Proxim | Harmony 802.11a Network Adapter 802.11a | Harmony App Note

Harmony App Note
HARMONY 802.11a WIRELESS APPLICATION NOTE
Creating Ad-Hoc Mobile Networks Using Harmony 802.11a PC Cards
The Harmony 802.11a Demo Kit contains everything you
need to quickly and easily set up ad-hoc mobile networks,
allowing you to inter-network with your colleagues at wired
network speeds.
• Share large files, such as PowerPoint presentations,
CAD drawings, and spreadsheets.
• Distribute and play multimedia files, such as
MPEG-2 videos or MP3 audio playlists, over the
network.
• Expedite the transfer or backup of critical files
between computers.
The Harmony 802.11a PC Card is an IEEE 802.11a-compliant CardBus card, offering:
• 54 Mbps data rate in 802.11a mode
• 108 Mbps data rate in Proxim’s 2X mode
• Up to 10 times higher data rates at any range
than 802.11b
• No interference from cordless phones and
microwave ovens
• Longer battery life due to higher energy efficiency
Creating a wireless ad-hoc network requires only three (3)
simple steps. This document provides details for each of
these steps depending on your operating system.
Step 1. Install the Harmony 802.11a PC Card in each
notebook and configure them for an ad hoc network.
Step 2. Enable file sharing on the notebook containing the
file you need.
Step 3. Browse to the file you need on the remote computer.
Harmony 802.11a CardBus PC Card
Step 1. Install the Harmony 802.11a PC
Card in each notebook and configure them
for an ad hoc network.
Insert the Harmony 802.11a PC Card into an available
CardBus slot. The computer should recognize the card and
offer to search for a driver. Direct the search to look on the
supplied CD. After the installation is complete, restart the
computer if prompted. Access the 802.11a PC Card’s
Network Properties screen and configure the Network
Mode to Ad Hoc and enter an SSID. By default the card
is in 802.11a mode. If desired, enable the Turbo mode for
higher speed. After all selections are made, select <OK>
until the Network Properties window is closed and restart if
prompted.
Students gather in the library to collaborate on
a project before class.
For more details on this installation, refer to the Demo Kit
Quick Start Guide included on the CD.
Step 2: Enable file sharing on the notebook
containing the file you need.
For Windows 98 Second Edition and Millennium Edition,
right-click Network Neighborhood (for 98 Second
Edition) or My Network Places (for Millennium Edition)
on the Desktop and select Properties from the drop-down
list. Verify the following are listed (other items may appear
as well): Client for Microsoft Networks, Harmony 802.11a
Wireless Network Adapter, TCP/IP, and File and Printer
Sharing for Microsoft Networks. Click the <File and
Printer Sharing…> button and choose I want to be able
to give others access to my files if not already selected.
Click <OK> and restart the computer if prompted. Next,
navigate to the location of the file you would like to share.
Right-click the files folder or drive and select Sharing from
the drop-down menu. Select Shared As and enter a new
Share Name if you do not want to use the default name.
Click <OK> to return to the Windows desktop.
Finally, you need to confirm that the username for the person on the remote computer accessing this file is located in
your Local User Group. From the Control Panel, select
Administrative Tools > Computer Management >
Local Users and Groups. Then click Users. If the username does not appear in the list, click Action > New User
and add them to the list. Note that the user’s password
must match the password entered when the user logs onto
the remote notebook
Step 3: Browse to the file you need on the
remote computer.
For Windows 98 Second Edition, click Start > Find >
Computer. Enter the name of the Computer that contains
the file you need and click <Search Now>. If you don’t
know the name of the computer, please see below. Once
the computer is located, browse to the location where the
file you need is located on the remote computer.
For Windows 2000 and Millennium Edition, click Start >
Search > For Files or Folders, and in the left pane click
Computers. Enter the name of the Computer that contains the file you need and click <Search Now>. If you
don’t know the name of the computer, please see below.
Once the computer is located, browse to the location where
the file you need is located on the remote computer.
Accountants update spreadsheets at a
customer site during an audit.
For Windows 2000, right-click My Network Places on the
Desktop and select Properties from the drop-down list. If
more than one Network Connection is shown, highlight
each one until you see the "Harmony 802.11a Wireless
Network Adapter" description. Then right-click the
Harmony 802.11a Wireless Network Adapter connection
and select Properties from the drop-down list. Verify that
the following are listed (other items may appear as well):
Client for Microsoft Networks, File and Printer Sharing for
Microsoft Networks, and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Once
these items are confirmed, navigate to the location of the
file you would like to share. Right-click the files folder or
drive and choose Sharing from the drop-down list. Select
Share this folder and click <OK>.
To determine the computer name of a particular computer,
right-click My Network Places (for Windows Millennium
or 2000) or Network Neighborhood (for Windows 98
Second Edition) and select Properties. For Windows
2000, click Network Identification on the lower left side
of the window. For Windows 98 Second Edition or
Millennium Edition, click the Identification tab.
Engineering teams meet to review CAD files
prior to a design review
Performance Evaluation
Throughput
The performance of any wireless LAN is highly subject to
environmental conditions. Numerous factors, such as materials of construction, reflecting surfaces, obstructions, etc.
will affect the throughput of radio-based communications
such as a wireless LAN link. It is therefore difficult to
quantify the performance of any wireless product.
Nonetheless, you may want to evaluate the throughput performance of your Harmony 802.11a network for purposes of
comparison with other wireless LAN products or to assess
its behavior in different locations.
Examples of other methods that can be used to evaluate the
throughput difference between the Harmony 802.11a PC
Card and any other wireless LAN technologies include:
•Perform FTP file transfers of files in excess of, for
example, 50 Mbps, and monitor the throughput
reported by the FTP client
•Transfer high-resolution MPEG-2 video files (e.g., 22
Mbps) and compare the video and audio quality on
the media player
Various standard networking tools exist that can help you
qualify the performance of your ad-hoc network without
investing in expensive networking utilities.
NetIQ’s QCheck is a simple network testing utility, which
provides a basic throughput test. You can download a free
copy from the NetIQ web site at
http://www.netiq.com/qcheck/.
This utility needs to be installed on each computer that will
be part of the test. Select Local Host in the drop-down
box for Endpoint 1 and enter the IP address of the remote
computer in the Endpoint 2 box. Change the Data Size to
1000 kBytes and run the test several times in a row by
pressing the <Run> button after each test is completed.
Managers consolidate slide show materials
before a sales presentation
Throughput vs. Radio Rate
With all wireless LAN products, the useable throughput you
will experience does not equal the radio rate. Due to the
fixed overhead associated with managing over-the-air data
transmission, all wireless LANs experience actual throughput of 30 to 50% of the radio rate. Therefore, in order to
increase user throughput, it is necessary to maximize the
radio rate; your Harmony 802.11a PC Cards offer the highest radio rate available in a wireless LAN product!
Range
QCheck network testing utility
QCheck will report the throughput for each test in Mbps.
Note, however, that the maximum data size QCheck allows
is only 1 MB. This data size limitation does not demonstrate the significant throughput advantage of the Harmony
802.11a PC Card, as would a larger data size.
The data rate of 108 Mbps should be obtainable within a
range of approximately 20 feet in a typical open indoor
environment, for example within a conference room. As
the Harmony 802.11a PC Cards are moved to greater distances or obstructions, such as walls, are introduced, the
radio will automatically start backing off to lower data rates.
Because of this automatic back-off mechanism, the 802.11a
cards will continually maintain the highest data rate possible
at that range.
In general, the 802.11a cards will consistently maintain a
data rate, at any range, of 3 to 10 times higher than 802.11b
products. For example, if the range of an 802.11b product
at 11 Mbps is 100 feet in the given environment (before
backing off to 5.5 Mbps), the 802.11a PC cards, in the same
environment, may have backed off from 108 Mbps to 96
Mbps to 72 Mbps, but will still be over 6 times faster at that
distance than 802.11b (72 Mbps vs. 11 Mbps).
Again, keep in mind that all wireless LANs are highly subject to environment conditions and that the LAN’s performance in your environment may differ from the examples discussed.
802.11a Mode vs. 2X Mode
The Harmony 802.11a PC Card is capable of operating in
two modes: 802.11a Mode and 2X Mode. In 802.11a
Mode, the default mode, the maximum data rate is 54
Mbps and the card will be interoperable with other
802.11a-compliant products.
In order to experience 100 Mbps networking, it is necessary
to configure your Harmony 802.11a PC Card for Proxim’s
2X Mode (also referred to as Turbo Mode). In this mode,
the maximum data rate is 108 Mbps. When in 2X Mode,
the Harmony 802.11a PC Card is not interoperable with
other 802.11a products.
Refer to the Demo Kit Quick Start Guide for instructions
on configuring your Harmony 802.11a PC Card for 2X
Mode.
Proxim, Inc
Corporate Headquarters
510 DeGuigne Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94085 USA
Phone 408-731-2700/800-229-1630
Fax: 408-731-3675
sales@proxim.com
www.proxim.com
© Copyright 2001 Proxim, Inc. All rights reserved.
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