Allied Telesis AT-9006LX/SC User`s guide

Allied Telesis AT-9006LX/SC User`s guide
Management
Software
®
AT-S26
◆
User’s Guide
FOR USE WITH THE AT-9006T, AT-9006SX/SC, AND
AT-9006LX/SC GIGABIT ETHERNET SWITCH
PRODUCTS
VERSION 2.0.1
PN 613-10852-00 Rev B
Copyright  2000 Allied Telesyn International, Corp.
960 Stewart Drive Suite B, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 USA
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from Allied Telesyn International,
Corp.
CentreCom is a registered trademark of Allied Telesyn International, Corp.
Netscape Navigator is a registered trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation. All other product names, company names,
logos or other designations mentioned herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Allied Telesyn International, Corp. reserves the right to make changes in specifications and other information contained in this
document without prior written notice. The information provided herein is subject to change without notice. In no event shall Allied
Telesyn International, Corp. be liable for any incidental, special, indirect, or consequential damages whatsoever, including but not
limited to lost profits, arising out of or related to this manual or the information contained herein, even if Allied Telesyn International,
Corp. has been advised of, known, or should have known, the possibility of such damages.
Table of Contents
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3
Preface ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Supported Platforms ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 9
Purpose of This Guide .........................................................................................................................................................................................11
How This Guide is Organized ...........................................................................................................................................................................12
Document Conventions ....................................................................................................................................................................................13
Where to Find Web-based Guides .................................................................................................................................................................14
Contacting Allied Telesyn .................................................................................................................................................................................15
Online Support ..............................................................................................................................................................................................15
Technical Support and Services ..............................................................................................................................................................15
Technical Support E-mail Addresses .....................................................................................................................................................15
Returning Products .............................................................................................................................................................................................16
FTP Server ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................17
For Sales or Corporate Information ...............................................................................................................................................................18
Tell Us What You Think ......................................................................................................................................................................................19
Chapter 1
Getting Started ...................................................................................................................................................................................................21
Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................................22
Starting a Local Omega Session Using the RS232 Port ..........................................................................................................................23
Omega Main Menu ......................................................................................................................................................................................24
Using the Terminal Interface....................................................................................................................................................................25
Quitting from a Local Session ..................................................................................................................................................................27
Starting an Omega Session from a Web Browser .....................................................................................................................................28
Managed Switch ...........................................................................................................................................................................................30
Omega Main Menu Window ....................................................................................................................................................................30
Web Links ........................................................................................................................................................................................................31
Browser Tools.................................................................................................................................................................................................31
Quitting an Omega Session from a Web Browser ............................................................................................................................32
Starting a Remote Omega Session with Telnet or an SNMP Management Program ..................................................................33
Connecting to a Remote Switch .....................................................................................................................................................................34
Menu Tree ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................35
3
Chapter 2
Managing a Switch ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Configuring the Switch IP Parameters ......................................................................................................................................................... 42
Setting IP Parameters................................................................................................................................................................................. 43
Configuring the Spanning Tree Protocol .................................................................................................................................................... 47
Activating or Deactivating STP and Configuring the Port Parameters .................................................................................... 48
Configuring STP Parameters.................................................................................................................................................................... 50
Enabling or Disabling IGMP Snooping ........................................................................................................................................................ 52
Naming a Switch .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 54
Resetting a Switch ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
Reassigning the Default Settings for the Switch ...................................................................................................................................... 56
Configuring the RS232 Port ............................................................................................................................................................................. 57
Running Diagnostics .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 59
Displaying the Activity Monitor ..................................................................................................................................................................... 61
Pinging a Device .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
Chapter 3
Configuring the Ports ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 65
Displaying Port Status ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 66
Configuring Port Parameters .......................................................................................................................................................................... 68
Creating a Port Trunk ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 71
Guidelines....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 71
Creating a Port Trunk ................................................................................................................................................................................. 72
Deleting a Port Trunk ................................................................................................................................................................................. 73
Configuring Port Mirroring .............................................................................................................................................................................. 74
Enabling Port Mirroring ............................................................................................................................................................................. 74
Disabling Port Mirroring............................................................................................................................................................................ 75
Configuring Port Security ................................................................................................................................................................................. 76
Chapter 4
Configuring the MAC Address Table ....................................................................................................................................................... 79
MAC Address Table ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 81
Displaying the MAC Address Table ....................................................................................................................................................... 82
Displaying the MAC Addresses of a Port ............................................................................................................................................. 83
Displaying the Port Number of a MAC Address................................................................................................................................ 84
Clearing All Dynamic MAC Addresses .................................................................................................................................................. 85
Changing the Aging Time of the MAC Address Table.................................................................................................................... 85
Static MAC Address Table ................................................................................................................................................................................. 86
Displaying the Static MAC Address Table ........................................................................................................................................... 86
Adding Addresses to the Static MAC Address Table ...................................................................................................................... 87
Deleting Addresses from the Static MAC Address Table............................................................................................................... 88
Clearing the Static MAC Address Table ............................................................................................................................................... 89
Multicast Address ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 90
Configuring a Multicast Address............................................................................................................................................................ 90
Changing a Multicast Port Assignment ............................................................................................................................................... 92
Deleting a Multicast Address................................................................................................................................................................... 92
Chapter 5
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service .............................................................................................................................. 93
Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 94
Port-Based VLANs ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 95
VLAN Tagging ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 96
Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN ..........................................................................................................................................102
Phase 1...........................................................................................................................................................................................................102
Phase 2...........................................................................................................................................................................................................105
Phase 3...........................................................................................................................................................................................................106
4
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Verifying the VLAN Configuration....................................................................................................................................................... 107
Creating an Example VLAN ............................................................................................................................................................................ 108
Phase 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 108
Phase 2 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 109
Phase 3 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 109
Modifying a Port-based or Tagged VLAN ................................................................................................................................................. 111
Phase 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 111
Phase 2 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 112
Phase 3 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 112
Deleting a Port-based or Tagged VLAN .................................................................................................................................................... 113
Phase 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 113
Phase 2 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 113
Assigning the CPU Management Port to a VLAN .................................................................................................................................. 115
Configuring Port Priority Queueing ........................................................................................................................................................... 116
Configuring Switch Priority Queuing ......................................................................................................................................................... 118
Chapter 6
Displaying Ethernet Statistics .................................................................................................................................................................. 121
Displaying Statistics for Received Frames ................................................................................................................................................ 122
Displaying Statistics for Transmitted Frames .......................................................................................................................................... 125
Displaying RMON Statistics for a Switch ................................................................................................................................................... 127
Displaying RMON Statistics for a Port ........................................................................................................................................................ 128
Resetting the Statistics Counters ................................................................................................................................................................ 129
Interpreting the Graphs .................................................................................................................................................................................. 130
Chapter 7
Configuring the Omega Interface ........................................................................................................................................................... 131
Creating an Omega Password ...................................................................................................................................................................... 132
Specifying a Timeout Value ........................................................................................................................................................................... 134
Enabling and Disabling the Access Methods .......................................................................................................................................... 135
Chapter 8
Upgrading Switch Software and Configuration Files ................................................................................................................... 137
Upgrading the Switch Software .................................................................................................................................................................. 137
Using XModem to Upgrade the Switch Software.......................................................................................................................... 138
Using TFTP to Upgrade Software......................................................................................................................................................... 139
Using Omega to Upgrade Additional Switches ..................................................................................................................................... 140
Downloading Software to One Switch .............................................................................................................................................. 140
Downloading Software to All Switches ............................................................................................................................................. 141
Uploading and Downloading System Configuration Files ................................................................................................................ 142
Appendix A
AT-S26 Default Settings .............................................................................................................................................................................. 143
Appendix B
Spanning Tree Protocol Concepts .......................................................................................................................................................... 145
Spanning Tree Protocol Features ................................................................................................................................................................ 146
Spanning Tree Protocol Parameters .......................................................................................................................................................... 147
Spanning Tree Protocol Operation ............................................................................................................................................................. 148
Appendix C
Supported Platforms .................................................................................................................................................................................... 151
Index ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 153
5
List of Figures
Chapter 1
Getting Started
Figure 1: Omega Main Menu from a Local Session ..................................................................................................................................24
Figure 2: Entering a Switch’s IP Address in the URL Field ......................................................................................................................28
Figure 3: Initial Omega Window Display from a Web Browser ............................................................................................................29
Figure 4: Omega Main Menu from a Web Browser ..................................................................................................................................30
Figure 5: Active Menu Option ..........................................................................................................................................................................31
Figure 6: Entry Field .............................................................................................................................................................................................31
Figure 7: Omega Main Menu Tree ..................................................................................................................................................................38
Chapter 2
Managing a Switch
Figure 8: System Configuration Menu ..........................................................................................................................................................43
Figure 9: IP Parameters Window .....................................................................................................................................................................43
Figure 10: DHCP Selections ..............................................................................................................................................................................45
Figure 11: Bridging Menu ..................................................................................................................................................................................48
Figure 12: Port Parameters for the Spanning Tree Protocol .................................................................................................................48
Figure 13: STP Port Parameters Window .....................................................................................................................................................49
Figure 14: Setting STP Port Parameters Window ......................................................................................................................................49
Figure 15: Spanning Tree Parameters Window .........................................................................................................................................50
Figure 16: Switch Configuration Menu ........................................................................................................................................................52
Figure 17: IGMP Configuration Menu ...........................................................................................................................................................53
Figure 18: Administration menu .....................................................................................................................................................................55
Figure 19: Terminal Configuration Window ...............................................................................................................................................57
Figure 20: Sample Diagnostics Window ......................................................................................................................................................60
Figure 21: Activity Monitor ...............................................................................................................................................................................61
Figure 22: Ping Window .....................................................................................................................................................................................62
Figure 23: Ping Results Example .....................................................................................................................................................................62
Chapter 3
Configuring the Ports
Figure 24: Port Status Window ........................................................................................................................................................................66
Figure 25: Port Configuration Window ........................................................................................................................................................68
Figure 26: Port Mirroring Window .................................................................................................................................................................74
Figure 27: Source and Destination Port Mirror Prompts ........................................................................................................................75
Figure 28: Port Security Menu .........................................................................................................................................................................76
Figure 29: Port Security Prompts ....................................................................................................................................................................77
7
List of Figures
Chapter 4
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Figure 30: MAC Address Menu ....................................................................................................................................................................... 82
Figure 31: MAC Address Table ........................................................................................................................................................................ 82
Figure 32: MAC Address Table Per Port Window ..................................................................................................................................... 83
Figure 33: MAC Address Prompt .................................................................................................................................................................... 84
Figure 34: MAC Address by Port Window ................................................................................................................................................... 84
Figure 35: Static MAC Address Table Window .......................................................................................................................................... 86
Figure 36: Static MAC Addresses Per Port Window ................................................................................................................................. 87
Figure 37: Adding a Static MAC Address Window ................................................................................................................................... 87
Figure 38: Deleting a Static MAC Address Window ................................................................................................................................ 88
Figure 39: Multicast Address Menu ............................................................................................................................................................... 90
Figure 40: Adding a Multicast Address Window ...................................................................................................................................... 91
Figure 41: Deleting a Multicast Address Window .................................................................................................................................... 92
Chapter 5
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Figure 42: VLAN Port-Based Example ........................................................................................................................................................... 95
Figure 43: VLAN Tagging Example ................................................................................................................................................................ 99
Figure 44: Virtual LAN/QoS Menu ................................................................................................................................................................102
Figure 45: VLANs Window ..............................................................................................................................................................................103
Figure 46: New VLAN Configuration Window .........................................................................................................................................103
Figure 47: VLAN Configuration Window for the Default VLAN .........................................................................................................105
Figure 48: Port to VLAN Configuration Window ....................................................................................................................................106
Figure 49: Port Priority Setting Window ....................................................................................................................................................117
Figure 50: Priority Weight Configuration Window ................................................................................................................................119
Chapter 6
Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Figure 51: Graph of Received Frames, Switch Level .............................................................................................................................122
Figure 52: Graph of a Port’s Received Frames .........................................................................................................................................124
Figure 53: Sample Graph of a Single Frame Type on All Ports ..........................................................................................................124
Figure 54: Sample Graph of Transmitted Frames Window ................................................................................................................125
Figure 55: RMON Statistics Graph Window ..............................................................................................................................................127
Figure 56: Sample RMON Statistics Graph for a Port ............................................................................................................................128
Chapter 7
Configuring the Omega Interface
Figure 57: Omega Options Window ...........................................................................................................................................................132
8
Preface
This guide contains instructions on how to use the AT-S26
Version 2.0.1 management software and the Omega management
interface to manage and configure your AT-9006T, AT-9006SX/SC, and
AT-9006LX/SC Series Gigabit Ethernet Switches.
Supported Platforms
Version 2.0.1 of the AT-S26 management software is supported on the
following Allied Telesyn Gigabit Ethernet switches:
❑
AT-9006T
❑
AT-9006SX/SC
❑
AT-9006LX/SC
Version 2.0.1 of the AT-S26 management software supports the
following expansion modules:
❑
AT-A14 100/1000Base-T (RJ-45) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A15/SX 1000Base-SX (SC) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A15/LX 1000Base-SL (SC) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A16 100Base-FX (VF-45) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A17 100Base-FX (SC) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A18 10/100Base-TX (RJ-45) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A19 100Base-FX (MT-RJ) Expansion Module
9
❑
AT-A24/SX 1000Base-SX (MT-RJ) Expansion Module
❑
AT-A24/LX 1000Base-LX (MT-RJ) Expansion Module
Note
Refer to Appendix C for additional information on the switches and
expansion modules supported by this version of the AT-S26
management software.
10
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Purpose of This Guide
This guide is intended for network administrators who are responsible
for managing the switches. Network administrators should be familiar
with Ethernet switches, Ethernet and Fast Ethernet technology,
bridging, and the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
11
How This Guide is Organized
This guide contains the following chapters and appendices:
Chapter 1, Getting Started, explains how to start an Omega session.
This chapter also describes the Omega Main Menu and how to navigate
around the various menus.
Chapter 2, Managing a Switch, describes how to configure the IP
parameters for a switch, how to set the spanning tree protocol
parameters, and more.
Chapter 3, Configuring the Ports, explains how to set the port
parameters, create port mirrors and port trunks, and configure port
security.
Chapter 4, Configuring the MAC Address Table, contains the
procedures for displaying the MAC address table, viewing and changing
the static MAC address table, and configuring multicast addresses.
Chapter 5, Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service, contains
background information on the different types of VLANs that are
supported by the switch. The chapter also contains the procedures for
creating and modifying VLANs and how to configure the Priority
Queueing feature.
Chapter 6, Displaying Ethernet Statistics, explains how to view switchlevel and port-level performance statistics.
Chapter 7, Configuring the Omega Interface, contains the procedures
for assigning the Omega interface a password and for disabling the
various access methods.
Chapter 8, Upgrading Switch Software and Configuration Files,
explains how to download new AT-S26 software onto the switches in
your network.
Appendix A, AT-S26 Default Settings, lists the factory default settings
for the switch and the management software.
Appendix B, Spanning Tree Concepts, briefly describes the spanning
tree protocol as implemented by Allied Telesyn for the switch.
Appendix C, Supported Platforms, lists the basic specifications of the
Fast Ethernet switches and optional expansion modules supported by
this version of the AT-S26 software.
Index, at the end of this guide, is organized according to subject matter.
12
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Document Conventions
This guide uses several conventions that you should become familiar
with first before you begin to install the product.
Note
Notes provide additional information.
Warning
Warnings inform you that performing or omitting a specific action
may result in bodily injury.
Caution
Cautions inform you that performing or omitting a specific action
may result in equipment damage or loss of data.
13
Where to Find Web-based Guides
The Allied Telesyn web site at www.alliedtelesyn.com offers you an easy
way to access the most recent documentation and technical information
for all of our products.
There are several manuals that you will need in order to manage your
Ethernet switch. The following manual contains the hardware
installation instructions for the switch. You can obtain this manual from
the Allied Telesyn web site:
❑
AT-9006T, AT-9006SX/SC, and AT-9006LX/SC Installation
Guide,
PN 613-10851-00
The following manual is shipped with the switch and contains an
abbreviated version of the installation instructions:
❑
14
AT-9006T, AT-9006SX/SC, and AT-9006LX/SC Quick Install
Guide,
PN 613-10853-00
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Contacting Allied Telesyn
You can contact Allied Telesyn technical support by telephone, fax or
e-mail. You can also contact technical support online through our web
site.
Online Support
Technical
Support and
Services
Technical
Support E-mail
Addresses
You can request technical support online by filling out the Online
Technical Support Form at www.alliedtelesyn.com/forms/support.htm.
Americas
United States, Canada, Mexico,
Central America, South America
Tel: 1 (800) 428-4835, option 4
Fax: 1 (503) 639-3176
Germany
Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Eastern
Europe
Tel: (+49) 0130/83-56-66
Fax: (+49) 30-435-900-115
Asia
Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Malaysia,
Indonesia, Korea, Philippines, China,
India, Hong Kong
Tel: (+65) 381-5612
Fax: (+65) 383-3830
Italy
Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Israel
Tel: (+39) 02-41-30-41
Fax: (+39) 02-41-30-41-00
Australia
Tel: 1 (800) 000-880
Fax: (+61) 2-9438-4966
Japan
Tel: (+81) 3-3443-5640
Fax: (+81) 3-3443-2443
France
France, Belgium, Luxembourg,
The Netherlands, Middle East,
Africa
Tel: (+33) 0-1-60-92-15-25
Fax: (+33) 0-1-69-28-37-49
United Kingdom
United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway,
Sweden, Finland
Tel: (+0044) 1235-442500
Fax: (+44) 1-235-442680
United States and Canada
[email protected]
Latin America, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Caribbean, and Virgin Islands
[email protected]
United Kingdom, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland
[email protected]
15
Returning Products
Products for return or repair must first be assigned a Return Materials
Authorization (RMA) number. A product sent to Allied Telesyn without a
RMA number will be returned to the sender at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an RMA number, contact Allied Telesyn’s Technical Support at
one of the following locations:
North America
2124 Zanker Road
San Jose, CA 95131
Tel: 1-800-428-4835, option 4
Fax: 1-503-639-3716
European Customer Support Centre
10/11 Bridgemead Close
Westmead Industrial Estate
Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 7YT
England
Tel: +44-1793-501401
Fax: +44-1793-431099
Mexico and Puerto Rico
Latin America, the Caribbean,
Virgin Islands
Tel: 1-800-424-5012, ext 3852 or
Tel: international code + 425-481-3852
1-800-424-4284, ext 3852
Fax: international code + 425-483-9458 Mexico only: 95-800-424-5012, ext 3852
Fax: international code + 425-489-9191
16
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
FTP Server
If you need a device driver for an Allied Telesyn device and you know the
name of the driver, you can download the software by connecting
directly to our FTP server at ftp://gateway.centre.com.
At login, enter ‘anonymous’. Enter your e-mail address for the password
as requested by the server at login.
17
For Sales or Corporate Information
Allied Telesyn International, Corp.
19800 North Creek Parkway, Suite 200
Bothell, WA 98011
Tel: 1 (425) 487-8880
Fax: 1 (425) 489-9191
18
Allied Telesyn International, Corp.
960 Stewart Drive, Suite B
Sunnyvale, CA 94085
Tel: 1 (800) 424-4284 (USA and Canada)
Fax: 1 (408) 736-0100
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Tell Us What You Think
If you have any comments or suggestions on how we might improve this
or other Allied Telesyn documents, please fill out the Send Us Feedback
Form at www.alliedtelesyn.com/forms/feedback.htm.
19
Chapter 1
Getting Started
This chapter provides an overview of the Omega management interface
and contains the different procedures for starting an Omega
management session. The sections in this chapter include:
❑ Starting a Local Omega Session Using the RS232 Port on page
23
❑ Starting an Omega Session from a Web Browser on page 28
❑ Starting a Remote Omega Session with Telnet or an SNMP
Management Program on page 33
❑ Connecting to a Remote Switch on page 34
This chapter also contains a section titled Menu Tree on page 35. This
section lists each Omega menu selection and the page number in this
guide where the selection is explained.
21
Getting Started
Overview
The Omega interface simplifies the task of managing your Allied Telesyn
AT-9006T, AT-9006SX/SC, and AT-9006LX/SC Series Gigabit Ethernet
switches. This menu-oriented interface, which comes pre-installed on
the switch along with the AT-S26 software, enables you to configure and
manage all of the switch parameters, such as the IP address, the gateway
address, and the subnet mask of the switch. You also use the interface to
create virtual LANs, view performance statistics, and configure the ports.
There are three different ways that you can access the Omega
management interface to configure and manage a switch. They are:
❑ Using the RS232 port on the front panel of the switch. This creates
a Local Omega session.
❑ Using a web browser, such as Netscape Navigator.
❑ Using Telnet.
You can also manage a switch using a SNMP program, such as HP
Openview; however, this method does not use the Omega interface.
The different sections in this chapter contain procedures on how to start
an Omega management session for each method. The chapter also
describes the Omega Main Menu and how to move through the
different menu selections.
22
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Starting a Local Omega Session Using the RS232 Port
This section contains the procedure for starting a local Omega session by
connecting a terminal to the RS232 port on the switch.
Note
If you are managing the switch in a TCP/IP environment and you are
configuring the IP parameters for the first time, you must access the
Omega program locally using this procedure and either manually
assign the switch an IP address and a subnet mask or activate the
dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP) option so that the
switch is automatically assigned an IP address from a DHCP or
BOOTP server.
To start a local Omega session, perform the following procedure:
1. Connect a terminal or PC to the RS232 port on the switch.
2. Configure the terminal or terminal emulation program as follows:
❑ Baud rate: 9600
❑ Data bits: 8
❑ Parity: None
❑ Stop bits: 1
❑ Flow control: None
Note
The default settings for the Omega’s terminal interface are for a DEC
VT100 or ANSI terminal, or an equivalent terminal emulation
program. Once you have started an Omega session, you can change
these values. For instructions, refer to the section Configuring the
RS232 Port on page 57.
3. Press the <Return> key.
4. If prompted for a password, enter the password for the Omega
interface. The default is no password. You can later configure a
password. For instructions, refer to Chapter 7, Configuring the
Omega Interface.
The Omega Main Menu is displayed. Refer to the next section for a
description of the menu.
23
Getting Started
Omega Main
Menu
Figure 1 illustrates the Omega Main Menu.
Allied Telesyn AT-9006SX/SC Ethernet Switch 2.0.1
Main Menu
Port status and configuration
Ethernet statistics
Administration
System configuration
Traffic/Port Mirroring
Virtual LANs/QoS
Bridging
MAC Address Table
Quit
Figure 1 Omega Main Menu from a Local Session
24
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Using the
Terminal
Interface
This section explains how to move around the menus using different
terminal interfaces.
If you are using a DEC VT100 or ANSI (the default) terminal configuration,
refer to the table below for instructions on how to move through and
select menu selections:
When directed to
You must
Select an option
Highlight the option by pressing the Up ( ↑ )
or Down ( ↓ ) arrow key; then press <Return>
or
Type the first character of the desired option
at the prompt and press <Return>.
If two or more options have matching initial
characters, type the initial characters until the
option you want is highlighted; then press
<Return>.
Enter information (for
example, the IP
address of a switch)
Type the information and press <Return>.
Return to the previous
screen
Select the “Return” option at the bottom of
the menu
or
Press <Esc>.
25
Getting Started
The table below shows you how to move through and select menu
selections if you are using a generic (dumb) terminal configuration:
When directed
You must
To select an option
Type the first character of the option you
want and then press <Return>.
If two or more options have matching initial
characters, type enough characters for
Omega to distinguish your choice from the
other options; then press <Return>. To
guide you, the characters you must type are
in uppercase.
For example:
Mirroring configuration
MAC Address Table
If options on a list are preceded by numbers
(1:, 2:, 3:, etc.) or letters (A:, B:, C:, etc.), type
the number or letter corresponding to your
choice at the prompt; then press <Return>.
To enter information
(for example, the IP
address of a switch)
Type the correct information at the prompt
and press <Return>.
To return to the
previous screen
Press <Return> after making an entry.
Activated options in menus are preceded with a > symbol. In the
following example, the first option is activated:
>
Enable this port
Disable this port
When you press <Return> to select a field in which you can enter a value,
the -> symbol is displayed. For example:
System name:
->
The -> symbol indicates that you can enter a new value for the
parameter or change the existing value. Once you have entered a value,
press <Return>. To delete an existing value to a parameter without
assigning a new value, type a space and press <Return>. Parameter
changes are activated on the switch immediately.
26
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Quitting from a
Local Session
To quit a local Omega session, select Quit from the Main Menu.
If you do not quit Omega from a local session, remote Telnet sessions to
the switch will be blocked.
27
Getting Started
Starting an Omega Session from a Web Browser
This section contains the procedure for starting an Omega session from
a web browser.
Note
You cannot use a web browser to manage an AT-9006 switch if the
switch is part of a non-TCP/IP network.
Before you can manage the switch in a TCP/IP environment with a web
browser, the switch must have an IP address and subnet mask. Initially,
these two parameters can only be set through the RS232 port on the
switch and a local Omega session. For instructions on establishing a local
management session, refer to Starting a Local Omega Session Using
the RS232 Port on page 23 for instructions.
To start an Omega session from a web browser, perform the following
procedure:
1. Start your web browser.
Note
If the PC with the browser is connected directly to the switch or is on
the same side of a firewall as the switch, you must configure your
browser’s network options not to use any proxies. Consult your web
browser’s documentation on how to configure the browser not to
use proxies.
2. Enter the IP address of the switch you want to manage in the URL field
of the browser, as shown in Figure 2:
Switch’s IP Address
Figure 2 Entering a Switch’s IP Address in the URL Field
28
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The window shown in Figure 3 is displayed.
Netscape Navigator’s Toolbar
Links to
Allied Telesyn
Internet Web Pages
Managed Switch
Main Menu Window
Figure 3 Initial Omega Window Display from a Web Browser
This window contains the following sections:
❑ Managed Switch
❑ Main Menu
❑ Web Links
29
Getting Started
Managed Switch
At the top of the window is a graphical imagge of the switch that you are
currently managing. (The display will not include any optional expansion
modules that might be installed in the unit.)
You can click on different areas of the image to display different Omega
windows. Clicking on a port displays the configuration window for that
port, which you use to set the port parameters. Clicking on the RS232
port displays the configuration window for the terminal port. Finally,
clicking on the switch chassis displays a window that lists the status of
the ports on the switch.
Omega Main
Menu Window
The Main Menu window contains the Omega menus. This window is
displayed in a reduced format when you first start an Omega session
from a web browser. To enlarge it, click on the window. Figure 4 is an
example of the Omega Main Menu.
Figure 4 Omega Main Menu from a Web Browser
30
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Selecting Menu Options and Changing Parameters
Activated options on the switch are preceded with a ! symbol. In the
following example, the first option is activated:
Figure 5 Active Menu Option
Options in which you can provide a value contain an entry field and the
two buttons Enter and Reset, as shown in the following example:
Figure 6 Entry Field
After entering a new value, click Enter or press <Return> to send the new
parameter setting to the switch. Changes to parameters are activated
immediately on the switch.
Clicking the Reset button queries the switch for the current parameter
setting and displays the setting in the entry field.
Web Links
The left portion of the window contains links that take you automatically
to relevant web pages at the Allied Telesyn web site.
The Online Manual link takes you to Allied Telesyn’s technical
communications web page, where you can download product
documentation in PDF format.
The Technical Support link takes you to Allied Telesyn’s Technical
Support web page, where you can learn about the company’s support
services.
The Send Email link allows you to submit feedback, questions, or any
other information to Allied Telesyn.
The What’s New? link takes you to a web page that describes Allied
Telesyn’s latest product offerings.
Browser Tools
You can use the browser tools to move around the Omega menus.
Selecting Back on your browser’s toolbar returns you to the previous
display. You can also use the browser’s bookmark feature on frequentlyused views to bypass the Omega menu hierarchies.
31
Getting Started
Quitting an
Omega Session
from a Web
Browser
32
To exit from a web-based Omega session, simply quit the browser. Once
you start an Omega session through a browser, the session remains
active even if you link to other sites. You can return to the Omega web
pages anytime as long as you do not quit the browser.
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Starting a Remote Omega Session with Telnet or an SNMP
Management Program
A switch can be managed with the Telnet program or with an SNMP
management program, such as HP Openview. This type of switch
management is referred to as remote management.
If the switch is in a TCP/IP environment, remote management is possible
only after the switch has been assigned an IP address and subnet mask.
Initially, this is accomplished by managing the switch locally through the
RS232 port.
Starting a Telnet management session involves specifying the IP address
of the switch with the Telnet utility. You then enter the Omega
password, if one has been assigned, after which the Omega main menu
is displayed. For instructions on using the Telnet utility, refer to the
documentation that came with the utility.
For non-IP environments, you can use MAC addresses to connect to
remote Allied Telesyn switches as long as there are no routers between
the two switches.
It is important to note that you can have only one Telnet session
operating at any one time. The session can be either inbound or
outbound. If you have an inbound session to Omega, you do not have
the option of starting a new session (outbound connection). Therefore, if
you are already using Telnet, the Omega menu selection Connect to a
remote system will not be available (described in detail in Connecting to
a Remote Switch on page 34). In addition, a local RS232 connection
blocks a Telnet session and vice versa.
If you are currently in a Telnet session, you must disconnect Telnet after
quitting Omega. Otherwise, future Telnet sessions to the switch will be
blocked. You can configure a timeout value so that the switch
automatically disconnects Telnet sessions after a period of inactivity.
Refer to Specifying a Timeout Value on page 134.
Note
For a description of the Omega main menu, refer to the section
Omega Main Menu on page 24.
If you intend to manage the switch from a management station using an
SNMP management program, you need to load the switch’s
Management Information Base (MIB) file onto the management station.
(The MIB file is available from the Allied Telesyn web site.) This requires
that you use a MIB compiler to compile the file. To load the MIB file onto
a management station, follow the instructions included with your MIB
compiler.
33
Getting Started
Connecting to a Remote Switch
If you are managing a switch locally (that is, through the RS232 port on
the switch), you can connect to another switch through the Omega
interface and so be able to manage the remote switch, without having
to end your local session. To connect to a remote switch from a local
session, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
The Administrator menu is displayed.
2. Select Connect to remote system.
3. Specify the remote switch to be managed using one of the following
methods:
❑ Switch IP address, in the format x.x.x.x
❑ Switch Ethernet (or MAC) address, in the format xxxxxx xxxxxx
The switch MAC address is printed above the RS232 management
port on the switch front panel.
Once the information is validated and the connection to the remote
switch is opened, you immediately get the remote switch Omega
Main Menu. You can then use the Omega program to configure the
remote switch and run diagnostics.
The only option not available on the remote switch is Connect to a
remote system from the Administration menu.
4. Select Quit from the Main Menu when you are finished managing the
remote switch.
After you have ended the session with the remote switch, your
Omega session with the local switch is reactivated.
Note
It is important that you select Quit after the Omega session.
Otherwise, you might block other sessions or software downloads
via the network to the remote switch.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Menu Tree
Table 1 lists the menu options in the Omega interface.
Table 1 Omega Menu Selections
Main Menu
Selection
Menu Selection
Page
Function
66, 68
Displays and configures the parameter
settings for the ports on the switch.
Transmit statistics
125
Displays statistics on the number of
frames transmitted by a port or the
switch.
Individual port
overview
122,
125
Displays the received and transmitted
frame statistics for a specific port.
RMON statistics
127
Displays RMON statistics for the entire
switch.
Port RMON statistics
128
Displays RMON statistics by port.
Zero all statistic
counters on the entire
system
129
Returns the statistic counters in a switch
to 0 (zero).
Update software in
another system
140
Downloads the switch software from one
switch to another switch.
Broadcast updated
software to all systems
141
Downloads the switch software from one
switch to all the other switches in the
network.
XModem software
update to this system
138
Downloads the AT-S26 software onto the
switch using XModem. Only available via a
local session.
Connect to a remote
system
34
Enables you to connect to and manage
another switch while running a local
management session on a switch. Only
available via a local session.
Ping a remote system
62
Tests the connectivity to another network
node.
Port Status And Configuration
Port number
Ethernet Statistics
Administration
35
Getting Started
Table 1 Omega Menu Selections (Continued)
Main Menu
Selection
Menu Selection
Page
Function
Activity monitor
61
Displays the activity monitor for the
switch.
Diagnostics
59
Performs a series of diagnostic tests on
the switch.
Reset and restart the
system
55
Resets the switch.
System name
54
Assigns a name to a switch.
Default aging time
85
Sets the aging time for the MAC address
table.
Omega Options
132,
134,
135
Configures the Omega security features,
such as the Omega password and the
timeout value.
IP Parameters
42
Configures the IP parameters for the
switch, such as the IP address, subnet
mask, and gateway address.
Security / source
address table
76
Sets port security.
Terminal configuration
57
Adjusts the settings for the RS232
management port.
System switch
configuration
52, 71
Enables and disables IGMP snooping on
the switch. Also creates port trunks.
Enable
74
Enables port mirroring on the switch.
Disable
75
Disables port mirroring on the switch.
102,
108,
108,
111
Displays a list of the VLANs existing on a
switch. Also creates and deletes virtual
LANs.
System Configuration
Traffic/Port Mirroring
Virtual LANs/QoS
Virtual LAN definitions
36
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Table 1 Omega Menu Selections (Continued)
Main Menu
Selection
Menu Selection
Page
Function
Port to VLAN
configuration
106,
109,
112
Changes an untagged port’s VID (PVID)
number to match the VLAN ID (VID)
number.
Assign port priority
116
Assigns a port priority to a port on a
switch, which can override the tag priority
in a frame.
Priority Weight
configuration
118
Select the priority weight mode for the
switch.
Assign Management
Port to VLAN
115
Assigns the CPU Management Port to a
VLAN.
Spanning tree
parameters
50
Configures the spanning tree parameters
for a switch.
Port spanning tree
configuration
48
Configures the spanning tree parameters
for the individual ports on a switch.
Show all MAC
addresses
82
Displays all the MAC addresses learned by
the ports on a switch.
By port MAC addresses
83
Displays the MAC addresses learned on a
particular port on a switch.
Get port from MAC
address
84
Displays the port number on which a
specific MAC address was learned.
Clear dynamic MAC
addresses
85
Clears all learned MAC addresses from the
MAC address table.
All static MAC
addresses
86
Displays all the entries in the static MAC
address table of a switch.
Per port static MAC
address
87, 88
Adds and deletes addresses from the
static MAC address table.
Multicast addresses
90, 92,
92
Displays the multicast addresses of a
switch. Also creates and deletes multicast
addresses.
Bridging
MAC Address Table
37
Getting Started
Table 1 Omega Menu Selections (Continued)
Main Menu
Selection
Menu Selection
Page
Function
Clear static MAC table
89
Clears all entries from the static MAC
address table of a switch.
The Figure 7 show the menu selection arrangement.
Port status and
configuration
Port number
Receive Statistics
Graph (web
Omega only)
Enable this port
Disable (partition)
this port
Administration
Ethernet Statistics
Receive Statistics
Graph
(all ports)
Update Software in
another system
Individual port
overview . . .
Broadcast updated
Software to
all systems
Zero all statistics
counters on the
entire system
Transmitted frames
statistics
Auto negotiate
Full duplex
Half duplex
Individual port
overview
Backpressure
No backpressure
Zero all statistics
counters on the
entire system
Flow control
No flow control
System
Configuration
Omega Options
IP parameters
Connect to a
remote system
Terminal
configuration
Diagnostics
System switch
configuration
RMON Statistics
Reset and restart
the System
Port RMON Statistics
Global configuration
Zero all statistics
counters on
entire system
Figure 7 Omega Main Menu Tree
38
Security / source
address table
Activity monitor
Zero all statistics
counters on
entire system
Port name
Default
aging time
Xmodem
Ping a remote
system
Discard broadcast
packets
System name
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Traffic/Port Mirroring
Enable/Disable
port mirroring
Virtual LANs/QoS
Virtual LAN
definitions
Port to VLAN
configuration
Bridging
MAC Address
Table
Spanning tree
parameters
Show all MAC
addresses
Port spanning
tree configuration
By port MAC
addresses
Enable spanning
tree by port
Assign port
priority
Enable spanning
tree for all ports
Priority weight
configuration
Assign Management
Port to VLAN
Disable spanning
tree for all ports
Get port from
MAC address
Clear dynamic
MAC address
All static MAC
address
Per port static
MAC addresses
Multicast
addresses
Clear static MAC
table
Figure 7 Omega Main Menu Tree (continued)
39
Chapter 2
Managing a Switch
This chapter contains the following procedures:
❑ Configuring the Switch IP Parameters on page 42
❑ Configuring the Spanning Tree Protocol on page 47
❑ Enabling or Disabling IGMP Snooping on page 52
❑ Naming a Switch on page 54
❑ Resetting a Switch on page 55
❑ Reassigning the Default Settings for the Switch on page 56
❑ Configuring the RS232 Port on page 57
❑ Running Diagnostics on page 59
❑ Displaying the Activity Monitor on page 61
❑ Pinging a Device on page 62
41
Managing a Switch
Configuring the Switch IP Parameters
If the AT-9006 Series Switch is in a TCP/IP network and you want to
manage the switch remotely, such as with a Telnet utility or a web
browser, you must assign the switch a set of IP parameters, such as a
unique IP address and a subnet mask. You can assign these parameters
either one of two ways:
❑ Manually using the Omega interface
❑ Automatically using a BootP or DHCP server.
If you have a BootP or DHCP server on your network, the switch can
automatically obtain its IP parameters from the server during startups. In
this case, you simply connect the switch to the network. The function of
the BootP or DHCP utility within an IP server is to provide IP parameters,
including an IP address, to the switch. Whenever you reset or power
cycle the switch, the switch transmits a request packet to the server
every three seconds to obtain the required IP parameters.
The switch makes three request attempts. If the requesting switch does
not receive a BootP or DHCP response after the third request, it will
operate with a computed pseudo IP address based on the switch’s MAC
address.
If the switch receives a response from the BootP or DHCP server, the
switch extracts the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway/router address
and uses these parameters to configure itself until the next power-on or
reset. Additionally, if the BootP response packet specifies a filename and
a server address, then the switch sends a request to the server using the
specified filename. This initiates a download of the operating software
and allows you to maintain the downloaded software on your server.
42
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Setting IP
Parameters
To set the IP parameters for the switch using the Omega management
interface, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu shown in Figure 8 is displayed.
System Configuration Menu
System name
Null (not configured)
Default Aging Time
300
Omega Options
IP parameters
Security / Source Address Table
Terminal configuration
System Switch configurations
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 8 System Configuration Menu
2. Select IP Parameters.
The IP Parameters window shown in Figure 9 is displayed.
IP address:
Subnet mask:
Gateway address:
Domain Name Server:
Default Domain Name:
Manager address:
Manager address:
Manager address:
Manager address:
DHCP configuration:
Download Password:
Config Download Password:
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Null (not
Null (not
Null (not
Null (not
Null (not
Null (not
Null (not
Get community string:
Set community string:
Trap community string:
Location:
Contact:
public
private
public
Null (not configured)
Null (not configured)
configured)
configured)
configured)
configured)
configured)
configured)
configured)
*****
******
Return to System Configuration Menu ...
Figure 9 IP Parameters Window
43
Managing a Switch
3. Enter or change the parameters in the window as desired. Changes to
the parameters are activated immediately on the switch.
Note
If you are configuring the switch for the first time and the switch is
in a TCP/IP network, you must assign the switch an IP address and
subnet mask. These are the minimum parameters that you must
specify for a newly installed Ethernet switch in a TCP/IP network if
you intend to manage the switch using Telnet or a web browser.
You can either assign these IP parameters manually or you can
activate the DHCP option so that the switch obtains its IP
configuration automatically from a DHCP or BootP server.
The parameters in the IP Parameters window are described below:
IP address
This parameter specifies the IP address of the switch.
Subnet mask
This parameter specifies the subnet mask for the switch.
Gateway address
This is the default router IP address. This address is required if you
intend to manage the switch from a management station separated
from the switch by a router.
Domain name server (DNS)
This is the DNS IP address. This address is required if you are using this
service.
Default domain name
This is the domain name to which the switch belongs. This is
recommended if you are using DNS services.
Manager address
You can enter up to four IP addresses of network management
stations that will receive SNMP traps from the switch. The addresses
are optional.
44
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
DHCP Configuration
You can use this selection to configure the switch to obtain its IP
address from a DHCP server. When you select this option, the
prompts in Figure 10 are displayed.
>
Enable DHCP function
Disable DHCP function
(This setting will be effective after rebooting
system.)
Return to IP Parameters Window ...
Figure 10 DHCP Selections
If you select Enable DHCP function, the switch will obtain its IP address
from a DHCP server on the network. If you select Disable DHCP
function, you must assign the IP address manually. The default for this
setting is disabled.
A change to the DHCP setting does not take affect on the switch until
the unit is reset.
Download password
This password is required when downloading AT-S26 image files from
one AT-9006 switch to another switch. The default password is
ATS26, displayed as a series of asterisks. You can keep the default or
change it. A switch can only accept software downloads from another
switch of the same product series and if their download passwords
are the same. The software automatically searches for this password
during downloads without requiring you to enter it.
This password is also used as the destination filename when you are
using TFTP to update the AT-S26 firmware. For instructions on how to
download the firmware onto a switch, refer to Chapter 8, Upgrading
Switch Software and Configuration Files.
Note
This password is different from the Omega password. The Omega
password prevents unauthorized individuals from using the Omega
interface to change switch configuration settings. For instructions
on setting the Omega password, refer to Chapter 7, Configuring
the Omega Interface.
45
Managing a Switch
Config download password
This password is used when downloading configuration files from
one AT-9006 switch to another switch. The default password is config
(all lowercase). The Omega interface displays the password as a series
of asterisks.
For instructions on how to download a configuration file onto a
switch, refer to Chapter 8, Upgrading Switch Software and
Configuration Files.
SNMP Community strings
The following default community strings are provided:
Get - public
Set - private
Trap - public
Location
You can enter a text string to indicate the physical location of the
switch, (for example, First Floor, Lab.)
Contact
You can enter a text string to indicate the name, phone number, and
other information to help identify the person responsible for
managing the switch.
4. After you have adjusted the parameters, return to the Main Menu.
46
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Configuring the Spanning Tree Protocol
The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) prevents data loops when multiple or
redundant paths exist in extended LANs.
Each switch or bridge in a spanning tree domain will:
❑ Determine the best single route to a destination device.
❑ Update other bridges with topology information by periodically
sending Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs).
Once the STP parameters have been configured, bridges can make a
determination on the best single path to a destination within a given
LAN. A formula determines the amount of time it takes for the topology
to reconfigure, depending upon the spanning tree values you use. Refer
to the IEEE specification for details.
Most users generally keep the default STP parameters to allow bridges to
reconfigure themselves automatically if the topology changes or if
bridges become disabled.
For a brief overview of STP, go to Appendix B, Spanning Tree
Concepts.
Caution
STP on a switch is disabled by default. If you enable STP, the switch
provides default STP parameters that are adequate for most
networks. Changing them without prior experience and an
understanding of how STP works might have a negative effect on
your network.
47
Managing a Switch
Activating or
Deactivating STP
and Configuring
the Port
Parameters
The Omega program allows you activate and deactivate STP on a per
port basis. You can also adjust the STP parameters for each port. To
configure the protocol parameters for the individual ports on a switch,
perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Bridging.
The Bridging menu shown in Figure 11 is displayed.
Bridge Menu
Spanning tree parameters
Port spanning tree configuration
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 11 Bridging Menu
2. Select Port spanning tree configuration.
The Port Parameters for the Spanning Tree Protocol window shown in
Figure 12 is displayed. The window lists the ports on the switch and
the current STP parameter settings for the ports.
Port
Priority
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
-------
Cost
-------
Enable Spanning Tree for All Ports
Disable Spanning Tree for All Ports
Return to Bridge Menu ...
Figure 12 Port Parameters for the Spanning Tree Protocol
3. To enable or disable STP for all the ports on the switch, select either
Enable Spanning Tree for all Ports or Disable Spanning Tree for all Ports.
If you enable STP on the ports, the Omega interface sets each port to
the default values of 128 for the port priority and 1 for the port cost.
4. To enable or disable STP for a particular port, select the port.
48
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The STP Port Parameters window in Figure 13 is displayed.
Bridge Menu
Port 1
Enable Spanning Tree
> Disable Spanning tree
Return to Previous menu...
Figure 13 STP Port Parameters Window
If STP is already activated on the port, the port’s STP parameters are
also displayed, as shown in Figure 14.
Bridge Menu
Port 1
> Enable Spanning Tree
Disable Spanning Tree
Priority:
Cost:
128
1
Return to Previous menu...
Figure 14 Setting STP Port Parameters Window
5. To enable STP on the port, select Enable Spanning Tree. To disable STP
on the port, select Disable Spanning Tree.
6. Change the priority and port cost parameters for the ports as desired.
The options are described below.
Priority
The parameter is used as a tie breaker when two or more ports are
determined to have equal cost to the root bridge. The range is 0-255
and the default value is 128.
Cost
The spanning tree algorithm uses the cost parameter to decide which
port provides the lowest cost path to the root bridge for that LAN.
Higher port costs are associated with ports of lower bandwidth, and
vice versa. The range is 1 to 65535. The default values are 1 for a 1
Gbps port, 10 for a 100 Mbps port, and 100 for a 10 Mbps port.
7. After you have adjusted the settings, return to the Main Menu.
49
Managing a Switch
Configuring STP
Parameters
To configure the STP parameters for the switch, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Bridging.
The Bridging menu in Figure 11 on page 48 is displayed.
2. Select Spanning tree parameters.
The Spanning Tree Parameters window in Figure 15 is displayed.
Bridge Configuration Menu
Bridge Identifier (MAC Address : Priority)
Root Bridge Identifier (MAC Address : Priority)
Cost to the Root
Port closest to the Root
Max Age
Forwarding Delay
Bridge Priority
Max age time:
Hello time:
Forwarding delay:
Spanning Tree not enabled)
Spanning Tree not enabled)
(Spanning Tree not enabled)
(Spanning Tree not enabled)
(Spanning Tree not enabled)
(Spanning Tree not enabled)
32768
20
2
15
Return to Bridge Menu ...
Figure 15 Spanning Tree Parameters Window
3. Adjust the settings as desired. The options are described below.
Bridge Priority
This parameter can be from 0 (zero) to 65535, with 0 being the highest
priority. The 2-byte bridge priority number is concatenated to the
bridge’s 6-byte MAC address. Bridges use this number to determine
the root bridge for a loop-free implementation. If bridges happen to
have equal priority values, the bridge with the numerically lowest
MAC address becomes the root bridge. When the root bridge
malfunctions, the bridge with the next priority number (or the next
lowest MAC address) automatically takes over as the root bridge.
Max Age Time
The aging time can be from 6 to 40 seconds. The default is 20 seconds.
All bridges in a bridged LAN use this aging time to test the age of
stored configuration messages called bridge protocol data units
(BPDUs). For example, if you use the default 20, all bridges delete
current configuration messages after 20 seconds.
The aging time for BPDUs is different from the aging time used by the
MAC address table.
50
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Hello Time
Hello time can be from 1 to 10 seconds, with 2 seconds as the default.
Bridges use this parameter to determine the time interval between
generating and sending configuration messages.
Forwarding Delay
The default is 15 seconds. The time indicates the waiting period
before a bridge changes to a new state, for example, becomes the
new root bridge after the topology changes. If the bridge transitions
too soon, not all links may have yet adapted to the change; therefore,
loops may result.
Caution
You should consult the IEEE 802.1d standard before changing the
Max Age Time, the Hello Time, and the Forwarding Delay
parameters.
4. After you have adjusted the settings, return to the Main Menu.
51
Managing a Switch
Enabling or Disabling IGMP Snooping
The Ethernet switch supports the Internet Group Management Protocol
(IGMP) snooping feature to take advantage of performance
improvements provided by IP multicasting. Allied Telesyn AT-S26
implementation supports IGMP Version 1.
Through the IGMP snooping feature, the switch obtains information
about multicast groups by looking at IGMP packets sent from hosts and
routers, and also by looking at Distance Vector Multicast Routing
Protocol (DVMRP) packets. IGMP packets provide information about
nodes joining multicast groups, while DVMRP packets provide
information about delivery paths. With this information, the switch
builds membership groups of ports for each IP multicast address.
To enable or disable IGMP snooping, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System configuration.
The System Configuration menu shown in Figure 8 on page 43 is
displayed.
2. From the System Configuration menu, select System switch
configuration.
The System Switch Configuration menu in is displayed.
System Switch Configuration Menu
IGMP Snooping configuration
Port Trunking in the 10/100M Speed Port
Return to System Configuration Menu...
Figure 16 Switch Configuration Menu
Note
The menu selection Port Trunking in the 10/100M Speed Port is
available only if the switch contains an expansion module that has
multiple 100 Mbps or 10/100 Mbps ports. For information on port
trunking, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the Ports.
52
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
3. From the System Configuration window, select IGMP Snooping
Configuration.
The IGMP Configuration menu in Figure 17 is displayed.
IGMP Snooping Configuration Menu
IGMP Snooping
> No IGMP Snooping
IGMP Snooping Aging Time (Minutes): 5
Return to System Switch Configuration Menu...
Figure 17 IGMP Configuration Menu
4. Select IGMP snooping to activate the option or No IGMP snooping to
deactivate IGMP snooping.
5. If desired, you can change the IGMP snooping aging time by selecting
the IGMP Snooping Aging Time parameter. This value, which is
specified in minutes, determines the permitted intervals between
report messages from the multicast clients.
6. Return to the Main Menu.
53
Managing a Switch
Naming a Switch
This procedure assigns a name to the switch. The name is displayed in all
Omega windows when you manage the switch. This can make it easier
for you to identify the switches in your network when you configure and
monitor them with Omega.
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu shown in Figure 8 on page 43 is
displayed.
2. In the System name entry field, enter a unique name of up to 20
characters.
The switch name must be unique within the subnet.
If the switch already has a name that you want to delete without
entering a new name, delete the existing name and enter a space
character.
Note
If you are running Omega from a web browser, select the System
name menu option and enter the name in the prompt.
3. Return to the Main Menu.
The new name is displayed at the top of every Omega screen.
54
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Resetting a Switch
This procedure explains how to reset a switch using the Omega
interface. You might need to reset the switch to resolve an error
condition or after you have made a configuration change to the switch
that requires resetting the device to activate the change.
You can also reset a switch by pressing the Reset button, located on the
front panel of the switch, with a small pointed object, such as a ballpoint
pen. You can also reset the switch by unplugging the switch’s power
cord from the power source and plugging it back in.
To reset a switch using the Omega interface, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
The Administration menu in Figure 18 displays.
Administration Menu
Update software in another system
Broadcast updated software to all systems
XModem software update to this system
Connect to a remote system
Ping a remote system
Activity monitor
Diagnostics
Reset and restart the system
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 18 Administration menu
Note
The menu selections XModem software update to this system and
Connect to a remote system in the Administration menu are available
only from a local Omega session.
2. Select Reset and restart the system.
A prompt is displayed asking you to confirm the command.
3. Select Yes to reset the switch or No to cancel the command.
The switch will reset itself. The switch runs a series of self-tests that
take approximately 30 seconds to complete. During the tests, the
Fault LED on the front of the switches flashes. Once the tests are
completed, the Fault LED will remain OFF.
55
Managing a Switch
Reassigning the Default Settings for the Switch
This procedure explains how to reset the switch settings to the factory
default settings, listed in Appendix A. This procedure can only be
performed locally through the RS232 port on the switch.
Warning
This procedure should be performed with caution. Resetting a
switch to its default settings deletes all existing settings, including
the IP address of the switch and the port settings. Any defined
VLANs also are deleted, and all ports are returned to the Default
VLAN.
To reset the switch settings to the factory default settings, perform the
following procedure:
1. Attach a terminal to the RS232 port on the front panel of the switch
and begin the terminal emulation program.
2. Press the Reset button on the switch.
3. Immediately press any key when you see the following prompt:
Hit any key to run diagnostics or to reload
system software.
A menu displays.
4. Select D from the menu. The following warning message displays:
WARNING: This will erase all current
configuration data!
Continue? Y/N
5. Type Y for yes.
The system displays the following prompt:
All configuration data has been reset to factory
default values.
6. Type B to boot the switch software.
The switch performs a series of diagnostic self-test. The Fault LED on
the front panel of the switch flashes during the self-tests. After the
switch has completed its self-test, reinitialized the management
software, and rebooted, you must reassign an IP address to the switch
if the device is in TCP/IP network.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Configuring the RS232 Port
The default settings for the RS232 port on the front panel of the Ethernet
switch are as follows:
❑ Baud rate: 9600
❑ Data bits: 8
❑ Parity: None
❑ Stop bits: 1
❑ Flow control: None
To change the settings for the RS232 port, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu in Figure 8 on page 43 is displayed.
2. From the System Configuration menu, select Terminal Configuration.
The Terminal Configuration window in Figure 19 is displayed.
Terminal Configuration Menu
> VT100-compatible / ANSI
Generic “dumb” terminal
> 8 data bits
7 data bits
> 1 stop bit
2 stop bits
> No parity
Odd parity
Even parity
> Full duplex (echo)
Half duplex (no echo)
Data rate (“baud” rate) ...
Return to System Configuration Menu ...
Figure 19 Terminal Configuration Window
57
Managing a Switch
If you are running the Omega session from a web browser, you can
display the Terminal Configuration window by clicking on the RS232
port in the graphical display of the switch.
3. Adjust the settings as desired. The parameters are described below.
8 data bits
7 data bits
The default is 8 data bits.
1 stop bit
2 stop bits
The default is 1 stop bit.
No parity
Odd parity
Even parity
The default is no parity.
Full-duplex (echo)
Half-duplex (no echo)
These two selections control the duplex mode of the port. The port
can operate in full-duplex mode, meaning it can send and receive
data simultaneously, or half-duplex mode, meaning the port can
either send or receive data, but not both at the same time. The default
is full-duplex.
Data rate (“baud” rate)
This selection allows you to specify the speed of the port. When you
select this option, the Omega program displays a list of possible baud
rates. Possible baud rates are:
❑ 19200 bps
❑ 9600 bps (recommended setting for fixed baud rate)
❑ 4800 bps
❑ 2400 bps
❑ 1200 bps
❑ 600 bps
❑ 300 bps
❑ 150 bps
❑ 75 bps
❑ Automatic baud rate detection.
The default is Automatic baud rate detection.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Running Diagnostics
The Omega interface has an option for running diagnostic self-tests on
the switch. The program reports on the operating status of the following
switch components:
❑ Flash PROM
❑ RAM
❑ Serial interface
❑ Main power supply
❑ Redundant power supply
❑ Redundant power supply, if installed
❑ Operating temperature
The tests also display the following information:
❑ AT-S26 version number
❑ Switch MAC address
❑ Running time
Note
Running the diagnostic tests will not disrupt the network operations
of the switch.
To run the self-diagnostics program on the switch, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
2. From the Administration menu, select Diagnostics.
59
Managing a Switch
The tests take only a second or two to complete. The results are
displayed in the Diagnostics window. Figure 20 is an example of the
window.
Allied Telesyn AT-9006SX/SC Ethernet Switch
MAC Address 00A0D2 2A0000, Uplink A: Not present, Uplink B: Not present
AT-S26 Ethernet Switch Software: Version 2.0.1 000413
Running 15 minutes, 8 seconds
Diagnostic Results:
Flash PROM
RAM
Serial Interface
System 3.3V power:
System 5V power:
System 12V power:
Redundant Power Supply
Fan #1
Fan #2
Temperature (Celsius):
Good
Good
Good
3.3 V
4.9 V
12.1V
Is not present
3901 RPM
3994 RPM
28 C
Hit any key to continue ... _
Figure 20 Sample Diagnostics Window
The Flash PROM, RAM, and Serial Interface test results are given as
Good or Failed.
3. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Displaying the Activity Monitor
The Activity Monitor is useful in troubleshooting or in monitoring switch
activity. To display the Activity Monitor, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
2. From the Administration menu, select Activity monitor.
The Activity Monitor for the switch displays. The example shown in
Figure 21 shows the results of a ping command.
Activity Monitor
Pinging: [Host 149.35.17.164, delay 1.000]
Ping 149.35.17.164 #1 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
Ping 149.35.17.164 #2 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
Ping 149.35.17.164 #3 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
.
.
.
[Finished]
(hit Return to resume the previous menu)
Figure 21 Activity Monitor
3. Return to the Main Menu.
61
Managing a Switch
Pinging a Device
The ping command allows you to test if an end system can be reached
by sending it an Internet control message protocol (ICMP) echo request.
If the system is connected to the network and operating, it sends a reply
to the requesting system.
To ping another device, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
2. From the Administration menu, select Ping a remote system.
The Ping window in Figure 22 displays.
Please enter station to ping:
The system may be identified by name (‘name’),
by IP address (128.2.3.4), or by Ethernet address (0000F4 123456).
Note: Ping will repeat until a key is hit
->
Figure 22 Ping Window
3. Specify the device to ping using one of the following methods:
❑ By its IP address, in the format x.x.x.x
❑ By its Ethernet (or MAC) address, in the format xxxxxx xxxxxx
The switch MAC address is printed above the switch RS232
management port on the front panel.
The activity monitor reports the results of the ping command. Figure
23 is an example.
Activity Monitor
Pinging: [Host 149.35.17.164, delay 1.000]
Ping 149.35.17.164 #1 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
Ping 149.35.17.164 #2 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
Ping 149.35.17.164 #3 ok, RTT 0.000 seconds
.
.
.
[Finished]
(hit Return to resume the previous menu)
Figure 23 Ping Results Example
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Performing a ping command from a web-based Omega session stops
after a set number of ping attempts. Performing a ping command
from a local or remote Omega session continues until you stop it.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
63
Chapter 3
Configuring the Ports
The procedures in this chapter allow you to view and change the
parameter settings for the individual ports on a switch. This chapter also
describes port trunking, port mirroring, and port security.
This chapter contains the following procedures:
❑ Displaying Port Status on page 66
❑ Configuring Port Parameters on page 68
❑ Creating a Port Trunk on page 71
❑ Configuring Port Mirroring on page 74
❑ Configuring Port Security on page 76
65
Configuring the Ports
Displaying Port Status
The Port Status window displays the current operating status of all the
ports on the switch, including the ports on any expansion modules, if
installed. The window allows you to quickly ascertain the operating
status of the ports by displaying a variety of information, such as
whether a link exists between the ports and the end nodes, and whether
any of the ports have been manually disabled.
To display the status of the ports on a switch, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Port Status and Configuration.
The Port Status window in Figure 24 is displayed.
Port Status Menu
Port
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
Link
Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
Online
1000M
1000M
1000M
1000M
1000M
1000M
Status
Mode
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
negotiate
negotiate
negotiate
negotiate
negotiate
negotiate
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 24 Port Status Window
The Port Status window contains the following information:
Port
This column displays the number and name of each port, if you have
assigned names. You can assign names to the ports to make them
easier to identify. For instructions on assigning port names, refer to
the section Configuring Port Parameters on page 68.
The standard six ports that come with the AT-9006 switch are
numbered 1 through 6. The numbering for ports on any expansion
modules start with 7. For example, if both slots contained an
expansion module, each with one port, the port on the expansion
module in slot A would be port 7 and the port on the expansion
module in expansion slot B would be port 8.
Link
This column indicates whether there is an active connection between
a port and the device connected to the port. Offline indicates that
there is no link, while Online indicates that there is a link. If a port is
online, this column will also specify the operating speed of the port.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Status
This column indicates whether a port is enabled or disabled. For
instructions on how to manually disable or enable a port, refer to the
section Configuring Port Parameters on page 68.
Mode
This column indicates the duplex mode of the ports. Possible values
are auto-negotiate, full-duplex, or half-duplex. For instructions on
how to manually set the duplex mode of a port, refer to the section
Configuring Port Parameters on page 68.
2. Return to the Main Menu.
67
Configuring the Ports
Configuring Port Parameters
This section contains the procedure for configuring the parameters for
the individual ports on a switch. Port parameters that you can change
include duplex mode, flow control, back pressure, and port speed.
To view and configure the parameter settings for the ports, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Port Status and Configuration.
The Port Status window in Figure 24 on page 66 is displayed.
2. Select the port to be configured.
The Port Configuration window in Figure 25 is displayed.
Port Configuration Menu
Port 1
> Enable this port
Disable (partition) this port
> Auto negotiate
Full duplex
Half duplex
Backpressure enabled (Half Duplex)
> No backpressure
Flow control (Full Duplex)
> No flow control
Global config
Discard broadcast packets
> Regular forwarding of broadcasts
Port name
Return to Port Status Menu ...
Figure 25 Port Configuration Window
If you are running the Omega interface from a web browser, you can
display this window by clicking on a port in the graphical switch
image.
3. Adjust the options as desired.
Any changes to the port settings are activated immediately on the
port. The options are described below.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Receive Statistics Graph
This option displays performance statistics for the port, specifically
the number and types of frames and errors that have occurred on the
port. For further information on port statistics, refer to Chapter 6,
Displaying Ethernet Statistics.
This option is not available from a Telnet or local session.
Enable this port
Disable (partition) this port
These selections allow you to manually disable a port in the switch so
that it no longer receives or sends packets. You might want to disable
a port and prevent packets from being forwarded if a problem occurs
with the node or cable connected to the port. Once the problem has
been fixed, you can enable the port again to resume normal
operation. You can also disable an unused port to secure it from
unauthorized connections. Enable is the default for all ports.
Auto-negotiate
Full-duplex
Half-duplex
These three selections control the duplex mode of the port. Fullduplex means that the port can both send and receive data
simultaneously. You can select this setting for a port if you know that
the device connected to the port supports full-duplex.
Half-duplex means the port can send or receive data, but not both at
the same time. Use this setting if you know that the device connected
to the port supports half-duplex mode.
Auto-negotiate means that the port negotiates with the connected
device to automatically configure to the highest common setting.
This setting eliminates the need to reconfigure the port if you change
the type of device connected to the port. Both end devices need to be
auto-negotiation compliant (802.3u) for the best possible
performance settings. If a connected device is not compliant, it
should only be configured for half-duplex. Auto-negotiate is the
default for all ports.
69
Configuring the Ports
Backpressure enabled (half-duplex)
No backpressure
Backpressure applies only to ports operating in half-duplex mode.
Backpressure is useful when the port input buffer is running low on
memory resources. In the switch, outbound packets are traversing a
single uplink port. When a switch detects that a port input buffer is
nearly full, it simulates a collision so that the sending node will defer
transmission. The sending node will retry transmissions according to
the Ethernet back-off algorithm. Once switch resources are available
again, the switch stops sending the collision signal and the sending
nodes can freely transmit packets.
Flow control (full-duplex)
No flow control
Flow control applies only to ports operating in full-duplex mode. It
works for full duplex ports the same way as backpressure does for
half-duplex ports except that the switch uses a special pause packet
instead of a jam signal. The pause packet notifies the other node to
stop transmitting for a specified period of time.
Global configuration
This option saves you from having to enter the same configurations
on every port. If you select this option, any settings you entered on a
port are copied to all the station ports on the switch (but not ports on
any optional expansion modules).
Discard broadcast packets
Regular forwarding of broadcasts
With this option, you can decide whether the switch forwards
broadcast packets or not.
Port name
The port name field is used to assign a name to the port. Naming ports
can make it easier for you to identify the various ports. A name can
have up to 20 characters. An example is Sales - cube 223.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Creating a Port Trunk
If your Gigabit Switch contains an expansion module that has multiple
100 Mbps or 10/100 Mbps ports, you can create a port trunk. A port trunk
is an economical way for you to increase the bandwidth between the
switch and another network device, such as a server, router, workstation,
or another switch. A port trunk is two or more data ports that have been
grouped together to increase the bandwidth between the switch and a
network node by functioning as one logical path. This increase in
bandwidth can prove useful in situations where a single connection
between the switch and a node is insufficient to handle the traffic load.
Despite the software configuration and physical connections, there are
no data loops in a port trunk. The port trunk always sends packets from a
particular source to a particular destination over the same link within the
trunk. A single link is designated for flooding broadcasts and packets of
unknown destination.
Note
Port trunking is only supported on expansion modules that feature
multiple 100 Mbps or 10/100 Mbps ports, such as the AT-A18
module. Port trunking is not supported on the six 1000 Mbps ports
on the base unit of the AT-9006SX/SC or AT-9006LX/SC Gigabit
Switches or the six 100/1000 Mbps ports on the base unit of the
AT-9006T Gigabit Switch.
Guidelines
When creating a port trunk, be sure to observe the following guidelines:
Guideline 1: Selecting the Number of Ports in a Trunk
A port trunk must consist of 2 or 4 ports.
Guideline 2: Using Ports from the Same Expansion Module
The ports selected to be a port trunk must be from the same expansion
module in the switch.
Guideline 3: Using Consecutive Ports
The ports of a trunk must be consecutive. For example, you could use
ports 7 and 8 as a port trunk because the ports are consecutive.
Guideline 4: Creating Only One Trunk Per Expansion Module
Each expansion module can support only one trunk.
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Configuring the Ports
Guideline 5: Maintaining Cabling Sequence Based on Port Number
When cabling a trunk, it is important that the order of the connections
be identical on both nodes. The lowest numbered port in a trunk on one
device must be connected to the lowest numbered port of the trunk on
the other device, the next lowest numbered port must be connected to
the next lowest numbered port on the other device, and so on.
Guideline 6: Configuring the Port Parameters of a Port Trunk
The ports in a trunk automatically assume the same configuration (such
as VLAN membership) as the configuration of the lowest numbered port.
For example, if you create a trunk consisting of ports 7 and 8, port 7 is
the master port and its configuration is propagated to port 8. As long as
the ports are configured as a trunk, you must not change any of the
attributes of any ports that might conflict with the settings of the master
port.
Creating a Port
Trunk
This section contains the procedure for creating a port trunk.
Caution
Do not connect the cables to the port trunk on the switch until after
you have created the port trunk. Connecting the cables prior to
creating the trunk will result in data loops in your network topology.
To create a port trunk, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System configuration.
The System Configuration menu in Figure 8 on page 43 is displayed.
2. Select System switch configuration.
The System switch configuration menu in Figure 16 on page 52 is
displayed.
3. Select Port Trunking in the 10/100M Speed Port.
4. Specify the ports that will be the port trunk and press <Return>. You
can use either of the following formats to enter the port numbers:
Single, consecutive ports (for example, 7,8)
Range of ports (for example, 7-10)
5. Return to the Main Menu.
6. To confirm the creation of a port trunk, select Port status and
configuration from the Omega main menu to display a list of ports. All
of the ports in a port trunk are automatically assigned the name
“Trunk” along with a number to help identify the port trunk.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
7. Return to the Main Menu.
8. Connect the port trunks on the switch to the end device, being sure
to follow the guidelines discussed earlier in this chapter.
Deleting a Port
Trunk
To delete a port trunk, perform the following procedure.
1. Disconnect the cables from the port trunk on the switch.
Caution
Disconnect the cables from the port trunk on the switch before you
delete the port trunk. Deleting the trunk before you have
disconnected the cables will create data loops in your network.
2. From the Omega Main Menu, select System configuration.
The System Configuration menu is displayed.
3. Select System switch configuration.
The System switch configuration menu in Figure 16 on page 51 is
displayed.
4. Select Port Trunking in the 10/100M Speed Port.
5. Do one of the following:
Web-based Omega session: Delete the port numbers and select Enter
or press <Return>.
Local Omega session: Enter a space in place of the port numbers and
press Enter.
The port trunk is now deleted.
6. Return to the Main Menu.
7. To confirm the deletion of a port trunk, select Port status and
configuration from the Omega main menu to display a list of ports.
The label “Trunk” should no longer appear next to the ports of the
port trunk.
73
Configuring the Ports
Configuring Port Mirroring
Port mirroring allows you to monitor the traffic on a port by having both
the receive and transmit traffic on a port copied to another port on the
switch. By connecting a network analyzer to the other port, you can
monitor the traffic.
The port to be monitored is referred to as the source port. The port that
will function as the mirror port is referred to as the destination port.
When selecting your source and destination ports, observe the following
guidelines.
❑ The destination port cannot be used by a network node, such as a
workstation or server.
❑ Both the source and destination ports must be on the same
switch.
❑ You cannot monitor more than one port on a switch at a time.
Enabling Port
Mirroring
To enable port mirroring, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Traffic/Port Mirroring.
The Port Mirroring window in Figure 26 is displayed.
Port Mirroring Configuration
Port mirroring state:
Enabled
> Disabled
Note: Both transmit and receive activity will be mirrored.
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 26 Port Mirroring Window
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
2. Select Enabled.
The window in Figure 27 is displayed.
Port Mirroring Configuration
Port mirroring state:
> Enabled
Disabled
Source port:
Destination port:
Null (not configured)
Null (not configured)
Note: Both transmit and receive activity will be mirrored.
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 27 Source and Destination Port Mirror Prompts
3. Select Source Port.
A window displays listing the ports on the switch.
4. Select the port to be monitored.
5. If you are running a web-based Omega session, return to the window
containing the prompts in Figure 27.
6. Select Destination Port.
Again, a window is displayed listing the ports on the switch.
7. Select the port where the network analyzer will be connected.
The two ports are now configured for port mirroring.
8. Return to the Main Menu.
9. Connect a device, such as a network analyzer, to the destination port
or use a remote monitoring program to view the mirrored traffic.
Disabling Port
Mirroring
To disable port mirroring on the switch, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Traffic/Port Mirroring.
The Port Mirroring window in Figure 26 is displayed.
2. Select Disabled.
The port mirroring feature is now disabled on the switch.
3. Return to the Main Menu.
75
Configuring the Ports
Configuring Port Security
The switch features two levels of port security that you can use to
enhance network security. These levels allow you to control network
access by limiting the number of MAC addresses that are learned on the
ports on the switch. The levels are as follows:
Limited - The ports will continue to learn new MAC addresses up to a
user defined maximum limit.
Secure - The ports will immediately stop learning new MAC addresses,
limiting network access only to those nodes whose MAC addresses have
already been learned.
Note
This port security feature does not apply to ports on any expansion
modules that might be installed in the switch.
To set the port security level for the ports on the switch, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu in Figure 8 on page 43 is displayed.
2. Select Security/Source Address Table.
The following window is displayed:
Source Address Learning Mode:
> Automatic: source address learning enabled; no intruder protection
Limited: intruder protection when port MAC address limit exceeded
Secure: source address table locked; intruder protection enabled
Security object port
ALL
Config MAC address limit per port
Return to System Configuration Menu ...
Figure 28 Port Security Menu
3. Select the desired port security level. The levels are described below:
Automatic
This selection disables port security. With this option activated, the
switch will not restrict the number of MAC addresses that are learned
on the switch ports. This is the default setting.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Limited
This selection activates a limited version of port security. With this
level selected, the switch will continue to learn MAC addresses for
each port up to a user defined maximum number. Once the
maximum number has been reached on a port, any frames received
on the port from a source with a new MAC addresses will be
discarded.
Note
Selecting this security level deletes all static MAC addresses. You
must reenter the static addresses. All static MAC addresses are
included in the count of maximum addresses that can be learned by
a port.
If you activate this security level, select the Config MAC address limit
per port option to display a list of the ports on the switch. In the list,
select a port and specify the maximum number of MAC addresses
that you want the port to be able to learn. The permitted range is 0 to
255. Specifying 0 (zero) means that the port will not stop learning
addresses. The default is 0.
Selecting this security level also displays the following prompts:
Intruder Protection:
Transmit an SNMP trap if an intruder is detected
> No SNMP trap if an intruder is detected
Disable the port if an intruder is detected
> Port state is unchanged if an intruder is detected
Return to System Configuration Menu ...
Figure 29 Port Security Prompts
These prompts allow you to control how the switch will respond
when a port exceeds the specified number of MAC addresses. You can
instruct the switch to send an SNMP trap to the management station,
disable the port, or both.
Secure
This option causes the switch to immediately stop learning new MAC
addresses on all or selected ports. Any frames received on a port from
a source with a new MAC address will be discarded. Existing static
MAC addresses are retained and are used in determining which
addresses are accepted by a port. However, you cannot add new
static addresses to ports with this level of security.
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Configuring the Ports
Activating this security level requires that you first specify the ports
that are to have this level of security. This is done by entering the
ports in the Security object port field. The ports can be entered as a
range (e.g., 2-5) or individually (e.g., 2,4,6). After specifying the ports,
select the Secure level from the Port Security menu.
Ports not specified as having the Secure level will default to the
Automatic security level. For example, if you were to activate the
Secure level on only ports 1 and 2, the switch would stop learning
MAC address on those two ports, but would continue to learn
addresses on the remaining ports.
As with the Limited security level, you can also use the Port Security
prompts to control how the switch will respond in the event new MAC
addresses are received by a port. You can instruct the switch to send
a SNMP trap to a management station or disable the port.
Note
A new security level takes affect immediately on a switch once
selected.
4. Once you have selected the desired level of port security, return to
the Omega main menu.
78
Chapter 4
Configuring the MAC Address Table
This chapter describes the MAC address table and the static MAC
address table. The chapter explains how to view the MAC addresses and
how to add and delete entries from the static table.
Procedures relating to the MAC address table include the following:
❑ Displaying the MAC Address Table on page 82
❑ Displaying the MAC Addresses of a Port on page 83
❑ Displaying the Port Number of a MAC Address on page 84
❑ Clearing All Dynamic MAC Addresses on page 85
❑ Changing the Aging Time of the MAC Address Table on page
85
Procedures relating to the static MAC address table include the
following:
❑ Displaying the Static MAC Address Table on page 86
❑ Adding Addresses to the Static MAC Address Table on page 87
❑ Deleting Addresses from the Static MAC Address Table on
page 88
❑ Clearing the Static MAC Address Table on page 89
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Configuring the MAC Address Table
This chapter also contains instructions on how to configure multicast
addresses for the ports of a switch. Procedures relating to multicast
addresses include the following:
❑ Configuring a Multicast Address on page 90
❑ Changing a Multicast Port Assignment on page 92
❑ Deleting a Multicast Address on page 92
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
MAC Address Table
The MAC address table (also referred to as the forwarding table) is a
snapshot of the source MAC addresses that a switch has learned and
stored in its volatile memory. When a frame is received by a port on a
switch, the source address of the frame is inspected to determine
whether or not the address is already in the table. If it is not, the switch
adds the address to the table.
Each AT-9006 Series switch maintains its own MAC address table. Each
table can hold up to 8,000 addresses. To prevent the table from
becoming filled with addresses of devices that have become inactive
and are no longer sending frames, MAC address are periodically deleted
from the table. An address is deleted if a MAC address in the table does
not reappear on any port after a specified period of time has elapsed.
The default time period is 300 seconds (5 minutes). This aging time is
configurable, as explained in the procedure Changing the Aging Time
of the MAC Address Table on page 85.
If you reset the switch or remove power, the table is cleared but
immediately gets updated as soon as the switch is operational and the
ports start to detect MAC addresses in incoming packets.
Each switch also maintains a static MAC address table. This table
contains MAC addresses that are entered manually and are not aged out
after a period of time. The only way that a static address is removed is if it
is manually deleted from the table. When you enter a static address, you
specify the port when the node with the address is connected. Each
switch is responsible for maintaining its own static MAC address table.
Note
The MAC address for an AT-9006 Series switch is provided on the
MAC address label directly above the RS232 management port on
the switch front panel. You can also determine the MAC address by
running the switch diagnostics program, as explained in Chapter 2,
Managing a Switch.
81
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Displaying the
MAC Address
Table
To display the MAC address table for a switch, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address menu in Figure 30 is displayed.
MAC Address Menu
Show all MAC addresses
By port MAC addresses
Get Port From MAC Address
Clear dynamic MAC table
--- Static addresses display and configuration --All static MAC addresses
Per port static MAC addresses
Multicast addresses
Clear static MAC table
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 30 MAC Address Menu
2. Select Show all MAC addresses.
The MAC Addresses window is displayed. An example is shown in
Figure 31.
MAC Address Table
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
00000C
0000C0
0000F4
0000F4
0000F4
00A0C9
00A0C9
00A0CC
00A0D2
00A0D2
00A0D2
938CDC
334CE6
A40D7D
A98B40
C89DCD
0300F4
0825AE
3E2463
18180B
53E346
BD01C7
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
6
Port
VLAN
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
-
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
Accounting1
4 - Accounting1
Return to MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 31 MAC Address Table
82
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The table lists each MAC address that the switch has learned, the
number or name of the port on which the MAC address was detected,
and the VLAN to which the port belongs.
The Refresh button queries the switch for the latest MAC address
information and updates the window.
3. Return to the Main Menu.
Displaying the
MAC Addresses
of a Port
In addition to displaying all of the MAC addresses stored in the switch,
you can also display the MAC addresses associated with a specific port.
This allows you to easily determine the MAC addresses of the devices
connected to a port on the switch.
To display the MAC addresses of the devices connected to a port on the
switch, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address menu shown in Figure 30 is displayed.
2. Select By port MAC addresses.
A list of the ports on the switch is displayed.
3. Select the desired port number from the list.
The MAC Address Table Per Port window is displayed. The window
contains the MAC addresses that have been detected on the selected
port. Figure 32 is an example of the window.
MAC Address Table
Port 5
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
VLAN
MAC Address
VLAN
00000C 4ACA6B
0000F4 A23192
0000F4 A411A0
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
00000C 938CD9
0000F4 A40F4B
0000F4 A411AD
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
Return to Port Selection Menu ...
Figure 32 MAC Address Table Per Port Window
4. Return to the Main Menu.
83
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Displaying the
Port Number of a
MAC Address
The Omega interface allows you to determine the port on which a MAC
address is located by specifying the address. This feature is useful in
determining the port that a particular device is connected to on the
switch.
To display the port number for a specific MAC address, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
2. Select Get Port From MAC Address.
The MAC Address prompt shown in Figure 33 is displayed.
MAC Address
0000F4 334CE5
Return to MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 33 MAC Address Prompt
3. Enter the source MAC address in the MAC Address field. Press
<Return>.
Enter the MAC address in the following format:
XXXXXX XXXXXX
The screen displays a window that contains the port on which the
MAC address was learned. Figure 34 is an example of the window.
Port
VLAN
6
Default VLAN
Return to Main Menu
Figure 34 MAC Address by Port Window
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Clearing All
Dynamic MAC
Addresses
To clear all of the learned MAC addresses from the MAC address table,
perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
2. Select Clear dynamic MAC table.
Confirmation prompts are displayed.
3. Select Yes to clear the table or No to cancel the procedure.
If you select Yes, all MAC addresses are deleted from the switch’s
dynamic MAC address table.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
Changing the
Aging Time of the
MAC Address
Table
If a switch detects a packet with a new source MAC address, the switch
stores the MAC address in its address table. This means the switch has
learned about the device that sent packets to the switch. The MAC
address table is updated as new MAC addresses are detected. If a MAC
address listed in the address table does not appear on any port after a
specified period of time, the switch deletes that address from the table.
The default aging time is 300 seconds.
To specify a new aging time for the MAC address table, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu in Figure 8 on page 43 is displayed.
2. Enter a new value (in seconds) in the Default Aging Time entry field.
The default is 300 seconds. The maximum value is 999 seconds.
Note
Entering a value of 0 (zero) deactivates the MAC aging time
parameter. MAC addresses continue to be added to the table until
the table is full. Once the table is full, any frame with a new MAC
address will be flooded to all appropriate ports.
3. Return to the Main Menu.
85
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Static MAC Address Table
The static MAC table contains a list of the MAC addresses that have been
entered manually. You can use the table to specify the MAC addresses of
devices that are connected to ports that might not be learned via the
dynamic learning process of the switch. Entering static MAC addresses
ensures that certain devices have access to the switch ports, because
aging time, power failures, or switch resets do not affect the static MAC
table. Each switch maintains its own static address table.
Displaying the
Static MAC
Address Table
To display the static address table for a switch, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu in Figure 30 is displayed.
2. Select All static MAC addresses.
The screen displays previously-added static MAC addresses, their
ports, and the VLANs to which the ports belong. The display is for
viewing purposes only. Figure 35 is an example of the table:
Static MAC Address Table
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
00000C 938CDC
0000C0 334CE6
00A0D2 18180B
Port
VLAN
Port 4 - Accounting1
1
3
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
Default VLAN
Figure 35 Static MAC Address Table Window
3. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Adding Addresses
to the Static MAC
Address Table
To add MAC addresses to the static MAC address table, perform the
following procedure:
1. Compile a list of the MAC addresses of the devices to be added to the
table.
2. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu shown in Figure 30 is displayed.
3. Select Per port static MAC addresses.
A list of the ports on the switch is displayed.
4. Select the port where you want to add the static MAC address.
The window in Figure 36 is displayed. The window lists the static
addresses already defined for the selected port.
Add MAC Address Menu
Port 5
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
VLAN
MAC Address
VLAN
Add MAC address
Delete MAC address
Return to Port Selection Menu ....
Figure 36 Static MAC Addresses Per Port Window
5. Select Add MAC Address.
The window in Figure 37 is displayed. You use this window to specify
the MAC address of the device you want to allow access to the port,
as well as the name of the VLAN to which the port belongs.
Add MAC Address Menu
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
VLAN Name:
MAC address:
VLAN
MAC Address
VLAN
Default VLAN
Null (not configured)
Return to Add MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 37 Adding a Static MAC Address Window
87
Configuring the MAC Address Table
6. In the VLAN Name field, specify the VLAN to which the port belongs.
The default is Default VLAN.
7. In the MAC Address field, enter the static MAC address of the device
to have access to the port.
The address should be entered in the following format:
XXXXXX XXXXXX
You can configure only one static MAC address per port.
A confirmation screen is displayed.
8. Press <Return>.
The address is added to the static MAC address table.
9. Return to the Main Menu.
10. If desired, perform the procedure Displaying the Static MAC
Address Table on page 86 to view the updated table.
Deleting
Addresses from
the Static MAC
Address Table
To delete an address from the static MAC address table, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu in Figure 30 is displayed.
2. Select Per port static MAC addresses.
A list of the ports on the switch is displayed.
3. Select the port containing the static MAC address to be deleted.
The window in Figure 36 on page 87 is displayed.
4. Select Delete MAC address.
The window in Figure 38 is displayed. You use this window to specify
the static MAC address to be deleted.
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
VLAN
00A0D2 18180B
Default VLAN
VLAN Name:
MAC address:
MAC Address
VLAN
Default VLAN
Null (not configured)
Return to Add MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 38 Deleting a Static MAC Address Window
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
5. In the VLAN Name field, enter the name of the VLAN to which the port
belongs.
6. In the MAC Address field, enter the MAC address to be deleted from
the static table.
A confirmation screen is displayed.
7. Press <Return>.
The address is deleted from the static MAC address table.
8. Return to the Main Menu.
9. If desired, perform the procedure Displaying the Static MAC
Address Table on page 86 to view the updated table.
Clearing the
Static MAC
Address Table
To clear all addresses from the static MAC address table for a switch,
perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu shown in Figure 30 on page 82 is
displayed.
2. Select Clear static MAC table.
A confirmation screen is displayed.
3. Select Yes to confirm or No to cancel the procedure.
If you select Yes, all of the static address entries are deleted from the
switch.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
89
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Multicast Address
A multicast is a special form of broadcast where copies of a packet are
delivered to a specific group of end stations. This differs from a
broadcast, which is a transmission that sends copies of a packet to all
end stations on the network.
A multicast address is a destination address. Configuring a multicast
address allows you to restrict certain packets to a specific group of ports.
For example, you might use this feature to restrict the number of end
stations that are to receive packets from a server running special
applications.
You can configure ten multicast addresses per switch.
Configuring a
Multicast Address
To enter a multicast address into the MAC address table of a switch,
perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu is displayed.
2. Select Multicast addresses.
The Multicast Address Menu shown in Figure 39 is displayed.
Add MAC Address Menu
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
Multicast Packet Ports
VLAN
Add MAC address
Delete MAC address
Return to Add MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 39 Multicast Address Menu
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
3. Select Add MAC address.
The Adding a Multicast Address window in Figure 40 is displayed.
Add MAC Address Menu
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
Multicast Packet Ports
VLAN Name:
MAC address:
VLAN
Default VLAN
Null (not configured)
Ports for multicast
Null (not configured)
(Example: 1,3,8-14, or all)
Return to Add MAC Address Menu ...
Figure 40 Adding a Multicast Address Window
4. In the VLAN Name field, enter the name of the VLAN to receive the
multicast frames. Select Enter.
5. In the MAC Address field, enter the MAC address of the multicast
stream. Select Enter.
6. In the Ports for Multicast field, enter one or more port numbers that
are members of the specified VLAN and that are to receive the
multicast packets from the device. Select Enter.
You can use one of the following formats to specify the port numbers:
Single port (for example, 1)
Several ports separated by a comma (for example, 3, 5, 6)
Range of ports (for example, 2-4)
All ports by entering the word “all”.
You can combine these different formats in a single line.
A port can have more than one multicast address associated with it.
The number of multicast addresses you can configure is limited to ten
per switch.
Omega confirms a successful operation with the message MAC
address added and the MAC address.
7. Return to the Main Menu.
91
Configuring the MAC Address Table
Changing a
Multicast Port
Assignment
Deleting a
Multicast Address
To add or remove ports from a multicast MAC address assignment, reenter the multicast MAC address and the new port assignments by
performing the instruction in the previous section. This will overwrite
the old port assignments with the new port information.
To delete a multicast address from the MAC address table, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select MAC Address Table.
The MAC Address Table menu is displayed.
2. Select Multicast addresses.
The menu in Figure 39 on page 90 is displayed.
3. Select Delete MAC Address.
The Deleting a Multicast Address window is displayed.
MAC Addresses
MAC Address
Multicast Packet Ports
00A0D2 18180C
6
VLAN Name:
MAC address:
Default VLAN
Null (not configured)
Figure 41 Deleting a Multicast Address Window
4. In the VLAN Name field, enter the name of the VLAN from which the
multicast address is to be deleted.
5. In the MAC Address field, enter the MAC address to be deleted. Select
Enter.
The multicast address is now deleted.
6. Return to the Main Menu.
92
Chapter 5
Configuring Virtual LANs and
Quality of Service
This chapter contains the following sections:
❑ Overview on page 94
❑ Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN on page 102
❑ Creating an Example VLAN on page 108
❑ Modifying a Port-based or Tagged VLAN on page 111
❑ Deleting a Port-based or Tagged VLAN on page 113
❑ Configuring Port Priority Queueing on page 116
This chapter explains the Allied Telesyn implementation of the VLAN
and Quality of Service (QoS) features for the AT-9006 Ethernet switch. An
Allied Telesyn Ethernet switch can support up to 254 port-based VLANs
with 802.1Q Virtual LAN (VLAN) tagging.
By default, an AT-9006 Series Switch has one pre-defined VLAN. The
name of this VLAN is Default VLAN. All of the ports on the switch are
configured as untagged (port-based) members of this VLAN. In most
situations, you will probably find this single broadcast domain and the
default QoS settings acceptable and will not need to modify the switch
VLAN and QoS settings.
Note
You should use caution when using the Spanning Tree Protocol
(STP) and VLANs. The switch has only one spanning tree domain.
93
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Overview
As the size and traffic on Ethernet networks have grown, new methods
have been needed for segmenting the network to improve network
performance and speed. One of the principal methods for improving
network performance is through the use of VLANs. The VLAN feature
allows you to segment your network through software management by
creating subnetworks. The use of VLANs allow you to group the
workstations, servers, and other networking equipment connected to
your switches into logical workgroups. These VLAN groupings can be
based on similar data needs or security requirements.
When networking devices, such as workstations and servers, are
grouped into a VLAN, data is exchanged between only those members
of the group. In more basic terms, just as switches separate collision
domains, VLANs separate broadcast domains.
Each VLAN constitutes one broadcast domain; therefore, frames are not
permitted to cross a VLAN boundary. This allows for several VLAN-based
broadcast domains to exist on the same switch.
Other advantages of VLANs include:
" You can group workstations logically or functionally, regardless of
their physical location on the network.
" You can change VLAN memberships anytime by software
configuration without moving the workstations physically, or
change group memberships by simply moving a cable from one
port to another.
" With VLAN tagging, the ability to group workstations into logical
work groups is more versatile. Network servers or other network
resources can be shared without loss of data isolation or security.
" With VLAN tagging, one port on a switch can be configured to be
an uplink to another 802.1Q-compatible switch. This one port can
be configured to carry traffic from all VLANs configured on the
switch. (With port-based VLANs, one uplink port is required for
each VLAN in order to uplink VLANs in other switches.)
The Fast Ethernet switches are capable of supporting two types of
VLANs:
" Port-based VLANs
" Tagged VLANs
Both types of VLANs are described in the following sections.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Port-Based
VLANs
Port-based VLANs are logical groupings of ports. Any devices connected
to the member ports share a common broadcast domain. The traffic
within a VLAN is forwarded only to the member ports.
As a frame enters a port, an ID for that port VLAN is associated with the
frame. This VLAN ID (VID) is used to forward the frame only to the port
or ports in the same VLAN (i.e., ports having the same VID).
When you create a new VLAN and give the VLAN a VID, each member
port Port VLAN ID (PVID) is set equal to the VID of the given VLAN
group through the Port to VLAN Configuration menu.
Port-based VLANs belong to separate broadcast domains; therefore, a
router is required to transfer the frames among the various VLANs.
Port-based VLAN Example
Figure 42 is an example of two port-based VLANs in an AT-9006SX/SC
switch. The example illustrates the two VLANs Sales and Production.
AT-9006SX/SC
Ethernet Switch
AT-8224XL Switches
with AT-A15 Modules
AT-8224XL Switches
with AT-A15 Modules
CentreCOM 8324SL
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
LINK
A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
PORT ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
LINK
A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
1X
FULL DUP
COL
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
PORT ACTIVITY
15X
17X
19X
21X
23X
100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
STATUS
FULL DUP
COL
ACTIVITY
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
15X
17X
19X
21X
23X
2X
4X
6X
8X
10X
12X
14X
16X
18X
20X
22X
24X
100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
COL
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
FAULT
D/C
FAULT
B
D/C
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
B
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
2
2X
4X
6X
8X
10X
12X
14X
16X
18X
20X
22X
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
STATUS
ACTIVITY
COL
1
L /A
1
L /A
RESET
24
24X
RESET
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
LINK
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
A
FULL DUP
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
15X
17X
19X
21X
23X
2X
4X
6X
8X
10X
12X
14X
16X
18X
20X
22X
24X
100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
STATUS
ACTIVITY
LINK
A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
1X
FULL DUP
COL
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
PORT ACTIVITY
15X
17X
19X
21X
23X
100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
STATUS
COL
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
ACTIVITY
COL
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
FAULT
L /A
COL
D/C
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
B
FAULT
L /A
L /A
RPS
D/C
PWR
2
2X
4X
6X
8X
10X
12X
14X
16X
18X
20X
22X
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
D/C
B
RESET
24
24X
RESET
Sales VLAN
(PVID 2)
Router
Production VLAN
(PVID 3)
Figure 42 VLAN Port-Based Example
95
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
The table below lists the ports assignments for the Sales and Production
VLANs:
Figure 42 VLAN
Example
Sales VLAN (PVID 2)
Production VLAN
(PVID 3)
AT-9006SX/SC switch
1, 2, 4
3, 5, 6
The movement of traffic between the two VLANs is accomplished with a
router. The router has one connection to each VLAN. One router
interface is connected to port 2 on the switch; this port is a member of
the Sales VLAN. Another router interface is connected to port 5; this port
is a member of the Production VLAN.
There are, however, several drawbacks to port-based VLANs:
❑ It is not easy to share network resources, such as servers and
printers, across multiple VLANs. A router must be added to the
network to provide a means for interconnecting the port-based
VLANs.
❑ The introduction of a router into your network could create
security issues from unauthorized access to your network.
❑ A VLAN that spans several switches will require a port on each
switch for the interconnection of the various parts of the VLAN.
For example, a VLAN that spans three switches would require one
port on each switch just to interconnect the various sections of
the VLAN. In network configurations where there are many
individual VLANs that span switches, many ports can end up
being used ineffectively just to interconnect the various VLANs.
VLAN Tagging
With VLAN tagging, you can easily share network resources and at the
same time retain the security found in port-based VLANs. And when
propagating the different VLANs throughout the network, you only
need one port-per-switch to trunk all VLANs from one switch to another
switch across one physical link.
For these and other reasons, the IEEE developed additions to the 802
standards to accommodate VLAN tagging, the 802.1Q and 802.3ac
standards. VLAN tagging allows the user to define a VID for a given VLAN
traffic flow, and then use this VID to switch the traffic throughout the
network. This means that the user can have a device connected to a
switch port that can accept traffic from one or more VLANs.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The ability to allow a port to forward traffic from many VLANs instead of
only one (as in port-based VLANs) allows the user to overcome the portbased limitations mentioned above. A server can now be configured to
accept the traffic from many different VLANs, and then return data to the
various VLANs without mixing or leaking data into the wrong VLANs.
Now when propagating VLANs across the network you can use one port
per switch for connecting all VLANs on the switch to another 802.1Qbased switch.
IEEE 802.1Q Standard
This flexibility comes from the ability to included a VLAN tag, in the form
of a VID, to an Ethernet frame, and the ability of NICs, switches, and
routers to act upon these VIDs (802.1Q).
The 802.3ac standard deals with the addition of 4 bytes to the original
802.3 frame. This means that while the minimum frame size is still 64
bytes, the maximum allowable frame size has been increased to 1522
bytes. These four bytes are inserted between the destination MAC
address field and Length/Type field and include the following
information.
Length/Type field (2 bytes): The Length/Type field of a tagged MAC
frame always uses the Type interpretation, and contains the 802.1Q Tag
Protocol Type: 0x81-00.
Tag Control Information field (2 bytes): The Tag Control Information field
is subdivided as follows:
a. A 3-bit User Priority field.
b. A Canonical Format Indicator (CFI) of 1 bit.
c. A 12-bit VLAN Identifier or VID.
The VID is the information that is used by the switch to forward the
frame to the appropriate VLANs. For further explanation of the function
and use of the other data fields, please consult the IEEE 802.1Q standard.
The 802.1Q standard deals with how this tagging information is used to
forward the traffic throughout the switch.
The handling of frames tagged with VIDs coming into a port is
straightforward. If the incoming frame’s VID tag matches one of the VIDs
of a VLAN that the port is a tagged member of, the frame will be
accepted and forwarded to the appropriate ports. If the frame’s VID does
not match any of the VLANs that the port is a member of, the frame will
be dropped.
97
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Note
Ports can be tagged members of multiple VLANs. This means that
the port can be configured to accept and forward traffic flows from
multiple VLANs (i.e., the port will recognize multiple VIDs).
If the connected device is a legacy device (i.e., a device that does not
support or act upon VLAN tagging), there are addition methods for
handling the frame.
As described in the port-based VLAN section, an untagged incoming
frame needs to have a VID inserted or associated with it so that the
frame can be properly forwarded throughout switch. Consequently,
each port is required to have a VLAN tag associated with it; this portbased tag is referred to as the Port VLAN ID or PVID. The port PVID
value is inserted into the frame and is used as the frame VID as the frame
is passed through the switching system.
The port PVID assignment enables legacy (non-802.1Q compliant)
devices connected to the switch to take advantage of the VLAN and QoS
capabilities of the switch.
Note
The CPU management port of this switch is a legacy device. It
cannot interpret VLAN tags. The management agent responds only
to communications from devices that are located within the same
VLAN, defined by the management port PVID.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
VLAN Tagging Example
Figure 43 illustrates how tagged ports can be used to interconnect IEEE
802.1Q-based products. The example uses tagged ports to provide an
uplink between two AT-9006SX/SC switches. A tagged port is also used
to connect an IEEE 802.1Q compliant server to a switch so that the server
can be shared among multiple VLANs without the need for a router.
AT-9006SX/SC
Switch (Top)
Port 5
Accounting VLAN (PVID 2)
Manufacturing VLAN (PVID 3)
AT-8224XL Switches
with AT-A15 Modules
AT-8224XL Switches
with AT-A15 Modules
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
LINK
A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FULL DUP
COL
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
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100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
STATUS
ACTIVITY
COL
LINK
A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
1X
FULL DUP
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
PORT ACTIVITY
17X
15X
19X
21X
23X
L /A
100M LINK /
D/C
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ACTIVITY
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TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
ACTIVITY
HALF DUP/
COL
STATUS
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1
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9
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21
B
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
23
FAULT
L /A
D/C
B
RESET
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
2
2X
4X
6X
8X
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18X
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20X
22X
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RESET
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
LINK
A
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
FULL DUP
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
COL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
5X
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A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
PORT ACTIVITY
15X
17X
19X
21X
23X
100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
3
5
7
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RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
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17
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21
23
2
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RESET
FAULT
L /A
STATUS
ACTIVITY
COL
1
L /A
STATUS
ACTIVITY
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
100M LINK /
L /A
D/C
HALF DUP
LINK
FULL DUP
COL
D/C
B
RPS
L /A
4X
6X
8X
10X
12X
14X
16X
18X
20X
22X
Port 2
IEEE 802.3Q
Compliant Server
with AT-2970 Gigabit NIC
PWR
D/C
2X
24X
RESET
Port 2
AT-9006SX/SC
Switch (Bottom)
AT-8224XL Switches
with AT-A15 Modules
Legacy Server
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
LINK
A
FULL DUP
COL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
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100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
STATUS
ACTIVITY
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
COL
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
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21
23
2
4
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8
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24
FAULT
L /A
D/C
B
AT-8224XL Switch
with AT-A15 Module
RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
RESET
CentreCOM 8324SL
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
LINK
A
FULL DUP
COL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
5X
7X
9X
11X
13X
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17X
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23X
2X
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100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
CentreCOM 8324SL
STATUS
ACTIVITY
AT-STACK1SL
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
ACTIVITY
COL
LINK
1
3
5
7
9
11
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23
2
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A
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX
FAULT
L /A
FULL DUP
D/C
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RPS
L /A
COL
PORT ACTIVITY
1X
3X
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8X
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100M LINK /
L /A
ACTIVITY
RS-232
TERMINAL PORT
10M LINK /
HALF DUP/
FULL DUP
D/C
HALF DUP
STATUS
ACTIVITY
COL
PWR
D/C
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L /A
RESET
D/C
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RPS
L /A
PWR
D/C
RESET
Engineering VLAN (PVID 4)
Manufacturing VLAN (PVID 3)
Figure 43 VLAN Tagging Example
99
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
The VLANs and port assignments for the top AT-9006SX/SC Gigabit
Switch in Figure 43 are listed in Table 2.
Table 2 VLAN Tagging Example Port Assignments, Top Switch
VLAN Example
Top AT-9006SX/SC
Switch
Accounting VLAN
(VID 2)
Manufacturing
VLAN (VID 3)
Engineering VLAN
(VID 4)
Untagged
Ports
Tagged
Ports
Untagged Tagged
Ports
Ports
Untagged
Port
1, 4
2, 5
3, 6
2, 5
Tagged
Port
2, 5
The Accounting VLAN, assigned a VID value of 2, contains two untagged
ports, ports 1 and 4, which connect to the AT-8224XL Fast Ethernet
Switches. The VLAN also has two tagged ports, Port 2 and Port 5. Port 5
functions as the uplink port to the bottom AT-9006SX/SC switch, while
Port 2 provides a connection to an IEEE 802.1Q compliant server capable
of handing tagged frames, thereby enabling the server to be a
simultaneous member of multiple VLANs.
The Manufacturing VLAN has two untagged ports, ports 3 and 6, which
connect the Gigabit Switch to two AT-8224XL switches, as well as two
tagged ports, ports 2 and 5, which provide the same functions as in the
Accounting VLAN.
Alos included in the top Gigabit Switch is a Engineering VLAN with the
VID of 4. It consists of just two ports, tagged ports 2 and 5. Port 2 is
connected to the IEEE 802.1Q compliant server and Port 5 is the uplink
port. This VLAN will enable the Engineering VLAN on the bottom Gigabit
Switch to access the shared server along with the other VLANs.
The VLANs and port assignments for the bottom AT-9006SX/SC switch
are listed in Table 3.
Table 3 VLAN Tagging Example Port Assignments, Bottom Switch
VLAN Example
Bottom AT-9006SX/SC
Switch
100
Engineering VLAN
(VID 4)
Manufacturing
VLAN (VID 6)
Untagged
Ports
Tagged Untagged Tagged
Ports
Ports
Ports
1, 4
2
3, 6
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The Engineering VLAN on the bottom AT-9006SX/SC switch has two
untagged ports and one tagged port, Port 2, which functions as the
uplink port to the top switch.
The Manufacturing VLAN also consists of two untagged ports. One port
is connected to an AT-8224XL switch and the other port is connected to
a legacy server, meaning that it is not capable of handing tagged frames
and, consequently, cannot be shared by multiple VLANs. This VLAN also
contains one tagged port, Port 2, which functions as the uplink.
The above configuration allows the traffic to remain restricted to a
particular VLAN where necessary, but also allows for resource sharing. It
also allows nodes to be a part of the same VLAN even though they are
connected to different Gigabit Switches.
The interconnection between the two Gigabit Switches is provided by
Port 5 on the top switch and port 2 on the bottom switch. These tagged
uplink ports are output enabled for every configured VLAN on the
switch. That is, they are a tagged member of each VLAN. Consequently,
when a broadcast packet is received on any port (representing a packet
on any VLAN), it is transmitted through the uplink port.
Note
The PVIDs on the uplink ports between two switches must match.
For example, they both must have PVIDs of 4.
An example of a VLAN spanning multiple Gigabit Switches is illustrated
by the Manufacturing VLAN. Even though it spans two Gigabit Switches,
both VLANs have the same VID, making them a part of the same VLAN.
Consequently, a node that is part of the Manufacturing VLAN in the top
AT-9006 Switch can access the legacy server in the Manufacturing VLAN
on the bottom switch. On the other hand, an end node from either the
Accounting VLAN or the Engineering VLAN cannot access the legacy
server because they belong to different VLANs.
An example of resource sharing across VLANs is provided by the IEEE
802.3Q compliant server connected to port 2 on the top Gigabit Switch.
This port has been designated as a tagged port in all VLANs, allowing all
VLANs access to the resource.
101
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN
This section contains the procedure for creating a new VLAN on a switch.
The procedure for creating a new VLAN consists of three phases:
❑ Phase 1:
— Name the VLAN.
— Assign a VLAN ID (VID) number to the VLAN.
— Designate which ports are to be members of the VLAN.
— Define which, if any, ports will be tagged ports.
❑ Phase 2:
— Remove the untagged ports from existing VLANs.
❑ Phase 3:
— Change the PVID of the untagged ports in the new VLANs to
match the VID.
The AT-9006 Series Gigabit Switches have one default VLAN, called
Default VLAN. The Default VLAN is assigned a VLAN ID. All the ports on
the switch are initially port-based (untagged) members of the Default
VLAN with a PVID of 1.
To create a new VLAN, perform the following procedures.
Phase 1
To perform Phase 1, do the following:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
The Virtual LAN/QoS menu in Figure 44 is displayed.
Virtual LAN Menu
Virtual LAN definitions
Port to VLAN configuration
Assign Port Priority
Priority Weight configuration
Assign Management Port to VLAN
Return to Main Menu ....
Figure 44 Virtual LAN/QoS Menu
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
2. Select Virtual LAN definitions.
The program displays the VLANs window. This window lists the
VLANs currently existing on the switch. The window provides the
name of each VLAN along with the ports on the switch that are
members of the VLAN. Figure 45 is an example of the window.
VLAN Definition Menu
page 1
VLAN Name
ID
All Ports On VLAN
Default VLAN
Building102
Building103
1
2
3
5,6
1,2
3,4
Add new table entry
Return to Virtual LAN Menu ...
Figure 45 VLANs Window
The example shows that there are three VLANs on the switch: Default
VLAN with ports 5 and 6; Building102 VLAN with ports 1 and 2;
Building103 VLAN with ports 3 and 4.
3. Select Add new table entry.
The VLAN Configuration window shown in Figure 46 is displayed. You
use this window to specify the parameters for the new VLAN, such as
its name and the ports on the switch that will be members of the
VLAN.
VLAN Name:
Null (not configured)
(or enter a single ‘*’ to delete this entry)
ID
2
All Ports on VLAN
Null (not configured)
(Example: 1,3,8-14 or all)
Tagged Ports On VLAN
Null (not configured)
Note: Use Port to VLAN Configuration Menu for Port-based VLANs
Return to VLAN Definition Menu ...
Figure 46 New VLAN Configuration Window
103
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
4. In the VLAN Name field, enter a name for the new VLAN (for example,
Marketing). Press <Return>.
After entering the name for the new VLAN, the VLAN ID number
should automatically increment to the next available number. For
example, if this is the first VLAN that you are adding to the switch, the
VID number increments to 2.
5. If desired, change the VLAN ID number by entering a number a
number in the ID field. (If the VLAN ID number failed to increment to
the next available VID after you entered the VLAN name, you must
enter the ID number manually.)
If IGMP snooping is disabled on the switch, the valid VID range is from
2 to 4096. If IGMP snooping is enabled on the switch, the valid VID
range is from 2 to 2047.
Note
Allied Telesyn highly recommends that you use the VLAN ID
(default) supplied by the system. Although you can change VLAN
IDs to suit your specific needs, changing them requires a more
advanced understanding of VLAN tagging.
6. In the All Ports on VLAN field, specify the ports (both tagged and
untagged) on the switch that are to be members of this new VLAN.
Press <Return>.
You can specify the ports individually or in a range or both, as shown
below. By entering the word “All” in this field, all ports on the switch
will be included in the new VLAN.
Range of Ports
Single Port
1, 4-6
Ports on expansion modules, if installed, are included by default in
the Ports on VLAN field. If desired, these ports can be removed from
the field so that they will not be a part of the VLAN.
7. In the Tagged Ports on VLAN field, specify which ports, if any, should
function as tagged ports. (A tagged port can be a member of more
than one virtual LAN in a switch.)
8. Return to the Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Phase 2
In Phase 1, you gave the new VLAN a name and specified the ports that
will be members of the VLAN. It is important to know, however, that the
untagged ports of the new VLAN are not automatically removed from
their current VLAN assignment. Instead, you must manually remove
them yourself. This involves reconfiguring the existing VLANs by
removing untagged ports that are members of the new VLAN.
Remember, an untagged port can be a member of only one VLAN at a
time. Unless you reconfigure the VLANs, an untagged port can end up
being a member of more than one VLAN and this could result in
unpredictable performance by your VLANs.
To reconfigure your existing VLANS, do the following:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS. The Virtual
LAN/QoS menu in Figure 44 is displayed.
2. Select Virtual LAN definitions.
3. Select an existing VLAN that contains an untagged port that you have
assigned to the new VLAN you created in Phase 1.
The VLAN Configuration window for the selected VLAN is displayed.
An example is shown in Figure 47. The window displays the name of
the VLAN and the tagged and untagged ports of the VLAN. The
example is for the Default VLAN.
VLAN Name:
Default VLAN
(or enter a single ‘*’ to delete this entry)
ID
1
All Ports on VLAN
1-6
(Example: 1,3,8-14 or all)
Tagged Ports On VLAN
Null (not configured)
Note: Use Port to VLAN Configuration Menu for Port-based VLANs
Return to VLAN Definition Menu ...
Figure 47 VLAN Configuration Window for the Default VLAN
4. Modify the All Ports on VLAN field so that it no longer includes the
untagged ports that you have assigned to the new VLAN. Press
<Return>.
5. Return to the Omega Main Menu.
6. Repeat this procedure to modify any other VLANs that contain
untagged ports that you have assigned to the new VLAN.
105
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Phase 3
The final phase to creating a new VLAN involves changing the PVID of
each untagged port in the new VLAN to match the VLAN’s VID. To
accomplish this, do the following procedure:
Note
Only the PVID of untagged ports must be changed to match the VID
of its respective VLAN. The default PVID of tagged ports should not
be changed.
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
2. Select Port to VLAN configuration.
A window is displayed that lists each port on the switch and the VLAN
whose VID matches the port’s PVID. Figure 48 is an example of the
window. The example shows that the PVID for all of the ports on the
switch match the VID of the Default VLAN and, thus, that they all
belong to the Default VLAN.
Port Virtual LAN Configuration
Port
Virtual LAN
1
2
3
4
5
6
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
Default
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
VLAN
Return to previous menu ...
Figure 48 Port to VLAN Configuration Window
3. Select one of the untagged ports that you specified in Phase 1 to be a
member of the new VLAN.
A list of the VLANs on the switch is displayed, similar to the VLANs
window in Figure 45 on page 103.
4. Select the new VLAN to which the port will be a member.
The untagged port’s PVID is automatically changed to match the
VLAN ID. The untagged port is now a member of the new VLAN. (With
a local or Telnet management session, the Port to VLAN Configuration
window is automatically refreshed. With a web-based session, you
must refresh the window manually by returning to the Virtual
LANs/QoS menu and selecting Port to VLAN configuration.)
5. Repeat this procedure to change the PVID of any other untagged
ports that are to be members of the new VLAN.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The VLAN is now configured on the switch. But before you begin to use
the VLAN for network operations, it is recommended that you review the
information in Verifying the VLAN Configuration on page 107.
Verifying the
VLAN
Configuration
Before you begin to use a new VLAN, you should do the following:
❑ Check to be sure that each untagged port belongs to only one
VLAN. If an untagged port belongs to more than one VLAN, you
must remove the port from one of the VLANs. Determining this
might require that you examine the VLAN Configuration window
of each VLAN on the switch.
❑ Check to be sure that the PVID for each untagged port has been
changed to match the VID of its VLAN. This can be determined by
selecting Port to VLAN configuration from the Virtual LANs/QoS
menu.
Once you have verified that the VLAN configuration is correct, you can
begin to use the VLAN for network operations. For an example of
creating a VLAN, refer to the next section.
107
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Creating an Example VLAN
The procedures in this section create the Accounting VLAN in the top
AT-9006SX/SC Switch in Figure 43 on page 99. This VLAN will contain
ports 1 and 4 as untagged ports and ports 2 and 5 as tagged ports. For
the purposes of this example, it will be assumed that the only VLAN
currently existing on the switch is the Default VLAN.
Phase 1
This phase defines the new VLAN by specifying its name, Accounting,
and the ports that will be part of the VLAN. To accomplish this, perform
the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LAN/QoS.
2. From the Virtual LAN/QoS menu, select Virtual LAN Definition.
3. From the Virtual LAN definition window, select Add New Table Entry.
4. In the VLAN Name field, enter the name Accounting and press
<Return>.
Note
No change will be made to the VLAN ID field. This example will
accept the automatically assigned default value, which is the next
available VID number. Since the switch in this example currently
contains only the Default VLAN, Omega will assign the new VLAN
the ID 2.
5. In the All Ports on VLAN field, enter the following and press <Return>:
1,2,4,5
These are the ports, both tagged and untagged, on the switch that
will be part of the Accounting VLAN. Ports 1 and 4 will be untagged
ports and ports 2 and 5 will be tagged ports, meaning that they can
be members of more than one VLAN. It is important to remember that
the All Ports on VLAN field must contain tagged ports, if there will be
any, in addition to the untagged ports.
6. In the Tagged Ports on VLAN field, enter the following and press
<Return>:
3,4
These are the two ports on the switch that are to be tagged ports in
the Accounting VLAN. If this VLAN was not to have any tagged ports,
you would leave this field empty.
7. Return to the Omega Main Menu.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Phase 2
Now that you have defined the new Accounting VLAN, you must
reconfigure the existing VLANs by removing the untagged ports that
you have assigned to the new Accounting VLAN. To accomplish this,
perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LAN/QoS.
2. From the Virtual LAN/QoS menu, select Virtual LAN Definition.
3. Select the Default VLAN.
The VLAN window for the Default VLAN is displayed. In our example,
the Accounting VLAN is the first VLAN to be created on the switch.
Consequently, all ports by default are still members of the Default
VLAN. Thus, this is the VLAN that needs to be modified since it
contains the ports that are to be a part of the new VLAN.
4. Select the All Ports on VLAN field and change the entry from:
ALL
to
2,3,5,6
The reason for the change is because ports 1 and 4 are now untagged
members of the new Accounting VLAN and should no longer be
members of the Default VLAN. Press <Return>.
5. Return to the Omega Main Menu.
Phase 3
The final phase is to change the PVID of the untagged ports in the new
VLAN to match the VID of the Accounting VLAN. To accomplishment
this, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LAN/QoS.
2. Select Port to VLAN configuration.
The Port to Virtual LAN Configuration window is displayed. The
window lists each port on the switch and the VLAN whose VID
matches the port’s PVID. Figure 48 on page 106 is an example of the
window.
3. Select port 1.
4. The management program displays a list of the VLANs on the switch.
109
Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
5. Select Accounting.
The ports PVID is changed to match the Accounting VLAN’s VID. (With
a local or Telnet management session, the Port to VLAN Configuration
window is automatically refreshed. With a web-based session, you
must refresh the window manually by returning to the Virtual
LANs/QoS menu and selecting Port to VLAN configuration.)
6. Select port 4.
7. Select the Accounting VLAN.
The PVIDs for the untagged ports 1 and 4 have now been changed to
match the VID of the Accounting VLAN.
8. Return to the Omega Main Menu.
The Accounting VLAN is now ready for network operations.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Modifying a Port-based or Tagged VLAN
This procedure explains how to add or delete ports from an existing
port-based or tagged VLAN. You can also change a port from untagged
to tagged, or vice versa.
To modify a VLAN, perform the following procedures.
Phase 1
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
The Virtual LAN/QoS menu shown in Figure 44 on page 102 is
displayed.
2. Select Virtual LAN definitions.
The VLAN window shown in Figure 45 on page 103 is displayed. The
window lists the current VLANs in the switch, along with the tagged
and untagged ports that are members of the VLANs.
3. Select the name of the VLAN to be modified.
The VLAN Configuration window for the selected VLAN is displayed.
An example is shown in Figure 47 on page 105.
4. Select the All Ports on VLAN field and enter the revised port list for the
VLAN. Press <Return>.
This field must specify both the untagged ports and the tagged ports,
if any.
5. Select the Tagged Ports on VLAN field and enter the revised port list
for the VLAN if you want to specify tagged ports. Press <Return>.
If the VLAN already contains tagged ports and you want to remove
the tagged ports and not assign new tagged ports, enter a space in
this field and press <Return>.
The changes to the port assignments to the VLAN are activated
immediately. Ports removed from the VLAN are returned to the
Default VLAN.
6. Return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Phase 2
If you added one or more untagged ports to the VLAN, you must
removed the ports from their current VLAN assignment; otherwise the
untagged ports will be members of more than one VLAN. This procedure
is explained in Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN, Phase 2
on page 105.
If you removed any untagged ports from the VLAN, you must manually
reassign them to another VLAN. This involves modifying the VLAN to
which you want to reassign the untagged ports. This is accomplished by
displaying the VLAN Configuration window of the VLAN and modifying
the All Ports in VLAN field. Additionally, if you are reassigning the ports
to a VLAN other than the Default VLAN, you must also change the ports’
PVIDs to match the VLAN’s VID. This is accomplished by using the Port to
VLAN Configuration menu selection. This menu selection is explained in
the procedure Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN, Phase 3
on page 106.
Phase 3
112
If you added untagged ports to the VLAN, you must change the PVIDs of
the ports to match the VID of the VLAN. This is explained in the
procedure in Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN, Phase 3 on
page 106.
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Deleting a Port-based or Tagged VLAN
Deleting a port-based or tagged VLAN from a switch consists of two
procedures. Phase 1 consists of deleting the VLAN. Phase 2 involves
assigning the ports in the deleted VLAN to another VLAN.
Phase 1
To delete a VLAN, do the following:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
The Virtual LAN/QoS menu in Figure 44 is displayed.
2. Select Virtual LAN definitions.
The VLANs window in Figure 45 on page 103 is displayed.
3. Select the name of the VLAN to be deleted.
Note
You cannot delete the Default VLAN.
The current configuration for the selected VLAN is displayed.
4. Replace the name of the VLAN in the VLAN Name field with an asterisk
(*). Press <Return>.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
The VLAN is now deleted from the switch. The PVIDs of the ports are
automatically changed to match the VID of the Default VLAN. The
ports themselves, however, are not reassigned to another VLAN. That
must be accomplished manually, as explained in Phase 2.
Phase 2
To reassign the ports in the deleted VLAN to another VLAN, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS. The Virtual
LAN/QoS menu in Figure 44 on page 102 is displayed.
2. Select Virtual LAN definitions.
3. Select the VLAN where you want to reassign the untagged ports that
were a part of the deleted VLAN.
The VLAN Configuration window for the selected VLAN is displayed.
4. Modify the All Ports on VLAN field so that it includes the untagged
ports of the deleted VLAN.
5. Return to the Omega Main Menu.
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Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
6. If you moved the ports back to the Default VLAN, no further steps are
required. The VLAN has been deleted and you have reassigned the
untagged ports to the Default VLAN. However, if you reassigned the
ports to a VLAN other than the Default VLAN, you must perform the
additional step of modifying the PVID of the ports to match the VID of
their new VLAN. This can be accomplished by performing the
procedure in Creating a New Port-based or Tagged VLAN, Phase 2
on page 105.
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Assigning the CPU Management Port to a VLAN
This section contains the procedure for assigning the CPU management
port to a VLAN. By default, the CPU management port is assigned to the
Default VLAN.
Note
This procedure should be performed with caution. The CPU
management port must be assigned to the same VLAN that contains
the ports on the switch to which your remote management stations
are connected. Assigning the CPU management port to a VLAN that
does not contain the ports for your remote management stations
will prevent you from being able to manage the switch remotely.
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
The Virtual LAN/QoS menu in Figure 44 is displayed.
2. Select Assign Management Port to VLAN.
The following prompt is displayed:
Assign Management Port To VLAN
NOTE: Input port must be on the same VLAN as the Management
port or the management connection will be lost.
Management Port VLAN:
1
Return to Virtual LAN Menu ...
3. In the Management Port VLAN field, enter the VLAN ID number of the
VLAN to which you want to assign the CPU management port. The
default is the Default VLAN (VLAN ID 1).
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Configuring Port Priority Queueing
The AT-9006 Series Ethernet Switches support the IEEE 802.1p standard
and Quality of Service (QoS). QoS can be of importance in network
environments where there are time-critical applications, such as voice
transmission or video conferencing, that can be adversely affected by
packet transfer delays.
Prior to QoS, network traffic was handled in a best-effort manner. File
transfer delays did occur, but were mostly transparent to network users.
But with the introduction of time-critical applications, packet transfer
delays can be problematic. For example, transfer delays in voice
transmission can result in poor audio quality.
The QoS feature was designed to address this problem. The IEEE 802.1p
standard outlines eight levels of priority, 0 to 7, with 0 the lowest priority
and 7 the highest priority. The AT-9006 Series Ethernet Switches have
two priority queues, normal and high. Packets with priority levels 0 to 3
are placed in the normal queue and packets with priority levels 4 to 7 are
placed in the high queue.
When a tagged packet enters a switch port, the switch responds to the
priority in the tag and forwards the packet accordingly. If desired, you
can configure the individual ports on the switch so that the priority level
in a tagged frame is ignored and that the tagged packets received on a
port are automatically assigned to either the normal or high priority
queue, regardless of the priority level in the packet. Consequently, the
switch will forward a tagged frame according to the port priority level
and not to the priority level in the tagged packet itself. However, the
switch does not alter the priority level in the packet, so that when the
packet egresses the switch, its original packet priority level is
unchanged.
Note
The priority value in the packet is forwarded unchanged except in
the rare case when VLAN ID equals 0 (a special priority-tagged frame
with no VLAN ID information). In this case, packets with priority
values 0 through 3 will be mapped to priority 0, and packets with
priority values 4 through 7 will be mapped to priority 7.
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The following procedure explains how you can configure the individual
ports to either accept or ignore the priority levels in the tagged frames,
and, if the latter, which queue the packets are to be assigned, normal or
high. To set a port priority level, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
2. From the Virtual LANs/QoS menu, select Assign Port Priority.
The Omega program displays a list of the ports on the selected switch.
3. Select a port number to display the following screen (Port 6 is used as
an example):
Port Priority Menu
Port 6
Override VLAN Tag Priority
> Use VLAN Tag Priority
High Port Priority
> Normal Port Priority
Return to previous menu ...
Figure 49 Port Priority Setting Window
4. Adjust the settings as desired.
To override the priority levels specified in the tagged frames received
on the port, select Override VLAN Tag Priority. Then select either High
Port Priority to have the tagged frames ingressing the port handled
by the high priority queue or Normal Port Priority to have ingressing
frames handled by the normal queue.
Selecting the Use VLAN Tag Priority option instructs the switch to use
the priority level as contained in the tagged frames, and disables any
port priority setting. This is the default setting.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring Virtual LANs and Quality of Service
Configuring Switch Priority Queuing
When a tagged frame enters a port on the switch, the frame is placed in
one of two priority queues, normal or high, according to the priority
level as specified in the frame or by the port priority level, which you can
set. (See the procedure Configuring Port Priority Queueing on page
116 for instructions on configuring a port’s priority level.)
Packets in the two queues are handled in a round robin manner. The
default algorithm specifies that packets in the high priority queue
receive six times more importance than packets in the normal priority.
That is, the switch can handle six high priority packets before checking
for the presence of a packet in the normal priority queue.
The algorithm is adjustable. There are eight possible settings. The
settings allow you to give the tagged packets in the high priority queue
either more or less priority than the packets in the normal priority queue.
The lowest setting is 1 to 1, meaning that the switch will treat packets in
both the high and normal queues the same. The highest ratio is 12 to 1,
where the switch can handle up to 12 high priority packets before
checking for a normal priority packet.
Note
This setting is made at the switch level and applies to all ports on the
switch. You cannot set this on a per-port basis.
To configure a switch’s priority queuing, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, select Virtual LANs/QoS.
The Virtual LANs/QoS menu is displayed, as shown in Figure 44 on
page 102.
2. From the Virtual LANs/QoS menu, select Priority Weight configuration.
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
The window in Figure 50 is displayed.
Priority Weight
> Mode 1 (High-1 : Normal-1)
Mode 2 (High-2 : Normal-1)
Mode 3 (High-4 : Normal-1)
Mode 4 (High-6 : Normal-1)
Mode 5 (High-8 : Normal-1)
Mode 6 (High-10 : Normal-1)
Mode 7 (High-12 : Normal-1)
Mode 8 (All pkt transmit from High, 0pkt from Normal)
Return to Virtual LAN Menu ...
Figure 50 Priority Weight Configuration Window
3. Select the desired switch priority ratio. The default is Mode 4, where
the switch can transmit up to 6 high priority tagged packets before
searching for a normal priority packet. Mode 8 causes the switch to
defer handling packets in the normal priority queue so long as there
are any packets in the high priority queue.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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Chapter 6
Displaying Ethernet Statistics
The Omega interface allows you to view a wide range of statistics that
you can use in monitoring the performance of your network or in
diagnosing a problem and isolating it to a specific port. Menu selections
enable you to view both received or transmitted frame statistics at either
the switch or the port level. You can also view RMON statistics at either
the switch or port level.
This chapter contains the following procedures:
❑ Displaying Statistics for Received Frames on page 122
❑ Displaying Statistics for Transmitted Frames on page 125
❑ Displaying RMON Statistics for a Switch on page 127
❑ Displaying RMON Statistics for a Port on page 128
❑ Resetting the Statistics Counters on page 129
❑ Interpreting the Graphs on page 130
121
Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Displaying Statistics for Received Frames
To display statistics for received frames at either the switch or the port
level, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Main Menu, select Ethernet Statistics.
The Receive Statistics Graph window for the switch is displayed.
Figure 51 is an example of the window.
Receive Statistics Graph
Receive Good Frames:
Filtered Frames:
Broadcasts:
Multicasts:
CRC Errors:
Undersized Frames:
Fragments:
Long Frames:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
---------------------------
Transmit Statistics ...
Individual port overview ...
RMON Statistics ...
Port RMON Statistics ...
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Main Menu ...
Figure 51 Graph of Received Frames, Switch Level
The graph shows the types of frames the switch has received over a
period since the last switch reset or since someone reset the counters
to zero.
Table 4 defines the different types of received frames.
2. To view received frame statistics for a particular port, do either of the
following:
a. Select Individual port overview and then a port. The frames
statistics for the selected port display. Figure 52 is an example of
the window.
b. Select a frame type from the Receive Frames window. The
statistics for the selected frame type for all of the ports is
displayed. A example is shown in Figure 53.
Note
You can also view an individual port’s receive statistics by selecting
the Port status and configuration option from the Main Menu, and
choosing a port number.
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3. To clear the graph, select Zero all statistics counters on the entire
system.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
Table 4 Received Ethernet Frames
Frame Type
Description
Received Good Frames
Total number of frames received by the switch since the last reset.
Filtered Frames
Frames received by the switch but not forwarded because the
destination is within the same LAN segment; therefore, the frame
was already seen by all nodes on the segment.
Broadcasts
Frames received by the switch destined for all nodes on the network,
excluding multicast frames.
Multicasts
Frames received by the switch destined for multiple but specific
addresses, excluding broadcast frames.
CRC Errors
Frames with a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) error but with the
proper length (64-1518 bytes).
Alignment Errors
Frames with a non-integral number of bytes, that is, frame length in
bits are not evenly divisible by 8, but with the proper length (64-1518
bytes).
Undersized Frames
Frames less than the minimum specified by IEEE 802.3 (64 bytes
including the CRC); also called runts.
Fragments
Undersized frames, frames with alignment errors, and frames with
FCS errors (CRC errors).
Long Frames
Frames exceeding the maximum specified by IEEE 802.3 (1518 bytes
including the CRC).
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Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Port 6
Receive Statistics Graph
Receive Good Frames:
Filtered Frames:
Broadcasts:
Multicasts:
CRC Errors:
Undersized Frames:
Fragments:
Long Frames:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
---------------------------
Transmit statistics ...
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Port Statistics Graph...
Figure 52 Graph of a Port’s Received Frames
Receive Statistics Graph
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
Port
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
-----------------------------------
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Receive Statistics Graph ...
Figure 53 Sample Graph of a Single Frame Type on All Ports
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Displaying Statistics for Transmitted Frames
To display statistics for transmitted frames at both the switch and port
level, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Main Menu, Ethernet Statistics.
The Receive Statistics Graph in Figure 51 is displayed.
2. Select Transmit Statistics.
The window in Figure 54 is displayed. The window displays the
transmit frame statistics for the entire switch The graph shows the
types of frames the switch has transmitted over a period since the
switch’s last reset or since someone has set the counters to zero.
Transmit errors should be very small. The switch may receive a
number of bad frames, but the switch drops those and sends only
good frames.
3. To view statistics for a particular port, do either of the following:
a. Select Individual port overview and then a port. The frames
statistics for the selected port are displayed.
b. Select a frame type from the graph transmit Frames window. The
statistics for the selected frame type for all of the ports is
displayed.
4. To clear the graph, select Zero all statistics counters on the entire
system.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
Transmit Statistics Graph
Total Good Transmits:
Broadcasts:
Multicasts:
Single Collisions:
Late Collisions:
0
0
0
0
0
|
|
|
|
|
---------------------------
Individual port overview ...
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Receive Statistics Graph ...
Figure 54 Sample Graph of Transmitted Frames Window
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Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Table 5 defines the statistics.
Table 5 Transmit Frames
Frame Type
Description
Total good transmits
Total frames transmitted by the switch without errors since the last
reset.
Broadcasts
Frames forwarded by the switch destined for all nodes on the
network, excluding multicast frames.
Multicasts
Frames forwarded by the switch destined for multiple but specific
addresses, excluding broadcast frames.
Single collisions
Frames from two ports that collided because they were sent at the
same time; considered normal.
Late collisions
Collisions that occur after 64-byte times of the frame had elapsed.
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Displaying RMON Statistics for a Switch
To display the RMON statistics for a switch, perform the following steps:
1. From the Main Menu, select Ethernet statistics.
The Receive Statistics Graph in Figure 51 is displayed.
2. Select RMON statistics.
The RMON Statistics Graph window is displayed. An example of the
window is shown in Figure 55.
RMON Statistics Graph
64 Byte Frames:
65-127 Byte Frames:
128-255 Byte Frames:
256-511 Byte Frames:
512-1023 Byte Frames:
1024-1518 Byte Frames:
0
0
0
0
0
0
|
|
|
|
|
|
---------------------------
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Receive Statistics Graph ...
Figure 55 RMON Statistics Graph Window
3. To clear the graph, select Zero all statistics counters from the entire
system.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
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Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Displaying RMON Statistics for a Port
To display RMON statistics for a specific port, perform the following
procedure:
1. From the Main Menu, select Ethernet statistics.
The Receive Statistics Graph shown in Figure 51 is displayed.
2. Select Port RMON Statistics.
The Omega interface displays a list of the ports on the switch.
3. Select a port to display a graph similar to Figure 56.
4. To clear the graph, select Zero all statistics counters from the entire
system.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
Port 6
RMON Statistics Graph
64 Byte Frames:
65-127 Byte Frames:
128-255 Byte Frames:
256-511 Byte Frames:
512-1023 Byte Frames:
1024-1518 Byte Frames:
0
0
0
0
0
0
|
|
|
|
|
|
---------------------------
Zero all statistics counters on the entire system
Return to Port Statistics Graph ...
Figure 56 Sample RMON Statistics Graph for a Port
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Resetting the Statistics Counters
You reset statistics counters because:
❑ The counters no longer reflect the current information.
For example, disabling a port to fix a problem does not reset its
counters. After the error clears and you manually re-enable the
port, you may want its statistics to accumulate from a fresh start.
Otherwise, the counters and the graph not only still reflect
information associated with the error condition; the counters
continue to increment from the wrong baseline.
❑ As each frame type reaches the maximum of 232 (over 4 billion),
the statistics for that frame type resets to zero. Once this happens,
the counters and graph become inaccurately skewed.
To reset switch (system) counters, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Main Menu, select Ethernet Statistics.
2. Select Zero all statistics on the entire system.
Both Receive and Transmit counters and graphs are reset to zero.
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Displaying Ethernet Statistics
Interpreting the Graphs
The statistics graphs show the types of received and transmitted frames
since the last time the counters or the switch were reset. The counters
and the graph dynamically increment as the switch processes frames
over a period of time.
When the individual counters reach a maximum of 232 (over 4 billion),
they reset to zero. Because each counter resets independently, your
graph may become inaccurately skewed over time; therefore, you need
to reset the counters to get a new baseline on frame statistics.
The graphs help you visually monitor the proportion of good and bad
frames the switch has detected. Good frames consist of filtered and
forwarded broadcasts and multicasts. Bad frames are runts and long
frames, or those with CRC or alignment errors. It is normal to have a
number of error packets now and then. If the network seems to be
“slow,” this graph is one of the areas you can check to help isolate the
problem.
To use the graphs as monitoring and diagnostics tools:
1. Display any of the Ethernet statistics graphs by selecting Ethernet
statistics from the Main Menu.
2. Observe the counters and the graph.
3. Identify and then fix the problem.
Note that the problem may be external to the switch, and the
statistics may just indicate an error condition somewhere on the
network you need to fix. You may also need additional monitoring
devices specifically designed for that purpose, such as a network
analyzer, to identify the problem.
4. Select Zero all statistics counters on the entire system from any of the
Statistics window after fixing the problem.
You need to reset counters to get a new baseline. That is because the
counters and graphs still depict the information during the error
condition and will continue to increment from there until you reset
the counters.
130
Chapter 7
Configuring the Omega Interface
This chapter describes the security features of the Omega interface.
These features allow you to configure the interface so as to prevent
unauthorized individuals from accessing it and making changes to the
configuration settings of a switch. This chapter contains the following
procedures:
❑ Creating an Omega Password on page 132
❑ Specifying a Timeout Value on page 134
❑ Enabling and Disabling the Access Methods on page 135
131
Configuring the Omega Interface
Creating an Omega Password
To prevent unauthorized individuals from accessing the Omega
interface and altering a switch’s configuration settings, you can assign a
password to the program. Any person who starts the program will be
required to enter the password, regardless of how they access the
program (i.e., RS232 port, web browser, Telnet program, or SNMP
management program). The default value for the Omega interface is no
password.
Note
The Omega password is not related to the download password for
downloading software to a switch. For information on the
download password, refer to Chapter 8, Upgrading Switch
Software and Configuration Files.
To specify a new password for the Omega interface, perform the
following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, choose System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu is displayed.
2. Select Omega Options.
The Omega Options window in Figure 57 is displayed.
Omega Options Menu
Password:
Null (not configured)
Timeout:
5
> Local Omega Enabled
Disable Local Omega
> Remote Omega Enabled
No Remote Omega
> Web-based Omega Enabled
Exclude Web-based Omega
Return to System Configuration Menu ...
Figure 57 Omega Options Window
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AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Note
The password can consist of the letters A to Z in uppercase and
lowercase, as well as the numbers 1 to 9. It is recommended that you
avoid special characters, such as a space, asterisk (*), or exclamation
point (!). Avoiding the use of special characters is particularly
important if you will be managing the switch using a web browser,
since browsers cannot handle special characters in program
passwords.
3. Enter a new password for the Omega interface in the Password field
at the top of the window.
The password can be up to 20 characters. The password displays as a
series of asterisks. To delete the current password but not assign a
new password, enter a space in the Password field.
4. Select Enter.
The new password is now activated on the switch. You will be
required to enter the password the next time you start an Omega
management session.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
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Configuring the Omega Interface
Specifying a Timeout Value
Specifying a timeout value is a way to prevent unauthorized individuals
from using the Omega interface in the event you forget to exit the
Omega interface and leave your management station unattended. By
specifying a timeout value, the program will end the session if it detects
that there has been no management activity after the timeout value has
expired. The default for the timeout value is 5 minutes.
To enter a new timeout value, perform the following procedure:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, choose System Configuration.
The the System Configuration menu is displayed.
2. Select Omega Options.
The Omega Options window in Figure 57 is displayed.
3. Enter a value from 0 (zero) to 65,535 (in minutes) in the Timeout field.
Entering a value of 0 means there is no timeout. The Omega interface
will not end any session. A session is ended only if you end the session
yourself. If you enter 0, you must always properly quit after a
management session in order not to block subsequent remote
sessions and software downloads to the switch.
Selecting Reset returns the timeout value to the default value of 300.
4. Select Enter.
The new Omega timeout value is now activated on the switch.
5. Return to the Main Menu.
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Enabling and Disabling the Access Methods
As explained in Chapter 1, you can access the Omega interface three
different ways. You can disable one or more of the methods to enhance
the security of a switch by preventing unauthorized individuals from
accessing the switch and making changes to the switch’s configuration
settings.
To enable or disable an Omega access method, perform the following
steps:
1. From the Omega Main Menu, choose System Configuration.
The System Configuration menu is displayed.
2. Select Omega Options.
The Omega Options window in Figure 57 is displayed.
3. Toggle the options as desired. Changes are immediately activated on
the switch. The options are explained below:
Local Omega Enabled
Local Omega Disabled
These two selections allow you to control whether the Omega
interface can be accessed by connecting a terminal or PC to the RS232
management port on the switch. This is referred to as accessing the
program locally. The default for this access method is enabled.
Remote Omega Enabled
Remote Omega Disabled
Accessing Omega remotely is accomplished with the Telnet program
or an SNMP management program, such as HP Openview. Accessing
the program remotely means you can access the program from a
remote location by entering the switch’s MAC address, its IP address,
or user-assigned unique name. The default for this access method is
enabled.
Web-based Omega Enabled
Web-based Omega Disabled
Web-based Omega means you can access the management menus
by connecting to your switch through a web browser. This feature
requires a TCP/IP network. The default is enabled.
4. Return to the Main Menu.
135
Chapter 8
Upgrading Switch Software and
Configuration Files
This chapter contains the following procedures:
❑ Upgrading the Switch Software on page 137
❑ Using Omega to Upgrade Additional Switches on page 140
❑ Uploading and Downloading System Configuration Files on
page 142
Upgrading the Switch Software
Allied Telesyn periodically updates and revises the AT-S26 software for
your AT-9006 switches. The latest version of the software is posted on
the Allied Telesyn web site for you to download onto your switches.
The file for you to download is a self-extracting compressed file. It
contains several additional files. One the files is the actual software
image file. It has an .IMG extension. This is the software image file that is
to be used in the following upgrade directions.
You can use either by XModem or Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) to
upgrade the software on a switch.
The Omega interface simplifies the task of upgrading the software in
multiple AT-9006 switches. Rather than having to upgrade each switch
manually, you need only upgrade one AT-9006 switch in your network
and then use commands in the Omega interface to download the new
software to the other switches automatically. The Omega commands
used for this are Update Software in Another Switch and Broadcast
Updated Software to All Systems.
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Upgrading Switch Software and Configuration Files
Upgrading the software in a switch involves using the Download
Password. This password is required when upgrading the software
except when using the XMODEM software upgrade feature. The default
download password is ATS26. The password is case sensitive. Changing
this default password to an unique password will prevent unauthorized
personnel from changing the software on the switch. See IP Parameters
in Chapter 3 for instructions on how to change the download password.
Using XModem
to Upgrade the
Switch Software
Omega supports software upgrades to the switch using XModem. It is
assumed that you have the required setup to support this type of file
transfer. This upgrade procedure can only be performed from a local
session because the Xmodem transfer occurs through the switch’s
RS232 management port.
You can upgrade a switch’s software with XModem using either of the
following methods:
Method 1: Using the Omega Menus
1. Start a local Omega management session.
2. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration to display the
Administration menu.
3. Select XModem software update to this system.
4. Initiate the upgrade from your XModem host. The Xmodem host
displays a message stating that the upgrade in progress. Be sure to
wait until the switch has fully downloaded the software, performed its
diagnostic tests, and reinitialized and rebooted itself before you
attempt to reestablish an Omega session.
Method 2: Using the Special System Menus
1. Attach a terminal to the RS232 port on the switch.
2. Press the Reset button on the right side of the switch’s front panel.
3. Immediately press any key when you see the following prompt:
Hit any key to run diagnostics or to reload
system software.
A menu is displayed.
4. From the menu, select Administration.
5. Select XModem software update to this system. The following prompts
are displayed.
Ready to receive software upgrade via XModem.
Warning: During software update, management
activity is disabled.
Do XModem update now? (Yes or No):
138
AT-S26 Version 2.1.0 User’s Guide
6. Enter Yes and wait for the following message:
The system host is now ready for download.
Please start your XModem transfer.
7. Initiate the upgrade from your XModem host. The Xmodem host
displays a message stating that the upgrade in progress. Be sure to
wait until the switch has fully downloaded the software, performed its
diagnostic tests, and reinitialized and rebooted itself before you
attempt to reestablish an Omega session.
Using TFTP to
Upgrade Software
If you use TCP/IP protocol on your network, you can use a workstation
and TFTP software to upload new software to the switch or download a
copy of the current software from the switch. The switch contains the
TFTP server portion of the TFTP protocol which requires that the
workstation contain the TFTP client portion of the protocol.
TFTP software is available from various sources and is included in
SNMPc, which can be purchased through Allied Telesyn. A command
line version is included in most UNIX variants and in Windows NT. Please
consult the documentation or the manufacturer of the software for
instructions on how to use the software.
Regardless of the manufacturer, all TFTP client software will need the
following information:
Host - This is the IP address of the switch to which you are uploading or
downloading software.
Binary or ANSI - You will need to specify binary mode for the file
transfer.
Get or Put - The Get command is used to download a copy of the
software to a file on the workstation. The Put command is used to
upload a new software image file to the switch.
Source file - When using the Put command to upload software to the
switch, enter the path and filename of the software image that is to be
uploaded. When using the Get command to download the software
from a switch, enter the Download Password here.
Destination file - When using the Put command to upload software to
the switch, enter the Download Password here. When using the Get
command to download the software from a switch, enter the path and
filename of the software image that is to be downloaded.
139
Upgrading Switch Software and Configuration Files
Using Omega to Upgrade Additional Switches
Once you have upgrade the software on one switch in the network, you
can use the Omega interface to download the new software onto
another switch. The switch with the upgraded software uses TFTP of the
TCP/IP protocol suite to download the software to the other switch. This
download feature will still work even if you do not use TCP/IP on your
network. A switch can download software to other switches of the same
product family as long as the following conditions are met.
❑ If your network does not use TCP/IP, the switches must be in the
same local segment (collision domain).
❑ If your network uses TCP/IP and the switches are on different
subnets, the default gateway IP parameter must be properly
configured on all switches.
❑ All switches must have the same download password as the
source switch. See the section Configuring the Switch IP
Parameters on page 42 for instructions on setting the download
password.
Downloading
Software to One
Switch
To download a new version of the AT-S26 software from one switch to
another switch using the Omega interface, perform the following
procedure:
1. Start an Omega session on the switch that contains the new AT-S26
software. The session can be a local session, web-based session, or a
Telnet session.
2. From the Omega Main Menu, select Administration.
3. From the Administration menu, select Update software in another
system.
4. Specify the switch to upgrade using one of the following methods:
❑ By its IP address, in the format x.x.x.x
❑ By its Ethernet (or MAC) address, in the format xxxxxx xxxxxx
(The switches must be on the same collision domain.)
The MAC address of a switch can be found above the switch’s RS232
management port on the front panel.
The Omega interface activates the Activity Monitor screen, which
displays status information as the destination switch requests and
then receives the software.
Repeat this procedure to download software to another switch on the
network.
140
AT-S26 Version 2.1.0 User’s Guide
Downloading
Software to All
Switches
To download a new version of the AT-S26 software from one switch to all
the other switches using the Omega interface, perform the following
procedure:
1. Start an Omega session on the switch that contains the new AT-S26
software. The session can be a local session, web-based session,
Telnet session, or SNMP session.
Note
This procedure should be performed during periods of low network
activity. Software broadcast updates can fail if the network is
operating at a high activity rate.
2. From the Omega Main Menu, select System administration.
3. Select Broadcast updated software to all systems.
The switch announces the availability of the software to all other
AT-9006 switches; in turn, those switches that need the upgrade
respond by sending back a “request” message.
The Omega interface activates the Activity Monitor screen, which
displays status information as the destination switch requests and
then receives the software.
Note
You cannot undo this command once it is executed.
You may go to menus without interrupting the software download.
If you have many switches requesting the download, not all of them may
receive it, especially if the network is busy. It is recommended that you
repeat this procedure to ensure that all switches receive the upgraded
AT-S26 software.
Note
Switches with different download passwords will not receive the
software download. For information on setting the download
password, refer to the procedure Configuring the Switch IP
Parameters on page 42.
141
Upgrading Switch Software and Configuration Files
Uploading and Downloading System Configuration Files
The switch configuration information can be downloaded and saved to a
file on a workstation. This file can then be used to restore the
configuration information to the same switch or can be uploaded to
other switches of the same family that need to be configured identically.
TFTP is used to download and upload the switch configuration
information. Please refer to the section Using TFTP to Upgrade
Software on page 139 earlier in this chapter for requirements and
instructions for using TFTP. The only difference is that you must use the
Config Download Password to access the switch configuration
information. By default this Config Download Password is set to config
and is case sensitive. Changing this default password to an unique
password will prevent unauthorized personnel from copying or
uploading an unauthorized configuration to a switch. See the section
Configuring the Switch IP Parameters on page 42 for instructions on
how to change the download password for configuration files.
The basic TFTP parameters for downloading and uploading the switch
configuration information are as follows:
Host - This is the IP address of the switch that you are uploading or
downloading the configuration information to.
Binary or ANSI - You need to specify binary mode for the file transfer.
Get or Put - The Get command is used to download a copy of the switch
configuration information to a file on the workstation. The Put
command is used to upload an existing switch configuration file to the
switch.
Source file - When using the Put command to upload a configuration
file to the switch, enter the path and filename of the configuration file
that is to be uploaded. When using the Get command to download the
software from a switch, enter the Config Download Password here.
Destination file - When using the Put command to upload a
configuration file to a switch, enter the Config Download Password here.
When using the Get command to download the configuration
information from a switch, enter the path and filename of the file that
you want to save the information to.
Note
The switch configuration file created with these procedures cannot
be edited.
142
Appendix A
AT-S26 Default Settings
This appendix lists the AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 factory default settings.
Settings
Default
IP Address
Subnet Mask
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Gateway Address
Domain Name Server
Default Domain Name
Download Password (AT-S26 image file)
Config Download Password
(Configuration Files)
DHCP Configuration
IGMP Snooping
System Name
MAC Aging Time
Domain Name
Community Strings
Get Community String
Set Community String
Trap Community String
Spanning Tree Protocol
Status
Bridge Priority
Bridge Max Age Time
Bridge Hello Time
Bridge Forwarding Delay
0.0.0.0
None
None
ATS26
config
Disabled
Disabled
None
300 seconds
None
public
private
public
Disabled
32768
20
2
15
143
AT-S26 Default Settings
Settings
Default
Omega
Omega Password
No password
Omega Time Out Value
5 minutes
Local Access
Enabled
Remote Access (Telnet or SNMP)
Enabled
Web-based Access
Enabled
AT-9006T Twisted Pair Ports
Status
Enabled
Duplex Mode
Auto-negotiation
Speed
Auto-negotiation
Backpressure
Disabled
Flow Control
Disabled
Broadcast Packets
Forwarded
Security
Automatic
AT-9006SX/SC and AT-9006LX/SC Fiber Optic Ports
Status
Enabled
Duplex Mode
Full-duplex
Speed
1000 Mbps
Security
Automatic
VLANs
Port-based and Tagged VLANs
Enabled
Default VLAN Name
Default VLAN (all ports)
VID
1
RS232 Port
Configuration
VT-100-compatible /
ANSI
Data Bits
8
Stop Bits
1
Parity
None
Duplex Mode
Full-duplex
Data Rate
9600 bps
144
Appendix B
Spanning Tree Protocol Concepts
This appendix provides a brief explanation of the Spanning Tree
Protocol as implemented by Allied Telesyn on the switches.
For detailed information on the operation of the Spanning Tree
Protocol, consult Section 4 of IEEE Std 802.1D, ISO/IEC 10038: 1993.
The AT-9006 switch, which runs the AT-S26 software, implements
the IEEE 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol (STP). The STP provides a
network with robustness and allows network administrators to easily
change their network topology. Its implementation reduces complex
network topologies (networks with multiple paths between source
and destination nodes) to a single active topology. This technique
guarantees that loops do not occur between source and destination
nodes of the network. Loops are eliminated by placing some of the
redundant ports in a “blocking” state, in which they do not forward
packets but continue to execute the protocol. If the network
topology changes, for example by the failure, removal, or addition of
an active network node, a “blocked” port may be included in the new
active topology and begin forwarding frames.
145
Spanning Tree Protocol Concepts
Spanning Tree Protocol Features
The switches implement the following STP features:
146
❑
Compensate automatically for the failure, removal, or addition
of any bridge in an active data path.
❑
Achieve port changes in short time intervals, which
establishes a stable active topology quickly with a minimum
of network disturbance.
❑
Use a minimum amount of communications bandwidth to
accomplish the operation of the STP.
❑
Reconfigure the active topology in a manner which is
transparent to stations transmitting and receiving data
packets.
❑
Manage the topology in a consistent and reproducible
manner through the use of STP parameters.
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Spanning Tree Protocol Parameters
Several configuration parameters control the operation of the
Spanning Tree Protocol. Table 6 describes the parameters and lists
each parameter default settings for the switch.
Table 6 Spanning Tree Protocol Parameters
Parameter and Description
Default
Bridge Group Address
Unique MAC group address, recognized by all
bridges in the network
N/A
Bridge Identifier
Identifier for each bridge, consisting of two
parts: a 16-bit bridge priority and a 48-bit
network adapter address. Ports are numbered
in absolute numbers; from 1-n for a multi-port
switch including optional expansion ports, if
any. The network adapter address is the same
address as the first port of the bridge.
32768
(bridge priority)
Port Priority
128
Port Cost
The spanning tree algorithm calculates and
ensures that an active topology generates
minimal path costs.
1 for 1000 Mbps
(Gigabit) ports
147
Spanning Tree Protocol Concepts
Spanning Tree Protocol Operation
When STP is enabled for the first time, or when the network topology
changes due to a failure, the addition, or removal of a component,
the spanning tree algorithm automatically sets up the active
topology of the current network.
Communication Between Bridges
Periodically, all devices running STP on a network transmit packets to
each other through the Bridge Group Address which all bridges
share. When a bridge receives a packet sent to the Bridge Group
Address, the bridge’s STP processes the packet. The packet is ignored
by application software and other LAN segments. Bridges
communicate between each other in order to determine the root
bridge.
Selecting a Root Bridge and Designated Bridges
During communication between bridges, one bridge is determined
to have the lowest bridge identifier. This bridge becomes the root
bridge.
After the root bridge has been selected, each LAN segment looks for
the bridge that has the lowest cost relative to the root bridge. These
bridges become designated bridges.
Selecting Designated Ports
Each designated bridge selects a designated port. This port is
responsible for forwarding packets to the root bridge.
Handling Duplicate Paths
When the active topology of the network is determined, all packets
between any two nodes in the network use only one path. Where a
duplicate path exists, the non-designated port is put into a blocking
state.
148
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
Remapping Network Topology
If there is a change in the network topology due to a failure, removal,
or addition of any active components, the active topology also
changes. This may trigger a change in the state of some blocked
ports.
The blocked ports do not forward packets immediately. They first
pass through two states, listening and learning, to verify that they
may begin forwarding. A port remains in each of these two states for
the time defined by the Forwarding Delay parameter. This algorithm
ensures that no temporary loops exist in the active network topology
and is a safeguard against packet forwarding during a network
topology change period.
149
Appendix C
Supported Platforms
Table 7 lists the Allied Telesyn Ethernet switches supported by the
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 management software.
Table 7 AT-9006 Switches
Model1
Number of
Ports
Type of
Connector
Maximum Distance
AT-9006T
6
100Base-T /
1000Base-TX
RJ-45
100 m (328 ft)
AT-9006SX/SC
6
1000Base-SX
SC
550 m (1804 ft)2
AT-9006LX/SC
6
1000Base-LX
SC
10 km (6.25 mi)3
Type of Port
1. The models include two expansion slots.
2. Assumes 50/125 micron fiber optic cable with a rating of 500 MHz/Km.
3. Assumes 9/125 micron single-mode fiber optic cable. Also assumes the port is connected to another AT-9006LX/SX switch or to a
compatible GBIC module.
151
Supported Platforms
Table 8 lists the optional expansion modules supported by the software.
Table 8 Optional Expansion Modules
Model
Number
of Ports
Type of Ports
Type of
Connector
Type of
Cable1
Maximum
Distance2
AT-A14
1
100/1000Base-T
RJ-45
Category 5 or
better twisted
pair3
100 m (328 ft)
AT-A15/SX
1
1000Base-SX
SC
Multimode
fiber optic
550 m (1,804 ft)
AT-A15/LX
1
1000Base-LX
SC
Single-mode
fiber optic
10 km (6.2 mi)
AT-A16
2
100Base-FX
VF-45
Multimode
fiber optic
2 km (1.25 mi)
AT-A17
2
100Base-FX
SC
Multimode
fiber optic
2 km (1.25 mi)
AT-A18
4
10/100Base-TX
RJ-45
Category 3
(for 10Base-T)
or Category 5
(for 100BaseT) or better
twisted pair
100 m (328 ft)
AT-A19
2
100Base-FX
MT-RJ
Multimode
fiber optic
2 km (1.25 mi)
AT-A24/SX
1
1000Base-SX
MT-RJ
Multimode
fiber optic
550 m (1,804 ft)
AT-A24/LX
1
1000Base-LX
MT-RJ
Single-mode
fiber optic
10 km (6.2 mi)
1. Multimode fiber optic cable can be either 50/125µm or 62.5/125µm cabling. Single-mode fiber optic cable must be 9/125µm
2. Maximum distance can be less depending on the duplex mode of the end node and the type of cabling used with the module.
3. Contact a qualified cabling technician for details on the IEEE specifications for Gigabit Ethernet over twisted pair cabling.
152
Index
(Entries in italic are menu selections.)
A
Activity monitor, 61
activity monitor, 61
Add MAC Address, 87
Add new table entry, 103
adding static MAC addresses, 87
Adminstration, 35
aging time
bridge, 50
MAC address table, 85
alignment errors, 123
All static MAC addresses, 86
ANSI terminal, 25
Assign Port Priority, 117
AT-S26 software
reassigning default values, 56
upgrading, 137, 140
version number, 59
audience, this guide, 11
Automatic level, port security, 76
auto-negotiation, 69
B
backpressure, 70
baud rate, 58
bookmarks, 31
Bootp, 42
BPDU, see bridge protocol data unit
bridge group address, 147
bridge identifier, 147
bridge priority, 50
bridge protocol data unit (BPDU), 50
Bridging, 37
broadcast packets, 70
broadcast statistics, 123, 126
Broadcast updated software to all systems, 141
browser tools, 31
By port MAC addresses, 83
C
Clear dynamic MAC table, 85
Clear static MAC table, 89
clearing the static MAC address table, 89
community strings, SNMP, 46
Config Download password, 46
Config MAC address limit per port, 77
configuration files, uploading or downloading, 142
configuring
multicast addresses, 90
port parameters, 68
priority queueing, 116
STP parameters, 50
STP port parameters, 48
switch IP parameters, 42
Connect to remote system, 34
connecting to remote switch, 34
conventions, used in this guide, 13
CPU management port 115
CRC errors, 123
creating
port trunk, 72
port-based VLAN, 102
tagged VLANs, 102
VLAN, 102
D
data bits, 58
data rate, 58
DEC VT100 terminal, 25
default domain name, 44
default settings
reassigning switch default values, 56
153
Index
Default VLAN, 102
Delete MAC Address, 92
deleting
multicast addresses, 92
port trunk, 73
static MAC addresses, 88
VLAN, 113
Destination Port, 75
DHCP Configuration, 45
DHCP server, 42
Diagnostics, 59
diagnostics, running, 59
Disable Spanning Tree for all Ports, 48
disabling port mirroring, 75
displaying
MAC address table by address, 84
MAC address table, 82
MAC addresses by port, 83
port status, 66
received frame statistics, 122
RMON statistics, 127, 128
transmitted frame statistics, 125
documentation set, list, 14
domain name server, 44
download password, 45, 138
downloading AT-S26 software
all switches, 141
one switch, 140
downloading configuration files, 142
E
emulation, terminal, 25
Enable Spanning Tree for all Ports, 48
enabling port mirroring, 74
Ethernet statistics, 35
F
filtered frames, 123
flow control, 70
forwarding delay, 51
fragments, 123
full-duplex, 58, 69
G
gateway address, 44
generic terminal, 26
Get Port From MAC Address, 84
global configuration, 70
graphical switch, 30
graphs, statistics
received frames, by frame type, 124
received frames, port level, 124
transmitted frames, switch level, 125
use as diagnostic tool, 129
guidelines, port trunking, 71
154
H
half-duplex, 58, 69
Hello time, 51
I
IEEE 802.1d standard, 51
IEEE 802.1Q standard, 97
IEEE 802.3ac standard, 97
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP), 52
IP address, 44
IP Parameters, 43
IP parameters, configuring, 42
L
late collisions, 126
Limited level, port security, 77
Link status, 66
local Omega session
enabling or disabling, 135
quitting, 27
starting, 23
long frame, 123
M
MAC address table
aging time, configuring, 85
defined, 81
displaying, 82
displaying by MAC address, 84
displaying by port, 83
MAC Address Table, 37
MAC address, 59
main menu
local session, 24
web browser session, 30
manager address, 44
max age time parameter, 50
menu tree, 35
Mode, port, 67
modifying a VLAN, 111
multicast addresses
changing, 92
configuring, 90
defined, 90
deleting, 92
Multicast addresses, 90
multicast statistics, 123, 126
N
naming a switch, 54
O
Omega interface
main menu, 24, 30
menu tree, 35
AT-S26 Version 2.0.1 User’s Guide
security, 131
Omega session
bookmarks, 31
local, 23
SNMP, 33
Telnet, 33
web browser, 28
Online Manual web link, 31
organization, this guide, 12
P
parity, 58
partitioning a port, 69
password
Config Download, 46, 142
download, 45
Omega interface, 132
Per port static MAC addresses, 87, 88
Ping a remote system, 62
ping command, 62
port cost, 147
port groups, 71
port mirroring
defined, 74
enabling, 74
port mirroring, disabling, 75
port name, 70
port priority, 147
port security, 76
Port spanning tree configuration, 48
Port Status and Configuration, 35, 66, 68
Port Status, 66
port status, 66
Port to VLAN configuration, 106, 109, 112
port trunking
creating, 72
defined, 71
deleting, 73
guidelines, 71
Port Trunking in the 10/100M Speed Port, 72, 73
ports
configuring parameters, 68
configuring security level, 76
configuring STP parameters, 50
displaying RMON statistics, 128
priority queueing, VLAN, 116
Priority Weight configuration, 118
purpose, this guide, 11
Q
Quit, 34
quitting
local Omega session, 27
Telnet Omega session, 33
web browser Omega session, 32
R
received frame statistics, 122
received good frames, 123
remote Omega session
defined, 33
enabling or disabling, 135
starting, 33
remote switch, connecting to, 34
Reset and restart the system, 55
resetting a switch, 55
resetting statistics counters, 129
RMON statistics, 127, 128
root bridge, 50, 148
root port, 148
RS232 port
configuring, 57
default settings, 23
running diagnostics, 59
S
Secure level, port security, 77
security, Omega interface, 131
Security/Source Address Table, 76
Send Email web link, 31
Show all MAC addresses, 82
single collision, 126
SNMP community strings, 46
SNMP Omega session, 33
snooping, 52
software upgrade, 137
Source Port, 75
Spanning tree parameters, 50
spanning tree protocol
concepts, 145
configuring parameters, 50
configuring port parameters, 48
defined, 47
starting Omega session
local, 23
SNMP, 33
Telnet, 33
web browser, 28
static MAC address table
adding addresses, 87
clearing, 89
defined, 86
deleting addresses, 88
displaying, 86
statistics
graphs interpretation, 129
received frames, 122
resetting counters, 129
RMON, 127, 128
transmitted frames, 125
transmitted frames, description, 126
155
Index
Status
port, 67
stop bits, 58
STP, see spanning tree protocol
subnet mask, 44
switch
configuring IP parameters, 42
configuring the RS232 port, 57
connecting to remote, 34
MAC address, 59
naming, 54
reassigning default settings, 56
resetting, 55
upgrading AT-S26 software, 137
System Configuration, 36, 57
System switch configuration, 72, 73
T
Technical Support web link, 31
Telnet session, 33
terminal emulation, 25
terminal interface, 25
TFTP, to upgrade AT-S26 software, 139
timeout value, 134
total good transmits, 126
Traffic/Port Mirroring, 36, 74, 75
transmitted frame statistics, 125
U
undersized frames, 123
Update software in another system, 140
upgrading AT-S26 software
using Omega, 140
using TFTP, 139
using XModem, 138
uploading configuration files, 142
V
Virtual LAN definitions, 103, 105, 111, 113
Virtual LANs/QoS, 36
VLAN
advantages, 94
CPU management port 115
creating, 102
Default VLAN, 102
deleting, 113
modifying, 111
port-based, 95
priority queueing, 116
tagging, 96
W
web browser Omega session
enabling or disabling, 135
quitting, 32
156
starting, 28
web links, 31
What’s New web link, 31
X
XModem software update to this system, 138
XModem, to upgrade AT-S26 software, 138
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