Academic Regulations Course Numbering System and Requirements

Academic  Regulations Course Numbering System and Requirements
Academic Regulations
Course Numbering System
and Requirements
Only courses numbered 500 to 699 may be applied toward the master’s degree. Courses numbered 500 to 599
are open to graduate students, seniors, and specially
qualified juniors. Courses numbered 600 through 699 are
open to graduate students only. Courses numbered 700899 are open only to students in doctoral programs.
Prerequisites
Prerequisites may be met by approved equivalent courses
taken at other universities. You should consult your academic advisor if you have a question about prerequisites.
Students who enroll in courses for which they do not meet
the prescribed prerequisites may be required to withdraw
from those courses. Prerequisite courses below 500-level
are not eligible for Graduate School financial assistance.
Grading System
The grading system of the University which applies to
graduate students is as follows:
A- High Competence (4.0)
B- Competence (3.0)
C- Minimum Competence (2.0)
D- Limited or Incomplete Competence (1.0)
F- Inadequate Competence for Credit
W- Official Withdrawal
IN- Incomplete Work
IP- Work in Progress
Only courses with a grade of “C” or higher can be used toward completion of degree requirements.
IN – Incomplete Work
“IN” is the symbol used when the instructor lacks sufficient
evidence to award a letter grade. The purpose of an “IN” is
to provide the time necessary for a student to complete
coursework which, through no fault of the student’s, was
not completed in the normal time allowed. Reasonable
time necessary for completion is decided by the student
and the faculty member teaching the course. The “IN,”
once assigned, remains on the official academic record
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
upon conversion to a grade or permanent “I.”
The “IN” should not be mistakenly considered as an
incentive for the faculty to recommend or for students
to believe that this extension permits students merely to
retake courses, or to extend the time for the completion
of the prescribed work beyond the end of the semester of
enrollment, as a means of removing the “Incomplete.”
At the time the “IN” is assigned, the instructor and students must sign a contract specifying what must be done
to complete the “IN” and the date by which the “IN” must
be converted. Copies of the contract must be provided to
the student, faculty member, graduate advisor, and Graduate School office. An “IN” must be converted not later than
four weeks before the end of the next regular semester.
Under unusual circumstances, the student may be granted
an extension to the end of the semester with the approval
of the instructor involved, provided that the request was
received prior to the normal deadline for the removal of
incompletes. If the instructor does not submit a letter
grade by the specified deadline, an “I” will remain permanently upon the student’s record and may not thereafter be
removed. Once a permanent “I” is recorded for a course, if a
student must complete the course to fulfill degree requirements, the student will have to register for the course again
and satisfactorily complete the course requirements.
Contracts are available in the Graduate School, 200
Bradley Hall, or from the graduate coordinator.
IP – Work in Progress
“IP” may be assigned to a student in a graduate course
when the instructor agrees that the student requires more
than one semester to complete the course. Normally, “IP”
grades will only be assigned for thesis courses, other
courses involving extensive projects involving research/
creative production, or independent study courses. At the
time the “IP” is assigned, the instructor and student must
sign a contract specifying what must be done to complete
the “IP” and the date by which the “IP” must be converted.
The “IP,” once assigned, remains on the official academic
record upon conversion to a grade or a permanent “I.”
Copies of the contract must be provided to the student,
faculty member, graduate advisor, and Graduate School
Office. If the “IP” is not removed by the specified date, it
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will be recorded as a permanent “I.” Once a permanent “I”
is recorded for a course, if a student must complete the
course to fulfill degree requirements, the student will have
to register for the course again and satisfactorily complete
the course requirements.
Contracts are available in the Graduate School, 200
Bradley Hall, or from the graduate coordinator.
Graduate Student Policy
Violation Issues and Grievance
Procedures
The policy violation issues of a graduate student may be
academic or non-academic in nature. In the following
sections the definitions, policies and grievance procedures to deal with the issues are delineated. The primary
source of procedures for dealing with these issues is the
Faculty Handbook. The Student Handbook also has a section dealing with policy violation issues. It also uses as its
primary source the Faculty Handbook. These handbooks
can be found in the Bradley University web pages. The following is not intended and may not supersede any of the
policies of the Faculty Handbook. It does in certain cases
provide for input from individuals that are primarily associated with graduate programs and students.
Academic Issues
Academic issues are concerns regarding breach of academic integrity by a student or a student’s allegation of unfair
academic evaluation by an instructor. A breach of academic
integrity is either cheating or plagiarism by a student.
Definitions
•
Cheating is officially defined as giving or attempting
to give, or obtaining or attempting to obtain, information relative to an examination or other work that the
student is expected to do alone and not in collaboration with others, or the use of material or information
restricted by the instructor. Each instructor will indicate beforehand work that may be done in collaboration with other students.
•
Plagiarism is reproducing from published or unpublished print or electronic media, without quotations
or citations, another’s sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own, presenting
someone else’s line of thinking in the development
of a thesis as though it were your own, and someone
else’s project work or results thereof as your own.
Policies
•
Cheating. A “zero” or whatever is the equivalent of
the failing lowest grade possible, shall be assigned for
that piece of work to any student cheating on a nonfinal examination or other class assignment. A “zero” or
whatever is the equivalent of the lowest failing grade
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possible shall be assigned on a final examination to any
student cheating on a final examination. An “F” shall
also be assigned as the course grade to any student
cheating on a comprehensive final examination.
•
Plagiarism. A “zero” or whatever is the equivalent of
the lowest failing grade possible shall be assigned
for that piece of work to any student plagiarizing on
a non-final piece of work. In the case of a student plagiarizing on a final research paper or project, an “F”
shall also be assigned as the course grade.
•
Repeated Cheating or Plagiarism. For twice-repeated or aggravated offences of cheating or plagiarism,
additional action, including dismissal from the University, may be taken pursuant to the Student Handbook procedures related to the University Judicial
System and the disciplinary sanctions for violation of
University regulations.
University Student Grievance Policy
If a student objects to instructor’s conclusion that a breach
of academic integrity has occurred, or if the student alleges
an unfair academic evaluation by an instructor, or if the
student has non-academic concerns, the student may take
recourse to the grievance procedures to resolve the issue.
The student shall first exhaust the informal grievance procedures before resorting to the formal grievance procedures.
The grievance process shall be completed as expeditiously as possible. The recommended timelines may be
exceeded only under compelling circumstances.
Academic Issues
Informal Academic Grievance Procedures
• The student shall first consult his or her graduate program coordinator or director to seek a course of action
to resolve the issue. The graduate program coordinator
or director shall advise the student of the procedures
to be followed to resolve the issue. If a conflict of interest exists between the student and the graduate program coordinator or director the student may seek the
advice of the department chairperson of the department offering the program in which they are enrolled.
If there is a question of the procedures to follow, the
academic ombudsman should be consulted.
• The student shall then appeal in writing to the instructor’s department chair to resolve the issue. If there is a
conflict of interest between the student and the chairperson, the student should appeal in writing to the
dean of the college to resolve the issue. The instructor
shall provide in writing to the chair the instructor’s
conclusions pertaining to breach of academic integrity by the student.
• The department chairperson shall consider the issue
and try to resolve it by meeting with the concerned
parties within five business days after receiving the
student’s appeal in writing.
Bradley University
•
•
•
•
•
•
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the department chairperson, the chairperson shall forward all
paperwork related to the issue including the student’s appeal to the director of graduate programs
of the college to which the department belongs, and
request that the director resolve the issue. The chairperson shall submit to the director a memo summarizing discussions with the concerned parties and the
chair’s decision. If the position of director of graduate
programs does not exist within the college all paperwork related to the issue including the students appeal shall be forwarded to the dean of the college to
which the department belongs.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the director of graduate programs, the director shall forward
all paperwork related to the issue, including the student’s appeal, to the dean of the college to which the
department belongs, and request that the dean resolve the issue. The director shall submit to the dean
a memo summarizing discussions with the concerned
parties and the director’s decision.
The dean of the college or the dean’s designee(s) shall
consider the issue and shall try to resolve the issue by
meeting with the concerned parties within ten business days after receiving the request from the department chair. Due process requirements for a fair hearing
shall be provided to all parties involved. The record of
the hearing before the dean or dean’s designee(s) shall
consist of written statements of the parties involved in
support of their positions provided prior to the hearing
and a transcript of the hearing.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the dean
of the college, the student may submit an appeal in
writing within five business days after receiving the
dean’s decision, to the dean of the Graduate School
to resolve the issue. The student shall inform the dean
of the college about the appeal to the dean of the
Graduate School.
The dean of the college shall submit all paperwork
related to the issue including the record of the hearing, to the dean of the Graduate School and the
dean’s or dean’s designee(s)’ decision, and if the dean’s
designee(s) rendered the decision, the dean shall indicate whether or not the dean agrees with the decision.
The dean of the Graduate School or the dean’s
designee(s) drawn from the Executive Committee
of the Graduate Faculty shall consider the issue and
shall try to resolve the issue by meeting with the concerned parties within ten business days after receiving the appeal from the student. Due process requirements for a fair hearing shall be provided to all parties
involved. The record of the hearing before the dean or
dean’s designee(s) shall consist of written statements
of the parties involved in support of their positions
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
provided prior to the hearing and a transcript of the
hearing. The dean shall provide the student the final
decision in writing.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the dean of the
Graduate School, the student may resort to the formal
grievance procedures, within five days of receiving the
final written decision by the dean of the Graduate School,
by appealing to the chairperson of the University Student
Grievance Committee.
Non-Academic Issues
Definition
Non-academic issues include concerns regarding access
or participation in courses, harassment and racial discrimination based on age, color, creed, disability, ethnicity, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual
orientation or veteran status, or any other derogatory or
discriminatory act by an instructor, a staff member, or a
fellow student.
Informal Non-Academic Grievance Procedures
The student shall meet with the associate provost for student affairs to seek a course of action to resolve the nonacademic issue. The associate provost for student affairs
shall advise the student about the informal grievance procedures to be followed to resolve the issue, and facilitate
the informal grievance process.
Formal Grievance Process Academic and Non-Academic
If the issue (academic or non-academic) is not resolved
through the informal grievance process, the student may
seek a resolution of the issue through the formal grievance process delineated in the Faculty Handbook. The
University Student Grievance Committee shall conduct
formal hearings after the chairperson of the committee
receives a written request from the student to begin the
formal grievance process.
University Student Grievance Committee
1. The function of the University Student Grievance
Committee shall be:
a) To conduct formal hearings, upon request from
a student or an instructor regarding academic or
non-academic issues as defined before.
b) To submit findings to the appropriate administrative officer (provost and vice president of academic affairs for academic matters and the associate provost for student affairs for non-academic
matters. If a conflict of interest exists, then, to the
appropriate vice president or the president of the
university). Should the committee find evidence
that the grievance was appropriate, it will forward
specific suggestions for rectifying such evaluation or treatment.
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2. The University Student Grievance Committee shall be
constituted as set forth in the Faculty Handbook, the
expectation being that the faculty members will be
taken from the graduate faculty and the students being graduate students in cases involving individuals
associated primarily with the Graduate School and its
programs.
3. The Committee shall elect its chairperson and establish its internal operating procedures in accordance
with the formal student grievance policy published in
the Faculty Handbook and the university policies on
affirmative action, discrimination, etc. The procedures
shall be made available to all parties involved in the
grievance process.
Dismissal for Non-Academic
Reasons
Bradley graduate students must abide by all University
regulations. Students who violate University regulations
may be subject to disciplinary sanctions including dismissal
or suspension as listed in the Bradley Student Handbook.
Handbooks are available from the Student Activities Office
located in the lower level of the Student Center.
Transcript of Credits
A transcript of credits is an authentic copy of the student’s
academic record. No partial transcript will be issued. Transcripts are released only by written request of the student.
This order must be placed in person or by mail to the Registrar’s Office, and be accompanied by a $4.00 fee per copy
requested. For other methods of ordering transcripts,
please see bradley.edu/registrar/transcripts.
Bradley University does not issue nor certify copies of
transcripts from other institutions.
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Bradley University
Graduate School Policies
Student Course Load
The Graduate School requires that a minimum of 30 semester hours be successfully completed for the master’s
degree. Specific programs may require additional hours.
A full-time student takes 9 semester hours of coursework
during a semester of the regular academic year; the maximum permitted is 12 semester hours. Full-time graduate
assistants may not enroll in more than 9 semester hours nor
work more than 20 hours each week without written permission of their graduate coordinator and the dean of the
Graduate School. During the summer, a full-time graduate
course load is 6 semester hours each session.
Half-time enrollment shall be considered a minimum
of four semester hours.
Graduate School Dismissal Policy
A graduate student must have a minimum cumulative
GPA of 3.0 (B) in graduate coursework at the University
to be in academic good standing at the graduate level. A
graduate student whose cumulative grade point average
in graduate coursework drops below 3.0 will be placed
on academic probation. While a student is on probation,
the student’s record will be reviewed at the end of each
term. A graduate student who earns a term GPA below 3.0
while on probation will be dismissed from the program. A
graduate student will be removed from probation when
the student’s cumulative grade point average in graduate
course work reaches or exceeds 3.0. Graduate students
cannot be removed from probation until the end of an official university semester. No changes in status or financial
assistance will be made until the end of the semester and
will not be effective until the following semester.
A graduate student who receives grades lower than “B”
for 6 or more semester hours in graduate coursework will
be dismissed. Graduate students receiving grades of lower
than B will be reminded of this policy each semester.
Academic good standing does not automatically ensure continuation in a graduate program. A student may
be dismissed for factors other than grades upon the recommendation of a committee of department faculty, the student’s advisor, the program coordinator/director, the chair
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
of the department/director of graduate program, the dean
of the college, and the dean of the Graduate School.
Dismissed students may petition for reinstatement
into the program from which they have been dismissed
by filing a Petition for Reinstatement to Graduate Study.
Dismissed students are allowed to make only one petition for reinstatement to the program from which they
have been dismissed. If the student is dismissed a second
time after reinstatement, no additional petition for reinstatement will be considered. The program coordinator/
director, the department chairperson, and the dean of
the Graduate School must approve the petition for reinstatement. Petitions for reinstatement are available in the
Graduate School office or on the Graduate School web
site bradley.edu/grad/.
A student who has been dismissed for any of the
reasons specified above may apply for admission to another program or as a student-at-large. The application
process for seeking admission to a different program or
as a student-at-large shall be the same as for new graduate students.
Time Limit for Degree/Certificate
Completion
Graduate program curricula continually evolve to stay current in disciplinary and industrial standards. Furthermore,
a graduate student examines a developing body of knowledge, and it is difficult to integrate that body of knowledge if a program extends beyond five years. Therefore,
candidates for a degree or certificate should complete all
requirements within five years following the recording of
their first graduate grades, including graduate courses
taken as a student-at-large, and courses transferred into
their graduate program from Bradley University or any
other accredited institution of higher learning.
Graduate students are expected to stay current in
their field. If they wish to use courses for the degree or
certificate that were taken prior to the five-year limitation,
they must have these courses validated by the program
coordinator. Credit will be allowed for courses that extend
beyond the limit if the coordinator confirms to the dean of
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the Graduate School that the candidate is proficient in the
subjects. Students should begin the approval process by
contacting their graduate program coordinator.
Students who are currently enrolled may apply for a
Change of Program. A student wishing to change his or
her program must complete a Change of Program form
and submit it to the Graduate School a minimum of two
weeks prior to the semester in which they wish to start the
new program. Additional materials or test scores may be
required at the discretion of the Graduate School and the
department for the Change of Program to be approved.
Admission to a degree program does not guarantee a
Change of Program will be approved.
be approved by both the instructor and the chairperson of
the department offering the course. Enrollment is contingent on having available space in the class. Except in special circumstances to be determined by the instructor and
department chairperson, courses involving laboratory or
studio work cannot be audited. Regular class attendance
by persons not on the class roster is not permitted.
Forms for audit registration are available in the Registrar’s Office or on-line. Audit registrations are accepted by
the Registrar’s Office only after the first day of classes of
each academic term.
The extent to which an auditor participates in a course
and the requirements for satisfactory performance must
be specified by the instructor when approval is granted.
Instructors are not obligated to grade any course work performed by the auditor. Courses taken for audit do not earn
academic credit, do not apply toward any academic degree
and do not count toward a student’s full-time or part-time
load for purposes of financial aid, loan deferments or visa
status. Courses taken for audit are recorded on the student’s
permanent academic record as completed satisfactorily
(“X”), completed unsatisfactorily (“UX”), or withdrawn (“W”).
After the last day for adding classes with special permission, anyone who is registered as an auditor may not
change the audit registration to a “for credit” status, i.e.
a regular registration; likewise, a student registered for
credit may not change to audit status. Deadlines associated with courses taken for credit and courses taken for
audit are identical.
All individuals will be charged a non-refundable fee
for audited courses. The current fee is published in the
Schedule of Classes. Persons who have audited a course
may petition to earn credit by proficiency examination;
however, the charge for a proficiency examination for
credit is based on the standard tuition structure determined by the Controller’s Office with a credit granted for
charges associated with auditing.
Repeated Courses
Transfer of Credit
Upon approval of the dean of the Graduate School, a
graduate student may repeat a maximum of two courses
in which he or she received grades of C or below. Both the
first and second grades received for the course are averaged to calculate the graduate student’s overall grade
point average; however, semester hours for the course
shall count only once toward the degree requirement.
For a coherent program, master’s degree candidates
should take all of their graduate coursework at one institution or consortium. Bradley will, however, accept 6
semester hours of transfer credit from another accredited
institution, providing that (1) the grade in each graduate course offered for transfer is at least a B, and (2) the
graduate coordinator recommends its acceptance to the
dean of the Graduate School. In rare instances, and upon
written approval of the dean of the Graduate School,
more than 6 semester hours may be transferred; but in
no instances will Bradley accept more than 12 semester
hours of transfer credit. Grades of the courses transferred
are not included in the calculation of the graduate grade
point average. Students applying to have course credits
transferred must submit an official transcript from the
Step-Out Policy
Graduate students may be allowed to step-out of their
graduate program for one semester (fall or spring) without being dropped from the program or changing graduation requirements. If a graduate student must take a second consecutive semester off during their program, he or
she must reapply for admission to the program. This reapplication does not guarantee admission to the program,
and students who are readmitted may be subject to new
degree requirements. A renewal of financial assistance
is not guaranteed for individuals that must reapply. Students are not required to enroll during summer or interim
sessions. Students who are not in good academic standing are required to reapply for admission as students on
academic probation.
Students whose time limit for completion of degree/
certificate has expired must submit a request to extend
time with the readmission application. The request to extend time for completion of degree must be submitted in
writing to the Graduate School.
Change of Program
Audited Courses
All Bradley students (undergraduate, graduate, full-time
and part-time) in good academic standing registered for a
given academic term, along with individuals admitted “at
large,” for a given academic term may request permission
to enroll as an “auditor.” Permission to audit a course must
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Bradley University
other institution and a Request to Transfer Graduate Credit
form to the Graduate School. This transcript will be kept in
the student’s graduate file.
Any graduate course completed elsewhere cannot be
transferred if eight years pass between completion of the
course and completion of the Bradley University graduate
program. Regardless of transfer of courses into a graduate program, the five-year time limit for degree/certificate
completion shall be retained.
In rare instances, courses beyond the eight-year limit
may be considered for transfer upon the recommendation
of the graduate coordinator and approval by the dean of
the Graduate School. Please see the Time Limit for Degree/
Certificate Completion policy in this Catalog. Courses taken
between the spring and fall semesters will be considered as
being taken during “summer.” This includes Bradley courses
taken during May three-week, May eight-week, Summer 1,
and Summer 2 sessions. “Summer” will count as one semester in the determination of the age of the course.
Courses used to earn a graduate degree at Bradley or
any other university may not be used as credit towards
another graduate degree at Bradley.
Extension credit is acceptable for transfer if it is taken
from an accredited institution and is approved by the
procedures outlined above. Correspondence courses and
equivalency credit by examination are not acceptable.
2.
3.
Age of Courses Eligible to Meet
Prerequisite Requirements
Courses that serve as prerequisites for a degree or certificate program and that do not count directly toward
graduate degree or certificate completion may be accepted to meet a prerequisite requirement provided they
have been completed no longer than five years prior to
the time the student begins his/her graduate program at
Bradley University. Courses beyond the five-year limit may
be accepted in rare cases at the discretion of the department with referral to the Graduate School and approval
by the dean of the Graduate School.
4.
Progression Toward Degree
1. Graduate Program of Study
Within the first semester of a degree seeking student’s
graduate coursework, a completed Program of Study
form must be approved by the program graduate coordinator and dean of the Graduate School. The Program
of Study form must identify all program requirements
including requirements beyond those listed in the
graduate catalog. Revisions to the Program of Study are
initiated by submission by the student of a Change of
Program of Study form. This must be approved by the
program coordinator and dean of the Graduate School.
The dean of the Graduate School and the program
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
5.
6.
coordinator will use the Program of Study form to determine the student’s qualifications for and progress
toward completion of his or her master’s degree.
Comprehensive Assessment
Each department offering a graduate program requires a comprehensive assessment of the student’s
total experience as it relates to fulfilling the objectives
of the program of study. The department offering the
program shall determine the form and content of
the assessment. The type of comprehensive assessment should be specified in the student’s Program of
Study. The student is responsible for making arrangements with the program coordinator for completing
the assessment. At least two weeks before the date
on which the degree is to be conferred, the coordinator must report the quality of the assessment to the
Graduate School as Pass, Pass with Distinction, or Fail.
The results of the assessment, as reported by the coordinator, will be posted on the student’s transcript.
Students who receive a Fail on the assessment will
be given only one additional opportunity for reassessment. The time frame in which the reassessment will
take place is determined by the program, but must be
within the time limit prescribed for finishing the degree.
Thesis
Departments of the University govern the thesis option. Those students selecting this option must obtain information about thesis requirements from their
graduate coordinator. The general format and procedures for thesis filing are available from the Graduate
School or on the Web at bradley.edu/grad.
Application for Graduation
Students must apply for graduation either online
using Webster or by submitting the printed Graduate Application for Graduation form to the Graduate
School. The application must be submitted when the
candidate is registering for his or her final semester
of study. Students finishing during a summer session
should make application at the beginning of the term
in which they plan to complete their requirements.
The Graduate Application for Graduation form can be
found online at www.bradley.edu/grad/.
Applicants failing to complete all requirements
for graduation in the semester for which they applied
must reapply later.
Removal of Conditional Status
A student must be in academic good standing to
graduate. The student also must have met all conditions placed on him or her by the department and
have been approved for unconditional status.
Attendance at Commencement
A commencement convocation is held at the completion of the fall and spring semesters. Students are encouraged to attend.
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Facilities and Services
Bradley University provides a comfortable setting designed for living and learning. A beautiful 85-acre campus contains both historic buildings and state-of-the-art
learning centers. Surrounded by an historic residential
district, the campus has restaurants, shops, and a supermarket within walking distance.
Bradley continuously updates facilities to keep pace
with new methods of teaching and learning. In recent
years complete renovations have taken place in Olin Hall
(science), Constance Hall (music), and Bradley Hall. In Fall
2008, the new state-of-the art Markin Family Student Recreation Center will open, offering a swimming pool, exercise facilities, and practice space for intramural sports.
It will serve as the social hub for student life on campus,
house the Wellness Program, Counseling Services, the
Health Center, and labs to support the Department of
Nursing. A 600-space parking deck will also open this fall.
Work has begun on the new Athletic Performance Center and the Puterbaugh Men’s Basketball Practice Facility.
The APC will be home court for women’s basketball and
volleyball and provide a spacious venue for concerts and
other performances. Bradley recently launched a major
capital campaign that will bring more renovations and
new facilities to campus.
St. James Place, a student residential community,
provides suite-style living for upperclass students and
outdoor intramural facilities—Meinen Field. In addition
to these playing fields, the university has lighted tennis
courts on campus. A food court in Williams Hall offers a variety of dining options for all students seven days a week
until 8 p.m.
Bradley University Bookstore
The Bradley Bookstore provides the books and supplies
necessary for coursework at the university. A large selection of emblematic clothing and gifts, as well as medical,
reference, and general reading books, are available at the
bookstore. Any book not carried in stock can be special
ordered. All students, faculty, and staff with a valid school
ID may purchase academically priced software online at
campusestore.com. For your convenience, greeting cards,
snacks, and soda are also stocked at the bookstore.
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Personal checks written for up to $30 can be cashed
for a small fee. Discover, Visa, MasterCard, or American
Express cards or Quick Cash are accepted at the Bradley
Bookstore. Barnes & Noble gift cards are also accepted
and available for purchase to be used at any Barnes &
Noble college bookstore or superstore.
Computing Services
Computing Services supports both the academic and
administrative aspects of university computing. Computing Services supports campus-wide computer networks,
connections to the Internet, and electronic mail. Bradley
is a member of Internet2, which provides high-speed network access to more than 300 research-oriented universities, laboratories, and companies. In addition, Internet2
participation provides high-speed access to all major research networks in the United States, as well as access to
the major international research networks.
Academic resources include a variety of computer
systems and software used for instruction, research, and
public service. Student workstations are located in the
Cullom-Davis Library and many academic buildings. All
residence hall rooms and St. James suites have network
connections giving access to the campus network as
well as the Internet. Students are encouraged to bring
their own workstations with them to campus. There is no
charge to access the campus data network or the Internet. HelpDesk services are available in the Reserves area
of the Library.
Student e-mail accounts
E-mail and network access accounts are automatically established for every student at Bradley University. You will
receive your account and password when you arrive on
campus. Bradley uses e-mail as an official means of communication with students, so you should check your account on
a regular basis.
Romeo B. Garrett Cultural Center
Located at 824 North Duryea Place (across from Williams
Hall), the Garrett Center houses the office of Multicultural
Student Services. Multicultural Student Services functions
to meet the various needs of international students and
Bradley University
Directory
About Peoria
Bradley University
1501 W. Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL 61625
(309) 676-7611 • bradley.edu
Peoria, Illinois is a metropolitan area of 350,000 people,
conveniently located halfway between Chicago and St.
Louis. Peoria is large enough to provide a wide range of
recreational, cultural, and professional activities, and yet is
small enough to maintain a shared community spirit.
Peoria’s downtown business district and riverfront
have been revitalized with art galleries, restaurants, and
boutiques. Providing a healthy business climate, Peoria is
home to Caterpillar Inc. and a number of innovative technological firms. It is also a medical center for central Illinois.
Peoria is proud to be home to Bradley University and joins
in welcoming you to your graduate school experience.
Bookstore
(309) 677-2320
Center for Student Health Services
(309) 677-2700
Markin Center
Computing Services Technology HelpDesk
(309) 677-2964
Controller’s Office
(309) 677-3120
103 Swords Hall
Cullom-Davis Library
Circulation, (309) 677-2825
Hours Open, (309) 677-2824
Interlibrary Loan, (309) 677-2837
Reference, (309) 677-3502
Renewals, (309) 677-2826
Reserves, (309) 677-3315
Financial Assistance Office
(309) 677-3089
100 Swords Hall
Graduate School
(309) 677-2375
200 Bradley Hall
[email protected]
bradley.edu/grad/
Multicultural Student Services Office
(309) 677-2646
Garrett Center
Registrar’s Office
(309) 677-3101
11 Swords Hall
Schedule of Classes
bradley.edu/classes
2
Bradley University
Contents
Academic Calendar, 4
Bradley University, 6
Founding of Bradley, 7
Accreditation, 8
Chemistry, 109
Computer Science and Information Systems, 110
English, 113
Liberal Studies, 115
The Graduate School
Administration and Faculty, 120
Vision and Mission, 9
Degrees Offered, 11
Admission, 12
Fees And Expenses, 17
Financial Assistance, 19
Academic Regulations, 21
Graduate School Policies, 25
Facilities And Services, 28
Student Affairs, 31
Index, 127
Graduate Programs
Graduate School Interdisciplinary Program, 34
Professional Master of Arts in Elementary Math, Science,
And Technology Education, 34
Foster College of Business Administration, 39
Master of Science in Accounting, 39
Executive Master of Business Administration, 42
Master of Business Administration, 45
Master of Science in Quantitative Finance, 51
Slane College of Communications and Fine Arts, 55
Art, 55
College of Education and Health Sciences, 59
Educational Leadership and Human Development, 61
Annual Institutional Title II Report Card: 2006-2007, 71
Curriculum and Instruction, 73
Nursing, 81
Physical Therapy, 83
College of Engineering and Technology, 89
Civil Engineering, 90
Electrical Engineering, 95
Industrial Engineering, 98
Manufacturing Engineering, 98
Mechanical Engineering, 101
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 107
Biology, 107
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Copyright Bradley University, August 2008
Bradley University is committed to a policy of non-discrimination and the promotion of equal opportunities for all
persons regardless of age, color, creed, disability, ethnicity,
marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University also is committed to compliance with all applicable laws regarding nondiscrimination, harassment, and affirmative action.
Federal regulations require universities to make student
consumer information available to prospective and current students concerning: financial assistance information; institutional programs and policies; graduation rates;
safety programs, policies, and crime statistics; athletic
program participation rates and financial support data;
and rights under Family Education Rights and Privacy
Act. This information may be obtained by requesting the
Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Compliance Report from Bradley University’s Office of University
Relations at (309) 677-3164 or by viewing the University
Web site at www.bradley.edu/police/.
This Catalog represents the University’s best effort to
communicate information on academic programs, policies, rules, and regulations that were in effect at the time
of its printing. Students should be aware that the University reserves the right to modify these programs, policies,
rules, and regulations at any time within a student’s term
of residence. The University’s policy is to provide notice
of any such modifications sufficiently in advance of their
implementation to ensure adjustments without undue
inconvenience. Before pre-registering for any academic
term, students should contact the administrative office of
their academic department or college to verify the most
current information.
3
Academic Calendar
The academic calendars are subject to revision. Students
should refer to the most recent Schedule of Classes for important dates each semester.
2008-2009
First Semester
August 18, Monday
August 23, Saturday
August 27, Wednesday
October 11, Saturday
October 15, Wednesday
November 26, Wednesday
December 1, Monday
December 9, Tuesday
December 10, Wednesday
December 11, Thursday
December 17, Wednesday
December 20, Saturday
January Interim
January 5, Monday
January 19, Monday
Second Semester
January 12, Monday
January 18, Sunday
January 21, Wednesday
March 14, Saturday
March 23, Monday
May 5, Tuesday
May 6, Wednesday
May 7, Thursday
May 13, Wednesday
May 16, Saturday
2009-2010
Reporting date for faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Fall Recess begins
Classes resume
Thanksgiving Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
First day of classes. Classes
meet Monday – Saturday
Final Examinations will be
held in the morning only
Reporting date for new faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Spring Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
Summer Sessions
May 18, Monday
May Interim I begins
(No classes on Memorial Day Holiday)
June 5, Friday
May Interim I ends
June 8, Monday
Summer Session I begins
July 10, Friday
Summer Session I ends
July 13, Monday
Summer Session II begins
August 14, Friday
Summer Session II ends
4
First Semester
August 17, Monday
August 22, Saturday
August 26, Wednesday
October 10, Saturday
October 14, Wednesday
November 25, Wednesday
November 30, Monday
December 8, Tuesday
December 9, Wednesday
December 10, Thursday
December 16, Wednesday
December 19, Saturday
January Interim
January 4, Monday
January 18, Monday
Second Semester
January 11, Monday
January 17, Sunday
January 20, Wednesday
March 13, Saturday
March 22, Monday
May 4, Tuesday
May 5, Wednesday
May 6, Thursday
May 12, Wednesday
May 15, Saturday
Reporting date for faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Fall Recess begins
Classes resume
Thanksgiving Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
First day of classes. Classes
meet Monday – Saturday
Final Examinations will be
held in the morning only
Reporting date for new faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Spring Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
Summer Sessions
May 17, Monday
May Interim I begins
May 17, Monday
May Interim II begins
(No classes on Memorial Day Holiday)
June 4, Friday
May Interim I ends
June 7, Monday
Summer Session I begins
July 9, Friday
Summer Session I ends
May Interim II ends
July 12, Monday
Summer Session II begins
August 13, Friday
Summer Session II ends
Bradley University
2010-2011
First Semester
August 16, Monday
August 21, Saturday
August 25, Wednesday
October 9, Saturday
October 13, Wednesday
November 24, Wednesday
November 29, Monday
December 7, Tuesday
December 8, Wednesday
December 9, Thursday
December 15, Wednesday
December 18, Saturday
January Interim
January 3, Monday
January 17, Monday
Second Semester
January 10, Monday
January 16, Sunday
January 19, Wednesday
March 12, Saturday
March 21, Monday
May 3, Tuesday
May 4, Wednesday
May 5, Thursday
May 11, Wednesday
May 14, Saturday
2011-2012
Reporting date for faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Fall Recess begins
Classes resume
Thanksgiving Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
First Semester
August 15, Monday
August 20, Saturday
August 24, Wednesday
October 8, Saturday
October 12, Wednesday
November 23, Wednesday
November 28, Monday
December 6, Tuesday
December 7, Wednesday
December 8, Thursday
December 14, Wednesday
December 17, Saturday
Reporting date for faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Fall Recess begins
Classes resume
Thanksgiving Recess begins
(no classes)
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
First day of classes. Classes
meet Monday - Saturday
Final Examinations will be
held in the morning only
January Interim
January 2, Monday
Reporting date for new faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Spring Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
Second Semester
January 9, Monday
January 15, Sunday
January 18, Wednesday
March 10, Saturday
March 19, Monday
May 1, Tuesday
May 2, Wednesday
May 3, Thursday
May 9, Wednesday
May 12, Saturday
Reporting date for new faculty
Residence halls open
Classes begin
Spring Recess begins
Classes resume
Last day of classes
Study Day
Final Examinations begin
Final Examinations end
Commencement
Summer Sessions
May 14, Monday
May 14, Monday
May Interim I begins
May Interim II begins
Summer Sessions
May 16, Monday
May Interim I begins
May 16, Monday
May Interim II begins
(No classes on Memorial Day Holiday)
June 3, Friday
May Interim I ends
June 6, Monday
Summer Session I begins
(No classes on Fourth of July Holiday)
July 8, Friday
Summer Session I ends
May Interim II ends
July 11, Monday
Summer Session II begins
August 12, Friday
Summer Session II ends
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
January 16, Monday
First day of classes. Classes
meet Monday – Saturday
Final Examinations will be
held in the morning only.
No classes on Memorial Day Holiday
June 1, Friday
May Interim I ends
June 4, Monday
Summer Session I begins
No classes on Fourth of July Holiday
July 6, Friday
Summer Session I ends
May Interim II ends
July 9, Monday
Summer Session II begins
August 10, Friday
Summer Session II ends
5
Bradley University
The University
Bradley University is an independent, privately endowed,
coeducational institution. Located on an 85-acre campus
in Peoria, Illinois, Bradley was founded in 1897 as Bradley
Polytechnic Institute by Lydia Moss Bradley as a memorial
to her children and husband, Tobias. It became a four-year
college in 1920 and in 1946 became a university and began offering graduate programs. Bradley is accredited by
the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
With approximately 5,300 undergraduate and 800
graduate students, Bradley is the ideal size for living and
learning. Bradley provides a broad choice of academic
and preprofessional programs with more than 100 programs of study in five colleges: the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences, College of Education and Health Sciences,
College of Engineering and Technology, Foster College of
Business Administration, and Slane College of Communications and Fine Arts. Through its Graduate School, Bradley awards 14 degrees in over 30 academic areas, including a doctor of physical therapy degree. Programs offered
through Continuing Education extend the resources of
the university to promote lifelong learning.
The average class size is 24 students and the studentto-faculty ratio is 14:1. Bradley has more than 300 full-time
faculty who are both active researchers and committed
teachers, providing personalized attention in learning
and academic advising. All courses are taught by professors, not graduate assistants, and team projects and collaboration are emphasized in every area of university life.
After class, Bradley students have abundant opportunities
for involvement in campus life—including more than 240
clubs and organizations, NCAA Division I athletics, intramural and club sports, study abroad, and the Lewis J.
Burger Center for Student Leadership and Public Service.
Technology is integrated across the campus—from
the digital editing suites used by communication students to the robotics used in the engineering labs. Students can borrow wireless laptops to use in Cullom-Davis
Library, work in computer labs across campus, and have
access to the Internet in every residence hall. Of the 300
universities participating in Internet2, Bradley is one of
the few non-doctoral research institutions offering access
6
to this high-performance network for faculty research and
student-faculty collaborative projects.
Bradley students do exceptionally well in their chosen
careers and advanced studies after graduation. Last year
the overall placement rate for Bradley graduates was 96
percent. Graduates of Bradley University have become
leaders in every field of endeavor.
Our Vision
Bradley University is committed to excellence. Already
one of the best private comprehensive universities in the
Midwest, Bradley will be one of the finest institutions of
its type in the nation.
Our Mission
Bradley University is committed to nurturing the multifaceted development of students to enable them to become
leaders, innovators, and productive members of society.
Our graduates are prepared for life and professions in a
changing world and they are able to cross academic, geographic, and cultural boundaries. A Bradley education is
characterized by small classes, active learning, mentoring
by highly qualified faculty, challenging academic programs, opportunities for study abroad, and numerous
cocurricular activities.
We recruit, develop, and support faculty who are
passionate educators and outstanding scholars whose
research and creative contributions benefit society. We
expect and reward pedagogy and scholarship of exceptional quality and influence.
A distinctive feature of Bradley University is our cohesive sense of community that unites faculty, students,
staff, and alumni. Our tradition of collective responsibility
is founded on a commitment to the values of academic
freedom, civility, diversity, and respect for the individual.
Our exemplary system of shared governance both represents and sustains our sense of community and fundamental values.
We promote and facilitate collaboration among all
members of the University community. Students learn
teamwork and leadership through group projects and colBradley University
laborate with faculty on research and creative production.
Likewise, faculty collaborate with colleagues across departmental, college, and institutional boundaries to elevate the
quality and impact of their work. The University’s strategic
partnerships with business, cultural, and governmental institutions provide benefits to the community and society
and create additional learning opportunities for students.
Founding of Bradley
On April 10, 1897, ground was broken for Bradley Hall. What
had been prairie-land cornfield was transformed
into a seat of learning because of the remarkable courage, strength, and determination of
one woman, Mrs. Lydia Moss Bradley.
Lydia Moss Bradley had seen all of her
hopes, ambitions, and dreams for her six
children end in their untimely deaths.
She and her husband, Tobias Bradley,
had devoted much time, thought, and
discussion to how their wealth might
be used as a fitting memorial to their
deceased offspring and considered establishing an orphanage.
Unfortunately Tobias died in May of
1867, before their dream could be realized.
Alone, Mrs. Bradley devoted herself unreservedly to
the achievement of their goal. After some study and travel
to various institutions, Mrs. Bradley decided that, instead
of an orphanage, she wanted to found a school where
young people could learn how to do practical things to
prepare them for living in the modern world. In 1892 she
purchased a controlling interest in Parsons Horological
School in LaPorte, Indiana, the first school for watchmakers in America, and moved it to Peoria. She specified in her
will that the school should be expanded after her death
to include a classical education as well as industrial arts
and home economics: “…it being the first object of this
Institution to furnish its students with the means of living
an independent, industrious and useful life by the aid of a
practical knowledge of the useful arts and sciences.”
In October 1896 Mrs. Bradley was convinced by Dr.
William Rainey Harper, president of the University of
Chicago, to move ahead with her plans and establish the
school during her lifetime. Bradley Polytechnic Institute
was chartered on November 13, 1896. Mrs. Bradley initially provided seventeen and a half acres of land; funds for
two campus buildings, including laboratory equipment
and library books; and annual operating expenses.
Contracts for Bradley Hall and Horology Hall (later re-
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
named Westlake) were awarded and work moved ahead
quickly. Fourteen faculty and 150 students began classes
in Bradley Hall on October 4, 1897—with 500 workers still
hammering away. (The Horological Department added
another eight faculty and 70 students.) Bradley Polytechnic Institute was formally dedicated on October 8, 1897.
Its first graduate, in June 1898, was Corinne Unland.
By 1899 there were 350 pupils in the School of Arts and
Science at Bradley, about equally divided between men
and women. Instruction was offered in biology, chemistry, food work, sewing, English, German, French, Latin,
Greek, history, manual arts, drawing, mathematics, and physics. Pleased with its progress,
Mrs. Bradley transferred to the school the
rest of her estate, including nearly 1,000
different pieces of property, reserving its
use and profits during her lifetime. At
Founder’s Day in 1906 she announced
an additional gift to build Hewitt Gymnasium, now Hartmann Center for the
Performing Arts. Mrs. Bradley died on
January 16, 1908, at the age of 91.
The Institute continued to grow and
develop to meet the educational needs of
the region. Bradley became a four-year college offering bachelor’s degrees in 1920 and a
full university offering graduate programs in 1946,
when it was renamed Bradley University.
Today, Bradley alumni total more than 60,000 worldwide. Prominent alumni include David Markin ‘53, president and chairman, Checker Motors Co., L.P.; General John
Shalikashvili ’58, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff ; Keith Bane ’61, founder of Nextel and retired president, global strategy and corporate development, Motorola, Inc.; Richard Teerlink ‘61, retired chairman, HarleyDavidson, Inc.; Wendy Ross ’64, assistant managing editor,
Washington Post; Gerald Shaheen ’66 MA ’68, retired group
president, Caterpillar Inc.; Charlie Steiner ’71, commentator, Los Angeles Dodgers; Dr. Nora Zorich ’75, vice president, research and development, director of new drug development, Proctor & Gamble Pharmaceuticals; Stephen
Gorman MBA ’78, executive vice president, operations,
Delta Air Lines; Renée C. Byer ’80, winner of the Pulitzer
Prize, senior photographer, Sacramento Bee; Kary G. McIlwain ‘81, president and CEO, Young & Rubicam Chicago;
Brad Cohen ’96, teacher, motivational speaker, and author
of Front of the Class (Best Education Book, 2005, and the
basis of a Hallmark Hall of Fame movie); and Tami Lane ’96,
winner of an Academy Award, prosthetic make-up artist.
7
Accreditation
Bradley University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central
Association of Colleges and Schools:
30 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 2400,
Chicago, Illinois, 60602-2504;
(312) 263-0456;
www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org.
Bradley also has a number of select undergraduate and
graduate programs that are accredited by the following:
AACSB International – The Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of Business
American Chemical Society
American Council for Construction Education
American Dietetic Association (didactic program approval)
Association for Childhood Education International
Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy
Education (CAPTE)
Council for Accreditation of Counseling
and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)
Council for Exceptional Children
Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia
Educational Programs
Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)
Educational Leadership Constituent Council
Engineering Accreditation Commission and the
Technology Accreditation Commission of the
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology,
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD
21202-4012 - telephone (410) 347-7700.
National Association for the Education of Young Children
National Association of Schools of Art and Design
National Association of Schools of Music
National Association of Schools of Theatre
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Council for the Social Studies
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
(NLNAC)
National Science Teachers Association
8
Bradley University
THE
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Vision
The Graduate School
The Graduate School of Bradley University will make available to individuals desiring post-baccalaureate studies a
selection of rigorous, high-quality professional degrees
and certificate programs that will enhance their professional skills and intellectual development. It will be recognized for the quality of the advanced study, research,
and creative production produced by the students and
faculty. Students completing programs of study shall be
recognized at the local, state, and national levels for their
excellence in research, creative production, professional
service, or performance in the workplace.
The Graduate School at Bradley University targets areas
of special strength for the offering of select graduate programs in 30 different areas designed to prepare students
for rewarding careers. The strength of Bradley’s graduate
programs lies in the outstanding quality of its faculty, who
mentor students in a genuine academic community. With
a strong commitment to facilitate student learning, the
faculty strives to advance knowledge relevant to society’s
local, regional, and global needs.
Bradley University offers state-of-the-art facilities, a
diverse cultural environment, and a beautiful campus. In
this setting, graduate programs rapidly adapt to external
forces that call for students to synthesize information and
integrate knowledge as they prepare for careers in the
twenty-first century—a century that promises continued
technological change.
Mission
The mission of The Graduate School, working with the
graduate faculty, is to provide leadership and administrative assistance to the faculties of the colleges and
departments of the university for the purpose of developing and maintaining high-quality professional postbaccalaureate programs. In accordance with the theme
of Bradley’s post-baccalaureate programs, “Professional
Programs for Emerging Leaders,” these programs are designed to prepare individuals for professional leadership,
with advanced skills in analysis, communication, creative
production, technology, and interpersonal relations. The
programs meet the diverse needs of individuals by offering students the opportunity to work closely with faculty,
in small classes, on a flexible schedule.
The Graduate School shall serve as an advocate before
the university administration and the community in support of the students, faculties, departments, and colleges
that are participants in the University’s post-baccalaureate
programs. It shall provide for the welfare of the students
and faculties by identifying the needs of these constituencies and pursuing avenues for meeting these needs.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Professional Programs for Emerging Leaders
Each semester nearly one thousand graduate students
from a wide variety of institutions study in 30 different
subject areas. The various post-baccalaureate programs
consist of masters’ degrees, the doctor of physical therapy
degree, and graduate certificate programs. These graduate programs are intended to promote the professional
development of graduate students by engaging them in
research, creative production, workplace-oriented experiences, and theoretical studies. Emphasis is placed on developing leadership, technology, research, and teamwork
skills through collaborations with nearly two hundred
graduate faculty members, the University’s strategic partners, and other students.
Role of the Graduate School
The Graduate School serves as the administrative unit that
provides guidance and leadership for initiating and maintaining post-baccalaureate programs of the highest quality. Its administrative roles include assisting departments
offering these programs in the following ways:
• recruiting and retaining students
• maintaining student records
• awarding financial aid, including assistantships
9
•
assisting in raising funds in support of the
programs
• approving membership to the Graduate Faculty
• assuring uniformly high quality by establishing
standards for all programs
• acting as the administrator for interdisciplinary
programs
• approving students for graduation.
The Dean of the Graduate School, in conjunction with
the Executive Committee of the Graduate Faculty, develops
policies and procedures that guide all activities relating to
post-baccalaureate education at Bradley. Another important role of the Graduate School is to act as an advocate
before the university administration in support of departments and colleges offering graduate programs.
Chief among the various roles of the Graduate School
is providing for the welfare of the graduate students and
the members of the graduate faculty by identifying the
needs of both of these constituencies. These needs are
brought to light by seeking input through the Executive
Committee of the Graduate Faculty, program coordinators, department chairs/directors, and the Graduate Student Advisory Committee. Once the needs are identified,
the Dean of the Graduate School is charged with the responsibility of seeking a means to meeting these needs
as expeditiously as possible.
Campus Visits
If you are considering graduate study and would like to tour
the Bradley University campus, please contact the Graduate
School office at (309) 677-2375 or [email protected]
Contact the Graduate School
Visit 200 Bradley Hall
Call (309) 677-2375
E-mail [email protected]
Visit Online www.bradley.edu/grad
10
Bradley University
Degrees Offered
Graduate School Interdisciplinary Program
Professional Master of Arts in STEM Education
P.M.A.
Elementary Math, Science, and Technology Education
Foster College of Business Administration
Accounting
Business Administration
Finance
Management
Marketing
Executive Master of Business Administration
Quantitative Finance
M.S.A.
M.B.A.
M.B.A.
M.S.
Slane College of Communication and Fine Arts
Art
M.A. and M.F.A.
Ceramics
Drawing/Illustration
Interdisciplinary Art Studies
Painting
Photography
Printmaking
Sculpture
Visual Communication & Design
College of Education and Health Sciences
Curriculum and Instruction
M.A.
Assessment
Early Childhood Education
Educational Technology
Gifted Education
Literacy and Reading
Middle School Education
Multidisciplinary
Science Education
Special Education
Curriculum and Instruction—Learning Behavioral
Specialist I
Additional endorsement options in education available:
Learning Behavior Specialist I Endorsement
Reading Endorsement
Middle Level Education Endorsement
Human Development Counseling
M.A.
Community and Agency Counseling
School Counseling
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Leadership in Educational Administration
Leadership in Human Service Administration
Nursing Administration
Nursing-General
Nurse Administered Anesthesia
Physical Therapy
College of Engineering and Technology
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Manufacturing Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Information Systems
Computer Science
English
Liberal Studies
M.A.
M.A.
M.S.N.
M.S.N.
M.S.N.
D.P.T.
M.S.C.E.
M.S.E.E.
M.S.I.E.
M.S.MF.E.
M.S.M.E.
M.S.
M.S.
M.S.
M.S.
M.A.
M.L.S.
Graduate Certificate Programs
College of Education and Health Science
Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction
Assessment
Early Childhood Education
Educational Technology
Gifted Education
Literacy and Reading
Middle School Education
Multidisciplinary
Science Education
Certificate in School Counseling
Certificate in Nurse-Administered Anesthesia
Certificate in Educational Administration (Type 75)
National Board Certified Teachers Fast Track Type 75
Cert.
Cert.
Cert.
Cert.
Cert.
11
General Admission Information
Eligibility
(see also: Admission Requirements)
Applications for graduate study are welcome from any
student who holds a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or the international
equivalent, and to certain qualified Bradley University seniors (see Categories of Admission below).
Categories of Admission
1. Unconditional. This classification denotes a graduate
student who is admitted to a degree program. At the
undergraduate level the student must have achieved
a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale in the last 60
hours of undergraduate coursework. Applicants with
previous graduate coursework must have achieved a
3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale in all graduate
coursework, and have completed a minimum of 12
graduate credit hours for the graduate grade point
average to be considered for admission. Admission
is competitive and based on an applicant’s entire
portfolio (see “Admission Requirements”). Achieving
the minimum required grade point average does not
guarantee admission to a program.
2. Conditional. This status may be given if the student’s
last 60-hour grade point average is below a 3.0 and
above a 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. It may also be given if the
student’s scores on standardized tests fall below the
requirement in the discipline; if the student does not
have sufficient undergraduate preparation; or in fine
arts performance areas, if, in the judgment of the faculty, the quality of work is not totally acceptable. If
undergraduate deficiencies are a cause of conditional
admission, the faculty in the discipline shall specify
the additional coursework prerequisites and/or a
standard of achievement in prescribed coursework
which will remove the deficiencies.
Students admitted in conditional status must fulfill the conditions of their admission as individually
specified. Once the student has met these conditions,
the Removal of Conditional Status form must be com12
pleted and filed in the Graduate School. Graduate students cannot be removed from conditional admission
status until the end of an official university semester.
No changes in status or financial assistance will be
made until the end of the semester and will not be
effective until the following semester.
Students granted conditional admission are not eligible for financial assistance.
3. Graduate Student-at-Large. This admission status is
for a student who has a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, wishes to register for graduate or
undergraduate courses, and is not currently seeking
a graduate degree from Bradley University. The student must have achieved a 2.75 grade point average
on a 4.0 scale in the last 60 hours of undergraduate
coursework. In rare cases, exceptions to the grade
point average requirement may be made for graduate students-at-large with the consent of the Dean of
the Graduate School. Graduate students-at-large do
not qualify for scholarships or assistantships.
At the time of application, a graduate student-at-large
must provide an Application for Graduate Admission,
application fee, and official transcripts. Students who
have met the prerequisites may enroll in most graduate courses. Students who enroll in courses for which
they are not qualified may be dropped from the
course.
Admission as a graduate student-at-large does not
constitute admission to a degree program. Should
the student wish to apply to a degree program, all
requirements for admission to that program must be
met. A maximum of 9 semester hours with grades of
B or better earned as a graduate student-at-large may
be applied to a degree program, with approval of the
program’s graduate coordinator.
4. Bradley Seniors Taking Courses for Graduate Credit.
Bradley seniors who are within 6 semester hours of
graduation, or who are registering for the semester
during which they will complete their bachelor’s degree requirements, may register for graduate courses
Bradley University
for graduate credit provided they also have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or greater. They must
also have the approval of: 1) their undergraduate advisor, 2) the instructor of the course who determines
if the course is appropriate for graduate credit, and
3) the graduate program director/coordinator if the
course is part of a graduate program, or the department chairperson if the department does not house
a graduate program. The senior may not take more
than 9 semester hours of courses for graduate credit
while registering as a senior. These hours will not
be counted toward the baccalaureate degree. The
student must secure the approval signatures on the
form, Application for Graduate Credit for a Senior, and
file it with the Registrar. Forms may be obtained from
the Registrar’s Office and the Graduate School.
Former Students
Students who have received an undergraduate or graduate degree from Bradley must reapply for admission if
they wish to register for additional coursework.
Admission Requirements
Before being considered for admission, degree-seeking
students must submit the following materials. Some departments have additional requirements. Be certain to
check individual programs for admission requirements.
Please note: all forms are available in the Graduate School
or on the web at bradley.edu/grad/.
1. Application Form. All applicants must submit an Application for Graduate Admission, signed and dated
by the applicant.
2. Application Fee. All applicants must submit a nonrefundable application fee, payable by check or
money order to Bradley University, at the time of application. The fee for domestic applicants is $40 and
$50 for international applicants. This fee cannot be
waived or deferred. Applications submitted without
an application fee will not be processed. Fees are subject to change without notice.
3. Transcripts. Applicants are required to provide one
official transcript sent directly from the Registrar’s office at the institution from which they receive their
bachelor’s degree or the international equivalent. Additional transcripts may be required at the discretion
of the Graduate School. Applicants should submit
additional official transcripts from post-baccalaureate
coursework for consideration. Applicants who have
completed graduate-level coursework should submit
all transcripts reflecting graduate coursework. International applicants see requirements for international
students (below).
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
4. Experience and Objectives. Applicants must provide a
short admissions essay on each of the following topics:
a. Explain achievements and work experience that
you consider relevant to your interest in and capacity for graduate study.
b. Briefly state your career objectives and how the
graduate program you have selected will assist
you in attaining these goals.
5. Recommendations. Applicants must provide two
letters of recommendation sent directly to the Graduate School from individuals who can comment on the
applicant’s potential for success in a graduate program. Recommendation forms are available through
the Graduate School or on the Web at bradley.edu/
grad/. Certain programs may require additional recommendations.
6. Entrance Examinations. Certain programs require
entrance examinations (e.g. GRE, GMAT, MAT, portfolio, et al.) as part of the application process. Students
can find these requirements within the information
described by each program. Official score reports
should be sent to the Graduate School if applicable.
Testing Information: Information about the GRE and
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) may
be obtained from the Educational Testing Service, Box
955, Princeton, NJ, 08540. All current testing and registration information on GRE and TOEFL is available on
the Internet at www.ets.org. Local administration of
the GRE and TOEFL is available through the Prometric Testing Center, 7501 N. University Ave., Peoria, IL,
61614, (309) 683-4653. Information about the GMAT is
available on the Web at www.mba.com. To have scores
sent to the Graduate School, indicate the Bradley institutional code 1070. Information about International
English Language Testing System (IELTS) is available
through their Web sites, www.ielts.org or www.ceil.
org, or British Council Offices. Additional information
is also available through the Graduate School.
MAT information and test registration are available
through the College of Education and Health Sciences, Westlake Hall 218, (309) 677-3181.
7. Language Proficiency. All applicants to the Graduate
School (degree seeking as well as students-at-large)
whose native language is not English are required to
submit official evidence of language proficiency. This
requirement is in effect for all applicants regardless
of citizenship or immigration status. Non-native English speakers who have earned a degree from a U.S.
institution or from an institution in a country where
the official language is English are exempt from this
requirement. Language proficiency is determined by
13
results on the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing
System (IELTS).
TOEFL Requirement. The minimum TOEFL requirement on the Paper Based Test (PBT) is a 550, the Computer Based Test (CBT) equivalent score of 213, or the
internet-based TOEFL (iBT) equivalent score of 79.
The IELTS is an acceptable substitute for TOEFL. The
minimum band requirement is 6.5. A departmental
program may require higher scores than the Graduate
School minimum. No applicant with less than a 550
PBT (213 CBT; 79 iBT; 6.5 IELTS) will qualify for financial
assistance.
Additional information about TOEFL testing and registration is available through their Web sites at www.
toefl.org or www.ets.org and U.S. Embassies, Consulates and advising centers throughout the world. Bradley’s institutional code for score reporting is 1070.
Additional information about IELTS testing and
registration is available through their Web sites at
www.ielts.org or www.ceii.org, British Council offices
throughout the world, and IDP Education Australia.
International Applicants
For admission purposes, an international applicant is not a
U.S. citizen. "International," therefore, includes permanent
residents, asylees, and other temporary visa holders. International students must meet the admission requirements
of the Graduate School as stated above. In addition, the
following is required.
1. Transcripts. All applicants must submit official documentation of their academic records and certification
of their degree(s). The names of these documents
differ from country to country, but are commonly referred to as transcripts, releve de notes, marksheets,
or statements of marks. The documentation should
include, semester by semester, or year by year, the
courses taken, the examination results received, the
grading scale or system used, and the degree and
date it was awarded. If the documents are not prepared in English, an official, literal translation must
accompany the original document.
From institutions in countries such as India, Pakistan,
Bangladesh, and Nepal, the Graduate School accepts
marksheets as official if “attested” by the registrar, controller of examinations, or other officially authorized office, when they are sent directly from the university office to the Graduate School. Alternatively, marksheets
may be considered official if enclosed in an official
university envelope that has been sealed, stamped,
dated, and signed by an authorized university official
and received by the Graduate School unopened. The
14
Graduate School requires marksheets from all examination sessions reflecting all examinations passed,
failed, and/or repeated. Consolidated marksheets
and college transcripts are not accepted.
From institutions in China, the Graduate School requires an official Chinese transcript accompanied by
an official, literal translation. In addition, the certificate of graduation and certificate of degree awarded
(in Chinese, accompanied by an official translation)
are required.
Applicants should alert the Graduate School as to how
their name appears on the transcripts or marksheets
if the family name is abbreviated or their name is reported in a manner different from how it appears on
the application. Confusion and inconsistency in the
reporting of names on documents is a common cause
for delay in the processing of applications.
2. Financial Certification. All international applicants
intending to enter the U.S. on an F-1 student visa are
required to present the Certificate of Eligibility Form
I-20 when applying for a visa. International applicants who are not or will not be in F-1 status are not
required to provide financial certification. The Graduate School will issue the Form I-20 to applicants who
have been approved for admission and who provide
the required financial certification documentation.
The financial certification requirements are described
in detail on the Bradley University Financial Information and Certification form provided to all international applicants. All applicants are required to document
their ability to finance their education and living expenses for the length of time estimated to complete
a master’s degree (two years). Certification requirements normally include:
a. a notarized affidavit of support from the applicant’s sponsor (normally parents or family) indicating the intent and ability to provide at least
$21,000 each year for two years.
b. an official bank statement (signed, dated, and
current) from the sponsor indicating an account
balance of at least $21,000. The bank statement
should report money in the local currency, the
current exchange rate, and the U.S. dollar equivalent. Bank statements should be current at the
time of application or within six months of enrollment. Estimated expenses are subject to change
without notice.
c. a Bradley University Financial Information and Certification form, which can be downloaded from the
Graduate School Web site at bradley.edu/grad/.
3. Language Proficiency. See “Language Proficiency”
under “Admission Requirements” above.
Bradley University
Permanent Residents/Immigrants
Applicants who are permanent residents/immigrants
must submit proof of their immigration status along with
their application. Applicants may submit a copy (front and
back) of their Alien Registration Card when applying for
admission. Before students can register, they must present
the original card to the Graduate School. (See “Language
Proficiency” under “Admission Requirements” above.)
Application or Admission Deferral
Applicants or admitted students wishing to defer their
application or admission to a subsequent semester must
complete a Request for Deferral of Application or Admission
form and return it to the Graduate School prior to the start
of the semester for which they intend to apply or are admitted. The form is available in the Graduate School or on
the Web at www.bradley.edu/grad/.
Applicants may defer their application or admitted
students may defer their admission for one consecutive
semester (excluding summer and interim sessions) without
reapplying. If an applicant does not complete the application process for a second consecutive semester, the applicant must reapply by submitting a new Application for
Graduate Admission form and application fee to the Graduate School. If an admitted student does not attend for a
second consecutive semester after admission, the student
must reapply by submitting a new Application for Graduate
Admission form and application fee to the Graduate School.
Additional application materials may be required at the discretion of the Graduate School and the department.
weeks prior to the beginning of any term to be reviewed
for admission for that term. Beyond that time the review
of applications cannot be guaranteed. Because some departments have specified deadlines, be certain to check
individual programs for deadline information.
Registration
Bradley University uses a web-based registration system.
Using their BUnetID available upon admission, students
may register by visiting webster.bradley.edu. Instructions
for online registration are included in the Schedule of
Classes each semester (bradley.edu/classes).
Schedule Change After Registration
Once a student has registered, changes to that schedule
(additions and deletions) may be made by using the online system. Instructions are outlined in the Schedule of
Classes.
For all schedule changes after the deadlines for online
registration, students must obtain the Late Add Request
from the Registrar’s Office and follow the procedures outlined below.
To add a class(es), the signatures of the graduate
coordinator (or, for business only, the associate dean of
the College), the instructor of the added class, the department chair for the added class, and the dean of the Graduate School must be obtained.
Partial drops may be done online up until the last day
for dropping classes outlined in the Schedule of Classes.
Graduate students who wish to withdraw from all classes in which they are registered should initiate a Request for
Withdrawal at the Graduate School, 200 Bradley Hall.
Registration
Graduate Certificate Programs
Academic Calendar
Bradley University’s academic calendar consists of two
fifteen-week semesters (fall and spring). A three-week
interim (mid-May to mid-June), an eight-week summer
session, and two five-week summer sessions (early June
to mid-July and mid-July to mid-August) are also offered.
A three-week January interim is also offered. (See “Academic Calendar.”)
Graduate certificate programs are relatively short-term
programs that offer students a coherent body of knowledge practical to the workplace; they are not degree programs. They may be post-baccalaureate or post-masters.
Certificate programs consist of no fewer than 12 semester
hours of 500- and/or 600-level courses. Students admitted to a graduate certificate program will be required, at
a minimum, to meet the same academic requirements as
those defined by the Graduate School for degree-seeking
students. The department(s) offering the program may
set additional admission requirements. The application
process is the same as for all other graduate programs.
Recognition of the courses taken and the completion of
the course of study will be noted on the student’s transcript. For information on specific certificate programs,
refer to the departmental sections of this catalog or to the
Graduate School’s web page at bradley.edu/grad.
Schedule of Classes
Bradley’s Schedule of Classes lists specific registration information on the courses to be offered and is available on
the Bradley University Web site at bradley.edu/classes/.
Application Deadlines
The Graduate School processes applications on a rolling,
or continuous, basis for most programs. The recommended dates by which applications and supporting materials
should be sent to the Graduate School are: May 15 for fall,
October 15 for spring, and April 15 for summer admission.
For full consideration, applicants must submit a complete
application and all supporting materials no later than two
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Student Eligibility and Admission Criteria
1. An earned baccalaureate degree or its equivalent
from a regionally accredited college or university is
15
required for admission to a post-baccalaureate program. An earned master’s degree or its equivalent
from a regionally accredited college or university is
required for admission to a post-master’s program.
2. Students who are currently enrolled in the Graduate
School and who wish to pursue a graduate certificate
program must apply for admission to the program
before completing the second course required by the
certificate program.
3. Courses that satisfy the requirements for a certificate
program may be used to satisfy the requirements for
a master’s degree if applicable and at the discretion of
the degree program coordinator/director.
4. Courses taken prior to admission to a certificate
program are not a guaranteed means of admission
to that certificate program or to a graduate degree
program. Admission to or completion of a certificate
program may be used as evidence in support of a student’s application for admission to a graduate degree
program, but the certificate itself is not a prerequisite
and does not guarantee admission.
5. All courses used to satisfy the certificate program requirements, with limited exceptions, must be taken
at Bradley University unless the certificate program is
taught jointly with another institution.
6. Students admitted to a graduate certificate program will
be required, at a minimum, to meet the same academic
requirements as those defined by the Graduate School
for degree-seeking students. Individual departments
may apply more stringent academic requirements.
7. The student’s official transcript shall contain the listing of courses taken in this program and will also indicate successful completion of the program.
8. The student will be required to complete the certificate program within the time limit specified for graduate programs by the Graduate School.
9. Students enrolled will have access to the same campus services as other graduate students.
10. Students seeking only a graduate certificate, with limited exceptions, will not be eligible for financial aid,
with the exception of loans.
11. The Graduate School will issue the certificates of completion.
12. Students completing a certificate program will not
participate in the University’s commencement exercises. Departments have the discretion to offer certificate award ceremonies.
16
Bradley University
Fees and Expenses
Application Fee
All applicants must submit a non-refundable application
fee, payable by check or money order to Bradley University,
at the time of application. The fee for domestic applicants
is $40 and $50 for international applicants. This cannot be
waived or deferred. Applications submitted without an
application fee will not be processed. Fees are subject to
change without notice.
Applicants for the Master of Liberal Studies degree program are not required to pay this fee.
Checks or money orders should be made payable to
Bradley University.
2008-2009 Tuition
Tuition rates and fees are subject to change. Tuition for the
2008-2009 academic year is as follows:
$615 per semester hour
Tuition rates are subject to change for 2008-2009 and
subsequent academic years. Current tuition and fees are
published each semester in the Schedule of Classes (bradley.edu/classes).
All courses taken in the College of Engineering and
Technology are assessed a tuition surcharge of $5.00 per
semester hour to support lab equipment.
Tuition for all classes in the MLS program is $320.00 per
semester hour for the 2008-2009 academic year.
Senior citizens (individuals 62 or older) may take
classes at the rate of $25.00 per credit hour for part-time
course work. Enrollment is subject to availability of classroom space. Contact Continuing Education for admission
information.
Tuition and any fees must be paid by the deadline and in
accordance with the instructions found in the current Schedule of Classes (bradley.edu/classes). Students who have not
made arrangements for payment by the deadline will be
dropped from all classes. Questions regarding payment
should be directed to the Controller’s Office, 100 Swords Hall,
(309) 677-3120.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Interim and Summer Sessions
See the Schedule of Classes (bradley.edu/classes) for specific details concerning payment.
Deferred Payment Plan
The University offers a Deferred Payment Plan that requires payment at registration of 25 percent of the total
tuition due. This payment may be made in the form of
cash or check, credit card, or a combination. The balance
is charged a one-time deferment charge of 4 percent and
is payable in three equal installments beginning approximately one month after registration.
A late fee of $25 per month is assessed for each payment not received by the date stipulated on the deferred
payment agreement. For further information contact
Student Fees, Controller's Office, 100 Swords Hall, Bradley
University, Peoria, IL 61625; (309) 677-3120.
Employees who work for employers who pay a percentage of their tuition costs contingent upon successful
course completion may be eligible for a full semester’s deferral if the employer is enrolled and approved in this program. Under this program tuition payments are deferred
until the 60th day after the end of the semester. A $40 fee
must be paid by the student at the time of enrollment
to participate in this special deferral program. Students
should check with their employer to find out if their company is enrolled in the program.
Refunds
Students who withdraw from a class may be eligible for a
partial tuition refund, depending on the date on which the
course was dropped. Students who drop all classes and officially withdraw from the University may be eligible for a
partial refund of tuition, room, and board, depending on
the date of the withdrawal.
Students should check deadlines and procedures
for requesting refunds in the current Schedule of Classes
(bradley.edu/classes).
17
Room and Board
Housing is available both on and off campus. On-campus
room and board fees vary with housing options and meal
plans. Bradley also owns a student apartment complex
one block from campus. For more information, contact the
Executive Director of Residential Living and Leadership,
Sisson Hall, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625.
Other Fees
Activity Fee
Graduate students pay a $25 activity fee per semester.
Health Fee
All students registering for 7 or more hours will be assessed
a $72.00 health fee per semester at the time of registration.
Vehicle Registration
The fee for automobile registration is $50.00 for the academic year. These fees are not refundable.
Thesis Binding Fee
Graduate students required to write a thesis must pay a fee
of $20.00 per copy (three copies required) for thesis binding
and handling. This fee, which is subject to change, must be
paid to either the Graduate School or the Controller’s Office
prior to submitting the completed thesis to the Graduate
School. The thesis must be signed by the coordinator and,
if the fee is paid in the Controller's Office, stamped by the
Controller’s Office showing that the fee has been paid.
Cap, Gown, and Hood Purchases
Graduate students electing to participate in commencement and hooding ceremonies must rent their cap, gown,
and hood at the bookstore. Forms for students to indicate
size of cap and gown are mailed to students during the semester preceding their graduation once they have filed the
Graduate Application for Graduation form with the Graduate
School. There is a $15.00 late fee assessed for orders made
after the indicated deadline.
18
Bradley University
Financial Assistance
The Graduate School awards scholarships and assistantships on a competitive basis to new and continuing
graduate students who are admitted unconditionally to a
graduate program or have removed the conditional status.
Awards range from partial tuition support to full tuition
support that may include a stipend. In general, financial assistance is available within these broad categories:
• Scholarships
• Fellowships
• Assistantships
• Loans
Students interested in financial assistance should apply
according to these deadlines:
March 1
Deadline to apply for the Caterpillar Master’s Fellowship for students who will begin study in the
following fall term.
April 1
Deadline to apply for assistantships for the upcoming academic year.
Students interested in financial support must complete
the Financial Assistance section on the Application for Graduate Admission. In some cases, i.e., Caterpillar Fellowship
and others, special applications must also be completed.
Students must have a minimum 3.0/4.0 graduate
cumulative grade point average to maintain graduate assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships. Students who
are placed on academic probation or dismissed will lose
their financial assistance. Once a student is removed from
probation or reinstated to a program, the student may reapply for financial assistance.
Academic good standing does not automatically ensure
continuation of financial assistance. Financial assistance
may be revoked for academic or non-academic reasons at
any time upon the recommendation of the faculty mentor,
graduate coordinator, department graduate committee,
dean of the college, and the dean of the Graduate School.
For the graduate grade point average to be considered
for financial assistance eligibility, applicants must have a
minimum of 12 credit hours of graduate coursework complete at the time of application.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Assistantships
Graduate assistantships are available in most departments
that offer graduate programs and in certain administrative
areas. Academic departments award assistantships for research, teaching assistance, and other academic activities,
annually or semi-annually, on a competitive basis, with
scholastic ability and evidence of special qualifications
being the most important criteria. Students must have an
undergraduate 60-hour grade point average of 3.0/4.0, or
a graduate grade point average of 3.0/4.0, to be eligible
for a graduate assistantship. Full-time graduate assistants
are given a 20-hour per week assignment by the awarding department and receive a stipend and waiver of 100%
of actual tuition costs, with a maximum tuition award per
academic year. Part-time graduate assistants are given a
10-hour per week assignment by the awarding department and receive a stipend and waiver of 50% of actual
tuition costs, with a maximum award per academic year.
Detailed information on eligibility and policies is available
at www.bradley.edu/grad or in the Graduate School, 200
Bradley Hall.
Other Scholarships
Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois Program
(DFI): this scholarship of up to $14,000 annually provides
financial assistance to Illinois residents who are members
of traditionally underrepresented racial minority groups
(Black, Hispanic, Asian American, American Indian, or
Alaskan Native) to pursue and complete graduate or professional degrees at Illinois institutions of higher education. Descriptions of eligibility and application procedures
are available from the Graduate Office.
For more information regarding additional scholarship opportunities, contact the Graduate School in 200
Bradley Hall, or 677-2375.
Caterpillar Masters Fellowships
Caterpillar Masters Fellowships are awarded annually on
a competitive basis to outstanding students who have
graduated from an accredited university, demonstrated
superior academic achievement, and are committed to
19
research or creative production. Students must have an
undergraduate 60-hour grade point average of 3.5/4.0
to be eligible for a Caterpillar Masters Fellowship. The
Fellowships provide: an annual stipend between $8,000
and $12,000 in addition to a full tuition waiver, an educational environment that provides a unique transition for
students preparing for doctoral degrees or professional
degree programs, innovative curricula designed for business, industry, and public sector needs, a student-selected
project guided by a faculty mentor, interdisciplinary teamwork on problem-solving research, and flexibility to adapt
specific interests and aspirations of students.
Loans
Federal Direct Subsidized Loans: Graduate students,
both full and half time, are eligible to borrow up to $8,500
each academic year under this program. For additional information contact the Financial Assistance Office, Swords
Hall, (309) 677-3089.
Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans: This loan program offers long-term educational loans to qualified
graduate students. Students are eligible to borrow up
to $12,000 each academic year. For additional information, contact Student Financial Services, 100 Swords Hall,
(309) 677-3089.
International Students
International (F-1) students are eligible to apply for Graduate Scholarships, Graduate Assistantships, and the Caterpillar Master’s Fellowship only. No separate application
form is required for Graduate Scholarships. Caterpillar
Master’s Fellowship applications are considered for fall
applicants only. See the application form for details and
deadlines.
For more information, visit www.bradley.edu/grad or
the Student Financial Services, 100 Swords Hall, where applications, eligibility requirements, policies, and specific
program details are available.
While on a full-time cooperative education/internship
assignment, students are considered to have full-time student status, making normal progress toward a degree in a
recognized university program and are entitled to all student privileges at Bradley University if they are registered
for a credit or noncredit course at the university.
Newly admitted graduate students must be unconditionally admitted to a degree program in order to qualify,
and continuing students must have at least a 3.0 grade
point average in graduate courses. Graduate students do
not receive graduate credit for cooperative education/internship experience; graduate assistantships do not count
as cooperative education/internship experience.
In order to be referred to an employer or participate
in a cooperative education/internship work assignment,
students must be attending Bradley University. They also
must be either registered for a minimum of three hours
of non-cooperative education/internship credit or be on
a full-time cooperative education assignment. A work
assignment will not be approved retroactively. Although
every effort is made to assist students in obtaining a cooperative education/internship position, no student is
guaranteed referral or placement.
Eligibility for employment of nonimmigrant (F-1)
students is defined on an individual basis according
to regulations set forth by the Bureau of Citizenship
and Immigration Services (BCIS) and the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE), formerly
referred to as INS—the Immigration and Naturalization Service. For clarification of eligibility criteria and
how it applies to you, please contact the Multicultural
Student Services Office or consult the BCIS Web site at
www.immigration.gov.
Cooperative
Education/Internship Program
Graduate students may gain career-related work experience by participating in Bradley’s Cooperative Education/
Internship Program. Cooperative education/internship
experiences are related to students’ academic and career
interests and provide opportunities for professional development that integrate classroom theory with supervised
work experience. Students have a choice of two options
to follow. The part-time option allows students to attend
classes while working part time with a local employer. The
full-time option allows students to work full time during
an academic semester or summer. Both options correspond with the academic calendar.
20
Bradley University
Academic Regulations
Course Numbering System
and Requirements
Only courses numbered 500 to 699 may be applied toward the master’s degree. Courses numbered 500 to 599
are open to graduate students, seniors, and specially
qualified juniors. Courses numbered 600 through 699 are
open to graduate students only. Courses numbered 700899 are open only to students in doctoral programs.
Prerequisites
Prerequisites may be met by approved equivalent courses
taken at other universities. You should consult your academic advisor if you have a question about prerequisites.
Students who enroll in courses for which they do not meet
the prescribed prerequisites may be required to withdraw
from those courses. Prerequisite courses below 500-level
are not eligible for Graduate School financial assistance.
Grading System
The grading system of the University which applies to
graduate students is as follows:
A- High Competence (4.0)
B- Competence (3.0)
C- Minimum Competence (2.0)
D- Limited or Incomplete Competence (1.0)
F- Inadequate Competence for Credit
W- Official Withdrawal
IN- Incomplete Work
IP- Work in Progress
Only courses with a grade of “C” or higher can be used toward completion of degree requirements.
IN – Incomplete Work
“IN” is the symbol used when the instructor lacks sufficient
evidence to award a letter grade. The purpose of an “IN” is
to provide the time necessary for a student to complete
coursework which, through no fault of the student’s, was
not completed in the normal time allowed. Reasonable
time necessary for completion is decided by the student
and the faculty member teaching the course. The “IN,”
once assigned, remains on the official academic record
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
upon conversion to a grade or permanent “I.”
The “IN” should not be mistakenly considered as an
incentive for the faculty to recommend or for students
to believe that this extension permits students merely to
retake courses, or to extend the time for the completion
of the prescribed work beyond the end of the semester of
enrollment, as a means of removing the “Incomplete.”
At the time the “IN” is assigned, the instructor and students must sign a contract specifying what must be done
to complete the “IN” and the date by which the “IN” must
be converted. Copies of the contract must be provided to
the student, faculty member, graduate advisor, and Graduate School office. An “IN” must be converted not later than
four weeks before the end of the next regular semester.
Under unusual circumstances, the student may be granted
an extension to the end of the semester with the approval
of the instructor involved, provided that the request was
received prior to the normal deadline for the removal of
incompletes. If the instructor does not submit a letter
grade by the specified deadline, an “I” will remain permanently upon the student’s record and may not thereafter be
removed. Once a permanent “I” is recorded for a course, if a
student must complete the course to fulfill degree requirements, the student will have to register for the course again
and satisfactorily complete the course requirements.
Contracts are available in the Graduate School, 200
Bradley Hall, or from the graduate coordinator.
IP – Work in Progress
“IP” may be assigned to a student in a graduate course
when the instructor agrees that the student requires more
than one semester to complete the course. Normally, “IP”
grades will only be assigned for thesis courses, other
courses involving extensive projects involving research/
creative production, or independent study courses. At the
time the “IP” is assigned, the instructor and student must
sign a contract specifying what must be done to complete
the “IP” and the date by which the “IP” must be converted.
The “IP,” once assigned, remains on the official academic
record upon conversion to a grade or a permanent “I.”
Copies of the contract must be provided to the student,
faculty member, graduate advisor, and Graduate School
Office. If the “IP” is not removed by the specified date, it
21
will be recorded as a permanent “I.” Once a permanent “I”
is recorded for a course, if a student must complete the
course to fulfill degree requirements, the student will have
to register for the course again and satisfactorily complete
the course requirements.
Contracts are available in the Graduate School, 200
Bradley Hall, or from the graduate coordinator.
Graduate Student Policy
Violation Issues and Grievance
Procedures
The policy violation issues of a graduate student may be
academic or non-academic in nature. In the following
sections the definitions, policies and grievance procedures to deal with the issues are delineated. The primary
source of procedures for dealing with these issues is the
Faculty Handbook. The Student Handbook also has a section dealing with policy violation issues. It also uses as its
primary source the Faculty Handbook. These handbooks
can be found in the Bradley University web pages. The following is not intended and may not supersede any of the
policies of the Faculty Handbook. It does in certain cases
provide for input from individuals that are primarily associated with graduate programs and students.
Academic Issues
Academic issues are concerns regarding breach of academic integrity by a student or a student’s allegation of unfair
academic evaluation by an instructor. A breach of academic
integrity is either cheating or plagiarism by a student.
Definitions
•
Cheating is officially defined as giving or attempting
to give, or obtaining or attempting to obtain, information relative to an examination or other work that the
student is expected to do alone and not in collaboration with others, or the use of material or information
restricted by the instructor. Each instructor will indicate beforehand work that may be done in collaboration with other students.
•
Plagiarism is reproducing from published or unpublished print or electronic media, without quotations
or citations, another’s sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own, presenting
someone else’s line of thinking in the development
of a thesis as though it were your own, and someone
else’s project work or results thereof as your own.
Policies
•
Cheating. A “zero” or whatever is the equivalent of
the failing lowest grade possible, shall be assigned for
that piece of work to any student cheating on a nonfinal examination or other class assignment. A “zero” or
whatever is the equivalent of the lowest failing grade
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possible shall be assigned on a final examination to any
student cheating on a final examination. An “F” shall
also be assigned as the course grade to any student
cheating on a comprehensive final examination.
•
Plagiarism. A “zero” or whatever is the equivalent of
the lowest failing grade possible shall be assigned
for that piece of work to any student plagiarizing on
a non-final piece of work. In the case of a student plagiarizing on a final research paper or project, an “F”
shall also be assigned as the course grade.
•
Repeated Cheating or Plagiarism. For twice-repeated or aggravated offences of cheating or plagiarism,
additional action, including dismissal from the University, may be taken pursuant to the Student Handbook procedures related to the University Judicial
System and the disciplinary sanctions for violation of
University regulations.
University Student Grievance Policy
If a student objects to instructor’s conclusion that a breach
of academic integrity has occurred, or if the student alleges
an unfair academic evaluation by an instructor, or if the
student has non-academic concerns, the student may take
recourse to the grievance procedures to resolve the issue.
The student shall first exhaust the informal grievance procedures before resorting to the formal grievance procedures.
The grievance process shall be completed as expeditiously as possible. The recommended timelines may be
exceeded only under compelling circumstances.
Academic Issues
Informal Academic Grievance Procedures
• The student shall first consult his or her graduate program coordinator or director to seek a course of action
to resolve the issue. The graduate program coordinator
or director shall advise the student of the procedures
to be followed to resolve the issue. If a conflict of interest exists between the student and the graduate program coordinator or director the student may seek the
advice of the department chairperson of the department offering the program in which they are enrolled.
If there is a question of the procedures to follow, the
academic ombudsman should be consulted.
• The student shall then appeal in writing to the instructor’s department chair to resolve the issue. If there is a
conflict of interest between the student and the chairperson, the student should appeal in writing to the
dean of the college to resolve the issue. The instructor
shall provide in writing to the chair the instructor’s
conclusions pertaining to breach of academic integrity by the student.
• The department chairperson shall consider the issue
and try to resolve it by meeting with the concerned
parties within five business days after receiving the
student’s appeal in writing.
Bradley University
•
•
•
•
•
•
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the department chairperson, the chairperson shall forward all
paperwork related to the issue including the student’s appeal to the director of graduate programs
of the college to which the department belongs, and
request that the director resolve the issue. The chairperson shall submit to the director a memo summarizing discussions with the concerned parties and the
chair’s decision. If the position of director of graduate
programs does not exist within the college all paperwork related to the issue including the students appeal shall be forwarded to the dean of the college to
which the department belongs.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the director of graduate programs, the director shall forward
all paperwork related to the issue, including the student’s appeal, to the dean of the college to which the
department belongs, and request that the dean resolve the issue. The director shall submit to the dean
a memo summarizing discussions with the concerned
parties and the director’s decision.
The dean of the college or the dean’s designee(s) shall
consider the issue and shall try to resolve the issue by
meeting with the concerned parties within ten business days after receiving the request from the department chair. Due process requirements for a fair hearing
shall be provided to all parties involved. The record of
the hearing before the dean or dean’s designee(s) shall
consist of written statements of the parties involved in
support of their positions provided prior to the hearing
and a transcript of the hearing.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the dean
of the college, the student may submit an appeal in
writing within five business days after receiving the
dean’s decision, to the dean of the Graduate School
to resolve the issue. The student shall inform the dean
of the college about the appeal to the dean of the
Graduate School.
The dean of the college shall submit all paperwork
related to the issue including the record of the hearing, to the dean of the Graduate School and the
dean’s or dean’s designee(s)’ decision, and if the dean’s
designee(s) rendered the decision, the dean shall indicate whether or not the dean agrees with the decision.
The dean of the Graduate School or the dean’s
designee(s) drawn from the Executive Committee
of the Graduate Faculty shall consider the issue and
shall try to resolve the issue by meeting with the concerned parties within ten business days after receiving the appeal from the student. Due process requirements for a fair hearing shall be provided to all parties
involved. The record of the hearing before the dean or
dean’s designee(s) shall consist of written statements
of the parties involved in support of their positions
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
provided prior to the hearing and a transcript of the
hearing. The dean shall provide the student the final
decision in writing.
If the issue is not resolved at the level of the dean of the
Graduate School, the student may resort to the formal
grievance procedures, within five days of receiving the
final written decision by the dean of the Graduate School,
by appealing to the chairperson of the University Student
Grievance Committee.
Non-Academic Issues
Definition
Non-academic issues include concerns regarding access
or participation in courses, harassment and racial discrimination based on age, color, creed, disability, ethnicity, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual
orientation or veteran status, or any other derogatory or
discriminatory act by an instructor, a staff member, or a
fellow student.
Informal Non-Academic Grievance Procedures
The student shall meet with the associate provost for student affairs to seek a course of action to resolve the nonacademic issue. The associate provost for student affairs
shall advise the student about the informal grievance procedures to be followed to resolve the issue, and facilitate
the informal grievance process.
Formal Grievance Process Academic and Non-Academic
If the issue (academic or non-academic) is not resolved
through the informal grievance process, the student may
seek a resolution of the issue through the formal grievance process delineated in the Faculty Handbook. The
University Student Grievance Committee shall conduct
formal hearings after the chairperson of the committee
receives a written request from the student to begin the
formal grievance process.
University Student Grievance Committee
1. The function of the University Student Grievance
Committee shall be:
a) To conduct formal hearings, upon request from
a student or an instructor regarding academic or
non-academic issues as defined before.
b) To submit findings to the appropriate administrative officer (provost and vice president of academic affairs for academic matters and the associate provost for student affairs for non-academic
matters. If a conflict of interest exists, then, to the
appropriate vice president or the president of the
university). Should the committee find evidence
that the grievance was appropriate, it will forward
specific suggestions for rectifying such evaluation or treatment.
23
2. The University Student Grievance Committee shall be
constituted as set forth in the Faculty Handbook, the
expectation being that the faculty members will be
taken from the graduate faculty and the students being graduate students in cases involving individuals
associated primarily with the Graduate School and its
programs.
3. The Committee shall elect its chairperson and establish its internal operating procedures in accordance
with the formal student grievance policy published in
the Faculty Handbook and the university policies on
affirmative action, discrimination, etc. The procedures
shall be made available to all parties involved in the
grievance process.
Dismissal for Non-Academic
Reasons
Bradley graduate students must abide by all University
regulations. Students who violate University regulations
may be subject to disciplinary sanctions including dismissal
or suspension as listed in the Bradley Student Handbook.
Handbooks are available from the Student Activities Office
located in the lower level of the Student Center.
Transcript of Credits
A transcript of credits is an authentic copy of the student’s
academic record. No partial transcript will be issued. Transcripts are released only by written request of the student.
This order must be placed in person or by mail to the Registrar’s Office, and be accompanied by a $4.00 fee per copy
requested. For other methods of ordering transcripts,
please see bradley.edu/registrar/transcripts.
Bradley University does not issue nor certify copies of
transcripts from other institutions.
24
Bradley University
Graduate School Policies
Student Course Load
The Graduate School requires that a minimum of 30 semester hours be successfully completed for the master’s
degree. Specific programs may require additional hours.
A full-time student takes 9 semester hours of coursework
during a semester of the regular academic year; the maximum permitted is 12 semester hours. Full-time graduate
assistants may not enroll in more than 9 semester hours nor
work more than 20 hours each week without written permission of their graduate coordinator and the dean of the
Graduate School. During the summer, a full-time graduate
course load is 6 semester hours each session.
Half-time enrollment shall be considered a minimum
of four semester hours.
Graduate School Dismissal Policy
A graduate student must have a minimum cumulative
GPA of 3.0 (B) in graduate coursework at the University
to be in academic good standing at the graduate level. A
graduate student whose cumulative grade point average
in graduate coursework drops below 3.0 will be placed
on academic probation. While a student is on probation,
the student’s record will be reviewed at the end of each
term. A graduate student who earns a term GPA below 3.0
while on probation will be dismissed from the program. A
graduate student will be removed from probation when
the student’s cumulative grade point average in graduate
course work reaches or exceeds 3.0. Graduate students
cannot be removed from probation until the end of an official university semester. No changes in status or financial
assistance will be made until the end of the semester and
will not be effective until the following semester.
A graduate student who receives grades lower than “B”
for 6 or more semester hours in graduate coursework will
be dismissed. Graduate students receiving grades of lower
than B will be reminded of this policy each semester.
Academic good standing does not automatically ensure continuation in a graduate program. A student may
be dismissed for factors other than grades upon the recommendation of a committee of department faculty, the student’s advisor, the program coordinator/director, the chair
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
of the department/director of graduate program, the dean
of the college, and the dean of the Graduate School.
Dismissed students may petition for reinstatement
into the program from which they have been dismissed
by filing a Petition for Reinstatement to Graduate Study.
Dismissed students are allowed to make only one petition for reinstatement to the program from which they
have been dismissed. If the student is dismissed a second
time after reinstatement, no additional petition for reinstatement will be considered. The program coordinator/
director, the department chairperson, and the dean of
the Graduate School must approve the petition for reinstatement. Petitions for reinstatement are available in the
Graduate School office or on the Graduate School web
site bradley.edu/grad/.
A student who has been dismissed for any of the
reasons specified above may apply for admission to another program or as a student-at-large. The application
process for seeking admission to a different program or
as a student-at-large shall be the same as for new graduate students.
Time Limit for Degree/Certificate
Completion
Graduate program curricula continually evolve to stay current in disciplinary and industrial standards. Furthermore,
a graduate student examines a developing body of knowledge, and it is difficult to integrate that body of knowledge if a program extends beyond five years. Therefore,
candidates for a degree or certificate should complete all
requirements within five years following the recording of
their first graduate grades, including graduate courses
taken as a student-at-large, and courses transferred into
their graduate program from Bradley University or any
other accredited institution of higher learning.
Graduate students are expected to stay current in
their field. If they wish to use courses for the degree or
certificate that were taken prior to the five-year limitation,
they must have these courses validated by the program
coordinator. Credit will be allowed for courses that extend
beyond the limit if the coordinator confirms to the dean of
25
the Graduate School that the candidate is proficient in the
subjects. Students should begin the approval process by
contacting their graduate program coordinator.
Students who are currently enrolled may apply for a
Change of Program. A student wishing to change his or
her program must complete a Change of Program form
and submit it to the Graduate School a minimum of two
weeks prior to the semester in which they wish to start the
new program. Additional materials or test scores may be
required at the discretion of the Graduate School and the
department for the Change of Program to be approved.
Admission to a degree program does not guarantee a
Change of Program will be approved.
be approved by both the instructor and the chairperson of
the department offering the course. Enrollment is contingent on having available space in the class. Except in special circumstances to be determined by the instructor and
department chairperson, courses involving laboratory or
studio work cannot be audited. Regular class attendance
by persons not on the class roster is not permitted.
Forms for audit registration are available in the Registrar’s Office or on-line. Audit registrations are accepted by
the Registrar’s Office only after the first day of classes of
each academic term.
The extent to which an auditor participates in a course
and the requirements for satisfactory performance must
be specified by the instructor when approval is granted.
Instructors are not obligated to grade any course work performed by the auditor. Courses taken for audit do not earn
academic credit, do not apply toward any academic degree
and do not count toward a student’s full-time or part-time
load for purposes of financial aid, loan deferments or visa
status. Courses taken for audit are recorded on the student’s
permanent academic record as completed satisfactorily
(“X”), completed unsatisfactorily (“UX”), or withdrawn (“W”).
After the last day for adding classes with special permission, anyone who is registered as an auditor may not
change the audit registration to a “for credit” status, i.e.
a regular registration; likewise, a student registered for
credit may not change to audit status. Deadlines associated with courses taken for credit and courses taken for
audit are identical.
All individuals will be charged a non-refundable fee
for audited courses. The current fee is published in the
Schedule of Classes. Persons who have audited a course
may petition to earn credit by proficiency examination;
however, the charge for a proficiency examination for
credit is based on the standard tuition structure determined by the Controller’s Office with a credit granted for
charges associated with auditing.
Repeated Courses
Transfer of Credit
Upon approval of the dean of the Graduate School, a
graduate student may repeat a maximum of two courses
in which he or she received grades of C or below. Both the
first and second grades received for the course are averaged to calculate the graduate student’s overall grade
point average; however, semester hours for the course
shall count only once toward the degree requirement.
For a coherent program, master’s degree candidates
should take all of their graduate coursework at one institution or consortium. Bradley will, however, accept 6
semester hours of transfer credit from another accredited
institution, providing that (1) the grade in each graduate course offered for transfer is at least a B, and (2) the
graduate coordinator recommends its acceptance to the
dean of the Graduate School. In rare instances, and upon
written approval of the dean of the Graduate School,
more than 6 semester hours may be transferred; but in
no instances will Bradley accept more than 12 semester
hours of transfer credit. Grades of the courses transferred
are not included in the calculation of the graduate grade
point average. Students applying to have course credits
transferred must submit an official transcript from the
Step-Out Policy
Graduate students may be allowed to step-out of their
graduate program for one semester (fall or spring) without being dropped from the program or changing graduation requirements. If a graduate student must take a second consecutive semester off during their program, he or
she must reapply for admission to the program. This reapplication does not guarantee admission to the program,
and students who are readmitted may be subject to new
degree requirements. A renewal of financial assistance
is not guaranteed for individuals that must reapply. Students are not required to enroll during summer or interim
sessions. Students who are not in good academic standing are required to reapply for admission as students on
academic probation.
Students whose time limit for completion of degree/
certificate has expired must submit a request to extend
time with the readmission application. The request to extend time for completion of degree must be submitted in
writing to the Graduate School.
Change of Program
Audited Courses
All Bradley students (undergraduate, graduate, full-time
and part-time) in good academic standing registered for a
given academic term, along with individuals admitted “at
large,” for a given academic term may request permission
to enroll as an “auditor.” Permission to audit a course must
26
Bradley University
other institution and a Request to Transfer Graduate Credit
form to the Graduate School. This transcript will be kept in
the student’s graduate file.
Any graduate course completed elsewhere cannot be
transferred if eight years pass between completion of the
course and completion of the Bradley University graduate
program. Regardless of transfer of courses into a graduate program, the five-year time limit for degree/certificate
completion shall be retained.
In rare instances, courses beyond the eight-year limit
may be considered for transfer upon the recommendation
of the graduate coordinator and approval by the dean of
the Graduate School. Please see the Time Limit for Degree/
Certificate Completion policy in this Catalog. Courses taken
between the spring and fall semesters will be considered as
being taken during “summer.” This includes Bradley courses
taken during May three-week, May eight-week, Summer 1,
and Summer 2 sessions. “Summer” will count as one semester in the determination of the age of the course.
Courses used to earn a graduate degree at Bradley or
any other university may not be used as credit towards
another graduate degree at Bradley.
Extension credit is acceptable for transfer if it is taken
from an accredited institution and is approved by the
procedures outlined above. Correspondence courses and
equivalency credit by examination are not acceptable.
2.
3.
Age of Courses Eligible to Meet
Prerequisite Requirements
Courses that serve as prerequisites for a degree or certificate program and that do not count directly toward
graduate degree or certificate completion may be accepted to meet a prerequisite requirement provided they
have been completed no longer than five years prior to
the time the student begins his/her graduate program at
Bradley University. Courses beyond the five-year limit may
be accepted in rare cases at the discretion of the department with referral to the Graduate School and approval
by the dean of the Graduate School.
4.
Progression Toward Degree
1. Graduate Program of Study
Within the first semester of a degree seeking student’s
graduate coursework, a completed Program of Study
form must be approved by the program graduate coordinator and dean of the Graduate School. The Program
of Study form must identify all program requirements
including requirements beyond those listed in the
graduate catalog. Revisions to the Program of Study are
initiated by submission by the student of a Change of
Program of Study form. This must be approved by the
program coordinator and dean of the Graduate School.
The dean of the Graduate School and the program
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
5.
6.
coordinator will use the Program of Study form to determine the student’s qualifications for and progress
toward completion of his or her master’s degree.
Comprehensive Assessment
Each department offering a graduate program requires a comprehensive assessment of the student’s
total experience as it relates to fulfilling the objectives
of the program of study. The department offering the
program shall determine the form and content of
the assessment. The type of comprehensive assessment should be specified in the student’s Program of
Study. The student is responsible for making arrangements with the program coordinator for completing
the assessment. At least two weeks before the date
on which the degree is to be conferred, the coordinator must report the quality of the assessment to the
Graduate School as Pass, Pass with Distinction, or Fail.
The results of the assessment, as reported by the coordinator, will be posted on the student’s transcript.
Students who receive a Fail on the assessment will
be given only one additional opportunity for reassessment. The time frame in which the reassessment will
take place is determined by the program, but must be
within the time limit prescribed for finishing the degree.
Thesis
Departments of the University govern the thesis option. Those students selecting this option must obtain information about thesis requirements from their
graduate coordinator. The general format and procedures for thesis filing are available from the Graduate
School or on the Web at bradley.edu/grad.
Application for Graduation
Students must apply for graduation either online
using Webster or by submitting the printed Graduate Application for Graduation form to the Graduate
School. The application must be submitted when the
candidate is registering for his or her final semester
of study. Students finishing during a summer session
should make application at the beginning of the term
in which they plan to complete their requirements.
The Graduate Application for Graduation form can be
found online at www.bradley.edu/grad/.
Applicants failing to complete all requirements
for graduation in the semester for which they applied
must reapply later.
Removal of Conditional Status
A student must be in academic good standing to
graduate. The student also must have met all conditions placed on him or her by the department and
have been approved for unconditional status.
Attendance at Commencement
A commencement convocation is held at the completion of the fall and spring semesters. Students are encouraged to attend.
27
Facilities and Services
Bradley University provides a comfortable setting designed for living and learning. A beautiful 85-acre campus contains both historic buildings and state-of-the-art
learning centers. Surrounded by an historic residential
district, the campus has restaurants, shops, and a supermarket within walking distance.
Bradley continuously updates facilities to keep pace
with new methods of teaching and learning. In recent
years complete renovations have taken place in Olin Hall
(science), Constance Hall (music), and Bradley Hall. In Fall
2008, the new state-of-the art Markin Family Student Recreation Center will open, offering a swimming pool, exercise facilities, and practice space for intramural sports.
It will serve as the social hub for student life on campus,
house the Wellness Program, Counseling Services, the
Health Center, and labs to support the Department of
Nursing. A 600-space parking deck will also open this fall.
Work has begun on the new Athletic Performance Center and the Puterbaugh Men’s Basketball Practice Facility.
The APC will be home court for women’s basketball and
volleyball and provide a spacious venue for concerts and
other performances. Bradley recently launched a major
capital campaign that will bring more renovations and
new facilities to campus.
St. James Place, a student residential community,
provides suite-style living for upperclass students and
outdoor intramural facilities—Meinen Field. In addition
to these playing fields, the university has lighted tennis
courts on campus. A food court in Williams Hall offers a variety of dining options for all students seven days a week
until 8 p.m.
Bradley University Bookstore
The Bradley Bookstore provides the books and supplies
necessary for coursework at the university. A large selection of emblematic clothing and gifts, as well as medical,
reference, and general reading books, are available at the
bookstore. Any book not carried in stock can be special
ordered. All students, faculty, and staff with a valid school
ID may purchase academically priced software online at
campusestore.com. For your convenience, greeting cards,
snacks, and soda are also stocked at the bookstore.
28
Personal checks written for up to $30 can be cashed
for a small fee. Discover, Visa, MasterCard, or American
Express cards or Quick Cash are accepted at the Bradley
Bookstore. Barnes & Noble gift cards are also accepted
and available for purchase to be used at any Barnes &
Noble college bookstore or superstore.
Computing Services
Computing Services supports both the academic and
administrative aspects of university computing. Computing Services supports campus-wide computer networks,
connections to the Internet, and electronic mail. Bradley
is a member of Internet2, which provides high-speed network access to more than 300 research-oriented universities, laboratories, and companies. In addition, Internet2
participation provides high-speed access to all major research networks in the United States, as well as access to
the major international research networks.
Academic resources include a variety of computer
systems and software used for instruction, research, and
public service. Student workstations are located in the
Cullom-Davis Library and many academic buildings. All
residence hall rooms and St. James suites have network
connections giving access to the campus network as
well as the Internet. Students are encouraged to bring
their own workstations with them to campus. There is no
charge to access the campus data network or the Internet. HelpDesk services are available in the Reserves area
of the Library.
Student e-mail accounts
E-mail and network access accounts are automatically established for every student at Bradley University. You will
receive your account and password when you arrive on
campus. Bradley uses e-mail as an official means of communication with students, so you should check your account on
a regular basis.
Romeo B. Garrett Cultural Center
Located at 824 North Duryea Place (across from Williams
Hall), the Garrett Center houses the office of Multicultural
Student Services. Multicultural Student Services functions
to meet the various needs of international students and
Bradley University
students of color. The Center serves as a meeting place for
students and community groups as well as a place for social and cultural events. It also has a fully-equipped computer lab and small multicultural library. Named in honor
of the late professor emeritus of sociology, Dr. Romeo B.
Garrett, the Center is open every day during the regular
academic year.
Center for Student Health Services
Student Health Services is an outpatient clinic that provides service to enrolled Bradley students who experience
health problems. Students are assisted through advisement, treatment, consultations with health providers, and
referral for extended treatment if necessary. While there is
no charge for most on-site treatment, services provided
through referral to outside agencies are charged by that
care provider and are the student’s financial responsibility.
The Center’s qualified staff of physicians, psychiatrist,
counselors, and nurses is located in modern treatment offices in Heitz Hall. They provide a point-of-entry for all university students to receive health care both at the Center and in
the Peoria community.
Professional counselors and supportive staff are
trained to work with Bradley students in their growth and
total development—social, emotional, intellectual, physical, spiritual, and occupational—as well as the environment in which they live.
Personal growth and development issues of adjustment to college, relationship concerns, alcohol and substance abuse, anxiety and stress management, communication skills, eating disorders, assertiveness, and lifestyle
choices are some of the issues addressed by the counselors. Visits are confidential and free for Bradley students.
The Center is open during the school year 8:00 a.m.11:30 a.m. and 1:00-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday. The Center
is open limited hours during breaks and regular summer
school sessions. Students are seen on an appointment basis. At times when the Health Center is closed, patients are
referred to the after hours number, 677-3200, which connects to OSF St. Francis Phone Nurses Triage.
In addition to regular medical services, Health Services also offers special men’s and women’s clinics during
the regular academic year.
All students are required to have a student health
form on file at Health Services before registering. To
avoid penalties and delays in registering, return the completed health form and then verify through Health Services that it has been received and is complete.
IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENT: To comply with Illinois State law, all students registering for classes for the
first time in a four-year college must show proof of proper
immunization or titer showing immunity to measles,
mumps, rubella, tetanus, and diphtheria.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Instructional Technology
and Media Services (ITMS)
Instructional Technology and Media Services provides a diverse range of instructional media and production services
in support of the academic and administrative needs of
faculty, students, and staff. Primary services include: the Instructional Technology Assistance Center (ITAC); Blackboard
course management system; technology training; AV equipment and staff assistance; Internet2/IP videoconferencing;
digital graphic, photographic, video, and copy production
services; and a variety of general media services.
Instructional Technology Assistance Center
(ITAC)
Located within Instructional Technology and Media Services, ITAC provides instructional technology training
and assistance to faculty, staff, and students as they
apply technology to teaching and learning. Services available include application training, instructional design,
production seminars, use of mediated facilities, and multimedia support. ITAC also administers and assists faculty
in the creation of Web-enhanced supplemental and asynchronous course sites using Blackboard software.
Cullom-Davis Library
The Bradley University Library primarily serves the needs
of the University’s students and faculty. Its collection
encompasses more than 1,304,000 items—including approximately 518,000 books, periodicals, and government
documents, 788,000 microforms, and a variety of audiovisual resources, manuscripts, and archival materials. Major
microform collections include the Educational Resources
Information Center (ERIC) documents, Library of American
Civilization, and Library of English Literature. The Library is
a depository for both U.S. and Illinois government documents.
The Library’s resources and services are housed in the
Cullom-Davis Library, which was renovated and enlarged
to 107,000 square feet (nearly double its previous size) in
1990. The facility provides seating for 1,000 students.
Among the facilities is the Virginius H. Chase Special Collections Center, established in 1979 in honor of a
Peorian who became a widely recognized authority on
the botany and natural history of Illinois; it houses and
exhibits rare books, manuscripts, archival materials, and
other resources that require special management, including the collections of the Peoria Historical Society and the
Citizens to Preserve Jubilee College.
About 13,800 music scores, 10,000 recordings, and selected music reference materials are in the Music Resource
Collection, which is located on the third floor.
As a participant in OCLC, a computerized bibliographic
network, the Library and its clientele have ready access to
millions of resources in over 6,000 libraries across the coun29
try and abroad. The Library also provides access to a wide
variety of electronic journal indexes and abstracts and to
many full text databases at no charge to Bradley students
and faculty. Through the University’s participation in the Alliance Library System, students and faculty may borrow materials from most other Peoria-area libraries. The Library is a
member of CARLI (Consortia of Academic Research Libraries
in Illinois), which provides an online catalog and circulation
system that incorporates Bradley’s holdings and those of
most of the other academic libraries in Illinois.
Markin Family Student Recreation
Center
A new 130,000-square-foot student recreation center will
open in Fall 2008. The Markin Family Student Recreation
will include four basketball courts for intramural and
recreational games, a championship basketball court, a
1/8-mile running/walking track, climbing wall, juice bar,
indoor pool, weight room, exercise rooms, and other amenities.
Safety and Security
Bradley University makes every attempt to provide a safe
and secure campus.
The primary function of the University Police Department is to protect life and property within the University
community. Its officers are commissioned by the State of
Illinois, have full law enforcement powers on and off University property, and are graduates of the Police Training
Institute. University Police are on duty 24 hours a day, 365
days a year; conduct foot, bike, and vehicular patrols of the
campus and residence halls; and make crime prevention
presentations to student groups. University Police also coordinate patrol and call responses with City of Peoria and
Peoria County law enforcement agencies.
For the safety of anyone walking alone at night on
campus or in the immediate neighborhood, Bradley police escorts can be requested from dusk until dawn for an
area generally bounding local neighborhoods. This opportunity replaces the previous “student escort service”
and may be modified after the first semester trial period.
Numerous clearly marked emergency telephones are
located strategically on campus. All ring directly into a police dispatcher and automatically display the location of
the caller so that help can be dispatched.
All residence halls have limited access, with some
halls having all outside doors locked on a 24-hour basis
and others having main doors unlocked during daytime
hours. The residence hall lobby offices are staffed during
the afternoon and evening and residence hall student security staff make rounds during the night.
Security-related concerns and campus crime information are reported to the campus community through the
Scout student newspaper, the University’s Web site, AUDIX
campus-wide voice mail, and other media. The University
30
has also instituted a campus mass notification system
using text messaging if circumstances warrant such. For
more information, see bradley.edu/police.
Students may borrow from the University Police Department engraving equipment to mark valuables such
as electronic equipment and bicycles. Literature on safety
and security is also available.
A safe campus can be achieved only with the cooperation of the entire University community—students, faculty,
staff, and visitors. For a copy of a brochure that includes
crime prevention information as well as crime statistics for
the campus and local neighborhood, contact University Relations at (309) 677-3164.
Robert H. Michel Student Center
The Student Center symbolizes the philosophy that makes
this truly a “campus community center.” The Center is the
focus of many campus activities. The wide variety of facilities and varied programs make a significant contribution to
campus life outside the classroom.
Facilities include: a ballroom, OutTakes convenience
store, meeting rooms, pool table, television, browsing
lounges, dining center, and Café Bradley featuring Blimpie’s, Sunset Strips, Starbucks, and smoothies. In addition,
meeting rooms with food service can accommodate 10
to 100 people, and the ballroom can accommodate up to
500 people for a banquet, dance, reception, or lecture.
Telecommunications
The Telecommunications Office operates a telephone
switch and voice mail system for the campus. Technical
staff support telephone equipment and information outlets in offices, residence hall rooms, and many public areas.
Information outlets supply voice, data, and video services
through connections to Internet2, AT&T, and other carriers’
local and long distance networks. Persons calling campus
phones may call direct by dialing (309) 677- or (309) 495and a phone’s four-digit extension.
WCBU FM 89.9
Operated by Bradley University, WCBU is the membersupported public radio service and National Public Radio
(NPR) affiliate for central Illinois. WCBU’s mission is to provide excellence in music and news programming with a
local emphasis, while at the same time providing valuable
professional experience for Bradley students.
WCBU provides a full 24-hour schedule of NPR news
and information, local news, and classical music on WCBU
89.9 as well as WCBU2, a digital HD Radio service. Additional information and online streaming of both the main
and digital channels can be found at the station web site,
wcbufm.org.
Bradley University
Student Affairs
The Bradley environment provides opportunities for the
deliberate and total development of its students and encompasses experiences beyond the classroom. The Division of Student Affairs is concerned with the whole student
and believes that what students learn and experience influences their aspirations, development, and achievements.
Therefore, the Division of Student Affairs enhances
students’ educational experiences through the mobilization and coordination of resources of the University community in order to develop responsibility within students
for growth and development.
The Division complements the academic experience
through programming provided by the centers for Student
Involvement, Student Development and Health Services,
Student Support Services, and the Smith Career Center.
Center for Student Involvement
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Campus Recreation
Multicultural Student Services and Romeo
B. Garrett Cultural Center
Off-Campus Student and Non-Traditional
Student Services
Parents’ Weekend
Student Organizations
Student Activities
Student Government
Student Media
This Center provides a cohesive plan of programs, activities,
events, and services designed to respond to the cultural,
social, physical and recreational needs of all students enrolled at Bradley. Opportunities for leadership and group
development and organization building are provided for
students to learn new skills, broaden their abilities, and
manage their organizational activities. Communication between faculty, administration, students, and staff will be encouraged as a means to promote a well-informed campus
community regarding student activities and government.
Campus Recreation offers students opportunities to
participate in a wide variety of sport and recreational activities. A diversified schedule of activities is maintained
for the novice to the advanced competitor.
Multicultural Student Services and the Romeo B. Garrett Cultural Center foster a greater awareness of the multi2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
cultural and international experience by responding to social, cultural, educational, and philosophical concerns. The
Center serves as a meeting place for students and community groups as well as a place for social and cultural events.
Off-Campus and Non-Traditional Student Services
helps coordinate services that are designed to meet the
special needs of these students.
Student Activities organizes social life that includes
concerts, dances, lectures, and special events such as Campus Carnival, homecoming, and a variety of student committees and programs. The office also registers student
organizations and provides information and certain administrative services for more than 200 student groups.
Student government organizations provide leadership opportunities for students to participate in the governing process of the University, particularly as it relates to
student concerns and welfare.
Student media, including the weekly newspaper The
Bradley Scout, the literary publication Broadside, and the
radio station WRBU, offer communication experiences and
opportunities for interested students. All student media
bearing the name of or sponsored by the University must be
approved and supervised by the Communications Council.
Center for Student Development
and Health Services
• Counseling
• Health Services
• Testing and Guidance
• Wellness Program
The Center for Student Development and Health Services
offers assistance to students seeking information, services,
or resources for their overall well being and development.
The Center provides physical and emotional consulting
and services to all Bradley University students. Through the
Health and Counseling Center, the professional staff offers
a holistic approach to student wellness. These services are
available without additional expense to students.
Emotional counseling services are provided to aid in
the total development of students and to enhance the
success of their academic achievement. Services are provided by a psychiatrist and professional licensed counsel31
ors in a confidential and caring environment.
The Student Health Center provides primary physical
care for injuries and short-term illnesses and advises students
on medical matters. The physicians may also refer students
who need more intensive, specialized medical assistance.
The Wellness Program offers information to students
about drug and alcohol prevention, nutritional needs,
and sexual awareness. The HEAT group is a peer education organization to inform students and promote healthy
living on the campus.
The Center for Testing can assist students with assessments of their professional goals. Referrals to the appropriate departments may be made for further information
about career and practicum opportunities.
Center for Residential Living
and Leadership
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•
•
•
•
Lewis J. Burger Center for Student Leadership and
Public Service
Judicial System
Fraternities and Sororities
Residence Programs
Residence Halls and Residence Hall Staff
The Center for Residential Living and Leadership is responsible for the general welfare of the residential hall
students and members of fraternities and sororities at
Bradley University, particularly as it concerns their outside class activities and living environment. This office
interacts with all segments of the University, including
students, faculty, administrators, parents, and the community. The responsibility of the student judicial system
is to protect the rights of the University and the individual
student through the University Standards of Conduct.
Smith Career Center
The Smith Career Center assists students in exploring and defining career options, developing job search strategies, obtaining career-related work experience, and identifying and
connecting with prospective employers. Innovative services
respond to current trends and economic conditions affecting the job market and career opportunities. These include:
• individual career advisement
• job search preparation
• resume development and review
• cooperative education and internships
• career seminars
• job fairs
• graduate and professional school fair
• campus interviews with employers
Extensive web-based resources are available to help students learn more about career information, job availability,
employer information, and networking. Through the Web
site, students can use eRecruiting to post their resume, view
job listings, and sign up for campus recruiting. Also available
32
are Interview Stream, Optimal Resumé, and Going Global.
Bradley University students must register with the
Smith Career Center to obtain an eRecruiting Web account.
Having an eRecruiting account allows registered users to
submit resumes for the Web Resume Book, review Web job
listings, and participate in campus interviews. Registration is
restricted to currently enrolled Bradley University students.
Misrepresentation Policy
Pursuant to the Bradley University Student Handbook, Standards of Conduct, registrants with the Smith Career Center
who misrepresent their credentials are in violation of the
University’s dishonesty policy. “Dishonesty, including the
acquisition of honors, awards, certification or professional
endorsements or grades by means of cheating, plagiarism,
unauthorized use of a computer, or the University’s computing resources, or falsification with respect to any examination, paper, project, application, recommendation, transcript, test, knowingly providing false information or failure
to provide correct information, misrepresentation, aiding or
abetting another person to do so, or by any other dishonest
means whatsoever.” (Bradley University Student Handbook
2008-2009; page 39, bradley.edu/student_handbook).
If any information provided in a registrant’s eRecruiting account, resume, or other application materials/activities is found to be inaccurate, disciplinary action through
the Smith Career Center and/or the University’s judicial
system may be taken. Examples of misrepresentation,
as they apply to the Smith Career Center, would include
falsifying information provided during an interview, at a
career fair, in a written resume or cover letter, and in eRecruiting profiles, resume books, and uploaded resumes.
The following process and sanctions would occur if a
registrant were found to be in violation of the aforementioned policy:
Process for Reviewing Probable Misrepresentation
1. The registrant will meet with the Associate Director
for Employer Relations.
2. The Associate Director for Employer Relations will
determine if the case is referred to the Smith Career
Center Review Board.
3. The Smith Career Center Review Board will determine
if sanctions will be imposed by the Smith Career Center and/or if the case should be referred to the Student Judicial System.
4. The Executive Director of the Smith Career Center will
notify the registrant regarding the final decision.
Sanctions
1. The registrant will be suspended immediately from
the eRecruiting database.
2. The Smith Career Center Review Board will determine
how long the registrant will be suspended from eRecruiting and reserves the right to suspend a registrant
for up to one academic year.
Bradley University
3. The registrant may be referred to the Bradley University Student Judicial System. Decisions made by the
Smith Career Center are separate from any rulings and
possible actions from the Student Judicial System.
Appeals of the Smith Career Center Review Board
Written appeals may be submitted to the Executive
Director of the Smith Career Center within five (5) business days of the decision.
Campus Interview Cancellation/No Show Policy
Cancellations: If you must cancel a scheduled campus interview with an employer visiting Bradley University, the
deadline for doing so is 24 hours prior (8:00-5:00 MondayFriday) to the interview. You are responsible for contacting
the Smith Career Center's receptionist at 677-2510 and
requesting that your name be removed from a schedule.
Failure to cancel your interview 24 hours prior to the interview
will result in the interview being classified as a “no show.”
No Show: A “no show” is defined as a missed scheduled interview where the student does not appear for a
scheduled interview and has not notified or given sufficient cancellation notification (as defined above) to the
Smith Career Center prior to the interview.
Campus interviews are an important service provided
by the Smith Career Center. Failure to follow interview
cancellation procedures means an opportunity denied
to other students who could have taken advantage of an
interview on a campus interview schedule. It also means
time and money lost to the employer and a less favorable
view of Bradley University and its candidates.
Sanctions: If you violate the interview cancellation
policy above—regardless of the reason (including illness,
emergencies, etc.)—your eRecruiting account will be immediately deactivated and you will be required to meet with a
Smith Career Center professional staff member within five
(5) working days subsequent to the missed interview. You
will also be required to submit a ready-to-mail letter of apology to the employer. The letter of apology is to be given to
the Smith Career Center's receptionist within three (3) working days from meeting with a Smith Career Center professional staff member. Upon receipt of the letter of apology,
your eRecruiting account will be re-activated. If you fail to
meet with a professional staff member and submit a written
letter of apology and/or violate the interview cancellation
policy more than once, your eRecruiting account will remain
inactive and your interview privileges will be revoked indefinitely by the Smith Career Center. (Note: This policy also applies to After Job Fair and practice interviews).
Cooperative Education/
Internship Program
Graduate students may gain career-related work experience by participating in Bradley’s Cooperative Education/
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Internship Program, which is administered through the
Marjorie and Bill Springer Center for Excellence in Internships in the Smith Career Center. Cooperative education/
internship experiences are related to students’ academic
and career interests and provide opportunities for professional development that integrate classroom theory with
supervised work experience. Students have a choice of
two options to follow. The part-time option allows students to attend classes while working part-time with a local employer. The full-time option allows students to work
full-time during an academic semester or summer. Both
options correspond with the academic calendar.
While on a full-time cooperative education/internship
assignment, students are considered to have full-time student status, making normal progress toward a degree in a
recognized university program and are entitled to all student privileges at Bradley University if they are registered
for a credit or noncredit course at the university. Also while
on full-time assignment, students may register for additional hours of classroom study upon departmental approval.
Newly admitted graduate students must be unconditionally admitted to a degree-seeking program in order to
qualify, and continuing students must have at least a 3.0
grade point average in graduate courses. Graduate students do not receive graduate credit for cooperative education/internship experience; graduate assistantships do not
count as cooperative education/internship experience.
In order to be referred to an employer or participate
in a cooperative education/internship work assignment,
students must be attending Bradley University. They also
must be either registered for a minimum of three hours
of non-cooperative education/internship credit or be on
a full-time cooperative education/internship assignment.
A work assignment will not be approved retroactively. Although every effort is made to assist students in obtaining
a cooperative education/internship position, no student
is guaranteed referral or placement.
See additional information on the Cooperative Education/Internship Program under “Financial Assistance.”
Center for Student Support
Services
The Center for Student Support Services is the major link between academic and student affairs to improve student retention through positive communications and relationships
with students, faculty, and staff at Bradley University. The
Center offers academic support services to assist students
in their academic goals. The Office for Student Accessibility
arranges for reasonable and appropriate accommodations
for students with physical limitations. Students with medical
emergencies can ask their physician to notify the university
by contacting the executive director at (309) 677-3658. The
Center for Learning Assistance provides accommodations
for students with documented learning disabilities.
33
GRADUATE SCHOOL
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM
Professional Master of Arts in
Elementary Math, Science,
and Technology Education
Kelly McConnaughay,
Program coordinator
The Professional Master of Arts (PMA) degree program in
Elementary Math, Science, and Technology Education is a
professional master’s degree for elementary (K-8) teachers. The program offers teachers learning experiences that
will allow them to enhance their competence as teachers
of mathematics, science, and technology. The program’s
goal is to prepare teachers who are leaders in Math, Science, and Technology Education who are committed to
providing all students the best educational opportunities
possible. Graduates of the program will be able to:
• demonstrate significant growth in their math
and science content mastery
• integrate technologies as tools of math
and science instruction
• design and implement inquiry-based approaches
to instruction that respond to the needs of a
diverse student population
• translate real-world events and phenomena
into effective instructional practices
• use various forms of assessment to inform their
work in the classroom
• exhibit the attributes of self-efficacy consistent
with being a life-long learner related to being
a math, science, and technology educator
• use research to inform practice
• provide service to the education community
as a teacher leader.
Admission Requirements
Applicants must meet all entrance requirements of the
Graduate School and hold current teacher certification.
Students progress through the program as a cohort. A
new cohort will begin no more than once per calendar
year. Check with the Graduate School for the next cohort
start date.
34
Degree Requirements
The program requires 33 hours of graduate-level courses
to be completed in 33 months. Students are expected
to successfully complete a STEM Education Project (MST
685) that integrates appropriate demonstrations of research and leadership skills and inquiry-based teaching
and learning as part of the comprehensive assessment of
their learning in the program.
Course of Study
Summer I
MST 600, 601, or 609 Science Through Inquiry ....................3
MST 610 Math Through Inquiry .................................................3
MST 611 Directed Research in Science & Math Internship ....1
MST 612 Introduction to Teacher Leadership .......................1
____
8
Fall I
Elective (chosen from approved list) ........................................3
____
3
Spring I
MST 650 Inquiry-based Curriculum: Development and
Analysis .......................................................................................3
____
3
Summer II
MST 620, 621, or 629 Science Through Inquiry II .................3
MST 660 Research in Math and Science ..................................2
____
5
Fall II
MST 670 Action Research: Methods and Practice................3
____
3
Spring II
Elective (chosen from approved list) ........................................3
____
3
Bradley University
Summer III
MST 680 Nature of Inquiry and Innovation............................3
MST 681 Advanced Teacher Leadership..................................2
MST 685 STEM Education Project ..............................................1
____
6
Fall III
MST 685 STEM Education Project ..............................................2
____
Total hours required
2
33
Electives
MST 630 Teaching Science Using Robotic Platforms
MST 631 The Science of Foods and Nutrition
MST 632 The Science of Matter
MST 633 Pharmacology and the Human Brain
MST 634 Crime Scene Science
MST 635 The Science of Global Climate Change
MST 636 The Science of Computer Games
MST 637 Scientific Myths and Misconceptions
MST 639 Special Topics
Course Descriptions
MST 600 Investigative Math, Science, and Technology
for Educators: Energy
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquirybased, investigative format that includes application to
pre K-12 classrooms. Introductory course of a two-courses
sequence. Course content integrated along the theme of
energy. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing; satisfactory score on pretest or suitable remediation.
MST 601 Investigative Math, Science, and Technology
for Educators: Motion
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquirybased, investigative format that includes application to
pre K-12 classrooms. Introductory course of a two-course
sequence. Course content is integrated along the theme
of motion. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing; satisfactory score on pretest or suitable remediation.
MST 609 Investigative Math, Science, and Technology
for Educators: Special Topics
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquirybased, investigative format that includes application to
pre K-12 classrooms. Introductory course of a two-course
sequence. Course content is integrated along a major
theme. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing; satisfactory score on pretest or suitable remediation.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
MST 610 Math Through Inquiry
3 hrs.
Investigation of important ideas of mathematics and
mathematical models. Topics include: classic problems,
number patterns, infinity, topology, chaos, and fractals.
Prerequisite: Graduate student standing; satisfactory
score on pretest or suitable remediation.
MST 611 Directed Research in Science and Math
Internship
1 hr.
Students work with a faculty member from a STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) discipline in a
guided research internship. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing.
MST 612 Introduction to Teacher Leadership
1 hr.
Introduction to teacher leadership roles in contemporary
schools through inter- and intra-personal leadership development. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing.
MST 620 Topics in Investigative Math, Science, and
Technology for Educators II: Evolution
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquiry-based, investigative format that includes application
to pre K-12 classrooms. Second course of a two-course
sequence. Course content is integrated along the theme
of evolution. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from
MST 600-609, or graduate student standing and consent
of instructor.
MST 621 Investigative Math, Science, and Technology
for Educators II: Environmental Science
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquiry-based, investigative format that includes application
to pre K-12 classrooms. Second course of a two-course
sequence. Course content is integrated along the theme
of environmental science. Prerequisite: B or better in one
course from MST 600-609, or graduate student standing
and consent of instructor.
MST 629 Investigative Math, Science, and Technology
for Educators II: Special Topics
3 hrs.
Course integrating math, science, and technology in an
investigative format. Emphasis on using scientific methods
to explore thematic material. Course taught in an inquirybased, investigative format that includes application to pre
K-12 classrooms. Second course of a two-course sequence.
Course content is integrated along a rotating theme. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from MST 600-609, or
graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
35
MST 630 Teaching Science Using Robotics
Platforms
3 hrs.
Robot building activities designed to teach key technology and science concepts. Addresses the concepts of
programming, behaviors, systems, control, sensors, and
feedback with an introduction to artificial intelligence as
it relates to robotics, the impact of robotics technology on
society, and futuristic trends. Prerequisite: B or better in
one course from MST 600-609, or graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 631 The Science of Foods and Nutrition
3 hrs.
Application of chemical and biological principles to food
and nutrition. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from
MST 600-609, or graduate student standing and consent
of instructor.
MST 632 The Science of Matter
3 hrs.
Properties and selection of materials for engineering and
medical applications. Developments and application of
allows, polymers, ceramics, and composite materials.
Interactions with the environment. Recent advances in
nanotechnology, and application of synthetic and natural materials in medicine. An inquiry-based course with
numerous easy-to-perform workshops. Active participation of the students in developing workshops is aimed at
enhancing leadership skills. Small team groups conduct
research and develop workshops. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from MST 600-699, or graduate student
standing and consent of instructor.
MST 633 Pharmacology and the Human Brain 3 hrs.
Drug use and abuse will be explored from psychological,
biological, sociological, and clinical perspectives. Students
will gain an understanding of the history of drug use and
drug policy and will be encouraged to identify sociological
factors that promote abuse and incarceration. Students will
be introduced to basic pharmacological principles, gross
brain anatomy, and the neurobiology of drug action. Theories of addiction and contemporary treatment paradigms
will be explored. Includes laboratory component. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from MST 600-609, or graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 634 Crime Scene Science
3 hrs.
Application of interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, fundamental scientific principles to solve simulated problems
within the theme of forensic science. A lab component
is included. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from
MST 600-609 or graduate student standing and consent
of instructor.
MST 635 The Science of Global Climate Change 3 hrs.
Focuses on the global climate change with particular attention to the global heat budget, its interactions with other
factors such as greenhouse gasses and anthropogenic alterations to global systems. Instructors will cover basic at36
mospheric and terrestrial science (biology, geology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics) necessary to understand
the problem. The consequences of global climate change
on society (commerce, international relationships, policy,
and national security) will then be discussed. Prerequisite:
B or better in one course from MST 600-609, or graduate
student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 636 The Science of Computer Games
3 hrs.
Computer gaming, its current uses, and societal impact
will be comprehensively explored. Participants will learn
rudimentary programming skills needed to develop a basic educational game, evaluate online gaming sites and
stand-alone game boxes, review demographics of current
gamers, identify the resources (software, hardware, and
personnel) needed to create games and run online gaming sites. Participants will also evaluate the gaming industry
and its business models for successful game development,
become familiar with related computer laws and oversight
committees from around the world, review current issues
and concerns with games, and look at future gaming trends.
Prerequisite: B or better in one course from MST 600-609, or
graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 637 Scientific Myths and Misconceptions 3 hrs.
Inquiry-based approach to investigating common myths or
popular beliefs using principles of mathematics and sciences. Prerequisite: B or better in one course from MST 600-609,
or graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 639 Special Topics
3 hrs.
Inquiry-based approach to investigating science and
mathematics content organized around a central theme.
Topics will vary by instructor. Prerequisite: B or better in
one course from MST 600-609, or graduate student standing and consent of instructor.
MST 650 Inquiry-based Curriculum: Development
and Analysis
3 hrs.
Examination of the characteristics of inquiry-based curriculum. Application as a teacher leader to the analysis and
modification of existing curricula using research-based
qualities of curriculum design. Prerequisite: B or better in
one course from MST 600-609.
MST 660 Research in Math and Science
2 hrs.
Students work with a faculty member from a STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math) discipline on
a collaborative research project. Prerequisite: Graduate
standing and B or better in MST 611.
MST 670 Action Research: Methods and Practice 3 hrs.
Focus on the methods of action research that lead to
teachers answering questions about classroom practice
with a goal of improving student performance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Bradley University
MST 680 Nature of Inquiry and Innovation
3 hrs.
Survey of innovations across the sciences and mathematics within a historical and cultural perspective. Comparison of modes of inquiry that lead to these innovations
with processes of discovery used in the social sciences
and the humanities. Prerequisite: B or better in MST 650.
MST 681 Advanced Teacher Leadership
2 hrs.
Concepts of shared school leadership designed to develop leadership in teachers who continue to teach students
but also have an influence extending beyond the classroom within the school and elsewhere. Prerequisite: B or
better in MST 612.
MST 685 STEM Education Project
1-4 hrs.
Capstone course to enhance STEM content knowledge
while integrating concepts from inquiry-based teaching
and learning, action research, and teacher leadership. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in an appropriate MPS program; grade of B or better in MST 660 and MST 670.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
37
FOSTER COLLEGE OF
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Robert Baer,
Dean
Edward Sattler,
Director of Graduate Programs
Susannah Gawor,
Assistant Director of Graduate Programs
Jack Russell,
Director of the Executive Master of Business Administration
John Gillett,
Director of Master of Science in Accounting Program
Philip Horvath,
Director of Master of Science in Quantitative Finance
The mission of the graduate programs in the Foster College
of Business Administration is to develop students’ knowledge, skills, and abilities through high-quality programs of
instruction. Our goal is to provide an educational experience that will allow for in-depth study in selected areas.
Master of Science
in Accounting
John Gillett,
Graduate Program Coordinator
This program is accredited by AACSB International
—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of
Business
The Department of Accounting offers a graduate program
leading to the Master of Science in Accounting (MSA) degree. The program provides graduate education that prepares students to meet professional practice challenges
in public, private, and not-for-profit accounting. The program is designed to broaden the student’s knowledge, to
provide for in-depth study, and to complement theoretical study with relevant and significant research. Graduates
should be prepared for meeting the 150-hour CPA examination education requirement and entrance into, or advancement within, their chosen careers.
The program is open to full-time and part-time students. Students may enter the program in August, January, or during the summer.
Entrance Requirements
a.
An undergraduate accounting degree or
the equivalent.
b. AACSB admission requirements as follows:
Admission—MSA
Admission to the Master of Science in Accounting program
is based on a thorough review of the required documents as
well as any supplemental materials that may be appropriate.
The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Department of
Accounting makes the admission recommendation.
The required documents are the following:
1. Application form. The application form must be complete with meaningful and well-developed answers to
the questions on the goals of the applicant. A check of
$40 for U.S. students or $50 for international students,
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
39
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
payable to Bradley University, must accompany the
application.
Transcript(s). Official transcripts (one copy) from each
college and university attended must be sent directly
from the registrar to: the Graduate School, Bradley
University, Peoria, IL 61625.
Letters of recommendation. Two current letters of
recommendation are required from persons who can
comment meaningfully on the applicant’s capability for graduate-level study. Character references are
not appropriate. Faculty members under whom the
applicant has studied and employers are considered
appropriate references.
GMAT (Graduate Management Admissions Test). The
GMAT is a standardized test designed to measure
aptitude for graduate study in management. Applicants must arrange to take the test in sufficient time
to permit processing of the results. The Bradley University GMAT institutional code is 1070. Information
about the GMAT may be obtained by contacting the
Graduate School Office or visiting the GMAT Web site
at www.gmac.com.
Students currently in a four-year undergraduate
accounting program should take the GMAT the first
semester of their senior year in order to allow sufficient time for processing of the results.
A current resume.
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Applicable only to international students whose native
language is not English. The test measures proficiency
in oral and written English.
600-Level Courses
Graduate courses in business administration at the 600
level are restricted to graduate students who have been
admitted to a degree-granting program in the Graduate
School. Students-at-large may not take 600-level graduate
courses in the Foster College of Business Administration.
In the Department of Accounting’s integrated Bachelor
Degree (BS or BA) and Master of Science in Accounting degree (MSA) program (commonly referred to as the 3:2 program), admitted students who meet the following criteria
can take course work, including 600-level graduate courses,
concurrently with their undergraduate courses. Eligible students can then designate to which degree that course work
would apply. A course can be used in only one degree, and
only appropriate courses can be applied to the MSA.
Admission—BS/BA and MSA
Admission to the 3:2 program is available when students
are initially admitted to Bradley as freshmen or during
their junior year. The Graduate Admissions Committee of
the Department of Accounting makes the admission recommendation.
40
The required procedures are the following:
Admission as a freshman (early admission): students
must be admitted in good standing into the Foster
College of Business Administration with an acceptable ACT or SAT score and a class standing usually in
the top 25 percent of their high school class. In addition to the material in their application for admittance
to Bradley, students must indicate a desire to be in the
3:2 program and may be asked for two letters of recommendation. Under early admission, students must
maintain at least a 3.00 GPA at Bradley and complete
at least 90 credit hours (including ATG 302) before
they can take graduate courses.
Admission as a junior (regular admission): Admission
in good standing into the FCBA with a GPA of 3.00 or
higher and at least 90 credit hours (including ATG 302)
by the end of the term in which the student enrolls.
Transfer students must have at least 24 hours at Bradley before admission. Admission for students without
a 3.00 GPA will be based on GMAT scores, letters of
reference, worthwhile experience, and GPA.
Degree Requirements
The Master of Science in Accounting program is 30 semester
hours. At least 15 of these hours consist of courses in accounting. There are also nine elective semester hours of 600-level
courses from the Foster College of Business Administration.
The six remaining semester hours of elective coursework at
the 500 or 600 level may be taken inside or outside of the
Foster College of Business Administration. The program allows a maximum of six semester hours to be taken outside of
the Foster College of Business Administration and requires a
minimum of nine semester hours outside of accounting.
Accounting Courses Required (12 hours)
ATG 601 Financial Accounting Theory
ATG 657 Advanced Auditing
ATG 677 Federal Taxes II
ATG 690 Applied Professional Accounting Research
For the remaining three required accounting hours students may select courses from one of the following:
ATG 501 Advanced Accounting II
ATG 514 Advanced Managerial Accounting
ATG 526 Fraud Examination
ATG 547 Internal Auditing
ATG 561 International Accounting Issues
ATG 583 Accounting Information Systems
ATG 585 Contemporary Issues in Accounting
ATG 590 Professional Accounting Problems
Note:
500-level courses taken to complete requirements in an
undergraduate degree cannot be used to complete master’s degree requirements.
Bradley University
Elective (9 hours) Foster College of Business
Administration
For choices, see the listing of 600-level courses (with the
exception of ATG 604) in the Foster College of Business
Administration MBA program and obtain approval from
the director of the MSA program.
Other Electives (6 hours)
May be taken in accounting with approval from the director
of the MSA program. See “Note” above. May be taken outside of the college with approval from the director of the
MSA program. For business course choices, see the listing
of 600-level courses (with the exception of ATG 604) in the
Foster College of Business Administration MBA program
and obtain director of the MSA program approval.
Other Requirements
Applicants should review the Graduate School admission
policies, special regulations, registration and fees, and degree regulations located in the front of this catalog.
Comprehensive Examination
Each MSA student must take a written comprehensive examination. This examination covers the graduate work that
the student is presenting for the degree. The time, place,
and nature of the examination are a part of ATG 690.
Course Descriptions
ATG 501 Advanced Accounting II
3 hrs.
In-depth application of accounting concepts, theories, and
conventions to recording and reporting of problems arising from business combinations, branch operations, and
business operations in foreign countries. Consolidated
balance sheets, income statements, and retained earnings
statements. Home office and branch accounting, foreign
exchange, foreign subsidiaries. Prerequisite: ATG 302.
ATG 514 Advanced Managerial Accounting
3 hrs.
Specialized topics in strategic cost management. Emphasis
on the role of accounting information in strategy development and implementation. Includes topics such as value
chain analysis, target costing, activity-based management,
theory of constraints, environmental costing, and strategic
performance evaluation. (Not open to students who have
taken ATG 304 or ATG 614.) Prerequisites: ATG 383; ATG
301.
ATG 526 Fraud Examination
3 hrs.
Techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements.
Controls to prevent and detect problems. (Not open to
students who have taken ATG 585 as Fraud Examination.)
Prerequisites: ATG 301; ATG 383.
ATG 547 Internal Auditing
3 hrs.
Internal audit activity’s role in governance, risk, and control. Professional practices framework. Establishing a risk2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
based plan, conducting the internal audit engagement,
reporting results, monitoring engagement outcomes.
Prerequisites: ATG 301 and ATG 383.
ATG 561 International Accounting Issues
3 hrs.
Significant accounting matters experienced by multi-national companies. Accounting matters include currency transactions and translations, transfer pricing, management planning and control, and taxation. Prerequisite: ATG 302.
ATG 583 Accounting Information Systems
3 hrs.
Design and implementation of accounting information systems using database technologies. Not open to students
who have taken ATG 667. Prerequisites: ATG 301; ATG 383.
ATG 585 Contemporary Issues in Accounting 3 hrs.
Critical evaluation of concepts, assumptions, principles,
and analytical methodologies of accounting and their application to factual situations. Asset valuation and income
determination: implications for internal and external uses
of accounting information in business decision making.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
ATG 590 Professional Accounting Problems
3 hrs.
Update and expansion of core knowledge in accounting
theory, practice, taxation, and auditing. Prerequisites: ATG
383; ATG 377 or 677; or consent of instructor.
ATG 601 Financial Accounting Theory
3 hrs.
Application of the current authoritative accounting
pronouncements to a variety of accounting situations.
Conceptual development of analytical tools. Current authoritative and alternative measurement theories. Prerequisites: ATG 302 and Advanced Accounting.
ATG 605 Cooperative Education/Internship
in Accounting
1-3 hrs.
Cooperative education or internship assignment. Credit
applies to Department of Accounting MSA electives. Pass/
Fail. Repeatable to a combined total of three credit hours.
ATG 657 Advanced Auditing
3 hrs.
Problems affecting the auditing profession. Evaluation of
alternative solutions and their implications. Prerequisite:
ATG 457.
ATG 677 Federal Taxes II
3 hrs.
Tax aspects of formation, distributions, and liquidations
of partnerships and corporations. Gift taxes, estate taxes,
and family tax planning. Prerequisite: ATG 477.
ATG 690 Applied Professional Accounting
Research
3 hrs.
Research methods to identify accounting, auditing, and
reporting issues; collect evidence from accounting/auditing literature; identify alternatives; develop recommendations; and communicate oral and written results. Prerequisites: 18 hours of graduate credit, including nine semester
hours from ATG 601, 657, and 677.
41
Executive Master
of Business
Administration
This program is accredited by AACSB International
—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of
Business.
The Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA)
program is especially designed for experienced professionals wishing to obtain a master’s degree in business
administration. EMBA students have a number of years
of significant, post-baccalaureate career experience and
continue to work full time while enrolled in the program.
Participants begin the program at the same time and
move through the curriculum together, completing the
requirements as a group. The collective professional experience of the program participants enriches the educational environment.
Bradley University’s EMBA program focuses on leadership and the business issues leaders face everyday. Leadership is a key issue in contemporary organizations. While effective leadership is a critical component of organizational
success, studies indicate that organizations are facing a
“crisis of leadership.” Two-thirds of executives surveyed
across the nation indicated that their organizations had too
many people who were strong in management but weak
in leadership. Bradley University’s Executive MBA is jointly
sponsored by the Foster College of Business Administration (FCBA) and The Executive Development Center (EDC).
One of the five business assistance centers in FCBA, EDC
is the Midwest affiliate of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), the premier leadership development program
in the nation.
Unlike traditional MBA and EMBA programs with
their prescribed courses in economics, finance, management, and accounting, Bradley University’s EMBA focuses
on issues that managers and executives identified as the
most pressing problems they faced. The program takes an
issues-oriented, problem-solving approach to business.
Business issues are addressed from an interdisciplinary
perspective. Each issue is approached with insights gained
from various business disciplines. Accounting, marketing,
management, and finance are integrated throughout the
curriculum. Through this award-winning, issues-based,
integrated curriculum, program participants will develop
the same broad business knowledge and awareness that
is expected from any rigorous MBA program.
Through the course of the program, the leadership
skills of individual participants will be developed. Faculty
will work one-on-one with participants to assess leadership skills and create a personal development plan.
42
Admissions Information
Requirements
A baccalaureate degree is normally required; however, in
exceptional cases, candidates who do not have a baccalaureate degree may be admitted upon the recommendation of the EMBA Admissions Committee and approval by
the Graduate School dean and the provost. In these rare
cases, noteworthy professional experience, the candidate’s ability to handle graduate-level study, and the ability to contribute to the academic experience of others in
the class will be considered.
Managerial experience is required for all candidates;
five to seven years of managerial experience is preferred.
Entrance requirements also include a personal interview,
professional recommendations, and a demonstrated ability to accomplish graduate-level business coursework.
Evaluation of students for admission is a very individualized process. A prospective student’s background, work
experience, career goals, and desire to succeed are considered in making an admission decision.
Program Costs
The fee for the 2008-2009 EMBA degree program is
$49,600. Tuition, instructional materials, meals, and the
international trip are included in the fee.
Payment Schedule for Program Beginning in 2009
First Payment ............................................................................ $500
Due immediately upon acceptance into the program
Second Payment ................................................................ $24,550
Due September 1, 2009
Final Payment ..................................................................... $24,550
Due April 1, 2010
Admissions Deadline
The admissions committee follows a “rolling admission”
process, whereby each application package is considered
separately and measured against acceptance criteria,
rather than against the applications of other candidates.
Applicants will be evaluated on the following criteria:
managerial experience, undergraduate/graduate performance, letters of recommendation, essay, and evidence of
readiness for entrance into the program.
The required documents are the following:
1. Application form. The application form must be complete with meaningful and well-developed answers
to the questions on the goals of the applicant. All applicants must submit a non-refundable application
fee, payable by check or money order, to Bradley University. The fee for domestic applicants is $40.
2.
Transcript(s). Official transcripts from each college and
university attended must be sent directly from the registrar to: Associate Dean, Foster College of Business Administration, Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois 61625.
Bradley University
3. Three letters of recommendation. Recommendation
forms are included in the application material. Please
note that a direct supervisor must be one of the recommenders, unless you are self-employed. These recommendations must be returned in a sealed, signed
envelope.
4. Employer letter of sponsorship. This letter should
be from a senior official of your employing organization. It should state that your employer endorses your
participation in the program, is aware of the time demands, will grant you the necessary time off to attend
classes, and, if applicable, is willing to provide financial assistance. Applicants who are self-employed are
not required to submit this statement.
5. Personal essay. Directions for the essays can be found
in the application form.
6. Interview. Once your application is received, an oncampus interview will be scheduled. Be prepared to
describe projects you have handled that demonstrate
your management skills. Please include a statement
with your application stating times and days that you
are available for the interview.
For application materials, please contact: EMBA Director,
Foster College of Business Administration, Bradley University, 1501 W. Bradley, Peoria, IL 61625. E-mail: [email protected]
bradley.edu. Phone: (309) 677-2253. You may download
the application at bradley.edu/emba.
Progress Toward the Degree
Degree Requirements
The EMBA consists of 19 courses comprising 35 academic
credit hours. The program lasts approximately 15 months
and meets every other weekend on Friday and Saturday
for the program’s duration. Two extended periods of
study, lasting 7-10 days each, will be required. Students
must successfully complete all 21 courses and pass a written comprehensive examination.
Required courses
BUS 621 The Leadership Challenge ..................................3 hrs.
BUS 623 Scanning the Environment ............................. 1/2 hr.
BUS 625 External Economic Environment......................1 hrs.
BUS 627 Managing Technology .........................................2 hrs.
BUS 629 Cost Management ..........................................11/2 hrs.
BUS 631 Competition and Pricing .......................................1 hr.
BUS 633 Creating and Maintaining
Customer Satisfaction ...................................................3 hrs.
BUS 635 Communication Workshop .........................11/2 hrs.
BUS 637 Attracting and Developing Talent ...................2 hrs.
BUS 639 Building Employee Commitment ....................2 hrs.
BUS 641 Dealing with Problem People .............................1 hr.
BUS 643 Team Building............................................................1 hr.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
BUS 645 Acquiring Capital and Making
Investment Decisions ....................................................3 hrs.
BUS 647 Global Environment and Issues ........................3 hrs.
BUS 649 Developing Strategy .............................................2 hrs.
BUS 651 Performance Measurement
and Control Systems ......................................................2 hrs.
BUS 653 Strategic Positioning
and Maximizing Performance ....................................2 hrs.
BUS 655 Leading Successful Change ........................11/2 hrs.
BUS 658 EMBA Topics.............................................................2 hrs.
____
35 hrs.
Course Descriptions
BUS 621 The Leadership Challenge
3 hrs.
Exploration of the characteristics and themes of successful
leadership. In-depth analysis of the strengths and development needs of participants through 360-degree feedback.
Important interpersonal skill foundations in communication, conflict resolution, and trust building are emphasized.
One-on-one coaching between participants and staff.
BUS 623 Scanning the Environment
1/2 hr.
Uncertainty in business planning caused by the external
environment. Utilization of a conceptual model to organize and frame the discussions of the macroenvironment
in which the firm operates.
BUS 625 External Economic Environment
1 hr.
Provide a broad overview of the economic environment
in which business firms and consumers carry out their
individual economic activities. Review the institutional
structure, the social goals, and implicit values of the market system and how they establish the parameters within
which choices are made. Overview of how and why business cycles occur. How economic policy, both monetary
and fiscal, have impacted the business cycle.
BUS 627 Managing Technology
2 hrs.
Management issues related to providing information
technology resources. Impact of product and processrelated technologies on development and execution of
organizational strategies.
BUS 629 Cost Management
11/2 hrs.
Analysis of the nature of cost. Techniques for accumulation of costs incurred in production and assignment of
those costs to products. Methods for reduction and management of non-value-added costs.
BUS 631 Competition and Pricing
1 hr.
Elasticity measurement of market response to price, income, and other influences on competitive structure
from commodities to monopoly; pricing strategies based
on competitive environment; price, output, and product
development for competition among few firms; the techniques of Cournot, Stackelberg, and Von Neumann.
43
BUS 633 Creating and Maintaining Customer
Satisfaction
3 hrs.
Customer-focused topics, including effective and efficient
product delivery, identifying customer segments that can
be served by the firm, offering customer value, and building brand and corporate loyalty.
BUS 635 Communication Workshop
11/2 hrs.
Communication skills, both verbal and written, will be
strengthened and learned through practice. Interpersonal and written communication skills and media interviews
receive primary emphasis.
BUS 637 Attracting and Developing Talent
2 hrs.
Expose students to the challenges of attracting talent and
provide advice on how to develop talent within an organization. Complexities of recruiting in difficult labor markets. Continuous improvement mechanisms to stimulate
ongoing talent development.
BUS 639 Building Employee Commitment
2 hrs.
Key themes and practical approaches for enhancing motivation and building high levels of commitment and continuing dedication throughout the workforce. Financial and
intrinsic reward systems are emphasized, as are the keys to
developing a culture of involvement and credibility.
BUS 641 Dealing with Problem People
1 hr.
Approaches, skills, and strategies for understanding and
addressing difficult and problem people in the organization. Application of course materials and learning to onthe-job situations. Examines both human resource and
legal ramifications of dealing with problem people.
BUS 643 Team Building
1 hr.
Design, introduction, development, and leadership of crossdisciplinary teams, including virtual teams. The course provides leaders with the background, perspective, and skill to
help teams reach their performance potential. Participants
receive feedback regarding their on-the-job approach to
teams. Areas of need are identified and participant-specific
skills and actions are emphasized. Approaches to team rewards and team compensation are studied.
BUS 649 Developing Strategy
2 hrs.
Provide an effective planning framework to integrate
strategies with different functional areas. All of the functional areas will be integrated within the strategic planning framework. Emphasis on strategic planning as an
ongoing, fluid process that evolves over time and adapts
to environmental changes.
BUS 651 Performance Measurement and Control
Systems
2 hrs.
Techniques for creation of profit plans and monitoring
of success. Design and use of broad-based performance
measures such as the balanced scorecard. Identification
and control of risks that threaten the attainment of objectives.
BUS 653 Strategic Positioning and Maximizing
Performance
2 hrs.
Expose managers to factors that impact different performance measures and provide strategies that maximize
performance. Achieve balance at many different levels; incremental/radical strategies, flexibility/control, resources/
capabilities, and growth/continuous improvement.
BUS 655 Leading Successful Change
11/2 hrs.
Background, insights, and skills in how to effectively challenge the status quo, create new directions, and lead organizations to embrace and successfully implement needed
change. Examination of the forces for change and dynamics of resistance. Participants examine their personal style
of change and apply change management strategies to
their respective organizations.
BUS 658 EMBA Topics
1/2-2 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. May be repeated under different topics for a
maximum of two hours credit. Topic stated in current
Schedule of Classes.
BUS 645 Acquiring Capital and Making Investment
Decisions
3 hrs.
Planning and strategies involved in identifying valueenhancing capital projects. Interpreting cash flow figures,
identifying risk factors, and employing risk analysis techniques. Strategies for acquiring capital and understanding
the impact of capital structure on firm value.
BUS 647 Global Environment and Issues
3 hrs.
Provide an understanding of the forces shaping the international economy. Provide frameworks and guidelines for
gathering, sorting, and assessing complex global and regional information to contribute to understanding organizations’ strategies and tactics. Emphasis on leadership
issues and diverse cultures.
44
Bradley University
Master of Business
Administration
This program is accredited by AACSB International
—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of
Business.
The MBA program at Bradley University originated in the
late 1940s and emerged as one of the dynamic forces in the
College in the 1970s. Subsequently, it earned recognition
by receiving accreditation from AACSB. This recognition
signals both the achievement of quality standards of long
standing and the establishment of a new base upon which
to build toward higher levels of excellence.
The MBA program is open to full-time and part-time
students, who take classes together. Students may enter
the program in August or January and complete their degree in two years. All of the required courses are offered
in the evenings. The combination of students from different undergraduate disciplines, with varying levels of work
experience, results in a dynamic educational environment
beneficial to all.
The curriculum has a general managerial perspective. It stresses the theoretical basis of management disciplines as well as practical applications of theory and
current management practices. The curriculum focuses
on improving managerial performance in the problemsolving environment and also conceptualizing elements
for policy formulating activity.
The study of management approached in this manner
is appealing to those interested in the administration of
all types of enterprise: health, government, and non-profit
organizations, as well as the traditional large and small industrial and service business firms.
The practical applications orientation of the curriculum necessitates the use of a wide variety of pedagogical
approaches. Problem-solving situations are used, calling
for individual attention, group interaction, computer analysis, and formulation of assumptions to deal with uncertainty. Case analysis is extensively used, focusing both on
problem-solving and presentation of conclusions using
appropriate oral and written communication skills.
The MBA program is designed to provide each student
with a professional business education through:
1. A rigorous body of coursework that reflects current
business practices;
2. The development of analytical and interpersonal skills
needed to work effectively in a rapidly changing domestic and global economy;
3. The teaching of the social and ethical responsibilities
of business in a system of free enterprise.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Progress Toward the Degree
Admission
Admission to the MBA program is based on a thorough review of the required documents as well as supplemental
materials that may be appropriate. The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Foster College of Business Administration, chaired by the director of graduate programs,
makes the admission recommendation.
The required documents are the following:
1. Application form. The application form must be complete with meaningful and well-developed answers
to the questions on the goals of the applicant. All applicants must submit a non-refundable application
fee, payable by check or money order, to Bradley University. The fee for domestic applicants is $40 and $50
for international applicants.
2. Transcript(s). Official transcripts (one copy) from each
college and university attended must be sent directly
from the registrar to: the Graduate School, Bradley
University, Peoria, Illinois 61625.
3. Letters of recommendation. Two current letters of
recommendation are required from persons who can
comment meaningfully on the applicant’s capability for graduate-level study. Character references are
not appropriate. Faculty members under whom the
applicant has studied and employers are considered
appropriate references.
4. GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test). The
GMAT is a standardized test designed to measure aptitude for graduate study in management. Applicants
must arrange to take the test in sufficient time to permit processing of the application with the test results
prior to the application deadline. For reporting the
test results, the Bradley University GMAT institutional
code is 1070. Information about the GMAT may be obtained by contacting the Graduate School Office or by
visiting www.mba.com.
5. A current resume. Since the evaluation includes analysis of work experience, a current resume is very helpful to the admissions committee.
6. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Applicable only to international students whose native
language is not English. The test measures proficiency
in oral and written English.
Graduate courses in business administration are restricted to graduate students who have been admitted to
the MBA program or another degree-granting program
in the Graduate School. Students-at-large may not take
600-level graduate courses in the Foster College of Business Administration.
45
Leave of Absence
Please refer to the Graduate School Step-Out Policy on
page 26.
Degree Requirements
The MBA program is 33 semester hours. Twenty-four of these
hours satisfy a set of required core courses. The program
begins with an interpersonal relations course that emphasizes the development and application of interpersonal skills
critical for managerial success. The program continues with
an introduction to key issues in business decision-making,
drawing on experienced practitioners and graduate faculty
teams. A capstone strategy course integrates the business
cross-functional approach to organizational issues.
There are 9 hours of elective coursework, which may
be chosen within one of three areas of concentration (finance, management, marketing) or across concentrations
as a customized elective selection. The required and elective courses are as follows:
MBA Courses
Required Core (24 hrs.)
ATG 604 Controllership*
ECO 606 Microeconomics for Managers
ECO 608 U.S. Business Cycles in International Economy
BMA 615 Interpersonal Relations
BMA 620 Management Theory
FIN 622 Financial Management
MTG 624 Marketing Decision Making
BMA 672 Information Systems Management
BMA 628 Business Policy and Strategy Formulation
*MBA students with an undergraduate accounting degree must choose a
three-hour elective to replace the ATG 604 requirement.
Concentration Electives
Finance
FIN 623 Multinational Financial Management
FIN 624 Capital Budgeting
FIN 625 Financial Analysis
FIN 627 Financial Risk Management
FIN 658 Topics in Finance
FIN 660 Readings in Finance
Management
BMA 602 Organizational Behavior
BMA 657 Executive Development
BMA 658 Topics in Business Administration
BMA 659 Topics in Management
BMA 660 Readings in Business Administration
BMA 671 Productivity Software for Managers
BMA 673 Data Communications for Managers
BMA 675 Managing Systems Development
BMA 676 Electronic Commerce
IB 656 International Business Administration
IB 658 Topics in International Business
IB 660 Readings in International Business
46
Marketing
MTG 640 Obtaining, Analyzing, and Applying Marketing
Information (required)
MTG 654 Managing Services Marketing
MTG 658 Topics in Marketing
MTG 660 Readings in Marketing
IB 656 International Business Administration
IB 658 Topics in International Business
IB 660 Readings in International Business
Other Electives
ATG 658 Topics in Accounting
ATG 660 Readings in Accounting
CIS 571 Computer Law
CIS 572 Computing Services Management
ECO 660 Readings in Economics
IB 660 Readings in International Business
MFE 565 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
QM 501 Quantitative Analysis I
QM 652 Advanced Data Analysis
QM 658 Topics in Quantitative Methods
QM 660 Readings in Quantitative Methods
All students must have a proficiency in mathematics
equivalent to the techniques of calculus in college, and
working familiarity with business computer systems that
includes microcomputers and management information
systems. Students without these proficiencies must take
appropriate mathematics and computer courses specified
by the director of graduate programs.
All students in the MBA program must possess the
common body of knowledge in business administration
as set forth below.
1. a background of the concepts, processes, and institutions in the production and marketing of goods and/
or services, and the financing of the business enterprise or other forms of organization;
2. a background of the economic and legal environment
as it pertains to profit and/or nonprofit organizations
along with ethical considerations and social and political influences as they affect such organizations;
3. a basic understanding of the concepts and applications of accounting, quantitative methods, and management information systems including computer
applications;
4. a study of organization theory, behavior, and interpersonal communications;
5. a study of administrative processes under conditions
of uncertainty including integrating analysis and policy determination at the overall management level.
All core courses are compressed and offered on sevenweek schedules. The foundation portion of the requirement may be satisfied if an applicant’s transcript contains
undergraduate courses equivalent to the foundation coursBradley University
es listed below and these courses were completed within
the past 10 years with a B or better. An admitted student
who has not had a particular foundation course may take
it at Bradley University or, with prior permission, at another
institution.
Foundation Courses
ATG 505 Accounting Principles-Financial
BMA 542 Legal Environment of Business
BMA 553 Operations Management
ECO 506 Elements of Microeconomics
FIN 522 Introduction to Finance
MTH 115 Calculus
QM 502 Quantitative Analysis II
Students must complete all their foundation courses prior
to enrolling in 600-level MBA courses. Students must earn
a B or better in all required foundation courses to be eligible for 600-level MBA courses.
Other Requirements
Applicants should review the Graduate School admission
policies, special regulations, registration and fees, and degree regulations located in the front of this catalog.
MBA Association
The MBAA is the social and professional extension of the
program. Its principal objectives are to enhance closer
personal ties among its members, foster communication
between students and the business world, and provide
closer ties with the faculty. A variety of activities is scheduled to include MBA students and spouses, as well as faculty and alumni. All MBA and EMBA students are encouraged to join the association.
Course Descriptions
Foundation MBA Courses
ATG 505 Accounting Principles—Financial
2 hrs.
Introduction to accounting concepts of recognition, measurement, classification, and disclosure, which are the
foundations to a financial reporting system. The accounting cycle; preparation of financial statements; introduction
to financial statement analysis. (Does not count as elective.)
Prerequisite: consent of director of graduate programs.
Practicum
BMA 542 Legal Environment of Business
2 hrs.
Analysis of the legal environment in which business operates. Ethical and equitable influence on legal development emphasized. Study of specific areas of procedure,
constitutional law, contracts, torts, international business
law, business organizations, and the regulatory environment related to antitrust, labor, securities, environmental,
and consumer law. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA elective
or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: consent of
director of graduate programs.
BUS 610 Graduate Business Practicum
0-3 hrs.
Solving technically challenging problems under faculty supervision, with a near-term economic benefit. May involve
research in collaboration with FCBA faculty, for up to three
hours credit. Repeatable to a combined total of three credit
hours. Prerequisite: Graduate business student in good
standing; approval of Center for Business and Economic Research and Director of Graduate Business Programs.
BMA 553 Operations Management
2 hrs.
Survey of issues and decision-making techniques related
to the operations of an organization. Quality management, project management, inventory management,
waiting line analysis, production scheduling, job design,
and facility layout. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA elective
or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: consent of
graduate program director.
IE MBA Program
ECO 506 Elements of Microeconomics
2 hrs.
Review of demand, supply, product markets, factor markets, perfect competition, monopoly, and other market
structures, using algebra. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA
elective or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: consent of director of graduate programs.
Comprehensive Examination
Candidates will be expected to demonstrate their capacity to draw upon and integrate their knowledge from all
courses in a written comprehensive examination. A candidate will complete the examination while enrolled in
BMA 628. In case of failure, the candidate will be allowed
to retake the comprehensive only once.
Undergraduate students in the industrial engineering
department may combine their studies and earn an MBA
degree in five and one-half years or fewer. Students may
include all of the prerequisites for the MBA program as
part of their required 124 undergraduate semester hours.
Careful scheduling is required and should be coordinated
with the student’s undergraduate adviser and director of
graduate programs. Students electing this option must
be fully admitted before registering for graduate-level
courses and have the written approval of the director of
graduate programs. Students should contact the director
of graduate programs during their sophomore year for
particular information.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
FIN 522 Introduction to Finance
2 hrs.
Principles of financial management; financial systems
and flow of funds; time value of money and its application; raising and allocation of funds; financial analysis,
planning, and forecasting. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA
elective or concentration requirements. Prerequisites: ATG
505, ECO 506, QM 501.
47
QM 502 Quantitative Analysis II
2 hrs.
Linear and multiple regression and correlation techniques.
Analysis of variance, times-series analysis, and nonparametric procedures. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA elective
or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: QM 501; or
QM 262 and MTH 115 or MTH 121.
Required Core Courses
ATG 604 Controllership
3 hrs.
Case studies of management accounting control systems
and strategic cost analysis. Use of relevant costs for decisionmaking, planning, and evaluation of performance. Development of analytic tools drawn from cost accounting, managerial accounting, mathematics, and behavioral science.
Prerequisites: ATG 157 or 505 or equivalents; not open to
students with an undergraduate degree in accounting.
BMA 615 Interpersonal Relations
3 hrs.
Foundations of interpersonal behavior, emphasizing the
development and application of the interpersonal skills
critical for managerial success. Foster self-understanding
and self-awareness through a variety of assessment instruments.
BMA 620 Management Theory
3 hrs.
Planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling operations through managerial decision making.
Emerging issues and trends; integration of principles and
concepts with contemporary concerns. Prerequisite: QM
263 or QM 502.
ECO 606 Microeconomics for Managers
2 hrs.
Analysis of domestic and international markets, resource
allocation, market structure, impacts on business decision
making and on society, role of government regulation
in business, pricing strategies. Prerequisites: ECO 221 or
506; MTH 115; QM 262, 263 (or QM 501, 502); or consent
of instructor.
ECO 608 U.S. Business Cycles
in the International Economy
2 hrs.
The application of economic analysis to explain fluctuations in Gross Domestic Product (GDP), employment, and
inflation in our contemporary open economy; evaluation
of alternative economic stabilization policies; uses and applications for managerial decision making. Prerequisites:
ECO 221; or ECO 506; MTH 115; QM 262, 263 (or QM 501,
502); or consent of instructor.
FIN 622 Financial Management
3 hrs.
The financial framework of business; principles governing
the operation of financial markets. Management of the
flow of funds through a company; evaluation of alternative methods of financing under changing conditions;
capital and cash budgeting; valuation problems. Prerequisite: MBA prerequisite courses completed.
48
MTG 624 Marketing Decision Making
3 hrs.
Marketing management problems, policies, and solutions.
Case studies of marketing problems, research, and applications of marketing techniques to business problems.
BMA 672 Information Systems Management 2 hrs.
Knowledge and application of information-related resources from a management perspective: identifying information needs, strategic uses of information systems,
emerging information technologies, managing information resources effectively. Prerequisite: FCBA proficiency
exam or BMA 172 or equivalent.
Capstone Course
BMA 628 Business Policy and Strategy
Formulation
3 hrs.
Strategies in response to conditions such as competition
and future development. Prerequisite: completion of all
core courses.
MBA Concentrations
(One course in each area is required as part of the Core. For a
concentration, choose 9 hours in one area from this list.)
Finance
Choose 9 hours:
FIN 623 Multinational Financial Management 3 hrs.
How global financial markets accommodate various cultural, legal, economic, and exchange rate systems. How
different conventions apply to country-specific accounting, operating, marketing, and financing. Multinational
interaction and exposure management are emphasized.
Prerequisite: completion of all MBA prerequisite courses.
FIN 624 Capital Budgeting
3 hrs.
Long-term capital investment decisions, policy, concepts,
tools and techniques. Builds on NPV decision rule, cash
flow, CAPM and APT, real options, and jump process approaches; risk considerations emphasized. Prerequisites:
completion of foundation courses, FIN 622.
FIN 625 Financial Analysis
3 hrs.
Contemporary theoretical and applied approaches to analyzing financial health. Managerial implications. Application and interpretation of ratios; univariate and multivariate tools. Financial modeling. Prerequisite: completion of
all MBA prerequisite courses.
FIN 627 Financial Risk Management
3 hrs.
Risks induced by input factor, interest rate, and currency
exchange rate changes are analyzed for interpretation,
reduction, offset, or alternative adjustment. How the firm
can enhance financial performance relative to risk taken.
Prerequisite: completion of all MBA prerequisite courses.
Bradley University
FIN 658 Topics in Finance
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of
Classes.
FIN 660 Readings in Finance
3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
Management
Choose 9 hours:
BMA 602 Organizational Behavior
3 hrs.
Analysis of individual and group behavior in the organizational environment. Motivation, leadership, communication, conflict, change, authority and power of lower-level
participants, decision-making, and organizational theory,
demonstrated through case analysis and classroom experiences. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate program of
study in business.
BMA 657 Executive Development
3 hrs.
Theory and research of development stages of executive
careers. The impact of the organization on the executive
personality; forces influencing the development of executive skills and abilities; studies of antecedents of executive
role performance; and the role of training programs in executive development.
BMA 658 Topics in Business Administration 3-6 hrs.
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of
Classes.
BMA 659 Topics in Management
1-2 hrs.
Management-related topics presented in modules or seminars. Topics may vary each time the course is offered. Topic
stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six hours credit.
BMA 660 Readings in Business Administration 1-3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy; consent of instructor and director of
graduate programs.
BMA 671 Productivity Software for Managers 3 hrs.
The use of packaged software to improve personal productivity in the business environment: spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, database retrieval, statistics,
word processing, and electronic mail. Problem-solving
laboratory exercises using the different software packages.
Prerequisite: familiarity with computer systems.
BMA 673 Data Communications for Managers 3 hrs.
Data communications for supporting management decision making and group coordination: communication
technologies, idea generation and group collaboration,
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
data and video conferencing, emerging technologies for
communication and coordination. Prerequisite: BMA 672
or consent of director of graduate programs.
BMA 675 Managing Systems Development
3 hrs.
Tools and techniques needed to manage the development of information systems. Systems analysis techniques, rapid application development, data modeling,
data management and administration, project management tools and techniques. Prerequisite: BMA 672 or consent of director of graduate programs.
BMA 676 Electronic Commerce
3 hrs.
Introduction to electronic commerce (EC). Managerial
and organizational issues surrounding EC. History of Internet, emerging technologies for EC, electronic data interchange, digital libraries, data warehouses, interactive
advertising and marketing, kiosk systems. Relation of EC
to organizational strategy. Prerequisite: BMA 672 or consent of director of graduate programs.
IB 656 International Business Administration 3 hrs.
Impact of economic, cultural, legal/political, institutional,
and competitive issues on the management of international and global business operations. Adjustment of
strategic and tactical entry mode, marketing, production,
human resources, and financial decisions to macroenvironmental constraints in selected world regions and markets. Case studies and reports. Prerequisites: BMA 620 or
MTG 624 or consent of instructor; consent of director of
graduate programs.
IB 658 Topics in International Business
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of
Classes.
IB 660 Readings in International Business
1-3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
Marketing
Required:
MTG 640 Obtaining, Analyzing, and Applying
Marketing Information
3 hrs.
Gathering, understanding, and using marketing information, data base marketing, qualitative research, electronic
research, forecasting, and computer software data analysis packages.
Choose two courses from the following:
IB 656 International Business Administration
Impact of economic, cultural, legal/political, institutional,
and competitive issues on the management of international and global business operations. Adjustment of
strategic and tactical entry mode, marketing, production,
49
human resources, and financial decisions to macroenvironmental constraints in selected world regions and markets. Case studies and reports. Prerequisites: BMA 620 or
MTG 624 or consent of instructor; consent of director of
graduate programs.
IB 658 Topics in International Business
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of
Classes.
IB 660 Readings in International Business
1-3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
MTG 654 Managing Services Marketing
3 hrs.
In-depth analysis of the problems facing marketing managers in service and nonprofit organizations. Interdependence of marketing, operations, and human resources.
MTG 660 Readings in Marketing
3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
MTG 688 Supply Chain Management
3 hrs.
Supply chain management consists of all stages involved in
directly or indirectly fulfilling customer requests. This course
will examine all aspects of the supply chain i.e., interactions
between manufacturers, suppliers, transportation agents,
retailers, and customers. Special emphasis is placed on managing flows of information, products, and funds between
organizations and throughout the open system.
ECO 660 Readings in Economics
3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
IME 555 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3 hrs.
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM); elements of
hardware and software within the manufacturing automation environment. Islands of factory automation and
their interactions, information flow and Local Area Networks within the CIM architecture, standardization of
electronic data and interfaces.
MTG 630 Building and Maintaining Marketing
Relationships
3 hrs.
Core concepts for developing and maintaining internal
and external customer relations. Relationship marketing;
customer satisfaction, quality, services marketing, consumer and industrial buyer behavior, personal selling, and
ethical marketing conduct. Prerequisite: MTG 624.
QM 501 Quantitative Analysis I
2 hrs.
The presentation and organization of data. Probability
theory, probability distributions, and sampling distributions. Confidence interval estimation and hypothesis tests
of one and two samples. Cannot be used to satisfy MBA
elective or concentration requirements. Prerequisite: MTH
115 or equivalent.
QM 660 Readings in Quantitative Methods
3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
MTG 658 Topics in Marketing
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of
Classes.
Other Electives
ATG 658 Topics in Accounting
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes.
ATG 660 Readings in Accounting
3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of graduate programs.
BUS 681 Professional Development
1-3 hrs.
Apply professional knowledge and skills in a team environment on not-for-profit, international, or research project. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours credit.
Prerequisites: consent of graduate program director.
50
Bradley University
Master of Science
in Quantitative Finance
Philip Horvath,
Graduate Program Coordinator
A variety of firms in many industries but especially financial institutions, investment banks, portfolio and fund
management firms, and commodities firms rely upon
very complex and sophisticated mathematical financial
models to identify, measure, and manage risks as well as
price certain assets. This phenomenon has led to the need
for professionals with extensive skills in both finance and
mathematics. Programs that prepare these professionals
are variously termed “financial engineering,” “computational finance,” “mathematical finance,” or “quantitative
finance.”
The Department of Finance and Quantitative Methods offers a graduate program leading to the Master of
Science in Quantitative Finance degree. The program
provides graduate education that prepares students to
meet professional finance challenges in public, private,
and not-for-profit organizations. The program is interdisciplinary and is designed for students with very strong
quantitative backgrounds who have objectives of understanding, modeling, and determining solutions to complex financial problems such as uncertainty (risk) management and derivatives. The program is rigorous and
requires completion of 30 credit hours of coursework. It
combines strong quantitative skills such as calculus, probability theory and numerical methods, computer science
such as algorithms, neural networks and computation
with uncertainty measurement and management, as well
as dynamic valuation and pricing from finance. The program emphasizes applied skills while providing sufficient
theoretical background. The program is open to full- and
part-time students.
Entrance Requirements—Students
possessing an undergraduate or
graduate degree
a.
Students may be admitted from a variety of undergraduate backgrounds, including finance, mathematics, economics, computer science, actuarial science,
statistics, information systems, and engineering.
Students may not have the required background
to immediately begin taking advanced courses
from the required program of study. In such cases,
the individual’s background will be assessed and
a program will be devised to prepare them for the
advanced material contained in the program.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
b. Prerequisites: completion of MSQF track in FCBA (See
Bradley’s Undergraduate Catalog), or
• Calculus: topics in analytic geometry, limits, continuity, differentiation, calculus of logarithmic,
exponential and trigonometric functions, integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals,
infinite series, calculus of functions of several
variables, multiple integrals, vector calculus;
• Linear Algebra: matrix algebra, determinants,
simultaneous equations, vector spaces, bases
Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, eigenvalues,
eigenvectors, transformations, and applications;
• Ordinary Differential Equations: existence and
uniqueness theorems, solution methods for initial
and boundary value problems, linear and nonlinear systems, stability theory, difference equations;
• Probability: continuous and discrete distributions, multivariate distributions and their moments; independence, ordinary and conditional
expectations, Central Limit Theorem;
• Statistics: statistical concepts, theory, and applications: random variables, sampling, theories
of estimation and testing of hypotheses, linear
models, and nonparametric methods, regression
analysis including detection of and solutions
to various violations of classic regression assumptions (heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation,
multicollinearity and simulataneity);
• Computer Programming: programming ability in
a high-level language such as C, C++, Fortran (70
or 90/95) Basic, Visual Basic;
• Economics: basic micro-and macroeconomic
topics including supply and demand functions,
market structure and the role of money;
• Finance: Financial markets and institutions,
fundamental and technical analysis, asset pricing
(CAPM, APT), derivatives, financial research, and
modeling.
Admission—MSQF
Admission to the Master of Science in Quantitative Finance program is based on a thorough review of the required documents as well as any supplemental material
that may be appropriate. The graduate admissions committee of the Department of Finance and Quantitative
Methods makes the admission recommendation. The required documents are the following:
1. Application form. The application form must be
complete with meaningful and well-developed answers to the questions on the goals of the applicant.
A check of $40 (international students pay $50),
payable to Bradley University, must accompany the
application.
51
2. Transcript(s). Official transcripts (one copy) from each
college and university attended must be sent directly
from the registrar to: Dean, Graduate School, Bradley
University, Peoria, IL 61625.
3. Letters of recommendation. Two current letters of
recommendation are required from persons who can
comment meaningfully on the applicant’s capability
for graduate-level study. Character references are
not appropriate. Faculty members under whom the
applicant has studied and employers are considered
appropriate references.
4. GMAT (Graduate Management Admissions Test). The
GMAT is a standardized test designed to measure
aptitude for graduate study in management. Applicants must arrange to take the test in sufficient
time to permit processing of the results. The Bradley
University GMAT institutional code is 1070. Information about the GMAT may be obtained by contacting
the Graduate School or visiting the GMAT Web site at
www.gmac.com.
5. A current resume.
6. Two essays as required by the Graduate School.
7. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language).
Applicable only to international students whose
native language is not English. The test measures
proficiency in oral and written English.
Graduate courses in business administration at the
600-level are restricted to graduate students who have
been admitted to a degree-granting program in the Graduate School. Students-at-large may not take 600-level
graduate courses in the Foster College of Business Administration. Exceptions, although rare, may be granted in unusual circumstances by the director of the program.
Admission—BS/BA-MSQF Program
Students may begin undergraduate courses along the BS/
BA-MSQF track when they are initially admitted to Bradley
as freshmen, or by transferring from other majors, colleges in the university, or from other colleges and universities by application. These students must be subsequently
admitted to the BS/BA-MSQF program during their senior
year (90 or more credit hours); provided they maintain at
least an overall 3.0 GPA. BS/BA-MSQF students are admitted as graduate students to the Graduate School subsequent to the completion of 124 undergraduate hours and
the BS/BA-MSQF undergraduate track.
Admission as a freshman: students must be admitted in good standing into the Foster College of Business
Administration. Students must apply to the BS/BA-MSQF
program in writing. Admission to the BS/BA-MSQF program will be based on ACT or SAT score, a class standing
usually in the top 15 percent of their high school class, and
two academic letters of recommendation. Under this process, students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA at Brad–
52
ley and complete at least 90 credit hours prior to taking
500-level courses.
Transfer Student Admission: students entering
the BS/BA-MSQF via transfer from other undergraduate
majors or programs must apply in writing. Admission is
based upon ACT or SAT score, grade point average (minimum acceptable is 3.0), and two academic letters of recommendation.
Admission to the Graduate School: students possessing undergraduate degrees apply directly to the
MSQF program. Admission for these students will be
based on GMAT scores, two short essays, and two letters
of reference, and undergraduate GPA.
Degree Requirements
The Master of Science in Quantitative Finance program
is 30 semester hours at the 500- or 600-level as outlined
below.
Foster College of Business Administration Courses:
FIN 633 Quantitative Methods in Finance ..............................3
FIN 636 Fixed Income ....................................................................3
FIN 637 Advanced Financial Derivatives ................................3
FIN 639 Uncertainty Analysis and Measurement ................3
FIN 649 Quantitative Finance Capstone .................................3
Courses outside the Foster College of Business
Administration:
MTH 510/CS 510 Numerical Methods I ...................................3
MTH 511/CIS 511 Numerical Methods II ................................3
MTH 514 Partial Differential Equations ...................................3
CS 514 Algorithms .........................................................................3
CIS 588 Expert Systems ................................................................3
Completion of MS in Quantitative Finance undergraduate
track or equivalent as outlined above.
Other Requirements
Applicants should review the Graduate School admission
policies, special regulations, registration and fees, and degree regulations located in the front of this catalog.
Capstone Course
Students must complete FIN 649 Quantitative Finance
Capstone, the capstone course, with a B or better to demonstrate their capacity to draw upon and integrate their
knowledge from all courses in the program. In case a student earns a grade less than B, the candidate will be allowed to retake the course only once.
Comprehensive Exam
Each MSQF student must take a written comprehensive examination. This examination covers the graduate work that
the student is presenting for the degree. The time, place,
and nature of the examination are a part of FIN 649.
Bradley University
Course Descriptions
FIN 633 Quantitative Methods in Finance
3 hrs.
Emphasizes the mathematical structure of and methods
for model solutions in asset and derivative pricing, capital
budgeting and real options, financing and liquidity. Includes solutions of systems of equations, complementarity, and optimization. Applications of numerical analysis,
integration and differentiation, functional and differential
equation solutions. Prerequisites: consent of department
chair.
FIN 636 Fixed Income
3 hrs .
Develops term structure models and options based on
fixed-income securities. Standard lognormal models,
short-term interest rate models, and more complex derivative models. Prerequisites: consent of department chair.
FIN 637 Derivatives II
3 hrs.
Advanced topics in derivative securities. Builds on introduction to derivatives and fixed income course. Develops
numerical techniques used to implement pricing methodologies, term structure models, and options based on
fixed income securities. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
FIN 639 Uncertainty Analysis and Measurement 3 hrs
The nature and importance of modeling and measuring
uncertainty; theoretical and computational approaches
to modeling and measuring uncertainty; qualitative and
quantitative uncertainty modeling and measurement;
computational issues in uncertainty modeling and measurement; simulation, moment generating and characteristic probability functions. Prerequisite: Consent of
department chair.
FIN 649 Quantitative Finance Capstone
3 hrs.
A capstone course that will develop topics of special interest which may vary each time the course is offered. Topic
stated in current Schedule of Classes. A maximum of three
credit hours of topics courses are allowed. Prerequisite:
consent of department chair.
FIN 659 Topics in Quantitative Finance
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the
course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
FIN 660 Readings in Quantitative Finance
1·3 hrs.
Individual readings for qualified students, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: consent of
instructor and director of the MBA program.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
53
SLANE COLLEGE OF
COMMUNICATIONS AND FINE ARTS
Jeffrey Huberman,
Dean
The mission of the Slane College of Communications and
Fine Arts shall be the pursuit of excellence in providing
distinctive programs and learning environments most
conducive to the intellectual, aesthetic, and professional
development of its students and faculty. The College also
recognizes its centrality to the broader University as a
participant in general education and to the larger community, nation, and world as a cultural and communications center.
In keeping with this mission, the College offers graduate degrees in the Department of Art, as well as courses in
communication and multimedia.
A dedicated faculty of professional artist-teachers is
committed to providing quality educational opportunities to students desiring post-baccalaureate study.
Art
Paul Krainak,
Chair, Department of Art
Fisher Stolz,
Graduate Advisor and Coordinator
The graduate degree program in art was established in
1948. The program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).
Mission
The mission of the graduate art program is the professional development of individual studio and scholarly
abilities, exemplified by a significant body of work. Students admitted to the program demonstrate the potential to solve contemporary problems in the visual arts and
address new questions and issues.
Two levels of graduate degrees are offered: a Master of
Art in Studio (M.A.) and a terminal graduate degree, Master
of Fine Art (M.F.A.), which designates the highest level of
academic achievement in studio art. The purpose of these
degrees is to prepare students for professional practice in
the field of studio art. Through participation in the program,
students gain knowledge and insight into historical and contemporary ideas and studio theory and practice.
Admission Requirements
Applicants for graduate degrees in art shall demonstrate a
special ability for growth and conceptual development in
their area of concentration.
Following are requirements for admission to the program:
1. Official transcript confirming an undergraduate degree with a major in art or the equivalent, and a grade
point average in accordance with the requirements of
the Graduate School.
2. Portfolio of work (20 slides or the equivalent in electronic format for ceramics, drawing/illustration, interdisciplinary art studies, painting, printmaking, sculpture; visual communications and design).
3. Three letters of recommendation.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
55
4. A statement of one’s interests, abilities, and direction
in the Fine Arts (250 words).
5. Personal interview with graduate or studio area coordinator (recommended).
6. Application deadlines are November 1 (for spring entrance) and March 1 (for fall entrance) to be assured
full consideration.
In some cases, conditional acceptance is possible. Undergraduate study may be necessary where deficiencies
exist. Students who already hold a Master of Arts degree
in studio art may be admitted to the M.F.A. program. For
details, consult the department chair.
Degree Requirements
General requirements:
1. Students are eligible to advance to candidacy with
an oral and visual presentation to the graduate faculty after completion of 9 semester hours and before
18 hours. Graduate faculty will make a collaborative
decision regarding the student’s continuation in the
program. Undergraduate study may be necessary
where deficiencies exist.
2. Each student must participate in the biennial graduate exhibition.
3. A student may transfer from 6 to 12 semester hours
of credit in the major concentration from another
accredited institution if approved in advance by the
graduate coordinator.
4. The following studio major concentrations are offered: ceramics, drawing/illustration, interdisciplinary art studies, painting, photography, printmaking,
sculpture, and visual communications and design.
5. Each student is assigned a graduate committee consisting of a major professor in the field and two additional graduate faculty members. The student must
work closely with the major graduate coordinator to
plan his or her program of study.
6. Each full-time graduate student must take one seminar each semester until the requirement is completed.
Twelve credits or four seminars are required.
7. A residency of 48 semester hours is required for the
M.F.A. degree and 24 semester hours for the M.A. degree.
8. Students must pass a written comprehensive examination and oral presentation.
9. Documentation of the student’s thesis exhibition and
presentation shall be the responsibility of the student
and will become the property of the University.
56
Course Requirements
Master of Fine Arts Degree with a
Major in Studio Art
Studio (major concentration)...........................................30 hrs.
Graduate studio electives.....................................................9 hrs.
Graduate electives (may be University graduate
courses, additional graduate studios, seminars,
and/or written thesis) ....................................................6 hrs.
Seminars in art history...........................................................6 hrs.
Seminar in contemporary trends................................ 6-12 hrs.
Thesis (exhibition) ...............................................................3-6 hrs.
____
Total Hours Required
60 hrs.
Master of Arts Degree with a Major in
Studio Art
Studio (major concentration)...........................................12 hrs.
Graduate studio electives.....................................................6 hrs.
Graduate electives (may be University graduate
courses, additional graduate studios, seminars,
and/or written thesis) ....................................................3 hrs.
Seminar in art history.............................................................3 hrs.
Seminar in contemporary trends.......................................3 hrs.
Thesis (exhibition) ...............................................................3-6 hrs.
____
Total Hours Required
30 hrs.
Course Descriptions
ART 500 Advanced Studio
3-6 hrs.
Advanced work in printmaking, drawing, photography,
ceramics, sculpture, intermedia, or painting. Prerequisites:
graduate standing or completion of corresponding senior
level course.
ART 600 Photography Studio
3-30 hrs.
Development of advanced technical, aesthetic, and conceptual concerns through experimentation within the
photographic media relating to appropriate historical and
contemporary references. 3-6 hours per semester. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
ART 610 Drawing
3-6 hrs.
Analytical and conceptual evaluation of individual style
and content emphasizing technical, creative, and digital
competencies on a professional level. 3-6 hours per semester. Repeatable to a maximum of 30 hours.
ART 620 Printmaking Studio
3-30 hrs.
Technical and conceptual development with intaglio, relief,
and planographic printing. Etching, engraving, wood, paper, and plastic relief printing, serigraphy and lithography.
3-6 hours per semester.
ART 630 Ceramics Studio
3-30 hrs.
Techniques and materials used in stoneware, earthenware,
and porcelain. Emphasis on creative development and
technical competence. 3-6 hours per semester.
Bradley University
ART 640 Sculpture Studio
3-30 hrs.
Technical and conceptual information about wood and
stone carving and construction, welding and metals fabrication, non-ferrous foundry practice, and plastics lamination, emphasizing individual development. 3-6 hours per
semester.
ART 698 Design Research and Collaboration
3 hrs.
A design problem that responds to social, economic, and
environmental concerns created in consultation and collaboration with a corporation, institution, or government
agency under the supervision of the faculty. Repeatable up
to a maximum of 6 semester hours.
ART 660 Interdisciplinary Art Studio
3-6 hrs.
Advanced work in more than one area of concentration. May
include two- or three-dimensional media; may incorporate
installation work, performance, construction, and creative
expression with interrelated forms of fine arts and design. 3-6
hours per semester. Repeatable to a maximum of 30 hours.
ART 699 Thesis Exhibition
3-6 hrs.
At the beginning of the third semester, graduate students
submit a proposal that defines their evolving thesis work.
During the last semester of their final year, all graduate students present thesis exhibitions for review by the graduate
faculty and other invited participants. A written thesis may
supplement the exhibition at the discretion and interest of
the student. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours.
ART 670 Painting Studio
3-30 hrs.
Advanced painting in the medium and direction of the
student’s choice. Emphasis on creative development and
technical competence. 3-6 hours per semester.
ART 680 Special Problems
3-18 hrs.
Problems in area of student’s special interest, as advised by
instructor. 3 hours per semester.
ART 690 Seminar
3-18 hrs.
Research and presentation of art topics ranging from history to contemporary concerns of the artist, to interdisciplinary courses or courses consisting of an organized sequence
of guest speakers. May be repeated under various topics for
a maximum of 18 hours or 3 hours per semester.
ART 694 Visual Communications
and Design Studio
3-6 hrs.
Working within hypothetical environments and data, focuses on design development, problem-solving skills, visualization, and invention. Concept exploration emphasized
while developing a personal creative vision and understanding of current graphic design practices and technology. Repeatable up to a maximum of 30 hours.
ART 695 Theory and Criticism
3-6 hrs.
Research, discussion, and presentations on topics in fine
arts and design, including contemporary trends, philosophies, literature, and history.
ART 696 Advanced Digital Design
3 hrs.
Advanced work in applied software for web design, animation, rapid prototyping, interactive design, and experience
design. Repeatable up to a total of 6 semester hours.
ART 697 Design Management
3 hrs.
Development phases of real-world project execution, including research, problem definition, planning, cost and
budget analysis, organization, and presentation of information for business, public institutions, government, and the
entertainment industry.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Supportive Courses
CFA 500 Research Methods in Speech
and Theatre Arts
3 hrs.
Problems and principles in conducting original and creative research, investigation, and reporting in rhetoric and
public address, theatre arts, and oral interpretation. Prerequisite: consent of appropriate chairperson.
CFA 604 Independent Study
1-3 hrs.
Independent research or creative production problems
not leading to a thesis. Repeatable to a maximum of 6
credit hours with permission of the graduate coordinator.
Prerequisite: consent of appropriate chairperson.
Multimedia
MM 513 Educational Software Design
3 hrs.
The design and construction of educational software that
is based upon sound educational theory and best practice. Students will become proficient with appropriate
multimedia instructional design software in developing
their projects. Investigating and applying current theories of learning, instruction, and assessment. Cross-listed
as ETE 513. Prerequisites: MM 113 or ETE 551; MM 213 or
instructor approval.
57
COLLEGE OF
EDUCATION AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Joan L. Sattler,
Dean
Lori Russell-Chapin,
Associate Dean and
Graduate Studies Coordinator
The College of Education and Health Sciences at Bradley
University was founded in June 1985. The mission of the
College is to prepare leaders within the human service
professions. The college provides innovative programs
through excellence in teaching, scholarship, and collaboration with interdisciplinary and community-based
partnerships. This dynamic learning environment prepares our graduates to provide services in a diverse and
global society to enhance human resources and to foster
life-long learning. It includes graduate degree programs
within the following departments:
1. Educational Leadership and Human Development, offering programs in leadership in educational administration, leadership in human service administration,
and human development counseling. Chair: Christopher Rybak.
2. Teacher Education, offering programs in curriculum
and instruction with concentrations in assessment,
early childhood education, educational technology,
gifted education, literacy and reading, middle school
education, multidisciplinary education, science education, and special education. The department also
offers a master's degree in curriculum and instruction
with a LBS1 concentration, for teachers seeking to
acquire initial special education certification. Reading Specialist endorsements are also available. Chair:
D. Antonio Cantu.
3. Nursing, offering a Master of Science in Nursing
(M.S.N.) in nursing administration, nurse administered anesthesia, and M.S.N-General and supportive
courses in nursing. Chair: Francesca Armmer.
4. Physical Therapy and Health Science, offering a Doctorate of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.). Chair: Steve Tippett.
Although the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
does not offer a graduate degree program, graduate courses
are available to fulfill cognate and elective purposes.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Master of Arts
The Master of Arts degree is conferred upon students
who have completed a minimum of 33 graduate semester
hours in curriculum and instruction or the learning behavior specialist I; 36 graduate semester hours in leadership
in educational administration or leadership in human
service administration; 51 graduate semester hours in human development counseling.
Before any application can be approved, the Miller
Analogies Test (MAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
must be a part of the candidate’s record. The GRE testing
program changed significantly in 2002, and this change
affected the graduate admissions requirements for the
departments in the College of Education and Health Sciences. Questions about these requirements for admission
should be directed to the respective department.
The candidate is urged to make necessary testing
arrangements with the EHS secretary, 677-3181, for the
MAT. The GRE is administered by the Educational Testing
Service. Candidates can get more information on the GRE
by visiting www.ets.org on the Internet. This will expedite
the application process.
All applicants must complete the prescribed application forms of the College of Education and Health Sciences and Graduate School.
Three letters of reference must be obtained by the
applicant from educational field employers or college/
university professors who can recommend the applicant
as having strong potential for success in graduate studies and in potential continued service to the education
profession.
ELH 604 is strongly recommended as the first course
taken by all degree candidates. The other core course that
is mandated in all professional education and counseling
programs within the College of Education and Health Sciences is ELH 605. It is recommended that the two required
core courses be completed during the first 12 semester
hours of the student’s program.
Students should consult with their advisor for departmental program requirements.
The Education Reform Act requires that after July 1,
1988, all persons seeking early childhood, elementary, special, high school, school service personnel, or administrative
59
certificates in Illinois must pass both a test of basic skills and
a test of subject-matter knowledge. Those persons covered
include new graduates from teacher preparation programs,
educators moving to Illinois from other states, and Illinois
educators applying for additional certification.
Educational Administration, Human
Development Counseling,
Human Service Administration
Accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
Admission to the 51-semester-hour M.A. Human Development Counseling, Track I: School Counseling and Track II:
Counseling in the Community and Other Agency Settings
as well as the Educational Administration and Human Service Administration is based on a thorough review of each
applicant’s documents. Requirements include:
documents. Requirements include:
1. B.S.N. from an NLNAC or CCNE accredited program.
2. licensed or license-eligible as a registered nurse in
Illinois.
3. three letters of recommendation from individuals
qualified to comment on the applicant’s ability to
successfully complete graduate study (employers, supervisors, and former instructional faculty members
are suitable references).
4. an undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of
3.0 based on a 4.0 scale and a 3.0 or higher cumulative
grade point average in nursing courses based on a 4.0
scale.
1. three professional and/or academic letters of references—at least one must be from a current supervisor
5. completion of at least one year of work as a professional nurse; nurse administered anesthesia applicants must have worked at least one year in an adult
critical care setting.
2. an undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of
3.0 based on a 4.0 scale
6. completion of a statistics course with a grade of “C” or
better.
3. completion of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
within five years prior to admission
7. completion of a course in health assessment or its
equivalent.
4. evidence of a satisfactory screening interview
8. completion of an undergraduate nursing research
course.
Applicants with deficiencies in requirements will be evaluated on an individual basis, contingent upon satisfactory
completion of a screening interview.
9. completion of undergraduate organic and inorganic
chemistry courses (nurse administered anesthesia
major applicants only).
Master of Science in Nursing
Accredited by National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, New York
10006, 800-669-1656 ext. 153 or (212) 363-5555 ext.
153, www.nlnac.org; and Council on Accreditation of
Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs, 222 S. Prospect Ave., Suite 304, Park Ridge, Illinois, 60068.
The purpose of the graduate program is to educate the
professional nurse for advanced nursing practice in hospitals, community health settings, nursing homes, and
other health-related agencies. The curriculum provides a
foundation for doctoral study.
Nursing Administration
The 36-semester-hour curriculum has three components:
core, research, and nursing administration.
Nurse Administered Anesthesia
The 48-semester-hour curriculum has three components:
core, research, and nurse administered anesthesia.
10. completion of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) within
five years prior to admission.
a. for unconditional admission: a GRE combined
score (verbal & quantitative) of 1000 or a minimum MAT score of 391.
b. for conditional admission: a GRE combined score
(verbal & quantitative) of 850 or a minimum MAT
score of 374.
11. completion of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 550 (foreign
applicants only).
12. evidence of a satisfactory interview with a graduate
faculty member in the relevant major; applicants for
the nurse administered anesthesia major will also
have an additional interview with anesthesia faculty
members.
Applicants with deficiencies in the requirements will be
evaluated on an individual basis.
A flexible entry option is available for graduates of
non-BSN programs.
Admission to the M.S.N. program with a major in
Nursing Administration or Nurse Administered Anesthesia is based on a thorough review of each applicant’s
60
Bradley University
MSN—General
The MSN—General addresses the need of advance practice nurses who hold certificates/diplomas of advanced
practice, but do not have a master’s degree in nursing.
Examples of these advance practice nurses include (but
are not limited to) pediatric nurse practitioners, family nurse practitioners, or clinical nurse specialists. The
MSN—General students will achieve a blend of theoretical, philosophical, and ethical components foundational
to graduate-level education. Admission to the MSN—
General program is based on a thorough review of each
applicant’s documents. Requirements include:
1. evidence of current APN certification
2. licensed or license-eligible as a registered nurse in
Illinois
3. three letters of recommendation from individuals
qualified to comment on the applicant’s ability to successfully complete graduate study (employers, supervisors, and former instructional faculty members are
suitable references)
4. completion of a statistics course with a grade of “C” or
better*
5. completion of undergraduate nursing research
course
6. completion of the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) within
five years prior to admission
a. For unconditional admission: a GRE combined
score (verbal and quantitative) of 1000 or an MAT
minimum score of 391.
b. For conditional admission: a GRE combined score
(verbal and quantitative) of 850 or an MAT minimum score of 374.
7. completion of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 550 (foreign
applicants only)
8. an interview with a graduate faculty member
*May take as an elective
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Educational
Leadership and Human
Development
Christopher Rybak,
Chair
Administration Programs
The Department of Educational Leadership and Human
Development offers two administration programs leading to the Master of Arts degree: leadership in educational
administration and leadership in human service administration. The programs develop qualities associated
with leadership and informed decision making through
coursework that engages students in “making the connections” that are fundamental to success as an administrator. Coursework focuses on establishing connections
between theory and practice, and culminates in a supervised field experience.
Leadership in Educational
Administration Master’s
Degree Program
Accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Educational
Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC).
The Leadership in Educational Administration Program is a
36-hour program accredited by NCATE, approved by the Illinois State Board of Education, and satisfying requirements
for a Type 75 certificate with the general administrative endorsement necessary for entry level school administrators.
The ISBE certification requirements include a teaching certificate and two years of teaching experience.
Students in the Leadership in Educational Administration Program are required to complete a total of 250 field
experience hours in a school setting. The first 50 hours are
completed prior to enrolling in ELH 686 Field Experiences
in Educational Administration, which is a capstone course.
The first 50 hours include observation of a recognized social justice school leader, observation of special education
meetings, and participation on the school improvement
committee in a school. The remaining 200 hours are completed during ELH 686 and involve assuming a leadership
role in two projects, assigned projects from each of the six
Illinois Standards for School Leaders, and participation in
four on-campus seminars.
In addition, the department offers a Type 75 certification program sequence for a person with a master’s
degree who wishes to obtain a Type 75 certificate with
61
the general administrative endorsement. The number of
hours required will normally vary from 18 to 30, depending upon how the educational background of the student
fulfills requirements of the college core and the other
required courses. Upon receipt of an application, each
student’s transcript is evaluated and required courses
established. Students applying for the Type 75 Certificate
program are required to follow the same application procedures as degree-seeking students. With the exception
of reduced coursework, Type 75 students have the same
program requirements as students in the master's program, including dispositions review and the comprehensive portfolio and presentation.
For unconditional admission to the program, a student must have an undergraduate overall and cumulative
major grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Conditional admission requires an undergraduate overall
cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or higher.
In addition to the GPA requirement, the screening
process requires three letters of recommendation that address leadership, ethical behaviors, and professional competencies. One letter of recommendation must be written
by a current supervisor. Students are required to write a
two-page minimum essay addressing the essay questions
required by the Graduate School, and also addressing the
candidate's leadership experiences, qualifications, and
ethical considerations of leadership.
Graduate Core .........................................................9 hrs.
ELH 604 Research Methodology & Applications..........3 hrs.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership .........................................................................3 hrs.
Departmental Required Courses ........................ 24 hrs.
ELH 611 Instructional Leadership......................................3 hrs.
ELH 662 Community Relations ...........................................2 hrs.
ELH 669 Special Education Law............................................1 hr.
ELH 670 Human Resource Management ........................3 hrs.
ELH 673 Leadership Perspectives ......................................3 hrs.
ELH 676 The School Principalship .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 677 Educational Finance ..............................................2 hrs.
ELH 678 United States Public School Law ......................3 hrs.
ELH 686 Field Experiences in Administration................4 hrs.
Suggested Electives ...............................................3 hrs.
ELH 510 Statistical Procedures ...........................................3 hrs.
ELH 550 Independent Study ...............................................3 hrs.
ELH 586 Counseling Diverse Populations.......................3 hrs.
ELH 612 Institutional Planning and Evaluation ............3 hrs.
ELH 620 Human Development Counseling ...................3 hrs.
ELH 651 Community Counseling.......................................3 hrs.
ELH 661 Couples and Family Counseling .......................3 hrs.
ELH 681 Seminar in Educational Administration .........3 hrs.
ELH 699 Thesis ......................................................................0-6 hrs.
____
Total Program Semester Hours
62
36 hrs.
Post-Master's Certification in Educational Administration
Post-Master's Certification in Educational Administration
is designed for students who have a master’s degree in education or an education-related field who wish to become
certified school administrators in Illinois. Applicants who
hold a master’s degree in any field other than Educational
Administration and who are seeking to earn the Type 75
certificate to be a school administrator in the State of Illinois are required to complete the equivalent of thirty (30)
semester hours of graduate credit in a specified course of
study in Educational Administration as prescribed by the
State of Illinois. Bradley University has provided this opportunity for many years to students holding a master's
degree in another area.
The Type 75 Certificate Program provides a service to
the profession of educational administration and to Bradley University because it satisfies the current demand to
train principals brought on by the high numbers of administrators retiring. In addition, students benefit by having the opportunity to fulfill the requirements for a Type
75 without taking on a new master's program. The Type
75 Certificate is an endorsement in Educational Administration and is required to be a principal or administrator
(other than superintendent) in Illinois schools. The number of graduate hours needed varies depending upon the
masters program completed by the student and typically
ranges from 18-30 graduate hours. The Illinois State Board
of Education requirements for an Illinois Type 75 Certificate include graduate coursework that is divided into
four categories: instructional leadership, management
of public schools, school and public policy, and clinical
experience. In addition to a master's degree and specific
graduate course work, candidates for the Illinois Type 75
Certificate are also required to have two years of full-time
teaching experience or school service personnel experience and successful completion of the required State of
Illinois certification examinations.
Curriculum
Students follow a course sequence similar to master's
degree-seeking Educational Leadership students with
the exception of coursework requirements already satisfied. Upon transcript evaluation of the previous masters
degree in another area, students follow the same courses
as master's level students.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership .........................................................................3 hrs.
ELH 673 Leadership Perspectives ......................................3 hrs.
ELH 676 The School Principalship .....................................2 hrs.
ELH 686 Field Experiences in Administration................4 hrs.
ELH 611 Instructional Leadership......................................3 hrs.
ELH 662 Community Relations ...........................................2 hrs.
Bradley University
ELH 669 Special Education Law..........................................1 hrs.
ELH 670 Human Resource Management ........................3 hrs.
ELH 677 Educational Finance ..............................................2 hrs.
ELH 678 United States Public School Law ......................3 hrs.
Application and Screening Interview Procedures for
Post-Masters Certification (Type 75) in Educational
Administration from the Department of Educational
Leadership and Human Development (ELH)
1. Prospective candidates for certification must formally
apply to the Post-Masters Certification in Educational
Administration Certificate Program. Application materials for each candidate shall consist of:
• Bradley Application for Graduate Admission
• two essays
• three letters of recommendation
• copies of official transcripts from previous undergraduate and graduate work
• application fee
Note: The requirement to take either the MAT or GRE is
waived.
2. Upon receipt and review of admission materials by
Bradley Educational Administration (EDA) Faculty, all
applicants are considered by EDA faculty for consensus admittance into the Type 75 Certificate program.
Upon faculty consensus for admission, applicants will
be notified of their acceptance by letter. If there is
no consensus for acceptance, applicants will be sent
a letter outlining faculty concerns and requiring the
applicant to interview with EDA faculty to address
identified concerns. Following the screening interview, applicants will be notified by letter of the final
disposition of their application.
3. Upon successful application and screening, applicants must complete a plan of study based upon a
transcript review and then complete identified deficit
coursework and experience.
4. In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the
Department of ELH, nor does such submission guarantee interim certification approval and signature by
appropriate College officers.
tance into the post-masters Educational Administration
Type 75 Certification program.
Transfer Credits
Post graduate students seeking the Type 75 Certification only may transfer up to twelve (12) semester hours
towards school administrator certification. Post graduate
students seeking the Type 75 Certification must complete
a minimum of 18 specific graduate credit hours in the
post-master's Type 75 Certification program offered at
Bradley University by the ELH Department. Determination of the total number of hours needed to secure the
Type 75 Certification will be determined by EDA Faculty
based upon the official transcripts submitted by the post
graduate student.
In determining the final disposition of the transferable graduate credits, EDA Faculty reserve the right to require the post graduate student to submit course syllabi
and course descriptions from the college catalog in place
when the first graduate degree was awarded. Department
of ELH faculty will evaluate these materials to determine
equivalency with the Bradley University Department of
ELH Educational Administration Program, in addition to
applicable ISBE requirements.
Retention Procedures for Certification-Only
Students
Certification-only students are held to the same retention criteria and procedures as degree-seeking students.
Students must complete a plan of study with an advisor,
which must be approved by the advisor and ELH Department chair.
In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the Department of ELH.
Financial Eligibility
Students accepted unconditionally into the Type 75 Certificate program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Human Development shall be eligible for the
Educators Scholarship offered through and administered
by the Graduate School.
Policy for Dated Coursework
National Board Certified Teachers
Fast Track Type 75 Certification
All graduate coursework must have been completed
within five (5) years of the date on the application for
the certificate program. Applicants with degrees and/or
coursework older than five (5) years must submit evidence
of appropriate continuing education and/or training in
education or a related field. Eligibility for post-masters
certification using these criteria will be decided on a caseby-case basis by Bradley Educational Leadership faculty.
Submission of these materials does not guarantee admit-
The Illinois General Assembly passed legislation in 2007
that provides an alternative route to administrative certification for National Board Certified Teachers. Teachers
who hold National Board certification are eligible for an
administrative Type 75 certificate after completing the following four phases:
• National Board certification and an endorsement
in teacher leadership
• A master's degree in a teacher leader program
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
63
•
•
Fifteen hours of coursework in which the
candidate must show evidence of meeting competencies for organizational management and
development, finance, supervision and evaluation, policy and legal issues, and leadership as
stated in the Illinois Professional School Leader
Standards for principals
A passing score on the Illinois Administrative
Assessment.
Curriculum
Qualified individuals take the following courses:
ELH 669 Special Education Law..................................................1
ELH 670 Human Resource Management ................................3
ELH 673 Leadership Perspectives ..............................................3
ELH 676 The School Principalship .............................................3
ELH 677 Educational Finance ......................................................2
ELH 678 U. S. Public School Law.................................................3
____
15
The legislation does not require an internship. No additional coursework would be required.
Leadership in Human Service
Administration Master’s
Degree Program
The leadership in human service administration program
requires 36 hours and is intended for persons seeking
administrative positions in human service agencies. The
fundamental goal of the Department of Educational
Leadership and Human Development is to provide its students with quality professional programs and an environment that will aid them in preparing for leadership roles
in human service professions. The courses in this program
provide a human development foundation and integrate
a human relations orientation with conceptual and technical skills required for effective administration in a variety
of human service organizations.
For unconditional admission to the program, a student must have an undergraduate last-60-hour grade
point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Conditional admission
requires an undergraduate overall cumulative grade point
average of 2.75 or higher.
In addition to the GPA requirement, the screening
process requires three letters of recommendation that address leadership, ethical behaviors, and professional competencies. One letter of recommendation must be written
by a current supervisor.
College Core Required Courses .............................9 hrs.
ELH 604 Research Methodology & Applications..........3 hrs.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership .........................................................................3 hrs.
64
Departmental Required Courses ........................ 18 hrs.
ELH 580 Financial Leadership in Human
Service Administration..................................................3 hrs.
ELH 583 Supervision and Employee Engagement
in Human Service Administration .............................3 hrs.
ELH 610 Survey in Human Service Administration .....3 hrs.
ELH 612 Institutional Planning & Evaluation .................3 hrs.
ELH 673 Leadership Perspectives ......................................3 hrs.
ELH 686 Field Experience in Administration..............3-6 hrs.
Elective Courses .................................................. 9 hours
ELH 540 Human Growth and Development ..................3 hrs.
ELH 550 Independent Study ...........................................1-6 hrs.
ELH 551 Substance Abuse Counseling ............................3 hrs.
ELH 581 Topics in Human Service Administration ..1-3 hrs.
ELH 582 Grant Writing in Human
Service Administration..................................................2 hrs.
ELH 586 Counseling Diverse Populations.......................3 hrs.
ELH 620 Human Development Counseling ...................3 hrs.
ELH 641 Appraisal of the Individual..................................3 hrs.
ELH 651 Community Counseling.......................................3 hrs.
ELH 662 Community Relations ...........................................2 hrs.
ELH 681 Seminar in Educational Administration .....1-6 hrs.
ELH 682 Seminar in Human Service Administration ..2 hrs.
ELH 699 Thesis ......................................................................0-6 hrs.
MLS 633 Issues in Higher Education.................................3 hrs.
Human Development
Counseling
Accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) and
the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher
Education (NCATE).
The human development counseling program is designed
to prepare students for positions as counselors in a variety of settings. The counselor education faculty believes
that the work of the professional counselor is to promote
the positive growth and development of the clients with
whom the counselor interacts.
The human development counseling model for preparing counselors recognizes the profound interactive effect of
people and human systems. We believe there is a need for
social science translators—people who are in touch with the
best in theory and research—who can translate this knowledge into effective programs, and who can evaluate these
programs. Because we believe that counselors should experience personal growth and development as persons and as
professionals, all courses are designed to provide both cognitive and experiential learning.
The program utilizes a Screening and Retention Policy to assist in determining the suitability of an individual
for a career in counseling, as well as to monitor progress
through the program. A detailed description of the Screening and Retention Policy and procedures is available in the
Human Development Counseling Handbook. Continuance
Bradley University
in the program is reviewed if at any time a student fails to
demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors; or other
circumstances occur which would make an HDC degree
candidate uncertifiable as a professional counselor.
Areas of specialization are offered in community and
agency counseling and school counseling (NCATE accredited and ISBE approved). The program prepares the student to
sit for the exam for certification as a National Certified Counselor or for Illinois Type 73 certification in school guidance
and personnel services. Both areas are CACREP accredited.
In addition, courses of continuing professional education are
offered to practicing counselors who wish to increase competencies to meet emerging needs of the profession.
Program of Study
The program in human development counseling requires
51 semester hours of graduate work at the master’s level
for completion. The program consists of a graduate core
of nine semester hours and a program core of 30 semester
hours of study required of all candidates. In addition, students take an additional 12 semester hours of specialty area
course work that may, in concert with the internship and
practicum work required in the core program, permit them
to develop a specialty area consistent with plans for future
employment. Areas of study include, but are not limited to,
school counseling and community and agency counseling.
All students should consult with their advisor to determine
specific courses that will meet their professional goals.
Graduate Core .........................................................9 hrs.
ELH 604 Research Methodology & Applications..........3 hrs.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Org. Leadership .3 hrs.
Program Core ....................................................... 30 hrs.
ELH 540 Human Growth and Development ..................3 hrs.
ELH 586 Counseling Diverse Populations.......................3 hrs.
ELH 620 Human Development Counseling ...................3 hrs.
ELH 621 Career & Life Planning Across Life Span.........3 hrs.
ELH 623 Pre-Practicum in Counseling .............................3 hrs.
ELH 624 Theories and Techniques of Counseling ........3 hrs.
ELH 625 Principles of Group Counseling ........................3 hrs.
ELH 641 Appraisal of the Individual..................................3 hrs.
ELH 690 Practicum (appropriate to specialty) ................1 hr.
ELH 691 Internship I (appropriate to specialty) ........1-2 hrs.
ELH 692 Internship II (appropriate to specialty) .......1-6 hrs.
Specialty Area ...................................................... 12 hrs.
Students should use the remainder of the program to
structure course work around a special area of interest
from among those possibilities listed below. These specialties should be consistent with and support activities in
the student’s proposed internship placement. Other areas
unique to a student’s interests may be designed in consultation with members of the department.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
I.
School Counseling ........................................ 12 hrs.
Intended to prepare students for positions as guidance
specialists or student personnel workers in elementary
and/or secondary schools. Degree requirements satisfy
ISBE guidelines for certification as a school counselor.
Required ..................................................................9 hrs.
ELH 551 Substance Abuse Counseling ............................3 hrs.
ELH 652 Professional School Counseling........................3 hrs.
ELH 654 Consultation in the Helping Professions .......3 hrs.
Electives ..................................................................3 hrs.
II. Community & Agency Counseling ............... 12 hrs.
Intended for students working or planning to work
as clinical mental health counselors in community
mental health centers, human service agencies, and
not-for-profit community support programs, and for
those interested in providing counseling services to
employees and their families within the context of
business or industrial settings.
Required ..................................................................9 hrs.
ELH 651 Community Counseling.......................................3 hrs.
ELH 661 Couples & Family Counseling ............................3 hrs.
ELH 663 Counseling and Dynamics of Aging ................3 hrs.
Electives ..................................................................3 hrs.
School Counseling Program
The Masters Degree in School Counseling Program at Bradley University meets the Illinois Standards for the School
Service Personnel Certificate (23.11, 2nd edition 2002). In
response to school counseling certification rule changes
(Section 25.225 of the 23 Illinois Administrative code) approved by the Illinois State Board of Education on June 1,
2004, the Bradley University School Counseling Program in
the Department of Educational Leadership and Human Development has established the following courses of study
for degree-seeking and post-master’s certification-only students in the School Counseling Program. In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into
any program offered by the Department of ELH.
Degree-seeking students who have Illinois
teacher certification
Degree-seeking students enrolled in the master’s degree
in School Counseling Program who hold or are qualified
to hold a teacher certificate in Illinois must meet ELH Department master’s degree requirements while completing
51 hours of graduate study as follows:
Graduate Core Credits
ELH 604 Research Methodology & Applications..........3 hrs.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change .....................................3 hrs.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership .........................................................................3 hrs.
65
Program Core
Post-Masters Certification-Only
ELH 540 Human Growth & Development .......................3 hrs.
ELH 586 Counseling Diverse Populations.......................3 hrs.
ELH 620 Human Development Counseling ...................3 hrs.
ELH 621 Career Development Across Lifespan.............3 hrs.
ELH 623 Pre-Practicum in Counseling .............................3 hrs.
ELH 624 Theories & Techniques of Counseling .............3 hrs.
ELH 625 Principles of Group Counseling ........................3 hrs.
ELH 641 Appraisal of the Individual..................................3 hrs.
ELH 690 Practicum in School Counseling .........................1 hr.
ELH 691 Internship in School Counseling I ................1-2 hrs.
ELH 692 Internship in School Counseling II ...............1-6 hrs.
Post-master’s certification in school counseling refers to
students who have a master’s degree in counseling or a
related field who wish to become certified school counselors in Illinois. Applicants who hold a master’s degree in any
related field other than school counseling (e.g., other counseling specialty, social work, or psychology) are required
to complete the equivalent of all requirements of an approved school counseling preparation program. Pursuant
to Section 25.225.h, the Department of ELH will review the
applicant’s educational background to determine any deficits as identified by standards set forth at 23 IL Adm. Code
23.110 or other applicable requirements of section 25.225.
School Counseling
ELH 551 Substance Abuse Counseling ............................3 hrs.
ELH 652 Professional School Counseling........................3 hrs.
ELH 654 Consultation.............................................................3 hrs.
Electives ......................................................................................3 hrs.
____
Total
51 hrs.
Degree-seeking students who do not have
Illinois teacher certification
Degree-seeking students enrolled in the masters degree
in School Counseling Program who are not certified
teachers in Illinois also must meet ELH Department master’s degree requirements while completing 51 hours of
graduate study. The program of study is the same as listed
for students holding teacher certification, with the exception that, in lieu of electives, students must take or have
taken course work addressing additional ISBE (section
25.225.d.2.A-D) requirements in four areas. These areas
and the ELH courses addressing them are:
•
the structure, organization and operation of the educational system with an emphasis on P-12 schools;
ELH 584-02 Understanding Schools: A Primer for NonTeachers (2 credit hours) and ELH 652 Professional
School Counseling (3 credit hours)
•
the growth and development of children and youth
and their implications for counseling in schools; ELH
540 Human Growth & Development and ELH 652 Professional School Counseling
•
the diversity of Illinois students and the laws and programs that have been designed to meet their unique
needs; ELH 669 Special Education Law (1 credit hour)
•
effective management of the classroom and the
learning process; ELH 584-02 Understanding Schools:
A Primer for Non-Teachers (2 credit hours), ELH 652
Professional School Counseling, and ELH 690, 691,
692 Practicum and Internship
Application and Screening Interview Procedures for
Post-Masters Certification in School Counseling for
master’s graduates of the Department of Educational
Leadership and Human Development (ELH) Human
Development Counseling (HDC) Program
1. Prospective candidates for certification must formally apply to the Post-Masters Certification (PMC)
in School Counseling Program. Application materials
for each candidate shall consist of:
• Bradley Application for Graduate Admission
• Two Letters of recommendation
• Copies of all official transcripts including master's degree
•
Deficit course work and experience list as identified in a transcript review using Dept. of ELH School
Counseling course requirements and 23 IL Adm. Code
23.110 and 25.225
2. Upon receipt of admission materials all applicants
are presented to HDC faculty for consensus admittance into the PMC program. Upon faculty consensus
for admission, applicants will be notified of their acceptance by letter. If there is no consensus for acceptance, applicants will be sent a letter outlining faculty
concerns and requiring the applicant to interview
with HDC faculty to address identified concerns. Follow the screening interview applicants will be notified by letter of final disposition of their application.
3. Upon successful application and screening, applicants must complete a plan of study based upon a
transcript review and identified deficit coursework
and experience.
4. In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the
Department of ELH, nor does such submission guarantee interim certification approval and signature by
appropriate College officers.
In cases where the above four areas are addressed through
graduate coursework taken elsewhere, the student may
transfer up to 6 credit hours to meet ISBE requirements.
66
Bradley University
Application and Screening Interview Procedures for
Post-Masters Certification in School Counseling for
masters graduates (non-school) from other CACREP
accredited programs
1. Prospective candidates for certification must
formally apply to the Post-Masters Certification (PMC)
in School Counseling Program. Application materials
for each candidate shall consist of:
a. formal application to the Certification Program,
including Bradley Application for Graduate Admission and all standard graduate application
forms from the Graduate School.
b. two letters of recommendation
c. official copies of transcripts
d. copies of course syllabi and/or course catalogue
descriptions as determined by HDC faculty
e. successful completion of ELH 652 Professional
School Counseling and deficit course work as
identified in a transcript review using Dept. of
ELH School Counseling course requirements and
23 IL Adm. Code 23.110 and 25.225
2. Students in this category may be asked to submit a
videotape of counseling skills as part of their admission packet.
3. Upon receipt of admission materials all applicants
are required to complete a screening interview. The
screening interview shall be the same as the interview
currently required for applicants to the Department
of ELH Masters in HDC programs. Follow the screening interview applicants will be notified by letter of
final disposition of their application.
4. Upon successful application and screening, applicants must complete a plan of study based upon a
transcript review and identified deficit coursework
and experience.
5. In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the
Department of ELH, nor does such submission guarantee interim certification approval and signature by
appropriate college officers.
Application and Screening Interview Procedures for
Post-Masters Certification in School Counseling for
master’s graduates (non-school) from non-CACREP
accredited programs or post-master’s graduates in related fields, e.g., social work or psychology
1. Prospective candidates for certification must formally apply to the Post-Masters Certification (PMC) in
School Counseling Program. Application materials for
each candidate shall consist of:
a. formal application to the Certification Program,
including Bradley Application for Graduate Ad2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
mission and all standard graduate application
forms from the Graduate School.
b. two Letters of recommendation
c. Bradley-equivalent GRE/MAT, GPA
d. successful completion of ELH 652 Professional
School Counseling and deficit course work as
identified in a transcript review using Dept. of
ELH School Counseling course requirements and
23 IL Adm. Code 23.110 and 25.225
2. Students in this category may be asked to submit a
videotape of counseling skills as part of their admission packet.
3. Upon receipt of admission materials all applicants
are required to complete a screening interview. The
screening interview shall be the same as the interview
currently required for applicants to the Department
of ELH Masters in HDC programs. Follow the screening interview applicants will be notified by letter of
final disposition of their application.
4. Upon successful application and screening, applicants must complete a plan of study based upon a
transcript review and identified deficit coursework
and experience.
5. In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the
Department of ELH, nor does such submission guarantee interim certification approval and signature by
appropriate College officers.
Transcript Evaluation to Pursue
Counseling Certification
Certification Only in Counseling. Individuals wishing to
pursue state counseling certification in Illinois will pay a
transcript analysis and assessment fee of $50. If the student enrolls as a graduate student in either Bradley University’s Counseling graduate degree program or as a
certification only student, this fee will be applied towards
tuition. For further information please contact the Chair
of the Department of Educational Leadership and Human
Development.
Policy for Dated Coursework
All graduate coursework must have been completed
within 10 years of application to the certification program.
Applicants with degrees and/or coursework older than
10 years must submit evidence of successful continuous
employment experience in the counseling field, continuing education and/or training, and relevant counseling or
counseling-related licensure and certifications. Eligibility
for post-master’s certification using these criteria will be
decided on an individual-case basis. Submission of these
materials does not guarantee admittance into the postmaster’s school counseling certification program.
67
Interim Certification as School Counselor
Intern and Employment
Upon successful application and screening, certificationonly applicants may submit an ISBE Application for Interim Certification as School Counselor Intern for approval
by the School Counseling Program Coordinator and signature by the college entitlement officer. The Department
of ELH and the PMC program are not responsible for any
employment as an Interim School Counselor Intern that
applicants may seek. The ELH Department neither implies
nor guarantees that enrollment in the PMC program will
occur in such a way as to coincide with applicant’s plans
to seek or obtain employment via Interim Certification as
a School Counselor Intern.
Transfer Credits
Certification-only students may transfer up to 6 semester
hours towards school counselor certification. Certification
only students must take a minimum of 12 credit hours in
the post-master’s certification program. In addition, postmaster’s applicants from non-CACREP programs or related
fields must submit official transcripts and may be required
to submit course syllabi and course descriptions from the
college catalogue in place when the degree was awarded.
Department of ELH faculty will evaluate these materials to
determine equivalency with the Bradley University Dept. of
ELH School Counseling Program, in addition to applicable
ISBE requirements.
Retention Procedures for Certification-Only
Students
Certification-only students are held to the same retention
criteria and procedures as degree-seeking students. Students
must complete a plan of study with an advisor, which must be
approved by the advisor and ELH Department chair.
In all cases, submission of materials does not guarantee acceptance into any program offered by the Department of ELH.
Course Descriptions
ELH 510 Statistical Procedures
3 hrs.
Principles and procedures for statistical interpretation of data.
Study of measures of central tendency, variability, correlation,
and introductory predictive and inferential statistics.
ELH 540 Human Growth and Development
3 hrs.
Cognitive and experiential learning in human growth and
development. Cognitive learning through reading and research into developmental patterns of humans through the
various developmental stages: birth; infancy; early childhood; primary, middle, and high school years; adulthood;
geriatrics. Experiential activities emphasize personal contact
and on-site work with people of different ages and stages of
physical and psychological development. (Area c)
68
ELH 550 Independent Study
Master’s Level
1-6 hrs;
Post Master’s
1-9 hrs.
Independent study in a selected area related to educational goals. Prerequisites: approval of appropriate department chair and the dean of the College of Education
and Health Sciences.
ELH 551 Substance Abuse Counseling
3 hrs.
Basic counseling interventions for prevention, remediation,
and treatment of substance abuse.
ELH 580 Financial Leadership in Human Service
Administration
3 hrs.
Provides students with a comprehensive overview of financial management related to human service organizations. Topics include various budgeting systems and other
financial management tools; service costing and the linking of costs to performance measures; fee setting; and
government contracting.
ELH 581 Topics in Human Service
Administration
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May
be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six
hours credit.
ELH 582 Grant Writing in Human Service
Administration
2 hrs.
This course is designed to provide an introduction to
grant writing and methods for writing grant proposals.
Students will learn to critique, research, and write grant
proposals. Emphasis will be placed upon organization of
a grant writing campaign and preparation of a complete
proposal package.
ELH 583 Supervision and Employee Engagement
in Human Service Administration
3 hrs.
Focuses on the recruitment, selection, and engagement
of employees within the context of mission in human service organizations.
ELH 584 Topics in Human Development
Counseling
1-6 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May
be repeated under different topics for a maximum of six
hours credit.
ELH 586 Counseling Diverse Populations
3 hrs.
Value systems in diverse groups; the use of philosophies
and models of diversity in establishing an effective, helping relationship.
Bradley University
ELH 604 Research Methodology
and Applications
3 hrs.
Focus on quantitative and qualitative methods of research
utilized in the areas of education and social science. Examination of sources of information for research, various
designs, basic statistics, interviewing strategies, and observational techniques. Students will learn to critique and
write research proposals in their areas of study. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change
3 hrs.
Analysis of the effects of legal and social change on lives
of young people and on the work of educators and other
helping professionals; focus on selected issues of legal
and social change with diverse populations. Prerequisite:
graduate standing.
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership
3 hrs.
Skills related to interpersonal communication, organizational behavior, and leadership values clarification with
diverse populations. Extensive opportunities for practicing and evaluating personal communication skills. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
ELH 610 Survey In Human Service
Administration
3 hrs.
An introduction to the roles and responsibilities of administrators in human service organizations. Trends in human
service delivery, including organizational leadership and culture, human resource management, financial management,
strategic planning, working with boards, marketing and public relations, social service partnership and collaboration.
ELH 611 Instructional Leadership
3 hrs.
Problem solving approach to general curriculum development from an administrative perspective, focusing on basic curriculum decisions, processes of change associated
with curriculum planning, and contemporary issues and
trends at state and national levels.
ELH 612 Institutional Planning and Evaluation 3 hrs.
Identification, analysis, and application of techniques and
tools of institutional planning and evaluation. Program,
personnel, financial, facility, and institutional planning.
Prerequisite: ELH 610.
ELH 620 Human Development Counseling
3 hrs.
Counseling as the promotion of human development. Historical development of the counseling field; survey of relevant skills, client populations, and settings; review of standards for ethical and professional practice in counseling.
ELH 621 Career & Life Planning Across
the Life Span
3 hrs.
Basic counseling skills for career planning, exploration,
and decision-making. Vocational guidance and career
development of elementary and high school students;
roles of women entering the work force; physically handi2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
capped workers; inner city youth; adult workers making
vocational changes in middle life; older workers preparing for retirement. Practical experience in interviewing,
vocational assessment, career information gathering and
distribution; labor market research. (Area e)
ELH 623 Pre-Practicum in Counseling
3 hrs.
Instruction, demonstration, practice, and evaluation in
basic interviewing and response skills. Emphasis on practice and skill development. (Area d) Prerequisite: ELH 620
or concurrent enrollment.
ELH 624 Theories and Techniques
of Counseling
3 hrs.
Study and evaluation of major theories of counseling
toward developing a working theory of counseling and
understanding of dynamics of human behavior. (Area d)
Prerequisite: ELH 620 or concurrent enrollment; consent
of instructor.
ELH 625 Principles of Group Counseling
3 hrs.
Group theory and dynamics as applied in group counseling. Group practices, methods, procedures, and group
leader facilitation skills. Supervised practice and experience in group counseling as leader and participant. Prerequisites: ELH 624; consent of instructor.
ELH 641 Appraisal of the Individual
3 hrs.
Development of a framework for understanding the individual. Methods of data gathering and interpretation,
individual and group testing, case study approaches, and
study of individual differences–ethnic, cultural, and sex
factors. (Area b)
ELH 651 Community Counseling
3 hrs.
How communities and community agencies can work to
promote human development. Role of the counselor as
a change agent and client advocate within the network
of community agencies. Prerequisite: ELH 620 or consent
of instructor.
ELH 652 Professional School Counseling
3 hrs.
Elementary and secondary school counseling programs;
cognitive and experiential skills. History and development of school counseling; elementary and secondary
school counseling programs (similarities and differences);
group and individual counseling; the counselor’s role in
school testing; career planning and exploration. Practical
experiences. (Area d) Prerequisite: ELH 620 or consent of
instructor.
ELH 654 Consultation in the Helping
Professions
3 hrs.
A conceptual understanding of effective consultation and
its relevance to the helping professional. Demonstration
of knowledge and skills necessary to deliver effective consultative services within the client setting. Prerequisites:
ELH 620; consent of instructor.
69
ELH 661 Couples and Family Counseling
3 hrs.
Theories and techniques of couples and family counseling. Emphasis is on working with couples, families, and
children to promote human development, including the
role of the family counselor within the network of school
and community agencies. Prerequisite: ELH 651 or 652.
ELH 662 Community Relations
2 hrs.
Developing effective community relations through a fourstep process involving two-way communication and researching, planning, communicating, and evaluating.
ELH 663 Counseling and the Dynamics
of Aging
3 hrs.
The mental health dynamics of aging and its impact on
the human service professions. Practical skills of gerontological counseling and their relationship to the concerns
of aging.
ELH 669 Special Education Law
1 hr.
Statutory provisions of IDEA, Section 504, and ADA. Special education process including classification, identification and evaluation, related services, least restrictive environment, and due process proceedings.
ELH 670 Human Resource Management
3 hrs.
Survey of the major approaches to supervision and evaluation in K-12 education; examination of the relationship
between evaluation practices, professional development,
and the improvement of instruction; and exercises to develop skills of classroom observation and conferencing.
ELH 673 Leadership Perspectives
3 hrs.
Concepts of leadership, organizational theory, and decision making presented from multiple perspectives; focus
on the practice of educational and human service administration. Prerequisite: ELH 606 or consent of instructor.
ELH 676 The School Principalship
3 hrs.
Various components, background, and training for an
entry-level elementary or secondary school principal. Prerequisite: ELH 673 or consent of instructor.
ELH 677 Educational Finance
2 hrs.
Theory and practice; historical and present sources of revenue and allocation of funds.
ELH 678 United States Public School Law
3 hrs.
Legal aspects of education. Constitutional, statute, and administrative laws related to public and private education.
ELH 682 Seminar in Human Service
Administration
1-6 hrs.
Special problems, area, or current issues in human service
administration.
ELH 684 Seminar in Professional Counseling 2-6 hrs.
Seminar for students specializing in counseling who desire to concentrate on special problems or areas. A variable credit course that may be taken more than once to a
maximum of 6 credits.
ELH 686 Field Experiences in Administration 3-6 hrs.
A culminating experience to give the student the opportunity to work with a practicing administrator in the application of theoretical knowledge from previous coursework
to administrative tasks. Accompanying seminars focus on
selected topics associated with leadership and administration. Requires 150 hours of supervised activity for three
hours of credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ELH 690 Practicum
1 hr.
An important part of the clinical education for a student
majoring in human development counseling is the opportunity to practice counseling skills and integrate these
with the theories studied in the classroom. Practicum provides the student with this opportunity. Prerequisites: ELH
625; consent of instructor.
ELH 691 Internship I
1-2 hrs.
Supervised post-practicum work experience appropriate
to student’s career goals. A variable credit course that may
be repeated to a maximum of two hours credit. Prerequisite: ELH 690; consent of instructor.
ELH 692 Internship II
1-6 hrs.
Supervised post-practicum work experience appropriate
to student’s career goals. A variable credit course that may
be repeated to a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: ELH 690; consent of instructor.
ELH 699 Thesis
0-6 hrs.
Advanced educational or social science research under
the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Student
will design, develop, and present the research proposal,
then conduct the approved research study consistent
with the Committee for Use of Human Subjects in Research (CUHSR) regulations and university ethical guidelines. Minimum of 3.0 and maximum of 6.0 hours may be
taken and applied toward Master's degree.
ELH 681 Seminar in Educational
Administration
1-6 hrs.
Special problems, areas, or current issues in student’s chosen field within educational administration/supervision.
Maximum of three hours may be taken under a single
topic.
70
Bradley University
Annual Institutional Title II Report Card: 2006-2007
Teacher Education Mission
The mission of Teacher Education at Bradley University
is to prepare teachers who will be effective leaders, advocates, and life-long learners. We believe that teaching
and learning are dynamic, interactive, life-long processes
based on empowering interactions among learners.
Notable Features
and Accomplishments:
•
•
Teacher Preparation Programs:
Bradley University offers 18 baccalaureate programs leading to state teacher certification and one graduate-level
certification programs in Educational Administration,
Special Education, and School Counseling.
•
•
Student Characteristics:
Most undergraduates (93.6 percent) are of traditional college age, 94 percent attend full-time, and 87 percent are
Illinois residents. Eleven percent of all students are minority students. The average ACT score for fall 2006 freshmen
was 25. Undergraduate enrollment is 5315. Graduate enrollment is 812. Total enrollment is 6127.
•
•
•
Admissions Requirements:
Candidates must have earned a minimum grade point average of 2.5 overall, 2.5 in education courses, and a 2.5 in
their content major or concentration. Candidates must have
earned grades of not less than a C in COM 103, ENG 101, and
a mathematics course that meets university general education requirements. They must have completed a prescribed
group of education courses for each major with the appropriate GPA and no Ds, passed the Illinois Certification Test of
Basic Skills, demonstrated appropriate pre-professional behaviors and dispositions, been cleared on a check of criminal
history, and received a satisfactory vote of the faculty.
Admission to Student Teaching: Candidates must have
maintained a minimum grade point average of 2.5 overall, 2.5 in education courses, and a 2.5 in their content
major or concentration. They must have been advanced
to candidacy, passed the Illinois Certification Test in their
content area, been cleared on a State Police fingerprint
check, and have a negative result on a current TB test.
•
•
•
•
Best Practices:
•
•
•
Practicum experiences in the schools begin the
freshman year and continue each year of the program, increasing in responsibility.
Each candidate will have clinical experiences in the
full range of his or her certification and in a diverse
setting.
The University has Professional Development School
partners at each level from early childhood through
high school.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
•
Placement of graduates was 96 percent for this year.
Bradley University’s education programs were
recognized in a June 2007 publication, “Preparing
STEM Teachers: The key to global competitiveness”
produced by the American Association of Colleges
for Teacher Education.
In four of the last nine years a student teacher has
been named one of 10 “PDK Outstanding Student
Teachers” in the nation.
Two teacher education professors have received
the NBPTS (National Board for Professional Teaching
Standards) certificate.
The College and the local schools have a PDS
partnership that provides unique opportunities for
students and faculty.
Opportunities exist for students to student teach in
Department of Defense Schools in England.
The College is a fourteen-year recipient of a William
T. Kemper Grant which supports a partnership
between Bradley University’s College of Education
and Health Sciences and four selected public school
sites to foster collaborative leadership and support
teaching excellence.
Science Education at Bradley has received awards from
Bradley for Excellence, National Science Foundation,
the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and other external
grants for STEM programming.
Bradley University is one of three institutions of higher
education in Illinois to be selected to participate in a
Library of Congress national project, focusing on developing interactive learning and teaching resources for
P-16 classrooms.
The Department of Education was funded for a third
year from the Casey Foundation in the amount of
$75,000. The funded project, “Building Excellent
Scientists for Tomorrow,” is a collaboration between
the sciences and teacher education.
Ms. Timeka Cooley, a 2006 alumna in Elementary
Education, received the Spirit of Youth Award as a
first-year teacher at Kipp Ascend Charter School,
North Lawndale District. Ms. Cooley was recognized
for her work in improving mathematics learning by
urban students.
Ms. Angelina Muskin, a 1988 alumna in the History
Teacher Program, was named “Georgia Teacher of
Merit for the Year for National History Day” by the
Georgia Humanities Council. Ms. Muskin is a history
teacher and the department chairperson for social
studies at Grove High School in Savannah.
71
Program Profile:
Total number of students admitted into
teacher preparation, all specializations, in academic year 2006-2007
678
Number of candidates in supervised student
teaching in academic year 2006-2007
175
Illinois Certification Testing System
Annual Institution Report 2006-2007
Bradley University • Number of Program Completers: 177
Number of faculty members who supervised
student teachers:
Test Field/Category
Statewide
Pass
Rate
Institution
Number Number Pass
Tested Passed Rate
Basic Skills
Basic Skills Test
172
172
100%
100%
•
Full-time faculty in professional education
3
Aggregate
172
172
100%
100%
•
Part-time faculty in professional education but full-time in the institution
1
Professional Knowledge/Pedagogy
18
100%
100%
Part-time faculty in professional
education, not otherwise employed
by the institution
14
•
Total faculty student teaching supervisors
Student teacher/faculty ratio
The average number of student teaching hours
per week
The total number of weeks of supervised student teaching required
Average total number of hours required
101 APT: Birth to
Grade 3
102 APT: Grades K-9
103 APT: Grades 6-12
104 APT: Grades K-12
18
9.72:1
35
14.43
avg.
505
18
73
73
100%
100%
36
36
100%
100%
47
47
100%
99%
174
174
100%
99%
002 Early Childhood
1
--
--
100%
024 Social Science
1
--
--
100%
105 Science: Biology
2
--
--
100%
106 Science: Chemistry
1
--
--
99%
17
17
100%
100%
112
111
99%
100%
12
12
100%
100%
9
--
--
100%
6
--
--
100%
1
--
--
100%
39
38
97%
99%
1
--
--
100%
5
--
--
100%
1
--
--
100%
208
206
99%
100%
6
--
--
100%
6
--
--
100%
40
40
100%
100%
40
40
100%
100%
177
177
100%
99%
Aggregate
Academic Content Areas
107 Early Childhood
Education
110 Elementary/
Middle Grades
111 English
Language Art
114 Social Science:
History
115 Mathematics
116 Science: Physics
163 Special Education
General Curriculum
127 Foreign Language:
French
143 Music
145 Visual Arts
Aggregate
Other Content Areas
172 Family &
Consumer Sciences
Aggregate
Teaching Special Populations
155 Learning
Behavior Specialist I
Aggregate
Summary Totals
and Pass Rate
Note: Institutional information is not released for tests taken by fewer than ten
students.
72
Bradley University
Illinois Certification Testing System
2003-2004 Third Year Cohort Update
Bradley University • Number of Program Completers: 145
StateInstitution
wide
Test Field/Category
Number Number Pass
Pass
Tested Passed Rate
Rate
Basic Skills
Basic Skills Test
145
145
100%
100%
Aggregate
145
145
100%
100%
Professional Knowledge/Pedagogy
101 APT: Birth to
11
Grade 3
102 APT: Grades K-9
58
11
58
100%
100%
103 APT: Grades 6-12
39
100%
100%
104 APT: Grades K-12
39
100%
100%
23
23
100%
99%
131
131
100%
99%
11
10
91%
100%
71
6
70
--
99%
--
99%
97%
024 Social Science
9
--
--
99%
025 English
7
--
--
99%
026 Spanish
2
--
--
99%
Aggregate
Academic Content Areas
002 Early Childhood
003 Elementary/
Middle Grades (K-9)
023 History
027 French
2
--
--
97%
034 Speech
1
--
--
100%
035 Biological Science
3
--
--
99%
036 Mathematics
5
--
--
99%
048 Art (K-12)
2
--
--
99%
049 Music (K-12)
3
--
--
98%
122
118
97%
99%
5
--
--
100%
5
--
--
100%
--
--
89%
--
--
100%
16
100%
100%
19
100%
97%
141
97%
99%
Aggregate
Other Content Areas
044 Family &
Consumer Sciences
Aggregate
Teaching Special Populations
006 Learning
1
Disabilities
007 Social/Emotional
2
Disorders
155 Learning Behavior
16
Specialist I
Aggregate
19
Summary Totals
and Pass Rate
145
Note: Institutional information is not released for tests taken by fewer than ten
students.
Curriculum
and Instruction
D. Antonio Cantu,
Chair, Department of Teacher Education
The professional education unit is accredited by the
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
The curriculum and instruction master’s program builds
upon the foundation laid at the undergraduate level and
continues the emphasis on pre-kindergarten through
twelfth-grade teachers as educational leaders, advocates,
and life-long learners. Teachers who wish to assume leadership roles within their school systems need to remain
current, increase their skill levels, add to their knowledge
bases, and increase their repertoire. As effective leaders
who take responsibility for their own continuing education, they also need to participate in the creation of their
own professional development plans.
The curriculum and instruction master’s program is
designed to provide for these needs. While making allowances for individual tailoring, the program includes a
common core of courses intended to increase graduate
students’ skill levels and knowledge base in: technology
applications (ETE 551), research applications (ELH 604),
legal and social issues (ELH 605), curriculum theory (ETE
651), cultural diversity and schooling (ETE 553), instructional theory (ETE 655), instructional design (ETE 653),
and assessment strategies (ETE 552, ETE 654, ETE 643). In
addition, the program offers practica, original research,
and creative contributions options. Working with a faculty advisor, graduate students plan a program of study
which addresses their needs, interests, and professional
development goals. These plans may include assessment,
early childhood education, educational technology, gifted education, literacy and reading, middle school education, multidisciplinary education, science education, and
special education.
The goal of the curriculum and instruction master’s
program is to prepare pre-kindergarten through twelfthgrade teachers to accept greater responsibility in their
roles as educational leaders, advocates, and life-long
learners by increasing their skill levels, adding to their
knowledge bases, and informing their attitudes.
The objectives of the curriculum and instruction master’s program are to:
1. Integrate theory with reflective practice.
2. Draw connections between the knowledge base and
the professional skills necessary for the success of effective leaders, advocates, and life-long learners.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
73
3. Assist teachers in remaining current with regard to
educational issues, individualized instruction, and the
elements of best practice.
4. Engage teachers in collaborative learning with colleagues who offer similar, as well as diverse, backgrounds, experiences, and views.
5. Individualize programs of study to meet the particular
needs of graduate students.
6. Facilitate the development of teachers as life-long
learners, who are capable of informing their instructional practices through appropriate application of
research results.
College/Department Admissions
Requirements
For unconditional admission, the candidate should have
an undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of 3.0
based on a 4.0 scale.
For conditional admission into a graduate program,
the candidate should have a minimum undergraduate
last-60-hour grade point average of 2.5. The conditional
student must maintain a 3.0 grade point average in the
first 9 to 18 hours of graduate work in order to gain unconditional status.
All applicants must complete the prescribed application forms of the College of Education and Health Sciences and Graduate School. All applicants must submit
official scores from the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or the
Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
Two letters of reference must be obtained by the applicant from educational field employers or college/university
professors who can recommend the applicant as having
strong potential for success in graduate studies and in potential continued service to the education profession.
Graduation Requirements
Graduation requirements for the thesis and non-thesis
options have in common the following components: an
eighteen-hour core which includes ELH 604 and ELH 605
(three hours each), a three-hour educational technology
course (ETE 551) and nine hours of Curriculum and Instruction (ETE 553, ETE 651 and ETE 653). The student must also
select an area of concentration consisting of nine semester
hours from areas in assessment, early childhood education, educational technology, gifted education, literacy and
reading, middle school education, multidisciplinary education, science education, or special education.
Graduate students must also select a capstone experience from among three options. Option A is thirty hours of
coursework plus ETE 655 plus a Comprehensive Examination which is tailored to the student’s program of study. Option B is twenty-seven hours of coursework plus six hours
of ETE 699 (Thesis). Option C is twenty-seven hours of
coursework plus ETE 655 plus ETE 698. Graduate students
74
may also select up to six hours of approved graduate-level
elective courses which may be taken within or outside the
department. The total minimum course requirement for
the curriculum and instruction program is thirty-three semester hours. Graduate students electing the thesis option
(capstone Option B) will design and conduct an original
research study under the guidance of their advisors. For
thesis option students, a comprehensive examination will
be administered orally at the time of the thesis defense.
Curriculum and Instruction Master’s
Degree Program
Graduate Core: 18 hours
A. Foundations and Research: 6 hours
ELH 604 Research Methodology & Applications (3)
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change (3)
B. Educational Technology: 3 hours
ETE 551 Technology Applications and Integration (3)
C. Curriculum and Instruction: 9 hours
ETE 553 Cultural Diversity and Schooling (3)
ETE 651 Curriculum Theory and Development (3)
ETE 653 Instructional Strategies and Designs (3)
Directed Elective: 3 hours
Students must choose at least one of the following options for a minimum of 3 hours:
ETE 552 Assessment Alternatives (3)
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 654 Program Evaluation (3)
Capstone Experience Option
Option A: 30 hours of coursework; ETE 655 Instructional
Theory; Comprehensive Examination
Option B: 27 hours of coursework; ETE 699 Thesis (6 hours)
Option C: 27 hours of coursework; ETE 655 Instructional
Theory; ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution
(3 hours)
Areas of Concentration: 9 hours minimum
Note: ETE 698 may not be used for both a Capstone Experience course and an Area of Concentration course.
Students must select one 9-hour area of concentration
from among the following choices:
Assessment
(Cannot include any course selected from among the Assessment choices under Directed Electives)
ETE 552 Assessment Alternatives (3)
ETE 560 Testing in Reading (3)
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 654 Program Evaluation (3)
Bradley University
ETE 670 Supervision and Evaluation of Instruction (3)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6)
Early Childhood Education
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (1-3)
ETE 661 Child Growth and Development (3)
ETE 662 Family Intervention (3)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6)
Educational Technology
(Cannot include ETE 551 from Core Courses)
(Students may select either ETE 650 or ETE 698, but may
not take both for this concentration)
ETE 513 Educational Software Design (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (1-3)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6)
ART 500 Advanced Studio (3)*
ENG 508 Composing Hypertext (3)
Gifted Education
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation Procedures for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 554 Characteristics of and Curriculum Development
for Learners Who Are Gifted (3-6)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6)
Literacy and Reading
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields (3)
ETE 544 Remedial Reading (3)
ETE 560 Testing in Reading (3)
ETE 570 Practicum in Reading (1-6)
ETE 616 Analysis & Evaluation of Children’s Literature (3)
ETE 620 Writing Across the Curriculum (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (1-3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (0-6)
Special Education
For the three-hour Directed Electives requirement listed
above, students must choose the following course:
ETE 643, Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners with Exceptionalities (3)
Prerequisites:
ETE 525 Including Learners with Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation for Learners with
Exceptionalities (3)
Required nine hours:
ETE 673 Self Determination for Individuals with
Disabilities (3)
ETE 674 Issues, Trends, and Research in Special
Education (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Special Education (1-3)
Electives required for endorsement to teach in Special Education
LBS I or for the capstone (three-hour minimum) experience:
ETE 697 Advanced Practicum for Students with
Exceptionalities (1-5)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6 hours)
ETE 699 Thesis (0-3 hours)
Science Education
Students may select up to 6 hours of science content from
graduate-level courses offered in the departments of biology, chemistry, geological science, or physics. Students
electing to do so must also select ETE 618.
ETE 618 Science: An Inquiry Approach (3)
SCI 501 Topics in Investigative Science for Educators (3)
(see “Supportive Courses” below.)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (1-3)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6)
Multidisciplinary Education
Students must choose two courses from one area of concentration and one course from a second area of concentration.
Middle School Education
Notices:
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields (3)
ETE 515 Mathematics Methods for the Middle School (3)
ETE 610 Young Adolescent Development (3) *
ETE 611 Middle School Instructional Strategies (3) *
ETE 618 Science: An inquiry Approach (3)
ETE 620 Writing Across the Curriculum (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
1. The Department recommends students selecting
areas of concentration in Literacy and Reading or Science Education enter the program having some content background in the respective content area prior
to enrolling in those area of concentration courses.
*
Needed for the State of Illinois Middle School
Endorsement
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
2. Courses which students wish to transfer into the program from other institutions must be approved by the
Department of Teacher Education graduate program
coordinator or department chair in advance.
Total Program: Minimum of 33 hours
75
Curriculum and Instruction
LBS I Master’s Degree Program
Teacher certification is necessary prior to entering the
C & I LBS I Master’s Degree Program. The program is available to teachers not currently certified in special education.
Prerequisites to Program: 6 hours
ETE 525 Including Learners with Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation for Learners with
Exceptionalities (3)
Graduate Core: 9 hours
ELH 604 Research Methodology and Applications (3)
ELH 605 Legal and Social Change (3)
ELH 606 Interpersonal Behavior and Organizational
Leadership (3)
Educational Technology Component: 3 hours
ETE 551 Technology Applications and Integration (3)
Curriculum and Instruction: 3 hours
ETE 653 Instructional Strategies and Designs (3)
Assessment: 3 hours
ETE 643 Assessment & Evaluation Practicum for Learners
with Exceptionalities (3)
Program Core for LBS I: 11 -17 hours
ETE 675 Characteristics of Learners with Special Needs (3)
ETE 676 Methods for Specific Learning Disabilities,
Emotional & Other Disorders (3)
ETE 677 Methods for Developmental Disabilities (3)
ETE 697 Advanced Practicum for Students with
Exceptionalities (1-5)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6) or
ETE 699 Thesis (0-3)
Initial to Standard Teacher Certification
Students seeking graduate work to move from initial to
standard certification for teaching must take the following courses:
ETE 653 Instructional Strategies and Designs (3)
ETE 659 Curriculum and Instruction Practicum (1-5)
for one semester hour
Endorsements
Endorsement in Reading (Optional)
A minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours must be taken from the courses listed below. At least three (3) semester hours must be acquired in each lettered section.
A. ETE 325 Introduction to Teaching Reading (3)
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields (3)
B. ETE 544 Remedial Reading (3)
C. ETE 560 Testing in Reading (3)
D. ETE 570 Practicum in Reading (1-5)
E. ETE 260 Children’s Literature (3)
ETE 616 Analysis & Evaluation of Children’s
Literature (3)
Please note that these requirements may be fulfilled by a
combination of undergraduate and graduate courses.
Endorsement in Special Education for Learning Behavior Specialist I (LBS I) (Optional)
A minimum of twenty-three (23) semester hours must be
taken from the courses listed below.
Prerequisites to Program: 6 hours
ETE 525 Including Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation for Learners With
Exceptionalities (3)
Program Core for LBS I: 14-20 hours
Electives: 3 hours
ETE 550 Independent Study (Special Education Focus) (1-3)
ETE 650 Topics in Education (Special Education Topic) (1-3)
Total Program: Minimum of 33 hours
Teacher Certification and
Teaching Endorsements
The teacher certification program is separate and distinct from the teacher education graduate C & I program. Students wishing to pursue routes to certification
are directed to the appropriate undergraduate courses
and/or to the endorsements in Reading or in Special
Education (see the following section). Graduate-level
courses listed in the endorsement areas and not in the
C & I graduate program areas of concentration cannot be
used for a master’s degree.
76
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 675 Characteristics of Learners With Special Needs (3)
ETE 676 Methods for Specific Learning Disabilities,
Emotional & Other Disorders (3)
ETE 677 Methods for Developmental Disabilities (3)
ETE 697 Advanced Practicum for Students With
Exceptionalities (1-5)
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution (0-6) or
ETE 699 Thesis (0-3)
Electives: 3 hours
Endorsement in Middle Level Education (Optional)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (6)
Please note that these requirements may be fulfilled by a
combination of undergraduate and graduate courses. To
gain the Illinois LBSI endorsement, the student must meet
the number of hours required by the state of Illinois.
Bradley University
Certificate Program in
Curriculum and Instruction
The Curriculum and Instruction Graduate Certificate is a
declaration indicating an individual has completed a prescribed set of graduate courses in teacher education. It is
not a master’s degree, nor is it the same as state teacher
certification. The Graduate Certificate is awarded by the
university, whereas, teacher certification is licensure
awarded by the state. One does not necessarily lead to the
other. The objectives of the Graduate Certificate program
in Curriculum and Instruction are to provide (1) opportunities for educators to expand their learning beyond that
of their bachelors or other master’s degree, (2) a basic core
of learning focusing on cultural diversity and instructional
strategies and designs, and (3) an area of concentration of
coursework that will strengthen one’s pedagogical and/or
pedagogical content knowledge.
College/Department Admissions Requirements
Applicants for admission to the C & I Graduate Certificate
Program must hold a bachelor’s degree from an institution
that is accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting
agency or that is recognized by the board of education of
the state in which the institution is located. Students must
apply for acceptance to the Graduate School, and take either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller
Analogies Test (MAT).
For unconditional admission, the applicant must have
a minimum undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of 3.0 based on a 4.0 scale.
For conditional admission, the applicant must have a
minimum undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale.
The conditional student must maintain a 3.0 GPA
during the first nine semester hours of Bradley University graduate work in order to gain unconditional status.
All students must earn a mean GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale)
throughout the program in order to successfully complete the certificate program. As with graduate program
requirements, the student may receive a maximum of one
“C” in one course and continue in the program.
All applicants must complete the prescribed application forms of the College of Education and Health Sciences and Graduate School.
Certificate Program Completion Requirements
The courses included in the certificate program are the
same as some of those offered in the master’s degree program, allowing students to apply their certificate program
courses toward a full master’s degree upon completion of
the certificate program, if they desire to do so. The total
number of certificate program courses equals 15 semester
hours (compared to the master’s degree minimum of 33).
All students pursuing the certificate program will be required to take two core courses (for a total of six semester
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
hours) and those courses identified as an area of concentration within the C & I Graduate Program (nine semester
hours). All students must take the following courses:
Core Courses:
ETE 553 Cultural Diversity and Schooling (3)
ETE 653 Instructional Strategies and Designs (3)
One Area of Concentration (three courses) totaling
9 semester hours:
Assessment
ETE 552 Assessment Alternatives (3)
ETE 560 Testing in Reading (3)
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 654 Program Evaluation (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
ELH 670 Human Resource Management (3)
Early Childhood Education
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 661 Child Growth and Development (3)
ETE 662 Family Intervention (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
Educational Technology
ETE 513 Educational Software Design (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
ART 500 Advanced Studio (3) *
ENG 508 Composing Hypertext (3)
* Students may select either ETE 650 or ETE 698, but
not both. Students selecting ART 500 must interview
with the Department of Art for approval (including
portfolio) and placement.
Gifted Education
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation Procedures for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3)
ETE 554 Characteristics of and Curriculum Development
for Learners Who Are Gifted (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
Literacy and Reading
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields (3)
ETE 544 Remedial Reading (3)
ETE 560 Testing in Reading (3)
ETE 570 Practicum in Reading (3)
ETE 616 Analysis & Evaluation of Children’s Literature (3)
ETE 620 Writing Across the Curriculum (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, & Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
77
Middle School Education
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields (3)
ETE 515 Mathematics Methods for the Middle School (3)
ETE 610 Young Adolescent Development (3) *
ETE 611 Middle School Instructional Strategies (3) *
ETE 618 Science: An inquiry Approach (3)
ETE 620 Writing Across the Curriculum (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, & Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
* Needed for the State of Illinois Middle School Endorsement
Science Education
ETE 618 Science: An inquiry Approach (3)
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, & Technology (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
SCI 501 Interdisciplinary Science (3)*
* Requires corequisite of ETE 550 (Independent Study)
for 1 hour
Special Education*
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum for
Learners With Exceptionalities (3) REQUIRED
ETE 650 Topics in Curriculum, Instruction, and
Technology (3)
ETE 673 Self-Determination for Individuals With
Disabilities (3)
ETE 674 Issues, Trends, and Research in Special
Education (3)
ETE 698 Creative Research Contribution (3)
* If needed, students must also take prerequisite courses
ETE 525 Including Learners with Exceptionalities (3) and
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation for Learners with
Exceptionalities (3).
Multidisciplinary
Two courses from one area of concentration and one
course from a second area of concentration
Special Education Approval
Students may choose to add a special education approval to any teaching certificate, which will entitle
them to teach special education classes in the grades
of their teaching certificate. This approval would be
good for three years while the student pursued an
LBS I certificate. The following courses are needed for this
approval.
ETE 525 Including Learners with Exceptionalities ...............3
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation for Learners
with Exceptionalities ..............................................................3
ETE 675 Characteristics of Learners
with Special Needs .................................................................3
ETE 676 Methods for Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional & Other Disorders .......................................................3
ETE 677 Methods for Developmental Disabilities ...............3
____
Total
78
15
Course Descriptions
ETE 506 Reading in the Content Fields
3 hrs.
Instructional and reading strategies to enhance students’
comprehension.
ETE 513 Educational Software Design
3 hrs.
The design and construction of educational software that
is based upon sound educational theory and best practice.
Students will become proficient with appropriate multimedia instructional design software in developing their projects. Investigating and applying current theories of learning,
instruction, and assessment. Cross-listed as MM 513. Prerequisites: MM 113 or ETE 551; MM 213 or instructor approval.
ETE 515 Mathematics Methods
for the Middle School
3 hrs.
Provides strategies and curriculum for teaching mathematics to youth in fifth through eighth grades. Strategies
focus on problem solving, logical reasoning, and real-life
connections. Use of dynamic software and math modeling are emphasized. Assessment strategies appropriate
for middle school mathematics will be addressed. Students will develop a deep understanding of national and
state standards. Prerequisites: senior standing in an education program and advancement to degree candidacy,
or teacher certification.
ETE 525 Including Learners with
Exceptionalities
3 hrs.
Legal, psychological, and social impact of various disabilities, including learning disabilities, for education and life
planning of included learners with exceptionalities. Psychological and educational characteristics, needs, services,
regulations, and laws discussed. Includes needs of learners
who are intellectually gifted and talented and have other
special needs. Prerequisite: advancement to degree candidacy in department.
ETE 543 Assessment and Evaluation Procedures
for Learners with Exceptionalities
3 hrs.
Diagnostic processes for learners with exceptionalities,
pre-school through high school. Screening, formal and
informal assessment, and evaluation techniques. Practice
in test administration, scoring, evaluation, individualized
educational programs (IEPs).
ETE 544 Remedial Reading
3 hrs.
Methods and procedures for diagnosis and correction of
reading difficulties; interpretation and use of reading tests
for diagnosis. Prerequisite: a basic reading course.
ETE 550 Independent Study
1-3 hrs.
Student selects subject of study with advisor approval.
Multiple sections may be taken concurrently. Maximum
of 6 semester hours may be applied to a degree program.
Prerequisite: approval of department chair and dean of College of Education and Health Sciences.
Bradley University
ETE 551 Technology Applications & Integration 3 hrs.
Integrating technology into PreK-12 curriculum. Emphasizes
computer as tutor, tool, and tutee; multimedia; HyperCard;
telecommunications and networking; and future impact.
ETE 552 Assessment Alternatives
3 hrs.
Qualitative and quantitative student assessment methods.
Creative alternatives to traditional techniques.
ETE 553 Cultural Diversity and Schooling
3 hrs.
Multicultural issues, perspectives, and current trends. Role
of the teacher as decision-maker and change agent. Evaluation of materials, methods, and programs.
ETE 554 Characteristics of and Curricular Development for Learners who are Gifted
3-6 hrs.
Class will focus on all aspects of the gifted learner cognition, psycho-social, affective, and talent development. Field
placement requires curriculum design, testing procedures,
identification, and direct instruction of gifted learners. Additionally, National Board Certification methodology will be
utilized. Repeatable for a maximum of six hours.
ETE 560 Testing in Reading
3 hrs.
Reading assessment techniques that identify students’
reading strengths and difficulties prior to diagnostic prescriptive teaching. For teachers of grades 1-9. Prerequisites:
a basic reading course; ETE 544.
ETE 570 Practicum in Reading
1-5 hrs.
Field experience in elementary reading. Focuses on current
research to guide reading practice. Emphasizes alternative
methods of reading instruction, other than basal approaches. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: a basic reading course.
ETE 610 Young Adolescent Development
3 hrs.
Examines the theories and research surrounding young
adolescents as they move through puberty and middle
school. Physical, cognitive, social, moral, and emotional development are studied with concern for the psychological
implications and educational ramifications. Students will
develop a deep understanding of national and state standards. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and teacher certification or permission of instructor.
ETE 611 Middle School Instructional Strategies 3 hrs.
Presents curriculum, teaching strategies, and assessment for
instructing youth in fifth through eighth grades. School organization, professional collaboration, active classroom environment, brain-based teaching and learning, high expectations for all students, and student progress are topics for
the course. Students will develop a deep understanding of
national and state standards. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and teacher certification or permission of instructor.
ETE 616 Analysis & Evaluation of Children’s
Literature
3 hrs.
Selection and evaluation of children’s literature; emphasis
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
on recent material. Individual in-depth study of a specific
topic required. Current trends, controversies, and problems.
ETE 618 Science: An inquiry Approach
3 hrs.
This course is designed to help educators learn and better
understand inquiry as an instructional approach. Topics include what inquiry is, how to conduct inquiry, and ways to
teach inquiry processes and skills to students. The course will
involve identifying and conducting an inquiry investigation
into some science topic and how it can best be taught to students. Prerequisite: Admission to the C & I Program.
ETE 620 Writing Across the Curriculum
3 hrs.
This course is designed to increase teacher understanding
and application of writing across content areas for primary
through secondary grade levels. Writing, an essential communication skill, has many foci, which are not limited to
creative writing. Expository, persuasive, and narrative writing formats will be examined, including their respective
formats and how to best teach them and apply them in a
clinical practice, classroom settings, and community leadership. Research skills as they pertain will also be included.
Prerequisite: Admission to the C & I Program.
ETE 643 Assessment and Evaluation Practicum
for Learners with Exceptionalities
3 hrs.
Practicum: use of psycho-educational tests and diagnostic
teaching techniques. Preparation of a complete formal and
informal educational assessment of a learner including a
professional report written in a specified format.
ETE 650 Topics In Education
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Multiple sections may be taken concurrently.
Maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied to a degree
program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and department chair.
ETE 651 Curriculum Theory and Development 3 hrs.
Curriculum models and theories. Curriculum development
processes and the teacher’s role.
ETE 653 Instructional Strategies and Designs
3 hrs.
PreK-12 instructional strategies and designs. Emphasis on
developmentally appropriate educational opportunities
that actively engage the learner.
ETE 654 Program Evaluation
3 hrs.
Qualitative and quantitative models and techniques for
evaluating educational programs. Prerequisite: ELH 604 or
consent of instructor.
ETE 655 Instructional Theory
3 hrs.
Investigation and development of a theory of instruction
for practitioners built upon the research based on existing
strategies, models, methods, assessment, skills, improvement techniques, movements in education, theorists, curriculum, and the learner.
79
ETE 659 Curriculum & Instruction Practicum 1-5 hrs.
Supervised field experience. Application of knowledge
and skills to contexts and environment selected by the
student and advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of
6 hours credit. Prerequisite: curriculum and instruction
course or consent of instructor.
ETE 661 Child Growth and Development
3 hrs.
Interaction of learning and developmental processes
from birth through age 8. Influence of sociocultural and
ecological factors.
ETE 662 Family Intervention
3 hrs.
The role of the family and community in the education of
infants, toddlers, pre-primary, and primary-aged children.
Analysis of family systems including resource development
and family program development.
ETE 669 Clinical Experience
1-6 hrs.
Supervised clinical experience in p-12 setting. Provides
opportunities to synthesize knowledge and skills and to
demonstrate competencies as a professional teacher. May
be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite:
curriculum and instruction course or consent of instructor.
ETE 673 Self-determination for Individuals
with Disabilities
3 hrs.
Focuses on instructional practices that can be utilized by
the student to teach self-determination skills to individuals with disabilities. The student will explore self-determination concepts, theories, assessment, instructional strategies, and issues of implementation that can in turn be
taught to individuals with disabilities in order to facilitate
goal-directed, self-regulated, autonomous behavior.
ETE 674 Issues, Trends, and Research
in Special Education
3 hrs.
Addresses critical analysis of current issues, trends, and
research in special education with attention to legislation,
litigation, definitions, identification, eligibility, inclusion,
placement, collaboration, and professional advocacy. Research design and methodology in special education.
ETE 675 Characteristics of Learners
with Special Needs
3 hrs.
Interdisciplinary study of literature and research in specific
learning disabilities, social emotional disorders, developmental disabilities, autism, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic and other health impairments. Social, educational,
psychological, and legal implications are explored.
ETE 676 Methods for Specific Learning Disabilities,
Emotional and Other Disorders
3 hrs.
Practical applications of educational and psychological strategies that promote learning for children and youth with learning disabilities, emotional and other disorders. The process of
assessment, planning for instruction, creating positive learning environments, instructional delivery, developing collaborative relationships will be examined. Prerequisite: ETE 675.
80
ETE 677 Methods for Developmental Disabilities 3 hrs.
Practical applications of educational strategies that promote learning for children and youth with a spectrum
of special needs (i.e., developmental disabilities, autism,
traumatic brain injury, orthopedic, and other health impairments). The process of assessment, planning, program
implementation, and evaluating the learning of individuals will be emphasized. Prerequisites: ETE 675
ETE 697 Advanced Practicum for Students with
Exceptionalities
1-5 hrs.
Supervised field experience with students who have exceptional learning needs. Tailored to meet the learning
and professional growth needs of graduate student.
ETE 698 Creative/Research Contribution
0-6 hrs.
Individual study on a topic selected by student with advisor approval. Integration and application of research. Student must produce a product such as a software program,
journal article, or program portfolio. May be repeated for
a maximum of 6 hours credit. Student may not receive
credit for both ETE 698 and ETE 699.
ETE 699 Thesis
0-3 hrs.
Design and implement a research proposal which has
implications for preK-12 education. May be repeated for
a maximum of 6 hours credit. Student may not receive
credit for both ETE 698 and ETE 699. Prerequisite: consent
of department chair.
Supportive Courses
Family and Consumer Sciences
FCS 536 The World of Fashion
2-6 hrs.
Intensified study in a major fashion market: merchandising, public relations, advertising, and career opportunities. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Prerequisite:
10 hours in clothing and textiles; or consent of instructor.
FCS 585 Topics in Family & Consumer Sciences 1-6 hrs.
Topic of special interest which may vary each time course is
offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor
SCI 501 Topics in Investigative Science for
Educators
3 hrs.
Laboratory-based biological and physical science. Content
developed along interdisciplinary themes. Course taught in
an inquiry/investigative format, and includes application to
Pre K-12 classroom settings. Course may be repeated under
different topic. NOTE: Credit will not be given for SCI 501 students who have obtained credit for SCI 101 under the same
theme. Registration is not open to undergraduate or graduate students enrolled in a natural science degree program.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ETE 550.
Bradley University
Nursing
Francesca A. Armmer,
Chair, Department of Nursing
Bradley University offers a Master of Science in Nursing
(M.S.N.). Students may choose one of three majors: nursing administration, nurse administered anesthesia, or
MSN-General. The nurse administered anesthesia major is
offered in cooperation with Decatur Memorial Hospital.
Degree requirements can be met on a full-time or
part-time basis. Enrollment in the nurse administered
anesthesia internship must be on a full-time basis. Graduation requirements must be fulfilled within five years of
enrollment.
Graduates with a major in nursing administration are
prepared for first line management as executives in a variety of health care settings.
Graduates with a major in nurse administered anesthesia will be eligible to write the certification examination.
The MSN-General major addresses the needs of advanced practice nurses who hold certificates/diplomas
of advanced practice, but who do not have a master’s
degree.
The student must maintain an academic average of
3.0 (4.0 scale), achieve a “B” or better in each required
nursing course, and earn a “C” or better in each course applied to graduation requirements.
The curriculum is subject to continuous review and
evaluation which may necessitate revision of courses and
requirements.
Thesis/Directed Research
Students may meet program requirements by completing
either a thesis (4 semester hours) or directed research (2
semester hours).
Comprehensive Assessment
Nursing Administration Major: A written comprehensive examination is administered during the last semester
of administration theory.
Nurse Administered Anesthesia Major: Written comprehensive examinations are administered at the end of
the second and third year of the course of study.
MSN-General Major: A comprehensive assessment, as
determined by the department must be completed by all
students in this major.
Master of Science in Nursing
Core Component .....................................................8 hrs.
NUR 600 Nursing Theories: Analysis
and Development ...........................................................3 hrs.
NUR 605 Leadership in the Health Care System ..........3 hrs.
NUR 610 Legal Issues in Nursing........................................2 hrs.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Research Component ......................................... 7-9 hrs.
NUR 620 Research Methods in Nursing ..........................3 hrs.
NUR 625 Nursing Research Seminar.................................2 hrs.
NUR 699 Thesis .........................................................................4 hrs.
or
NUR 698 Directed Research in Nursing ...........................2 hrs.
Nursing Administration Major 19-21 hrs.
NUR 630 Nursing Administration I, Theory ....................3 hrs.
NUR 631 Nursing Administration I, Practicum ..............4 hrs.
NUR 632 Nursing Administration II, Theory ...................3 hrs.
NUR 633 Nursing Administration II, Practicum .............4 hrs.
Electives ..................................................................................5-7 hrs.
____
Total Program Semester Hours
36 hrs.
Nurse Administered Anesthesia Major 31-33 hrs.
PHY 541 Physics Basics ..........................................................2 hrs.
CHM 500 Chemical Topics ....................................................2 hrs.
BIO 570 Seminar: Contemporary Physiology ................3 hrs.
BIO 525 Advanced Physiology ............................................3 hrs.
NUR 500 Health Assessment ...............................................4 hrs.
Electives ..................................................................................3-5 hrs.
NUR 670 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Principles I......3 hrs
NUR 671 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Principles II....3 hrs.
NUR 672 Pharmacology I .................................................... 4 hrs.
NUR 673 Pharmacology II ................................................... 4 hrs.
NUR 675 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Internship 0 hrs.
____
Total Program Semester Hours
48 hrs.
MSN-General 13-15 hrs.
NUR 683 Advance Practice Nurse Internship ................6 hrs.
Electives ..................................................................................7-9 hrs.
(Nine hours required if NUR 698 is taken; seven are
required if NUR 699 is taken.)
____
Total Program Semester Hours
30 hrs.
Certificate Program in
Nurse-Administered Anesthesia
The certificate program in Nurse-Administered Anesthesia
(NRAN) is a 2-year program that has developed to respond
to the need for certified registered nurse anesthetists. Registered nurses who currently have a master's degree or higher
will be given an opportunity to earn a certificate in nurseadministered anesthesia. By earning the certificate, the individual will be eligible to take the certification examination
that would result in the designation of Certified Registered
Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). Because certificate students and
NRAN majors will take the same selected courses, enrollment
in the certificate program will be very limited.
81
Required Courses
BIO 525 Advanced Physiology ...................................................3 hrs.
BIO 570 Seminar: Contemporary Physiology ......................3 hrs.
NUR 670 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Principles I.....3 hrs.
NUR 671 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Principles II....3 hrs.
NUR 672 Pharmacology I ..............................................................4 hrs.
NUR 673 Pharmacology II.............................................................4 hrs.
NUR 675 Nurse Administered Anesthesia Internship......0 hrs.
____
20 hrs.
Course Descriptions
NUR 600 Nursing Theories: Analysis
and Development
3 hrs.
Analysis of theoretical models. Emphasis on assessment and
implications of models for advanced professional nursing
practice and research. Prerequisite: nursing majors only.
NUR 605 Leadership in the Health Care System 3 hrs.
Leadership theory: role of the nurse as a leader, colleague,
and consultant in health care systems. Prerequisite: nursing
majors only.
NUR 610 Legal Issues in Nursing
2 hrs.
Legal and ethical issues that influence the practice of advanced nursing and leadership in health care systems. Critical assessment of the ethical implications of law and public
policy in health care. Case studies. Prerequisite: nursing majors only, or consent of instructor or department chair.
NUR 620 Research Methods in Nursing
3 hrs.
In-depth study of the research process; the significance of
nursing theory as a basis for nursing research. Various research designs. Development of a testable hypothesis applicable to advanced nursing practice. Prerequisite: undergraduate statistics course or ELH 510; nursing majors only.
NUR 625 Nursing Research Seminar
2 hrs.
Trends in nursing and society that influence the direction
of nursing research. Problems from clinical practice. Identification and refinement of specific researchable questions
through a hypothetico-deductive process. Prerequisites:
NUR 600, 605, 620; or consent of instructor.
NUR 630 Nursing Administration I (Theory)
3 hrs.
Theories, concepts, and principles from nursing and related
disciplines as a foundation for nursing administration. Theories of change, role, adaptation, need, and leadership as related to nursing management. Prerequisites: NUR 600, 605.
Corequisite: NUR 631 or consent of department chair.
NUR 631 Nursing Administration I (Practicum)
4 hrs.
Practicum applying concepts, theories, and principles from
NUR 630. Use of relevant research findings. Advanced practice in management. Prerequisites: NUR 600, 605. Corequisite: NUR 630 or consent of department chair.
82
NUR 632 Nursing Administration II (Theory)
3 hrs.
Advanced concepts and principles relevant to external and
internal nursing organizational situations including power,
authority, and politics. Review of various organizational
patterns and their relationship to nursing personnel management, budgeting, public relations, leadership style, and
research. Prerequisites: NUR 630, 631. Corequisite: NUR 633
or consent of department chair.
NUR 633 Nursing Administration II (Practicum) 4 hrs.
Practicum applying advanced concepts, theories, and principles from NUR 632. Use of management skills such as staffing, budgeting, and developing positive public relations.
Prerequisites: NUR 630, 631. Corequisite: NUR 632 or consent
of department chair.
NUR 660 Seminar in Nursing Education
3 hrs.
Application of educational theories and techniques for the
nurse educator. Prerequisite: ETE 655.
NUR 670 Nurse Administered Anesthesia
Principles I
3 hrs.
Introduction to clinical nurse administered anesthesia: practice, ethics, professional organizations, psychology, history
of anesthesia. Emphasis on nursing process in perioperative and operative patient care; equipment and technology.
Laboratory experience included. Prerequisites: BIO 506, 570,
525; CHM 500; PHY 541; nurse-administered anesthesia majors only.
NUR 671 Nurse Administered Anesthesia
Principles II
3 hrs.
A progression from Principles I to more advanced anesthesia
delivery. Emphasis is on nursing process in perioperative and
operative client care, plus the study of equipment and technology. Laboratory experience provided to introduce the
student to anesthesia practice. Prerequisites: NUR 670; nurse
administered anesthesia majors only.
NUR 672, 673 Pharmacology I, II
4 hrs. each
Pharmacologic principles related to administration of anesthesia and adjunct drugs. Drug receptor theory, biotransformation, structure activity relationships, uptake, distribution,
elimination. Systemic pharmacology and drug interactions.
Prerequisites: NUR 500; CHM 500; BIO 506, 570, 525; PHY 541;
nurse-administered anesthesia majors only. NUR 672 is prerequisite for NUR 673.
NUR 675 Nurse Administered Anesthesia
Internship
0 hrs.
Internship under direct supervision of cooperating agency
CRNA or anesthesiologist. Use of nursing process (assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation) to support
patient’s physiological and emotional status into post-operative period. Regularly-scheduled conferences. Prerequisites:
nurse administered anesthesia majors only; completion of
Year I and Summer I of required course sequence.
Bradley University
NUR 682 Seminar in Nursing
1-6 hrs.
Seminar on special problems or areas in nursing. A variable
credit hour course; may be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 credits total. Prerequisite: consent of instructor or
department chair.
NUR 683 Advanced Practice Nurse Internship
6 hrs.
Internship applying advanced practice nursing concepts in
selected specialty areas. Regularly scheduled conferences.
Prerequisite: certified advance practice nurses only.
NUR 689 Independent Research
1-6 hrs.
Readings, research, or project complementing the student’s
program of study. May be repeated for a maximum of six
hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
NUR 698 Directed Research in Nursing
0-2 hrs.
A research-oriented, student-initiated endeavor that culminates in a scholarly paper suitable for publication or presentation. Required for MSN students who do not select the
thesis option. Prerequisites: NUR 620, NUR 625, and consent
of instructor.
NUR 699 Thesis
0-4 hrs.
Design and implement a research proposal which has implications for nursing practice. May be repeated for a maximum
of four semester hours. Prerequisites: NUR 620, 625; consent
of department chair.
Supportive Courses
NUR 500 Health Assessment
3-4 hrs.
Systematic method for collecting data used in holistic health
assessment of children and adults. Interviewing techniques
for history taking; physical assessment skills. Prerequisites:
R.N. with B.S. major in nursing; or R.N. with consent of instructor.
NUR 522 Seminar on Nursing & Public Policy
3 hrs.
Nursing activities and organizations affecting practice, health
care, public policy, and the future of the profession. Emphasis on generating recommendations for the profession and
developing a personal professional plan for participating in
the process that develops public policy at the local, state, national, and/or international level. Prerequisites: nursing majors and senior or graduate status; or consent of instructor.
NUR 533 Seminar in International Health &
Nursing
3 hrs.
Study of healthcare systems and nursing in a foreign
country in selected hospitals, healthcare settings, and
universities. Establishing healthcare professional and research networks.
Physical Therapy
Steven Tippett,
Chair, Department of Physical Therapy and
Health Science
The curriculum is accredited by the Commission on
Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).
Mission
The mission of the Department of Physical Therapy and
Health Science is to prepare undergraduate students to enter careers in the health care industry or to enter graduate
education in health related fields, and to prepare graduate
students as general practitioners in Physical Therapy.
Vision
The Department of Physical Therapy and Health Science will
strive to build a balanced environment of teaching, research,
service, and practice, which will prepare students to live and
work productively in a diverse and ever-changing society.
Doctor of Physical Therapy
The Doctor of Physical Therapy program began
summer 2005.
Admission Requirements
In addition to meeting admission requirements for the
Graduate School, requirements for entry into the Doctor
of Physical Therapy (DPT) program include the following:
•
Completion of a baccalaureate degree with a Health
Science major from Bradley University with a “C” or
higher in all required courses OR
•
Completion of a baccalaureate degree with the following courses completed with a “C” or higher:
1. Chemistry - 1 year chemistry sequence for
science majors (eg. 6-8 semester hours) with
laboratory experience
2. Physics - 1 year physics sequence for science
majors (eg. 6-8 semester hours) with laboratory
experience
3. Biology/Zoology - 6-8 semester hours with content that includes an introduction to cell biology,
biochemistry, and genetics
4. Anatomy - 3-4 semester hours of vertebrate,
mammalian, human, or comparative anatomy
that includes a laboratory experience
5. Physiology - 3-4 semester hours of vertebrate,
mammalian, or human physiology (a twosemester sequence of combined anatomy and
physiology will meet the anatomy and physiology requirement)
6. Statistics - 3 semester hours of statistics
The following courses are highly recommended:
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
83
1. Kinesiology, biomechanics, or additional courses in
human anatomy
Course of Study
2. Exercise physiology, pathophysiology, or additional
courses in physiology
In addition, an applicant should have:
PT 612 Functional Anatomy I (Five Weeks) ....................2 hrs.
PT 614 Gross Anatomy I (Five Weeks) ..............................2 hrs.
PT 616 Research I (Five Weeks) ............................................1 hr.
PT 622 Functional Anatomy II (Five Weeks) ..................2 hrs.
PT 624 Gross Anatomy II (Five Weeks) .............................2 hrs.
____
1. Minimum 3.0 grade point average in all
mathematics and science courses taken.
Fall I
3. Upper division psychology and sociology courses
4. Medical Terminology
2. Minimum 3.0 grade point average for all courses taken.
3. GRE verbal and quantitative minimum total of 1000.
4. TOEFL score of 600 or higher, TSE of 50 or higher, and
TWE of 4.5 or higher for non-native English speaking
applicants.
5. Skills in computer literacy, communication (written
and verbal), medical terminology, and teaching.
Along with the application, students are expected to
submit:
1. An essay to articulate the applicant’s perception of
the physical therapy profession and examples of
professional conduct.
2. Expanded résumé of education, activities, and work
experiences.
Other Requirements
In addition to the University’s student health form requirement, and prior to enrollment in the first full-time physical
therapy course that includes a clinical experience, each
student must verify:
Summer I
9 hrs.
PT 630 Foundations of Physical Therapy ........................4 hrs.
PT 636 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I ...................4 hrs.
PT 640 Clinical Science I .......................................................3 hrs.
PT 646 Research II ...................................................................2 hrs.
____
13 hrs.
January Interim I
PT 650 Clinical Education I ..................................................3 hrs.
Spring I
PT 662 Neurological Physical Therapy I ..........................4 hrs.
PT 666 Research III ..................................................................3 hrs.
PT 670 Human Development Throughout
the Lifespan ......................................................................3 hrs.
PT 680 Clinical Science II ......................................................2 hrs.
____
12 hrs.
Summer II
PT 700 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II
(8 Weeks) ...........................................................................4 hrs.
PT 710 Clinical Education II (5 Weeks) .............................8 hrs.
____
12 hrs.
•
professional liability insurance (renewable annually)
Fall II
•
immunity to rubeola (measles) by one of the following: - a rubeola (measles) immunization received in
1990 or later, or - written verification from a physician
of having had the disease, or - birth date prior to 1957
•
immunity to rubella (German measles) by one of the
following: - written verification of having had the
immunization, or - written verification rubella titer
greater than 1:10
PT 710 Clinical Education II (Continuation - 3 Weeks)
PT 716 Research IV (13 Weeks) .............................................1 hr.
PT 720 Teaching and Learning Theory in PT
(13 Weeks) .........................................................................3 hrs.
PT 730 Neurological Physical Therapy II
(13 Weeks) .........................................................................4 hrs.
PT 740 Clinical Science III (13 Weeks) ..............................2 hrs.
____
•
written verification of immunity to Hepatitis B virus
Spring II
•
written verification of tuberculin test results (renewable annually)
•
CPR certification (renewable annually)
PT 750 Physical Therapy Administration
and Management ..........................................................4 hrs.
PT 766 Research V ....................................................................1 hr.
PT 770 Applied Exercise Principles ...................................3 hrs.
PT 780 Clinical Science IV (8 Weeks) ................................2 hrs.
PT 790 Cardiovascular/Pulmonary/Integumentary
Physical Therapy (8 Weeks) ..........................................2 hrs.
____
Contact the Department for the most current requirements
Admission is competitive for a limited number of spaces
in the class.
10 hrs.
12 hrs.
84
Bradley University
Summer III
PT 800 Clinical Education III (8 Weeks) ............................8 hrs.
Fall III
PT 810 Health and Wellness ................................................3 hrs.
PT 820 Professional Issues in Physical Therapy ............3 hrs.
PT 830 Physical Therapy Differential Diagnosis ...........4 hrs.
PT 840 Independent Study (Optional) .........................1-6 hrs.
____
10-16 hrs.
Spring III
PT 850 Clinical Education IV (8 Weeks) ...........................8 hrs.
PT 860 Clinical Education V (8 Weeks) .............................8 hrs.
____
16 hrs.
Elective
PT 760 Independent Study .......................................... (1-6 hrs.)
Total required
105 hrs.
Course Descriptions
PT 612 Functional Anatomy I
2 hrs.
A lecture and laboratory study of human movement and
applied kinesiology along with the introduction of physical therapy techniques to assess components of human
movement. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 636 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I
4 hrs.
The study and application of orthopaedic basic science
in the examination, evaluation, and management of dysfunctions and disabilities of the appendicular skeleton.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 640 Clinical Science I
3 hrs.
The anatomical, biomechanical, physiological, and histological basis of the normal and pathological musculoskeletal system, along with specialized examination, assessment, and intervention strategies for the musculoskeletal
system. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 646 Research II
2 hrs.
Research design, methods, and principles of basic statistical analysis; exploration of research topics with review of
appropriate literature; and introduction to components
of the research proposal. Prerequisite: consent of department chair; PT 616.
PT 650 Clinical Education I
2 hrs.
The first of five full-time supervised clinical experiences
requiring utilization of communication skills and teaching
interpersonal and evaluation skills. This course emphasizes the development of the student’s interpersonal skills,
professional behaviors, examination techniques, and
intervention techniques learned previously in the classroom. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 614 Gross Anatomy I
2 hrs.
Cadaveric dissection and study of the musculoskeletal,
vascular, and peripheral nervous systems of the extremities. Prerequisite: consent of the department chair.
PT 662 Neurological Physical Therapy I
4 hrs.
The study and application of neurological basic science
in the examination, evaluation, and management of dysfunctions and disabilities in physical therapy patient care.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 616 Research I
1 hr.
A seminar introducing students to critical analysis of research with special emphasis on levels of evidence and
evidence-based practice. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 666 Research III
3 hrs.
Principles of intermediate statistical analysis and technical/
research writing will be provided as the student finalizes
methods for research project and prepares research proposal. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 646.
PT 622 Functional Anatomy II
2 hrs.
A lecture and laboratory study of human movement and applied kinesiology along with introduction of physical therapy techniques to assess components of human movement.
Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 612.
PT 670 Human Development Throughout
the Lifespan
3 hrs.
A multi-system analysis of the many facets of individual
development from conception to death. Prerequisite:
consent of department chair.
PT 624 Gross Anatomy II
2 hrs.
Cadaveric dissection and study of the structures of the
nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal,
genitoutinary, and integumentary systems. Prerequisites:
consent of department chair; PT 614.
PT 680 Clinical Science II
2 hrs.
The anatomical, physiological, and histological basis of
the normal and pathological neuromuscular system, and
foundations of pharmacology as it relates to intervention
strategies for patients with neuromuscular impairments.
Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 640.
PT 630 Foundations of Physical Therapy
4 hrs.
An introduction to clinical applications in physical therapy. Topics covered in this course include basic physical
therapy examination procedures, professional documentation and communication, therapeutic exercise, physical
agents and mechanical modalities, and patient care skills.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
PT 700 Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II
4 hrs.
The study and application of orthopaedic basic science
in the examination, evaluation, and management of dysfunctions and disabilities of the axial skeleton. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 636.
85
PT 710 Clinical Education II
8 hrs.
The second of five full-time supervised clinical experiences
requiring utilization of communication skills and teaching
interpersonal and evaluative skills. This course provides the
opportunity to advance physical therapy procedures and
to continue to develop professional socialization. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 650.
PT 716 Research IV
1 hr.
Data collection, statistical analysis, data interpretation,
and completion of the Results section of the written student research report. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 666.
PT 720 Teaching and Learning Theory in PT
3 hrs.
Discussion and application of teaching and learning theories as related to the classroom and clinical setting, including student clinical education, staff inservice, and patient
education. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 730 Neurological Physical Therapy II
4 hrs.
Applied neurological examination, evaluation, and intervention theories and strategies in physical therapy patient
care. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 662.
PT 740 Clinical Science III
2 hrs.
The management of a variety of disorders resulting in
physical, emotional, and cognitive impairments and their
physical therapy implications. Prerequisites: consent of
department chair; PT 680.
PT 750 Physical Therapy Administration
and Management
4 hrs.
Discussion and practical application of administrative
and management issues relative to a variety of physical
therapy patient care settings. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 760 Independent Study
1-6 hrs.
Individual study and investigations through selected
readings, discussions, and/or written assignments. Repeatable up to 6 hours. Prerequisites: Physical Therapy
major and/or permission of the Department of Physical
Therapy/Health Science Chair.
PT 766 Research V
1 hr.
Completion of student research project and presentation of
research findings to peers and internal and external constituents. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 716.
PT 770 Applied Exercise Principles
3 hrs.
A course composed of lecture/discussion on the scientific
basis and evidence supporting the use of various exercise
techniques, as well as practical application and handson experience performing and completing these exercise techniques and applications correctly. Therapeutic,
training, and performance enhancement approaches to
exercise will be addressed. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
86
PT 780 Clinical Science IV
2 hrs.
The anatomical, physiological, and histological basis of
the normal and pathological cardiopulmonary, vascular,
and integumentary systems. Normal and abnormal metabolic processes and their physical therapy implications.
Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 740.
PT 790 Cardiovascular, Pulmonary,
and Integumentary Physical Therapy
2 hrs.
Using the gas transport model as a foundation, this lecture
and laboratory course provides the student with the skills
to apply, analyze, and synthesize the basic science of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and integumentary physical therapy as it relates to disorders of cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, an integumentary systems. The focus of this course
is examination and evaluation techniques and program
planning. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 800 Clinical Education III
8 hrs.
The third of five full-time supervised clinical experiences
offering the opportunity for continued development of
clinical management of patients in one of a variety of
clinical settings. This course allows for continued professional socialization and growth as well as further development of professional behaviors. Prerequisites: consent of
department chair; PT 710.
PT 810 Health and Wellness
3 hrs.
Physical therapy implications of common health issues
in a variety of physical therapy clients, and the role of
screening and prevention in dealing with these issues.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 820 Professional Issues in Physical Therapy 3 hrs.
Presentation and discussion of pertinent issues in the field of
physical therapy. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
PT 830 Physical Therapy Differential Diagnosis 4 hrs.
The curriculum’s capstone course that emphasizes the
role of the physical therapist in managing the patient
with multi-system dysfunctions. Prerequisite: consent of
department chair.
PT 840 Independent Study
1-6 hrs.
An optional opportunity for the student to focus on a
specific area of interest with faculty and/or clinician guidance.
PT 850 Clinical Education IV
8 hrs.
The fourth of five full-time, supervised clinical experiences
or first half of the clinical education experience requiring
utilization of advanced communication skills and teaching interpersonal and evaluative skills. Students have the
opportunity to further develop clinical management of
patients in a different clinical setting. Furthermore, continued professional socialization and growth as well as development of professional behaviors are expected. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 800.
Bradley University
PT 860 Clinical Education V
8 hrs.
The last of five full-time, supervised clinical experiences or
second half of the final clinical education experience requiring utilization of advanced communication skills and teaching interpersonal and evaluative skills. Students have the
opportunity to further develop clinical management of patients in a different clinical setting. Furthermore, continued
professional socialization and growth as well as continued
development of professional behaviors are expected. Prerequisites: consent of department chair; PT 850.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
87
COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
Richard T. Johnson,
Dean
Joseph Emanuel,
Associate Dean
Robert Podlasek,
Assistant Dean
The College of Engineering and Technology offers programs leading to:
• Master of Science in Civil Engineering
• Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
• Master of Science in Industrial Engineering
• Master of Science in Manufacturing Engineering
• Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Students majoring in engineering are required to complete from 30 to 33 semester hours of coursework, depending on the program they are pursuing. Students
should consult the department graduate program coordinator for a plan of study prior to registration.
For international graduates (unless from an English
speaking country), a minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required for unconditional admission. The GRE is required
by some departments and suggested for others.
A minimum undergraduate last-60-hour grade point
average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is needed for unconditional
admission. However, some programs may have other
requirements for unconditional admission. Prospective
graduate students who have a GPA below 3.0 or a TOEFL
score below 550 may be admitted conditionally. TOEFL
and GRE scores are taken into consideration for admission
and when making assistantship award decisions.
Special Academic Programs
To participate in the following programs, students must have
authorization to work in the United States. Eligibility of nonimmigrant (F-1) students is defined on an individual basis according to regulations set forth by the Bureau of Citizenship
and Immigration Services (BCIS) and the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE), formerly referred to as
INS—the Immigration and Naturalization Service. For clarification of eligibility, contact the Multicultural Student Services
Office or consult the BCIS Web site at www.immigration.gov.
Practicum
Graduate students enrolled in chemistry, civil engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, industrial
engineering, manufacturing engineering, mechanical
engineering, and physics may have an opportunity for
employment for 10-20 hours per week in a practicum program that partners industry and the university. Generally,
the practicum is on-site work in an industrial setting. Students are assigned technically challenging projects with
a near-term economic significance. Participating students
will be enrolled in EGT 500 for zero credit hours.
Internship
Engineering internships provide engineering students an
opportunity to participate in a full-time internship semester and/or summer away from campus providing careerrelated work experience. Participating graduate students
will enroll in EGT 510 for zero credit hours. While on a
full-time internship assignment, students are considered
to have full-time student status, making normal progress
toward a degree in a recognized University program, and
are entitled to all student privileges at the University. Also
while on a full-time internship assignment, students may
register for additional hours of classroom study upon departmental approval.
Course Descriptions
EGT 500 Graduate Engineering Practicum
0 hrs.
Solving challenging problems with a near-term economic
benefit. Only for students approved for practicum by the
Dean’s Office. Pass/fail. Prerequisite: graduate student.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
89
EGT 510 Graduate Engineering Internship
0 hrs.
Full-time internship away from campus for engineering
and technology students to gain academic or career-related work experience in industry. May be repeated only
with consent of internship coordinator and internship
faculty advisor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisites:
engineering and technology graduate student. Newly
admitted graduate student must be unconditionally admitted and continuing student must have a minimum of
3.0 grade point average in graduate courses. Approval of
internship coordinator and internship faculty advisor.
90
Civil Engineering
Kerrie Schattler,
Graduate Program Coordinator
The Department of Civil Engineering and Construction offers an MSCE degree program that prepares graduates for
thriving engineering careers characterized by continued
professional growth. Our graduates are given unique opportunities to acquire the talents and skills needed in a
highly technical society facing serious uncertainties and
challenges in the environment and infrastructure. Our
program provides you with the broad scope necessary
for a fruitful and successful career in the practice of civil
engineering and construction management.
To meet the needs of industry and students, the department recently acquired a multimedia laboratory and
equipped it with the most sophisticated software and
hardware available anywhere in the country. This recent
acquisition provides a vivid example of the commitment
to excellence and persistent drive that has become the
hallmark of our department. The departmental goal is to
provide an educational experience that is nationally and internationally recognized. Our students and faculty aspire to
be leaders in their respective fields on and off campus.
Financial Support Research and teaching assistantships are available for qualified graduate students through
the department and ongoing funded research projects.
Currently more than 60% of all graduate students are being supported. The department has numerous endowed
scholarships, and some of these funds provide fellowships
to selected graduate students. Qualified students may
also receive up to 100% tuition waiver from the University.
Additionally, faculty and graduate students have received
research grants from major companies, state agencies,
the National Science Foundation, and other private and
government sources.
Students have abundant opportunities to gain practical experience off campus either part time or full time
during semester breaks and summers. For example, the
Illinois Department of Transportation has hired many
graduate students. Various industries have employed our
graduates under a pollution prevention program sponsored by the Illinois EPA.
Internationalization and Our Global Explorer Program The Global Explorer program is designed to expand
the professional capabilities, stimulate intellectual growth,
and broaden the personal perspectives of all participants.
Arrangements have been made with universities around the
world to send our students either for short courses or for the
entire academic year. Students with financial need have received financial support that enables them to study abroad
for equal or less than what it would cost them to study at
Bradley University. This program enables students to meet
Bradley University
the challenges of tomorrow and equips them with the needed skills to compete in an international marketplace.
Programs of Study The graduate program can be
characterized by areas of concentration: construction
management, structures, and geo-environmental/water
resources. New course offerings have been introduced
in multimedia, pavement and superpave, GIS/GPS, and
transportation systems. Selected courses in other engineering departments, the college of business, and computer science are permissible. The program’s flexibility
provides graduate students with a wide variety of means
to prepare for their future careers.
Construction Management The construction industry is the largest industry in the United States. Its impact is
felt in every area of civil engineering, both nationally and
internationally. This fast-growing area provides courses
that enhance the education of students by examining
the most recent trends and methods in the management
of the construction process. Opportunities are provided
through coursework dealing with advanced cost estimating, contract administration, productivity analysis, total
quality management (TQM), cutting-edge software dealing with design/build processes and multimedia presentations, and many other areas that affect the profession.
Structural Engineering The graduate courses in the
structural program offer a wide variety of courses that
provides a strong theoretical and applied background
suitable for both practice and research. The structural engineering group has five faculty members with a diverse
academic background. The group employs experimental,
numerical, and analytical techniques in their research activities. The research interests within the group include:
behavior and design of reinforced concrete, structural
durability, analysis and design of bridges, finite element
analysis, computational mechanics, structural stability,
and seismic analysis and design of structures.
Students are given the opportunity to utilize a spectrum of computer facilities, including a networked personal computer and workstations. These computers are
equipped with the state-of-the-art structural engineering
and finite elements software packages. The well-equipped
structures laboratory provides state-of- the-art research
tools. Among them are an MTS 80 kips Cyclic Testing System, NI data acquisition system, a large number of transducers and LVDT’s, Universal Testing Machine, and an ELE
compression testing machine.
Geo-Environmental Engineering This program option meets the growing need for professionals who are
well educated in the science and engineering of treatment
processes and pollutant transport and impact on the environment. The program also addresses the need for more
informed decision-making with respect to environmental
risks and impacts. Graduates from this program are employed by governmental agencies, by consulting com2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
panies that specialize in environmental engineering and
environmental planning, and by industrial manufacturing
companies in pollution prevention or environmental control rules. Funded research from Caterpillar Inc. and from
regional and national environmental agencies provides
an opportunity for graduate students to participate in the
research of hazardous waste treatment, biological wastewater treatment, physico-chemical treatment, and management models of environmental policies and systems.
Facilities The Department has major laboratories
with state-of-the-art equipment in multimedia, Archicad,
geo-technical, concrete, asphalt, environmental, surveying, structural, microcomputers, construction, design,
projects, research, and fluids. Our students have 24-hour
access to a spectrum of computer facilities, including
networked personal computers and workstations. These
computers are equipped with cutting edge software
packages in structural, geotechnical, environmental, and
construction management. The CEC laboratories include
needed instrumentation for education and research.
For example, the structural laboratory includes an MTS
80 kips Cyclic Testing System, NI data acquisition, a universal testing machine, and an ELE compression testing
machine. The environmental laboratory includes a gas
chromatograph with purge trap, atomic absorption spectrophotometers, and FTIR. The asphalt laboratory is being
updated to include Superpave testing equipment. These
laboratories are well equipped to meet the educational
needs of students and research objectives of graduate
students and faculty.
Career Services Graduate students have numerous
opportunities to develop through professional activities
such as the student chapters of ASCE and AGC. These organizations sponsor noted speakers on a variety of topics and provide a forum for interaction between students
and industry. In addition, graduate students may become
involved with community projects such as the Bridge Pal
program that fosters engineering interest in high school
seniors.
The departmental advisory board is composed of successful civil engineers and construction leaders. Advisory
board members are very active as speakers and outside
professional contacts for our students. The departmental
director for job placement also helps our students with
their search for employment.
Faculty Qualifications The faculty are renowned
worldwide and have published more textbooks (25) than
any other civil engineering or construction department
of similar size in the United States. These textbooks are
used at a large number of highly regarded institutions.
CEC faculty members have received numerous awards
for teaching excellence and scholarship. Faculty have also
conducted research for national, state, and local sponsors
that have benefited our students.
91
MSCE Degree Requirements After selecting core
courses, the student may study in any one of three areas
of concentration: construction management, structural,
or geo-environmental/water resources. The student has
the opportunity of selecting a thesis or a non-thesis option. The thesis option requires 6 semester hours of CE
699 (Thesis). The non-thesis option requires a minimum
of 6 semester hours in an area of concentration.
In addition to the requirements of the Graduate
School, the Department of Civil Engineering and Construction has the following requirements:
1. The MSCE program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree.
2. All MSCE students are required to take CE 610 to
meet the mathematics requirement and a minimum
of 18 semester hours from the department.
3. A plan of study is required by the end of the first
semester. The plan may be changed by filing a request
for amendment. This request must be filed with and
approved by the graduate coordinator prior to registering for courses. Courses not on the approved study
plan may not be counted towards the MSCE degree.
4. Admission of undergraduate students into 500-level
courses requires that the student have the necessary
prerequisites and a minimum average of 2.50/4.0 in
the major field.
5. Admission into the MSCE program requires a
bachelor’s degree in civil engineering or construction. Qualified graduates from other engineering
or related fields may be admitted conditionally. The
conditional status may be changed to unconditional
only after all deficiencies are removed.
6. Each student is required to pass a comprehensive examination during the last semester of his/her study.
Students seeking the thesis option are required to
make oral defense of their thesis instead.
Exceptions to the departmental requirements listed
above may be made with the approval of the department
chair. Such exceptions are rare and will only be granted in
cases where clear justification can be demonstrated.
Course Descriptions
Civil Engineering
CE 508 Advanced Soil Mechanics
3 hrs.
Consolidation theory and settlements, stress-path method, strength and deformation behavior of soils, failure
theories, confined flow, flow nets, numerical analysis of
flow, unconfined flow, seepage through earth dams. Laboratory experiments on consolidation and shear strength.
Prerequisites: CE 380.
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CE 515 Advanced Foundation Engineering
3 hrs.
Advanced pile capacity formulations, buckling, and lateral loading. Mat foundations, finite difference solutions.
Foundations on difficult soils. Slope stability; stability of
earth dams. Excavations; geotechnical instrumentation.
Prerequisite: CE 422.
CE 541 Pollution Modeling
3 hrs.
Phenomena that affect mass balance of contaminants in
environmental systems. Advection, diffusion, dispersion,
and interfacial mass transfer. Physical, chemical, and biological descriptions of these processes with mathematical
models. Solutions to these models with illustrations from
reactor engineering and surface water quality modeling.
Application to actual process reactor. Prerequisites: senior
or graduate standing; consent of instructor.
CE 542 Advanced Water Treatment
3 hrs.
Design of physical and chemical unit processes and unit
operations with an emphasis on water treatment. Design
of aeration systems, coagulation and flocculation processes, sedimentation tanks, filtration systems, chemical
precipitation processes, ion exchange processes, and
disinfection processes. Advanced purification methods
including adsorption, reverse osmosis, electro-dialysis,
and membrane processes. Treatment and disposal of
physiochemical process sludges. Prerequisite: CE 360.
CE 543 Advanced Wastewater Treatment
3 hrs.
Application of concepts from microbiology and biology to
environmental engineering systems. Detailed integrated
design of wastewater treatment. Microbiology of wastewater treatment processes and soil bioremediation processes. Interaction between biogeochemical phenomena
and microbial processes in an environmental engineering
context. Prerequisite: CE 360.
CE 546 Groundwater Hydrology
3 hrs.
Groundwater in the hydrological cycle, fundamentals of
groundwater flow; flow net analysis; steady-state and
transient well testing techniques for parameter estimation; multiple well systems; leaky aquifers; sea water
intrusion; groundwater investigation; artificial recharge
of aquifers, design of wells; subsidence and lateral movement of land surface due to groundwater pumping. Design and computer applications. Prerequisites: CE 304.
CE 550 Geoenvironmental Engineering
3 hrs.
Soil composition and behavior. Development and movement of groundwater. Soil sampling and monitoring of
contaminants in groundwater. Drilling techniques based
on soil type. Land disposal of wastes. Solidification of
wastes and design of landfills. Processes affecting the
distribution of inorganic and organic pollutants in the
environment. Exchange among soil, water, sediment, and
biota. Remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater at existing sites. Prerequisites: CE 380, CE 360.
Bradley University
CE 555 Sustainability and Environmental
Regulations
3 hrs.
Sustainability as it is expressed in environmental regulations and policies for conventional and hazardous wastes
in air, water, and groundwater. Toxicological, risk assessment, risk-based engineering, and regulatory aspects for
the sustainable management of all types of waste. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
CE 558 Solid Waste Management
3 hrs.
Sources, composition, and properties of solid waste.
Transport of solid wastes and design of transfer stations.
Separation, transformation, and recycling of waste materials. Landfill siting. Leachate generation, collection, and
removal systems. Liner system design. Landfill settlement and stability analysis. Accelerated treatment of solid
waste. Methane recovery from landfills. Closure, restoration, and rehabilitation of landfills. Case studies. Prerequisites: CE 360, CE 380.
CE 560 Advanced Structural Analysis
3 hrs.
Direct stiffness method for the analysis of two-dimensional trusses and frames, equivalent nodal forces, thermal and
settlement effects, principle of virtual work, space trusses,
grid structures, static condensation, Lagrange multipliers,
tapered elements. Prerequisites: CE 210, CE 359.
CE 562 Advanced Steel Design
3 hrs.
Structural framing systems; rigid frame design; design of
bracing; design of simple rigid and moment resisting connections; torsion of steel open sections; design of beams
subjected to torsion; design of steel plate girders; design
of composite beams. Prerequisite: CE 442.
CE 565 Advanced Concrete Design
3 hrs.
Advanced topics in flexural design; torsion in beams; behavior and design of slender columns; biaxial bending of
columns; design of two-way slabs; behavior and design of
frame-wall structural systems; inelastic analysis of flexural
members; use of strut and tie analysis; yield line analysis;
design of mat foundations. Prerequisite: CE 403.
CE 567 Prestressed Concrete Design
3 hrs.
Theory and analysis of prestressed concrete members by
various methods of prestressing; design of simple and
continuous beams and slabs; prestress losses; composite
beams. Extensive study of materials used in prestressed
concrete. Precast concrete systems. Prerequisites: CE 403;
senior or graduate standing.
CE 570 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
3 hrs.
Two- and three-dimensional stress and strain at a point; twodimensional elasticity; beams on elastic foundations; torsion
of noncircular sections; curved beams; unsymmetrical bending; plastic collapse and limit analysis. Prerequisite: CE 270.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
CE 575 Structural Dynamics
3 hrs.
Single degree of freedom systems; multi-degree of freedom systems; lumped mass and consistent mass—MDOF
beams; free and forced vibrations; earthquake loading;
impact and impulsive loads; numerical procedures.
CE 577 Seismic Design
3 hrs.
Theory, analysis, and design of building structures under
earthquake loading. Application of current codes and
standards related to steel, concrete, masonry, and wood
structures. Prerequisite: CE 403.
CE 580 Highway Safety
3 hrs.
Safety aspects of streets and highways; planning, implementation, and evaluation of highway safety improvement projects and programs. Highway risk analysis and
risk management systems. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
CE 583 Geometric Highway Design
3 hrs
Application of standards, theory, and practice in design
of streets and highways. Design of streets and highways
including cross section elements, shoulder, and roadside
features. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
CE 585 Advanced Pavement Design
3 hrs.
Advanced methods in pavement design: mechanistic empirical pavement design, performance models, overlay design, back calculation of layer moduli, perpetual pavement
design. Prerequisites: CE 356, senior or graduate standing.
CE 586 Pavement Management Systems
3 hrs.
Condition assessment of the infrastructure with emphasis
given to pavement, deterioration modeling, engineering
economics of payment systems, evaluation of project
alternatives, optimization and ranking, sustainability,
and strategic environment assessment for infrastructure
decision-making. Prerequisite: CE 356.
CE 591 Special Topics I
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
CE 592 Special Topics II
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest, which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
CE 610 Advanced Numerical Methods
3 hrs.
Selected numerical methods and applications chosen to
meet current needs for solving problems in civil engineering. Prerequisite: CE 210 or equivalent. Not open to students who have previously earned credit in CE 510.
93
CE 655 Environmental Management Modeling 3 hrs.
Development, solution, and interpretation of management models used in environmental planning and water
resource systems. Risk analysis and management. Risk
and how its various aspects influence environmental
regulations and policy. Decision making with risk including risk-based design. Environmental impact assessment.
Water resource allocation decisions. Prerequisite: CE 360.
CE 670 Theory of Elasticity
3 hrs.
Stress and strain tensors; stress on arbitrary planes; principle stresses in three dimensions; equilibrium equations;
strain displacement equations and compatibility conditions; transformation of stresses and strains; plane elasticity in rectangular and polar coordinates; boundary value
problems; yield and failure criteria; energy principles. Prerequisites: CE 610, CE 570.
CE 681 Traffic Signal Design
3 hrs.
Analysis and design of traffic signals for isolated intersections and coordinated systems. Hardware, communication,
and detection systems associated with signal systems. Fundamental concepts of simulation of traffic operations. Application of optimization/simulation computer software programs. Not open to students who have previously earned
credit in CE 581. Prerequisites: CE 310 or equivalent.
CE 682 Transportation Economics
3 hrs.
Application of engineering economy for transportation
systems; analysis of congestion costs, highway transportation costs, and road user consequences. Identification
and measurement of highway benefits, concepts of value
and time, and willingness to pay; discount rate and vest
charge; concepts of depreciation and service life; life cycle
cost analysis; evaluation of transportation alternatives
and evaluation of completed projects and programs. Not
open to students who have previously earned credit in CE
582. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
Construction
CON 520 Construction and Engineering Practice 3 hrs.
Issues of the processes affiliated with the construction
and engineering consulting profession: project delivery,
conception through construction of projects, phases of
design, and unique challenges. Case studies will be utilized. Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing.
CON 522 Advanced CADD
3 hrs.
Applications of CAD systems. Visualization and optimization of the processes used in construction through threedimensional modeling and utilization in various civil engineering and construction applications. Prerequisites: CE
224 or consent of department chair.
CON 524 Building Information Modeling
3 hrs.
Application of state-of-the-art technology in projects during various phases from inception to completion including
planning, design, procurement, construction, handing over,
and operation and maintenance. Investigation of different
available tools and technologies in recording, storing, and
sharing project information. Prerequisites: senior or graduate
standing in the College of Engineering and Technology.
CON 526 Advanced Cost Estimating
3 hrs.
Advanced techniques in taking-off quantities, pricing techniques, computer estimating, and bidding strategy models.
Prerequisite: CON 396 or consent of department chair.
CON 528 Advanced Scheduling
3 hrs.
Project scheduling methods with emphasis on network
scheduling techniques, work breakdown structure (WBS),
resource and cost loading, scheduling under uncertainties, project time compression, resource leveling, scheduling for linear projects (LOB), time-cost trade-offs, project
status, reporting and updating, schedules as tools for
claims documentation. Case studies. Computer based.
Prerequisites: CON 392 or consent of department chair.
CE 691 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering I 3 hrs.
Advanced topics of special interest in civil engineering
and construction which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor.
CON 529 Advanced Contracts
3 hrs.
Issues in the administration and implementation of a construction contract. Coordinating and controlling the construction project under legal and ethical considerations.
Prerequisites: CON 492 or consent of department chair.
CE 692 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering II 3 hrs.
Advanced topics of special interest in civil engineering
and construction which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor.
CON 536 TQM Principles
3 hrs.
Theory and analysis of the Total Quality Management
system as applied within the construction industry. Case
studies. Prerequisites: QM 262, CE 310, or IME 311 or consent of department chair.
CE 699 Thesis
3-6 hrs.
Research on a topic selected by the student and approved
by the thesis advisor. Prerequisite: graduate standing in CE.
94
Bradley University
CON 537 Construction Simulation
3 hrs.
Decision making using simulation and simulation languages to model construction operations. Simulation of
construction process using what-if analysis. Role of simulation and decision making in the planning and scheduling phases in the construction industry. Topics include
introduction to discrete event simulation, generation
of random numbers, queuing, simulation languages for
construction. Prerequisites: QM 262, CE 310, or IME 311 or
consent of department chair.
CON 540 Project and Company Management 3 hrs.
Unique issues of company and project management in
the construction industry not traditionally found in construction programs, such as fraud, regulatory issues, and
international construction. Presentations on project and
company management by renowned experts will give the
student knowledge and insights on new trends, innovative procedures, practical case studies, and exposure to
innovation in construction. The course will give the student knowledge of the business aspects of running a wide
range of construction companies and a variety of projects.
Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
Electrical Engineering
Prasad Shastry,
Graduate Program Coordinator
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
offers a graduate program leading to the degree Master of
Science of Electrical Engineering. The goal of the program
is to enhance the student’s understanding of advanced
concepts in core areas of modern electrical and computer
engineering and to enrich the student’s design and/or research skills in a specialization of his or her choice. This is
done through coursework and a design project or thesis
as described below.
Students work closely with the Graduate Program Coordinator in tailoring an overall program best suited to their
background and interests. Course sequences, design projects, and research are available in applied electromagnetics,
communication theory, control theory, digital systems and
computers, microprocessor applications, signal processing,
and wireless components and systems. The ECE department has excellent computer and laboratory facilities to
support advanced studies in these areas.
Degree Requirements
A total of 33 semester hours is required for the degree and
all students must do either a thesis (thesis option) or design project (design option). The specific requirements for
each option are as follows:
Thesis Option
•
EE 501 Principles of Electrical Engineering Design, 3
hours
•
Thesis, 6 hours
•
18 hours of electrical engineering courses with two
6-hour specializations
•
6 hours of EE or approved technical electives
Design Option
•
EE 501 Principles of Electrical Engineering Design,
3 hours
•
Design Project, 3 hours
•
21 hours of electrical engineering courses with two
6-hour specializations
• 6 hours of EE or approved technical electives
In addition to the two six-hour specializations, at least six
hours of the EE coursework must utilize advanced mathematical concepts. Examples of such courses are EE 532,
EE 540, EE 550, EE 630, EE 631, EE 642, EE 643, and EE 651.
Technical electives can be chosen from graduate courses
offered by other engineering programs or by the biology, chemistry, computer science, math, or physics depart2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
95
ments. The one-semester EE 501, Principles of Electrical
Engineering Design, covers design techniques in key areas
of electrical engineering. This course will be waived for students unconditionally admitted to the MSEE program. In
addition, those students conditionally admitted but with
considerable design experience can seek to waive EE 501
by petitioning the graduate coordinator.
All the courses used to satisfy the degree requirements
for the MSEE degree must be listed in the student’s Graduate Program of Study. This document must be completed
and approved by the EE Graduate Program Coordinator
before completion of 12 hours of coursework. The student
must also complete a final degree experience, normally an
oral comprehensive or colloquium.
Admission
Successful completion of an undergraduate electrical or
computer engineering program is required for admission.
In addition to the material described in the general admission section of this catalog, applicants to the MSEE program
must also submit their scores from the GRE General Test.
Undergraduate GPA, number of repeated undergraduate
courses (if any), and GRE scores are the primary factors considered in admission decisions. International students must
also submit material and information described in the general admission section of this catalog.
Plans of study are available for those with non-electrical
engineering or non-engineering undergraduate degrees.
These plans require a number of undergraduate foundation
courses to be successfully completed before admission to
the MSEE program. Further information can be obtained by
contacting the ECE graduate program coordinator.
Course Descriptions
EE 501 Principles of Electrical Engineering
Design
3 hrs.
Analog, digital, and software design experiments: use of
instrumentation transistor amplifiers and switches, operational amplifiers, active and passive filters, digital logic, microcontrollers, and signal processing circuits. Use of computer-aided design and simulation tools for system analysis
and design. (Cannot be used to satisfy MSEE elective.) Prerequisite: BSEE degree or consent of the department chair.
EE 531 Communication Theory I
3 hrs.
Orthogonal signal representation; review of Fourier series
and Fourier transform; basic probability theory; random
processes; power spectral density; Shannon's channel capacity; sampling theorem; baseband signaling; bandpass
signaling; complex envelop representation of signals and
systems; analog modulations; binary and M-ary digital
modulations; phase locked loops, demodulation circuits;
matched filter; error performance in digital communications. Prerequisite: a minimum grade of C in both EE 301
and EE 302 or equivalents.
96
EE 532 Communication Theory II
3 hrs.
Digital communication systems; modulation; demodulation; maximum likelihood detection; trade-offs between
bandwidth and power; bit error rate; channel coding techniques: block coding, convolutional coding, and iterative
decoding; mutual information; channel capacity; trellliscoded modulation; synchronization. Prerequisite: EE 531.
EE 533 Digital Image Processing
3 hrs.
Design of computer-based imaging systems; multidimensional filtering and quantization methods for image
enhancement, restoration, and pattern recognition. Prerequisite: EE 302 or MTH 325.
EE 534 Digital Signal Processing
3 hrs.
Representation and analysis of discrete time signals and
systems. Finite and infinite impulse response filter design;
computer-aided-design; Fast Fourier Transform; implementation of digital filters. Prerequisites: EE 302.
EE 535 Engineering Applications of Neural
Networks
3 hrs.
Provides a working knowledge of the theory, design, and
engineering applications of artificial neural networks. Emphasis will be directed to low-level implementation such
as embedded microcontrollers and integrated circuits.
Specific architectures such as correlation matrix memory,
perceptron, adaline, multilayer networks, radial-basis
function networks, and Hopfield networks will be examined as well as their corresponding learning rules. Prerequisite: EE 302 or graduate standing.
EE 540 Dynamic Systems Analysis
3 hrs.
Advanced techniques for analysis of electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical systems. State function concepts are emphasized with methods for determining state
equations, system stability, and control. Prerequisite: EE
302 or graduate standing.
EE 550 Electromagnetic Theory
3 hrs.
Time-varying electric and magnetic fields; Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic potentials, electromagnetic boundary conditions, plane-wave propagation in unbounded
conducting and non-conducting media, wave polarization,
Poynting vector, reflection and transmission of waves at
boundaries; radiation and antennas . Prerequisite: EE 381 or
equivalent with a grade of C or better.
EE 551 Radio Frequency Circuits and Systems 3 hrs.
Review of transmission lines, impedance matching and
transformations, S-parameters, passive R.F. junctions, R.F.
amplifier design, R.F. systems, and front end design. Prerequisites: EE 205, 206.
EE 555 Optical Fiber Communication
3 hrs.
EM wave propagation in silica glass and step index optical fibers, LP modes, multimode and singlemode fibers,
optical transmitters and receivers, design of optical fiber
Bradley University
communication systems meeting industry standards. Prerequisite: EE 381 or consent of instructor.
EE 561 Digital Systems: Logic Design
3 hrs.
Boolean algebra; logical design; storing and switching
phenomena. Prerequisite: EE 304 or graduate standing.
EE 562 Digital Systems: Computer Structures 3 hrs.
Use of hardware programming language to design a small
computer or other digital system; busing; control units; interfacing; transfer design. Prerequisite: EE 201.
EE 563 Advanced Electronics - VLSI System
Design
3 hrs.
Design and implementation of very-large-scale integrated
systems (VLSI). Integrated circuit devices, subsystems, and
architecture. Computer-aided-design (CAD) and design
testing. Prerequisites: EE 304 or graduate standing.
EE 565 Digital Systems: Microprocessor and PC
Architecture
3 hrs.
Architecture of PC-compatible computers; 32-bit processor architecture and assembly language programming;
standard buses. Design of peripheral cards to interface
with the standard PC bus architectures. Prerequisites: EE
365 or consent of instructor.
EE 566 Digital Systems: Memory and Interfacing 3 hrs.
Design of single-board computers using 32-bit processors; processor architecture and assembly language programming. Introduction to RISC processors. Prerequisites:
EE 365 or consent of instructor.
EE 567 Advanced VLSI Design
3 hrs.
Addresses the testability of integrated systems, using very
large scale integration or VLSI, which includes topics on
devices, circuits, and digital subsystems in CMOS technology. Includes the concept and methodology for the
design for testability of digital integrated systems. Prerequisite: EE 563.
EE 568 VHDL: Digital System Design
3 hrs.
A structured guide to the modeling of the design of digital systems, using VHDL, a hardware description language.
VHDL is designed to fill a number of needs in the design
process. It allows description of the structure of a system,
and the specification of the function using familiar programming language forms. As a result it allows the design
of a system to be simulated and synthesized.
EE 575 Power Systems
3 hrs.
Analysis of electric power systems; fault studies; load flow;
economic loading; stability; relaying; high voltage DC
transmission; lightning and switching transients. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in EE. .
photon planar imaging), single photon emission computed
tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography
(PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultra-sound
imaging. The physics and design of systems, typical clinical
applications, medical image processing, and tomographic
reconstruction. Cross-listed as ME 582. Prerequisites: Senior
standing in engineering or consent of instructor.
EE 630 Random Variables and Signals
3 hrs.
Axiomatic probability; probability distributions; correlation functions; power spectral density; random processes;
Markov chains and Markov processes; linear and non-linear systems with random inputs; linear mean square estimation; Wiener and Kalman filtering; applications to signal processing problems. Prerequisites: a minimum grade
of B in both EE 301 and EE 302 or equivalents; completion
of a senior or graduate-level course in the area of signals
and systems with a minimum grade of C.
EE 631 Advanced Communication Theory
3 hrs.
Wireless communication systems, spread spectrum systems; multiple access techniques; software-defined radios; iterative receiver design; application to engineering
problems: Global Navigation Satellite Systems. Prerequisites: EE 532 with a minimum grade of B.
EE 642 Advanced Control Systems
Continuation of EE 540. Prerequisite: EE 540.
3 hrs.
EE 643 Optimal Control Systems
3 hrs.
Analysis and design of multivariable control systems:
stability, observability and controllability, deterministic/
stochastic linear optimal regulator and observers, and
multivariable stability robustness. Prerequisite: EE 540 or
permission of instructor.
EE 651 Advanced Electrodynamics
3 hrs.
Continuation of EE 550. Special theory of relativity; plasma
dynamics. Prerequisites: EE 540, 550.
EE 681, 682 Research
3-6 hrs. each
Graduate research on a project selected by student
and advisor.
EE 691, 692 Topics in Electrical
Engineering
1-3 hrs. each
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes.
EE 699 Thesis
3-6 hrs.
Advanced electrical engineering research or design under
the guidance of a faculty advisor. Required of students
choosing thesis option. Total of 6 semester hours to be
taken in one or two semesters. Prerequisites: consent of
department chair; unconditional status.
EE 582 Medical Imaging
3 hrs.
Introduction to the common methods and devices employed
for medical imaging, including conventional x-ray imaging,
x-ray computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine (single
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
97
Industrial Engineering
Manufacturing
Engineering
The Department of Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering & Technology offers two graduate programs leading
to the Master of Science degree: M.S.I.E. in industrial engineering and M.S.Mf.E. in manufacturing engineering.
These degree programs respond to a wide range of
manufacturing and service industry needs.
Each program has a graduate coordinator. The admission requirements for each are stated in the following
program statements.
Industrial Engineering
Contact IMET Department
The Department of Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering & Technology offers a graduate program leading to
the M.S.I.E. degree stressing the role of industrial engineers as problem solvers at managerial and staff levels in
both manufacturing and service industries. The program
offers students the opportunity to customize a plan of
study, beyond an IE core, based on the student’s educational background and career objectives. Courses will
be drawn from such disciplines as engineering, science,
mathematics, and business administration.
Admission is selective and is open to holders of an undergraduate degree in engineering, science or mathematics who meet Graduate School admission requirements.
Students without an IE undergraduate degree may be
required to make up undergraduate deficiencies. Those
who do not have an engineering degree should have
worked in an engineering environment for at least three
years. International graduates should have a TOEFL score
of 550 for unconditional admission and a score of 52 on
part 1 of the test. Both part-time and full-time students
are welcome.
Degree Requirements
The total program is 30 semester hours of graduate level
work of which a minimum of 18 hours must be taken from
IME designated courses, including 3 semester hours of a
project course to demonstrate ability to identify, define
and solve unstructured IE related problems. Most entering
students who do not have the undergraduate degree in IE
must complete IME 500, Engineering Economy and Costs,
and IME 503, Engineering Quantitative Analysis. Neither
will count towards graduate degree requirements. A 36hour, non-project program is also available.
A course of study must be prepared by each student
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in consultation with the academic advisor and must be
approved by the department as early as possible but not
later than the beginning of the second semester of study
at Bradley.
Manufacturing Engineering
Contact IMET Department
The Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering and Technology offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Science in Manufacturing Engineering.
The objective of the program is to educate professionals
who will design, build, operate, and control world-class
manufacturing systems with enhanced productivity and
competitiveness.
The program is structured with five interrelated areas:
design, materials, processes, systems, and automation
and integration.
Students applying for admission to the program must
have a baccalaureate degree in engineering or science and
must meet the grade point requirements of the Graduate
School. Transcripts of all prior work at the college level and
two letters of recommendation must accompany the application. All applicants will be considered on an individual
basis. Successful applicants will have a background in the
areas of processes, materials, mathematics, mechanics,
computer science, and manufacturing systems. If a candidate does not have the required level or breadth of preparation in the areas specified above, the candidate may be
admitted conditionally and will be advised of appropriate
preparatory courses or conditions for full unconditional
entrance to the program.
A total of 33 graduate credit hours is required to complete the program. Of the total credit hours:
A. A minimum of 15 semester hours must be taken from
the list entitled Manufacturing Engineering Areas.
At least one course must be taken from each of the
five manufacturing engineering areas. Selected topic
courses and professional projects do not fulfill this requirement.
B. Six semester hours should be devoted to thesis work. If
a student elects not to undertake a thesis, a minimum
of 3 semester hours must be devoted to project work.
C. A minimum of 3 semester hours will be taken in advanced mathematics.
D. A minimum of 6 semester hours must be taken outside of the program. A list of suggested courses is
available from the graduate coordinator.
The student must file and secure approval for a plan
of study with the manufacturing graduate advisory committee prior to completing 9 semester hours. Such a plan
will specify the courses to be taken and the proposed theBradley University
sis or project topic. In the event that a change in the plan
is desired, such a change can be accomplished by filing
a request for amendment with the advisory committee.
This amendment must be approved prior to taking the
alternative course. Candidates will be expected to demonstrate their capacity to draw upon and integrate their
knowledge from all courses presented for their degree in
a written comprehensive examination. Scheduling, grade
reporting, and retakes will conform to the rules of the
Graduate School.
Manufacturing Engineering Areas
Design
IME 590 Geometric Modeling
IME 591 Design for Manufacturability
IME 592 Tribology
Materials
IME 531 Nonmetallic Materials
IME 533 Composite Materials
Processes
IME 541 Forming Processes
IME 543 Materials Removal Processes
IME 545 Joining and Fabrication
Systems
IME 563 Process Engineering
IME 568 Introduction to Expert Systems and Artificial
Intelligence
IME 583 Production Planning and Control
Automation and Integration
IME 553 Advanced Computer Aided Manufacturing
IME 555 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
Course Descriptions
IME 500 Engineering Economy and Costs
3 hrs.
Analysis of the economic aspects of engineering decisions
including the time value of money and the techniques of obtaining cost data. Does not count toward MSIE. Prerequisite:
graduate standing in engineering or consent of instructor.
IME 503 Engineering Quantitative Analysis
3 hrs.
Probability, random variables, distributions, inference, regression, linear programming, simulation. Does not count
towards MSIE. Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or consent of instructor.
IME 511 Engineering Statistical Analysis
3 hrs.
Concepts in probability and statistics from practical and
theoretical angles. Definition of probability, random variable, distribution, important discrete and continuous
distributions, sampling distribution of X-bar, Central Limit
Theorem, t, chi-squared and F distributions, estimation,
hypothesis testing, regression analysis, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: IME 503 or consent of instructor.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
IME 512 Design and Analysis of Experiments
3 hrs.
Design and analysis of experiments in research, development, and production activities. Experimental designs for
evaluating significance of main effects and interactions of
several variables. Treatment of problems of measurement,
planning, and evaluating programs. Prerequisite: two semesters of statistics or consent of instructor.
IME 514 Introduction to Operations Research 3 hrs.
Mathematical model building and use of deterministic
and non-deterministic tools in problem solving. Problem
solving structure, linear programming, transportation and
assignment algorithms, game theory, networks, branch
and bound algorithms, dynamic programming, deterministic and stochastic inventory models, markov chains,
queueing theory and simulation. Prerequisite: IME 503 or
consent of instructor.
IME 515 Linear Programming and Network
Analysis
3 hrs.
Theoretical and computational aspects of linear programming; application to practical problems. Prerequisite: MTH
202; IME 117; consent of instructor.
IME 522 Manufacturing Quality Control
3 hrs.
Analysis of factors affecting product quality during manufacturing; process control charts; process capability studies;
error of measurement; sampling plans; motivation programs; quality audit; organization. Prerequisite: one semester of statistics or consent of instructor.
IME 524 Advanced Quality Control
3 hrs.
Comparative study of philosophies of using quality as a
business management tool, with special reference to Deming’s Theory of control charts and a study of their strengths
and weaknesses. Special control charts such as CUSUM
chart, median chart, moving average chart, and their application. The latest published articles used to keep up-todate in quality technology. Prerequisite: IME 522 or consent
of instructor.
IME 526 Reliability Engineering
3 hrs.
Specification, prediction, and evaluation of product reliability and maintainability. Use of models for failure distribution–exponential, Weibull, lognormal–and analytical and
graphical methods for failure data analysis. Test plans and
accelerated testing models. Design methods for increasing
reliability and maintainability. Prerequisite: IME 511 or consent of instructor.
IME 531 Non-metallic Materials
3 hrs.
Recent developments and applications of polymeric and
ceramic materials. Selection and design criteria, material properties, process engineering, quality considerations,
and failure prevention. Prerequisite: IME 331.
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IME 533 Composite Materials
3 hrs.
Science and technology of modern composite materials:
properties, design, toughening mechanisms, fabrication
methods, evaluation, mechanisms of failure and quality assurance. Prerequisite: IME 331.
IME 541 Forming Processes
3 hrs.
Analytical methods in metal forming processes including
slab approach, upper bound techniques, slip-line field and
visio-plasticity methods. Forging, rolling, extrusion, drawing, sheet forming, near net-shape processes, and CAD/
CAM. Prerequisite: IME 441.
IME 543 Material Removal Processes
3 hrs.
Current and future trends in: mechanics of chip generation; forces and energies in cutting and dynamometry;
thermal aspects of machining; cutting tool materials;
friction, wear, vibrations and tool life; applications of
engineering fundamentals to design and analysis of machining operations with emphasis on computer control.
Prerequisites: IME 441; IME 341.
IME 545 Joining and Fabrication
3 hrs.
Principles of advances in joining and fabrication of engineering materials including metallic, nonmetallic, and
electronic materials. Process science and technology with
emphasis on casting, welding, and microjoining of electronic components. Physical and mathematical modeling
of various processes. Prerequisite: IME 331.
IME 553 Advanced Computer Aided
Manufacturing
3 hrs.
Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) within the CAD/
CAM and CIM contents. Computer Assisted Process Planning (CAPP), Computer Assisted Tool Design, Computer
Assisted NC Programming (APT), Interactive Graphics, NC
Programming, and the elements of computer control of
manufacturing equipment (CNC). A semester project. Prerequisite: IME 445.
IME 555 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3 hrs.
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM); elements of
hardware and software within the manufacturing automation environment. Islands of factory automation and their
interactions, information flow and Local Area Networks
within the CIM architecture, standardization of electronic
data and interfaces. Prerequisite: IME 386.
IME 561 Simulation of Human/Machine Systems 3 hrs.
Procedures and rationale for planning, designing, and implementing computer simulation experiments used to analyze
human-machine systems in engineering, business, and social sciences. Prerequisite: MTH 202, IME 117, IME 311.
puter aided process design and interactive accessing of machining data and tooling element of group technology and
expert systems. Prerequisites: IME 395; IME 443.
IME 566 Advanced Facility Planning
3 hrs.
Extension of IME 466. Facility design consideration of internal and external service functions; logistic concerns; design
flexibility. Prerequisites: IME 383 or IME 386 or IME 500.
IME 568 Introduction to Expert Systems
and Artificial Intelligence
3 hrs.
Knowledge-based systems design and implementation;
expert system shells and programming environments; validation and implementation of expert systems; case studies/laboratories. Cross-listed as CIS 588. Prerequisites: two
semesters of computer programming and one semester of
statistics, or consent of instructor.
IME 570 Selected Topics in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May
be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hrs. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Combined credit for IE 590 and IME 570
may not exceed 6 hours.
IME 583 Production Planning and Control
3 hrs.
Analysis of production-inventory systems using common
planning and scheduling techniques. Mathematical models for project planning, aggregate planning, master scheduling, and inventory analysis. Interface with quality control
and computer systems. Prerequisites: IME 386; minimum
grade of C in IME 311 and IME 313; or consent of instructor.
IME 584 Advanced Production Planning
3 hrs.
Planning methods for converting to or creating Just-in-Time
and/or group technology systems. Analytical and behavioral
aspects. Prerequisite: IME 564; consent of instructor.
IME 585 Human Factors Engineering
3 hrs.
Functional anatomy and physiology of muscle and skeletal
systems and their relationship to work design. Work physiology, kinesiology, and anthropometry in relation to their
application in work-place design and hand tool design. Utilization of physical work capacity and job demands for job
design, personnel assignment, and assessment of work-rest
scheduling. Prerequisites: IME 311, IME 386, CE 150.
IME 587 Occupational Safety and Health
3 hrs.
Occupational safety and health standards and regulations. Injury and illness statistics. Employer’s responsibilities and bookkeeping requirements. Hazard analysis and
systems safety, occupational and environmental hazards
and controls. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
IME 563 Process Engineering
3 hrs.
The process design function interaction with product design,
and the responsibilities within a manufacturing organization.
Selection and design of machinery, tools, and methods. Com100
Bradley University
IME 590 Geometric Modeling
3 hrs.
Computer-based representations of the shape and spatially dependent attributes of real or conceived physical
objects. Techniques and concepts needed to couple the
digital computer with the techniques of geometric modeling and graphics display for analysis and viewing. Prerequisite: IME 395; MTH 223.
Mechanical
Engineering
IME 591 Design for Manufacturability
3 hrs.
The design process; interaction of materials, processes, and
design; economic considerations; design considerations
for machining, casting, forging, extrusion, forming, powder
metallurgy; designing with plastics; design for assembly;
projects and case studies. Prerequisites: IME 395; IME 341.
The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers opportunities for graduate study providing for advanced professional competency and leading to the degree of Master of
Science in Mechanical Engineering. The main goal of the
graduate program in mechanical engineering is to strengthen the ability of the student to solve complex technological
problems in a creative way. To achieve this, the program of
study is designed to broaden the student’s knowledge, to
provide for in-depth study in an area of concentration, and
to complement theoretical study with relevant and significant research and/or design. The student will ordinarily
concentrate in either the mechanical systems design area
or in the area of energy systems/thermosciences.
To qualify for unconditional admission, applicants
should have the equivalent of an undergraduate degree
in mechanical engineering with a minimum undergraduate last-60-hour grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
Transcripts of all prior work at the college level and two
letters of recommendation should accompany the application. Students with undergraduate degrees in related fields
of science and engineering or those who do not meet the
minimum grade point requirement can be admitted conditionally at the discretion of the department. Requirements
for removal of conditional status will be specified in the letter of admission. For students whose primary language is not
English, a TOEFL score of at least 550 is required for unconditional admission.
Students with undergraduate degrees in mechanical
engineering from institutions other than Bradley University
may be required to take undergraduate coursework if their
transcripts do not show a satisfactory level of preparation in
certain areas.
New students who are planning to take their coursework
at an off-campus site must submit copies of their transcripts
for evaluation purposes with their first application for offcampus registration. To ensure that appropriate academic
advising takes place, all continuing students, including those
off-campus, will have their registration capability encumbered each semester until they have met with their advisor
or appropriate faculty representative from the Department
of Mechanical Engineering.
The student must file an approved plan of study with
the graduate program director that describes the courses to
be taken and any proposed research. It must be filed prior to
registering for more than nine semester hours that will be
applied toward satisfying degree requirements. The plan of
study must be approved by the graduate program director
and by the student’s advisor.
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IME 592 Tribology
3 hrs.
An introduction to systems approach to tribology, surface
topography, physical, chemical, and geometric nature of
surfaces. Mechanics of contact between surfaces. Various
theories of friction and wear, hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication. Frictional instabilities.
Rolling contact problems. Application of system methodology to tribological problems in engineering design and
manufacturing. Prerequisites: IME 331 or ME 351 or consent of instructor.
IME 670 Independent Study
3 hrs.
Critical investigation and analysis in management systems
design, facilities and/or process design, material selection,
or industrial economics. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
IME 691, 692 Research
0-3 hrs. (each)
Research project or professional problem to be selected
by student and advisor. May be repeated to a maximum of
3 hours credit. Beyond initial enrollment the student must
register for 0 hours. Prerequisite: unconditional graduate
status; consent of instructor.
IME 699 Thesis
0-6 hrs.
Required of students choosing thesis option. Total of six
hours to be taken; any semester after six hours, the student
must register for zero hours to maintain progress. Prerequisites: unconditional status, consent of graduate coordinator.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Dean Kim,
Graduate Program Coordinator
Master’s Degree Curriculum
Requirements
A total of 30 graduate credit hours is required to complete
the Mechanical Engineering program. The total credit
hours must include:
• One advanced mathematics course is a general requirement for all MSME students and must be approved by the student’s advisor. Courses in statistics,
numerical methods, and engineering analysis are applicable to this requirement.
• Students must take ME 681 project(s) or thesis in order
to graduate, unless the ME Department approves the
student’s work experience to satisfy this requirement.
• In the systems and solid mechanics specialization, the
student must gain fundamental knowledge in the following three areas and must acquire basic knowledge
in one of the fundamental areas in the thermal sciences. The following courses fulfill the above mentioned
requirement:
Mechanical Systems Design students must take
Systems (Vibration ME 540, Systems ME 544, or Advanced
Controls)
Dynamics (ME 502)
Advanced Design of Machine Elements (ME 557)
One course in thermal science chosen from three fundamental areas namely, thermodynamics, heat transfer and
fluids. The student must select one of the courses outlined
below.
Thermal science students must take
Thermodynamics (ME 501)
Heat Transfer (ME 515)
Fluids (ME 521)
One fundamental course in solid mechanics (one of the
above mentioned)
Applied Science students must take
at least four of the following courses plus one fundamental course in either mechanical systems or energy systems
as required above.
ME 503 Internal Combustion Engines
ME 509 Solar Engineering
ME 533 Propulsion Systems
ME 534 Environmental Engineering - Air Conditioning ME
535 Environmental Engineering - Refrigeration
ME 536 Industrial Pollution Prevention
ME 537 Building Energy Management
ME 547 Fluid Power Control Systems
ME 549 Microprocessor Interfacing in Mechanical Systems
ME 560 Principles of Robotic Programming
ME 604 Design of Internal Combustion Engines
ME 648 Advanced Computer Aided Design
The student’s advisor must approve the program of study,
including any subsequent changes.
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Students opting not to do a thesis will be required to
register for three but not more than nine semester hours
of research (ME 681, 682) unless waived because of demonstrated experience. All students are required to pass a
comprehensive examination in their respective area of
concentration according to the policies outlined above.
Comprehensive Exam
The student will be eligible to take the MCE after he/she
successfully completes all the requirements stated above.
The student must report to the department by February
15 or September 15 a list of five courses (excluding math
and the course from other side) to be tested on. The list
must include all the three fundamental/applied required
courses listed above and two additional ME courses. The
department’s graduate committee will combine the list
of courses to be tested on by the 3rd week of February or
September. A request for test questions will be issued by
March 1 or October 1 by the graduate committee to the
faculty members who teach the listed courses. The involved
faculty will provide two (2) problems for each of their listed
courses to the ME Department office by the first Friday of
March or October. The student will be required to solve one
of the two problems. Each problem should not take more
than one-half hour to solve. All tests are open book. Faculty
who request a closed-book option for their part must notify
the ME Department by the first Friday of March or October
and will be encouraged to proctor the exam. The students
must be notified by the ME Department by the second
Friday of March or October whether certain tests will be
closed book. The students will be instructed to solve 5 of the
10 problems. No two problems can be on the same topic.
Passing the MCE requires successful completion of 4 of the
5 submitted problems. The student must retake the topic
that he/she failed during the next regularly scheduled MCE.
Students who fail have only one additional opportunity for
reassessment. Time allotted for the test will be three hours.
Students who opt to take thesis option will not be required
to take the MCE written exam, but still must abide by the
degree guidelines as described above. These students will
be tested on their fundamental knowledge during the oral
defense of their thesis.
Course Descriptions
ME 501 Advanced Thermodynamics
3 hrs.
Laws and concepts of classical thermodynamics; real
gases and equations of state; availability; irreversibility;
property relations; potential functions; equilibrium; multicomponent systems. Prerequisite: ME 302.
ME 502 Problems in Advanced Dynamics
3 hrs.
Application of analytical and graphical methods to problems involving velocities, accelerations, working and inertia forces. Prerequisite: ME 341.
Bradley University
ME 503 Internal Combustion Engines
3 hrs.
Thermodynamic analysis, thermo-chemistry, and performance characteristics of spark ignition and compression
ignition engines. Prerequisites: ME 301; ME 302 or consent
of instructor.
ME 504 Experimental Stress Analysis
3 hrs.
Experimental methods of stress analysis. Strain gages and
related transducers. Photoelasticity and polariscopes. Instrumentation amplifiers, integrated circuits, and other
electronics used for connecting transducers with a terminating device. Analog to digital conversion. Extensive
hands-on laboratory exercises are emphasized. Prerequisites: ME 303, 403 or consent of instructor.
ME 507 Nuclear Energy
3 hrs.
Introduction to nuclear reactors, the physics of nuclear
radiations and interactions, the effects of radiation on
people, and the issues and potentials that will govern the
future use of nuclear energy. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; senior or graduate standing; PHY 201.
ME 509 Solar Engineering
3 hrs.
Nature and characteristics of solar energy as a renewable
energy source. Solar geometry and radiation. Thermodynamics of solar systems; emphasis on 2nd Law considerations. Performance characteristics of collectors, storage
systems, house heating systems, cooling and refrigeration, and photovoltaics. Comprehensive design project.
Theory and performance characteristics of solar devices
and application to design of a comprehensive solar energy system. Prerequisite: ME 415 or consent of instructor.
ME 511 Heat Transfer - Conduction
3 hrs.
General conduction equation in Cartesian, cylindrical,
spherical, parabolic, and paraboloidal coordinate systems
solved for various boundary conditions. Inversion theorem and residue theorem used to solve Laplace transform
equation. Prerequisite: ME 415.
ME 512 Heat Transfer - Convection
3 hrs.
Non-isothermal flow of fluids in Cartesian, cylindrical,
spherical, and other coordinate systems: slug flow, laminar flow, flow entrance effects, property variation effects,
and turbulent flow. Prerequisite: ME 415.
ME 515 Intermediate Heat Transfer
3 hrs.
In-depth treatment of the three modes of heat transfer;
design applications. Development of analytical and specific numerical skills needed for solving design problems
involving heat transfer. Prerequisite: ME 415.
ME 520 Gas Dynamics
3 hrs.
One dimensional flow: wave and shock motion in subsonic and supersonic flow; flow with heat transfer and
friction; viscosity effects; similarity. Introduction to multidimensional flow. Prerequisite: ME 308.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
ME 521 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
3 hrs.
Analysis of statics and dynamics of non-viscous and viscous fluids. Derivation of differential equations of motion.
Potential flow; vortex motion; creeping motion; introduction to boundary layer theory; turbulence. Prerequisites:
MTH 224; ME 308.
ME 533 Propulsion Systems
3 hrs.
Gas turbine analysis; stationary power plants; turboprop,
turbojet, and ramjet engines; rocket propulsion; applications of thermodynamics. Prerequisite: ME 308.
ME 534 Environmental Engineering - Air
Conditioning
3 hrs.
Heating and cooling of moist air; solar radiation; computation of heating and cooling loads; study of heating,
ventilating, and cooling systems and equipment; design
project. Prerequisite: ME 301.
ME 535 Environmental Engineering Refrigeration
3 hrs.
Mechanical vapor compression refrigeration cycles; refrigerants; absorption refrigeration; miscellaneous refrigeration processes; cryogenics; semester design project.
Prerequisite: ME 301.
ME 536 Industrial Pollution Prevention
3 hrs.
Industrial pollution prevention for small quantity generators such as foundries, metal fabrication, electroplating,
electronics, soldering, wood products, cleaning, degreasing, and coating. Study of emerging technologies for pollution prevention. Relationships among energy consumption,
waste production, and productivity enhancement. Actual
plant assessments. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ME 537 Building Energy Management
3 hrs.
The energy problem. Energy consumption patterns in existing and new buildings. Analysis of energy saving strategies for existing buildings; developing designs for new,
energy efficient buildings, including reliability, comfort,
and economic considerations. Formal oral presentations.
ME 540 Advanced Mechanical Vibrations
3 hrs.
Principles of vibration in one or more degrees of freedom; application to machine members. Prerequisite:
ME 341; MTH 224.
ME 544 Mechanical Systems Analysis
3 hrs.
Mathematical modeling of mechanical, electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, and hybrid physical systems emphasizing a unified approach such as the Bond graph technique.
LaPlace, state-variable, and matrix formulation of models.
Systems response characteristics, prediction, and analysis.
Prerequisite: ME 341.
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ME 547 Fluid Power Control Systems
3 hrs.
Definition and scope of fluid power control systems.
Fluid properties. Continuity and power balance equations. Components function, operation, and dynamic
performance. Use of perturbation theory for developing
linearized transfer functions. Application of conventional
control theory. Prerequisite: ME 301, 308.
ME 548 Optimization of Mechanical Systems 3 hrs.
Development and application of optimization techniques
in design of engineering systems and elements; mathematical modeling and formulation of design problems
for optimization; different optimization methods including linear, non-linear, geometric and dynamic programming; shape optimization. Emphasis on development and
choice of appropriate search methods, sensitivity analysis,
and programming. Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering or consent of department.
ME 549 Microprocessor Interfacing
in Mechanical Systems
3 hrs.
Principles of microprocessor hardware and software; integration of microprocessor hardware and software in mechanical systems for data acquisition and control purposes
(e.g., robotics, internal combustion engine monitoring systems, and pneumatic controls). Intensive hands-on laboratory exercises and practical problem solving. Introduction of
“mechatronics.” Prerequisites: ME 303; EE 328; proficiency in
at least one computer language; or consent of instructor.
ME 554 Fracture of Solids
3 hrs.
Mechanical failure caused by the stresses, strains, and energy transfers in mechanical parts: conventional design
concepts relationship to occurrence of fracture; mechanics of fracture; fracture toughness; macroscopic and microscopic aspects of fracture; high and low cycle fatigue
failures; creep; stress rupture; brittle fracture; wear; case
studies of failure analysis. Emphasis on time-dependent
failures. Prerequisites: ME 354 and CE 270.
ME 556 Mechanics of Composite Materials
3 hrs.
Mechanical behavior, analysis, and design of various advanced composite materials: introduction to composite
materials and their applications; elasticity of anisotropic
solids; micromechanics of fiber reinforced composites and
particulate composites; short fiber composites; macromechanics of laminated composites; thermal stresses; failure
criteria; fracture and fatigue, reliability, testing, and design
of composite materials. Emphasis on developing simple
microcomputer programs for analysis. Projects involve curing and testing composites. Prerequisite: CE 270.
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ME 557 Advanced Design of Machine Elements 3 hrs.
Review of mechanical testing, 3-D stress-strain relationship, complex and principal states of stress, yielding and
fracture under combined stresses, fracture of cracked members, stress and strain based approaches to fatigue, creep
damage analysis, and plastic damage analysis as applied to
the design of machine elements. Prerequisites: ME 342, ME
351, ME 354 with a minimum grade of C or graduate standing in ME. Requires consent of instructor if non-ME student.
ME 560 Principles of Robotic Programming
3 hrs.
Programming of industrial robotic manipulators with external inputs, tactile sensing and vision sensing. A design project is required. Cross-listed as IME 560. Prerequisites: graduate or senior standing in engineering or computer science.
ME 562 Analysis & Design of Robotic Systems 3 hrs.
Underlying theories of robotic systems; implications for
engineering design. Kinematic, dynamic, and control
analysis of robotic arms; robotic systems design. Plant visits to observe robots in action; hands-on experience using
open-loop and closed-loop robots. Prerequisites: ME 344,
403, 441; EE 328; or consent of department.
ME 573 Methods of Engineering Analysis
3 hrs.
Application of principles of analog and digital computers
and numerical methods to solve mechanical engineering
problems. Prerequisites: ME 341; ME 273; MTH 224.
ME 577 Finite Element Methods in Engineering 3 hrs.
Theory of finite element methods and applications in mechanical engineering; review of matrix algebra and basic
theorem of elasticity. Direct formulation of plane truss element and variational formulations of plane stress/strain,
axisymmetric solids, flexural beam, and flat plate elements. Element analysis and isoparametric formulation.
Applications to problems of stability, vibrations, thermal
stress analysis, and fluid mechanics. Computer programming techniques. Prerequisite: senior standing in ME or
consent of instructor.
ME 580 Fundamentals of Bio-Medical
Engineering
3 hrs.
Human body as a thermal and mechanical system. Mathematical modeling. Thermodynamics aspects of biological
systems. Energy balance of a human body as a closed and
open thermodynamic system. Static and dynamic analysis of a human body as a mechanical system. Principles of
instrumentation used in the medical field. Interfacing of
microprocessors with rehabilitative devices. Demonstrative laboratory exercises. Field trips. Prerequisites: ME 301,
302, 303; BIO 200.
Bradley University
ME 582 Medical Imaging
3 hrs.
Introduction to the common methods and devices employed for medical imaging, including conventional xray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (CT), nuclear
medicine (single photon planar imaging), single photon
emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron
emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging
(MRI), and ultra-sound imaging. The physics and design of
systems, typical clinical applications, medical image processing, and tomographic reconstruction. Cross-listed as
EE 582. Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering or
consent of instructor.
ME 699 Thesis
0-6 hrs.
A comprehensive research project containing a synthesis
of several components of the student's course work. Repeatable for a maximum of six hours total. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor.
ME 591 Topics in Mechanical
Engineering
1-3 hrs. each
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes.
Graduate students may repeat the course up to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ME 604 Design of Internal Combustion
Engines
3 hrs.
Detailed study of design of internal combustion engines.
Gas-pressure and inertia-force diagrams; determination of
bearing loads; torsional vibration analysis; stress analysis
and design of components, including piston, connecting rod, crankshaft, flywheel, valve mechanism, and cam
layout. Prerequisites: undergraduate courses in dynamics
of machines, internal combustion engines, and machine
design, or consent of instructor.
ME 648 Advanced Computer Aided Design
3 hrs.
Augmentation of mechanical design through application
of computer graphics. Hardware/software characteristics;
elements of geometric/solid modeling. Emphasis on integration in the application of the design process through
packages for geometric/solid modeling, finite element
analysis, and mechanisms and system simulation. Prerequisites: BSME; or background in mechanical and thermal
systems and consent of department chair. Students without a BSME degree may take ME 342, ME 344, ME 415, and
ME 411 to help develop an appropriate background for
the course.
ME 681, 682 Research
0-6 hrs. each
Individual study on a topic selected by the student with
advisor approval. Integration and application of research.
Student must produce a product such as a software program or journal article Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ME 691 Topics in Mechanical Engineering
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
105
COLLEGE OF
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Claire Etaugh,
Dean
Kelly McConnaughay,
Associate Dean
The mission of the College of Liberal Arts Sciences is to:
1. Provide an environment for students to develop an
awareness of the great issues facing humanity.
2. Encourage students to be imaginative, critical, intellectually curious individuals, who will aspire to lifelong learning.
3. Develop career interests and abilities appropriate to
the needs of the students.
4. Foster in students communicative and evaluative
competencies. Develop self-renewing people in a
value-centered interdisciplinary, intercultural, and
humanistic context that puts career goals of students
into a societal context in ways that will have significant impact on contemporary and future society, and
will bring continuing personal satisfaction to them.
Interdisciplinary Courses
SCI 501 Topics in Investigative Science
for Educators
3 hrs.
Laboratory-based biological and physical science. Content developed along interdisciplinary themes. Course
taught in an inquiry/investigative format, and includes
application to Pre K-12 classroom settings. Course may be
repeated under different topic. NOTE: Credit will not be
given for SCI 501 students who have obtained credit for
SCI 101 under the same theme. Registration is not open to
undergraduate or graduate students enrolled in a natural
science degree program. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ETE 550.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Biology
Sherri Morris,
Graduate Program Coordinator
Minimum prerequisites for admission to the graduate program in biology are: 16 semester hours of biology beyond
freshman biology, one semester of organic chemistry, one
semester of physics, one semester of calculus, GPA above
3.0, and a sum of the GRE verbal and quantitative sections
above 1000.
A student desiring a Master of Science in biology will
need to complete 32 semester hours of graduate work. A
minimum of 26 hours will be biology; the remaining hours
may include cognate courses (e.g., in education, psychology, or computer science) approved by the graduate
coordinator. Of the total 32 hours, sixteen hours must be
classroom courses (i.e., non-independent study) and twelve
hours must be taken at the 600 level. The graduate coordinator must approve the entire course of study.
The student must pass a comprehensive oral exam
covering any aspect of biology, with an emphasis on
the graduate classes taken by the student and the student’s field of study. The oral comprehensive exam must
be passed during the semester immediately following
completion of 24 graduate semester hours. Oral comprehensive exams will be offered during a one-week period
in each of the spring and fall semesters.
All biology graduate students must complete an independent research thesis and enroll in six hours of thesis (BIO
699). In the student’s first year, a committee of three members of the graduate faculty (including the thesis advisor)
will be chosen in consultation with the graduate coordinator. A majority of committee members must be from the
faculty of the department of Biology at Bradley University.
This committee will advise the student in his or her thesis
research. Within three semesters following enrollment in
the graduate program (or prior to completion of 18 semester hours), the student must submit a thesis proposal to his
or her thesis committee. The student will be permitted to
enroll in BIO 699 (thesis) only upon written acceptance of
the proposal by the thesis committee. Upon completion of
the thesis, a student will present a departmental seminar.
107
The student must then successfully defend the thesis to the
committee members. Full-time students should anticipate
requiring a minimum of four semesters for completion of
the biology graduate program.
Course Descriptions
BIO 501 Biology of Fishes
3 hrs.
Fishes: organ-system structure and function, ecology, embryology, behavior, and economic importance. Prerequisites: 6 hours college-level biology.
BIO 502 Biometry
3 hrs.
Principles of biological measurement. Topics include the
nature of data, sampling, experimental design, and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: C or better in BIO 223, or six
hours of college biology.
BIO 506 Advanced Microbiology
3 hrs.
Comprehensive analysis of selected topics of current interest in bacteriology, immunology, and virology: genetic engineering, plasmid research, bactericidal and bacteriostatic
agents, complement system, viruses, tumor formation, and
cancer. Prerequisites: one semester of laboratory bacteriology; organic chemistry; or consent of instructor.
BIO 509 Human Genetics
3 hrs.
Genetic theory and methodology applied to humans. Prerequisites: C or better in BIO 224.
BIO 510 Population and Evolutionary Ecology 3 hrs.
Emphasis on structure, growth patterns, and interactions
of populations; relationship to evolutionary theory. Prerequisites: MTH 115; one semester of environmental biology or consent of instructor.
BIO 519 Comparative Animal Behavior
3 hrs.
Animal communication, social behavior, and evolution
of behavior. Comparisons of a wide variety of vertebrates
and invertebrates. Prerequisites: 6 hours of college level
biology or zoology.
BIO 525 Advanced Physiology
3 hrs.
Detailed study of the structure and function of animals;
special reference to the human body; theories and
methods of investigation mostly at organ system level;
adaptational strategies to special conditions. Prerequisite:
one semester of physiology or consent of instructor.
BIO 530 Plant Systematics
3 hrs.
Evolution, classification, and characteristics of various
flowering plant families. Prerequisites: 6 hours collegelevel biology.
BIO 545 Biophysics
3 hrs.
Applications of physics principles and methods of investigation of biological systems. Emphasis on physical environmental effects on biological systems. Cross listed as
PHY 545. Prerequisites: PHY 108 or 201; senior standing; or
consent of instructor. PHY 345 recommended.
108
BIO 561 Natural History of Vertebrates
3 hrs.
Vertebrates as integrated organisms: emphasis on activities
and interaction with environment under natural conditions.
Field work on local fauna. Introduction to classification. Prerequisite: 6 hours of college-level biology or zoology.
BIO 563 Advanced Plant Ecology
3 hrs.
Physiological and growth responses of plants to environmental stresses, and consequences to the structure and
function of communities and ecosystems. Prerequisites: 6
hours college-level biology.
BIO 564 Advanced Molecular Biology
3 hrs.
Selected topics in molecular biology. Emphasis on proteins
and nucleic acids. Prerequisites: C or better in BIO 224.
BIO 565 Aquatic Ecology
3 hrs.
Emphasis on survival and dispersion of natural aquatic
populations as related to environmental degradation in
lakes, rivers, and streams. Prerequisites: 6 hours collegelevel biology or zoology.
BIO 566 Advanced Biochemistry
3 hrs.
Quantitative aspects of all areas of biochemistry. Emphasis
on metabolism. Prerequisite: one semester of biochemistry or physical chemistry, or consent of instructor.
BIO 568 Cellular and Molecular Immunology 3 hrs.
Interaction between antigen presenting cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes to mount immune responses.
Molecules responsible for immune interactions. Methods
to study cell and molecular interactions in immunity. Prerequisites: BIO 564 or equivalent.
BIO 570 Seminar
1-3 hrs.
Selected topics in biological sciences. May be repeated
under different topics for a maximum of 6 hours credit.
Prerequisites: 3.0 grade point average in student’s major;
senior or graduate standing; consent of instructor.
BIO 575 Special Graduate Topics in Biology 2-3 hrs.
Selected graduate-level coursework in biology. May be repeated under different topics for a total of 6 credit hours.
Prerequisites: 3.0 grade point average in graduate-level
biology program; or consent of instructor.
BIO 580 Readings
1-3 hrs.
Individual assignments of relevant topics in biological sciences. Prerequisites: 3.0 grade point average in student’s
major; senior or graduate standing; consent of instructor.
BIO 585 Research
1-6 hrs.
Individual research for qualified students in special areas of
biology. Prerequisites: 3.0 grade point average in student’s
major; senior or graduate standing; consent of instructor.
BIO 681 Readings
1-6 hrs.
Readings in an area of interest to the student. Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Bradley University
BIO 683 Research
1-6 hrs.
Research in an area of interest to the student. Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of advisor.
BIO 699 Thesis
1-6 hrs.
Research and thesis preparation. Repeatable for up to 6
hours credit. A student can receive no more than a total of
6 hours credit in BIO 699 or CHM 699 or PHY 699. Prerequisite: consent of program coordinator.
Chemistry
Wayne Bosma,
Graduate Program Coordinator
The Department of Chemistry has long offered a Master
of Science degree in chemistry. The program is designed
for students who are locally employed and wish to advance their knowledge and professional careers by taking advanced work in chemistry and related disciplines.
Most courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening.
Candidates for the M.S. degree must take a minimum of
30 semester hours in chemistry and related subjects. Of
these hours, 6 semester hours must be devoted to original research. A publishable thesis is required for graduation based on this research. Of the remaining 24 semester
hours, up to a maximum of 12 semester hours may be
taken at the graduate level in cognate fields such as engineering, education, mathematics, business or biology. Individual programs are developed in conference between
the student and the advisor.
Course Descriptions
CHM 500 Chemical Topics
1-3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: CHM 351, 461.
CHM 509 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
3 hrs.
Theoretical-descriptive approach to inorganic chemistry. Emphasis on dependence of selected chemical and
physical characteristics of elements and compounds on
extranuclear structure. Prerequisites: CHM 320, 461.
CHM 510 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Laboratory
1 hr.
Laboratory work in inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM
509 or concurrent enrollment.
CHM 530 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
4 hrs.
Theory and applications of modern qualitative, quantitative,
and instrumental methods. Prerequisite: CHM 320, 462.
CHM 550 Industrial Organic Chemistry
1 hr.
Survey of modern industrial organic chemistry; emphasis
on petroleum derivatives. Prerequisite: one year of organic
chemistry.
CHM 551 Advanced Organic Chemistry
3 hrs.
Organic reactions and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite:
CHM 351.
CHM 556 Organic Spectroscopy
3 hrs.
Characterization/identification of compounds using
spectrometric methods. Not open to students with credit
in CHM 356 or equivalent. Prerequisites: CHM 351 or
equivalent.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
109
CHM 568 Selected Topics in Biochemistry
1-3 hrs.
Content and credit will vary as indicated in current schedule of classes. May be repeated for up to eight credits, with
no more than two credits counting towards the major.
Prerequisite: CHM 366.
CHM 630 Advanced Chemical Instrumental
Analysis
3 hrs.
Modern chemical instrumental analysis: theory of operation of instruments and related chemical theory. Lecture
and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 530.
CHM 652 Advanced Organic Chemistry
3 hrs.
Theoretical aspects of organic chemistry: stereoisomerism,
conformational analysis, molecular rearrangements, and
electronic interpretations of organic reactions. Prerequisite: CHM 551.
CHM 671 Reading in Chemistry
1-6 hrs. total
Directed reading for qualified students. Maximum of 3 hrs.
per semester. Prerequisite: CHM 509 or 551.
CHM 683 Research
1-6 hrs.
Required of all candidates for the Master of Science degree in chemistry. Prerequisite: accepted thesis proposal.
CHM 699 Thesis
1-6 hrs.
Research and thesis preparation. Open to students in the
MNS program only. Repeatable for up to 6 hours credit. A
student can receive no more than a total of 6 hours credit
in BIO 699 or CHM 699 or PHY 699. Prerequisite: consent
of program coordinator.
Computer Science and
Information Systems
Jiang B. Liu,
Graduate Program Coordinator
Jiang B. Liu, Young Park,
Graduate Advisors
The Department offers graduate programs leading to the
degrees of Master of Science in computer science and
Master of Science in computer information systems. These
courses of study are designed to prepare students for professional careers in the field of computing and information processing or for further study and research.
Computer scientists are developers of basic computer
technology such as operating systems, language translators, data management software and other programming,
processing, and operating aides to be used in conjunction
with computer hardware. They are usually employed by
computer manufacturers and software houses specializing in systems software. Computer information systems
specialists are principally users of computer technology,
usually in systems projects for applications in business,
industry, or government.
In addition to satisfying all the Graduate School requirements for the degree, all candidates for the master’s degree
must satisfy the following departmental requirements:
1. At least 36 hours of graduate-level coursework.
2. No “D” grades can be counted in the completion of
requirements for the degree.
3. Every student must pass a written comprehensive
examination that will be based on the core requirements for the program pursued.
Interested and qualified students are offered the option
of writing a master’s thesis. Students selecting this option
are encouraged to choose an advisor and topic as early as
possible in order to plan the thesis development and any
needed supporting coursework. The following policies
apply to theses:
1. A minimum grade point average of 3.5 in computer
science and computer information systems graduate
courses is required for students enrolling in CS 699
(Thesis).
2. No student may register for CS 699 until 18 hours of graduate courses have been completed in the department.
3. Six credit hours of CS 699 are required and, upon
completion, the thesis must be defended in an oral
examination. No grade will be given for CS 699 until
after the oral defense.
110
Bradley University
coherent program in an applications area and must
be approved by the graduate coordinator.
4. A written outline of the thesis project and a tentative
schedule must be submitted to and approved by the
graduate coordinator and the chair prior to the registration for CS 699.
Admission requirements and graduation requirements specific to computer science and computer information systems are given below. In addition, applicants must submit
GRE General Test scores taken with the last five years. The
applicant may request a GRE waiver under certain circumstances. Note that prospective students who do not meet
the conditions for admission may be admitted conditionally, in which case the department will prescribe a program
for the removal of such admission conditions. Conditional
status must be removed prior to graduation.
The admission requirements for the computer information
systems program are one semester of calculus, one semester of calculus-based statistics, two semesters of accounting,
one semester of finance, two semesters of programming and
data structures in a structured or object-oriented programming language, and one semester of data communications.
Computer Science
Course Descriptions
In addition to meeting all the general requirements of the
Graduate School and of the department as stated above,
candidates for the master’s degree in computer science
must satisfy the following requirements.
Computer Information Systems
1.
At least 30 of the 36 hours required must be in computer
science courses. At most, six hours may be earned in approved courses other than those labeled CS.
2. The following core requirements must be satisfied
(either by taking the course or showing evidence of
the completion of an equivalent course elsewhere):
CS 503 or CS 615, CS 516, CS 518, CS 519, CS 550 or CS
643, CS 682, CS 609, CS 521 or CS 514.
3. Two of the following two-course sequences must be
completed: CS 500 and CS 530, CS 615 and CS 616, CS
514 and CS 614, CS 521 and CS 522, CS 510 and CS
511, CS 519 and CS 570, CS 609 and CS 505.
For admission into the computer science program, a student
must have completed discrete mathematics, at least two
semesters of calculus, matrix or linear algebra, and at least
one semester of calculus-based statistics; must have at least
15 hours of computer science coursework including knowledge of one structured or object-oriented programming
language, elementary data structures, assembly language,
advanced data structures, and introductory computer architecture; and must have approval of the Department.
Computer Information Systems
In addition to meeting all the general requirements of the
Graduate School and of the department as stated above,
candidates for the master’s degree in computer information systems must satisfy the following requirements:
1.
At least 21 of the 36 hours required must be in computer
information systems or computer science courses.
2. A minimum of 12 hours must be taken in courses
outside the department. These courses must form a
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
3. The following core requirements must be met (either
by taking the course or by showing evidence of having completed an equivalent course elsewhere): CIS
571, CIS 572, CIS 588, CIS 607, CIS 608, and CS 609. (CS
500 and CS 615 are recommended).
CIS 571 Computer Law
3 hrs.
Ethical considerations of computer scientists and computer-related security and privacy issues; copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret issues, deceptive trade
practices, computer crime, contract issues, venture capitalists, tax issues, computer torts, constitutional issues,
and international trade considerations. Prerequisite: one
semester of programming.
CIS 572 Computing Services Management
3 hrs.
Management of computing resources: planning for computing services; operational considerations; evaluation of
service. Prerequisites: CS 310 or equivalent.
CIS 588 Introduction to Expert Systems
and Artificial Intelligence
3 hrs.
Knowledge-based systems design and implementation;
expert systems shells and programming environments;
validation and implementation of expert systems; case
studies/laboratories. Cross-listed as IME 568. Prerequisites: two semesters of programming and one semester of
statistics, or consent of instructor.
CIS 606 Software Systems Design
3 hrs.
Planning, writing, debugging, and documenting large
software systems. Consult with instructor for details on
programming language to be used. Prerequisite: a grade
of C or better in CS 121 or equivalent.
CIS 607 File Organization and Management
3 hrs.
File organizations and access methods. Sort/merge operations; hashing schemes for storage and retrieval. Projects
involve data validation; creation and updating of files;
simulation and/or implementation of direct and indexed
files. Prerequisite: CS 121 or equivalent.
CIS 608 System Specification and Development 3 hrs.
Techniques and tools of system specification and development. Case studies; problems. Prerequisite: a grade of C
or better in CS 121 or equivalent.
111
Computer Science
CS 500 JAVA Programming and Web Design
3 hrs.
Introduction to JAVA programming and PERL. Internet
and Web-based applications, design and building of multimedia systems, user interface design, Gateway Interface
(CGI) scripting; VRML. Prerequisite: CS 121 or equivalent.
CS 502 Advanced Programming
3 hrs.
Introduces the fundamental concepts of programming
from an object-oriented perspective with emphasis on
advanced programming skills and good software development principles in a closed laboratory setting. Covers
topics including object-oriented paradigm, design and
programming, fundamental data structures and computing algorithms, and software development principles
Prerequisites: consent of graduate program coordinator;
at least two semesters of programming experience.
CS 503 Programming Methodology
3 hrs.
Predicate calculus, Dijkstra’s methodology of algorithm
development. Algorithm development. Algorithmic language characteristics; syntax, semantics. Postconditions
and preconditions. Verification of postcondition states
satisfied by algorithmic programs executed from preconditions. Problems. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in
both MTH 120 and CS 121.
CS 505 Advanced Topics in Databases
3 hrs.
Current trends in information technology. Hypertext navigation, intelligent navigation with expert systems and
neural nets, multimedia, text management and retrieval,
deductive and object-oriented databases, distributed databases, the integrated intelligent database. Prerequisites:
CS 405 or equivalent.
CS 510 Numerical Methods I
3 hrs.
Introduction to numerical and computational aspects of
various mathematical topics: finite precision, solutions to
nonlinear equations, interpolation, approximation, linear
systems of equations, and integration. Cross- listed as
MTH 510. Prerequisites: CS 104 or 106; MTH 207 and 223.
CS 511 Numerical Methods II
3 hrs.
Continuation of CS/MTH 510: further techniques of integration, ordinary differential equations, numerical linear
algebra, nonlinear systems of equations, boundary value
problems, and optimization. Cross- listed as MTH 511. Prerequisites: MTH 224 or 345; CS 510.
CS 514 Algorithms
3 hrs.
Design and analysis of algorithms. Dynamic structures
maintenance and hashing. Searching, sorting, and traversal. Time and space requirements; simplification; computational complexity; proof theory and testing; NP-hard
and NP-complete problems. Prerequisites: a grade of C or
better in CS 302; one semester of statistics.
112
CS 516 Programming Languages
3 hrs.
Design concepts of high-level languages. Description
languages; grammars and syntax; expressions and data
structures; selection and control structures; constructs for
input and output; subprograms and parameter communications. Prerequisite: CS 302 or 310.
CS 518 Programming Language Translation
3 hrs.
Overview of programming language translation with emphasis on modern compiler construction. Lexical analysis,
parsing, syntax and semantic analysis, code generation,
garbage collection, and optimization. Prerequisite: grade
of C or better in CS 302. Corequisite: CS 516 or CS 216.
CS 519 Introduction to Operating Systems
3 hrs.
Design principles of software for operation of computers.
Storage, processor, device, and file management as an
integrated system; input/output control. Prerequisite: a
grade of C or better in CS 302.
CS 521 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
3 hrs.
Basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence:
philosophical considerations, examples, pattern recognition, search strategies, game playing, knowledge representation, logic and resolution, planning, vision, natural
language processing, programming in LISP. Prerequisite:
a grade of C or better in CS 302.
CS 522 Neural Networks, Knowledge-based
Systems, and Applications
3 hrs.
Theorem proving, logic programming, expert systems,
uncertainty, fuzzy logic, machine learning, neural networks, programming in PROLOG. Prerequisites: a grade of
C or better in CS 302; one course in statistics.
CS 530 Client-Server Computing with JAVA
3 hrs.
Continuation of CS 500. JAVA programming in clientserver environment. JAVA distributed computing and distributed object computing protocols. Internet and object
Web computing in JAVA. JAVA Enterprise computing technologies. Prerequisite: CS 500 or equivalent.
CS 535 Introduction to Computer Graphics
3 hrs.
Mathematics and algorithms of computer graphics. Device differences, lines, arcs, curves, transformations, input
and output primitives. Data structures for geometric entities. Prerequisites: MTH 207, 223; CS 302.
CS 550 Advanced Computer Architecture
3 hrs.
Fundamental computer sub-systems: central processing
unit; memory systems; control and input-output units.
General purpose computing systems design. Examples
from existing typical computers. Prerequisite: CS 350.
CS 609 Database Management Systems
3 hrs.
Relational, hierarchical, and network database models. Conceptual and physical schema. Data definition and data manipulation languages. Normal forms and database design.
Database administration, security, integrity, and backup reBradley University
covery. Query optimization. Latest developments in databases. Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in CS 302 or CIS 607.
English
CS 610 Advanced Topics
3 hrs.
Special projects under staff supervision on advanced
problems in numerical or nonnumerical branches of computer science. May be taken more than once under different topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Kevin Swafford,
Graduate Program Coordinator
CS 611 Directed Individual Studies
1-3 hrs.
Individual study in an area of computer science relevant
to the student’s professional goals and not covered in a
formal course offered by the department. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Prerequisites:
consent of the department.
CS 614 Parallel Algorithms
3 hrs.
Parallel algorithms for multi-processor computer architectures: concurrent programming, SIMD and MIMD systems,
and time complexity. Prerequisite: CS 514.
CS 615 Software Engineering I
3 hrs.
Software engineering: technical management; project
management, estimation, and control; economics; environments; standards; products and their phases. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CS 302 or CS 310.
CS 616 Software Engineering II
3 hrs.
Background and overview of software production: requirements for engineering and analysis; software specifications,
design, coding, qualification, manufacture, support, and
standards. Emphasis on a specific topic in software engineering. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CS 302 or CS 310.
CS 643 Data Communications and Distributed
Computing
3 hrs.
Introduction to communication technologies. Emphasis
on application to computer networks, information and
coding theory, design considerations, and architecture,
including topologies, implementation techniques, and
standard distributed computing architectures. Prerequisites: MTH 120, 325; CS 519.
CS 682 Theory of Computation
3 hrs.
Theory of formal languages and computability. Automata,
Turing machines, grammars. Context-free and contextsensitive languages; parsing. Recursion theory; limits of
effective computability. Unsolvability, reducibility, complexity. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CS 302.
CS 699 Thesis
3-6 hrs.
Computer science research and thesis preparation. Required of candidates choosing the thesis option. Total of 6
semester hrs. to be taken in one or two semesters. Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
The Master of Arts in English provides post-baccalaureate
students with study in the theory and practice of English.
It is intended to prepare students for professional advancement and for further study in either literature or writing.
The literature track emphasizes the study of literary texts
with related study of writing, theory, and methods. The literature track also requires an internship within the context
of an undergraduate literature course, a portfolio of written work, and a written comprehensive exam over selected
work taken in the program. The writing track emphasizes
the study and practice of writing with related study of literature, theory, and methods. The writing track also requires
an internship within the context of an undergraduate writing course, a portfolio of written work, and a written comprehensive exam over selected work taken in the program.
Because the master’s program is predicated upon the
complementary relationship between theory and practice
in the study of English, both tracks of the program require
ENG 500 Theory and Practice of English, another course
in theory, and the internship. Students in either program
not only will become familiar with the aesthetic, formal,
and theoretical underpinnings of their field of study, but
also will learn how to address their audiences by means of
professional discourse. In this way, the program enriches
students’ professional lives and enhances their uses of the
discipline in the classroom and the workplace.
Special Admission Requirements
In addition to the admission requirements of the Graduate
School, the applicant shall present the following material
with the application:
1.
An essay of under 1500 words stating what the applicant expects to achieve from the study of English (literature or writing) at the master’s level.
2.
A writing sample (professional, critical, creative) that the
applicant deems to be representative of the quality of
his or her work. The sample may be an undergraduate
paper, professional work, or work prepared for personal
use. (The sample will not be returned. Submit a copy.)
3.
Two letters of recommendation from references whose
discipline is English literature or writing or from employers who have experience in the field of literature or writing. For those applicants who no longer have contact
with either, the recommendations should be from those
who can comment on the applicant’s ability to benefit
from a graduate program in English.
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Programs of Study
Literature Emphasis Requirement
Theory and Practice of English ...........................................3 hrs.
Language Theory or Writing Theory or
Literary Criticism..............................................................3 hrs.
American or English Periods ...............................................6 hrs.
Selected Authors/Genres .....................................................6 hrs.
Internship in Literature..........................................................3 hrs.
Writing Emphasis Requirement
Theory and Practice of English ...........................................3 hrs.
Writing in the Professions and/or
Workshop for Writers and/or
Creative Non-Fiction ......................................................6 hrs.
Language Theory or Writing Theory or Literary
Criticism ..............................................................................3 hrs.
Literature Courses ...................................................................6 hrs.
Internship in Writing ..............................................................3 hrs.
To complete either 30-hour program, students elect 3
courses (9 credits) from literature, writing, theory, or independent study.
Course Descriptions
ENG 500 Theory and Practice of English
3 hrs.
Overview of the practices, theories, and history of the field
of English and an introduction to the Bradley program.
Required of all graduate students. Must be taken in first
nine hours.
ENG 503 Creative Non-Fiction
3 hrs.
Practice in writing non-fiction genres, such as autobiography, biography, nature writing, and travel writing.
Prerequisite: submission to instructor of an acceptable
manuscript.
ENG 506 Writing in the Professions
3 hrs.
Study and practice of the writing conventions and rhetorical characteristics of individual professions.
ENG 507 Workshop for Writers
3 hrs.
Individual guidance in creative writing projects. May be
repeated for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor, after submission of an acceptable
manuscript.
ENG 508 Composing Hypertext
3 hrs.
Elements of hypertext composition, mechanics, style, and
theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing; or specially qualified junior or senior; or completion of C2 general education requirement; or consent of instructor.
ENG 560 Writing Theory
3 hrs.
Theoretical approaches to the study of writing. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
ENG 570 Contemporary Literary Criticism
3 hrs.
Advanced study of contemporary critical approaches to
literature, including, but not limited to, feminism, semiotics, cultural criticism, post structuralism. Study of the critical theories and applications of the criticisms to literary
texts.
ENG 580 Theories and Methods of Teaching
Composition
3 hrs.
Theoretical and pedagogical issues and approaches in
teaching composition.
ENG 630 American Periods
3 hrs.
Study of selected periods or movements from the 17th
century to the present. May be repeated under a different
topic for a maximum of six hours credit.
ENG 640 English Periods
3 hrs.
Study of selected periods or movements from the 7th
century to the present. May be repeated under a different
topic for a maximum of six hours credit.
ENG 650 Selected Authors
3 hrs.
Study of one or two authors who write in English. May be
repeated under different authors for a maximum of six
hours credit.
ENG 660 Genres
3 hrs.
Study of a single genre: fiction, prose, poetry, or drama.
May be repeated under a different genre for a maximum
of six hours credit.
ENG 690 Internship in Literature
3 hrs.
Theory, analysis, and practice of literature within the context of an undergraduate literature course. Prerequisites:
21 hrs. English graduate courses.
ENG 691 Internship in Writing
3 hrs.
Theory, analysis, and practice of writing within the context of an undergraduate composition class. Prerequisite:
21 hrs. English graduate courses.
ENG 695 Independent Study
3 hrs.
Independent research in literature, writing, or theory.
ENG 699 Thesis
3-6 hrs.
Independent research. Three hours required in the first
program (traditional M.A.). Prerequisite: consent of department chair.
ENG 550 Language Theory
3 hrs.
Study of the relationships between language and writing, thinking, and society. Prerequisite: senior or graduate
standing.
114
Bradley University
Liberal Studies
Max Taylor,
Coordinator/Director, Liberal Studies Program
Definition and Purpose
The purpose of the Master of Liberal Studies program is to
provide motivated adults with opportunities to continue
intellectual growth by integrating knowledge and perspectives from different disciplines in an innovative and
challenging manner. The program introduces students to
the pleasures and principles of science, the arts, technology, business, and the humanities as a means of exploring
the problems and possibilities of life in modern society.
The program is designed for the adult student who wants
a flexible part-time program offered during evening and
weekend hours. Courses in the program bring Bradley’s
most distinguished faculty together with practitioners of
business, education, law, medicine, journalism, and others
who seek to understand the most controversial issues of
the age and to extend their intellectual knowledge and
vision.
Special Regulations
The M.L.S. degree meets the standards and policies of the
Graduate School of Bradley University. But as with other
programs, it has its own curriculum and integrity which
require special regulations.
Admission
Admission to the M.L.S. program is limited to those who
qualify for unconditional admission to the Graduate
School. A personal letter of intent and an interview will be
required in addition to the customary transcript and two
recommendations.
Course Requirements
All work must be on the 600 level in M.L.S. courses. Thirty
semester hours are required for the degree.
Transfer of Credit
The M.L.S. program ordinarily does not allow for transfer
of credit. However, the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences
will act on individual petitions.
Colloquium
In the final semester of the program, the candidate will
participate in a colloquium with members of the M.L.S.
faculty. The M.L.S. faculty in cooperation with each candidate shall devise the colloquium.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Course Descriptions
Most MLS courses are offered only when there is a demonstrated demand and faculty members are available. Contact the coordinator/director for further information.
MLS 601 Physical Science Concepts & Society 3 hrs.
Great concepts of modern physical science and their impact on society. The scientists and their creative insights;
influence of governmental policies on science.
MLS 602 Physics: Resonance With Reality
3 hrs.
Influence of historical and cultural notions (such as the
world being organism, pure number, and total harmony)
on creative minds of the West, and how these notions are
enmeshed in modern physics theories and developments.
MLS 603 Origins, Structure, and Dependability
of Information
3 hrs.
Eastern and Western attitudes in the 20th Century concerning the source, nature, and accuracy of human
knowledge. Analysis of artistic creativity, psychological
experiments of left and right hemispheric brain activity,
and methods of scientific discovery.
MLS 604 Philosophical Foundations and Law 3 hrs.
“Law” as an idea and as seen from a general perspective.
Existing and proposed laws are explored in terms of underlying, fundamental considerations to develop a meaningful
concept of law in the context of the student’s own life.
MLS 605 A Philosophical Description
of the Human Condition
3 hrs.
A rigorous investigation of our presuppositions about what
a “better” way of being human should be, in context of developments in the life sciences that allow persons to alter or
modify their own nature.
MLS 606 The Development of Social Thought
3 hrs.
Survey of theoretical perspectives for critical social science;
emphasis on classic socio-economic thought of the 19th
and 20th century. Construction of a theoretical framework
for critical analysis of late industrial societies. Importance
of Marxian theory to analyses of cultural forms and quality
of everyday life. Relation of thought and social structures;
doctrine of ideology; social organization of scientific and intellectual activities; processes of bureaucratization, rationalization, and alienation; social status; the role of intellectual
activity in processes of revolution and social criticism.
MLS 608 American Egalitarianism and Mass
Education
3 hrs.
Investigation of the ambivalence in American culture and
educational philosophy between commitment to mass education as a force for democratization and suspicion of the
educated as fostering an undemocratic elitism. The effects
of this ambivalence on American education.
115
MLS 609 Popular Music and Poetry
in the Twentieth Century
3 hrs.
Techniques and broad historical outlines of all forms of
twentieth-century music and poetry. Emphasis on the
inter-relatedness of the two arts, and on familiar popular
forms. Practice writing, analyzing, and criticizing popular
music and poetry.
MLS 617 All Reality is Astronomy
3 hrs.
The impact of astronomy on our present culture; our place
in the cosmic environment. Planetarium scenarios and
models display visually how various cultures in the past
viewed our place in the universe, and also project modern
cultural and cosmic views and theories. A cooperative
venture with Lakeview Planetarium.
MLS 610 Weimar Germany: Culture
and Politics Before Hitler
3 hrs.
Interdisciplinary, conceptual study of the profound changes that shaped the evolution of Weimar Germany. The disintegration of the values of old Germany, post-World War
I alienation, and Weimar political and economic chaos as
contrasted with the enormous creativity that brought forward exciting developments in art, film, architecture, science, literature, and popular culture.
MLS 618 Controversial Issues in Biology
3 hrs.
A detailed examination of the important topical issues
that are currently under intense debate in biology. Topics
such as genetic engineering, the patenting of life forms,
sperm banks, and nuclear waste disposal discussed from a
scientific, political, moral, and religious point of view.
MLS 611 Contemporary World Issues
3 hrs.
Sophisticated analysis of major contemporary international
issues such as relations among industrial societies, the
North-South dialogue, nationalism, and global economic
problems. No more than four issues will be explored in
depth in any one semester. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 612 Perspectives on United States
International Relations
3 hrs.
In-depth analysis of United States foreign relations from
North American, European, Asian, African, and Latin American perspectives. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 613 The Energy Situation: An Overview
3 hrs.
In-depth study of the U.S. and world energy situation,
problems and methods associated with energy production, and effects of various factors such as population on
the energy problem. Technical, social, economic, political,
and moral implications of the energy situation. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 614 Cultural Dimensions of Psychological
Theory
3 hrs.
Ideological roots of psychological science in American culture. Social science understandings of the good person and
the good society.
MLS 615 Philosophy, Psychology, and Religion
in the Works of William James
3 hrs.
How William James brought together studies in psychology, philosophy, and religion to develop a comprehensive
theory of human nature. James’s writings as an exemplary
attempt to build a model of human experience in its many
and varied expressions (philosophical anthropology).
MLS 616 Female and Male: Origins
of Sex Differences in Behavior
3 hrs.
Critical analysis of research findings and theories concerning the origin and development of differences in the behaviors of females and males; psychological, sociological,
and biological factors.
116
MLS 619 Controversial Psychological Issues
and Society
3 hrs.
Topics in psychology that have stimulated heated controversy in both the professional and public arenas because of their potential impact on individuals and on
society. Topics such as control of human behavior, use of
psychosurgery, effectiveness of psychotherapy, effects of
televised violence, and states of altered consciousness.
MLS 620 Literature and Society
3 hrs.
The primary ‘’social’’ theories of literature; the relationships between society and literature as an institution; and
literary documents themselves.
MLS 621 Communicating Change and Innovation 3 hrs.
Basic communication principles used in creating change
and having change and innovation adopted by people
and/or organizations. Practical examples used to demonstrate effective communication channels and means for
getting change accepted.
MLS 622 The Places We Inhabit: Design of Cities
and Towns
3 hrs.
An examination of the value and importance of the physical structure and physical characteristics of human settlements. Treating them metaphorically as living organisms,
like any other, which need careful, thoughtful creation
and maintenance. Includes some history of the evolution
of human settlements and considers examples of utopian
and purpose-built cities and towns, taken from America
and elsewhere. The art and science of physical space
(architecture), at both the micro and macro scale, figure
prominently in class discussions and exercises. Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.L.S. program.
MLS 623 Death and Dying:
An Interdisciplinary Inquiry
3 hrs.
Interdisciplinary investigation of the human experience of
death. Modernism and death, religion and death, euthanasia, the mourning and bereavement process, psychoanalytic interpretation of death anxiety.
Bradley University
MLS 624 The North American Frontier
in Literature
3 hrs.
Literature relating to the North American Frontier as
both a body of themes and as a group of conditions surrounding literature: gender, genre, language, region, and
nationalism. United States, Canadian, Colonial, and European literatures.
MLS 625 Music and Western Society
3 hrs.
Relationship of music to other areas of human endeavor.
Basic elements of music; various beliefs and myths about
music. Required concert attendance.
MLS 626 Three Ideas that Formed
Western Culture
3 hrs.
Diagnostic examination of the origins in Greek, Hebrew,
and Roman antiquity of three pillars of Western culture:
Protestant Christianity, natural science, and democratic
self-government. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 627 Religion in the Modern World
3 hrs.
Sociological, psychological, and philosophical issues confronting religion in the late twentieth century.
MLS 634 Understanding Cancer
3 hrs.
Cancer is one of the most prevalent and publicized diseases in most of the world, yet the general nature of the
disease is not well understood by most of the population.
Discussion of a myriad of issues related to the disease of
cancer from a definition of the disease to the types, treatments, and causes. Opportunity to discuss the disease
with a medial oncologist, radiation oncologist, and cancer geneticist. Students who successfully complete the
course will have general knowledge and understanding
of the many aspects of cancer. They will also be able to
intelligently discuss cancer issues and be able to answer
general questions about the disease.
MLS 690 Independent Study
3 hrs.
Student pursues a topic of interest in depth under the
guidance of a single instructor. Subject must naturally
evolve from study undertaken in one or more courses in
the student’s MLS program. To be undertaken only after
21 semester hours have been completed.
MLS 628 The Western Legal Tradition
3 hrs.
A survey of Western legal history from the Roman Republic to the present.
MLS 629 Critical Thinking and Reasoning
3 hrs.
Study of critical thinking, defined as the ability to weigh
evidence judiciously in making decisions. Application of
the scientific method to everyday decision making. Examination of examples from a broad array of disciplines
and media. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 630 Nature Writers and Writing
3 hrs.
Selected American nature writers from Thoreau to the
present, concentrating on the cultural implications of the
genre for writers, general readers, and environmentalists.
MLS 631 Controversial Legal Issues
3 hrs.
An analysis of controversial legal issues and the arguments that support them, with emphasis on contemporary conflicts. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
MLS 632 The Pacific Century: US Asian/Pacific Relations Since 1900
3 hrs.
Examines America’s role and influence in the rise of Japanese and Chinese power and the meaning and significance of the Korean and Vietnam wars.
MLS 633 Issues in Higher Education
3 hrs.
Covers both controversial and topical issues in higher
education. Examination of the myriad of issues (sometimes changing daily) that occur in higher education, the
challenges and opportunities facing higher education,
and the nature and complexity of universities and higher
education.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
117
Supportive Courses
The following courses are offered by departments in liberal arts and sciences to graduate students and qualified
undergraduates. Graduate students who intend to use
them as an integral part of their degree program should
consult both their graduate coordinator and the chair of
the department concerned.
History
HIS 505, 506 Seminar in Directed
Reading
1-3 hrs. each
Program of directed readings; analysis, synthesis, and interpretation of materials. Prerequisites: senior or graduate
standing; 15 hrs. of college-level history with at least a B
average; consent of department chair.
HIS 507, 508 Area Study in Directed
Reading
1-3 hrs. each
Projects and readings in area studies; e.g. Asia, Russia, Africa,
or South America. Prerequisites: 15 hours of college-level history with at least a B average; consent of department chair.
Mathematics
MTH 501 Topics in Applied Mathematics I
3 hrs.
Theory, applications, and algorithms for basic problems of
modern applied mathematics. Symmetric linear systems,
minimum principles, equilibrium equations, calculus of
variations, orthogonal expansions, and complex variables.
Prerequisite: MTH 224 or 345.
MTH 502 Topics in Applied Mathematics II
3 hrs.
Continuation of MTH 501. Selected numerical algorithms:
Fast Fourier transform, initial value problems, stability, ztransforms, and linear programming. Prerequisite: MTH
501 or consent of instructor.
MTH 510 Numerical Methods I
3 hrs.
Introduction to numerical and computational aspects of
various mathematical topics: finite precision, solutions of
non-linear equations, interpolation, approximation, linear
systems of equations, and integration. Cross listed as CS
510. Prerequisites: CS 104 or 106; MTH 207 and 223.
MTH 511 Numerical Methods II
3 hrs.
Continuation of CS/MTH 510: further techniques of integration, ordinary differential equations, numerical linear
algebra, nonlinear systems of equations, boundary value
problems, and optimization. Cross listed as CS 511. Prerequisites: MTH 224 or 345; CS/MTH 510.
MTH 514 Partial Differential Equations
3 hrs.
Fourier series and applications to solutions of partial differential equations. Separation of variables, eigenfunction
expansions, Bessel functions, Green’s functions, Fourier
and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MTH 224 or 345.
118
Philosophy
PHL 551, 552 Readings in Philosophy 1-3 hrs. each
Directed individual study. Prerequisites: 6 hours in philosophy; senior or graduate standing; consent of department chair.
Physics
PHY 501 Quantum Mechanics I
3 hrs.
Inadequacies of classical physics when applied to problems in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of
mathematical formalism used in basic quantum theory,
with applications to simple models of physical systems.
Prerequisites: PHY 301; PHY 202, 303, 306 or consent of
instructor. MTH 207 recommended.
PHY 502 Quantum Mechanics II
3 hrs.
The mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics with
applications to problems of electron spin and many-particle systems will be studied along with development of
approximation techniques with applications to complex
physical systems. Prerequisite: PHY 501.
PHY 539 Topics in Theoretical Physics
3 hrs.
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course
is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. Prerequisites: PHY 301, 305, 501; consent of instructor.
PHY 541 Physics Basics
2 hrs.
Numerical and graphical analysis of data; basic mechanics
including Newton’s laws and gas laws; hydrostatics and
hydrodynamics; energy conservation principles; thermal
physics; electricity and magnetism; and solubility and
transport processes. Only students in the Nurse Administered Anesthesia Program may register.
PHY 545 Biophysics
3 hrs.
Applications of physics principles and methods to investigation of biological systems. Emphasis on physical environmental effects on biological systems. Cross listed as
BIO 545. Prerequisites: PHY 108 or 201; senior standing; or
consent of instructor. PHY 345 recommended.
PHY 555 Independent Readings
1-3 hrs.
Individually assigned reading assignments of relevant
topics in physics or astronomy. Prerequisites: senior or
graduate student standing; background appropriate to
the study; consent of instructor.
PHY 563 Special Problems in Physics
1-3 hrs.
Qualified students work on an individually assigned problem and prepare oral and written reports on the problem
solution. Approved for off-campus programs when required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.
Prerequisites: physics preparation sufficient for the problem; consent of instructor and department chair.
Bradley University
PHY 568 Condensed Matter Physics
3 hrs.
Introduction to the physics of the solid state and other condensed matter especially for students of physics, materials
science, and engineering; structure of crystals; molecular
binding in solids, thermal properties, introduction to energy
band structure and its relation to charge transport in solids;
semiconductors; superconductivity. Prerequisite: Physics
majors: PHY 301, 202, or 303; PHY 305. Corequisite: PHY 306.
Other majors need instructor consent.
Political Science
PLS 583, 584 Reading in Political
Science
1-3 hrs. each
Individual in-depth work on a subject approved and supervised by a PLS faculty member. For highly qualified
students. Prerequisites: senior standing; political science
major; consent of instructor.
Sociology
SOC 571 Field Studies
1-3 hrs.
Individual research. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing and consent of department chair.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
119
Administration
and Faculty
Administration
Joanne K. Glasser, B.A., J.D., President
Robert Bolla, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs
Gary Anna, B.S., C.P.A., Vice President for Business Affairs
Alan Galsky, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs
Shelley Epstein, B.S., Assistant Vice President of
Communications
Kurt Field, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the Graduate School
Leslie Betz, B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Dean of the Graduate
School
Lynne Franks, B.S., Director of Graduate International
Admissions and Student Services
Staff
Bonnie Price, Admissions Secretary
Janet Pesek, Records Evaluator
Darlene Jacobs, Secretary/Receptionist
Kristina Ptashnik, Records Coordinator-Admissions
Susan Tanner, Records Coordinator-Graduation
Executive Committee of the Graduate
Faculty
Permanent Member
Kurt Field, Ph.D., Interim Dean of the Graduate School
Elected Members
Kevin Finson, Ph.D., College of Education and Health
Sciences (2006-2009)
Bernard Goitein, Ph.D., Foster College of Business
Administration (2006-2009)
Jiang B. Liu, Ph.D., College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
(2007-2010)
Sherri Morris, Ph.D., College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
(2008-2011)
Oscar Gillespie, M.F.A., The Henry Pindell Slane College
of Communications and Fine Arts (2008-2011)
Lori Russell-Chapin, Ph.D., College of Education and
Health Sciences (2008-2011)
Edward Sattler, Ph.D., Foster College of Business
Administration (2007-2010)
120
Prasad Shastry, Ph.D., College of Engineering and
Technology (2008-2011)
Jobie Skaggs, Ph.D., College of Education and Health
Sciences (2006-2009), Secretary
Fisher Stolz, M.F.A., The Henry Pindell Slane College of
Communications and Fine Arts (2006-2009)
David Zietlow, Ph.D., College of Engineering and
Technology (2007-2010)
TBA, Student Representative (2008-2009)
Graduate Faculty
Jorge Luis Abanto-Bueno, 2004, Assistant Professor of
Mechanical Engineering. National University of Trujillo,
B.S.; University of Puerto Rico, M.S.; University of Illinois,
Ph.D.
Jeries Abou-Hanna, 1986, Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. University of Alabama, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E.,
Ph.D.
James J. Adrian, 1972, Professor of Civil Engineering and
Construction. University of Illinois, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Ph.D.;
Bradley University, B.S., P.E., C.P.A.
In Soo Ahn, 1986, Associate Professor of Electrical and
Computer Engineering. Seoul National University, Seoul,
South Korea, B.S.; Korea Advanced Institute of Science ,
Seoul, M.S.; Iowa State University, Ph.D.
Amir Al-Khafaji, 1986, Professor of Civil Engineering and
Construction. Wayne State University, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E.;
Michigan State University, M.S.C.E., Ph.D.
Winfred K.N. Anakwa, 1985, Professor of Electrical and
Computer Engineering. Brown University, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Brad Andersh, 1993, Associate Professor of Chemistry.
University of South Dakota, B.S., Iowa State University,
Ph.D.
Heljä Antola-Crowe, 1993, Professor of Education.
University of Jyvaskla, B.S., M.A.; University of Mississippi,
Ph.D.
Francesca A. Armmer, 1990, Associate Professor of
Nursing. Ball State University, B.S.N.; University of
Evansville, M.S.N.; Indiana State University, Ph.D.
Cecile M. Arquette, 2005, Assistant Professor of Education.
Mary Washington College, B.A.; Teacher’s College,
Columbia University, M.A.; New Mexico University, Ph.D.
Bradley University
Robert Baer, 1984, Dean, Foster College of Business
Administration and Professor of Marketing. Ohio
University, B.A.; University of Missouri, M.A.; Miami
University, Ph.D.
Edith M. Baker, 1995, Associate Professor of English.
Cornell College, B.A.; University of Virginia, M.A.;
University of Arizona, Ph.D.
Julie Baylor, 1994, Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Bradley University, B.S.N.,M.S.N., St. Louis University, Ph.D.
Stacie Bertram, 1991, Assistant Professor of Physical
Therapy. Bradley University, B.S.; University of Alabama at
Birmingham, M.S.P.T., Illinois State University, Ph.D.
Shyam B. Bhandari, 1976, Professor of Finance.
Rajasthan University, Jaipur, India, B.S., M.S.; Miami
University, M.B.A.; University of Iowa, Ph.D.
Christine E. Blouch, 1992, Associate Professor of English.
Miami University of Ohio, B.A.; University of Wisconsin,
M.A.; University of Michigan, Ph.D.
Edward U. Bond III, 1997, Associate Professor of
Marketing. Manhattan Christian College, B.A.; University
of Northern Colorado, M.A.; Arizona State University,
Ph.D.
Wayne B. Bosma, 1997, Associate Professor of
Chemistry. Calvin College, B.S.; University of Rochester,
Ph.D.
Heather Brammeier, 2004, Assistant Professor of Art.
Bradley University, B.F.A.; University of Pennsylvania,
M.F.A.
Kendra Brandes, 2005, Assistant Professor of Family and
Consumer Sciences. Central Mission State University, B.S.
Ed., M.S.E.; University of Illinois, Ed.D.
Susan B. Brill De Ramirez, 1991, Caterpillar Professor
of English. University of Wisconsin-Madison, B.A., M.B.A.;
University of Chicago, M.A.; University of New Mexico, Ph.D.
Shari L. Britner, 2002, Associate Professor of Education.
Eckerd College, B.A.; Georgia State University, M.Ed.;
Emory University, Ph.D.
Mark P. Brown, 2001, Associate Professor of Business
Management and Administration. University of the
South, B.A.; Louisiana State University, M.B.A., Ph.D.
Cindy L. Brubaker, 2000, Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Swedish American Hospital School of Nursing, R.N.;
Bradley University, B.S.N.; University of Illinois at Chicago,
Ms. F.N.P.
Aaron A. Buchko, 1989, Professor of Management. Ferris
State College, B.S.; Bradley University, M.B.A.; Michigan State
University, Ph.D.
Kathleen Buchko, 1998, Associate Professor of
Education. Bradley University, B.S.; Michigan State
University, M.A., Ph.D.
Charles Bukowski, 1984, Professor of International
Studies. Bradley University, B.A.; University of South
Carolina, M.A., Ph.D.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Craig Cady, 2002, Associate Professor of Biology. University
of Wisconsin, B.S., M.S.; University of Arizona, Ph.D.
Dean J. Campbell, 1998, Associate Professor of
Chemistry. University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, B.S.;
Northwestern University, M.S., Ph.D.
Randall Carlson, 1993, Associate Professor of Art. Luther
College, B.A.; University of Iowa, M.A.; Bradley University,
M.F.A.
George Chambers, 1969, Professor of English. Boston
University, B.A.; University of Wisconsin, M.A.
Chang-Ok Choi, 1987, Associate Professor of Family and
Consumer Sciences. Keimyung University, B.S., M.Ed.; The
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Ph.D.
Patricia Chrosniak, 2004, Associate Professor of Teacher
Education. Niagra University, B.A.; University of Illinois—
Urbana-Champaign, M.S., Ph.D.
Maureen Cluskey, 1998, Associate Professor of Nursing.
Bradley University, B.S.; The Catholic University of
America, M.S.N., DNSC, Ph.D.
Nina R. Collins, 1968, C.C. Wheeler Professor of Family
and Consumer Sciences. Southern Illinois University, B.S.,
M.S.; Oklahoma State University, Ed.D.
Timothy K. Conley, 1982, Associate Professor of
English. St. Louis University, B.A.; The Pennsylvania State
University, M.A., Ph.D.
Martha J. Craig, 1999, Associate Professor of English.
Stanford University, B.A.; The College of William and Mary,
M.A.; Purdue University, Ph.D.
Jeannette Davidson, 1992, Professor of Family and
Consumer Sciences. University of Pretoria, B.S., M.S.; Ohio
State University, Ph.D.
Robert M. Davison Avilés, 1999, Associate Professor of
Education. University of Arizona, B.A.; Lehigh University,
M.Ed., Ph.D.
Richard Deller, 1978, Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering and Manufacturing. University of Illinois,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Gary Dempsey, 1992, Associate Professor of Electrical
Engineering. University of North Carolina, B.S.E.; University
of Virginia, M.S.E.E., Ph.D.
Steven B. Dolins, 2002, Associate Professor of Computer
Science and Information Systems. Tulane University, B.S.,
B.A., M.S.; University of Texas at Arlington, Ph.D.
Peter F. Dusenbery, 1970, Associate Professor of English.
Lewis and Clark College, B.A.; University of Washington,
M.A., Ph.D.
Kyle Dzapo, 1993, Professor of Music. University of
Michigan, B.M.E.; New England Conservatory of Music,
M.Mus.; Northwestern University, D.M.
Souhail Elhouar, 2000, Associate Professor of Civil
Engineering and Construction. University of Oklahoma,
M.Sc., Ph.D.
121
Joseph T. Emanuel, Jr., 1967, Associate Dean, Professor
of Industrial Engineering. University of New Mexico, B.S.;
Ohio State University, M.A., Ph.D.
John Engdahl, 2004, Donald V. Fites Chair, Professor.
University of Michigan, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Claire A. Etaugh, 1965, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences, Professor of Psychology. Barnard College, A.B.;
University of Minnesota, M.A., Ph.D.
Ahmad Fakheri, 1985, Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Samuel Fan, 1992, Associate Professor of Biology.
University of Massachusetts, B.S.; University of Illinois,
M.S., Ph.D.
Joseph Felder, 1981, Associate Professor of Economics.
Boston University, A.B.; University of California at Los
Angeles, M.A., Ph.D.
Chang-xue (Jack) Feng, 1998, Professor of Industrial
and Manufacturing Engineering. Wuhan Transportation
University China, B.S., M.S.; University of Iowa, M.S., Ph.D.
Kurt Field, 1976, Professor of Chemistry. Hiram College,
B.A.; Case Western Reserve University, Ph.D.; Johns
Hopkins University, Post Doctoral Associate.
Ross Fink, 1991, Professor of Operations Management.
Western Illinois University, B.S., M.B.A.; University of
Alabama, Ph.D.
Kevin D. Finson, 2001, Professor of Education. Kansas
State University, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Peggy Flannigan, 1996, Associate Professor of Nursing.
Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing, B.S.N.;
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, M.S.,
Ph.D.
Edward B. Flint, 1992, Associate Professor of Chemistry.
Kenyon College, A.B.; University of Illinois, Ph.D
Merrill Foster, 1970, Professor of Biology. University of
California-Berkeley, A.B., M.A.; Harvard University, Ph.D..
Barbara A. Frase, 1985, Professor of Biology. University
of Illinois at Chicago, B.S., M.S.; University of Kansas, Ph.D.
Fred L. Fry, 1976, Professor of Business Administration.
Oklahoma State University, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Michelle R. Fry, 1995, Associate Professor of
Biochemistry. Shippensburg University, B.S.; Virginia
Commonwealth University, Ph.D.
Robert W. Fuessle, 1981, Professor of Civil Engineering
and Construction. Monmouth College, B.A.; University of
Illinois, M.S., Ph.D., P.E.
Robert Fuller, 1978, Caterpillar Professor of Philosophy
& Religious Studies, Denison University, B.A.; University
of Chicago, M.A., Ph.D.
Alan G. Galsky, 1969, Vice President for Student
Affairs, Professor of Biology. Roosevelt University, B.S.;
Northwestern University, M.S., Ph.D.
122
Carol Gard, 1974, Assistant Professor of Nursing.
Montana State University, B.S.N., M.N.; Illinois State
University, Ph.D.
Janet L. Gehring, 1996, Associate Professor of Biology.
University of Nebraska at Omaha, B.S., M.A.; University of
Colorado, Ph.D.
Daniel Getz, 1992, Associate Professor of Religious
Studies. MaryKnoll College, B.A.; National Taiwan
University, M.A.; Yale University, M.A., Ph.D.
Oscar J. Gillespie, 1986, Professor of Art. Northern
Arizona University, B.F.A.; Arizona State University, M.F.A.
John Gillett, 1993, Professor of Accounting. University
of North Dakota, B.S., M.S.; North Texas State University,
Ph.D.; C.P.A.
Sarah R. Glover, 1999, Assistant Professor of Art. Drew
University, B.A.; University of Virginia, M.A., Ph.D.
Bernard J. Goitein, 1981, Professor of Business
Management and Administration. Hebrew University, B.A.,
M.A., University of Michigan, Ph.D.
Jean Marie Grant, 1994, Associate Professor of
Education. Eastern Illinois University, B.S.; Rosary College,
M.S.; University of Illinois at Chicago, Ph.D.
Mitch Griffin, 1990, Professor of Marketing. Southern
Illinois University, B.S., M.B.A.; Louisiana State University,
Ph.D.
Mahmood Haghighi, 1984, Professor of Computer
Science and Information Systems. Tehran Teachers
College, B.A.; Hofstra University, M.A.; City College of
New York, M.S.; City University of New York, Ph.D.
Dawn Hall, 2001, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy.
University of Illinois, B.S.; Temple University, M.P.T.; Illinois
State University, Ph.D.
Patricia Hatfield, 1990, Professor of Finance. Eastern
Kentucky University, B.A.; University of Kentucky, M.B.A.,
Ph.D.
Jannett K. Highfill, 1985, Professor of Economics.
Wichita State University, B.B.A.; University of Kansas,
M.A., Ph.D.
Donna J. Hill, 1989, Professor of Marketing. Indiana
University, B.A.; Ball State University, M.B.A.; Indiana
University, Ph.D.
Riyadh Hindi, 2001, Associate Professor of Civil
Engineering and Construction. University of Baghdad,
B.S., M.S.C.E.; University of British Columbia, Ph.D.
Bonnie B. Hinrichsen, 1980, Assistant Professor of
Nursing. University of South Carolina, B.S.N.; University of
Illinois, M.N.; Southern Illinois University, Ph.D.
Philip A. Horvath, 1977, Stevenson/National City
Professor and Professor of Finance. Indiana University at
South Bend, B.S., M.S.; Kent State University, D.B.A.
Brian Huggins, 1978, Associate Professor of Electrical
and Computer Engineering. University of Wisconsin,
B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D.
Bradley University
James H. Irwin, 1987, Associate Professor of Electrical
Computer Engineering. Bradley University, B.S.E.E.,
M.S.E.E.; University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Celia Johnson, 1992, Professor of Education. Illinois
State University, B.S.,
M.Ed., Ed.D.
Keith A. Johnson, 2002, Assistant Professor of Biology.
Monmouth College, B.A.; Dartmouth College, Ph.D.
Jean E. Jost, 1989, Professor of English. Nazareth
College, B.A.; University of Cincinnati, M.A., Ph.D.
K. Paul Kasambira, 1979, Professor of Education. Taylor
University, B.A.; Ball State University, M.A., Ed.D.
Seth Katz, 1992, Assistant Professor of English.
University of North Carolina, B.A.; University of Chicago,
A.M., Ph.D.
Andrew K. Kelley, 1999, Associate Professor of
Philosophy. Bowdoin College, B.A.; University of Warwick
(Coventry, England), M.A.; University of Iowa, Ph.D.
Dean Kim, 1997, Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. Cornell University, B.S.; University of Illinois,
M.S., Ph.D.
Paul Krainak, 2006, Professor of Art. Creighton
University, B.A.; Northern Illinois University, M.F.A.
Kalikathan S. Krishnamoorthi, 1980, Professor of
Industrial Engineering. University of Madras, B.S.M.E.;
SUNY at Buffalo, M.S.I.E., M.A., Ph.D.
Dennis Kroll, 1981, Associate Professor of Industrial
Engineering. Bradley University, B.S.I.E.; University of
Wisconsin, M.S.I.E.; University of Illinois, Ph.D.
George W. Krull, 2000, Professor of Accounting and
Executive in Residence. The Ohio State University,
B.S.; Oklahoma State University, M.S.; Michigan State
University, Ph.D., C.P.A.
Hwa Lee, 2001, Associate Professor of Education.
Keimyung University, B.A.; Whitworth College, M.Ed.;
University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Gary (Chen Sin) Lin, 1991, Professor of Industrial
Engineering. Chung-Yuan Christian University, Taiwan,
B.S.; Texas Tech University, M.S.; University of Florida,
Ph.D.
D. Elizabeth Linn, 1980, Associate Professor of Art. Siena
Heights College, B.A.; Eastern Michigan University, M.F.A.
Jiang B. Liu, 1987, Professor of Computer Science and
Information Systems. Nanking Institute of Aeronautical
Engineering, B.S.; Washington University, M.S., Ph.D.
Yufeng Lu, 2008, Assistant Professor of Electrical
Computer Engineering. Nanchang Institute of Aeronautic
Technology, B.S.E.E., Beijing University of Aeronautics and
Astronautics, M.S.E.E., Illinois Institute of Technology, Ph.D.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Krishnanand Maillacheruvu, 1997, Associate Professor
of Civil Engineering and Construction. Indian Institute of
Technology, B.S.; University of Iowa, M.S., Ph.D.
Aleksander Malinowski, 1998, Associate Professor
of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Technical
University of Gdansk, Poland; University of Louisville,
Ph.D.
Kelly McConnaughay, 1992, Associate Dean, College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences; Professor of Biology. University
of Illinois, B.S., M.S.; Harvard University, Ph.D.
Matthew K. McGowan, 1995, Associate Professor of
Management Information Services. Bucknell University,
B.S.; Bowling Green State University, M.S.; Kent State,
M.B.A., Ph.D.
David McMullen, 1989, Associate Professor of Education.
Bradley University, B.S., M.S.; University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Kristi L. McQuade, 2000, Associate Professor of
Chemistry. McKendree College, B.S.; University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Ph.D.
Desh Paul Mehta, 1978, Ameren-CILCO Professor of
Mechanical Engineering. Punjab University, B.S.; Aligarh
University, M.S.; Kansas State University, M.S.; Iowa State
University, Ph.D.
James Miller, 1978, Associate Professor of Computer
Science and Information Systems. University of Delaware,
B.A.; Pennsylvania State University, M.A., D.Ed.
Caitriona Moloney, 1999, Associate Professor of English.
University of Santa Clara, B.A; Holy Names College,
Oakland, M.A.; University of California-Davis, Ph.D.
Martin Morris, 1997, Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. Bradley University, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E.;
University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Sherri Jeakins Morris, 2000, Associate Professor of
Biology. San Diego State University, B.S., M.S.; Ohio State
University, Ph.D.
Kurt R. Neelly, 1999, Assistant Professor of Physical
Therapy. Washburn University, B.A.; University of Kansas
Medical Center, M.S.P.T., University of Kansas, Ph.D.
Arnold Reuben Ness, 1974, Associate Professor of
Manufacturing. University of Illinois, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Lee Newton, 1999, Assistant Professor of English.
Bradley University, B.A.; George Mason University, M.F.A.
Christos Nikolopoulos, 1987, Professor of Computer
Science and Information Systems. University of Athens,
B.S.; Colorado State University, M.S., Ph.D.; Michigan State
University, M.S.
Patricia Nugent, 2005, Assistant Professor of Teacher
Education. Millikin University, B.A.; Illinois State
University, M.S., Ph.D
123
Thomas Palakeel, 1993, Associate Professor of English.
Loyola College, The University of Madras, B.A.; University
of Kerala-India, M.A.; Eastern Washington University,
M.F.A.; University of North Dakota, Ph.D.
Sherrie Pardieck, 1998, Associate Professor of Teacher
Education. Illinois Central College, A.A.; Eureka College,
B.A.; Bradley University, M.A.; Illinois State University,
Ed.D.
Young Park, 2000, Professor of Computer Science and
Information Systems. Seoul National University, B.S.;
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,
M.S.; New York University Courant Institute of
Mathematical Sciences, M.S., Ph.D.
Sandra Perry, 1984, Professor of Business
Administration. Bradley University, B.S.; Southern Illinois
University, J.D.
Melissa Peterson, 2002, Assistant Professor of Physical
Therapy. Bradley University, B.S.P.T.; University of
Indianapolis, M.H.S.; University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Simon Petravick, 1994, Professor of Accounting. Loyola
University, B.S.; DePaul University, M.S.A.; University of
Illinois at Chicago, Ph.D.; C.P.A.
Robert J. Podlasek, 1982, Assistant Dean, College
of Engineering and Technology, Director Bradley/
Fraunhofer Partnership, Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering. University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, B.S., A.B., M.S., Ph.D., P.E.
Scott Post, 2006, Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. University of Missouri-Columbia, B.S.; Purdue
University, M.S., Ph.D.
Brenda Pratt, 2007, Assistant Professor of Physical
Therapy. Washington University, B.S., Rocky Mountain
University of Health Professions, M.S.
Robert Prescott, 1991, Associate Professor of English.
University of Illinois, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.
Mitchell H. Raiborn, 1981, Professor of Accounting.
University of Texas at Austin, B.B.A., M.P.A.; University of
Missouri at Columbia, Ph.D.; C.P.A., C.M.A.
G. Kevin Randall, 2006, Assistant Professor of Education.
Illinois State University, B.S.; Iowa State University, M.S.,
Ph.D.
Julie A. Reyer, 2002, Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. University of Illinois, B.S.; Carnegie Mellon
University, M.E.; University of Michigan–Ann Arbor, Ph.D
D. Michael Risen, 2004, Assistant Professor of Education.
Illinois State University, B.S., M.S.; Western Illinois
University, Ed.S.; Illinois State University, Ph.D.
Dawn C. Roberts, 1993, Associate Professor of
Psychology. Augustana College, B.A.; University of Iowa,
M.S., Ph.D.
124
Robert E. Rowe, 2000, Professor of Art. University of Florida,
B.F.A.; Indiana University, M.F.A.
Arlyn R. Rubash, 1974, Associate Professor of Finance.
Pennsylvania State University, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.
Lori A. Russell-Chapin, 1987, Associate Dean, College of
Education and Health Sciences, Professor of Education.
University of Wyoming, B.S.; Eastern Montana College,
M.S.; University of Wyoming, Ph.D.
Christopher J. Rybak, 1993, Professor of Education.
Illinois State University, B.S.; Southern Illinois University,
M.S., Ph.D.
Saeed Saboury, 1989, Associate Professor of
Manufacturing. University of Tehran, B.S.; University of
London, Imperial College,
M.Sc., Ph.D.
Edward L. Sattler, 1977, Associate Dean, Foster College
of Business Administration, Professor of Economics.
Western Michigan University, B.B.A., M.A.; University of
Illinois, M.A., Ph.D.
Joan L. Sattler, 1977, Dean, College of Education
and Health Sciences. Professor of Education. Western
Michigan University, B.S.; University of Illinois, M.Ed.,
Ed.D.
Roy Schmidt, 1998, Associate Professor of Business
Computer Systems. University of Maryland, B.A., B.S.; St.
Mary’s University, M.B.A.; Indiana University, Ph.D.
Wendy A. Schweigert, 1987, Associate Professor of
Psychology. St. Lawrence University, B.S.; Ohio University,
M.S., Ph.D.
Robert C. Scott, 1975, Professor of Economics. University
of South Dakota, B.A.; University of Iowa, M.A., Ph.D.
Lori Scroggs, 2004, Assistant Professor of Educational
Leadership and Human Development. Illinois State
University, B.S., M.S.; University of Illinois, Ed.D.
James G. Seckler, 1970, Associate Professor of Civil
Engineering and Construction. Stanford University,
B.S.C.E.; New Mexico State University, M.S.C.E., Sc.D., P.E.
Iqbal Shareef, 1984, Professor of Manufacturing.
Osmania University, Hyd., India, B.S., M.S.; Illinois Institute
of Technology, Ph.D.
Prasad Shastry, 1991, Professor of Electrical and
Computer Engineering. Bangalore University, B.S.; Indian
Institute of Technology, India, M.S., Ph.D.
Nancy E. Sherman, 1992, Professor of Education.
State University of New York, B.A.; Bowling Green State
University, M.A.; The Ohio State University, Ph.D.
Jobie L. Skaggs, 1999, Associate Professor of Education.
Idaho State University, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Cheryl Sparks, 2008, Assistant Professor. Bradley
University, B.S., St. Ambrose University, D.P.T.
Erich Stabenau, 1996, Professor of Biology. Texas A & M
University, B.Sc., M.Sc.; University of Texas, Ph.D.
Bradley University
Kevin Stein, 1984, Caterpillar Professor of English. Ball
State University, B.S., M.A.; Indiana University, M.A., Ph.D.
Paul R. Stephens, 2000, Associate Professor of
Management Information Systems. Illinois State
University, B.S.; Bradley University, M.B.A.; University of
Cincinnati, Ph.D.
Robert R. Stephens, 1967, Associate Professor of
Biology. Oklahoma Baptist University, B.A.; University of
Oklahoma, M.A.; Oklahoma State University, Ph.D.
H. Fisher Stolz, 1994, Associate Professor of Art.
University of Georgia, B.F.A., M.F.A.
Charles R. Stoner, 1980, Robert A. McCord Professor of
Executive Management Development and Professor of
Business Administration. The Florida State University,
B.S., M.B.A., D.B.A.
Nicholas Stover, 2006, Assistant Professor of Biology. New
Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology, B.S.; University of
California, Irvine, Ph.D.
Andrew J. Strubhar, 1993, Associate Professor of
Physical Therapy. Wheaton College, B.S.; Northwestern
University Medical School, B.S.P.T.; Bradley University,
M.A.; Illinois State University, Ph.D.
Alexey Sverdlin, 1991, Professor of Manufacturing.
University of Tashkent-USSR, M.S.; Institute of Aviation
Materials of USSR, Ph.D.
Kevin R. Swafford, 2001, Associate Professor of English.
San Francisco State University, B.A.; New York University,
M.A.; University of Rhode Island, Ph.D.
Allen L. Webster, 1990, Professor of Quantitative Methods.
Fort Hays Kansas State University, B.S., M.S.; Florida State
University, Ph.D.
Robert I. Weinstein, 1980, Professor of Economics.
University of Missouri, Kansas City, B.B.A., M.B.A.;
University of Texas, Austin, Ph.D.
Laurence Weinzimmer, 1993, Professor of Management.
Bradley University, B.A., M.B.A.; University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Ph.D.
Charles West, 1997, Temporary Instructor, Executive in
Residence, Business Management and Administration.
Illinois State University, B.S.; Bradley University, M.S.;
Illinois State University, Ed.D.
William E. Wilcox, 1999, Associate Professor of
Accounting. Iowa State University, B.S.; University of
South Dakota, M.S.; University of Lincoln-Nebraska, Ph.D.
Gary N. Will, 2000, Associate Professor of Art. Southport
College of Art and Design, N.W.R.A.C.; Doncaster College,
T.D.L.B.; Leeds Metropolitan University (England), M.A.
Raymond Wojcikewych, 1977, Associate Professor of
Economics. Scranton University, B.A.; Pennsylvania State
University, M.A., Ph.D.
Robert J. Wolffe, 1993, Professor of Education. Miami
University of Ohio, B.S.; Xavier University, M.Ed.;
University of Cincinnati, Ed.D.
Demetrice Worley, 1988, Associate Professor of English.
Bradley University, B.A.; University of Illinois, M.A.; Illinois
State University, Ph.D.
Max A. Taylor, 1969, Professor of Chemistry. Colorado
College, B.S.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ph.D.
Fariborz Tayyari, 1985, Professor of Industrial Engineering.
Iranian Institute of Advanced Accounting. Tehran, Iran,
B.A.; Sul Ross State University, M.B.A.; New Mexico State
University, M.S.; Texas Tech University, Ph.D., P.E.
Steven R. Tippett, 1995, Professor of Physical Therapy.
St. Louis University, B.S., Illinois State University, M.S.,
Ph.D.
Jenny S. Tripses, 1999, Associate Professor of Education.
Bradley University, B.S.; Illinois State University, M.S., Ph.D.
Coleen S. Troutman, 1992, Associate Professor of
Accounting. Kansas State Teachers College, B.S.E.; Wichita
State University, M.S.; Oklahoma State University, Ph.D.;
C.P.A.
David Zietlow, 1998, Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering. Bradley University, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E.;
University of Illinois, Ph.D.
Vladimir L. Uskov, 2000, Professor of Computer Science
and Information Systems. Moscow Aviation University,
M.S., Ph.D.
Laurie Vickroy, 1990, Professor of English. University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee, B.A.; New York University, M.A.;
SUNY-Binghamton, Ph.D.
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
125
Affiliate Members
Sharon Bangert, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
William Barnhill, Ph.D., Affiliate Instructor of Nursing
Marci Baumann, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Michelle Barbee, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Julie K. Baylor, M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing
Samuel Betts, M.O.P.T., Affiliate Faculty of Physical Therapy
Dale Brown, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Affiliate Instructor of
Physical Therapy
Anita Burton, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Janet Butcher, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Christina Davidson-Ropp, B.S., Affiliate Faculty of
Physical Therapy
T. Gerald Davis, Jr., J.C., Affiliate Instructor of Computer
Science and Information Systems
Tracy Dehority, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Teresa Duncan, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Michelle Edgcomb, M.S., Laboratory Coordinator for
Biology
Deborah Erickson, B.S.N., M.S.N., Assistant Professor of
Nursing
David Evelti, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Robert F. Fahey, J.D., Affiliate Instructor of Liberal Arts
and Sciences
William Frame, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Kimberly Garcia, B.S., Affiliate Instructor of Chemistry and
Biochemistry
Rhonda Gee, C.R.N.A., DNSC, Adjunct Professor of
Nursing
Andre Granzotti, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Rachel Harris, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Sandra Helms Bury, M.A., Affiliate Instructor of Computer
Science and Information Systems
Sheila Hollinden, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Janet Jackson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing
Jon Jacoby, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Brian Jones, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Susan M. Kiefer-Griffin, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty
of Nursing
Lisa Kamm, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Wendy Kooken, B.A.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., Associate Professor
of Nursing
Richard Landgrebe, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Ellen Gay Leathers, M.A., Lecturer in English
Edward Lee, B.S.E.E., Affiliate Instructor of Electrical
Engineering
Vicki Lee, M.A., Affiliate Instructor of Physical Therapy
Ann Lercher, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
126
Robert Ludwig, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Mary Ellen McAsey, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Biology
William McGehee, B.S.P.T., Assistant Professor of Physical
Therapy
Monica McGill, Ed.D., Temporary Assistant Professor of
Communication
Gretchen Meyer, M.S., Affiliate Instructor of Physical
Therapy
J. Mark Moore, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Oluwatosin Oladipupo, M.D., Adjunct Professor of
Nursing
Dale P. Ostrander, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Valerie Vogt Pape, M.B.A., Temporary Instructor of
Business Management and Administration
Breanna Reynolds, B.S.P.T., D.P.T., Affiliate Faculty of
Physical Therapy
Diane Ritter, C.R.N.A., M.S., Affiliate Instructor of Nursing
Nicholas Sarros, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Nursing
Nadia Schwarz, M.S.A., Affiliate Instructor of Accounting
Sharon Sekosky, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Instructor of
Nursing
James Springer, Ph.D., Affiliate Instructor of Liberal Arts
and Sciences
Lori Stone, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Karin Terry, Pharm. D., Affiliate Instructor of Physical
Therapy.
Valerie Vancil, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of Nursing
Angela Vaughn, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Steven Vaughn, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Biology
Paul Wayvon, M.B.A., Temporary Instructor of Accounting
Matthew Wolter, C.R.N.A., M.S.N., Affiliate Faculty of
Nursing
Suzanne Worsfold, M.A., Affiliate Instructor of Computer
Science and Information Systems
Bradley University
Index
A
Academic Calendar 4
Academic Regulations 21
Accounting 39
Accreditation 8
Administration 120
Admission 12
Categories of 12
Eligibility 12
Requirements for 13
Affiliate Members of Graduate Faculty 126
Age of Courses Eligible to Meet Prerequisite Requirements 27
Application Fee 17
Application for Graduation 27
Application or Admission Deferral 15
Art 55
Assistantships 19
Audited Courses 26
Average Class Size 6
B
Biology 107
Bookstore 28
Bradley Alumni 7
Bradley, Lydia Moss 7
Bradley Seniors Taking Courses for Graduate Credit 12
Bradley University, Description of 6
C
Calendar, Academic 4
Campus Visits 10
Cap, Gown, and Hood Rentals 18
Career Center, Smith 32
Caterpillar Masters Fellowships 19
Certificate Programs, Graduate 11,15
Change of Program 26
Cheating 22
Chemistry 109
Civil Engineering 90
College of Education and Health Sciences 59
College of Engineering and Technology, 89
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 107
Communications and Fine Arts, Slane College of 55
Comprehensive Assessment 27
Computer Science and Information Systems 110
Computing Services 28
2008-2009 Graduate Catalog
Conditional Admission 12
Cooperative Education/Internship Program 20, 33
Counseling 29
Course Load 25
Course Numbering System and Requirements 21
Cultural Center, Romeo B. Garrett 28
Curriculum and Instruction 73
Certificate Program 77
LBS I Master’s Degree Program 76
Master’s Degree Program 74
D
Deferral of Application or Admission 15
Deferred Payment Plan 17
Degrees 11
Dismissal for Non-Academic Reasons 24
E
Educational Leadership and Human Development 61
Electrical Engineering 95
E-mail accounts 28
Endorsement
in Middle Level Education 76
in Reading 76
in Special Education for (LBS I) 76
Engineering and Technology 89
English 113
Entrance Examinations 13
Executive Committee of the Graduate Faculty 120
Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) 42
F
Facilities 28
Faculty, Graduate 120
Family and Consumer Sciences Supportive Courses 80
Federal Direct Subsidized Loans 20
Fees and Expenses 17
Fees, Miscellaneous 18
Finance
Master of Science in Quantitative Finance 51
MBA concentration 48
Financial Assistance 19
Financial Certification 14
Formal Grievance Process 23
Former Students 13
Foster College of Business Administration 39
127
G
Garrett Cultural Center 28
Grading System 21
Graduate Certificate Programs 11,15
Graduate Faculty 120
Graduate School 9
Graduate School Interdisciplinary Program 34
Graduate School Policies 25
Graduate Student-at-Large 12
Graduation Application 27
Grievance Policy, Procedures 22
H
Health Fee 18
Health Services Center 29
History Supportive Courses 118
Human Development Counseling 64
I
IE M.B.A. Program 47
Immunization Requirement 29
Incomplete Work 21
Industrial Engineering 98
Informal Grievance Procedures 22
Instructional Technology and Media Services (ITMS) 28
Interim Certification as School Counselor Intern and
Employment 68
International (F-1) Students and Financial Assistance 20
International Students 14
Internet2 6
Internship, College of Engineering and Technology 89
Internship Program 20
L
Leadership
Educational Administration Master's Degree
Program 61
Human Service Administration Master’s Degree
Program 62, 63
Liberal Studies 115
Library, Cullom-Davis 29
Loans 20
M
Manufacturing Engineering 98
Master of Business Administration (MBA) 45
Mathematics Supportive Courses 118
Mechanical Engineering 101
Mission and Vision, Bradley University 6
N
Nursing 81
Nurse Administered Anesthesia Major 81
Nursing Administration Major 81
P
Permanent Residents/Immigrants 15
Philosophy Supportive Course 118
Physical Therapy 83
Physics Supportive Courses 118
Plagiarism 22
Police Department 30
128
Policies, Graduate School 25
Policy Violation Issues and Grievance Procedures 22
Political Science Supportive Course 119
Post-Master's Certification in School Counseling 66
Practicum, College of Engineering and Technology 89
Prerequisites 21
Professional Master of Arts, STEM Education, 34
Program, Change of 26
Program of Study 27
Progression Toward Degree 27
Psychology Supportive Courses 119
Public radio, WCBU FM 89.9 30
R
Refunds 17
Registration 15
Removal of Conditional Status 27
Repeated Courses 26
Residential Living and Leadership, Center for 32
Room and Board 18
S
Safety and Security 30
Scholarship 19
Scholastic Requirements 22
School Counseling Program 65
Slane College of Communications and Fine Arts 55
Smith Career Center 32
Sociology Supportive Courses 119
STEM Education, Professional Master of Arts, 34
Student Affairs 31
Student Center 30
Student Health Services, Center for 29
Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act
Compliance Report 3
Student Services 31
T
Teacher Certification 76
Teaching Endorsements 76
Telecommunications 30
Thesis 27
Thesis Binding Fee 18
Time Limit for Degree Completion 24
Title II Institutional Report 71
TOEFL 14
Transcript Evaluation to Pursue Counseling Certification 67
Transcript of Credits 24
Tuition 17
Type 75 Certificate Program 62
U
Unconditional Admission 12
University Student Grievance Committee 23
Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans 20
V
Vehicle Registration 18
W
Work in Progress 21
Bradley University
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