KN220 CPU System Maintenance Order Number EK–375AA–SM–001 Digital Equipment Corporation Maynard, Massachusetts

KN220 CPU System Maintenance Order Number EK–375AA–SM–001 Digital Equipment Corporation Maynard, Massachusetts
KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Order Number EK–375AA–SM–001
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
First Printing, September 1990
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation.
Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in
this document.
The software, if any, described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used
or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. No responsibility is assumed
for the use or reliability of software or equipment that is not supplied by Digital Equipment
Corporation or its affiliated companies.
Restricted Rights: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS 252.227–7013.
© Digital Equipment Corporation 1990. All rights reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
The Reader’s Comments form at the end of this document requests your critical evaluation to
assist in preparing future documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation:
CompacTape, DDCMP, DEC, DECdirect, DECnet, DECserver, DECsystem 5400, DECUS,
DECwriter, DELNI, DELQA, DEQNA, DESTA, DSSI, IVIS, MicroVAX, PDP, Professional,
Q-bus, ReGIS, RQDX, ThinWire, ULTRIX, UNIBUS, VAX, VAX 4000, VAXcluster, VAX
DOCUMENT, VAXELN, VAXlab, VMS, VT, and the DIGITAL Logo.
Prestoserve is a trademark of Legato Systems, Inc.
FCC NOTICE: The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and may emit radio
frequency energy. The equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for
a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed
to provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency interference when operated in
a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause
interference, in which case the user at his own expense may be required to take measures to
correct the interference.
S1304
This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 1.2.
Contents
xiii
Preface
Chapter 1 KN220 Base System
1.1
Base System Overview . . . . . . . . .
1.2
KN220 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.1
R3000 RISC Processor . . . . . . .
1.2.2
Cache Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.3
Main Memory System . . . . . . .
1.2.4
Console Serial Line . . . . . . . . .
1.2.5
Time-of-Year Clock and Timers
1.2.6
Boot and Diagnostic Facility . .
1.2.7
Q22-Bus Interface . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.8
CVAX Diagnostic Processor . . .
1.2.9
Network Interface . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.10 DSSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.11 SCSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3
H3602–AC CPU I/O Panel . . . . . .
1.4
Using Console Security . . . . . . . .
1.4.1
Securing the System . . . . . . . .
1.4.2
Privileged Users . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4.3
Unsecuring the System . . . . . .
1.4.4
The passwd Command . . . . . . .
1.4.5
The unpriv Command . . . . . . .
1.5
MS220 Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–1
1–6
1–7
1–8
1–8
1–8
1–9
1–9
1–10
1–10
1–11
1–11
1–12
1–12
1–16
1–16
1–17
1–17
1–18
1–18
1–19
iii
Chapter 2 KN220 Configuration
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.6.1
2.6.2
2.6.3
2.6.4
2.7
2.7.1
2.7.2
2.7.3
2.7.4
2.7.5
2.7.6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Module Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module and Bulkhead Order for KN220 Systems
Memory Module Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Q-Bus Module Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DSSI Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Node Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Unit Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DSSI Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DSSI Bus Termination and Length . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Configuration and Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding External Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Multiple Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Tabletop Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Internal Drive to Tabletop Drive . .
Assigning the Node ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Interface ID Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2–1
2–1
2–2
2–2
2–2
2–4
2–6
2–7
2–9
2–10
2–10
2–10
2–11
2–11
2–12
2–12
2–12
3.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2
KN220 Firmware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3
CVAX Halt Entry and Dispatch Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4
External Halts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5
Power-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.1
Power-Up Sequence: Operation Switch Set to Normal . . . .
3.5.2
Power-Up Sequence: Operation Switch Set to Maintenance
3.5.3
Operation Switch Set to Action: Loopback Tests . . . . . . . .
3.5.4
Operation Switch Set to Action: Language Query . . . . . . .
3.6
Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1
ULTRIX–32 Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1.1
ULTRIX–32 Bootstrap Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1.2
On Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.2
MDM Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.3
MDM Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–5
3–6
3–6
3–7
3–8
3–9
3–10
3–10
3–11
3–15
Chapter 3 KN220 Firmware
iv
3.7
Normal Mode Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7.1
Control Characters in Normal Mode . . . . .
3.7.2
Environment Variables in Normal Mode . .
3.8
Normal Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1
Conventions Used in This Section . . . . . . .
3.8.2
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.3
boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.4
continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.5
d (deposit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.6
dump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.7
e (examine) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.8
fill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.9
go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.10 help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.11 ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.12 init . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.13 printenv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.14 setenv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.15 test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.16 unsetenv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.17 x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9
Maintenance Mode Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.1
Command Syntax in Maintenance Mode . .
3.9.2
Address Specifiers in Maintenance Mode . .
3.9.3
Symbolic Addresses in Maintenance Mode .
3.9.4
Command Qualifiers in Maintenance Mode
3.9.5
Maintenance Mode Command Keywords . .
3.10 Maintenance Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.1 BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.2 CONFIGURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.3 CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.4 DC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.5 DEPOSIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.6 EXAMINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.7 EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.8 FIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3–16
3–16
3–17
3–18
3–20
3–20
3–21
3–23
3–24
3–25
3–27
3–28
3–29
3–30
3–31
3–32
3–33
3–34
3–35
3–36
3–37
3–38
3–39
3–39
3–40
3–42
3–44
3–47
3–47
3–48
3–50
3–51
3–53
3–54
3–56
3–57
v
3.10.9
3.10.10
3.10.11
3.10.12
3.10.13
3.10.14
3.10.15
3.10.16
3.10.17
3.10.18
3.10.19
3.10.20
3.10.21
3.10.22
HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEARCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UNJAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X—Binary Load and Unload
! (Comment) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3–58
3–59
3–61
3–63
3–65
3–67
3–68
3–70
3–73
3–77
3–78
3–79
3–80
3–82
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4–1
4–1
4–3
4–4
4–7
4–10
4–12
4–17
4–31
4–32
4–33
4–34
4–41
4–41
4–44
4–46
4–47
4–48
4–48
Chapter 4 KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4.1
4.1.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4
4.2.5
4.2.6
4.2.7
4.2.8
4.3
4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4
4.5
4.5.1
vi
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Troubleshooting Procedures . . .
KN220 ROM-Based Diagnostics . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Script Calling Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Displays and LEDs . . . . . . . . . .
System Halt Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VMB Error Messages (CVAX) . . . . . . . . .
Acceptance Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FE Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Isolating Memory Failures . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Memory Test . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Troubleshooting Suggestions .
Loopback Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DSSI Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.5.2
Ethernet Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5.3
Testing the Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.6
Module Self-Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7
RF-Series ISE Troubleshooting and Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.1
DRVTST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.2
DRVEXR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.3
HISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.4
ERASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5
PARAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.1
EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.2
HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.3
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.4
SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.5
STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5.6
WRITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.6
Diagnostic Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8
Memory Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.1
Test 30 - Bitmap Placing Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.2
Test 4F - Memory Data Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.3
Test 4E - Memory Byte Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.4
Test 4D - Memory Address Uniqueness Test . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.5
Test 4C - Memory ECC Logic, Verify Error Detection and
Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.6
Test 48 - Memory Address/Shorts Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.7
Test 47 - Memory Data Retention, Verify Refresh Logic . . .
4.8.8
Test 40 - Memory Count; Bad Pages Marked in Bitmap . .
4.8.9
Test 9A - Define Current Memory Configuration . . . . . . . .
4.9
SCSI Controller Chip Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.9.1
ASC Reset Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.9.2
ASC Register Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.9.3
ASC Interrupt Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.9.4
ASC FIFO Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.9.5
ASC DMA Counter Register Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–48
4–49
4–49
4–50
4–52
4–53
4–54
4–55
4–56
4–57
4–57
4–57
4–58
4–58
4–58
4–59
4–59
4–59
4–62
4–62
4–62
4–62
4–62
4–63
4–63
4–63
4–64
4–64
4–64
4–64
4–65
4–65
vii
Appendix A ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command
Summary
A.1 On-line ULTRIX Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.1
Communications Exerciser (Asynchronous Serial Lines)
A.1.2
Disk Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.3
File System Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.4
Line Printer Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.5
Memory Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.6
Magtape Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.7
TCP/IP Network Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2 uerf Error Log Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–4
A–5
A–5
A–6
A–8
..
..
..
B–1
B–3
B–6
Appendix B KN220 Address Assignments
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
B.6
Accessing Physical Locations (R3000) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R3000 Physical Address Space Map (M7637–AA) . . . . . . .
R3000 Physical I/O Address Space Map (M7638–AA) . . . .
KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Address Space Map
(M7638–AA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Processor Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Global Q22-Bus Memory Space Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . B–11
. . B–15
. . B–17
Appendix C Configuring the KFQSA
C.1
C.2
C.2.1
C.2.2
C.2.3
C.3
C.4
C.5
viii
KFQSA Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the KFQSA at Installation
Entering Maintenance Mode . . . . . .
Displaying Current Addresses . . . . .
Running the Configure Utility . . . . .
Programming the KFQSA . . . . . . . . . .
Reprogramming the KFQSA . . . . . . . .
Changing the ISE Unit Number . . . . .
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. C–1
. C–2
. C–4
. C–5
. C–6
. C–8
. C–13
. C–15
Appendix D Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D.1 Why Data Recovery Is Necessary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2 Using the dc Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.1
Determining If a Cache Contains Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.2
Saving the Cache Data to Tape with the dc/save Command
D.2.3
Restore Data From Tape with the dc/restore Command . . .
D.2.4
Clearing the Cache with the dc/zero Command . . . . . . . . .
D.3 Recover from Abnormal System Shutdowns . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.1
Recovering Data From a System That Can Reboot . . . . . .
D.3.2
Recovering Data From a System That Cannot Reboot . . . .
D.3.2.1
Bad I/O Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.2.2
Bad CPU Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.2.3
Bad Boot Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.2.4
Other Hardware Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.3
Power-up Screen and Test 79 with NVRAM Battery Off . .
D–1
D–1
D–3
D–3
D–4
D–4
D–4
D–5
D–5
D–6
D–6
D–7
D–8
D–8
Appendix E Field-Replaceable Units (FRUs)
Appendix F Related Documentation
Index
Examples
2–1
2–2
3–1
3–2
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
Changing a DSSI Node Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a DSSI Unit Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Selection Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Command Procedure to Boot on Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Script with Utility 9F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listing and Repeating Tests with Utility 9F, Help and Loop
on A0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Display (No Errors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Output with Errors: R3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Output with Errors: CVAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. 2–6
. 2–8
. 3–8
. 3–11
. 4–13
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4–14
4–17
4–19
4–20
ix
4–6
4–7
4–8
C–1
C–2
C–3
C–4
C–5
C–6
C–7
C–8
SHOW SCSI and SHOW SCSI/FULL . . . . .
FE Utility Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Isolating Bad Memory Using T 9C . . . . . . .
Entering Console Mode Display . . . . . . . . .
SHOW QBUS Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display for Programming the First KFQSA
SHOW QBUS Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SHOW DEVICE Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reprogramming the KFQSA Display . . . . .
Display for Changing Unit Number . . . . . .
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4–40
4–41
4–45
C–5
C–5
C–7
C–8
C–11
C–12
C–14
C–16
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. 1–2
. 1–3
. 1–5
. 1–14
. 4–24
. B–2
. C–3
H3602–AC Operation and Function Switch Settings
Conventional ISE and Tape Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISE DIP Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TLZ04 SCSI Address Node ID Number Settings . . .
RRD40 SCSI Address ID Number Settings . . . . . . .
SCSI Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KN220 Firmware Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actions Taken on a Halt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ULTRIX–32 Supported Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . .
VMB Boot Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported MDM Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal-Mode Control Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Figures
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
4–1
B–1
C–1
KN220 CPU Module (M7637–AA)
KN220 I/O Module (M7638–AA) .
KN220 Functional Block Diagram
H3602–AC CPU I/O Panel . . . . . .
KN220 I/O Module LEDs . . . . . . .
KN220 Virtual Memory Map . . . .
KFQSA Module Layout (M7769) .
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Tables
1–1
2–1
2–2
2–3
2–4
2–5
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–7
x
1–15
2–4
2–5
2–13
2–14
2–14
3–1
3–4
3–10
3–13
3–14
3–16
3–17
3–8
3–9
3–10
3–11
3–12
3–13
3–14
3–15
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
4–7
4–8
4–9
4–10
4–11
4–12
4–13
4–14
4–15
4–16
4–17
4–18
4–19
B–1
B–2
B–3
B–4
B–5
B–6
C–1
KN220 Normal Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Device Names (Normal Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KN220 Console Control Characters (Maintenance Mode) . . .
Console Symbolic Addresses (Maintenance Mode) . . . . . . . .
Symbolic Addresses Used in Any Address Space . . . . . . . . .
Console Command Qualifiers (Maintenance Mode) . . . . . . .
Command Keywords by Type (Maintenance Mode) . . . . . . .
Console Command Summary (Maintenance Mode) . . . . . . .
Scripts Available to Customer Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commonly Used Customer Services Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tests Run During Power-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Values Saved, Machine Check Exception During Executive
(CVAX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Values Saved, Exception During Executive (CVAX) . . . . . . .
LED Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KN220 Console Displays and FRUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Halt Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VMB Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Error Summary Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running a Memory Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Memory Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loopback Connectors for Q22-Bus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DRVTST Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DRVEXR Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HISTRY Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ERASE Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RF-Series ISE Diagnostic Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R3000 Physical Address Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R3000 Physical I/O Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Processor Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Q22-Bus Memory Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Q22-Bus I/O Space with BBS7 Asserted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KFQSA (M7769) Service Mode Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
3–18
3–21
3–38
3–40
3–42
3–43
3–44
3–44
4–9
4–10
4–18
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
4–22
4–22
4–23
4–25
4–31
4–32
4–33
4–43
4–46
4–47
4–50
4–52
4–53
4–54
4–56
4–59
B–3
B–6
B–11
B–15
B–17
B–17
C–4
xi
Preface
This maintenance guide describes the base system, configuration, ROMbased diagnostics, and troubleshooting procedures for systems containing
the KN220 CPU module and the KN220 I/O module.
Intended Audience
This guide is intended for use by Digital Customer Services personnel and
qualified self-maintenance customers.
Organization
This guide has four chapters and six appendixes, as follows:
Chapter 1 describes the KN220 base system.
Chapter 2 contains system configuration guidelines and provides a table
listing current, power, and bus loads for supported options. Chapter 2
also describes the Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI) and Small
Computer Storage Interface (SCSI) bus interface cabling between the
KN220 I/O module, the CPU I/O panel, the operator control panel (OCP),
and the integrated storage elements (ISEs).
Chapter 3 describes the KN220 diagnostic firmware, including normal mode
commands and maintenance mode commands.
Chapter 4 describes the KN220 diagnostics, including an error message and
FRU cross-reference table. Chapter 4 also describes diagnostics that reside
on the ISEs.
Appendix A describes the uerf commands.
Appendix B contains the address space maps for the KN220 CPU module
and the KN220 I/O module.
Appendix C explains how to configure the KFQSA storage adapter.
Appendix D describes the Prestoserve™ commands for dealing with data
in the NVRAM cache on the CPU board.
xiii
Appendix E lists the major field-replaceable units (FRUs) of the KN200
system.
Appendix F contains a list of related documentation.
Cautions, Notes, and Conventions
Cautions, differences, and notes appear throughout this guide. They have
the following meanings:
CAUTION
Provides information to prevent damage to equipment or software.
NOTE
Provides general information about the current topic.
Boldface
User input is indicated by commands in boldface type.
commands are lowercase, VMS commands are uppercase.
xiv
ULTRIX
Chapter 1
KN220 Base System
This chapter describes the KN220 base system, which consists of the KN220
CPU module, the KN220 I/O module, the MS220–AA memory modules, and
the H3602–AC I/O panel.
1.1 Base System Overview
The KN220 system is designed for applications that require highperformance processing. The KN220 system supports only the ULTRIX–
32 operating system (Version 4.0 and later). KN220 configurations include
the capability for server and multiuser support.
The KN220 systems are enclosed in the DECsystem 5500 Pedestal (BA430
enclosure).
The KN220 CPU module (M7637–AA) is a quad-height processor module.
The KN220 CPU operates at a 30 MHz clock rate and contains a reduced
instruction set computer (RISC) processor based on the R3000 MIPS
chipset. The RISC implementation is based on a CPU architecture that
uses a pipelined design, a simple instruction set, and write buffering.
The major components on the KN220 CPU module are shown in
Figure 1–1.
KN220 Base System
1–1
Figure 1–1: KN220 CPU Module (M7637–AA)
Manufacturing
Console
100-Pin
RIO Bus
LEDs
100-Pin Memory
J3
J2
J1
ECC
Data
MUX
0
Instr/
Data
Cache
Data
MUX
1
Data
MUX
2
Clock
Driver
Read/
Write
Buffer
FPU
CPU
ECC
Data
MUX
3
R3000
EPROM
TAG
RAM
R3000
EPROM
MLO-005170
1–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The KN220 I/O module (M7638–AA) is a quad-height module that contains
mass storage and network interfaces. These interfaces provide higher
performance than those available on the Q22-bus.
The major components on the KN220 I/O module are shown in Figure 1–2.
Figure 1–2: KN220 I/O Module (M7638–AA)
100-Pin
RIO Bus
LEDs
50-Pin SCSI
(Top)
50-Pin H3602
(Bottom)
SCSI
53C94
SSC
SGEC
CVAX
EPROM
CVAX
CQBIC
SII
DXX
50-Pin
DSSI
MLO-005172
The KN220 I/O module appears as the following asynchronous devices on
the KN220 CPU’s buffered RIO bus, which is a private I/O bus:
•
Master/slave devices:
—CVAX diagnostic processor
—CVAX Q22-bus interface chip (CQBIC)
KN220 Base System
1–3
—Second-generation Ethernet controller chip (SGEC)
•
—Slave-only devices:
Ethernet station address ROM
—VAX-compatible console port
—DSSI controller chip (SII)
—DSSI buffer memory
—SCSI controller chip (53C94)
—SCSI buffer memory
The mass storage interface controls up to seven devices on a Digital Storage
System Interconnect (DSSI) bus capable of a transfer rate of 4 Mbytes per
second. The Small Computer Storage Interface (SCSI) port has 128 Kbytes
of static RAM buffer space with a 32-bit data and address path to the CPU
module.
The mass storage interface also controls up to seven devices on a Small
Computer Storage Interface (SCSI) bus. The bus has a transfer rate of
4 Mbytes per second. The DSSI port has 128 Kbytes of static RAM buffer
space with a 32-bit data and address path to the CPU module. The network
interface is an Ethernet controller.
The KN220 CPU module, the KN220 I/O module, and the MS220–AA
memory module(s) combine to form a subsystem that contains an RIO bus
and a Q22-bus for communicating with mass storage and I/O devices.
The KN220 CPU module set and the MS220–AA modules mount in
standard Q22-bus backplane slots that implement the Q22-bus in the AB
rows and the CD interconnect in the CD rows.
Figure 1–3 shows a functional block diagram of the KN220 CPU module,
I/O module, and memory subsystem.
1–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Figure 1–3: KN220 Functional Block Diagram
Ethernet Port
RS-423 Console
ThinWire
H3602
Console MMU
Clock Battery
Switches/LEDs
DESTA
H3605
SCSI Panel
SCSI In Port
SCSI Out Port
Memory Data Bus
32-64MB Memory
32-64MB Memory
50-Pin
Connector
DSSI Bus
32-64MB Memory
SCSI Bus
50-Pin
Connector
50-Pin
Connector
50-Pin
Connector
32-64MB Memory
KN220 I/O Module
-
KN220 Base System
DSSI Support
Ethernet Support
Q22 Bus Interface
CVAX Diagnostic Processor
CVAX Console, T.O.Y and
Battery Backed RAM
- 128 KB ROM
- RIO to CVAX Pin Bus Interface
- SCSI Support
Backplane
100-Pin
Connector
C/D Backplane
Buffered RIO Control Bus
100-Pin
Connector
MP2 CPU Module
MIPS R3000 33.3-MHz CPU
MIPS R3010 Floating Point Unit
Read & Write Buffer
64KB I & D Caches
Memory Controller
Memory Interface
R3000 Console
256 KB ROM
32KB Non-Volatile RAM
100-Pin
Connector
Memory Address Bus and Control
C/D Backplane
Buffered Rio Data Bus
Q-bus
-
To VME Adapter
1–5
MLO-005173
1.2 KN220 Features
The major features of the KN220 CPU-I/O module set are as follows:
•
MIPS R3000-series RISC processor with a cycle time of 33 ns.
•
MIPS R3010 floating-point unit.
•
Enhanced read/write buffer for memory throughput.
•
64-Kbyte, 12-ns instruction cache.
•
64-Kbyte, 12-ns data cache.
•
DSSI mass storage interface.
•
SCSI (small computer system interface) mass storage interface.
•
Ethernet interface that supports DMA.
•
Main memory controller that supports up to 256 Mbytes of error
correction code (ECC) memory. The ECC memory resides on one to four
MS220–AA memory modules, depending on the system configuration.
•
Console port featuring switch-selected baud rates.
•
Console port for testing the CPU module as a standalone unit.
•
RIO bus interface that supports DMA transfers from devices on the I/O
module.
•
System security and features.
•
Q22-bus interface that supports up to 16-word, block mode transfers
between a Q22-bus DMA device and main memory, and block mode
transfers of up to 2 words between the CPU and Q22-bus devices. This
Q22-bus interface contains:
–
16-entry map cache for the 8192 entry, scatter-gather map that
resides in main memory. This map translates 22-bit, Q22-bus
addresses into 26-bit main memory addresses.
–
Interrupt arbitration logic that recognizes Q22-bus interrupt
requests BR7 through BR4.
–
240-ohm, Q22-bus termination.
•
CVAX diagnostic processor.
•
Two 128-Kbyte EPROMs (R3000).
•
128-Kbyte EPROM (CVAX).
1–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
•
512-Kbyte nonvolatile memory (NVRAM)
1.2.1 R3000 RISC Processor
The R3000 RISC processor plus its associated R3010 floating-point unit
combine to form the KN220 central processor.
The R3000 chip resides on the KN220 CPU module (Figure 1–1) and
implements two tightly coupled processors in a single VLSI chip. One
processor is the 32-bit CPU and the other is the system control processor
(CP0). The combined CPU/CP0 processors provide the following features:
•
32-bit operation. The R3000 contains thirty-two 32-bit registers that
use 32-bit addressing.
•
Pipelined design. The five-stage pipeline is capable of executing one
instruction per 33-ns cycle.
•
On-chip cache control. Separate instruction and data caches of 64
Kbytes each. Each cache can be accessed in a single CPU cycle.
•
On-chip memory management. The 4-Gbyte virtual address space is
mapped with a 64-entry, fully associative translation lookaside buffer
(TLB).
•
Coprocessor interface. A tightly coupled coprocessor interface for up to
four coprocessors. CP0 is located on the CPU chip. CP1 is the floatingpoint accelerator. CP2 and CP3 are not used.
•
Single read/write buffer. All CPU reads and writes pass through this
write buffer.
DIFFERENCES: For the KN220-based system, the terminology for
various words is as follows:
•
R3000: a halfword consists of 16 bits, and a word consists of 32
bits.
•
CVAX: a word consists of 16 bits, and a longword consists of 32 bits.
For similar systems, the terminology is the same as for the CVAX listed
above: a word consists of 16 bits, and a longword consists of 32 bits.
The KN220 floating-point accelerator resides on the KN220 CPU
module and is implemented by a single VLSI chip called the R3010.
KN220 Base System
1–7
1.2.2 Cache Memory
To maximize CPU performance, the KN220 CPU module contains a 64Kbyte instruction cache and a 64-Kbyte data cache. Both caches have the
same organization and are direct mapped, with a block size of one word
(four bytes). The fill size is either one word (4 bytes) or four words (16
bytes).
1.2.3 Main Memory System
The KN220 CPU module contains a main memory controller with state
machine and memory control signals.
The maximum amount of main memory supported by KN220 systems is
256 Mbytes. This memory resides on from one to four MS220–AA memory
modules, depending on the system configuration. The MS220 modules
communicate with the KN220 through the MS220 memory interconnect,
which uses the CD interconnect for the address and control lines and a
100-pin ribbon cable for the data lines.
The main memory controller supports the following:
•
Synchronous or asynchronous, 32-bit word read and write references
•
Synchronous 4-word read references generated by R3000 cache
references that miss the cache
•
Longword, quadword, hexword, or octaword asynchronous reads
generated by the CVAX or any DMA device on the RIO bus
•
Masked or unmasked write references (synchronous or asynchronous)
generated by the DMA devices or write buffer, as well as synchronous
pagemode unmasked writes
1.2.4 Console Serial Line
The KN220 contains two console lines: one is located on the I/O module
and one on the CPU module.
The console serial line on the KN220 I/O module is the standard VAX
console implemented through the System Support Chip (SSC) and the
H3602–AC CPU I/O panel.
The console serial line on the KN220 CPU module can be programmed to
provide a full-duplex, RS–423 EIA serial line interface, which is also RS–
232C compatible. This console serial line is implemented through the 2681
DUART chip. The port is available only during manufacturing; one channel
of the DUART chip is available through an 8-pin MMJ connector mounted
on the CPU module (not available in the field).
1–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1.2.5 Time-of-Year Clock and Timers
The KN220 I/O module contains the time-of-year clock (TODR), two
additional programmable timers, and a 100-Hz interval timer that serves
as the R3000 interval clock.
1.2.6 Boot and Diagnostic Facility
The KN220 CPU boot and diagnostic facility is contained on both the I/O
and CPU modules.
The KN220 CPU module contains firmware that consists of two EPROMs,
each 64-Kbytes by 16 bits. Another 64-Kbyte EPROM resides on the KN220
I/O module. Both the CVAX and the R3000 CPU have access to all three
EPROMs. The CPU module ROM address space extends from 1FC00000 to
1FC3FFFF in the R3000 memory map (2FC00000 to 2FC3FFFF in CVAX
space).
The KN220 CPU module also contains 512 Kbytes of battery backed-up
NVRAM, for use as a console scratchpad and NFS buffer. This array is not
protected by parity; bus parity is neither checked nor generated on reads
or writes.
NOTE: The NVRAM battery jumper, in the upper rear corner of the CPU
board as it is seated in the enclosure, must be set in the On position (1).
The KN220 firmware gains control when the processor halts and contains
programs that provide the following services:
•
Module initialization
•
Power-up self-testing of the KN220 and MS220 modules
•
R3000 console program
•
Emulation of a subset of the VAX standard console, which contains
manual bootstrap and a simple command language for examining or
altering the state of the processor
•
Booting from supported Q22-bus devices, SCSI, Ethernet, and DSSI
•
Multilingual capability
The KN220 firmware is described in detail in Chapter 3.
KN220 Base System
1–9
1.2.7 Q22-Bus Interface
The KN220 I/O module contains a Q22-bus interface, which is implemented
by a single VLSI chip called the CQBIC (Figure 1–2). The CQBIC contains
an interface between the CDAL bus and the Q22-bus and supports the
following:
•
A programmable mapping function (scatter-gather map) for translating
22-bit, Q22-bus addresses into 26-bit main memory addresses. This
mapping function allows any page in the Q22-bus memory space to be
mapped to any page in main memory.
•
A direct mapping function for translating 26-bit main memory
addresses into 22-bit, Q22-bus addresses.
These main memory
addresses are located in the local Q22-bus address space and the local
Q22-bus I/O page.
•
Masked and unmasked longword reads and writes from the CPU to the
Q22-bus memory and I/O space and the Q22-bus interface registers.
–
Longword reads and writes of the local Q22-bus memory space
are buffered and translated into two-word (16 bits), block mode
transfers.
–
Longword reads and writes of the local Q22-bus I/O space are
buffered and translated into two single-word transfers.
•
Block-mode writes of up to 16 words from the Q22-bus to main memory.
•
Transfers from the CPU to local Q22-bus memory space. The Q22-bus
map translates the address back into main memory (local-miss, globalhit transactions).
1.2.8 CVAX Diagnostic Processor
The KN220 CPU diagnostic processor is located on the KN220 I/O module.
The diagnostic processor is implemented by a single VLSI chip called the
CVAX. The KN220 processor is used for the following:
•
Power-up diagnostics
•
Extended self-tests and scripts
•
Booting and running MDM diagnostics
The CVAX supports the MicroVAX chip subset (plus six additional string
instructions) of the VAX instruction set, data types, and full VAX memory
management. The processor state is composed of 16 general purpose
registers (GPRs), the processor status longword (PSL), and internal
processor registers (IPRs).
1–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The KN220 CPU diagnostic processor is capable of detecting the following
types of error conditions during program execution:
•
CDAL bus parity errors. MSER<6> (on a read) is set.
•
Q22-bus NXM errors. DSER<7> is set.
•
Q22-bus NO SACK errors. No indicator.
•
Q22-bus NO GRANT errors. DSER<2> is set.
•
Q22-bus device parity errors. DSER<5> is set.
•
CDAL-bus timeout errors. DSER<4> (on DMA) is set.
•
Main memory NXM errors. DSER<0> (on DMA) is set.
•
Main memory correctable errors.
•
Main memory uncorrectable errors. DSER<4> (on DMA) is set.
1.2.9 Network Interface
The KN220 I/O module contains a network interface implemented through
the Ethernet controller and serial interface adapter chips. The H3602–AC
CPU I/O panel interface allows you to connect the KN220 I/O module to
either a ThinWire or standard Ethernet cable.
The second-generation Ethernet chip (SGEC) connects to the CP bus and
the system through command and status registers (CSRs) and a system
communication area in main memory. For data transfer, the SGEC contains
a DMA controller that supports physical memory addresses.
The hardware address of the KN220 I/O module is determined during
manufacture and is stored in the network interface station address (SAR)
ROM.
1.2.10 DSSI Interface
The KN220 I/O module contains an SII chip and four 32K by 8-bit static
RAMs that implement the Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI) bus
interface. The DSSI interface allows the KN220 to transmit packets of
data to, and receive packets of data from, up to seven RF-series integrated
storage elements (ISEs). The DSSI bus improves system performance for
two reasons:
•
It is faster than the Q22-bus.
•
It relieves the Q22-bus of disk traffic, thereby allowing more bandwidth
for Q22-bus devices.
KN220 Base System
1–11
The physical characteristics of the DSSI bus are as follows:
•
4 Mbytes/second maximum bandwidth
•
Distributed arbitration
•
Synchronous operation
•
Parity checking
•
Six-meter total bus length (includes internal and external cabling)
•
Maximum of eight nodes (KN220 I/O module counts as one)
•
Eight data lines
•
One parity line
•
Eight control lines
See the following sections for more information about the DSSI bus and
RF-series ISEs:
Section
Section
Section
Section
2.6
3.10.16
4.3
4.7
Setting and changing DSSI node names, addresses, and unit numbers
Console SET HOST command
DSSI ISE acceptance testing
RF-series resident diagnostics and local programs
1.2.11 SCSI Interface
The KN220 I/O module also contains a small computer storage interface
(SCSI) bus that is implemented through the 53C94 chip and four 32K by
8-bit static RAMs.
The SCSI interface allows the KN220 I/O module to transmit packets of
data to, and receive packets of data from, external SCSI devices. See
Section 2.7 for more information.
1.3 H3602–AC CPU I/O Panel
The H3602–AC CPU I/O panel, shown in Figure 1–4, contains the following
components:
•
An operation switch
•
A function switch
•
Seven-segment LED for diagnostics
•
A console serial line connector
•
A console baud rate select switch
1–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
•
A 15-conductor connector for standard Ethernet cable
•
A BNC connector plug for a ThinWire Ethernet coaxial cable
•
An Ethernet connector select switch
•
Two LEDs that indicate the selected Ethernet connector (ThinWire or
standard)
•
One LED that indicates valid +12 Vdc for the selected Ethernet
connector
The H3602–AC switches are read by the firmware when the processor
starts. For this reason, if you change the baud rate on the H3602–AC,
the new baud rate does not take effect until you power up or reset the
system.
The hex LED display shows the individual test numbers during the powerup self-tests and bootstrap. Codes for the LED display are listed in Chapter
4, Table 4–6.
You connect the KN220 I/O module to the H3602–AC module cover through
a ribbon cable and to the H3605 module cover through a ribbon cable. The
H3602–AC connects to the bottom of the double-stack connector on the I/O
module, and the H3605 connects to the top connector of the double stack
on the I/O module.
KN220 Base System
1–13
Figure 1–4: H3602–AC CPU I/O Panel
MS220-BA
Memory Modules
KN220
KN220
CPU Module I/O Module
H3602
CPU Module
H3605
SCSI Panel
CPU/Memory
Cable
RIO
Cable
MLO-005372
1–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
DIFFERENCES FROM KN210 SYSTEMS: The KN220 System has an
interface module, M9715–AA, in slot 0, next to the power supply. KN210
systems had no M9715–AA module.
For the KN220 system, use the switch settings that appear in Table 1–1.
The operation switch (three-position rotary) and the function switch (twoposition slider) are described in Table 1–1. See Chapter 3 for a detailed
description of power-up procedures and console commands.
Table 1–1: H3602–AC Operation and Function Switch Settings
Operation
Switch
Position
Function
Switch
Position
Action mode
Normal mode
Maintenance mode
Action
Test. The console serial line external loopback test
is executed at the completion of the power-up selftests. Use the H3103 MMJ loopback (12–25083–01).
See Section 1.4 for a description of security features.
Query. The user is prompted for the language.
Power-up self-tests are run.
Power-up self-tests run and, if successful, console
enters normal mode (>>).
If the bootmode environment variable is set to
a, the R3000 processor attempts to locate a
booting device specified through the bootpath
environmental variable.
If the bootmode environment variable is set to d,
the R3000 processor enters normal mode without
running any diagnostics, and prompts the user for
commands.
Breaks enabled.
Breaks disabled.
Power-up self-tests run and console enters maintenance mode (>>>).
Breaks enabled.
Breaks disabled.
DIFFERENCES: The KN220 system has no autoboot capability when the
operation switch is set to the maintenance position. See Chapter 3,
Section 3.6.1.1, for information on the ULTRIX–32 bootstrap procedure.
Similar systems do have the autoboot capability when the operation switch
is set to the maintenance position.
KN220 Base System
1–15
1.4 Using Console Security
DECsystem 5500 systems have a console security feature as part of the
console firmware. The security feature allows you to secure the system.
When the system is secure, unprivileged users (users who do not know
the security password) are limited to just the boot command (with no
arguments). Privileged users, knowing the security password, have access
to all console commands.
1.4.1 Securing the System
To secure the system, use the passwd command as follows:
NOTE: If unprivileged users are to be allowed to boot the system, the system
manager should assign values to the bootpath and bootmode variables before
securing the system. Once the system is secure, unprivileged users cannot
issue the boot command with arguments or set the boot mode/boot path
environment variables.
1. At the console prompt (>>), enter the set password command,
passwd -s.
2. At the ‘‘New password:’’ prompt, enter a password of 8–32 characters.
You must retype the password for verification.
3. After the password has been accepted, enter the command
passwd -u
which causes the console module to display the unprivileged console
prompt (s>). Unprivileged users are limited to the boot command with
no arguments.
The following example shows how to secure the system.
>> passwd -s
New password:
Retype new password:
New password accepted
>> passwd -u
Memory Size: 16777216 (0x1000000) bytes
Ethernet Address: 08-00-2b-12-81-22
S>
4. To maintain security, the Operation switch must remain set to Normal
mode (indicated by the arrow) and the lower front door should be locked.
1–16 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1.4.2 Privileged Users
By entering the security password, privileged users have access to all the
console commands. In the example below, the passwd command is used to
access the privileged console prompt (>>).
s> passwd
Password:
Password accepted.
Memory Size: 16777216 (0x1000000) bytes
Ethernet Address: 08-00-2b-12-81-22
>>
For a complete description of the passwd command, refer to Section 1.4.4.
1.4.3 Unsecuring the System
Privileged users can remove the security restrictions by using the clear
password command, passwd -c at the console prompt (>>). For example,
>> passwd -c
>>
removes all security restrictions from the console firmware. The system is
now unsecure.
If you forget the security password, you must use the following procedure
to clear the password.
1. Set the Operation switch to the Maintenance mode setting (indicated
by a T inside a circle).
2. Press the Restart button on the System Control Panel (SCP).
3. After the system completes self-tests, enter the maintenance command
unpriv at the Maintenance mode prompt (>>>).
4. Reset the Operation switch to the Normal mode setting (indicated by
and arrow).
5. Press the Restart button and wait for self-test to complete. You can
now enter a new security password.
For a complete description of the passwd and unpriv commands, see
Section 1.4.4 and Section 1.4.5.
KN220 Base System
1–17
1.4.4 The passwd Command
passwd [-(s | c | u])
The four variants of this command are used to control the console security
feature. Using the console security feature, you can secure the system and
limit unprivileged users (users who do not know the security password) to
just the boot console command.
The use of the passwd command with flags is restricted to privileged mode
(>>), while the use of passwd without flags is restricted to unprivileged
mode (s>).
passwd —This command enables the console user to enter the security
password to become privileged.
passwd s —This command is used to set a new security password. The
security password can be from 8 to 32 characters long. This variant is
available only in privileged mode (>>).
passwd c —This command removes security restrictions by clearing
the security password.
passwd u —This command causes the console user to be unprivileged.
The unprivileged console prompt (s>) is displayed.
1.4.5 The unpriv Command
unpriv
This Maintenance mode command clears the security password by setting
it to zero. This command is used to unsecure or disable the console security
feature if you forget the security password. To enter Maintenance mode, set
the Operation switch to Maintenance mode (indicated by a T inside a circle).
Press the Restart button on the SCP. After clearing the password, you must
reset the Operation switch to Normal mode (indicated by an arrow) and
press the Restart button again.
1–18 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1.5 MS220 Memory
The MS220–AA (M7639–AA) is a 32-Mbyte memory module that provides
memory for the KN220 system. The MS220–AA is a pseudo-intelligent
memory array module.
The quad-height MS220–AA has a 100-ns, 78 bit-wide array (64-bit data
and 14-bit ECC), implemented with 1-Mbit dynamic RAMs in dual in-line
packages (SOIC).
The KN220 CPU module and up to four MS220–AA memory modules (128
Mbytes maximum) communicate through the MS220 memory interconnect.
This interconnect uses the CD backplane interconnect for address and
control signals and a 100-pin ribbon cable for data signals.
Ordering Information
MS220–AA
32-Mbyte module only (M7639–AA).
Diagnostic Support
MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor
Self-test
Release 133 (Version V4.4)
KN220 self-test
KN220 Base System
1–19
Chapter 2
KN220 Configuration
2.1 Introduction
This chapter provides guidelines for changing the configuration of a KN220
system.
Before you change the system configuration, you must consider the
following factors:
Module order in the backplane
Module configuration
Mass storage device configuration
If you are adding a device to a system, you must know the capacity of the
system enclosure in the following areas:
Backplane
I/O panel
Power supply
Mass storage devices
2.2 General Module Order
The order of modules in the backplane depends on four factors:
•
Relative use of devices in the system
•
Expected performance of each device relative to other devices
•
The ability of a device to tolerate delays between bus requests and bus
grants (called delay tolerance or interrupt latency)
•
The tendency of a device to prevent other devices farther from the CPU
from accessing the bus
KN220 Configuration
2–1
2.3 Module and Bulkhead Order for KN220 Systems
Observe the following rules about module order:
•
Interface module (M9715) in slot 0.
•
KN220 I/O module (M7638–AA) in slot 1.
•
KN220 CPU module (M7637–AA) in slot 2.
•
MS220–AA (M7639–AA) memory module in slot 3.
Install any
additional MS220–AA memory modules in slots 4, 5, and 6.
•
Do not install dual-height modules in the CD rows.
Observe the following rules about bulkhead order:
•
H3605 (70–27464–01), single-width bulkhead with two connector ports,
is installed over slot 1 and connected to the I/O module in slot 1.
•
H3602–AC (70–25775–03), double-width bulkhead, is installed over
slots 2 and 3 and covers the CPU and the first memory module.
2.4 Memory Module Configuration
Memories have no registers in which the memory capacities can be
configured. You need to run T 9A after installation of the memory if you
want to view the board-specific memory configuration. (See Section 4.8.9.)
Test 9A allows you to enter the capacity of each individual memory module.
The specifications you enter in T 9A stay in NVRAM as long as battery
power is applied, or until you run T 9A and enter changes. See Section 4.3.
2.5 Q-Bus Module Configuration
The Q-bus passes through the backplane in a BA400-series enclosure.
Each Q-bus module in a system must use a unique device address and
interrupt vector. The device address is also known as the control and status
register (CSR) address. Most modules have switches or jumpers for setting
the CSR address; most interrupt vector values are set by software. The
value of a floating address depends on what other modules are housed in
the system.
Set CSR addresses and interrupt vectors for a module as follows:
1. Determine the correct values for the module with the CONFIGURE
command at the maintenance mode prompt (>>>). Type CONFIGURE,
then HELP for the list of supported devices.
2–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
NOTE: Some of the devices listed in the HELP display are not supported
by the KN220 CPU module set.
See the description of the CONFIGURE and HELP commands in
Section 3.10.2 of how to obtain the correct CSR addresses and interrupt
vectors, and Section 3.10.10 for a description of the help screen .
The LPV11–SA, which is the LPV11 version compatible with the BA400series enclosures, has two sets of CSR address and interrupt vectors.
To determine the correct values for an LPV11–SA, enter LPV11,2 at the
Device, Number? prompt for one LPV11–SA, or enter LPV11,4 for two
LPV11–SA modules.
2. See Appendix C for instructions on how to configure the KFQSA storage
adapter. Appendix C explains how to do the following:
•
Set a four-position switchpack on the KFQSA
•
Program the CSR addresses for all the system’s DSSI devices into
the EEROM on the KFQSA
•
Reprogram the EEROM when you add DSSI devices
3. See Microsystems Options for switch and CSR and interrupt vector
jumper settings for supported options.
KN220 Configuration
2–3
2.6 DSSI Configuration
This section concerns the internal RF-series storage devices linked to the
host CPU by means of the Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI). To
link external RF-series storage devices to the host CPU by means of the
KFQSA module, see Appendix C.
Whether internal or external to the host system, each storage device on a
DSSI storage bus must have a unique DSSI node ID. The RF-series (ISE)
receives its node ID from a plug on the operator control panel (OCP) on the
front panel of each separate ISE. By convention, ISEs are mounted in the
BA430 enclosure from right to left, as listed in Table 2–1.
Table 2–1: Conventional ISE and Tape Slots
Device
Position
Node ID1
TK70 is in rightmost slot
First ISE
Second ISE
Third ISE
–
Right side
Center
Left side
0
1
2
1 KN220
node ID = 7
If the cable between the ISE and the OCP is disconnected, the ISE reads
the node ID from three DIP switches on its electronic controller module
(ECM).
NOTE: Pressing the system reset button on the front of the power supply
has no effect on the ISEs. You must perform a power cycle.
The node ID switches are located behind the 50-pin connector on the ECM.
Switch 1 (the MSB) is nearest to the connector. Switch 3 (the LSB) is
farthest from the connector. Refer to the RF71 section in Microsystems
Options for an illustration and further information. Table 2–2 lists the
switch settings for the eight possible node addresses.
NOTE: The node ID plugs on the control panel of each ISE override the ISE
DIP switches. It is good practice, however, to set the DIP switches to equal
the node ID plugs.
2–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 2–2: ISE DIP Switch Settings
Node ID
S1
S2
S3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Up
Up
Up
Down
Down
Up
Up
Down
Down
Up
Up
Down
Up
Down
Up
Down
Up
Down
Up
KN220 Configuration
2–5
The maintenance mode SET HOST/DUP command creates ISE device
names according to the following scheme:
nodename $ DIA unit number. For example, KATH$DIA3
You can use the device name for booting MDM, as follows:
>>> BOOT KATH$DIA3
You can access local programs in the ISE through the MicroVAX Diagnostic
Monitor (MDM) or through the maintenance mode SET HOST/DUP
command. This command creates a virtual connection to the storage
device and the designated local program, using the Diagnostic and Utilities
Protocol (DUP) standard dialog. Section 3.10.16 describes the SET HOST
/DUP command.
2.6.1 Changing the Node Name
Each ISE has a node name that is maintained in the EEPROM on the
controller module. This node name is determined in manufacturing from
an algorithm based on the drive serial number. You can change the node
name of the ISE to something more meaningful by following the procedure
in Example 2–1. In the example, the node name for the RF71 ISE at DSSI
node address 1 is changed from R3YBNE to DATADISK.
See Section 4.7.5 for further information about the PARAMS local program.
Example 2–1: Changing a DSSI Node Name
>>> SHOW DSSI
DSSI Node 0 (MDC)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (R3YBNE)
!The node name for this drive will be
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71)
!changed from R3YBNE to DATADISK.
DSSI Node 7 (*)
>>>
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 1 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
Copyright 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SHOW NODENAME
Parameter
Current
--------- ---------------NODENAME
R3YBNE
Default
---------------RF71
Example 2–1 Cont’d on next page
2–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Type
-------String
Radix
----Ascii
B
Example 2–1 (Cont.): Changing a DSSI Node Name
PARAMS> SET NODENAME DATADISK
PARAMS> WRITE
!This command writes the change
!to EEPROM.
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] y
Stopping DUP server...
>>> SHOW DSSI
DSSI Node 0 (MDC)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (DATADISK)
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71)
!The node name has changed from
!R3YBNE to DATADISK.
DSSI Node 7 (*)
2.6.2 Changing the Unit Number
By default, the ISE’s unit number is the same value as the DSSI node
address for that drive. This occurs whether the DSSI node address is
determined from the bus ID plugs or from the three DIP switches on the
ISE controller module.
ISEs conform to the Digital Storage Architecture (DSA). Each drive can be
assigned a unit number from 0 to 16,383 (decimal). The unit number need
not be the same as the DSSI node address.
Example 2–2 shows how to change the unit number of an ISE. This example
changes the unit number for the RF71 at DSSI node address 1 from 1 to 14
(decimal). You must change two parameters: UNITNUM and FORCEUNI.
Changing these parameters overrides the default, which assigns the unit
number the same value as the node address.
See Section 4.7.5 for further information about the PARAMS local program.
KN220 Configuration
2–7
Example 2–2: Changing a DSSI Unit Number
>>> SHOW DSSI
DSSI Node 0 (MDC)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (R3QJNE)
!The unit number for this drive will be
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71) !changed from 1 to 14
DSSI Node 7 (*)
>>>
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 1
Starting DUP server...
Copyright 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
DRVEXR V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
DRVTST V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
HISTRY V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
ERASE V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
PARAMS V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
DIRECT V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989 15:33:06
End of directory
Task Name? PARAMS
Copyright 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SHOW UNITNUM
Parameter
Current
--------- ---------------UNITNUM
1
Default
---------------1
Type
-------Word
Radix
----Dec
U
Default
---------------1
Type
-------Boolean
Radix
----0/1
U
PARAMS> SHOW FORCEUNI
Parameter
Current
--------- ---------------FORCEUNI
1
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 14
PARAMS> SET FORCEUNI 0
PARAMS> WRITE
!This command writes the changes
!to the EEPROM.
PARAMS> EX
Exiting...
Task Name?
Example 2–2 Cont’d on next page
2–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example 2–2 (Cont.): Changing a DSSI Unit Number
Stopping DUP server...
>>>
>>> SHOW DSSI
DSSI Node 0 (MDC)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (R3QJNE)
-rf(1,14,*) (RF71)
!The unit number has changed
!and the node ID remains at 1.
DSSI Node 7 (*)
2.6.3 DSSI Cabling
Each ISE has a connector that connects to the backplane. The ISEs are
connected to the internal DSSI bus by means of the backplane.
A 10-conductor cable connects each ISE to the OCP on its front panel.
A 50-conductor round cable is routed from the external DSSI connector,
lower left of the front of the unit, to the backplane.
KN220 Configuration
2–9
2.6.4 DSSI Bus Termination and Length
The DSSI bus has a maximum length of 6 m (19.8 ft), including internal
and external cabling. The DSSI bus must be terminated at both ends. The
KN220 I/O module terminates the DSSI bus at one end. A terminator on
the left side of the media faceplate terminates the bus at the other end.
This terminator can be removed if you need to expand the bus.
2.7 SCSI Configuration and Cabling
This subsection describes the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
device configuration and SCSI bus cabling in a DECsystem 5500 system.
CAUTION: If you have a TLZ04-GA, it is supplied with two cables. One
cable is the BCO6P-06, which is a 1.83-m (6-foot) cable and should be used.
The other cable is shorter in length and should not be used.
2.7.1 Adding External Devices
CAUTION: Before you proceed with step one below read the following list of
general configuration rules.
1. All external SCSI cables used with the DECsystem 5500 must be BC06P
cables.
2. A maximum of two BC06P cables may be used in any one bus. BC06P
cables are available in lengths of .76 m (2.5 ft), 1.83 m (6 ft), and 2.74
m (9 ft).
•
An exception: If a 2.74-m (9-foot) BC06P cable is used in the system,
only one cable is allowed.
•
The .76 m (2.5 ft) cable that is used to connect the adapter to the
storage shelf in the Q-bus-based BA430 enclosure is an external
cable that must be counted in calculating the maximum length.
3. There are no restrictions on the number of devices or the type of devices
under these rules as long as the devices are within the standard limits
of the SCSI bus. For example, only seven devices maximum per bus
are allowed.
4. Care must be taken not to exceed the industry standard maximum bus
length of 6 meters. If the above steps are followed, there should be no
problem. The BA430 enclosure’s internal SCSI bus length is 1.2 m (47
in).
5. If there are tabletop drives connected to the DECsystem 5500, the
internal cable length must be taken into account.
2–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
6. To connect the BA430 external drive to the SCSI bus, attach the 1.83
m (6 ft) SCSI cable (17–02659–02) to the bottom connector of the CPU
module. Connect the terminator (12–30552–01) to the top connector.
Pull the bail latches toward the cable and terminator to hold them in
place.
7. Connect the other end of the 1.83-m (6-foot) SCSI cable to the top
connector of the tabletop drive.
8. Connect the terminator to the lower connector of the drive.
NOTE: The two following steps are for internal drives only.
9. To connect the BA430 internal drive to the SCSI bus, attach the .76
m (2.5 ft) SCSI cable (17–02659–03) to the top connector of the CPU
module. Connect the terminator (12–30552–01) to the lower connector.
Pull the bail latches toward the cable and terminator to hold them in
place.
10. Connect the other end of the .76 m (2.5 ft) SCSI cable to the
connector. (When connecting more than one drive refer to Chapter 6
for information on connecting multiple drives.)
2.7.2 Connecting Multiple Drives
Multiple drives are connected to the CPU module by a daisy-chain cabling
configuration. TLZ04, RZ5x, or RRD40 drives may be daisy chained in any
order. Each drive then must be assigned a unique node ID number. (See
Section 6.3.)
Because the embedded drive has no power supply, it is physically smaller
than the tabletop model, which does have a power supply.
2.7.3 Connecting Tabletop Drives
Connection of the tabletop drives proceeds as follows:
1. Remove the terminator from the lower connector of the first drive and
replace it with 1.83 m (6 ft) SCSI cable.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to the top connector of the next drive.
3. Connect the SCSI terminator to the bottom connector. (The SCSI
bus can accommodate up to three drives, with the last drive being
terminated on the bottom connector.)
KN220 Configuration
2–11
2.7.4 Connecting Internal Drive to Tabletop Drive
Because the internal drive is embedded in the system, the cable connections
for additional drives begin at the CPU module. All additional drives must
be tabletop models.
1. Remove the terminator from the bottom connector of the CPU module
and replace it with a 1.83-m (6-foot) SCSI cable.
2. Connect the other end of the cable into the top connector of the next
drive.
3. Connect the terminator to the bottom connector. (The CPU module can
accommodate up to three drives, with the last terminated on the bottom
connector.)
2.7.5 Assigning the Node ID
You must assign to each drive and to the CPU module a unique SCSI node
ID.
NOTE: The higher the node ID address number selected, the higher the bus
priority.
2.7.6 SCSI Interface ID Switches
Before proceeding, locate the SCSI switches on the back of your drive. The
four numbered DIP switches set the SCSI address ID number that the drive
will respond to in the system. The drive must be given a SCSI address ID
number by setting the switch. See Tables 2–3 and 2–4.
1. Power down all drives before assigning a SCSI ID number.
2. Determine the SCSI address ID number that your drive will be
assigned. The address ID number can be any number from 0 to 7.
The default ID for the CPU module is 7.
3. Set the switches to the correct address ID number. (The TLZ04 and
RRD40 drive switches are marked differently.)
4. After you complete the drive switch settings, use MDM to test your
SCSI bus interconnects.
CAUTION: Use a ballpoint pen or pointed object to set the switches. Never
use a pencil to set the switches. The graphite used in pencils can damage
the switches.
2–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 2–3: TLZ04 SCSI Address Node ID Number Settings
ID
Switch Settings
No.
SW4
SW2
SW1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
3
0
1
1
4
1
0
0
5
1
0
1
6
1
1
0
7
1
1
1
Key to switch settings
1 = down
0 = up
Switch P is not used
KN220 Configuration
2–13
Table 2–4: RRD40 SCSI Address ID Number Settings
ID
Switch Settings
No.
1
2
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
0
3
0
1
1
0
4
1
0
0
0
5
1
0
1
0
6
1
1
0
0
7
1
1
1
0
Key to Switch Settings
1 = ON = UP
0 = OFF = DOWN
Switch 4 must be set to 0
Table 2–5 describes the SCSI cables.
Table 2–5: SCSI Cables
Cable Description
Order
Number
2.74-m (9-foot) SCSI 50-pin cable
17–02659–01
1.83-m (6-foot) SCSI 50-pin cable
17–02659–02
.76-m (2.5-foot) SCSI 50-pin cable
17–02659–03
.31-m (12-inch) 50-pin ribbon cable
70–22834–03
.53-m (21-inch) 50-pin ribbon cable
70–22834–02
.92-m (36-inch) 50-pin ribbon cable
70–22834–01
SCSI terminator
12–30552–01
2–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Chapter 3
KN220 Firmware
3.1 Introduction
This chapter describes the KN220 firmware.
The KN220 CPU-I/O module set contains a maximum of 384 Kbytes of
EPROM for the firmware. This firmware is located as follows:
•
R3000: two 128-Kbyte EPROMs on the KN220 CPU module (256
Kbytes)
•
CVAX: one 128-Kbyte EPROM on the KN220 I/O module
The EPROMs are arranged as 32-bit words and are located at the following
R3000 and CVAX restart locations:
•
R3000: physical address 1FC00000
•
CVAX: physical address 20040000
NOTE: In the KN220 system, the firmware resides in three EPROMs: two
for R3000 and one for CVAX.
The CVAX and R3000 firmware contain the major functional blocks of code
listed in Table 3–1.
Table 3–1: KN220 Firmware Code
CVAX Firmware Code
R3000 Firmware Code
Halt entry, dispatch, and exit
Primary and secondary bootstrap
(MDM)
Console program
(maintenance mode commands)
System restart
ROM-based diagnostics
Primary and secondary bootstrap (ULTRIX–32)
Console program
(normal mode commands)
ROM-based diagnostics
KN220 Firmware
3–1
The firmware uses the KN220 IO module LEDs and the console terminal
to communicate diagnostic progress, display error conditions, and indicate
the current mode of operation.
This chapter discusses the following:
•
CVAX halt procedures
•
Power-up procedures
•
Bootstrap procedures for ULTRIX–32 and MDM
•
R3000 console program and normal mode commands
•
CVAX console program and maintenance mode commands
The CVAX/R3000 ROM-based diagnostics are described in Chapter 4.
3.2 KN220 Firmware Features
The KN220 CVAX and R3000 firmware provide the following features:
•
Automatic or manual bootstrap of customer application images at
power-up, reset, or conditionally after processor halts.
•
A CVAX interactive command language (maintenance mode) that allows
you to examine and alter the state of the processor.
•
An R3000 interactive command language (normal mode) that allows
you to make use of environment variables to pass information to the
ULTRIX–32 operating system.
•
Diagnostics and console utilities that test components on the KN220
and memory modules and test devices on the DSSI bus, SCSI bus, and
Ethernet.
•
LEDs and displays on the KN220 IO module and console terminal that
display diagnostic progress and error reports.
•
Multilingual support. In maintenance mode only, the firmware can
issue system messages in several languages.
The processor must be functioning at a level capable of executing
instructions from the maintenance program ROM for the maintenance
program to operate.
3–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.3 CVAX Halt Entry and Dispatch Code
Unless a halt occurs when the R3000 is running, the CVAX processor
enters the halt entry code at physical address 20040000 whenever the
CVAX receives a halt signal. The halt entry code saves machine state,
then transfers control to the firmware halt dispatcher.
After a halt, the halt entry code saves the current LED code, then writes
an E to the LEDs. An E on the LEDs indicates that at least several
instructions have been successfully executed, although if the CPU is
functioning properly, the E occurs too quickly to be seen. The halt entry code
saves the following registers. The console intercepts any direct reference
to these registers and redirects it to the saved copies.
R0–R15
PR$_SAVPSL
PR$_SCBB
DLEDR
SSCCR
ADxMCH
ADxMSK
General purpose registers
Saved processor status longword register
System control block base register
Diagnostic LED register
SSC configuration register
SSC address match registers
SSC address mask registers
The halt entry code unconditionally sets the following registers to fixed
values on any halt to ensure that the console itself can run:
SSCCR
ADxMCH
ADxMSK
CBTCR
TIVRx
SSC configuration register
SSC address match registers
SSC address mask registers
CDAL bus timeout control register
SSC timer interrupt vector registers
The console command interpreter does not modify actual processor
registers. Instead, it saves the processor registers in console memory when
it enters the halt entry code, then directs all references to the processor
registers to the corresponding saved values, not to the registers themselves.
When the processor reenters normal mode, the saved registers are restored
and any changes become operative only then. References to processor
memory are handled normally. The binary load and unload command (X,
Section 3.10.21) cannot reference the console memory pages.
After saving the registers, the halt entry code transfers control to the halt
dispatch code. The halt dispatch code determines the cause of the halt
by reading the halt field (PR$_SAVPSL <13:08>), the processor halt action
field (PR$_CPMBX <01:00>), and the break enable switch on the H3602–
AC panel. Table 3–2 lists the actions taken, by sequence. If an action fails,
the next action is taken. There is no autoboot on the CVAX side.
KN220 Firmware
3–3
Table 3–2: Actions Taken on a Halt
Breaks Enabled
on H3602–AC
Power-Up Halt1 Halt Action2
Action
T3
T
F
F
X
X
X
Diagnostics, halt
Halt
Diagnostics, halt
Restart, halt
Restart, halt
Halt
Halt
T
F
T
F
F
F
F
X
0
X
0
1
2
3
1 Power-up
halt: PR$_SAVPSL<13:08>=3
action: PR$_CPMBX<01:00>
3 T = condition is true, F = condition is false, X = does not matter
2 Halt
3.4 External Halts
Several conditions can trigger an external halt, and different actions are
taken depending on the condition. The conditions are listed below.
•
The function switch is set to enable, and you press
console terminal.
•
Assertion of the BHALT line on the Q22-bus.
•
Deassertion of DCOK. A halt is delivered if the processor is not running
out of halt-protected space, and the BHALT ENB bit is set. The system
restart switch deasserts DCOK. DCOK may also be deasserted by the
DELQA sanity timer or any other Q22-bus module that chooses to
implement the Q22-bus restart/reboot protocol.
Break
on the system
When in maintenance mode, the processor halts on the deassertion of
DCOK. If halts are enabled, the firmware enters maintenance mode. If
halts are disabled, the firmware takes the action dictated by the halt action
field.
The action taken by the halt dispatch code on a console Break or Q22-bus
BHALT is the same: the firmware enters maintenance mode if halts are
enabled.
The halt dispatch code distinguishes between DCOK deasserted and
BHALT by assuming that BHALT must be asserted for at least 10
milliseconds, and that DCOK is deasserted for at most 9 microseconds.
To determine if the BHALT line is asserted, the firmware steps out into
halt-unprotected space after 9 milliseconds. If the processor halts again,
3–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
the firmware concludes that the halt was caused by the BHALT and not by
the deassertion of DCOK.
3.5 Power-Up
On power-up, the firmware performs several unique actions. It runs
the initial power-up test (IPT), locates and identifies the console device,
performs a language inquiry, and runs the remaining diagnostics.
The IPT waits for power to stabilize by monitoring SCR<5>(POK). Once
power is stable, the IPT verifies that the console private SSC NVRAM
(System support chip nonvolatile RAM) is valid (backup battery is charged).
If it is invalid or zero (battery is discharged), the IPT tests and initializes
the SSC NVRAM.
NOTE: The CPU board also contains NVRAM and a battery-backup system.
For details of CPU verification, see Section D.3.3.
After the battery check, the firmware tries to determine the type of terminal
attached to the console serial line. If the terminal is a known type, it is
treated as the system console.
Once a console device has been identified, the firmware displays the KN220
banner message:
KN220-A Vn.n
The banner message contains the processor name (KN220–A) and the
version of the firmware (Vn.n), where n.n denotes the major and minor
release numbers.
Power-up actions differ, depending on the state of the operation switch
located on the H3602–AC CPU I/O panel, shown previously in Figure 1–4.
3.5.1 Power-Up Sequence: Operation Switch Set to Normal
If you set the operation switch on the H3602–AC CPU I/O panel to the
normal position ( ), the power sequence is as follows:
1. CVAX powers up (begins execution at a location pointed to by physical
address 20040000).
In addition, the console displays the language selection menu if the
operation switch is set to the normal position ( ) and the contents of
SSC NVRAM are invalid. The console uses the saved console language
if the operation switch is set to the normal position and the contents of
SSC NVRAM are valid.
2. CVAX runs self-test diagnostics.
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3–5
3. CVAX executes an EXIT command (40 000 000 is written into the SPR).
4. CVAX hangs on a DMA grant.
5. R3000 begins execution at address 1FC00000.
–
If the bootmode environmental variable is set to a, the R3000
attempts to autoboot. If the bootpath environment variable is
valid, the autoboot succeeds. See Section 3.7.2 for a description
of environmental variables.
–
If the bootmode environment variable is not initialized (*), the
R3000 prompts you for a command at the normal mode prompt
(>>).
If you enter maint at the >> prompt, 80 000 000 is written in the
SPR, the R3000 hangs on a RDBUSY stall, and the CVAX resumes
execution (the >>> prompt is displayed).
3.5.2 Power-Up Sequence: Operation Switch Set to
Maintenance
If you set the operation switch on the H3602–AC CPU I/O panel to the
maintenance position ( ), the power-up sequence is as follows:
1. CVAX powers up (begins execution at a location pointed to by physical
address 20040000).
In addition, the console displays the language selection menu if the
operation switch is set to the normal position ( ) and the contents of
SSC NVRAM are invalid. The console uses the saved console language
if the operation switch is set to the normal position and the contents of
SSC NVRAM are valid.
2. CVAX runs self-test diagnostics.
3. CVAX enters maintenance mode and prompts you for commands at the
maintenance mode prompt (>>>).
–
If you enter EXIT at the >>> prompt, the CVAX hangs on a DMA
grant and the R3000 begins execution (the >> prompt is displayed).
3.5.3 Operation Switch Set to Action: Loopback Tests
You can verify the connection between the KN220 CPU module set and the
console terminal, as follows:
1. Set the operation switch to the action position ( ).
2. Set the function switch to enable ( ).
3–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3. To test the console terminal, connect the H3103 loopback connector
to the H3602–AC console connector. (You must install the loopback
connector to run the test.)
4. To test the console cable, connect the H8572 connector at the end of the
console cable and connect the H3103 to the H8572.
During the test, the firmware toggles between the active and passive states.
During the active state (3 seconds), the LED is set to 7. The firmware reads
the baud rate and operation switch setting, then transmits and receives a
character sequence.
During the passive state (7 seconds), the LED is set to 4.
If at any time the firmware detects an error (parity, framing, overflow, or
no characters), the display hangs at 7. If you move the operation switch
from the action position, the firmware continues as on a normal power-up.
3.5.4 Operation Switch Set to Action: Language Query
If you set the operation switch to the action position ( ) and the function
switch to query ( ), or if the firmware detects that the contents of NVRAM
are invalid, the firmware prompts you for the language to be used for
displaying the following system messages:
Failure.
Performing normal system tests.
Tests completed.
Normal operation not possible.
The selection menu for the language and keyboard type is shown in
Example 3–1. If no response is received within 30 seconds, the firmware
defaults to English.
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Example 3–1: Language Selection Menu
KN220-A Vn.n
1) Dansk
2) Deutsch (Deutschland/Österreich)
3) Deutsch (Schweiz)
4) English (United Kingdom)
5) English (United States/Canada)
6) Español
7) Français (Canada)
8) Français (France/Belgique)
9) Français (Suisse)
10) Italiano
11) Nederlands
12) Norsk
13) Português
14) Suomi
15) Svenska
(1..15):
3.6 Bootstrap
Bootstrapping is the process of loading and transferring control to an
operating system. The KN220 bootstrap support is as follows:
•
CVAX (maintenance mode) supports the bootstrap of MDM diagnostics.
•
R3000 (normal mode) supports the bootstrap of ULTRIX–32 as well as
any user application image that conforms to the boot formats described
in this section.
NOTE: The KN220 system contains two console programs: maintenance
mode (CVAX) and normal mode (R3000). See Section 3.8 for normal mode
commands that you type at the >> prompt. Normal mode commands are
case sensitive. See Section 3.10 for maintenance mode commands that you
type at the >>> prompt.
A KN220 bootstrap occurs under the following conditions:
•
For MDM, enter BOOT at the maintenance mode prompt (>>>), MDM
only.
•
For ULTRIX, enter
>>boot
in lowercase letters at the normal mode prompt.
3–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.6.1 ULTRIX–32 Bootstrap
The ULTRIX–32 operating system is booted in the Normal operating mode
under one of the following conditions:
1. Power is on; environmental variables are set as shown in
Section 3.6.1.2. According to the variables set, the boot is either
automatic or manual.
2. Power is on; no environmental variables are set. The commands are as
follows, with the bootpath to the boot device is included in the command
examples as shown.
>> boot -f rf(0,0,0)vmunix
>> boot -f rz(0,0,0)vmunix
3. The operating system initiates a reboot operation.
You can use one of the following ports as the ULTRIX–32 boot device:
•
KN220 I/O module Ethernet controller
•
KN220 I/O module DSSI controller
•
KN220 I/O module SCSI controller
•
KN220 Q22-bus MSCP or TMSCP controller
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Table 3–3 lists the supported ULTRIX–32 boot devices. The table correlates
the boot device names expected in a boot command with the corresponding
supported devices.
Boot device names consist of a two- or three-letter device code (letters a
through z).
Table 3–3: ULTRIX–32 Supported Boot Devices
Device Type
Protocol
Number of Units
Per Storage Interface
Device Name
RA-series fixed disk
RF-series ISE
RZ-series fixed disk
TZ-series tape drive
TQK-series tape drive
Ethernet adapter
Ethernet adapter
MSCP
DSSI
SCSI
SCSI
TMSCP
MOP
TFTP
4
7
7
7
1
1
1
ra
rf
rz
tz
tm
mop
tftp
3.6.1.1 ULTRIX–32 Bootstrap Procedure
Boot the ULTRIX–32 operating system at the normal mode prompt (>>),
using the commands explained in Section 3.7. Normal mode commands are
case sensitive (see Section 3.8).
Boot the system as follows:
3.6.1.2 On Installation
1. On the H3602–AC CPU I/O panel, set the operation switch to the
normal position ( ).
2. Set the on/off power switch to 1 (on).
3. After the system has completed the power-up self-tests successfully, the
normal mode prompt is displayed (>>).
To define the bootpath, define the environmental variable for the desired
boot device and boot mode, using lowercase letters, then boot the system
to save the desired boot device. In Example 3–2, the boot device is an
ISE at node 0.
3–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example 3–2: Command Procedure to Boot on Installation
>> setenv bootpath rf(0,0,0)vmunix
!For file name, type
!vmunix or
!application file name.
>> boot
To make the boot automatic, set the following environmental variable:
>>setenv bootmode a
!Boot will be automatic.
On Power-Up of Existing System
1. On the H3602–AC CPU I/O panel, set the operation switch to the
normal position ( ).
2. Set the on/off power switch to on (1).
3. After the system has completed the power-up self-tests successfully,
the R3000 processor attempts to boot the operating system through the
previously defined boot device.
3.6.2 MDM Bootstrap
When you enter maintenance mode and type BOOT MUa0: at the >>> prompt,
the CVAX processor boots the MDM operating system from a TK tape
cartridge.
The following example is for a TQKxx subsystem.
Before dispatching to the primary CVAX bootstrap (VMB), the KN220 CVAX
processor firmware initializes the system to a known state, as follows:
1. Checks CPMBX<2>(RIP), bootstrap in progress. If it is set, bootstrap
fails and the console displays the message Failure. in the selected
console language.
2. Validates the boot device name. If none exists, supplies a list of
available devices and issues a boot device prompt. If you do not specify
a device within 30 seconds, uses EZA0.
3. Writes a form of this boot request, including active boot flags and boot
device (BOOT/R5:0 EZA0, for example), to the console terminal.
4. Sets CPMBX<2>(BIP).
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5. Initializes the Q22-bus scatter-gather map.
6. Validates the PFN bitmap. If invalid, rebuilds it.
7. Searches for a 128-Kbyte contiguous block of good memory as defined
by the PFN bitmap. If 128 Kbytes cannot be found, the bootstrap fails.
8. Initializes the general purpose registers:
R0
R2
R3
R4
R5
R10
R11
AP
SP
PC
R1, R6, R7, R8,
R9, FP
Address of descriptor of the boot device name or 0 if none specified
Length of PFN bitmap in bytes
Address of PFN bitmap
Time-of-day of bootstrap from PR$_TODR
Boot flags
Halt PC value
Halt PSL value (without halt code and mapenable)
Halt code
Base of 128-Kbyte good memory block plus 512
Base of 128-Kbyte good memory block plus 512
0
9. Copies the virtual memory bootstrap (VMB) image from EPROM to
local memory, beginning at the base of the 128 Kbytes of good memory
block plus 512.
10. Exits from the firmware to VMB residing in memory.
Virtual Memory Bootstrap (VMB) is the primary MDM bootstrap. The
KN220 VMB resides in the CVAX firmware and is copied into main memory
before control is transferred to it. VMB then loads the secondary bootstrap
image and transfers control to it.
3–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–4 lists the supported R5 boot flags.
Table 3–4: VMB Boot Flags
Bit
Name
Description
0
RPB$V_CONV
1
RPB$V_DEBUG
2
RPB$V_INIBPT
3
RPB$V_BBLOCK
4
RPB$V_DIAG
5
RPB$V_BOOBPT
6
RPB$V_HEADER
8
RPB$V_SOLICT
9
RPB$V_HALT
31:28
RPB$V_TOPSYS
Conversational boot. At various points in the system boot
procedure, the bootstrap code solicits parameters and other
input from the console terminal.
Debug. If this flag is set, the code for the XDELTA debugger is
mapped into the system page tables of the running system.
Initial breakpoint.
If RPB$V_DEBUG is set, the VMS
operating system executes a BPT instruction in module INIT
immediately after enabling mapping.
Secondary bootstrap from bootblock. When set, VMB reads
logical block number 0 of the boot device and tests it for
conformance with the bootblock format. If in conformance, the
block is executed to continue the bootstrap. No attempt is made
to perform a Files–11 bootstrap.
Diagnostic bootstrap. When set, the load image requested over
the network is [SYS0.SYSMAINT]DIAGBOOT.EXE.
Bootstrap breakpoint. When set, a breakpoint instruction is
executed in VMB and control is transferred to XDELTA before
booting.
Image header. When set, VMB transfers control to the address
specified by the file’s image header. When not set, VMB
transfers control to the first location of the load image.
File name solicit. When set, VMB prompts the operator for
the name of the application image file. The maximum file
specification size is 17 characters.
Halt before transfer. When set, VMB halts before transferring
control to the application image.
This field can be any value from 0 through F. This flag changes
the top-level directory name for system disks with multiple
operating systems. For example, if TOPSYS is 1, the top-level
directory name is [SYS1...].
KN220 Firmware
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Table 3–5 lists the supported MDM boot devices.
Table 3–5: Supported MDM Boot Devices
Boot Name
Controller Type
Device Type(s)
MUcn
DIAn
TQK70 MSCP
On-board SCSI
TK70
SCSI CDROM
EZA0
XQcn
On-board Ethernet
DELQA
DESQA
–
–
–
Tape
Network
3–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.6.3 MDM Restart
An MDM restart is the process of bringing up the MDM operating system
from a known initialization state following a processor halt.
A restart occurs under the conditions listed in Table 3–2, earlier in this
chapter.
To restart MDM, the firmware searches system memory for the Restart
Parameter Block (RPB), a data structure constructed for this purpose by
VMB. If the firmware finds a valid RPB, it passes control to the operating
system at an address specified in the RPB.
The firmware keeps a RIP (restart-in-progress) flag in CPMBX, which it
uses to avoid repeated attempts to restart a failing operating system. The
operating system maintains an additional RIP flag in the RPB. The RPB is
a page-aligned control block that can be identified by its signature in the
first three longwords:
+00 (first longword) = physical address of the RPB
+04 (second longword) = physical address of the restart routine
+08 (third longword) = checksum of first 31 longwords of restart routine
The firmware finds a valid RPB as follows:
1. Searches for a page of memory that contains its address in the first
longword. If none is found, the search for a valid RPB has failed.
2. Reads the second longword in the page (the physical address of the
restart routine). If it is not a valid physical address, or if it is zero,
returns to step 1. The check for zero is necessary to ensure that a page
of zeros does not pass the test for a valid RPB.
3. Calculates the 32-bit two’s-complement sum (ignoring overflows) of the
first 31 longwords of the restart routine. If the sum does not match the
third longword of the RPB, returns to step 1.
4. If the sum matches, a valid RPB has been found.
KN220 Firmware
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3.7 Normal Mode Overview
When the KN220 is in normal mode, the console reads and interprets
commands received on the console terminal at the normal mode prompt
(>>).
This R3000 interactive command language allows you to make use of
environment variables to pass information to the ULTRIX–32 operating
system.
You can use normal mode commands to boot the ULTRIX–32 operating
system, set up automatic booting, and deposit or examine I/O address space
and memory.
3.7.1 Control Characters in Normal Mode
Table 3–6 lists the characters that have special meaning in normal mode.
Table 3–6: Normal-Mode Control Characters
Character
Action
<CR>
Ends a command line. Command characters are buffered until you
press Return.
Deletes the previously typed character.
If you define the console terminal as hard copy (environmental
variable term set to hardcopy), the deleted text is displayed
surrounded by backslashes. If the console terminal is a CRT
(environmental variable term set to crt), each delete is displayed
with the sequence <BS><SP><BS>.
Deletes received are ignored when there are no characters to be
deleted.
Causes the console to abort the processing of a command.
Causes console output to be discarded until you enter the next
Ctrl/O or until the next console prompt or error message is issued.
Ctrl/O is also canceled when you enter Ctrl/C.
Resumes console output that was suspended when you entered
Ctrl/S.
Causes the current command line to be displayed without any
deleted characters.
Suspends output on the console terminal until you enterCtrl/Q.
Discards all characters accumulated for the current line.
Suppresses any special meaning associated with the next
character.
X (delete or backspace)
Ctrl/C
Ctrl/O
Ctrl/Q
Ctrl/R
Ctrl/S
Ctrl/U
Ctrl/V
3–16 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.7.2 Environment Variables in Normal Mode
The KN220 console makes use of environmental variables to pass
information to the operating system.
There are three types of variables:
•
Volatile (lost when power resumes)
•
Nonvolatile (maintained after power resumes)
•
Fixed (rebuilt when power is turned on)
You can define additional environmental variables, but those you define will
be lost when power is removed.
Table 3–7 lists the default environmental variables.
Table 3–7: Environmental Variables
Variable
Type
Description
baud
Fixed
The baud rate of the console terminal line is determined
by the baud rate select switch inside the H3602–AC
CPU I/O panel. The factory setting is 9600. Allowed
values are 300, 600, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19,200, and
38,400.
bitmap
Fixed
Indicates the address of the memory bitmap. The
bitmap keeps track of good and bad memory pages.
Each bit corresponds to one page in memory; 1
indicates the page is good and 0 indicates the page is
bad.
bitmaplen
Fixed
Indicates the length of the memory bitmap in words.
bootmode
Nonvolatile
Determines what programs run when the system is
turned on or reset. Use one of the following codes:
a
Autoboots the operating system,
bootpath variable
using the
d
Halts the system with no diagnostics run, and goes
to Normal mode prompt
bootpath
Nonvolatile
Indicates the default bootpath. The system uses this
variable when you type the auto command. An example
of a bootpath definition is: rf(0,0,0)vmunix.
memdescriptor
Volatile
Set by test 9A in Maintenance mode.
KN220 Firmware
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Table 3–7 (Cont.): Environmental Variables
Variable
Type
Description
console
Fixed
The system always selects TTY(0) as the console device.
osconsole
Fixed
The system always selects TTY(0) as the console device.
scsiid[0-7]
Fixed
The SCSI controller number. Defaults 7. The number
in the variable is the SCSI controller number.
systype
Fixed
Contains information used to identify the processor.
Bits 24:31 contain the CPU type. Bits 16:23 contain
the system type (11 for KN220). Bits 8:15 contain the
firmware revision level. Bits 0:7 contain the hardware
version level.
3.8 Normal Mode Commands
The R3000 console program displays the normal mode prompt (>>) when it
is ready to accept commands.
Table 3–8 lists the supported normal mode console commands.
Table 3–8: KN220 Normal Mode Commands
Command
Description
boot
continue
d
dump
e
fill
go
help
?
init
maint
passwd
Boots the ULTRIX–32 operating system
Returns control to the processes interrupted by a halt signal
Deposits data at a given address
Dumps memory to the screen
Examines memory
Deposits data in an address range
Resumes execution of the program in memory
Displays the syntax of console commands
Displays the syntax of console commands
Reinitializes memory
Causes the console to enter maintenance mode
Prompts for the entry of a password, clears the old password, and sets
security mode
Displays console environment variables
Sets console environment variables
Executes the CPU module ROM diagnostic referenced by the test number
specified
printenv
setenv
test
3–18 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–8 (Cont.): KN220 Normal Mode Commands
Command
Description
unsetenv
Unsets console environment variables
Observe the following rules when you type normal mode commands:
•
All commands typed at normal mode level are case sensitive with
respect to parsing commands; case is preserved when you assign values
to environment variables.
•
Type all normal mode console commands using ASCII characters only.
Values that you enter for environment variables may contain any 8-bit
character code.
•
Command execution begins when you press
•
Enter numeric values as follows:
•
Return
.
–
Enter decimal values as a string of decimal digits with no leading
zeros (for example, 123).
–
Enter octal values as a string of octal digits with a leading zero (for
example, 0177).
–
Enter hexadecimal values as a string of hexadecimal digits preceded
by 0x (for example, 0x3ff).
–
Enter binary values as a string of binary digits preceded by 0b (for
example, 0b1001).
When reading or writing to memory, you have a choice of data sizes:
byte, halfword, or word. Leading zeros are dropped.
Because a word is 4 bytes, successive addresses, when referenced by a
word, are successive multiples of 4. For example, the address following
0x80000004 is 0x80000008. An error occurs if you try to specify an
address that is not on a boundary for the data size you are using.
KN220 Firmware
3–19
3.8.1 Conventions Used in This Section
The following conventions apply in Section 3.8.
•
Letters are to be typed exactly as they appear.
•
Letters in italics represent arguments for which you supply values.
(Note that the Help and menu screens display these arguments in all
capital letters.)
•
Arguments enclosed in brackets ([ ]) are optional.
•
Ellipses (...) follow an argument that can be repeated.
•
A vertical bar ( | ) separates choices.
•
Parentheses are used as in algebraic expressions. For example, the
following sequence means enter -b or -h or -w:
-(b|h|w)
3.8.2 Getting Help
You can get help with console command syntax in several ways:
•
You can type the word help or a question mark (?) to display a menu
of all console commands.
•
You can enter the name of the command for which you want help as an
argument to help or as a question mark (?).
For example, entering ? e at the console prompt (>>) displays the syntax
for the examine (e) command:
e [-(b|h|w)] [ADDR]
>>
•
If you type an incorrect command line, you get a usage message.
For example, the e command requires an addr argument. If you type
e -b at the console prompt (>>) without entering an address, the screen
will display the correct syntax for the command:
e [-(b|h|w)] [ADDR]
>>
3–20 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.3 boot
The boot command loads the file that contains the operating system.
Format:
boot [-f file] [-s] [-n] [arg...]
The optional -f flag followed by the file parameter specifies the file you want
to use during a boot procedure. If you do not specify the -f flag and a file,
the file specified by the environment variable bootpath is loaded.
The file parameter has the format:
dev([controller] [,unit-number.logical-unit-number] [,logical-block-number])
[filename]
•
dev indicates the device from which you are booting the operating
system. Typical devices are rf for RF-series ISEs, ra for RA-series hard
disk drives, tm for a tape, and mop for a network. Typing mop nullifies
the other arguments in the list. Table 3–9 lists the device names for
each device.
Table 3–9: Boot Device Names (Normal Mode)
Device Type
Protocol
Number of Units
Per Storage Interface
Device Name
RA-series fixed disk
RF-series ISE
RZ-series fixed disk
TZ-series tape drive
Tape drive
Ethernet adapter
Ethernet adapter
MSCP
DSSI
SCSI
SCSI
TMSCP
MOP
TFTP
41
7
7
7
11
1
1
ra
rf
rz
tz
tm
mop
tftp
1 Up
to 16 controllers and 32 units supported.
•
controller indicates the ID number of the controller for the device from
which you are booting the operating system.
•
unit-number indicates the unit number of the device from which you
are booting the operating system.
•
logical-unit-number (LUN) has meaning for SCSI devices only; it
defaults to zero.
•
logical-block-number indicates the number (or other designator) of the
block from which you are booting the operating system. When you are
KN220 Firmware
3–21
booting from a tape, this number is not used because the boot file must
be the first file on the tape. When you are booting from a disk, this
number depends on how you partitioned the disk when you installed
your operating system software. Refer to your software installation
manual if you need a reminder about logical block indicators.
•
filename indicates the name of the operating system file.
The optional -s flag causes the operating system to boot in single-user mode.
Unless -s is specified, the system will boot in multiuser mode.
The optional -n flag causes the specified file to be loaded but not executed.
The optional arg parameter contains any information to be passed to the
booted image.
Examples:
>> boot -f ra(0,0,0)vmunix
This command boots the file vmunix, located in the logical block number of
the first hard disk (unit number 0), using controller 0.
>> boot -f rf(2,2,0)vmunix
This command boots the file vmunix, located in the logical block of the
second RF-series ISE (unit number 2), using controller 2.
>> boot -f tm(0,5)
This command boots from the tape, which is unit 5 and controller 0.
>> boot -f rz(0, 0, 0)vmunix
This command boots from the tape, which is unit 0 and controller 0.
To display a list of devices, their unit numbers, and controller numbers,
type the following sequence at the Normal mode prompt:
>> maint
>>> show dev (or dssi, scsi, ethernet, or uqssp)
>>> exit
>>
The show command displays all of the system device names, which are
followed by the controller number and unit number in parentheses. The
asterisk indicates the logical-block-number variable, which is determined
during installation of the operating system software.
3–22 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.4 continue
CAUTION: If the operating system state has not been properly saved
(halted), entering the continue command may cause the processor to hang.
Use the continue command if you inadvertently halt the system by pressing
Break or the Halt button.
When a process is interrupted by a halt signal, the state of the process
(R3000 and R3010 internal registers) are stored in the halt state memory
block. When the continue command is entered, the saved state of the
process is reloaded, and the process resumes execution.
The continue command returns control to the processes interrupted by a
halt signal.
Format:
continue
KN220 Firmware
3–23
3.8.5 d (deposit)
The d (deposit) command deposits a single byte, halfword, or word value
at the specified address. If you repeat the command without specifying an
address, the data will be deposited in the next word location.
Format:
d [[[-(b | h | w)] [addr]] | [-H reg-name]] val
The first parameter, which is optional, indicates the data size. If not given,
data size defaults to word. If you do not specify a data size, a word is used.
•
-b deposits 1 byte of data.
•
-h deposits a halfword (2 bytes) of data.
•
-w deposits a word (4 bytes) of data.
The addr parameter indicates the address to which you want data written.
System address space is in the range 0x80000000 to 0xbf000000. If addr is
not specified, it will default to one location beyond the last address accessed
by either the examine or deposit commands.
The -H parameter specifies that the data is to be deposited to a register in
the halt state memory block. This memory location is where all the R3000
internal registers are saved when the system is halted.
The reg-name parameter specifies the name of the particular R3000 internal
register for which you want data written.
The val parameter contains the data you want deposited at the given
address.
Example:
>> d -w 0x80000000 0xffffffff
This version of the command deposits the value 0xffffffff, with a data size
of one word, at address 0x80000000.
3–24 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.6 dump
dump [-H] | [[[-(b | h | w)] [-(o | d | u | x | c | B)]] | [-I]] rng
This command shows a formatted display of the contents of memory.
The -H parameter displays the contents of the halt state memory block. All
R3000 internal registers are stored in the halt state memory block when
the system is halted. The -H parameter option cannot be used with any
other command parameter.
The second parameter, which is optional, indicates the data size. If you do
not specify a data size, the system uses a word.
•
-b displays memory in bytes.
•
-h displays memory in halfwords.
•
-w displays memory in words.
The next parameter, also optional, determines how data is displayed.
•
-o displays memory in octal format.
•
-d displays memory in decimal format.
•
-u displays memory in unsigned decimal format.
•
-x displays memory in hexadecimal format.
•
-c displays memory in ASCII format.
•
-B displays memory in binary format.
If no format argument is given, hexadecimal format is used.
The -I parameter displays memory in assembly language format.
The rng parameter indicates the range of memory you want to see. You can
specify the range in one of two ways:
•
addr#cnt displays the number of addresses specified by cnt, beginning
at addr.
•
addr:addr displays all values between the specified addresses.
Examples:
>> dump 0x80000000#0xf
This command uses hexadecimal format to dump the first 15 words of
memory to the screen.
KN220 Firmware
3–25
>> dump -b 0x80000000#0xf
This command uses hexadecimal format to dump the first 15 bytes of
memory to the screen. The dump display shows rows of address contents.
The left-most column gives the address of the first field in each row.
>> dump -I 0x80030200:0x80030220
0x80030200:
c048228
jal
0x80030204:
2021
addu
0x80030208:
8fbf0014
lw
0x8003020c:
27bd0018
addiu
0x80030210:
3e00008
jr
0x80030214:
0
nop
0x80030218:
27bdffe8
addiu
0x8003021c:
afbf0014
sw
>>
0x801208a0
a0,zero,zero
ra,0x14(sp)
sp,0x18
ra
sp,0xffe8
ra,0x14(sp)
This command displays in assembly language format, all values between
the specified addresses. The first column lists the memory location in
hexadecimal, the second column lists the contents of the memory location,
the third column lists the R3000 assembly language instruction, and the
fourth column lists the corresponding operand.
3–26 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.7 e (examine)
The e (examine) command examines the byte, halfword, or word at the
specified address.
Format:
e [-(b | h | w)] [addr]
The first parameter, which is optional, indicates the data size. If not given,
data size defaults to word. If you do not specify the data size, a word is
used.
•
-b indicates a single byte.
•
-h indicates a halfword.
•
-w indicates a word.
The addr parameter indicates an address in the range 0x80000000 to
0xBF000000. The addr parameter is also optional. If it is not specified,
it will default to one location beyond the last address accessed by either
the Examine or Deposit commands.
When you enter the examine command, a display similar to the following
appears:
0x80000005:
65 0x41
’A’
The left-hand field echoes the address you entered.
The next three fields display the contents of the address in decimal,
hexadecimal, and ASCII formats, respectively. If the ASCII character is
unprintable, it is displayed as an octal value preceded by a backslash: for
example, ’\032’.
Example:
>> e 0x80000000
This command examines the word at address 0x80000000. The resulting
display might look like this:
0x80000000:
1008385985
0x3c1abfc1
’\301’
KN220 Firmware
3–27
3.8.8 fill
The fill command writes a specified value to a range of memory. If you do
not specify a value, the system puts zeros in the memory range.
Format:
fill [-(b | h | w)] [-v val] rng
The first parameter, which is optional, indicates the data size. If not given,
data size defaults to word.
•
-b indicates bytes.
•
-h indicates halfwords.
•
-w indicates words.
The optional parameter -v val specifies the numeric value to write to
memory. If you do not specify a value, all zeros are written. If the size
of val does not match the data size parameter, val is truncated or expanded
as necessary.
The rng parameter indicates the memory range. You can specify the range
in one of two ways:
•
addr#cnt fills addresses beginning at addr and continuing for cnt
locations.
•
addr:addr fills all locations between the two given addresses.
Example:
>> fill -v 0xffffffff 0x80000010:0x800000ff
This command sets all bits to 1 at addresses 16 to 255.
3–28 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.9 go
The go command transfers control to the indicated entry-point address.
Format:
go [pc]
The optional pc parameter indicates the entry-point address you want to
use.
If you do not specify an entry address, the system uses the entry point of
the program module that was most recently loaded. If no program module
was previously loaded, the system uses 0 as the entry-point address.
KN220 Firmware
3–29
3.8.10 help
The help command displays the correct syntax for the console commands.
Format:
help [cmd]
The optional cmd parameter indicates the command for which you want
information. If you do not specify cmd, the complete console menu appears.
Example:
>> help
CMD:
x -(l|u) addr count
boot [-f FILE] [-s] [-n] [ARG...]
continue ADDRESS
d [-(b|h|w)] [ADDR] VAL
dump [-(b|h|w)] [-(o|d|u|x|c|B)] RNG
e [-(b|h|w)] [ADDR]
fill [-(b|h|w)] [-v VAL] RNG
go [PC]
help [CMD]
init
maint
passwd -(c|s|u)
printenv [EVAR...]
setenv EVAR STR
test [-r] TEST_NUMBER
unsetenv EVAR
? [CMD]
RNG:
ADDR#CNT
ADDR:ADDR
>>
3–30 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.11 ?
The ? command functions exactly like the help command.
Format:
? [cmd]
KN220 Firmware
3–31
3.8.12 init
The init command fully initializes the system.
Format:
init
The system performs the following:
•
Clears memory.
•
Resets I/O.
•
Initializes all supported devices.
Example:
>> init
Memory Size: 33554432 (0x2000000) bytes
Ethernet Address: 08-00-2b-12-81-22
>>
3–32 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.13 printenv
The printenv command displays the current value for the specified
environment variable.
Format:
printenv [evar...]
The optional evar parameter indicates the variable whose value you want
to see. If you do not specify a variable, the complete environment variable
table appears.
Example:
>> printenv
bootpath=rf()vmunix
bootmode=*
console=0
scsiid0=7
scsiid1=7
scsiid2=7
scsiid3=7
scsiid4=7
scsiid5=7
scsiid6=7
scsiid7=7
baud=9600
systype=0x820b0800
bitmap=0xa1ff2000
bitmaplen=0x800
memdescriptor=0x0
boot=rf()vmunix
osconsole=0
>>
KN220 Firmware
3–33
3.8.14 setenv
The setenv command assigns new values to the specified environment
variable. Refer to the discussion of the printenv command (Section 3.8.13)
for a description of each variable.
Format:
setenv evar str
•
The evar parameter indicates the variable you want to set.
•
The str parameter indicates the value you want to specify.
Example:
>> setenv bootmode a
This command assigns a value of ‘‘a’’ to the bootmode variable. This will
cause the system to autoboot at power-up.
You can also add your own environment variables, as explained in
Section 3.8.
These variables are stored in volatile memory.
The
environment variables table can contain up to 32 variables, for a total of
512 characters.
3–34 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.15 test
Test executes the CPU module ROM diagnostic referenced by test_number.
Format:
test [-r] test_number
The test number must be preceded by a ’0x’ (that is, specified in hex). If
the -r flag is specified, the test repeats (even if failures occur).
KN220 Firmware
3–35
3.8.16 unsetenv
The unsetenv command removes the specified variable from the
environment variables table.
Format:
unsetenv evar
The evar parameter indicates the variable you are removing. Refer to
Table 3–7 earlier in this section for a description of each variable.
The unsetenv command does not affect the environment variables stored in
nonvolatile memory. These variables are reset at the next reset or power
cycle.
3–36 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.8.17 x
The x command is a binary load/unload command for automatic testing
systems that load programs through the console when the IO board is not
present.
Format:
x [-l | -u] address count <CR> <LF> command_checksum
•
-l specifies that data is to be loaded into memory through the console.
•
-u specifies that data is to be unloaded from memory and output through
the console.
The x command loads/unloads count number of bytes of data starting at
address. After the command is entered x expects a byte of input which is
the checksum of command line. If the command checksum is correct then x
will begin accepting the input of count bytes of data or will begin outputing
count bytes of data. Following the data, x will expect, or will output, an
additional data checksum byte. If a load (-l option) and the checksum is
incorrect, x will issue an error message.
When x is receiving the checksum or receiving data during a load, the
data will not be echoed on the screen. When receiving data, control flow
characters (CTRL-O, etc.) will be interpreted only as data and will not
effect the flow of control.
The checksums will be validated by adding each byte of data to an 8-bit
register. When the checksum is added the result should be zero. For
the command checksum, each non-white_space character will be added to
the register. Note that the whitespace includeing spaces, tabs, and the
final return <CR> and linefeed <LF>, are excluded when calculating the
checksum.
The address will be expected to be a virtual address so that count bytes of
data will fit in the range 0000 0000 : 7fff ffff.
KN220 Firmware
3–37
3.9 Maintenance Mode Overview
Whenever the CVAX console program is running, the maintenance mode
prompt (>>>) is displayed on the console terminal and the KN220 is halted
as described in Section 3.3 and Section 3.4.
In maintenance mode, you can examine and alter the state of the processor
by typing certain console commands and characters. Table 3–10 lists the
keypad control characters that have special meaning in maintenance mode.
Table 3–10: KN220 Console Control Characters (Maintenance
Mode)
Character
Action
Return
Also <CR>. The carriage return ends a command line. No action is taken
on a command until after it is terminated by a carriage return. A null
line terminated by a carriage return is treated as a valid, null command.
No action is taken, and the console prompts for input. Carriage return is
echoed as carriage return, line feed.
When you press X (rubout), the console deletes the previously typed
character. The resulting display differs, depending on whether the console
is a video or a hardcopy terminal.
X
For hardcopy terminals, the console echoes a backslash (\ ) followed by the
character being deleted. If you press additional rubouts, the additional
deleted characters are echoed. If you type a nonrubout character, the console
echoes another backslash, followed by the character typed. The result is
to echo the characters deleted, surrounding them with backslashes. For
example:
EXAMI;E X
X
NE<CR>
The console echoes: EXAMI;E\ E;\ NE<CR>
The console sees the command line: EXAMINE<CR>
For video terminals, the previous character is erased and the cursor is
restored to its previous position.
Ctrl/C
Ctrl/Q
Ctrl/S
Ctrl/R
The console does not delete characters past the beginning of a command line.
If you press more rubouts than there are characters on the line, the extra
rubouts are ignored. A rubout entered on a blank line is ignored.
Echoes ^C<CR> and aborts processing of a command. Has no effect as part
of a binary load data stream. Clears Ctrl/S and reenables output stopped by
Ctrl/O .
Resumes output to the console terminal. Not echoed.
Stops output to the console terminal until you enter Ctrl/Q. Not echoed.
Echoes <CR><LF>, followed by the current command line. Can be used to
improve the readability of a command line that has been heavily edited.
3–38 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–10 (Cont.): KN220 Console Control Characters (Maintenance Mode)
Character
Action
Ctrl/U
Echoes ^U<CR> and deletes the entire line. Entered, but otherwise ignored
if typed on an empty line.
3.9.1 Command Syntax in Maintenance Mode
The console accepts commands up to 80 characters long. Longer commands
produce error messages. The character count does not include rubouts,
rubbed-out characters, or the Return at the end of the command.
You can abbreviate a command by entering only as many characters as are
required to make the command unique. Most commands can be recognized
from their first character. See Table 3–14.
The console treats two or more consecutive spaces and tabs as a single
space. Leading and trailing spaces and tabs are ignored. You can place
command qualifiers after the command keyword or after any symbol or
number in the command.
All numbers (addresses, data, counts) are hexadecimal (hex) except for GPR
symbolic names, which are in decimal. The hex digits are 0 through 9 and
A through F. You can use uppercase and lowercase letters in hex numbers
(A through F) and commands.
The following symbols are qualifier and argument conventions:
[]
an optional qualifier or argument
{}
a required qualifier or argument
3.9.2 Address Specifiers in Maintenance Mode
Several commands take an address or addresses as arguments. An address
defines the address space, and the offset into that space. The console
supports six address spaces:
Physical memory
Virtual memory
Protected memory
General purpose registers (GPRs)
Internal processor registers (IPRs)
The PSL
KN220 Firmware
3–39
The address space that the console references is inherited from the previous
console reference, unless you explicitly specify another address space. The
initial address space is physical memory.
3.9.3 Symbolic Addresses in Maintenance Mode
The console supports symbolic references to addresses. A symbolic reference
defines the address space and the offset into that space. Table 3–11 lists
symbolic references supported by the console, grouped according to address
space. You do not have to use an address space qualifier when using a
symbolic address.
Table 3–11: Console Symbolic Addresses (Maintenance Mode)
Symbol
Address
Symbol
Address
R1
R3
R5
R7
R9
R11
R13
R15
FP
PC
–
1
3
5
7
9
0B
0D
0F
0D
0E
–
pr$_esp
pr$_usp
pr$_p0br
pr$_p1br
pr$_sbr
pr$_pcbb
pr$_ipl
pr$_sirr
pr$_iccr
pr$_icr
pr$_rxcs
pr$_txcs
01
03
08
0A
0C
10
12
14
18
1A
20
22
GPR Address Space (/G)
R0
R2
R4
R6
R8
R10
R12
R14
AP
SP
PSL
0
2
4
6
8
0A
0C
0E
0C
0D
–
IPR Address Space (/I)
pr$_ksp
pr$_ssp
pr$_isp
pr$_p0lr
pr$_p1lr
pr$_slr
pr$_scbb
pr$_astlv
pr$_sisr
pr$_nicr
pr$_todr
pr$_rxdb
00
02
04
09
0B
0D
11
13
15
19
1B
21
3–40 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–11 (Cont.): Console Symbolic Addresses (Maintenance
Mode)
Symbol
Address
Symbol
Address
pr$_tbdr
pr$_mcesr
pr$_savpc
pr$_ioreset
pr$_tbia
pr$_sid
–
24
26
2A
37
39
3E
–
IPR Address Space (/I)
pr$_txdb
pr$_cadr
pr$_mser
pr$_savpsl
pr$_mapen
pr$_tbis
pr$_tbchk
23
25
27
2B
38
3A
3F
Table 3–12 lists symbolic addresses that you can use in any address space.
KN220 Firmware
3–41
Table 3–12: Symbolic Addresses Used in Any Address Space
Symbol
Description
*
+
The location last referenced in an EXAMINE or DEPOSIT command.
The location immediately following the last location referenced in an EXAMINE
or DEPOSIT command. For references to physical or virtual memory spaces, the
location referenced is the last address, plus the size of the last reference (1 for
byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword, 8 for quadword). For other address spaces, the
address is the last address referenced plus one.
The location immediately preceding the last location referenced in an EXAMINE
or DEPOSIT command. For references to physical or virtual memory spaces,
the location referenced is the last address minus the size of this reference (1 for
byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword, 8 for quadword). For other address spaces, the
address is the last address referenced minus one.
The location addressed by the last location referenced in an EXAMINE or
DEPOSIT command.
–
@
3.9.4 Command Qualifiers in Maintenance Mode
You can enter console command qualifiers in any order on the command
line after the command keyword. There are three types of qualifiers: data
control, address space control, and command specific. Table 3–13 lists and
describes the data control and address space control qualifiers. Command
specific qualifiers are listed in the descriptions of individual commands.
3–42 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–13: Console Command Qualifiers (Maintenance Mode)
Qualifier
Description
Data Control
/B
/W
/L
/Q
/N:{count}
/STEP:{size}
The data size is byte.
The data size is word.
The data size is longword.
The data size is quadword.
An unsigned hexadecimal integer that is evaluated as a longword. This
qualifier determines the number of additional operations that are to take place
on EXAMINE, DEPOSIT, MOVE, and SEARCH commands. An error message
appears if the number overflows 32 bits.
Step. Overrides the default increment of the console current reference.
Commands that manipulate memory, such as EXAMINE, DEPOSIT, MOVE,
and SEARCH normally increment the console current reference by the size of
the data being used.
Address Space Control
/G
/I
/V
/P
/M
/U
General purpose register (GPR) address space, R0–R15. The data size is
always longword.
Internal processor register (IPR) address space. Accessible only by the MTPR
and MFPR instructions. The data size is always longword.
Virtual memory address space. All access and protection checking occur. If
access to a program running with the current PSL is not allowed, the console
issues an error message. Deposits to virtual space cause the PTE<M> bit to be
set. If memory mapping is not enabled, virtual addresses are equal to physical
addresses. Note that when you examine virtual memory, the address space
and address in the response is the physical address of the virtual address.
Physical memory address space.
Processor status longword (PSL) address space. The data size is always
longword.
Access to console private memory is allowed. This qualifier also disables
virtual address protection checks. On virtual address writes, the PTE<M>
bit is not set if the /U qualifier is present. This qualifier is not inherited; it
must be respecified on each command.
KN220 Firmware
3–43
3.9.5 Maintenance Mode Command Keywords
Table 3–14 lists maintenance mode command keywords by type. Table 3–15
lists the parameters, qualifiers, and arguments for each console command.
Parameters, used with the SET and SHOW commands only, are listed in
the first column along with the command.
Although it is possible to abbreviate by using the minimum number of
characters required to uniquely identify a command or parameter, these
abbreviations may become ambiguous at a later time if a new command or
parameter is added in an updated version of the firmware. For this reason
you should not use abbreviations in programs.
Table 3–14: Command Keywords by Type (Maintenance Mode)
Processor Control
Data Transfer
Console Control
BOOT
CONTINUE
HALT
INITIALIZE
NEXT
START
UNJAM
EXAMINE
DEPOSIT
MOVE
SEARCH
X
DC [qualifier]
CONFIGURE
FIND
REPEAT
SET
SHOW
TEST
!
DC
UNPRIV
Table 3–15: Console Command Summary (Maintenance Mode)
Command
Qualifiers1
Argument
Other(s)
BOOT
CONFIGURE
CONTINUE
DC
DC/RESTORE
DC/SAVE
DC/ZERO
DEPOSIT
/R5:{boot_flags} or /{boot_flags}
–
–
–
–
–
–
/B /W /L /Q
/G /I /V /P /M /U
/N:{count} /STEP:{size}
[{boot_device}]
–
–
–
{tape_device}
{tape_device}
–
{address}
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
{data} [{data}]
1 {}
denotes a mandatory item that must be syntactically correct.
[ ] denotes an optional item.
! denotes an ‘‘or’’ condition.
3–44 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 3–15 (Cont.): Console Command Summary (Maintenance
Mode)
Command
Qualifiers1
Argument
Other(s)
EXAMINE
/B /W /L /Q
/G /I /V /P /M /U
/N:{count} /STEP:{size}
/INSTRUCTION
–
/MEM /RPB
–
–
–
/B /W /L /Q
/V /P /U
/N:{count} /STEP:{size}
–
–
/B /W /L /Q
/V /P /U
/N:{count} /STEP:{size}
/NOT
–
–
/DUP {/DSSI n /UQSSP}
{/DISK n
/TAPE n csr_address}
/{MAINTENANCE /UQSSP}
{/SERVICE n csr_address}
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
/FULL
–
/FULL
–
–
[address]
–
–
–
–
–
–
{src_address}
–
–
–
–
–
{dest_address}
[count]
{command}
{start_address}
–
–
{pattern} [{mask}]
EXIT
FIND
HALT
HELP
INITIALIZE
MOVE
NEXT
REPEAT
SEARCH
SET BFLAG
SET BOOT
SET HOST
SET LANGUAGE
SHOW BFLAG
SHOW BOOT
SHOW DEVICE
SHOW DSSI
SHOW ETHERNET
SHOW LANGUAGE
SHOW MEMORY
SHOW QBUS
SHOW SCSI
SHOW UQSSP
SHOW VERSION
{boot_flags}
–
{device_string}
–
{node} n
[{task}]
{controller_number}
{language_type}
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
1 {}
denotes a mandatory item that must be syntactically correct.
[ ] denotes an optional item.
! denotes an ‘‘or’’ condition.
KN220 Firmware
3–45
Table 3–15 (Cont.): Console Command Summary (Maintenance
Mode)
Command
Qualifiers1
Argument
Other(s)
START
TEST
UNJAM
UNPRIV
X
–
–
–
–
–
[{address}]
{test_number}
–
–
{address}
–
[{parameters}]
–
–
{count}
1 {}
denotes a mandatory item that must be syntactically correct.
[ ] denotes an optional item.
! denotes an ‘‘or’’ condition.
3–46 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10 Maintenance Mode Commands
This section describes the maintenance mode commands. Enter the
commands at the maintenance mode prompt (>>>). These commands may
be typed in uppercase or lowercase letters. However, they are shown in all
uppercase letters in this document to differentiate them from the normal
mode commands, which must be typed in all lowercase letters.
3.10.1 BOOT
The BOOT command initializes the processor and transfers execution to
VMB. VMB attempts to boot MDM from the specified device or from the
default boot device if none is specified. The console qualifies the bootstrap
operation by passing a boot flags bitmap to VMB in R5.
Format:
BOOT [qualifier-list] [device_name]
If you do not enter either the qualifier or the device name, the default value
is used. Explicitly stating the boot flags or the boot device overrides, but
does not permanently change, the corresponding default value.
Set the default boot device and boot flags with the SET BOOT and SET
BFLAG commands. If you do not set a default boot device, the processor
times out after 30 seconds and attempts to boot from the on-board Ethernet
port, EZA0.
Qualifiers:
Command specific:
/R5:{bitmap}
A 32-bit hex value passed to VMB in R5. The console does not interpret this
value. Use the SET BFLAG command to specify a default boot flags longword.
Use the SHOW BFLAG command to display the longword. Table 3–4 lists the
supported R5 boot flags.
/{bitmap}
Same as /R5:{bitmap}
[device_name] A character string of up to 39 characters. Longer strings cause a VAL TOO
BIG error message. Apart from length, the console makes no attempt to
interpret or validate the device name. The console converts the string to
uppercase, then passes to VMB a string descriptor to this device name in R0.
Example:
>>> BOOT XQA0! Boot using default boot flags and
(BOOT/R5:10 XQA0)
! specified device.
2..
-XQA0
KN220 Firmware
3–47
3.10.2 CONFIGURE
The CONFIGURE command invokes an interactive mode that permits you
to enter Q22-bus device names, then generates a table of Q22-bus I/O page
device CSR addresses and interrupt vectors. CONFIGURE is similar to
the ULTRIX shoadrs utility. This command simplifies field configuration
by providing information that is typically available only with a running
operating system. Refer to the example below and use the CONFIGURE
command as follows:
1. Enter CONFIGURE at the maintenance mode prompt (>>>).
2. Enter at the Device, Number? prompt to see a list of devices whose
CSR addresses and interrupt vectors can be determined.
3. Enter the device names and number of devices.
4. Enter EXIT to obtain the CSR address and interrupt vector assignments.
The devices listed in the HELP display are not necessarily supported by
the KN220–AA CPU.
3–48 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Format:
CONFIGURE
Example:
>>> CONFIGURE
Enter device configuration, HELP, or
Device,Number? help
Devices:
LPV11
KXJ11
DLV11J
RLV12
TSV05
RXV21
DMV11
DELQA
DEQNA
RRD50
RQC25
KFQSA-DISK
RV20
KFQSA-TAPE
KMV11
CXA16
CXB16
CXY08
LNV21
QPPSS
DSV11
KWV11C
ADV11D
AAV11D
DRQ3B
VSV21
IBQ01
IDV11D
IAV11A
IAV11B
DESNA
IGQ11
DIV32
KWV32
KZQSA
Numbers:
1 to 255, default is 1
Device,Number? cxa16,2
Device,Number? cxy08
Device,Number? tqk70
Device,Number? kda50
Device,Number? kzqsa
Device,Number? exit
EXIT
DZQ11
DRV11W
DESQA
TQK50
IEQ11
VCB01
ADV11C
VCB02
IDV11A
MIRA
KIV32
DZV11
DRV11B
RQDX3
TQK70
DHQ11
QVSS
AAV11C
QDSS
IDV11B
ADQ32
DTCN5
DFA01
DPV11
KDA50
TU81E
DHV11
LNV11
AXV11C
DRV11J
IDV11C
DTC04
DTC05
Address/Vector Assignments
-772150/154 KDA50
-774500/260 TQK70
-760440/300 CXA16
-760460/310 CXA16
-760500/320 CXY08
-761400/330 KZQSA
>>>
KN220 Firmware
3–49
3.10.3 CONTINUE
CAUTION: If the operating system state has not been properly saved
(halted), do not type CONTINUE. Doing so may cause the processor to hang.
The CONTINUE command causes the processor to begin instruction
execution at the address currently contained in the PC. It does not perform
a processor initialization.
Format:
CONTINUE
Example:
>>> CONTINUE
3–50 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.4 DC
The DC command acts on the contents of the nonvolatile disk cache, by
diagnosing (no modifier), restoring, saving, or zeroing.
Whenever the system notifies that "NVRAM dirty," back up the NVRAM
and replace the CPU. Then restore the NVRAM to the new CPU before you
boot the system. See Appendix D.
Format:
DC [/RESTORE] [/SAVE] [/ZERO]
Examples:
>>> DC/SAVE
>>> dc
At the dc command, if the CPU board’s cache contains data the following
message is displayed on the console terminal:
Disk Cache - Dirty
At the dc command, if the CPU board’s cache does not contain any data the
following message is displayed on the console terminal:
Disk Cache - Clean
If there is no data in the cache (cache is clean), you can follow normal
procedures for rebooting or troubleshooting.
You should always run the dc command before replacing or using any
DECsystem 5500 CPU board.
>>> dc/save mua0
Disk Cache - Dirty
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
-MUA0
Zero Disk Cache (y/n)? y
>>>
>>> dc/restore mua0
Disk Cache - Dirty
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
-MUA0
>>>
If the cache is clean, as in the following example, the contents of the tape
(in this example, mua0) are loaded into the cache.
KN220 Firmware
3–51
>>> dc/restore mua0
Disk Cache - Clean
-MUA0
>>>
When the system reboots, the contents of the cache are moved to the
appropriate disks.
>>> dc/zero
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
The command prompts you to confirm that you want to clear the contents
of the cache and then fills the cache with zeroes. You can use this command
as a security measure to ensure that the cache is cleared.
3–52 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.5 DEPOSIT
The DEPOSIT command deposits data into the address specified. If you
do not specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the
last address space and data size used in a DEPOSIT, EXAMINE, MOVE,
or SEARCH command. After processor initialization, the default address
space is physical memory, the default data size is longword, and the default
address is zero. If you specify conflicting address space or data sizes, the
console ignores the command and issues an error message.
Format:
DEPOSIT [qualifier_list] {address} {data} [data...]
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}
Address space control: /G, /I, /P, /V, /U, /M
Arguments:
{address}
A longword address that specifies the first location into which data is deposited.
The address can be an actual address or a symbolic address.
{data}
The data to be deposited. If the specified data is larger than the deposit data size,
the firmware ignores the command and issues an error response. If the specified
data is smaller than the deposit data size, it is extended on the left with zeros.
[data]
Additional data to be deposited (as many as can fit on the command line).
Examples:
>>> D/P/B/N:1FF 0 0
! Clear first 512 bytes of physical memory.
>>> D/V/L/N:3 1234 5
! Deposit 5 into four longwords starting
! at virtual memory address 1234.
>>> D/N:8 R0 FFFFFFFF ! Loads GPRs R0 through R8 with -1.
>>> D/L/P/N:10/S:200 0 8
! Deposit 8 in the first longword of
! the first 17 pages in physical
! memory starting at location 0.
>>> D/N:200/8 - 0
! Starting at previous address,
! clear 513 bytes.
KN220 Firmware
3–53
3.10.6 EXAMINE
The EXAMINE command examines the contents of the memory location or
register specified by the address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.
The display line consists of a single character address specifier, the physical
address to be examined, and the examined data.
EXAMINE uses the same qualifiers as DEPOSIT. The EXAMINE command
also supports an /INSTRUCTION qualifier, which will disassemble the
instructions at the current address.
Format:
EXAMINE [qualifier_list] [address]
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}
Address space control: /G, /I, /P, /V, /U, /M
Command specific:
/INSTRUCTION
Disassembles and displays the VAX MACRO–32 instruction at the specified
address.
Arguments:
[address]
A longword address that specifies the first location to be examined. The
address can be an actual or a symbolic address. If no address is specified,
+ is assumed.
3–54 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Examples:
>>>
G
>>>
G
>>>
M
>>>
M
>>>
G
G
G
G
G
G
EXAMINE PC
! Examine the PC.
0000000F FFFFFFFC
EXAMINE SP
! Examine the SP.
0000000E 00000200
EXAMINE PSL
! Examine the PSL.
00000000 041F0000
EXAMINE/M
! Examine PSL another way.
00000000 041F0000
EXAMINE R4/N:5 ! Examine R4 through R9.
00000004 00000000
00000005 00000000
00000006 00000000
00000007 00000000
00000008 00000000
00000009 801D9000
>>> EXAMINE PR$_SCBB ! Examine the SCBB, IPR 17
I 00000011 2004A000
! (decimal).
>>> EXAMINE/P 0 ! Examine local memory 0.
P 00000000 00000000
>>> EXAMINE/INS 20040000 ! Examine 1st instruction
! in ROM.
P 20040000
11 BRB
20040019
>>>
P
P
P
P
P
P
EXAMINE/INS/N:5 20040019 ! Disassemble from branch.
20040019
D0 MOVL
I^#20140000,@#20140000
20040024
D2 MCOML
@#20140030,@#20140502
2004002F
D2 MCOML
S^#0E,@#20140030
20040036
7D MOVQ
R0,@#201404B2
2004003D
D0 MOVL
I^#201404B2,R1
20040044
DB MFPR
S^#2A,B^44(R1)
>>> EXAMINE/INS ! Look at next instruction.
P 20040048
DB MFPR
S^#2B,B^48(R1)
>>>
KN220 Firmware
3–55
3.10.7 EXIT
The EXIT command exits from maintenance mode (>>>) to the normal mode
prompt (>>). This command idles the CVAX chip. The maint command,
typed in lowercase letters from the normal mode prompt, returns you to
maintenance mode.
Format:
EXIT
Example:
>>> EXIT ! From maintenance mode, exit to
! normal mode.
>> maint ! From normal mode, exit to maintenance mode.
>>>
3–56 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.8 FIND
The FIND command searches main memory starting at address zero for a
page-aligned 128-Kbyte segment of good memory, or a restart parameter
block (RPB). If the command finds the segment or RPB, its address plus
512 is left in SP (R14). If it does not find the segment or RPB, the console
issues an error message and preserves the contents of SP. If you do not
specify a qualifier, /RPB is assumed.
Format:
FIND [qualifier-list]
Qualifiers:
Command specific:
/MEM
/RPB
Searches memory for a page-aligned block of good memory, 128 Kbytes in length.
The search looks only at memory that is deemed usable by the bitmap. This
command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.
Searches all of physical memory for an RPB. The search does not use the bitmap
to qualify which pages are looked at. The command leaves the contents of memory
unchanged.
Examples:
>>>
G
>>>
>>>
G
>>>
?2C
>>>
EXAMINE SP ! Check the SP.
0000000E 00000000
FIND /MEM
! Look for a valid 128 Kbyte.
EXAMINE SP ! Note where it was found.
0000000E 00000200
FIND /RPB
! Check for valid RPB.
FND ERR 00C00004
! None to be found here.
KN220 Firmware
3–57
3.10.9 HALT
The HALT command has no effect. It is included for compatibility with
other VAX consoles.
Format:
HALT
Example:
>>> HALT
>>>
! Pretend to halt.
3–58 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.10 HELP
The HELP command provides information about command syntax and
usage.
Format:
HELP
Example:
>>> HELP
Following is a brief summary of all the commands supported by the
console:
UPPERCASE
|
[]
<>
denotes a keyword that you must type in
denotes an OR condition
denotes optional parameters
denotes a field that must be filled in
with a syntactically correct value
Valid qualifiers:
/B /W /L /Q /INSTRUCTION
/G /I /V /P /M
/STEP: /N: /NOT /U
Valid commands:
DEPOSIT [<QUALIFIERS>] <ADDRESS> [<DATUM> [<DATUM>]]
EXAMINE [<QUALIFIERS>] [<ADDRESS>]
MOVE [<QUALIFIERS>] <ADDRESS> <ADDRESS>
SEARCH [<QUALIFIERS>] <ADDRESS> <PATTERN> [<MASK>]
SET BFLG <BOOT_FLAGS>
SET BOOT <BOOT_DEVICE>[:]
SET HOST/DUP/DSSI <NODE_NUMBER> [<TASK>]
SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP </DISK | /TAPE> <CONTROLLER_NUMBER> [<TASK>]
SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP <PHYSICAL_CSR_ADDRESS> [<TASK>]
SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP/SERVICE <CONTROLLER_NUMBER>
SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP <PHYSICAL_CSR_ADDRESS>
SET LANGUAGE <LANGUAGE_NUMBER>
SHOW BFLG
SHOW BOOT
SHOW DEVICE
SHOW DSSI
SHOW SCSI [/FULL]
SHOW ETHERNET
SHOW LANGUAGE
SHOW MEMORY [/FULL]
SHOW QBUS
SHOW UQSSP
SHOW VME
SHOW VERSION
HALT
KN220 Firmware
3–59
INITIALIZE
UNJAM
CONTINUE
START <ADDRESS>
REPEAT
X <ADDRESS> <COUNT>
FIND [/MEM | /RPB]
TEST [<TEST_CODE> [<PARAMETERS>]]
BOOT [/R5:<BOOT_FLAGS> | /<BOOT_FLAGS>] [<BOOT_DEVICE>[:]]
NEXT [count]
CONFIGURE
EXIT
UNPRIV
DC [[</SAVE | /RESTORE <TAPE_DEVICE>>] | /ZERO]
HELP
>>>
3–60 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.11 INITIALIZE
The INITIALIZE command performs a processor initialization.
Format:
INITIALIZE
The following registers are initialized:
Register
State at Initialization
PSL
IPL
ASTLVL
SISR
ICCS
RXCS
TXCS
MAPEN
CVAX cache
Instruction buffer
Console previous reference
TODR
Main memory
General registers
Halt code
Bootstrap-in-progress flag
Internal restart-in-progress flag
041F0000
1F
4
0
Bits <6> and <0> clear; the rest are unpredictable
0
80
0
Disabled, all entries invalid
Unaffected
Longword, physical, address 0
Unaffected
Unaffected
Unaffected
Unaffected
Unaffected
Unaffected
KN220 Firmware
3–61
The firmware clears all error status bits and initializes as follows:
1. Clears any interrupts.
2. Initializes pr$_scbb to console SCB.
3. Initializes the IPR:
ipri$1_ipr
ipri$1_val
ipri$s_ipri
pr$_ipl
pr$_astlvl
pr$_sisr
pr$_iccs
pr$_rxcs
pr$_txcs
pr$_mapen
ctx_base plus ctx$1_psl
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
0
4
8
^x0000001F
^x00000004
^x00000000
^x00000000
^x00000000
^x00000080
^x00000000
^x041F0000
4. Flushes and disables the chip cache.
5. Initializes the SSC.
6. Initializes the console state:
Sets the current and previous reference to PHYSICAL and LONG
at address 0; current datum is then 0; clears the exit flag:
cs_base plus cs$1_address
cs_base plus cs$1_prev_address
cs_base plus cs$1_datus_size
cs_base plus cs$q_datum
cs_base plus cs$1_qv
plus 4*qual$v_n
ctx_base plus ctx$b_exit
=0
=0
=4
=0
=0
=0
Example:
>>> init
>>>
3–62 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.12 MOVE
The MOVE command copies the block of memory starting at the source
address to a block beginning at the destination address. Typically, this
command has an /N qualifier so that more than one datum is transferred.
The destination correctly reflects the original contents of the source,
regardless of the overlap between the source and the data.
The MOVE command actually performs byte, word, longword, and
quadword reads and writes as needed in the process of moving the data.
Moves are supported only for the physical and virtual address spaces.
Format:
MOVE [qualifier-list] {src_address} {dest_address}
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size},
Address space control: /V, /U, /P
Arguments:
{src_address}
A longword address that specifies the first location of the source data to be
copied.
{dest_address}
A longword address that specifies the destination of the first byte of data.
These addresses may be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no
address is specified, + is assumed.
KN220 Firmware
3–63
Examples:
>>> EXAMINE/N:4 0 ! Observe destination.
P 00000000 00000000
P 00000004 00000000
P 00000008 00000000
P 0000000C 00000000
P 00000010 00000000
>>> EXAMINE/N:4 200 ! Observe source data.
P 00000200 58DD0520
P 00000204 585E04C1
P 00000208 00FF8FBB
P 0000020C 5208A8D0
P 00000210 540CA8DE
>>> MOVE/N:4 200 0
! Move the data.
>>> EXAMINE/N:4 0
! Observe moved data.
P 00000000 58DD0520
P 00000004 585E04C1
P 00000008 00FF8FBB
P 0000000C 5208A8D0
P 00000010 540CA8DE
>>>
3–64 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.13 NEXT
The NEXT command executes the specified number of macro instructions.
If no count is specified, 1 (one) is assumed.
After the last macro instruction is executed, the console reenters
maintenance mode.
Format:
NEXT [count]
The console implements the NEXT command, using the trace trap enable
and trace pending bits in the PSL and the trace pending vector in the SCB.
The following restrictions apply:
•
If memory management is enabled, the NEXT command works only if
the first page in SSC RAM is mapped in S0 (system) space.
•
Overhead associated with the NEXT command affects execution time
of an instruction.
•
The NEXT command elevates the IPL to 31 for long periods of time
(milliseconds) while single stepping over several commands.
•
Unpredictable results occur if the macro instruction being stepped over
modifies either the SCBB or the trace trap entry. This means that you
cannot use the NEXT command in conjunction with other debuggers.
Arguments:
[count]
A value representing the number of macro instructions to execute.
Examples:
>>> EXAMINE PC
G 0000000F 00000200
>>> NEXT
PC = 00000202
>>> NEXT 4
PC = 00000213
>>>
KN220 Firmware
3–65
>>>
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
EXAMINE/INS/N:10 0
00000000
01 NOP
00000001
01 NOP
00000002
01 NOP
00000003
01 NOP
00000004
01 NOP
00000005
01 NOP
00000006
01 NOP
00000007
01 NOP
00000008
11 BRB
0000000A
01 NOP
0000000B
01 NOP
0000000C
00 HALT
0000000D
00 HALT
0000000E
00 HALT
0000000F
00 HALT
00000010
00 HALT
00000011
00 HALT
00000002
>>> DEP PC 0
>>>
P
>>>
P
>>>
P
>>>
P
>>>
P
>>>
P
P
P
P
P
N
00000001
N
00000002
N
00000003
N
00000004
N
00000005
N 5
00000006
00000007
00000008
00000002
00000003
01 NOP
01 NOP
01 NOP
01 NOP
01 NOP
01
01
11
01
01
NOP
NOP
BRB
NOP
NOP
00000002
3–66 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.14 REPEAT
The REPEAT command repeatedly displays and executes the specified
command. Press Ctrl/C to stop the command. You can specify any valid
console command except the REPEAT command.
Format:
REPEAT {command}
Arguments:
{command} A valid console command other than REPEAT.
Examples:
>>>
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
>>>
REPEAT EXAMINE PR$_TODR ! Watch the clock.
0000001B 5AFE78CE
0000001B 5AFE78D1
0000001B 5AFE78FD
0000001B 5AFE7900
0000001B 5AFE7903
0000001B 5AFE7907
0000001B 5AFE790A
0000001B 5AFE790D
0000001B 5AFE7910
0000001B 5AFE793C
0000001B 5AFE793F
0000001B 5AFE7942
0000001B 5AFE7946
0000001B 5AFE7949
0000001B 5AFE794C
0000001B 5AFE794F
0000001B 5^C
KN220 Firmware
3–67
3.10.15 SEARCH
The SEARCH command finds all occurrences of a pattern and reports the
addresses where the pattern was found. If the /NOT qualifier is present,
the command reports all addresses in which the pattern did not match.
Format:
SEARCH [qualifier_list] {address} {pattern} [{mask}]
SEARCH accepts an optional mask that indicates bits to be ignored (don’t
care bits). For example, to ignore bit 0 in the comparison, specify a mask
of 1. The mask, if not present, defaults to 0.
A match occurs if (pattern AND mask complement) = (data AND mask
complement), where:
pattern is the target data
mask is the optional don’t care bitmask (which defaults to 0)
data is the data at the current address
SEARCH reports the address under the following conditions:
/NOT Qualifier
Match Condition
Action
Absent
Absent
Present
Present
True
False
True
False
Report address
No report
No report
Report address
The address is advanced by the size of the pattern (byte, word, longword,
or quadword), unless overridden by the /STEP qualifier.
Qualifiers:
Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}
Address space control: /P, /V, /U
Command-specific:
/NOT
Inverts the sense of the match.
3–68 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Arguments:
{start_address} A longword address that specifies the first location subject to the search. This
address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is
specified, + is assumed.
{pattern}
The target data.
[{mask}]
A longword containing the bits desired in the comparison.
Examples:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
DEPOSIT /P/L/N:1000 0 0 !Clear some memory.
DEPOSIT 300 12345678 !Deposit some search data.
DEPOSIT 401 12345678
DEPOSIT 502 87654321
>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 12345678 !Search for all occurrences
P 00000300 12345678
!of 12345678 on any byte
P 00000401 12345678
!boundary.
>>> SEARCH /N:1000 0 12345678 !Try on longword boundaries.
P 00000300 12345678
>>>
P
P
P
P
P
SEARCH /N:1000 /NOT 0 0 !Search for all nonzero
00000300 12345678
!longwords.
00000400 34567800
00000404 00000012
00000500 43210000
00000504 00008765
>>>
P
P
P
P
SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 1 FFFFFFFE !Search for odd longwords
00000502 87654321
!on any boundary.
00000503 00875543
00000504 00008765
00000505 00000087
>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /B 0 12 !Search for all occurrences
P 00000303 12
!of the byte 12.
P 00000404 12
>>> SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 /W 0 FE11
>>>
>>>
>>>
!Search for all words that
!could be interpreted as a
!spin (10$:brb 10$).
!None were found.
KN220 Firmware
3–69
3.10.16 SET
The SET command sets the parameter to the value you specify.
Format:
SET {parameter} {value}
Parameters:
BFLAG
Set the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hex number of up to 8 digits.
See Table 3–4, VMB Boot Flags, for a list of the boot flags.
BOOT
Set the default boot device. The value must be a valid device name as specified
in the BOOT command description, Section 3.10.1.
HOST
Connect to the DUP or MAINTENANCE driver on the selected node or device.
Note the hierarchy of the SET HOST qualifiers below.
/DUP—Use the DUP driver to execute local programs of a device on either the
DSSI bus or the Q22-bus.
/DSSI node—Attach to the DSSI node. A node is a name up to 8 characters
in length or a number from 0 to 7.
/UQSSP—Attach to the UQSSP device specified using one of the following
methods:
/DISK n—Specifies the disk controller number, where n is a number
from 0 to 255. The resulting fixed address for n=0 is 20001468 for the
first TMSCP controller, and the floating rank for n>0 is 26.
/TAPE n—Specifies the tape controller number, where n is a number
from 0 to 255. The resulting fixed address for n=0 is 20001940 for the
first MSCP controller, and the floating rank for n>0 is 30.
csr_address—Specifies the Q22-bus I/O page CSR address for the
device.
/MAINTENANCE—Examines and modifies DSSI controller module configuration values. Does not accept a task value.
/UQSSP—
/SERVICE n—Specifies service for DSSI controller module n, where n
is a value from 0 to 3. (The resulting fixed address of a DSSI controller
module in maintenance mode is 20001910+4*n.)
/csr_address—Specifies the Q22-bus I/O page CSR address for the
DSSI controller module.
LANGUAGE Sets console language and keyboard type. If the current console terminal does
not support the Digital Multinational Character Set (MCS), then this command
has no effect and the console message appears in English. Values are 1 through
15. Refer to Example 3–1 for the languages you can select.
Qualifiers: Listed in the parameter descriptions above.
3–70 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Examples:
>>> SET BFLAG 220
! Sets boot flags 5 and 9 (See boot flag
! table in the BOOT command description.)
>>> SET BOOT DUA0
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 0
Starting DUP server...
DSSI Node 0 (SUSAN)
DRVEXR V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
DRVTST V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
HISTRY V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
ERASE V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
PARAMS V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
DIRECT V1.0 D 2-JUN-1989
Copyright © 1988 Digital
10:01:35
10:01:35
10:01:35
10:01:35
10:01:35
10:01:35
Equipment Corporation
Task Name? PARAMS
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> STAT PATH
ID
-0
1
4
5
2
3
Path Block
-----------PB FF811ECC
PB FF8120D4
PB FF8121D8
PB FF8120DC
PB FF8122E0
PB FF8124E4
Remote Node
--------------Internal Path
KAREN RFX V101
WILMA RFX V101
BETTY RFX V101
DSSI1 VMS V5.0
3
VMB BOOT
DGS_S DGS_R
------ -----0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
MSGS_S
-----0
0
0
0
816
50
MSGS_R
-----0
0
0
0
3045
52
PARAMS> EXIT
Exiting...
Task Name?
Stopping DUP server...
KN220 Firmware
3–71
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 0 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
DSSI Node 0 (SUSAN)
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SHOW NODE
Parameter
Current
--------- -------------NODENAME
SUSAN
Default
-----------RF30
Type
-------String
Radix
----Ascii
Default
-----------0
Type
-------Byte
Radix
----Dec B
PARAMS> SHOW ALLCLASS
Parameter
Current
--------- -------------ALLCLASS
1
PARAMS> EXIT
Exiting...
Stopping DUP server...
>>>
3–72 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
B
3.10.17 SHOW
The SHOW command displays the console parameter you specify.
Format:
SHOW {parameter}
Parameters:
BFLAG
Displays the default R5 boot flags.
BOOT
Displays the default boot device.
DEVICE
Displays all devices displayed by the SHOW DSSI, SHOW ETHERNET, SHOW
SCSI, SHOW UQSSP, and SHOW VME commands.
DSSI
Displays the status of all nodes that can be found on the DSSI bus. For each
node on the DSSI bus, the firmware displays the node number, the node name,
and the boot name and type of the device, if available. The command does not
indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.
The node that issues the command is listed with a node name of * (asterisk).
The device information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP
command GET UNIT STATUS. If a node is not running or is not capable of
running an MSCP server, then no device information is displayed.
ETHERNET Displays hardware Ethernet address for all Ethernet adapters that can be
found, both on-board and on the Q22-bus. Displays as blank if no Ethernet
adapter is present.
LANGUAGE Displays console language and keyboard type. Refer to the corresponding SET
LANGUAGE command for the meaning.
MEMORY
Displays main memory configuration board-by-board, if available.
Section 4.8.9.)
(See
/FULL—Additionally, displays the normally inaccessible areas of memory, such
as the PFN bitmap pages, the console scratch memory pages, the Q22-bus
scatter-gather map pages. Also reports the addresses of bad pages, as defined
by the bitmap.
QBUS
Displays all Q22-bus I/O addresses that respond to an aligned word read, and
vector and device name information. For each address, the console displays the
address in the VAX I/O space in hex, the address as it would appear in the Q22bus I/O space in octal, and the word data that was read in hex. Also displays
the vector that you should set up and device name(s) that could be associated
with the CSR.
This command may take several minutes to complete. Press Ctrl/C to terminate the command.
During execution, the command disables the scatter-gather map so that it can search for
memory on the Q-bus.
KN220 Firmware
3–73
SCSI
Displays the status of all nodes that can be found on the SCSI bus. For each
node, the firmware displays the node number and the boot name and type of
the device, if available. The command does not indicate whether the device
contains a bootable image.
/FULL—Displays the boot path, device type, device capacity, product ID,
revision, and fixed or removable.
UQSSP
Displays the status of all disks and tapes that can be found on the Q22-bus that
support the UQSSP protocol. For each such disk or tape on the Q22-bus, the
firmware displays the controller number, the controller CSR address, and the
boot name and type of each device connected to the controller. The command
does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.
This information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP command
GET UNIT STATUS. The console does not display device information if a node
is not running (or cannot run) an MSCP server.
VERSION
Displays the current firmware version.
VME
Displays presence of VME interface board.
Qualifiers: Listed in the parameter descriptions above.
Examples:
>>> SHOW BFLAG
00000220
>>> SHOW BOOT
DUA0
>>> SHOW DEVICE
DSSI Node 0 (R7YRMS)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
SCSI Node 0
-rz(0,0,*) (RZ56 )
SCSI Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-tm(0,0) (TK70) -MUA0
Ethernet Adapter
-mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-12-81-22)
Ethernet Adapter 0 (774440)
-XQA0 (08-00-2B-08-CB-5C)
VME Interface Board - Not Installed
>>>
3–74 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
>>> SHOW DSSI
DSSI Node 0 (SUSAN)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (KAREN)
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
>>> SHOW ETHERNET
Ethernet Adapter
-mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-12-81-22)
Ethernet Adapter 0 (774440)
-XQA0 (08-00-2B-08-CB-5C)
>>>
>>> SHOW LANGUAGE
English (United States/Canada)
>>> SHOW MEMORY
Memory 1: 00000000
Memory 2: 02000000
Memory 3: 04000000
Memory 4: 06000000
to
to
to
to
01FFFFFF,
03FFFFFF,
05FFFFFF,
07FFFFFF,
32MB,
32MB,
32MB,
32MB,
0
0
0
0
bad
bad
bad
bad
pages
pages
pages
pages
Total of 128MB, 0 bad pages, 160 reserved pages
>>>
>>> SHOW MEMORY/FULL
Memory 1: 00000000 to
Memory 2: 02000000 to
Memory 3: 04000000 to
Memory 4: 06000000 to
01FFFFFF,
03FFFFFF,
05FFFFFF,
07FFFFFF,
32MB,
32MB,
32MB,
32MB,
0
0
0
0
bad
bad
bad
bad
pages
pages
pages
pages
Total of 128MB, 0 bad pages, 160 reserved pages
Memory Bitmap
-07FEC000 to 07FF3FFF, 64 pages
Console Scratch Area
-07FF4000 to 07FF7FFF, 32 pages
Qbus Map
-07FF8000 to 07FFFFFF, 64 pages
Scan of Bad Pages
>>>
KN220 Firmware
3–75
>>> SHOW QBUS
Scan of Qbus I/O Space
-20001468 (772150) = 4000 (154) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/X-DISK
-2000146A (772152) = 0B40
-20001940 (774500) = 0000 (260) TQK50/TQK70/TU81E/RV20/X-TAPE
-20001942 (774502) = 0BC0
-20001F40 (777500) = 0020 (004) IPCR
Scan of Qbus Memory Space
>>> SHOW SCSI
SCSI Node 0
-tz(0,0,*) (TLZ04) -DIA0
SCSI Node 1
-rz(0,1,*) (RZ56 )
SCSI Node 2
-rz(0,2,*) (RRD40) -DIA2
SCSI Node 4
-tz(0,4,*) (.....) -DIA4
SCSI Node 7 (*)
>>>
>>> SHOW SCSI/FULL
Boot Path
Dev
Cap (in Hex)
Product Id
Revs
r/f
-------------------------------------------------------------------tl(0,0,*)
TAPE
4B0 MBs
TLZ04 1989(C)DEC
0304
r
-rz(0,1,*)
DISK
27A MBs
RZ56
(C) DEC
0200
f
-rz(0,2,*)
CDROM
23B MBs
RRD40
TM DEC
250E
r
-tz(0,4,*)
TAPE
5A MBs
................
....
r
SCSI Node 7
>>>
>>> SHOW UQSSP
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (772150)
-MUA0 -tm(0,0) (TK70)
>>> SHOW VERSION
KN220-A Vn.n
>>>
3–76 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.18 START
The START command starts instruction execution at the address you
specify. If no address is given, the current PC is used. If memory mapping
is enabled, macro instructions are executed from virtual memory, and the
address is treated as a virtual address. The START command is equivalent
to a DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a CONTINUE. It does not perform a
processor initialization.
Format:
START [address]
Arguments:
[address]
The address at which to begin execution. This address is loaded into the user’s
PC.
Example:
>>> START
1000
KN220 Firmware
3–77
3.10.19 TEST
The TEST command invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test
number. If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), all tests allowed to be
executed from the console terminal are executed. The console accepts an
optional list of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.
Refer to Chapter 4 for a detailed explanation of the diagnostics.
Format:
TEST {test_number} [test_arguments]
Arguments:
{test_number}
A two-digit hex number specifying the test to be executed.
[test_arguments]
Up to five additional test arguments. These arguments are accepted
but they have no meaning to the console.
Example:
>>> TEST 0 !Execute the power-up diagnostic script.
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
3–78 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3.10.20 UNJAM
The UNJAM command performs an I/O bus reset, by writing a 1 (one) to
IPR 55 (decimal).
Format:
UNJAM
Example:
>>> UNJAM
>>>
KN220 Firmware
3–79
3.10.21 X—Binary Load and Unload
The X command is for use by automatic systems communicating with the
console.
The X command loads or unloads (that is, writes to memory or reads from
memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial line
(regardless of console type) starting at the specified address.
Format:
X {address} {count} CR {line_checksum} {data} {data_checksum}
If bit 31 of the count is clear, data is received by the console and deposited
into memory. If bit 31 is set, data is read from memory and sent by the
console. The remaining bits in the count are a positive number indicating
the number of bytes to load or unload.
The console accepts the command upon receiving the carriage return.
The next byte the console receives is the command checksum, which is
not echoed. The command checksum is verified by adding all command
characters, including the checksum and separating space (but not including
the terminating carriage return, rubouts, or characters deleted by rubout),
into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If no errors occur, the result is
zero. If the command checksum is correct, the console responds with the
input prompt and either sends data to the requester or prepares to receive
data. If the command checksum is in error, the console responds with an
error message. The intent is to prevent inadvertent operator entry into a
mode where the console is accepting characters from the keyboard as data,
with no escape mechanism possible.
If the command is a load (bit 31 of the count is clear), the console responds
with the input prompt (>>>), then accepts the specified number of bytes
of data for depositing to memory, and an additional byte of received data
checksum. The data is verified by adding all data characters and the
checksum character into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If the final
content of the register is nonzero, the data or checksum is in error, and the
console responds with an error message.
If the command is a binary unload (bit 31 of the count is set), the console
responds with the input prompt (>>>), followed by the specified number of
bytes of binary data. As each byte is sent, it is added to a checksum register
initially set to zero. At the end of the transmission, the two’s complement
of the low byte of the register is sent.
3–80 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
If the data checksum is incorrect on a load or if memory or line errors occur
during the transmission of data, the entire transmission is completed, then
the console issues an error message. If an error occurs during loading, the
contents of the memory being loaded are unpredictable.
The console represses echo while it is receiving the data string and
checksums.
The console terminates all flow control when it receives the carriage return
at the end of the command line in order to avoid treating flow control
characters from the terminal as valid command line checksums.
Using control characters ( Ctrl/C , Ctrl/S , Ctrl/O , and so on), you can control the
console serial line during a binary unload. You cannot control the console
serial line during a binary load, since all received characters are valid
binary data.
The console has the following timing requirements:
•
It must receive data being loaded with a binary load command at a rate
of at least one byte every 60 seconds.
•
It must receive the command checksum that precedes the data within
60 seconds of the carriage return that terminates the command line.
•
It must receive the data checksum within 60 seconds of the last data
byte.
If any of these timing requirements is not met, the console aborts the
transmission by issuing an error message and returning to the console
prompt.
The entire command, including the checksum, can be sent to the console
as a single burst of characters at the specified character rate of the console
serial line. The console is able to receive at least 4 Kbytes of data in a
single X command.
KN220 Firmware
3–81
3.10.22 ! (Comment)
The comment character (an exclamation point) is used to document
command sequences. It can appear anywhere on the command line. All
characters following the comment character are ignored.
Format: !
Example:
>>> ! The console ignores this line.
>>>
3–82 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Chapter 4
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4.1 Introduction
This chapter contains a description of KN220 ROM-based diagnostics,
acceptance test and troubleshooting procedures, diagnostics, and power-up
self-tests for common options.
NOTE: Check the status of the nonvolatile RAM(NVRAM) disk cache and
save the cache if necessary. Store the NVRAM and check the service history
before removing any modules. See Appendix D.
4.1.1 General Troubleshooting Procedures
Before troubleshooting any system problem, check the site maintenance
guide for the system’s service history. Ask the system manager two
questions:
•
Has the system been used before and did it work correctly?
•
Have changes been made to the system recently?
Three problems commonly occur when you make a change to the system:
•
Incorrect cabling
•
Module configuration errors (incorrect CSR addresses and interrupt
vectors)
•
Incorrect grant continuity
Most communications modules use floating CSR addresses and interrupt
vectors. If you remove a module from the system, you may have to change
the addresses and vectors of other modules. Microsystems Options lists
address and vector values for most options.
If you change the system configuration, run the Configure utility at the
maintenance mode prompt (>>>) to determine the CSR addresses and
interrupt vectors recommended by Digital.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–1
See MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor User’s Guide for information about the
Connect and Ignore commands, which are used to set up MDM for testing
nonstandard configurations.
See Appendix A for a summary of ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf commands
to help you troubleshoot and diagnose errors. When troubleshooting, note
the location of cables and connectors before you perform each step. Label
cables before you disconnect them to save time and prevent you from
introducing new problems.
If the system fails (or appears to fail) to boot the operating system, check
the console terminal screen for an error message. If the terminal displays
an error message, see Section 4.2. Check the LED display on the device you
suspect is bad. If no errors are indicated by the device LED display, run
the ROM-based diagnostics described in this chapter. In addition, check
the following:
•
If self-test fails, check the module interconnect cabling.
•
If no message appears, make sure that the console terminal and the
system are on. Check the on/off power switch on both the console
terminal and the system. If the terminal has a DC OK LED, be sure it
is on.
•
Check the cabling to the console terminal.
•
If you cannot get a display of any kind on the console terminal, try
another terminal.
•
If the system DC OK LED remains off, check the power supply and
power supply cabling.
•
Check the hex display on the H3602–AC. If the display is off, check the
I/O module LED display and the CPU cabling. If a hex error message
appears on the H3602–AC or the module, see Section 4.2.
If the system boots successfully, but a device seems to fail or an intermittent
failure occurs, check the error log first for a device problem. The failing
device is usually in one of the following areas:
•
CPU
•
Memory
•
Mass storage
•
Communications devices
4–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.2 KN220 ROM-Based Diagnostics
The KN220 ROM-based diagnostic facility, rather than the MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor (MDM), is the primary diagnostic tool for troubleshooting
and testing of the CPU, memory, Ethernet, SCSI, and DSSI subsystems.
ROM-based diagnostics have significant advantages:
•
Load time is virtually nonexistent.
•
The boot path is more reliable.
•
Diagnosis is done in a more primitive state. (MDM requires successful
loading of the operating system.)
The ROM-based diagnostics can indicate several different FRUs, not just
the CPU or I/O modules. (Table 4–7 lists the FRUs indicated by ROM-based
diagnostic error messages.)
The diagnostics run automatically on power-up. While the diagnostics are
running, the LEDs on the H3602–AC display a hexadecimal countdown of
the tests from F to 4 (though not in precise reverse order) before booting
the operating system, and 2 to 0 while booting the operating system. A
different countdown appears on the console terminal.
The ROM-based diagnostics are a collection of individual tests with
parameters that you can specify. A data structure called a script points
to the tests. (See Section 4.2.2.) There are several field and manufacturing
scripts. Qualified Customer Services personnel can also create their own
scripts interactively.
A program called the diagnostic executive determines which of the available
scripts to invoke. The script sequence varies if the KN220 is in a
manufacturing environment. The diagnostic executive interprets the script
to determine what tests to run, the correct order in which to run the tests,
and the correct parameters to use for each test.
The diagnostic executive also controls tests so that errors can be detected
and reported. It also ensures that when the tests are run, the machine is
left in a consistent and well-defined state.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–3
4.2.1 Diagnostic Tests
To get the list of ROM-based utilities, enter T 9E at the maintenance mode
prompt (T is the abbreviation of TEST). The column headings have the
following meanings:
•
Test is the test code or utility code.
•
Address is the test or utility’s base address in ROM. This address varies.
The addresses shown are examples only. If a test fails, entering T
FE displays diagnostic state to the console. You can subtract the base
address of the failing test from the last_exception_pc to find the index
into the failing test’s diagnostic listing.
•
Name is a brief description of the test or utility.
•
Parameters shows the parameters for each diagnostic test or utility.
Tests accept up to 20 parameters.
The asterisks (*) represent
parameters that are used by the tests but that you cannot specify
individually. These parameters are encoded in ROM and are provided
by the diagnostic executive.
4–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
>>>T 9E
Test
#
Address
Name
Parameters
___________________________________________________________________________
2004CA00 CP_SCB
2004DCA8 De_executive
20 200583BC R_D_Cache_Seg
***
21 200583D4 R_D_Cache_Tag
***
22 200583EC R_D_Cache_Tag_Par ***
23 20058408 R_D_Cache_Data_Par ***
24 20058425 R_D_Cache_Val_Bit ***
25 20058441 R_D_Cache_RAM
***
26 20058472 R_I_Cache_Seg
***
27 2005848A R_I_Cache_Tag
***
28 200584A2 R_I_Cache_Tag_Par ***
29 200584BE R_I_Cache_Data_Par ***
2A 200584DB R_I_Cache_Val_Bit ***
2B 200584F7 R_I_Cache_RAM
***
2C 2005850F R_I_Cache_Inst
***
2D 20058459 R_D_Cache_Inst
***
2E 20058528 R_Cache_IStream
***
2F 20058542 R_Cache_Exerciser ***
30 20058058 MEM_Bitmap
*
34 2004F25C ROM logic test
*
40 2005774C Memory Count Errs Soft_errs_allowed *******
41 20055FFC CDE Cleanup
******
42 2005617A Check_for_intrs
******
43 20057BD0 CVAX Mem Interface start_add end_add inc pat sel_tst
sav_map ****
44 200561F8 CVAX Cache mem
addr_incr *********
45 20050490 C_cache_mem_cqbic start_addr end_addr addr_incr ****
46 20050790 C_Cache_diag_mode addr_incr *********
47 2005822B MEM_Refresh
start end incr cont_on_err
time_seconds
48 200581B4 MEM_Addr_shrts
start_add end_add * cont_on_err
pat_2 pat_3
4C 2005819C MEM_ECC_Error
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
4D 2005811E MEM_Address
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
4E 2005810B MEM_Byte
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
4F 200580F8 MEM_Data
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
52 2004FEEF Prog timer
which_timer wait_time_us ***
53 200501D0 TOY clock
repeat_test_250ms_ea Tolerance ***
54 20055D19 Virtual mode
*********
55 20050387 Interval timer
which_timer **
56 20051624 SII_ext_loopbck
***
57 20054124 SII_memory
incr test_pattern *******
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–5
58
59
5B
5C
5D
5F
60
65
66
67
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7C
7D
80
81
82
83
90
91
92
9A
9B
9C
9D
20053D40
200557B8
2005450D
2005192F
200525DD
20054B08
2004FB6E
20054139
20058834
200546A8
2005855E
20058572
20058586
200585A3
200585BD
200585D8
200585F2
2005860F
2005862C
20058642
2005865C
20058672
2004F424
20050E2F
20051003
200588D4
2004F39E
2004F32C
20057988
2005806F
20057890
20056662
2005655E
DSSI reset
SGEC_LPBCK_ASSIST
SII_registers
SII_initiatior
SII target
SGEC
SSC Console Serial
SCSI_memory
R_SCSI_Test
SCSI Quick test
R3000_FPU
R3000_TLB
R_IO_Reg_Interface
R_SII_Buf_Intrf
R_SCSI_Buf_Intrf
R3000_Interrupt
R_Mem_Moving_Inver
R3000_Write_Buffer
R3000_NVRAM
R3000_NVRAM_all
R3000_DUART
R3000_Interaction
CQBIC_memory
MSCP-QBUS test
DELQA
VME Test
CQBIC registers
CQBIC Powerup
CDAL_RIO Intrf
Memory Descrip
Init_memory_32MB
List Registers
Utilities
9E
9F
C1
C2
C5
C6
C7
20050E07
20056FDF
200511E4
200513B0
20051529
2004F0E0
2004F1A1
List diags
Create Script
SSC RAM
SSC RAM ALL
SSC regs
SSC_powerup
CBTCR timeout
port_no time_secs *
time_secs **
****
******
*******
loopback_type no_ram_tests ******
start_baud end_baud ******
incr test_pattern *******
**********
**********
*
*
loop ***
start_add end_add incr patrn **
start_add end_add incr patrn **
*
start_add end_add incr ***
*
start_add end_add
start_add end_add
*
loop_cnt sel_dev
**********
IP_csr ******
device_num_addr ****
*
*
**
*****
Board1 Bd2 Bd3 Bd4 verify_only
*
*
Expnd_err_msg get_mode init_LEDs
clr_ps_cnt
*
*******
*
*
*
*********
***
4–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Scripts
#
Description
A0
A1
A3
A4
A7
A8
A9
B3
Soft Script, created by 9F
Powerup field
Manuf FV
Manuf Loop on A3
Memory tests, called by A8
Field memory acceptance, mark Hard SBEs
Run memory tests, stop on any error
Manuf APT, Do NOT use in field
>>>
Parameters that you can specify are written out, as shown in the following
examples:
54
52
2004E557
2004FF38
Virtual mode
Prog_timer
******
which_timer,wait_time_us***
The virtual mode test on the first line contains several parameters, but you
cannot specify any of them. To run this test individually, enter:
>>> T 54
The Prog_timer test on the second line accepts 5 parameters, but you can
specify only the first two to test the programmable timer.
>>> T 52 0 10
4.2.2 Scripts
Most of the tests shown by utility 9E are arranged into scripts. A script
is a data structure that points to various tests and defines the order in
which they are run. Different scripts can run the same set of tests, but in
a different order and/or with different parameters and flags. A script also
contains the following information:
•
The parameters and flags that need to be passed to the test.
•
Where the tests can be run from. For example, certain tests can be
run only from EPROM. Other tests are program independent code and
can be run from EPROM, cache diagnostic space, or main memory to
enhance execution speed.
•
What is to be shown, if anything, on the console.
•
What is to be shown, if anything, in the LED display.
•
What action to take on errors (halt, repeat, continue).
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–7
The power-up script runs every time the system is powered on. You can
also invoke the power-up script at any time by entering T 0. Some of the
common scripts are listed in test 9E.
Scripts
#
Description
A0
A1
A3
A4
A7
A8
A9
B3
Soft script, created by 9F
Powerup field
Manuf FV
Manuf Loop on A3
Memory tests, called by A8
Field memory acceptance, mark Hard SBEs
Run memory tests, stop on any error
Manuf APT, Do NOT use in field
Additional scripts are included in the ROMs for use in manufacturing and
engineering environments.
Customer Services personnel can run scripts and tests individually, using
the T command. When doing so, note that certain tests may be dependent
upon a state set up from a previous test. For this reason, you should use
the UNJAM and INITIALIZE commands, described in Chapter 3, before
running an individual test after the operating system has crashed or has
been halted. You do not need to use these commands on system power-up,
however, because system power-up leaves the machine in a defined state.
Customer Services personnel with a detailed knowledge of the KN220
hardware and firmware can also create their own scripts by using the 9F
utility. (See Section 4.2.4.)
4–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–1 lists the scripts that are available to Customer Services.
Table 4–1: Scripts Available to Customer Services
Script1
A0
A1
Enter with
TEST
Command
A7
A0
A1, B8,
0, 3
A7, A8
A8
A8
A9
A9
AD
AD
AE
AF
B1
AE, AD
AF
2, B8
Description
Soft script created by de_test9f. Enter T 9F to create.
Common section of power-up script. Script B8 invokes this
script at power-up.
Memory test portion invoked by script A8. Reruns the memory
tests without rebuilding and reinitializing the bitmap. Run
script A8 once before running script A7 separately to allow
mapping out of both single-bit and double-bit main memory
ECC errors.
Memory acceptance. Running script A8 with script A7 tests
main memory more extensively. It enables hard single-bit and
multibit main memory ECC errors to be marked bad in the
bitmap. Invokes script A7 when it has completed its tests.
Memory tests. Halts and reports the first error. Does not reset
the bitmap or busmap.
Console program. Runs memory tests, marks bitmap, resets
busmap, and resets caches. Calls script AE.
Console program. Resets board registers and caches.
Console program. Resets busmap and resets caches.
Initial power-up script for console SLU before first console
announcement. Invoked at power-up.
1 Scripts A2–A6, B0, and B2–B5 are for manufacturing use. They should not be used by
Customer Services. Scripts A2, A5, A6, AA, AB, AC, B2, B4, B7, BA–BF are unused.
Scripts A3, A4, B0, B1, B3, B5, B6, and B9 are for manufacturing.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–9
In most cases, Customer Services needs only the scripts shown in Table 4–2
for effective troubleshooting and acceptance testing.
Table 4–2: Commonly Used Customer Services Scripts
Command
Description
0
Automatically invokes the proper scripts; runs the same tests as during powerup.
Primarily runs the memory tests; halts upon first hard or soft error.
Memory acceptance script; marks hard multibit and single-bit ECC errors in
the bitmap. Script A8 calls script A7 when this command is entered. Script
A7 contains the memory tests that will continue on error.
Can be run by itself; useful when you want to bypass the bitmap test.
Power-up script that can be run by itself.
A9
A8
A7
A1
4.2.3 Script Calling Sequence
Actions at Power-Up
In a nonmanufacturing environment where the intended console device is
the serial line unit (SLU), the console program (referred to as CP below)
performs the following actions at power-up:
1. Runs the IPT.
2. Assumes console device is SLU.
3. Calls the diagnostic executive (DE) with Test Code = 2.
a. DE determines that the environment is nonmanufacturing from
H3602–AC. (Manufacturing sets a jumper on the H3602–AC for
testing.)
b. DE selects script sequence for console SLU.
c.
DE executes script B1. Script B1 directs DE to execute test.
(Console announcements are off.)
d. DE passes control back to the CP.
4. Establishes SLU as console device (whether or not SLU test passed).
5. Prints banner message.
6. Displays language inquiry menu on console if console supports MCS
and any of the following is true:
4–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
a. Battery is dead.
b. H3602–AC switch set to action (language inquiry).
c.
Contents of SSC NVRAM are invalid.
7. Calls DE with Test Code = 3.
a. DE executes script A1. (Announcements are on.)
b. DE passes control back to CP.
8. CP issues end message and >>> prompt. CP may exit to >> prompt.
Actions After You Enter T 0
In a nonmanufacturing environment where the intended console device is
the SLU, the console program (CP) performs the following actions after you
enter T 0 at the console prompt (>>> T 0):
1. Calls the diagnostic executive (DE) with Test Code = 0.
a. DE determines environment is nonmanufacturing from H3602–AC
switch setting.
b. DE executes script B8.
Script B8 directs DE to execute scripts B1 and A1.
i Script B1 directs DE to execute tests. (Console announcements
are off.)
ii Script A1 directs DE to execute tests. (Console announcements
are on.)
c.
DE passes control back to the CP.
2. CP prints end message and >>> prompt. Console may exit to >> prompt.
Note that although the sequence of actions is different in the two cases
above, the same tests (those in scripts B1 and A1) are run both times.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–11
4.2.4 Creating Scripts
You can create your own script, using utility 9F, to control the order in which
tests are run and to select specific parameters and flags for individual tests.
In this way you do not have to use the defaults provided by the hard-wired
scripts.
Utility 9F also provides an easy way to see what flags and parameters are
used by the diagnostic executive for each test.
Run test 9F first to build the user script (see Example 4–1). Press Return to
use the default parameters or flags, which are shown in parentheses. Test
9F prompts you for the following information:
•
Script location. The script can be located in the 1-Kbyte NVRAM in
the SSC, in the 128-Kbyte mass storage interface (MSI) RAM, or in
main memory. A script is limited by the size of the data structure that
contains it. A larger script can be developed in main memory than in
MSI RAM, and a larger script can be built in MSI RAM than in SSC
RAM.
A script cannot, however, always be located in main memory. For
example, a script that runs memory tests will overwrite the user script,
since the diagnostic executive cannot relocate the user script to another
area. The diagnostic executive notifies you if you have violated this type
of restriction by issuing a script incompatibility message.
•
Test number.
•
Run environment. This defines the environment from which the actual
diagnostic test can be run. The choices are 0 = ROM, 1 = MSI RAM, 2
= Main Memory, and 3 = Fastest Possible. Choose number 3 to select
the fastest possible environment that will not overwrite the test.
•
Repeat code.
•
Error severity level.
•
Console error report.
•
Script error treatment.
•
LED display.
•
Console display.
•
Parameters.
Example 4–1 shows how to build and run a user script.
4–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The utility displays the test name after you enter the test number and the
number of bytes remaining after you enter the information for each test.
When you have finished entering tests, press Return at the next Next test
number: prompt to end the script-building session. Then type T A0 Return
to run the new script.
You cannot review or edit a script you have created.
Example 4–1: Creating a Script with Utility 9F
>>> T 9F
SP=20140670
Create script in ?[0=SSC,1=SII_RAM,2=RAM] :
Script starts at 201407D4
40 bytes left
Next test number :80
CQBIC_memory >>Run from ?[0=ROM,1=Diag_RAM,3=fastest possible] (0):
CQBIC_memory >>Addressing mode? [0=physical,1=virtual] (0):
CQBIC_memory >>Repeat? [0=no,1=forever,>1=count<FF] (0):
CQBIC_memory >>Error severity ? [0,1,2,3] (2):
CQBIC_memory >>Console error report? [0=none,1=full] (1):
CQBIC_memory >>Stop script on error? [0=NO,1=YES] (1):
CQBIC_memory >>LED on entry (08):
CQBIC_memory >>Console on entry (80):
33 bytes left
Next test number :7d
R3000_Interaction>>Run from ?[0=ROM,1=Diag_RAM,2=RAM,3=fastest
possible] (0):
R3000_Interaction>>Addressing mode? [0=physical,1=virtual] (0):
R3000_Interaction>>Repeat? [0=no,1=forever,>1=count<FF] (0):
R3000_Interaction>>Error severity ? [0,1,2,3] (2):
R3000_Interaction>>Console error report? [0=none,1=full] (1):
R3000_Interaction>>Stop script on error? [0=NO,1=YES] (1):
R3000_Interaction>>LED on entry (07):
R3000_Interaction>>Console on entry (7D):
R3000_Interaction>> loop_cnt : 00000001 - 0000FFFF ?(00000001) 3
R3000_Interaction>> sel_dev : 00000000 - 0000000F ?(0000000F)
18 bytes left
Next test number :
>>> T A0
80..7D..
>>>
Example 4–2 shows the script-building procedure to follow if (a) you are
unsure of the test number to specify, and (b) you want to run one test
repeatedly. If you are not sure of the test number, enter ? at the Next test
number: prompt to invoke test 9E and display test numbers, test names,
and so on. To run one test repeatedly, enter the following sequence:
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–13
1. Enter the test number (55 in Example 4–2) at the Next test number:
prompt.
2. Enter A0 at the next Next test number: prompt.
3. Press
Return
at the next Next test number: prompt.
4. Enter T A0 to begin running the script repeatedly.
5. Press
Ctrl/C
to stop the test.
The sequence above is a useful alternative to using the REPEAT console
command to run a test, because REPEAT (test) displays line feeds only; it
does not display the console test announcement.
Example 4–2: Listing and Repeating Tests with Utility 9F, Help and Loop
on A0
>>>T 9F
SP=20140670
Create script in ?[0=SSC,1=SII_RAM,2=RAM] :0
Script starts at 201407D4
40 bytes left
Next test number :?
Test
#
Address
Name
Parameters
_______________________________________________________________
2004CA00 CP_SCB
2004DCA8 De_executive
20 200583BC R_D_Cache_Seg
***
21 200583D4 R_D_Cache_Tag
***
22 200583EC R_D_Cache_Tag_Par ***
23 20058408 R_D_Cache_Data_Par ***
24 20058425 R_D_Cache_Val_Bit ***
25 20058441 R_D_Cache_RAM
***
26 20058472 R_I_Cache_Seg
***
27 2005848A R_I_Cache_Tag
***
28 200584A2 R_I_Cache_Tag_Par ***
29 200584BE R_I_Cache_Data_Par ***
2A 200584DB R_I_Cache_Val_Bit ***
2B 200584F7 R_I_Cache_RAM
***
2C 2005850F R_I_Cache_Inst
***
2D 20058459 R_D_Cache_Inst
***
2E 20058528 R_Cache_IStream
***
2F 20058542 R_Cache_Exerciser ***
30 20058058 MEM_Bitmap
*
Example 4–2 Cont’d on next page
4–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example 4–2 (Cont.): Listing and Repeating Tests with Utility 9F, Help
and Loop on A0
34
40
41
42
43
2004F25C
2005774C
20055FFC
2005617A
20057BD0
44
45
46
47
200561F8
20050490
20050790
2005822B
48
200581B4
4C
2005819C
4D
2005811E
4E
2005810B
4F
200580F8
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5B
5C
5D
5F
60
65
66
67
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
2004FEEF
200501D0
20055D19
20050387
20051624
20054124
20053D40
200557B8
2005450D
2005192F
200525DD
20054B08
2004FB6E
20054139
20058834
200546A8
2005855E
20058572
20058586
200585A3
200585BD
200585D8
200585F2
ROM logic test
Memory Count Errs
CDE Cleanup
Check_for_intrs
CVAX Mem Interface
*
Soft_errs_allowed *******
******
******
start_add end_add inc pat sel_tst
sav_map ****
CVAX Cache mem
addr_incr *********
C_cache_mem_cqbic start_addr end_addr addr_incr ****
C_Cache_diag_mode addr_incr *********
MEM_Refresh
start end incr cont_on_err
time_seconds
MEM_Addr_shrts
start_add end_add * cont_on_err
pat_2 pat_3
MEM_ECC_Error
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
MEM_Address
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
MEM_Byte
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
MEM_Data
start_add end_add add_incr
cont_on_err
Prog timer
which_timer wait_time_us ***
TOY clock
repeat_test_250ms_ea Tolerance ***
Virtual mode
*********
Interval timer
which_timer **
SII_ext_loopbck
***
SII_memory
incr test_pattern *******
DSSI reset
port_no time_secs *
SGEC_LPBCK_ASSIST time_secs **
SII_registers
****
SII_initiatior
******
SII target
*******
SGEC
loopback_type no_ram_tests ******
SSC Console Serial start_baud end_baud ******
SCSI_memory
incr test_pattern *******
R_SCSI_Test
**********
SCSI Quick test
**********
R3000_FPU
*
R3000_TLB
*
R_IO_Reg_Interface loop ***
R_SII_Buf_Intrf
start_add end_add incr patrn **
R_SCSI_Buf_Intrf
start_add end_add incr patrn **
R3000_Interrupt
*
R_Mem_Moving_Inver start_add end_add incr ***
Example 4–2 Cont’d on next page
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–15
Example 4–2 (Cont.): Listing and Repeating Tests with Utility 9F, Help
and Loop on A0
78
79
7A
7C
7D
80
81
82
83
90
91
92
9A
9B
9C
9D
2005860F
2005862C
20058642
2005865C
20058672
2004F424
20050E2F
20051003
200588D4
2004F39E
2004F32C
20057988
2005806F
20057890
20056662
2005655E
R3000_Write_Buffer
R3000_NVRAM
R3000_NVRAM_all
R3000_DUART
R3000_Interaction
CQBIC_memory
MSCP-QBUS test
DELQA
VME Test
CQBIC registers
CQBIC Powerup
CDAL_RIO Intrf
Memory Descrip
Init_memory
List Registers
Utilities
9E
9F
C1
C2
C5
C6
C7
20050E07
20056FDF
200511E4
200513B0
20051529
2004F0E0
2004F1A1
List diags
Create Script
SSC RAM
SSC RAM ALL
SSC regs
SSC_powerup
CBTCR timeout
*
start_add end_add
start_add end_add
*
loop_cnt sel_dev
**********
IP_csr ******
device_num_addr ****
*
*
**
*****
Board1 Bd2 Bd3 Bd4 verify_only
*
*
Expnd_err_msg get_mode init_LEDs
clr_ps_cnt
*
*******
*
*
*
*********
***
Scripts
#
Description
A0
A1
A3
A4
A7
A8
A9
B3
Soft Script, created by 9F
Powerup field
Manuf FV
Manuf Loop on A3
Memory tests, called by A8
Field memory acceptance, mark Hard SBEs
Run memory tests, stop on any error
Manuf APT, Do NOT use in field
Example 4–2 Cont’d on next page
4–16 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example 4–2 (Cont.): Listing and Repeating Tests with Utility 9F, Help
and Loop on A0
40 bytes left
Next test number :55
Interval timer >>Run from ?[0=ROM,1=Diag_RAM,2=RAM,3=fastest
possible] (0):
Interval timer >>Addressing mode? [0=physical,1=virtual] (0):
Interval timer >>Repeat? [0=no,1=forever,>1=count<FF] (0):
Interval timer >>Error severity ? [0,1,2,3] (2):
Interval timer >>Console error report? [0=none,1=full] (1):
Interval timer >>Stop script on error? [0=NO,1=YES] (1):
Interval timer >>LED on entry (05):
Interval timer >>Console on entry (55):
Interval timer >> which_timer : 00000001 - 00000003 ?(00000003)
29 bytes left
Next test number :a0 - script
28 bytes left
Next test number :
>>>R T A0
55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..
55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..55..
55..55..55..
>>>
4.2.5 Console Displays and LEDs
Example 4–3 shows a typical console display during execution of the ROMbased diagnostics (power-up).
Example 4–3: Console Display (No Errors)
KN220-A Vn.n
Performing normal system tests.
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–17
The first line contains the module (KN220–A) and the firmware version
(Vn.n).
The numbers on the console display do not refer to actual test numbers.
Table 4–3 shows the actual ROM-based diagnostic tests that run during
power-up.
Table 4–3: Tests Run During Power-up
Number
Displayed/Test Run
Number
Displayed/Test Run
Number
Displayed/Test Run
83/91
82/90
81/52
80/52
79/53
78/C1
77/34
76/C5
75/55
74/5B
73/57
72/C7
71/C2
70/5C
69/5D
68/65
67/67
66/92
65/79
64/78
63/7C
62/71
61/72
60/21
59/22
58/23
57/24
56/25
55/2D
54/27
53/28
52/29
51/2A
50/2B
49/2C
48/30
47/9A
46/4F
45/4E
44/4D
43/48
42/48
41/48
40/48
39/48
38/48
37/48
36/48
35/48
34/48
33/48
32/48
31/48
30/48
30/48
29/48
28/48
27/47
26/4C
25/40
24/46
23/43
22/5F
21/7A
20/20
19/26
18/2E
17/2F
16/73
15/74
14/75
13/76
12/66
11/44
10/80
09/54
08/34
07/C5
06/45
05/83
04/7D
03/41
During execution of the IPT, normal error messages are displayed if the
console terminal is working. Console announcements, such as test numbers
and countdown, however, are suppressed. Tests continue to run after the
IPT, up to and including the appropriate console test.
4–18 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Diagnostic test failures, if specified in the firmware script, produce an error
display in the format shown in Example 4–4 and Example 4–5.
Example 4–4: Sample Output with Errors: R3000
>>>T 0
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..
?79 2 06 FF 0000 0007
P1 =28000000 P2 =2807FFFC P3 =00000000 P4 =00000000 P5 =00000000
P6 =00000000 P7 =00000000 P8 =00000000 P9 =00000000 P10=00000000
P11=00000000 P12=00000000 P13=00000000 P14=00000000 P15=00000000
P16=00000000 P17=00000000 P18=00000000 P19=00000000 P20=00000000
gp =1C270008 sp =B8001B1C fp =00000000 sr =B048FF04
epc=BFC2903C badvaddr =00000000 cause =00000000
64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Normal operation not possible.
>>>
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–19
Example 4–5: Sample Output with Errors: CVAX
>>>T 0
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..
?5B 2 01 FF 0000 0009
P1 =20160044 P2 =000080FF P3 =00000000 P4 =FFFF0000 P5 =00000000
P6 =00000000 P7 =00000000 P8 =00000000 P9 =00000000 P10=00000000
P11=00000000 P12=00000000 P13=00000000 P14=00000000 P15=00000000
P16=00000000 P17=00000000 P18=00000000 P19=00000000 P20=00000000
r0 =00000001 r1 =2005462B r2 =0000005B r3 =201407AC r4 =2005450D
r5 =2005452B r6 =200589B3 r7 =00000000 r8 =0000000C ERF=80000000
73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Normal operation not possible.
>>>
4–20 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The errors are printed in a seven-line display. The first line has six fields:
Test
Severity
Error
De_error
Vector
Count
•
Test identifies the diagnostic test. In Example 4–5, the test is 5B.
•
Severity is the severity level of a test failure, as dictated by the script.
In Example 4–4 and Example 4–5, 2 is the severity level. Failure of a
severity level 2 test causes the display of this five-line error printout
and halts an autoboot. An error of severity level 1 causes a display of
the first line of the error printout, but does not interrupt an autoboot.
Most tests have a severity level of 2.
•
Error is two hex digits identifying, usually within 10 instructions,
where in the diagnostic the error occurred. This field is also called the
subtestlog. In Example 4–5, 01 is the area where the error occurred.
•
De_error (diagnostic executive error) signals the diagnostic’s state and
any illegal behavior. This field indicates a condition that the diagnostic
expects on detecting a failure. FE, EE, or EF in this field means that an
unexpected exception or interrupt was detected. FF indicates an error
as a result of normal testing, such as a miscompare. The possible codes
are:
FF—Normal error exit from diagnostic
FE—Unexpected interrupt
FD—Interrupt in cleanup routine
FC—Interrupt in interrupt handler
FB—Script requirements not met
FA—No such diagnostic
EF—Unexpected exception in executive
EE—Unexpected exception in console
•
Vector identifies the SCB vector (0000 in the example above) through
which the unexpected exception or interrupt trapped, when the de_
error field detects an unexpected exception or interrupt (FE or EF; for
EE look at the CAUSE REGISTER).
•
Count is four hex digits. It shows the number of previous errors that
have occurred (seven in Example 4–4 and nine in Example 4–5).
Lines 2 through 5 of the error printout are parameters 1 through 20.
When the diagnostics are running normally, these parameters are the same
parameters that are listed in Table 4–5.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–21
When an unexpected machine check exception or other type of exception
occurs during the executive (de_error is EF), the stack is saved in the
parameters on lines 2 and 3, as listed in Tables 4–4 and 4–5.
Table 4–4: Values Saved, Machine Check Exception During
Executive (CVAX)
Parameter
Value
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P10
Contents of SP, points to vector value in P2
Vector = 04, vector of exception 04–FC, 00 = Q-bus
Address of PC pointing to failed instruction, P9
Byte count = 10
Machine check code
Most recent virtual address
Internal state information 1
Internal state information 2
PC, points to failing instruction
PSL
Table 4–5: Values Saved, Exception During Executive (CVAX)
Parameter
Value
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P10
P11-P20
Contents of SP, points to vector value in P2
Vector = nn, vector of exception 04–FC, 00 = Q-bus
Address of PC pointing to failed instruction, P4
PC, points to instruction following failed instruction
PSL
Contents of stack
Contents of stack
Contents of stack
Contents of stack
Contents of stack
Unused
4–22 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
In the example of CVAX errors (Example 4–5), lines 6 and 7 of the error
printout are general registers R0 through R8 and the hardware error
summary register. In the example of R3000 errors (Example 4–4) lines
6 and 7 are the general registers gp, sp, fp, sr, epc, badvaddr, and cause.
When returning a module for repair, record the first line of the
error printout and the version of the ROMs on the module repair
tag.
In addition to the console diagnostic countdown, a hexadecimal value is
displayed on the diagnostic LEDs on the KN220 I/O module and on the
H3602–AC CPU I/O panel.
Table 4–6 lists all LED codes and the associated actions that are performed
at power-up.
Table 4–6: LED Codes
LED Value
Action
F
E
D
C
B
A
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Initial state on power-up. No code has executed.
Entered ROM. Some instructions have executed.
Waiting for power to stabilize (POK).
SSC and ROM tests.
CVAX tests.
R3000 tests.
Memory controller and memory tests.
CQBIC (Q22-bus) tests.
Console loopback tests.
DSSI and SCSI subsystem tests.
Ethernet subsystem tests.
CVAX maintenance mode.
R3000 normal mode.
CVAX primary/secondary bootstrap.
R3000 primary/secondary bootstrap.
Operating system running.
Figure 4–1 shows the LEDs on the KN220 I/O module. They correspond to
the hex display on the H3602–AC.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–23
Figure 4–1: KN220 I/O Module LEDs
Green
DC OK LED
Red LEDs
Value On
Value Off
8
0
4
0
2
0
1
0
MLO-005176
Table 4–7 lists the hex LED display, the default action on errors, and the
most likely FRUs. It is divided into IPTs and scripts.
The Default Action on Error column refers to the action taken by the
diagnostic executive under the following circumstances:
•
The diagnostic executive detects an unexpected exception or interrupt.
•
A test fails and that failure is reported to the diagnostic executive.
The Default on Error column does not refer to the action taken by the
memory tests. The diagnostic executive either halts the script or continues
execution at the next test in the script.
Most memory tests have a continue on error parameter (labeled cont_on_
error, as shown in test 47 in Example 4–2). If you explicitly set cont_on_
error, using parameter 4 in a memory test, the test marks bad pages in
the bitmap and continues without notifying the diagnostic executive of the
error. In this case, a halt on error does not occur even if you specify halt
on error in the diagnostic executive (by answering Yes to Stop script on
error? in Utility 9F), since the memory test does not notify the diagnostic
executive that an error has occurred.
4–24 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–7: KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
Power-up
WAIT_POK
Entering IPT
SLU_EXT_LOOPBACK2
7, 2, 5, 6, 10
2
2
8, 9, 2
Initial Power-Up Tests
F
D
4
7
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Loop
Loop
Loop
Loop
on
on
on
on
test
test
self
test
?9D
?42
?C6
?60
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Utilities
Check_for_intrs
SSC_power-up
CONSOLE_SERIAL
2,
2,
2,
2,
?91
?90
?52
?52
?53
?C1
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
CQBIC Powerup
CQBIC registers
Prog timer
Prog timer
TOY clock
SSC RAM
2
2
2
2
2
2
Script B1
C
B
C
7
End of
None
None
None
None
script.
10
1, 10
10
10
Script A1
8
8
C
C
C
C
83
82
81
80
79
78
1 In
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
2 This test runs only if the power-up mode switch on the H3602–AC is set to select the test.
See Section 4.5.3.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–25
Table 4–7 (Cont.): KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
ROM logic test
SSC regs
Interval timer
SII_registers
SII_memory
CBTCR timeout
SSC RAM ALL
SII_initiatior
SII target
SCSI_memory
SCSI Quick test
CDAL_RIO Intrf
R3000_NVRAM
R3000_Write_Buffer
R3000_DUART
R3000_FPU
R3000_TLB
R_D_Cache_Tag
R_D_Cache_Tag_Par
R_D_Cache_Data_Par
R_D_Cache_Val_Bit
R_D_Cache_RAM
R_D_Cache_Inst
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Script A1
C
C
B
6
6
C
C
6
6
6
6
C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
?34
?C5
?55
?5B
?57
?C7
?C2
?5C
?5D
?65
?67
?92
?79
?78
?7C
?71
?72
?21
?22
?23
?24
?25
?2D
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Halt
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
1 In
10
10
1, 10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
1, 10
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
4–26 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–7 (Cont.): KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
R_I_Cache_Tag
R_I_Cache_Tag_Par
R_I_Cache_Data_Par
R_I_Cache_Val_Bit
R_I_Cache_RAM
R_I_Cache_Inst
MEM_Bitmap
Memory Descrip
MEM_Data
MEM_Byte
MEM_Address
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
1
1
1
1
1
1
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
Script A1
A
A
A
A
A
A
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
?27
?28
?29
?2A
?2B
?2C
?30
?9A
?4F
?4E
?4D
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
?48
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Halt
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
1 In
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–27
Table 4–7 (Cont.): KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_Refresh
MEM_ECC_Error
Memory Count Errs
C_Cache_diag_mode
CVAX Mem Interface
SGEC
R3000_NVRAM_all
R_D_Cache_Seg
R_I_Cache_Seg
R_Cache_IStream
R_Cache_Exerciser
R_IO_Reg_Interface
R_SII_Buf_Intrf
R_SCSI_Buf_Intrf
R3000_Interrupt
R_SCSI_Test
CVAX Cache mem
CQBIC_memory
Virtual mode
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
3,1,2,4,6
2
3,2,1,4,6
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2,1
2,1
1,2
2,1
1,3,4,6
1,3,5,4,6
2,1,3,4,6
Script A1
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
B
9
5
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
6
B
8
B
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
?48
?48
?48
?48
?47
?4C
?40
?46
?43
?5F
?7a
?20
?26
?2e
?2f
?73
?74
?75
?76
?66
?44
?80
?54
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
1 In
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
4–28 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–7 (Cont.): KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
Script A1
C
C
8
A
A
C
08
07
06
05
04
03
?34
?C5
?45
?83
?7d
?41
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
ROM logic test
SSC regs
C_cache_mem_cqbic
VME Test
R3000_Interaction
CDE Cleanup
2
2
2,1,3,5,4,6
11
2,1,3,4,10
2,1,5
?4F
?4E
?4D
?4C
?48
?47
?40
?41
Halt
Halt
Halt
Halt
Continue
Continue
Continue
Continue
MEM_data
MEM_byte
MEM_addr
MEM_ECC_error
MEM_Addr_shrts
MEM_refresh
MEM_count_errs
Board reset
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
2,
Halt
MEM_bitmap
1, 3, 2, 4, 6
Script A9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
C
End of
4F
4E
4D
4C
48
47
40
41
script.
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
2,
2,
2,
4,
4,
4,
4,
5
4, 6
4, 6
4, 6
6
6
6
6
Script A8
9
30
?30
Invoke script A7.
1 In
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–29
Table 4–7 (Cont.): KN220 Console Displays and FRUs
Hex
LED
Normal Error
Console Console Default
Display Display on Error
Description
FRU1
MEM_data
MEM_byte
MEM_addr
MEM_ECC_error
MEM_address_shorts
MEM_refresh
MEM_count_bad pages
CQBIC_memory
Board reset
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
3,
1,
2,
Script A8
End of script.
Script A7
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
8
C
End of
4F
4E
4D
4C
48
47
40
80
41
script.
?4F
?4E
?4D
?4C
?48
?47
?40
?80
?41
Halt
Halt
Halt
Halt
Halt
Halt
Cont
Cont
Halt
1 In
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
3,
1,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
2,
5,
5
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
the case of multiple FRUs, refer to Section 4.4.2 for further information.
If a problem recurs with the same FRU, check that the tolerances for system power supply
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, and ac ripple are within specification.
FRU key:
1 = KN220 CPU module
2 = KN220 I/O module
3 = MS220 memory module
4 = Memory interconnect cable
5 = Q22-bus device
6 = Q22/CD backplane
7 = System power supply
8 = H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
9 = H3602–AC cable
10 = CPU and I/O module interconnect cable
11 = CPU and VME interconnect cable
4–30 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.2.6 System Halt Messages
Table 4–8 lists messages that may appear on the console terminal when a
system error occurs.
Table 4–8: System Halt Messages
Code
Message
Explanation
?02
EXT HLT
?03
–
?04
ISP ERR
?05
DBL ERR
?06
?07
?08
?0A
HLT INST
SCB ERR3
SCB ERR2
CHM FR ISTK
?OB
?OC
CHM TO ISTK
SCB RD ERR
?10
MCHK AV
?11
KSP AV
?12
DBL ERR2
?13
DBL ERR3
?19
?1A
?1B
?1D
?1E
?1F
?38
PSL EXC5
PSL EXC6
PSL EXC7
PSL REI5
PSL REI6
PSL REI7
SECENB
External halt, caused either by console BREAK condition or
because Q22-bus BHALT_L or DBR<AUX_HLT> bit was set
while enabled.
Power-up; no halt message displayed. The presence of the
firmware banner and diagnostic countdown indicates this
halt.
Caused by attempt to push interrupt or exception state onto
the interrupt stack when the interrupt stack was mapped NO
ACCESS or NOT VALID.
A second machine check occurred while the processor was
attempting to service a normal exception.
The processor executed a HALT instruction in kernel mode.
The vector had bits <1:0> = 3.
The vector had bits <1:0> = 2.
A change mode instruction was executed when PSL<IS> was
set.
The SCB vector for a change mode had bit <0> set.
A hard memory error occurred during a processor read of an
exception or interrupt vector.
An access violation or an invalid translation occurred during
machine check exception processing.
An access violation or an invalid translation occurred during
invalid kernel stack pointer exception processing.
Double machine check error. A machine check occurred
during an attempt to service a machine check.
Double machine check error. A machine check occurred
during an attempt to service a kernel stack not valid
exception.
PSL <26:24> = 5 on interrupt or exception.
PSL <26:24> = 6 on interrupt or exception.
PSL <26:24> = 7 on interrupt or exception.
PSL <26:24> = 5 on an rei instruction.
PSL <26:24> = 6 on an rei instruction.
PSL <26:24> = 7 on an rei instruction.
Security is enabled.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–31
4.2.7 Console Error Messages
Table 4–9 lists messages issued in response to an error or to a console
command that was entered incorrectly.
Table 4–9: Console Error Messages
Code Message
Explanation
?20
CORRPTN
?21
ILL REF
?22
?23
?24
ILL CMD
INV DGT
LTL
?25
?26
?27
ILL ADR
VAL TOO LRG
SW CONF
?28
?29
UNK SW
UNK SYM
?2A
CHKSM
?2B
?2C
HLTED
FND ERR
?2D
TMOUT
?2E
?2F
?30
?31
?32
?33
?34
?35
?36
?37
?64
MEM ERR
UNXINT
UNIMPLEMENTED
QUAL NOVAL
QUAL AMBG
QUAL REQ VAL
QUAL OVERF
ARG OVERF
AMBG CMD
INSUF ARG
INVSCSIID
The console data base was corrupted. The console simulates
a power-up sequence and rebuilds its data base.
The requested reference would violate virtual memory
protection, address is not mapped or is invalid in the specified
address space, or value is invalid in the specified destination.
The command string cannot be parsed.
A number has an invalid digit.
The command was too large for the console to buffer. The
message is sent only after the console receives the Return at
the end of the command.
The specified address is not in the address space.
The specified value does not fit in the destination.
Switch conflict.
For example, an EXAMINE command
specifies two different data sizes.
The switch is not recognized.
The EXAMINE or DEPOSIT symbolic address is not
recognized.
An X command has an incorrect command or data checksum.
If the data checksum is incorrect, this message is issued and
is not abbreviated to ‘‘Illegal command.’’
The operator entered a HALT command.
A FIND command failed either to find the RPB or 64 Kbytes
of good memory.
Data failed to arrive in the expected time during an X
command.
Memory error or machine check occurred.
An unexpected interrupt or exception occurred.
Unimplemented function.
Qualifier does not take a value.
Ambiguous qualifier.
Qualifier requires a value.
Too many qualifiers.
Too many arguments.
Ambiguous command.
Too few arguments.
Invalid SCSI host ID configuration.
4–32 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.2.8 VMB Error Messages (CVAX)
If VMB is unable to boot MDM, it returns an error message to the console.
Table 4–10 lists the error messages and their descriptions.
Table 4–10: VMB Error Messages
Message
Number
Mnemonic
Interpretation
?40
?41
?42
?43
?44
?45
?46
?47
?48
?49
?4A
?4B
?4C
?4D
?4E
?4F
?50
?51
?52
?53
NOSUCHDEV
DEVASSIGN
NOSUCHFILE
FILESTRUCT
BADCHKSUM
BADFILEHDR
BADDIRECTORY
FILNOTCNTG
ENDOFFILE
BADFILENAME
BUFFEROVF
CTRLERR
DEVINACT
DEVOFFLINE
MEMERR
SCBINT
SCB2NDINT
NOROM
NOSUCHNODE
INSFMAPREG
?54
?55
RETRY
IVDEVNAM
No bootable devices found
Device is not present
Program image not found
Invalid boot device file structure
Bad checksum on header file
Bad file header
Bad directory file
Invalid program image format
Premature end-of-file encountered
Bad file name given
Program image does not fit in available memory
Boot device I/O error
Failed to initialize boot device
Device is off line
Memory initialization error
Unexpected SCB exception or machine check
Unexpected exception after starting program image
No valid ROM image found
No response from load server
Insufficient Q-bus mapping registers due to invalid
memory configuration, bad memory, or because Q-bus
map was not relocated to main memory
No devices bootable, retrying
Invalid device boot name
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–33
4.3 Acceptance Testing
Perform the acceptance testing procedure listed below, after installing a
system or whenever replacing the following:
KN220 CPU module
KN220 I/O module
MS220–AA memory module
Memory data interconnect cable
Backplane
DSSI device
SCSI device
H3602–AC
1. Run five error-free passes of the power-up scripts by entering the
following command:
>>> R T 0
2. Press
Ctrl/C
to terminate the scripts.
3. Perform the next two steps for a more thorough test of memory.
>>> T A8
Script A8 runs for one pass. This command enables mapping out of
solid single-bit ECC as well as multibit ECC errors. It will also run
script A7 for one pass.
4–34 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
If any of the memory tests fail, they mark the bitmap and continue
with no error printout to the console. An exception is test 40 (count
bad pages). If any single-bit or multibit ECC errors are detected, they
are reported in test 40. Such a failure indicates that pages in memory
have been marked bad in the bitmap because of solid single-bit and
/or multibit ECC errors. The error printout does not display the 20
longwords, since it is a severity level 1 error.
4. Run T 9A to check the memory configuration again, since T 9A prompts
you for the correct memory configuration.
NOTE: The specifications you entered in T 9A stay in NVRAM as long
as battery power is applied, or until you run T 9A and enter changes.
>>> T 9A
0 MB = 0;
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA = 1;
64 MB, M7639-B, MS220-BA = 2;
MEM FRU 0:3
MEM FRU 0 = 1
MEM FRU 1 = 1
MEM FRU 2 = 0
MEM FRU = 0
MEM FRU = 1
>>>
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA
00000000 01FFFFFF
02000000 03FFFFFF
5. To determine the exact configuration, run the SHOW MEMORY/FULL
command.
>>>SHOW MEM/FULL
Memory 0: 00000000 to 01FFFFFF, 32MB, 0 bad pages
Memory 1: 02000000 to 03FFFFFF, 32MB, 0 bad pages
Total of 64MB, 0 bad pages, 128 reserved pages
Memory Bitmap
-03FF0000 to 03FF3FFF, 32 pages
Console Scratch Area
-03FF4000 to 03FF7FFF, 32 pages
Qbus Map
-03FF8000 to 03FFFFFF, 64 pages
Scan of Bad Pages
>>>
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–35
Memories 0 through 3 are the MS220 memory modules. The Q22-bus
map always spans the top 32 Kbytes of good memory. The memory
bitmap always spans two pages (1 Kbyte) per 4 Mbytes of memory
configured.
6. Check the Q22-bus and the Q22-bus logic in the KN220 CQBIC chip
and the configuration of the Q22-bus, as follows:
>>> SHOW QBUS
Scan of Qbus I/O Space
-20000120 (760440) = 0080
-20000122 (760442) = F081
-20000124 (760444) = DD18
-20000126 (760446) = 0200
-20000128 (760450) = 0000
-2000012A (760452) = 0000
-2000012C (760454) = 8000
-2000012E (760456) = 0000
-20001920 (774440) = FF08
-20001922 (774442) = FF00
-20001924 (774444) = FF2B
-20001926 (774446) = FF06
-20001928 (774450) = FF16
-2000192A (774452) = FFF2
-2000192C (774454) = 00F8
-2000192E (774456) = 1030
-20001940 (774500) = 0000
-20001942 (774502) = 0BC0
-20001F40 (777500) = 0020
(300) DHQ11/DHV11/CXA16/CXB16/CXY08
(120) DELQA/DEQNA
(260) TQK50/TQK70/TU81E/RV20/K-TAPE
(004) IPCR
Scan of Qbus Memory Space
>>>
4–36 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The columns are described below. The examples listed are from the last
line of the example above.
First column = the VAX I/O address of the CSR, in hex (20001F40).
Second column = the Q22-bus address of the CSR, in octal (777500).
Third column = the data, contained at the CSR address, in hex
(0020).
Fourth column = the device vector in octal, according to the fixed
or floating Q22-bus and UNIBUS algorithm (004).
Fifth column = the device name (IPCR, the KN220 interprocessor
communications register).
Additional lines for the device are displayed if more than one CSR
exists.
The last line, Scan of Qbus Memory Space, displays memory residing
on the Q22-bus, if present. VAX memory mapped by the Q22-bus map
is not displayed.
If the system contains an MSCP or TMSCP controller, run test 81. This
test performs the following functions:
Performs step one of the UQ port initialization sequence
Performs the SA wraparound test
Checks the Q22-bus interrupt logic
If you do not specify the CSR address, the test searches for and runs
on the first MSCP device by default. To test the first TMSCP device,
you must specify the first parameter:
>>> T 81 20001940
You can specify other addresses if you have multiple MSCP or TMSCP
devices in the first parameter. This action may be useful to isolate
a problem with a controller, the KN220, or the backplane. Use the
VAX address provided by the SHOW QBUS command to determine the
CSR value. If you do not specify a value, the MSCP device at address
20001468 is tested by default.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–37
5. Check that all UQSSP, MSCP, TMSCP, and Ethernet controllers and
devices are visible by typing the following command line:
>>> SHOW DEVICE
DSSI Node 0 (R7YRMS)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
SCSI Node 0
-rz(0,0,*) (RZ56)
SCSI Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-tm(0,0) (TK70) -MUA0
Ethernet Adapter
-mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-12-81-22)
Ethernet Adapter 0 (774440)
-XQA0 (08-00-2B-08-CB-5C)
VME Interface Board - Not Installed
>>>
In the example above, the console displays the DSSI node names
and numbers, then the R3000 boot names, which are followed by the
controller number and unit number in parentheses, then the device
type.
DSSI Node 7 (*) is the DSSI adapter located on the KN220 I/O module.
In most cases, the KN220 I/O module is the local DSSI node shown
by the asterisk and has a node number of 7. DSSI node names, node
numbers, and unit numbers should be unique.
The console also displays the SCSI node number, the R3000 boot name,
the controller number, the unit number, and the device type. SCSI
node number (7 (*)), is the SCSI controller number contained in the
environment variables described in Section 3.7.2.
The UQSSP (TQK70) tape controller and its CSR address are also
shown. The line below this display shows a TK70 connected.
The next two lines show the logical name and station address for the
Ethernet adapter located on the KN220 I/O module. A Q-bus Ethernet
adapter is listed with Q-bus address and station address.
6. Test the DSSI subsystem, using the KN220 ROM-based Diagnostics and
Utilities Protocol (DUP) facility. This facility allows you to connect to
the DUP server in the RF drive controller. Here are some examples:
4–38 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 7
Starting DUP server...
Stopping DUP server...
In this example, a DUP connection was made with DSSI node 7, the
KN220 I/O module. The DUP server times out, since no local programs
exist and no response packet was received.
>>> SET HOST/DUP/DSSI 1
Starting DUP server...
DSSI Node 1 (R3VBNC)
DRVEXR V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
DRVTST V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
HISTRY V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
ERASE V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
PARAMS V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
DIRECT V1.0 D 21-FEB-1988
End of directory
21:27:54
21:27:54
21:27:54
21:27:54
21:27:54
21:27:54
Task Name? DRVTST
Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]: <CR>
5 minutes for test to complete.
Compare failed on head 1 track 1091.
Compare failed on head 0 track 529.
Task Name? DRVEXR
Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)]: <CR>
Test time in minutes? [(10)-100]:
10 minutes for test to complete.
R3VBNC::MSCP$DUP 21-FEB-1988 21:37:35 DRVEXR CPU=00:00:01.88 PI=43
R3VBNC::MSCP$DUP 21-FEB-1988 21:37:38 DRVEXR CPU=00:00:03.38 PI=79
Compare failed on head 1 track 1091.
R3VBNC::MSCP$DUP 21-FEB-1988 21:37:40 DRVEXR CPU=00:00:04.97 PI=116
^C
>>>
In the example above, the local programs DRVTST and DRVEXR are
run on drive 1. Do not enter 1 in response to the question Write/read
anywhere on medium?. Doing so destroys data on the disk. Press Return,
which uses the default, allowing reads and writes to the DBNs only. Ctrl/T
or Ctrl/G displays a message as shown in the DRVEXR example above
(the lines beginning with R3VBNC::). In the example, Ctrl/T has been
pressed twice to show the difference in the time and in the value of the
progress indicator (PI).
Press
Ctrl/C
to terminate the program.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–39
Use the local programs HISTRY (Section 4.7.3) and PARAMS
(Section 4.7.5) to determine the cause of errors displayed during
DRVTST or DRVEXR. DRVTST should run successfully for one pass on
each drive. Customer Services can refer to the RF71 Disk Drive Service
Manual for details about the DUP local programs and corrective action.
7. Enter the SHOW SCSI/FULL command.
Example 4–6: SHOW SCSI and SHOW SCSI/FULL
>>> SHOW SCSI
SCSI Node 0
-tz(0,0,*) (TLZ04) -DIA0
SCSI Node 1
-rz(0,1,*) (RZ56 )
SCSI Node 2
-rz(0,2,*) (RRD40) -DIA2
SCSI Node 4
-tz(0,4,*) (.....) -DIA4
SCSI Node 7 (*)
>>> SHOW SCSI/FULL
Boot Path
Dev
Cap (in Hex)
Product Id
Revs
r/f
-------------------------------------------------------------------tl(0,0,*)
TAPE
4B0 MBs
TLZ04 1989(C)DEC
0304
r
-rz(0,1,*)
DISK
27A MBs
RZ56
(C) DEC
0200
f
-rz(0,2,*)
CDROM
23B MBs
RRD40
TM DEC
250E
r
-tz(0,4,*)
TAPE
5A MBs
................
....
r
SCSI Node 7
This will list the R3000 boot path, the device type, the device capacity
(in hexadecimal), the product identification (if available), the revision
number of the drive, and whether it is removable or fixed. If the
capacity field returns zero, then a problem exists with the specified
drive.
8. If there are one or more DELQA modules in the system, use test 82
to invoke the Ethernet option’s self-test and receive status from the
firmware. Test 82 is useful for acceptance testing if you cannot access
the system enclosure to see the DELQA LEDs.
4–40 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
9. After the steps above have completed successfully, load MDM and run
the system tests from the Main Menu. If they run successfully, the
system has gone through its basic checkout and you can load the
software.
4.4 Troubleshooting
This section contains suggestions for determining the cause of ROM-based
diagnostic test failures.
4.4.1 FE Utility
If any of the tests that run after the IPTs and up to the primary console
test fail, the major test code is displayed on the LEDs. Run the FE utility
if the message Normal operation not possible is displayed after the tests
are completed and there is no other error indication, or if you need more
information than what is provided in the error display.
The FE utility dumps the diagnostic state to the console (Example 4–7).
This state indicates the major and minor test code of the test that failed, the
20 parameters associated with the test, and the hardware error summary
register.
Example 4–7: FE Utility Example
>>> T FE
bitmap=07FEC000, length=00008000, checksum=0000
busmap=07FF8000
return_stack=20140670
subtest_pc=2005668D
timeout=000003E8, error=00, de_error=00
de_error_vector=0000, severity_code=02, total_error_count=0000
previous_error=00000000, 00000000, 00000000, 00000000
last_exception_pc=00000000
flags=000FFFFF, test_flags=0020
highest_severity=00
led_display=09
console_display=9C
save_mchk_code=80, save_err_flags=000000
Interrupted test number = 48, Subtestlog=02, Error_type=FF
gp =C10AE000 sp =B8001B14 fp =00000000 sr =BFC29A0C
epc=B0482004 badvaddr =00000000 cause =10002000
parameter_1 =00000000 2=00000000 3=00000000 4=00000000
Example 4–7 Cont’d on next page
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–41
Example 4–7 (Cont.): FE Utility Example
5=00000000
parameter_6 =00000000 7=00000000 8=00000000 9=00000000
10=00000000
parameter_11=00000000 12=00000000 13=00000000 14=00000000
15=00000000
parameter_16=00000000 17=00000000 18=00000000 19=00000000
20=00000000
>>>
The most useful fields displayed above are as follows:
•
De_error_vector, which is the SCB vector through which the unexpected
interrupt or exception is trapped if de_error equals FE or EF.
•
Total_error_count. Four hex digits showing the number of previous
errors that have occurred.
•
Previous_error. Contains the history of the last four errors. Each
longword contains four bytes of information. From left to right these
are the de_error, subtest_log, and test number (copied in both bytes).
•
Save machine check code (save_mchk_code). Valid only if the test halts
on error. This field has the same format as the hardware error summary
register.
•
Save error flags (save_err_flags). Valid only if the test halts on error.
This field has the same format as the hardware error summary register.
•
Parameters 1 through 20. Valid only if the test halts on error. The
parameters have the same format as the hardware error summary
register.
FE in the previous_error field indicates that an unexpected exception has
occurred. If any of the tests that announce to the console fails, and the
error code is FE, examine the last longword of the error printout. The last
longword is the hardware error summary register and contains the machine
check code (<31:24>) and KN220 error status bits (<23:0>). Table 4–11 lists
the status bits.
4–42 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–11: Hardware Error Summary Register
Bit
Register
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
8
7
6
4
3
2
1
0
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
Machine check
MSER <6>
MSER <5>
MSER <4>
MSER <1>
MSER <0>
Unused
CBCTR <31>
CBCTR <30>
DSER <7>
DSER <5>
DSER <4>
DSER <3>
DSER <2>
IPCRn <15>
Description
code
code
code
code
code
code
code
code
;
;
;
;
;
CDAL data parity error
Mchn chck CDAL parity error
Machine check cache parity
Cache data parity error
Cache tag parity error
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
;
CDAL bus timeout.
CPU read/write bus timeout.
Q22-bus NXM.
Q22-bus parity error.
Read main memory error.
Lost error.
No grant timeout.
DMA Q22-bus memory error.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–43
4.4.2 Isolating Memory Failures
This section describes procedures for isolating memory subsystem failures,
particularly when the system contains more than one MS220 memory
module.
1. SHOW MEMORY/FULL.
Use the SHOW MEMORY/FULL command to examine failures detected
by the memory tests. If test 40 fails, indicating that pages have been
marked bad in the bitmap, use this test.
Memory failures normally show up as errors during test 40, which
counts memory pages marked bad in the bitmap. If this test fails,
you should use the SHOW MEMORY/FULL command to describe the
number of bad pages on each individual memory module. If the system
contains more than one memory module and SHOW MEMORY/FULL
does not identify each module, then you should run test 9A.
2. T 9A to define capacity of memory modules.
Test 9A allows you to enter the capacity of each individual memory
module. When 9A is completed, enter the SHOW MEMORY/FULL
command again to display the individual memory modules that contain
errors.
The utility prompts for a description of each board. The descriptions
are as follows:
0 = no memory
1 = 32-Mbyte board
2 = 64-Mbyte board
You can avoid the prompt by entering the specified command:
>>> T 9A mem_board_0 mem_board_1 mem_board_2 mem_board_3
To specify a system with two 32-Mbyte boards, the command is:
>>> T 9A 1 1
>>>
See Section 4.3 for an example of running T 9A interactively.
3. T 40.
Specify the first parameter in test 40 to be the threshold for soft errors.
To allow 0 (zero) errors, enter the following: >>> T 40 0. The parameter
is a threshold of allowable software errors on all boards. The default is
to ignore soft errors.
4. Test 40 always fails if any hard errors are marked in the bitmap.
4–44 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
This command tests the memory all memory installed modules. Use it
after running memory tests individually or within a script. If test 40
fails with subtestlog = 6, enter the SHOW MEMORY/FULL command
to see the error summary.
Run test A9 after a failure of test 40.
5. T A9.
>>> T [memory test] starting_address ending_address
Script A9 stops on any error, hard or soft. This script is useful in
determining the first memory test that failed. After finding a failure in
test 40, T A9 runs the power-up memory test and prints the first error.
When an error is detected, run the failed test on each memory module,
one at a time. Enter parameters 1 and 2 of tests 40, 47, 48, and 4A–4F
as the starting and ending addresses for testing.
All memory tests with the exception of 40 save the MEAR, MESR, and
CAUSE registers.
6. T 9C.
Example 4–8: Isolating Bad Memory Using T 9C
>>> T 9C
TOY =000402C8
TCR0 =00000000
TCR1 =00000081
RXCS =00000000
MSER =00000000
BDR =FFFFFFD2
SCR =0000D000
QBMBR=07FF8000
MESR =FFFC0614
IOPRE=EFFFFFFF
ICCS =00000000
TIR0 =00000000
TIR1 =01EE03BC
RXDB =0000000D
CADR =0000000C
DLEDR=0000000B
DSER =00000000
IPCR =0000
MEAR =3E030003
ISR =7FFFFFF1
NICSR0 =3FFF0003
NICSR7 =00000000
NICSR13=00000000
Ethernet
3=00008380
9=04E204E2
15=0000FFFF
TNIR0=00000000
TNIR1=00000000
TXCS =00000000
TIVR0=00000078
TIVR1=0000007C
TXDB =00000030
SSCCR=00D45077
QBEAR=0000000F
CBTCR=00000004
DEAR =00000000
ITR
=FFFFFF8F
4=00008360
10=00030000
5=803BFF00
11=00000000
6=09E0F108
12=00000000
SA = 08-00-2B-12-81-22
MSIDR0 =0000
MSIIDR =0007
MSIDSCR=80FF
MSIDR1 =0000
MSITR =80CE
MSIDSSR=AC00
MSIDR2 =0000
MSITLP =0032
MSIDCR =0004
MSICSR =0000
MSIILP =79D6
Example 4–8 Cont’d on next page
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–45
Example 4–8 (Cont.): Isolating Bad Memory Using T 9C
XCTRL =00
INTR =00
>>>
XCTRH =00
FFLAG =80
FIFO =00
CON1 =07
COMD =12
CON2 =00
STS =00
CON3 =00
SEQST =C4
MEAR contains the address of the failure. MESR indicates the type of
failure. These registers are valid only after a memory test has failed.
Bit 0 of MEAR is set if a non-existent memory error was detected. Bits
2 through 31 contain the failing address.
7. T A8 for testing a new memory module.
Test A8 is used in the field when a new memory module is installed.
It runs the same tests as the power-up script, but with different
parameters. In addition, near the end when it runs test 40 to check
the bitmap, it also counts soft errors and allows only one.
4.4.3 Running a Memory Test
To run a memory test, check your entries against Table 4–12.
The command is:
>>> T [test] [start_address] [ending_address] [address_increment]
Table 4–12: Running a Memory Test
Entry
Description
4F
Memory test, floating 1s and 0s pattern
4E
Memory byte test; use masked write cycles
4D
Memory address uniqueness
4C
ECC logic
48
Memory address shorts
47
Memory refresh logic
Table 4–13 describes the common memory parameters.
4–46 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Table 4–13: Common Memory Parameters
Entry
Description
Start_address
First address to test; default is 0
Ending_address
Last address to test plus one; default is all memory
Address_increment
How often to run the test; minimum value is always 0x10 or
greater. Test 48 tests every location in memory; for tests 4F, 4E,
and 4C set this parameter low since the test will take a long time;
tests 47 and 4D run fairly quickly so you can test all locations. To
see the parameters used, run T 9E after the test finishes.
4.4.4 Additional Troubleshooting Suggestions
Note the following additional suggestions when diagnosing a possible
memory failure.
If more than one memory module is failing, you should suspect the KN220
CPU module, KN220 I/O module, CPU/memory cable, or the backplane.
Always check the seating of the memory cable first before replacing a
KN220 or MS220 module. If the seating appears to be improper, remove
the cable and check the pins on the connector.
If you are rotating MS220 modules to verify that a particular memory
module is causing the failure, be aware that a module may fail in a different
way when in a different slot.
Be sure to put the modules back in their original positions when you are
finished.
If memory errors are found in the error log, use the KN220 ROM-based
diagnostics to see if it is an MS220 problem or if it is related to the
KN220, CPU/memory interconnect cable, or backplane. Follow steps 1–3 of
Section 4.3 and Section 4.4.2 to aid in isolating the failure.
Use the SHOW QBUS, SHOW DEVICE, and SET HOST/DUP commands
when troubleshooting I/O subsystem problems.
Use the CONFIG command to help with configuration problems or when
installing new options onto the Q-bus. See the command descriptions in
Chapter 3.
You can run a DSSI device power-up diagnostic without performing a cold
restart or spinning the disk drives down and back up.
Type the following at the console program:
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–47
>>> T 58 <node_number>
A CI RESET command is issued to the DSSI device, causing the device to
perform its power-up diagnostics.
Parameter 1 is the DSSI node or port number. It must be in the range of
0–7 (0 is the default). Use the default for parameter 2.
You can perform this test repeatedly with the REPEAT command (R T 58
<node_number>). In that case, the drive’s self-tests run repeatedly until
you press Ctrl/C to terminate the test.
Once the test has completed successfully, you can examine the DSSI
device’s internal error logs by running the DUP local programs HISTRY and
PARAMS. Refer to Section 4.7.3 and Section 4.7.5 for further information.
4.5 Loopback Tests
You can use external loopback tests to localize problems with the Ethernet,
console, and DSSI subsystems.
4.5.1 DSSI Problems
For DSSI problems, run the SII external loopback test (test 56). To check
the DSSI out to the KN220 I/O module connector, plug one end of the cable
(17–02216–01) into the H3281 loopback connector and the other end into
the DSSI connector on the KN220 I/O module. To test out to the end of
the DSSI bus, power down the system, remove all DSSI devices with the
exception of the KN220 from the bus, and replace the DSSI bus terminator
plug with the external DSSI loopback connector 12–30702–01.
4.5.2 Ethernet Problems
For Ethernet problems, run the SGEC external loopback test by entering
the following:
>>> T 5F 1 <CR>
Set the ThinWire/standard Ethernet switch on the H3602–AC to the
appropriate position.
Use two 50-ohm H8225 terminators connected to an H8223 T-connector.
Before running the test, attach this assembly to the H3602–AC ThinWire
port.
To test the standard Ethernet connector, attach loopback connector 12–
22196–02 to the H3602–AC standard Ethernet port.
4–48 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
To test further, connect the Ethernet port to a live network and run the
SGEC_LPBCK_ASSIST test, number 59. To display responses from other
network nodes, enter the following line:
>>> T 59 <CR>
4.5.3 Testing the Console Port
To test the console port at power-up, set the operation switch on the H3602–
AC, using the procedure in Section 3.5.3. The H3103 connects the console
port transmit and receive lines. At power-up, the SLU_EXT_LOOPBACK
IPT then runs a continuous loopback test.
To test the end of the console terminal cable:
1. Plug the MMJ end of the console terminal cable into the H3602–AC.
2. Disconnect the other end of the cable from the terminal.
3. Plug an H8572 adapter into the disconnected end of the cable.
4. Connect the H3103 to the H8572.
While the test is running, the LED display on the CPU I/O insert should
alternate between 7 and 4. A value of 7 latched in the display indicates a
test failure. If the test fails, one of the following parts is faulty: the KN220,
the H3602–AC, the cabling, or the I/O module.
4.6 Module Self-Tests
Module self-tests run when you power up the system. A module self-test
can detect hard or repeatable errors, but usually not intermittent errors.
Module LEDs display pass/fail test results.
A pass by a module self-test does not guarantee that the module is good,
because the test usually checks only the controller logic. The test usually
does not check the module Q22-bus interface, the line drivers and receivers,
or the connector pins—all of which have relatively high failure rates.
A fail by a module self-test is accurate, because the test does not require
any other part of the system to be working.
The following modules do not have LED self-test indicators:
KLESI
LPV11
TSV05
The following modules have one green LED, which indicates that the
module is receiving +5 and +12 Vdc:
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–49
CXA16
CXB16
CXY08
Table 4–14 lists loopback connectors for common KN220 system modules.
See Microsystems Options for a description of specific module self-tests.
Table 4–14: Loopback Connectors for Q22-Bus Devices
Device
Module Loopback
CXA16/CXB16
CXY08
DELQA
KN220/H3602–AC
H3103 + H85721
H3046 (50-pin)
12–22196–02
H3103
Cable Loopback
H3197 (25-pin)
H3103 + H8572
1 For
DSSI to KN220 or RF-series connector, use 17–02216–01 plus H3281 loopback. For
connection to end of bus, use the DSSI loopback connector 12–30702–01.
4.7 RF-Series ISE Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
An RF-series integrated storage element (ISE) may fail either during initial
power-up or during normal operation. In both cases, the failure is indicated
by the lighting of the red fault LED on the operator control panel (OCP) on
the enclosure front panel. The ISE also has a red fault LED, but it is not
visible from the outside of the system enclosure.
If the drive is unable to execute the Power-On Self-Test (POST) successfully,
the red fault LED remains lit and the ready LED does not come on, or both
LEDs remain on.
POST is also used to handle the following two types of error conditions in
the drive:
1. Controller errors are caused by the hardware associated with the
controller function of the drive module. A controller error is fatal to the
operation of the drive, since the controller cannot establish a logical
connection to the host. If the red fault LED remains lit, replace the
drive module.
2. Drive errors are caused by the hardware associated with the drive
control function of the drive module. These errors are not fatal to
the drive, since the drive can establish a logical connection and report
the error to the host. Both LEDs go out for about 1 second, then the
red fault LED lights. In this case, run either DRVTST, DRVEXR, or
PARAMS (described in the next sections) to determine the error code.
4–50 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Three configuration errors also commonly occur:
•
More than one node with the same node number
•
Identical node names
•
Identical unit numbers
The first error cannot be detected by software. Use the SHOW DSSI
command to display the second and third errors. This command lists each
device connected to the DSSI bus by node name and unit number.
You must install a bus node ID plug in the bus node ID socket on the OCP.
If the ISE is not connected to the OCP, the ISE reads its bus node ID from
the three-switch DIP switchpack on the side of the drive.
The RF-series ISE contains the following local programs (described in the
following sections):
DIRECT
DRVTST
DRVEXR
HISTRY
ERASE
PARAMS
A directory, in DUP specified format, of available local programs
A comprehensive drive functionality verification test
A utility that exercises the ISE
A utility that saves information retained by the drive
A utility that erases all user data from the disk
A utility that allows you to look at or change drive status, history, and
parameters
A description of each local program follows, including a table showing the
dialog of each program. The table also indicates the type of messages
contained in the dialog, although the screen display will not indicate the
message type. Message types are abbreviated as follows:
Q—Question
I—Information
T—Termination
FE—Fatal error
To access these local programs, use the Maintenance mode SET HOST
/DUP command, which creates a virtual terminal connection to the storage
device and the designated local program, using the Diagnostic and Utilities
Protocol (DUP) standard dialog.
Once the connection is established, the local program is in control. When
the program terminates, control is returned to the KN220 console. To
abort or prematurely terminate a program and return control to the KN220
console, press Ctrl/C or Ctrl/Y .
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–51
4.7.1 DRVTST
DRVTST is a comprehensive functionality test. Errors detected by this test
are isolated to the FRU level. The messages are listed in Table 4–15.
Table 4–15: DRVTST Messages
Message
Type
I
Q
Q
I
T
or
FE
FE
FE
FE
Message
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=yes/(0=no)]
User data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=yes/(0=no)]
Five minutes to complete.
Test passed.
Unit is currently in use.1
Operation aborted by user.
xxxx—Unit diagnostics failed.2
xxxx—Unit read/write test failed.2
1 Either
2 Refer
the drive is inoperative, in use by a host, or is currently running another local program.
to the diagnostic error code list at the end of this chapter.
Answering No to the first question (‘‘Write/read...?’’) or pressing Return
results in a read-only test. DRVTST, however, writes to a diagnostic area
on the disk. Answering Yes to the first question or pressing Return causes
the second question to be displayed.
Answering No to the second question (‘‘Proceed?’’) or pressing Return is the
same as answering No to the first question. Answering Yes to the second
question permits write and read operations anywhere on the medium.
DRVTST resets the ECC error counters, then calls the timed I/O routine.
After the timed I/O routine ends (5 minutes), DRVTST saves the counters
again. It computes the uncorrectable error rate and byte (symbol) error
rate. If either rate is too high, the test fails and the appropriate error code
is displayed.
4–52 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.7.2 DRVEXR
The DRVEXR local program exercises the ISE. The test is data transfer
intensive and indicates the overall integrity of the device. Table 4–16 lists
the DRVEXR messages.
Table 4–16: DRVEXR Messages
Message
Type
I
Q
Q
Q
I
I
I
I
T
or
FE
FE
FE
FE
Message
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=yes/(0=no)]
User data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=yes/(0=no)]
Test time in minutes? [(10)-100]
ddd minutes to complete.
dddddddd blocks (512 bytes) transferred.
dddddddd bytes in error (soft).
dddddddd uncorrectable ECC errors (recoverable).
Complete.
Unit is currently in use.1
Operation aborted by user.
xxxx—Unit diagnostics failed.2
xxxx—Unit read/write test failed.2
1 Either
2 Refer
the drive is inoperative, in use by a host, or is currently running another local program.
to the diagnostic error list at the end of this chapter.
Answering No to the first question (‘‘Write/read...?’’) results in a read-only
test. DRVEXR, however, writes to a diagnostic area on the disk. Answering
Yes to the first question causes the second question to be displayed.
Answering No to the second question (‘‘Proceed?’’) is the same as answering
No to the first question. Answering Yes to the second question permits write
and read operations anywhere on the medium.
NOTE: If the write-protect switch on the OCP is pressed in (LED on) and
you answer Yes to the second question, the drive does not allow the test to
run. DRVEXR displays the error message 2006—Unit read/write test failed.
In this case, the test has not failed but has been prevented from running.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–53
DRVEXR saves the error counters, then calls the timed I/O routine. After
the timed I/O routine ends, DRVEXR saves the counters again. It then
reports the total number of blocks transferred, bits in error, bytes in error,
and uncorrectable errors.
DRVEXR uses the same timed I/O routine as DRVTST, with two exceptions:
•
DRVTST always uses a fixed time of five minutes, whereas you specify
the time of the DRVEXR routine.
•
DRVTST determines whether the drive is good or bad. DRVEXR reports
the data but does not determine the condition of the drive.
4.7.3 HISTRY
The HISTRY local program displays information about the history of the
ISE. Table 4–17 lists the HISTRY messages.
Table 4–17: HISTRY Messages
Message
Type
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I1
T
Field Length
Field Meaning
47 ASCII characters
4 ASCII characters
12 ASCII characters
6 ASCII characters
1 ASCII character
8 ASCII characters
17 ASCII characters
6 ASCII characters
5 ASCII characters
4 ASCII characters
Copyright notice
Product name
Drive serial number
Node name
Allocation class
Firmware revision level
Hardware revision level
Power-on hours
Power cycles
Hexadecimal fault code
Complete
1 Displays
the last 11 fault codes as informational messages. Refer to the diagnostic error code
list at the end of this chapter.
4–54 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
The following example shows a typical screen display when you run
HISTRY:
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
RF71
EN01082
SUSAN
0
RFX V101
RF71 PCB-5/ECO-00
617
21
A04F
A04F
A103
A04F
A404
A04F
A404
A04F
A404
A04F
A404
Complete.
If no errors have been logged, no hexadecimal fault codes are displayed.
4.7.4 ERASE
The ERASE local program overwrites application data on the drive while
leaving the replacement control table (RCT) intact. This local program is
used if an HDA must be replaced and the customer wants to protect any
confidential or sensitive data.
Use ERASE only if the HDA must be replaced and only after you have
backed up the customer’s data.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–55
Table 4–18 lists the ERASE messages.
Table 4–18: ERASE Messages
Message
Type
I
Q
Q
I
T
or
FE
FE
FE
FE
Message
Copyright © 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
Write/read anywhere on the medium? [1=yes/(0=no)]
User data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=yes/(0=no)]
6 minutes to complete.
Complete.
Unit is currently in use.
Operation aborted by user.
xxxx—Unit diagnostics failed.1
xxxx—Operation failed.2
1 Refer
to the diagnostic error code list at the end of this chapter.
= one of the following error codes:
000D : Cannot write the RCT.
000E : Cannot read the RCT.
000F : Cannot find an RBN to which to revector.
0010 : The RAM copy of the bad block table is full.
2 xxxx
If a failure is detected, the message indicating the failure will be followed
by one or more messages containing error codes.
4.7.5 PARAMS
The PARAMS local program supports modifications to device parameters
that you may need to change, such as device node name and allocation
class. You invoke it in the same way as the other local programs. However,
you use the following commands to make the modifications you need:
EXIT
HELP
SET
SHOW
STATUS
WRITE
Terminates PARAMS program
Prints a brief list of commands and their syntax
Sets a parameter to a value
Displays a parameter or a class of parameters
Displays module configuration, history, or current counters, depending on the
status type chosen
Alters the device parameters
4–56 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.7.5.1 EXIT
Use the EXIT command to terminate the PARAMS local program.
4.7.5.2 HELP
Use the HELP command to display a brief list of available PARAMS
commands, as shown in the example below.
PARAMS> HELP
EXIT
HELP
SET {parameter | .}
SHOW {parameter | .
/ALL
/CONST
/SERVO
/SCS
/DUP
STATUS [type]
CONFIG
LOGS
PATHS
WRITE
value
| /class}
/DRIVE
/MSCP
DATALINK
PARAMS>
4.7.5.3 SET
Use the SET command to change the value of a given parameter. Parameter
is the name or abbreviation of the parameter to be changed. Value is the
value assigned to the parameter.
For example, SET NODE SUSAN sets the NODENAME parameter to
SUSAN.
The following parameters are useful to Customer Services:
ALLCLASS
FIVEDIME
UNITNUM
FORCEUNI
NODENAME
FORCENAM
The controller allocation class. The allocation class should be set to match
that of the host.
True (1) if MSCP should support five connections with ten credits each. False
(0) if MSCP should support seven connections with seven credits each.
The MSCP unit number.
True (1) if the unit number should be taken from the DSSI ID. False (0) if the
UNITNUM value should be used instead.
The controller’s SCS node name.
True (1) if the SCS node name should be forced to the string RF71x (where x
is a letter from A to H corresponding to the DSSI bus ID) instead of using the
NODENAME value. False (0) if NODENAME is to be used.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–57
4.7.5.4 SHOW
Use the SHOW command to display the settings of a parameter or a class
of parameters. It displays the full name of the parameter (8 characters or
less), the current value, the default value, radix and type, and any flags
associated with each parameter.
4.7.5.5 STATUS
Use the STATUS command to display module configuration, history, or
current counters, depending on the type specified. Type is the optional
ASCII string that denotes the type of display desired. If you omit Type, all
available status information is displayed. If present, it may be abbreviated.
The following types are available:
CONFIG
LOGS
DATALINK
PATHS
Displays the module name, node name, power-up hours, power cycles, and
other such configuration information. Unit failures are also displayed, if
applicable.
Displays the last 11 machine and bug checks on the module. The display
includes the processor registers (D0–D7, A0–A7), the time and date of each
failure (if available; otherwise the date 17 November 1858 is displayed), and
some of the hardware registers.
Displays the data link counters.
Displays available path information (open virtual circuits) from the point of
view of the controller. The display includes the remote node names, DSSI IDs,
software type and version, and counters for the messages and datagrams sent
and/or received.
4.7.5.6 WRITE
Use the WRITE command to write the changes made while in PARAMS
to the drive nonvolatile memory. The WRITE command is similar to the
VMS SYSGEN WRITE command. Parameters are not available, but you
must be aware of the system and/or drive requirements and use the WRITE
command accordingly or it may not succeed in writing the changes.
The WRITE command may fail for one of the following reasons:
•
You altered a parameter that required the unit, and the unit cannot be
acquired (that is, the unit is not available to the host). Changing the
unit number is an example of a parameter that requires the unit.
•
You altered a parameter that required a controller initialization, and
you replied negatively to the request for reboot. Changing the node
name or the allocation class are examples of parameters that require
controller initialization.
•
Initial drive calibrations were in progress on the unit. The use of the
WRITE command is inhibited while these calibrations are running.
4–58 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.7.6 Diagnostic Error Codes
Diagnostic error codes appear when you are running DRVTST, DRVEXR,
or PARAMS. Most of the error codes indicate a failure of the drive module.
The exceptions are listed below. The error codes are listed in Table 4–19. If
you see any error code other than those listed below, replace the module.
Table 4–19: RF-Series ISE Diagnostic Error Codes
Code
Message
Meaning
2032/A032
Failed to see FLT go away
FLT bit of the spindle control status register was
asserted for one of the following reasons:
1. Reference clock not present
2. Stuck rotor
3. Bad connection between HDA and module
203A/A03A
Cannot spin up, ACLOW
is set in WrtFlt
Did not see ACOK signal, which is supplied by the
host system power supply for staggered spin-up.
1314/9314
Front panel is broken
Could be either the module or the operator control
panel or both.
4.8 Memory Diagnostics
The following subsections describe the memory diagnostics.
4.8.1 Test 30 - Bitmap Placing Test
The purpose of test 30 is to determine the size of memory and set up a
bitmap in memory to be used by the memory tests. After all memory tests
are complete, the bitmap defines memory that is good and available and
memory that is bad or being used for the bitmap, busmap, etc.
An error is marked in the bitmap when a multibit error or a hard single bit
error occurs. Soft single bit errors are not marked, but they are counted.
This test is run before other memory tests to make sure the memory bitmap
is present. Though this test is usually run only once, other memory tests
may be run more than once if desired.
The main purpose of this test is to find a good block of memory for the
maps. It fails only when all memory is bad or the CPU memory logic is
bad. If it fails, troubleshooting should be done by running the individual
memory tests, do not try to troubleshoot using this test. The easiest way
to run all individual tests is to run the A9 memory script (>>>T A9).
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–59
The bitmap placing test calls the data test (4F), the byte test (4E) and the
address shorts test (48). During this time the parameters are determined
by the test being run. First the memory is sized to determine the amount
of memory available and describe any holes in memory if present.
The test looks for a 256 KB section of memory to be used for the bitmap,
busmap and CVAX reserved console area. The bitmap ranges in size from 8
KB (for 32 MB of memory) to 128 KB (for 512 MB of memory), the busmap
is always 32 KB and the CVAX reserved console area is 16 Kb. The other 80
KB may be used by diagnostics. The actual size of the bitmap is determined
by the results of the memory sizing routine previously run. The test starts
at the top of available memory and tests the highest 256 KB section of each
8 MB of memory until a good section is found for the maps or the bottom
of memory is reached in which case a failure is reported. When a good
section is found, the bitmap is initialized to mark all memory other than
the bitmap, busmap and CVAX reserved console area as good, these are
marked as taken (same as being marked bad). Load the bitmap address,
bitmap length and busmap address in the diagnostic state. Save address
of CVAX reserved console area. The busmap itself is not properly setup at
this time, it is left cleared.
NOTE: This test reports an error only if it fails to find a good section of
memory for the maps or if the size of memory is 0.
It is important to note that the bitmap is always initialized to all good
memory when this test is run except for memory holes which are marked
as bad. You must run all memory tests after this test to insure that bad
memory is marked correctly.
The following list contains a detailed description of the procedure.
1. Clear bitmap address, bitmap checksum, bitmap length and busmap
address in diagnostic state. Mark RAM available flag (DST$V_RAM)
as not available.
2. Size memory from address 0 upwards. Memory is present if it responds
to a write cycle without timing out (NXM). If memory is not present in
0 then there is error. Size every 32 MB from the beginning to end of
memory. Store the results in a 16 bit mask with each bit defining one
32 MB memory bank, 0 = not present, 1 = present. Bit 0 is first 32 MB,
etc.
NOTE: This routine is a destructive sizing routine, it will destroy any
contents present in the memory locations sized. The sizing routine does
not write below 192 KB to protect R3000 console code.
4–60 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
3. From the top of memory -256KB, test the highest 256KB block in each
8MB section of memory until either a good block is found (success) or
the bottom of memory is reached (failure).
4. Call the memory data test (4F) with the starting and ending address of
the current 256KB section of memory to test. The address increment
is set to 32 KB to test eight QWs in section.
5. Call the memory byte test (4E) with the starting and ending address of
the current 256KB section of memory to test. The address increment
is set to 64 KB to test four QWs in section.
6. Call the memory address shorts test (48) with the starting and ending
address of the current 256KB section of memory to test. The address
shorts test will always test every word selected. The misc parameter is
set to use both I and D cache and to only run the first three passes of
the address shorts test. This will leave the contents of the last pattern
(0x55555555) left unchecked in the section of memory.
7. For all of memory from beginning to end by (4 KB + 4) clear the first
QW in each 16 KB block. Ignore any errors if they occur. Do not clear
any locations in the 256 KB area under test. Do not start below 192
KB to protect the R3000 console.
8. Call the memory address shorts test (48) with the starting and ending
address of the current 256KB section of memory to test. The address
shorts test will always test every word selected. The misc parameter
is set to use both I and D cache and to only run the fourth pass of the
address shorts test. This will verify that the pattern of 0x55555555 left
by running passes 1,2 and 3 of the test was not disturbed by accessing
other locations in memory.
9. If any error occurs during test then subtract 8 MB from the current
base address and continue trying.
10. If a good 256 KB section of memory was not found then report error.
11. If a good 256 KB section of memory was found then continue.
12. Clear the 256 KB block of memory found.
13. Mark all locations in bitmap as good. Save length of bitmap and address
of bitmap in diagnostic state. Determine correct checksum for bitmap
and then save the complement of the good checksum. This makes
sure the bitmap checksum is bad after running this test. The correct
checksum is not placed in the diagnostic state until the test which
counts bad pages in memory is run which is after all other memory
tests. At this time the bitmap should be valid. Save the address of
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–61
the 16 KB CVAX reserved area for the console program in the console
portion of SSC RAM. Mark RAM available flag good.
4.8.2 Test 4F - Memory Data Tests
The purpose of Test 4F is to verify that each bit in the data path can be
written to a one and a zero individually. This test also checks for shorts
between individual paths. The test always checks a QW at a time to make
sure that both sides of the memory array are checked. The test need only
be run once for each array of memory chips.
4.8.3 Test 4E - Memory Byte Tests
Test 4E verifies that masked write cycles work correctly. The test writes to
each byte of a QW and verifies the data. The test need only be run once for
each array of memory chips.
4.8.4 Test 4D - Memory Address Uniqueness Test
The main purpose of test 4D is to verify that each location in memory can
be uniquely addressed. Write each LW from the starting address to ending
address with its own R3000 physical address.
From starting address to ending address read back each LW and verify that
it contains its address.
4.8.5 Test 4C - Memory ECC Logic, Verify Error Detection
and Reporting
The main purpose of test 4C is to test ECC logic. It is not intended to test
the memory boards explicitly. The test introduces single and multiple bit
errors and then reads back or tries to do a masked write to the location and
verifies the proper responses and error logging.
4.8.6 Test 48 - Memory Address/Shorts Test
Test 48 verifies that all locations in each bank can be uniquely written and
that each of the 39 data bits in each LW can be written to a one and a zero.
This test also writes all locations in memory with good ECC.
This test takes 12 seconds to verify each 32 MBs of memory.
T 48 runs address shorts test across every LW from beginning to end
address.
4–62 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
4.8.7 Test 47 - Memory Data Retention, Verify Refresh Logic
Test 47 verifies that the refresh logic is working for all memory boards.
4.8.8 Test 40 - Memory Count; Bad Pages Marked in Bitmap
Test 40 counts the number of pages marked in the memory bitmap. It also
places the correct bitmap checksum into the diagnostic state.
4.8.9 Test 9A - Define Current Memory Configuration
Test 9A is an optional test which allows a user to define exactly what size
memory boards are present in the system and in what order they are. This
information is useful to the memory tests to allow them to associate memory
addresses with physical memory boards in the backplane (FRUs).
NOTE: It is not possible for a sizing routine to associate accurately memory
addresses with board numbers for all possible memory configurations.
This is an optional test that the user can invoke to prompt the user with
questions to describe the actual memory configuration of the system. It
then verifies the information and if it is reasonable it saves it in SSC RAM.
Otherwise an error is reported.
The memory configuration information is used by memory diagnostics to
allow the test to identify which memory board is bad if a failure occurs.
This routine must be manually invoked and is not run automatically by
any of the powerup scripts. The routine is not required to run any of the
test scripts.
The following is a example of the interaction with the user. In this case
the system has two 32-Mbyte memory boards. The memory board number
(M7639-x) is shown because it is readable from the handle end of the
module.
0 MB = 0;
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA = 1;
64 MB, M7639-B, MS220-BA = 2;
MEM FRU 0:3
MEM FRU 0 = 1
MEM FRU 1 = 1
MEM FRU 2 = 0
MEM FRU = 0
MEM FRU = 1
>>>
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA
32 MB, M7639-A, MS220-AA
00000000 01FFFFFF
02000000 03FFFFFF
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–63
4.9 SCSI Controller Chip Test
There are five SCSI controller chip tests, as shown below.
4.9.1 ASC Reset Test
The ASC reset test checks whether the Software can reset the ASC and
bring it to a known state.
Reset the ASC through the COMMAND register and check Initial values
of some of the registers.
Reset the ASC through the RESET command and the COMMAND register.
The following registers will ZERO after reset.
1. Command Register
2. First element of FIFO
3. Status Register
4. Interrupt Register
5. FIFO Flag and Sequence register
6. Configuration Registers 1, 2 and 3
4.9.2 ASC Register Test
The purpose of this test is find whether the software can "Access" internal
bits in a register. This is a read write test done on a register that can be
read as well as written to.
The configuration registers are chosen for this test. Each register is run
through an 8 bit up-counter and the values are tested at each increment.
Configuration 2 register is run through an 8 bit down-counter.
4.9.3 ASC Interrupt Test
ASC interrupt tests the ability of the ASC to generate an Interrupt and
tests the ability of the hardware to field an interrupt generated by the
SCSI subsystem.
There are two ways that the ASC can be ’faked’ into generating an interrupt
without actually having any devices connected to the SCSI bus. These
interrupts are generated and fielded to prove that the interrupts can be
handled by the SCSI subsystem.
4–64 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
After Poweron/Reset, ASC will be in disconnected mode. Issuing a
command from another mode (either Initiator or target mode) will cause
an Illegal command interrupt.
The ASC is reset through the software. An ISR is setup to handle the
interrupt and a flag is setup. The interrupt is initiated by writing an
Initiator command to the command register. The flag is checked and reset
in the ISR. If the flag is not reset within a reasonable time, it signifies
error.
Without an actual device (target) on the bus, it is difficult to test the
Disconnect Interrupt. The Target Disconnect interrupt is the same as the
interrupt that indicates Selection or Reselection Timeout, which can be
tested.
Set the SELECT/RESELECT TIMEOUT register to 1 (minimum value),
then issue a select command with the SCSI ID the same as the ASC. The
effect of this is to setup a short timeout and selecting the host itself. After
the timeout, expect the Disconnected Interrupt. The interrupt is tested
with a flag being set before causing the interrupt and checking/resetting
the flag in the ISR.
4.9.4 ASC FIFO Test
This is to test the working of the FIFO and associated FIFO flags inside
the ASC.
The FIFO inside the ASC helps speed up the transfer of Command, data
and messages to and from the SCSI bus. The FIFO test checks out the
operation of the 16 by 9 FIFO along with the FIFO flags inside the ASC.
The FIFO registers tells how many bytes are in the FIFO. Load a number
of bytes into the FIFO and check the flags. The number in the register
should agree with the number of bytes sent. This is checked for numbers 0
through 15 and the flags are checked. Also in this test, the bytes read from
out of FIFO should follow the order in which it was written.
4.9.5 ASC DMA Counter Register Test
This is to test the working of the DMA counter and count register inside
ASC.
The DMA register stores the DMA transfer count. A DMA transfer
command instructs the ASC to use this counter to do DMA operation. This
test will check whether a DMA command will transfer this value to the
internal count-down counter.
KN220 Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
4–65
Setup the COUNT register with a ’starting value’. Issue a DMA NOP
instruction to the ASC. This command will transfer the COUNT value into
the internal count-down counter. A read from the COUNTER register will
return the number of bytes remaining to be transferred. In this case no
bytes will have been transferred, so the values read from COUNT should
be identical to the value written to the COUNT register. Repeat the test
from the ’starting value’ being the lowest possible number to the highest
possible count value.
4–66 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Appendix A
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf
Command Summary
This appendix contains a summary of ULTRIX–32 exerciser and uerf
commands to help you troubleshoot and diagnose errors in the DECsystem
5500.
See the following documents for detailed information on the commands:
•
ULTRIX–32 Guide to System Exercisers
•
ULTRIX–32 Guide to the Error Logger System
A.1 On-line ULTRIX Exerciser
The ULTRIX exercisers perform functional system and device testing. The
exercisers are run in single- or multiuser mode from an account with root
privileges.
The exercisers log status information in LOG files. Normal device errors
are handled by the error log and uerf. You can run each of the exercisers in
the background by ending each command line with an &. This allows many
(the same or different) exercisers to be run concurrently, which enhances
your ability to perform system testing.
To run the exercisers, your current directory must be the field account. To
terminate the exercisers, enter Ctrl/C if the job is in the foreground, or kill
-15 pid if in the background. When you run an exerciser in the background,
pid is displayed when the command is envoked.
A time stamp entry is made in the system error log each time you stop or
start an exerciser. Use the uerf option -r 350 to include these in an error
report. All the system exercisers, except netx, have the -o option. The -o
option allows you to specify a file where diagnostic output is saved when
the exerciser terminates.
Exercising More Than One Part of the System
You can run more than one exerciser at the same time. Keep in mind,
however, that the more processes you have running, the slower the system
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–1
performs. Before exercising the system extensively, make sure there are no
other users on the system.
To exercise more than one part of the system simultaneously, use the
syscript maintenance command. The syscript command asks you which
exercisers you want to run, how long you want to run each exerciser, and
how many exercisers you want to run at one time. The syscript command
allows you to exercise a device, a subsystem, or the entire system.
You can start each exerciser by using either of the following methods:
•
Manually, by specifying the time parameter (-t option) and by placing
each command in the background before executing the next command
•
By typing the syscript command as follows:
# syscript
Once the syscript command is running, answer the questions displayed
on the console. The syscript command then executes the individual
exercisers and creates a file called testsuite, which contains all the answers
you entered. You can reexecute the commands in the testsuite file by
entering the following, which causes testsuite to execute using the original
commands and parameters that you specified:
# sh testsuite
A.1.1 Communications Exerciser (Asynchronous Serial
Lines)
The communications exerciser writes, reads, and validates random data
and packet lengths on communication lines as specified.
Syntax
cmx [-h] [-ofile] [-t m] -lline#
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. Default file is #LOG_CMX_##.
-tmin
Runs the exerciser for x minutes. Default is run continuously.
-lline#
Specifies the line number to exercise.
exercised is /dev/tty03, line#=03.
A–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
For example, if the line to be
Usage
Any line to be exercised must have a loopback connector on the
communication option’s bulkhead panel or the end of the cable. Any line to
be exercised must be disabled in the letc/ttys file by setting the status to
off.
Exercise line tty01 and tty03 for 10 minutes in the background:
cmx -t10 -1 01 03
A.1.2 Disk Exerciser
CAUTION: This exerciser can DESTRUCTIVELY WRITE on a disk. Do not
use this exerciser on any portion of a disk that contains customer data.
The -p and -c options destroy data on a disk. The -rdev command does not
overwrite data.
Syntax
dskx [options] -rdev
dskx [options] -pdevpart
dskx [options] -cdev
Arguments
rdev
Random read-only test on all but the c partition.
-pdevpart
Writes, reads, and validates on device dev on partition part.
-cdev
Writes, reads, and validates on devide dev on all but the c partition.
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. The default file is #LOG_DSKX_##.
-tm
Runs the exerciser for m minutes. The default is run continuously.
Test (read only) the first RA disk in the system (ra0) for 20 minutes in the
background. Diagnostics display every five minutes:
dskx -rra0 -t20 -d5 &
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–3
A.1.3 File System Exerciser
The file system exerciser initiates multiple processes and creates, writes,
closes, opens, and reads a test file of random data.
Syntax
fsx [-h] [-ofile] [-tm ] -fpath) [-pn]
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. The default file is #LOG_FSX_##.
-tmin
Runs the exerciser for x minutes. The default is run continuously.
-fpath
Path name of the file system directory to test. Default is /usr/field.
-pn
Number of fsx processes to spawn. Maximum is 250. Default is 20.
Usage
This test writes and reads data on the disk; it is not destructive to the
customer’s data. The file system exerciser can also be used on an NFSmounted file system.
Exercise the /usr/tmp file system continuously using 10 processes in the
background:
fsx -p10 -f/usr/tmp &
A.1.4 Line Printer Exerciser
Syntax
lpx [-h] [-ofile] [-tm] -fpath [-pn]
Arguments
-ddev
Printer device name to exercise.
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. Default file is #LOG_LPX_##.
-tmin
Runs the exerciser for x minutes. Default is run continuously.
A–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
-fpath
Path name of the file system directory to test. Default is /usr/field.
-pn
To save paper, pauses printing for n minutes and only exercises the
controller. Default is 15. A value of 0 indicates no pause.
Exercise lp1: lpx -dlp 1
A.1.5 Memory Exerciser
Syntax
memx [-h] [-s] [-ofile] [-tm] [-mj] [-pk]
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-s
Disables shared memory testing. Shared memory is software functionality,
not hardware.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. Default file is #LOG_MEMX_##.
-tmin
Runs exerciser for x minutes. Default is run continuously.
-mj
Memory size in j bytes to be tested by each spawned process. Default is
(total memory)/20.
-pk
Number of memx processes to spawn. Maximum is 20. Default is 20.
Usage
The memory exerciser is restricted by available swap space. Errors like out
of memory generally indicate swap space was used up. If you have more
physical memory than swap space, you may see this problem. If so, reduce
the number of spawned processes and/or the size of memory you are testing.
Running the memory exerciser can also cause other users to have the same
memory problem.
Exercise all of memory and the shared memory functionality for 10 minutes
in the background:
memx -t10 &
A.1.6 Magtape Exerciser
The magtape exerciser reads, writes, and validates random data from the
beginning of the tape (BOT) to the end of the tape (EOT).
Syntax
mtx [options] -adev
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–5
mtx [options] -sdev
mtx [options] -ldev
mtx [options] -vdev
Arguments
-adev
Use short-, long-, and variable-length record tests on raw device dev.
-sdev
Use short records on raw dev.
-ldev
Use long records on raw dev.
-vdev
Use variable records on raw dev.
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-ofile
Writes run-time statistics to file. Default file is #LOG_MTX_##.
-ti
Runs exerciser for i minutes. Default is run continuously.
-rj
Record length for long record test. Range is 1 to 20480. Default is 10240.
-tk
Size of file in k number of records. Default: -1, go to EOT.
Run all record lengths on tape drive rmt0h for five minutes in the
background:
mtx -armt0h -t5 &
A.1.7 TCP/IP Network Exerciser
Syntax
netx [-h] [-tm] [-pm]nodename
Arguments
nodename
Node name of target system to test. May also be the host system name.
Options
-h
Prints a help message.
-tmin
Runs exerciser for x minutes. Default is run continuously.
-pm
Port number.
A–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Usage
The TCP echo service defined in the /etc/inetd.conf file must not be
commented out (# at start of line) on the host and target systems.
Exercise the network from the local host to the remote node max
continuously in the background:
netx max &
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–7
A.2 uerf Error Log Commands
The uerf utility generates error log reports and does bit-to-text translation
for hardware device registers and messages, similar to ERF on VMS. Syntax
is case sensitive. If no options are specified, all errors are reported.
To disable error logging to an error log file, type:
# /etc/eli -d
To enable error logging in multiuser mode, type:
# /etc/eli -e
Syntax
/etc/uerf [options...]
Options
-A adapter_type
Example: /etc/uerf -A uba,nmi
aie
BVP controller
aio
BVP controller
bia
BI LESI adapter
bua
BI UNIBUS adapter
nmi
NMI errors
uba
VAX UNIBUS adapter
default
Report all error types
-c classes
Example: /etc/uerf -c oper
err
All hardware and software errors
maint
Maintenance events
oper
System status; startup/shutdown; configuration
A–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
-D
Reports errors for MSCP disks (ra, rd). Default: all MSCP
disks are reported.
Example: /etc/uerf -D ra60
-f
Specifies the error log file to be used to generate the report.
Example: /etc/uerf -f old.errorlog
-h
Displays a brief help message.
-H
Selects errors only for the specified system name.
Example: /etc/uerf -H guru
-M mainframe_errors
Example: /etc/uerf -M mem
cpu
Reports CPU errors and machine checks.
mem
Reports memory errors (SBE and DBE).
default
Reports all error types.
-n
Uerf runs. Waits for errors to be logged and immediately
reports them.
-o output
Example: /etc/uerf -o full
brief
Reports errors in brief format (default).
full
Reports all information for each error.
terse
No bit-to-text translation for register values.
-O operating_system_events
Example: /etc/uerf -O seg,raf
aef
Arithmetic exception faults
ast
Asynchronous trap exception faults
bpt
Breakpoint instruction faults
cmp
Compatibility mode faults
pag
Page faults
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–9
pif
Privileged instruction faults
pro
Protection faults
ptf
Page table faults
raf
Reserved address faults
rof
Reserved operand faults
scf
System call exception faults
seg
Segmentation faults
tra
Trace exception faults
xfc
Reports xfc instruction faults
-R
Reports errors in reverse chronological order.
-r record_type
Example: /etc/uerf -r 102,210,250
Hardware Detected Error Types:
100
Machine check
101
Memory CRD/RDS errors
102
Disk errors
103
Tape errors
104
Device controller errors
105
Adapter errors
106
Bus errors
107
Stray interrupts
108
Asynchronous write errors
109
Exceptions/faults
112
Stack dump
Software Detected Error Types:
A–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
200
Panics (bug checks)
201
CI pdd information
Informational ASCII Message Types:
250
Informational
Operational Message Types:
300
Startup
301
Shutdown
310
Time change
350
Diagnostic information
351
Repair information
-s sequence numbers
Reports errors for the specified sequence numbers.
EXAMPLE: /etc/uerf -s 1011,1320
-S
Summarizes error information.
Example: /etc/uerf -S -o full
-t s:dd-mmm-yyyy,hh:mm:ss e:dd-mmmm-yyyy,hh:mm:ss
Example: /etc/uerf -t s:08-aug-1989:13:20:00
s
Starting date and time
e
Ending date and time
dd
Day
mmm
Month
yyyy
Year
hh
Hour
mm
Minute
ss
Second
ULTRIX–32 Exerciser and uerf Command Summary
A–11
-T
Reports errors for TMSCP tapes (tk, tu). Default: all TMSCP
tapes are reported.
Example: /etc/uerf -T tu81
-x
Excludes specified error types from the report.
Example: /etc/uerf -x -r 102,103
-Z
Displays the entire error record as hexadecimal data. Used
only for debugging.
A–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Appendix B
KN220 Address Assignments
This appendix explains how to access R3000 physical address locations and
provides physical address space maps for the KN220 CPU module set.
B.1 Accessing Physical Locations (R3000)
From the R3000 processor, you must use virtual addresses to access
physical locations.
Figure B–1 shows the virtual memory map for the R3000 and CVAX
processors. Note that the R3000 virtual addresses are separated into kernel
segments (ksegs):
•
To address physical locations, use the upper four bits of the kernel
segment.
•
Always reference kernel segment 1 for I/O addresses, which are
unmapped and uncached.
For example, from the R3000 processor:
•
If you are using kernel segment 0 (80000000; unmapped and cached),
use 8001A340 to access physical location 0001A340.
•
If you are using kernel segment 1 (a0000000; unmapped and uncached),
use a001A340 to access physical location 0001A340.
•
Use a008000C to access DMA error address register 1008000C
(physical).
KN220 Address Assignments
B–1
1024
MB
(TLB)
CVAX Physical
Physical
kseg2
Kernel
Mapped
Cacheable
ffff ffff
3fff
Any
c000 0000
bfff ffff
512
MB
I/O
a000 0000
9fff ffff
512
MB
kseg1
No Access
Unused
Kernel
b000 0000
Unmapped
afff ffff
Uncached
Memory
I/O
kseg0
Kernel
9000 0000
Unmapped
8fff ffff
Uncached
8000 0000
Memory
7fff ffff
4000 0000
3fff ffff
Memory
3000 0000
kuseg
256 MB
UserMapped
Cacheable
Any
2fff ffff
Unused
2000 0000
1fff ffff
I/O
1000 0000
256 MB
0fff ffff
256 MB
Memory
000 0000
0000 0000
3040 0000
303f ffff
2fff ffff
2048
MB
(TLB)
4 MB
Q22-bus
CVAX I/O
2000 0000
1fff ffff
CVAX
Memory
Space
0000 0000
MLO-005177
Figure B–1: KN220 Virtual Memory Map
B–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
R3000 Virtual
ffff ffff
Sections B.2 through B.6 list contents and address ranges for the KN220
CPU module (M7637–AA).
B.2 R3000 Physical Address Space Map
(M7637–AA)
Table B–1: R3000 Physical Address Space
Contents
Address Range
Local memory space (up to 256 Mbytes)
0000 0000–0FFF FFFF
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Q22-bus floating address space
User reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved and fixed CSR Q22-bus I/O space
Interprocessor communication register
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
SGEC internal registers
Reserved (copies of SGEC regs)
Reserved I/O module address space
Two copies of CVAX ROM
Q22 system configuration register
Q22 system error register
Q22 master error address register
Q22 slave error address register
Q22-bus map base register
Reserved
Interrupt status register
Boot and diagnostic register
Select processor register
Interval timer register
Reserved I/O module address space
Q22-bus map registers
Reserved I/O module address space
DSSI buffer RAM
NI station address ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
SSC base address register
SSC configuration register
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1002
1004
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1009
1010
1012
1012
1014
1014
0000–1000 0007
0008–1000 07FF
0800–1000 0FFF
1000–1000 1F3F
1F40
1F48–1000 1FFF
2000–1000 7FFF
8000–1000 803C
8040–1001 FFFF
0000–1003 FFFF
0000–1007 FFFF
0000
0004
0008
000C
0010
0014–1008 3FFF
4000
4004
4008
4010
4014–1008 7FFF
8000–1008 FFFF
0000–1009 FFFF
0000–1011 FFFF
0000–1012 007C
0080–1013 FFFF
0000
0010
KN220 Address Assignments
B–3
Table B–1 (Cont.): R3000 Physical Address Space
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
CDAL bus timeout control register
Diagnostic LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
Time-of-year register
Reserved
CVAX console receiver control/status
CVAX console receiver data buffer
CVAX console transmitter control/status
CVAX console transmitter data buffer
Reserved
I/O system reset register
Reserved
ROM data register
Bus timeout counter
Interval timer
Reserved
Timer 0 control register
Timer 0 interval register
Timer 0 next interval register
Timer 0 interrupt vector
Timer 1 control register
Timer 1 interval register
Timer 1 next interval register
Timer 1 interrupt vector
MSIDB address decode match register
MSIDB address decode mask register
LIOD address decode match register
LIOD address decode match register
Reserved
CVAX battery backed-up RAM
Reserved I/O module address space
SII internal registers
Reserved I/O module address space
Reserved
Local Q22-bus memory space
Reserved (4 copies local Q22-bus memory)
Reserved
Vector read register 01
1 Accessible
only from R3000 processor.
B–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1016
1016
1018
1400
1440
1500
1600
0020
0030
0034–1014 0068
006C
0070–1014 007C
0080
0084
0088
008C
0090–1014 00DB
00DC
00E0
00F0
00F4
00F8
00FC–1014 00FF
0100
0104
0108
010C
0110
0114
0118
011C
0130
0134
0140
0144
0148–1014 033F
0400–1014 07FF
0800–1015 FFFF
0000–1016 007C
0080–1017 FFFF
0000–13FF FFFF
0000–143F FFFF
0000–14FF FFFF
0000–1600 004F
0050
Table B–1 (Cont.): R3000 Physical Address Space
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Vector read register 11
Vector read register 21
Vector read register 31
Reserved
Vector write register
Reserved
I/O presence register
Memory error syndrome register
Memory error address register
Memory ID register
SCSI 53C94 registers
Reserved
Reserved (copies of SCSI registers)
SCSI DMA register
Reserved (copies of DMA register)
SCSI buffer RAM
Reserved (copy of SCSI RAM)
Reserved SCSI address space
R3000 LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 nonvolatile RAM
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 UART registers
Reserved (copies of UART registers)
Reserved I/O module address space
VME option memory and I/O space
FDDI option memory and I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
Reserved
Memory space (up to 256 Mbytes)
Reserved
1 Accessible
1600 0054
1600 0058
1600 005C
1600 0060–1610 0058
1610 005C
1610 0060–FFFF FFFF
1700 0000–1703 FFFF
1704 0000–1707 FFFF
1708 0000–170B FFFF
170C 0000–170F FFFF
1710 0000–1710 0028
1710 002C–1710 003C
1710 0040–1713 FFFF
1714 0000
1714 0004–1717 FFFF
1718 0000–1719 FFFF
171A 0000–171B FFFF
171C 0000–171F FFFF
1720 0000–1723 FFFF
1724 0000–17FF FFFF
1800 0000–1807 FFFF
1808 0000–180F FFFF
1810 0000–1810 003C
1810 0040–1813 FFFF
1814 0000–18FF FFFF
1900 0000–1AFF FFFF
1B00 0000–1CFF FFFF
1D00 0000–1FBF FFFF
1FC0 0000–1FC3 FFFF
1FC4 0000–1FFF FFFF
2000 0000–2FFF FFFF
3000 0000–3FFF FFFF
4000 0000–FFFF FFFF
only from R3000 processor.
KN220 Address Assignments
B–5
B.3 R3000 Physical I/O Address Space Map
(M7638–AA)
Table B–2: R3000 Physical I/O Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Q22-bus floating address space
User reserved I/O module address space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Interprocessor communication register
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
SGEC CSR0: vector, IPL, mode
SGEC CSR1: polling demand
SGEC CSR2: reserved register
SGEC CSR3: receive descriptor list
SGEC CSR4: transmit descriptor list
SGEC CSR5: status register
SGEC CSR6: command and mode register
SGEC CSR7: system base register
SGEC CSR8: reserved register
SGEC CSR9: watchdog timers
SGEC CSR10: revision number
and missed frame count
SGEC boot message registers
SGEC diagnostic registers
Reserved (copies of SGEC registers)
Reserved I/O module address space
Two copies of CVAX ROM
Q22 system configuration register
Q22 system error register
Q22 master error address register
Q22 slave error address register
Q22-bus map base register
Reserved
Interrupt status register
Boot and diagnostic register
Select processor register
Interval timer register
B–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
0000–1000 0007
0008–1000 07FF
0800–1000 0FFF
1000–1000 1F3F
1F40
1F48–1000 1FFF
2000–1000 7FFF
8000
8004
8008
800C
8010
8014
8018
801C
8020
8024
8028
1000
1000
1000
1002
1004
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
1008
802C–1000 8034
8038–1000 803C
8040–1011 FFFF
0000–1003 FFFF
0000–1007 FFFF
0000
0004
0008
000C
0010
0014–1008 3FFF
4000
4004
4008
4010
Table B–2 (Cont.): R3000 Physical I/O Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved I/O module address space
Q22-bus map registers
Reserved I/O module address space
DSSI buffer RAM
NI station address ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
SSC base address register
SSC configuration register
CDAL bus timeout control register
Diagnostic LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
Time-of-year register
Reserved
CVAX console receiver control/status
CVAX console receiver data buffer
CVAX console transmitter control/status
CVAX console transmitter data buffer
Reserved
I/O system reset register
Reserved
ROM data register
Bus timeout counter
Interval timer
Reserved
Timer 0 control register
Timer 0 interval register
Timer 0 next interval register
Timer 0 interrupt vector
Timer 1 control register
Timer 1 interval register
Timer 1 next interval register
Timer 1 interrupt vector
DSSIDB address decode match register
DSSIDB address decode match register
LIOD address decode match register
LIOD address decode match register
Reserved
CVAX battery backed-up RAM
1008
1008
1009
1010
1012
1012
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
1014
4014–1008 7FFF
8000–1008 FFFF
0000–1009 FFFF
0000–1011 FFFF
0000–1012 007C
0080–1013 FFFF
0000
0010
0020
0030
0034–1014 0068
006C
0070–1014 007C
0080
0084
0088
008C
0090–1014 00DB
00DC
00E0
00F0
00F4
00F8
00FC–1014 00FF
0100
0104
0108
010C
0110
0114
0118
011C
0130
0134
0140
0144
0148–1014 033F
0400–1014 07FF
KN220 Address Assignments
B–7
Table B–2 (Cont.): R3000 Physical I/O Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved I/O module address space
DSSI diagnostic register 0
DSSI diagnostic register 1
DSSI diagnostic register 2
DSSI control and status register
DSSI ID register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI timeout register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI short target list pointer
DSSI long target list pointer
DSSI initiator list pointer
DSSI DSSI control register
DSSI DSSI status register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI diagnostic control register
DSSI clock control register
DSSI internal state register 0
DSSI internal state register 1
DSSI internal state register 2
DSSI internal state register 3
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved I/O module address space
Reserved
Local Q22-bus memory space
Reserved (4 copies local Q22 memory)
Reserved
B–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1014
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1016
1018
1400
1440
1500
0800–1015 FFFF
0000
0004
0008
000C
0010
0014
0018
001C
0020
0024
0028
002C
0030
0034
0038
003C
0040
0044
004C
004C
0050
0054
0058
005C
0060
0064
0068
006C
0070
0074
0078
007C
0080–1017 FFFF
0000–13FF FFFF
0000–143F FFFF
0000–14FF FFFF
0000–1600 004F
Table B–2 (Cont.): R3000 Physical I/O Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Vector read register 01
Vector read register 11
Vector read register 21
Vector read register 31
Reserved
Vector write register1
Reserved
I/O presence register
Memory error syndrome register
Memory error address register
Memory ID register
53C94 transfer counter low register
53C94 transfer count low register
53C94 transfer counter high register
53C94 transfer count high register
53C94 FIFO register
53C94 command register
53C94 status register
53C94 select bus ID register
53C94 interrupt status register
53C94 select timeout register
53C94 sequence step register
53C94 synchronous transfer period register
53C94 FIFO flags register
53C94 synchronous offset register
53C94 configuration register
53C94 clock conversion register
53C94 test register
Reserved
Reserved (copies of SCSI registers)
SCSI DMA register
Reserved (copies of DMA register)
SCSI buffer RAM
Reserved (copy of SCSI RAM)
Reserved SCSI address space
R3000 LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 nonvolatile RAM
1 Accessible
1600 0050
1600 0054
1600 0058
1600 005C
1600 0060–1610 0058
1610 005C
1600 0060–16FF FFFF
1700 0000–1703 FFFF
1704 0000–1707 FFFF
1708 0000–170B FFFF
170C 0000–170F FFFF
1710 0000 (read only)
1710 0000 (write only)
1710 0004 (read only)
1710 0004 (write only)
1710 0008
1710 000C
1710 0010 (read only)
1710 0010 (write only)
1710 0014 (read only)
1710 0014 (write only)
1710 0018 (read only)
1710 0018 (write only)
1710 001C (read only)
1710 001C (write only)
1710 0020
1710 0024 (write only)
1710 0028 (write only)
1710 002C–1710 003C
1710 0040–1713 FFFF
1714 0000 (write only)
1714 0004–1717 FFFF
1718 0000–1719 FFFF
171A 0000–171B FFFF
171C 0000–171F FFFF
1720 0000–1723 FFFF
1724 0000–17FF FFFF
1800 0000–1807 FFFF
only from R3000 processor.
KN220 Address Assignments
B–9
Table B–2 (Cont.): R3000 Physical I/O Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 UART registers
Reserved (copies of UART registers)
Reserved I/O module address space
VME option memory and I/O space
FDDI option memory and I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
Reserved
B–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
1808 0000–180F FFFF
1810 0000–1810 003C
1810 0040–1813 FFFF
1814 0000–18FF FFFF
1900 0000–1AFF FFFF
1B00 0000–1CFF FFFF
1D00 0000–1FBF FFFF
1FC0 0000–1FC3 FFFF
1FC4 0000–1FFF FFFF
2000 0000–2FFF FFFF
B.4 KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Address
Space Map (M7638–AA)
Table B–3: KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Memory Space (up to 256 Mbytes)
0000 0000–0FFF FFFF
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Q22-bus floating address space
User reserved I/O module address space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Interprocessor communication register
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
SGEC CSR0: vector, IPL, mode
SGEC CSR1: polling demand
SGEC CSR2: reserved register
SGEC CSR3: receive descriptor list
SGEC CSR4: transmit descriptor list
SGEC CSR5: status register
SGEC CSR6: command and mode register
SGEC CSR7: system base register
SGEC CSR8: reserved register
SGEC CSR9: watchdog timers
SGEC CSR10: revision number and missed frame
count
SGEC boot message registers
SGEC diagnostic registers
Reserved (copies of SGEC registers)
Reserved I/O module address space
Two copies of CVAX ROM
Q22 system configuration register
Q22 system error register
Q22 master error address register
Q22 slave error address register
Q22-bus map base register
Reserved
Interrupt status register
Boot and diagnostic register
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
0000–2000 0007
0008–2000 07FF
0800–2000 0FFF
1000–2000 1F3F
1F40
1F48–2000 1FFF
2000–2000 7FFF
8000
8004
8008
800C
8010
8014
8018
801C
8020
8024
8028
2000
2000
2000
2002
2004
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
802C–2000 8034
8038–2000 803C
8040–2001 FFFF
0000–2003 FFFF
0000–2007 FFFF
0000
0004
0008
000C
0010
0014–2008 3FFF
4000
4004
KN220 Address Assignments
B–11
Table B–3 (Cont.): KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Select processor register
Interval timer register
Reserved I/O module address space
Q22-bus map registers
Reserved I/O module address space
DSSI buffer RAM
NI station address ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
SSC base address register
SSC configuration register
CDAL bus timeout control register
Diagnostic LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
Time-of-year register
Reserved
CVAX console receiver control/status
CVAX console receiver data buffer
CVAX console transmitter control/status
CVAX console transmitter data buffer
Reserved
I/O system reset register
Reserved
ROM data register
Bus timeout counter
Interval timer
Reserved
Timer 0 control register
Timer 0 interval register
Timer 0 next interval register
Timer 0 interrupt vector
Timer 1 control register
Timer 1 interval register
Timer 1 next interval register
Timer 1 interrupt vector
DSSIDB address decode match register
DSSIDB address decode mask register
LIOD address decode match register
LIOD address decode match register
Reserved
B–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
2008
2008
2008
2008
2009
2010
2012
2012
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
4008
4010
4014–2008 7FFF
8000–2008 FFFF
0000–2009 FFFF
0000–2011 FFFF
0000–2012 007C
0080–2013 FFFF
0000
0010
0020
0030
0034–2014 0068
006C
0070–2014 007C
0080
0084
0088
008C
0090–2014 00DB
00DC
00E0
00F0
00F4
00F8
00FC–2014 00FF
0100
0104
0108
010C
0110
0114
0118
011C
0130
0134
0140
0144
0148–2014 033F
Table B–3 (Cont.): KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
CVAX battery backed-up RAM
Reserved I/O module address space
DSSI diagnostic register 0
DSSI diagnostic register 1
DSSI diagnostic register 2
DSSI control and status register
DSSI ID register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI timeout register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI short target list pointer
DSSI long target list pointer
DSSI initiator list pointer
DSSI DSSI control register
DSSI DSSI status register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
DSSI diagnostic control register
DSSI clock control register
DSSI internal state register 0
DSSI internal state register 1
DSSI internal state register 2
DSSI internal state register 3
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved DSSI register
Reserved I/O module address space
Reserved
Reserved
I/O presence register
Memory error syndrome register
2014
2014
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2016
2018
2400
2700
2704
0400–2014 07FF
0800–2015 FFFF
0000
0004
0008
000C
0010
0014
0018
001C
0020
0024
0028
002C
0030
0034
0038
003C
0040
0044
004C
004C
0050
0054
0058
005C
0060
0064
0068
006C
0070
0074
0078
007C
0080–2017 FFFF
0000–23FF FFFF
0000–26FF FFFF
0000–2703 FFFF
0000–2707 FFFF
KN220 Address Assignments
B–13
Table B–3 (Cont.): KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
Memory error address register
Memory ID register
53C94 transfer counter low register
53C94 transfer count low register
53C94 transfer counter high register
53C94 transfer count high register
53C94 FIFO register
53C94 command register
53C94 status register
53C94 select bus ID register
53C94 interrupt status register
53C94 select timeout register
53C94 sequence step register
53C94 synchronous transfer period register
53C94 FIFO flags register
53C94 synchronous offset register
53C94 configuration register
53C94 clock conversion register
53C94 test register
Reserved
Reserved (copies of SCSI registers)
SCSI DMA register
Reserved (copies of DMA register)
SCSI buffer RAM
Reserved (copy of SCSI RAM)
Reserved SCSI address space
R3000 LED register
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 nonvolatile RAM
Reserved I/O module address space
R3000 UART registers
Reserved (copies of UART registers)
Reserved I/O module address space
VME option memory and I/O space
FDDI option memory and I/O space
Reserved I/O module address space
B–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
2708 0000–270B FFFF
270C 0000–270F FFFF
2710 0000 (read only)
2710 0000 (write only)
2710 0004 (read only)
2710 0004 (write only)
2710 0008
2710 000C
2710 0010 (read only)
2710 0010 (write only)
2710 0014 (read only)
2710 0014 (write only)
2710 0018 (read only)
2710 0018 (write only)
2710 001C (read only)
2710 001C (write only)
2710 0020
2710 0024 (write only)
2710 0028 (write only)
2710 002C–2710 003C
2710 0040–2713 FFFF
2714 0000 (write only)
2714 0004–2717 FFFF
2718 0000–2719 FFFF
271A 0000–271B FFFF
271C 0000–271F FFFF
2720 0000–2723 FFFF
2724 0000–27FF FFFF
2800 0000–2807 FFFF
2808 0000–280F FFFF
2810 0000–2810 003C
2810 0040–2813 FFFF
2814 0000–28FF FFFF
2900 0000–2AFF FFFF
2B00 0000–2CFF FFFF
2D00 0000–2FBF FFFF
Table B–3 (Cont.): KN220 Diagnostic Processor Physical Addresses
Contents
Address Range
Local Q22-Bus I/O Space
R3000 ROM
Reserved I/O module address space
Local Q22-bus memory space
Reserved
2FC0 0000–2FC3 FFFF
2FC4 0000–2FFF FFFF
3000 0000–303F FFFF
3040 0000–3FFF FFFF
B.5 Diagnostic Processor Registers
Several KN220 internal processor registers (IPRs) are implemented in
the SSC chip rather than the CVAX chip. These registers are listed in
Table B–4. The R3000 accesses these registers through R3000 memory
space.
Table B–4: Diagnostic Processor Registers
Dec
Hex
Register Name
Mnemonic
Type
Location
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
10
11
12
13
14
15
Kernel Stack Pointer
Executive Stack Pointer
Supervisor Stack Pointer
User Stack Pointer
Interrupt Stack Pointer
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
P0 Base Register
P0 Length Register
P1 Base Register
P1 Length Register
System Base Register
System Length Register
Reserved
Reserved
Process Control Block Base
System Control Block Base
Interrupt Priority Level
AST Level
Software Interrupt Request
Software Interrupt Summary
KSP
ESP
SSP
USP
ISP
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
P0B
P0LR
P1BR
P1LR
SBR
SLR
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
PCBB
SCBB
IPL
ASTLVL
SIRR
SISR
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
w
r/w
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
KN220 Address Assignments
B–15
Table B–4 (Cont.): Diagnostic Processor Registers
Dec
Hex
Register Name
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
31
32
33
34
1F
20
21
22
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
55
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
47
Reserved
Reserved
Interval Clock Control Status
Next Interval Count
Interval Count
Time-of-year Register
Console Storage Receiver Status
Console Storage Receiver Data
Console Storage Transmitter
Status
Console Storage Transmitter Data
Console Receiver Control Status
Console Receiver Data Buffer
Console Transmitter Control
Status
Console Transmitter Data Buffer
Translation Buffer Disable
Cache Disable
Machine Check Error Summary
Memory System Error
Reserved
Reserved
Console Saved PC
Console Saved PSL
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
I/O System Reset Register
B–16 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Mnemonic
Type
Location
ICCS
NICR
ICR
TOY
CSRS
CSRD
CSTS
r/w
w
r
r/w
r/w
r
r/w
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
SSC
SSC
SSC
SSC
CSDB
RXCS
RXDB
TXCS
w
r/w
r
r/w
SSC
SSC
SSC
SSC
TXDB
TBDR
CADR
MCESR
MSER
w
r/w
r/w
r/w
r/w
SAVPC
SAVPSL
r
r
IORESET
–
SSC
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
CVAX
B.6 Global Q22-Bus Memory Space Map
Table B–5: Q22-Bus Memory Space
Contents
Address Range (Octal)
Q22-bus memory space
0000 0000–1777 7777
Table B–6: Q22-Bus I/O Space with BBS7 Asserted
Contents
Address Range (Octal)
Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Q22-bus floating address space
User-reserved Q22-bus I/O space
Reserved and fixed CSR Q22-bus I/O space
Interprocessor communication register
Reserved Q22-bus I/O space
1776
1776
1776
1776
1777
1777
1777
0000–1777
0000–1776
0010–1776
4000–1776
0000–1777
7500
7502–1777
7777
0007
3777
7777
7477
7777
KN220 Address Assignments
B–17
Appendix C
Configuring the KFQSA
This appendix describes the KFQSA storage adapter and explains how to:
•
Configure the KFQSA storage adapter at installation
•
Enter console I/O mode
•
Run the Configure utility
•
Program the EEROM on the KFQSA
•
Reprogram the EEROM on the KFQSA
•
Change the ISE’s allocation class and unit number
C.1 KFQSA Overview
The KN220 CPU module contains the DSSI adapter that interfaces six
DSSI devices, both internal and external to the DECsystem 5500. At the
same time, the KFQSA adapter module can be added to interface six DSSI
devices external to the DECsystem 5500.
The KFQSA module is a storage adapter that allows Q-bus systems that
support the KFQSA to communicate with storage peripherals based on
the Digital Storage Architecture (DSA), using the Digital Storage System
Interconnect (DSSI).
The KFQSA contains the addressing logic required to make a connection
between the host and a requested ISE on the DSSI bus. Each ISE has
its own controller, which contains the intelligence and logic necessary to
control data transfers over the DSSI bus. The KFQSA presents a mass
storage control protocol (MSCP) U/Q port for each ISE.
The EEROM on the KFQSA contains a configuration table. After you install
the KFQSA, you program the EEROM with the CSR address for each ISE
in the system.
Configuring the KFQSA
C–1
C.2 Configuring the KFQSA at Installation
At installation, configure the KFQSA as follows:
CAUTION: Static electricity can damage integrated circuits. Use the
wrist strap and antistatic mat found in the Antistatic Kit (29–26246)
when you work with the internal parts of a computer system.
1. Check the KFQSA module for the presence of a jumper intended for
manufacturing use only. The location of this jumper is shown in
Figure C–1. Remove the jumper.
2. Use the four-position DIP switchpack shown in Figure C–1 as follows to
set a temporary CSR address that enables you to access the EEROM:
a. Set switches 1, 2, 3, and 4 to reflect a fixed CSR address to allow the
KFQSA to be programmed. Table C–1 shows the switch settings for
the KFQSA.
b. Install the KFQSA adapter module into the backplane according to
the procedures in the appropriate enclosure maintenance manual.
C–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Figure C–1: KFQSA Module Layout (M7769)
Four-Position
Switchpack
On
1
2
3
4
LEDs
Jumper
(For Manufacturing
Use Only)
MLO-001878
Configuring the KFQSA
C–3
The positions of the KFQSA four-position switchpack are shown in
Table C–1.
Table C–1: KFQSA (M7769) Service Mode Switch Settings
Switches
S/N
Mode 1
Fx/F1
2
MSB
3
LSB
4
Fixed
Address
First KFQSA
on
off
on
on
0774420
Additional
on
off
on
off
0774424
"
on
off
off
on
0774430
"
on
off
off
off
0774434
S/N = Service mode/Normal operating mode
Fx/Fl = fixed/floating CSR address
C.2.1 Entering Maintenance Mode
After installing the KFQSA, you issue a series of commands to the KN220
system at the maintenance mode prompt (>>>) to program the EEROM on
the KFQSA. You may type these commands in either uppercase or lowercase
letters. Unless otherwise specified, type each command, then press Return .
Enter maintenance mode as follows:
1. Set the operation switch on the H3602–AC CPU cover panel to the
maintenance position ( ).
2. Set the function switch on the CPU cover panel to the enable position
( ).
3. Set the on/off power switch to on (1).
4. When the power-up self-tests complete, the console prompt appears, as
shown in Example C–1.
C–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example C–1: Entering Console Mode Display
KN220-A Vn.n
Performing normal system tests.
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
C.2.2 Displaying Current Addresses
Type SHOW QBUS to display the current Q22-bus addresses (Example C–2).
The KFQSA adapter appears in service mode as KFQSA #0.
Example C–2: SHOW QBUS Display
>>> SHOW QBUS
Scan of Qbus I/O Space
-20001910 (774420) = 0000
-20001912 (774422) = 0AA0
-20001920 (774440) = FF08
-20001922 (774442) = FF00
-20001924 (774444) = FF2B
-20001926 (774446) = FF09
-20001928 (774450) = FFA3
-2000192A (774452) = FF96
-2000192C (774454) = 8000
-2000192E (774456) = 1030
-20001940 (774500) = 0000
-20001942 (774502) = 0BC0
-20001F40 (777500) = 0020
(000) KFQSA #0
(120) DELQA/DEQNA/DESQA
(260) TQK50/TQK70/TU81E/RV20/KFQSA-TAPE
(004) IPCR
Scan of Qbus Memory Space
>>>
Configuring the KFQSA
C–5
C.2.3 Running the Configure Utility
Now that you have physically reconfigured the system by installing the
KFQSA storage adapter, you must run the Configure utility to find the
correct address for each device and module in the system. The Configure
utility uses Q-bus/Unibus fixed and floating address space rules.
Run the Configure utility as follows. Refer to Example C–3.
1. At the maintenance mode prompt, type CONFIGURE, then type HELP at
the Device,Number? prompt for a list of devices that can be configured.
NOTE: Some of the devices listed in the HELP display are not supported
by the KN220–A CPU.
2. For each device in the system, type the device name at the
Device,Number? prompt. If you have more than one of the same
type, type a comma followed by the total number of that device. In
Example C–3, the system contains one KFQSA with six ISEs.
Be sure you list all the devices: those already installed and those you
plan to install.
3. Type EXIT. The Configure utility displays an address and vector
assignment for each device. Example C–3 shows the address and vector
assignments and the device input. Write down the addresses for the
KFQSA devices.
4. For all modules except the KFQSA, verify that the CSR addresses are
set correctly by comparing the addresses listed in the SHOW QBUS
command with those listed in the Configure utility display. If necessary,
remove modules from the backplane and reset switches or jumpers to
the addresses in your Configure display, using module removal and
replacement procedures in BA430/BA440 Enclosure Maintenance.
C–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example C–3: Configure Display
>>> CONFIGURE
Enter device configuration, HELP, or EXIT
Device,Number? help
Devices:
LPV11
KXJ11
DLV11J
DZQ11
RLV12
TSV05
RXV21
DRV11W
DMV11
DELQA
DEQNA
DESQA
RRD50
RQC25
KFQSA-DISK
TQK50
RV20
KFQSA-TAPE
KMV11
IEQ11
CXA16
CXB16
CXY08
VCB01
LNV21
QPSS
DSV11
ADV11C
KWV11C
ADV11D
AAV11D
VCB02
DRQ3B
VSV21
IBQ01
IDV11A
IDV11D
IAV11A
IAV11B
MIRA
DESNA
IGQ11
DIV32
KIV32
KWV32
KZQSA
Numbers:
1 to 255, default is 1
Device,Number? KFQSA-DISK, 6
Device,Number? DESQA
Device,Number? TQK70
Device,Number? EXIT
Address/Vector Assignments
-774440/120 DESQA
-772150/154 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-760334/300 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-760340/304 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-760344/310 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-760350/314 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-760354/320 KFQSA-DISK !NODE
-774500/260 TQK70
>>>
DZV11
DRV11B
RQDX3
TQK70
DHQ11
QVSS
AAV11C
QDSS
IDV11B
ADQ32
DTCN5
DFA01
DPV11
KDA50
TU81E
DHV11
LNV11
AXV11C
DRV11J
IDV11C
DTC04
DTC05
0
1
2
3
4
5
NOTE: KN220 does not support all devices in this list.
Installation Guide for complete information.
See ULTRIX
Configuring the KFQSA
C–7
C.3 Programming the KFQSA
Program the configuration table in the EEROM of the KFQSA to include
all ISEs on the DSSI bus, as follows. Refer to Examples C–4 through C–6.
1. Determine the DSSI node plug address for each ISE you are configuring.
Start with node 0, then continue up through node 5. In Example C–3,
nodes 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are used; node 7 is saved for the KFQSA
adapter.
2. At the console prompt on each system, type SET HOST/UQSSP/MAINT
/SERV 0 to program the KFQSA.
3. Type HELP to display a list of supported commands.
4. Program the KFQSA to include each DSSI device in the system:
a. For each ISE, type SET, followed by the node number, the CSR
address (from the list of addresses you obtained from the Configure
utility), and the model number (ISEs are model 21).
b. Type SHOW to display the configuration table you just programmed.
c.
Check the display to make sure the addresses are correct.
d. Type EXIT to save the configuration table or QUIT to leave the table
unchanged.
Example C–4: Display for Programming the First KFQSA
>>> SET HOST/UQSSP/MAINT/SERV 0
!in the system.
!0 refers to first KFQSA
UQSSP Controller (772150)
Enter SET, CLEAR, SHOW, HELP, EXIT, or QUIT
Example C–4 Cont’d on next page
C–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example C–4 (Cont.): Display for Programming the First KFQSA
Node
CSR Address
Model
7
------- KFQSA ------? HELP
Commands:
SET <node> /KFQSA
!Sets KFQSA DSSI node
!number
SET <node> <CSR_address> <model> !Enables a DSSI device
CLEAR <node>
!Disables a DSSI device
SHOW
!Displays current
!configuration
HELP
!Displays this display
EXIT
!Saves the KFQSA program
QUIT
!Does not save the KFQSA
!program
Parameters:
<node>
!0 through 7
<CSR_address>
!760010 to 777774
<model>
!21 (disk) or 22 (tape)
? SET 0 772150 21
? SET 1 760334 21
? SET 2 760340 21
? SET 3 760344 21
? SET 4 760350 21
? SET 5 760354 21
? SHOW
Node
CSR Address
Model
0
772150 21
1
760334
21
2
760340
21
3
760344
21
4
760350
21
5
760354
21
7
------ KFQSA ------? exit
Programming the KFQSA...
!Note from the system that
!the KFQSA is
!being programmed.
Configuring the KFQSA
C–9
5. Turn the system power off by setting the on/off switch to off (0).
6. Remove the KFQSA from the backplane.
7. Confirm that the unit ID plugs on the enclosure’s operator control panel
(OCP) match the node IDs you just programmed.
8. On the KFQSA, set switch 1 on the four-position switchpack to on (1).
(Figure C–1 shows the location and position of the switchpack.) This
action sets the KFQSA to the normal operating mode; switches 2, 3,
and 4 are ignored since switch 1 is set to off, and the DSSI addresses
are read from the EEROM.
9. Reinstall the KFQSA in the backplane.
10. Power on the system by setting the on/off switch to on (1). Wait for the
self-tests to complete.
11. At the maintenance mode prompt, type SHOW QBUS to verify that all
addresses are present and correct, as shown in Example C–5.
12. Type SHOW DEVICE to verify that all ISEs are displayed correctly, as
shown in Example C–6.
C–10 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example C–5: SHOW QBUS Display
>>> show qbus
Scan of Qbus I/O Space
-200000DC (760334) = 0000
-200000DE (760336) = 0AA0
-200000E0 (760340) = 0000
-200000E2 (760342) = 0AA0
-200000E4 (760344) = 0000
-200000E6 (760346) = 0AA0
-200000E8 (760350) = 0000
-200000EA (760352) = 0AA0
-200000EC (760354) = 0000
-200000EE (760356) = 0AA0
-20001468 (772150) = 0000
-2000146A (772152) = 0AA0
-20001920 (774440) = FF08
-20001922 (774442) = FF00
-20001924 (774444) = FF2B
-20001926 (774446) = FF09
-20001928 (774450) = FFA3
-2000192A (774452) = FF96
-2000192C (774454) = 0050
-2000192E (774456) = 1030
-20001940 (774500) = 0000
-20001942 (774502) = 0BC0
-20001F40 (775500) = 0020
(300) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(304) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(310) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(314) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(320) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(154) RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK
(120) DESQA
(260) TQK70/TU81E/RV20/KFQSA-TAPE
(004) IPCR
Scan of Qbus Memory Space
>>>
Configuring the KFQSA
C–11
Example C–6: SHOW DEVICE Display
>>> SHOW DEVICE
DSSI Node 0 (772150)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (760334)
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 2 (760340)
-rf(2,2,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 3 (760344)
-rf(3,3,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 4 (760350)
-rf(4,4,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 5 (760354)
-rf(5,5,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
SCSI Node 0
-rz(0,0,*) (RZ56)
SCSI Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-tm(0,0) (TK70) -MUA0
Ethernet Adapter 0
-tftp() -mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-0C-C4-75)
VME Interface Board - Not Installed
>>>
C–12 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
C.4 Reprogramming the KFQSA
When you add a new DSSI device to a system with at least one RF-series
ISE that has been programmed correctly, you must reprogram each KFQSA
on the DSSI bus to include the new device(s) as follows:
1. Enter maintenance mode, using the procedure in Section C.2.1.
2. At the maintenance mode prompt, type SHOW DEVICE for a display of all
devices currently in the system. The display includes tape drives and
the Ethernet adapter, as shown in Section C.3, Example C–6.
This display lists the Q-bus address and port name of the device.
3. Type SHOW QBUS for a display of the eight-digit Q-bus address (hex) for
each device, as shown in Section C.3, Example C–5.
4. Find the eight-digit Q-bus address for an ISE attached to the KFQSA
that you are reprogramming. Use the SET HOST command to enter
the KFQSA through an existing port and edit the configuration table
as follows. Refer to Example C–7.
a. Type SET HOST/UQSSP/MAINT followed by the Q-bus address.
b. Use the SET and CLEAR commands to reconfigure the KFQSA, as
shown in Example C–7.
c.
Type SHOW to display the new KFQSA configuration table setting.
d. Type EXIT to save the configuration table or QUIT to cancel the
reprogramming.
Configuring the KFQSA
C–13
Example C–7: Reprogramming the KFQSA Display
>>> SET HOST/UQSSP/MAINT 20001468
UQSSP Controller (772150)
Node
CSR Address
Model
0
772150
21
1
760334
21
2
760340
21
3
760344
21
4
760350
21
5
760354
21
7
----- KFQSA -----? CLEAR 5
? SHOW
Node
CSR Address
Model
0
772150
21
1
760334
21
2
760340
21
3
760344
21
4
760350
21
7
----- KFQSA -----? SET 5 760354 21
? SHOW
Node
CSR Address
Model
0
772150
21
1
760334
21
2
760340
21
3
760344
21
4
760350
21
5
760354
21
7
----- KFQSA -----? EXIT
Programming the KFQSA...
!Note from the system that the
!KFQSA is being programmed.
C–14 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
C.5 Changing the ISE Unit Number
This section describes how to change the ISE unit number. For most
configurations, you will not need to change the default unit numbers.
Change the allocation class and unit number parameters, using the consolebased DUP driver utility, as follows. Refer to Example C–8.
1. Enter maintenance mode, using the procedure in Section C.2.1.
2. At the maintenance mode prompt, type SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP/DISK 0
PARAMS (0 through 6 for the ISE to which you want to connect) to start
the DUP server.
3. Type SHOW UNITNUM to check the unit number.
4. To change the ISE’s unit number from the default value, type SET
UNITNUM n (where n is the new unit number). For example, type SET
UNITNUM 20 to change the unit number from 0 to 20.
5. Type SET FORCEUNI 0 to set the forceunit flag to zero in order to use a
nondefault value. If you do not change the FORCEUNI parameter, the
drive unit number defaults to the number of the corresponding DSSI
plug on the operator control panel (OCP).
6. Type SHOW UNITNUM to show the new unit number.
7. Type SHOW FORCEUNI to show the new forceunit flag values.
8. Type WRITE, then type Y to save the new values into the EEROM or N
to cancel the reprogramming.
9. Type SHOW DEVICE to make sure you have programmed the first ISE to
have a unit number of 20. When you boot the operating system, the
display shows the new unit number.
Configuring the KFQSA
C–15
Example C–8: Display for Changing Unit Number
>>> SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP/DISK 0 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772150)
Copyright (c) 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SHOW UNITNUM
Parameter
--------UNITNUM
Current
---------0
Default
---------0
Type
-----Word
Radix
-----Dec
B
Default
---------0
Type
-----Word
Radix
-----Dec
U
Default
---------1
Type
Radix
------ -----Boolean 0/1
U
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 20
PARAMS> SET FORCEUNI 0
PARAMS> SHOW UNITNUM
Parameter
--------UNITNUM
Current
---------20
PARAMS> SHOW FORCEUNI
Parameter
--------FORCEUNI
Current
---------0
PARAMS> WRITE
Stopping DUP server...
>>> SHOW DEVICE
DSSI Node 0 (772150)
-rf(0,20,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 1 (760334)
-rf(1,1,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 2 (760340)
-rf(2,2,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 3 (760344)
-rf(3,3,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 4 (760350)
-rf(4,4,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 5 (760354)
-rf(5,5,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
Example C–8 Cont’d on next page
C–16 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
Example C–8 (Cont.): Display for Changing Unit Number
SCSI Node 0
-rz(0,0,*) (RZ56)
SCSI Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-tm(0,0) (TK70) -MUA0
Ethernet Adapter 0 (774440)
-mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-0C-C4-75)
VME Interface Board - Not Installed
>>>
Configuring the KFQSA
C–17
Appendix D
Prestoserve Software on the
DECsystem 5500
This appendix contains information about using Prestoserve on the
DECsystem 5500, especially in regard to firmware support.
D.1 Why Data Recovery Is Necessary
Prestoserve is a software facility for disk acceleration. It uses non-volatile
storage on the CPU board to cache data writes to disk. In the event of
an abnormal system shutdown, data intended for disk may be left in the
NVRAM cache. It is necessary to assure that the data intended for disk is
ultimately written to the disk to maintain disk integrity. See the ULTRIX
Guide to Prestoserve for a more detailed description of Prestoserve.
Data in the cache is automatically recovered and moved to the appropriate
disks in the following cases:
•
If you follow the normal ULTRIX shutdown procedures for the
DECstation 5500
•
If you unmount a removable device that uses Prestoserve software while
running ULTRIX
If your system shuts down abnormally because of a power failure, hardware
failure, or software failure, data intended for disk may remain in the
cache after the shutdown has completed. A cache containing data is
referred to as dirty. The data intended for disk will be written to the disk
automatically during reboot (if the system is able to boot). This section
describes procedures for recovering data both in the case when reboot is
possible, and in the case when reboot is not possible.
D.2 Using the dc Commands
Commands executed from the Maintenance mode prompt (>>>) allow you
to try to recover any data in the cache and avoid corrupting your disks. The
commands allow you to:
•
Determine if the cache contains data
Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D–1
•
Save cache data to tape
•
Restore data from tape
•
Zero (clear) the data in the cache
The commands that access tape drives depend on the availability of a
functioning tape device. To determine the tape devices that are available
on your system, enter the show device command at the Maintenance mode
prompt. For example:
>>> show device
>>>show dev
DSSI Node 0 (R7YRMS)
-rf(0,0,*) (RF71)
DSSI Node 7 (*)
SCSI Node 0
-tz(0,0,*) (TLZ04) -DIA0
SCSI Node 1
-rz(0,1,*) (RZ56 )
SCSI Node 2
-rr(0,2,*) (RRD40) -DIA2
SCSI Node 4
-tz(0,4,*) (.....) -DIA4
SCSI Node 7 (*)
UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)
-tm(0,0) (TK70) -MUA0
Ethernet Adapter
-mop() -EZA0 (08-00-2B-12-81-22)
Ethernet Adapter
-XQA0 (08-00-2B-08-CB-5C)
VME Interface Board - Not Installed
>>>
The available devices are displayed on the console terminal. Note the unit
number of the tape device that you want to use. Use the Maintenance mode
boot path. For example, for UQSSP tape controller 0, the Maintenance
mode boot path is shown at the end of the line containing the ULTRIX boot
path, and it is MUA0.
D–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
D.2.1 Determining If a Cache Contains Data
To determine if the cache contains data, use the dc command with no
qualifier, executed at the Maintenance mode >>> prompt. For example:
>>> dc
At the dc command, if the CPU board’s cache contains data the following
message is displayed on the console terminal:
Disk Cache - Dirty
At the dc command, if the CPU board’s cache does not contain any data the
following message is displayed on the console terminal:
Disk Cache - Clean
If there is no data in the cache (cache is clean), you can follow normal
procedures for rebooting or troubleshooting.
NOTE: You should always run the dc command before replacing or using
any DECsystem 5500 CPU board.
D.2.2 Saving the Cache Data to Tape with the dc/save
Command
If a problem exists with the CPU board, and there is data in the Prestoserve
cache, save the data to tape before you replace the board. You can save data
by using the dc/save command, and specifying the tape device. The dc/save
command checks if the cache is clean or dirty and displays the status. If the
cache is clean, no additional action is taken. After the data has been saved
on tape, the dc/save command will attempt to clear the cache. Prior to this
action it will query. The command is executed at the Maintenance mode
(>>>) prompt. If the cache is dirty, the system responds to the command
as follows:
>>> dc/save mua0
Disk Cache - Dirty
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
-MUA0
Zero Disk Cache (y/n)? y
>>>
Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D–3
D.2.3 Restore Data From Tape with the dc/restore Command
After you correct or replace the CPU board, you must move the data from
the specified tape device to the new CPU board’s NVRAM cache, using the
dc/restore command. The command is executed at the Maintenance mode
(>>>) prompt. The command checks that the new cache is clear. If the
cache is dirty, you will be prompted to continue, to make sure that you
want to overwrite the cache contents, as in the following example.
>>> dc/restore mua0
Disk Cache - Dirty
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
-MUA0
>>>
If the cache is clean, as in the following example, the contents of the tape
(in this example, mua0) are loaded into the cache.
>>> dc/restore mua0
Disk Cache - Clean
-MUA0
>>>
When the system reboots, the contents of the cache are moved to the
appropriate disks.
D.2.4 Clearing the Cache with the dc/zero Command
If you want to clear the contents of the cache because the data is not wanted
or because the data cannot be saved to tape with the dc/save command, use
the dc/zero command. The command is executed at the Maintenance mode
(>>>) prompt. For example:
>>> dc/zero
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
The command prompts you to confirm that you want to clear the contents
of the cache and then fills the cache with zeroes. You can use this command
as a security measure to ensure that the cache is cleared.
D.3 Recover from Abnormal System Shutdowns
The following sections describe in detail how to use the dc commands in
data recovery. Data recovery applies to systems that were abnormally shut
down.
In some circumstances, you may not be able to recover the data.
D–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
D.3.1 Recovering Data From a System That Can Reboot
If the system was shut down uncleanly but can still reboot, the contents
of the cache are automatically moved to the appropriate disks during the
boot process. If a particular disk that is needed is unavailable, you will
be given the opportunity to discard the cache data for that disk; then you
must recreate that disk by using backups or by re-entering the data.
D.3.2 Recovering Data From a System That Cannot Reboot
If the system was shut down uncleanly and cannot reboot, the following
message is displayed on the console terminal after the execution of the
system self-tests:
Normal operation not possible.
>>>
The Maintenance mode prompt (>>>) is then displayed.
NOTE: Make sure that the CPU cover panel Operation switch is set to
Maintenance mode before you attempt to recover data.
If you are unable to enter any commands, you will be unable to recover the
data in the cache. Also, if the cache fails, you will be unable to recover the
data.
To recover any data that may be in the cache, you must determine the
contents of the CPU board’s cache by using the dc command.
If the display on the console terminal indicates that the cache is clean,
no file systems were being accelerated when the system was shut down;
therefore you will not lose data or corrupt your disks when the system
reboots. You should continue troubleshooting the system.
If the display on the console terminal indicates that the cache is dirty (that
is, it contains data), you should attempt to recover the data by the following
steps. Note that you should not remove any disks from the system, and
you should not change the system configuration until the data has been
recovered.
You can use the maint command at the console prompt (>>) to set the system
to Maintenance mode. For example:
>> maint
>>>
You should run the full system self-tests to determine the hardware
problem. The self-test command is t 0, or press the Reset button.
Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D–5
Note the results of the system self-tests and refer to the appropriate section
to correct the hardware error.
D.3.2.1 Bad I/O Board
If the system self-tests indicate a bad I/O board (Table 4–7), follow these
steps:
1. Replace the I/O board.
2. Run the system self-tests again and note the results.
3. If a problem still exists, perform the appropriate corrective action. If
the problem is corrected, attempt to reboot.
If you are able to reboot, a message indicating the CPU board and I/O
board mismatch is displayed on the console terminal. At the prompt,
you should confirm that you want to continue with the reboot. Then, the
contents of the cache are moved to the appropriate disks if available.
D.3.2.2 Bad CPU Board
If the system self-tests indicate a bad CPU board (Table 4–7), follow the
steps in this section.
Before you replace the CPU board, you must make sure that the bootmode
environment variable is not set to autoboot. You must also make sure that
the CPU cover panel is switched to Maintenance mode.
To install a new CPU board and recover data in the cache, follow these
steps:
1. Determine what tape devices are available on your system by typing the
show device command at the Maintenance mode prompt. For example:
>>> show device
The available devices are displayed on the console terminal, as shown
in Section D.2. Note the unit number of the tape device that you want
to use.
2. Move the contents of the bad CPU board’s cache to tape by using the
dc/save command. For example:
>>> dc/save [tape device]
3. Use the dc/zero command to clear the contents of the cache.
example:
>>> dc/zero
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
D–6 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
For
4. If you want to install a new CPU board, place the battery jumper on the
new CPU board to the two top jumper pins (position 1, On). To prevent
battery drain, new CPU boards are shipped with the battery jumper on
the bottom two jumper pins (position 0, Off).
Clear the old board’s cache either by setting the battery jumper to
position 0 for two seconds or by using the dc/zero command.
NOTE: Before installing a CPU board, reposition the jumper to the On
position.
5. Use the dc/restore command to move the contents of the tape to the
newly installed CPU board’s cache. For example:
>>> dc/restore [tape device]
Do you want to continue (y/n)? y
6. Run the system self-tests again and note the results.
7. If a problem still exists, perform the appropriate corrective action; then
attempt to reboot.
Once the reboot is successful, the data in the cache is moved to the
appropriate disks.
D.3.2.3 Bad Boot Disk
If you have a bad boot disk, you should attempt to reboot the system and
move the contents of the cache to the appropriate disks. However, any data
destined for the boot disk will be lost.
To reboot the system, follow these steps:
1. Boot the memory-based operating system from the installation tape.
2. Make a system special file for any file system by using the MAKEDEV
command. Refer to MAKEDEV(8) in the ULTRIX Reference Pages for
more information.
3. Use the fsck command to check the file system. Refer to fsck(8) in the
ULTRIX Reference Pages for more information.
4. During the file system checking, the system moves the data in the cache
to the appropriate disks. If a disk is unavailable, the system prompts
you to confirm that you want to discard the data for those disks. Once
the data is discarded the cache is empty.
5. Reinstall the ULTRIX operating system on a viable boot disk. Refer to
the appropriate installation guide for more information.
Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D–7
D.3.2.4 Other Hardware Problems
Once you correct a hardware problem, you should be able to reboot, and
the data in the cache will be moved to the appropriate disks.
D.3.3 Power-up Screen and Test 79 with NVRAM Battery Off
If the battery jumper on the CPU module is installed in the ON position (1),
there is no message. If the battery jumper is installed in the OFF position
(0), there is an error message in the first line of the error display.
The following screen messages are displayed after the initial power-up, and
then after running test 79.
This is the display when the cache is dirty.
>>>
KN220-A VX.x
Performing normal system tests.
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..
?79 1 07 FF 0000 0000
64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
>>>T 79
?79 1 07 FF 0000 0001
>>>
This is the display when the battery jumper is in the OFF (0) position.
KN220-A VX.x
Performing normal system tests.
83..82..81..80..79..78..77..76..75..74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..
66..65..
?79 1 0A FF 0000 0000
64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..
49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..
32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
>>>T 79
D–8 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
?79 1 0A FF 0000 0001
>>>
Prestoserve Software on the DECsystem 5500
D–9
Appendix E
Field-Replaceable Units (FRUs)
This appendix lists the major field-replaceable units (FRUs) for the KN220based system (DECsystem 5500).
FRU Description
Part Number
KN220 Base System
H3602–AC bulkhead assembly
H3605 bulkhead assembly
Interface (ISE terminal power) module
KN220 I/O module
KN220 CPU module
MS220–AA memory module, 32 Mbyte
NVRAM battery
70–25775–03
70–27464–01
M9715–AA
M7638–AA
M7637–AA
M7639–AA
12–33140–01
Field-Replaceable Units (FRUs)
E–1
FRU Description
Part Number
BA430 Enclosure
Battery pack
Blank labels
Backplane
Bulkhead assy
Bulkhead cover, single
Bulkhead cover, dual
Control assembly
Door assembly, top
Door assembly, bot
EOS clip
Fan, 6"
FCC clip/handles
Indicator panel
Interface module, terminal power
Key, plastic
One quarter-turn fastener/handle
Operator Control Panel
Power supply assy (120/240)
Side gap filler panel (2)
Terminator, bus
Wheel, base
Wheel, shaft
Wheel, pin
E–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
12–19245–01
36–26883–01
54–20181–01
70–28083–01
70–23981–01
70–23982–02
70–27044–01
70–27047–01
70–27048–01
12–26922–01
12–31500–01
12–26340–01
70–27044–02
M9715–AA
12–17119–01
12–26948–01
70–25752–01
H7874–00
70–24505–01
12–29258–01
74–34068–01
74–34069–01
90–09385–00
FRU Description
Part Number
Cables, Base System
Backplane cable to operator control panel (OCP)
CPU and I/O module interconnect cable to H3605
Data cable, with MMJ
50-cond flat cable
H3602–AC cable
H3605 cable
KN220 CPU module cable to KN220 I/O module
Memory daisy chain cable (1 memory board)
Memory daisy chain cable (2 memory boards)
Memory daisy chain cable (3 memory boards)
Memory daisy chain cable (4 memory boards)
Power cord, 120 V (USA)
Power control cable, BA400-BA400
Power control cable, BA400-BA200
17–01964–01
17–02665–01
BC16E–43
17–01836–01
17–02666–01
17–02665–01
17–02700–01
17–02700–01
17–02700–02
17–02700–03
17–02700–04
17–00083–43
17–02638–01
17–02637–01
Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI)
Cable, external
Cable, round
Cable, conns, bulkhead to backplane
Daisy-chain cable, flat
Operator control panel (OCP)
Port protector
Terminator, bus
Unit ID plugs
KFQSA module
RF30/71 drive bracket
RF31 integrated storage element
RF71 drive module
RF71 head disk assembly (HDA)
RF71 integrated storage element (ISE)
RF71 shock mount, bottom
RF71 shock assembly, top
RF-series lens, encoder set
17–02152–03
17–02059–01
70–27458–01
17–01836–01
70–25752–01
12–33902–01
12–29258–01
12–28766–19
M7769–00
70–36498–01
70–
54–18316–01
70–23557–01
RF71–EA
70–25452–03
70–25452–04
12–28766–19
Field-Replaceable Units (FRUs)
E–3
FRU Description
Part Number
Small Computer Storage Interface (SCSI) ISEs, Modules, and Cables
SCSI cable, external
Cable, conns, bulkhead to backplane
Port cover
Unit ID plugs
17–02659–01
70–27459–01
12–33377–01
12–28766–28
Q22-Bus Devices
CXA16–M module
CXB16–M module
CXY08–M module
DESQA–SA module
Load module
LPV11–SA module
Q-bus expansion modules
Q-bus expansion cable
M3118–YA
M3118–YB
M3119–YA
M3127–PA
M9060–YA
M8086–PA
M9405–PA/M9405–PA
17–02048–01
Loopback Connectors
CXY08 loopback
DEQNA Ethernet loopback
H3103–00 (MMJ) loopback
H3197–00 CXY08 loopback
E–4 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
12–26964–01
12–22196–02
12–25083–01
12–15336–07
Appendix F
Related Documentation
The following documents contain information relating to the KN220 CPU
system:
Document Title
Order Number
Modules
CXA16 Technical Manual
CXY08 Technical Manual
DESQA Technical Manual
DSV11–S Communications Option User Guide
DSV11 Communications Option Technical Description
KDA50–Q CPU Module User’s Guide
KFQSA Installation Guide
EK–CAB16–TM
EK–CXY08–TM
EK–DESQA–TM
EK–DSV11–UG
EK–DSV11–TD
EK–KDA5Q–UG
EK–KFQSA–IN
Disk and Tape Drives
RF31 Installation Guide
RF71 Disk Drive User’s Guide
RZ56 Manual
RZ57 Manual
RRD40 Owner’s Manual
TLZ04 Cassette Tape Drive Owner’s Manual
EK–RF31–IN
EK–RF71D–UG
TBD
TBD
EK-RRD40-OM
EK-TLZ04-OM-001
Enclosures
BA430/BA440 Enclosure Maintenance
Microsystems Options
Microsystems Site Preparation Guide
EK–348AB–MG
EK–192AA–MG
EK–067AB–PG
Related Documentation
F–1
Document Title
Order Number
Diagnostics
MDM User’s Guide
MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor Ethernet Server User’s Guide
MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor Reference Card
AA-FM7AB-DN
AA–FNTAC–DN
AV–FMXAA–DN
Expanders
B400X Expander Installation
R400X Expander Installation and Maintenance
EK–400AA–MG
EK–349AA–MG
Networks
Ethernet Transceiver Tester User’s Manual
F–2 KN220 CPU System Maintenance
EK–ETHTT–UG
Index
! (comment command), 3–82
9E utility, 4–12
examples, 4–13
A
Acceptance testing, 4–34
Address assignments, B–3 to B–17
B
BA430 enclosure
termination with internal drive,
2–11
termination with tabletop drive,
2–11
Boot and diagnostic facility, on
KN220 CPU, 1–9
BOOT command, in maintenance
mode, 3–47
boot command, in normal mode,
3–21
Bootstrap
of MDM, description of, 3–11
of MDM, supported boot devices,
3–13
of MDM, supported boot flags,
3–13
of ULTRIX–32, description of,
3–9
of ULTRIX–32, procedures for,
3–10
of ULTRIX–32, supported devices,
3–10
support, for KN220 systems, 3–8
Bus length (DSSI), 2–10
C
53C94 chip, on KN220 I/O module,
1–12
Cables available, SCSI, 2–14
Cabling
DSSI, 2–9
ISE, 2–9
Cache data, clearing, D–2
Cache memory, on KN220 CPU, 1–8
? command, in normal mode, 3–31
Comment command (!), 3–82
Configuration
and module order, 2–1
DSSI, 2–4
rules, 2–2
CONFIGURE command, 2–3, 3–48
Console commands
address space control qualifiers,
in maintenance mode, 3–43
address specifiers, in maintenance
mode, 3–39
binary load and unload (X), 3–80
BOOT, in maintenance mode,
3–47
boot, in normal mode, 3–21
! (comment), 3–82
CONFIGURE, in maintenance
mode, 3–48
CONTINUE, in maintenance
mode, 3–50
continue, in normal mode, 3–23
d (deposit), in normal mode, 3–24
data control qualifiers, 3–42
DC, in maintenance mode, 3–51
DEPOSIT, in maintenance mode,
3–53
dump, in normal mode, 3–25
Index–1
Console commands (Cont.)
e (examine), in normal mode,
3–27
EXAMINE, 3–54
EXIT, 3–56
fill, in normal mode, 3–28
FIND, 3–57
go, in normal mode, 3–29
HALT, 3–58
HELP, 3–59
help, in normal mode, 3–30
init, in normal mode, 3–32
INITIALIZE, 3–61
?, in normal mode, 3–31
keywords, 3–44
list of, 3–44
MOVE, 3–63
NEXT, 3–65
passwd, 1–18
printenv, in normal mode, 3–33
qualifier and argument
conventions, in maintenance
mode, 3–39
qualifiers, 3–42
REPEAT, 3–67
SEARCH, 3–68
SET, 3–70
setenv, in normal mode, 3–34
SHOW, 3–73
START, 3–77
symbolic addresses, 3–40
syntax, in maintenance mode,
3–39
TEST, 3–78
test, in normal mode, 3–35
UNJAM, 3–79
unpriv, 1–18
unsetenv, in normal mode, 3–36
X (binary load and unload), 3–80
x, in normal mode, 3–37
Console displays
and FRUs, 4–24
Console displays, ROM-based
diagnostics, 4–17
Console error messages, 4–31
Index–2
Console error messages (Cont.)
list of, 4–32
sample of, 4–19
Console port, testing, 4–49
Console security, 1–16
privileged, 1–17
unprivileged, 1–16
Console serial lines on KN220 CPU,
1–8
CONTINUE command, 3–50
continue command, in normal mode,
3–23
CQBIC chip, on KN220 I/O, 1–10
CVAX
console displays, 4–17
halt entry and dispatch code, 3–3
on KN220 CPU, 1–10
CVAX ROM-based diagnostics
parameters for, 4–4
D
d (deposit) command, in normal
mode, 3–24
DC command, 3–51
DEPOSIT command, 3–53
Diagnostic executive, 4–3
error field, 4–21
Diagnostics
CVAX, description of, 1–10
KN220 CVAX and boot and
diagnostic facility, on
KN220 CPU, 1–9
Diagnostic tests
list of, 4–4
parameters for, 4–4
Differences, between KN220 and
other systems
in autoboot capability, 1–15
in H3602–AC switch meanings,
1–15
in modules and slot locations,
1–15
in terminology surrounding word
size, 1–7
Displays
Displays (Cont.)
console banner, 3–5
Documentation, relating to KN220
systems, list of, F–1
Drive connect
BA430, 2–11
Drives, 2–11
descriptions, 2–11
ID switches, 2–12
internal to tabletop connect, 2–12
RRD40 table, 2–14
tabletop to tabletop connect, 2–11
TLZ04 table, 2–12
DRVEXR local program, 4–39, 4–53
DRVTST local program, 4–39, 4–52
DSSI
bus length, 2–10
bus termination, 2–10
cabling, 2–9
configuration, 2–4
interface, on KN220 I/O module,
1–11
ISE order, 2–4
node ID, 2–4
node name, changing, 2–6
testing with H3281 loopback,
4–48
unique addresses, 4–38
unit number, changing, 2–7
dump command, in normal mode,
3–25
E
e (examine) command, in normal
mode, 3–27
Embedded drive, 2–11
description, 2–11
Environmental variables, 3–17
ERASE local program, 4–55
Error messages
console, list of, 4–32
console, sample of, 4–19
halt, 4–31
VMB, 4–33
Ethernet
See Network interface
Ethernet connectors
location of, on H3602–AC, 1–12
EXAMINE command, 3–54
EXIT command, 3–56
F
FE utility, 4–41
Field replaceable units (FRUs) for
DECsystem 5500, E–1 to E–4
fill command, in normal mode, 3–28
FIND command, 3–57
Firmware
description of, on KN220 CPU,
3–1
features of, 3–2
power-up sequence, 3–5
Firmware, on KN220 CPU, 1–9
Floating-point accelerator, on KN220
CPU, 1–7
FRUs and console display, 4–24
Function switch
and loopback tests at power-up,
3–6
and query position at power-up,
3–7
Function switch, on H3602–AC,
1–15
G
General purpose registers (GPRs)
in error display, 4–23
initialization of, 3–12
symbolic addresses for, 3–40
go command, in normal mode, 3–29
H
H3103 loopback connector, 4–49
H3281 loopback connector for DSSI,
4–48
H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
description of, 1–12
Index–3
H3602–AC I/O panel, 4–49
H8572 loopback connector, 4–49
HALT command, 3–58
Halts
and actions taken, 3–3
conditions for, external, 3–4
CVAX, halt entry and dispatch
code, 3–3
messages, list of, 4–31
registers saved, 3–3
registers set to fixed values, 3–3
Hardware error summary register,
4–42
HELP command, 3–59
help command, in normal mode,
3–30
HISTRY local program, 4–39, 4–54
I
init command, in normal mode, 3–32
INITIALIZE command, 3–61
Initial power-up test
See IPT
Installation
of KN220 and MS220–AA
modules, 1–15
Internal processor registers (IPRs)
symbolic addresses for, 3–40
IPT, 3–5, 4–25
ISE
cabling, 2–9
node ID switches, 2–4
K
KFQSA storage adapter
and running Configure utility,
C–6
changing the ISE unit number,
C–15
configuring, C–2
programming, C–8
reprogramming, C–13
KN220
features of, 1–6
Index–4
KN220 (Cont.)
LEDs, 4–30
KN220 CPU module
description of, 1–1, 1–3
firmware, features of, 3–2
L
Loopback connectors
H3103, 4–49
H8572, 4–49
list of, 4–50
tests, 4–48
Loopback tests
at power-up, 3–6
for DSSI problems, 4–48
for Ethernet problems, 4–48
M
Maintenance mode, 3–21
address specifiers, 3–39
command keywords, 3–44
command qualifiers, 3–42
command syntax, 3–39
console commands, 3–47
description of, 3–38
special characters for, 3–38
symbolic addresses, 3–40
Maintenance mode commands
CONFIGURE, 2–3
Mass storage
See DSSI
MDM operating system
and restart procedures, 3–15
boot devices, supported, 3–13
bootstrap, 3–11
supported boot flags, 3–13
Memory
cache, on KN220 CPU, 1–8
isolating FRU, 4–44
main memory system, on KN220
CPU, 1–8
maximum supported, in KN220
systems, 1–8
Memory (Cont.)
MS220–AA, description of, 1–19
testing, 4–44
Messages
console error, 4–32
system halt, 4–31
VMB error, 4–33
Module
configuration, 2–2
order, in backplane, 2–1
self-tests, 4–49
MOVE command, 3–63
MS220–AF option kit, contents of,
1–19
MS220 memory module, description
of, 1–19
N
Network interface
on KN220 I/O module, 1–11
NEXT command, 3–65
Node name
DSSI, changing, 2–6
Normal mode
command syntax in, 3–19
console commands for, 3–18
conventions used for description
purposes, 3–20
description of, 3–16
environmental variables for, 3–17
special characters for, 3–16
O
OCP, 4–51
cabling, 2–9
Operating system bootstrap
and bootstrap support, 3–8
and ULTRIX–32 procedures, 3–10
conditions for, 3–8
of MDM, description of, 3–11
of ULTRIX–32, 3–9
Operating system restart, MDM,
3–15
Operating system support, 1–1
Operation switch
and action position at power-up,
3–6, 3–7
and maintenance position at
power-up, 3–6
and normal position at power-up,
3–5
Operation switch, on H3602–AC,
1–15
Operator console panel
See OCP
P
Panel, CPU I/O
See H3602–AC CPU I/O panel
Parameters
for diagnostic tests, 4–7
in error display, 4–21
PARAMS local program, 4–39, 4–56
commands, 4–56
passwd command, 1–18
Physical address locations, and
accessing through R3000
processor, B–1
Power-up sequence, 3–5
Prestoserve software, D–1
printenv command, in normal mode,
3–33
Q
Q22-bus
interface chip (CQBIC), 1–10
R
R3000 RISC chip, on KN220 CPU,
1–7
REPEAT command, 3–67
RF30 local programs
DRVEXR, 4–39
DRVTST, 4–39
HISTRY, 4–39
PARAMS, 4–39
RF-series ISE, local programs
Index–5
RF-series ISE, local programs
(Cont.)
DRVEXR, 4–53
DRVTST, 4–52
ERASE, 4–55
HISTRY, 4–54
list of, 4–51
PARAMS, 4–56
RF-series ISEs
configuration errors, 4–51
diagnostic error codes, 4–59
diagnostics, 4–50
RISC chip, R3000, on KN220 CPU,
1–7
ROM-based diagnostics
description of, 4–3
list of, 4–4
utilities, 4–4
Switch (Cont.)
function, on H3602–AC, 1–15
function, set to test position at
power-up, 3–6
operation, on H3602–AC, 1–15
operation, set to action position at
power-up, 3–6, 3–7
operation, set to maintenance
position at power-up, 3–6
operation, set to normal position
at power-up, 3–5
Symbolic addresses, 3–40
for any address space, 3–42
for GPRs, 3–40
for IPRs, 3–40
for physical memory, 3–41
Systems, for KN220 CPU module
set, 1–1
S
T
Scripts
calling sequence for, 4–10
commonly used, 4–10
creating with 9E utility, 4–12
description of, 4–7
list of, 4–9
SCSI
interface, on KN220 I/O module,
1–12
SEARCH command, 3–68
Securing the system, 1–16
Security password
forgotten, 1–17
Self-test, for modules, 4–49
SET command, 3–70
setenv command, in normal mode,
3–34
SET HOST/DUP command, 3–70
SHOW command, 3–73
Shutdown, abnormal, recovery from,
D–1
SII chip, on KN220 I/O module,
1–11
START command, 3–77
Switch
Tabletop drive, 2–11
description, 2–11
TEST command, 3–78
test command, in normal mode,
3–35
Tests, diagnostic
See also Troubleshooting;
Loopback
list of, 4–4
parameters for, 4–7
Time-of-year clock, on KN220 I/O,
1–9
Timers, on KN220 I/O, 1–9
Troubleshooting
memory failures, 4–44
memory failures, additional
suggestions for, 4–47
with FE utility, 4–41
Index–6
U
ULTRIX–32 operating system
boot devices, supported, 3–10
bootstrap, 3–9
bootstrap procedure for, 3–10
ULTRIX–32 operating system
(Cont.)
Exerciser and Uerf commands,
list of, A–1
Unit number
DSSI, changing, 2–7
UNJAM command, 3–79
unpriv command, 1–18
Unsecuring the system, 1–17
unsetenv command, in normal mode,
3–36
Utilities, diagnostic, 4–4
V
Virtual memory bootstrap
See VMB
VMB, 3–12
boot flags, 3–13
error messages, 4–33
X
X command (binary load and
unload), 3–80
x command, in normal mode, 3–37
Index–7
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