the E360 Outlook Magazine

the E360 Outlook Magazine
Volume 2 Number 2
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P. 8
Multiplex refrigeration system
lays foundation for café’s
green mission
Outlook
Balancing All Aspects of the Commercial Refrigeration
and Air Conditioning Industries
P. 12
Montreal Protocol commits to
HFC management amendment
P. 14
E xploring the potential of CO2
transcritical booster systems
Reducing
Refrigerant Leaks
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Environmental and Economic Impacts
Force Retailers to Take a Close Look
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E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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Progress Report:
Sustainability Commitments Met; New Goals Set
By Bob Sharp
Executive Vice President & Business Leader
Emerson Climate Technologies
A
short 18 months have passed since
the EPA proposed its delisting rule
regarding today’s refrigerants. At
that time, members of Emerson Climate
Technologies’ senior team attended a
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symposium at the White House to discuss
ways to mitigate the negative impacts of
HVACR technology on the environment.
The meeting concluded with all parties
pledging to take steps to reduce global
warming, and we laid out Emerson’s
specific plan to do just that. I am pleased
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to report that we have kept our promise.
As a company known for our
proactivity and planning, we were already
well down the path of formalizing many
sustainability initiatives, and the specific
commitments we made were aligned with
those objectives. First, we committed
to the construction of a global industryaccessible innovation center that would
take on the biggest environmental and
energy efficiency challenges affecting
food retail, foodservice, commercial and
residential buildings, and data centers. On
December 17, 2015, the Helix Innovation
Center opened on the University of Dayton
campus, where we are beginning these
pursuits toward a next generation of
technologies.
Second, we committed to complete
the development of several new products
optimized for low-GWP refrigerants, as
well as expand upon our efficient and
sustainable CO2, propane and ammonia
product lines. I am happy to report that we
successfully developed new compressors,
controls and flow components in 2015,
utilizing natural and low-GWP synthetic
refrigerants that are viable replacements
for traditional HFC applications. We
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Dr. Rajan Rajendran and Bob Sharp were invited to the White House to participate in a meeting
addressing the environmental impacts of hydrofluorocarbon emissions.
also advanced our condensing units
built around these class-leading core
technologies, launching new products that
enable significantly higher efficiencies while
meeting refrigerant needs.
Our industry witnessed a whirlwind of
regulatory activity in 2015, and these rulings
are likely to continue throughout the near
future. With the Helix Innovation Center
open for business, it enhances our capability
to collaborate with the entire value chain
and respond to these requirements as
they emerge. We’ve learned through the
development of these products that as
an industry of contractors, wholesalers,
OEMs and consultants, we are all seeking to
better understand how to apply and service
new installations and manage the existing
installed base of systems.
That is why we are even more
committed to accelerating the E360
stewardship and exchange platform. To
date, nearly 6,000 industry leaders and
professionals have registered for these
events. We are dedicated to hosting an
objective forum — a place where ideas
are presented and the challenges we face
throughout the channel can be discussed
and solved.
In October of 2015, the White House
invited us to a follow-up meeting to report
on our progress. While we were extremely
pleased to present these accomplishments,
we also pledged our ongoing commitment.
It is our strong belief that environmental
protection, global understanding of these
sustainability measures and continued
industry participation are all required to
meet our shared challenges and objectives.
Emerson Climate Technologies is dedicated
to continuing its support for these
efforts through our commitment to
providing innovative products and ongoing
industry stewardship.
F I R S T WO R D
by D O N N E W LO N
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CO N T E N T S
1 First Word
The Helix Innovation Center Is Open for Business
T
he relentless pursuit of innovation has always been a staple of Emerson’s
business model. We are at our best when we’re asked to solve tough problems
and balance customer requirements within the larger context of industry-wide
challenges. With the launch of The Helix Innovation Center in December, our ability
to build upon this legacy just got stronger.
Located on the University of Dayton campus in Ohio, this 40,000 square foot
facility blends the disciplines of technology and engineering — part academic think
tank and part real-world test lab. It’s here where we’ll take a blank slate approach,
utilizing a comprehensive suite of flexible resources to tackle current industry
challenges and develop the solutions of tomorrow.
To accomplish this, we’ve installed five industry modules that simulate the
following real-world environments:
BY DON NEWLON
The Helix Innovation Center is open
for business
2 F E AT UR E
Industry Sets Sights on
Reducing Refrigerant Leaks
BY JOHN WALLACE
Effective leak detection good for
retailers and the environment
8 SU C C E SS S TO RY
State of the Art Sustainability
Multiplex refrigeration system lays
foundation for café’s green mission
• Residential connected home — 2,000 square foot, fully functional two-story home
built to Department of Energy specifications. Capable of simulating global weather
and annual performance conditions, from -20 °F to 120 °F ambient temperature
and 20 percent to 90 percent humidity.
12 Rajan on … Refrigerants
• Light commercial building — the facility itself serves as the light commercial module,
with state-of-the-art HVAC and variable refrigerant flow systems. The facility is
LEED certified by the U.S. Green Building Council.
14 Helix Highlight
• Foodservice operations — 1,500 square foot restaurant features a fully functioning,
licensed commercial kitchen capable of servicing up to 150 diners. Like the
residential module, allows for complete control of ambient air and humidity for
desired comfort levels.
• S upermarket refrigeration — utilizes a CO2 transcritical booster system for
refrigeration, HVAC and heat reclamation for hot water. Simulates a 2,500 square
foot supermarket or convenience store retailer.
•D
ata center — 1,000 square foot module replicates a data center’s precise
temperature and humidity control requirements.
Each industry module is a separate entity with isolated power sources to
enable discrete measurement of energy consumption in individual modules and their
respective equipment. We’ve also equipped the innovation center with three industry
learning labs, where we expect to host up to 600 visitors and trainees each year.
The Helix is under the direction of Dr. Rajan Rajendran, vice president of
system innovation center and sustainability, and will reflect the collaborative spirit
that’s characteristic of our E360 program. Rajan will also be contributing a new
column to this publication that will highlight a relevant module, system or project
taking place at the center. Look for the first installment of Helix Highlight in this
edition, where Rajan takes a closer look at the supermarket module’s CO2 transcritical
booster system. We look forward to sharing these stories with you and invite you to
make use of this new industry hub of innovation.
BY DR. RAJAN RAJENDRAN
Montreal Protocol commits to HFC
management amendment
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BY DR. RAJAN RAJENDRAN
Exploring the potential of CO2
transcritical booster systems
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16 Solution Spotlight
BY BEN PICKER
The evolution of predictive protection
18 Contractor Connection
BY TIM UDERMAN
20 E360 Forum and Industry Events
21 E360 Webinar Series
Emerson Climate Technologies
Managing Editor
Don Newlon
Email Us
Email us at [email protected]
with any comments or suggestions.
We would love to hear from you.
Website
EmersonClimate.com/E360
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Publisher
V.P./G.M., Refrigeration Marketing, Emerson Climate Technologies
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Make the upgrade to digital
Don Newlon, Managing Editor, E360 Outlook
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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Industry Sets Sights on
Reducing Refrigerant Leaks
Effective Leak Detection Good for Retailers and the Environment
By John Wallace
Director of Innovation, Retail Solutions
Emerson Climate Technologies
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E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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Understanding the Impacts of Refrigerant Leaks
Aside from the obvious environmental concerns,
these leaks are also cutting into retailers’ profits.
The True Costs of Refrigerant Leaks
this impact becomes much more signif-
(HCFC) refrigerants used in stationary
For decades, refrigerant leaks have been
icant, costing the same retailer nearly
refrigeration and air conditioning. The
$500,000 annually on lost refrigerant.
main tenets of the ruling are designed to
This doesn’t include the associated labor
ensure proper use, handling and disposal
costs or the potential loss of business due
of these refrigerants, including:
to service disruptions in response to fixing
• Prohibiting venting
a refrigerant leak.
• Requiring technician certification
considered an inevitable yet unfortunate
consequence of operating typical
supermarket refrigeration systems. Often
thought of as a cost of doing business,
refrigerant leaks and their far-reaching
impacts are largely underestimated.
According to the EPA’s GreenChill
research,1 the average supermarket has
two to four refrigeration racks charged with
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approximately 3,500 pounds of refrigerant,
of which approximately 25 percent — or
the equivalent of 875 pounds — is lost
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each year to leaks.
With increased consumer, business
and regulatory focus on minimizing the
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environmental impacts of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, food retailers
are recognizing the importance of reducing
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refrigerant leaks through effective leak
detection practices. But aside from the
obvious environmental concerns, these
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leaks are also cutting into retailers’ profits.
Even in a more moderate scenario
with a lower leak rate of 20 percent, the
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economic costs cannot be ignored. For an
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of R-404A (arguably the most common
individual store, the loss of 700 pounds
refrigerant in use today) at $7 per pound
This 100-store scenario also reveals
the true environmental impacts: the nearly
• Mandating accurate record keeping
70,000 pounds of leaked refrigerant is
• Requiring corrective actions for leak
equivalent to 124,500 metric tons of CO2,
the emissions of 24,000 cars or 10,600
rates greater than 35 percent
According to the EPA’s Section 608
homes. Refrigerant leaks also affect
fact sheet,3 the agency is authorized to
equipment performance, causing systems
assess up to $37,500 in fines per day for
to run harder to compensate.
any violation of these regulations.
While this example may not be
Environmental
Impact
R-404A refrigerant
3,500 pounds of charge per site
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Equivalent
carbon dioxide
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California Air Resources Board (CARB)
representative of your exact scenario,
The California Environmental Protection
we encourage everyone to calculate the
Agency is historically a forerunner in
impacts of refrigerant leaks in their
environmental initiatives, and their CARB
systems. The EPA has provided financial
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20% leak rate (vs. 0%)
refrigerant management program4
calculators to help with these estimations.
2
Before implementing strategies to
ruling builds upon the EPA’s Section 608
fully understand the regulatory landscape
regulation and introduces new measures to
to better align our efforts with existing
promote effective management of refrig-
and proposed regulations.
erants and minimize leaks, including:
Existing Section 608
Equivalent to emissions of
24,000+ cars
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high-GWP refrigerants is no exception. The
reduce refrigerant leaks, it’s important we
Increased Regulatory Focus on Leak
Detection
Leak 70,000 pounds/year total per chain
designed to reduce leaks and emissions of
• Requiring periodic leak inspections
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Leak 700 pounds/year
per site
10,600 homes
- Registration, record keeping and
Economic
Impact
reporting
The EPA introduced Section 608 as part
of the Clean Air Act (CAA) in the 1990s to
refrigerant charge
cases are where refrigerant leaks are most
address emissions of ozone-depleting
- Small: 50 to 200 pounds
likely to occur.
substances (ODS) such as chlorofluorocarbon
- Medium: 200 to 2,000 pounds
(CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon
- Large: > 2,000 pounds
• Categorizing refrigeration systems by
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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or
and follow-up actions
$5,000. Note that refrigeration racks and
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100-Store
Chain
• Providing for safe disposal
equates to an annual expense of nearly
Across a chain of 100 supermarkets,
Store
Profile
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$490,000
annual cost in refrigerant lost
Average $7 per pound
for R-404A
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
- Potential for customer disruptions
- Damage to brand
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• Mandating Automated Leak Detection
- Direct or indirect methods acceptable
5–50 pounds of charge
• Extending the requirements of the
Notifications — ensure that the
correct individuals in the organization are
refrigerant management program to
alerted when a leak has occurred. Alarms
refrigeration system is indoors and oper-
cover substitute refrigerants, such as
are typically remote, local or a combination
ates, or is intended to operate year round,
hydrofluorocarbons 7
of the two. Most remote notifications are
an ALD device is required.” I will explain
As with all SNAP proposals, the EPA
5
encouraged the industry to submit public
system that will alert a technician or
technologies later in this article.
comments to the federal register. We
monitoring center to ensure that the leak
don’t yet know when the final rule will be
is handled correctly.
announced, but given its alignment with
When developing your program, your aim should be
to not only establish proper leak detection response
protocols, but also institute proactive measures to
minimize or eliminate leaks altogether.
tied into the store’s energy management
the emergence and application of ALD
SNAP Proposal to Section 608
Continuous monitoring — is one
In October 2015, the EPA announced a
the CARB regulations, the proposal
aspect that is often overlooked. By
significant new alternatives policy (SNAP)
will likely lower the leak threshold and
recording and analyzing the data around
proposal to amend Section 608 of its CAA.6
recommend automated monitoring or
leak events, retailers can correlate the
Leak Detection Technologies
It incorporates some of the key elements
more frequent leak inspections.
leaks with different types of equipment
There are several continuous monitoring
of the CARB initiative and lowers the leak
rate threshold for penalties. Among the
highlights of the proposal include:
• Reducing the leak detection threshold
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Key Elements of Effective Leak
Detection Programs
Accurate detection methods, reliable
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can identify problem areas, develop more
meet their leak detection objectives. Some
no moving parts and generally require
have even combined direct and indirect
less maintenance than an active (tubing)
leak detection systems to benefit from the
compliance. The technology falls into two
system. If you need to sample a lot of
best of both technologies.
retailers automate the leak detection
process, meet CARB’s ALD requirements
improve their overall operations.
and ensure future Section 608 regulatory
are the key elements in an effective leak
to remember that there are many
primary categories, direct and indirect,
different areas in a single location, this
detection program. When developing your
operational benefits of early leak
and there are pros and cons of each leak
may become cost prohibitive.
than 50 pounds of refrigerant6
program, your aim should be to not only
detection. While most refrigeration
detection method.
establish proper leak detection response
systems are designed with enough
continuous monitoring devices, including
protocols, but also institute proactive
capacity to offset the short-term impacts
quarterly inspections for systems contain-
measures to minimize or eliminate
ing at least 500 pounds of refrigerant
leaks altogether.
Indirect leak detection — monitors and
With the renewed regulatory focus on
the concentration of refrigerants in the air.
entire refrigeration system to determine if
reducing refrigerant leaks, retailers are
of a small refrigerant leak, even a small
Direct technologies can be fixed or portable,
leaks are occurring. This method typically
taking a closer look at developing effective
leak will significantly degrade performance
with fixed systems having a dedicated piece
uses existing sensors and hardware and
leak detection strategies. Through the
and capacity over time. Left undetected,
of hardware installed on-site to detect
does not require dedicated leak detection
help of ALD devices, retailers can achieve
Direct leak detection — directly monitors
starts with detection. There are differing
this leak could impair the refrigeration
refrigerant leaks. Because fixed leak detection
hardware to be installed on-site. Indirect
continuous monitoring, satisfy reporting
refrigerant that have leaked 75 percent
technologies available depending on your
system’s capacity to maintain proper
systems can be connected to a facility’s
technologies analyze refrigeration system
requirements and reduce the need to
or more of their full charge for two
requirements, and I will address these in
cooling. At that point, not only have you
energy management system to enable
data — such as temperatures, pressures,
perform manual inspections.
consecutive years
the last section of this article. But installing
lost refrigerant and compromised system
remote monitoring and notifications, they
liquid levels and ambient conditions —
devices in the locations most likely to
performance, you’re also faced with the
are good candidates for meeting the CARB
against performance algorithms and
or future regulations is only one benefit.
produce refrigerant leaks — particularly
cost of potential food loss.
ALD requirement. Fixed systems include
historical data to evaluate system status.
When you examine the cost of lost refrigerant,
both active and passive technologies:
While this method has the advantage of
the degradation of refrigerated system
• Active — centralized system with sniffing
not requiring location-specific sensors,
performance and the potential for eventual
technology that utilizes tubing connected
it may not be capable of pinpointing the
food loss, the business case for implementing
to multiple zones. The central unit takes
exact location of a leak. It is, however,
effective leak detection programs is as
air samples from zones to determine if
also considered a suitable method for
clear as refrigerant-free air.
clearly communicate the importance of detecting and minimizing leaks across
4
But achieving compliance with current
• Establish a zero-tolerance policy for refrigerant leaks
Resources
• Focus on the potential for cost savings
1. http://www2.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/gc_averagestoreprofile_final_june_2011_revised_1.pdf
• Utilize automated leak detection devices
2. http://www2.epa.gov/sites/production/files/greenchill/downloads/FinancialImpactCalculator.xls
• Correlate leaks to equipment
3. http://www3.epa.gov/ozone/title6/downloads/Section_608_FactSheet2010.pdf
• Analyze data to detect trends and decide on corrective actions
4. http://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/rmp/rmp.htm
• Institute proper maintenance procedures
5. http://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/rmp/RMP_QA_Guidance_Document.pdf
• Inform and educate with available resources
6. http://www2.epa.gov/snap/608-proposal
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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7. http://www3.epa.gov/ozone/title6/downloads/Section_608_FactSheet2010.pdf
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their organizations. Here are a few best practices to achieve that goal:
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normally containing 50+ pounds of
To maximize the effectiveness of leak detection programs, retailers should
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Conclusion: Leak Detection Makes Good
Business Sense
interprets the status and operation of the
Leak detection program best practices
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areas where sensing is desired. There are
equipment technologies available to help
refrigeration systems containing more
Detection — an effective program
Each method has specific advantages
and offers retailers viable options to help
effective leak detection programs and
Finally, it’s important for retailers
complying with CARB’s ALD requirement.
infrared technology placed in the specific
industrial process and commercial
record of refrigerant recovered during
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• Passive — zone-specific hardware with
notifications and continuous monitoring
• Mandating that technicians keep a
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or maintenance events. In doing so, they
there is refrigerant present in the air.
from 35 percent to 20 percent in
• Prohibiting the operation of systems
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racks and cases — is as equally as important.
According to the ruling, “if the large
• Requiring regular leak inspections or
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system disposal in smaller systems with
(ALD) equipment for large systems
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SU C C E SS S TO RY
State of the Art
Sustainability
I
f you’re a restaurant owner who decides to put the word
provide refrigeration, servicing eight fixtures in the café’s
“green” in your name, sustainability better be a significant
medium-temperature suction group with one 4 HP Copeland
part of your culinary story. After all, when patrons dine at
Scroll Digital compressor. With their ability to digitally modulate
a green restaurant, their standards are raised. They expect
capacity from 10 to 100 percent, the Copeland Scroll Digital
locally sourced, natural, organic and sustainably raised foods.
enables precise matching of refrigeration requirements to the
And they want a dining experience in an environment that exudes
Multiplex Refrigeration System Lays Foundation for
Café’s Green Mission
green and supports sustainable principles. The Green Sage Café
in Asheville, N.C., embraces this challenge with a green vision that
permeates every facet of their operation.
Owned and operated by Randy Talley and Roger Derrough,
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variable operating loads typical of a foodservice application.
Dyess ensured Talley that the benefits of this multiplex
architecture would be immediately apparent.
“Instead of eight compressors kicking on and off, pulling
full run-load amps each time, you have a single compressor
the Green Sage Café has three locations across Asheville. While
running at only the capacity needed to meet the load. And if
their first café incorporated many green elements, its refrigerated
all fixtures call for refrigerant, that compressor is capable of
fixtures each operated on independent compressors — a refrigera-
handling everything at the same time,” Dyess explained.
tion architecture that Talley identified as an area for improvement
in their second restaurant.
“With 10 compressors running on everything from undercounter sandwich stands to reach-in refrigerators, there was a lot
of heat being generated and energy wasted, not to mention a
lot of noise rattling around the restaurant,” he said.
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The medium-temp fixtures covered by the 4 HP Copeland
Scroll Digital compressor included:
• Walk-in cooler
• Griddle stand
• Sandwich stands (2)
• Product merchandiser
• Reach-in refrigerators (2)
• Beer cooler
Talley leaned on his background in the natural foods grocery
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industry to find a better solution. There he had utilized rack refrigeration
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systems with minimal compressors to provide cooling for multiple
fixtures. He wanted to implement a similar architecture — now
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commonly referred to as multiplexing — but wasn’t sure if this technology would translate into his foodservice applications. That’s when
Talley tapped Refrigeration Design Technologies (RDT), experts in
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eco-friendly refrigerated system design, to implement a system that
would take his second location to the next level of energy efficiency.
“Our goal was to create the greenest restaurant possible.
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We wanted to cut energy consumption in half without compro-
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Keeping (Eco)-Cool Under Pressure
mising the quality of the food we’re serving,” Talley said.
Brent Dyess, RDT’s president, knew that Talley’s lofty goals were
“Our goal was to create
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the greenest restaurant
possible. We wanted to cut
energy consumption in half
without compromising the
quality of the food we’re serving.”
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— Randy Talley, Green Sage Café
within reach. Dyess selected RDT’s proven Eco-Cool refrigeration
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system based on the Copeland Scroll Digital™ compressor for
the second Green Sage Café location. Eco-Cool was specifically
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designed to meet the demands of environmentally responsible
foodservice outlets, relying on lean multiplex refrigeration
architecture to deliver the highest degree of energy efficiency.
The Green Sage Café’s unique energy and environmental
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E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
reduces the piping required in conventional systems. “Considering
we have eliminated numerous one-to-one piping scenarios, we can
run piping in a more efficient trunk line configuration,” he said.
Surprising Energy Savings
requirements made it an ideal candidate for the Eco-Cool
Dyess originally estimated that the system would provide the
system. The system minimizes the compressors needed to
restaurant up to 30 percent in annual energy savings. But when
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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Dyess explained that the digital application also substantially
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Dyess explained, at temperatures below 90 °F, the potential for
“If our customers
see the value in reusing
a natural by-product
of the refrigeration system,
then we recommend it.”
energy savings will continue to rise above the 48 percent mark.
Keeping Cool and Getting Into Hot Water
The multiplex refrigeration system also helped Green Sage Café
owners check other significant items off their sustainability list.
By placing the Eco-Cool unit outside the restaurant and removing
condenser surface areas that are present on each fixture in
conventional systems, they eliminated 53,856 BTUH of heat, or
the equivalent of 4.5 tons of air conditioning. Not only does this
contribute to the café’s eco-friendly footprint, it helps create
a better dining experience for patrons and improved working
— Brent Dyess, RDT
Another advantage of the Eco-Cool refrigeration system was
the Green Restaurant Association (GRA) evaluated the Green
Sage Café’s environmental profile for certification purposes, they
its ability to capture waste heat and divert it into a heat exchanger
commissioned RDT to perform an independent, third-party study
that provided heating for the restaurant’s hot water tank.
“We had used solar panels for hot water heating in our
on the Eco-Cool system. The results were surprising.
first location, but this heat reclamation system was even more
comparing a multiplex system (with one Copeland Scroll Digital
effective,” Talley explained. “This system takes care of all of our
compressor servicing six fixtures) to a conventional system. The
hot water requirements,” he added.
For the RDT team, the concept of heat reclamation just
study replicated actual foodservice conditions, such as varying
demands and frequent refrigerator door openings and closings. The
Digital-based Eco-Cool system delivered 48 percent energy savings.
The study demonstrates that as the ambient temperature
rises above 90 °F, the energy savings will decrease slightly. But as
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makes good environmental sense.
“If our customers see the value in reusing a natural by-product of
data revealed that in 90 °F ambient conditions, the Copeland Scroll
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conditions for the staff.
The UL energy study simulated a foodservice application,
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the refrigeration system, then we recommend it,” Dyess said. “Green
Sage Café had the vision and commitment to utilize every available
natural resource,” he added.
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Energy Consumption Comparison:
Copeland Scroll Digital Compressor vs. Conventional System
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Certifiably Green
With the Eco-Cool refrigeration system as a green foundation, the
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Energy Consumption vs. Temperature
Temperature (°F)
90
95
100
105
110
Conventional System
3,571
3,712
3,849
4,143
4,142
Digital Compressor
1,852
2,275
2,508
2,648
2,756
Delta
1,719
1,437
1,341
1,495
1,386
Energy Consumption (watts/Hr)
4,500
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4,000
3,500
Conventional
System
3,000
2,500
Digital
Compressor
2,000
1,500
48%
39%
35%
36%
33%
1,000
500
0
80
90
100
Temperature (°F)
10
Energy Saved (%)
110
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Green Sage Café incorporated additional sustainable elements,
Energy Consumption (watts/hr)
An independent UL study of RDT’s Eco-Cool unit compares a
conventional compressor system with the Copeland Scroll Digital
compressor. At 90 °F ambient temperatures, the digital scroll
compressor saves 48 percent on energy.
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
including: solar panels, energy-efficient dishwashers and LED
lighting. In recognition of its sustainable, state-of-the-art vision,
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the Green Sage Café earned the distinction of being the GRA’s
first four-star certified Green Restaurant in the South.
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As a result of their success, many other restaurants in the
Asheville area have taken on the green mantel. And with the help of
grants from the state of North Carolina, 17 restaurants (including the
first two of the Green Sage Café’s three locations) are now offering
sustainable, natural food-based fare in Asheville. The city has become
such a bastion of green culinary principles that it was recently named
the country’s first Green Dining Destination by the GRA.
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
Designed with a Copeland Scroll Digital compressor,
the Eco-Cool system from RDT serves as a cornerstone of
the Green Sage Café’s sustainability strategy.
11
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RAJAN ON … REFRIGERANTS
by D R . R A J A N R A J E N D R A N
environmental treaties ever negotiated.
The original treaty’s first order of
Montreal Protocol Commits to
HFC Management Amendment
ozone-depleting substances — particularly
The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric
chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) — by replacing
Policy is one such example.
serves as the Alliance chairman, expressed
the ozone by 2050, they are also cautioning
their commitment in a press release
or more than a year, we’ve discussed
against the continued widespread global
immediately following the 27th meeting.
the Environmental Protection Agency’s
use of HFC refrigerants due to their
(EPA) actions to prohibit the use of
environmental dangers.
As we know, HFCs are used in every-
hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants
Protocol which we believe can most
effectively promote the availability of
air conditioning applications, as well as
tors to foam insulation and fire protection
low-GWP replacement compounds and
expand the list of low-global warming
systems. And while the U.S. and the
technologies,” Hurst said.3
potential (GWP) alternatives. But while
European Union (EU) are well down the
these actions have focused on U.S. and
path of phasing out HFC use in specific
founded on its reliance on sound scientific
North American initiatives, the move to
applications, the demand for these
reviews, ongoing technology assessments
limit HFCs is also picking up steam on a
technologies continues to grow in
and a funding mechanism to assist
global level.
developing countries where they
developing countries. The Parties of the
provide added health, safety, comfort
Protocol’s decision to address the HFC
and productivity benefits.
issue with an amendment in 2016 is
The Montreal Protocol’s success was
Protocol in Dubai, United Arab Emirates,
Because of this, the Parties of the
Article 5 (developing) and non-Article 5
Protocol have considered the issues of HFC
countries make the transition to low-GWP
(developed) nations alike came together
usage and emissions for more than five
technologies, while accelerating HFC phase-
and committed to reduce worldwide
years. During this time, the EPA’s SNAP
down schedules in developed countries.
greenhouse gas emissions from HFCs.
rulings and the European Union’s F-Gas
The amendment will likely contain the
The meeting concluded with an agreement
regulations provided viable examples of
following components:
to phase down HFC consumption by
official policies to limit the use of HFCs.
completing an amendment to the Montreal
This is important because it set a precedent
Protocol in 2016.
for responding to the global HFC challenge.
1
ò
stage for an amendment to the Montreal
thing from air conditioners and refrigera-
meeting of the Parties to the Montreal
l
“We are working rapidly to set the
in certain commercial refrigeration and
Last November at the 27th international
4
Lennox International’s John Hurst, who
scientists are projecting a full restoration of
F
t
continue to do so in support of future
amendments to the Montreal Protocol.
2
F
HFC replacement alternatives — and will
business was to achieve a rapid phase-out of
them with HFC-based alternatives. While
27th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol Addresses Global HFC Phase-Down
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It’s an important reminder that a
Private companies and industry
global commitment to responsible envi-
coalitions have already answered the call
r
ronmental stewardship is nothing new.
to develop low-GWP technologies and
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Montreal Protocol treaty has served as
largely focused on helping developing
• Technology conversion and HFC phasedown schedules
• Financing for developing countries
• Possible exemptions for those in high
ambient temperature conditions
• Interim reviews to assess technologies
and progress
The history of the Montreal Protocol
demonstrates that once a reduction
schedule is set, industry responds with
rapid development and deployment of
alternatives.4 The Parties to the Protocol
agree on reduction schedules based
upon the knowledge available at the
time, and are asked to be open to
schedule modifications due to scientific
discoveries and/or technological
advances.
While the details of the amendment
are still unclear, it is certain that efforts to
phase down HFCs will soon have a global
driver. Many of us in the U.S. are already
in the process of reducing HFCs and
therefore have a head start in making this
F
transition. As negotiations continue to
take place throughout the year and an
amendment to the Montreal Protocol
t
is drafted, we will keep you updated on
its progress and the implications to
our industry.
4
Dr. Rajan Rajendran is one of the most
respected, global authorities on alternative
refrigerants and their applications across
Technologies’ Vice President, System
ò
Innovation Center and Sustainability,
Rajan helps steer the company’s strategic
direction, research and product development.
among world governments, industry and
References
the environmental community. With every
1. http://www.unep.org/newscentre/default.aspx?DocumentID=26854&ArticleID=35543
country within the United Nations charter a
2. http://www3.epa.gov/ozone/science/makemore.html
signatory to the agreement, it is considered
3. http://www.alliancepolicy.org/downloads/press-releases/alliance-PR-Dubai-11-6-15.pdf
one of the most effective multi-lateral
4. http://www.alliancepolicy.org/downloads/documents/Technology_Development_and_an_Amendment_to_the_Montreal_Protocol.pdf
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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an example of decades-long cooperation
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
l
a variety of industries. As Emerson Climate
First signed on September 16, 1987, the
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HELIX HIGHLIGHT
by D R . R A J A N R A J E N D R A N
Exploring the Potential of
CO2 Transcritical Booster Systems
CO2 transcritical booster system performs
medium-temperature suction group to
everything is within this controlled
in the middle of summer in a supermarket in
add a compressor and test it in a parallel
environment, we’re able to evaluate the
Miami, we can do that.
compression configuration. We could
performance of the CO2 transcritical
install an ejector device to evaluate its
booster system in the supermarket and
that we have the flexibility to control every
The great thing about our facility is
effectiveness in the CO2 refrigeration cycle
the larger building envelope.
variable that contributes to refrigerated
in real-world conditions. Or, we could
system performance. This allows us to
retrofit our gas coolers with adiabatic pads
is that you now have a real-world test lab
simulate a year’s worth of performance in
to measure their ability to keep the CO2
for designing the ideal refrigeration system
one week from any location in the world.
system below its critical point.
for your supermarkets, simulating the
And, we can use this space to solve problems
conditions and environments that are most
with rapid prototyping and evaluation of
Helix, the supermarket is an entity unto
challenging without risking product loss
new ideas.
itself, meaning that the power coming
or potential damage to your brand. While
into the module is completely isolated.
today the system is CO2 based, we have the
For example, if we want to test one of
✉
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Like every industry module in The
What all this means to our customers
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☰
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the available methods for increasing CO2
This allows us to measure the power
ability to change the refrigerant as well as
transcritical booster system performance
consumed by the store on its own, while
the system architecture. We hope that this
in hot weather, we have several options.
further isolating the energy consumption
opportunity will only spawn new ideas and
First, we have ample space left in our
of any one piece of equipment. Because
open the doors to further innovation.
✉
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CO2 Transcritical Booster System Profile for the Supermarket Module
The Helix Innovation Center utilizes a CO2 transcritical booster system that’s designed to accommodate mediumand low-temperature requirements in the supermarket. The medium-temperature suction group is based on three
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W
elcome to the first installment
system to not only meet the entire air
preferred option for retailers seeking to meet
of a new column that will
conditioning and heating needs of the
sustainability goals and take regulatory
focus on the technologies,
supermarket module, we’re also reclaiming
compliance out of the equation. But with a
emerging products and research projects
its exhaust heat for the facility’s hot water
critical point of 87.8 °F, special measures are
taking place at our recently opened Helix
and snow melt system beneath the sidewalks.
required to keep CO2 systems operating at
Innovation Center. In this edition, we will
ò
r
We also chose CO2 because we feel it
high efficiencies above this temperature.
place the spotlight on the CO2 transcritical
has the potential for much broader appli-
booster system that, among many other
cations than what is commonly thought in
have attempted to deploy CO2 systems in
things, is providing refrigeration to our
the industry today. Our system is designed
warmer regions. It’s also one of the limitations
supermarket industry module.
with the flexibility to demonstrate and
with CO2 transcritical booster systems that
exploit these possibilities.
we are determined to eliminate.
module for several reasons. It has the
Real-World Simulation Evaluates the
Viability of CO2 in Warmer Climates
environmental control chamber, located
potential to provide an efficient, eco-friendly
CO2 transcritical booster systems have
just outside the facility. This chamber
refrigeration source for medium- and
gained wide acceptance in northern
serves each of the five industrial modules
low-temp display cases, walk-ins and
climates throughout the world. As a
on-site and is capable of simulating
freezers. But that’s only the beginning.
natural refrigerant with near zero global
operating temperatures between -20 °F
We designed our CO2 transcritical booster
warming potential, CO2 is becoming a
and 120 °F. So, if we want to measure how a
We installed a CO2 transcritical
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Copeland™ CO2 semi-hermetic compressors (Copeland 4MTLS), supplying cooling to the store’s refrigerated cases,
walk-in cooler and air conditioning.
booster system to anchor our supermarket
14
This is the reason very few retailers
One unique aspect of The Helix is its
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
Medium-Temp Compressor Suction Group
Equipment Served
Copeland transcritical CO2 compressors
• 4MTLS11ME-FSD (with VSD)
• 4MTL82KE-FSD (qty: 2)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Total BTUs: 225,000
t
Floral case with three doors
Cake case
Upright dairy (qty: 2)
Upright produce (qty: 2)
Upright deli (qty: 2)
Upright meat (qty: 2)
Walk-in cooler
Air conditioning
4
l
ò
For the low-temperature group, three Copeland Scroll™ CO2 compressors (Copeland Scroll ZO) — including one
Copeland Scroll Digital™ compressor (Copeland Scroll ZOD) to enable varying capacity modulation for the group —
supply cooling to the store’s frozen food cases and walk-in freezer.
Low-Temp Compressor Suction Group
Equipment Served
Copeland Scroll CO2 compressors
• ZO34K3E-TFD
• ZOD34K3E-TFD (Copeland Scroll Digital)
• ZO21K5E-TFD
• Frozen foods with three doors (qty: 3)
• Ice cream with three doors (qty: 2)
• Walk-in freezer
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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S O LU T I O N SP OT L I G H T
by B E N P I C K E R
The Evolution of Predictive Protection
Copeland Scroll™ Outdoor
Refrigeration Unit offers
advancements in efficiency,
uptime and flexibility.
and even new, outside-the box-applications.
X-Line units utilize Copeland Scroll com-
See our energy savings calculator here:
overheating — but also before they occur.
pressors and contain variable speed PSC
http://xjenergycalc.emersonclimate.com/
fan motors, both of which are highly
xjenergycalc/.
X-Line 2.0 is always on alert for things
in the system that could cause problems —
efficient with industry-leading low noise
liquid floodback, compressor short cycling
levels. The compressors are compatible
and low voltage conditions, for example.
with the emerging class of newly approved,
X-Line’s electronic controls provide the
The proactive diagnostics even protect
low-GWP refrigerants — including R-450A,
advanced diagnostics and complete
bearings from wear caused by flooded
R-513A, R-448A and R-449A — making
system protection to prevent catastrophic
starts. This level of protection and
them compliant with new EPA standards
compressor failures and accelerate the
diagnostics allows system issues to
and eco-friendly. The fan motors optimize
repair process. By preventing damage that
be identified before case temperatures
air flow for maximum heat transfer and are
would otherwise require a compressor
rise and product is lost.
compliant with CEC and national standards.
replacement, costly downtime is avoided
The condenser’s sizing has been
and repairs are unnecessary. The system’s
optimized as well, with large coils and
on-board diagnostics codes and data log
data log provide refrigeration contractors
integrated electronic controls, which,
allow refrigeration contractors to quickly
an unparalleled level of information to help
when combined with the variable speed
and accurately diagnose system issues,
quickly and accurately correct the system.
fans, enable the unit to operate at
reducing downtime due to troubleshooting
The advanced knowledge provided by
maximum efficiency. This design not
and misdiagnosis.
CoreSense has been shown to improve
only meets the DOE’s annual walk-in
service technician accuracy and reduce
efficiency factor (AWEF) standards, it
further enable advanced warnings and
call-backs.
also supports low-condensing operation,
improved uptime. By connecting the unit
which provides 15–20 percent energy
to a site supervisory control — such as an
of units with CoreSense technology compared
efficiency ratio improvements for every
E2 controller or ecoSYS Site Supervisor
to units without CoreSense, we found a
10 °F drop in head pressure.
available from Emerson, or other controls
75 percent difference (92–17) in accuracy
t
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F
or years, the outdoor refrigeration
questioning the long-term practicality and
comprehensive range of system protection
condensing unit has been the work-
viability of their refrigeration technology.
it offers. Based on a fully integrated
horse of small- and large-format
Addressing this need in the market is
electronic control system that combines
food retailers. It’s called upon to endure
not new to Emerson — X-Line units were
pressure, defrost, electronic valve, fan
extreme climates and continuously
introduced to North America back in
speed, diagnostics and communications
support walk-in refrigerator and freezer
2008. The new, second generation X-Line
controls into one modular control,
r
operations.
(X-Line 2.0) builds upon the technology of
X-Line 2.0 offers comprehensive control,
the original models to offer best-in-class
protection and smart store technology
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sustainability goals increasing, and
energy efficiency, uptime and flexibility,
that meets the demands of modern food
embedded electronics and equipment
all while providing advanced diagnostics
retail requirements.
technologies emerging, many food
and protection from an integrated suite of
retailers are looking to add efficiency
electronic controls.
With energy costs rising, corporate
and eco-friendliness to their refrigeration
checklist. The Copeland Scroll Outdoor
Unique Proactive Diagnostics
Using our proven CoreSense™ technology for Copeland compressors, the unit’s
controls and sensors are designed to provide
both proactive and reactive protection.
Refrigeration Unit (X-Line) is Emerson
What is most unique about X-Line 2.0
Issues are not only detected as they occur —
Climate Technologies’ answer to those
compared to others in the industry is the
including problems such as lost phase,
16
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
Maximize Uptime
on-board diagnostics and time-stamped
As we have studied the effectiveness
F
ò
Increase Efficiencies
discharge temperature and compressor
When a system issue is identified, the
✉
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l
incorrect phase, high pressure, high
At test sites, users are saving 20
available from third parties — system
percent on average in energy costs with
issues can be identified and scheduled for
percent difference (100–63) in accuracy
X-Line 2.0 units compared to other units,
repairs before leading to a system failure
among experienced technicians. Warranty
making it ideal for walk-in coolers and
or product loss. Some issues can even be
costs are also significantly reduced.
freezers, reach-in display merchandisers,
diagnosed and repaired remotely.
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A New Standard in Refrigeration Flexibility
flexible refrigeration unit available today:
✉
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X-Line’s communication capabilities
among entry-level technicians, and a 37
X-Line has many attributes that make it the most versatile and
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ò
•C
orrosion resistant — with galvannealed and powder-coated
steel construction, and a hydrophilic condenser fin coating, the
X-Line is resistant to the corrosive salt air of coastal regions.
• Lightweight — 30 percent lighter than other units, X-Line can
cooling allow operation in up to 120 °F ambient, while a heated
support structures.
and insulated receiver, condenser check valve, variable speed
•Q
uiet — at the low sound level of 55 decibels, X-Line units
are ideal in noise-restricted residential areas; they have been
installed only feet away from hotel windows, and even inside
big-box stores on top of refrigeration cases.
• Small footprint — allows the X-Line units to also be installed on
G
y
fan, and low pressure control time delay allow operation
down to -40 °F.
•O
perates with multiple refrigerants — compatible with
R-404A as well as many of the new EPA-approved refrigerants,
including: R-407C/A, R-448A, R-449A, R-513A, R-450A; makes
a wall, or reduces required space when mounting on a roof or on
X-Line units suitable for both new equipment and service
the ground.
replacement applications.
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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• Extreme ambient conditions — large condensers and demand
often be used when other units may require new roof
17
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CO N T R AC TO R CO N N EC T I O N
by T I M U D E R M A N
offers an upgrade kit per specific model (Copeland Discus
Digital™ or Copeland Scroll™). Note: for semi-hermetic compressors
that are less than four years old, technicians can perform a head
modification to convert the compressor to digital.
Make the Upgrade to Digital
• Improved temperature control — digital modulation is capable
of temperature control within +/- 1 °F, giving operators the
assurance that they are minimizing food loss while maintaining
the highest quality of perishable items.
• Tighter suction pressure control — operating suction pressure
ranges are significantly reduced, moving from double-digit
suction pressures (psig) to single-digit levels. In some systems,
operators have experienced as much as 89 percent improvement in suction pressure.
BEFORE
Identify the correct model number by its specific letter designation.
✉

Capacity modulation made possible through digital compressor upgrade kit
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ò
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T
he use of a digital compressor as the lead compressor in a
fixed capacity refrigeration rack is becoming a preferred
method for supermarkets seeking to meet varying refrigeration loads. With the ability to modulate capacity from 10 to 100
percent, a digital compressor gives operators many benefits:
• Precise matching of capacity to changing refrigeration loads
• Tight control over suction pressures
• Improved case temperature precision
• Reduced compressor cycling (on/off)
Digital compressors have proven so effective in providing
capacity modulation that this strategy is being written into the
design specifications of many big-box retailers.
Digital Upgrade Kit for Traditional Rack Systems
This option is also available as an upgrade to existing refrigeration
systems that are based on traditional parallel rack architectures.
Many technicians are being called upon to retrofit these systems
with a digital compressor upgrade kit. Although there are some
newer technologies and electronic controls involved with the
transition, the upgrade process is relatively straightforward.
The typical scenario for a digital compressor upgrade is
fairly predictable:
a) The supermarket operator has likely made several attempts to
18
e) Install upgrade kit — often the greatest apprehension about the
upgrade process is the wiring required to tie into the interface
controller, even though the process is fairly straightforward.
The length of time required to install depends on the technician’s
experience and electrical familiarity.
Digital Technology Yields Indisputable Results
improve control of product temperature or reduce compressor
cycling. It’s common in these scenarios to see cycling rates in
the hundreds per day with as much as 15 °F fluctuations in case
temperatures.
A single digital compressor with 10 to 100 percent capacity modulation enables continuous variable unloading that delivers immediate and significant benefits. While results vary per application,
operators can expect improvements in three major categories:
b) Modifications to the equipment (typically via the rack controller)
were unsuccessful: adjustments to narrow suction pressure
resulted in excessive compressor cycling; adjustments to
reduce compressor cycling produced a wide range of suction
pressures and unacceptable fluctuations in temperatures.
• Reduced compressor cycling — the average compressor cycling is
reduced up to 50 percent, but some scenarios have seen cycle
counts go from 900 starts per day to 12 starts across a four-day
span. This increases equipment reliability by reducing contactor
wear and tear due to the infrequent cycling. It also saves
energy from reduced in-rush, start-up currents and persistent
consumption from running at full capacity.
These operating conditions present an ideal opportunity for a
digital compressor upgrade:
a) Identify the compressor — the technician’s first order of
business is to identify the fixed capacity, semi-hermetic or
scroll compressor in the rack that is the best candidate for
replacement. Ideally, the fixed compressor capacity needs to be
equal to or larger than the next compressor in the stage
sequence to prevent capacity gaps between compressor cycling.
b) Verify the system controller — the system controller must be
capable of providing an analog signal to the digital controller.
Most modern rack controllers are capable of providing
analog output.
c) Choose the correct upgrade model — once the replacement
compressor has been identified, Emerson Climate Technologies
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
AFTER
C2 SUCT PSI-33
PSI
160
140
d) S elect the digital controller — the new digital compressor
necessitates an additional interface controller to tie into the
rack system’s master controller. Emerson offers controllers for
these specific applications.
Copeland Discus Digital Activated
120
89% Reduction
in Suction
Pressure Range
100
72
psi
8
80
psi
60
40
20
07/06
On
Off
On
Off
On
Off

⌂
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2D
07/07
07/08
07/09
07/10
07/11
07/12
07/13
07/14
Significant and
Immediate Reduction in
Compressor Cycling
3D
Digital Retrofit
4D
From 900 Starts per Day
to
12 Starts in 4 Days
This chart represents the before and after comparison
of an actual supermarket case study where a fixed capacity rack
has been upgraded to a digital compressor system.
Highlights include: 89 percent reduction in suction pressure range
and significantly reduced compressor cycling.
These results make an open and shut case for a digital compressor
upgrade. As awareness of this option becomes more well-known,
many supermarket operators will opt for capacity modulation
using this relatively simple upgrade to their existing rack systems.
✉
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Other Methods of Capacity Modulation
The challenge of modulating capacity in centralized rack
refrigeration systems is not a new one, and system designers
have made several attempts to solve the problem. Though
none are as effective as digital capacity modulation,
technicians still frequently encounter these systems:
• Uneven rack — one potential solution is to design an uneven
rack made up of compressors of varying capacities. But
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
this still results in high cycling (on/off) rates and provides
insufficient temperature control.
r
• Variable speed drives — known to provide effective capacity
modulation, but is often considered cost-prohibitive
technology.
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One digital compressor per suction group can provide precise
capacity modulation from 10 to 100 percent. The results are
up to 50 percent reduction in compressor cycling, improved
equipment reliability and precise temperature control.
19
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Forum
E
merson Climate Technologies is excited to take our educational
platform on the road; we’ll be coming to Atlanta on February 18.
Visit
EmersonClimate.com/
E360-Event-Registration
to register.
Once again, this daylong event will feature prominent
industry authorities as well as Emerson’s own internal experts.
Our Dallas E360 Forum, held this past September, offered timely
discussions on top-of-mind industry concerns, such as the EPA
delisting ruling aftermath. More than 120 foodservice and retail
leaders gathered and conversed about our shifting industry.
The E360 Forums give attendees an opportunity to participate
What do the E360 Forum attendees have to
say about the event?
in the conversations shaping the commercial refrigeration industry.
✉

We hope to see you at an E360 Forum in the future.
E360 Forum Schedule Atlanta, GA
Marriott Atlanta Airport Gateway
Feb. 18, 2016 Toronto, ON CN Tower
March 15, 2016
Dayton, OH Dayton Marriott/The Helix
May 9–11, 2016
“
Additional 2016 venues to be announced
“
4
What was the most meaningful takeaway from today?
Some of the biggest takeaways were
learning about the changes happening in the foodservice
industry, and how energy and environmental challenges
are playing huge roles. Seeing how these things are
interconnected was an eye-opening experience.”
— Bryan Tonn, engineering manager, H&K International
F
t
Would you recommend the E360 Forum?
With respect to the E360 Forum, I would
absolutely recommend it to anybody in the industry. It has
applications regardless of the type of company you have
— whether you’re an OEM manufacturer, a wholesaler
distributor, a contractor or a consultant.”
— Tom Richgels, director of sales, RefPlus
l
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AHRI Executive Committee
Willard InterContinental Hotel
Washington, DC
March 15
ahrinet.org/site/412/NewsEvents/Meetings-and-Events
AHRI Public Policy Symposium
Willard InterContinental Hotel
Washington, DC
March 15–16
ahrinet.org/site/412/NewsEvents/Meetings-and-Events
20
F
S
ince early 2013, Emerson Climate Technologies
has produced Webinars as part of a series
known as Making Sense. We have recently
renamed this series E360 Webinars to include this
educational effort in the E360 platform which also
includes the E360 Outlook and E360 Forums.
Practical leak detection insights were shared during
the most recent E360 Webinar, including:
2016 IIAR Industrial Refrigeration Conference & Exhibition
Caribe Royale All-Suite Hotel
and Convention Center
Orlando, FL — March 20–23
iiar.org/IIAR/WCM/Events/
IIAR_Events_2015-2016.aspx
AHRI Board of Directors
Hyatt Regency Reston
Reston, VA — May 2
ahrinet.org/site/412/NewsEvents/Meetings-and-Events
AHRI Spring Meeting
Hyatt Regency Reston
Reston, VA
May 2–4
ahrinet.org/site/412/NewsEvents/Meetings-and-Events
NRA Show 2016
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL
May 21–24
show.restaurant.org/Home
2016 ASHRAE Annual
Conference
America’s Center Convention
Complex and Renaissance
St. Louis Grand Hotel
St. Louis, MO
June 25–29
ashraem.confex.com/ashraem/
s16/cfp.cgi
E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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Recently Archived Webinars
Find archived Webinars at EmersonClimate.com/E360-Webinars
Understanding Leak Detection and
Implementing Effective Programs
4
November 3, 2015
l
EPA Final Refrigerant Ruling: Its Impact on
Your Business
August 18, 2015
• The benefits of putting such a program in place
Seven Keys to Servicing CO2 Systems
July 14, 2015
ò
• An overview of the regulatory environment related
to leak detection
Meeting Future Refrigeration Energy Regulations
With Today’s Technology Alternatives
March 17, 2015
r
• Current leak detection technologies, including tips
on how to get the best result
Staying Ahead of DOE 2017 Walk-In Cooler
• What an effective leak detection program looks like
I N D US T RY E V E N T S
ò
✉
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Archived Webinars can be found at
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E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
and Freezer Energy Efficiency Ratings
October 21, 2014
Staying Ahead of Rulemaking Proposals
on Acceptable Refrigerants
August 26, 2014
Improve Refrigerated Marine Container
Management With Pervasive Connectivity
July 8, 2014
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Thank you for reading this edition of E360 Outlook! At Emerson, we believe
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We hope the information provided here will spark conversations and open
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E360 Outlook Volume 2 Number 2
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