ENCLOSURE USER'S GUIDE pORtabLE HaRD DRIVE FOR 3.5" IDE HaRD DISk DRIVES

ENCLOSURE USER'S GUIDE pORtabLE HaRD DRIVE FOR 3.5" IDE HaRD DISk DRIVES
User's Guide
portable HARD DRIVE
ENCLOSURE
For 3.5" IDE Hard Disk Drives
Model 701 model shown
Contents
Getting Started
6
Welcome
8
Precautions
9
Package Contents
10
System Requirements for PC
11
System Requirements for Mac
About 700 Series Enclosures
14
700 Series Enclosures at a Glance
16 700 Series Enclosures In-Depth
16
Hi-Speed USB 2.0
17
FireWire (FireWire-equipped models)
18
eSATA (eSATA-equipped models)
20PushButton™ Backup (PushButton models only)
21
Sync (PushButton models only)
21
Fanless Design
21
Mac & PC Ready
21
Hot-Pluggable
22
On-Off Switch
22
Understanding 'hard drive', 'partition' and 'volume'
24
Technical Specifications
Installation & Setup
26 Installing a 3.5" IDE Hard Disk Drive
26A few things before you begin…
26
Are you installing a PATA or a SATA hard disk?
26
Are you installing a new or legacy hard disk?
29
Step 1: Disassemble the Enclosure
30
Confirm which type of carrier your Enclosure has
31
Step 2: Install Your IDE Hard Disk
31
Installing a PATA hard disk
40
Installing a SATA Hard Disk
47
Step 3: Mount the hard disk to the carrier
48
Step 4: Reassemble the Enclosure
48
Step 4: Attach the Stand
50
Installing the USB 2.0 Driver
51
56
57
57
58
59
59
59
Connecting the Drive to Your Computer
What to do after you connect the Drive
Verifying that the Drive mounts
Windows Vista/XP/2000/Me Users:
Mac Users:
Re-Naming Your Drive
Windows Users:
Mac Users:
60 Formatting the Drive
60About Formatting and File Systems
61
About the most common file systems:
62
Choosing a file system
63
63
65
66
68
Formatting a Drive in Windows
Formatting a Raw Drive in Windows
Formatting a Legacy Drive in Windows Vista/XP/2000
Formatting a Legacy Drive in Windows 98SE or Me
Formatting the Drive in Mac OS X
Drive Use & Maintenance
71
Performing Routine Tasks
72
72
73
How to Unmount and Turn Off the Drive
Windows Users
Mac Users
74
Daisy-Chaining the Drive (FireWire-equipped Enclosures)
76 Maintaining Your Drive & Safeguarding Your Data
76
Defragmenting and Optimizing a Hard Drive
77
Examining and Repairing a Hard Drive
78Protecting Your Data from Malware
78
Cleaning the Drive Case
Help & Additional Information
81
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
85 Troubleshooting
85Troubleshooting for Windows Users
88Troubleshooting for Mac Users
91
Glossary of Terms
94
Notices
Getting Started
Welcome
Welcome, and thank you for choosing a
700 Series Hard Drive Enclosure.
This product features high-quality construction,
advanced engineering, and state-of-the-art
technology, designed to provide years of
reliable performance. Please read this guide
carefully and retain it for future reference.
700 Series Enclosure
(Model 701 shown)
If your Enclosure is equipped with PushButton™ Backup…
If you wish to use PushButton™ Backup, refer to the PushButton™
Backup User's Guide on the included CD after you setup the Drive.
Symbols used in this guide:
Alerts the reader to a warning or to
important information.
Indicates important information for
USB users.
Indicates a helpful tip or other useful
information.
Indicates important information for
FireWire users.
Indicates important information specific to
Windows users.
Indicates important information for
e SATA users.
Indicates important information specific to
Mac users.
PATA or SATA?
The Enclosure you purchased is designed to accommodate:
• a PATA (Parallel ATA) hard disk, or;
• a SATA (Serial ATA) hard disk, or;
• either a SATA or PATA hard disk.
As you proceed through this guide, be sure to follow the correct instructions for
the type of hard disk and Enclosure you have.
About 'IDE'
The term 'IDE', which stands for Integrated Drive Electronics, can apply to both
PATA and SATA hard disks. 'IDE' is used in this guide when no distinction between
PATA and SATA hard disks is made. For definitions of IDE, ATA, PATA and SATA see
the Glossary of Terms.
'Enclosure' v. 'Drive'
In this guide, for the sake of clarity, prior to the installation of an IDE hard disk,
the product is referred to as an Enclosure. An Enclosure with an IDE hard disk
installed is referred to as a Drive.
Precautions
Please follow the precautions below. Failure to do so may result in damage to the device,
loss of data, and voiding of the warranty.
• If using your product for general-purpose data storage (as
opposed to data backup) we strongly recommend that you
backup your data. The manufacturer is not responsible for data
loss or corruption; nor will the manufacturer perform recovery
of lost data or files.
• Do not expose the device to damp or wet conditions.
• Never place containers of liquids on the device. This can damage
the device and increase the risk of electric shock, short-circuiting,
fire, or personal injury.
• If the device has a three-prong plug, never plug the device
into a two-prong outlet.
• Do not expose this device to temperatures outside the range
of 5°C to 35°C when the device is in operation, and -20ºC to
60ºC when not in operation.
• Do not use a third-party AC adapter/power cord.
• Do not bump, jar or drop the device.
• Do not try to stand the device in a way not described in this guide.
• Do not disconnect any cables while the device is powered on
without first unmounting the device.
Package Contents
700 Series Enclosure
(701 model shown)
USB Cable
CD-ROM
FireWire Cable
(Supplied with FireWireequipped models only)
eSATA Cable
(Supplied with eSATAequipped models only)
Stand
(Comes with fastening
bolts and screws)
Hard Disk
Mounting Screws
AC Adapter
(Your Enclosure is furnished
with either a wall-mounted
adapter or a desktop adapter
with separate power cord)
Installation
Guide
-ICROSOFT
7INDOWS
System Requirements for PC
What you need:
• PC with a 233 MHz or faster processor (e.g. Pentium, Celeron, AMD)
• One of the following Windows operating systems:
- Windows Vista (Ultimate, Home Basic/Premium, Business)
- Windows XP with Service Pack 1 or later
(Home, Professional, Professional x64, Media Center Edition)
- Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4 or later
- Windows Me
- Windows 98SE
• A free port for one of the interfaces (USB 2.0, FireWire, eSATA)
equipped with your Enclosure.
Important Notes:
To get Windows updates go to www.microsoft.com
If connected to a USB 1.1 port, the device will operate at USB 1.1 speeds (up to 12 Mbps).
Users of Windows 98SE and Windows 2000 (SP3 or earlier):
You will need to install the supplied USB 2.0 driver. Instructions are provided in
"Installing the USB 2.0 Driver."
10
System Requirements for Mac
What you need:
• G3 (or later), or Intel processor
• Mac OS 10.2 or later
• A free port for one of the interfaces (USB 2.0, FireWire, eSATA)
equipped with your Enclosure.
Important Notes:
PushButton™ Backup requires Mac OS 10.3 or later.
If connected to a USB 1.1 port, the device will operate at USB 1.1 speeds (up to 12 Mbps).
Mac OS 10.2 users with 128 GB or larger IDE hard disks:
Mac OS 10.2 will not recognize FAT32/MD-DOS formatted hard disk volumes larger
than 128 GB. This issue only affects Mac OS 10.2. For more information, go to:
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107483 at the Apple web site.
If the IDE hard disk you intend to install in the Enclosure meets the conditions
described above, there are several ways to deal with this issue:
1. If you don’t need Windows compatibility, you can re-format the Drive using the Mac OS
Extended file system. Before you format the Drive, follow the instructions for installing
an IDE hard disk and connecting the Drive to your computer;
11
2. If you want to maintain Windows compatibility, you can partition the Drive so that no
single partition is larger than 128 GB. Partitioning a hard disk will erase any data stored
on the disk. Go to http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107483 for instructions.
Before you partition the Drive, follow the instructions for installing an IDE hard disk and
connecting the Drive to your computer;
3. Before you connect the assembled Drive to your computer, upgrade to Mac OS 10.3 or
later. This option will allow you to maintain Windows compatibility and no partitioning
or re-formatting is required.
12
About
700 Series
Enclosures
700 Series Enclosures at a Glance
Power-Data Indicator
Lights up solid when the Drive is powered
on. Flashes when reading or writing data.
If your Enclosure is equipped with
PushButton Backup, the Power-Data
Indicator is also the PushButton. You
press the PushButton™ to initiate data
backups (requires installation of the supplied software).
Stand
Shown attached to enclosure.
701 model shown
14
On the back panel:
USB 2.0 Models
USB 2.0 & eSATA Models
On-Off Switch
USB Port
Power Port
USB 2.0 & FireWire Models
On-Off Switch
eSATA port
USB Port
Power Port
On-Off Switch
USB Port
FireWire
Ports (2)
Power Port
(Actual layouts of the back panels may not be exactly as shown)
On-Off Switch
You can turn the Drive on and off while your computer is running.
See “How to Unmount and Turn off the Drive" for details.
eSATA Port (eSATA-equipped models only)
See "If using eSATA…" in the chapter "Connecting the Drive to
Your Computer" for important information about eSATA/SATA
connectors.
Power Port
The AC adapter plugs in here.
FireWire Ports (FireWire-equipped models only)
Two ports allow you to daisy-chain another FireWire device to your
Enclosure. See "Daisy-Chaining the Drive" for details.
USB Port
The Enclosure has a Type B USB port; your computer has a Type A
port. The ports correspond to the connectors of the USB cable.
15
700 Series Enclosures In-Depth
Hi-Speed USB 2.0
USB stands for "Universal Serial Bus." USB 2.0 has a maximum
interface transfer rate, or bandwidth, of 480 Mbps (Megabits per
second). That's 40 times faster than the earlier standard, USB 1.1,
which has a bandwidth of 12 Mbps).
Performance in day-to-day use will depend on many factors,
including: CPU utilization; file system overhead; the number of
active devices on the USB bus; the size, structure and number
of files being transferred, and; the speed at which other devices
can transfer data to/from the Drive. Also, as is the case with any
data I/O (input/output) technology, some bandwidth is taken up
by the protocols that structure and govern data transmissions
(this is called interface overhead). Given these and other factors,
in day-to-day use you can expect maximum, sustained transfer
rates in the mid-30s MB/s (Megabytes per second).
The interface transfer rate specification of an I/O technology is expressed in
bits per second (e.g. Mbps – Megabits per second) because this is the truest
way of measuring raw interface performance. However, for the end user it
is more meaningful to express day-to-day transfer rates in bytes per second
(e.g. MB/s – Megabytes per second) because computer files are measured in
bytes (kilobytes, megabytes, etc.).
16
USB 2.0 is backward compatible with USB 1.1. This means you
can connect a USB 1.1 device to a USB 2.0 port, and vice versa.
However, interface transfer rates are limited by the interface
with the lower speed. So, for example, if you plug a USB 2.0
device into a USB 1.1 port on your computer, data transfer rates
will be limited to USB 1.1 speeds.
USB uses a master-slave architecture. This means the computer
(the 'master') dictates data flow to, from, and between attached
USB devices (the 'slaves'). A single USB bus can support up to
127 USB devices. However, connecting more than a few USB
devices to a computer usually requires the use of one or more
USB-equipped hubs. A typical USB hub can accommodate several USB devices.
FireWire (FireWire-equipped models)
FireWire (IEEE 1394a) can transmit data at up to 400 Mbps.
FireWire supports both isochronous and asynchronous data
transfers. Isochronous mode provides guaranteed transmission
of data at defined intervals; it’s used when delayed or out-of-order
data frames are unacceptable, such as for capturing digital video.
In asynchronous mode the intervals between transmissions can
vary, and data can be resent if missed. Asynchronous mode is
typically used for routine data transfers.
17
FireWire devices can be linked in a daisy-chain, where the devices
are connected to each other in series. A hub is only required
when a very large number of devices will share the same FireWire
bus. Up to 63 devices can be linked on a single FireWire bus.
Data transmissions between FireWire devices on the same bus can
take place without help from the host computer. This is one of
the reasons FireWire devices are, on average, faster than USB
2.0 devices in routine, day-to-day use—even though FireWire's
bandwidth is smaller than USB 2.0's.
Standard FireWire cables use 6-pin connectors at both ends.
Cables with 4-pin connectors are also available for connecting
FireWire devices to laptop computers and to other devices that
have 4-pin ports, such as digital cameras and camcorders.
eSATA (eSATA-equipped models)
Parallel ATA (PATA) technology served computers well for about
two decades. Over this time period, increasingly faster hard disk
transfer rates have forced the ATA interface specification to be
continuously updated in order to avoid becoming the limiting
factor in disk I/O performance. At the same time, popular applications—such as digital video and audio, file sharing over highspeed networks, and other data intensive applications—are
placing greater demands on hard drive performance.
18
SATA, a serial implementation of the ATA interface, was developed by the Serial ATA Working Group in response to this need.
(The original working group has since been incorporated into the
Serial ATA International Organization.)
Before the introduction of SATA, all ATA/IDE hard disks used a parallel interface.
After the introduction of SATA, the term 'PATA' was coined to distinguish the two
technologies. Before SATA no such distinction was necessary, which is why 'PATA'
is a relatively new term even though the technology has existed for over twenty
years.
The most basic yet most important difference between PATA and
SATA is how data is transmitted. PATA technology transmits multiple streams of data bits simultaneously along parallel pathways
(wires). SATA transmits data bits serially (one after the other), so
fewer wires are needed.
SATA's serial architecture can achieve faster data transfer rates
than PATA by overcoming a number of electrical signalling
constraints inherent in a parallel architecture. SATA can also be
scaled to accommodate increasing storage capacities and higher
performance demands.
Thanks to its serial architecture, SATA cables and connectors
are much smaller than those of PATA, and they utilize electro19
magnetic shielding, which makes the cables less susceptible to
interference, and allows the cables to be made longer than PATA
cables. These advantages have made it feasible to employ SATA
technology for external storage. The external implementation
of SATA is called 'eSATA'. eSATA cables and connectors are more
robust than those used for internal SATA hard disks and can sustain greater wear and tear.
The SATA interface is available in two bandwidths: 1.5 Gbps and
3.0 Gbps, achieving maximum interface transfer rates of 150 and
300 Megabytes per second, respectively.
PushButton™ Backup (PushButton models only)
PushButton™ Backup is a faster, easier way to run routine data
backups. Rather than having to launch a backup utility and set
cumbersome parameters every time you want to backup your
files, all you need to do is press the PushButton™ on your Drive.
Not only does PushButton™ Backup make backups simpler and
more convenient, but since you’re backing up your data to a
high-performance hard drive—as opposed to, say, tape or optical media—backups are also much faster.
Full instructions for setting up and using PushButton™ Backup
are provided in the PushButton™ Backup User's Guide on the
supplied CD.
20
Sync (PushButton models only)
Sync is the no-fuss way to synchronize files on multiple computers, while also getting the benefits of data redundancy. The Sync
operation can be launched via the PushButton. Full instructions
for setting up and using Sync are provided in the PushButton™
Backup User's Guide on the supplied CD.
Fanless Design
All hard drives generate heat during normal use. However, the
700 Series Enclosure was engineered to dissipate heat so efficiently it doesn’t need a fan. The result is near-silent operation.
Mac & PC Ready
The 700 Series Enclosure is itself compatible with both Mac and
PC. However the file system used to format your IDE hard disk
will affect compatibility. See the chapter "Formatting the Drive"
for more information.
Hot-Pluggable
You can turn the Drive on/off or connect/disconnect it while your
computer is running. This makes portability easier, allows you to
use the Drive only when you need it, and saves electricity too.
21
On-Off Switch
The On-Off switch allows you to save electricity by turning the
Drive on only when you actually need to use it.
Always unmount the Drive or turn off your computer before you turn off or
disconnect the Drive. See “How to Unmount and Turn off the Drive” for details.
Understanding 'hard drive', 'partition' and 'volume'
While following the instructions in this guide you will come across
the terms 'hard drive' (or 'hard disk'), 'partition', and 'volume'.
These terms can be very confusing because they all seem to
refer to the same thing. While it's true they are closely related,
these terms actually mean different things.
A hard drive (or 'hard disk drive') is a physical device that contains a set of disks (called platters), which store the data saved to
the drive. The total amount of usable storage space available on
all of the platters makes up the hard drive's storage capacity.
A partition is a logically defined amount of storage space on
a hard drive. A hard drive can have one or more partitions. If
a hard drive has only one partition, all of the available storage space is reserved for that partition. Within the limits of the
22
drive's capacity, the user can set the size of individual partitions.
Partitioning is done when you set up an unformatted hard drive
for the first time. You can also partition a hard drive that contains data but the data will be erased.
Before a computer can access a partition on a hard drive, the
partition must be formatted with a file system that the computer understands. (See "Formatting the Drive" for more information on file systems.)
A formatted partition is called a volume. When you connect
a hard drive to a computer, the drive icon that you see in My
Computer (Windows) or on the Desktop/Finder (Mac) represents
the mounted volume, not the physical hard drive.
If the hard drive has more than one formatted, readable partition,
each one will appear on your computer as a discrete volume
—just as if you had more than one hard drive connected to your
computer. The volumes can even be formatted with different file
systems. For example, if your hard drive has one volume that is
formatted with the Mac OS Extended file system, and one volume that is formatted FAT32, when you connect the drive to a
Windows PC, only the FAT32-formatted volume will mount.
23
Technical Specifications
Dimensions (may vary between models, not including stand):
(inches)..............................................................................................................5.61 X 1.38 X 8.52
(mm)................................................................................................................. 142.5 X 35 x 216.4
Interface transfer rates (max)
USB 2.0.......................................................................................................................... 480 Mbps
FireWire (if equipped)................................................................................................... 400 Mbps
eSATA (if equipped)......................................................................................................... 1.5 Gbps
External Power Supply
AC Input...........................................................................................100–240 V~, 50-60 Hz, 1.0 A
DC output..................................................................................................................... 12 V @ 2 A
Ambient temperature
Operating.....................................................................................................................5ºC – 35ºC
Non-operating......................................................................................................... -20ºC – 60ºC
Relative humidity (non-condensing)
Operating............................................................................................................5% – 95%, 33ºC
Non-operating....................................................................................................5% – 95%, 35ºC
24
Installation
& Setup
Installing a 3.5" IDE Hard Disk Drive
A few things before you begin…
Are you installing a PATA or a SATA hard disk?
The Enclosure you purchased is designed to accommodate a
PATA hard disk, a SATA hard disk, or both. While most of the
instructions in this guide apply to both types of hard disks, some
instructions are specific to either PATA or SATA hard disks. Be
sure to follow the correct instructions for your hard disk.
Are you installing a new or legacy hard disk?
The IDE hard disk that you will install in the Enclosure is either
a legacy hard disk that was removed from a computer (typically
due to an upgrade), or it is a new, raw hard disk that you purchased specifically for your Enclosure. This will have a bearing on
the steps you will need to take to prepare the Drive for use on
your computer…
Installing a legacy IDE hard disk
If you are installing a legacy IDE hard disk, the disk is already
formatted. If the file system used to format your IDE hard disk
is compatible with your computer's operating system, you will
NOT need to format the assembled external Drive after you con26
nect it to your computer.
If the file system is not compatible with your computer, you will
need to format the external Drive after you connect it to your
computer. You may also wish to re-format the Drive in order to
erase all the old data and start fresh with a blank Drive.
Details on file systems and formatting are provided in the chapter
"Formatting the Drive."
Installing a raw IDE hard disk
IDE hard disks that are purchased as upgrades are unformatted
(i.e. raw). Manufacturers of IDE hard disks furnish partitioning
and formatting software with their hard disks for this purpose.
However, this software will only work for a hard disk installed
inside a computer.
Do not format a raw IDE hard disk with the manufacturer's formatting software.
The formatting software will not work for a hard disk installed in an external
enclosure.
You will need to partition and format the assembled external
Drive after you connect it to your computer. Complete formatting
instructions are provided in the chapter "Formatting the Drive."
27
Whether you are installing a legacy or raw IDE hard disk, follow
the instructions on the succeeding pages. After the chapter
"Connecting the Drive to Your Computer", you will be guided to
the specific instructions that pertain to your situation.
Proceed now to "Disassemble the Enclosure."
28
Step 1: Disassemble the Enclosure
1. Use a Phillips screwdriver to unfasten the four screws on the back
of the Enclosure and remove the back fascia. Do not lose or discard the screws; you will need them to re-assemble the Enclosure.
2. Grab the front fascia and carefully slide out the attached carrier.
When handling the carrier, never touch the PCB (printed circuit board); it
contains sensitive electronics that an be easily damaged.
Carrier
29
Confirm which type of carrier your Enclosure has
Your 700 Series Enclosure has one of three types of carrier.
Match the one you have with one of the carriers shown below.
PATA Interface
Connector
PATA carrier:
Accommodates a PATA hard disk.
PATA Power
Connector
SATA Interface/
Power Connector
SATA carrier:
Accommodates a SATA hard disk.
SATA Interface Cable
PATA Interface
Connector
PATA/SATA carrier:
Can accommodate either a PATA
or SATA hard disk .
Cable with PATA
& SATA Power
Connectors
30
Step 2: Install Your IDE Hard Disk
Installing a PATA hard disk
PATA hard disks at a glance
The illustration below shows the components of a typical PATA
hard disk that are relevant to this installation.
PATA Interface Connector
Jumper Block
Power Connector
Jumper
Configure your hard disk as a master
A PATA hard disk can function as either a master or a slave. For
definitions of 'master' and 'slave' see the Glossary of Terms. The
hard disk you install in the Enclosure must be configured as a
master.
31
Your PATA hard disk has a jumper block located between the ATA
interface connector and the power connector. The jumper block
has an array of pins. Your hard disk most likely came with one or
more jumpers already attached to the jumper block. Depending
on how the jumper(s) are arranged, the hard disk can be configured to work as either a master or a slave.
Arrange the jumper(s) so that the hard disk is configured as a
master. Use small needle-nose pliers or tweezers to remove/
insert jumpers.
Jumper settings are often depicted on the hard disk itself, or you can find this
information in the manufacturer's manual or web site. Be sure to use the
correct jumper setting for your specific model as settings can differ from model
to model.
32
Connecting a PATA hard disk to a PATA carrier
The PATA carrier contains the PATA interface connector and
the power cable, which are attached to the PCB (printed circuit
board). The power cable is tethered to the board via flexible
wires. The PATA interface connector is hard-wired (rigidly fixed)
to the PCB (see illustration below).
PCB
PATA Interface
Connector
Hard Disk
Mounting Holes
Power
Connector
1. Place the carrier flat on a table or desk with the PCB facing up.
2. Take your hard disk in one hand and plug the power connector
33
from the carrier into the
power connector on
the hard disk. Be sure to
insert it all the way.
The connector is shaped
such that it can only be
inserted one way.
Do not let go of the hard
disk.
3. Hold the hard disk at a
slight angle, as shown in
the illustration at right,
and brace the carrier
with your other hand.
4. Carefully align the hard
disk's PATA connector
to the PATA connector
on the carrier. Begin to
push the hard disk onto
the connector. When the
connector is just partially
inserted, gently lower
the hard disk onto the
carrier.
34
5. Firmly but gently push the hard disk toward the PCB until the
PATA connector is fully inserted.
Proceed to "Step 3: Fasten the hard disk to the carrier."
35
Connecting a PATA hard disk to a PATA/SATA carrier
The PATA/SATA carrier has interface and power connectors for
both PATA and SATA hard disks. The SATA connectors will not be
used for this installation.
SATA Interface
Cable
PCB
PATA Interface
Connector
Hard Disk
Mounting Holes
SATA Power
Connector
SATA Power
Connector
36
1. Place the carrier flat on a table or desk with the PCB facing up.
2. Take your hard disk in one
hand and plug the PATA
power connector from
the carrier into the power
connector on the hard
disk.
The connector will go in
only one way. Be sure to
insert it all the way.
PATA Power
Connector
SATA Power
Connector
3. Without letting go of
the hard disk, gently but
firmly pull the wires of
the SATA power connector around the side of the
PATA power connector, as
shown in the illustration
at right.
The SATA power connector is not needed for this
installation. You will tuck it
in and out of the way later.
37
4. Hold the hard disk at a
slight angle and brace
the carrier with your
other hand.
5. Carefully align the hard
disk's PATA connector to
the PATA connector on
the carrier.
Begin to push the hard
disk onto the connector.
When the connector is
just partially inserted,
gently lower the hard
disk onto the carrier.
Make sure the SATA power
connector wires stay to the
side of the PATA power connector and do not get pinched between
the PATA power connector and the PCB.
6. Gently but firmly push the hard disk toward the PCB until the
PATA connector is fully inserted.
38
On-Off Switch
housing
7. Tuck in the SATA power
connector.
A good place for the
SATA power connector is
between the USB connector housing and the OnOff switch housing.
SATA Power
Connector
Hard Disk
USB Connector
housing
8. The SATA interface connector is not needed
for this installation. You
can tuck in the SATA
interface connector
by folding the cable
over. Or you can simply
unplug the cable and
set it aside.
Proceed to "Step 3:
Fasten the hard disk to the carrier."
39
Installing a SATA Hard Disk
SATA hard disks at a glance
The illustration below shows the components of a typical SATA
hard disk that are irrelevant to this installation.
SATA Interface
Connector
SATA Power
Connector
Jumper Block
(on some hard disks)
Jumper
Legacy Power
Connector
• You can ignore the legacy power connector; it is not needed for this installation.
• Not all SATA hard disks are equipped with a jumper block. If yours is, you may
need to configure the jumper bock, as explained on the next page.
40
Does your SATA hard disk have a jumper block?
If your SATA hard disk is equipped with a jumper block, you may
need to configure it to operate in 150 MB/s (1.5 Gbps) mode.
Ask yourself the following questions:
• Is your SATA hard disk rated at either 300 MB/s or 3.0 Gbps?
• Is your 700 Series Enclosure equipped with an eSATA port?
If the answer to both of these questions is "yes", you will need to
configure your hard disk to operate in 150 MB/s mode.
Configuring the jumper block for 150 MB/s (1.5 Gbps) mode
In order to set your hard disk to operate in 150 MB/s mode,
you may need to plug one or more jumpers onto specific pairs
of pins on the jumper block. The placement of the jumper(s)
depends on the make and model of your hard disk.
Jumper settings are often depicted on the hard disk itself, or you can find this
information in the manufacturer's manual or web site. Be sure to use the correct
setting for your specific model as settings can differ from model to model.
Your hard disk most likely came with one or more jumpers
already attached to the jumper block. Use small needle-nose pliers or tweezers to remove/insert jumpers.
41
Connecting a SATA hard disk to a SATA carrier
On the carrier, the SATA interface connector and power connector are enclosed in a single sheath (see illustration below).
PCB
SATA
Interface/
Power
Connector
Hard Disk
Mounting Holes
42
1. Place the carrier flat on a table or desk with the PCB facing up.
2. Hold the hard disk in
one hand and brace
the carrier with your
other hand.
3. Very carefully align the
hard disk's SATA/power
connector to the SATA/
power connector on
the carrier. Begin to
push the hard disk onto
the connector. When
the connector is just
partially inserted, gently lower the hard disk
onto the carrier.
4. Firmly but gently push the hard disk toward the PCB until the
SATA/power connector is fully inserted.
Proceed to "Step 3: Fasten the hard disk to the carrier."
43
Connecting a SATA hard disk to a PATA/SATA carrier
The PATA/SATA carrier has interface and power connectors for
both PATA and SATA hard disks. The PATA connectors will not be
used for this installation.
SATA Interface
Cable
PCB
PATA Interface
Connector
Hard Disk
Mounting Holes
SATA Power
Connector
PATA Power
Connector
44
1. Place the carrier flat on a table or desk with the PCB facing up.
2. Take your hard disk in one hand and plug the SATA power connector from the carrier into the power connector on the hard
disk.
The SATA power conSATA Power
nector is keyed so it
Connector
will go in only one
way. Be sure to insert it
all the way.
The other power
connector is not
needed for this
installation. Do not
plug it into the hard disk.
3. Plug the SATA interface cable into the
SATA interface connector on the hard
disk.
The SATA interface
connector is keyed so
it will go in only one
way. Be sure to insert it
all the way.
SATA Interface
Cable
45
4. Gently set down
the hard disk on the
carrier. The SATA
connectors plugged
into the hard disk will
sit just ahead of the
PATA interface connector on the PCB.
PATA Interface
Cable
Proceed to "Step 3: Fasten the hard disk to the carrier."
46
Step 3: Mount the hard disk to the carrier
1. Hold the hard disk and carrier firmly together in one hand and
turn the carrier over. The four screw holes in the bottom of the
hard disk should line up with the mounting holes on the carrier.
Do not allow the hard disk to sag. The weight of the hard disk may
put undue strain on the connectors.
2. Screw the hard disk to the carrier using the supplied hard disk
mounting screws. Make sure all screws are secure and that the
hard disk is firmly mounted to the carrier.
Outline of
Hard Disk
Hard Disk
Mounting
Screws
47
Step 4: Reassemble the Enclosure
1. Carefully slide the carrier back into the Enclosure until the fascia is
properly seated and pressed tightly against the Enclosure’s edge.
Make sure all wires are safely tucked in as you slide in the carrier.
2. Seat the back fascia onto the enclosure and re-fasten the screws.
Make sure all screws are tightly fastened and the fascia is secure.
Place the Drive on a sturdy, flat surface. Do not place the Drive on an unstable or
makeshift base, such
Step 4: Attach the Stand
1. If the screws and nuts are not
already fastened to the stand,
insert the two screws through
the two holes from the underside of the stand.
2. Fasten a nut onto each screw
just far enough to secure it to
the screw. Do not tighten.
3. With both screws and nuts
in place, push down on each
screw head to make sure the
screws extend all the way
through the holes.
48
4. Attach the stand to the Drive by sliding the nuts through the
channel in the bottom of the Drive, entering from the back.
The stand is symmetrical, so it does not matter which end you insert
first.
Position the stand so that it is centered with the Drive case.
5. Use a Phillips screwdriver to tighten the screws. Make sure the
stand is firmly secured to the Drive case.
49
Installing the USB 2.0 Driver
If you are using Windows 98SE or Windows 2000 (Service Pack 3
or earlier) and USB 2.0, you need to install the USB 2.0 driver on
the supplied CD before connecting the Drive. Follow the instructions below. All other users can proceed to "Connecting the
Drive to Your Computer."
1. Insert the CD into your computer's CD/DVD drive.
2. On the splash screen that appears, select "Install USB 2.0 Driver."
3. Follow the instructions in the InstallShield Wizard.
On the final screen of the InstallShield Wizard, you will be given
the option to restart your computer. (You must restart your computer in order to make the software active.) Make sure the 'restart'
option is selected and click Finish. Do not remove the CD until
after the computer restarts.
4. After your computer restarts, you can remove the CD.
Proceed to "Connecting the Drive to Your Computer."
50
Connecting the Drive to Your Computer
If your Enclosure came with a desktop AC adapter, refer to the illustration below when
following the instructions on the succeeding pages.
On-Off Switch
To AC outlet
Data Interface Port
(USB 2.0 port shown)
Data Cable
Power Port
To Computer
Power Cord
AC Adapter
51
If your Enclosure came with a wall-mounted AC adapter, refer to the illustration
below when following the instructions on the succeeding pages.
On-Off Switch
To AC outlet
Data Interface Port
(USB 2.0 port shown)
Data Cable
Power Port
AC Adapter
To Computer
52
Step 1: Plug in the AC adapter and power cord:
1. Plug the small end of the AC adapter into
the Drive's Power Port.
2. If you have a desktop adapter…
Plug the power cord into the socket in
the AC adapter. Plug the other end into
an AC outlet. If the power cord has three
prongs, be sure to plug the cord into a
three-prong (grounded) outlet.
If you have a wall-mounted adapter…
Plug the adapter into an AC outlet.
Wall-mounted AC Adapter
Desktop AC Adapter
Step 2: Connect the interface cable:
Important
• Your 700 Series Enclosure may be equipped with more than one interface (USB 2.0,
eSATA, FireWire). See below for important information about each interface.
• Do not use more than one interface (e.g. USB 2.0 and FireWire) at a time. Doing so
may damage the Drive and void the warranty.
• You can use two FireWire ports simultaneously, where one port is used to connect
the Drive to your computer, and the other port is used to daisy-chain another
FireWire device. See "Daisy-Chaining the Drive" for details.
• Do not connect the Drive to more than one computer at a time. This may damage
the Drive and void the warranty.
53
1. Select the cable for the interface you wish to use, and plug one
end into a corresponding port on your computer.
2. Plug the other end into a corresponding port on the Drive.
64#DBCMF
If using USB…
The USB cable has a Type 'A' connector at
one end, and a Type 'B' connector at the
other end. The 'A' connector plugs into your
computer/hub. The 'B' connector plugs into
the Drive. Be sure to correctly insert the connectors or you may damage the Drive and
void the warranty.
If using eSATA…
The eSATA cable has eSATA (also called
"SATA II") connectors at both ends. The connectors are keyed, so they will only plug in
one way. Be sure to correctly insert the connectors, or you may damage the Drive and
void the warranty.
If your computer has a built-in SATA port,
it is most likely an eSATA port. Some early
SATA PCI host adapter cards used SATA I
54
"$POOFDUPS
#$POOFDUPS
eSATA cable
(Supplied with eSATA-equipped
Enclosures only)
ports, which are shaped differently than eSATA ports and connectors.
If your computer has a SATA I port, you will need to purchase a cable
with an eSATA/SATA II connector at one end and a SATA I connector
at the other end.
If using FireWire…
The FireWire cable has the same connector type at both ends. It does not matter
FireWire cable
which end you plug into the Drive and
(Supplied with FireWire-equipped
Enclosures only)
the computer.
FireWire-equipped Enclosures have two FireWire ports. It does not
matter which port you use. The additional port can be used to daisychain another FireWire device to the Drive. (See "Daisy-Chaining the
Drive" for more information.)
Step 3: Turn on the Drive:
Flip the On-Off Switch on the back of the Drive to turn it on.
55
What to do after you connect the Drive
If you installed a legacy IDE hard disk:
If the file system used to format your IDE hard disk is compatible with your computer, proceed to the section "Verifying that
the Drive mounts" now. (See "Formatting the Drive" for information on file formats and OS compatibility.)
If the file system of your IDE hard disk is not compatible with
your computer, go to "Formatting the Drive" now.
If you wish to re-format your Drive, follow the instructions
in "Verifying that the Drive mounts" first, then proceed to
"Formatting the Drive".
If you installed a raw IDE hard disk:
The Drive will power on but it will not mount to your operating
system; it must be formatted first. Go to "Formatting the Drive"
now.
56
Verifying that the Drive mounts
Before the data stored on a hard drive can be accessed, the drive
must be "mounted" to a computer's operating system. This
means the system has recognized at least one readable partition
on the drive, and established a communications link with it.
-ICROSOFT
7INDOWS
Windows Vista/XP/2000/Me Users:
Once the Drive is powered on, in a few moments it should
mount, and a new drive icon/letter will appear in My Computer/
Windows Explorer.
If the installed IDE hard disk has two or more mountable volumes,
each volume will mount with a separate drive icon.
Your Drive is now ready to use as a general-purpose data storage device.
If you have a PushButton-equipped Drive and you wish to use
the PushButton™ Backup feature, see the PushButton™ Backup
User's Guide on the CD.
Windows Me users:
If the Drive will not mount you will need to update your
Windows Me. Go to www.microsoft.com and check for updates.
57
Mac Users:
Once the Drive is powered on, in a few moments it should
mount, and a new hard drive icon will appear on the Desktop
and in the Finder.
If the installed IDE hard disk has two or more mountable volumes,
each volume will mount with a separate drive icon.
Your Drive is now ready to use as a general-purpose data storage device.
If you have a PushButton-equipped Drive and you wish to use
the PushButton™ Backup feature, see the PushButton™ Backup
User's Guide on the CD.
58
Re-Naming Your Drive
This section shows you how to change a volume label (name) of a formatted volume/
Drive. If your IDE hard disk was not already formatted, or if you wish to re-format the
Drive go to "Formatting the Drive" now. You will have the opportunity to assign a
volume label during the formatting setup process.
-ICROSOFT
7INDOWS
Windows Users:
1. Go to My Computer and click on the icon of your Drive.
2. In the pop-up menu, select Rename.
3. Enter a new name in the icon label and press Return.
Mac Users:
1. Click on the icon of your 700 Series Drive on the Desktop and
press Return to highlight the label.
2. Type in a new name and press Return. You may be required to
enter an administrator password before the change is accepted.
59
Formatting the Drive
Follow these instructions if you installed a raw IDE hard disk in the Enclosure, or if you
wish to re-format the Drive.
Formatting a hard disk erases all data stored on the disk! Before you format
or partition the Drive, be sure to save a copy of any files you wish to keep to
another storage device.
About Formatting and File Systems
Before a hard disk can be used to store data it must contain one
or more partitions, and each partition must be formatted with
a given file system. ('Formatting' is also commonly referred to as
'Initializing' on the Mac OS.)
A file system defines the disk’s directory structure for keeping
track of and accessing files. It also governs other features, such
as the way files are named, the maximum allowable size of a file
or volume, and the disk's allocation unit size (the smallest unit of
data storage on a disk).
60
About the most common file systems:
• FAT32 is the default file system used on Windows 98SE and Me,
and is supported under Windows Vista, XP, 2000 and the Mac
OS. Think of FAT32 as the "universal" PC and Mac file system.
• NTFS is the default file system for Windows Vista, XP and 2000.
NTFS offers more advanced features than FAT32, including support for files larger than 4 GB. NTFS cannot be used on Windows
98SE or Me. NTFS cannot be used on the Mac OS, with the exception that Mac OS 10.3 and higher can read, but not write to NTFSformatted volumes.
• Mac OS Extended (HFS Plus) is the most common file system
used on Macs. It is not compatible with Windows. Depending
on which version of the Mac OS you have, you have the option
to use journaled and case-sensitive HFS Plus file systems. For
an explanation of journaling, go to http://docs.info.apple.com/
article.html?artnum=107249. For an explanation of the casesensitive option, go to http://docs.info.apple.com/article.
html?artnum=107863.
• MS-DOS is the Windows/Mac-compatible file system available
on the Mac OS. It is equivalent to FAT32.
61
Choosing a file system
• If you plan to use the Drive only on Windows Vista, XP or 2000,
we recommend formatting the Drive with the NTFS file system.
• If you plan to use the Drive only on a Mac, we recommend formatting the Drive with the Mac OS Extended file system.
• If you need cross-platform compatibility, you have two options:
1. Format the Drive on a Windows PC with the FAT32 file system.
2. Format the Drive on Mac OS 10.3 or later with the MS-DOS file
system.
62
-ICROSOFT
7INDOWS
Formatting a Drive in Windows
If you installed a raw IDE hard disk in the Enclosure…
Go the section "Formatting a Raw Drive in Windows."
If you installed a legacy IDE hard disk in the Enclosure…
Find the section "Formatting a Legacy Drive in…" that pertains
to your specific Windows operating system.
Formatting a Raw Drive in Windows
When you format a raw hard drive in Windows, the first step is partitioning the drive.
This section provides instructions for creating a primary partition. For instructions on
creating multiple partitions, consult your Windows documentation.
1. Right-click on My Computer and select Manage in the pop-up
menu.
2. In the Computer Management window, expand the Storage
folder, then select Disk Management.
3. The Disk Management window has two sections. The upper section lists the volumes currently mounted to your computer. The
lower section shows the disks connected to the computer. In the
lower section, locate for the disk with the capacity closest to your
63
Drive. This will be Disk 1, or Disk 2 etc. Disk 0 is the "C" drive (your
computer's startup disk); leave this alone.
4. Right-click on the right-hand box. In the pop-up menu select
Delete Partition… Under "Disk" it will now say “Online." In the
right-hand box is will now say “Unallocated.”
5. Right-click on the box and select Create/New Partition… in the
pop-up menu. The Partition Wizard will launch; click Next.
6. In the Select Partition Type screen, select Primary partition and
click Next.
7. In the Specify Partition Size screen, specify the amount of disk
space you wish to allocate to this partition. The default setting
will be the maximum. Leave it at this setting and click Next.
8. In the Assign Drive Letter or Path screen, assign a drive letter and
then click Next.
9. In the Format Partition screen, click on the radio button that says
"Format this partition…"
10. In the File system field, select a file system.
11. In the volume label field, type a unique name for your Drive that
will distinguish it from other devices attached to your computer.
Leave the Allocation unit size field at the default setting.
12. If you check Quick Format the formatting process will take just a
64
few minutes, but will do less verifying of the Drive. If you leave it
unchecked, a Full format will be performed. This will take about
30-90 minutes.
13. In the Completing the New Partition Wizard screen you will see
a summary of the settings you selected. Click Finish.
14. Once the format is complete, in the Disk Management window
the right hand box next to the Disk listing will show the name
of your Drive with the drive letter. The status of the Drive should
now be "Online" and "Healthy." The new volume should also
appear in the volume list window.
15. To view the properties of the Disk or volume right-click on the
Disk box or the volume box and select Properties.
Formatting a Legacy Drive in Windows Vista/XP/2000
1. Disable any anti-virus software you may have running.
2. Double-click on My Computer. In the My Computer window you
should see the icon/drive letter for the Drive.
3. Right-click the Drive icon and select Format… in the pop-up
menu. The Format dialog box will appear.
4. Under Capacity, verify the Drive capacity. It should be close to
the stated capacity of your Drive in gigabytes.
65
5. In the File System pop-up menu, select the file system.
6. In the Allocation unit size pop up, select “Default allocation size.”
7. In the Volume label field, type in a unique name for the Drive
that will distinguish it from other storage devices.
8. Under Format options you can check Quick Format. If you leave it
unchecked Windows will run a Full format. A Full format will take
about 30-90 minutes. A Quick format will take just a few minutes,
but will do less verifying of the Drive.
9. Click Start. Once the format process is complete, the Drive will be
ready to use.
Formatting a Legacy Drive in Windows 98SE or Me
1. Disable any anti-virus software you may have running.
2. Double-click the My Computer icon. In the My Computer window you should see an icon/drive letter for the Drive.
3. Right-click the Drive letter and select Format. In the Format window, verify the Drive’s capacity; it should be close to the stated
capacity of your Drive in megabytes.
4. Under Format type, select Full; everything else should be left
at the default setting. In the Label field, under Other options,
66
you may assign a name to the Drive that will allow you to easily
distinguish it from other storage devices. (Limit 8 characters; no
symbols.)
5. Click Start. The following warning will appear: “This device is
either a hard disk or a large removable disk. Formatting it will
destroy all files currently on the drive. Are you sure you want to
format this drive?” If the Drive contains no data or you already
backed up the data you wish to keep, click OK.
6. If you see a warning from an antivirus program, click Exclude.
7. When formatting is complete, you will be asked to run a thorough Scandisk. (Periodically running Scandisk is a part of regular
hard drive maintenance.) If you do not wish to run Scandisk at
this time, close the Format window.
67
Formatting the Drive in Mac OS X
1. If you installed a raw IDE hard disk in your Enclosure…
After you connect the external Drive to your computer you will
get the following alert message: "You have inserted a disk containing no volumes that Mac OS X can read." Click the Initialize
button to launch the Disk Utility application in Mac OS X, and
then proceed to step 2.
If you installed a legacy IDE hard disk in your Enclosure…
The Drive should have mounted after you connected it to
your computer. Launch Disk Utility in the Applications folder
(Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility), and proceed to step 2.
If your legacy IDE disk was formatted NTFS and you are
using Mac OS 10.2…
The computer will not recognize the Drive and you will get the
alert message: "You have inserted a disk containing no volumes
that Mac OS X can read." Click the Initialize button to launch the
Disk Utility application in Mac OS X, and then proceed to step 2.
2. The Disk Utility window will open with a small window at left
and a larger window with a series of tabs at the top. In the small
window at the left, click on the drive icon with the capacity that
most closely matches the capacity of your Drive.
68
3. Click on the Erase tab. In the Erase window you will see a Volume
Format pop-up menu and a Name field.
4. From the Volume Format pop-up, select Mac OS Extended.
You may have the option to use journaled and case-sensitive HFS
Plus file systems. For an explanation of journaling, go to http://docs.
info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107249. For an explanation of
the case-sensitive option, go to http://docs.info.apple.com/article.
html?artnum=107863.
5. In the Name field, type in a unique name for this Drive/volume
that will allow you to easily distinguish it from other storage
devices attached to your computer.
6. Click Erase. You should see an alert message: “Erasing a disk
will destroy all information on all of the volumes of the disk…”
Click Erase. Once initializing is complete, you should see the
Drive listed in the Disk Utility window with whatever name you
assigned. Quit Disk Utility. You should now see the Drive icon on
the Desktop and in the Finder.
69
Drive Use &
Maintenance
Performing Routine Tasks
Operating systems typically give users multiple methods for
performing certain tasks, such as opening files. The instructions below each describe but one method of performing their
respective tasks, and apply to both Windows and Mac.
Opening files and folders
1. Double-click on the Drive icon. A window showing the files and
folders stored on the Drive will appear.
2. Double-click on the file or folder that you want to open.
Copying files and folders to your Drive
1. Click on the file or folder you want to copy.
2. With the file/folder highlighted, go to Edit --> Copy.
3. Double-click on the Drive icon to open it. If you want to copy the
file or folder to a specific folder on the Drive, double-click that
folder to open it.
4. Go to Edit --> Paste. The file or folder will copy over.
71
How to Unmount and Turn Off the Drive
When a hard drive is “mounted” to a computer, that means the
computer has established a communications link with it. When
you unmount the drive, the communications link is severed and
the computer can no longer access it.
Never turn off a hard drive or disconnect any cables while it is mounted. You
may lose data or damage the drive.
Windows Users
1. In the Windows Taskbar, at the bottom of your screen, click the
Safely Remove icon (the icon with the green arrow). A pop-up
message will appear with a list of mounted devices.
2. Select the Drive. After a few seconds Windows will give you a
message that it is safe to remove the device.
3. Click OK. You can then safely turn off the Drive.
72
Mac Users
Option 1: From the Desktop:
Drag the Drive's icon to the Trash. After the icon disappears from
the Desktop you can safely turn off and/or disconnect the Drive.
Option 2: From within the Finder:
Locate the Drive icon in the Sidebar. Click the eject symbol (the
triangle with the bar underneath) next to the icon. After the icon
disappears you can safely turn off and/or disconnect the Drive.
Whether you are using a Mac or a PC…
When you shut down your computer the Drive will unmount automatically.
After the computer has shut down you can safely turn off and/or disconnect it.
73
Daisy-Chaining the Drive
(FireWire-equipped Enclosures)
A daisy-chain is a grouping of devices linked one after another
in series, starting from the computer (as shown in the illustration
below). If your Drive is equipped with FireWire ports, you can
daisy-chain another FireWire device to it.
For the sake of clarity, only the FireWire cables are shown. Other
cables, such as power cables are not shown.
74
What you need to know about daisy-chaining:
• FireWire ports can be used in any order. For example, it does
not matter which port you use to connect the Drive to your
computer and which port you use to connect another FireWire
device.
• You can locate the Drive anywhere in a daisy-chain (e.g. first,
last, or somewhere in the middle).
• Data transfer rates between two devices in a daisy-chain will
be limited by the device with the slower interface. For example, data transfers between a FireWire 400 hard drive and a
FireWire 800 hard drive will be limited to FireWire 400 speeds.
• FireWire devices with only one FireWire/1394 port (such as digital camcorders) will necessarily be placed last in a daisy-chain.
• Bus-powered devices, such as 2.5" external hard drives, can be
included in a daisy-chain.
75
Maintaining Your Drive &
Safeguarding Your Data
A hard drive is a very sophisticated and sensitive device that
requires proper care and maintenance to ensure the longest possible life, reliable operation and—most importantly—the integrity of your stored data.
Defragmenting and Optimizing a Hard Drive
A hard drive stores data on disks called platters. Each platter
surface is divided into concentric tracks. Each track is divided
into sections called sectors. A group of sectors, called a cluster, is
the smallest unit of data storage space on a platter.
When data is saved to a new hard drive, it is written to the disk(s)
contiguously, one cluster after another. As old files are erased,
clusters that were previously occupied become available for new
data. However, there may not be enough space for the drive to
write a new file in a contiguous set of clusters. The drive uses the
clusters it can; if more are needed it searches for empty clusters
in other locations on the disk(s). The result is a fragmented file.
Over time, as more and more files are erased and new files
are written, the data on the disk(s) becomes increasingly
fragmented. The more fragmented a disk becomes, the longer
76
it takes to read and write data because the Drive’s read/write
mechanism spends more time hunting for fragmented data or
free clusters.
We recommend using defragmentation and optimization software
to maximize storage efficiency and optimize performance.
Optimization software re-organizes files so that the files you
use most often can be accessed more quickly. Defragmentation
(defragging) software consolidates file fragments into more
efficient contiguous clusters.
Quite often, defragging and optimization functions will be
included in one software package, such that both operations are
performed at the same time.
Examining and Repairing a Hard Drive
There are a number of reasons why a hard drive may become
damaged or the data may become corrupted. Regular examination
of your Drive with a quality diagnostic and repair utility is the best
way to prevent irreparable disk damage and avoid data loss.
There are several software packages available that offer
a suite of disk management and repair utilities, including
defragmentation, optimization, repair, erased file recovery and
more. How often you should perform maintenance depends
on how much you use the Drive. Generally speaking, it’s a good
idea to examine a hard drive for damage at least once a month.
77
Some maintenance and repair operations can take quite some
time, so it’s wise to perform hard drive maintenance at times
when you don’t need to use your computer. The good news is
that, for the most part, you won’t need to tend to the computer
while the software performs these operations.
Protecting Your Data from Malware
One of the greatest threats to your data comes from viruses
and other malware, such as worms, trojan horses and spyware.
(The term 'virus' is commonly used to refer to all forms of malware.)
These are insidious programs created by malefactors and are
designed to damage or disable a computer or network, or steal
personal information. The worst part is you may not be aware
that your system has been compromised until it’s too late.
The most common way computers catch viruses is by downloading and sharing infected files via e-mail and other Internet
services. You can protect your data against viruses by using antivirus software. These programs are designed to seek out and
eradicate or quarantine viruses before they can cause damage.
Cleaning the Drive Case
Always unplug all cables from the Drive before cleaning it. Clean
the Drive using a soft, dry cloth. For tough dirt, dampen a soft
78
cloth with some neutral detergent diluted in 5 to 6 parts water;
wipe off the dirt, then wipe off the Drive with a dry cloth. Do not
use alcohol, paint thinner, or other chemicals; they may damage
the case materials.
79
Help &
Additional
Information
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Q: Can I use my Drive on two computers at the same time?
A: No. The Drive can only be used with one computer at a time. If
you connect the Drive to two computers at the same time, you
may damage the Drive and the computers.
Q: Do I have to format the Drive prior to using it?
A: If the IDE hard disk drive you installed in the 700 Series Enclosure
was already formatted you do not need to format the Drive as
long as the file system used is compatible with your computer's
operating system. If the IDE drive was not formatted, you will
need to format it before your computer will recognize the Drive.
See the chapter "Formatting the Drive" for more information
and formatting instructions.
Q: Can I use the Drive on multiple operating systems?
A: Yes. Your 700 Series Enclosure is compatible with both Mac and
PC. However the file system used to format your IDE hard disk
drive will affect compatibility. See the chapter "Formatting the
Drive" for more information.
Q: What is the difference between FAT32 and NTFS?
A: FAT32 is an older and more compatible file system but it has cer81
tain limitations, such as file size (maximum 4 GB). NTFS is more
secure and has fewer limitations.
The NTFS file system can only be used on Windows Vista, XP
and 2000. If you plan to use your Drive on Windows Vista, 2000
or XP only, consider re-formatting the Drive using the NTFS file
system. If you plan to use the Drive on a Mac OS only, consider
re-formatting the Drive using the Mac OS Extended file system.
Q: Where are the drivers for Vista, XP, 2000 and Me?
A: They are built into the operating system. No additional drivers
are needed. However, you may need to upgrade your Windows
OS. See “System Requirements” for more information.
Q: Can I connect the Drive to a USB expansion card?
A: Yes, but you may need to update the software/firmware for the
card. We recommend you check with the card’s manufacturer
for the latest updates.
Q: Is the Drive compatible with Windows 95, 98FE, or NT 4.0?
A: No.
Q: What is the cache (buffer) size on my Drive?
A: Cache memory resides on the actual IDE hard disk drive you
install in the Enclosure. 8 MB is typical, though many newer IDE
hard disks have 16 MB caches.
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Q: Can you make the Drive bootable?
A: Windows does not support the use of external hard drives as
startup disks. On a PowerPC-based Mac you can use a FireWire
hard drive as a startup disk. On Intel-based Macs you can also
use a USB hard drive as startup disk.
Q: Why doesn’t the Enclosure have a fan?
A: Heat generation can be an issue with some hard drives, which
is why they often have big, noisy fans. The 700 Series Enclosure
was engineered to be so efficient at dissipating heat that it does
not need a fan. The result is near-silent operation.
Q: Why is the capacity of my Drive, as shown in Windows or
Mac OS, lower than the Drive’s stated capacity?
A: The difference is mostly due to the way Windows and Mac operating systems measure hard disk capacity, as compared to the
method used by hard drive manufacturers. Hard drive manufacturers have always used the decimal (base 10) method, where
1GB = 1,000 MB = 1,000,000 KB = 1,000,000,000 bytes. Windows
and Mac operating systems use the binary (base 2) method,
where 1GB = 1,024 MB = 1,048,576 KB = 1,073,741,824 bytes.
For example: 120 GB (decimal) = 111.8 GB (binary). How did
we get that number? Using the decimal method, 120 GB =
120,000,000,000 bytes. To convert that to binary we divide
120,000,000,000 by 1,073,741,824, which equals 111.8. Therefore,
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a 120 GB hard drive partition will mount as approximately a 111.8
GB volume on your computer's OS. The reason the number
will be approximate is because the actual number of available
bytes of storage on a 120 GB hard drive will not be exactly
120,000,000,000. It is actually a bit more than that. We just round
down the figure to 120 GB for simplicity's sake.
Hard drive manufacturers use the decimal method because it is
simpler and less confusing to consumers who may not be familiar with the base 2 number system. Manufacturers of operating
systems do not need to concern themselves with this issue, so
they typically use the more traditional binary method.
Q: Can I use my Drive to copy an operating system from one
computer to another?
A: You cannot transfer an installed operating system to another
computer or hard drive simply by copying the operating system’s files. In order to install an operating system, you’ll need to
follow the manufacturer’s installation procedure. If you wish to
transfer the contents of one startup (boot) disk to another, you
will first need to properly install the operating system on the
target disk. You can then use your 700 Series Drive to copy over
your files (except the operating system).
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting for Windows Users
The power will not go on when I turn on the Drive.
Make sure your connections are secure.
My computer does not recognize the Drive.
Make sure all of your connections are secure. If you have an
add-on card, make sure it is working properly and update the
software/firmware. Also, make sure you have the latest updates
for your operating system.
When I leave my computer idle for a while and come back, the
Drive won’t work properly.
The most likely cause is that your computer is going into Sleep
mode. The immediate solution is to restart your computer.
To prevent this problem from recurring, go into your Power
Settings/Energy Saver and set it to where it never goes into
Sleep mode.
The Drive feels quite warm when powered on. Is this dangerous?
When in operation, the Drive may feel quite warm to the touch.
This is normal.
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The Drive gives me a “Device cannot start. Code (10).”
This is a power issue. Make sure your connections are secure.
The other possibility is that the Drive has malfunctioned and
requires service.
I don’t see the Drive in My Computer, but it does appear in
Device Manager.
Right-click on My Computer. Select Manage in the pop-up
menu. In the Computer Management window, select Storage,
then select Disk Management. In the Disk Management window,
you should see a list of available storage devices. Look for the
Disk that has a capacity closest to your 700 Series Drive. Rightclick on the right-hand box; in the pop-up menu select Delete
Partition. Once you do this, it will say “Online” & “Unallocated.”
Right-click on the box and select Create New Partition in the
pop-up menu. When the Partition Wizard appears, select Primary
Partition and click on Next. You will see a default value for the
700 Series Drive; click Next. You will then see a drive letter (you
can change this drive letter if you wish); click Next. You will then
be asked to format the 700 Series Drive.
When I try to format the Drive, I get the message: “Could not
complete format.”
This problem can occur if you are using an expansion card to
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connect the Drive. Plug the Drive into a data port on your computer and try the format again. You may also come across this
error if you are using Windows Vista, XP or 2000 and you try to
format the Drive using the FAT32 file system. If reformatting the
Drive and you do not need Mac compatibility, Windows Vista/
XP/2000 users should use the NTFS files system.
After I connected the Drive to my PC, I got the following alert
message: “Hi-Speed USB device plugged into non-Hi-Speed USB
Hub.” What does this mean?
Windows Vista, XP and 2000 users will get this alert message if
you plugged the Drive into a USB port that only supports USB
1.1. This is fine, except your 700 Series Drive will operate USB 1.1
speeds (up to 12 Mbps).
Performance via USB seems to be slower than 480 Mbps.
First, in order to reach USB 2.0 speeds, you need a connection that
supports USB 2.0. If the connection only supports USB 1.1 the
Drive will operate at USB 1.1 speeds (up to 12 Mbps). The Drive
will auto-sense the speed of your USB port and adjust between
USB 1.1 and USB 2.0. Second, 480 Mbps is the maximum speed of
USB 2.0 devices. Actual data transfer rates will vary depending
on a number of factors, including available CPU resources.
87
Troubleshooting for Mac Users
The power will not go on when I plug in the Drive.
Make sure your connections are secure.
My computer does not recognize the Drive.
First, make sure the connections are secure. Second, check if the
Drive is listed in the Apple System Profiler. If the driver listed is
“USB Authoring Support” or “Toast USB Support”, disable this
Extension(s) in the Extensions Manager, as they can cause a conflict with the Drive.
When I leave my computer idle for a while and come back, the
Drive won’t work properly.
The most likely cause is that your computer is going to sleep.
The immediate solution is to restart your computer. To prevent
this problem from recurring, go into your Energy Saver preferences and set it to never go into Sleep mode.
The Drive feels quite warm when powered on. Is this dangerous?
When in operation, the Drive may feel quite warm to the touch.
This is normal.
88
Performance via USB seems to be slower than 480 Mbps.
First, in order to reach USB 2.0 speeds, you must have a computer or host adapter card that supports USB 2.0. If the connection
only supports USB 1.1 the Drive will operate at USB 1.1 speeds
(up to 12 Mbps). Second, 480 Mbps is the maximum speed that
USB 2.0 devices can reach. Actual data transfer rates will vary
depending on a number of factors, including available CPU
resources.
When I connected the Drive to my computer, I got the following
alert message: “Please insert disk ‘untitled’.”
If you get this alert message, your Mac is not recognizing the
Drive and the mouse cursor may actually freeze on screen. If
this happens, hold down the Apple/Control key and press the
Period “.” key. You should regain control of your mouse. Restart
your computer and rebuild the Desktop. (Refer to the manual
that came with your Mac for instructions on how to rebuild the
Desktop. It is good practice to periodically rebuilt the Desktop
anyway.) After your Mac reboots, the Drive should mount normally and you should not have this problem again.
When I upgraded from Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X, my computer
asked me to re-initialize the Drive.
If this message appears, you have no choice but to re-initialize
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the Drive in order to use it on Mac OS X. Copy the data stored on
your Drive to another storage device before upgrading to Mac OS
X. After the upgrade is complete, re-initialize the Drive on Mac
OS X, and then copy the data back to it.
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Glossary of Terms
ATA (Advanced Technology Attachment) – A disk drive interface standard
based on the IBM PC ISA16-bit bus. The ATA specification deals with the
power and data signal interfaces between a motherboard or a bridgeboard
and the integrated disk controller and drive.
Bit - The fundamental unit of binary data; represented logically as a 1 or 0;
also, the base unit of data communications.
Buffer – See “Cache.”
Bus – An electronic link that can transmit data between digital devices,
such as computers and attached peripherals.
Byte – The base unit of encoded digital data and storage capacity; usually
made up of eight bits (octet).
Cache – A memory buffer that stores frequently used disk data in RAM so
the data can be read at a faster rate than if accessed from the disk.
Capacity – The amount of data that can be stored on a hard drive or other
storage device.
Device Driver – A software program that enables a computer to communicate with peripheral devices, such as hard drives and CD-ROM drives. Each
type of device requires a different driver.
eSATA (external Serial ATA) – eSATA refers to the cabling and connector
technology that enables the SATA interface to be employed on external,
hot pluggable storage devices. Cables up to two meters long attach eSATA
drives to the computer, either via a built-in eSATA port, an eSATA host bus
91
adapter (PCI) card, or directly to an internal SATA socket on the motherboard. Designed for thousands of insertions, eSATA plugs and sockets are
more rugged than internal SATA connectors.
FAT32 – The file system that is used on Windows 98SE and Me, and is supported under other Windows operating systems. A single file is limited in
size to 4 GB.
File System – The method for storing and retrieving files on a disk. A file
system defines the directory structure for keeping track of the files and the
path syntax required to access them. It also defines the way files are named
as well as the maximum size of a file or volume. FAT32 and NTFS are file systems used on PCs; HFS is used on Macs.
Format(ing) – Preparing a disk partition with a file system, for the storage
and retrieval of files; often referred to as initializing on the Mac.
Gigabyte – 1,074,000,000 bytes (binary); 1,000,000,000 bytes (decimal), or
approximately one billion bytes.
Hot-Pluggable – The ability to connect and disconnect peripheral devices
while the computer is running.
Hub – A device which links peripherals together onto the same data bus.
IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) – Refers to hard disk drives where the
controller electronics are built into the drive itself. Before IDE hard disk
drives, the controller electronics resided in the host computer. The term
IDE is often used interchangeably with the term ATA to describe hard disk
drives that use an ATA interface, though technically IDE and ATA are not the
same thing.
Interface – Junction between two items of hardware or software for the
exchange of data.
92
Master-Slave – An ordering of electronic devices in a primary-secondary
sequence. For example, when a pair of IDE hard disk drives are installed in
the same PC, one is configured as master and the other as slave. The master
drive generally appears first when the computer’s bios and/or operating
system enumerates available drives. If there is a single device on a cable, in
most cases it should be configured as master.
Mbps (Megabits per second) – A data transmission speed of one million
bits per second.
MB (Megabyte) – 1,048,576 bytes (binary); 1,000,000 bytes (decimal).
NTFS – The primary file system for Windows Vista, XP and 2000.
PATA (Parallel ATA) – The term 'PATA' was coined to refer to ATA hard disks
after the introduction of the Serial ATA (SATA) interface.
Partition – A fixed amount of storage space on a hard disk. A disk can contain one or more partitions.
Port – A connection which enables compatible devices to send and receive
data. A port can be either hardware-based or software-based.
SATA (Serial ATA) – A serial implementation of the ATA interface. The original parallel ATA (PATA) interface was launched in 1986. SATA was introduced
in 2002, offering significantly higher speeds.
Startup Disk – The disk from which a computer loads its operating system
at startup. Also called a "boot" volume.
Volume – A formatted partition on a hard disk drive. The term 'volume' is
often used as a synonym for the hard drive upon which it resides, but it is
possible for a single hard drive to contain more than one volume, or for a
single volume to span more than one hard drive.
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Notices
Copyrights
Copyright © 2007. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written consent.
Trademarks
All trademarks mentioned or appearing in this document are the property of their respective owners.
Changes
The material in this document is for information only and subject to change without notice. While reasonable efforts have been made
in the preparation of this document to assure its accuracy, no liability resulting from errors or omissions in this document, or from the
use of the information contained herein is assumed. The publisher reserves the right to make changes or revisions without reservation and
without obligation to notify any person of such revisions and changes.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Radio Frequency Interference Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
Canada Compliance Statement
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
94
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