v2r1metaframe

v2r1metaframe
Windows Applications Servers
Network Station Education
IBM NCD
March 1999
01/31/00 v2r1metaframe.prz
Copyright IBM Corp. 1998 -©
Course
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1
Objectives
Understand what Windows Applications
Servers are
WinFrame
WinCenter
Windows Terminal Server Edition
MetaFrame
Unix Integration Services (UIS)
Understand what protocols are used to connect
to these servers
Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)
Independent Computing Architecture (ICA)
X11
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Network Computer Division 2
Notes
The topic of this presentation is Windows Applications Servers.
This objective of this topic is to provide an overview of Windows applications servers.
This is meant for those who are new to Windows applications servers and need a high
level overview of the terminology, the products and the functions that these products
provide.
One also needs to understand the different protocols that can be used to connect clients to
Windows applications servers.
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Network Computer Division 3
What are Windows Applications Servers?
Windows Applications
Server
Windows Applications
MS Word
Excel or Lotus 1-2-3
Freelance Graphics
Etc.
Execute here
but display on
remote
station's
monitor
IBM Network Station
Native Applications
3270/5250 EM
Web Browser
Execute here
Java
and display on
local monitor
X-Server
or
ICA Client
local screen
local screen
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Network Computer Division 4
Notes
The typical PC running a version of Microsoft Windows such as Windows NT server 3.51
or Windows NT Server 4.0 is usually a single user system. These server systems are used
to share resources such as files and printers and these resources can be accessed by
many remote clients simultaneously, but there are not multiple users simultaneously
executing applications on those servers.
There are however versions available that can turn a Windows NT server into a multi-user
system such that multiple users can be simultaneously logged on to the server and
execute applications on the server itself. This multi-user facility allows remote clients
(which are usually thin clients, but do not have to be) to use their keyboard, mouse and
display as remote devices and actually execute an application on the server itself (as
opposed to on the client) and have the output redirected to their display.
In other words, instead of having to use the local console on the server to execute
applications, these applications are executed from the keyboard, mouse and display of the
remote clients. Each client logging in to the server receives a Windows desktop on its
display and has the illusion of being the only user of the system.
This allows a thin client such as a Network Station, which may not have the engine, and
resources necessary to execute full blown Windows applications locally to actually execute
these applications on a remote server. Even PCs who could execute these applications
locally but do not have the required engine power (such as an old 386 processor) or the
required local storage capability may take advantage of executing on a remote server by
using a client that allows them to redirect the output of these applications to their I/O
devices.
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Network Computer Division 5
Products/Manufacturers
Windows NT Server 3.51 (from Microsoft)
Normal Base Windows NT server system
WinFrame 1.x (from Citrix)
Adds multi-user support to the base Windows NT 3.51
Provides ICA as connection protocol
WinCenter (from NCD)
Adds X11 as connection protocol to WinFrame
Windows NT Server 4.0 - Terminal Server Edition (WTSE)
(from Microsoft)
Base Windows NT 4.0 server including multi-user support
Includes RDP as connection protocol
MetaFrame (from Citrix)
Product from Citrix Inc.
Adds ICA connection protocol to WTSE
Unix Integration Services (from NCD)
Adds X11 connection protocol to MetaFrame
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Network Computer Division 6
Notes
This Windows NT server multi-user environment has been evolving over the past few years and there are
many products and manufacturers involved in providing this environment.
Let talk about what we usually refer to as the WinFrame environment.
The base for that environment is Microsoft's Windows NT server 3.51.
Citrix have obtained the right from Microsoft to use the base WIndows NT server 3.51 system and add to it a
multi-user capability which is called WinFrame. Citrix provides, as part of WinFrame, the ICA protocol which
is used by remote clients to connect into the Winframe system.
In addition, NCD also has developed a product called WinCenter which adds to the Winframe product the
ability to have clients use the X11 protocol to connect into the WinFrame system.
In other words, when talking about a WinFrame system, we are talking about a Windows NT 3.51 type of
system with multi-user capability.
For the Windows NT server 4.0 environment:
Microsoft has actually built (work performed by Citrix) into its product the multi-user capability and called it
Windows NT Server 4.0 - Terminal Server Edition, abbreviated WTSE. THis gives the base Windows NT
server 4.0 system a multi user capability that lets WIndows terminals connect in using a protocol called
Remote Display Protocol (RDP).
Citrix has then developed a product called MetaFrame which adds the ICA protocol to WTSE so that clients
other than Windows terminals can connect using ICA. There are a few versions of this product that we will
explain in a moment.
Finally, NCD followed with the Unix Integration Services product to allows clients using the X11 protocol to
connect into the MetaFrame server.
In other words, when talking about a MetaFrame system we are talking about a Windows NT Server 4.0
type of system with multi-user capabilities.
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Network Computer Division 7
What is WinFrame?
WinFrame
(Citrix Inc.)
Windows NT 3.51 base (Microsoft)
Windows
Applications
User 1
User 2
User 4
User 3
ICA
low
speed
connections
JAVA
ICA
Client
IBM Network
Station
User 1
ICA
Client
IBM Network
Station
ICA
client
ICA
client
PC
PC
User 3
User 4
User 2
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Network Computer Division 8
Notes
This chart describes a WinFrame environment.
The base of the system is Microsoft's WIndows NT Server 3.51 code.
Citrix has added a multi-user function to the base system so that many users can connect
into the server and simultaneously execute Windows applications.
The connection between the clients and the server uses a protocol from Citrix called
Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) which was originally designed to maximize the
transfer of data over low speed connections.
Clients that want to connect into the WinFrame server therefore run a client called the ICA
client that can execute on either PCs on many different platforms or on thin clients such as
the IBM Network Station.
Initially, the IBM Network Station did not have a native ICA client but it was able to run the
Java ICA client. Today, the Network Station does have a native ICA client that can connect
to any ICA-based server.
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Network Computer Division 9
What is WinCenter Connect?
WinFrame
(Citrix Inc.)
Windows NT 3.51 base (Microsoft)
Windows Applications
User 1
User 2
User x
WinCenter Connect (NCD Inc.)
ICA
X-client
low
speed
connections
High Speed - LAN
X-server
IBM
Network
Station
User 1
WinCenter
Chooser
X-server
PC
User 2
ICA
client
ICA
client
IBM Network
Station
PC
User 3
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User 4
Network Computer Division10
Notes
WinCenter Connect is a product from NCD Inc. that allows clients that function as X
terminals to connect into a WinFrame server. In other words, client that want to use the
X11 protocol instead of the ICA protocol require the presence of the WinCenter Connect
product to connect into the WinFrame server.
Essentially, the WinCenter product acts as the X-client that communicates with the
X-server on the remote client (confusing terminology when talking about X windows).
The IBM Network Station is, by design, an X-terminal which allows it to use the X11
protocol natively. Other platforms, such as any PC for example, also have the capability to
run a Wincenter Chooser product that allows the PC to function as an X-server and
connect to WinCenter Connect.
The diagram indicates that high speed LAN connection are used with the X11 protocol
because it was initially designed to function over a LAN as opposed to the ICA protocol
that can function well on either slow or high speed connections.
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Network Computer Division11
What is WTSE/MetaFrame/UIS?
Windows NT 4.0 - Terminal Server Edition (Microsoft)
User 1
Windows Applications
User n
User 2
MetaFrame (Citrix)
Unix Integration
Services (NCD) X11
X-Server
IBM Network
Station
RDP
ICA
UIS Client
X-server
ICA
Client
PC
PC
ICA
Client
IBM Network
Station
RDP
Client
PC
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RDP
Windows
Terminal
Network Computer Division12
Notes
Moving on to the Windows NT Server 4.0 environment, we now have a different set of
products to deal with.
In this case, the base system is Microsoft's Windows NT 4.0 - Terminal Server Edition,
which is a modified Windows NT Server 4.0 system to which the multi-user capability has
been added in order to support WIndowsw Terminals (hence the name Terminal Server
Edition).
As shown on the right hand side of the diagram, the base protocol used to communicate
between the server and its clients is the Remote Display Protocol (RDP) which is part of
the base WTSE product.
In order to use the ICA protocol, which has a lot more functionality than the RDP protocol,
the MetaFrame product from Citrix must be added to Microsoft's WTSE product.
And, if the X11 protocol is the protocol required, then the Unix Integration Services product
from NCD must also be added to the MetaFrame product.
The types of clients that can now connect to a WTSE server are as follows:
Windows Terminals use the base RDP protocol.
Any PC can also install the Terminal Server Client code and use the RDP protocol
PC can also install the ICA client and/or the UIS client ad communicate using the ICA or the
X11 protocols.
Network Station have a native ICA client or they can function as an X-terminal to use the
X11 protocol.
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Network Computer Division13
Connecting to WinFrame or MetaFrame
Connect using Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)
Used by Windows Terminals or RDP clients on W95/NT/WFW
Note: This method is not supported by the IBM Network Station
Connect Using ICA
Windows-Based Application (manual or autostarted)
ICA Remote Application Manager (user can choose amongst
multiple target servers)
Kiosk Mode (which is actually a Windows-based application that
is autostarted)
Connect Using X11
Use a Remote Program Menu Item
Using the X11 command (new with UIS)
Using the WinCenter command (was used with WinCenter)
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Network Computer Division14
Notes
In summary, the different connection mechanisms that can be used to connect to a WTSE
server are as follows:
Using the RDP Protocol
This is used by Windows Terminals or RDP clients installed on either Windows 95,
Windows NT or Windows for Workgroup platforms.
Note that the Network Station does NOT support the RDP protocol.
Using the ICA protocol
This is the most popular method and the one that has the most functionality.
In the case of the Network Station, there are three ways to use the ICA protocol
Define a Windows-Based application session with a specific target server
Define multiple connections in the ICA remote application manager to let the user
choose which one he requires
Operate the station in kiosk mode with a specific server as the target server
Using the X11 protocol
Configure a remote program session that can use either the X11 command or the
WinCenter command
Examples of how to configure these different sessions are provided in the ICA topic.
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Network Computer Division15
Levels of MetaFrame Servers
The Metaframe product is available in different levels of
functionality:
Citrix Devices Services (CDS)
Inexpensive version of MetaFrame
Provides basic ICA connectivity, printing and COM support
No load balancing, audio support or session shadowing
MetaFrame for Terminals
Designed to host only Windows-based terminals, which includes Network
Stations
Supports all MetaFrame features/functions
Less expensive than the Enterprise version
MetaFrame Enterprise
Full version of MetaFrame
Supports all types of clients
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Network Computer Division16
Notes
There are multiple levels or versions of the MetaFrame product that can be installed on top
of the base WTSE system.
The Citrix Devices Services (CDS) is the least expensive of the MetaFrame versions and it
is designed to provide only basic ICA connectivity functions, including printing and COM
support. It does not provide features such as load balancing, audio support or session
shadowing.
The MetaFrame for Terminals version is less expensive than the Metaframe Enterprise
version. It does provide the full functionality of MetaFrame but will accept connections only
from Windows-based (which includes the Network Station).
The MetaFrame Enterprise version is the most expensive and allows connections from any
type of client.
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Network Computer Division17
RDP Client Example
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Network Computer Division18
Notes
Even though the Network Station does not support the RDP protocol, it might be useful,
when setting up a WTSE environment, to be able to use the RDP protocol from a PC when
doing some system programming work.
The panels illustrated here shows how the RDP client looks like on a PC, and users
familiar with the ICA client will recognize some of the same fields.
The panel on the left identifies a specific server to go to, which can be identified as an IP
address or an IP host name. As an option, the user name and password can be specified
here to provide an automatic logon instead of the user having to be prompted with the
normal Windows NT user logon panel.
The panel in the center defines the connection options such as the window size
(resolution) and whether you want to start in windowed mode or full screen mode.
The panel on the right specifies whether you want the normal Windows desktop to be
displayed initially or whether you want to launch a particular application immediately.
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Network Computer Division19
ICA Features
User Logon Parameters
Published applications
Load balancing
Shadowing
Client drive, printer, COM port and audio mapping
Color Support
Video resolution
Cut and Paste (Text)
Encryption
Data Compression
Bitmap caching
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Network Computer Division20
Notes
Here are the main features provided by the ICA protocol:
User logon parameters lets you configure an ICA session and pre-specify the user name,
password and domain name so that the user does not need to be prompted every time he
starts the session.
Published applications lets you
Load balancing lets you connect to a server farm and have the system determine which
server the session should use at the time the session is requested
Shadowing allows an administrator to display on his monitor whatever is displayed on any
client's monitor, and vice-versa.
Client device mapping (drive, printer, COM port and audio) lets a Windows application on
the server communicate with the device through the ICA session itself.
Color support allows the client to use either 16 or 256 colors
Video resolution allows to set the ICA client's window size to fullscreen, a set of 4
predetermined sizes or a custom size.
Cut and Paste allows exchange of text (only) between the Windows application running in
the ICA client window and other windows on the Network Station's desktop.
Five levels of encryption are available for the data passing between the client and the
server
Data compression and bitmap caching are techniques to enhance the performance on slow
speed links at the expense of doing more processing on the client.
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Network Computer Division21
Where to Go for More Information
Redbook - SG24-5221 - NSM R3 Guide for Windows NT
Redbook - SG24-5844 - NSM V2R1 Guide
Citrix Documentation
online help
Citrix MetaFrame Administrator's Guide
Citrix MetaFrame ICA Client User's Guide
UIS Documentation
online help
Unix Integration Services Administrator's Guide
Citrix Web site (http://www.citrix.com)
NCD Web Site (htp://www.ncd.com)
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materials may not be reproduced in whole
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Network Computer Division22
Notes
These are some of the publications and web sites where additional information can be
obtained.
IBM Network
Station Technical Education
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01/31/00
v2r1metaframe.prz
Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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materials may not be reproduced in whole
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Network Computer Division23
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