B.Ed in Ed. Psy 2 Autumn Semester 2015

B.Ed in Ed. Psy 2 Autumn Semester 2015
Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology
Year Two, Semester Three
Course Handbook
2015
Welcome from the Dean of Education/ Fáilte ó Dhéan an Oideachais
Dear Student,
On behalf of my colleagues I extend a warm welcome back to BEd in Education &
Psychology 2, Faculty of Education at Mary Immaculate College. Tá súil agam gur bhain
tú taitneamh as laethanta gealla an tsamhraidh.
During Year 2 of the BEd in Education & Psychology programme you will follow a core
programme which focuses on the Student as Teacher. During this year you will have an
opportunity in some modules to build on the concepts and knowledge developed in first
year. Other areas you will experience for the first time, such as Inclusive Education,
Social, Personal, Health, and Physical Education. You will also note that the programme is designed to allow for
progression in curricular areas across the two semesters.
The Faculty is also continually involved in the development of other new programmes. This academic year sees
the introduction of the Professional Master of Education (Primary Teaching) which is a new two year teaching
qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school
teaching. We have also a new MEd in Educational Leadership and Management. Our Professional Diploma in
Education (Further Education, Level 8) has been accredited by the Teaching Council, and our revised Certificate in
Religious Education has been approved by the Council for Catechetics. We have an Education Preparatory
Programme for Mature Learners, which is aimed at adult learners who wish to gain access to the BEd programme.
Táthar ag leanúint ar aghaidh i mbliana lenár gclár iarchéime nuálaíoch, M. Oid. san Oideachas Lán-Ghaeilge, a
cuireadh ar an bhfód don chéad uair anuraidh. Is é seo an chéad chlár iarchéime i bPoblacht na hÉireann le
freastal go sonrach ar oideoirí tumoideachais agus ar ghairmithe eile a bhíonn ag obair i réimse an oideachais lánGhaeilge. These programmes contribute to the extensive range of postgraduate programmes already being
provided by the Faculty in SEN, ICT, Mentoring and Teacher Development, Early Childhood Studies, Adult and
Continuing Education, Masters in Education (by Research and Thesis) and Structured PhD in Education.
Our lecturers are very approachable and are dedicated to providing you with a top quality educational
experience. Please engage with them and with your fellow students to enrich your own learning and to broaden
your understanding of what it means to be a teacher. Participate in the life of the College, join clubs and societies,
and enjoy the many sporting, social, cultural, and personal development opportunities available to you. In
closing, I wish you well in your studies and I hope that your time at Mary Immaculate College will prove both
enjoyable and rewarding.
Guím gach rath ort i rith na bliana,
Professor Teresa O’Doherty.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 1
INDEX
PAGE NUMBER
1.
Introduction from the Dean
1
2.
Index
2
3.
Faculty of Education – A Brief Overview
3
4.
Faculty of Education – Mission Statement
4
5.
Overview of Programme
5
6.
Progression within the Programme
6
7.
Programme Specific Regulations
6
8.
Academic Integrity Policy
7
9.
Lecture and Tutorial Assistance
9
Module Assessment Guidelines
10.
Key Faculty of Education Contacts
10
11.
Staff of the Faculty of Education
12
12.
Autumn Semester Modules
22
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 2
FACULTY OF EDUCATION – A BRIEF OVERVIEW
The academic work of the College is divided into two faculties: the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of
Arts, both of which contribute to the BEd Programme. The Faculty of Education at Mary Immaculate College
is proud of its tradition of teacher education and of the high standards achieved by graduates since its
establishment in 1898. The Faculty is one of the largest education faculties in Ireland, with a staff of more
than 65 full-time academic staff and a further 50 associate members. The Faculty is strongly studentcentred and is committed to excellence in its teaching and research.
The Faculty offers programmes at certificate, diploma, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Our flagship
undergraduate honours programmes include the following:
•
BEd, which is a full-time four-year programme and is the professional qualification required for
teachers in primary schools.
•
BEd in Education and Psychology, this four-year full-time programme prepares graduates to be
recognised primary school teachers while also holding a degree in Psychology, which is recognised
by the Psychological Society of Ireland.
•
BA in Early Childhood Care and Education, which focuses on the development of educarers,
professional leaders in the provision of care and education for children from birth to six years in a
variety of educational settings.
The Faculty also offers a number of postgraduate programmes. The academic year 2015/16 heralds the
introduction of the Professional Master of Education (Primary Teaching) which is a new two-year teaching
qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school
teaching. In addition, a suite of postgraduate and masters programmes is available. The Faculty also
provides a range of postgraduate research options and the numbers of students engaging in masters and
doctoral studies by research and thesis within the Faculty continue to grow. The research work of the
Centre for Research in Education and Teacher Education (CREaTE), Centre for Early-Childhood Research at
Mary Immaculate College (Ceramic), the Curriculum Development Unit and the Centre for Transforming
Education through Dialogue reflect the commitment of Faculty to researching aspects of curricular interest,
but also issues of equity and justice within education on local, national and international levels.
Faculty members cover a wide range of expertise and professional interests. Many are qualified primary
teachers and bring to their students a wealth of professional knowledge and experience. An internationally
recognised standard of excellence has been achieved in the areas of professional development, curriculum
design and educational research. The Faculty of Education has close links with many of the primary schools
in Limerick city and the wider mid-west region. These connections facilitate an on-going professional
relationship between the Faculty and the schools. The Faculty is greatly facilitated by the schools and
teachers who make their classes available to student teachers for school placements, a crucial aspect of
Mary Immaculate College’s BEd programme.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 3
MISSION STATEMENT OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
To foster the social, emotional and intellectual development of our students; to promote and enhance their
well-being during their time in college, and to provide opportunities for them to access a range of cultural
activities.
To encourage students to aspire to standards of excellence in their professional lives compatible with their
individual potential.
To promote reflective, creative, open-minded, sensitive, competent and committed practice among teachers
in the national primary schools system. To empower such teachers to deal not alone with pupils and inschool colleagues but with parents, local communities, colleagues generally, other professionals.
To engender in our graduates a commitment to the full, social, emotional, intellectual development, and
cultural diversity of the children they teach so that as citizens of the future they are competent, assured and
caring members of society.
To promote and develop educational research and the application of existing research for the benefit of
schools and of the community.
To promote among our graduates an openness to research and methodological innovation and to help them
to foster a sense of ongoing professional and personal development.
To engender in students and graduates a positive, critical attitude to change in their professional lives and
the capacity to develop skills and competences to deal with changing needs and demands.
To promote and develop educational thought and practice for the benefit of the community, both local and
national.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 4
Overview of B.Ed in Education & Psychology Programme
The conceptual framework of the overall B.Ed in Education & Psychology programme (of which a brief
overview was provided in the Year 1 Handbooks) demonstrates a dynamical programme that challenges
what it means to be a learner, a teacher, a researcher, and a leader and how, collectively, these
understandings become embedded in the everyday realities of all those working together in a 21st century
teacher education programme. In Year 2, the focus is upon the Student as Teacher and the programme will
reiterate and expand upon concepts and themes already addressed in Year 1 (Student as Learner) while also
introducing you to new modules. The School Placement modules will enable you to apply your learning from
your previous placements as well as your learning from both the theoretical and pedagogical modules which
you have undertaken to date. This incremental approach demonstrates a commitment to the centrality of
observation, professional knowledge and practice, and reflection in each of the placements. The level of
expertise, insight and responsibility demanded of students increases from one placement to the next. The
School Placements are a combination of observation and teaching in Multi-grade settings (SP3) and in Senior
Classes (SP4). The modules in B.Ed in Education & Psychology 2 are as follows:
Semester 3
ECTS
Student as Teacher
Semester 4
ECTS
Student as Teacher
Semester 4a
ECTS
Student as Teacher
Language and Literacy 3
3
Language and Literacy 4
3
An Ghaeilge agus
Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
3cts
The Creative Arts 2
3od
STeM 4
3
Social, Personal, Health,
and Physical Education 2
3
Social Studies
3ects
STeM 5
3 od
A Biopsychosocial
Approach to Inclusive
Education for Children
with Special Educational
Needs
6
School Placement 4
6
Information Technology
& Psychology
6
Social, Personal, Health,
and Physical Education 1
3
Personality and Individual
differences
6
School Placement 3
3
Cognitive Psychology 3
6
Psychological
Perspectives on
Behaviour
3
Please note that students who have chosen to take the Certificate in Religious Education in Year 1 will take
Module 2 of the Certificate in the Autumn Semester of Year 2. Also note that you have the option to take an
elective in either Christian Religious Education or Multi-Disciplinary Religious Education this year. One of
these modules form a core part of your programme in Year 3. Regardless of whether you choose a Religious
Education elective this year, you must complete a religious education module in Year 3.
For more information on the structure of the B.Ed in Education & Psychology programme, please refer to the
Year 1 Handbook.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 5
Progression within the Programme
In developing the programme, a focus has been maintained on ensuring progression within the programme
in terms of students’ learning and self-development and the understanding, knowledge and skills required to
meet the learning and teaching needs of children in today’s schools. Clear links are maintained between
theoretical input and student teachers’ school placements. Students must successfully complete all modules
in order to progress to the next academic year of the programme.
Programme Specific Regulations
Programme Specific Regulations
Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Education in Education and Psychology
3.9 Mary Immaculate College
3.9.1 Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Education in Education and Psychology
3.9.1.1
A student who fails a school placement module shall be awarded an F grade or, in the case
of Pass/Fail registration, an N grade.
3.9.1.2
The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for school placement
modules.
3.9.1.3.1
Save in exceptional circumstances, where a student fails a school placement, s/he shall be
afforded only one further opportunity to repeat that placement.
3.9.1.3.2
A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails
the repeat attempt) will normally have their enrolment on their current programme of study
terminated.
3.9.1.3.3
A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails
the repeat attempt) in years 1, 2, 3 or 4 will be eligible for consideration, at the discretion of
the relevant Examination Board, for an exit award or transfer to an appropriate exit
programme, as listed below. The award type will depend on the number of credits
accumulated by the student.
• Certificate in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥60 + <120 ECTS])
• Diploma in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥120 + <180 ECTS])
• BA Education Studies (Major Award (Level 7) [≥180 + <240 ECTS])
• BA Hons. Education Studies (Major Award (Level 8) [≥240 ECTS. The ECTS requirements for
students registered on the three-year Level 8 Bachelor of Education programme is ≥180
ECTS.])
3.9.1.3.4
A student who is eligible for an exit award may take the appropriate award based on
accumulated credits or may link in to approved modules in an attempt to fulfil the
requirements for the next higher award. The approved modules will be determined
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 6
following consultation between the student, the relevant Dean(s) and the Vice President
Academic Affairs.
3.9.1.4
Students who are due to start professional placement in the Spring semester of years 1, 2
and 3 of the programmes are subject to critical review. A student who has failed more than
four modules or whose residual QCA following the Autumn semester is less than 2.00 will
not be allowed to progress to the Spring semester and will be required to repeat the
Autumn semester prior to progressing to the Spring semester.
3.9.1.5.1
Students who receive an F grade in the oral Irish component of the following modules shall
be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:
• An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2
• Language and Literacy 5
3.9.1.5.2
Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the oral Irish
component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.
3.9.1.5.3
The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for the oral Irish component
of the module.
3.9.1.6.1
Students who receive an F grade in the Scríobh na Gaeilge component of the following
modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the
overall module:
• An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2
• Language and Literacy 5
3.9.1.6.2
Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the Scríobh
na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.
3.9.1.7.1
Students who receive an F grade in the Múineadh na Gaeilge component of the following
modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the
overall module:
• An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
• Language and Literacy 4
3.9.1.7.2
Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the
Múineadh na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at
grade C3.
3.9.1.8.1
Students who receive an F grade in the Teanga Scríofa na Gaeilge component of the
following module shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in
the overall module:
• An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 7
3.9.1.8.2
Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the Teanga
Scríofa na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at
grade C3.
3.9.1.9.1
Students who receive an F grade in the English component of the following modules shall be
awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:
• Language and Literacy 4
• Language and Literacy 5
3.9.1.9.2
Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the English
component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.
3.9.1.10.1
To progress into the final year of their programme, students are required by the end of Year
3 of the programme to obtain an average quality point value (QPV) of at least 2.00 in the
areas of English, Gaeilge and Mathematics in each of the three module groupings listed
below:
1.
Language and Literacy 1; Language and Literacy 2; Language and Literacy 3;
Language and Literacy 4; Language and Literacy 5
2.
An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 1; An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 2;
An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 3; Language and Literacy 4; Language and
Literacy 5
3.
STEM 1; STEM 2; STEM 4; STEM 5
3.9.1.10.2
A student who does not obtain the minimum average QPV required in Mathematics
following annual repeats in Year 2 but who is otherwise eligible to progress may do so and
may link in on a capped basis to relevant modules in the following academic year to obtain
the average minimum QPV of 2.00 in that module grouping.
3.9.1.10.3
A student who is not eligible to progress following the annual repeats in Year 3 on account
of not having attained the minimum average QPV required in one or more of the English,
Gaeilge or
Mathematics groupings but who otherwise satisfies the general progression regulations may
link in to relevant module/s in the following academic year subject to the current academic
regulations whereby a maximum of two modules can be taken on a link-in basis in each
semester.
3.9.1.11.1
The award and award classification shall be made on the basis of performance of candidates
in part 2 only, commencing with Semester 3. As per the student handbook, semesters 1 and
2 are assigned a relative weighting of 1. Semesters 5 – 8 are assigned a relative weighting of
2.
3.9.1.11.2
An absolute QPV of 2.60 across school placement modules SP4, SP5, SP6 and SP7 is required
for the award of a first or second class honours degree.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 8
Mary Immaculate College Academic Integrity Policy
Preamble
Academic Integrity refers to honesty and responsibility in academic practice and scholarship. It values ethical
academic behaviour and the avoidance of plagiarism, cheating, fraudulent representation of academic work
and other dishonesty in academic endeavours.
1.0 Academic Dishonesty
1.1 Academic dishonesty includes:
-
falsely representing the work of others as one’s own in an assignment.
copying of ideas or work of fellow students.
copying from published works, in assignments, without proper acknowledgement, i.e. plagiarism.
using co-authoring assistance in individual academic work, including the commissioning or
purchasing of essay writing services, i.e syndication.
using technical assistance in assignments where it has not been authorised, e.g. using translation
software in a translation assignment.
signing attendance records on behalf of a classmate.
fabricating results or research findings in an assignment.
using false information to gain extensions to deadlines or i-grades.
cheating in examinations by copying or using unauthorised materials.
misrepresenting achievements on application forms.
2.0 Plagiarism
2.1 Plagiarism is defined as the use of either published or unpublished writing, ideas or works without proper
acknowledgement.
2.2 Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty where, either intentionally or unintentionally, ideas or works
are falsely presented as being those of the author for her/his benefit. It can include:
-
the use of a part of a text without quotation marks and citation.
the use of a part of a text, with minor paraphrase, without citation.
the use of an image without citation or permission.
the use of music without citation or permission.
the use of computer code, mathematical work, research results, spreadsheets without citation or
permission.
the re-use of one’s own work from a previous assignment without citation.
2.3 All writing, ideas or works quoted or paraphrased in an academic assignment in MIC must be attributed
and acknowledged to the original source through proper citation.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 9
2.4 To avoid plagiarism when quoting or paraphrasing, ideas or works must be referenced using the
referencing system appropriate to the module under assessment or disciplinary area1.
2.5 Module and Programme Coordinators will provide guidance to students regarding the required
referencing system for a given module or programme.
2.6 Written assignments will normally be submitted to the MIC plagiarism detection software and will be
checked against and stored in the standard repository of the software. Students may submit only once
to the plagiarism detection software for any one assignment.
3.0 Acceptable use of MIC teaching and assessment materials
3.1 Assignments are the property of MIC and may not be made publicly available (e.g. online) without
consent.
3.2 Recording of lectures on personal devices is not permitted, unless by special arrangement.
3.3 Lectures captured on livestreaming facilities, which are password protected, cannot be shared with
anyone who is not registered for a given module.
3.4 Teaching materials made available for download in electronic format by MIC lecturers may not be shared
with anyone who is not registered for a given module.
4.0 Acceptable use of ICT and digital identities
4.1 When using MIC computers or network, films, music, books and other published works subject to
copyright must not be downloaded.
4.2 Software licensed to MIC must not be downloaded to private devices or shared outside of MIC network,
unless by prior agreement.
4.3 Digital identities should be respected and identity credentials should never be shared. Using the email or
VLE identity of another (e.g. if not logged out on a device) is considered a theft of digital identity.
4.4 MIC’s Policy for Responsible Computing must be adhered to at all times.
5.0 Data protection
5.1 Assignments that involve the gathering and storing of personal data, including images, must adhere to
the MIC data protection policy.
6.0 Sanction
6.1 In accordance with MIC’s Code of Conduct, it is a serious disciplinary offence to engage in academic
cheating in any form whatsoever.
6.2 Section 4.2 of the MIC Code of Conduct states that “The College Discipline Committee shall be entitled to
impose penalties including suspension or expulsion where, in its view, the gravity of the complaint or
offence or the College disciplinary record of the offender shall so warrant”.
1 Harvard, APA and numeric footnote systems are used in MIC, depending on the module or programme.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 10
Normally, the penalty for cheating is suspension for 12 months. A repeat of such conduct shall warrant
expulsion.
Lecture and Tutorial Attendance
Attendance at lectures and tutorials is mandatory. Lecturers reserve the right to administer attendance
checks at all/some lectures and tutorials. Except in exceptional circumstances and with the prior approval of
both the academic year co-ordinator and lecturer, students must attend their assigned group lecture or
tutorial. Lecturers reserve the right to refuse admittance to lectures/tutorials and/or mark a student absent
if they do not attend their designated lecture/tutorial. Up to 10% of marks in a module may be deducted for
poor attendance at lectures. In the case of tutorials (except in exceptional circumstances), 10% of marks will
be deducted for poor attendance.
Important: Students are required to familiarise themselves with the Code of Conduct and to adhere to same
(see http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further
information).
Module Assessment Guidelines
Students are responsible for familiarising themselves with the assessment arrangements for each module.
Where modules are assessed by examination, it is the responsibility of the student to register and present
for the examination (see
http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further information).
In the case of coursework, students are responsible for ensuring that coursework adhers to the module
assessment guidelines, that it is completed on time, and submitted on the designated date. Students are
strongly advised to keep an electronic copy of all coursework. Except in exceptional circumstances,
extensions will not be granted for coursework submission deadlines.
Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% of marks in a
modulewill bededucted for late submission of coursework.
Repeat Assessment Procedures: Where Coursework is the repeat assessment (including both F and I Grades) students will be notified of the repeat assessment and the repeat assessment guidelines by email. It
is the responsibility of the individual student to comply with the repeat assessment guidelines which
includes submission deadlines.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 11
KEY FACULTY OF EDUCATION CONTACTS
Dean of Education
Professor Teresa O Doherty
Contact: teresa.odoherty@mic.ul.ie
Office: 304a
(061) 204995
Assistant Dean of Education and BEd 3 Co-Ordinator
Dr Angela Canny
Contact: angela.canny@mic.ul.ie
Office: 311
(061) 204598
BEd 2 Co-Ordinator
Dr Carol O’Sullivan
Contact: Carol.OSullivan@mic.ul.ie
Office: 305
(061) 204928
BEd in Education & Psychology Course Leader
Marie Ryan
Contact: marie.ryan@mic.ul.ie
Office: R107
(061) 204372
Director of School Placement
Neil Ó Conaill
Contact: neil.oconaill@mic.ul.ie
Office: 306
(061) 204519
Education Office Manager
Fintan Breen
Education Office, Room 307
Contact: fintan.breen@mic.ul.ie
Office: (061) 204906
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 12
Faculty of Education Office
Room 307 (Foundation Building)
Phone: 061-204906
Counter service to students is available from Monday – Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. –
4.00 p.m
Whom should I contact?
If you have a concern or query in relation to your programme, please contact Marie Ryan. You can make an
appointment to see her by email.
If you have a concern or query in relation to general academic issues, please contact Dr Carol O’Sullivan. You
can make an appointment to see her by email or via the Education Office.
If your concern specifically refers to School Placement, please contact the SP Office and/or Director of SP
(061 204358/061 204924).
If you have a concern relating to examinations / repeats / link-ins etc. please contact the Assistant Dean, Dr
Angela Canny.
You may also go to the Education Office, Third Floor, Main Building, if you have a general query.
Please give your mobile phone number to the Education Office or other members of staff when
communicating with them, as if a matter is urgent, this will enable them to contact you directly.
Contacting Lecturers
You can find contact details for all academic staff on the College website
http://www.mic.ul.ie/welcome/Pages/staffdirectory.aspx. Initial contact with a lecturer should be made by
email and if required, the lecturer will arrange a meeting with you. Please remember that lecturers are very
often in schools or engaged in other work, so it is important that you contact them by telephone or email.
You are reminded that all communication should be conducted in a courteous manner.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 13
STAFF OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Dean of Education
Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed.,
M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious
Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL)
teresa.odoherty@mic.ul.ie
(061)204995
angela.canny@mic.ul.ie
(061)204598
cathal.depaor@mic.ul.ie
(061)204950
Assistant Dean of Education
Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc.,
M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),
Ph.D.(Warwick)
Director of Continuing
Professional Development
Cathal de Paor, B.A.(NUI),
Grad.Dip.in Ed.(UL),
M.Ed.(UL), M.A. in Classical
Irish(NUI), Ph.D.
Director of the Curriculum
Development Unit
Eucharia McCarthy,
B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)
eucharia.mccarthy@mic.ul.ie
(061)204508
Director of School
Placement
Neil Ó Conaill, B.Ed.(NUI),
M.Ed.(Nottingham)
neil.oconaill@mic.ul.ie
(061)204519
There are five academic departments within the Faculty of Education:

Department of Arts Education and Physical Education

Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies

Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education

Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education

Department of Special Education
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 14
Department of Arts Education and Physical Education
Acting Head of Department
Déirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL) M.A. in
Academic Practice(UL)
deirdre.nichroinin@mic.ul.ie
(061)204553
Michael Finneran, B.Ed.(DCU), M.A,
Ph.D.(Warwick)*
michael.finneran@mic.ul.ie
(061)204976
Dorothy Morrissey, B.Ed., M.A.(NUI), Grad Dip in
Drama in Education(Thomond), Grad Dip in
Dance(UL), Cert in Community Dance
Leadership(Laban Guild), Ph.D (Univ. of Bristol)
dorothy.morrissey@mic.ul.ie
(061)204521
Margaret O'Keeffe, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(DCU), LLSM*
Co-ordinator of the access programme
margaret.okeeffe@mic.ul.ie
(061)204526
Gwen Moore, B.Mus.Ed.(TCD), M.A. in Music
Ed.(UL), GRIAM, ALCM, Ph.D.(Univ. of London)
gwen.moore@mic.ul.ie
(061)204945
Ailbhe Kenny, B.Ed., M.Ed.(DCU), Ph.D.(Cambridge)
ailbhe.kenny@mic.ul.ie
(061)774721
Tanya Power, NDD, M.A.(NUI)
tanya.power@mic.ul.ie
(061)204388
Anne-Marie Morrin, B.A., H.Dip. Art and Design
Education (NCEA), M.A.(UL)
annemarie.morrin@mic.ul.ie
(061)204552
Sinead Dinneen, Dip.in Fine Art Sculpture(LSAD),
H.Dip.(Art and Design Education), B.A.(WIT), M.A. in
Interactive Media(UL)
sinead.dineen@mic.ul.ie
(061)204936
Niall Quinn, Visual Arts Technician, Dip. in Fine
Arts(NCEA)
niall.quinn@mic.ul.ie
(061)204350
Deirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL), M.A. in
Academic Practice(UL)
deirdre.nichroinin@mic.ul.ie
(061)204553
Richard Bowles, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Sc.(Leicester) PhD.
(UL)
Co-ordinator of international placements and AEE
richard.bowles@mic.ul.ie
(061)204912
Elaine Murtagh, B.A., PGCE, Ph.D.(Univ. of Ulster)*
elaine.murtagh@mic.ul.ie
(061)204569
Drama
Music Education
Visual Arts Education
Physical Education
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 15
Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies
Head of Department
Emer Ring, B.Ed.(Carysfort College of Ed.), PG Dip.
in Special Ed.(DCU), BL, (Univ. of London),
M.Ed.(DCU), PG Cert. in Autism (Children)(DCU),
M.Ed.(Autism)(Univ. of Birmingham), Diploma in
Irish(NUIG), Ph.D.(DCU)
emer.ring@mic.ul.ie
(061)204571
Deirdre Breathnach, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)
deirdre.breathnach@mic.ul.ie
(061)204565
Jennifer Pope, B.A. Early Childhood Studies,
Ph.D.(UCC)
jennifer.pope@mic.ul.ie
(061)204581
Lisha O'Sullivan, B.A. Early Childhood Studies(UCC),
M.A. Non-directive Play Therapy (Univ. of York)*
lisha.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204566
Des Carswell, B.Sc.(UCD and Vrije Univ.
Amsterdam), Masters in European Social Policy
Analysis (UCD)
Co-ordinator of and tutor on the research methods
and undergraduate dissertation modules for the
B.Ed. programme
des.carswell@mic.ul.ie
(061)204961
Mary Moloney, Cert. in Psychology(NUIM),
Diploma in Nursery Management(UCD), M.Ed. in
Early Childhood Care and Education(MIC),
Ph.D.(MIC)
mary.moloney@mic.ul.ie
(061) 204316
teresa.mcelhinney@mic.ul.ie
(061) 204542
Brendan Barry, B.A.(TCD), Grad.Dip.Ed.(MIC),
M.Sc.(DCU)
brendan.barry@mic.ul.ie
(061)204941
Rory McGann, B.Ed, M.Ed. ICT(UL), Grad. Dip. Ed.
Lead. (NUIM), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL)
rory.mcgann@mic.ul.ie
(061)204520
Edward Corry, B.A. (NUIG), Higher Diploma in
Education (NUIG); Higher Diploma in Systems
Analysis and Design (NUIG); B.E. (NUIG); Ph.D.
(NUIG)
edward.corry@mic.ul.ie
(061)204986
kathleen.horgan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204328
Early Childhood Care and Education
Educational Methodology
Teresa McElhinney, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI)
ICT in Education
Microteaching
Kathleen Horgan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD),
Ph.D.(NUI)
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 16
School Placement
Eamonn Mitchell, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL)
eamonn.mitchell@mic.ul.ie
(061)204518
Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education
Head of Department
Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), M.A.(NUI),
Ed.D.(DCU)
carol.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204928
Suzanne Parkinson, B.Ed., B.Sc., M.SC. in
Developmental and Educational Psychology, Ed.D.(Ed.
Psych).
suzanne.parkinson@mic.ul.ie
(061)204958
Marie Ryan, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),
MAEP (UCD)
marie.ryan2@mic.ul.ie
(061)204372
Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),
MAEP (UCD)
claire.griffin@mic.ul.ie
(061)204701
Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious
Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL)
teresa.odoherty@mic.ul.ie
(061)204995
Eilís O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.A.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)
eilis.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204384
margaret.nohilly@mic.ul.ie
(061)774744
Tony Bonfield, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), TEFL Cert.(MIC),
Ed.D. (Univ. Of Sheffield)
tony.bonfield@mic.ul.ie
(061)204970
Aislinn O Donnell, B.A.(TCD), M.A.(UCD),
Ph.D.(Warwick)
aislinnodonnell@mic.ul.ie
(061)204354
Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc., M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),
Ph.D.(Warwick)
angela.canny@mic.ul.ie
(061)
204598
Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western
Michigan)
sandra.ryan@mic.ul.ie
(061)
204984
Psychology of Education
History of Education and Policy of Education
Co-ordinator of M.Ed in Educational Leadership and
Management
Margaret Nohilly, B.Ed, M.St., D.Ed (DCU)
Philosophy of Education
Sociology of Education
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 17
Religious Education
Patricia Kieran, B.Rel.Sc.(Mater Dei), M.Th.,
Ph.D.(London)
patricia.kieran@mic.ul.ie
(061)204965
Daniel O’Connell, Dip.Phil., B.D.(NUIM), Grad.Dip. in
Holistic Dev.(All Hallows), M.Ed., Ph.D.(Boston College)
daniel.oconnell@mic.ul.ie
(061)204966
Maurice Harmon, Dip. Phil, B.D., H.Dip. in Pastoral
Studies, (Maynooth), M.A.(Fordham University)
maurice.harmon@mic.ul.ie
(061)204720
sandra.ryan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204984
Ann Higgins, B.Ed., Dip. Remedial Ed., Ph.D.(UL)
ann.higgins@mic.ul.ie
(061)204979
Ruth Bourke, B.A.(UL), M.Ed.(Adult Ed)(UL)
ruth.bourke@mic.ul.ie
(061)774715
anne.dolan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204983
eileen.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204975
maeve.liston@mic.ul.ie
(061)204726
anne.odwyer@mic.ul.ie
(061)
204346
miriam.hamilton@mic.ul.ie
061 774754
brighid.golden@mic.ul.ie
(061)204991
carol.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204928
Educational Disadvantage
Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western
Michigan)
Transforming Education Through Dialogue
Social, Environmental and Scientific Education
Anne Dolan, B.Ed., M.A., Dip.Adult Comm.Ed.(NUI),
Ed.D.(Sheffield Hallam)
(Pedagogy of Geography)
Eileen O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UCC), Ph.D.(UCC)
(Pedagogy of History)
Maeve Liston, B.Sc., Ph.D.(UL)
(Science Education)
Anne O’Dwyer B.Sc (UL), Phd, UL
(Science Education)
Miriam Hamilton, B.A., Post-Grad Dip in Co-operative
Learning, (TCD), M.Ed (MIC), PhD (MIC)
(Science Education)
Development and Intercultural Education
Brighid Golden B.Ed., M.Ed (Birmingham)
Social, Personal and Health Education
Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL) M.A.(NUI),
Ed.D.(DCU)
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 18
MA in Educational Psychology
Siobhán O’Sullivan, B.Sc in Ed. (UL), H.Dip.Psych.(NUI),
M.Sc.(Univ.Coll.London)
siobhan.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204536
claire.griffin@mic.ul.ie
(061)774701
josephine.frahill@mic.ul.ie
(061)204366
Programme Leader
Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),
MAEP (UCD
Department Administrator
Josephine Frahill
Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education
Head of Department
Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI)
sean.debrun@mic.ul.ie
(061)204329
Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI)
sean.debrun@mic.ul.ie
(061)204329
Roibeárd Ó Cathasaigh, B.A., M.A., HDE(NUI)
roibeard.ocathasaigh@mic.ul.ie
(061)204342
Eilís Ní Dheá, B.A., M.A., HDE, Ph.D.(NUI)
eilis.nidhea@mic.ul.ie
(061)204359
Martina Ní Fhatharta, B.Oid., M.Oid.(UL)
martina.nifhatharta@mic.ul.ie
(061)204555
Áine Cregan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Ed.D.(Harvard)
aine.cregan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204902
Martin Gleeson, N.T., B.A.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD), Ph.D.(UL)
martin.gleeson@mic.ul.ie
(061)204971
Fiodhna Gardiner-Hyland B.Ed. (MIC); MA in Ed., (MIC);
PhD, (Univ. of Leicester)
fiodhna.gardiner@mic.ul.ie
061204766
Aisling Leavy, B.Sc.(NUI), Grad.Dip.Ed.(DCU), M.A.in
Ed.(Calif. State), Ph.D.(Ariz. State)
aisling.leavy@mic.ul.ie
(061)204978
Mairéad Hourigan, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(UL)
mairead.hourigan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204504
John O’Shea, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)
john.oshea@mic.ul.ie
(061)774713
Noreen O’Loughlin, B.Ed., M.Ed., Grad. Dip. Comp, Dip.
Bus. St., Grad. Dip. Mant St., Ph.D. (University of Bristol)
noreen.oloughlin@mic.ul.ie
(061)204357
sean.ocathallain@mic.ul.ie
(061)204371
Gaeilge
English
Mathematics Education
Modhanna Múinte na Gaeilge
Seán Ó Cathalláin, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(OU), Ph.D.(Stirling)
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 19
TJ Ó Ceallaigh, B.Oid.(UL), M.Oid. (UCC) Dioplóma
Iarchéime san Oideachas Gairmiúil(NUIG), Ph.D.(UCC)
tj.oceallaigh@mic.ul.ie
(061)204325
Siobhán Ní Mhurchú, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A.(Ed)(UWE, Bristol)
siobhan.nimhurchu@mic.ul.ie
(061)204973
Department of Special Education
Head of Department
Patricia Daly, B.A., HDE (NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Ohio
State)
patricia.daly@mic.ul.ie
(061)204309
Margaret Egan, B.Ed.(TCD), M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UCC)
margaret.egan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204337
Stella Long, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Dip.Soc.Studies(NUI)
stella.long@mic.ul.ie
(061)204580
Eucharia McCarthy, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)*
eucharia.mccarthy@mic.ul.ie
(061)204508
Johanna Fitzgerald, M.A.(IOE, London)
johanna.fitzgerald@mic.ul.ie
(061)204517
Trevor O’Brien, B.Ed.(DCU), M.Ed., Advanced
Diploma in Applied Educational Studies(Hull), Dip
Social Studies(UCC)
trevor.obrien@mic.ul.ie
(061)774780
Professional Services Staff
Education Office Manager
Fintan Breen
fintan.breen@mic.ul.ie
(061)204906
Marie Quaid
marie.quaid@mic.ul.ie
(061)204310
Caroline Ní Chadhain*
caroline.coyne@mic.ul.ie
(061)204358
Zeta Penny
zeta.penny@mic.ul.ie
(061)204924
Helen Heffernan
helen.heffernan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204923
Nora O’Donoghue
nora.odonoghue@mic.ul.ie
(061)204923
Paula Treacy
paula.treacy@mic.ul.ie
(061)204925
Perry Meskell
perry.meskell@mic.ul.ie
(061)204551
Rose Higgins
rose.higgins@mic.ul.ie
(061)204551
Deirdre Cussen*
deirdre.cussen@mic.ul.ie
(061)204545
Education Office
Hellen Gallagher
Hellen.Gallagher@mic.ul.ie
(061)774725
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 20
Sheila O'Callaghan
sheila.ocallaghan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204549
Mairead Horan
mairead.horan@mic.ul.ie
(061)204563
Josephine Frahill
cdu@mic.ul.ie
(061)204366
* Indicates that the Faculty Member is currently on leave
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 21
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION in Education & Psychology 2 – Autumn Semester Modules
Module
Code
Title
Credits Semester
AUTUMN SEMESTER
EDU200
School Placement 3
3
3
EDU201
Language and Literacy 3
3
3
EDU202
An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
3
3
EDU203
STeM 1 Introduction to Mathematics and its Teaching 3
3
3
EDU 254
Social Studies
3
3
EDU207
Social, Personal, Health, and Physical Education 1
3
3
EPS200
A Biopsychosocial Approach to Inclusive Education for Children with Special
Educational Needs
6
6
PS4013
Cognitive Psychology 1
6
6
Please note that students who have chosen to take the Certificate in Religious Education in Year 1 will take
Module 2 of the Certificate in the Autumn Semester of Year 2.
*Additional Elective Module Available
*A Religious Education module forms part of your core programme in Year III and next year you will be
provided with the opportunity to select to take either
a. Christian Religious Education appropriate for teaching in Catholic, Protestant and Interdenominational schools.
Or
b. Multidenominational Religious Education appropriate for teaching in Educate Together and VEC
schools.
However, some students may wish to prepare themselves to teach in all school types and accordingly may wish
to take both options outlined above. If you would like the opportunity to take both options, then the College is
delighted to facilitate your decision. There is no additional fee for participating in this course.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 22
Academic Schedule Autumn Semester
2BEd in Education & Psychology
Autumn
Weeks 1-6
Lectures Monday –Friday inclusive
Week 7
Lectures Monday – Thursday inclusive
Conferring Friday 23rd October
Monday 26th October Bank Holiday
Week 8
Lectures Tuesday – Friday inclusive
Weeks 9-12
Lectures Monday – Friday inclusive
Week 13
Study Week / Course work
Week 14
Examinations
Week 15
Examinations
SP3 Tutor meeting TBA
School Placement 3
Monday December 7th & Tuesday December 8th Observation
Wednesday 6th January – Friday 15th January School Placement 3
Monday 18th January & Tuesday 19th January SP3 Make-up days
Monday 30th May – Friday 10th June Repeat SP3
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 23
Module EDU200
School Placement 3
Autumn Semester 2015/2016
Bachelor of Education 2 & Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
INTRODUCTION:
School Placement 3 is a three credit module which students undertake on December 7 th and 8th 2015 and
from January 6th – 15th 2016. Students undertake this School Placement in a school and class which the
students himself/herself selects and organises, with due regard to the Class Selection Criteria for School
Placement 3 (see School Placement Handbook 2015/2016). Students may opt to undertake SP3 as a
partnered or as a non-partnered placement, and it is undertaken in a mixed grade class between 1st and 4th
class (i.e. it could be a grouping of 1st & 2nd; 2nd & 3rd; 3rd & 4th or any combination of classes from 1st to 4th).
The key focus of the placement is to allow students to observe and engage in mixed class teaching. The
placement recognises that students will learn with and from the class teacher as well as learn about planning
and teaching in a mixed class context by engaging in these activities themselves.
The placement prioritises learning about mixed class teaching: it provides the opportunity for students to
develop their ability to plan for different class levels and to develop their ability to manage a mixed class
while recognising that this is the student’s second teaching placement.
The placement also prioritises students’ learning about integrated planning and teaching, and the lessons
taught in week 2 are centred on a common theme, selected by the student in consultation with the class
teacher.
The placement combines teaching and non-teaching activities, and students will be required to maximise
whole school learning opportunities which the placement provides.
All relevant documentation is available to the students on the EDU200 course on Moodle.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On completion of this module, students will be able to:


Organise and present a (i) planning file and (ii) resource file for SP3
Demonstrate awareness of the importance of planning for different class age levels and children of
all abilities
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 24






Demonstrate a developing competence in planning for children of all abilities
Demonstrate a developing competence in maintaining effective classroom management
Demonstrate an ability to engage in meaningful integrated teaching through thematic planning
Demonstrate a developing competence in engaging with children to promote their learning
Reflect critically on and document their development as student teachers and demonstrate their
ability to engage in critical reflection with their tutor, class teacher and peers
Demonstrate the capacity to engage with the School Placement in a professional manner
MODULE CONTENT:
No teaching is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday of Dec. 7th and 8th as the student observes the class and
works with the teacher. On Jan. 6th-8th (Wednesday, Thursday and Friday) the student teaches two Gaeilge,
two English and two Maths for 45 – 60 minutes each. The lesson content will be agreed with the teacher and
in terms of differentiation, the focus will be on writing and teaching towards differentiated outcomes per
class (e.g. in a 1st/2nd class, specific learning objectives for the pupils in 1st and specific learning objectives for
pupils in 2nd). Students also teach areas already taught on School Placement 2 (e.g. Science, Drama, Music
and Visual Art) on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the first week.
In Week 2 (Jan. 11th-15th) students are requested to schedule two English, two Gaeilge and two Maths lesson
of 45 – 60 mins duration. For these lessons, students write differentiated lesson objectives for the learners
within each class (Refer to the guidelines from each subject area regarding writing differentiated objectives
for all learners). Students also teach PE (2 x 30 mins), History (2 x 45-60 mins), Geography (2 x 45-60 mins),
SPHE (1 x 30 mins) and RE (3 x 30 mins) and two of Science, Drama, Music or Visual Art (@ 45-60 mins each)
during Week 2.
In keeping with the emphasis on integration and thematic teaching, all lessons in Week 2 should be centred
on a theme. Students liaise with the class teacher in selecting an appropriate theme and in planning their
lessons must have regard to the thematic planning guidelines provided by faculty.
Class teachers and students will devise a plan for the remaining time and the student teacher will carry out
other school-related activities as co-devised. Working closely with the class teacher and availing of whole
school teaching and learning opportunities are key features of this placement.
Students must present and maintain a well-organised and complete Planning Folder & Resource Folder,
complete detailed and comprehensive lesson plans and identify appropriate teaching and learning strategies
for engaging children in middle classes with the Primary School Curriculum. Students must continue to
observe and practice assessing children’s learning, as well as their own learning. At all times, students must
relate appropriately and professionally with pupils, school personnel and school placement personnel.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 25
MODULE ASSESSMENT:
This module is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis. See Moodle course for assessment criteria and grade
descriptors.
There are two elements to the assessment of the module:
a) Attending school for 10 days and submitting a School Placement Attendance Form
b) Receiving a pass grade from his/her school placement tutor, who will visit the student a minimum of
two visits in the course of the placement
No uncertified absences are permitted and all absences have to be noted in the Cuntas Tinrimh. In cases of
absence from school, a student is required to contact the Education Office (061 204924) and his/her school.
On completion of the module the student is required to submit a School Placement Attendance Form to the
Education Office by Thursday January 21st, 2016.
Students to whom an I or F grade is awarded, the repeat for School Placement 3 occurs from 30 th May- 10
June 2016.
Normally, students may repeat a School Placement module once.
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
FEEDBACK:
Feedback occurs during the school placement with school placement tutor.
STAFF:
Name
Title
Office
Telephone
Email
061 204 518
Eamonn.Mitchell@mic.ul.ie
Office Hour/s
Eamonn
Mitchell
Lecturer in
School
Placement
Co-ordinator for
School
Placement 3
G46 (meeting
requests should
be e-mailed in
advance)
READING LIST:
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 26
Primary Readings
1. Government of Ireland (1999) Primary School Curriculum, Dublin: Stationary Office.
2. Mary Immaculate College (2015) School Placement Handbook 2015/2016: Handbook for Students
and Tutors, Limerick: Mary Immaculate College
3. Gregory G. and Chapman C. (2007) Differentiated Instructional Strategies: One size doesn’t fit all, 2nd
Ed. London: Sage.
Supplementary Readings
4. Cohen, L. Manion, L., Morrison, K. & Wyse, D. (2010) A Guide to Teaching Practice 5th Edition,
London: Routledge.
5. Kyriacou, C. (2007) Essential Teaching Skills Third Edition, Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.
6. Woolfolk, A. and N.E. Perry (2012) Child and Adolescent Development, New Jersey: Pearson
Education.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 27
Module EDU201 – Language and Literacy 3
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education 2: Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
The rationale and purpose of this module is to expand on student teachers’ knowledge of instructional
practice in English Language and Literacy for effective literacy instruction in the Middle Classes.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation
On completion of this module, students will be able to:
 explore how their personal experience as writers contributes to their understanding of the process of
literacy development for children
 demonstrate an understanding of the target oral language skills for development among primary
school children in the middle classes
 select a range of developmentally appropriate research-based approaches to promote the literacy
development of children in their development as readers and writers
Affective: Attitude and Values
On completion of this module, students will be able to:
 explore their own values, beliefs and biases, in relation to language and literacy teaching in the primary
classroom
 display an appreciation of differentiated and inclusive approaches to language and literacy
development which support the language learning needs of all children
MODULE CONTENT
This module will build on Language and Literacy 2 by continuing to explore effective instructional practices
for oral language development, reading and writing. In this module, students will be introduced to the
importance of differentiating in English Language and Literacy in the primary classroom – adapting the
curriculum to support diverse learning needs, and in particular, the importance of supporting the needs of
young bilingual learners. This module will aim to provide student teachers with opportunities to learn about
genre writing, talk in writing development, creating a print and literacy-rich environment, vocabulary
development and writing across the curriculum and to develop an understanding of the challenges children
face when confronted with the task of writing.
The module will be delivered in the form of one lecture and one tutorial session each week. Readings based
on the content of the lecture will be assigned in advance of the tutorial session. Students will be required to
be familiar with the contents of the readings and to participate in discussions based on the readings during
the tutorial sessions. The tutorial sessions will also involve students engaging interactively in workshops
designed to enhance student knowledge about language.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 28
Note: The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and
other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
WEEK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS
Course Introduction/Differentiation in the English Classroom (1)
Differentiation in the English Classroom (2)
Instructional approaches to writing
Writing across the curriculum
All children can write – why don’t they?
Talk in writing development
Creating a print and literacy rich environment
Children’s literature and language and literacy development
Vocabulary development
Adapting the English curriculum to suit the needs of EAL learners (1)
Adapting the English curriculum to suit the needs of EAL learners (2)
School Placement 3 Preparation
MODULE ASSESSMENT
Assessment in this module will take the form of coursework (100%), which is due Week 12 and will be based
on the content of the course. Repeat assessment will consist of coursework (100%), based on the content of
the course.
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
Attendance at and participation in lectures and tutorials is a requirement of the course. Attendance will be
recorded weekly. Email notification of absences is not accepted. 10% of marks in the module will be
deducted for poor attendance.
Assessment Criteria
1. Understanding of the task and key concepts/issues involved:
Discusses application to key language and literacy issues, as introduced throughout the semester and
highlights application and relevance to their upcoming School Placement 3.
2. Depth of analysis and/or critique in response to the task:
A critical perspective and analysis is evident, including a developing philosophical approach, in analyzing
conceptions of teaching language and literacy.
3. Appropriate use of professional and/or research literature:
Quality up-to-date academic sources are used to support and inform the course work (Minimum of 4) which
may include reading materials distributed during the semester and/or self-accessed academic books,
journal articles and appropriate online resources.
4. Structure and organization:
The course work is structured and organised coherently and is of an appropriate length (1200-1500 words).
Sub-headings and paragraphing aid comprehension.
5. Presentation according to academic conventions:
There is clarity, consistency and appropriateness of conventions for quoting and paraphrasing, attributing
sources of information and accompanying resources and citing relevant texts according to the Harvard
referencing system.
6. Presentation according to linguistic conventions:
Course work is presented according to appropriate linguistic conventions, including appropriateness of
sentence structure, specialized educational and literacy vocabulary usage, spelling, punctuation. There is a
general flow and coherency of language.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 29
Marking Scheme
A1
96-100
A2
90-95
B1
80-89
B2
70-79
B3
60-69
C1
55-59
C2
50-54
C3
40-49
D1
35-39
D2
30-34
F
<30
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
FEEDBACK
Feedback on student work is given as appropriate during tutorial sessions.
Office Hours: Lecturers and tutors are available by appointment to meet with students.
STAFF
LECTURERS
NAME
OFFICE
CONTACT DETAILS
Dr. Fíodhna GardinerHyland
R206, Foundation Building 061-204766/fiodhna.gardiner@mic.ul.ie
Dr. Martin Gleeson
G47, Foundation Building
Dr. Áine Cregan
C109, Foundation Building 061204902 / aine.cregan@mic.ul.ie
061204971 / martin.gleeson@mic.ul.ie
TUTORS
NAME
CONTACT DETAILS
Ms. Sara Fitzgerald
sarafitzgerald84@gmail.com
Ms. Kate Lynch
catherinelynch228@hotmail.com
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 30
READING LIST
Mandatory readings will be assigned on a weekly basis. All readings will be available on:
Moodle.mic.ul.ie
Course Name: Language and Literacy 3 (EDU 201)
Access Key:
edu2012015
INDICATIVE READINGS INCLUDE:


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Bond, M. A. and Wasik, B. A. (2009) 'Conversation Stations: Promoting Language Development in
Young Children', Early Childhood Education Journal, 36(6), 467-473.
Dean, D. (2010). What Works in Writing Instruction: Research and Practices. USA: National Council of
Teachers of English.
Evans, R. & Jones, D. (2007). Perspectives on Oracy – Towards a Theory of Practice. Early Child
Development and Care, 177 (6-7), 557-567.
Gambrell, L.B. & Mandel Morrow, L. (2011) Best Practices in Literacy Instruction, 4th ed., New York: The
Guilford Press.
Graham, S., MacArthur, C.A., and Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.)(2013). Best Practices in Writing Instruction. New
York: The Guildford Press.
Guofang, L. & Edwards, P.A. (2010) Best Practices in ELL Instruction. New York: The Guilford Press.
Harris, K.R., Graham S., Mason, L.H. and Friedlander, B. (2008). Powerful Writing Strategies for All
Students. New York: Brookes Publishing
Kirkland, L.D. & Patterson, J. (2005). Developing Oral Language in Primary Classrooms. Early Child
Education Journal 32 (6), 391-395.
Quintero, E.P. (2010). Something to Say: Children Learning through Story. Early Education and
Development, 2(3), 372-391.
Vasilyeva, M., Waterfall, H. & J. Huttenlocher (2008). Emergence of Syntax: Commonalities and
Differences across Children. Developmental Science, 11(1), 84-97.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 31
Modúl EDU202 (T1) – An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
Seimeastar an Fhómhair 2015-2016
Baitsiléir an Oideachais 2: Baitsiléir an Oideachais san Oideachas agus sa
tSíceolaíocht 2
RÉAMHRÁ
Sa mhodúl seo cuirtear béim ar chumas labhartha agus scríofa na mac léinn a fheabhsú chun cur ar a
gcumas an Ghaeilge a úsáid mar theanga theagaisc sa bhunscoil. Is í aidhm an mhodúil seo tuiscint a
thabhairt do na mic léinn ar na gnéithe seo a leanas den teanga: an tríú agus an ceathrú díochlaonadh
den ainmfhocal, an chopail ‘is’, ailt a aistriú ó Bhéarla, uimhreacha, ceisteanna agus freagraí,
réamhfhocail ó, trí, um, sa, roimh, foghair na Gaeilge a mhúineadh agus nathanna cainte, maraon le
tuiscint ar fhorbairt na litearthachta Gaeilge mar chéad teanga, ar chur chuige cumarsáideach do
mhúineadh na Gaeilge, agus ar an tábhacht a bhaineann le foghraíocht agus gramadach i bhfoghlaim
na Gaeilge i scoileanna T1.
Spreagtar na mic léinn bheith gníomhach sa Ghaeilge gach seachtain i rith an tseimeastair agus dul i
mbun foghlama go neamhspleách sa Ghaeilge.
TORTHAÍ FOGHLAMA
Ar chríochnú an mhodúil seo go rathúil ba chóir go mbeadh ar chumas an mhic léinn







Ardleibhéal líofachta agus cruinnis le foghraíocht chruinn agus foclóir saibhir a léiriú i
labhairt agus i scríobh na Gaeilge
Dul i mbun foghlama sa Ghaeilge go neamhspleách
An Ghaeilge a úsáid mar theanga theagaisc sa seomra ranga bunscoile
Dearcadh dearfach i leith mhúineadh agus fhoghlaim na Gaeilge a chothú agus a léiriú.
Tuiscint a léiriú ar na gnéithe is suntasaí de chur chuige cumarsáideach do mhúineadh na
Gaeilge i scoileanna T1
Straitéisí éifeachtacha do mhúineadh na litearthachta i scoileanna T1 a mheas agus a
chur i bhfeidhm
Tuiscint a léiriú ar bhealaí éifeachtacha chun gramadach, foghraíocht agus fónaic na
Gaeilge a theagasc i scoileanna T1
ÁBHAR AN CHÚRSA
Seachtain
1
Cur chuige cumarsáideach 1
2
Cur chuige cumarsáideach 2
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 32
3
Fónaic & Foghraíocht na Gaeilge
4
Gramadach na Gaeilge
5
An suíomh ilrangach
6
Freastal ar éagsúlacht chumais sa suíomh ilrangach
7
Straitéisí chun cumas cumarsáide an pháiste a fhorbairt: Tascanna agus
fadhbanna le réiteach
8
An traidisiún béil: Scéalta traidisiúnta, Agallaimh bheirte
9
Múineadh na gramadaí: Teagasc foirm-dhírithe agus Straitéisí foghlama teanga
10
An Fhoghlaim Chomhtháite Ábhar agus Teanga
11
Forbairt na litearthachta i scoileanna T1 A
12
Forbairt na litearthachta i scoileanna T1 B
AISEOLAS
Múineadh na Gaeilge
Más mian leat aon ghné den chlár a phlé déan teagmháil leis an léachtóir cuí ar an ríomhphost.
An Ghaeilge – Teanga
Seachtain
1
Teanga
Léiriú ar an gclár.
Dul siar ar an ainmfhocal.
An tríú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 1.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Éadaí 1
Foghraíocht 1
2
An tríú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 2.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Éadaí 2
Scileanna aistriúcháin
Foghraíocht 2
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 33
3
An ceathrú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 1.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Sa Bhaile 1
Ailt as aistriú ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge
Foghraíocht 3
4
An ceathrú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 2.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Sa Bhaile 2
An réamhfhocal 1 - ó
Ailt as aistriú ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge
Foghraíocht 4
5
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (1)
An réamhfhocal 2 - trí
Foghraíocht 5
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
6
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (2)
Foghraíocht 6
An réamhfhocal 3 - um
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
7
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (3)
Uimhreacha 1
An réamhfhocal 4 - sa
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
8
Uimhreacha 2
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 34
An réamhfhocal 5 - roimh
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
An teanga chun plean ceachta a scríobh
9
An chopail Is
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 1
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Gaeilge neamhfhoirmiúil sa bhunscoil
10
An chopail Is
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 2
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
11
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 3
Céimeanna comparáide na haidiachta 1
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
12
Céimeranna comparáide na haidiachta 2
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
AISEOLAS
Más mian leat aon ghné den chlár a phlé déan teagmháil leis an léachtóir cuí ar an ríomhphost.
MEASÚNÚ
Múineadh na Gaeilge T1 - 40%
Scrúdú ag deireadh an tseimeastair. Beidh trí cheist ar an bpáipéar agus ceist amháin le freagairt (Q3/1)
(agus don atriail freisin) do mhúineadh na Gaeilge.
Beidh an scrúdú bunaithe ar ábhar an chúrsa agus ar an ábhar léitheoireachta.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 35
Is i nGaeilge amháin a ghlacfar le freagraí scrúdaithe.
Tógfar tinreamh ranga i rith an tseimeastair.
Teanga – 60%
Scrúdú scríofa ag deireadh an tseimeastair. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsula don teanga.
Atriail: Scrúdú scríofa. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsúla don teanga.
Ní mór pas a fháil i Múineadh na Gaeilge agus sa Teanga faoi seach chun pas a fháil sa mhodúil seo.
Tógfar tinreamh ranga i rith an tseimeastair.
FOIREANN TEAGAISC
Ainm
Teideal
Oifig
Fón
Ríomhphost
Seán de Brún
Ceann Roinne
C101
061-204329
sean.debrun@mic.ul.ie
Siobhán
Léachtóir i
Múineadh na
Gaeilge
G61
061-204973
siobhan.nimhurchu@mic.ul.ie
R116
061-204371
sean.ocathallain@mic.ul.ie
Ó Cathalláin
Léachtóir i
Múineadh na
Gaeilge
Éilís Ní Dheá
Léachtóir
G58
061-204359
eilis.nidhea@mic.ul.ie
G16
061-204342
roibeard.ocathasaigh@mic.ul.ie
Ní Mhurchú
Seán
le Gaeilge
Roibeard
Léachtóir
Ó Cathasaigh
le Gaeilge
Conchúr Ó
Brolcháin
Léachtóir
Martina Ní
Fhátharta
Léachtóir
N101
conchur.obrolchain@mic.ul.ie
le Gaeilge
C102
061-204555
martina.nifhatharta@mic.ul.ie
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 36
le Gaeilge
Emily-Anne
Rennison
Teagascóir
G71
emily.a.rennison@mic.ul.ie
Seán Ó Floinn
Teagascóir
G71
ofloinns@yahoo.ie
Úna Ní Ghairbhith
Teagascóir
G71
una.orourke1@gmail.com
Bríd Nic
Fhlannchadha
Teagascóir
G71
bberclancy@eircom.net
Dr Seosamh Ó
Cuinneagáin
Teagascóir
G71
seosamhocuinneagain@yahoo.ie
LIOSTA LÉITHEOIREACHTA
Múineadh na Gaeilge
An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig
an tSoláthair.
Lgh. 98 - 111: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 1 & 2)
Lgh. 112 - 125: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 3 & 4)
Lgh. 126 - 139: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 5 & 6)
An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga Treoirlínte do
Mhúinteoirí. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair.
Lgh. 93-95: Druileanna gramadaí
Lgh. 100 -105: Scéalaíocht
Lgh.112 - 115: Rabhlóga, tomhais, seanfhocail, tréanna
Lgh.125 - 144: Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht
Lgh. 52 - 115: Cur chuige cumarsáideach
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 37
Hickey, T. (1992). Teaching Irish Reading: What can Research Tell Us? In T. Hickey (eag.), Múineadh na
Gaeilge sa Bhunscoil: Moltaí Praiticiúla. Baile Átha Cliath: Bord na Gaeilge/Cumann Léitheoireachta
na hÉireann. (Tá cóipeanna den leabhrán seo ar fáil sa leabharlann ar iasacht 4 uair a chloig.)
ACMHAINNÍ BREISE
An Gúm. Preab san Aer (1988) Baile Atha Cliath: An Gúm (sa leabharlann)
An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta/Foras na Gaeilge. (2005) Séideán Sí: Cúrsa Comhtháite Gaeilge
(Leabhar an Oide, A, B, C, D, E). An Gúm: Baile Átha Cliath.
Fios Feasa (2005) Amhrán is Fiche: Amhráin do Pháistí. An Daingean: Fios Feasa. (sa leabharlann)
Fios Feasa (2007) Amhrán is Fiche Eile 2007: Amhráin do Pháistí . An Daingean: Fios Feasa. (sa leabharlann)
Furlong, S. (2005) D’Aon Ghuth 2. London: Boosey & Hawkes.
Furlong, S. (2006) D’Aon Ghuth 3. London: Boosey & Hawkes.
Harris, J. & Ó Duibhir, P. (2011) Múineadh Éifeachtacha Teangacha: Sintéis ar Thaighde. CNCM:
Baile Átha Cliath
Hickey, T. agus Ó Cainín, P. (2003). Léitheoirí Óga na Gaeilge: Cothú agus Cabhair. In R. Ní Mhianáin (eag.),
Idir Lúibíní: Aistí ar an Léitheoireacht agus ar an Litearthacht. Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life. (810.9/IDI
Tá cóipeanna den leabhar seo ar fáil ar iasacht 4 uair a chloig freisin.
Mac Dhonnagáin, T. (2004) Ceol na Mara: Amhráin do pháistí. An Spidéal: Futa Fata.
Mac Dhonnagáin, T. (2005) Bliain na nAmhrán (Amhráin do pháistí) An Spidéal: Futa Fata. (sa
leabharlann)
Mac Dhonnagáin, T. agus Ryan, J. (2005) Gugalaí Gug: Rannta Traidisiúnta Gaeilge. An Spidéal: Futa
Fata .
Mehisto, P., Marsh, D. & Frigols, M.J. (2008) Uncovering CLIL: Content and Language Integrated
Learning in Bilingual and Multilingual Education, Oxford: Macmillan.
Nassaji, H. (2000). Towards Integrating Form-focused Instruction and Communicative Interaction in
the Second Language Classroom: Some Pedagogical Possibilities. The Modern Languages
Journal, 84, 241-250.
NCCA Guidelines for Teachers – Exceptionally Able Students Caibidil 5 – Classroom Strategies
www.ncca.ie
Ní Nuadháin, N. (2006). Ar Maidin Moch. Indreabhán: Cló Iar-Chonnachta.
Ó Cathasaigh, R. (1998) Scéilín ó Bhéilín: Scéalta Traidisiúnta don Aos Óg. Luimneach: An tAonad
Forbartha Curaclaim, Coláiste Mhuire gan Smál / Baile an Fheirtéaraigh: Oidhreacht Chorca
Dhuibhne.
Ó Cathasaigh, R. (2009) Tidil Eidil Éró: Amhránaíocht Thraidisiúnta don Aos óg. Luimneach. Coláiste
Mhuire gan Smál / Oidhreacht Chorca Dhuibhne.
Ó Muimhneacháin, S. (2006) Bígí ag Agallamh: Agallaimh Bheirte do Leanaí Scoile. Cill Áirne: Coiste
Laitiarain.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 38
Ó Súilleabháin, A. (2002) Daid Dearmadach. Clár Chlainne Mhuiris: Cló Mhaigh Eo.
Rosenstock, G. (2001) Dánta Duitse: Scothvéarsaí do dhaoine óga. Indreabhán: Cló Iar-Chonnachta.
Ryan, M. (2008) Plúra Lúra agus Na Bopóga. Béal Feirste: Cultúrlann McAdam Ó Fiaich.
Williams, N. J. A. (1988) Cniogaide Cnagaide: Rainn traidisiúnta do pháistí. Baile Átha Cliath: An
Clóchomhar Tta.
Teanga
Mac Murchaidh, C. (2002) Cruinnscríobh na Gaeilge, Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life.
Mac Suibhne, A. agus Whelton, M. (2009) Sruth na Maoile, Baile Átha Cliath: Brunswick Press.
Ó Dónaill, É. (2011) Gramadach gan Stró Baile Átha Cliath: Gaelchultúr Teo.
ACMHAINNÍ BREISE
An Gúm (2004) Séideán Sí A B C D E F, Baile Átha Cliath: An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta.
An Mheitheal um theagasc na Gaeilge ar an Tríú Leibhéal Siollabas Nua don Dara Bliain
Ollscoile
De Bhaldraithe, T. (1998) English - Irish Dictionary, Baile Átha Cliath: An Gúm.
McGonagle, N. (2003) Irish Grammar - A Basic Handbook, Gaillimh: Cló Iar-Chonnachta.
Ó Dónaill, N. (1998) Foclóir Gaeilge – Béarla, Baile Átha Cliath: An Gúm.
Gaelscéal
www.acmhainn.ie
An Foclóir Beag www.focloir beag
Focal.ie www.focal.ie
GaelSpell www.gaelspell.com
www.acmhainn.ie
www.seomraranga.ie
www.tobar.ie
www.teachnet.ie
www.teagascnagaeilge.ie
Vifax www.vifax.nuim.ie
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 39
EDU 203
SteM 4: Introduction to Mathematics and its Teaching 3
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education 2: Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
INTRODUCTION:
In this module, a developmental approach to the teaching of the strand of ‘Measures’ across the primary
school curriculum will be presented. Attention will be placed on mathematically appropriate sequences of
instruction which address cognitive readiness for measurement concepts. In addition, appropriate use of
real world applications, measurement tool, manipulatives/technology in addition to the importance of
addressing pupil misconceptions will underpin the sessions. It also provides opportunities to develop
knowledge of relevant measurement concepts as well as an appreciation of the need for a robust knowledge
of number when teaching Measures in primary school.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Refine and develop the ability to teach mathematics effectively, focusing in particular on the multiclass settings.
Reflect on and deconstruct previous mathematics experiences to examine and address
misconceptions or ‘thin’ understanding
Participate in sessions to experience best practice in mathematics teaching i.e. constructivist
approach, use of materials etc.
Demonstrate understanding of primary level measures concepts in addition to linkage between
strand units.
Increase personal mathematics subject matter knowledge
Apply knowledge and understanding of number in real-world situations particularly in
measurement contexts.
Explore and develop an understanding of the teaching progressions for primary level Measures
concepts and demonstrate suitable manipulative usage to support children’s understanding.

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



MODULE CONTENT:
The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other
events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
WEEK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS
Introduction to measures
Teaching progressions and foundational concepts in measures
An introduction to ‘Maths Eyes’ as a teaching approach
Teaching Length: A focus on Non Standard Units
Teaching Length: A focus on Standard Units
Problem Solving in measures
Teaching Weight
Teaching Area and Perimeter
An Introduction to Mathematics trails
Teaching Capacity
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 40
8
9
10
11
12
Angle and Triangle construction
Teaching Circle
Promoting measurement in the environment using ‘Maths Eyes’
Teaching concepts relating to Time
Teaching concepts relating to Money
Sharing perspectives on the development of ‘Maths trails’
Multi class planning for School Placement
Theme teaching within the strand unit of measurement
Overview of course
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
FEEDBACK:
Students can ask questions in relation to the course generally from lecturers before/after focus sessions or
during office hours (see top of page 1). Specific feedback regarding in-class assignments will be given to each
group in subsequent sessions.
MODULE ASSESSMENT:
The examination which is worth 100% of the course mark will take place during examination week by means
of an objective test (OT). This examination is not negatively marked. Students must answer all questions in
the exam. Questions will be set from lecture material/notes, available handouts, lecture-based activities, and
required readings from the Van De Walle textbook in addition to other readings identified during the focus
and tutorial sessions.
In the event that a student fails the module, the repeat assessment procedure for the module is examination
(worth 100%). In the repeat examination, students must answer four essay-type questions from a choice of
four (4Q/4).
Attendance and participation in focus sessions and tutorials is a requirement of the course. Attendance is
required due to the emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences when working with measurement
instruments and manipulatives. Attendance will be recorded weekly. Email notification of absences is not
accepted. 10% of marks in the module will be deducted for poor attendance.
Absence due to illness: If you receive a cert from a doctor outside the college medical centre, a copy of
the doctor certificate must be handed to the relevant lecturer during the FOCUS SESSION the week
following the absence. If you receive a cert from the college medical centre, you must still inform the
lecturer during the focus session following the absence. The cert will be sent directly to the lecturers at
the end of semester. Otherwise you will be marked absence. Please do not send emails in relation to
doctor certificates.
Absences due to sports: Absences due to sports are only accepted in the case where the student is
representing the college in a competition. Documentary evidence of this will be required. Absences for
training are not permitted. You must still inform the lecturer during the focus/tutorial session following
the absence. Please do not send emails in relation to matches.
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
The following are grade descriptors:
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 41
Grade
A
Descriptor
Excellent
A comprehensive, focused and concise response to the assessment items, consistently
demonstrating
• an extensive and detailed knowledge of the mathematics content
• an extensive and detailed knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy
• an extensive and detailed knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors
• extensive evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings
B
Very Good A thorough and well organised response to the assessment items,
demonstrating
• a broad knowledge of the mathematics content
• a broad knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy
• a broad knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors
• substantial evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings
C
Good An adequate and competent response to the assessment items, demonstrating
• adequate but not complete knowledge of the mathematics content
• adequate but not complete knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy
• gaps and misconceptions relating to some important mathematics content and/or
pedagogical knowledge
• adequate knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors
• some evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings
D
Satisfactory An acceptable response to the assessment items with
• basic grasp of the mathematics content knowledge, somewhat lacking in breadth and
depth
• basic grasp of the mathematics pedagogy, somewhat lacking in breadth and depth
• gaps and misconceptions relating to some important mathematics content and/or
pedagogical knowledge
• basic knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors
• minimal evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings
F
Unacceptable A response to the assessment items which is unacceptable, with
• a failure to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the mathematics content
• a failure to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy
• a failure to demonstrate basic knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and
errors
• no evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings
STAFF:
Name
Title
Dr
Aisling
Leavy
Dr
Mairéad
Lecturer in
Mathematics
Education
Lecturer in
Mathematics
Office
Hours
Monday
11:30-12:30
Monday
11:30-12:30
Office
Telephone Email
R124
061 204978
Foundation
Building
R123
061 204504
Foundation
Aisling.Leavy@mic.ul.ie
Mairead.Hourigan@mic.ul.ie
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 42
Hourigan
Ms.
Maura
Walsh
Claire
Carroll
Education
Tutor in
Mathematics
Education
Tutor in
Mathematics
Education
Building
By appointment
Maura.Walsh@mic.ul.ie
By appointment
Claire.Carroll@mic.ul.ie
READING LIST:
Readings are aligned with course topics and are sourced from the course textbook. It is important to note
that the readings supplement the course content and provide background on the mathematical topics.
However, the readings are not a substitute for attendance at lectures.
For this and subsequent mathematics education courses, there is one required core text which will support
your learning. Required readings from the Van De Walle textbook will be assigned by the lecturer at the
relevant lecture and/or listed in the relevant lecture notes. This text is available in the 4 hour loan and
general lending sections of the library and may be purchased from O’Mahoney’s, the student’s union
bookshop or a variety of online sources (www.bookdepository.co.uk and www.amazon.co.uk). A number of
articles from practitioner journals are also mandatory reading. Full details are below. These readings are
available through the library.
Core textbook and curriculum readings
Van De Walle , J., Karp, K.S. & Bay-Williams, J. (2013). Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching
Developmentally. International Edition. Boston: Pearson /Allyn and Bacon.
 Chapter 19: Developing Measurement Concepts.
You may choose to refer to these to develop your own mathematical content knowledge relating to
measures:



Chapter 15: Developing Fraction Concepts.
Chapter 16: Developing Strategies for Fraction Computation.
Chapter 17: Developing Concepts of Decimals and Percents.
Government of Ireland (1999). Mathematics: Primary School Curriculum. The Stationery Office. Personal
copy of curriculum handbook (also available from library).
Government of Ireland (1999). Mathematics: Teacher Guidelines. The Stationery Office. Personal copy of
curriculum handbook (also available from library) p. 30- 65.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 43
Practitioner readings
Rozanski, K.D., Beckmann, C.A. & Thompson, D.R. (2003). Exploring Size with the Grouchy Ladybug. Teaching
Children Mathematics, October, 84-89.
Lubinski, C. A., & Thiessen, D. (1996). Exploring measurement through literature. Teaching Children
Mathematics, 2, 260–263.
Tyminski, A. M., Weilbacher, M., Lenburg, N., & Brown, C. (2008, August). Ladybugs and lengths: Beginning
measurement. Teaching Children Mathematics, 15, 34-37.
Kurz, Terri L. (2012). A Super Way to Soak in Linear Measurement. Teaching Children Mathematics, 536–41.
Hoekstra, K. (2009). Problem Solvers. A Greener Greendale. Teaching Children Mathematics, October,
Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 140-143.
Morrig et al. (2010). Problem Solvers: Solutions. A Greener Greendale. Teaching Children Mathematics,
Volume 17, Issue 3, Page 129-131.
Nitabach, E. & Lehrer, R. (1996). Developing Spatial Sense through Area Measurement. Teaching Children
Mathematics, April, 473-476.
Casa, Spinelli & Gavin (2006). This about covers it! Strategies for finding Area. Teaching Children
Mathematics, October, 168-173.
Carmody, H.G. (2010). Water Bottle Designs and Measures. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School,
16(5), 272-280).
Reynolds, A. and Grayson, W.H. (1997). Third-Grade students engage in a Playground Measuring. Teaching
Children Mathematics, 4, 199-170.
Richardson, K.M. (2004). Designing Math Trails for the Elementary School. Teaching Children Mathematics,
August, 8-14.
Greenes, Cavanagh, Tsankova & Glanfield (2012). Can we cross the street in time? Mathematics Teaching in
the Middle School, 19(2), 86-93.
Dixon, J.K. (2006). Tracking Time. Representing Elapsed Time on an Open Number Line. Teaching Children
Mathematics, August, 18-24.
Reys R., Reys, R. and Reys, B. (2013). Quick Reads: Sport Courts and Fields: A Context for Estimation and
Tessellation. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 18(9), 566-570
Lecturers may make notes available relating to weekly lectures in both components of the course. These
notes are intended as a brief overview of the content covered during the session; they are not intended as a
summary of the lecture nor are they intended as a substitute for attendance at lectures (attendance is a
requirement). Hence, you are advised to take detailed notes during all lectures. These notes are available to
all students via moodle.
URL:
Moodle.mic.ul.ie
Access Key:
polya
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 44
Module EDU 201 – Social Studies - Teaching History and Geography in Primary Schools
Autumn Semester 2015
Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
INTRODUCTION:
Geography and History are exciting, relevant and invigorating subject areas which are important for
teachers’ personal and professional development. This course develops student teachers’ confidence,
knowledge and skills to enable them to teach geography and history in primary schools in line with the
requirements of the Primary School Curriculum (DES/NCCA, 1999). The course aims to engage students
critically with core aspects of geography and history through practical workshops, critical reflection, online
learning and field studies. Ultimately, the course will model high quality geography and history teaching both
for student teachers and for primary children.
The course will cover a range of theoretical and practical issues in teaching primary history and geography,
informed by current trends from international, national and local research. This will include teaching literacy
and numeracy through history and geography; implications of new guidelines for early childhood education;
long term and short term planning; use of a range of assessment approaches, creative approaches, learning
from previous experiences as learners of history and geography and enquiry-based learning.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of the module, the students will acquire learning at different levels:
Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation






Understand and be able to critique the content and structure of the history and geography
curriculum in the context of school placement, personal experiences and research;
understand the relationship between content and process in the context of teaching history and
geography;
become familiar with the constructivist theories of learning appropriate to primary teaching;
develop their pedagogical content knowledge and subject matter knowledge in history and
geography;
become familiar with resources for teaching history and geography;
become familiar with the important role history and geography lessons have in developing the
children’s literacy and numeracy skills.
Affective: Attitude and Values

realise the important potential contribution of history and geography to the lifelong
development of the person;
 appreciate the child-centred philosophy and learning principles of the revised curriculum and how
they can be enacted through the teaching of history and geography;
 have an opportunity to discuss and reflect upon their initial experiences of teaching history and
geography.
Psychomotor: Skills, Capabilities and Experience
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 45



engage in practical activities that promote the skills of working as a historian and working as a
geographer;
practice and evaluate some methodologies in the classroom, as part of their school placement;
design and utilise some resources for teaching history and geography while on school placement.
Research


value the concept of ‘Assessment for Learning’ and become familiar with different assessment
methodologies to promote a deep level of thinking and understanding in primary history and
geography;
conduct research in a classroom context.
MODULE CONTENT:
The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other
events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
This schedule applies to groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 only
Lectures/Tutorials
Week
1
2
3
4
5
Lecture/Tutorial
Topic
Lecture:
Primary Assessment procedures
History
Introduction to Module EDU 254
Teaching of History in the Primary school – an
overview
Tutorial: Primary Using the college campus as a site for learning
Geography
geography
Lecture:
Primary The Geographical World of the Child.
Geography
Lecturer
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Tutorial:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Lecture:
History
Primary Introduction to Photo Voice as a technique for
teaching History/
Recording old buildings
Primary History in the Constructivist Classroom
O’
Dr. Anne Dolan
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Enquiry based learning
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Enquiry based approaches to teaching the
Geography
geography curriculum
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial:
History
Lecture:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Primary Using Visual Evidence in Station Teaching in
History
Primary Building deeper historical understanding
Dr. Anne Dolan
O’
O’
Approaches and Methodologies in History
6
Tutorial: Primary Teaching (Overview)
Geography
Mapping and graphicacy
Lecture:
Primary Teaching Literacy and Numeracy through
Geography
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Dr. Anne Dolan
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 46
7
8
9
10
11
12
Tutorial:
History
Lecture:
History
Primary Visit to King John’s Castle/Hunt Museum
Primary Using the Local Environment in the teaching of
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
O’
Tutorial: Primary Working as tourism agents for Limerick City
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Lecture:
Primary No lecture due to bank holiday
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial:
History
Primary Visit to King John’s Castle/Hunt Museum
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Lecture:
History
Primary Structure and content of the history curriculum
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Tutorial: Primary Working with a geographical topic
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Local Geography
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial:
History
Lecture:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Primary Using Narrative texts in History Teaching
Primary Effective Planning for a History Lesson
Dr. Anne Dolan
O’
O’
Tutorial: Primary Education for Sustainability
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Geography and the Environment
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Primary Planning for School Placement 3 –mixed class
setting
Dr. Anne Dolan
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
O’
Page 47
This schedule applies to groups 6 and 7 students only
Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Lecture/Tutorial
Topic
Lecturer
Lecture:
History
Primary Introduction to Module EDU 254
Assessment procedures
Teaching of History in the primary school – an
overview
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Tutorial:
History
Primary Introduction to Photo Voice as a technique for
teaching History/
Recording old buildings
Primary The Geographical World of the Child
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Lecture:
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Using the college campus to teach geography
Geography
Lecture:
Primary History in the Constructivist Classroom
History
Dr. Anne Dolan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Tutorial:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Primary Using Visual Evidence in Station Teaching in
History
Lecture:
Primary Enquiry based approaches to teaching
Geography
geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Enquiry based teaching
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Building deeper historical understanding
History
Approaches and Methodologies in History
Teaching (Overview)
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Visit to King John’s Castle/Hunt Museum
History
Lecture:
Primary Teaching Literacy and numeracy through
Geography
geography
Dr.
Eileen
O’
Sullivan
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Mapping and graphicacy
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Using the Local Environment in the teaching of
History
History
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Visit to King John’s Castle/Hunt Museum
History
Lecture:
Primary No lecture due to Bank Holiday
Geography
Dr.
Eileen
O’
Sullivan
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Working as a tourism agent for Limerick City
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Structure and content of the history curriculum
History
Tutorial: Primary Using Narrative texts in History Teaching
History
Dr. Anne Dolan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
O’
O’
O’
Page 48
10
11
12
Lecture:
Primary Local geography
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Working with a geographical topic
Geography
Lecture:
Primary Effective Planning for a History Lesson
History
Dr. Anne Dolan
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Tutorial:
History
Dr.
Eileen
Sullivan
O’
Primary Planning for School Placement 3 –mixed class
setting
Lecture:
Primary Geography and the Environment
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
Tutorial: Primary Education for Sustainability
Geography
Dr. Anne Dolan
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
MODULE ASSESSMENT:
Coursework: To be submitted to the Education Office in Week 12 – Wednesday 25 November 2015 during
normal office hours.
The assignment will be comprised of two parts (maximum word count of 1,800 words for both parts) and will
be based on the theme of “Teaching History and Geography in the Constructivist Classroom”.
Part A
Essay (50% of marks, maximum 1000 words)
1. Outline the rationale for a constructivist approach, with reference to the history and geography
curriculum. (20% of marks)
2. Supplement your argument with references to readings indicated on Moodle. (10% of marks).
3. Provide your own reflections/observations on how constructivist approaches can be facilitated/adopted,
commenting on examples of the activities you experienced during the course. (20% of marks)
Part B (40% of marks. Maximum 800 words)
Groups 1,3,5 and 7
1.
Design a one hour geography lesson for a mixed class which you can use during SP3. Please ensure
there is evidence of integration with history and literacy. (20% of marks)
2.
This should include examples of interactive methodologies that were examined in lectures and
tutorials. (10% of marks)
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 49
3.
You are required to design an activity sheet for children to complete as part of this lesson. Please note
this should not be copied from the internet or any other source. Ensure that your activity sheet is colourful,
well designed and includes some visuals or images, if appropriate. The lesson plan should contain a strong
focus on constructivist/enquiry approaches to teaching your geography or history lesson. (10% of marks)
Groups 2, 4, 6 (B. Ed. Students ) and all B. Ed in Education and Psychology students
1.
Design a one hour history lesson for a mixed class which you can use during SP3. Please ensure there is
evidence of integration with geography and literacy.(20% of marks).
2.
This should include examples of interactive methodologies that were examined in lectures and
tutorials. (10% of marks)
3.
You are required to design an activity sheet for children to complete as part of this lesson. Please note
this should not be copied from the internet or any other source. Ensure that your activity sheet is colourful,
well designed and includes some visuals or images, if appropriate. The lesson plan should contain a strong
focus on constructivist/enquiry approaches to teaching your geography or history lesson. (10% of marks)
Full attendance at lectures is a requirement of this course. Up to 10% of the marks allocated for the area
may be deducted for unsatisfactory attendance/participation. Lecturers reserve the right to refuse to accept
coursework from students whose attendance is deemed to be unsatisfactory. A record of attendance will be
taken at each lecture/tutorial.
Repeat Examination (Annual repeats, August 2016): Coursework
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
FEEDBACK:
A group feedback session will be offered to students in Spring Semester.
If, after attending the group feedback session, a student wishes to seek further clarification, they will be
advised on specific times when they can meet with the relevant lecturer individually.
STAFF:
Name
Title
Office
Telephone
Email
061 204983
anne.dolan@mic.ul.ie
Office Hour/s
Dr.
Dolan
Anne Lecturer,
Primary
Geography
M103
Mount
Building
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 50
Dr. Eileen O’ Lecturer,
Sullivan
Primary History
N35, Gerard 061-204975
House
eileen.osullivan@mic.ul.ie
READING LIST:
Mandatory Reading
Geography (All documents listed are available on Moodle).
1. Scoffham, S. (2013) Geography and Creativity: Making Connections in Scoffham, S. (Ed). Teaching
Geography Creatively: London: Routledge p1-17
2. Scoffham, S. (2013). Geography and creativity: developing joyful and imaginative learners. Education
3-13, 41(4), 368-381. doi: 10.1080/03004279.2013.819625
3. Dolan, A. (2013) Exploring geography through stories in Scoffham, S. (Ed). Teaching Geography
Creatively: London: Routledge p31-46.
4. Department of Education and Science / National Council for Curriculum and Assessment NCCA
(1999) The Geography Curriculum, Dublin, Stationery Office
5. Department of Education and Science / National Council for Curriculum and Assessment NCCA
(1999) Geography Curriculum – Teacher Guidelines, Dublin, Stationery Office.
(Note: Scoffham, S. (2013). Teaching Geography Creatively: London: Routledge. may be purchased
from O Mahoney’s or Students’ Union Shop).
History (All documents listed are available on Moodle)
1. Department of Education and Science / National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (1999)
Primary School Curriculum: History – Curriculum Statement. Dublin: The Stationery Office.
2. Department of Education and Science / National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (1999)
Primary School Curriculum: History – Teacher Guidelines. Dublin: The Stationery Office.
3. Freidman, W. J. (1982) Conventional time concepts and children’s structuring of time. In W. J.
Freidman (Ed.) The Developmental Psychology of Time, pp. 171-208. New York: Academic Press.
4. O’ Sullivan E. (2012). Learning to ‘Understand Backwards’ in time: Children’s Temporal cognition and
the primary History Curriculum. Educational Studies Association of Ireland Conference, 2012.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 51
Optional Readings
Geography:
1. Scoffham, S. (2010) (Ed.) Handbook of Primary Geography. The Geographical Association: Sheffield.
2. Dolan, A.M. (2012) Making a connection. Primary Geography. Sheffield: Geographical Association
Vol. 79, (3) pp.16-17.
http://www.geography.org.uk/Journals/Journals.asp?articleID=983
3. Dolan, A.M. (2012) Futures talk over story time. Primary Geography. Sheffield: Geographical
Association Vol. 78, (2) pp.26-17.
http://www.geography.org.uk/Journals/Journals.asp?articleID=970
4. Catling, S and Willy, T. (2008) Achieving QTS Teaching Primary Geography. Exeter: Learning Matters.
5. Martin, F. (2006) Teaching Geography in Primary Schools: Learning to Live in the World
Cambridge: Chris Kington Publishing.
6. Martin, F. and Owens, P (2008) Caring for our World: ESD for 4-8 year olds. Sheffield: Geographical
Association.
History
1. Hodkinson, A. (2003) The usage of subjective temporal phrases within the national curriculum for
history and its schemes of work. Education 3-13: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and
Early Years Education, 31:3, pp. 28-34.
2. Hoodless, P.A. (1996) Time and Timelines in the Primary School, Teaching of History Series No. 69.
London: Historical Association.
3. Hoodless, P. A. (2002) An investigation into children’s developing awareness of time and chronology
in story. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 34: 2, pp. 173-200.
4. Jahoda, G. (1963) Children’s concept of time and history. Educational Review, 15 (287): pp. 87-104.
5. Levstik, L. S. and Pappas, C. C. (1987) Exploring the development of historical understanding, Journal
of Research and Development in Education, 21(1), pp. 1-15.
6. Virta, A. (2002) Becoming a history teacher: Observations on the beliefs and growth of student
teachers, Teaching and Teacher Education, 18(6) pp. 687- 698.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 52
Module EDU/EDE 207
Social, Personal, Health, & Physical Education 1
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education (Yr 2): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr 2)
INTRODUCTION:
This module will support students’ learning to teach PE and SPHE in primary schools.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theory, concepts and methods pertaining to the
effective teaching, learning and assessment of PE and SPHE
 Identify and implement key teaching strategies for PE and SPHE
 Reflect critically on his/her practice on an on-going basis so as to inform that practice
 Demonstrate appreciation of the importance and value of PE and SPHE in the Primary School as part of
the holistic development of children
 Foster good relationships with and among pupils based on mutual respect and trust and meaningful
interactions.
 Demonstrate ability to embrace and use the diverse range of skills required for the implementation of
PE and SPHE
 Plan coherent, differentiated and integrated teaching programmes in PE and SPHE within a safe,
interactive and challenging environment using strategies that promote and maintain positive
behaviour, in accordance with school policy
MODULE CONTENT:
The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other
events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
WEEK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
WEEK
1
2
3
4
5
6
TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS: PE
Introduction to Primary PE;
PE pedagogy explored through Games;
PE pedagogy explored through Games;
Games Peer-teaching;
PE pedagogy explored through Gymnastics;
PE pedagogy explored through Gymnastics;
Examining the Aquatics strand;
PE pedagogy explored through Gymnastics;
PE pedagogy explored through Dance;
PE pedagogy explored through Dance;
PE pedagogy explored through Dance;
School Placement Preparation;
TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS: SPHE
Introduction to SPHE
The Health Promoting School
Lifestyle: Nutrition/Food Safety
Lifestyle: Nutrition/Food Poverty/Food Waste
Lifestyle: Importance of Exercise
Child Safety: Road/Water/Fire
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 53
7
8
9
10
11
12
Child Safety: Child Protection Guidelines/Anti-Bullying
Child Safety: Cyber Safety
Citizenship Education: Active Citizenship/Green Schools
Citizenship Education: Development Education
Citizenship Education: Human Rights Education
School Placement Preparation: Teaching SPHE in mixed class settings
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
FEEDBACK:
Generic group feedback will be provided at the beginning of Semester 4. Individual feedback on assessments
is available to all students. Please make an appointment via email
ATTENDANCE:
Because of the practical and experiential nature of the classes provided as part of module EDU 207,
attendance at all classes is compulsory. For this reason, you will be required to sign-in to all classes in the
module.
Absence from four (4) or more hours of class across the entire module, without appropriate certification
(Doctor, Counsellor or Chaplaincy certificate), will result in the student receiving an F grade on the whole
module. Failing the module will result in it having to be retaken at annual repeats in August 2016.
It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all certificates concerning absences are presented to the
class lecturer at the first class immediately after the absence. If you do not do this, your absence will not be
accounted for.
An additional rule exists concerning attendance at PE classes, whereby students who miss two classes may
not be allowed out on school placement.
ASSESSMENT:
Format: Course workbook.
Weighting: PE 66%; SPHE 34%
Grade Descriptors & Assessment Criteria:
A grading rubric is provided on a separate document. This can be accessed in the Course Outline and
Assessment Folder within the PE and SPHE sections on Moodle
Submission date: Class time in Week 12.
 A hard copy of the PE portion should be submitted to Tailteann Reception
 A hard copy of the SPHE portion should be submitted to the SPHE lecturer
 Electronic versions must be submitted via Turnitin links on the PE and SPHE sections on
Moodle
Repeat assessment: Written exam.
 Two PE questions, answer 1
 Two SPHE questions, answer 1
All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 54
STAFF:
Name
Richard
Bowles
Ruth
Rafferty
Mary Corry
Aoife
O’Rourke
Tim
Moloney
Brighid
Golden
Title
Dr
Dr
Contact
Email for an
appointment
Email for an
appointment
Email for an
appointment
Email for an
appointment
Email for an
appointment
Email for an
appointment
Office
G49
Telephone
Ext 4912
Email
richard.bowles@mic.ul.ie
R109
Ext 4569
ruth.rafferty@mic.ul.ie
Mary.corry@mic.ul.ie
Aoife.orourke@mic.ul.ie
tim.moloney@mic.ul.ie
R222
Ext 4991
brighid.golden@mic.ul.ie
READING LIST:
Core Texts:
1. Government of Ireland.1999. Primary School Curriculum: Physical Education. Dublin: The Stationery
Office.
2. Government of Ireland. 1999. Primary School Teacher Guidelines: Physical Education. Dublin: The
Stationery Office.
3. Government of Ireland (1999). Primary School Curriculum: Social, Personal and Health Education.
Dublin: The Stationery Office.
4. Government of Ireland (1999). Primary School Teacher Guidelines: Social, Personal and Health
Education. Dublin: The Stationery Office.
5. Graham, G. 2001. Teaching Children Physical Education: Becoming a Master Teacher. 2nd ed.
Champaign IL: Human Kinetics.
6. Ryan, P., Mannix McNamara, P. and Deasy, C. (2006). Health Promotion in Ireland, Dublin: Gill and
McMillan.
7. Economic and Social Research Institute (2013). Growing up in Ireland: National Longitudinal Study of
children. Dublin: ESRI.
Supplementary Texts:
1. Gallahue, David L. 2003. Developmental Physical Education for All Children. Champaign, IL: Human
Kinetics.
2. Graham, G., Holt-Hale, S.A., & Parker M. (2004) Children moving: A Reflective Approach to Teaching
Physical Education Boston: McGraw Hill
3. Pickup, I. and Price, L. 2007. Teaching PE in the Primary School. London: Continuum.
4. Naidoo, J. and Wills, J. (2000). Health Promotion: Foundations for Practice. London: Balliere Tindall.
5. Mosely, J. (2000). Quality Circle Time in the Primary Classroom. Cambridge: LDA.
6. Westwood, P. (2011). Commonsense Methods for Children with Special Educational Needs. London:
Routledge.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 55
Modúl EDU209 – An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3
Seimeastar an Fhómhair 2015-2016
Baitsiléir an Oideachais 2: Baitsiléir an Oideachais san Oideachas agus sa tSíceolaíocht 2
Sa mhodúl seo cuirtear béim ar chumas labhartha agus scríofa na mac léinn a fheabhsú chun cur ar a
gcumas an Ghaeilge a úsáid mar theanga theagaisc sa bhunscoil. Is í aidhm an mhodúil seo tuiscint a
thabhairt do na mic léinn ar na gnéithe seo a leanas den teanga: an tríú agus an ceathrú díochlaonadh
den ainmfhocal, an chopail ‘is’, ailt a aistriú ó Bhéarla, uimhreacha, ceisteanna agus freagraí,
réamhfhocail ó, trí, um, sa, roimh, foghair na Gaeilge a mhúineadh agus nathanna cainte, maraon le
tuiscint ar fhorbairt na litearthachta Gaeilge mar mar dhara teanga, ar chur chuige cumarsáideach do
mhúineadh na Gaeilge, agus ar an tábhacht a bhaineann le foghraíocht agus gramadach i bhfoghlaim
na Gaeilge i scoileanna T2.
Spreagtar na mic léinn bheith gníomhach sa Ghaeilge gach seachtain i rith an tseimeastair agus dul i
mbun foghlama go neamhspleách sa Ghaeilge.
TORTHAÍ FOGHLAMA:
Ar chríochnú an mhodúil seo go rathúil ba chóir go mbeadh ar chumas an mhic léinn:







Ardleibhéal líofachta agus cruinnis le foghraíocht chruinn agus foclóir saibhir a léiriú i
labhairt agus i scríobh na Gaeilge
Dul i mbun foghlama sa Ghaeilge go neamhspleách
An Ghaeilge a úsáid mar theanga theagaisc sa seomra ranga bunscoile
Dearcadh dearfach i leith mhúineadh agus fhoghlaim na Gaeilge a chothú agus a léiriú.
Tuiscint a léiriú ar na gnéithe is suntasaí de chur chuige cumarsáideach do mhúineadh na
Gaeilge i scoileanna T2
Straitéisí éifeachtacha do mhúineadh na litearthachta i scoileanna T2 a mheas agus a chur i
bhfeidhm
Tuiscint a léiriú ar bhealaí éifeachtacha chun gramadach, foghraíocht agus fónaic na Gaeilge
a theagasc i scoileanna T2
ÁBHAR AN CHÚRSA (Múineadh na Gaeilge i Scoileanna T2)
Seachtain
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Fónaic & Foghraíocht na Gaeilge
Gramadach na Gaeilge
Cur chuige cumarsáideach 1
Cur chuige cumarsáideach 2
An suíomh ilrangach 1
An suíomh ilrangach 2
Modh na sraithe
Múineadh na Gramadaí i Scoileanna T2
Straitéisi Foghlama Teanga
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 56
10
11
12
Scileanna agus foscileanna na léitheoireachta
Cur chuige na léitheoireachta
Ullmhúchán do Mhúineadh na Gaeilge ar Shocrúchán Scoile 3
An Ghaeilge – Teanga
Seachtain
1
Teanga
Léiriú ar an gclár.
Dul siar ar an ainmfhocal.
An tríú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 1.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Éadaí 1
Foghraíocht 1
2
An tríú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 2.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Éadaí 2
Scileanna aistriúcháin
Foghraíocht 2
3
An ceathrú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 1.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Sa Bhaile 1
Ailt as aistriú ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge
Foghraíocht 3
4
An ceathrú díochlaonadh den ainmfhocal 2.
Labhairt na Gaeilge Téama an Churaclaim – Sa Bhaile 2
An réamhfhocal 1 - ó
Ailt as aistriú ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge
Foghraíocht 4
5
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (1)
An réamhfhocal 2 - trí
Foghraíocht 5
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
6
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (2)
Foghraíocht 6
An réamhfhocal 3 - um
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
7
Cíoradh ar theanga is urlabhra chun scéalta a mhúineadh sa bhunscoil. (3)
Uimhreacha 1
An réamhfhocal 4 - sa
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
8
Uimhreacha 2
An réamhfhocal 5 - roimh
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
An teanga chun plean ceachta a scríobh
9
An chopail Is
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 57
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 1
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Gaeilge neamhfhoirmiúil sa bhunscoil
10
An chopail Is
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 2
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
11
Ceisteanna agus freagraí 3
Céimeanna comparáide na haidiachta 1
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
12
Céimeranna comparáide na haidiachta 2
Labhairt na Gaeilge - Cúrsaí Reatha
AISEOLAS
Más mian leat aon ghné den chlár a phlé déan teagmháil leis an léachtóir cuí ar an ríomhphost.
MEASÚNÚ AN MHODÚIL
Múineadh na Gaeilge T2 - 40%
Scrúdú ag deireadh an tseimeastair. Beidh trí cheist ar an bpáipéar agus ceist amháin le freagairt
(Q3/1) (agus don atriail freisin) do mhúineadh na Gaeilge.
Beidh an scrúdú bunaithe ar ábhar an chúrsa agus ar an ábhar léitheoireachta.
Is i nGaeilge amháin a ghlacfar le freagraí scrúdaithe.
Tógfar tinreamh ranga i rith an tseimeastair.
Teanga – 60%
Scrúdú scríofa ag deireadh an tseimeastair. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsula don teanga.
Atriail: Scrúdú scríofa. Dhá cheist le codanna éagsula don teanga.
Ní mór pas a fháil i Múineadh na Gaeilge agus sa Teanga faoi seach chun pas a fháil sa mhodúil seo.
Tógfar tinreamh ranga i rith an tseimeastair.
FOIREANN TEAGAISC
Ainm
Teideal
Oifig
Fón
Ríomhphost
Seán de Brún
Ceann Roinne
C101
061-204329
sean.debrun@mic.ul.ie
Siobhán
Léachtóir i
G61
061-204973
siobhan.nimhurchu@mic.ul.ie
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 58
Ní Mhurchú
Seán
Ó Cathalláin
Éilís Ní Dheá
Roibeard
Ó Cathasaigh
Conchúr Ó
Brolcháin
Martina Ní
Fhátharta
Emily-Anne
Rennison
Seán Ó Floinn
Múineadh na
Gaeilge
Léachtóir i
Múineadh na
Gaeilge
Léachtóir
le Gaeilge
Léachtóir
le Gaeilge
Léachtóir
le Gaeilge
Léachtóir
le Gaeilge
Teagascóir
R116
061-204371
sean.ocathallain@mic.ul.ie
G58
061-204359
eilis.nidhea@mic.ul.ie
G16
061-204342
roibeard.ocathasaigh@mic.ul.ie
N101
C102
conchur.obrolchain@mic.ul.ie
061-204555
martina.nifhatharta@mic.ul.ie
G71
emily.a.rennison@mic.ul.ie
Teagascóir
G71
ofloinns@yahoo.ie
Úna Ní Ghairbhith
Teagascóir
G71
una.orourke1@gmail.com
Bríd Nic
Fhlannchadha
Teagascóir
G71
bberclancy@eircom.net
Dr Seosamh Ó
Cuinneagáin
Teagascóir
G71
seosamhocuinneagain@yahoo.ie
LIOSTA LÉITHEOIREACHTA
Múineadh na Gaeilge T2
An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga. Baile Átha
Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair.
Lgh. 36 - 47: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 1 & 2)
Lgh. 48 - 60: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 3 & 4)
Lgh. 62 - 75: Éisteacht, Labhairt, Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht (Rang 5 & 6)
An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta (1999) Curaclam na Bunscoile Gaeilge – Teanga Treoirlínte do
Mhúinteoirí. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair.
Lgh. 93-95: Druileanna gramadaí
Lgh.125 - 144: Léitheoireacht & Scríbhneoireacht
Lch.159: Ceacht samplach chun briathra a mhúineadh
Lgh. 52 - 115: Cur chuige cumarsáideach
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 59
Harris, J., Ó Néill, P., Uí Dhufaigh, M. & Ó Súilleabháin, E. (1996). Cúrsaí Nua Gaeilge na Bunscoile:
Moltaí agus Ábhar Samplach (Imleabhar 1 nó Imleabhar 2). BÁC. ITÉ. Lgh.6-13: Na prionsabail
ghinearálta a bhaineann le Múineadh na Gaeilge sa bhunscoil.
Hickey, T. (2001) Múineadh Léitheoireacht na Gaeilge agus an Curaclam Athbhreithnithe,
Teangeolas , Uimhir 40, BÁC. ITÉ (Tá cóipeanna den iris seo ar fáil sa leabharlann)
Teanga
Mac Murchaidh, C. (2002) Cruinnscríobh na Gaeilge, Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life.
Mac Suibhne, A. agus Whelton, M. (2009) Sruth na Maoile, Baile Átha Cliath: Brunswick Press.
Ó Dónaill, É. (2011) Gramadach gan Stró Baile Átha Cliath: Gaelchultúr Teo.
ACMHAINNÍ BREISE
Múineadh na Gaeilge T2
Gibbons, P. (2002). Scaffolding language, scaffolding learning: Teaching second language learners
in the mainstream classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (Caibidlí 4, 5)
Hickey, T. (1992). Teaching Irish Reading: What can Research Tell Us? In T. Hickey (eag.), Múineadh
na Gaeilge sa Bhunscoil: Moltaí Praiticiúla. Baile Átha Cliath: Bord na Gaeilge/Cumann
Léitheoireachta na hÉireann. (Tá cóipeanna den leabhrán seo ar fáil sa leabharlann ar iasacht 4 uair
a chloig.)
Hickey, T. agus Ó Cainín, P. (2003). Léitheoirí Óga na Gaeilge: Cothú agus Cabhair. In R. Ní Mhianáin
(eag.), Idir Lúibíní: Aistí ar an Léitheoireacht agus ar an Litearthacht. Baile Átha Cliath: Cois Life.
(810.9/IDI Tá cóipeanna den leabhar seo ar fáil ar iasacht 4 uair a chloig freisin.)
Littlewood, W. (1981) Communicative Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press Caibidlí: 3, 4,
5, 8. (372.65/LIT)
NCCA Guidelines for Teachers – Exceptionally Able Students
5 – Classroom Strategies
www.ncca.ie
Caibidil
Ní Nuadháin, N. (2006). Putting a bit of spice into reading in Irish in the primary school. In T. Hickey
(ed.), Literacy and Language Learning: Reading in a First or Second Language. Dublin: Reading
Association of Ireland. (372.6/LIT)
Ní Nuadháin, N. (2006). Ar Maidin Moch. Indreabhán: Cló Iar-Chonnachta.
ACMHAINNÍ BREISE
Teanga
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 60
An Gúm (2004) Séideán Sí A B C D E F, Baile Átha Cliath: An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta.
An Mheitheal um theagasc na Gaeilge ar an Tríú Leibhéal Siollabas Nua don Dara Bliain
Ollscoile
De Bhaldraithe, T. (1998) English - Irish Dictionary, Baile Átha Cliath: An Gúm.
McGonagle, N. (2003) Irish Grammar - A Basic Handbook, Gaillimh: Cló Iar-Chonnachta.
Ó Dónaill, N. (1998) Foclóir Gaeilge – Béarla, Baile Átha Cliath: An Gúm.
Gaelscéal
www.acmhainn.ie
An Foclóir Beag www.focloir beag
Focal.ie www.focal.ie
GaelSpell www.gaelspell.com
www.acmhainn.ie
www.seomraranga.ie
www.tobar.ie
www.teachnet.ie
www.teagascnagaeilge.ie
Vifax
www.vifax.nuim.ie
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 61
Module EPS200
A Biopsychosocial Approach to Inclusive Education for Children with Special
Educational Needs
Autumn Semester 2015
Bachelor of Education in Education and Psychology 2
The module aims to provide an introduction to the area of special educational needs (SEN) /
disability from an educational and a psychological perspective. The module will present the child
with additional learning needs and/or special educational needs as being first and foremost a child
whose educational needs will be explored within the Irish Legislative and Policy context through the
use of psychological frameworks. Inclusion, models of disability and students’ personal attitudes,
values and beliefs about diversity and equality in education will be examined. An examination of
psychological and educational research will address the implications for inclusion. The role of the
primary teacher will be addressed in terms of facilitating and planning for inclusion.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On completion of this module, students will be able to:
o Demonstrate an understanding of children’s strengths and needs from a biopsychosocial
approach; with due attention to interacting factors, ecological factors and the language of
inclusion.
o Demonstrate an ability to support children’s learning from a biopsychosocial approach;
o Plan for inclusion using Universal Design for Learning Frameworks
o Give examples of the enabling role of ICT and assistive technology in supporting
differentiated instruction
o Suggest ways of engaging responsively with parents of children with additional
learning needs and/or SEN
o Suggest evidenced-based approaches for individual capacity building in relation to
supporting learning needs in the following areas; speech, language and
communication skills, organisational skills, social skills, emotional regulation, literacy
skills and mathematic skills.
o Demonstrate critical engagement with contemporary philosophical issues pertaining to
inclusive education for children with special educational needs in the primary school
o Critically examine legislation, policy, school-level practice and classroom level practice
through a biopsychosocial lens, demonstrating engagement with contemporary issues and
tensions pertaining to inclusive education.
o Demonstrate an understanding of the role of psychology in understanding and supporting
SEN
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 62
MODULE CONTENT:
Week
Topic
Lecture A
(Inclusive Education & SEN TEAM)
Week
1
Week
2
Week
3
Week
4
Lecture B
(Educational Psychology)
Introduction, Assessment,
Inclusive Education
Inclusive Education and the
Child with SEN
Introduction, Course
Outline, Assessment,
Legislation and Policy in
Ireland and
Internationally
Universal Design for Learning Legislation and Policy in
Ireland: NCSE,2014
Continuum of Support
Collaborative class teacher in Planning for All: – UDL
the inclusive classroom
Adapting Teaching
Methods
Week
5
Differentiation
Week6
Social Skills Development 1
Week
7
Week
8
Week
9
Week
10
Week
11
Week
12
The Enabling Role of ICT
Bank Holiday
Communication, Language
and Literacy 1
School Placement
Working Responsively with
Parents
Revision
Planning for All: – UDL
Adapting Teaching
Resources
Planning for All: – UDL
Adapting Learning
Content & Assessment
Capacity Building: Social
Skills 2, Self-Regulation
Capacity Building:
Numeracy
Capacity Building:
Language & Literacy 2
Capacity Building:
Behaviour Support
Inclusive Education in
Mary Immaculate College
Tutorial
(Educational
Psychology)
Concepts of Inclusion
(BPS Approach) Prior
Knowledge & Beliefs
Philosophical
Perspectives
Inclusive Organisations
Inclusive
Classrooms/Teaching
Presentations
Formative Assessment
– Peer Review
MODULE ASSESSMENT:
40% will be allocated for a Problem-Based Learning Group Assignment (Wk 10)
60% will be allocated for an Individual Essay 2000 words (Due Wk 13)
All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet
Marking Guidelines:
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 63
Satisfactory
Excellent
2
3
4-5
Application:
15 %
1
2-3
Analysis:
15 %
Poor
Grading Rubric
0-1
1. Problem-Based Learning Group Assignment 40%: A group presentation will take place on the
basis of a case-study of two characters from a book/film. Copy of the presentation and UDL plan
must be submitted in hard-copy and in soft-copy via Moodle. Marks will be allocated as follows:
1. Depth of analysis of characters’ potential and the challenges
that the characters face
2. Accuracy of analysis
3. Level of independent academic reading and research to
support character analysis
4. Attention to ecological factors and interacting factors
5. Appropriate use of language – language of inclusion n.b.
remember “a child is first and foremost a child”
1. UDL plan demonstrates obvious consideration of characters’
potential and challenges (plan should not be overly generic –
should be specifically designed in consideration of both
characters)
2. Creative, insightful, original adaptations to ensure that the
characters in question can access the learning and express their
learning
3. Suggestions for capacity building demonstrate obvious
consideration of characters’ potential and challenges
4. Suggestions for capacity building are carefully and thoughtfully
incorporated into plan in consideration of inclusive principles
5. Suggestions for capacity building are evidence-based
Structure
Coherence:
5%
& The presentation is structured and organised coherently. Two
copies of the presentation, resources and the reference list are
submitted on the day of the presentation. Slides are structured
clearly, using visuals, keywords and adequate amount of text
information to support the Presentation.
Communication
The presentation is interactive, motivating and engages the peer
Skills
audience.
5%
Total
2. Essay 60%: Essay title will be assigned during the first 5 weeks of the semester. Essay
development will be supported through directed reading and tutorial sessions. Peer feedback is
also encouraged. Word Count: 2000 words. Essays will be graded as follows:
Grade Range
Cognitive dimensions
Evaluative Criteria to be met
Gradations of
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 64
required for Grade
Range
A1 – A2
B1 – B2
B3 – C1
C2 – C3
D1 – D2
F Grade:
0–2%
Remember, understand,
apply, analyse, evaluate
and create
Remember, understand,
apply, analyse
Remember, understand,
apply
Remember, understand
Remember – (recall,
describe, rewrite from
reading/lecture notes,
inaccuracies) – limited
Understanding
Lack of understanding
with regards to core
content
quality in relation
to evaluative
criteria
Accuracy: of understanding
Precision: in use of
psychological terminology
Depth: of analysis, evaluation
and creativity/criticality
Structure: clear beginning,
middle and end, one idea per
paragraph, clear conclusion
Mechanics: referencing,
phrasing, grammar
Academic Reading
Excellent – (remain
in grade range –
upper-end)
Satisfactory –
(lower-end of range)
Unsatisfactory –
(drop grade range)
See Assessment Guidelines document for further details and more detailed grading rubric
(Available on Moodle to download)
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of
the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
Attendance and Participation at Lectures/Tutorials
Students are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials and engage in any required readings or
preparatory work prior to class.
Students displaying poor attendance or engagement at lectures/tutorials can be deducted up to
10% of marks.
Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework
Students are required to contact their tutorial lecturer as soon as possible in the case of late
submission of coursework. Students may be deducted up to 10% for late submission of
coursework, unless supported by a medical certificate, or similar.
Repeat Assessment
100% Examination: 5Q answer 2
FEEDBACK:
Queries, opinions and questions are welcomed during lectures and tutorials in particular. If you
wish to speak to lecturers outside of lecture time, please arrange a time via email.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 65
Students are provided with detailed grading rubrics for all of their assessment tasks (included in
Assessment Guidelines document). Students are encouraged to use these rubrics for selfassessment and peer-assessment prior to submission of their final portfolio and essay. Students
will receive a formal peer review of their draft essays prior to submission (Week 12). Lecturer
feedback will also be offered at this time.
Students will be provided with the opportunity to view their evaluative grading rubrics upon
request in order to inform future learning. These grading rubrics will only become available once
module grades have been issued as per college regulations.
STAFF:
Name
Title
Office
Telephone
Email
061 204372
Marie.ryan@mic.ul.ie
061-204389
anne.obyrne@mic.ul.ie
Office Hour/s
Marie Ryan
Anne O Byrne
Lecturer in
Educational
Psychology and
Developmental
Psychology
R107 (Res
Block)
Inclusive
Education for
Children with
SEN
N30
By
Appointment
By
Appointment
READING LIST:
Required:
Problem-Based Learning Task
 Doherty, U., Egan, M., Daly, P., Coady, M., Holland, M., Kelleher, D., Long, S., McCarthy, E.,
and O’Sullivan, S. (2011) STRANDS: Strategies for Teachers to Respond Actively to the Needs
of Children with Down Syndrome-Meeting the Special Educational Needs of Children with
General Learning Disabilities in Primary Schools, Limerick: Curriculum Development UnitMary Immaculate College.
o Strand 5
o Strand 7
o Strand 8
o Strand 9
o Strand 10
 Griffin, S. and M. Shevlin (2011) Responding to Special Educational Needs: An Irish Perspective,
2nd ed., Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.
 Westwood, P. (2013). Inclusive and Adaptive Teaching. Routledge.
o Chapter 4
o Chapter 5
o Chapter 6
o Chapter 7
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 66
 Westwood, P. (2007). Commonsense methods for children with special educational needs.
Routledge.
Reading for Tutorials & Essay
 Florian, L. (Ed.). (2014). The SAGE handbook of special education. Sage.
o Chapter 1 – Reimagining special education: Lani Florian
o Chapter 5 – Categories of special educational needs – Brahm Norwich
o Chapter 22 – Curriculum considerations in meeting SEN – Richard Rose
o Chapter 31 – Collaborative Teaching: Critique of the scientific evidence – Thousand
et al.
o Chapter 37 – What do teachers need to know about meeting SEN – Ruth Kershner
o Chapter 38 – Learning without limits: constructing a pedagogy free from determinist
beliefs about ability – Hart et al
 Hick, P., Kershner, R., & Farrell, P. (Eds.). (2009). Psychology for inclusive education: New
directions in theory and practice. Taylor & Francis.
o Chapter 2 – An epistemology for inclusion – Gary Thomas
o Chapter 4 – Towards inclusive pedagogy – Lani Florian
o Chapter 5 – Learning in inclusive classrooms – Ruth Kershner
o Chapter 7 – Cooperative learning for inclusion – Joanne Putnam
o Chapter 10 – Can educational psychologists be inclusive – Farrell & Venables
 Norwich, B. (2013). Addressing Dilemmas and Tensions in Inclusive Education: Living with
Uncertainty. Routledge.
o Chapter 3 – Classification and identification of special educational needs or disability
in education
o Chapter 4 – Inclusive curriculum issues
o Chapter 8 – Philosophical and research issues
 Norwich, B., & Lewis, A. (2007). How specialized is teaching children with disabilities and
difficulties?. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 39(2), 127-150.
 Kinsella, W., & Senior, J. (2008). Developing inclusive schools: a systemic approach.
International journal of inclusive education, 12(5-6), 651-665.
 Slee, R. (2001). Social justice and the changing directions in educational research: The case of
inclusive education. International journal of inclusive education, 5(2-3), 167-177.
 Griffin, C. (2015). The Pursuit of Independence?: Reconsidering the Role of the Special Needs
Assistant in Inclusive Education. In O’ Donnell, A (Ed). The Inclusion Delusion? Reflections on
Democracy, Ethos, and Education. Oxford: Peter Lang Publications.
 Parkinson, S. (2015). ‘Inclusive’ Educational Policy in Ireland - An Illusory Quest? In O’ Donnell,
A (Ed). The Inclusion Delusion? Reflections on Democracy, Ethos, and Education. Oxford:
Peter Lang Publications.
 Ryan, M., C. (2015). Time for Inclusion to Detach from ‘Differentiation’? Re-looking at How
Teachers Support Learner Differences in the Mainstream Classroom. In O’ Donnell, A (Ed).
The Inclusion Delusion? Reflections on Democracy, Ethos, and Education. Oxford: Peter Lang
Publications.

Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 67
Recommended:
1. Squires, G., & Armstrong, D. (2012). Contemporary issues in special educational need:
considering the whole child. Buckingham: Open University Press
2. Frederickson, N., &, Cline, T. (2009). Special educational needs, inclusion and diversity.
Buckingham: Open University Press
3. Tilstone, C & Layton, L. (2004). Child development and teaching pupils with special
educational needs. London: Routledge Falmer
4. Griffin, S. and M. Shevlin (2011) Responding to Special Educational Needs: An Irish
Perspective, 2nd ed., Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.
5. Lindsay, G. (2007). Educational psychology and the effectiveness of inclusive
education/mainstreaming. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 77(1), 1-24.
6. Westwood, P. (2001). Differentiation’ as a strategy for inclusive classroom practice: Some
difficulties identified. Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties, 6(1), 5-11.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 68
Module PS4013
Cognitive Psychology 1
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
INTRODUCTION:
The aim of this module is to introduce you to Cognitive Psychology, the branch of psychology concerned with
the processing of information and acquisition and use of knowledge.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Having understood the lectures and done the appropriate reading and further study for this course you
should be able to...

...understand the basic theories and concepts associated with cognitive psychology

...critically evaluate research relevant to basic cognitive processes

...outline and describe the key theories and approaches associated with basic cognitive processes

...critically evaluate theories of basic cognitive processes

…write a psychology essay
MODULE CONTENT:
The module will run over 12 weeks. It will include topics such as memory, attention, object recognition,
language, imagery, decision making and problem solving. Typically, we will spend one week on each of these
areas. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are
subject to change.
*ASSESSMENT:
Continuous assessment - 30%
End of semester exam - 70%
For this module you will have to complete one continuous assessment essay and a formal essay based
examination at the end of term. The continuous assessment will be assigned by Week 6 and you will have at
least 2 weeks to complete it. You will receive your grade for the continuous assessment before you sit the
end of term exam and individual feedback will be available on the assessment.
In the event that you fail the module the repeat assessment procedure for the module is an exam during the
repeat examinations period in August. The repeat exam will take the same format as the end of term exam
and will be worth 100%. Assessment will be based on material presented during lectures, your independent
reading, your ability to accurately and coherently demonstrate relevant knowledge and to engage in critical
analysis of the subject matter.
FEEDBACK:
Individual feedback on the continuous assessment will available to all students.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 69
READING LIST:
Optional core text books listed below. These are available in the library on general lending, 3 day loan and 4
hour loan. Additional readings will be recommended in class.
Eysenck, M.W. & Keane, M.T. (2015). Cognitive Psychology: A Students Handbook (6th Ed.). Hove: Psychology
Press.
Goldstein, E.B. (2011). Cognitive Psychology (3rd Ed.). USA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
Matlin, M. (2012). Cognition (8th Ed.). New York: J. Wiley & Sons.
Sternberg, R.J. (2012). Cognitive Psychology (6th Ed.). USA: Thomson Wadsworth.
STAFF:
Name
Title
Office
Telephone
Email
Dr Suzanne
Egan
Lecturer, Department
of Psychology
G63
061 204333
Suzanne.Egan@mic.ul.ie
*Note: Information contained in this module outline may be superseded by information presented in class at the start of the module
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 70
PS4013 Indicative Grade Descriptors
Grade
A1
A2
B1
B2
B3
C1
C2
C3
D1
D2
F
NG
Brief description of typical response
Outstanding performance, response is extremely well written and structured,
comprehensively addresses the subject matter, demonstrates in-depth knowledge and
understanding of relevant material, evidence of a significant amount of independent
reading, displays excellent analysis, interpretation and critical reasoning.
Excellent performance, response is extremely well written and structured, demonstrates
substantial knowledge and understanding of relevant material, evidence of a significant
amount of independent reading, displays excellent analysis, interpretation and critical
reasoning, response may neglect some minor aspects of the subject matter
Very good performance, response is well written and structured, demonstrates substantial
knowledge and a competent understanding of relevant material, evidence of independent
reading, displays good analysis, interpretation and critical reasoning, response may neglect
some minor aspects of the subject matter or fail to develop some points fully
Good performance, response is well written and structured, demonstrates competent
knowledge and understanding of relevant material, some evidence of independent reading,
displays good analysis, interpretation and critical reasoning, response may neglect some
aspects of the subject matter or fail to develop some points fully
Competent performance, response is competently written and structured, demonstrates
reasonable knowledge and understanding of relevant material, limited evidence of
independent reading, displays reasonable analysis, interpretation and critical reasoning,
response may neglect aspects of the subject matter, include irrelevant material or fail to
develop some points fully
Satisfactory performance, response is adequately written and structured, demonstrates
basic knowledge and understanding of relevant material, little or no evidence of
independent reading, displays limited analysis, interpretation and critical reasoning,
response may neglect aspects of the subject matter, include irrelevant material, errors in
understanding or fail to develop some points fully
Acceptable performance, response is adequately organised and demonstrates familiarity
with the subject matter but there may be significant gaps in knowledge and inaccuracies in
material presented, little or no evidence of independent reading, displays little or no
analysis, interpretation or critical reasoning
Minimally acceptable performance, very basic knowledge of subject matter and there may
be considerable gaps in knowledge and inaccuracies in material presented, little or no
evidence of independent reading, displays little or no analysis, interpretation or critical
reasoning, response may fail to answer part of the question or includes quite a bit of
irrelevant material
Weak performance, compensating fail, response may include basic information about the
subject matter but fails to adequately address the question, significant shortcomings
present such as a considerable amount of irrelevant material, disorganised structure, errors
in understanding, little or no evidence of analysis or critical reasoning
Poor performance, compensating fail, response may include very basic information about
the subject matter but fails to adequately address the question, significant shortcomings
present such as a considerable amount of irrelevant material, disorganised structure, errors
in understanding, no evidence of analysis or critical reasoning
Fail, response demonstrates little or no knowledge of the subject matter and provides little
evidence of effort in preparing the response
Not present for exam or no work submitted
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 71
Module 2 Certificate in Religious Education –
(Scripture and Spirituality)
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education 2: Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 2
INTRODUCTARY STATEMENT
This module introduces the students to the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments within their historical
context. It gives an overview of the content (story, genres and general themes) of the Bible. It aims to
provide students with a framework for understanding selected biblical themes and passages and to explore
the contemporary relevance of the Bible. It also aims to provide students with an opportunity to appreciate
and critique some forms and expressions of spirituality and to recognise that spirituality is the lifeblood of
religious education and an essential dimension of the primary school child.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On completion of this module, students will be able to:












Demonstrate basic knowledge of the background, development, content and literary genres of the
Bible
Understand and reflect on some meanings of the term “spirituality”
Recognise the difference between spirituality and religion
Appreciate the historical importance of the Bible in Western culture
Balance a critical approach to the biblical text with respect for its status as scripture within
communities of faith
To appreciate the significance of covenantal relationship expressed in the Judaeo-Christian
scriptures
Appreciate the centrality of the person of Jesus Christ to Christian Spirituality
Recognise the importance of prayer to Christian spirituality
Locate high quality and relevant materials and resources for teaching biblical stories and themes
Deepen their own understanding of spirituality and develop the skill to nurture the spirituality of
children in the classroom
Examine what is meant by children’s spirituality
Investigate the notion of the spirituality of the teacher
MODULE DELIVERY:
Lectures per week: 2 lectures (20 contact hours) 3 ECTS credits
Wednesday: Scripture
Thursday: Spirituality
Moodle Access: 2nd Year Cert in Religious Education
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 72
MODULE CONTENT:
Calendar: this is subject to change
Weeks
Wednesday: Scripture
Week 1
a) Introduction to course –
9th/10th Sept
b) Catholic Preschool and Primary Religious
Education Curriculum for Ireland –
Strand: Word of God
Week 2
a) How do I find my way around the Bible?
16th/ 17th Sept
b) Stories of our fathers and mothers: Book
of Genesis
Week 3
Freedom From/ Freedom For: Moses and the
23rd/24th Sept journey
Week 4
Response of a People: The Psalms
th
st
30 Sept / 1
Oct
Week 5
Insight rather than foresight - The Prophets
7th/ 8th Oct
Week 6
a) Structure of the New Testaments :The
th
th
14 /15 Oct
Gospels
b) Catholic Preschool and Primary Religious
Education Curriculum for Ireland –
Strand: Word of God
Week7
The Gospel of Mark
21st/ 22nd Oct
Week8
Jesus’ Public Life
th
th
28 / 29 Oct
Week 9
4th/5th Nov
Pentecost and the followers of Jesus
Week 10
11th/12th Nov
The Word of God in the classroom
Thursday: Spirituality
Spirituality: Spirituality for me?
What is Spirituality?:
The Self and Search for One’s
Voice
Christian Spirituality 1
Christian Spirituality 2
Spirituality of the Teacher
Spirituality of the child 1:
Spirituality and the Children’s
World
Spirituality of the child 2:
Variety of Spiritual Experience
Catholic Preschool and Primary
Religious Education Curriculum
for Ireland - Strand: Liturgy and
Prayer
Spirituality and the
Environment.
Laudoto Si
Review of Course
MODULE ASSESSMENT:
100% is the value of the module
(10% may be deducted for poor attendance and participation at lectures)
End of term exam:
o You must answer all questions on the paper – some questions will have choices contained
within them
o Question 1: 20 short questions – all must be answered -40%
o Question 2: Short essay answering either section A or B – these will be taken from reading
given in lectures - 30%
o Question 3: Short essay answering either section A or B – these will be based on themes
covered during lectures - 30%
Repeat Assessment:
Exam 100% - same structure as original exam
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 73
All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the
Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.
FEEDBACK:
General feedback will be offered to the student group once the in class assignments are corrected.
Assignments will not be returned to students.
STAFF:
Name
Title
Office
Telephone
Email
061 774720
Maurice.harmon@mic.ul.ie
Office Hour/s
Maurice
Harmon
Lecturer,
Religious
Education
R118
Email for an
appointment
READING LIST:
# means the book is on 4 hour loan in the library
Holy Bible, New revised standard version or good news bible, Catholic Edition.
Charpentier, E.(1982) How to read the old testament, London: SCM Press #
Charpentier, E. (1982) How to read the new testament, London: SCM Press #
Coles, R. (1990) The spiritual life of children, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.
Irish Episcopal Conference. (2015) Catholic preschool and primary religious education curriculum for ireland,
Dublin: Veritas
http://www.veritasbooksonline.com/media/wysiwyg/9781847306241.pdf
Nye, R. (2009) Children's spirituality: what it is and why it matters, London: Church house publishing#
Rolheiser, R. (1998) Seeking spirituality: guidelines for a Christian Spirituality for the twenty-first century,
London: Hodder & Stoughton #
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 74
Module EDU 205
Title Christian Religious Education (CRE) 1
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education (Yr 2/3): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr.
2/3)
INTRODUCTION:
This module will prepare students to teach Religious Education in Christian primary schools in Ireland.
It will overview the nature and purpose of Christian Religious Education and introduce students to
Christian Religious Education programmes and methodologies (Junior Infants to Second Class) used in
Irish Primary Schools.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
 Understand the nature and purpose of Christian Religious Education (CRE)
 Identify some main teachings, liturgical seasons and festivals in the Christian tradition
 Critique methodologies for CRE in the Grow in Love and Follow Me programmes
 Analyse Thomas Groome’s Shared Christian Praxis as a key pedagogy of CRE
 Understand the importance of sacred story, prayer, meditation and social justice within CRE.
MODULE CONTENT:
The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other
events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
Week 1
Lecture 1: Introduction to Christian RE
Tutorial 1: Christian RE in Ireland
Week 2
Tutorial 2 The National RE Curriculum in
Catholic Primary Schools
Week 3
Lecture 2: Christianity and Religious Education
(Bishop Brendan Leahy)
Tutorial 3 Grow in Love 2015
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 75
Week 4
Lecture 3: Meditating with Children, (Noel
Keating Coordinator Christian Meditation
Ireland )
Tutorial 4: Praying with Children
Week 5
Lecture 4: Tom Groome’s Shared Christian
Praxis
Tutorial 5: Exploring Bible Stories with Children
Week 6
Lecture 5: Sacred Space and Prayer
Tutorial 6: Field work
Week
Lecture 6: Protestant Schools and the Follow
Me Programme
Week 8
Lecture 7: Planning for Successful Christian RE
Week 9
Lecture 8: Teaching children about key
doctrines of the Christian Faith
Week 10
Lecture 9: Social Justice and Christian RE Ruby Bridges
Lecture 10: Preparing for School Placement
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
FEEDBACK:
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 76
Contact lecturer through e-mail and/or weekly drop- in session in lecturers office(LG 9) on Monday from
11.30 to 1.00.
ASSESSMENT:
Portfolio 100% 1,500 to 1,800 words.
Coursework to be handed into Education Office in Week 11, 17th November.
Repeat assessment: Course work 100% 1,500- 1,800 words.
All A Grades: Exceptional degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists,
programmes and methodologies. Portfolio exhibits excellent evidence of appreciation of the complexity of
CRE and students’ work is imaginative and analytical in a manner which integrates key concepts and
methodologies with students’ own personal, professional and academic experience. Evidence of sustained,
personal and informed critical response to assessment task.
All B Grades: High degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and
methodologies. Portfolio provides very good evidence of students’ appreciation of the complexity of
questions posed in CRE and students’ work is nuanced, well-articulated, structured and expressed. Portfolio
exhibits evidence of sustained personal and informed critical response to assessment task.
All C Grades: Familiarity with and comprehension of some key CRE concepts, theorists, programmes
and methodologies. Portfolio provides some evidence of independent reading. Students’ personal opinion is
sometimes substantiated by reference to CRE literature. Some evidence of critical response to assessment
task.
All D Grades: Basic recall of some general ideas presented during lectures/tutorials and in the required
reading. Students’ portfolio provides evidence of reading of a small number of set texts and basic attempt is
made to express personal response to ideas, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio narrates
some relevant ideas pertinent to the assessment task.
All F Grades: Unfamiliarity with and misunderstanding of key concepts, theorists , programmes and
methodologies. Little or no evidence of independent research and reading. Failure to complete or respond
to the set assessment task. No evidence of sustained personal or critical response to questions posed.
STAFF:
Name
Patricia
Kieran
Title
Dr.
Contact
11.30-1.00
Mondays
LG8
Office
LG8
Telephone
061 204965
Email
Patricia.kieran@mic.ul.ie
READING LIST:
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 77
Core Texts:
Mahon, E., & O’Connell, D. (2015) Grow in Love Junior Infants and Senior Infants, Dublin: Veritas
Publications.
Hyland, M., Series Editor.(1996—2005) The Alive-O Programme/ Beo Go Deo, Dublin: Veritas.
Wilkinson, J. Series Editor. (2002-10) Follow Me Series - Stepping Out!, Moving on! Log On!, On Line!,
Follow me Series Dublin.
Supplementary reading:
Congregation for Catholic Education. (2013) Education to Intercultural Dialogue in Catholic Schools.
Groome, Thomas H. Will There Be Faith? Dublin, Veritas, 2011. Chapter 9 “Life to Faith to Life: The
Movements, Putting the Approach to Work”, 299-338.
Groome, T.H. (1980) Christian Religious Education: Sharing our Story and Vision, San Francisco: Harper &
Row.
Hession, A. (2015) Catholic Primary RE in a Pluralist Environment, Dublin: Veritas.
John Paul II. (1994) Catechism of the Catholic Church, Dublin: Veritas.
Kieran, P. & Hession, A. (2008) Exploring Religious Education: Catholic Religious Education in an Intercultural
Europe, Dublin: Veritas.
Renehan, C. (2014) Openness with Roots: Education in Religion in Irish Primary Schools. Netherlands:
Springer.
Irish Bishops’ Conference. (2010) Share the Good News: National Directory for Catechesis, Dublin: Veritas.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 78
Module EDU206
Multi-Denominational Religious Education (MDRE)
Autumn Semester, 2015-2016
Bachelor of Education (Yr 2): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr. 2)
INTRODUCTION:
This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the historical background,
philosophical rationale and methodological approaches of Religious Education programmes used to
teach in Multi‐denominational schools in Ireland. Learners will critically evaluate a range of teaching
and learning strategies which acknowledge and promote respect for a range of religious and
convictional (atheist, humanist, secular etc.) world views.
LEARNING OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
 Demonstrate an understanding of the complex nature, history and purpose of Multidenominational Religious Education
 Comprehend and evaluate the different programmes used to teach Ethical Education and
Religious Education in Multi-denominational schools
 Appreciate and evaluate a variety of approaches and methodologies which foster an inclusive
approach to teaching and learning from and about religions and beliefs in equality based
schools
 Appreciate the challenges inherent in multi-denominational education and celebrate
difference within the context of human rights
MODULE CONTENT:
The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other
events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.
WEEK
1
2
TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS
No lectures
Introduction to the module
Background to Educate Together
3
Development of Learn Together Curriculum
4
Intercultural Education
Challenges facing Multi-denominational Education
5
Moral and Spiritual Strand
6
- Junior and Senior Infants
- First and Second Class
Moral and Spiritual Strand
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 79
7
- Third and Fourth Class
- Fifth and sixth Class
Current Issues in Multi-denominational Education
8
9
Reading week – no lectures
Equality and Justice Strand:
10
- Junior and Senior Infants
- First and Second Class
Equality and Justice Strand
11
- Third and Fourth Class
- Fifth and sixth Class
Planning for MDRE
12
Community National Schools
Goodness Me Goodness You Programme
NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.
FEEDBACK:
The module lecturer will be available via email and at the end of each lecture for informal feedback and
assistance regarding the requirements of the module.
ASSESSMENT:
Portfolio 100% 1,500 to 1,800 words.
Coursework to be handed into Education Office in Week 11, 17th November.
Repeat assessment: Course work 100% 1,500- 1,800 words.
All A Grades: Exceptional degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists,
programmes and methodologies. Portfolio exhibits excellent evidence of appreciation of the complexity of
MDRE and students’ work is imaginative and analytical in a manner which integrates key concepts and
methodologies with students’ own personal, professional and academic experience. Evidence of sustained,
personal and informed critical response to assessment task.
All B Grades: High degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and
methodologies. Portfolio provides very good evidence of students’ appreciation of the complexity of
questions posed in MDRE and students’ work is nuanced, well-articulated, structured and expressed.
Portfolio exhibits evidence of sustained personal and informed critical response to assessment task.
All C Grades: Familiarity with and comprehension of some key MDRE concepts, theorists, programmes
and methodologies. Portfolio provides some evidence of independent reading. Students’ personal opinion is
sometimes substantiated by reference to MDRE literature. Some evidence of critical response to assessment
task.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 80
All D Grades: Basic recall of some general ideas presented during lectures/tutorials and in the required
reading. Students’ portfolio provides evidence of reading of a small number of set texts and basic attempt is
made to express personal response to ideas, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio narrates
some relevant ideas pertinent to the assessment task.
All F Grades: Unfamiliarity with and misunderstanding of key concepts, theorists, programmes and
methodologies. Little or no evidence of independent research and reading. Failure to complete or respond
to the set assessment task. No evidence of sustained personal or critical response to questions posed.
STAFF:
Name
Lorraine
Cullivan
Patricia
Kieran
Title
Ms.
Contact
Office
n/a
Telephone
n/a
Dr.
11.30-1.00
Mondays
LG8
LG8
061 204965
Email
Lorraine.cullivan3@mail.d
cu.ie
Patricia.kieran@mic.ul.ie
READING LIST:
Key Sources
1. Educate Together. (2004) Learn Together: Ethical Education Curriculum, Dublin: Educate
Together.
2. Moloney, C. (2011) Goodness Me Goodness You: Religion Programme, Dublin: VEC.
Supplementary sources
1. Dermody, A., Ward, F. and Kelly, E. (2010) Signposts: Lessons for Living, Dublin: Original
writing.
2. DeVries, R. and Zan, B. (1994) Moral Classrooms, Moral Children, New York: Teachers
College Press.
3. Freire, P. (1972) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, London: Sheed and Ward.
4. Hyland, A. (June 2010) ‘The Patronage of Primary Schools’ , Education Matters
5. Keast, J. (ed).( 2007) Religious Diversity and Intercultural Education: A Reference Book for
Schools, Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.
6. Lipman, M. (1998) Philosophy goes to School, US: Temple University Press.
7. Lipman, M. (2003) Thinking in Education, Cambridge: University Press.
8. Mc Gowan, D .(ed). (2007) Parenting Beyond Belief: on Raising Caring Ethical Kids without
Religion. New York: Amacon.
9. NCCA (2005) Intercultural Education in the Primary School, Dublin: Department of Education
and Science.
10. Palmer, P. J. (1999) The Active Life: A Spirituality of Work, Creativity, and Caring, San
Francisco, Calif.: Jossey-Bass.
11. Sandel, M. J. (2009) Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? 1st ed. New York: Farrar, Straus
and Giroux.
12. Wright, A. (2000) Spirituality and Education Master Classes in Education Series, London:
Routledge Falmer.
Faculty of Education, MIC – B.Ed. 2 Handbook
Page 81
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