GEH-6515-614
MULTILIN TM
PMCS System Test
Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
User’s Guide
GEH-6515
GE Power Management Control System 6.13
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. GE makes no warranty of any
kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and
fitness for a particular purpose. GE shall not be liable for errors contained herein or incidental consequential
damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
This document contains proprietary information, which is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No
part of this document may be photocopied or otherwise reproduced without consent of GE.
Copyright ©2001 - 2004 by GE
Published in a limited copyright sense, and all rights including trade secrets, are reserved.
Document Edition - First 05/96
Second 05/97
Third 05/98
Fourth 03/00
Fifth 02/01, Sixth 01/02, Seventh 01/04, Eigth 09/04
The following are products of General Electric Company:
POWER LEADERTM Meter
Power Quality Meter (PQM),
GE Fanuc Series 90/30 PLC
POWER LEADER Modbus Monitor
239 Motor Protection Relay
GE Fanuc Series 90/70 PLC
POWER LEADER Electronic Power
Meter
269 Plus Motor Management Relay
GE Fanuc MicroPLC
Spectra MicroVersaTrip
369 Motor Management Relay
Enhanced MicroVersaTrip-C
SR469 Motor Management Relay
Enhanced MicroVersaTrip-D
SR489 Generator Management Relay
MDP Overcurrent Relay
565 Feeder Management Relay
735 Feeder Relay
EPM 3710 Electronic Power Meter
Spectra Electronic Control Module
SR745 Transformer Management Relay
EPM 3720 Electronic Power
Meter
Universal Relay devices
SR750 Feeder Management Relay
EPM 7300 Electronic Power
Meter
SR760 Feeder Management Relay
Multilin 269+ Motor Management Relay® are registered trademarks of Multilin Inc., and
Multilin SR489 Generator Management Relay™ and Multilin SR745
Transformer Management Relay™ are trademarks of Multilin Inc.
Microsoft, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint are registered trademarks, and
Windows NT is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
NetDDE is a trademark of WonderWare Corporation.
US Pat Nos 5,768,148; 5,764,155; 5,862,391
Back to Main Menu
Contents
Introduction
1
Welcome ....................................................................................................................................1
Basic Concepts ...........................................................................................................................2
DDE .............................................................................................................................2
NetDDE .......................................................................................................................3
PMCS DDE Server ......................................................................................................3
Client Applications ......................................................................................................4
About the System Test Simulator ...............................................................................................5
Devices Supported by the System Test Simulator........................................................5
Who uses the System Test Simulator? .........................................................................6
What is the System Test Simulator used for?...............................................................6
Why use the Simulator rather than the real DDE Server? ............................................6
Features........................................................................................................................6
Applicable Documents.................................................................................................7
Installation Instructions ..............................................................................................................7
System Requirements...................................................................................................7
Directory Structure.......................................................................................................7
Menu Conventions .....................................................................................................................8
Quick Start
9
Introduction................................................................................................................................9
Launching the Program ..............................................................................................................9
Setting up a Simulation ............................................................................................................10
Setting up DDE Requests from Client Applications.................................................................16
The Device Simulator
17
Introduction..............................................................................................................................17
Start-up.....................................................................................................................................17
Simulator Screen Controls........................................................................................................20
Title Bar .....................................................................................................................20
Command Bar ............................................................................................................20
Device Selector ..........................................................................................................21
Meter Values..............................................................................................................21
PMCS System Test Simulator
Contents • i
Register Details ......................................................................................................... 23
Defining Device Profiles ......................................................................................................... 25
Defining Events and Special Commands................................................................................. 27
Events........................................................................................................................ 27
Special Commands.................................................................................................... 28
ii • Contents
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
29
Screen Navigation ....................................................................................................................29
Menu Bar ...................................................................................................................30
Toolbar.......................................................................................................................30
Minimize Icon............................................................................................................30
System Menu............................................................................................................................31
Server Menu .............................................................................................................................31
Switch to Simulator / Run ..........................................................................................31
Stop ............................................................................................................................32
Suspend Protocol/Resume Protocol ...........................................................................32
Exit.............................................................................................................................32
Configure Menu .......................................................................................................................33
Ports ...........................................................................................................................33
Device Info ................................................................................................................35
Device Type Information ...........................................................................................37
Operational Parameters..............................................................................................37
Reports Menu ...........................................................................................................................38
Configuration .............................................................................................................38
Active Links...............................................................................................................38
Help Menu................................................................................................................................39
Toolbar.....................................................................................................................................39
Troubleshooting
41
Trouble-shooting the PMCS System Test Simulator................................................................41
WWLogger ................................................................................................................41
Communications – Client to Server..........................................................................................41
NetDDE Troubleshooting ........................................................................................................43
Trouble-Shooting Chart............................................................................................................43
Error Messages.........................................................................................................................44
Advanced Topics
47
Introduction..............................................................................................................................47
Device Type Information – Adding Generic Devices .............................................................47
Add Default Type ......................................................................................................48
Delete.........................................................................................................................49
Function Codes ..........................................................................................................49
Register Map..............................................................................................................50
Mnemonics.................................................................................................................54
Optimizing Server Performance ...............................................................................................56
Operational Parameters..............................................................................................56
PMCS DDE Server .ini File.......................................................................................57
Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions
59
Data-Addressing Conventions..................................................................................................59
Standard Data Organization .......................................................................................60
Special Naming Conventions .....................................................................................61
Register Array Format................................................................................................62
Index
PMCS System Test Simulator
65
Contents • iii
Introduction
Welcome
GE’s Power Management Control System (PMCS) is a supervisory management and
control system (SCADA) for industrial or institutional electrical distribution systems.
These systems can be complex and costly to build, involving large amounts of
cabling and many power management devices, such as meters and trip units. With
such high overhead involved, you can see the importance of being able to model and
test such a system prior to physical construction and installation.
The GE PMCS System Test Simulator answers this need. The System Test Simulator
is a PC-based tool for developing and configuring the software interface of the
PMCS DDE Server, then testing it with client applications. The System Test
Simulator makes it possible to model an entire power management system in
software, without ever connecting a physical device.
The Simulator plays the role of every power management device attached to the
model system, generating appropriate data, events, and responses to the requests of
the PMCS DDE Server, which in turn passes the data to the requesting client
applications. The client applications requesting data from the PMCS DDE Server are
completely unaware that the data they are receiving are not coming from a real power
management network.
The figures below Figure 1 and Figure 2 illustrate the differences between a real
PMCS network and one running the PMCS System Test Simulator.
Host PC
Device
Device
...
PMCS
client
Modbus RTU communications network
DDE
communications
PMCS
client
Device
PMCS
DDE Server
DDE
communications
PMCS client
on networked PC
NetDDE
communications
PMCS client
on networked PC
Figure 1. Example of PMCS system with real devices.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Introduction • 1
The first figureFigure 1 shows an example of a real PMCS network. Client
applications request device data from the PMCS DDE Server via DDE or NetDDE
communications. The PMCS DDE Server collects the data from the power
management devices, then replies to the clients.
Host PC
PMCS
System Test
Device Simulator
PMCS
client
DDE
communications
DDE
communications
PMCS
client
PMCS client
on networked PC
DDE
communications
PMCS System
Test Simulator
DDE Server
NetDDE
communications
PMCS client
on networked PC
Figure 2. Example of PMCS System Test Simulator.
In the second figureIn Figure 2, the client applications request device data from the
PMCS DDE Server, just as in a real PMCS network. However, the System Test
Simulator uses a special PMCS DDE Server that has been modified to collect its data
from the Device Simulator program, rather than from a network of devices. The DDE
Server requests the desired data from the Device Simulator, which generates a
realistic simulation of data for the appropriate device type. The DDE Server replies
to the client applications, which are unaware that the data has not come from real
power management devices.
Basic Concepts
DDE
DDE is the acronym for Dynamic Data Exchange, a communications protocol that
allows independently developed MS Windows programs to share data and
instructions with each other.
DDE implements a client-server relationship between two concurrently running
programs. The server application provides data and accepts requests from any other
applications interested in its data. The applications requesting the data are called
clients.
Requests for data can be of two types: one-time requests or permanent data links.
With one-time requests, the client program requests a “snapshot” of the desired data
from the server application. An example of a one-time request is a program, such as
Excel, running a report-generating macro. The macro opens a temporary link to
another application, requests specific data, closes the link, then uses the data to
generate the report.
2 • Introduction
PMCS System Test Simulator
Permanent data links are called “hot links.” When a client application sets up a hot
link to another application, it requests the server application to advise the client
whenever a specific parameter changes. Hot links remain active until either the client
or server program terminates the link. Hot links are an efficient means of exchanging
data because, once the link has been established, no communication occurs until the
specified parameter changes.
The DDE protocol specification includes standardized formats for messages to be
exchanged between DDE-compliant applications (such as Microsoft Excel).
NetDDE
NetDDE for Windows NT is an extension to DDE. With NetDDE, client applications
do not have to be running on the same PC as the DDE Server; a client application on
one PC may request data from a DDE Server operating on another PC. Its
capabilities include communication over local-area networks and through serial ports.
Two or more networked PCs running Windows NT are required to run NetDDE. The
version of NetDDE that is supplied with Windows NT is the recommended version;
other versions of NetDDE are not recommended for use with PMCS.
PMCS DDE Server
The PMCS Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) Server is the heart of a POWER
LEADERTM Power Management Control System (PMCS), a tool that helps you
increase productivity, reduce downtime, and improve power quality by automatically
collecting the wealth of data available from devices in your power network. You
select data to monitor, configure the PMCS DDE Server to communicate with the
selected devices in your system, and the PMCS DDE Server collects the requested
data and supplies it to your choice of software applications for analysis and trending.
NOTE: The DDE Server supplied with the System Test Simulator is a modified
version of the PMCS DDE Server. Instead of collecting data from power
management devices, it collects data from a special software application called the
Device Simulator, which supplies the DDE Server with realistic data to pass to
clients.
Apart from collecting its data from the Device Simulator rather than from real
devices, the Simulator’s DDE Server and the real PMCS DDE Server are
functionally identical, even using the same configuration files. After setting up a
PMCS network on the System Test Simulator you can immediately use the same
configuration simply by launching the real PMCS DDE Server.
Because of this tightly integrated design, you should also keep in mind that any
changes you make using the System Test Simulator will apply to the real PMCS DDE
Server.
The PMCS DDE Server collects metering, status, event, and alarm data from
metering, control, and protection devices on the network, or from the PMCS System
Test Simulator. The Server then communicates this data to PMCS software clients,
such as the third-party HMI tools or the PMCS Event Logger. The data can easily be
imported into spreadsheets such as Microsoft Excel for analysis and presentation.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Introduction • 3
The PMCS DDE Server supports both DDE for sharing data with applications on the
same computer and NetDDE for sharing data with other computers in a local-area
network (LAN).
Client Applications
Client applications request specific data from the PMCS DDE Server and then
provide calculations, trending, and display of the data on screen and/or printer.
Various client applications are available to serve different needs. Event Logger is an
example of client applications that are fully optimized for PMCS.
Any DDE-compliant application can request data from the PMCS DDE Server by
initiating a “conversation” with the server and providing the correct information
phrased in DDE format—i.e., what data from which device.
Other common DDE-compliant applications used to analyze data from the PMCS
DDE Server are Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access, both providing datamanipulation and analysis tools. However, any DDE-compliant application may
retrieve data from thefS DDE Server. For instance, a presentation on the power
consumption at an industrial facility can be created using Microsoft PowerPoint,
retrieving and graphing power consumption data from the PMCS DDE Server.
4 • Introduction
PMCS System Test Simulator
About the System Test Simulator
The PMCS System Test Simulator consists of two primary applications and several
support applications. The support applications are discussed later. For now, we are
only concerned with the primary applications: the Server and the Device Simulator.
The Server is a modified version of the PMCS DDE Server (Modbus version;
Ethernet simulations are not supported by the System Test Simulator), which has
been programmed to retrieve data from the Device Simulator rather than from a
network of power management devices. The Device Simulator serves as a
replacement for the network of power management devices, pretending to be
whatever devices we’ve told it to represent. The Device Simulator responds to the
Server’s data queries by supplying data that accurately emulates data from real
devices.
Devices Supported by the System Test Simulator
Pre-installed GE proprietary devices
The PMCS Simulator contains pre-installed profile data for the devices supported by
PMCS 6.9.
NOTE: The Simulator supports some of the functions of the PMCS 6.9 devices. It is
not intended to be a compete simulation of all device functions nor a simulation of
device interaction or network behavior. For instance, increasing the voltage at one
device will not cause the voltage at another device to increase, as it might in a real
system. Command coils are not supported for most device types, nor is the generation
of waveform data.
Generic devices
The Simulator also supports a customizable generic device type, capable of registerbased communications with Modbus RTU.
Usually, a generic device is a third-party power management device requiring custom
configuration to work with the PMCS DDE Server. The Simulator can be configured
to support generic device types; instructions are provided in Advanced Topics.
Several GE devices, such as the family of PLCs, are designed to be so flexible that
they also can be considered generic devices, requiring special configuration.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Introduction • 5
Who uses the System Test Simulator?
•
System integrators and developers can use the Simulator for
development and preliminary testing of PMCS supervisory control and
data acquisition (SCADA) systems for electrical distribution
components, metering, and monitoring.
•
Marketing and sales engineers can use the Simulator for demonstration
of PMCS systems without connecting to an actual network of devices.
What is the System Test Simulator used for?
Some of the practical uses of the System Test Simulator are as follows:
•
To build a model of a PMCS system, including planned devices and
DDE Server Software.
•
To test the DDE Server’s interface and DDE links between the DDE
Server and client applications.
•
To test custom-designed Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs), verifying
the links between custom wizards and the DDE Server registers.
•
In third-party HMI design tools, to validate the logic of the one-line
diagram (electrical representation of the system). In the DDE Simulator,
to create pseudo-device names and PLC I/O points to test against the
DDE Server.
Why use the Simulator rather than the real DDE
Server?
Using the Simulator provides the following benefits:
•
It allows system developers to debug the DDE links in the DDE
interface software off-site, prior to full system installation.
•
It reduces the time needed for development and on-site testing of the
system.
•
It eliminates disruptions of the customer operating system or facility.
Features
6 • Introduction
•
User-configurable power-simulation profiles and topic setup
parameters.
•
Pre-installed registers for all GE device parameters.
•
Pre-installed values for many dynamic value registers (GE devices).
•
Consistent device event and trip simulation for dissimilar devices.
•
Generic support for any Modbus RTU-compliant device.
•
Easy to use, Windows-based graphical user interface with a toolbar and
pull-down menus for quick and easy device definition, configuration,
and report generation.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Applicable Documents
•
GEH-6502, PMCS Network Architecture Guide
•
GEH-6510, PMCS Network and Device Configurator Users’ Guide
•
GEH-6509, PMCS DDE Server Interface Reference
•
GEH-6508, Modbus Concentrator Protocol Reference
Installation Instructions
For installation instructions, refer to GEH-6514, Read This Book First, which
contains installation procedures for all POWER LEADERTM system and application
software packages.
In order to fully test your system, you may need to install additional software,
including the PMCS system, Microsoft Office, and third-party HMI development
tools.
System Requirements
Refer to GEH-6514, PMCS Read This Book First, for system requirements to run the
PMCS System Test Simulator.
Directory Structure
Installing the PMCS Simulator software creates the following directory on the hard
drive, where X is the drive letter:
X:\ge_pmcs\sim\
You should know where the files are located on your hard drive so that you do not
accidentally move or erase them. In addition, you may want to make changes to these
files in the testing process.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Introduction • 7
Menu Conventions
Several standard buttons, such as OK and Cancel, are used in many dialog boxes
throughout the software. You should be familiar with the general use and function of
such buttons from experience with Windows software. Rather than repeating their
definitions in each place where they occur, the following definitions apply globally.
In general, only buttons having unique or important functions in a particular dialog
box are described in the text.
Click this button to confirm any changes made in a particular dialog
box or to confirm a selection from a list. The button may be dimmed
if no changes have been made or nothing is selected.
Clicking this button cancels a selection, closes the dialog box, and
returns to the previous dialog box or level.
Click this button to access the Help topic for the current dialog box.
Similar to OK. Click on this button to finish selection and close the
dialog box.
Creates a new selection, perhaps a new topic (device), and usually
opens a dialog box with various parameters that need to be defined.
Usually opens a dialog box regarding the current selection, showing
various parameters which may be modified.
Deletes the current selection.
8 • Introduction
PMCS System Test Simulator
Quick Start
Introduction
In this section, we’ll demonstrate the basic functions of the PMCS System Test
Simulator software and walk through the most commonly used menus and commands
of the program.
This section provides a tutorial rather than a comprehensive reference. Sections 3 and
4, The Device Simulator and DDE Server Menus and Toolbars, of the User’s Guide
offer in-depth descriptions of the menus and functions of the Device Simulator and
DDE Server respectively.
Before working with the PMCS System Test Simulator, you should plan your
network on paper, diagramming the RS-485 communications networks, the devices
assigned to each network, and the Modbus address assigned to each device. For
information on how to design a PMCS network, refer to GEH-6502, PMCS Network
Architecture Guide.
Launching the Program
To start the PMCS System Test Simulator, open the GE PMCS program group in
Windows. The Simulator program icon is shown below. Launch the application from
the Windows Start menu or by double-clicking on the icon.
Launching the System Test Simulator also starts several supporting applications: the
Simulator’s specially-modified DDE Server and the Graphics Server. All of these
pieces work together to provide the simulated devices for client applications.
Note: The PMCS System Test Simulator is designed to simulate only Modbus-based
PMCS networks. Simulation of Ethernet-based PMCS systems is not supported by
the System Test Simulator. However, you can use the Simulator with clients set for
an Ethernet DDE Server by changing the Server name referenced by the client
applications. In your client application, change any references to GE32ENET (the
Ethernet DDE Server) to GE32MODB (the Modbus DDE Server/Simulator).
PMCS System Test Simulator
Quick Start • 9
When launched, the Simulator prompts you to load profile data and register map data
from a file. If you have previously saved profile data or register map data that you
want to continue working with, go ahead and select the data file to load. If you are
setting up a new system simulation, click NO and proceed.
Setting up a Simulation
The PMCS Simulator generates data in response to requests from the DDE Server.
The Simulator’s responses are based on the device type associated with the DDE
request; when you request data from an MDP Overcurrent Relay, that’s what you get
back.
Before the simulation can occur, you must tell it specifically which devices you want
to include in your particular system. Therefore, the first step in setting up a
simulation is to configure the devices you want to simulate. We’ll walk through
setting up a device to demonstrate the procedure.
To begin this exercise, you should be looking at the main window of the Simulator’s
DDE Server:
10 • Quick Start
PMCS System Test Simulator
If you’re looking at the Device Simulator window (shown below), click the Server
button to switch to the Server window.
We’ll configure a single device and explain how to access its data from a client
application. Once you’ve learned the basics of configuring a device, you’ll be ready
to set up simulations of more involved networks. Later, we’ll show you how to
custom-configure generic devices and perform advanced Server configuration.
From the Server window’s menu bar, pull down the Server menu and select Stop,
unless it is already grayed out. The Server must be Stopped before any device
configuration can be performed. (Clicking the stop sign button on the toolbar
performs the same action as selecting Stop from the Server menu.)
PMCS System Test Simulator
Quick Start • 11
Pull down the Configure menu and select Configure (the only option on the menu).
This will bring up the Configuration dialog box, offering four options:
•
Ports…
•
Operational Parameters…
•
Device Type Info…
•
Device Info…
Ignore the Operational Parameters… and Device Type Info… buttons for the time
being–these are advanced options that will be discussed later. We’ll first configure a
communications port, then configure a device assigned to that port.
To configure a communications port, click the Ports button. and the
Communication Port Configuration dialog box is displayed:
12 • Quick Start
PMCS System Test Simulator
Select the communication port to configure from the COM Port pull-down list at the
top of the dialog box.
Select the appropriate radio button for each of the communication settings: Parity,
Stop Bits, Flow Control, and Baud Rate. The default settings are shown. Typically,
only the baud rate need be changed to match the baud rate of the devices connected
to the comm port. The rest of the communication settings are standard. Refer to the
user manuals of the individual devices to be sure the communication settings match.
Click on OK to return to the Configure dialog box—our first com port has been
successfully configured.
Hint: You don’t need to leave the Communication Port Configuration dialog box to
configure multiple ports. Select a port from the pull-down list, make your changes,
then you can select another port from the pull-down list and configure it as well.
Configure as many ports as you need to, then click OK to save your changes and
return to the Configure dialog box.
Next, we’ll configure a sample device.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Quick Start • 13
Click the Device Info button. This will bring up the Device Configuration dialog
box, displaying a list of configured devices and options to Add, Modify or Delete
devices.
We want to add a device, so click the Add button. The Add Device Configuration
dialog box appears:
14 • Quick Start
PMCS System Test Simulator
In the Device Name (Topic) field, enter the name by which you’ll reference this
device from a client application. The device name should be unique, have fewer than
20 characters, and contain no special characters (the program won’t allow you to
enter any, so this part is easy).
Select a device type from the Device Type pull-down list. For this exercise, select an
MVT (MicroVersaTrip trip unit). Selecting the type of device, such as Spectra ECM
or POWER LEADER EPM, tells the DDE Server what kind of register map to expect
and tells the Device Simulator what kind of register map to use in simulating this
device. (Details of PMCS device register maps can be found in GEH-6508, the
PMCS DDE Server Interface Reference.)
Select the com port this device is attached to.
Enter a valid slave address; this is the Modbus address of the device. You should
have this information on the network diagram you drew earlier.
The address selected must adhere to the following rules:
•
For Modbus Concentrators, the slave address must be between 1 – 32.
•
commnet devices must have slave addresses in the range
33 – 247
•
Modbus-based devices may have any address from 1 – 247
If you’re not sure whether a device is commnet- or Modbus-based, or you have
questions regarding commnet and Modbus, refer to GEH-6502, PMCS Network
Architecture Guide.
The Scan Interval field should be left set at 1000. We’ll discuss Scan Interval later
on.
Last, click the OK button to accept your entries, close the dialog box, and return to
the Device Configuration dialog box.
Make sure the Activate checkbox is selected, or the Server will not recognize the
device. This feature is a useful way to quickly disable individual devices.
Click Close and Restart Server to exit Configuration and begin using the device.
You’ll return to the Device Simulator window and view the default data being
generated to simulate the device you just configured.
The Server now recognizes the device, so when a client application requests data
from the device, the Server will retrieve the data from the Device Simulator and
respond to the client’s query.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Quick Start • 15
That’s the procedure for configuring any supported GE device. Configuration
procedures for “generic” devices such as non-supported third-party devices, and
highly customizable GE Fanuc Programmable Logic Controllers, are covered in
Section 6, Advanced Topics.
Setting up DDE Requests from Client Applications
To obtain data from a device on the System Test Simulator, a client opens a channel
to the DDE Server by specifying these three names:
<application name> <topic name> <item name>
<application name> – the name of the Server program.
<topic name> – the name given to the field device, such as EPM1 for a device of type
EPM.
<item name> – The actual address of the field parameter to be monitored—a specific
valid register address or group under topic EPM1, such as R34001, or mnemonic,
such as Amps_A.
For register and item names and examples of DDE protocol, refer to GEH-6509,
PMCS DDE Server Interface Reference. An example is provided which demonstrates
the use of a spreadsheet to link to a DDE item in the Server or Simulator.
Refer to documentation of your client program for details on defining a DDE item in
the client.
16 • Quick Start
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator
Introduction
With the overview of device setup behind us, we’ll now take a closer look at the
Device Simulator.
As we mentioned earlier, the System Test Simulator has two major components, the
DDE Server and the Device Simulator. The DDE Server is just a special version of
the real PMCS DDE Server modified to retrieve data for any configured device from
another piece of software, the Device Simulator. The Device Simulator pretends to
be any device the DDE Server requires, supplying realistic data simulations for the
parameters of each device.
Start-up
When the DDE Simulator is launched, the Device Simulator is launched as well.
Several start-up screens, shown below, prompt you to either load previous simulation
data or start from scratch (by not loading any previous data). Respond No to the
following two prompts if you wish to start a new simulation from scratch.
First you’ll be prompted to load previously saved profile data. Profile data is any
special customization to your device’s power profile, such as adding noise or setting
arbitrary currents or voltages.
Select Yes if you want to load saved profile data. Select No if you are running the
Simulator for the first time or do not have any previously saved simulator profile data
files available.
Next you’re prompted to load previous register maps. Like saving profile data, you
may also save fixed values you may have changed in the devices’ register maps.
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator • 17
Click Yes if you want to initialize registers with their previously stored values, or No
to use default register values or if you are running the Simulator for the first time.
Register maps and profiles are saved separately, allowing for more-flexible
simulations. You might set up a group of devices with particular register maps and
then see how the system performs under a variety of different power profiles.
18 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
When you have navigated the opening dialog boxes, the Device Simulator main
screen appears. When you select a device for display, a screen full of simulated data
is displayed, similar to the one below.
There are five important parts of the Device Simulator screen, indicated below and
detailed in the following pages.
1. Title bar shows current
device’s name & address.
2. Command bar.
4. Meter Values area shows
values being simulated for
various parameters and a graph
plotting a selected parameter.
PMCS System Test Simulator
3. Device-selection pull-down menu.
5. Register details area allows
access to detailed information on
individual registers.
The Device Simulator • 19
Simulator Screen Controls
Title Bar
The title bar at the top of the Device Simulator screen displays the name of the
currently selected device and its Modbus address.
Command Bar
The buttons at the top of the Simulator screen offer access to the following
commands.
Opens the Configure Load Profile dialog box, allowing you to
customize details of the selected device’s load profile. See Defining
Device Profiles for details.
Opens the Event Generation dialog box to simulate events for the
selected device. See Defining Events and Special Commands for
details.
Opens the Special Command dialog box, which allows you to
simulate various device functions. See Defining Events and Special
Commands for details.
The Freeze button freezes data simulation for the currently selected
device. Clicking this button toggles the button between Freeze and
UnFreeze. In Freeze state, updating stops for all simulated
parameters. The data being simulated at the moment the Freeze
button is clicked will continue to be sent to the DDE Server until
the Unfreeze button is clicked.
The Server button allows you to switch to the DDE Server window
quickly.
Displays version information about the Device Simulator.
20 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
Device Selector
The Device Name pull-down list allows you to select the device for which you want
to see simulated data. A clock displaying the current system time is provided for your
convenience to the right of the pull-down list.
Meter Values
The Meter Values area displays the data being generated by the Device Simulator
for the selected device.
These data are generated using the values configured in the Configure Load Profile
dialog. The parameters displayed vary depending on the selected device type;
different device types have different capabilities.
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator • 21
The graph area shows a plot of a selected parameter. The simulation cycle repeats
continuously over the Profile Length selected in the Configure Load Profile dialog.
The moving line shows the progress through the simulation while the Time counter
shows the elapsed time in five-second increments. The current value is displayed in
the Value box.
Use the pull-down list box to select the parameter to be plotted on the
graph.
The current value of the variable being plotted is shown in the Value
box.
The elapsed profile time of the parameter being plotted on the graph
is shown in the Time box. The counter ticks in one-second intervals
(this increment is not user adjustable).
22 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
Register Details
The right side of the Device Simulator screen shows information on the registers of
the selected device. The panel at the right side of the window offers push-buttons for
each register type present in the selected device. The buttons available vary
depending on the currently selected device type. You can click any of the buttons to
see the related register values in the list box.
Using the controls in this area, you can directly view and change the contents of any
available registers for the current device type.
1. Select a group of registers to
view by clicking one of these
buttons.
2. Select the display format for
the register values.
3. If you selected the Int or Long radio button,
you’ll have access to this pull-down list to
further select the display mode.
4. Enter a register number in the Reg No.
field or select a register in the scrollable list
box. The register number and value are
shown in the fields above the list box. To
change a register, enter its new value in
the Value field, and press the Enter key.
For most devices, the register numbers are
in decimal format. The Multilin devices are
an exception, and show register numbers in
hexidecimal format.
5. To clear a value from a register and restore
the default value, click CLEAR. To update
the register map with any changes you’ve
made, click Download. (Download does
not write changes to a file; see below.) To
refresh the screen with any new data
changes coming from DDEclients, click
Upload.
The scrollable list box shows the values present in the selected register group. Note
that the scrollable list box does not immediately show new values from DDE clients;
to update the display, click on the upload button.
If you make a change to a register group, then click on a button to display another
group of registers, you’ll be prompted to save changes to the current register group,
as shown in the following dialog box. Clicking Yes in this dialog box writes any
changes to a file.
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator • 23
Clicking the Download button updates the register map with any changes we have
made. The new data is available for client access when the Download button is
clicked. The display of registers at the Device Simulator is static and is not updated
unless you have switched to a different register group and back or click on the
Upload button.
Before exiting the DDE Simulator, you will have another opportunity to save any
changes you’ve made. When exiting, the software prompts you to save any profile
data to a disk file.
For example, suppose we want to change a Setpoint register in the EMVT-D device
type. Select EMVT-D from the Device Type pull-down menu, then click the
Setpoint button in the Register Details area. Enter the register number in the Reg
No. field, or scroll down the register list and click on the desired register. The current
value of this register will be displayed in the Value field. Highlight the Value field
and type the new entry for this register. Press the Enter key, or click on the
Download button. The new value is entered into the register, and is available for
access from clients. In order to see any changes to the data registers (such as a new
data value poked to the simulator from a DDE client); click on the Upload button on
the DDE Simulator screen.
NOTE: Since both the DDE Server and the DDE Simulator point to the same
configuration files, setting up or editing either program causes the same configuration
to take effect in the other program as well.
Be careful when running both the Simulator and the real PMCS DDE Server
simultaneously; be sure that the .ini file for the current application references the
appropriate configuration files. To use one set of configuration files with the
Simulator and a different set with the PMCS DDE Server, be sure to change the .ini
file prior to launching the application.
24 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
Defining Device Profiles
The Device Simulator allows you to customize the power load profile for an
individual device.
Clicking the Load Profile button displays the Configure Load Profile dialog box
for the current device:
Click in any of the cells and enter the desired power data in spreadsheet-style. To
, which
speed data entry, click the Balanced Load checkbox
automatically balances the load on all phases. All phases will have similar current,
voltage, and PF values; the value you enter in one of the cells will be propagated to
all the cells. You can enter values for Average and Peak Current, Average and
Peak Voltage, Average and Peak Power Factor and also Random Noise, a value
for simulating noise on any of the phases.
You can specify different profile trends by selecting the desired profile from the
buttons at the top of the dialog box:
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator • 25
Entering the Profile Length sets the time duration that the Simulator will take to run
the selected profile. The profile is cycled continuously.
The Simulator uses a counter to increment energy hours once every second. Hour
Cnt Incr Units allows you to customize the increment for energy hour data – for
instance, energy hours can accumulate by one unit (1, 2, 3, 4, ...) or two units (2, 4, 6,
8, ...) every second.
When you have finished configuring the load profile, click OK to save the changes
and close the Configure Load Profile window. Cancel closes the window without
saving changes.
26 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
Defining Events and Special Commands
Events
Clicking the Events button opens the Event Generation dialog box. This dialog box
allows you to simulate events for a particular device.
Event codes for some devices may be found in GEH-6508, Modbus Protocol Guide,
or in the specific device’s user manual or Modbus protocol guide.
Select a device from the pull-down list in the Event Generation dialog box. Select an
Event Code from the pull-down list or type in the event code number. Event codes
are entered as decimal (not hexadecimal) numbers. Refer to the device
documentation for lists of available event codes.
Click the Add button to generate the selected event for the selected device. Click
Exit to close the Event Generation dialog box.
NOTE: If you select an EPM 3720 from the pull-down list, the dialog box is slightly
different, as the 3720 requires that you specify cause and effect keys; refer to the
EPM 3720 documentation for Cause and Effect Keys.
PMCS System Test Simulator
The Device Simulator • 27
Special Commands
The Spl Command button enables the simulation of various device functions,
including trips, sending coil commands, and resetting energy.
Similar to the Event Generation dialog box, the Special Commands dialog box
prompts you to select a Device from the upper pull-down list and a Command from
the lower pull-down list:
The Device list contains the list of all configured devices (topics) that can execute
special commands. Select a device for which you want to simulate a special
command. The Command pull-down list shows the special commands available for
the selected device. Select a command, and click OK to execute it. Click Exit to
leave the Special Commands dialog box.
NOTE: Special commands are not supported for most device types.
28 • The Device Simulator
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
In this section, we’ll examine each of the Server’s menus and toolbar buttons in
detail, describing its functions and options. We’ll assume that some buttons (such as
OK and Cancel) are self-evident and that you can interpret their functions from
general experience with the Windows interface.
Screen Navigation
With the software up and running, you should find yourself looking at the PMCS
System Test Simulator Server main window, a modified version of the PMCS DDE
Server main window. If you are familiar with the PMCS DDE Server, you will find
the Simulator’s DDE Server is nearly identical.
The program offers two sets of navigational and operational controls, the menu bar
and the tool bar:
•
Menu bar -- Located directly beneath the window’s title bar. You can
access these pull-down items either with the mouse or the keyboard
(Alt+underlined letter).
•
Toolbar -- Located beneath the menu bar. These control buttons
provide point-and-click access to commonly used controls.
These controls are discussed in more detail in the following sections.
Where applicable, Help icons appear below the cursor and in the status line (box at
the bottom of the main window) that prompt an action or describe an object when the
cursor “lingers” over an object.
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 29
Menu Bar
The PMCS DDE Simulator main window contains four pull-down menus:
•
Server
•
Configure
•
Reports
•
Help
…as well as the standard Windows system menu. We’ll take a closer look at these
menus shortly.
Toolbar
The main window toolbar contains four icons, shown below in Table 1. Click on an
icon to perform the action described.
Icon
Function
Description
Server Run
Starts the DDE Server
Stop DDE Server
Stops DDE Server
Suspend/Resume
Suspends or resumes the DDE
Server’s activities
Exit DDE Server
Exits DDE Server
Table 1. Toolbar icons.
Minimize Icon
The following icon appears when the DDE Simulator Server is minimized.
30 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
System Menu
The system pull-down menu is shown below. The menu is standard to Windows;
refer to the Windows documentation if you have any questions regarding these
functions.
Server Menu
The Server pull-down menu is shown below. Descriptions of the Server options
follow.
Switch to Simulator / Run
The first item on the Server menu is either Switch to Simulator or Run, depending
on the current mode.
If the item reads Switch to Simulator, you know that you are currently in Run
mode—the DDE Server is able to accept DDE requests from clients and respond to
them.
If the item is Run, the Server program is in Stop mode — no requests are being
accepted or answered. You must be in Stop mode to make any configuration changes
such as adding new devices or modifying existing devices. To enter Stop mode, close
all DDE client programs to disconnect any active DDE links, then select Stop.
Switch to Simulator jumps from the DDE Server to the Device Simulator.
Run places the DDE Server in Run mode, ready to answer DDE requests from
clients. The Server waits for DDE clients to become active. Once a client is actively
making requests for data, the PMCS DDE Server retrieves the appropriate data from
the Device Simulator and answers the requests.
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 31
Note: The Stop command temporarily closes the Device Simulator window, and the
Run command will restart the Device Simulator. It may take several seconds for the
Device Simulator to start up after issuing the Run command.
You must configure the Server with at least one device before it can run a simulation
or a client requests data from it. Configuration is discussed in Section Two, Quick
Start, and also later in this section.
All configuration information is saved to disk and is re-loaded each time the Server is
run.
Stop
Stop sets the PMCS DDE Server off-line, preventing it from requesting any data
from the Device Simulator. Before you can stop the Server, however, DDE links with
client applications must be broken from any open client applications. This may
require closing the client applications.
Once the PMCS DDE Server is off-line, you can make configuration changes.
While the Server is Stopped, a DDE request from a client will automatically return
the Server to Run mode, unless configuration changes are underway. Selecting
Configure from the Configure menu disables this “auto-wakeup” feature.
Suspend Protocol/Resume Protocol
This menu item is enabled once the Server starts running. Suspend Protocol and
Resume Protocol are mutually exclusive options. One or the other will be displayed
on the Server menu, depending on the current state of the program.
Suspend Protocol temporarily halts the collection of data by the DDE Server
without requiring that the DDE links with clients be broken, whereas Stop requires
that the links be broken first. When you select Suspend, any DDE links remain
intact; they merely become idle until you select Resume.
When you select Suspend Protocol, the Server stops data acquisition and the menu
item changes to Resume Protocol.
When you select Resume Protocol, the suspended DDE links become active again,
and the Server resumes answering requests for data.
This is useful if you wish to pause operation of the Server to view data traffic in
WWLogger . It has no effect on the Device Simulator; the Simulator continues to
generate appropriate simulated data.
Note that Suspending the DDE Server does not permit you to make any configuration
changes; the Server must be Stopped for configuration changes to be made.
Exit
Exit is the standard Windows function for leaving the program. A dialog box
prompts you for confirmation that you really want to exit the program. This will also
exit the Simulator and you will be prompted to save the profile data and register
maps.
32 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
Configure Menu
The Configure pull-down menu is shown below. Descriptions of the Configure
options follow.
The only option available from the Configure menu is Configure. Selecting this
option brings up the Configuration dialog box.
Ports
The Simulator supports up to 256 RS-485 ports. We refer to these communication
ports as “comm ports” in the documentation. Communication ports must be
configured before a device can be assigned to that port.
Step 1. Click on the Configure pull-down menu and select Configure.
At the Configuration dialog box click Ports.
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 33
This brings up the Communication Port Configuration dialog box:
Step 2. Select the communication port to configure from the COM Port pull-down
list at the top of the dialog box.
Step 3. Select the appropriate radio button for each of the communication settings:
Parity, Stop Bits, Flow Control, and Baud Rate. The default settings are shown.
Typically, only baud rate need be changed to match settings of the devices connected
to the comm port. The other communication settings are fairly standard. Refer to the
user manuals of the individual devices to be sure the communication settings match.
NOTE: Flow Control applies only to systems using an RS-232/RS-485 converter box
other than the recommended converter. Some RS-232/RS-485 boxes require
Hardware Flow Control to be enabled; check the product’s documentation to see if
your RS-485 converter requires this.
Step 4. Click on OK to return to the Configure dialog box.
34 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
Device Info
Click this button to display the Device Configuration dialog box:
Add
Click this button to configure a new device. The Add Device Configuration dialog
box appears:
The PMCS DDE Server doesn’t just look at individual devices directly; instead it
uses a more flexible virtual addressing scheme, which looks at topics at particular
addresses. A topic consists of a user-specified device name, port number, address,
and device type, with information on how often it is to be scanned. While there is
usually just a single topic per device, it is possible to have multiple topics obtaining
data from the same device. This feature allows you the ability to scan different data
from the same device at different intervals.
For example, suppose you want to scan a set of registers at one device every 1000
milliseconds, while for other registers a 5,000 millisecond scan is adequate. In this
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 35
case, you could set up two separate topics, each addressed to the same device, but set
to scan at different scan intervals.
Enter a name for the device. This will be the topic name referenced from client
applications. This name must be unique, must begin with an alphabetic character, be
no more than 20 characters long (8 characters if used with a third-party HMI client).
Only alphanumeric characters and underscores are permitted; the topic name cannot
include spaces or special characters, such as: + * / /, ? () “ ‘.
Select the Device Type from this pull-down list.
Enter the Slave address assigned to the device in this field. On a single RS485
network, all addresses must be unique, though it is acceptable to have devices with
the same address if they are on different RS485 networks. For example, Network 1,
Device 1 is recognized as different from Network 2, Device 1. For purposes of the
DDE Simulator, if you configure multiple devices with the same Modbus address, the
Simulator automatically differentiates between them as though they were on separate
RS485 networks.
The device addresses must fall into the following ranges:
•
Modbus devices other than the Modbus Concentrator may have
addresses in the range 1–247.
•
POWER LEADER Modbus Concentrators must have addresses in the
range 1–32.
•
Commnet devices must have addresses in the range 33–247.
For details on addressing requirements, refer to GEH-6502, PMCS Network
Architecture Guide.
Enter the scan interval to be assigned to the device (the default is 1000). The scan
interval is the target time in milliseconds at which the current device will be scanned;
it is the scan time that could be achieved under optimal circumstances. This will vary
greatly from network to network, depending upon the number and type of devices
being managed, the amount of data being requested by the client applications, and
even the architecture of the network itself. The valid range for scan interval is 1 to
9999999; scan intervals less than 100 milliseconds are usually impossible due to
network timing constraints.
Clicking OK accepts the entries and returns to the Device Configuration dialog box.
Modify
Select the device (topic) to be modified and click the Modify button. The Modify
Device Configuration dialog box appears. The options and fields in the Modify
Device Configuration dialog box are similar to those in the Add Device
36 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
Configuration dialog box. Make any necessary modifications and click on the OK
button. The modified information is reflected in the Device Configuration dialog
box.
Delete
To delete a device (topic), select it and click on this button.
Activate checkbox
At the bottom right of the Device Configuration dialog box, you’ll notice a check
box labeled Activate. This box provides a one-step way to turn a device on or off at
the Server. Make sure this box is checked for each device; devices that are not
activated will not communicate with the Server and will not be available to DDE
clients. Conversely, for troubleshooting purposes, you can use this checkbox to
quickly take a device off-line.
Device Type Information
CAUTION: Advanced users only.
Do not access this option unless you have studied the Advanced Topics section of the
User’s Guide and are sure of what you are doing. Misuse of this option may cause
errors or malfunction of the Server.
See Section 6 of the User’s Guide, Advanced Topics, for information on this option.
Operational Parameters
CAUTION: Advanced users only.
Do not access this option unless you have studied the Advanced Topics section of the
User’s Guide and are sure of what you are doing. Misuse of this option may cause
errors or malfunction of the Server.
See Section 6 of the User’s Guide, Advanced Topics, for information on this option.
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 37
Reports Menu
The Reports pull-down menu is shown below. Descriptions of the reports options
follow. The System Test Simulator generates two kinds of reports and saves them as
.txt files on disk for viewing and printing. The Reports menu is always available; the
Server need not be stopped to run a report.
Configuration
Selecting this option generates a report on the current configuration of the Server.
The report is saved as a text file containing the following information: configured
device types (with the mnemonic list, function codes added, and register groups),
configured comm ports (with port parameters), and configured devices (with
DevTpName, ComPortName, SlaveAddr and ScanInterval). (Note that the Simulator
assigns a com port number to each device, but that this is meaningless with regard to
Simulator performance.)
A dialog box prompts you for a file name and location to save the file. The default
file name is config.txt.
Active Links
The Active Links option (available only when in Run mode) creates a text file
containing the following information: currently active comm ports and active devices
(along with their device type, register groups, and mnemonic items). You will be
prompted for a file name (default file name is active.txt). The information in this text
file can be useful for debugging communications problems.
38 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
Help Menu
The Help pull-down menu is shown below. The options are all standard Windows
functions.
Contents
Brings up a listing of all the topics for which help is available. The interface is
standard Windows and is easy to use. If you are not sure how to navigate the Help
windows, refer to your Windows manuals.
About Server
Presents the program version and copyright information.
Toolbar
The Simulator DDE Server’s main window toolbar contains four buttons, shown
below in Table 2. Click a button to perform the action described.
Icon
Function
Description
Server Run
Starts the DDE Server.
Stop DDE Server
Stops DDE Server.
Suspend/Resume
Suspends or resumes the DDE Server’s
activities. When in Suspend mode, this
button Resumes the Server’s operation.
When the Server is running, this button
Suspends the Server.
Exit DDE Server
Exits DDE Server.
or
Table 2. Toolbar icons appearing on the Server main window.
PMCS System Test Simulator
DDE Server Menus & Toolbars • 39
(This page left blank intentionally.)
40 • DDE Server Menus & Toolbars
PMCS System Test Simulator
Troubleshooting
Trouble-shooting the PMCS System Test Simulator
This section describes some simple steps that can be taken to isolate and correct
communication problems. The problems described here represent the most probable
causes of communication failure.
NOTE: This is a general trouble-shooting guide–it is not intended to cover every
possible problem. If you still cannot establish communications after reading this
section, call the GE Resolution Center, at 1-888-GE-RESOLV.
WWLogger
WWLogger is a software application that is included with the PMCS installation. It
is found in the GE_PMCS/TOOLS directory, and can be used for diagnostics
purposes. The WWLogger application tracks all error messages generated by DDE
communications or Server to device communications. Obviously this can be of
tremendous value for trouble-shooting purposes. The messages tracked by
WWLogger describe the application and topic or device that caused a given error.
This information can then be used to diagnose and correct the cause of the error.
If you are experiencing trouble, launch WWLogger, and attempt to reproduce the
error condition. You can then use the error messages displayed by WWLogger to
troubleshoot your problem.
Error messages that may be encountered in the WWLogger are listed at the end of
this chapter, in the section titled Error Messages.
Communications – Client to Server
This section explains the most common error situations that can occur when
attempting to establish a DDE conversation between client applications and the DDE
Server.
When a client requires the status of a DDE item, it opens a link with the DDE Server
and requests the data. The DDE Server retrieves simulated device data from the
Simulator and sends it to the client application.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Troubleshooting • 41
The DDE Server also begins monitoring the data and advises the client whenever a
parameter changes. The client application simply tells the DDE Server what register,
coil number, or I/O point to read or write. The DDE Server then automatically
updates the client upon any change of that parameter.
Always start the DDE Server before starting any client software. If a client attempts
to establish a link with a Server that is not running, an error message will result.
When an error message is displayed, note the information shown. You can often
determine the source of the error message from the message itself – usually an
application that is not running or a topic that is not properly configured.
Below are several situations that will cause a DDE conversation error message to
appear:
1.
The DDE Server application is not running. You can verify this by
opening the Windows Task List (press Shift+Ctrl+Esc keys) and
checking the list of currently running applications for the Server.
2.
The Server program name is misspelled in the DDE Access Name
definition. The Server is running, but its name is misspelled in one or
more DDE Access Name definitions. The name entered in the DDE
Access Name definition must be the DDE Server’s actual program
name (less the .exe extension) as seen in the Windows File Manager. If
the name is misspelled, the Server can not be found.
3.
The topic is not defined in the Server or it is misspelled. The Server
may be functioning properly, but if a client requests data from a topic
that doesn’t exist, an error is generated.
4.
The mnemonic or register address is not defined in the Server or it
is misspelled. The Server may be functioning properly, but if a client
requests data from a mnemonic or register address that doesn’t exist, an
error is generated.
Let’s assume that the Server’s name is spelled correctly in the client’s DDE request
and that the Server is running. The client is now looking for a topic defined in the
Server; for example, Device1. To check the topic name, close the client (the Server
cannot be configured if the client is running) and open the Server’s program window.
Invoke the Configure:Device Info... command. Is there a configured device listed as
Device1 in the dialog box? Is it spelled exactly the same (including spaces, etc.) as it
is in the DDE Access Name definition?
NOTE: Make sure there are no blank spaces after the topic name in both the Server
or in the DDE Access Name definition in the client.
If nothing appears in the Server’s window, try using WWLogger to track your error
messages. The most probable error message indicates that the item used with one or
more tagnames is unrecognized by the Server. Tagnames use specific naming
conventions when accessing data from a Server, and deviation from these
conventions can cause errors.
42 • Troubleshooting
PMCS System Test Simulator
NetDDE Troubleshooting
If you are using NetDDE to share a Server’s data with clients across a network, make
sure a share called GE32MODB|* exists in the system and has been trusted with
proper parameters. A share need to be created only once, but each NT user should
trust the share explicitly.
Refer to the NetDDE documentation for further information on how to set up shares
and trusting a share. Information may also be found in the Microsoft Knowledgebase
by searching for keyword “NetDDE”.
NOTE: Make sure you’re using the version of NetDDE supplied with Microsoft
Windows NT 4.0 Workstation. Other versions of NetDDE are not supported by the
PMCS DDE Server.
Trouble-Shooting Chart
The following table lists a variety of common problems, possible causes, and
recommended solutions.
Error Condition
Possible Cause
Solution
Client application times out
while setting up DDE link or
receives negative
acknowledgment.
Valid Data Timeout is
set too low.
Increase the Valid Data Timeout value; it
should be around 5000 milliseconds (5 sec) for
most networks.
#NAME on Excel spreadsheet
(client application)
Item name is incorrect.
Check for precise spelling and correct
mnemonic name. Make sure the device is not
deactivated.
#N/A on Excel spreadsheet
(client application)
Data is currently
unavailable.
Server may be down, suspended, or stopped, or
port may be suspended.
The Simulator or Server are
showing an incorrect device
configuration.
The Simulator may be
using a different set of
configuration files.
Check the GE32MODB.ini file to ensure that
the Simulator is referring to the correct
configuration files.
Starting the Event Server forces
the GE32MODB Modbus DDE
Server to start up, and closing
GE32MODB forces the Event
Server to shut down. Cannot
run GE32MODB and the
Simulator at the same time.
Your system
components are
configured as NT
Services.
Preconfigured Service
dependencies are
causing this behavior.
Shut down the PMCS NT Services. Start the
DDE Simulator. Restart the PMCS NT
Services. GE32MODB will not start if the
DDE Simulator is already running. Be sure to
shut down and restart the PMCS NT Services
after you finish with the Simulator to restore
normal operatoin.
Data request may not yet have been processed.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Troubleshooting • 43
Error Messages
This section provides descriptions of the error messages which may be generated by
the PMCS DDE Server. These messages are logged in the WWLogger
Activation of <item name> item failed, item not found in register’s item list.
Activation of an item failed when the client requested a link to this item. Please
contact Customer Service. This error message does not appear in normal
circumstances — it appears only if the item list is corrupt or if the toolkit gives an
out-of-sequence ProtActivateItem() call.
Could not open RMS data file <file name>
The data file to store MicroVersaTrip device Peak Demand computation parameters
could not be opened by the Server as defined in GE32MODB.INI. The .ini file entry
may be wrong or the file may have been deleted.
CServerApp::OnDeleteDev - Invalid toolkit index
Internal error in the Server. Please contact Customer Service.
DDE Execute <DDE execute command> failed
Possible causes are:
a)
The execute command is misspelled.
b) Parameters passed with the execute command are not proper. Refer to
the Server interface specifications for correct parameter syntax and
range.
c)
The execute command string has some extra space characters. The
Server does not accept extra space characters in execute commands.
Please follow the Server interface specifications strictly.
d) The DDE execute command is not supported for the topic on which it
was issued.
<device name> device got deleted – discarding packet
This is an informational message. A client application deleted a topic and the Server
is deleting a scheduled communication packet.
Error allocating new topic (<topic>, <toolkit id>) => 0
The Server is unable to initiate a DDE transaction with the topic. The possible causes
are :
a)
The topic is not configured on the Server. Configure the topic in the
Server.
b) The communication port associated with the topic could not be opened
or initialized properly. In this case, the Server displays communication
port-related error messages immediately preceding this error message in
WWLogger.
c)
The device type of the topic is not configured. Configure the topic’s
Generic Device Type in the Server.
Failed to activate item(<logical device handle>, <Protocol Handle>)=>0
Server internal error. Please contact Customer Support.
44 • Troubleshooting
PMCS System Test Simulator
Failed to create item (<logical device handle>) (<toolkit handle>) (<item name>)
=> 0
Possible causes are :
a)
The item name is not spelled correctly on the client.
b) The item register(s) is (are) not configured in any of the register groups
of the device type. Check the device type’s register-group
configuration.
c)
If the item name uses a mnemonic convention, then the mnemonic is not
defined on the Server. Check the device type’s mnemonic
configuration.
Failed to deactivate item(<logical device handle>, <Protocol Handle>)
Server internal error. Please contact Customer Support.
Failed to delete item(<logical device handle>, <Protocol Handle>)
Server internal error. Please contact Customer Support.
No Write to Individual Discrete Bits
The client tried writing to individual bits of a read/write register, which is not
allowed.
RegFormat Name is INVALID
The register name (either as mnemonic equivalent or as item name) is not valid.
The device type <device type name> is NOT a valid type for topic
The Server detected an unconfigured device type for a topic being created. Possible
reasons are :
a)
The <device type name> has been deleted from the device-type
configuration file (GE32MODB.CFG). Reconfigure the device type that
generated the error or, if you intend to remove all the devices of that
particular type, go to device(topic) configuration and remove all the
topics with this device type. NOTE: This applies to generic devices
only.
b) GE32MODB.INI entry DocFile points to an incorrect device-type
configuration file. Enter the correct path to the configuration file.
Unable to free topic (hLogDev = <logical device handle>)
Internal error for the Server. Please contact Customer Support.
Unable to open RMS data file for rewriting RMS data
The RMS data file has been deleted since the Server started. Restart the Server. The
Server will create a new RMS data file during startup.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Troubleshooting • 45
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46 • Troubleshooting
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics
Introduction
CAUTION: For advanced users only!
These advanced options are for experts only! Do not attempt these actions if you are
not sure of what you are doing; it is possible to render your PMCS DDE Server
inoperable, forcing you to reinstall it and potentially lose your device configurations.
Please read all instructions before attempting any advanced configuration.
The information contained in this section applies to two types of devices:
•
the broadly-defined generic devices that must be completely defined by
the user
•
the highly flexible GE Fanuc PLC family of products.
The GE Fanuc PLC 90/70, PLC 90/30, and Micro90 PLC consist of a backplane to
which may be attached a wide variety of modules with a broad range of functions,
from metering and data collection to process control. Because these devices are so
flexible and there is no way to predict the options that will be chosen by the end user,
they must be configured in the same manner as a generic device.
Device Type Information –
Adding Generic Devices
The PMCS DDE Server is preconfigured to support the POWER LEADER family of
power-management devices, as well as a variety of third-party devices. However, you
may add additional kinds of devices by creating your own device type. These
“generic” devices have the register maps and functions that you assign, as explained
in this section. The generic device type does not support the use of the DDE Server’s
special device handling, such as automatic time synchronization, waveform
capability, or event handling.
The procedure for adding a generic device is as follows. The details of each option
mentioned are provided after the procedure. Remember that the Server must be
stopped before you can do any configuration.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 47
Step 1. Select the Device Type Info option from the Configuration menu to display
the Device Types dialog box, shown below.
Step 2. Enter the name for your new generic device in the field at the bottom of the
dialog box. The field is labeled Enter Device Type Name. Click the Add Default
Type button to add the new device type to the list of Configured Device Types.
Step 3. Next, select the generic device from the Configured Device Types list, and
click the Function Codes button to add the functions codes supported by this device
type. Setting up the register groups for a device type is mandatory; you may also
enter an optional mnemonic list. To do this, you’ll need to have on hand a complete
protocol reference for the device before proceeding.
Add Default Type
Entering the name of a new device type in the Enter Device Type Name box enables
the Add Default Type button. Names may be up to 20 alphanumeric characters long
and cannot include embedded spaces or special characters, such as + * / /, ? () “ ‘.
Click on this button to add your new device type. You will need to do further
configuration after creating a new device type. See the Register Map section for
details on defining the device type’s register map.
48 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
Delete
The standard device types may not be deleted, so this button is grayed when a
standard device type is selected. Only generic (user-defined) device types may be
deleted. Select a user-defined device type and click Delete to delete that device type.
Function Codes
Click on this button to attach or detach function codes to a device type. You will
need the device’s Modbus RTU protocol specification to know the correct codes to
add for the new device type.
Clicking this button displays the Modbus Function Codes dialog box:
The two list boxes, Available Function Codes and Selected Function Codes, are
multiple-selection list boxes. The Available Function Codes box lists the function
codes available to any generic device type; the Selected Function Codes box lists
those function codes that are to be assigned to a specific device type. Place the
desired function codes into the Selected Function Codes box using the Add and
Delete buttons, then click OK.
Select the function codes to be added from the Available Function Codes list box
and click this button. The selected function codes are added for the device type and
displayed in the Selected Function Codes list box.
This button is displayed only when there are no user-configured register groups for
the device type. To remove a function code support from the device type, all the
register groups that are added are removed. (To delete a register group from the
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 49
device type, refer to Delete under the Register Map subsection.) Select the function
codes to be deleted from the Selected Function Codes list box and click this button.
The selected function codes are deleted for the device type and displayed in the
Available Function Codes list box.
NOTE: You cannot delete function codes if any user-configured register group exists
for this device type. To delete function codes, you must first delete all the register
groups calling those functions.
Register Map
Click this button to add, delete, or modify register groups for the selected device
type.
NOTE: Register Maps for preconfigured devices may not be modified or deleted.
When a preconfigured device type is selected, you will find that buttons for changing
register maps, function codes, and mnemonics are disabled. Only generic devices and
PLC type-devices are intended to have any modifications to their Register Groups.
When this button is clicked, the Register Map dialog box appears:
The Add New Register Group..., Delete..., Modify..., and Change Register Name
buttons are described below.
Adding a Register Group
Click this button to add a new register group. The Select Register Group Type
dialog box appears:
50 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
Enter the Register Group name. The name may be up to 20 alphanumeric characters
and cannot include embedded spaces or special characters, such as: + * / /, ? () “ ‘.
Select the register type from the Select Register Type pull-down list. The Modbus
Register Types shown are determined by the function codes selected previously. The
four types of register groups that support the Modbus function codes are R0, R1, R3,
R4. The table below describes the types, registers, supported codes, and uses.
Type
Code
Type of
Register
Supported
Function
Codes
Use
R0
Coils
01
Reading coil status
R0
Coils
05
Setting/forcing/executing coils
R0
Coils
15
Setting/forcing multiple coils
R1
Contacts or
discrete inputs
02
Reading contact/discrete inputs
R3
Actual value or
input register
04
Reading actual value or input
registers
R4
Setpoint or
holding register
03
Reading setpoint or holding
registers
R4
Setpoint or
holding register
06
Presetting single setpoint register
R4
Setpoint or
holding register
16
Presetting multiple registers
You will need the device’s Modbus RTU protocol specification for the correct codes
to add or delete.
Click OK to accept your new register group; the Register Group dialog box is
displayed for you to finish defining the characteristics of the new register group.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 51
The PMCS DDE Server supports both decimal and hexadecimal address formats.
Select the type of addressing you wish to use (refer to the device user manual if you
are unsure) by clicking either the Decimal or Hexadecimal radio button. Next, enter
the Start Address and End Address for the register group in the appropriate boxes.
The PMCS DDE Server supports Modbus RTU extended addressing; in decimal
mode, the range is 0 to 65535; in hexadecimal mode, the address range is 0 to FFFF.
Refer to Appendix A – Register Addressing Conventions for more information on
formatting register addresses.
Next, set the desired polling speed by clicking one of the radio buttons - Fast Poll,
Slow Poll, or Poll Once.
The polling speed is based on the scan interval for the topic. A polling speed of Fast
attempts to scan at the assigned Scan Interval. This is the default. Setting the polling
speed to Slow causes this register group to be read once every ten scan intervals. This
is typically used for setpoints or low-priority parameters that change infrequently.
Slow Poll is a multiple of Fast Poll, with a default value of 10. This multiple is
controlled by a setting in the PMCS DDE Server’s .ini file, and may be changed if
desired. See the section PMCS DDE Server .ini File.
For example, if the scan interval is set to 1000 msec (1 second – this is the default
value), setting the Poll Speed to Fast Poll causes the Server to scan as close to every
1000 msec as possible (based on the network load, communication bandwidth
availability, etc.); setting the Poll Speed to Slow Poll reduces the scan attempts to
once every 10,000 msec (10 seconds), or as close to this as possible; i.e.; not less
than 10 seconds (≥ 10,000 msec.)
Poll Once means that this register group is scanned only the first time data is
requested by a client application. All future requests for the same data receive the
data from this poll. If the device is later declared to be dead, the device is scanned
periodically until it comes back on-line, at which point the Poll Once data are reread.
52 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
This is useful for registers with settings of a more permanent nature, which need to be
read but are unlikely to change.
Invalid Register Blocks
A register block consists of a contiguous piece of a device’s memory that contains
multiple pieces of data. Within this block, however, some addresses may be unused
by the device. We can make the PMCS DDE Server aware of these unused or
extraneous addresses by specifying them as invalid register blocks. (The Server’s
register maps for supported devices have already been optimized; only generic
devices’ invalid register blocks must be entered manually.)
An invalid register block is a list of registers within a register group that should not
be polled for data by the Server, perhaps because they are unused by the device itself
or simply because they are not desired.
Invalid register blocks allow the Server to focus its attention on only those registers
of interest; by not asking the Server to poll addresses that contain no data of interest,
we can improve the Server’s potential performance. Also, some devices, if asked for
a valid register block that happens to contain invalid registers within it, will return a
message that the entire block is invalid. Thus, it can be important to identify any
invalid blocks to the Server.
Add
Click this button to access the Add Invalid Register Range dialog box.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 53
Enter the start and end addresses for the invalid block, following the addressing
conventions.
Modifying an Invalid Register Block
To modify an invalid register block, select the block from the Invalid Registers list
box and click the Modify button. The Modify Invalid Register Range dialog box
appears. Follow the method used for adding invalid register blocks to make changes
to the register block.
Deleting an Invalid Register Block
Clicking the Delete button deletes the selected invalid register block.
Deleting a Register Group
Clicking the Delete button deletes the selected register group.
Modifying a Register Group
Click the Modify button to modify the register group. The Register Group dialog
box appears. Make any necessary changes to the register group Start Address, End
Address, Poll Speed, and Invalid Register blocks, then click on the OK button.
Changing a Register Group Name
Click on this button to change the name of the selected register group. The Change
Register Group Name dialog box appears:
Enter the new name in the Register Group field, then click OK to accept or Cancel
to back out of this dialog box.
Mnemonics
Mnemonics are an optional way of naming registers or groups of registers, by
assigning an easily remembered name to a register address. From the Device Types
dialog box, click this button to add, delete, or modify mnemonics. Mnemonics are
useful to speed selection of registers – it’s much easier to remember Trip_Set_Points
than R41234A5.
54 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
When this button is clicked, the Mnemonics dialog box appears:
Adding a Mnemonic
Click the Add button to add a mnemonic. The Add/Modify Mnemonics dialog box
appears:
Enter the Mnemonic Name. You may use up to 20 alphanumeric characters, but no
embedded spaces or special characters, such as + * / /, ? () “ ‘.
Enter the register address in this field. Follow the register-naming conventions
presented in Appendix A.
Click OK to accept your changes.
Modifying a Mnemonic
Click on the Modify button to modify the selected mnemonic. The Add/Modify
Mnemonics dialog box appears. The procedure is similar to adding a mnemonic.
Make any necessary modifications to the mnemonic name or register address, then
click OK.
Deleting a Mnemonic
Select a mnemonic from the Item Mnemonic Map list box and click the Delete
button to remove it from the list.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 55
Optimizing Server Performance
Every network has different devices, different numbers of RS485 ports to support, a
different number of devices, and various client software requesting different amounts
of data. System administrators with Modbus RTU network experience may be able to
analyze their particular network’s needs and adjust some of the PMCS DDE Server’s
advanced settings to improve its performance. These settings are discussed below.
With regard to the System Test Simulator and the server Operational Parameters, it is
recommended that you not change any of these settings. There is little reason to alter
these parameters, since they concern communications between the DDE Server and
the devices in a real network. In the Simulator, the peculiarities and nuances of
network communications have been replaced by the software of the Device
Simulator. They are explained here to help you better understand PMCS.
Operational Parameters
Clicking on this button in the Configuration dialog box causes the Server
Operational Parameters dialog box to appear:
Protocol Timer Tick
The Protocol Timer Tick is the time interval (in milliseconds) at which protocol is
executed; the frequency at which the Server checks for work to do. A good analogy
might be that the protocol timer tick serves as a metronome or heartbeat to the
Server. Every tick, the Server executes a function, whether it is to listen at a
particular port or to send a message to a device. The default is 65 milliseconds. At
values below this level, the Server may query devices too quickly for the devices to
consistently answer correctly.
When the Protocol Timer Tick field has been changed, the OK button is enabled. It
is disabled until any changes are made. Click on this button to accept changes. The
changes take effect the next time the Server software is launched (not to be confused
with Run from the Server menu).
CAUTION: Changing the Server operational parameters can adversely affect the
Server’s performance. If you are unsure of how to adjust any of these settings,
consult Customer Support before making any changes.
56 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
PMCS DDE Server .ini File
The application program’s .ini file contains several lines that may be modified by
knowledgeable and qualified personnel to fine-tune performance of an individual
network. Do not modify these items unless you are experienced with the PMCS DDE
Server.
NOTE: Both the real PMCS Modbus DDE Server program and the Simulator DDE
Server program use the same .ini file, which points to configuration files for both
applications. Be careful when making changes to the .ini file; be sure that you are
making changes to the Simulator section of the file only.
This section of the
GE32MODB.ini file applies to
the Simulator. Any changes
to the Simulator’s settings
must be made here. Be sure
not to change any other part
of the .ini file unless you
intend those changes to
apply to the real PMCS DDE
Server application.
As explained above, these settings should not usually be modified for purposes of the
System Test Simulator. They are useful primarily for real PMCS networks.
CAUTION: Back up the application’s current .ini file before attempting any
modifications.
Open the application’s .ini file with Windows Notepad. This file is named
GE32MODB.ini and is located in the Windows NT directory. The parameters are
grouped by subject:
[Server Operational Parameters],
[GE32MODB], etc.
Look for the GE32SIM group. These are the settings that apply specifically to the
PMCS System Test Simulator.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Advanced Topics • 57
Slow Poll Count
The slow poll count is not used by the Simulator. Do not change this parameter.
NOTE: Do not change any other parameters of the .ini file, as doing so may
adversely affect Server performance.
58 • Advanced Topics
PMCS System Test Simulator
Appendix A - Register
Addressing Conventions
Data-Addressing Conventions
The PMCS DDE Server is capable of interpreting both decimal and hexadecimal
addresses. This allows access to the Modbus RTU protocol’s extended register mode.
The two addressing schemes are identical with one exception; in hexadecimal mode,
an “X” is inserted prior to the address number to indicate that the address following
is in hexadecimal format. The R character is ALWAYS present. Items in < >
represent a variable numeric value. Capital letters in brackets [ ] indicate a hard
character that does not change; it is either present or not. Lower-case letters in
brackets [ ] indicate switches that may or may not be present; refer to the following
sections for details.
The basic addressing scheme is as follows:
R indicates a Register
address follows.
X indicates a address is
hexadecimal. If the X is not
present, the address is read
as decimal.
R <f> <[X] nnnn>
f indicates the
register type.
nnnn is the actual address.
Four characters are required,
so leading zeroes must be
used if necessary. For
example, the correct syntax is
0025 rather than 25.
Switches may be used to modify addresses. The possible switches are shown below,
and are detailed in the following sections:
PMCS System Test Simulator
Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions • 59
-b represents the reading of
individual bits. Not present if
reading whole registers or an
array of registers. See the
following section “Individual
Bits in Registers” for details.
t represents the type of data, if there are
any special conventions. See the
following section “Special Naming
Conventions” for details.
R <f> <[X]nnnn> [t] [A] [lll] [-b]
A indicates that the data is an Array.
See the following section “Register
Array Format” for details..
lll provides the length of the array
or ASCII string in bytes, This field
is present only if the address
represents an array or an ASCII
string. Leading zeros are not
required for this field.
Standard Data Organization
Data is organized according to data type, numeric range, tag type, and access type.
Data Types
There are four data types typically used by the GE devices. These four data types are
the possible values for ‘f’ in the address. (Each data type is organized in a separate
table for each device in this manual):
1.
Dynamic Value
2.
Setpoint
3.
Command Coil
4.
Fixed Value
Each data type is assigned a range of register numbers, tag type, and access as shown
below:
Data Organization
Data
Type
Use
Register
Range
(hex)
Register
Range
(decimal)
DDE
Tag
Type
Type of
Access
Command
Coil
1. Commands a device to take
action.
R0X0000 –
R0XFFFF
R00000 –
R09999
Discrete
Read and
Write
2. Reads the status of an action
or discrete input.
Dynamic
Value
Read frequently, such as
metering values which change
constantly
R3X0000 –
R3XFFFF
R30000 –
R39999
Analog
Read
Only
Fixed
Value
Read only once at power-up.
Info such as Product ID and
configuration options
R4X0000 –
R4XFFFF
R40000 –
R49999
Analog
Read
Only
Setpoint
Read infrequently
R4X0000 –
R4XFFFF
R40000 –
R49999
Analog
Read
Only
60 • Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions
PMCS System Test Simulator
Examples
Here are some examples of different types of register numbers:
Register
number
Represents
R00005
Coil command, number 5, with Read/Write access to the user
R31005
Dynamic value, number 1005, Read Only access
R43010
Fixed value or Setpoint, number 3010, with Read/Write access to
the user
Special Naming Conventions
Special handling of data from devices can be done by using the following
conventions:
Long Words and Special Numbers
By default, a register item is treated as an unsigned integer. To treat the contents of
any register differently, refer to the table below:
Special Data Item
Naming Convention
Example
Unsigned 16-bit Integer
Default
R40001
16-bit Signed Integers with values
between -32,768 and 32,767
Append letter I to item number.
R40001I
32-bit Signed Integers
(Long Integers)
Append L to item number.
R40001L
32-bit floating point numbers
Append F to item number.
R40001F
Modulus 10000
Append E to the item name
R40010E
Used in 32-bit register mode for
EPM 3710 and 3720.
NOTE: See 3710 and 3720 ACM Modbus Protocol Manuals for
details.
ASCII data string
Append S to item number.
R40010S020
[lll] field immediately after S character represents the number of
characters to read. If no length is specified ([lll] field is not
provided), only one register of characters (2 or 4) will be read. The
High byte represents the first character, and the Low byte represents
the second character.
NOTE: No array type is allowed with S data items, nor are ASCII
strings supported for coil registers.
NOTE 2: For most devices (16-bit mode), there are 2 characters per
register. For 32-bit mode devices, there are 4 characters per
register.
NOTE 3: The maximum value for the S string is 250.
PMCS System Test Simulator
Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions • 61
Individual Bits In Registers
Individual bits in registers are read-only. They can be read as discrete/integer tags by
using the following notation (explained beneath):
X indicates an address is
hexadecimal. If the X is not present,
the address is read as decimal.
nnnn is the actual address. Four
characters are required, so leading
zeroes must be used if necessary.
For example, the correct syntax is
0025 rather than 25.
R indicates a Register
address follows.
R <f> <[X]nnnn>DL-B
B indicates the
starting bit
number.
f indicates the
register type.
D stands for Discrete type
specifier, and indicates that bit
data is being requested.
L indicates the specific
number of bits being
requested.
Examples
Register
Number
Represents
R40001D1-0
Specifies least significant bit of first holding register
R30008D1-15
Specifies most significant bit of an input register
R40001D2-5
Specifies 6th and 7th from the least significant bit of first holding
register.
Register Array Format
If multiple data items are being requested from a single topic, it is more efficient to
request a block of contiguous registers than to place multiple requests for single
registers. This is referred to as register array format. The register array format is
used for the following applications:
•
to read a block of register values into a column of cells in a worksheet
(Excel or Access).
•
to pass waveform data to a client application (refer to GEH-6509,
PMCS DDE Server Interface Reference, for details)
The rules for register arrays are as follows:
1.
A register array, or series of consecutive registers, can be treated as a
block of numeric values. Up to 100 sixteen-bit registers or 50 thirtytwo-bit registers can be read as a block. Enter the starting register
address, and append it with type specifier “A”, followed by the length
field. For example, the register address R30501A12 accesses registers
501 through 512 as a block.
62 • Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions
PMCS System Test Simulator
2.
When the DDE Server returns a new value for a register array to the
client, it is in the form of a character string containing a value for each
register, separated by a carriage return and line feed.
For example, for R30021A6, the values returned might look like this:
50<cr><lf>
17<cr><lf>
0<cr><lf>
5<cr><lf>
1007<cr><lf>
20<cr><lf>
NOTE: All arrays must be terminated by a null character (ASCII 0).
3.
When the client application writes a value to a register array, it must be
in the form of a character string containing a value for each register in
the array. The register values can be separated by commas, tabs, spaces,
carriage returns or line feeds. For example, for R40001A6, the value
string could be written:
1,2,3,4,5,6
or
1<tab>2<tab>3<tab>4<tab>5<tab>6
or
123456
PMCS System Test Simulator
Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions • 63
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64 • Appendix A - Register Addressing Conventions
PMCS System Test Simulator
Index
A
S
About Server 39
server 2
Server menu 31
System menu 31
System Test Simulator
main window 29
C
client 2
client-server 2
Configure menu 33
D
DDE 2
DDE Server 3
DDE Simulator icon 9
H
T
Toolbar 29, 30, 39
Toolbar icons 30, 39
topic 35
W
WWLogger 32, 41, 44
Help menu 39
I
Installing PMCS DDE Simulator 7
M
Main window controls 29
menu bar 29
Minimize icon 30
P
PMCS DDE Server 3
Power Management Control System (PMCS) 3
R
Reports menu 38
PMCS System Test Simulator
Index • 65
g
GE Consumer & Industrial
General Electric Company
215 Anderson Avenue, Markham ON, L6E 1B3, CANADA
USA & Canada: 1-800-547-8629 Global: (905) 294-6222 Fax: (905) 201-2098
Email: [email protected] <mailto:[email protected]>
GEH-6515 R045 01/02
© 2000 - 2004 General Electric Company
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