours.
OFTC 2291 – Cooperative Experience I (3)
Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and successful completion of the first
year of one of the Office Systems Technology degree programs with a minimum
of a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average
This course is designed to give the Office Systems Technology student
an opportunity to obtain further knowledge and skills through planned and
supervised work experience in an office setting. The student may receive both
financial remuneration and academic credit. Lab 15 hours.
163
OFTC 2292 – Cooperative Experience Il (3)
Prerequisite: OFTC 2291 with a “C” or better and consent of the instructor
This course is a continuation of OFTC 2291. Lab 15 hours.
OIL & NATURAL GAS TECHNICIAN
ONGT 1200 – Introduction to the Petroleum Industry (1)
This course provides an overview of the oil and gas industry, focusing
on the procedure for extracting oil and gas from the underground source.
Students will be introduced to basic oil and gas field concepts and will explore
the multitude of career options available in this ever-changing and growing
industry. Lecture 1 hour.
ONGT 1201 – Oil and Gas Production I (3)
Prerequisite: ONGT 1200
This course consists of the study of the principles of drilling methods and
drilling systems, including drilling fluids, bit programs, casting and cementing,
well control and drilling data analysis. Student will explore many issues related to
conventional well development and specialty applications, including horizontal
drilling. Emphasis will be placed on the applications of new technology. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ONGT 1202 – Artificial Lift Systems (3)
Prerequisite: ONGT 1201
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the different methods
associated with petroleum production, natural flow and artificial lift. The student
also will develop skills and competency in lease layouts and specific recovery
methods, such as water flooding, chemical flooding, thermal processes and CO2
injections. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ONGT 1203 – Oil and Gas Production II (3)
Prerequisites: ONGT 1200 & 1201
This course is a continuation of ONGT 1201 – Oil and Gas Production I. It
will familiarize the students with the duties of an oil and gas technician. Topics
covered include: natural gas treatment; dehydration and compression systems
and equipment; auxiliary systems and equipment; artificial lift and enhanced
recovery techniques; pumping and transportation systems; well completion; and
safety, health and environmental consideration relative to the field of oil and gas
production. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ONGT 1204 – Oil and Gas Production Equipment (2)
Prerequisite: ONGT 1201 or concurrent enrollment
This course reviews the fundamentals and operating considerations of
process equpment and processes, including valves, piping, vessels, positive
displacement and centrifugal pumps, reciprocating and centrifugal compressors,
steam turbines, motors, heat transfer equipment, cooling towers, boilers, furnaces
and process flow diagrams. This course develops theory as well as mechanics of
plant equipment. Lecture 2 hours.
ONGT 2201 – Petroleum Refining (4)
This course studies the origin, exploration and physical properties of
petroleum. Review of the production process along with stabilization and storage
of petroleum are discussed. The explanation of physical refining processes like
thermal and catalytic conversions, starting with distillation; catalytic cracking,
alkylation, reformation and isomerization are described in a very comprehensive
way. Treating processes, as well as other auxiliary operations of particular
importance for the process of petroleum refining, are reviewed. Laboratory
activities mainly concentrate on petroleum products testing. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
ONGT 2202 – Oil and Gas Well Mapping and Logging (3)
Prerequisites: GEOL 1101 and SURV 1205
This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of the geological
processes which create oil and gas resources in sedimentary rocks. Specific
techniques used in the oil and gas industry for locating and extracting oil and
gas reserves will be studied, as well as the environmental impacts caused by
their development. An understanding of the limited nature of fossil fuels will
be encouraged. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ONGT 2203 – SafeLand USA Training (2)
This course is a study of ideas and methods for preventing personal injury and
property damage specific to the oil and gas industry and provides instructions
in safety, ethics and responsibilities for entry-level personnel. Lecture 2 hours.
164
ONGT 2210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (3)
Prerequisites: Approval of Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This is eight weeks of employment experience working in the petroleum
and natural gas industry. The student will be employed in a business. The
college coordinator and the employer will supervise the learning. The student
will use his or her education to demonstrate knowledge in the subject area. The
student will receive technical counseling and individual assistance through this
transition. Lab 6 hours.
ORIENTATION
ORIE 1101 – Orientation (1.5)
This course is designed to improve academic, personal/social and career
survival skills. Topics include the college’s organization, layout, offerings and
policies. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1 hour.
PHILOSOPHY
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
PHIL 1101 – Introduction to Philosophy (3)
An introduction to the problems and branches of philosophy such as
metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion
and contemporary views of philosophy. The aim of the course is to have students
undertake a critical examination of their own ideas in relation to traditional
philosophical positions. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H4 900.
PHIL 2101 – Logic (3)
The purpose of the course is to develop the student’s reasoning and problemsolving skills. These skills include the ability to identify and formulate problems, as
well as to propose solutions to various problems. Logical skills relating to decisionmaking, correct inference, evaluation of evidence and the detection fallacies and
propaganda will be increased through analysis. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H4 906
PHIL 2103 – World Religions (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to contemporary and
historical world religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism,
Judaism, Christianity, Islam and indigenous religions. These religions will be
analyzed through study of their development, sacred texts, and distinctive
teachings. Emphasis will be on understanding religion as an expression of cultural
diversity. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H5 904N
PHIL 2104 – Ethics (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the elements of ethics,
including principal ethical theories, concepts and meanings and their practical
application to contemporary moral problems. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H4 904
PHIL 2105 – Non-Western Philosophy (3)
A survey of philosophical concepts and value systems of several non-Western
cultures. Thinkers, texts and philosophical movements from Africa, South Asia
and East Asia are studied. Cultural biases involved in thinking are examined for
a better understanding of cultural diversity. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H4 903N
PHIL 2106 – Philosophy of Religion (3)
A study of selected religious concepts and theories, such as the existence and
nature of a deity, the nature of good and evil, reason and faith, ethics, the afterlife,
religious language and religious experience. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H4-905
PHLEBOTOMY
If Reading course is required students must complete READ 2409, PREP 1403
or PREP 1404.
PHLE 1200 – Introduction to Phlebotomy (4)
The course will provide basic instruction on techniques, procedures, and
issues pertaining to the proper collection of blood specimens for routine clinical
laboratory testing. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
PHLE 1201 – Practicum (6)
This course will provide a clinical experience for students in laboratory
facilities. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to utilize
knowledge and skills in direct care situations. Successful completion of this
course requires the student to complete all hours and to complete a minimum
of 100 successful unaided venipunctures, 25 successful unaided skin punctures
and orientation in a full service laboratory. Lab 12 hours.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PYED 1131 – Introduction to Athletic Training (2)
This course is designed to train, teach and provide knowledge in the art of
Karate, as well as to provide a constructive outlet for energy, knowledge, selfdefense, self-discipline and mental control. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
This course is designed for students pursuing a career in athletic training.
The course provides knowledge about NATA, job opportunities, incidence of
injury, basic injury, prevention, recognition and treatment. It also provides the
student with information concerning the recognition of illnesses and conditions
common to athletes. Lecture 2 hours.
PYED 1103 – Golf (.5-3)
PYED 1132 – Taping Techniques (1)
PYED 1101 – Karate (1)
Develops skills, knowledge, attitudes and conditions essential to playing
golf. Activity 3 hours per week first 11 weeks of fall semester; last 11 weeks of
spring semester. Lab 1-6 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1104 – Basketball (.5-4)
Develops skills, knowledge, attitudes and conditions necessary for playing
basketball. Lab 1-8 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1105 – Weight Conditioning (.5-1)
Offers instruction and practice in proper techniques of the development of
muscular strength, endurance and flexibility. Emphasis placed on application
of scientific principles and methods used to build, improve and maintain
proper muscular fitness through a variety of exercise options. Lab 1-2 hours.
(Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1106 – Tennis (.5-3)
Develops skills, knowledge and attitudes essential to playing tennis. Activity
3 hours per week first 11 weeks of fall semester; last 11 weeks of spring semester.
Lab 1-6 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1107 – Volleyball (.5-4)
Develops skills, knowledge and attitudes essential to those interested in
playing volleyball. Lab 1-8 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1108 – Baseball (.5-4)
Develops skills, knowledge, attitudes and conditions necessary for playing
baseball. Lab 1-8 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1111 – Ballroom Dancing (1)
A course designed to develop an appreciation of ballroom dancing as a
popular recreational activity for relaxation and physical exercise. Lab 2 hours.
(Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1112 – Intermediate Ballroom Dancing (1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1111
This is a continuation of Ballroom Dancing covering the waltz, fox trot,
jitterbug, disco, polka, cha cha cha and tango. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1118 – Aerobics ~ Individualized Fitness Program (.5-1)
An introductory course in Aerobics as an individualized fitness program,
with emphasis on safe, physical participation, including an evaluation of
individual progress and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 1-2 hours.
(Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1124 – Country-Style Dancing (1)
This course provides an introduction and instruction in basic steps and
patterns of country-style dancing. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1125 – Swimming I (.5-1.5)
An introduction to elementary swimming, stressing orientation to water,
floating and basic strokes. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1126 – Swimming II (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1125
A review of basic skills and additional arm strokes and leg movements
necessary to master the crawl, side stroke, breast stroke, inverted breast stroke
and butterfly. Safety, survival skills and rescue techniques will be taught. Lab
1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1128 – Softball (.5-4)
Develops skills, knowledge and attitudes essential for playing softball. Lab
1-8 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1130 – Introduction to Physical Education (3)
This course is designed to give the prospective physical education teacher /
coach / recreation worker the philosophy, objectives, professional preparation,
duties and qualifications of the physical educator using lectures, class discussions
and field observations. Lecture 3 hours.
This course will familiarize the student with all aspects of taping, including
practice taping experience for athletic injuries. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 1 hour.
PYED 1133 – Concepts of Physical Fitness (3)
A course designed to provide Physical Education students with the
most recent scientific evidence to promote health-related physical fitness by
introducing different training programs, their benefits and means of evaluation.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
PYED 1134 – Cross-Country Running (.5-3)
Development of skills and training methodology for cross-country running.
Lab 1-6 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1135 – Track and Field (.5-3)
Development of skills and training methodology for track and field. Lab 1-6
hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1136 – Aerobics II (.5-1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1118
An intermediate course in Aerobics as an individualized fitness program, with
emphasis on safe, physical participation including an evaluation of individual
progress and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1137 – Lifeguard Training I (1.5)
Prerequisite: Minimum age of 15 and ability to demonstrate competency in a
swimming pre-test.
Develop skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to prevent and respond
to aquatic emergencies required to become a certified American Red Cross
Lifeguard. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 1 hour.
PYED 1139 – Swimming III (.5-1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1126
This course is an introduction to advanced swimming, stressing advanced
strokes, water safety, water revival and rescue. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1140 – Introduction to Recreation (3)
This course will give the prospective recreation leader knowledge of the
philosophy and learning objectives of recreation. Included is a study of the
professional preparation, duties and qualifications for the field of recreation.
Lecture 3 hours.
PYED 1141 – Recreation Program Planning (3)
A study of the essential elements and basic principles involved in planning,
organizing and promoting recreation programs. Emphasis is on class discussion,
field trips and field experiences for planning and conducting programs for
community agencies. Lecture 3 hours.
PYED 1142 – Sports and Modern Society (3)
A study of the interrelationships between society, cultures, values and sports,
and the ways in which they influence one another. Lecture 3 hours.
PYED 1143 – Weight Conditioning II (.5-1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1105
Intermediate weight conditioning continues the instruction and practice
in proper techniques of the development of muscular strength, endurance, and
flexibility. Emphasis is placed on the application of the scientific principles and
methods used to build, improve, and maintain proper muscular fitness through a
variety of exercise options. Included in the course are body composition, nutrition
information, and various avenues for attaining cardiovascular health and fitness.
Lab 1-2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1144 – Weight Training I (1.5)
Weight training offers classroom instruction in basic strength training
principles and practice in the proper techniques for the development of muscular
strength, endurance, and flexibility. Instruction will emphasize the application
of scientific principles and methods used to build, improve, and maintain proper
muscular fitness, body composition and nutritional information. Lecture .5 hour.
Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
165
PYED 1145 – Latin Dancing I (1)
A course designed to develop an appreciation of ballroom dancing, Latin
style, as a popular recreational activity for relaxation and physical exercise. Lab
2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1146 – Latin Dancing II (1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1145
A course designed to further develop an appreciation of ballroom dancing,
Latin style, as a popular recreational activity for relaxation and physical exercise.
Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1152 – Yoga I (1)
This course will teach the fitness and therapeutic benefits gained from the
practice of Yoga. The emphasis of instruction will focus on poses, breathing,
relaxation and meditation with additional emphasis on flexibility and body
awareness. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1153 – Tai Chi I (.5-1)
This course will teach the fitness and therapeutic benefits gained from the
practice of Tai Chi. The emphasis of instruction, the yang style short form, will
be supplemented by warm-up routines, yoga postures and self defense postures.
Lab 1-2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1154 – Ai Chi I (1)
This course will teach the fitness and therapeutic benefits gained from
the practice of Ai Chi. The emphasis of instruction will focus on cardio and
respiratory function, increased metabolism and blood circulation, improved
range of motion and relaxat9ion while immersed in shoulder-depth water. Lab
2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1155 – Wrestling (.5-3)
This course provides students with an opportunity to participate in and
become familiar with the fundamentals of wrestling. The student will gain
knowledge of the rules, terminology, scoring and strategies. Lab 1-6 hours.
(Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1156 – Advanced Ballroom Dancing (1)
Prerequisite: PYED 1112
A course designed to further develop an appreciation of ballroom dancing
as a popular recreational activity for relaxation and physical exercise. Lab 2
hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1157 – Water Safety Instructor (2)
Prerequisites: Minimum age of 17; possess at least one of the following – Current
American Red Cross Health and Safety Instructor Authorization or “Instructor
Candidate Training” issued within one year; successfully pass the precourse
written test and skills test
Analysis of techniques and methods of teaching swimming and life saving.
Opportunity for American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Certification.
Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
PYED 1158 – Dance Performance (.5-2)
Prerequisite: Audition or permission of the instructor
An introduction in basic steps, dance patterns, and techniques. Practical
experience in performance, repertory, and choreography through rehearsal and
public performance in the college setting. Lab 1-4 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1159 – Gymnastic Performance (.5-3)
Prerequisite: Audition or permission of the instructor
Development of skills and safety in gymnastics and tumbling through
rehearsal and public performance in the college setting. Lab 1-6 hours.
(Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1160 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center I (.5-4)
(Individualized) Introduction to and participation in a multi-station
aerobic super-circuit utilizing sub-maximal weights with multiple repetitions.
After cardiovascular and other physiological testing, students will be provided
opportunities to increase cardio-vascular efficiency, improve muscle tone and
reduce percent of body fat by rotating through a 23-station circuit, going from
a stationary bike to Universal equipment every 30 seconds. May be taken for
a letter grade or pass-fail; that determination must be made at the time of
registration and may not be changed. Orientation session to be scheduled with
instructor during the first week of classes each semester. Lab 2 hours. (Sequence
Repeatable – 3 times)
166
PYED 1164 – Introduction to Coaching (2)
The various aspects of the coaching career will be analyzed, with focus on
such topics as how to become a coach, why people coach, how coaches motivate,
techniques of coaching and the coach’s relationships with other members of the
institution and community. Lecture 2 hours.
PYED 1165 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center II (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1160
(Individualized) A continuation of Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center I. It
is for those students desiring to continue to benefit from Universal super-circuit
workouts. May be taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but that determination
must be made at the time of registration and may not be changed. Orientation
session to be scheduled with instructor during the first week of classes each
semester. Lab 1-8 hours. (Sequence Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1170 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center Ill (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1165
(Individualized) A continuation of PYED 1165. It is for those students
who wish to continue their physical fitness and aerobic improvement in the
super-circuit fitness center. May be taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but
determination must be made at time of registration and may not be changed.
Orientation session to be scheduled with instructor during the first week of
classes each semester. Lab 1-8 hours. (Sequence repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1174 – Water Aerobics IV (1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1179
A course in aerobics using the water as resistance as an individualized
fitness program to reduce the stress of weight on joints. Designed to help
improve cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance, physical strength and
increase flexibility with emphasis on safe, physical participation including an
evaluation of individual progress and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 3
hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1175 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center IV (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1170
(Individualized) A continuation of Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center
III. This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students to continue
participation in the multi-station aerobic super-circuit fitness center. May be
taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but that determination must be made at the
time of registration and may not be changed. Orientation session to be scheduled
with instructor during the first week of classes each semester. Lab 1-8 hours.
(Sequence repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1176 – Aquatic Recreational Games (1)
Instruction in the skills, techniques and rules of inner tube water polo, water
basketball, water volleyball, underwater hockey, and water beach ball. Lab 2
hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1177 – Water Aerobics I (.5-1.5)
A course in aerobics using the water as resistance as an individualized
fitness program to reduce the stress of weight on joints. Designed to help
improve cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance, physical strength and
increase flexibility with emphasis on safe, physical participation including an
evaluation of individual progress and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 1-3
hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1178 – Water Aerobics II (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1177
A fitness course using the water as resistance while exercising which reduces
the normal amount of stress generally caused by body weight on joints during an
aerobics program. It is designed to help improve cardiovascular fitness, muscle
endurance, physical strength and flexibility with emphasis on safe participation
including an evaluation of individual progress and a study of the concepts involved.
Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1179 – Water Aerobics III (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1178
Water Aerobics III is a fitness course using the water as resistance while
exercising which reduces the normal amount of stress generally caused by body
weight on joints during an aerobics program. It is designed to help improve
cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance, physical strength and flexibility with
emphasis on safe participation, including an evaluation of individual progress
and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1180 – Aquatic Aerobic Fitness I (.5-4)
Required: Orientation/Testing Session
(Individualized) After the orientation and physiological testing, the student will
be given a printout of the test results and a proposed workout schedule that will
provide opportunities to increase cardiovascular efficiency, improve muscle tone and
reduce the percent of body fat by engaging in a multi-station water aerobic circuit
and lap swimming. Workouts may be conducted any time the pool is open. It may
be taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but that determination must be made at the
time of registration and may not be changed. Orientation session to be scheduled
with instructor during the first week of classes each semester. Lab 1-8 hours.
(Sequence Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1182 – Soccer (.5-3)
Develop skills, knowledge, attitudes, and conditions necessary to understand
and participate in soccer. Lab 1-6 hours. (Repeatable - 3 times)
PYED 1185 – Aquatic Aerobic Fitness II (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1180
(Individualized) A continuation of PYED 1180, this course is for students
desiring to continue to benefit from the multi-station water aerobic circuit and
lap swimming. Workouts may be conducted any time the pool is open. It may
be taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but that determination must be made
at the time of registration and may not be changed. Orientation session to be
scheduled with instructor during the first week of classes each semester. Lab 1-8
hours. (Sequence Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1187 – Arthritis Aquatics I (.5-1.5)
The Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Exercise program provides five different
opportunities for people with arthritis to participate in a recreational group
activity that may improve their sense of well-being while also improving joint
flexibility and muscle strength. These activity levels differ in the amount of
exertion expended with the exercises; each ensuing program is designed to
require additional exertion and endurance. Full body involvement and full
range of motion is desired as the exercised joints are submerged in the water, but
exercises are done only to the point of pain. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
PYED 1188 – Arthritis Aquatics II (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1187
The Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Exercise program provides five different
opportunities for people with arthritis to participate in a recreational group
activity that may improve their sense of well-being while also improving joint
flexibility and muscle strength. These activity levels differ in the amount of
exertion expended with the exercises; each ensuing program is designed to
require additional exertion and endurance. Full body involvement and full
range of motion is desired as the exercised joints are submerged in the water, but
exercises are done only to the point of pain. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
PYED 1190 – Aquatic Aerobic Fitness III (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1185
(Individualized) A continuation of PYED 1185, this course is for students
wishing to continue their physical fitness and aerobic improvement from
the multi-station water aerobic circuit and lap swimming. Workouts may be
conducted any time the pool is open. It may be taken for a letter grade or passfail, but that determination must be made at the time of registration and may not
be changed. Orientation session to be scheduled with instructor during the first
week of classes each semester. Lab 1-8 hours. (Sequence Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1195 – Aquatic Aerobic Fitness IV (.5-4)
Prerequisite: PYED 1190
(Individualized) A continuation of PYED 1190, this course is intended to
provide an opportunity for students to continue participation in the multi-station
water aerobic circuit and lap swimming. Workouts may be conducted any time
the pool is open. It may be taken for a letter grade or pass-fail, but that must
be determined at the time of registration and may not be changed. Orientation
session to be scheduled with instructor during the first week of classes each
semester. Lab 1-8 hours. (Sequence Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1197 – Arthritis Aquatics Plus I (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1188
The Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Exercise program provides five different
opportunities for people with arthritis to participate in a recreational group
activity that may improve their sense of well-being while also improving joint
flexibility and muscle strength. These activity levels differ in the amount of
exertion expended with the exercises; each ensuing program is designed to
require additional exertion and endurance. Full body involvement and full
range of motion is desired as the exercised joints are submerged in the water, but
exercises are done only to the point of pain. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1198 – Arthritis Aquatics Plus II (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1197
The Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Exercise program provides five different
opportunities for people with arthritis to participate in a recreational group
activity that may improve their sense of well-being while also improving joint
flexibility and muscle strength. These activity levels differ in the amount of
exertion expended with the exercises; each ensuing program is designed to
require additional exertion and endurance. Full body involvement and full
range of motion is desired as the exercised joints are submerged in the water, but
exercises are done only to the point of pain. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1199 – Arthritis Aquatics Deep Water (.5-1.5)
Prerequisite: PYED 1198
The Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Exercise program provides five different
opportunities for people with arthritis to participate in a recreational group
activity that may improve their sense of well-being while also improving
joint flexibility and muscle strength. This deep water program is designed for
participants who have progressed beyond the fitness level accommodated by
previous Arthritis Aquatic classes. Participants in this program will need specific
water skills to be able to participate and deep water instructors will evaluate
these skills. Lab 1-3 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 1301 – Aerobic Super-Circuit Fitness Center (CE)
Prerequisite: PYED 1160/1165/1170/1175 class sequence completed four times
(Individualized) This course is intended to provide an opportunity for
students to continue participation in the multi-station aerobic super-circuit
fitness center after completing the credit class sequence. This course is non-credit
and no grade is assigned. Orientation session to be scheduled with instructor
during the first week of classes each semester.
PYED 2100 – Karate II (.5-3)
Prerequisite: PYED 1101
This course is designed to introduce the student to an intermediate level
of knowledge in the art of karate, as well as continue to provide a constructive
outlet for energy, knowledge, self defense, self discipline and mental control.
Lab 1-6 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 2101 – Aerobics III (.5-1)
An advanced course in Aerobics as an individualized fitness program, with
emphasis on safe, physical participation including an evaluation of individual
progress and a study of the concepts involved. Lab 1-2 hours. (Repeatable – 3 times)
PYED 2301 – Arthritis Aquatics (CE)
Prerequisite: PYED 1199 four times
A continuation of the water exercise program to give people with arthritis and
minimal joint involvement who have completed the credit courses an opportunity
to do gentle, warm water activities which may lead to endurance-building and
muscle-strengthening. This course is non-credit and no grade is assigned.
PYED 2302 – Aquatic Aerobic Fitness (PL)
Prerequisite: PYED 1180/1185/1190/1195 class sequence completed four times
This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students to continue
participation in the multi-station water aerobic circuit and lap swimming.
Workouts may be conducted any time the pool is open. This course is non-credit
and no grade is assigned. Orientation session to be scheduled with instructor
during the first week of classes each semester.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement. If reading courses are
required, the student must complete READ 2409 or PREP 1404.
PHSC 1101 – Physical Science (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1402 or equivalent placement
An introductory course into the interdisciplinary physical sciences. The
subject matter includes units on astronomy, chemistry, physics and earth science.
It is designed to fulfill the physical science requirement for general education and
Liberal Arts students. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P9 900L
PHSC 1102 – Principles of Earth Science (3)
Principles of Earth Science will introduce the student to the make-up and
processes of the planet Earth. The course will include history of the Earth, plate
tectonics, physical properties and materials, natural phenomena such as volcanoes,
earthquakes, and landslides, weathering and erosion, natural resources, oceans,
waste and pollution, and human impact. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 905
167
PHYSICS
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 and MATH 1402 or equivalent placement.
PHY 1101 – College Physics I (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1109 or MATH 1110 with a “C” or better
An introductory course in classical and modern physics without calculus as a
prerequisite. Units covered include kinematics, Newton’s Laws, circular motion,
work and energy, fluids, thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of matter and heat.
Classes are for premedical, dental, pharmacy and pre-four-year engineering
technology students. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P1 900L
PHY 1102 – College Physics II (5)
Prerequisite: PHY 1101 with a “C” or better or approval of the Dean
A continuation of PHY 1101 into a study of waves, simple harmonic motion,
electricity, magnetism, light and optics and special relativity. It is intended
for premedical, dental, pharmacy and pre-four-year engineering technology
students. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
PHY 1103 – University Physics I (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1121 with a “C” or better
This course covers the mechanics of vectors, linear motion, Newton’s Laws,
rotational motion, mechanics of solids and liquids and thermodynamics and
heat. It is intended for pre-engineering and science majors. Lecture 4 hours. Lab
2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ P2 900L
PHY 1104 – University Physics II (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 2122 or concurrent enrollment and PHY 1103 with a “C”
or better
This is a continuation of PHY 1103 and includes DC-AC electricity and
magnetism, wave motion and light. Intended for pre-engineering and science
majors. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 2 hours.
PHY 1201 – Technical Physics I (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1201 or MATH 1407 with a “C” or better
This class is intended to be an introductory course for technical or vocational
students. It covers the basic physics topics of measurement; statics; motion; force
applications; work, power and energy, and properties of materials. Lecture 3
hours. Lab 2 hours.
PHY 1202 – Technical Physics II (4)
Prerequisite: PHY 1201 or consent of the Dean
This course is a continuation of PHY 1201. Topics covered will include
heating effects sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Practical applications
will be stressed along with theoretical exercises. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
PHY 2101 – Statics (3)
Prerequisites: MATH 1121 and PHY 1101, or PHY 1103 with a “C” or better
A study of resultants of force system, algebraic and graphical conditions of
equilibrium in force systems, analysis of forces acting on members of trusses,
frames, etc.; forces due to friction, and centroids. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ EGR 942
PHY 2102 – Dynamics (3)
POLI 2101 – American Government (3)
A study of the origin, nature and purpose of the national government. The
structure, functions and powers of government in current affairs are emphasized.
Attention is given to the relationship of the citizen and interest groups to
government in order to create knowledge and leadership potential that will
be transformed into practical demonstrative service. Successful completion of
this course is evidence of having passed the State and Federal Constitution Test.
Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S5 900
POLI 2102 – Intro to International Relations (3)
This course surveys the many aspects of cooperation, interaction and discord
between nations, including the nationwide system, national power, international
law, United Nations, causes of conflict and possible solutions and international
problems. The student is expected to examine and form reasoned judgments
about the relationship between the U.S. and world community. Lecture 3 hours.
▶ IAI ~ S5 904
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 2101 – Introduction to Psychology (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
An introductory course in the scientific study of affect, behavior and
cognition. The broad scope of the field of psychology will be covered, with
emphasis on major theories, multi-cultural and gender differences, and behavior
patterns of the individual. Child development, learning theories, abnormal
psychology, mental health, personality and mental measurement and their
practical applications will be studied. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S6 900
PSYC 2102 – Child Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 2101
A study of the psychological development of the child, with emphasis on
practical applications useful to parents, educators and other caregivers. The course
covers human development from conception through young adulthood, including
multi-cultural and gender-related issues. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S6 903
PSYC 2103 – Educational Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 2102 or consent of instructor
Study and application of the principles of development, learning and
motivation as they apply to children from birth to adulthood. Emphasis is
given to the characteristics of effective school, effective teachers and students.
Topics include learning theories, content areas, motivational and measurement
techniques. Application of psychological principles will be presented as
they relate to individual differences, multi-cultural backgrounds, societal
expectations and gender roles. Lecture 3 hours.
PSYC 2104 – Personality Dynamics (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 2101
Investigation of selected theories of personality development, motivation,
stress and stress reactions and maladaptive coping patterns. Human behavior in
the personal, interpersonal and social context will be examined. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisites: PHY 2101 with a “C” or better
A study of displacements, velocity and acceleration of a particle; relation
between forces acting on rigid bodies and the changes in motion produced;
translation; rotation; plan motion solutions using the principles of force, mass
and acceleration; work and energy, impulse and momentum. Lecture 3 hours.
▶ IAI ~ EGR 943
PSYC 2105 – Social Psychology (3)
PHY 2121 – Electrical Engineering Circuits (4)
Prerequisite: If reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
or be concurrently enrolled in PREP 1404
This course will show that learning and then practicing good human relations
will increase an understanding of yourself, the people around you and your
relationship with them. It will teach you to cope effectively with relationships
at work. Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 2123 and PHY 1104 with a “C” or better
This course is designed to meet the lecture requirements for an introductory
Electrical Engineering Circuits course for electrical engineering majors and
other engineering majors. Topics include resistant circuits, transient circuits,
sinusoidal analysis, and complex frequencies network analysis, including Fourier
Transforms and Laplace Transforms. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ EGR 931
POLITICAL SCIENCE
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
POLI 1101 – State and Local Government (3)
The structure, function and operation of state, county and local units of
government are studied. Contemporary problems are given special attention, as
well as Illinois politics and its constitution. Office holders will be used to emphasize
practical applications. Successful completion of this course is evidence of having
passed the State and Federal Constitution Test. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S5 902
168
Prerequisite: PSYC 2101
This course introduces students to the scientific study of how people interact
with, influence and perceive others in both group and individual settings. Lecture
3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S8 900
PSYC 2106 – Human Relations (3)
QUALITY CONTROL
QUAL 1201 – Procurement Quality Control (3)
This course presents a systematic and complete description of the basic
principles involved in vendor-vendee relationships and provides guidelines which
can aid in the control of quality at the buyer-seller interface. Lecture 3 hours.
QUAL 1202 – Industry Standards and Radiation Protection (4)
An overview of standards and regulations procurement personnel must deal
with on a daily basis to insure quality of the products and services they purchase
for their industry. Lecture 4 hours.
QUAL 1203 – Introduction to Quality Control (3)
RAD 1210 – Radiology Pathology (2)
QUAL 1601 – Quality Control Statistical Methods (.5)
RAD 1211 – Radiology Clinical III (7)
This course gives individuals an introduction to the methods for establishing
and maintaining industrial quality control. Includes the procurement process,
statistical methods, histograms, Pareto diagrams, control charts, acceptance
sampling, process capability, reliability and in-process inspection principles.
Lecture 3 hours.
Organization and methods for establishing and maintaining industrial
quality control. Includes statistical methods, cost analysis and control techniques,
and final and in-process inspection principles and techniques. Lecture .5 hour.
RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY
RAD 1200 – Radiologic Technology Orientation (.5)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207 and 1208
Students will continue the study of radiography in this course, which includes
modules on trauma radiology, medical terminology, special procedures, contrast
medias, anatomy and positioning of the facial bones and skull, myelograms and
pediatric radiology. Lecture 2 hours.
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207 and 1208
A continuation of earlier clinical experience in radiographic positioning,
darkroom, office procedures, patient management, and critical analysis of
radiographs. Lab 24 hours.
RAD 1212 – Radiographic Equipment and Imaging III (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Technology program
This is a course designed to develop the student’s knowledge and
understanding of the policies of the Rend Lake College Radiologic Technology
program. Lecture .5 hour.
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207 and 1208
An advanced course, including the proper manipulation of equipment,
positioning and alignment of the anatomical structure and equipment, and
evaluation of images for proper demonstration of advanced anatomy and related
pathology. Lecture 2.5 hour. Lab 1 hour.
RAD 1201 – Introduction to Radiography (2)
RAD 1213 – Radiation Biology (2)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200
This course includes the historical development of radiography, basic
radiation protection, introductory medical terminology, ethical and legal issues
facing health care professionals and an orientation to the program and health
care in general. Lecture 2 hours.
RAD 1202 – Radiographic Procedures (3)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200
This course introduces students to radiographic positioning. A review of
routine upper and lower extremity examinations, as well as an introduction to
positioning of the chest and abdomen. Students will be given the opportunity
to position fellow students and to produce radiographs of the positions. Lecture
1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
RAD 1203 – Patient Care (3)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200
This course includes patient assessment, infection control procedures,
emergency and safety procedures, communication and patient interaction skills
and basic pharmacology. Lecture 3 hours.
RAD 1205 – Radiographic Equipment and Imaging (3)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202 and 1203
This course will provide a study of the equipment and physics of X-ray
production, basic X-ray circuits, and the relationship of equipment components
to the imaging process. Students also will analyze radiographic image qualities
and the effects of exposure variables upon these qualities. Lecture 3 hours.
RAD 1206 – Intermediate Radiographic Procedures (3)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202 and 1203
This course is a continuation of the study of proper manipulation of
radiographic equipment, positioning and alignment of the anatomical
structure and equipment, and evaluation of images for proper demonstration
of intermediate anatomy and related pathology. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
RAD 1207 – Radiology Clinical I (5)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202 and 1203
Designed for the first-year, second-semester Radiologic Technology
student, this is an orientation to clinical experience in radiographic positioning,
darkroom, office procedures, patient management, and critical analysis of
radiographs. Lab 17 hours.
RAD 1208 – Radiology Clinical II (6)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206 and 1207
Designed for the summer semester between the first and second years of the
Radiologic Technology program, this is a continuation of earlier clinical experience
in radiographic positioning, darkroom, office procedures, patient management,
and critical analysis of radiographs. Lab 20.5 hours.
RAD 1209 – Radiographic Equipment and Imaging II (3)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207 and 1208
A continuation of the study of radiographic imaging technique formulation,
image quality assurance, and the synthesis of all variables in image production.
Lecture 3 hours.
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1210,
1211 and 1212
Course content includes an introduction to the separate imaging modalities
– tomography, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, PET,
digital MRI, and radiation therapy. Radiation protection, radiobiology, quality
assurance and radiography review also will be covered. Self-assessment exercises
and self-study will be used throughout the semester. Lecture 2 hours.
RAD 1214 – Radiology Clinical IV (7)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1210,
1211 and 1212
A continuation of earlier clinical experience in radiographic positioning,
darkroom, office procedures, patient management, and critical analysis of
radiographs. Lab 24 hours.
RAD 1215 – Cross-Sectional Anatomy (1)
Prerequisite: RAD 1200, 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1210,
1211 and 1212
The study of human anatomy as viewed in cross-section. A comparison will
be made of planar anatomy, as viewed in conventional radiography, and crosssectional anatomy and how they relate to computed tomography and magnetic
resonance imaging. Lecture 1 hour.
RAD 1216 – Radiologic Technology Review (1)
Prerequisite: RAD 1201, 1202, 1203, 1205, 1206, 1207, 1208, 1209, 1210, 1211, 1215,
or has completed an accredited Radiologic Technology program.
Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps
the student prepare for the national certification examinations for radiologic
technologist. Lecture 1 hour.
RAD 1220 – Computed Tomography Applications (4)
This Internet-based course concentrates on the use of computed tomography
as an imaging tool from the technologist’s perspective. Lecture 4 hours.
RAD 1221 – Computed Tomography Clinicals (6)
This course is designed for the student in the certificate program for computer
tomography. This clinical rotation will give the student an opportunity to
perform routine CT examinations and administer patient care related to a CT
exam. Lab 12 hours.
RAD 1222 – Computed Tomography Physics (4)
This Internet-based course explores basic physics, instrumentation and
quality control in CT scanning. This course is also designed to assist the student
in preparing for the ARRTs CT registry. Lecture 4 hours.
RAD 1223 – Computed Tomography Cross-Sectional
Anatomy (2)
This course is a comprehensive review of the study of human anatomy as
viewed in cross-section. A comparison will be made of planar anatomy to crosssectional anatomy and how they relate to computed tomography and magnetic
resonance imaging. This course includes the cranium, anatomical structure
in brain, chest, abdomen, spine, pelvis. Required relationship and research of
cross-sectional pathology. Lecture 2 hours.
169
RAD 1230 – Special Topics in Radiology (.5-4)
This class is designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of radiologic
technologists at all levels, focusing on current trends and developments in patient
care. Lecture .5-4 hours.
RAD 1231 – Legal and Ethical Topics in Health Care (2)
This course is designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of legal and
ethical issues within the health care field. Real-life examples and case studies
will be used to illustrate the skills needed in situations that could escalate
into conflict or dispute. Important HIPPAA information including the latest
privacy guidelines with legal and ethical implications will also be discussed.
Lecture 2 hours.
RAD 1232 – MRI Principles (4)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of an AAS Radiologic Technology program
or ARRT registered
This course will provide the radiographer with a brief history of how MRI
was developed and the different main mathematical methods which are utilized
in MRI. The radiographer will learn about the different pulse sequences, different
types of data manipulation, sequence parameters and imaging options which
are essential when performing MRI examinations. This course will prepare the
radiographer for the AART’s MRI registry exam. Lecture 4 hours.
RAD 1233 – MRI Applications (4)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of an AAS Radiologic Technology program
or ARRT registered
This course will provide the radiographer with an introduction to magnetic
resonance imaging hardware, software, general applications, system components,
pulse sequence and image formation. This course will prepare the radiographer
for the ARRT’s MRI registry exam. Lecture 4 hours.
RAD 1234 – MRI Cross-Sectional Anatomy (2)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of an AAS Radiologic Technology program
or ARRT registered
This course will provide the radiographer with knowledge of cross-sectional
human anatomy. A comparison will be made of planar anatomy to cross-sectional
anatomy and how they relate to MRI. Upon completion, the student will be able
to identify cross-sectional anatomy from an MRI study. Lecture 2 hours.
RAD 1235 – MRI Clinicals (6)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of an AAS Radiologic Technology program
or ARRT registered
This course is designed for the student in the MRI certificate program. The
clinical rotation will give the student an opportunity to perform routine MRI
examinations and administer patient care related to an MRI exam. Lab 12 hours.
RAD 1236 – Digital Radiography and PACS (2)
Prerequisite: ARRT Registered Technologist or enrolled in an AAS Radiologic
Technology program
This course is designed to help the student gain additional knowledge
regarding the principles of digital radiographic image acquisition and processing.
The student also will learn the fundamentals of PACS as well as quality control
and quality management which are required to be maintained in the PACS
systems. Lecture 2 hours.
READING
READ 2409 – Reading Review (3.5)
Students must register for Reading course within first 12 credit hours attempted
and must complete with “C” or better to satisfy requirement; students earning
“D” or “E” must repeat course following semester. Students enrolled in READ
2409 must also enroll in PREP 1402.
This course is designed to enhance existing reading skills by improving
vocabulary, critical and literal reading skills and speed of reading. Placement
will be determined by the college reading policy. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 1 hour.
REAL ESTATE
The following courses can be applied toward the required hours to become a
licensed Real Estate Broker or Managing Broker. Students must have a “C”
grade-point average or higher in order to successfully complete requirements
to sit for the examinations. Students also must meet minimum hours of
instruction requirements.
REAL 1205 – Broker Pre-License Topics (5)
An introductory course pertaining to the fundamentals of Real Estate.
Topics covered include federal, state and license law, marketing, seller and
buyer relationships, real estate principles, real estate transactions, types of real
170
estate opportunities, and application of real estate principles. Lecture 5 hours.
(Repeatable 3 times)
REAL 1207 – Broker Prelicense Applied Principles (1)
Prerequisite: REAL 1205
This interactive course, along with Broker Pre-License Topics, satisfies the
90 hours of instruction as required by the Illinois Department of Professional
and Financial Regulation. Successful completion allows students to sit for the
Illinois Real Estate Broker Examination. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
REAL 1208 – Broker Post-License Topics (1)
Prerequisites: REAL 1205 and REAL 1207
This course is designed for successful completers of the Illinois Real Estate
Broker Examination. Topics covered include license law, state / federal laws,
agency and real estate transactions. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
REAL 1209 – Broker Post-License Applied Practices (1)
Prerequisites: REAL 1205, REAL 1207, REAL 1208
This interactive course, along with Broker Post-License Topics, satisfies the
30 hours of instruction as required by the Illinois Department of Professional
and Financial Regulation. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
REAL 1210 – Managing Broker Pre-License Topics (2)
Prerequisites: REAL 1205, REAL 1207, REAL 1208, REAL 1209
This course is designed for current Illinois Brokers interested in becoming
a Managing Broker. Topics covered include licensing and operations, managing
licensees, and risk management, laws and issues. Lecture 2 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
REAL 1211 – Managing Broker Applied Management (1)
Prerequisites: REAL 1205, REAL 1207, REAL 1208, REAL 1209, REAL 1210
This interactive course, along with Managing Broker Pre-License Topics,
satisfies the 45 hours of instruction as required by the Illinois Department of
Professional and Financial Regulation. Successful completers are eligible to sit for
the Illinois Managing Broker Examination. Lecture 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
SOCIAL SCIENCE
SOSC 2101 – Topics in Social Science (1-6)
A seminar on a special topic or current issue in one of the following social
sciences: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science,
psychology or sociology. The seminar may include experiential learning involving
travel to a foreign country or instruction in a correctional facility. Repeatable
three times. Lecture 1-6 hours.
SOSC 2102 – Inside-Out Prison Exchange (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance to the course through application process
The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is a course that creates a dynamic
partnership between institutions of higher learning and correctional facilities.
The course integrates college students (outside students) and detainees (inside
students) at a local justice center, allowing them to deepen conversations about
social justice, crime, deviance, stratification, economics, inequality and other
issues of social concern. Students evaluate their value systems, making connections
between American values and the construction of social institutions such as the
criminal justice system and the prison industrial complex. Additionally, students
examine the impact of incarceration on individuals and families. Inside-out is
designed to create a paradigm shift for students. Lecture 3 hours.
SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 1101 – Introduction to Sociology (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This course is a study of the basic elements of sociological inquiry, including
culture, personality, social structure, stratification, community and deviant
behavior. It is designed to equip sociology majors with the necessary foundation
to continue in sociology and provide non-majors with a general understanding
of the structure and process of society. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S7 900
SOCI 2101 – Social Problems (3)
Prerequisite: If reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
or be concurrently enrolled in PREP 1404
Students will evaluate why certain conditions and situations are treated as
social problems while others remain on a personal level. Issues related to several
social problems will be presented and discussed. Students will be given the
opportunity to hear guest speakers and participate in discussions relevant to the
problems being studied. Field trips may be taken or volunteer work opportunities
offered. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S7 901
SOCI 2102 – Marriage and the Family (3)
Prerequisite: If reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
or be concurrently enrolled in PREP 1404
This course is a study of the basic elements of family life. A “life course”
perspective is used, beginning with theory, moving to patterns of dating and
marriage, following the family through child-bearing and child-rearing and
concluding with marriage in the later years. This course is designed to acquaint
the student with a sociological perspective on the family. It is not intended to be
a “how to” course for a happy family or to assist individuals experiencing family
difficulties. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ S7 902
SOCI 2103 – Introduction to Social Work (3)
(If reading courses are required, the student must complete READ 2409 or
PREP 1404)
This course introduces the student to the role of the generalist social worker.
Topics include theoretical perspectives for social work, social welfare policies,
historical trends, issues of social and economic justice, and contemporary social
welfare programs. Settings in which social workers are frequently employed
are explored. In addition, issues related to the special populations typically
encountered in social work settings are discussed. Lecture 3 hours.
SOCI 2104 – Modern Britain (3)
This course introduces some of the main institutions and issues in modern
British society. It begins with an outline of the main British political institutions,
examines the organization of British politics and looks at debates over change
and reform. The course then explores the national and international context of
British politics and culture, examining such issues as subnational identity, the
devolution of government and Britain’s international relationships. The last part
looks in greater detail at British culture and society, examining issues such as the
role of media, racial relations and law and order. Lecture 3 hours.
SPANISH
SPAN 1100 – Spanish Conversation (2)
This is a conversational course for beginners designed to equip the student
to understand and speak everyday Spanish in common situations often met by
travelers. Lecture 2 hours.
SPAN 1101 – Elementary Spanish I (4)
This course is designed to develop understanding, speaking, reading and
writing skills, with emphasis on direct presentation and practice in Spanish of
the basic grammatical structures and vocabulary of the language. (No transfer
credit unless SPAN 1102 also is taken.) Lecture 4 hours.
SPAN 1102 – Elementary Spanish II (4)
Prerequisite: SPAN 1101 or one year of high school Spanish and consent of instructor
A continuation of SPAN 1101, including oral work. Lecture 4 hours.
SPAN 1103 – Conversational Spanish I (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 1100 or consent of instructor
This course is a continuation of Spanish Conversation I. It covers additional
vocabulary Spanish useful to probation officers and law enforcement. Oral
communications and basic Spanish sentence structure are emphasized. Some
reading and writing in Spanish is included. The material may be adjusted to
cover additional questions of probation and law enforcement or to apply to other
careers, such as medicine and horticulture. Lecture 3 hours.
SPAN 2101 – Modern Spanish I (4)
Prerequisite: SPAN 1102 or two years of high school Spanish and consent of instructor
This course aims at further development of understanding and speaking,
with more emphasis on reading and writing. Advanced oral practice and
grammar study in the language, including discussion in Spanish of Spanish and
Latin American civilizations. Lecture 4 hours.
SPAN 2102 – Modern Spanish II (4)
Prerequisite: SPAN 2101 or three years of high school Spanish and consent of instructor
This course is a continuation of SPAN 2101, including oral and written
practice. Lecture 4 hours. ▶ IAI ~ H1 900
SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
STP 1215 – Introduction to Surgical Technology (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program
This course introduces the student to the broad field of surgical technology.
This course has three basic sections: 1) general introductory information; 2)
introduction to basic principles of aseptic technique, and 3) introduction to
patient care. Lecture 3 hours.
STP 1216 – Principles of Surgical Technology (6)
Prerequisite: STP 1215
This course introduces the student to the practice of surgical technology. The
focus is on the skills that are specifically those of the scrub role and circulator
role. The student will demonstrate the proper and safe execution of procedures
and instruments and equipment. Adequate laboratory time for the practice and
testing of skills is required. Lecture 4 hours. Lab 4 hours.
STP 1217 – Surgical Procedures I (5)
Prerequisites: STP 1216, STP 1221 and ZOO 1105
This course is designed to prepare students for clinic practice training.
Instruction combines lectures and lab to introduce students to all surgical
specialties. Lecture 5 hours.
STP 1218 – Surgical Procedures II (3)
Prerequisite: STP 1217, MICR 1101 and ZOO 1106
This course is a continuation of STP 1217 and is designed to prepare students
for clinic practice training. Instruction combines lecture and lab to introduce
students to all surgical specialties not covered in the first course. Lecture 3 hours.
STP 1219 – Clinical in Surgical Technology I (5)
Prerequisites: Certified in CPR; STP 1215, STP 1221 and ZOO 1105
This course introduces the student to the operating room and its routines.
This course functions to expand knowledge gained in STP 1215 and supports
the knowledge being gained in the Principles and Practice of surgical technology
courses. This course is offered Pass/Fail. Lab 15 hours.
STP 1220 – Clinical in Surgical Technology II (5)
Prerequisites: Certified in CPR; STP 1222, MICR 1101 and ZOO 1106
This course is a continuation of STP 1222. It is designed to provide the
student with continued exposure to the operating room and its routines. This
course expands knowledge gained in STP 1215, STP 1216 and STP 1222. It is
offered Pass/Fail. Lab 15 hours.
STP 1221 – Pharmacology for Health Professions (3)
Prerequisite: STP 1215
This course provides basic knowledge of the most commonly used
medications. Discusses commonly prescribed medications, potential adverse
reactions, dietary response to treatment and desired effect. Lecture 3 hours.
SURVEYING
SURV 1205 – Introduction to Mapping and Geographic
Information Systems (3)
This is an introductory course that will explore the art and science of map
making focusing on Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This course will
examine the history and uses of maps as well as how computer software and
hardware currently play a vital role in their development. Global Positioning
Systems, remote sensing and aerial photogrammetry will be discussed, as well
as how they relate to GIS with application into the fields of natural resource
management, city planning, scientific research and business applications. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
SURV 1601– Foundations and Application of Geographic
Information Systems (1)
By alternating lecture and hands-on assignments , students will learn and
apply the basics of GIS, including geographic principles, ethics and accountability
in map making, cartographic design, databases and computer information
systems. Class activities will involve small independent mapping projects as
well as creating and compiling data to make a final map project. Lab 2 hours.
SURV 2201 – Engineering Surveying (4)
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to provide line and
grade construction layout using tape, level and transit. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
SURV 2210 – GIS / GPS Concepts and Applications (3)
This course is designed to introduce Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the form of classroom curriculum
and hands-on training. Topics include basic GIS concepts, basic GPS concepts,
mapping data input and analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
SUSTAINABLE DESIGN GREEN BUILDING
SDGB 1201 – Foundations of Sustainable Building Design (3)
The purpose of these course is to provide the student with an understanding
of why sustainable design of buildings is so important for our future and how
it can have a global impact. It will prepare those who would like to lead more
171
sustainable lives and be stewards of the earth. This course also will assist
in the preparation for those planning to take the Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design (LEED) exam. Lecture 3 hours.
SDGB 1202 – BIM & Sustainable Design (4)
Building information modeling merged with sustainable design allows for
complex processes, formerly too labor-intensive and expensive, to be performed.
Complete collection of techniques merging data to design via digital application.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
SDGB 1203 – Sustainable Landscape Design (3)
Obtain understanding in sustainable techniques, methods and elements
working in unison to create a landscape which is responsive to the environment,
regenerative and actively contributes to a health community. Lecture 2 hours.
Lab 2 hours.
SDGB 1204 – Sustainable Design & Construction Project (4)
Techniques and application of sustainable elements (passive and active)
through design projects / requirements and construction (built environment)
phase. Informative design decisions based upon analysis, research and
sustainable knowledge applied to physical testing and construction. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 4 hours.
THEATRE
THEA 1101 – Acting (3)
This introductory course includes the theories and techniques of acting,
including the following: movement, blocking, characterization and analysis
and group scene development. There are no prerequisites. Performances are
required and presented as in-class assignments. Lecture 3 hours. ▶ IAI ~ TA 914
THEA 1102 – Practicum in Theatre (3)
Through directed work on theatrical productions, the student will gain
acting and technical skills. Hours to be arranged with the theatre director. Skills
include experience in such positions as assistant director, prop master and a
plethora of other duties necessary to execute a performance. (Repeatable for up
to 12 hours credit.) Lab 6 hours.
THEA 1103 – Acting II (3)
Prerequisite: THEA 1101
This course will continue the development of fundamentals introduced
in THEA 1101. It will emphasize an increasingly intensive approach to acting
exercises, improvisations and scene study. Performances are required and
presented as in-class assignments. Lecture 3 hours.
THEA 1105 – Stage Makeup (3)
This course introduces elementary stage makeup techniques including
highlighting and shadowing, old age, wounds and scars, fantasy, animals and
basic corrective makeup. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
THEA 1106 – Theatre Appreciation (3)
Prerequisite: If reading course is required, student must complete READ 2409
or be concurrently enrolled in PREP 1404
This course is designed to stimulate an interest in the theatre and to develop
an understanding of the elements that make up the theatrical event. It explores
the relationship between theatre and the society of which it is a part. Lecture 3
hours. ▶ IAI ~ F1 907
THEA 1107- Introduction to Technical Theatre (3)
This course introduces elementary construction techniques to create
theatrical scenery and stage properties, utilizing a variety of carpentry tools;
additional scenic painting and lighting techniques will be explored. Backstage
safety practices including backstage organization will also be examined.
Laboratory experience is mandatory. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 5 hours.
THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE
THM 1201 – Introduction to Therapeutic Massage (2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program
This course is designed to serve as an introduction to basic principles and
techniques of therapeutic massage. Students will learn basic Swedish massage
techniques and how to apply them to the back, arms and legs. Identification of the
major muscle groups and bony landmarks, indications and contraindications to
massage and professional ethics will be addressed. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
172
THM 1202 – Therapeutic Massage Techniques I (3)
Prerequisite: THM 1201
This course is designed to serve as the initial training in therapeutic massage.
Students will learn about medical terminology, self-care techniques and history
of massage, as well as the benefits of massage. Swedish massage techniques and
variations will be taught and developed into a sequence for a full-body massage.
Pathologies, pressure sensitivity, draping techniques and communication skills
also will be covered. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 3 hours.
THM 1203 – Human Body for Massage Therapy I (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program
This course is an investigation into the study of the structure and functional
relationships, homeostasis of body systems. The course incorporates the systems
approach and integration of the systems into one functioning unit – the human
body. Laboratory procedures, basic chemistry, the cell and development are
incorporated into the course. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
THM 1204 – Pathology for Therapeutic Massage (3)
This course is designed to provide the student of therapeutic massage
the knowledge of disease processes that affect the human body as it relates
to therapeutic massage. It will provide general information on anatomy and
physiology, assessment techniques, general and specific disease manifestations,
indications and contra-indications to therapeutic massage. Lecture 3 hours.
THM 1208 – Business Practices and Ethics (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program
This course is designed to explore the various aspects of developing and
maintaining a successful therapeutic massage practice. Topics to be covered
include how to establish a bookkeeping system, maintain client records,
marketing, developing a business plan, the client/therapist relationship and
ethical issues. Lecture 3 hours.
THM 1209 – Responding to Client Emergencies (1)
This course is designed to prepare practitioners to respond appropriately to
the client in an emergency situation. It includes training in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation, first aid and communication skills. Lecture 1 hour.
THM 1210 – Human Body for Massage Therapy II (3)
Prerequisite: THM 1203
This course is an in-depth study of bones and muscles, which is a
continuation of THM 1203. Specific bones, prominent surface landmarks,
surface muscles and joint structures, as they pertain to therapeutic massage,
are included. Study also will include origins, insertions and actions of muscles.
Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
THM 1211 – Therapeutic Massage Techniques II (4)
Prerequisite: THM 1202
This course is designed to provide the student with the skills of deep
connective tissue massage techniques and incorporate them into a massage
session to meet the client’s needs. Joint mobilization, various forms of stretching
and chair massage will be included. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
THM 1212 – Therapeutic Massage Clinical I (4)
Prerequisite: THM 1201, THM 1202 and THM 1203
This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to
apply principles, techniques and procedures practiced in Therapeutic Massage
Techniques. Under the direction of the clinical supervisor, students will be
expected to demonstrate proper ethics, client/therapist communication skills,
proper draping technique, adequate sanitary precautions, perform full-body
massage based on client needs and properly document the session in the client’s
record. Student will be expected to massage three clients consecutively. Lecture
2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
THM 1222 – Therapeutic Massage Clinical II (1)
Prerequisite: THM 1201, THM 1202 and THM 1203
This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to
apply principles, techniques and procedures practiced in Therapeutic Massage
Techniques. Under the direction of the clinical supervisor, students will be
expected to demonstrate proper ethics, client/therapist communication skills,
proper draping techniques, adequate sanitary precautions, perform full-body
massage based on client needs and properly document the session in the client’s
record. Students will be expected to massage three clients consecutively while
demonstrating professional behavior. Lab 2 hours.
THM 1223 – National Certification Exam Review (2)
This course is designed to provide a comprehensive review of material
covered by the Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork Certification Examination,
including anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, clinical pathology, theory of
massage and bodywork, professional standards, ethics and business practices.
Lecture 2 hours.
THM 1601 – Special Topics in Therapeutic Massage (1)
Prerequisite: THM licensure
This course is a study of topics in the therapeutic massage field. The exact
content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied.
The course may be repeated three times depending on the subject studied.
Lecture 1 hour.
VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY
VET 1210 – Small Animal Nursing I (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to program
Skill development in handling, restraint, and nursing techniques in dogs and
cats. Emphasis on laws and ethics in veterinary medicine, breed identification,
restraint techniques, history taking, physical examination, grooming, diagnostic
sampling, therapeutic techniques, wound management, bandaging, fluid therapy,
catheter placement, and preventive medicine. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
VET 1211 – Small Animal Nursing II (3)
TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
A continuation of VET 1210 with emphasis on banadaging, venipuncture,
immunology, dentistry, urinary disease and emergency nursing. Lecture 1
hour. Lab 4 hours.
TRUK 1201 – Commercial Driver’s License Review (1)
VET 1212 – Animal Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Prerequisites: Valid Illinois driver’s license; provide Motor Vehicle Report, and
successful completion of a DOT Physical / Drug Screen (to be arranged by Rend
Lake College Truck Driver Training program staff).
A review of the rules and regulations set forth by the Commercial Motor
Vehicle Safety Act to prepare individuals for the written portion of the Illinois
Secretary of State’s Commercial Driver’s License Examination. Lecture 1 hour.
(Repeatable 3 times)
TRUK 1202 – Truck Driving I (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of TRUK 1201 or consent of Dean; valid
Commercial Driver’s License Learner’s Permit; provide Motor Vehicle Report;
successful completion of a DOT Physical / Drug Screen (to be arranged by Rend
Lake College Truck Driver Training Program staff).
Corequisite: TRUK 1203
An introduction to the skills and techniques utilized in the operation of a
semi-tractor trailer unit. Instruction will include driver safety and introduction
to backing, shifting and cornering techniques. Students will be assisted with job
placement. Industry recruiters will conduct employment seminars throughout
the class. Lecture 2.00 hours, Lab 2.00 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
TRUK 1203 – Truck Driver Training II (3)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of TRUK 1201 or consent of Dean
Corequisite: TRUK 1202
Hands-on instruction to improve and upgrade the skills and techniques
utilized in the operation of a semi-tractor trailer unit. Instruction will include
pre-trip inspection, backing, shifting and cornering techniques. The Illinois
Secretary of State’s Commercial Driver’s License Pre-Trip, Skills and Road
Examinations will be administered at the conclusion of this course. Lecture 1
hour. Lab 4 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
TRUK 1604 – Truck Driving Refresher (1)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of TRUK 1201, TRUK 1202, and TRUK 1203,
or consent of Dean and a current Class A Illinois Commercial Driver’s License.
This course provides hands-on training to refresh or improve skills required
to operate a semi-tractor trailer unit. Lab 2 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
TRUK 1605 – Commercial Driving Instructor Review (1.5)
This course is designed for the individual who wishes to become a driver
training instructor and apply for certification from the Illinois Secretary of
State. This course will include a review of Title 92, Chapter II, Section 1060
of the Illinois Administrative Code, Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for
Entry-Level Truck Driver, the Illinois Commercial Driver’s License Study Guide,
and the psychology of training adults. Participants will receive classroom and
behind-the-wheel instruction in the techniques of operating a commercial vehicle
safely and how to convey this information to student trainees. Lecture 1 hour.
Lab 1 hour. (Repeatable 3 times)
TRUK 1606 – Teen Accreditation Instructor Review (3.0)
This course is designed for the individual who wishes to become a driver
education training instructor and apply for certification from the Illinois
Secretary of State. This course will include a review of Title 92, Chapter II,
Section 1060 of the Illinois Administrative Code, Illinois Rules of the Road,
Secretary of State Driver Education rules and regulations, and the psychology
of training adults and teens. Participants will receive classroom and behind-thewheel instruction in the techniques of driver training and how to convey this
information to student trainees. Lecture 3 hours. (Repeatable 3 times)
Prerequisites: Admission to program
Course provides an overview of the structure and function of animal body
systems with focus on homeostasis. Subjects covered include: fundamental
cellular chemistry, physiology, cytology, histology, and anatomy of mammalian
and avian species. Laboratory work includes observation of histology slides as
well as identification of structures from each system on selected mammalian
cadavers. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
VET 1213 – Animal Anatomy and Physiology II (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
This course is a continuation of VET 1212. Subjects covered include;
fundamental cellular chemistry, physiology, cytology, histology, and anatomy of
mammalian and avian species. Laboratory work includes observation of histology
slides as well as identification of stuctures from each system on selected mammalian
and avian cadavers. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
VET 1216 – Large Animal Nursing (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
Handling, restraint, and nursing techniques in horses, cows, swine,
and sheep. Fundamentals of selection, management, genetics, nutrition and
physiology of farm animals. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
VET 1217 – Animal Radiology (2)
Prerequisite: Admission to program
Utilization of radiographic equipment on animals and positioning for
various anatomical exposures, with an emphasis on radiation safety and methods
of obtaining high-quality diagnostic pictures. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
VET 1218 – Veterinary Practice Management (2)
Prerequisite: Admission to program
Office practices utilized in a veterinary hospital including OSHA regulations,
invoices, inventory, estimate preparation, record keeping, legal issues, grief
management and customer relations. Lecture 2 hours.
VET 1219 – Animal Clinical Lab I (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
This course teaches routine laboratory testing with an emphasis on hematology,
urinalysis and fecal examination. Lecture 1 hours. Lab 4 hours.
VET 1233 – Animal Surgical Technology I (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
Methods of surgery preparation with emphasis on surgery packs,
instruments, autoclaves, sterile technique, surgical preps and suture material.
An introduction to intubation and anesthesia. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
VET 1238 – Animal Pharmacology I (2)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of VET 1210, 1212, 1217 and 1218
A discussion of dosage and solution problems, dispensing procedures, client
education, administration of drugs, and introduction to common veterinary
drug classes. Lecture 2 hours.
VET 2219 – Animal Clinical Lab II (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2231
A continuation of VET 1219. Emphasis on blood chemistry, internal
parasites, CBCs, cytology, histology, sample preparation and other veterinary
diagnostic testing. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
173
VET 2231 – Veterinary Technology Internship I (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program
Skill and proficiency development through participation in clinical rotations
at veterinary clinics. Skills developed through the clinical site should include:
large animal (if applicable), surgery, radiology, clinical pathology, nursing,
client relations and care, telephone etiquette, necropsy, and exotics. Students
will be placed within a designated clinic for the duration of the semester where
all required hours must be successfully completed. Lab 15 hours.
VET 2232 – Veterinary Technology Internship II (4)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2219, 2231,
2233, 2238 and 2239
A continuation of VET 2231. Continued skill and proficiency development
through participation in clinical rotations at Humane Societies, clinical practices,
animal disease laboratories, rescue facilities, university teaching hospitals,
emergency clinics or large animal facilities. Students will be placed within a
designated facility for the duration of the semester where all required hours must
be successfully completed. Students will meet once per week for participation in
review for the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE). Lecture
1 hour. Lab 15 hours.
VET 2233 – Animal Surgical Technology II (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2231
A continuation of VET 1233 with emphasis on anesthesia, surgical assisting,
trauma surgery, and ophthalmic and thoracic surgery. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 4 hours.
VET 2235 – Laboratory and Exotic Animals (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2219, 2231,
2233, 2238 and 2239
Students will be introduced to handling, restraint and nursing techniques in
common laboratory, exotic and wild animal species. Topics will include care and
use of laboratory animals, sanitary procedures, clinical pathology and common
diseases. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
VET 2236 – Animal Management and Nutrition (3)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2219, 2231,
2233, 2238 and 2239
This course will introduce basic principles of animal and herd health
management including nutrition, reproduction, pharmacology, vaccinations,
diseases and laboratory tests. Lecture 3 hours.
VET 2238 – Animal Pharmacology II (2)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2231
A continuation of VET 1238 with emphasis on drugs currently used in
veterinary practice. Lecture 2 hours.
VET 2239 – Animal Diseases (2)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year of program and VET 2231
This course introduces students to the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and
treatment of selected diseases of companion animals. Students will gain
knowledge of disease processes and how they affect companion animals. Students
will learn about commonly seen diseases within organ systems of mammals.
Lecture 2 hours.
VITICULTURE
VIT 1201 – Introduction to Viticulture (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to current practices for
establishing a commercial vineyard and maintaining its health and productivity
once established. Topics covered include varietal selection, site preparation,
equipment, site selection, first season establishment, vine growth development
and training, trellis systems, vine propagation, weed control and vine disease
control. Field practicum sessions consisting of 16 hours of hands-on experience
will be scheduled in area vineyards. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
VIT 1203 – Winter Viticulture Technology (2)
Prerequisite: VIT 1201 or consent of instructor
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture
practical experience in winter vineyard operations. Students are required to
partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience
portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking
employment in commercial viticulture. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
VIT 1204 – Spring Viticulture Technology (2)
Prerequisite: VIT 1201 or consent of instructor
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture
practical experience in spring vineyard operations. Students are required to
174
partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience
portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking
employment in commercial viticulture. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
VIT 1205 – Summer/Fall Viticulture Technology (2)
Prerequisite: VIT 1201 or consent of instructor
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture
practical experience in summer/fall vineyard operations. Students are required to
partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience
portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking
employment in commercial viticulture. Lecture 1.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
VIT 1207 – Integrated Pest Management (2)
Effective grape production depends on the grower developing a system of
grape management that is appropriate for each vineyard. Decisions need to be
made for how to manage all of the normal cultural practices such as planting,
fertility, harvesting, and pruning as well as managing the insect, disease, and
weed problems that occur either regularly or sporadically. The information in
this course will address management issues related to common, expected pest
problems as well as the occasional appearance of minor pest problems. Lecture
2 hours.
VIT 1208 – Midwest Vineyard Management (2)
Prerequisite: VIT 1201 and VIT 1203 or consent of instructor
This course is a general study of vineyard management applicable to the
Mid-America region, primarily Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois.
The course primarily covers management of the mature vineyard. It does not
go into detail concerning vineyard establishment which is addressed in the
Vineyard Establishment and Maintenance VESTA Course, nor does it go into
detail concerning pests and diseases which is addressed in the Integrated Pest
Management VESTA Course. Lecture 2 hours.
VIT 1209 – Soils for Viticulture (3)
The course will explore soil properties and behavior and their influence
on wines. The course focuses not only on growth and production, but on the
long-term effects of viticulture on soil quality and the wider environment.
Lecture 3 hours.
VOLUNTEERISM
VOL 1100 – Volunteerism (.5-1)
This course is intended to meet legislative guidelines providing students with
opportunities to participate in community service experiences. Students will
select work and be placed based on skills, knowledge and interest. Opportunities
include tutoring, literacy training, neighborhood improvement, environmental
safety, assisting the elderly, disabled and/or community agencies. Hours TBA.
(Repeatable 3 times)
WEBMASTER
WBM 1220 – Introduction to HTML (3)
This course will develop basic skills necessary to create and maintain Web
pages. Students will develop an understanding of basic HTML codes, page layout,
links and how they affect different browsers. Lecture 3 hours.
WELDING
WELD 1270 – Introduction to Welding Processes (4)
This course is designed to give the student an overview of the various
metal-joining processes used in general industry, construction and fabrication
industries. Processes include shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding,
oxy-acetylene welding and brazing and gas tungsten arc welding. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 4 hours.
WELD 1272 – Structural Shielded Metal Arc Welding (4)
Concentrated instruction in the use of different welding electrodes, electrode
identification, electrode storage and basic welding symbols. The course provides
practical applications of AC/DC theory in the area of fillet joints in the vertical
up and overhead positions. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
WELD 1282 – GMAW / GTAW Welding (4)
Introduces Gas Metal and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding for use in auto body
and production manufacturing processes where light gauge metals are used. The
ability of GMAW and GTAW processes to weld nonferrous materials with high
quality results will be stressed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
WELD 1283 – GMAW / GTAW Pipe Welding (4)
Prerequisites: WELD 1282 and WELD 1272 or consent of instructor
Introduces Gas Metal Arc Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding for use
in pipe welding manufacturing. Safety and proper welding technique will be
stressed. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
WELD 1284 – GTAW Welding (3)
This course provides the student with a thorough knowledge of gas tungsten
arc welding fundamentals, arc characteristics and welding safety. The course will
include lecture and lab activities on the welding characteristics of carbon steel,
stainless steel and aluminum. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
WELD 1601 – Welding (2)
This course is designed to acquaint the beginning student with the selection,
installation and maintenance of oxyacetylene and electric welding equipment, as
well as the safety precautions which should be observed when welding. Beginning
welding provides the instruction and practice necessary to develop the specific
skills required for welding. Lecture 1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
WELD 1602 – Advanced Welding (2)
This course is a continuation of WELD 1601. It is designed to develop
additional skills necessary for the fabrication of metal products. It also provides
training necessary for the welding of special metals and metal alloys. Lecture
1 hour. Lab 2 hours.
WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY
WCT 1210 – Introduction to Communications (3)
Focusing on all aspects of telecommunications, this course provides a
comprehensive overview of how information, including voice and data, travels
throughout the world. A high-level overview of telecommunications; the
technical aspects of the field, and applications in telecommunications will
demonstrate the practical uses of telecommunications. Lecture 3 hours.
WCT 1250 – Land Based Communications (5)
This course investigates typical land based “hard wired” telecommunications
systems including T1, Frame Relay, ATM, Fiber, Sonet, DSL, ISDN, and SS7.
This course will offer a balance of lecture and lab experiments. Lecture 3 hours.
Lab 4 hours.
WCT 1260 – Intro to Mobile Telephone Systems (3)
This course is an introduction to Mobile Telephone Systems. The student will
learn about the current landscape of cellular service by examining 1st generation
analog systems (1G) through 2G, 2.5G and 3rd generation digital broadband
systems. Compatibility, internetworking, voice/data convergence, standards and
protocols, and wireless service and applications will be discussed. Lecture 3 hours.
WCT 2200 – Voice Over IP (4)
This course is designed to meet the individual needs of the experienced
welder who wishes to update his/her skills. The course is designed to review
skills in preparation for industrial welding test. Lecture .25 hour. Lab .5 hour.
Prerequisites: CNS 1210, CNS 1221 and CNS 2224
This course investigates Voice Over IP (VoIP) technology. Standards, similarities
and differences between traditional telephone networks and IP Telephony, call setup, equipment selection and installation will also be covered. Students will have the
opportunity to work on functional VoIP equipment. The course will offer a balance
of lecture and lab experiments. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
WELD 1610 – Welding Applications (2)
WCT 2210 – Supervised Occupational Experience (2)
WELD 1605 – Welding Refresher (.5)
A course is designed to meet the specific needs of the experienced welder.
Instruction is individualized and provided on an open-entry/open-exit basis.
Each student will meet with the instructor to design his/her course of instruction,
which should center around a special project, welding technique or preparation
for an employer-required weld test. No student will be admitted prior to meeting
with, and being granted approval by, the instructor. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 3 hours.
WELD 2240 – Metallurgy and Heat Treatment (2)
The purpose is to enable students to identify metals other than low carbon
steel and to know proper welding procedures for the metals. The student will be
able to identify physical properties and gain a broad overview of different metals
and their physical characteristics as well as laboratory usage of the annealing
furnaces and hardness tester used to measure those properties. Lecture 2 hours.
WELD 2242 – Weld Inspection for Quality Control (2)
This course is an introductory discussion of both destructive and
nondestructive inspection methods, welding processes, the metals a product
is made of and the various codes (AWS, ASTM, etc.) and standards, as well as
the specifications with which a welding inspector may be required to work.
Lecture 2 hours.
WELD 2262 – Pipe Welding I (4)
Prerequisite: WELD 2275 or consent of the instructor
This course is designed to familiarize the student with procedures for welding
various size pipe in the 2G and 5G pipe positions, using E-6010 and E-7018
electrodes in preparation for destructive testing. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 4 hours.
WELD 2274 – Blueprint Reading for Welders (3)
The purpose of this course is to aid the student in becoming proficient in
reading field blueprints for fabrication work in the welding industry. The course
will include various written exams and identification of symbols and details of
field blueprints. Lecture 2 hours. Lab 2 hours.
WELD 2275 – Advanced Welding (2)
Prerequisite: WELD 1272 or consent of the instructor
This course is designed to familiarize the student with welding procedures
as stipulated by American Welding Society (AWS) D1.1 structural code for
qualifications, testing and standards. Lecture .5 hour. Lab 3 hours.
WELD 2285 – Pipe Welding II (4)
Prerequisite: WELD 2262
Advanced pipe welding is designed to meet student needs for ASME and
AWS standards for welding pipe in the 6G position. Students will be able to
read blueprints for layout work. Destructive tests will be conducted. Lecture 2
hours. Lab 4 hours.
Prerequisite: Approval from Dean and minimum 2.0 GPA
This course may be offered to Wireless Communications Technology students
following the completion of the first year of the program. The student will be
placed in the wireless industry for their supervised experience. Both the college
coordinator and the employer will supervise the learning experience. The student
trainee will receive vocational counseling and individual assistance. Special
attention will be given to career planning, on-the-job problems and current
business practices. Lab 20 hours.
WCT 2250 – Cellular Technology (5)
This course investigates Cellular Telecommunications systems and their
associated equipment including layout, cabling, microwave systems, calibration,
pressurization systems, and GPS antenna. The course will offer a balance of lecture
and lab experiments. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 4 hours.
WCT 2260 – Wireless LAN / WAN (4)
This course investigates wireless networking technology. Planning,
designing, installing and configuring wireless networks will be covered. Coverage
of IEEE 802.11b/a/g/pre-n implementation, security, and troubleshooting will
also be addressed. The course will offer a balance of lecture and lab experiments.
Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
ZOOLOGY
Prerequisite: PREP 1404 or equivalent placement.
ZOO 1101 – General Zoology (4)
This course provides a survey of the Animal Kingdom, including
morphology, physiology, life cycles and comparative anatomy of representative
animals in each phylum. The first part of the course considers anatomical and
physiological changes due to evolutionary pressures. The latter part focuses on
taxonomy and ecology as they relate to local wildlife. It is recommended for
those pursuing a career in zoology, wildlife, forestry and fisheries. Lecture 3
hours. Lab 2 hours. ▶ IAI ~ LI 902L
ZOO 1105 – Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
This course provides an overview of cytology, histology and organ systems,
including integumentary, muscle, skeletal and nerve. Biochemistry will be
discussed as it relates to each of these systems. Laboratory work includes
observation of histology slides as well as identification of structures from each
system on selected mammals and cadavers. Required for all students pursuing
a career in allied health. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours.
175
ZOO 1106 – Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Prerequisite: ZOO 1105 with a “C” or better
This course is a continuation of ZOO 1105, focusing on the anatomy and
physiology of such areas as the endocrine, reproductive, urinary, cardiovascular,
immune and digestive systems. Laboratory work includes identification of
structures from each system on selected mammals and cadavers. Required
for those pursuing a career in allied health. ZOO 1105 is recommended as a
prerequisite but is not required. Lecture 3 hours. Lab 2 hours
.RESTRICTED CLASSES
The following classes are restricted to students enrolled in the listed programs.
AMERICORPS
EDUC 1102 – Tutor Training (3)
This course is designed to provide students with awareness of literacy
challenges and the opportunity to develop tutoring skills and techniques that
enable student achievement. This course will prepare each student to provide
high-quality tutoring services to teacher-referred emergent learners in grades
K-2 and teacher-designated students in grades 5-8. Lecture 3 hours.
EDUC 1103 – Mentor Training (2)
This course is designed to provide students with awareness of practices and
techniques for effective mentoring that enable student achievement. This course
will prepare students to provide effective mentoring services to teacher-referred
emergent learners in grades K-2 and teacher-designated students in grades 5-8.
Lecture 2 hours.
UPWARD BOUND
ENGL 1204 – Selected Topics in Liberal Arts (.5-4)
This course will include an in-depth study of topics in Liberal Arts. The exact
content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied.
Lecture .5-4 hours, repeatable three times.
ENGL 1205 – Selected Topics in English & Literature (.5-4)
This course will include an in-depth study of topics in English and Literature.
The exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject
studied. Lecture .5-4 hours, repeatable three times.
MATH 1203 – Selected Topics in Mathematics (.5-4)
This course will include an in-depth study of topics in Mathematics. The
exact content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject
studied. Lecture .5-4 hours, repeatable three times.
PHSC 1201 – Selected Topics in Science (.5-4)
This course will include an in-depth study of topics in Science. The exact
content will vary from semester to semester depending on the subject studied.
Lecture .5-4 hours, repeatable three times.
176
LATE ADDITION
ALLIED HEALTH
ALH 1200 – Introduction to Pharmacology (3)
This course provides the student with an introduction to basic pharmacology.
Drugs are presented within the major drug classifications along with general
drug actions, common adverse reactions, contraindication, precautions and
interactions related to each body system. Emphasis is placed on ways to promote
an optimal response to therapy, how to monitor and manage adverse reactions,
and important points to keep in mind when educating patients about the use of
these drugs. Lecture 3 hours.
ALH 1201 – Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals (3)
If reading courses are required, the student must complete PREP 1404
This course is designed for students entering entry-level health professional
programs. Students will study the structure and function of human anatomy,
including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,
urinary, reproductive and circulatory systems. Lecture 2.5 hours. Lab 1 hour.
ALH 1202 – Medical Law & Ethics (3)
This course is an introduction to the concepts of medical law and ethics for
health care practitioners. Topics including criminal and civil acts, contracts,
negligence and ethical concepts as they relate to the medical profession. Managed
care, HIPAA and other health care legislative rulings are discussed. Lecture 3
hours.
RECOMMENDED COURSE SELECTION GUIDE
FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN ENGLISH REVIEW, READING REVIEW OR PREP 1404
IF
enrolled in
ENGL 1412,
READ 2409 and
MATH 1401, 1402
or 1407 . . .
NOTE:
AAS students need
to confer with their
respective Dean or
Academic
Advisor
• Must enroll in PREP 1402
• May enroll in PYED courses
Contact
Dean
Andrea Banach
(Ext. 1258) or
Dean
Henry Leeck
(Ext. 1790)
QUESTIONS?
• May enroll in approved
Career-Technical courses
IF enrolled in
PREP 1404
Select from: ART 1103, 1105,
1107, 1111, 2105, 2108, 2113, 2115, 2121;
CSCI 1243; HEA 1101, 1102, 1103, 1120, 2130; MUSI
1109, 1120, 1145, 1164, 1166; PSYC 2106; THEA 1106
• No Science course
RECOMMENDED COURSE
SELECTION GUIDE
• May enroll in approved Career-Technical courses
• May enroll in PYED courses
• Math prerequisites must be followed
IF enrolled in READ 2409
Select from: ART 1103, 1105, 1107,
1111, 2105, 2108, 2113, 2115, 2121;
CSCI 1243;
MUSI 1109, 1120, 1145, 1164, 1166
• Must enroll in PREP 1402
• May enroll in PYED courses
• May enroll in approved Career-Technical
courses • No Science course
• Math prerequisites must be followed
IF enrolled in ENGL 1412
Select from: ANTH 1101;
ART 1101,
1103, 1105, 1107, 1111, 2105, 2108,
2113, 2115, 2121; CSCI 1243;
GEOG 1101; HEA 1101; MUSI 1100, 1109,
1164, 1166; PSYC 2106; SOCI 1101, 2101
• May enroll in Science and PYED courses
• May enroll in approved Career-Technical
courses • Math prerequisites must be followed
177
ERICA BLUMENSTOCK
REND LAKE COLLEGE
FACULTY and STAFF
Provider Services Coordinator / CCRR
[email protected]
B.S.N., Barnes College of Nursing
M.S.N., University of Southern Indiana
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S.Ed., McKendree University
M.B.A. and M.A.Ed., University of Phoenix
SOUTH OASIS 122 PHONE EXT. 1759
MICHAEL ADAMSON
Allied Health / Therapeutic Massage Professor
[email protected]
ATC 113 PHONE EXT. 1274
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S.N., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Massage Therapy Certification,
Middle Tennessee Institute of T.M.
SARA ALSTAT
Liberal Arts / Music Associate Professor
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 148 PHONE EXT. 1817
A.A., John A. Logan College
M.M. & B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
JACQUELYN ANSELMENT
BRUCE BOWEN
Custodian
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
EMILY BOWERS
Math & Sciences Division / Biological Sciences Instructor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 143
PHONE EXT. 1722
M.S. & B.S., Southeast Missouri State University
SUMMER BRADEN
Records Specialist
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 134
PHONE EXT. 1329
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
A.A., & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Coordinator / Title III Health Studies Support
244-2210, Ext. 112
NORTH OASIS 144 PHONE EXT. 1493
M.S. & B.S., Murray State University
Ed.D., Oakland City University
ANDREA BANACH
MOLLIE BREMER
LRC 143 PHONE EXT. 1769
SOUTH OASIS 145 PHONE EXT. 1258
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.S., Eastern Illinois University
HEATHER BAUERSACHS
RLC Murphy-Wall Pinckneyville Campus Coordinator
[email protected]
PINCKNEYVILLE CAMPUS 357-3742 PHONE EXT. 3001
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
MELISA LEE BERENDSON
Allied Health / Director of Nursing
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 123
TRANAE BROCKHOUSE
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
244-2210, EXT. 103
M.S. & B.S., Eastern Illinois University
PHONE EXT. 1705
M.S.N & B.S.N., Southern Illinois Univ. Edwardsville
Liberal Arts / History Associate Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1792
M.A. & B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
CHARLES BROWN
Security Guard
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 135
EXT. 1212
EMERGENCY 1911
NATALIE BROWN
ADMINISTRATION 152
PHONE EXT. 1233
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
Cosmetology Instructor / Studio RLC
[email protected]
CEO / Rend Lake College Foundation
[email protected]
Cosmetology Certificate, Kaskaskia College
Cosmetology Instructor Certificate, Rend Lake College
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
242-8459
REBECCA L. BIGGS
Liberal Arts / English Professor
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 147
PHONE EXT. 1707
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.A. & B.S., Murray State University
SARAH BILDERBECK
Applied Science & Technology /
Office Systems Technology Associate Professor
[email protected]
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY 130
PHONE EXT. 1754
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Mid-Continent University
180
STUDENT CENTER 210
PHONE EXT. 1214
Computer Technician
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1344
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
MIKE BURRIS
Applied Science & Technology /
Agricultural Mechanics & Diesel Technology Professor
[email protected]
APPLIED SCIENCE CENTER 112
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
244-2210, EXT. 117
CINDY CALDWELL
Math & Sciences Division / Mathematics Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1715
MARVIN BRISCOE
Custodial Supervisor
[email protected]
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
JAMIE CAMBRON
Lead Child Care Provider / RLCF Children’s Center
[email protected]
RLCF CHILDREN’S CENTER PHONE EXT. 1393
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Applied Science & Technology /
Computer Science Professor & Instructional Designer
2000 RLCF “OUTSTANDING OFFICE
SUPPORT STAFF AWARD”
2011 RLCF “ASSESSMENT AWARD”
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1774
Certificate, Microsoft Office User Specialist
Certificate, Microsoft Office 2000 Master
A.A. & A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ed.M., University of Illinois
KATHY CARR
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE/MT. VERNON
244-2210, Ext. 105
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
NATHAN BURKITT
ACADEMIC 107
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY 180
SHAWNA BULLARD
MELISSA BERTSCHI
242-8459
A.A.S., John A. Logan
Cosmetology & Cosmetology Teacher Certificate
John A. Logan
Paul Mitchell Level 2 Certified Haircutting /
Level 1 Certified Color
SHARI CARPENTER
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Records Specialist
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.A., McKendree University
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Director / Child Care Resource & Referral
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 151
ERIN BUTLER
SOUTH OASIS 137
NATHAN BROUWER
Dean / Math & Sciences
[email protected]
244-2210, EXT. 111
Cosmetology Associate Professor / Studio RLC
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
[email protected]
REND LAKE COLLEGE
ELIZABETH BAILEY-SMITH
A.A., Rend Lake College
FACULTY
and STAFF
Liberal Arts / Speech Associate
Professor
B.S., University of Illinois
2013 RLCF “ASSESSMENT AWARD”
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
KATHRYN BYARS
Provider Recruitment-Quality Specialist / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE/MT. VERNON
PAULA BURRIS
Allied Health / Nursing Associate Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1269
Ag Mechanics Certificate, Rend Lake College
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
WHITNEY CHAUDOIN
Administrative Assistant /
Community & Corporate Education
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE 396 PHONE EXT. 2000
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
M.B.A. & B.B.A., McKendree University
BRIAN CLARK
Programmer / Analyst
2012 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ACADEMIC 106A
PHONE EXT. 1218
B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology
RUSSELL CLENDENIN
PEGGY DAVIS
Truck Driver Training Professor
STUDENT CENTER 204
PHONE EXT. 1380
Illinois Secretary of State Certified Instructor
Illinois Class A Commercial Driver’s License
National Safety Council DDC-4
GARRETT COLLIER
Web / SharePoint Developer
[email protected]
ACADEMIC 106E
NORTH OASIS 150
PHONE EXT. 1725
PHONE EXT. 1275
AMY COOK
PHONE EXT. 1720
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
CHAD COPPLE
Director / Marketing & Public Information
2009 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
THE HITTING ZONE
PHONE EXT. 1282
B.S., Blackburn College
JEFFREY DEMATTEI
Custodian
[email protected]
ACADEMIC 107
PHONE EXT. 1208
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
JO ANN DICK
STARS Advisor
[email protected]
TONY ETNIER
Director / The Hitting Zone
[email protected]
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.A. & B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Administrative Computer Technician
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
SOUTH OASIS 111
Liberal Arts / English Literature Professor
[email protected]
Institutional Effectiveness /
Coordinator of Special Projects
[email protected]
LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER 131
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Mid-Continent University
REND LAKE COLLEGE MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
JEFF FAIRBANKS
Culinary Arts Associate Professor
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 132A
PHONE EXT. 1334
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
AMBER FANN
PHONE EXT. 1337
STEVE DOTY
Custodian
KELLY EUBANKS
Allied Health / Allied Health Associate Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 121
PHONE EXT. 1304
B.S.N., University of Missouri-St. Louis
JAMES FEATHERSTONE
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.A.Ed., McKendree University
A.A.S., Rend Lake College (2)
Report Writer
[email protected]
RUSSELL (RUSTY) DOWNEN JR.
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
CYNTHIA CORN
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
ADMINISTRATION 118
PHONE EXT. 1237
Math & Sciences Division /
Health & Physical Education Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 151
PHONE EXT. 1721
B.S., University of Alabama-Birmingham
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
MARY CORNETT
Executive Assistant to the President
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 126
PHONE EXT. 1243
B.S., Ball State University
DARA COX
Academic Coordinator /
Adult Education & Family Literacy
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 118
PHONE EXT. 1287
B.S., Ball State University
M.A. (2), University of Pheonix
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
Maintenance Technician
PHONE EXT. 1255
PHONE EXT. 1255
A.A.S., Rend Lake College (2)
KELLY DOWNES
Director of Student Records / Registrar
2006 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ASC 110 / ATC 138
PHONE EXT. 1261
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
FELICIA FOLLMER
SARAH DRAPER
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
NORTH OASIS 149
Lead Child Care Provider / RLCF Children’s Center
[email protected]
Liberal Arts Division / Sociology Associate Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1809
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S.W., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.S.W., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
ANGELA ELLIS
Allied Health Division / Nursing Instructor
[email protected]
B.S.N., McKendree University
M.S.N., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
APPLIED SCIENCE CENTER 113 PHONE EXT. 1066
Business Office / Human Resources Specialist
[email protected]
MONICA (RENE) CROUSE
JOY FITTS
Administrative Assistant / Applied Science & Technology
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
PHONE EXT. 1327
SOUTH OASIS 118 PHONE EXT. 1709
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.B.A., McKendree University
PHONE EXT. 1229
Administrative Assistant to the President
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 155
KATHY CRAIG
Applied Science & Technology /
Agriculture Associate Professor
[email protected]
ACADEMIC 106C
MACEY ELLIS
ADMINISTRATION 159 PHONE EXT. 1112
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
TYSON ELLIS
ADMINISTRATION 131
PHONE EXT. 1261
KAITLYN GATIMU
RLCF CHILDREN’S CENTER
PHONE EXT. 1393
B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
VICKIE GOLLIHER
Student Services Coordinator /
Adult Education & Family Literacy
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 115
PHONE EXT. 1244
A.A., Rend Lake College
TINA GROUNDS
Math & Sciences Division /
Early Childhood Education Professor
2013 RLCF “FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARD”
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 153 PHONE EXT. 1396
A.A.S., John A. Logan College
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Pre-K Head Teacher / RLCF Children’s Center
[email protected]
Records Specialist
[email protected]
B.S., Towson University
M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Accounts Receivable Specialist
[email protected]
SUSAN CUNNINGHAM
AMY EPPLIN
A.S., Rend Lake College
RLCF CHILDREN’S CENTER
PHONE EXT. 1393
ADMINISTRATION 152
PHONE EXT. 1230
ADMINISTRATION 159 PHONE EXT. 1235
Learning Enhancement Specialist
[email protected]
Financial Aid Specialist
[email protected]
A.A., Mt. St. Clare College
B.A., University of Northern Iowa
M.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.B.A., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
GAYLA DAVENPORT
Liberal Arts / English Associate Professor
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 120
PHONE EXT. 1204
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
A.A., Rend Lake College
244-2210, EXT. 114
ADMINISTRATION 113
MICHELLE GOIN
PHONE EXT. 1386
JOSEPH ERVIN
HILLARY HALSEY
First-Year Experience Coordinator
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 121 PHONE EXT. 1323
A.A., Lake Land College
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
NORTH OASIS 141 PHONE EXT. 1232
B.A., Eastern Michigan University
M.A., University of Texas at El Paso
181
BARBARA HAMPTON
Liberal Arts Division /
Developmental Reading & English Associate Professor
[email protected]
2011 RLCF “ASSESSMENT AWARD”
NORTH OASIS 152
PHONE EXT. 1321
M.A. & B.A., Vermont College
Ed.D., Oakland City University
NICOLE HANEY
Allied Health / Nursing Associate Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 118
PHONE EXT. 1808
A.D.N., Rend Lake College
B.S.N., McKendree University
BRENDA H. HEINZMANN
Math & Sciences Division /
Early Childhood Education Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 152
PHONE EXT. 1397
GREG HOLLMANN
Liberal Arts Division /
Political Science Associate Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 149 PHONE EXT. 1780
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
MALLORY HOWELL
PHONE EXT. 1291
A.S. & A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.Acc., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
RON HUDSON
STUDENT CENTER 135
EXT. 1212
EMERGENCY 1911
HOLLY HEISNER
Maintenance / Grounds
2002 RLC “OUTSTANDING PHYSICAL
PLANT STAFF AWARD”
TRINDA HEITMEYER
Data and Technology Specialist / CCRR
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
B.A., DePauw University
FRANK HUGHEY
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
EXT. 1255
JEAN HUIE
A.A.S., Kaskaskia College
B.S., Grand Canyon University
244-2210, Ext. 101
BRAD HELM
Applied Science & Technology /
Computer Science Associate Professor
[email protected]
Executive Assistant to the Vice President
of Academic Instruction
1996 RLC “OUTSTANDING OFFICE
SUPPORT STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 131
PHONE EXT. 1247
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
KACIE HUNTER
ATC 181 PHONE EXT. 1814
Administrative Assistant /
Mining & Industrial Department
[email protected]
CHARLOTTE HENRY
A.S., Parkland College
B.S., Indiana University
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY CENTER 195 PHONE EXT. 1772
Director / Adult Education & Family Literacy
[email protected]
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Allied Health Division /
Director / Health Information Technology
[email protected]
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
BETTY JO HERBERT
Allied Health / Nursing Associate Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 123 PHONE EXT. 1706
A.A.S, Rend Lake College
M.S.N. & B.S.N., McKendree University
JORDAN HICKS
Academic Advisor
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 109 PHONE EXT. 1361
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southwest Baptist University
M.S., Southern Illinois University
BETH HOFFMAN
Upward Bound Program / Student Advisor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 109
PHONE EXT. 1219
B.S., Southern Illinois University
COAL MINING TECHNOLOGY 115 PHONE EXT. 2373
CHRISTINA HUTCHESON
NORTH OASIS 116 PHONE EXT. 1220
A.A.S., Southeastern Illinois College
M.S. & B.S., Oakland City University
CATHERINE JACKSON
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
A.A.S., Kaskaskia College
244-2210, EXT. 115
MATTHEW JACKSON
Coordinator /
Illinois Green Economy Network Curriculum
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1233
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.B.A., McKendree University
CAITLIN KEELE
Administrative Assistant /
Rend Lake College Foundation
[email protected]
STEVE KENNETT
Liberal Arts / Psychology & Philosophy Professor
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 146
PHONE EXT. 1755
B.A., Indiana Central University
M.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
LAURA L. KERN
Student Services Coordinator /
Adult Education & Family Literacy
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 114
PHONE EXT. 1417
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
ANGIE KISTNER
Vice President of Finance & Administration
2011 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 163
PHONE EXT. 1221
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
CHRISTINA R. KUBERSKI
Vice President of Academic Instruction
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 135
PHONE EXT. 1264
B.A., Olivet Nazarene University
M.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
LYNDA LANINGHAM
Math & Sciences Division / Mathematics Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 144
PHONE EXT. 1760
A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
HENRY (BUSTER) LEECK
Dean / Liberal Arts
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 145
PHONE EXT. 1790
ATC 106 PHONE EXT. 1296
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
JENA JENSIK
Assistant Director /
RLC Small Business Development Center
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M. Arch, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Counselor
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 107
PHONE EXT. 1293
B.A., Eastern Illinois University
M.S. Ed., Southern Illinois University
Type 73 Certification
Math & Sciences Division / Aquatics Center Coordinator
[email protected]
AQUATICS CENTER
NICHOLAS LeMAY
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
LAURA JOHNSTON
182
ABBI KASH
Records Specialist
[email protected]
A.A., A.S., A.A.S. & A.F.A., Rend Lake College
B.S, MacMurray College
ATC 198 PHONE EXT. 1778
PHONE EXT. 1273
M.B.A. & B.A., Benedictine University
STUDENT CENTER 202 PHONE EXT. 1213
Police Officer
[email protected]
B.S.Ed., University of Tennessee-Martin
M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Allied Health Division /
Radiologic Technology Program Director
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 154
ADMINISTRATION 153
Business Office Accountant
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 159
MARK JORND
Math & Sciences Division / Business Associate Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1207
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
EXT. 2001
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
KEELI LeVART
Assistant Director / Rend Lake College Foundation
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 202
PHONE EXT. 1324
B.S., Greenville College
M.B.A., Anderson University
JENNIFER TARANTINO LINSIN
BROOKE MAY
Applied Science & Technology / Graphic Design Professor
[email protected]
Director / RLC Foundation Children’s Center
[email protected]
A.A., John A. Logan College
M.S.Ed. & B.A., Southern Illinois Univ. Carbondale
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
NORTH OASIS 110
PHONE EXT. 1716
JOHN R. LITTLE
Liberal Arts / English Professor
2009 RLCF “FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARD”
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 143
PHONE EXT. 1765
RLCF CHILDREN’S CENTER
PHONE EXT. 1393
DON McBRIDE
COAL MINE TRAINING CENTER 104 PHONE EXT. 1217
CHARLOTTE LOQUASTO
Liberal Arts Division / Art Associate Professor
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 116
B.S., Northwestern University
MELISSA McCLEMENT-ENGLER
NORTH OASIS 140
PHONE EXT. 1268
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.B.A., McKendree University
PHONE EXT. 1719
B.F.A., Kendall College of Art & Design
M.A., Syracuse University
APRIL McCORMICK
Custodian
BETH MANDRELL
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
MAINTENANCE BUILDING PHONE EXT. 1255
Reference Librarian
2005 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER 116
PHONE EXT. 1276
Practical Nursing Certificate, Rend Lake College
L.T.A. Certificate, College of DuPage
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Greenville College
M.L.I.S., Drexel University
CARY MARSHALL
Subsidy Services Coordinator / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Greenville College
244-2210, EXT. 113
ASHLEY MARTHALER
Allied Health / CNA Associate Professor
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE
PHONE EXT. 1708
A.A.S, Rend Lake College
ALEX MARTIN
Math & Sciences Division /
Math Lab Coordinator / Instructor
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 112
PHONE EXT. 1297
GARY McGILL
Chief of Police
STUDENT CENTER 135
EXT. 1212
LESLIE McKENZIE
PHONE EXT. 1418
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
American Heart Association Regional Faculty CPR /
ACLS / PALS Instructor
EMT-Paramedic Lead Instructor
Applied Science & Technology / Agriculture Instructor
[email protected]
APPLIED SCIENCE CENTER 111 PHONE EXT. 1758
B.S., Murray State University
STEPHANIE McKINNEY
NORTH OASIS 119 PHONE EXT. 1358
CHARLES MASSIE
Network Specialist
[email protected]
Maintenance Technician
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical College
DAVID MATHIS
MAINTENANCE
PHONE EXT. 1317
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
GLENNA D. MAXWELL
Payroll & Financial Accountant
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 159 PHONE EXT. 1224
B.A., Northwest Missouri State University
PHONE EXT. 1773
B.S.Ed., Southeast Missouri State University
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
DONNIE MILLENBINE
Grounds Supervisor
2011 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
A.S., Rend Lake College
PHONE EXT. 1255
Director / Studio RLC
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
242-8459
Cosmetology Certificate, Marion Cosmetology
Cosmetology Teacher Certificate, John A. Logan
Paul Mitchell Product Specialist
Paul Mitchell Level 1 Certified Haircutting / Color
JEANNIE MITCHELL
Liberal Arts / Psychology Professor
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 142
PHONE EXT. 1804
A.S., John A. Logan College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ed.D., Oakland City University
Certified Instructor of Leadership Development Studies
WALT MONTGOMERY
Director / Alternative & Optional Education
PHONE EXT. 1823
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
ERIN MORRIS
STUDENT CENTER 204 PHONE EXT. 1380
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
CURT D. MOWRER
KENT McKOWN
Executive Director /
RLC Small Business Development Center
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 146
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
PHONE EXT. 1215
A.B.A., Morrison College
Cisco Certified Network Associate
244-9525
RONALD MURRAY
Applied Science & Technology Division /
Criminal Justice Associate Professor
[email protected]
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY CENTER 143
CHRIS MAXWELL
Maintenance Technician
244-2210, EXT. 200
RON MEEK
Maintenance Supervisor
SOUTH OASIS 142
Specialist / Community & Corporate Education
[email protected]
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
2011 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
Math & Sciences Division / Mathematics Professor
2003 RLCF “FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARD”
[email protected]
ATC 116
JOHN McKINNEY
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Greenville College
B.S.,Northwestern University
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
EMERGENCY 1911
CPR Professor ~ Coordinator /
American Heart Association Training Center
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE 201
PHONE EXT. 1747
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.F.A, M.F.A., & M.S.Ed.,
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
DAPHNE MITCHELL
Financial Aid Specialist
[email protected]
GALE LOWERY
NORTH OASIS 139
DIANE METZGER
Applied Science & Technology /
Mining Technology Instructor
[email protected]
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.A., Southwest Baptist University
M.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Testing & Placement Specialist
[email protected]
THERESE MELENA
Liberal Arts Division / Art Professor
[email protected]
EXT. 1239
A.A.S., Lake Land College
B.S., Greenville College
FBI National Academy, Quantico, Va.
Police Training Institute, University of Illinois
Information Systems Specialist
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 156
PHONE EXT. 1257
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
CARRIE NEWMAN
Subsidized Child Care Specialist / CCRR
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
A.G.S., Kaskaskia College
244-2210, EXT. 102
JAMIE NICHOLS
Infant & Toddler Specialist / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE/MT. VERNON
244-2210, Ext. 120
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
183
CHRIS NIELSEN
CAROLINE RAGAN
Dean / Applied Science & Technology
2010 RLCF “FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARD”
[email protected]
Math & Sciences Division / Biology &
Anatomy / Physiology Associate Professor
[email protected]
A.S., John A. Logan College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
A.A., John A. Logan College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.S., Bradley University
ATC 132
PHONE EXT. 1292
TYLER O’DANIEL
Director / RLC Recreational Center
[email protected]
RECREATIONAL CENTER 102 PHONE EXT. 1279
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., University of Indianapolis
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
JULIE OXFORD
Administrative Assistant /
Health, P.E. and Recreation / Athletics
1995 RLC “OUTSTANDING OFFICE
SUPPORT STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
GYMNASIUM 120
PHONE EXT. 1250
REANNE PALMER
PHONE EXT. 1223
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.A., Northern Illinois University
SHANNON PERKINS
Applied Science & Technology /
Automotive Technology Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1784
B.S. & A.A.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
A.S.E. Certified Master Automobile Technician
COREY PHILLIPS
Director / RLC MarketPlace
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE 397
242-3001
VOICE MAIL 2020
JESSICA PHILLIPS
Administrative Assistant / Liberal Arts Division
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1263
B.A., McKendree University
LORA PHILLIPS
Allied Health / Medical Coding &
Health Information Technology Instructor
[email protected]
ATC 131
PHONE EXT. 1287
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Illinois State University
LISA PRICE
CASEY RHINE
Manager / Bookstore & Copy Center
[email protected]
ACADEMIC BLDG.
PHONE EXT. 1281
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
KIM ROBERT
PHONE EXT. 1775
A.A.S., Kaskaskia College
M.B.A. & B.A., Webster University
BRIA ROBINSON
Allied Health Division Coordinator
Radiologic Technology Clinical Coordinator
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 116
PHONE EXT. 1777
B.S., Midwestern State University
M.A.Ed., McKendree University
PHONE EXT. 1205
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Applied Science & Technology /
Computer Networking Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1789
A.A.S., ITT Technical Institute-Evansville
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
Certified Novell Administrator
CISCO Certified Network Associate
CompTIA Network+
PHONE EXT. 1222
A.A., Rend Lake College
GINA SCHENK
Coordinator / Technology Integration & Training
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 148
PHONE EXT. 1271
A.A.S. & O.C., Rend Lake College
VICKIE SCHULTE
Director / Institutional Research
ADMINISTRATION 139
PHONE EXT. 1331
[email protected]
B.S., Greenville College
CHRISTINA SCHUSTER
Parent Services Coordinator / CCRR
[email protected]
RLC MARKETPLACE / MT. VERNON
244-2210, Ext. 119
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
KAY SHAW
Math & Sciences Division /
Developmental Math Professor
2010 RLCF “ASSESSMENT AWARD”
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 150
PHONE EXT. 1286
B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
KRISTINA SHELTON
Coordinator / Perkins
2012 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1267
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
RANDALL SHIVELY
Director / Physical Plant
2003 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1256
KIM ROGERS
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Murray State University
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Certified Instructor of Leadership Development Studies
ADMINISTRATION 120 PHONE EXT. 1201
Custodian
Human Resources Specialist
[email protected]
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
WESLEY RUSH
Custodian
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
ROY SIMPKINS
MAINTENANCE BUILDING
PHONE EXT. 1255
DAMON SIMS
PHONE EXT. 1255
CHERI RUSHING
Director / Financial Aid
2008 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
B.S., Central Missouri State University
PAUL SANDROCK
Math & Sciences Division /
Chemistry Associate Professor
sand[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 138 PHONE EXT. 1732
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
ROBIN PYTLINSKI
ADMINISTRATION 159
STUDENT CENTER 105
RICKY ROBINSON
ADMINISTRATION 111 PHONE EXT. 1238
Vice President of Student Services
2007 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 110
A.A.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
B.S., Greenville College
M.A.Ed., McKendree University
ATC 185
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.B.A., McKendree University
NORTH OASIS 134
Dean / Community & Corporate Education
2003 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
LEARNING RESOURCE CTR. 129
Public Information Specialist
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 108
LORI RAGLAND
Dean of Allied Health / Title III Project Manager
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
ADMINISTRATION 122
PHONE EXT. 1378
STUDENT CENTER 207 PHONE EXT. 1367
LLOYD OWENS
Custodian
SOUTH OASIS 139
SUE SCATTONE
Specialist / Accounts Payable & Purchasing
2002 RLC “OUTSTANDING OFFICE
SUPPORT STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
Assistant Chief of Security / Safety Officer
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 135
EXT. 1212
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
EMERGENCY 1911
CHRISTOPHER E. SINK
Applied Science & Technology /
Computer Networking &
Wireless Communications Technology Professor
[email protected]
ATC 183
PHONE EXT. 1798
A.S., Rend Lake College
A.A.S., John A. Logan College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
STEPHANIE SMITH
Lead Child Care Provider /
RLC Foundation Children’s Center
[email protected]
Administrative Assistant /
Community & Corporate Education
[email protected]
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southeast Missouri State University
RLCF CHILDREN’S CENTER
184
PHONE EXT. 1393
STUDENT CENTER 204 PHONE EXT. 1714
WENDY SMITH
ZACHARY VAHLKAMP
Controller
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 164 PHONE EXT. 1216
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
LEAH STALLMAN
Director / TRIO Programs
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 108
PHONE EXT. 1366
A.A., Rend Lake College
M.S. & B.S.W., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
BETH STEVENS
Records Specialist
2013 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 115
PHONE EXT. 1266
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
BRAD STOUT
Culinary Arts Instructor
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 132A
PHONE EXT. 1336
A.A.S., Sullivan University
RODNEY A. SUMMERS
Maintenance Technician
ATC 113
PHONE EXT. 1322
Truck Driver Training Certificate
Illinois Class A Commercial Drivers License
48-Hr. Driver Training Instructor Certificate
RACHEL SVEDA
Applied Science & Technology /
Welding Associate Professor
[email protected]
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
MARGO WAGNER
A.A.S. & O.C., Rend Lake College
Certified Welder / Certified Pipe Welder /
Certified Downhill Pipe Welder
ATC 109 PHONE EXT. 1345
President
[email protected]
APPLIED SCIENCE CENTER 114
PHONE EXT. 7914
Director / Land of Lincoln AmeriCorps /
Southern 7 AmeriCorps
[email protected]
B.S., Southern Illinois University
M.S.Ed., Eastern Illinois University
RICKIE WASSON
Maintenance Technician
MAINTENANCE BUILDING PHONE EXT. 1255
ARVELLA WAUGH
Administrative Assistant / Math & Sciences Division
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 134
PHONE EXT. 1288
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
HANNAH WEBB
Assistant Manager / Bookstore & Copy Center
[email protected]
ACADEMIC BUILDING PHONE EXT. 1320
A.S., A.A. & A.A.S., Rend Lake College
TRACEY WEBB
Liberal Arts Division / Theatre Professor
[email protected]
Financial Aid & Admissions Coordinator
2014 RLC “OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD”
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 113
A.A. & A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Coordinator of Technical Services & Collection
Management / Learning Resource Center
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 120
PHONE EXT. 1298
JASON SWANN
PHONE EXT. 1295
B.A., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.A., University of Illinois at Chicago
SANDRA WEST
Dean of Admissions & Enrollment Management
[email protected]
LEARNING RESOURCE CTR. 117 PHONE EXT 1249
B.A., Blackburn College
M.A.Ed., McKendree University
KEVIN WESTON
ADMINISTRATION 125
PHONE EXT. 1265
TRAVIS THOMASON
Computer Technician
[email protected]
ACADEMIC 107
PHONE EXT. 1333
A.S., Rend Lake College
Cisco Routing Certificate, Rend Lake College
Microsoft Windows Certificate, Rend Lake College
PC Maintenance Certificate, Rend Lake College
CCENET Certificate
NET+ Certificate
A.S., Rend Lake College
B.A., Judson College
Applied Science & Technology /
Architectural Technology Professor
2012 RLCF “FACULTY EXCELLENCE AWARD”
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 112
PHONE EXT. 1816
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois Univ. Carbondale
NATHAN WHEELER
Marketing Specialist
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 121
PHONE EXT. 1234
NIGEL THOMPSON
A.A.S., Lake Land College
B.S., Eastern Illinois University
N. OASIS 111
Program Specialist & Administrative Assistant /
STARS & Upward Bound
[email protected]
Applied Science & Technology /
Automotive Technology Professor
[email protected]
PHONE EXT. 1806
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
A.S.E. Certified Master Automobile Technician
DEIDRA TRAYLOR
Upward Bound Program / Student Advisor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 115
PHONE EXT. 1365
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
JAMES “PETE” WILCE
Applied Science & Technology /
Heavy Equipment Technology Associate Professor
[email protected]
MARCIA WHITEHEAD
SOUTH OASIS 113
PHONE EXT. 1236
A.A., Rend Lake College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY CTR. 135
PHONE EXT. 1272
TERRY WILKERSON
ADMINISTRATION 127 PHONE EXT. 1242
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
TIM WILLS
Math & Sciences Division / Health & P.E. Professor
Athletic Director
1996 RLC FOUNDATION
“ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR AWARD”
[email protected]
GYMNASIUM
PHONE EXT. 1270
A.S., Rend Lake College
M.S.Ed. & B.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
LANA WILSON
Business Office Accountant
ADMINISTRATION 159
PHONE EXT. 1113
[email protected]
A.S., Rend Lake College
ROBERT WILSON
Culinary Arts Lead Associate Professor
[email protected]
STUDENT CENTER 132B
PHONE EXT. 1332
A.A., Alaska Pacific University
B.S., Arizona State University
CHARLES WINGO
Applied Science & Technology /
Mining Technology Instructor
[email protected]
COAL MINE TRAINING CENTER 103 PHONE EXT. 1285
A.S., Rend Lake College
ANDREA WITTHOFT
Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 137 PHONE EXT. 1277
A.A., Shawnee Community College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.S., University of Illinois
KRISTIN YOSANOVICH
Allied Health / Nursing Professor
[email protected]
SOUTH OASIS 119
PHONE EXT. 1763
A.A.S., Kaskaskia College
B.S.N., McKendree College
M.S.N., University of Southern Indiana
CHELSEA ZETTLER
Administrative Assistant /
Communication & Information Department
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATION 102
PHONE EXT. 0
A.A.S., Rend Lake College
ALISHA WHITTINGTON
Literacy & Data Management Specialist /
Adult Education & Family Literacy
[email protected]
NORTH OASIS 117
PHONE EXT. 1342
A.A. & A.S., John A. Logan College
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
185
SICCM STAFF
MAEGAN KING, BS, COTA/L
MIKE BAKER, ASCP
SICCM Program Director /
Medical Laboratory Technology
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
M.A. Ed., Tarleton State University
M.T., American Society for Clinical Pathology
LEEANN GREENWELL, DVM
SICCM Program Director / Veterinary Technology
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
B.S., Murray State University
D.V.M., Auburn University
SICCM Academic Field Work Coordinator /
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
A.S. & B.S., University of Southern Indiana
KIM LANGLEY, MAED, COTA/L
SICCM Program Director /
Occupational Therapy Assistant
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
A.S., Southeastern Illinois College
A.S., Indiana University
B.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
JENNIFER ASHMORE, CST
SICCM Program Director / Surgical Technology
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
C.S.T., John A. Logan College
MARY SULLIVAN, Ph.D., RHIA
SICCM Executive Director
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
B.S., Illinois State University
M.S., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University Carbondale
R.H.I.A., Illinois State University
JAMIE D. MORGAN, CVT
SICCM Certified Veterinary Technologist /
Veterinary Technology
[email protected]
SICCM OFFICES ~ HERRIN
PHONE 942-6902
B.S., Murray State University
INDEX
A
Academic Honors.....................................................47
Academic Information...........................................42
Academic Policies....................................................45
Academic Probation...............................................47
Academic Suspension............................................47
Access to Records.....................................................27
Accreditation...................................................... Cover
Adding Courses........................................................46
Administration............................................................ 7
Admission Requirements......................................22
AA / AS / AFA / AES Degree..............................50
Associate Degree Nursing................................52
Certified Nurse Assistant...................................55
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic........55
EMT - Paramedic...................................................53
General Admission Requirements.................22
High School Grad or GED Recipient..........22
Home-Schooled Student or High SchoolAge Student Not Attending HS..............22
International Students....................................22
Non-High School Graduate 18 Years of
Age or Older..................................................22
Student Currently Enrolled in HS................22
Students Entering Baccalaureate-Transfer
Curricula..........................................................23
Transfer Student from an Accredited
College............................................................22
Medical Laboratory Technology....................52
Occupational Therapy Assistant.....................52
Radiologic Technology......................................52
Surgical Technology............................................52
Veterinary Technology.......................................52
Adult Basic Education............................................. 19
Adult Education & Literacy Programs............... 19
Adult Basic Education......................................... 19
Adult Secondary Education............................. 19
Adult Volunteer Literacy.................................... 19
English as a Second Language........................ 19
GED............................................................................ 19
Job Readiness........................................................ 19
Adult Secondary Education................................. 19
Adult Volunteer Literacy........................................ 19
Advanced Placement Credits..............................35
Allied Health Division............................................. 17
AmeriCorps.................................................................36
Annual Security Report...................................35, 36
186
Appeals - Financial Aid...........................................32
Applied Science & Technology Division.......... 17
Assessment for Placement & Credit..................34
Associate Degree Programs................................. 74
Associate Degree Worksheets............................58
Associate in Arts...................................................58
Associate in Engineering Science..................68
Associate in Fine Arts
Art...........................................................................62
Music – Instrumental.......................................64
Music – Vocal......................................................66
Associate in Science............................................60
Associate in Applied Science Degree...............52
Associate in Arts Degree.......................................58
Associate in Engineering Science Degree......68
Associate in Fine Arts Degree................62, 64, 66
Associate in Science Degree................................60
Athletics.......................................................................39
Attendance.................................................................45
Audit Fees...................................................................25
Auditing a Course....................................................46
B
Baccalaureate-Transfer Programs......................72
Board of Trustees........................................................ 7
Business and Industry Training........................... 17
Business Expansion Consultation......................18
Business Problem Consultation..........................18
Business Start-up Consultations.........................18
C
Campus Access Map................................................. 9
Campus Map.............................................................. 12
Campus Security & Emergency Response......36
Career Development and Goal Setting...........34
Career / Occupational Certificates.....................54
Career-Technical Programs...................................72
Center for Community & Corp. Education...... 17
Business and Industry Training....................... 17
Community Education....................................... 17
Computer Workshops........................................ 17
Cooperative Education...................................... 17
Emergency Management Services................18
Employment Services.........................................18
Institute of Lifelong Learning..........................18
Professional Continuing Education...............18
Real Estate...............................................................18
Truck Driver Training...........................................18
Volunteerism..........................................................18
Certified Nurse Assistant.................................... 106
Chargeback Tuition.................................................43
Cheer............................................................................38
Clery Report...............................................................35
Clubs & Organizations............................................38
College Bowl..............................................................38
College Campus........................................................ 14
College Closings....................................................... 13
College District.....................................................9, 13
College District Residency....................................24
College-Level Examination Program................34
College Mission........................................................... 1
College Preparatory Class Policies.....................47
English Review Policy.........................................47
Placement...............................................................47
Common Outcome.................................................... 1
Communications Lab.............................................36
Computer Workshops............................................ 17
Contact Information (Counseling).....................35
Contents........................................................................ 4
Cooperative Education.......................................... 17
Course Descriptions
Accounting...........................................................124
Adult Basic Education (ABE)...........................124
Adult Secondary Education (ASE)................124
Agriculture............................................................124
Allied Health.........................................................176
Anthropology......................................................125
Architecture.........................................................125
Art............................................................................126
Astronomy............................................................127
Automotive Technology..................................127
Banking..................................................................128
Biology...................................................................128
Botany....................................................................129
Business.................................................................129
Certified Medical Assistant.............................130
Certified Nurse Assistant.................................130
Chemistry..............................................................130
College Preparatory..........................................130
Communications................................................131
Computer-Aided Drafting...............................131
Computer Networking Systems...................131
Computer Science..............................................131
Construction Management............................134
Continuing Education......................................134
Cooperative Education....................................136
Cosmetology........................................................136
Criminal Justice...................................................137
Culinary Arts.........................................................139
Diesels....................................................................140
Early Childhood Education.............................140
Subject ............................................................. Page
Economics.............................................................141
Therapeutic Massage.......................................172
Education..............................................................141
Truck Driver Training.........................................173
Electricity...............................................................142
Veterinary Technology.....................................173
Emergency Management Systems..............142
Viticulture..............................................................174
Emergency Medical Technician....................143
Volunteerism........................................................174
EMT - Paramedic................................................ 144
Webmaster...........................................................174
Engineering......................................................... 144
Welding..................................................................174
English................................................................... 144
Wireless Communications Technology.....175
English as a Second Language......................145
Zoology..................................................................175
Enology..................................................................145
Course Numbering System................................122
Environmental / Wastewater Tech...............146
Course Selection Guide for Students in
Fire Fighter............................................................146
Developmental Classes...................................177
Fluid Power...........................................................147
Credit Types
French.....................................................................147
INDEX FACULTY and STAFFAdvanced Placement..........................................35
Geography............................................................147
Credit by Examination........................................44
Geology.................................................................147
Advanced Placement......................................44
German..................................................................147
Proficiency..........................................................44
Graphic Design...................................................147
General Studies.....................................................44
Green Facilities Management........................148
Illinois State Police Academy Credit..............44
Health.....................................................................148
Military Service.....................................................44
Health Care Coach.............................................149
Occupational.........................................................44
Health Information............................................149
Proficiency..............................................................35
Heating, Air Cond. & Refrigeration..............150
Transfer....................................................................44
Heavy Equipment Technology......................150
University Parallel................................................44
History....................................................................150
D
Horticulture..........................................................151
Degree Programs
Humanities...........................................................151
Agricultural Business (AAS)..............................75
Independent Study...........................................151
Agricultural Mechanics (AAS)..........................75
Industrial Electronics........................................151
Agricultural Prod. & Management (AAS).....76
Industrial Maintenance Technology...........152
Agriculture (AS).....................................................77
Insurance...............................................................153
Architectural Technology (AAS).....................77
IT Systems Specialist.........................................153
Art (AA)....................................................................79
Japanese................................................................154
Art (AFA)..................................................................79
Journalism.............................................................154
Associate Degree Nursing (AAS)....................80
Leadership............................................................154
Automotive Technology (AAS)........................81
Machining Technology....................................154
Biological Sciences (AS).....................................81
Management.......................................................155
Business (AS)..........................................................82
Manufacturing Technology............................155
Certified Medical Assistant (AAS)...................82
Marketing..............................................................155
Chemistry (AS).......................................................83
Mathematics........................................................155
Communications (AA)........................................83
Medical Coding...................................................156
Computer Programming (AAS).......................84
Medical Laboratory Technology..................157
Computer Science - Business (AS)..................84
Microbiology.......................................................157
Computer Science - Science (AS)...................85
Mining Technology...........................................157
Criminal Justice (AA)...........................................87
Music.......................................................................158
Criminal Justice (AAS).........................................87
Nursing...................................................................160
Culinary Arts Management (AAS)..................89
Occupational Therapy Assistant...................161
Diesel Technology (AAS)...................................89
Office Systems Technology............................162
Early Childhood Education (AAS)...................90
Oil & Natural Gas Technician......................... 164
Education
Orientation.......................................................... 164
Elementary (AA)................................................91
Philosophy........................................................... 164
Secondary (AA / AS)........................................91
Phlebotomy..........................................................165
EMT - Paramedic (AAS).......................................92
Physical Education.............................................165
Engineering Science (AES)................................93
Physical Science..................................................168
Engineering Technology (AS)..........................93
Physics....................................................................168
English (AA)............................................................94
Political Science..................................................168
Graphic Design (AAS).........................................95
Psychology...........................................................168
Health Information Technology (AAS).........95
Quality Control....................................................169
Heavy Equipment Technology (AAS)...........96
Radiologic Technology....................................169
History (AA)............................................................97
Reading..................................................................170
Industrial Elec. & Maint. Tech (AAS)...............98
Real Estate.............................................................170
Industrial Technology (AAS)............................99
Restricted Classes...............................................176
IT Systems Assistant (AAS)............................. 100
AmeriCorps.......................................................176
IT Systems Specialist (AAS)............................ 100
Upward Bound................................................176
Manufacturing Technology (AAS)...............101
Social Science......................................................170
Mathematics (AS)...............................................102
Sociology..............................................................171
Medical Laboratory Technology (AAS)......103
Spanish...................................................................171
Mining Technology (AAS).............................. 104
Surgical Technology..........................................171
Music (AFA)
Surveying..............................................................171
Instrumental Option......................................105
Theatre...................................................................172
Vocal Option.................................................... 106
Subject ............................................................. Page
Occupational Therapy Assistant (AAS)..... 106
Office Systems Technology (AAS)
Administrative Assistant..............................107
Health Information Assistant.....................108
Oil & Natural Gas Technician (AAS)..............110
Pharmacy (AS).....................................................110
Plant & Soil Science (AS).................................. 111
Political Science (AA)........................................ 111
Pre-Dentistry (AS).............................................. 112
Pre-Law (AA / AS)............................................... 112
Pre-Medicine (AS).............................................. 112
Pre-Veterinary Medicine (AS)......................... 112
Psychology (AA).................................................. 113
Radiologic Technology (AAS)........................ 113
Social Work (AA)................................................. 114
Sociology (AA)..................................................... 115
Veterinary Technology (AAS)......................... 117
Welding Technology (AAS).............................118
Wireless Communications Tech (AAS)........ 119
Dining Services.........................................................36
Diploma & Certificate Application Process.....27
Directory Information............................................27
Disability Access Services.....................................36
Disclaimers................................................................. 13
Disclosure of Student Info. to Parents..............28
Distance Learning.................................................... 19
Hybrid Courses...................................................... 19
Online Courses...................................................... 19
Online Navigation Essentials........................... 19
Telecourses............................................................. 19
Videoconferencing.............................................. 19
Divisions
Allied Health........................................................... 17
Applied Science & Technology....................... 17
Community & Corporate Education.............. 17
Liberal Arts............................................................. 17
Math & Sciences.................................................... 17
Dropping a Course..................................................46
Dual Credit..................................................................44
Dual Enrollment........................................................44
E
Easy Refund Card.....................................................26
Educational Planning..............................................34
Employment Services.............................................18
Endowed Scholarships...........................................16
English Literacy / Civics......................................... 19
English Review Policy.............................................47
F
Faculty.......................................