001-0690-201
Network Management
for Simulcast
Service Manual
Copyright © 1997 by the E.F. Johnson Company
The E.F. Johnson Company, which was founded in 1923, designs, manufactures,
and markets radio communication products, systems, and service worldwide. The
company produces equipment for land mobile radio and mobiletelephone services
which include business, industrial, government, public safety, and personal users.
Viking Head/EF Johnson logo and Multi-Net® are registered trademarks of the
E.F. Johnson Company. All other company and/or product names used in this
manual are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective
manufacturer.
This software and documentation are based in part on HP OpenView® under
license from Hewlett-Packard Company. HP OpenView is a registered trademark
of the Hewlett-Packard Company.
Information in this manual is subject to change without notice.
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Table of Contents
1. Introduction ............................................................................................................ 1-1
1.1. Scope of manual ............................................................................................. 1-1
1.2. Conventions.................................................................................................... 1-1
1.3. Definition of terms .......................................................................................... 1-1
2. Network Structure .................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1. Network equipment ........................................................................................ 2-1
2.2. Site types......................................................................................................... 2-2
2.3. Logical addresses .......................................................................................... 2-9
2.3.1. IP address overview ............................................................................... 2-9
2.3.2. E.F. Johnson method ........................................................................... 2-10
2.3.3. IP addressing example ......................................................................... 2-11
2.3.4. Subnet assignments ............................................................................. 2-13
2.3.5. IP address assignments ....................................................................... 2-15
2.4. Unique host names....................................................................................... 2-17
2.5. Passwords..................................................................................................... 2-18
2.5.1. Router passwords................................................................................. 2-18
2.5.2. Windows® NT passwords .................................................................... 2-18
2.5.3. OpenView passwords........................................................................... 2-18
3. Router Configuration ............................................................................................. 3-1
3.1. Equipment setup............................................................................................. 3-1
3.2. Configuration .................................................................................................. 3-1
4. Site/Channel Computer Configuration ................................................................. 4-1
4.1. Install Ethernet card ....................................................................................... 4-1
4.2. Equipment setup............................................................................................. 4-1
4.3. Configure Windows NT 3.51 .......................................................................... 4-2
4.3.1. Mouse configuration ............................................................................... 4-2
4.3.2. Enter a password.................................................................................... 4-3
4.3.3. Install Windows networking .................................................................... 4-3
4.3.4. Edit the LMHOSTS file ........................................................................... 4-4
4.3.5. Change the passwords........................................................................... 4-5
4.3.6. Change the system information through the Control Panel .................... 4-6
4.3.7. Change the system information in Windows NT Registry....................... 4-8
4.4. Install site controller application................................................................. 4-10
4.4.1. Install the application ............................................................................ 4-10
4.4.2. Set the start up application ................................................................... 4-10
4.4.3. Configure for no mouse ........................................................................ 4-10
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5. Host Computer Configuration ............................................................................... 5-1
5.1. Install Ethernet card ....................................................................................... 5-1
5.2. Equipment setup............................................................................................. 5-1
5.3. Configure Windows NT 4.0 ............................................................................ 5-2
5.3.1. Log on to Windows NT ........................................................................... 5-2
5.3.2. Set CD properties ................................................................................... 5-2
5.3.3. Install Windows networking .................................................................... 5-3
5.3.4. Edit the LMHOSTS file ........................................................................... 5-4
5.3.5. Change the passwords........................................................................... 5-5
5.3.6. Change the system information through the Control Panel .................... 5-6
5.3.7. Change the system information in Windows NT Registry....................... 5-7
5.4. Install OpenView Professional Suite............................................................. 5-9
5.5. Install host computer application ................................................................. 5-9
5.6. Create OpenView maps................................................................................ 5-11
5.6.1. Create a System map........................................................................... 5-11
5.6.2. Create a Site map................................................................................. 5-13
5.6.3. Create a Device map............................................................................ 5-14
5.6.4. Add lines and text ................................................................................. 5-16
5.6.5. Set the default map .............................................................................. 5-17
5.6.6. Protect the map .................................................................................... 5-17
5.6.7. Format for background maps ............................................................... 5-17
5.6.8. Options for map creation ...................................................................... 5-17
5.7. Edit site and system settings ...................................................................... 5-18
5.8. Configure OpenView polling........................................................................ 5-19
5.8.1. Add devices to polling list ..................................................................... 5-19
5.8.2. Set polling defaults ............................................................................... 5-20
5.8.3. Verify polling settings............................................................................ 5-20
5.9. Configure OpenView traps........................................................................... 5-20
5.10. Set OpenView passwords .......................................................................... 5-21
5.10.1. Log in passwords................................................................................ 5-21
5.10.2. Protect maps password ...................................................................... 5-21
5.10.3. SNMP passwords ............................................................................... 5-22
5.11. Service functions........................................................................................ 5-22
5.12. Configure Windows NT 3.51 ...................................................................... 5-23
5.12.1. Enter a password................................................................................ 5-23
5.12.2. Install Windows networking ................................................................ 5-23
5.12.3. Edit the LMHOSTS file ....................................................................... 5-25
5.12.4. Change the passwords ....................................................................... 5-26
5.12.5. Change the system information through the Control Panel ................ 5-27
5.12.6. Change the system information in Windows NT Registry ................... 5-28
5.13. Install OpenView Work Group Node Manager.......................................... 5-30
5.14. Other files.................................................................................................... 5-31
5.14.1. Install additional files .......................................................................... 5-31
5.14.2. Modify DEVICES ................................................................................ 5-31
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6. Installation .............................................................................................................. 6-1
6.1. MBC in repeaters ............................................................................................ 6-1
6.2. MBC in channel controllers ........................................................................... 6-1
6.3. MBC configuration.......................................................................................... 6-4
6.3.1. Flash code into MBC .............................................................................. 6-4
6.3.2. Configure MBC ....................................................................................... 6-4
6.4. Site computer to repeater .............................................................................. 6-4
6.5. Channel computer to channel controller...................................................... 6-5
6.6. Router to site/channel computer................................................................... 6-5
6.7. Hub to site/channel computer ....................................................................... 6-6
6.8. Hub to host computer .................................................................................... 6-7
6.9. Router to host computer................................................................................ 6-8
6.10. Hub to router ................................................................................................. 6-8
6.11. Router to channel bank................................................................................ 6-9
7. Alignment and Calibration..................................................................................... 7-1
7.1. Align threshold and timing tone gain ........................................................... 7-1
7.1.1. Alignment procedure .............................................................................. 7-1
7.1.2. Alignment icons ...................................................................................... 7-2
7.2. Calibrate uni-directional, non-redundant systems ...................................... 7-4
7.2.1. Data acquisition procedure (uni-directional) ........................................... 7-5
7.2.2. Data acquisition icons for uni-directional ................................................ 7-6
7.2.3. Write procedure (uni-directional) ............................................................ 7-8
7.3. Calibrate bi-directional, non-redundant systems ........................................ 7-8
7.3.1. Phase 1 data acquisition (bi-directional) ................................................. 7-9
7.3.2. Phase 2 data acquisition (bi-directional) ............................................... 7-10
7.3.3. Data acquisition icons for bi-directional ................................................ 7-10
7.3.4. Write procedure (bi-directional) ............................................................ 7-13
7.4. Determine and set overlap offset ................................................................ 7-13
7.4.1. Description of overlap offset ................................................................. 7-13
7.4.2. Determine overlap offset values ........................................................... 7-14
7.4.3. Set overlap offset values and recalibrate system ................................. 7-15
7.5. Set SMC parameters from OpenView ......................................................... 7-16
7.5.1. Read/Write parameters ........................................................................ 7-17
7.5.2. Audio Gain............................................................................................ 7-18
7.5.3. Data Gain ............................................................................................. 7-18
7.5.4. Pilot Tone Gain..................................................................................... 7-18
7.5.5. Threshold ............................................................................................. 7-18
7.5.6. Timing Tone Gain ................................................................................. 7-19
7.5.7. Buffer Delays section............................................................................ 7-19
8. Update Software ..................................................................................................... 8-1
8.1. Update site controller application (Windows NT 4.0) .................................. 8-1
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8.2. Uninstall host computer software (Windows NT 4.0) .................................. 8-2
8.3. Update site controller application (Windows NT 3.51) ................................ 8-3
8.4. Uninstall host computer software (Windows NT 3.51) ................................ 8-4
8.5. Install host computer software (Windows NT 3.51)..................................... 8-5
8.6. Remove host computer software (Windows NT 3.51) ................................. 8-5
8.7. Install Windows NT 4.0................................................................................... 8-6
9. Troubleshooting ..................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1. Ping troubleshooting techniques.................................................................. 9-1
9.2. Troubleshooting from a router ...................................................................... 9-1
9.2.1. Show ARP - list of IP address in subnet ................................................. 9-2
9.2.2. Show hosts - list of host names and IP addresses ................................. 9-2
9.2.3. Show IP route - list of known subnets and routes................................... 9-2
9.2.4. Show int - information on ports ............................................................... 9-4
9.2.5. Ping from router...................................................................................... 9-4
9.2.6. Telnet from router ................................................................................... 9-5
9.3. Troubleshooting from a host computer........................................................ 9-5
9.3.1. Ping from OpenView............................................................................... 9-5
9.3.2. Ping from Command Prompt .................................................................. 9-6
9.3.3. Telnet from computer ............................................................................. 9-7
9.4. Recovery (Reverts) setup and actions.......................................................... 9-7
9.4.1. Consider interference problems.............................................................. 9-8
9.4.2. Consider status channel and home channel access............................... 9-8
9.4.3. Configure automatic channel reverts .................................................... 9-10
9.4.4. Manually unrevert and revert channels................................................. 9-10
9.4.5. Channel unrevert examples.................................................................. 9-11
9.4.6. Configure inputs for automatic site reverts ........................................... 9-12
9.4.7. Configure actions for automatic site reverts ......................................... 9-13
9.4.8. Manually unrevert and revert sites........................................................ 9-14
9.4.9. Site revert example............................................................................... 9-14
9.5. Perform manual repeater control ................................................................ 9-19
9.5.1. Repeater menu..................................................................................... 9-20
9.6. Alarm list for E.F. Johnson components.................................................... 9-20
9.6.1. Repeater generated alarms .................................................................. 9-20
9.6.2. Site/Channel computer generated alarms ............................................ 9-22
9.6.3. Host Computer generated alarms (for the site/channel computers) ..... 9-23
9.6.4. Host Computer generated alarms (for the repeaters) ........................... 9-23
9.6.5. Host Computer generated alarms (for a system).................................. 9-23
9.7. Mnemonics.................................................................................................... 9-24
Frequency Charts
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INTRODUCTION
SECTION
1. Introduction
1.1.
Scope of manual
This manual covers configuration and installation of network management
equipment (devices).
The configuration process defines a logical network. Each port of each device is
assigned a unique IP (Internet protocol) address, which is used to route
information (messages). If IP addresses are not assigned properly, messages may
not get to their destination and the purpose for the network could be adversely
affected.
For information to get from one device to another, there must be a physical path
(for example, a wire or an RF link). The layout of the physical paths between
devices influences the assignment of addresses. This manual first covers the
relationship between the logical and physical, then covers specific configuration
and installation information.
1.2.
Conventions
<Enter> refers to the enter or return key on the computer keyboard.
< > Other information in angle brackets is a definition of variable information.
For example, <password> means to type a password, without the angle brackets.
Menu item selections are written similar to:
Monitor -> Status Legend
This example means to pull down the Monitor menu and select the Status Legend
item.
Ctrl+click means to press the Control key (normally labeled Ctrl) while clicking
the mouse on the desired location.
Keyboard shortcuts are written similar to:
Ctrl+Alt+Del
Ctrl+S
Press and hold the keys in the order written and then release all keys. Each
keyboard key is separated by a + sign. Example: Ctrl+S means press and hold the
Ctrl key, press the S key, then release both keys.
1.3.
Definition of terms
Multi-Net Signaling - The format of the data messages that are used to control
trunking. Data messages contain over-the-air instructions, or update information,
about incoming calls and free channels. Multi-Net signaling also provides many
enhanced operating features such as unique ID calls and access priority.
Multi-Net System - A trunked radio system that uses E.F. Johnson Multi-Net
signaling. Other types of signaling can also be used. A Multi-Net system can be
one site or multi-site. Each site uses a different set of channels and radios can be
trunked between sites.
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INTRODUCTION
Network Management - A computer system that monitors the radio system for
significant events. These events are sent to a host computer where they can be
responded to manually, or in some cases automatically.
Reverts - Actions that are automatically performed if failures occur. These
actions are configured and performed through network management.
Simulcast - A transmission method where several sites that have overlapping
coverage areas use the same channels. All sites have a repeater on each channel.
All repeaters on the same channel are synchronized so they will transmit the same
message at the same time and phase.
Simulcast System - A system whose transmission method is simulcast and whose
trunking method is Multi-Net signaling. Simulcast systems are monitored by
network management.
Site - Repeaters and/or other network equipment that is physically located
together. Each site includes one computer that is part of the network management
system. Sites can be collocated.
Stand-Alone Multi-Net Site - A site that uses Multi-Net signaling, but will not
trunk to other sites that use Multi-Net signaling. None of the enhanced operating
features provided by Multi-Net signaling are available at these sites.
Trunking - The automatic sharing of channels in a multiple repeater system.
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
SECTION
2. Network Structure
2.1.
Network equipment
Network management equipment consists of
• routers
• computers
• hubs
• MBCs (message bridge cards)
• cables that wire these devices together
A router is installed at every site. (The master site may require more than one
router.) The router is connected to the computer(s) at the site and to the channel
bank(s). Routers keep track of how to forward messages to their destinations and
either send the message to a computer at the site or send the message to another
site by way of a channel bank.
Computer(s) are installed at every site. There are three types of computers in an
E.F. Johnson network system - host, site, and channel. The host computer runs
software that receives alarm messages from the system and displays them on the
screen to inform the operator of the system’s status. There is normally only one
host computer in a system, although there could be more. Site computers send
messages between the repeaters and the host computer. Each repeater site has a
site computer. A channel computer sends messages between the channel
controller and the host computer. There is one channel computer in a system.
Hubs act as signal splitters. If there is more than one computer or router at a site,
a hub is needed.
MBCs are installed in repeaters and channel controllers. Each stack of repeaters
or channel controllers has one MBC. An MBC reports repeater or channel
controller status to the site or channel computer.
Several types of cables are used to connect these devices together. Null Ethernet®
(crossover) cables connect routers and computers together. Standard (straightthrough) Ethernet cables connect routers and computers to hubs. Serial cables
connect MBCs to site and channel computers. RS-449 cables connect routers to
channel banks.
The site and channel computers are rack mounted and do not have keyboards or
monitors. (Keyboards and monitors are offered as options.) Routers are also rack
mounted. The cables that connect the routers to the channel banks are only 10 feet
long. The cables from the routers to the computers or hub can be up to 328 feet
long. Cables between computers and MBCs can be up to 50 feet long. Adapters
between cable connectors and device connectors may also be needed.
See Section 6 for installation information.
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
2.2.
Site types
There are three basic types of sites, although variations will exist.
• Master site: The master site contains a router, a channel computer, and
channel controllers. It may be collocated with a site computer and
repeaters. In addition, it may also contain a host computer. If there is more
than one computer or router, the master site also contains a hub. There is
only one master site per system.
• Remote site: A remote site contains a router, a site computer, and repeaters.
It may also contain a host computer, in which case a hub will be needed.
There will normally be several remote sites.
• Monitoring point site: The monitoring point contains a router and a host
computer. This site is remotely located; it is at a site without repeaters or a
channel controller. This site does not always exist if a host computer is at a
master or remote site.
Figure 2-1 shows a full master site and a typical remote site (although each site
may have additional channel banks, routers, repeaters, and channel controllers).
Figure 2-2 shows a master site without a host computer. The host computer is
shown at a typical monitoring point. A typical remote site is also shown.
Figure 2-3 shows a minimal master site and a remote site that also contains the
host computer. Other remote sites in this system would be like the typical remote
sites in Figures 2-1 and 2-2.
If there are several channel banks at a site, the router will be a multi-port router or
there will be more than one router. Each channel bank is wired to a different port
of a router, as shown in Figure 2-4. It is important that the correct ports are used.
See Section 6.11 for router to channel bank cable installation.
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Figure 2-1. Full master site with typical remote site
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Master Site
Microwave
Repeater n
Intraplex
Channel Banks
IRDB
Cisco Router
RS-449
Channel
Controller n
IRDB
Repeater 3
Channel
Controller 3
Repeater 2
Hub
Host Computer
Channel
Controller 2
Repeater 1
Site Computer
to MBC
Channel
Controller 1
Channel Computer
Serial c able
to MBC Card
Remote Site
Repeater n
IRDB
Microwave
Cable
RS-449
Intraplex
Channel Bank
Repeater 3
Repeater 2
Cisco Router
Site Computer
Repeater 1
Serial cable to MBC Card
Standard
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Crossover Ethernet
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Figure 2-2. Master site, monitoring point, and remote site
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Master Site
Microwave
Repeater n
Intraplex
Channel Banks
IRDB
Cisco Router
RS-449
Channel
Controller n
IRDB
Repeater 3
Channel
Controller 3
Repeater 2
Hub
Channel
Controller 2
Repeater 1
Site Computer
to MBC
Channel
Controller 1
Channel Computer
Serial c able
to MBC Card
Monitoring Point
Remote Site
Repeater n
IRDB
Microwave
Cable
RS-449
Intraplex
Channel Bank
Cisco Router
Microwave
Cable
RS-449
Intraplex
Channel Bank
Repeater 3
Repeater 2
Cisco Router
Host Computer
Site
Repeater 1
Serial cable to MBC Card
Standard
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Crossover Ethernet
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Figure 2-3. Minimal master site and remote site with host computer
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Master Site
Microwave
Intraplex
Channel Banks
Channel
Controller n
Cisco Router
RS-449
IRDB
Channel
Controller 3
Channel
Controller 2
Channel
Controller 1
Channel Computer
Serial c able
to MBC Card
Combined
Remote Site and
Monitoring Point
Repeater n
IRDB
Microwave
Cable
RS-449
Host Computer
Intraplex
Channel Bank
Repeater 3
Repeater 2
Cisco Router
Hub
Site
Repeater 1
Serial cable to MBC Card
Standard
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Crossover Ethernet
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Figure 2-4. Each port of a router connects to a different channel bank
Mic rowave
Intraplex
Channel Banks
Cisc o Router
Standard Ethernet, if to
Crossover Ethernet, if to c omputer
hub or
c hannel c omputer
RS-449
10 feet
max c able
length
Mic rowave
Hub
Intraplex
Channel Banks
Cisc o Router
Cisc o Router
Standard
Ethernet
c omputer(s)
RS-449
10 feet
max c able length
2.3.
Logical addresses
2.3.1. IP address overview
Network devices send messages to each other by addressing their messages to IP
addresses. Each port of each device in a system must be assigned a unique
address. An IP address is divided into three sub-addresses called network, subnet,
and host.
A network is a system, or a collection of network devices, that must communicate
with each other. For example, all of the radio repeaters of a police department
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could be a network, while the radio repeaters of the cab company would be a
separate network.
A subnet is a portion of the network, or a group of network devices, that share a
common interest. For example, all the devices at one repeater site may need to
talk to each other about that site, but other devices in the system do not need to
hear the conversation. For another example, each backbone link relays only the
messages for the sites on its link, and does not relay messages for sites that are on
other backbone links.
A host is a unique network entity, in other words, anything that must be uniquely
(or specifically) addressed within the network, for example, a computer or the
port of a router.
Although there are three sub-addresses, an IP address is written as four numbers
that are separated by periods. For example, 192.185.32.25 or 100.100.201.100.
The range of each number is 0 to 255, with 0 and 255 reserved for special
situations. A subnet mask defines which part of the IP address belongs to the
network and subnet (also called a data link), and which part belongs to the host
(also called a node).
2.3.2. E.F. Johnson method
E.F. Johnson has developed a method for assigning IP addresses that provides
consistency in initial installation and future expansion. When using this method,
the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. This mask tells the equipment that the first
three numbers define the network and subnet and the last number defines the host.
An E.F. Johnson radio network system is a stand-alone network and therefore
does not require coordination with the Internet world or existing networks (such
as an in-house Novell® network).
Using the E.F. Johnson addressing method, the first two numbers will be unique
to each system. The third number will be unique to each subnet within a system.
The fourth number will be unique to each host within a subnet.
To provide for consistent future expansion, this addressing method further defines
the third number. Inter-site backbone links will be assigned numbers between 100
and 199. Links that connect devices within a site will be assigned numbers
between 200 and 255. Therefore, by looking at the third number, one can tell if
the subnet is an inter-site backbone link or a link that connects devices within a
site. Inter-site backbone links are often microwave or some other long-distance
carrier; links that connect site devices are typically connected by Ethernet
cabling.
Standard subnet assignments:
Links within sites
200 - Monitoring Point subnet
201 - Master site subnet
202 - Remote site subnet
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
203 - Remote site subnet
etc.
If there are additional monitoring points, they are assigned remote site
subnet numbers.
Links between sites (inter-site backbone links)
100 - Backbone between master site and monitoring point
102 - Backbone between master site and subnet 202
103 - Backbone between master site and subnet 203
etc.
The fourth number is also further defined. Within a backbone link (subnets
between 100 and 199), the hosts will be assigned numbers sequentially starting
with number 1. Within a site link (subnets between 200 and 255), there are three
groups of devices. Routers will be assigned numbers sequentially starting with
number 1. Site/Channel computers will be assigned numbers sequentially starting
with number 100; and host computers will be assigned numbers sequentially
starting with 200.
2.3.3. IP addressing example
Figure 2.5 shows the IP addresses that would be assigned to a three-site system,
as well as showing how expansion to a five-site system could begin. In this figure,
100.100 has been assigned for the system address.
The subnet numbers (third number of the IP address) are assigned as follows:
• 201 is the link within site 1
• 202 is the link within site 2
• 203 is the link within site 3
• 102 is the backbone link between site 1 and site 2
• 103 is the backbone link between site 1 and site 3
• 104 is the backbone link between site 1 and site 4
• 105 is the backbone link between site 1 and site 5
Within site 1 (subnet 201) the host numbers (fourth number of the IP address) are
assigned as follows:
• 1 is an Ethernet port on the first router
• 2 is an Ethernet port on the second router
• 100 is a network port on the site computer
• 101 is a network port on the channel computer
• 200 is a network port on the host computer
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The hub is acting as a splitter. It does not need IP addresses because it does
not send messages to and from specific hosts. Instead, the hub listens to all
attached hosts. If a message comes in one port, the hub sends the message
out all other ports.
Figure 2-5. IP addresses
Router
Site 1
Site Computer
100.100.201.100
100.100.102.1
Hub
100.100.201.1
100.100.103.1
Channel Computer
100.100.201.101
Router
Host Computer
100.100.201.200
To Site 4
100.100.104.1
100.100.201.2
To Site 5
100.100.105.1
Router
100.100.102.2
Site 2
Site Computer
100.100.202.100
100.100.202.1
Router
100.100.103.2
Site 3
Site Computer
100.100.203.100
100.100.203.1
Within site 2 (subnet 202) the host numbers (fourth number of the IP address) are
assigned as follows:
• 1 is an Ethernet port on the router
• 100 is a network port on the site computer
Within site 3, the host numbers are the same as in site 2. However, since the
subnet is 203, the IP addresses are unique. The same would be true for the
expansion to a fourth site (subnet 204) and a fifth site (subnet 205).
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Within the backbone link from site 1 to site 2 (subnet 102) the host number is 1
for the router at site 1, and 2 for the router at site 2. The link from site 1 to site 3
(subnet 103) is the same; 1 is for the router at site 1 and 2 is for the router at site
3. Again the different subnet makes the IP addresses unique. Expansion to site 4
and 5 would be the same.
2.3.4. Subnet assignments
Routers and computers communicate with each other by addressing messages to
IP addresses. Before assigning IP addresses, determine which equipment has
direct communications with other equipment. It is often helpful to draw a picture
of the sites and the inter-site links (backbones); then, assign a subnet number to
each site and to each backbone.
Begin by assigning subnet 201 to the master site (the site with the channel
controllers). If there is a separate monitoring point, assign it subnet 200. Then,
number the rest of the sites consecutively beginning with 202, 203, etc. Assign
backbone links with a 100 series number that corresponds to the remote subnet.
For example, assign subnet 102 to the link that is between the master site and
subnet 202. Assign 103 to the link between the master site and subnet 203, etc.
Figure 2-6 shows a drawing for a 3-site system. This drawing represents the
system in the example in Section 2.3.3. Figure 2-7 shows the same system with a
remote monitoring point.
Figure 2-6. Three-site system
Figure 2-7. Three-site system with
monitoring point
201
Master
201
Master
102
100
102
202
West
200
MP
103
202
West
203
South
103
203
South
In these drawings, the sites have also been given names for human convenience.
The network devices do not use the names, but people often remember names
easier than numbers. In some situations the network devices will allow use of a
name instead of a number, as long as the relationship between the name and
number have been configured in the device.
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
Figure 2-8 shows examples of two systems with even more remote sites.
Figure 2-8. Subnet drawings
202
North
209
NW
203
NE
102
109
103
108
208
West
201
Master
204
East
104
107
105
106
205
SE
207
SW
206
South
201
102
103
202
203
109
209
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Part No: 001-0690-201
105
104
204
110
210
106
205
111
107
206
112
211
212
2-14
108
207
113
213
208
114
214
115
215
NETWORK STRUCTURE
2.3.5. IP address assignments
After the subnets are assigned, then assign an IP address to each port of the
routers and to each network port of the computers (using the method described in
Section 2.3.2). The IP address is written as four numbers, such as
100.100.201.100. The first number should always be 100. The second number
should be different for each system that E.F. Johnson installs. The third number is
the subnet number that was assigned in Section 2.3.4 .
Within a subnet, the fourth number is assigned as follows:
• Router ports are assigned numbers sequentially starting with 1. (The
Ethernet port of a router belongs to the subnet of the site. The serial ports
of a router belong to subnets that are backbone links to other sites.)
• Site/Channel computers are assigned numbers sequentially starting with
100.
• Host computers are assigned numbers sequentially starting with 200.
The following chart shows the IP address for a three-site system.
201
Master
102
202
West
103
203
South
Master Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site computer
Channel computer
Host computer
West Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
IP address
Notes
100.100.102.1
100.100.103.1
100.100.201.1
100.100.201.100
100.100.201.101
100.100.201.200
subnet to West Site
subnet to South Site
100.100.102.2
subnet to Master Site
100.100.202.1
100.100.202.100
South Site
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Part No: 001-0690-201
NETWORK STRUCTURE
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
100.100.103.2
subnet to Master Site
100.100.203.1
100.100.203.100
The following chart shows the IP addresses for a system with three sites plus a
remote monitoring site.
201
Master
100
102
202
West
200
MP
103
203
South
IP address
Master Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router serial 2
Router Ethernet
Site computer
Channel computer
West Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
IP address
100.100.102.1
100.100.103.1
100.100.100.1
100.100.201.1
100.100.201.100
100.100.201.101
100.100.102.2
100.100.202.1
100.100.202.100
South Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
Monitoring Point
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Host computer
100.100.103.2
100.100.203.1
100.100.203.100
100.100.100.2
100.100.200.1
100.100.200.200
The master site router in the above chart has at least three serial ports. However, it
could be done with two two-port routers, in which case the addresses would be as
shown in the following chart.
Master Site
Router 1 serial 0
Router 1 serial 1
Router 2 serial 0
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
IP address
Notes
100.100.102.1
100.100.103.1
100.100.100.1
to West Site
to South Site
to Monitoring Point
2-16
NETWORK STRUCTURE
Router 2 serial 1
Router 1 Ethernet
Router 2 Ethernet
Site computer
Channel computer
2.4.
100.100.201.1
100.100.201.2
100.100.201.100
100.100.201.101
Unique host names
Since it is often easier to remember names instead of numbers, the computers and
routers allow the assignment of names to devices and to IP addresses. These
names will be entered when asked for a host name, computer name, device name,
or similar wording. The names can also be associated with IP addresses by using
the router’s ip host command and by editing the computer’s files named lmhosts
and hosts (stored in the \winnt\system32\drivers\etc\ directory). Then, the names
can be used instead of IP addresses for commands like ping and telnet.
Each device is given a unique name. Names are normally based on the site’s
geographic location, such as city, section of county, etc. The following standard
should be used to differentiate devices at a site, where “name” is the geographic
location.
Name
Assigned to
name
Router
name-hub
Site computer
name-chn
Channel computer
name-hst
Host computer
If there are two routers at a site, add a number at the end of the name, for
example, chicago1, chicago2, etc.
The maximum length of the entire name is 15 characters, that leaves 11 characters
for the name portion in the above standard. For consistency, enter all names in
lower case, since they are case sensitive.
Routers have several addresses, but only one name. If a device needs to have an
address associated with a router’s name, the router’s address that communicates
to the device should be used.
For example, if waseca is the name of a multi-port router using addresses:
100.100.102.1 to talk to the west site
100.100.103.1 to talk to the south site
100.100.201.1 to talk to the local subnet
Devices at the west site will associate the name waseca with address
100.100.102.1. Devices at the south site will associate the name waseca with the
address 100.100.103.1. Devices that are part of the local subnet will associate
waseca with address 100.100.201.1.
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NETWORK STRUCTURE
2.5.
Passwords
Passwords are case sensitive. For consistency, enter all passwords in lower case
unless specifically told otherwise. This section lists the passwords that will need
to be entered during configuration.
2.5.1. Router passwords
Routers use several passwords for different purposes. Normally the passwords are
all set the same. Except for SNMP community password ro, which is set to
“public” and corresponds to the SNMP community password in OpenView.
• Enable secret (encrypted by the router)
• Enable password (provides security)
• Virtual terminal password (used when connecting from attached terminal)
• Line con password (used when telnetting from someplace on the network)
• SNMP community password ro (read only)
• SNMP community password rw (read/write)
2.5.2. Windows® NT passwords
Passwords for Windows NT have a maximum length of 14 characters and can not
contain spaces.
• E.F. Johnson username and log-on password
• Administrator username and log-on password
2.5.3. OpenView passwords
• Observer log in password (access to very few functions)
• Operator log in password (access to functions in Operator Manual)
• Supervisor log in password (access to all functions)
• Protect maps password (makes maps read-only)
• SNMP Community password (read only)
• SNMP Set Community password (read/write)
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Part No: 001-0690-201
2-18
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
SECTION
3. Router Configuration
3.1.
Equipment setup
The router is configured by connecting a computer to the router and running a
terminal (communications) program, such as Procomm Plus, on the computer.
Plug a serial cable into the computer’s serial port and into the console port of the
router (see Figure 3-1). The Auxiliary/Console Port Cable Kit (Cisco® Part No.
72-0803-02, E.F. Johnson Part No. 585-1156-053) contains an RJ-45 to RJ-45
rollover serial cable and DB adapters.
Start the terminal program on the computer before turning on the power to the
router. Set the terminal program’s communications parameters to 9600, N, 8, 1.
Turn the router’s power on. The router will begin sending a sign-on message to
the computer.
Figure 3-1. Router back panel (Cisco 2501)
AUI
3.2.
SERIAL 0
SERIAL 1
CONSOLE AUX
ON/OFF POWER
Configuration
Router configuration involves answering questions that the router asks and then
sending specific set-up commands to the router. Below is a sample configuration
with explanations. (This sample is from the Cisco 2501 router, other routers may
have different wording, but the commands should be the same.) The information
that needs to be entered is shown as bold; information that the router displays is
shown as lighter.
When <Enter> is shown, press the enter key to accept the default answer. Other
information that is in angle brackets < > is a description of the information that
needs to be entered. For example, <ip address> means to enter the required IP
address, such as 100.100.103.1.
When the router is turned on, it sends several paragraphs of sign-on and legal
information.
System Bootstrap, Version 5.2(8a), RELEASE SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems
2500 processor with 1024 Kbytes of main memory
F3: 3072444+66260+202400 at 0x3000060
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
(c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
3-1
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.
cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, California 95134-1706
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 3000 Software (IGS-I-L), Version 10.3(9), RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Tue 30-Jan-96 20:37 by vatran
Image text-base: 0x0301B110, data-base: 0x00001000
cisco 2500 (68030) processor (revision D) with 1024K/1024K bytes of memory.
Processor board serial number 02348730
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface.
2 Serial network interfaces.
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)
Notice: NVRAM invalid, possibly due to write erase.
--- System Configuration Dialog --At any point you may enter a question mark ‘?’ for help.
Use ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets ‘[]’.
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes]: <Enter>
First, would you like to see the current interface summary? [yes]: <Enter>
Any interface listed with OK? value “NO” does not have a valid configuration
Interface
Ethernet0
Serial0
Serial1
IP-Address
unassigned
unassigned
unassigned
OK?
NO
NO
NO
Method
not set
not set
not set
Status
up
down
down
Protocol
down
down
down
Configuring global parameters:
Enter host name [Router]: <unique name for this router>
See Section 2.4. This name will also be used for the router’s prompt.
The enable secret is a one-way cryptographic secret used
instead of the enable password when it exists.
Enter enable secret: <secret password>
The enable password is used when there is no enable secret
and when using older software and some boot images.
Enter enable password: <enable password>
% Please choose a password that is different from the enable secret
The router cautions that the same password for both secret and enable has been
entered. Next, the router requests that the enable password be re-entered, in case
the two passwords should not be the same.
Enter enable password: <enable password>
Enter virtual terminal password: <virtual terminal password>
Configure SNMP Network Management? [yes]: <Enter>
Community string [public]: <Enter>
Configure IP? [yes]: <Enter>
Configure IGRP routing? [yes]: <Enter>
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3-2
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Your IGRP autonomous system number [1]: <Enter>
Configuring interface parameters:
Configuring interface Ethernet0:
Is this interface in use? [yes]: <Enter>
Configure IP on this interface? [yes]: <Enter>
IP address for this interface: <ip address>
Number of bits in subnet field [0]: 16
Class A network is 100.0.0.0, 16 subnet bits; mask is 255.255.255.0
Configuring interface Serial0:
Is this interface in use? [yes]: <Enter>
Configure IP on this interface? [yes]: <Enter>
Configure IP unnumbered on this interface? [no]: <Enter>
IP address for this interface: <ip address>
Number of bits in subnet field [16]: <Enter>
Class A network is 100.0.0.0, 16 subnet bits; mask is 255.255.255.0
Configuring interface Serial1:
Is this interface in use? [yes]:
If a device will be attached to this serial port, follow the same procedure as for
serial port 0 above. If no device will be attached, enter No.
Note: If the router has additional serial ports, continue to enter the required information.
The following configuration command script was created:
hostname <unique name for this router>
enable secret 5 $1$uFlL$7l8EALcmq4KBmtwZtSetj/
enable password <enable password>
line vty 0 4
password <virtual terminal password>
snmp-server community public
!
ip routing
!
interface Ethernet0
ip address <ip address> 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0
ip address <ip address> 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial1
ip address <ip address> 255.255.255.0
!
router igrp 1
network 100.0.0.0
!
end
Use this configuration? [yes/no]: yes
The enable password you have chosen is the same as your enable secret.
This is not recommended. Re-enter the enable password.
Building configuration...
Use the enabled mode ‘configure’ command to modify this configuration.
Press RETURN to get started!
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Ethernet0, changed state to down
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0, changed state to down
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ROUTER CONFIGURATION
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial1, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Ethernet0, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial1, changed state to down
%SYS-5-RESTART: System restarted -Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 3000 Software (IGS-I-L), Version 10.3(9), RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Tue 30-Jan-96 20:37 by vatran <Enter>
oc-rtr>enable
Password: <enable password>
When this password is entered, it is not displayed on the screen.
oc-rtr#config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
oc-rtr(config)#banner \<text>\
End with CNTL/Z.
Example: banner \EF Johnson Operations Center Cisco Router\
The text defines a sign-on message for this router and should indicate the location
of the router. A separator must be used before and after this text. In this example
the backslash (\) character is the separator. The separator can be any character
that is not used in the text and the same separator must be used at the beginning
and ending of the text.
oc-rtr(config)#clock timezone <zone abbreviation> <hours from UTC>
Example: clock timezone CST -6
Enter the standard time zone for the location that the router will be installed and
the offset from UTC (GMT, Zulu). Minutes may also be entered if necessary.
Eastern Standard Time: EST -5
Central Standard Time: CST -6
Mountain Standard Time: MST -7
Pacific Standard Time: PST -8
oc-rtr(config)#clock summer <zone> recurr <week> <day> <month> <hr:min> <week> <day>
<month> <hr:min> <offset>
Example: clock summer CDT recurr first Sunday April 02:00 last Sunday October 02:00 60
This command sets automatic adjustment for daylight savings time.
<zone>
Time zone for summer time (for U.S.A., EDT, CDT, MDT, or PDT)
<week>
Week of the month (first, last, or 1 to 5)
<day>
Day of the week (Sunday, Monday, etc.)
<month>
Name of month (January, February, etc.)
<hr:min>
Hour and minutes in 24-hour format
<offset>
Number of minutes to add during summer time
oc-rtr(config)#inter ether0
This command tells the router that the next three parameters will apply to the
Ethernet port of the router.
oc-rtr(config-if)#band <kilobits per second>
Example: band 10000
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3-4
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Enter the bandwidth of the link connected to this port. For an Ethernet link, enter
10000.
oc-rtr(config-if)#delay 100
oc-rtr(config-if)#descript <path description>
Example: descript oc-net
Enter a description for the link. The example, oc-net, is short for operations center
subnet. This description will display with some troubleshooting commands as a
reminder of the link’s location.
oc-rtr(config-if)#int s0
This command tells the router that the next three parameters will apply to the
Serial 0 port of the router.
oc-rtr(config-if)#band <kilobits per second>
Example: band 56
Enter the bandwidth of the link connected to this port. For a microwave link, enter
56.
oc-rtr(config-if)#delay 100
oc-rtr(config-if)#descript <path description>
Example: descript oc-west
Enter a description for the link. The example, oc-west, is short for operations
center to west site. This description will display with some troubleshooting
commands as a reminder of the link’s location.
Note: If there are additional serial ports, continue to enter these four commands for each port (int
s#, band 56, delay 100, descript <path description>).
oc-rtr(config-if)#exit
oc-rtr(config)#ip host <name> <ip address>
Example:
ip host oc-hst 100.100.201.200
ip host west-hub 100.100.202.100
ip host south 100.100.103.2
This command associates a name with an IP address. An entry should be made for
every computer and router in the system. See Section 2.4.
If a number needs to be corrected, just re-enter the host name and correct number.
If an entry needs to be deleted, enter the command:
no ip host <name> <ip address>
oc-rtr(config)#line con 0
This command tells the router that the next two parameters will apply to a console
(computer) that is attached to the router.
oc-rtr(config-line)#password <line password>
This password will be used to gain access to the router commands from a
computer that is attached to the router.
oc-rtr(config-line)#login
Tells the router that a password is required at login.
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ROUTER CONFIGURATION
oc-rtr(config-line)#line vty 0 4
This command tells the router that the next two parameters will apply to a virtual
terminal for remote console access to the router.
oc-rtr(config-line)#password <virtual terminal password>
Enter the same password that was entered for the virtual terminal password at the
beginning of configuration. When telnetting to the router, this password will be
used to gain remote access to the router commands.
oc-rtr(config-line)#login
oc-rtr(config-line)#exit
oc-rtr(config)#ntp master
Enter the ntp master command in one router only. Normally, use a router at the
site with the host computer. NTP stands for Network Time Protocol.
oc-rtr(config)#ntp peer <ip address>
Example: ntp peer 100.100.102.2
Example: ntp peer 100.100.103.2
This command is different if the router is the ntp master than if it is not the ntp
master.
If the ntp master command has been given, enter an ntp peer command for each
router in the system (except this router). Typically, use the IP address that is
assigned to the serial 0 port of the router. If the router is connected to the ntp
master’s Ethernet port (via a hub), use the router’s Ethernet port IP address. In the
following diagram, the bold addresses would be used for the ntp peer commands.
NTP Master
Router 1
100.100.102.1
Hub
Router 2
100.100.102.2
100.100.201.1
100.100.103.1
Router 3
100.100.103.2
Router 5
Router 4
100.100.104.1
100.100.104.2
100.100.201.2
Ethernet
Microwave
If the ntp master command was not given, enter the IP address of the master that
the router would use when communicating with the master. Using the above
diagram, the following IP addresses would be used for the ntp peer command.
Router 2 - 100.100.102.1
Router 3 - 100.100.103.1
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3-6
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Router 4 - 100.100.201.1
Router 5 - 100.100.201.1
oc-rtr(config)#snmp community <password> ro
Example: snmp community public ro
Sets the ro (read only) snmp community password. This password is normally set
to “public” and should be set the same as the snmp community password in
OpenView.
oc-rtr(config)#snmp community <password> rw
Sets the rw (read/write) snmp community password. This password corresponds
to the snmp set community password in OpenView.
oc-rtr(config)#snmp host <ip address or unique name> public snmp
Example: snmp host 100.100.201.200 public snmp
Example: snmp host waseca-hst public snmp
Enter the IP address or unique name of the host computer. This address is used for
the destination of trap messages.
oc-rtr(config)#no service config
oc-rtr(config)#end
oc-rtr#
Wait for the next message; it can take a few seconds to appear.
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
oc-rtr#clock set <hour:min:sec> <date> <month> <year>
<Enter>
Example: clock set 8:46:00 11 Nov 1996
Sets the current time and date.
oc-rtr#wr mem
Writes the configuration to memory.
Building configuration...
[OK]
oc-rtr#
This ends configuration for the router. To verify that the router boots successfully,
turn the router off and then back on. The following sign-on and legal messages
should appear.
System Bootstrap, Version 5.2(8a), RELEASE SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems
2500 processor with 1024 Kbytes of main memory
F3: 3072444+66260+202400 at 0x3000060
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
(c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.
cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, California 95134-1706
3-7
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 3000 Software (IGS-I-L), Version 10.3(9), RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Tue 30-Jan-96 20:37 by vatran
Image text-base: 0x0301B110, data-base: 0x00001000
cisco 2500 (68030) processor (revision D) with 1024K/1024K bytes of memory.
Processor board serial number 02348730
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface.
2 Serial network interfaces.
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)
Press RETURN to get started!
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Ethernet0, changed state to down
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial1, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Ethernet0, changed state to up
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0, changed state to down
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial1, changed state to down
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from memory by console
%SYS-5-RESTART: System restarted -Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 3000 Software (IGS-I-L), Version 10.3(9), RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Tue 30-Jan-96 20:37 by vatran
If <Enter> is pressed, the router will request a password.
The router can be turned off.
Mark the site name that this router was configured for on the outside of the router.
Routers are configured for a specific site and can not be moved to a new site
without reconfiguration.
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3-8
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
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3-9
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SITE/CHANNEL COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
SECTION
4. Site/Channel Computer Configuration
4.1.
Install Ethernet card
1. Plug in the computer power cord.
2. Loosen the screws on the top cover of the computer.
3. Remove the cover by sliding it towards the back of the computer and lifting up.
4. Remove the blank cover from the next to last expansion slot (J11). Save the
screw.
5. Insert the Ethernet card into expansion slot J11.
6. Using the screw saved in step 4, secure the Ethernet card in place.
7. Replace the computer cover.
8. Tighten the screws on the computer cover.
4.2.
Equipment setup
A monitor, keyboard, and mouse need to be attached to the site and channel
computers for configuring the computers. After configuration is complete, the
monitor, keyboard, and mouse will be removed from the computers; they will not
be attached to the computers when installed at the sites. When servicing a site,
take along a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.
The site and channel computers have 3-1/2 inch floppy disk drives that are
accessed by opening the cover on the right front of the computer. The front of the
computer also has a reset button, power on/off switch, and a 5-pin DIN jack for
attaching a keyboard that has a 5-pin DIN plug. Other peripherals are attached to
the back of the computer as shown in the diagram below; however, the cards may
be installed in different slots than shown.
4-1
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SITE/CHANNEL COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
DB-9
Serial Port
DB-25
Printer Port
fan
AC
Monitor
Power Power
DB-15
Monitor
Video
Mini-6
Keyboard
Mini-6
Mouse
RJ-45
Ethernet
Port
Note:
The monitor power c able may plug into a wall
The keyboard c able may have a 5-pin DIN plug, which plugs into the front of the c omputer.
The c ards may be in a different order and have other c onnec tors that are not used.
4.3.
Configure Windows NT 3.51
Windows NT has been installed on the site and channel computers, however, it
was probably not configured with the network information needed for the system.
Configuring Windows involves opening several folders and entering information
that includes the following.
• IP addresses (See Section 2.3 for information on assigning IP addresses.)
• Unique host names (See Section 2.4 for information on assigning host
names.)
• Usernames and passwords (See Section 2.5.2.)
• Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
• Default gateway: The IP address of the router port that will be connected to
the Ethernet port of this computer.
4.3.1. Mouse configuration
1. Turn on the monitor and computer.
2. The screen displays:
PS2-Mouse Configuration Change
Press Any Key to Continue
3. Press a key. The setup screen appears.
4. Press F10 (Record and Exit).
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SITE/CHANNEL COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
5. The computer boots.
4.3.2. Enter a password
1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del. A Welcome box appears.
2. Press the enter key (leaving the password box blank). The Log on Message box
reports: “Your password has expired and must be changed”.
3. Click OK. The Change Password box appears.
4. Enter the password for the computer in the Enter New Password box. Asterisks
will appear on the screen as the characters are typed.
5. Verify the password by also entering it in the Confirm New Password box.
6. Click OK. A message confirms that the password has been changed.
7. Click OK.
4.3.3. Install Windows networking
1. The Program Manager and Main windows should be open. If not, open them.
2. Open the Control Panel.
3. Open the Network icon.
4. The Network Settings window displays a message that Windows NT
Networking is not installed.
Note: If this window does not appear, click Cancel. Close the Control Panel
and the Main program group; then skip to Section 4.3.4, Edit the LMHOSTS
file.
5. Click Yes to install networking. The Windows NT Setup box appears.
6. Verify that the setup box displays: A:\i386
7. Click Continue. A Windows Installation message appears.
A. Verify network card installation
1. The Network Adapter Card Detection window appears.
2. Click Continue.
3. The computer detects the card that is installed and displays:
Setup has detected the following network adapter card in your computer:
3Com Etherlink III ISA/PCMCIA Adapter
If the message says that a network adapter card could not be detected, recheck
the installation of the Ethernet card.
4. Click Continue.
5. A window displays the setup for the card:
I/O Port Address
0x300
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SITE/CHANNEL COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
Interrupt Number
10
Transceiver Type
10BaseT
6. Click Continue to accept the defaults.
7. A setup message reports that the parameters are not verifiably correct.
8. Click OK to use them anyway.
B. Installation options
1. A Windows NT setup box appears.
2. De-select “NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport” (so that the check box is
not checked).
3. Select “TCP/IP Transport” (so that the check box is checked).
4. Click Continue. A TCP/IP Installation Options box appears.
5. Select “Simple TCP/IP Services” (so that the check box is checked). Leave all
other selections (boxes) as is.
6. Click Continue. Several messages appear.
7. Insert disks as requested, and click OK after inserting each disk.
C. Network settings
1. A Network Settings box appears.
2. Click OK.
3. Messages appear for configuring the network and setting up the protocol.
4. The TCP/IP Configuration box appears.
5. Enter the IP address for the computer.
6. Enter the Subnet Mask for the computer.
7. Enter the Default Gateway IP address for the computer.
8. Click OK. A Setup is Starting the Network message appears.
9. The Domain/Workgroup Settings box appears.
10. Click OK. A message reports that networking is now installed.
11. Click the Restart Computer button.
12. A message reports that shutdown is in progress and the computer reboots.
4.3.4. Edit the LMHOSTS file
Note: The LMHOSTS file needs to be edited once per system. The same file can
be used for all computers within a system.
1. Insert the floppy disk named E.F. Johnson Site Controller (remote hub
computer) into the A: drive. (The disk is Part No: 023-9998-406.)
2. Open the file named A:\LMHOSTS in an ASCII editor, such as Notepad.
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3. Change the IP addresses and host names to those for this system. (See Section
2.3 for information about IP addresses and Section 2.4 for information about
unique host names.)
Example:
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a ‘#’ symbol.
#
# For example:
#
#
102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com
# source server
#
38.25.63.10
x.acme.com
# x client host
#
127.0.0.1
localhost
100.100.201.100
oc-hub
100.100.201.101
oc-chn
100.100.201.200
oc-hst
100.100.202.100
west-hub
100.100.203.100
south-hub
100.100.201.1
oc
100.100.102.2
west
100.100.103.2
south
4. Save the changes
5. Exit the editor
4.3.5. Change the passwords
1. Open the Administrative Tools program group.
2. Open the User Manager.
A. E.F. Johnson password
1. Open the efjohnson username properties by double clicking on the efjohnson
username. If it does not exist, select menu item User -> New User and enter
efjohnson in the Username field.
2. Enter the E. F. Johnson password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that the check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
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6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
B. Administrator password
1. Open the Administrator username in the User Manager window.
2. Enter the Administrator password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that the check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
9. Close the User Manager and Administrative Tools windows.
4.3.6. Change the system information through the Control Panel
1. Open the Main program group.
2. Open the Control Panel.
3. Open the Network icon.
A. Change the computer name
1. Click the Change button next to Computer Name.
2. Enter the unique host name for this computer (see Section 2.4).
3. Click OK
B. Change TCP/IP settings
1. Select TCP/IP Protocol in the scroll box.
2. Click on Configure.
3. Enter the IP Address, Subnet mask, and Default Gateway for this computer.
4. Click the DNS button.
5. Change the Host Name to match the computer name entered above (the unique
host name for this computer).
6. Click OK.
Import the LMHOSTS file
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1. Insert the floppy disk named E.F. Johnson Site Controller (remote hub
computer) into the A: drive.
2. Click the Advanced button.
3. Click the Import LMHOSTS button.
4. Enter A:\ in the dialog box.
5. Click the Import button. The lmhosts file is imported.
6. Be sure the Enable LMHOSTS Lookup check box is checked in the Windows
Networking Parameters section.
7. Click OK to close the Advanced window.
8. Click OK to close the TCP/IP Configuration window.
9. Click OK to close the Network Settings window.
C. Change system settings
1. Open the System icon in the Control Panel.
2. In the Operating System section, change the Show List For entry to 5 seconds.
3. In the Variable box, enter:
PATH
4. In the Value box, enter:
C:\UTILITY
5. Click the Set button.
6. In the Variable box, enter:
TZ
7. In the Value box, enter the standard time zone for the location that the
computer will be installed, the offset from UTC (GMT, Zulu), and the daylight
savings time zone.
Timezone
Eastern Standard Time
Central Standard Time
Mountain Standard Time
Pacific Standard Time
Entry
EST5EDT
CST6CDT
MST7MDT
PST8PDT
8. Click the Set button.
9. Click OK to close the System window.
10. Close the Control Panel.
D. Copy LMHOSTS to HOSTS
1. Open the File Manager.
2. Open the \WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\ETC\ folder.
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3. Select LMHOSTS.
4. Select menu item File -> Copy.
5. In the To box, enter HOSTS. Click OK.
6. A Confirm File Replace message box appears. Click Yes.
7. Close the File Manager.
8. Close the Main program group.
4.3.7. Change the system information in Windows NT Registry
1. From the Program Manager, select menu item File -> Run.
2. In the Command line field, enter:
regedt32
3. Click OK.
4. Select the window HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.
A. System folder
1. Open the System folder.
Note: The following steps (2-20) need to be repeated for several folders that are
within the System folder. Return to this point until all folders have been modified.
2. Open one of these folders:
Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
3. Open the Control folder.
4. Open the ComputerName folder.
5. Select the ComputerName folder (which is in the ComputerName folder).
6. In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
7. Select the ActiveComputerName folder (if present in the ComputerName
folder). In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name
to the unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
8. Close the Control folder.
9. Open the Services folder.
10. Open the Elnk31 folder.
11. Open the Parameters folder.
12. Select the Tcpip folder.
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13. In the right window, change the following entries by double-clicking on the
entry, changing the value, and clicking OK.
DefaultGateway
IPAddress
SubnetMask
14. Open the NETBT folder (in the Services folder).
15. Select the Parameters folder.
16. Verify the value of EnableLMHOSTS in the right window - it should be 0x1.
If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering 1, setting
Radix to Hex, and then clicking OK.
17. Open the Tcpip folder (in the Services folder).
18. Select the Parameters folder.
19. In the right window, double-click on Hostname, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
20. Close the folder that was opened in step 2.
Note: Return to step 2 under “A. System folder” until all folders have been
modified.
Folders that require changes, if present and not dimmed:
Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
21. Close the System folder, after all folders have been modified.
B. Software folder
1. Open the Software folder.
2. Open the Microsoft folder.
3. Open the Windows NT folder.
4. Open the Current Version folder.
5. Select the Winlogon folder.
6. Verify the value of DefaultUserName in the right window - it should be
efjohnson. If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering
efjohnson, then clicking OK.
7. Look for AutoAdminLogon in the right window. If not present:
Select menu item Edit -> Add Value.
Enter AutoAdminLogon and click OK.
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Enter 1 and click OK.
8. Look for DefaultPassword in the right window. If not present:
Select menu item Edit -> Add Value.
Enter DefaultPassword and click OK.
Enter the E.F. Johnson password and click OK.
9. Close the Registry Editor window.
4.4.
Install site controller application
4.4.1. Install the application
1. Put the disk named E.F. Johnson Site Controller into the floppy drive.
2. From the Program Manager, select menu item File -> Run.
3. Click Browse.
4. In the drive section, select the floppy drive.
5. In the filename section, select setup.exe.
6. Click OK.
7. Click OK in the Run dialog box.
8. Follow the on-screen instructions. Accept the defaults in all dialog boxes.
9. When installation is completed, the Program Manager will appear with a new
program group named Site Controller.
4.4.2. Set the start up application
1. Open the Site Controller program group.
2. While holding the Control key, drag the Site Controller icon on top of the
Startup program group.
3. Close the Site Controller program group.
4. Minimize the Program Manager window.
4.4.3. Configure for no mouse
1. Select the Program Manager icon - a pop up menu appears.
2. Click on Shutdown.
3. Select Shutdown and Restart.
4. Click OK.
5. When the system restarts, the Program Manager and Site Controller icons
should display on the screen. Next, the Site Controller application should
appear.
6. Exit the Site Controller by selecting menu item File -> Exit.
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SITE/CHANNEL COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
7. Disconnect the mouse from the back of the computer.
8. Press ALT+F4 to shut down the computer.
9. Use the cursor (arrow) keys to select Shutdown and Restart.
10. Press the enter key.
11. When the system restarts, an error message will display indicating that the
mouse configuration has changed.
12. Press any key - the setup screen will appear.
13. Press F10 - the system will reboot.
14. Wait for the Site Controller application window(s) to appear on the screen.
15. Press ALT+F, then X to exit the Site Controller application.
16. Press ALT+F4 to shutdown the computer.
17. Use the cursor (arrow) keys to select Shutdown (not restart).
18. Press the enter key.
19. When the message appears that it is safe to turn off the computer, do so.
20. Disconnect the keyboard and monitor from the computer.
21. Mark the site name that this computer was configured for on the outside of the
computer. Computers are configured for a specific site and can not be moved
to a new site without reconfiguration.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
SECTION
5. Host Computer Configuration
5.1.
Install Ethernet card
1. Plug in the computer power cord.
2. Loosen the screws on the top cover of the computer.
3. Remove the cover by sliding it towards the back of the computer and lifting up.
4. Remove the blank cover from the next to last expansion slot (J11). Save the
screw.
5. Insert the Ethernet card into expansion slot J11.
6. Using the screw saved in step 4, secure the Ethernet card in place.
7. Replace the computer cover.
8. Tighten the screws on the computer cover.
5.2.
Equipment setup
The host computer has a 3-1/2 inch floppy disk drive and a CD-ROM drive that
are accessed by removing the cover from the right front of the computer. The
front of the computer also has a reset button, power on/off switch, and a 5-pin
DIN jack for attaching a keyboard that has a 5-pin DIN plug. Other peripherals
are attached to the back of the computer as shown in the diagram below; however,
the cards may be installed in different slots than shown.
DB-9
Serial Port
DB-25
Printer Port
fan
AC
Monitor
Power Power
Note:
DB-15
Monitor
Video
Mini-6
Keyboard
Mini-6
Mouse
RJ-45
Ethernet
Port
The monitor power c able may plug into a wall outlet.
The keyboard c able may have a 5-pin DIN plug, which plugs into the front of the c omputer.
The c ards may be in a different order and have other c onnec tors that are not used.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
5.3.
Configure Windows NT 4.0
Windows NT has been installed on the host computer; however, it was probably
not configured with the network information needed for the system. Configuring
Windows involves opening several windows and folders and entering information
that includes the following.
• IP addresses (See Section 2.3 for information on assigning IP addresses.)
• Unique host names (See Section 2.4 for information on assigning host
names.)
• Usernames and passwords (See Section 2.5.2.)
• Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
• Default gateway: The IP address of the router port that will be connected to
the Ethernet port of this computer.
5.3.1. Log on to Windows NT
1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del. A Welcome box appears.
2. Press the enter key (leaving the password box blank). The Log on message box
reports: “You are required to change your password at first login”.
3. Click OK. The Change Password box appears.
4. Enter the password for the computer in the New Password box. Asterisks will
appear on the screen as the characters are typed.
5. Verify the password by also entering it in the Confirm New Password box.
6. Click OK. A message confirms that the password has been changed.
7. Click OK.
5.3.2. Set CD properties
1. Click Start on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen. A menu appears.
2. Select menu item Run.
3. Enter regedt32.
4. Click OK. The Registry Editor window appears.
5. Click on the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE window.
6. Open the System folder.
7. Open the CurrentControlSet folder.
8. Open the Services folder.
9. Click once on the Cdrom folder.
10. In the right window, double-click on Autorun. The DWORD Editor window
appears.
11. In the Data box, enter 0 (zero).
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
12. Click OK.
13. Close the Registry Editor.
5.3.3. Install Windows networking
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Control Panel. The Control Panel window
appears.
3. Open the Network icon.
4. The Network Configuration window displays a message that Windows NT
Networking is not installed.
Note: If this window does not appear, click Cancel. Close the Control Panel
and the Main program group; then skip to Section 5.3.4, Edit the LMHOSTS
file.
5. Click Yes to install networking. The Network Setup Wizard window appears.
6. Select “Wired to the network”.
7. Click Next. The network adapters window appears.
8. Click Start Search. Network adapters are added to the list.
If a message indicates that a network adapter card could not be detected,
recheck the installation of the Ethernet card.
9. When the search is finished, click Next. The network protocols window
appears.
10. Select “TCP/IP Protocol”.
11. Click Next. The network services window appears.
12. Click Next to accept the defaults. The install window appears.
13. Click Next to install files. A window asking for the CD drive letter appears.
14. Enter the CD drive letter and i386. For example,
D:\i386
15. Click Continue.
16. A window displays the setup for the card:
I/O Port Address
0x300
Interrupt Number
10
Transceiver Type
10BaseT
17. Click Continue to accept the defaults.
18. A setup message reports that the parameters are not verifiably correct.
19. Click OK to use them anyway.
20. The DHCP server window appears.
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21. Click No.
22. Network files are copied and installed onto the hard disk.
A. TCP/IP Properties
1. The Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window appears.
2. Enter the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for this computer.
3. Click the DNS tab.
4. Verify that the host name is correct for this computer. (It should be the same as
the computer name.)
5. Click OK.
6. Click Yes or Next to accept the defaults on the remaining setup windows.
7. Click Finish.
8. Click Yes to restart the computer.
5.3.4. Edit the LMHOSTS file
Note: The LMHOSTS file needs to be edited once per system. The same file can
be used for all computers within a system.
1. Insert the floppy disk named E.F. Johnson Site Controller (remote hub
computer) into the A: drive.
2. Open the file named A:\LMHOSTS in an ASCII editor, such as Notepad.
3. Change the IP addresses and host names to those for this system. (See Section
2.3 for information about IP addresses and Section 2.4 for information about
unique host names.)
Example:
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a ‘#’ symbol.
#
# For example:
#
#
102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com
# source server
#
38.25.63.10
x.acme.com
# x client host
#
127.0.0.1
localhost
100.100.201.100
oc-hub
100.100.201.101
oc-chn
100.100.201.200
oc-hst
100.100.202.100
west-hub
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
100.100.203.100
100.100.201.1
100.100.102.2
100.100.103.2
south-hub
oc
west
south
4. Save the changes.
5. Exit the editor.
5.3.5. Change the passwords
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Programs -> Administrative Tools -> User Manager.
A. E.F. Johnson password
1. Open the efjohnson username properties by double clicking on the efjohnson
username. If it does not exist, select menu item User -> New User and enter
efjohnson in the Username field.
2. Enter the E. F. Johnson password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that a check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
B. Administrator password
1. Open the Administrator username in the User Manager window.
2. Enter the Administrator password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that the check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
9. Close the User Manager window.
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5.3.6. Change the system information through the Control Panel
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Control Panel.
3. Open the Network icon.
A. Identification tab
If the computer name is not correct, click the Change button. The Identification
Changes window appears. Change the name and click OK.
B. Protocols tab
1. Select TCP/IP.
2. Click the Properties button. The Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window appears.
3. Click the WINS Address tab.
4. Be sure the Enable LMHOSTS Lookup check box is checked.
5. Click Import LMHOSTS. The Open box appears.
6. Put the floppy disk named E.F. Johnson Site Controller (remote hub computer)
into the A: drive.
7. From the Look in drop down list, select 3-1/2 Floppy (A:).
8. Click Open.
9. Select the lmhosts file.
10. Click Open. The file is imported and the Open box closes.
11. Click OK in the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window.
12. An empty WINS address warning appears.
13. Click Yes to continue.
14. Click Close in the Network window. A message box appears.
15. Remove the disk from the A drive.
16. Click Yes to restart the computer.
C. Change system settings
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Control Panel.
3. Open the System icon. The System Properties window appears.
4. Click the Startup/Shutdown tab.
5. In the System Startup section, change the Show List For entry to 10 seconds.
6. Click the Environment tab.
7. In the Variable box, enter:
TZ
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
8. In the Value box, enter the standard time zone for the location that the
computer will be installed, the offset from UTC (GMT, Zulu), and the daylight
savings time zone.
Timezone
Eastern Standard Time
Central Standard Time
Mountain Standard Time
Pacific Standard Time
Entry
EST5EDT
CST6CDT
MST7MDT
PST8PDT
9. Click the Set button.
10. Click OK to close the System Properties window.
11. Close the Control Panel.
5.3.7. Change the system information in Windows NT Registry
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Run.
3. In the Open field, enter:
regedt32
4. Click OK. The Registry Editor appears.
5. Select the window HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.
A. System folder
1. Open the System folder.
Note: The following steps (2-20) need to be repeated for several folders that are
within the System folder. Return to this point until all folders have been modified.
2. Open one of these folders:
Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
3. Open the Control folder.
4. Open the ComputerName folder.
5. Select the ComputerName folder (which is in the ComputerName folder).
6. In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
7. Select the ActiveComputerName folder (if present in the ComputerName
folder). In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name
to the unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
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8. Close the Control folder.
9. Open the Services folder.
10. Open the Elnk31 folder.
11. Open the Parameters folder.
12. Select the Tcpip folder
13. In the right window, change the following entries by double-clicking on the
entry, changing the value, and clicking OK.
DefaultGateway
IPAddress
SubnetMask
14. Open the NETBT folder (in the Services folder).
15. Select the Parameters folder.
16. Verify the value of EnableLMHOSTS in the right window - it should be 0x1.
If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering 1, setting
Radix to Hex, and then clicking OK.
17. Open the Tcpip folder (in the Services folder).
18. Select the Parameters folder.
19. In the right window, double-click on Hostname, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
20. Close the folder that was opened in step 2.
Note: Return to step 2 under “A. System folder” until all folders have been
modified.
Folders that require changes, if present and not dimmed:
Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
21. Close the System folder, after all folders have been modified.
B. Software folder
1. Open the Software folder.
2. Open the Microsoft folder.
3. Open the Windows NT folder.
4. Open the Current Version folder.
5. Select the Winlogon folder.
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6. Verify the value of DefaultUserName in the right window - it should be
efjohnson. If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering
efjohnson, then clicking OK.
7. Close the Registry Editor window.
C. Copy LMHOSTS to HOSTS
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Programs -> Command Prompt.
3. At the prompt, enter:
cd \winnt\system32\drivers\etc\
copy lmhosts hosts
exit
5.4.
Install OpenView Professional Suite
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Control Panel.
3. Open the Add/Remove Programs icon. The Add/Remove Programs Property
window appears.
4. Click Install.
5. Follow the screen instructions, putting the HP OpenView Professional Suite
CD in the drive and clicking Next and Finish.
6. OpenView’s Setup program starts. Follow the screen instructions and accept
the default values, except for the following items.
Do not install Internet Explorer.
Do not install Acrobat Reader. The license agreement will have to be
agreed to, but select Cancel for the installer.
7. When finished, close the Control Panel.
• Modify DEVICES
1. Open the file named C:\OV\OVFILES\DEVICES in an ASCII editor, such as
Notepad.
2. Add the following line to the top of the list.
“Cisco Router”
1.3.6.1.4.1.9
0x133a ROUTER
0
3. Save the file.
5.5.
Install host computer application
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Control Panel.
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3. Open the Add/Remove Programs icon. The Add/Remove Programs Property
window appears.
4. Click Install.
5. Follow the screen instructions, putting the E.F. Johnson Host Computer disk 1
(Part No. 023-9998-405) in the drive and clicking Next and Finish.
6. The install program starts. Follow the screen instructions and accept the default
values.
7. When finished, close the Control Panel.
A. Set taskbar properties
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Settings -> Taskbar. The Taskbar Properties window appears.
3. Select the Start Menu programs tab.
4. Click the Advanced button. The Exploring-Start Menu window appears.
5. Open the following folder hierarchy.
Winnt
Profiles
AllUsers
StartMenu
Programs
6. Click once on HP OpenView in the Programs folder.
7. In the right window, click once on the HP OpenView icon.
8. Select menu item Edit -> Copy.
9. Click once on the Startup folder (in the Programs folder of step 5).
10. Select menu item Edit -> Paste.
11. Close the Exploring-Start Menu window.
12. Select the Taskbar Options tab in the Taskbar Properties window.
13. Select Autohide.
14. Select Show small icons in start menu.
15. Click OK in the Taskbar Properties window.
B. Finish installing
1. Reboot the computer.
2. After logging on to Windows NT, OpenView should start.
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5.6.
Create OpenView maps
OpenView maps are created to show a visual representation of the network to the
person using the map and to inform the program of the devices that are part of the
network, as well as the information needed to communicate with the devices.
Note: Correct maps are essential for proper alarm notification.
Maps consist of:
• icons (symbols) representing network devices
• icons representing submaps
• lines showing communication links (optional)
• a background image showing geographic location (optional)
A map file is a collection of related submaps. The home submap (typically the
System map) is the first map displayed when OpenView starts (or when the map
file is opened). The System map contains icons for systems. Double-clicking on a
System icon will display a submap that shows Site icons for each site within the
system. Double-clicking on a Site icon will display a submap with icons for all
monitored devices (routers, computers, repeaters, etc.) at that site.
The following information is needed to create maps.
• a list of devices at each site (routers, computers, repeaters, and channel
controllers)
• a unique name (up to 64 characters) for each icon (systems, sites, routers,
computers, repeaters, and channel controllers). OpenView calls this name
an “Object Name”.
• a background image file (optional) and the geographic layout of the sites
(to know where to place icons on the background image). See Section 5.6.7
for file formats.
• IP addresses for network components (routers and computers)
• information about E.F. Johnson components (repeaters, channel controllers,
sites, and systems). In addition to a unique name, the descriptive
information in the following sections will be needed: Section 5.6.1
Creating the System map, Section 5.6.2 Creating a Site map, and Section
5.6.3 Creating a Device map.
The OpenView program is used to create maps.
5.6.1. Create a System map
Follow these steps to create a System map.
1. If an empty untitled window is not displayed, select menu item File -> New.
An empty untitled window will appear.
2. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save As and enter a filename
(append a directory name if necessary). OpenView will assign a .OVM
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extension to the filename. This filename will be part of the window title of each
submap.
3. Name this submap by selecting menu item Edit -> Rename Submap. This name
will be part of the window title for this submap. The maximum length of the
name is 20 characters.
4. Make this submap the home submap by selecting menu item Edit -> Set Home
Submap.
5. Add a background image (optional) for the map by selecting menu item Edit ->
Set Background and then selecting the desired filename. (Background images
are stored in the \OV\BKGROUND\ directory.)
6. Add a System icon by selecting menu item Edit -> Add. The Add toolbox will
appear. Select Compound Object from the next to bottom drop down list box.
Select EFJ System from the bottom drop down list box. Alternatively, to
display icons, click the button to the left of the list; then, select the EFJ System
icon.
EFJ System icon
Move the cursor to the desired map location for the icon and click the mouse
button. The icon will be added to the map and the EFJ System Description
dialog box will appear. (Unless displaying the dialog box has been disabled
with menu item Options -> Customize HP OpenView, Describe Objects as
Added, which is described in Section 5.6.8.)
7. In the EFJ System Description dialog box, enter the following information.
- System Name: Enter a unique name for this system. The name will also
appear under the icon on the map and in some dialog boxes.
- System Number: Each system is assigned a unique number from 1 to 30. This
number is arbitrary, but each system must be different.
- Status Channel Repeater Number: Select the Repeater Number of the
repeaters that are used on the Status Channel.
- Channel Revert MIN: Select the number of simulcast channels that will not
automatically shut down if simulcast failure, repeater failure, or RNT/CIM
Channel Problem alarms occur. This is the minimum number of channels that
will stay operational, even if there are additional problems. To prevent any
channels from automatically reverting, select the number of channels that exist
in the system.
Example: If the system has 10 channels and 8 channels are required to remain
operational, select 8. If problems occur, up to 2 channels that have problems
will be automatically shut down. The remaining 8 channels will stay
operational, even if additional problems occur. Additional changes could be
made manually. If automatic site reverts are configured, they may further
automatically change the system.
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See Section 9.4 for more information about channel reverts and other types of
reverts.
- Allow Status Channel Revert: If there are problems on the Status Channel,
should the system automatically revert the Status Channel? When this check
box is checked, the system can automatically revert the Status Channel. If the
Status Channel should not automatically revert, leave this box unchecked.
8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 to add additional System icons, if needed.
9. If the system’s host computer is at a separate site (not collocated with the
channel controller or repeaters), add the host computer’s router to the System
map. See Section 5.6.3 for adding a router instructions.
10. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
5.6.2. Create a Site map
Follow these steps to create a Site map.
1. Double-click on a System icon (that was placed in the previous section) and a
blank map will appear. The title bar will be named with the filename of the
map and the name of the System icon that was double-clicked.
2. Add a background image (optional) for the map by selecting menu item Edit ->
Set Background and then selecting the desired filename. (Background images
are stored in the \OV\BKGROUND\ directory.)
3. Add a Site icon by selecting menu item Edit -> Add. The Add toolbox will
appear. Select Compound Object from the next to bottom drop down list box.
Select EFJ Site from the bottom drop down list box. Alternatively, to display
icons, click the button to the left of the list; then, select the EFJ Site icon.
EFJ Site icon
Move the cursor to the desired map location for the icon and click the mouse
button. The icon will be added to the map and the EFJ Site Description dialog
box will appear.
4. In the EFJ Site dialog box, enter the following information.
- Site Name: Enter a unique name for this site. The name will also appear under
the icon on the map and in some dialog boxes.
- System Number: Select the number that was assigned to the system that is
associated with this site.
- Site Number: Each site in a system is assigned a unique number from 0 to 31.
Number 0 is reserved for the primary channel controller and number 31 is
reserved for the secondary or backup channel controller. Otherwise, this
number is arbitrary; however, each site in a system must be assigned a different
number.
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- Site Type: Select “Primary Controller” for the site that has the primary
channel controller. Select “Secondary Controller” for the site that has the
secondary or backup channel controller. Select “Remote” for sites that have
repeaters. A channel controller is a separate site, even if it is physically located
with repeaters.
- IP Address: Enter the IP address of the site or channel computer.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 to add additional Site icons. Remember that the Channel
Controller is a site.
6. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
5.6.3. Create a Device map
Follow these steps to create a Device map.
1. Double-click on a Site icon (that was placed in the previous section) and a
blank map will appear. The title bar will be named with the filename of the
map and the name of the Site icon that was double-clicked.
2. Add the devices that are at the site. Instructions for installing the most common
devices are below.
3. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
4. Repeat as necessary to add devices to other sites.
• Router
1. Add a Router icon by selecting menu item Edit -> Add. The Add toolbox will
appear.
2. Select Component from the next to bottom drop down list box.
3. Select Cisco 2501 or Router from the bottom drop down list box. Alternatively,
to display icons, click the button to the left of the list; then, select the router
icon.
2500
Cisco 2500-series router icon
Router icon (generic)
4. Move the cursor to the desired map location for the icon and click the mouse
button. The icon will be added to the map and the Describe dialog box will
appear.
5. In the Describe dialog box, enter a unique name for this router and enter a label
that will appear as a name under the icon on the map. Also, click the Net
Address button to enter the IP addresses of the router. The first IP address entry
should be the IP address that talks to the host computer, because the first listed
address will be used for pinging. MAC (Media Access Control) addresses are
not required.
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• Site or channel computer
1. Add an icon for the site or channel computer by selecting menu item Edit ->
Add. The Add toolbox will appear.
2. Select Computer from the next to bottom drop down list box.
3. Select Personal Computer from the bottom drop down list box. Alternatively, to
display icons, click the button to the left of the list; then, select the Personal
Computer icon.
Site or Channel (Personal) computer icon
4. Move the cursor to the desired map location for the icon and click the mouse
button. The Describe dialog box will appear.
5. In the Describe dialog box, enter a unique name for this computer and enter a
label that will appear as a name under the icon on the map. Also, click the Net
Address button to enter the IP address of the device. MAC (Media Access
Control) addresses are not required.
6. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
• Repeater or channel controller
1. Add a Repeater icon by selecting menu item Edit -> Add. The Add toolbox will
appear.
2. Select Component from the next to bottom drop down list box.
3. Select EFJ Repeater from the bottom drop down list box. Alternatively, to
display icons, click the button to the left of the list; then, select the EFJ
Repeater icon.
EFJ Repeater icon
4. Move the cursor to the desired map location for the icon and click the mouse
button. The icon will be added to the map and the EFJ Repeater Description
dialog box will appear.
5. In the EFJ Repeater dialog box, enter the following information.
- Repeater Name: Enter a unique name for this repeater. The name will also
appear under the icon on the map and in some dialog boxes.
- System Number: Select the number that was assigned to the system that is
associated with this site.
- Site Number: Select the number that was assigned to the site that is associated
with this repeater.
- Repeater Number: Each repeater was programmed with a repeater number
during installation/configuration. Each repeater at a site must be programmed
with a different number from 1 to 30. The number entered in OpenView must
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be the same as the number programmed into the repeater. All repeaters on the
same channel need to have the same repeater number.
- Repeater Type: Select the mode for this repeater.
Disabled: The repeater is not functioning.
Multi-Net: (Not used in a simulcast system.) Multi-Net signaling is a
trunked method that provides enhanced features. It can be multi-site,
where each site has different channels and mobile stations are
automatically switched to a different channel when they drive into the
coverage of a different site.
Simulcast Controller: The “repeater” is a channel controller, which makes
several simulcast remote repeaters look like one repeater to the RNT
(Radio Network Terminal, which controls the operating features of the
radio system). Simulcast is a transmit method where each site in a system
has the same channels and the channel audio is rebroadcast at each site.
Simulcast Remote: A repeater that is part of a simulcast system.
- Rptr Power Type: Low power repeaters have adjustable output from 25 to 75
watts. High power repeaters have adjustable output from 75 to 160 or 175
watts.
- Channel: Select the channel number that represents the transmit and receive
frequencies for the repeater. Each repeater was programmed with a channel
number during installation/configuration. Refer to Appendix A for 800 MHz
channel numbers and Appendix B for 900 MHz channel numbers.
- Status Channel: When this check box is checked, the repeater is on the Status
Channel. The Status Channel transmits update information for all calls. There is
only one Status Channel in a simulcast system.
- Power Level: Select the level of output power that the repeater uses for
normal operation.
- IAC Alarms Descriptions: Enter text to define custom Alarm Log descriptions
for IAC alarms. IAC (Interface Alarm Card) alarms are external inputs on the
IAC in repeaters and channel controllers. These alarms will be custom to each
installation.
Note: For a bi-directional microwave system, the IAC 1 input for repeater 1 at
each site should be configured so that the microwave default direction does not
cause an alarm. See Section 5.7 for bi-directional configuration.
- Severity: Use the Severity drop down list boxes to select an alarm level for
each IAC alarm.
6. Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
5.6.4. Add lines and text
Lines may be added to a map to show backbone links.
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Lines and text are added from the Add toolbox (select menu item Edit -> Add).
There are two types of lines. The button with a straight line will add a line that
will stay where it was drawn even though icons are moved. The button with a line
that has vertical end-pieces will draw a line that will move with the icon. Line
weights can be selected from the drop down list box.
Text can be added with the text (T) button. The size of characters can be selected
from the drop down list and bold or underline can be selected with the “B” and
“U” buttons. OpenView uses the Windows system default font.
Clicking on the line and text buttons with Ctrl+click will allow multiple
operations to be performed without reselecting the button.
Save the map by selecting menu item File -> Save or by pressing Ctrl+S.
5.6.5. Set the default map
Define a default startup map by selecting Options -> Customize HP OpenView
and entering the name of the map in the Default Map box. If a default map is not
defined, OpenView will start with a blank untitled map.
5.6.6. Protect the map
Maps should be protected to avoid accidental changes. To protect the map, select
menu item Options -> Protect Map and enter the required password. Verify the
password by entering it again in the next box. When maps are unprotected, they
can be edited and an operator can open new maps by selecting menu item File ->
Open. To unprotect maps, select menu item Options -> Unprotect Map and enter a
password. This menu item is a toggle between unprotecting and protecting maps.
5.6.7. Format for background maps
Background maps are optional graphic files that normally show the outline of the
county and major roads. Maps can be made in a graphics program, such as PC
Paintbrush, and should be stored in the directory C:\OV\BKGROUND\.
Computer monitor size and the number of submaps normally displayed should be
considered when deciding the size to create a background map. Maps can be
reduced within OpenView; however, the icon names will not show on reduced
maps. A typical size is approximately 375 pixels wide and 325 pixels high.
Background maps can be created in any program that will save a BMP (Windows
3.0 or later bitmap) graphics file or a TIFF graphics file (standard TIFF file
format with .TIF file extension. TIFF version 5.0 or later are not supported).
Typical resolutions are 72 or 96 pixels per inch (ppi).
5.6.8. Options for map creation
• Check maps: Selecting menu item File -> Check Map runs a test to see that all
compound object icons (system and site) have corresponding maps. If there are no
problems, this menu item is dimmed.
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• Print list of Object Names: Selecting menu item File -> Print Object List will
print a list of all Object Names assigned in the current map. Object names are
names that were assigned to devices in the Describe dialog boxes. The list will be
printed to the workstation printer.
• Number of symbols: The maximum number of symbols (icons, submaps, text
blocks, and lines) can be set by selecting menu item Options -> Customize HP
OpenView. The range is 8 to 32,760, with a default of 5000. OpenView rounds
the entry to the next multiple of 8 and the change takes effect the next time
OpenView is started.
• Describe Objects as Added: The Describe dialog box can be displayed after
each icon is added to a map, or OpenView can be set to not display the dialog box
each time. In which case, each icon will need to be described by right-clicking on
the icon and selecting Describe, or by selecting the icon and selecting menu item
Edit -> Describe. Describe Objects as Added can be changed by selecting menu
item Options -> Customize HP OpenView.
• Create Submaps Automatically: OpenView can be set to automatically create
submaps for Site and System icons when the icons are added to the maps, or
submaps can be created manually by selecting menu item Edit -> New Submap. If
created manually, give a map the same name as the icon that represents it. Create
Submaps Automatically can be changed by selecting menu item Options ->
Customize HP OpenView.
• Autodiscovery is another method of creating maps, but is not recommended for
an E.F. Johnson radio network.
• Maximum Number of Messages: This option sets the size of OpenView’s
message queue. The range is 8 to 120, with a default of 8. A larger setting may be
desired if there are normally many map status changes. The size can be changed
by selecting menu item Options -> Customize HP OpenView. OpenView must
then be restarted for the change to take effect.
5.7.
Edit site and system settings
Note: This menu item will only be available if the service.ini file was present in
the C:\SITECTR\ directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
The Edit Offsets dialog box is used to configure several site and system settings.
The Save System button will be enabled if changes have been made to the System
Settings. The Save Site button will be enabled if changes have been made to the
selected site’s settings or if the selected site is not in the configuration file.
The site names are obtained from the OpenView map and the settings are
obtained from a configuration file. During initial configuration and when a site is
added to the system, a site must be saved even though no changes have been
made to the settings. Saving the site adds it to the configuration file or modifies
the settings in the file.
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1. Select a System icon.
2. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> Edit Offsets. The Edit Offsets
dialog box appears.
Site Settings
3. Select a site in the site list.
4. Enter the overlap offset value, if known. Enter a hyphen before negative
numbers. This value can be from -100 to 100 microseconds. The simulcast
system must be recalibrated if this value is changed. (See Sections 7.2 and 7.3
for information about calibration. See Section 7.4 for more information about
overlap offsets.)
5. If a channel bank is used to transmit to the repeater site, select Channel Bank
(so that the check box is checked). A channel bank is not used when a repeater
site is collocated with a channel controller site. This setting affects the phase
delay to be used for each site.
6. Click the Save Site button.
7. Repeat steps 3 through 6 for each site.
System Settings
8. The Buffer Delay Min value sets the lowest buffer delay in the system. This
value can be from 250 to 2000 microseconds. Buffer delay is the amount of
time the repeater delays after receiving a signal before transmitting the signal.
9. If the system has a bi-directional microwave, select Bi-Directional (so that the
check box is checked). This change will take affect after OpenView is restarted
and each Repeater 1 Describe dialog box is opened and saved.
After restarting OpenView, right-click on a repeater 1 icon and select Describe
to open the EFJ Repeater Description dialog box. The IAC alarm 1 description
will be updated automatically. Click OK. Repeat for the repeater 1 icon at
every site in the system.
10. If the system has a redundant microwave, select Redundant (so that the check
box is checked). A redundant system has two channel controllers that can
control the system. Only one channel controller is in use at a time. This
change will take affect after OpenView is restarted.
11. Click the Save System button.
5.8.
Configure OpenView polling
Polling is configured from within the OpenView program.
5.8.1. Add devices to polling list
1. Select the map icons for all routers and computers in the system. Shift+click or
Ctrl+click to select multiple icons.
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2. Select menu item Monitor -> Polling -> Add Device(s). The IP addresses of the
selected devices will be added to the polling list. If a device has more than one
address, another dialog box will ask which address(es) to poll. Select the
address that communicates with the host computer. If a device that does not
have an IP address is selected, an error message will be displayed.
5.8.2. Set polling defaults
1. Select menu item Monitor -> Polling -> Configure System Defaults.
2. Set Interval to 1 minute.
3. From the Device Down Severity drop down list box, select Major.
4. Select Update Map Status, Sound Bell, and Log (so that the check box is
checked).
5. From the Device Up Severity drop down list box, select Normal.
6. Select Update Map Status, Sound Bell, and Log (so that the check box is
checked).
7. Click OK.
8. Select menu item Monitor -> Polling -> Start Polling.
If a system requires a different polling configuration, see the polling section of the
Network Management online help or the System Manager Manual for additional
polling information.
5.8.3. Verify polling settings
Select menu item Monitor -> Polling -> View Polling List.
A dialog box will show the name, interval, and IP address for each polled device.
At the bottom of the dialog box, the total number of entries is displayed and also
whether polling is on or off.
5.9.
Configure OpenView traps
Traps are configured from within the OpenView program.
1. Select menu item Monitor -> Customize Traps.
2. Click the Add Device Class button.
3. From the list, select the entry with a Device Class Name of Cisco Router, and
an Enterprise of 1.3.6.1.4.1.9.
4. Click OK.
5. Click the Add Trap button.
6. Select Specific in the Generic list.
7. Enter 0 in the Specific field.
8. Click OK.
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9. In the Description field, enter:
Cisco Router Reloading
10. Select Update Map Status, Sound Bell, and Log (so that the check boxes are
checked).
11. From the Severity drop down list, select Warning.
12. Click the Add Trap button.
13. Select Specific in the Generic list.
14. Enter 1 in the Specific field.
15. Click OK.
16. In the Description field, enter:
Telnet Connection Closed
17. De-select Update Map Status, Sound Bell, and Log (so that the check boxes
are not checked).
18. From the Severity drop down list, select Informational.
19. Click OK.
5.10. Set OpenView passwords
These passwords are set from within the OpenView program.
5.10.1.Log in passwords
To set log in passwords, select menu item Options -> Set Password. Select a
security level from the drop down list box. Enter the password into the Password
box. Verify the password by entering it again in the next box.
Log in passwords are requested when OpenView is started and after someone has
logged out. There are three levels of security. The supervisor password gives
access to all OpenView functions. The operator password gives access to the
functions described in the operator’s manual and the observer password gives
access to very few functions. Passwords are case sensitive.
5.10.2.Protect maps password
To protect maps, select menu item Options -> Protect Map and enter a password.
Verify the password by entering it again in the next box. This menu item is a
toggle between protecting and unprotecting maps. To unprotect the maps, select
menu item Options -> Unprotect Map and enter the required password.
If the password is lost, it can be deleted from the OVWIN.INI file and the maps
will be unprotected (until a password is entered). A coded version of the password
is stored in the Key entry of the [OpenView] section. OpenView must be restarted
for the change to take affect.
The map password makes the maps read-only, which provides protection from
accidental changes. When protected, the map can not be edited (for example,
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changing the layout of the icons or changing the background image). Alarms will
still function normally and icon colors will be updated. When logged on with the
operator password, maps can be opened but they cannot be edited.
Note: If operators are given the map password, they can change the map
password.
5.10.3.SNMP passwords
Note: These passwords are not needed for normal day-to-day operation of the
system. They are used by OpenView applications, such as the SNMP Manager
and Autodiscovery.
Passwords to read and write information to SNMP devices are set by selecting
menu item Options -> Customize Device Access.
To modify system defaults, select <System Default> from the Network Addresses
list and then click the Modify button.
To modify information for a specific device, select the IP address of the device
from the Network Addresses list and click the Modify button. Only devices that
do not use system defaults will be listed in the Network Addresses list.
To change information for a device that is not listed, click the Add button and
enter the IP address of the device. Alternatively, select a map icon, select menu
item Options -> Customize Device Access, and click the Add button. The IP
address of the selected map icon will already be filled in.
To delete a device (or return it to system defaults), selected the device in the list
and click the Delete button.
Community: Enter the SNMP password that needs to be sent to read the MIB
variables in a device. This password is case sensitive and must be the same as the
password in the device. (Corresponds to router password: SNMP community
password ro.)
Set Community: Enter the SNMP password that needs to be sent to write
changes to the MIB variables in a device. This password is case sensitive and
must be the same as the password in the device. (Corresponds to router password:
SNMP community password rw.)
5.11. Service functions
If the service.ini file is present when OpenView starts, extra functions are
available for service personal. The service.ini file is stored on disk 1 of the E.F.
Johnson Host Computer disk set.
To use service functions, exit OpenView and copy the service.ini file from the
floppy disk to the hard disk directory C:\SITECTR\. When OpenView is started,
the service.ini file will be read and then deleted from the hard disk.
Service.ini adds the following menu items to OpenView.
• System -> Calibration -> Edit Offsets. See Sections 5.7 and 7.4.3.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
• System -> Calibration -> Threshold Alignment. See Section 7.1.
• System -> Calibration -> SMC Configuration. See Section 7.5.
• Repeater -> Setup State. See Section 9.5.1.
• Repeater -> Normal State. See Section 9.51.
5.12. Configure Windows NT 3.51
Note: This section is provided as a reference for systems using Windows NT
version 3.51.
Windows NT has been installed on the host computer; however, it was probably
not configured with the network information needed for the system. Configuring
Windows involves opening several folders and entering information that includes
the following.
• IP addresses (See Section 2.3 for information on assigning IP addresses.)
• Unique host names (See Section 2.4 for information on assigning host
names.)
• Usernames and passwords (See Section 2.5.2.)
• Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
• Default gateway: The IP address of the router port that will be connected to
the Ethernet port of this computer.
5.12.1.Enter a password
1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del. A Welcome box appears.
2. Press the enter key (leaving the password box blank). The Log on Message box
reports: “Your password has expired and must be changed”.
3. Click OK. The Change Password box appears.
4. Enter the password for the computer in the Enter New Password box. Asterisks
will appear on the screen as the characters are typed.
5. Verify the password by also entering it in the Confirm New Password box.
6. Click OK. A message confirms that the password has been changed.
7. Click OK.
5.12.2.Install Windows networking
1. The Program Manager and Main windows should be open. If not, open them.
2. Open the Control Panel.
3. Open the Network icon.
4. The Network Settings window displays a message that Windows NT
Networking is not installed.
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Note: If this window does not appear, click Cancel. Close the Control Panel
and the Main program group; then skip to Section 5.12.3, Edit the LMHOSTS
file.
5. Click Yes to install networking. The Windows NT Setup box appears.
6. Verify that the setup box displays: A:\i386
7. Click Continue. A Windows Installation message appears.
A. Verify network card installation
1. The Network Adapter Card Detection window appears.
2. Click Continue.
3. The computer detects the card that is installed and displays:
Setup has detected the following network adapter card in your computer:
3Com Etherlink III ISA/PCMCIA Adapter
If the message says that a network adapter card could not be detected, recheck
the installation of the Ethernet card.
4. Click Continue.
5. A window displays the setup for the card:
I/O Port Address
0x300
Interrupt Number
10
Transceiver Type
10BaseT
6. Click Continue to accept the defaults.
7. A setup message reports that the parameters are not verifiably correct.
8. Click OK to use them anyway.
B. Installation options
1. A Windows NT setup box appears.
2. De-select “NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Transport” (so that the check box is
not checked).
3. Select “TCP/IP Transport” (so that the check box is checked).
4. Click Continue. A TCP/IP Installation Options box appears.
5. Select “Simple TCP/IP Services” (so that the check box is checked). Leave all
other selections (boxes) as is.
6. Click Continue. Several messages appear.
7. Insert disks as requested, and click OK after inserting each disk.
C. Network settings
1. A Network Settings box appears.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
2. Click OK.
3. Messages appear for configuring the network and setting up the protocol.
4. The TCP/IP Configuration box appears.
5. Enter the IP address for the computer.
6. Enter the Subnet Mask for the computer.
7. Enter the Default Gateway IP address for the computer.
8. Click OK. A Setup is Starting the Network message appears.
9. The Domain/Workgroup Settings box appears.
10. Click OK. A message reports that networking is now installed.
11. Click the Restart Computer button.
12. A message reports that shutdown is in progress and the computer reboots.
5.12.3.Edit the LMHOSTS file
Note: The LMHOSTS file needs to be edited once per system. The same file can
be used for all computers within a system.
1. Insert the floppy disk named SITECTRL (remote hub computer) into the A:
drive.
2. Open the file named A:\LMHOSTS in an ASCII editor, such as Notepad.
3. Change the IP addresses and host names to those for this system. (See Section
2.3 for information about IP addresses and Section 2.4 for information about
unique host names.)
Example:
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a ‘#’ symbol.
#
# For example:
#
#
102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com
# source server
#
38.25.63.10
x.acme.com
# x client host
#
127.0.0.1
localhost
100.100.201.100
oc-hub
100.100.201.101
oc-chn
100.100.201.200
oc-hst
100.100.202.100
west-hub
100.100.203.100
south-hub
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100.100.201.1
100.100.102.2
100.100.103.2
oc
west
south
4. Save the changes.
5. Exit the editor.
5.12.4.Change the passwords
1. Open the Administrative Tools program group.
2. Open the User Manager.
A. E.F. Johnson password
1. Open the efjohnson username properties by double clicking on the efjohnson
username. If it does not exist, select menu item User -> New User and enter
efjohnson in the Username field.
2. Enter the E. F. Johnson password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that the check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
B. Administrator password
1. Open the Administrator username in the User Manager window.
2. Enter the Administrator password in the Password field and in the Confirm
Password field.
3. Select Password Never Expires, so that the check box is checked.
4. Click the Groups button.
5. Verify that Administrators is listed in the Member Of box. If it is not listed,
select Administrators in the Not Member Of box and click the Add button.
6. If anything other than Administrator is listed in the Member Of box, select
them and click the Remove button.
7. Click OK.
8. Click OK in the User Properties window.
9. Close the User Manager and Administrative Tools windows.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
5.12.5.Change the system information through the Control Panel
1. Open the Main program group.
2. Open the Control Panel.
3. Open the Network icon.
A. Change the computer name
1. Click the Change button next to Computer Name.
2. Enter the unique host name for this computer (see Section 2.4).
3. Click OK.
B. Change TCP/IP settings
1. Select TCP/IP Protocol in the scroll box.
2. Click on Configure.
3. Enter the IP Address, Subnet mask, and Default Gateway for this computer.
4. Click the DNS button.
5. Change the Host Name to match the computer name entered above (the unique
host name for this computer).
6. Click OK.
Import the LMHOSTS file
1. Insert the floppy disk named SITECTRL (remote hub computer) into the A:
drive.
2. Click the Advanced button.
3. Click the Import LMHOSTS button.
4. Enter A:\ in the dialog box.
5. Click the Import button. The lmhosts file is imported.
6. Be sure the Enable LMHOSTS Lookup check box is checked in the Windows
Networking Parameters section.
7. Click OK to close the Advanced window.
8. Click OK to close the TCP/IP Configuration window.
9. Click OK to close the Network Settings window.
C. Change system settings
1. Open the System icon in the Control Panel.
2. In the Operating System section, change the Show List For entry to 10 seconds.
3. In the Variable box, enter:
PATH
4. In the Value box, enter:
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
C:\OV;C:\UTILITY
5. Click the Set button.
6. In the Variable box, enter:
TZ
7. In the Value box, enter the standard time zone for the location that the
computer will be installed, the offset from UTC (GMT, Zulu), and the daylight
savings time zone.
Timezone
Eastern Standard Time
Central Standard Time
Mountain Standard Time
Pacific Standard Time
Entry
EST5EDT
CST6CDT
MST7MDT
PST8PDT
8. Click the Set button.
9. Click OK to close the System window.
10. Close the Control Panel.
D. Copy LMHOSTS to HOSTS
1. Open the File Manager.
2. Open the \WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\ETC\ folder.
3. Select LMHOSTS.
4. Select menu item File -> Copy.
5. In the To box, enter HOSTS. Click OK.
6. A Confirm File Replace message box appears. Click Yes.
7. Close the File Manager.
8. Close the Main program group.
5.12.6.Change the system information in Windows NT Registry
1. From the Program Manager, select menu item File -> Run.
2. In the Command line field, enter:
regedt32
3. Click OK.
4. Select the window HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.
A. System folder
1. Open the System folder.
Note: The following steps (2-20) need to be repeated for several folders that are
within the System folder. Return to this point until all folders have been modified.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
2. Open one of these folders:
Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
3. Open the Control folder.
4. Open the ComputerName folder.
5. Select the ComputerName folder (which is in the ComputerName folder).
6. In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
7. Select the ActiveComputerName folder (if present in the ComputerName
folder). In the right window, double-click on ComputerName, change the name
to the unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
8. Close the Control folder.
9. Open the Services folder.
10. Open the Elnk31 folder.
11. Open the Parameters folder.
12. Select the Tcpip folder
13. In the right window, change the following entries by double-clicking on the
entry, changing the value, and clicking OK.
DefaultGateway
IPAddress
SubnetMask
14. Open the NETBT folder (in the Services folder).
15. Select the Parameters folder.
16. Verify the value of EnableLMHOSTS in the right window - it should be 0x1.
If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering 1, setting
Radix to Hex, and then clicking OK.
17. Open the Tcpip folder (in the Services folder).
18. Select the Parameters folder.
19. In the right window, double-click on Hostname, change the name to the
unique host name for this computer, then click OK.
20. Close the folder that was opened in step 2.
Note: Return to step 2 under “A. System folder” until all folders have been
modified.
Folders that require changes, if present and not dimmed:
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Clone
ControlSet001
ControlSet002
ControlSet003
ControlSet004
CurrentControlSet
21. Close the System folder, after all folders have been modified.
B. Software folder
1. Open the Software folder.
2. Open the Microsoft folder.
3. Open the Windows NT folder.
4. Open the Current Version folder.
5. Select the Winlogon folder.
6. Verify the value of DefaultUserName in the right window - it should be
efjohnson. If required, change the value by double-clicking on it, entering
efjohnson, then clicking OK.
7. Close the Registry Editor window.
5.13. Install OpenView Work Group Node Manager
Note: This section is provided as a reference for systems using Windows NT
version 3.51 and HP OpenView Work Group Node Manager (not Professional
Suite).
1. Insert the first installation disk into the floppy disk drive. (The name of the disk
may be similar to HP OpenView for Windows Work Group Node Manager
Disk 1.)
2. From the Program Manager, select menu item File-> Run.
3. In the Command line field, enter:
A:\SETUP
4. Click OK.
5. The HP OpenView for Windows Initializing Setup message box displays.
6. A Welcome box displays.
7. Click Continue.
8. The default path box displays.
9. Click Continue to accept the default Destination Path of C:\OV.
10. The HP OpenView Applications box displays.
11. Select SNMP over TCP/IP Communications, so that the check box is checked.
12. Click Continue.
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HOST COMPUTER CONFIGURATION
13. Insert additional disks as requested.
14. The Setup Successful message box displays.
15. Click OK.
This completes installation and the HP OpenView program group has been placed
in the Program Manager.
5.14. Other files
Note: This section is provided as a reference for systems using Windows NT
version 3.51 and HP OpenView Work Group Node Manager (not Professional
Suite).
5.14.1.Install additional files
1. Create the following directory on the hard disk.
C:\SITECTR\
2. Copy all files from the following disks/directories to the directory created in
step 1.
Host Sitectr Disk 1 - all files
Host Sitectr Disk 2 - all files
Host Sitectr Disk 3 - files in the main directory
3. Create the following directory on the hard disk.
C:\SITECTR\SYMBOLS\
4. Copy all files from the following disk directory to the directory created in
step 3.
Host Sitectr Disk 4 - files in the A:\SYMBOLS\ directory
5. Create the following directory on the hard disk.
C:\UTILITY\
6. Copy all files from the following disk directory to the directory created in
step 5.
Host Sitectr Disk 3 - files in the A:\UTILITY\ directory
7. If background maps will be used, copy the graphics files (normally .bmp files)
to the following directory. (See Section 5.6.7 for creating background maps.)
C:\OV\BKGROUND\
5.14.2.Modify DEVICES
1. Open the file named C:\OV\OVFILES\DEVICES in an ASCII editor, such as
Notepad.
2. Add the following line to the top of the list.
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“Cisco Router”
1.3.6.1.4.1.9
3. Save the file.
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0x133a ROUTER
0
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INSTALLATION
SECTION
6. Installation
Figure 6-1 shows an overview of the cables to install Network Management
equipment. See Section 2.2 for diagrams of different types of sites.
CAUTION: Flat and round cables with RJ-45 connectors are used for standard
Ethernet cables, Ethernet crossover cables, and serial cables. Each type of cable is
wired differently. Ethernet cables must be twisted-pair cables. Also, the colors of
the wires in the cables may not always be the same or be used for the same
function.
CAUTION: DB-9 to RJ-45 adapters are not all wired the same. The following
two adapters can not be used interchangeably.
• The adapter at the computer end of the serial cable that is used to connect
the computer to the router for configuration.
• The adapter at the computer end of the serial cable that is used to connect
the computer to the repeater or channel controller MBC for installation.
This adapter is also used (with a different cable) to connect the computer to
the repeater or channel controller for programming.
Note: For a bi-directional microwave system, the IAC 1 input for repeater 1 at
each site should be configured so that the microwave default direction does not
cause an alarm.
6.1.
MBC in repeaters
One MBC (message bridge card) is installed at each repeater site. The MBC is
normally installed in repeater 1 and can be placed in any slot except the last slot
of the repeater. Configure the card as described in Section 6.3 and then wire it to
the site computer as described in Section 6.4.
6.2.
MBC in channel controllers
One MBC (message bridge card) is installed at a channel controller site. The
MBC is normally installed in the first shelf and must be placed in the first set of
cards. Configure the card as described in Section 6.3 and then wire it to the site
computer as described in Section 6.5.
6-1
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INSTALLATION
Figure 6-1. Cables for installing Network Management equipment
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6-2
INSTALLATION
Channel Bank
Channel Bank
DB-37 c onnec tor
on MA-412 c ard
RS-449 c able
10 feet
(585-1156-054)
High-density
DB-60 c onnec tor
Router
RJ-45 c onnec tor (515-2006-056)
may require AUI/10BaseT transceiver
(585-1156-080)
Standard Ethernet cable
328 feet maximum
(597-0009-010)
If no hub
Crossover Ethernet cable
328 feet maximum
(to any one c omputer)
RJ-45 c onnec tors
(597-9000-00x)
RJ-45 c onnec tor
(515-2006-056)
Standard Ethernet cable
328 feet maximum
(597-0009-010)
Hub
RJ-45 c onnec tor
(515-2006-056)
RJ-45 c onnec tor
(515-2006-056)
Site and/or Channel
Computers
RJ-45 c onnec tor
(515-2006-056)
RJ-45 c onnec tor
with DB-9 to RJ-45 adapter
Standard Ethernet cable
328 feet maximum
(597-0009-010)
Serial cable
50 feet maximum
(023-2100-313)
RJ-45 c onnec tor
(515-2006-056)
Ground wire to Ground pin
Rxd wire to com49 pin
Txd wire to c om17 pin
Host Computer
MBC
in Repeater or
Channel Controller
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INSTALLATION
6.3.
MBC configuration
Message Bridge Cards (MBCs) from stock need to be configured for Network
Management functions. Serialization of the cards should have been performed by
production, before the cards were sent to staging.
MBCs also need to have code flashed into them and need to be configured.
6.3.1. Flash code into MBC
The code in a file named MBC_ONLY.HEX is flashed into the MBCs using the
DWN_BOSS.EXE program
1. Be sure the MBC rear panel connections (COM 17 and COM 49) are not
connected to the site controller computer. If these are connected, unplug the
cable from the site controller computer COM port.
2. Connect a computer to the MBC’s laptop port.
3. Run the flash program with the command “dwn_boss mbc_only.hex”. This
loads the MBC code into the card.
4. When completed, the MBC card will display F on the front panel 7-segment
display.
6.3.2. Configure MBC
1. Start the 2000pgmr software using the engineering test mode switch
(2000pgmr -e).
2. Select the menu item Hardware -> Tools -> Raw Rx/Tx.
3. Be sure the MODE is set to 0.
4. Enter 34 00. Press Enter.
This configures the MBC card as a primary bridge card and the 7-segment display
will show 0. Proper operation is indicated by rapid flashing of the green LED on
the MBC card and a 0 on the display.
Although not currently supported, an MBC card may be configured as a
secondary bridge card by entering 34 01 in step 4.
6.4.
Site computer to repeater
The Message Bridge Cable Kit (E.F. Johnson part number 023-2100-313)
contains a cable and adapter for connecting the site computer to a repeater that
has an MBC installed. The DB-9 end of the adapter plugs into the DB-9 serial
(COM) port of the computer. The RJ-45 cable connector plugs into the RJ-45 end
of the adapter. At the repeater end, the receive, transmit, and ground wires are
attached to the terminal block as shown in the following chart.
Receive
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Part No: 001-0690-201
DB-9
pin
2
RJ-45
pin
4
Repeater (with MBC)
input
com49 (pin 10)
6-4
INSTALLATION
Transmit
Ground
DB-9
pin
3
5
RJ-45
pin
3
2
Repeater (with MBC)
input
com17 (pin 9)
ground (pins 21 or 22)
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connector
with the cable towards you, the locking mechanism down, and the connector pins
facing up.
This cable must not be more than 50 feet long.
6.5.
Channel computer to channel controller
The Message Bridge Cable Kit (E.F. Johnson part number 023-2100-313)
contains a cable and adapter for connecting the channel computer to the channel
controller shelf that has an MBC installed. The DB-9 end of the adapter plugs into
the DB-9 serial (COM) port of the computer. The RJ-45 cable connector plugs
into the RJ-45 end of the adapter. At the channel controller end, the receive,
transmit, and ground wires are attached to the top-left terminal block as shown in
the following chart.
Receive
Transmit
Ground
DB-9
pin
2
3
5
RJ-45
pin
4
3
2
Channel Controller (with MBC)
input
com49 (pin 32)
com17 (pin 29)
ground (pins 21, 22, 23, or 24)
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connector
with the cable towards you, the locking mechanism down, and the connector pins
facing up.
This cable must not be more than 50 feet long.
6.6.
Router to site/channel computer
When there is no hub, an Ethernet crossover cable is used to connect the router to
the site computer or to the channel computer. The Ethernet crossover cable is E.F.
Johnson part number 597-9000-00x Ethernet Cables - Anixter 10BaseT crossover.
The x in the part number indicates cable lengths according to the following chart.
x
1
2
3
cable length
1 ft.
3 ft.
7 ft
x
4
5
cable length
14 ft.
25 ft.
This cable connects to the RJ-45 port of the computer and to the RJ-45 (or AUI)
port of the router. An AUI port requires an AUI to 10BaseT transceiver adapter
(E.F. Johnson part number 585-1156-080 AUI/10BaseT Micro Transceiver).
6-5
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INSTALLATION
The cable length may be up to 328 feet. Custom lengths may be made by
crimping RJ-45 connectors to standard Ethernet cable.
Ethernet Crossover Cable Wiring Chart
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Color
white-orange
orange
white-green
blue
white-blue
green
white-brown
brown
Twisted Pair
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
RJ-45
3
6
1
4
5
2
7
8
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connectors
with the cables towards you, the locking mechanisms down, and the connector
pins facing up.
6.7.
Hub to site/channel computer
An Ethernet cable is used to connect the hub to the site/channel computer. This
cable connects to the RJ-45 port of the computer and to any RJ-45 port of the hub.
The cable length may be up to 328 feet and is made by crimping RJ-45 connectors
to standard Ethernet cable.
Cable: E.F. Johnson part number 597-0009-010 - Ethernet Cable - 4 Twisted pair,
Blk PVC jacket, 24 AWG solid wire
RJ-45 connectors: E.F. Johnson part number 515-2006-056 - RJ-45 Modular
Connector, 8 wire x 8 position, keyed, 24 AWG solid wire
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6-6
INSTALLATION
Ethernet Cable Wiring Chart
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Color
white-orange
orange
white-green
blue
white-blue
green
white-brown
brown
Twisted Pairs
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connectors
with the cables towards you, the locking mechanisms down, and the connector
pins facing up.
6.8.
Hub to host computer
An Ethernet cable is used to connect the hub to the host computer. This cable
connects to the RJ-45 port of the computer and to any RJ-45 port of the hub. The
cable length may be up to 328 feet and is made by crimping RJ-45 connectors to
standard Ethernet cable.
Cable: E.F. Johnson part number 597-0009-010 - Ethernet Cable - 4 Twisted pair,
Blk PVC jacket, 24 AWG solid wire
RJ-45 connectors: E.F. Johnson part number 515-2006-056 - RJ-45 Modular
Connector, 8 wire x 8 position, keyed, 24 AWG solid wire
Ethernet Cable Wiring Chart
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Color
white-orange
orange
white-green
blue
white-blue
green
white-brown
brown
Twisted Pairs
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connectors
with the cables towards you, the locking mechanisms down, and the connector
pins facing up.
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INSTALLATION
6.9.
Router to host computer
When there is no hub, an Ethernet crossover cable is used to connect the router to
the site computer or to the channel computer. The Ethernet crossover cable is E.F.
Johnson part number 597-9000-00x Ethernet Cables - Anixter 10BaseT crossover.
The x in the part number indicates cable lengths according to the following chart.
x
1
2
3
cable length
1 ft.
3 ft.
7 ft
x
4
5
cable length
14 ft.
25 ft.
This cable connects to the RJ-45 port of the computer and to the RJ-45 (or AUI)
port of the router. An AUI port requires an AUI to 10BaseT transceiver adapter
(E.F. Johnson part number 585-1156-080 AUI/10BaseT Micro Transceiver).
The cable length may be up to 328 feet. Custom lengths may be made by
crimping RJ-45 connectors to standard Ethernet cable.
Ethernet Crossover Cable Wiring Chart
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Color
white-orange
orange
white-green
blue
white-blue
green
white-brown
brown
Twisted Pair
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
RJ-45
3
6
1
4
5
2
7
8
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connectors
with the cables towards you, the locking mechanisms down, and the connector
pins facing up.
6.10. Hub to router
An Ethernet cable is used to connect the hub to the router. The cable length may
be up to 328 feet and is made by crimping RJ-45 connectors to standard Ethernet
cable.
This cable connects to any RJ-45 port of the hub and to the RJ-45 (or AUI) port of
the router. An AUI port requires an AUI to 10BaseT transceiver adapter (E.F.
Johnson part number 585-1156-080 AUI/10BaseT Micro Transceiver).
Cable: E.F. Johnson part number 597-0009-010 - Ethernet Cable - 4 Twisted pair,
Blk PVC jacket, 24 AWG solid wire
RJ-45 connectors: E.F. Johnson part number 515-2006-056 - RJ-45 Modular
Connector, 8 wire x 8 position, keyed, 24 AWG solid wire
June 1997
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6-8
INSTALLATION
Ethernet Cable Wiring Chart
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Color
white-orange
orange
white-green
blue
white-blue
green
white-brown
brown
Twisted Pairs
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RJ-45 pins are numbered 1 to 8 from left to right when looking at the connectors
with the cables towards you, the locking mechanisms down, and the connector
pins facing up.
6.11. Router to channel bank
The cable from the router to the Intraplex channel bank is E.F. Johnson part
number 585-1156-054 (Cable - RS-449 DTE, Male, 10 ft.). These cables are 10
feet long, so the router must be installed within 10 feet (cable distance) of all
attached channel banks.
The high-density DB-60 connector plugs into a high-density DB-60 port of the
router. The DB-37 connector plugs into the DB-37 port of the MA-412 card in the
channel bank. It is important that the cable from a specific router port plugs into
the correct channel bank.
Router ports were assigned IP addresses during configuration to create network
subnets (backbones). The cable from a router port must go to the channel bank
that transmits to the site at the other end of the network backbone link.
Using the following diagram as an example, at the master site, router serial 0
must attach to the channel bank that transmits to the west site. Router serial 1
must attach to the channel bank that transmits to the south site.
201
Master
102
202
West
103
203
South
IP address
Notes
6-9
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Part No: 001-0690-201
INSTALLATION
Master Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site computer
Channel computer
Host computer
West Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
South Site
Router serial 0
Router serial 1
Router Ethernet
Site Computer
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
100.100.102.1
100.100.103.1
100.100.201.1
100.100.201.100
100.100.201.101
100.100.201.200
subnet to West Site
subnet to South Site
100.100.102.2
subnet to Master Site
100.100.202.1
100.100.202.100
100.100.103.2
100.100.203.1
100.100.203.100
6-10
subnet to Master Site
INSTALLATION
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6-11
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Part No: 001-0690-201
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
SECTION
7. Alignment and Calibration
Simulcast systems must be aligned and calibrated to avoid distorted signals in
areas that have repeater coverage overlap. Alignment sets the threshold and
timing tone gain values. During calibration the channel controller sends a timing
tone that is used to determine the length of time it takes for a signal to reach each
repeater. The repeaters’ buffer and phase delays are then adjusted so that all
repeaters will transmit at the same time and phase. The timing of the entire system
is synchronized by GPS (global positioning system).
7.1.
Align threshold and timing tone gain
Note: This menu item will only be available if the service.ini file was present in
the C:\SITECTR\ directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
Threshold and timing tone gain must be aligned before calibrating the system.
The following procedure will automatically align these values. Threshold and
timing tone gain are described in Sections 7.5.5 and 7.5.6.
7.1.1. Alignment procedure
1. A channel defined as the status channel will not properly align. Therefore, if
aligning the status channel:
A. Select the System icon.
B. Select menu item System -> Manual Repeater Control.
C. Select the status channel in the channel controller site.
D. In the Repeater Mode section, de-select Status Channel.
E. Click the Set Mode button and close the dialog box.
The status channel in the repeater sites does not need to be changed.
2. Select a System icon.
3. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> Threshold Alignment. The
Threshold Alignment dialog box appears.
4. Select a channel from the list.
5. Click the Start Alignment button.
6. Alignment requires some time. Icons to the left of the channel/repeater names
will show the progress of the alignment procedure. The icons may change
slowly.
If failure occurs, two icons will be displayed beside the repeater name. The
left-most icon indicates the type of failure. The icon next to the repeater name
indicates the stage of alignment when failure occurred. Repeater disable alarms
do not indicate a failure.
For icon descriptions, see Section 7.1.2.
7-1
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
7. Repeat steps 4 through 6 for additional channels.
8. Alignment is complete. Close the dialog box.
9. If the status channel was aligned:
A. Select the System icon.
B. Select menu item System -> Manual Repeater Control.
C. Select the status channel in the channel controller site.
D. In the Repeater Mode section, select Status Channel.
E. Click the Set Mode button and close the dialog box.
10. If a repeater disable alarm occurred during alignment, enable the repeater:
A. Select the System icon.
B. Select menu item System -> Manual Repeater Control.
C. Select a repeater that has Disabled in the Mode column.
D. Select the appropriate mode in the Repeater Mode section.
E. Click the Set Mode button.
F. Repeat steps C through E as necessary.
7.1.2. Alignment icons
In the System -> Calibration -> Threshold Alignment dialog box, icons appear
beside the channel and repeater names to indicate the progression of alignment.
The following tables list the icons, their descriptions, and possible
causes/remedies. To align, follow the instructions in Sections 7.1.1.
Table 7-1. Channel icons during threshold alignment
Channel
Icons
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
Description
Possible Causes/Remedies
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
alignment proceeds.
Clicking the box will
collapse the repeater list.
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
alignment proceeds.
Clicking the box will
show the list of repeaters.
Testing repeaters for zero
values.
To align, follow the instructions in
Section 7.1.1.
7-2
To align, follow the instructions in
Section 7.1.1.
Alignment is progressing normally.
The threshold value is being tested.
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Channel
Icons
Description
Possible Causes/Remedies
Testing repeaters for
valid values.
Alignment is progressing normally.
The timing tone value is being
tested.
1. Collisions may have occurred.
Retry alignment procedure.
Unable to communicate
with channel controller.
2. Channel controller may be turned
off.
3. Determine if there are problems
communicating with the site by
trying other channels.
Unknown failure.
1. The channel controller may be
described incorrectly. In the channel
controller’s Describe dialog box, the
Repeater Type should be Simulcast
Controller.
2. IP address may be incorrect.
Check assignment in EFJ Site
Description dialog box. See Section
5.6.2.
3. System and/or Site numbers may
be incorrect. Check assignments in
EFJ System Description and EFJ
Site Description dialog boxes. See
Sections 5.6.1 and 5.6.2.
Alignment is completed.
Table 7-2. Repeater icons during threshold alignment
Repeater
Icons
Description
Possible Causes/Remedies
Alignment has not been
started.
Testing repeater for zero
values.
Increasing threshold
level.
Align as described in Section 7.1.1.
Zero values received
successfully.
7-3
Alignment is progressing normally.
The threshold value is being tested.
Alignment is progressing normally.
The threshold value is being
adjusted.
Alignment is progressing normally.
The threshold value is properly set.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Repeater
Icons
Description
Possible Causes/Remedies
Could not get zero
values.
Threshold value can not be set.
1. There may be too much noise on
the signal.
2. The repeater may be mis-aligned.
See the repeater manual for repeater
alignment procedures.
Testing repeater for valid
values.
Could not get valid
values.
Unable to communicate
with repeater.
Alignment is progressing normally.
The timing tone value is being
tested.
The timing tone value can not be set.
The repeater may be mis-aligned.
See the repeater manual for repeater
alignment procedures.
1. Collisions may have occurred.
Retry alignment procedure.
2. Repeater may be turned off.
3. Determine if there are problems
communicating with the site by
trying other channels.
Unknown failure.
1. IP address may be incorrect.
Check assignment in EFJ Site
Description dialog box. See Section
5.6.2.
2. System and/or Site numbers may
be incorrect. Check assignments in
EFJ System Description and EFJ
Site Description dialog boxes. See
Sections 5.6.1 and 5.6.2.
This repeater is
successfully aligned.
7.2.
Calibrate uni-directional, non-redundant systems
Note: This section is for calibrating uni-directional, non-redundant microwave
systems. Section 7.3 is for bi-directional, non-redundant microwave systems. The
program will display the appropriate dialog box and help for the system.
Note: The System -> Calibration -> Edit Offsets dialog box defines the type of
system (uni- or bi-directional, and non-redundant or redundant). See Section 5.7.
June 1997
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7-4
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
If the system type is changed, OpenView must be restarted before changes take
effect.
The manual uni-directional calibration process occurs in two steps.
1. Data Acquisition procedure: Information is collected that is used to
automatically calculate the repeaters’ buffer and phase delays. See
Section 7.2.1.
2. Write procedure: The calculated values are written to the Simulcast
Modulation Cards (SMCs) in the repeaters. See Section 7.2.3.
7.2.1. Data acquisition procedure (uni-directional)
1. Select a System icon.
2. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> Manual Calibration.
3. Select a channel from the list.
4. Click the Acquire Data button.
If the channel is the status channel, a message box will appear. Clicking OK
will continue the process for the status channel; clicking Cancel will cancel
data acquisition for the status channel.
If a “Channel cannot be calibrated” message appears, the channel controller
may be described incorrectly. In the channel controller’s Describe dialog box,
the Repeater Type should be Simulcast Controller.
5. Data acquisition requires some time. A flashing icon next to the channel name
indicates that data acquisition is in progress. Status messages will appear below
the Write button.
6. When the data acquisition process for the selected channel finishes, the icons
next to the channel and associated repeaters will change.
• An OK icon indicates that data acquisition was successful for a repeater.
• A W icon indicates that the channel is writeable (two or more repeaters
have returned good data).
• Other icons indicate that the data acquisition process was not successful.
See Section 7.2.2 for icon descriptions and remedies.
7. Repeat steps 3-6 to acquire data for additional channels.
8. When data has been acquired for all channels to be calibrated, continue with
the write procedure in Section 7.2.3. Data will only be written to repeaters that
display an OK icon.
CAUTION: If all repeaters on a channel do not have OK icons, writing that
channel’s data may cause poor simulcast performance. The recommended
procedure is to close the manual calibration dialog box, fix any unsuccessful
repeaters, and recalibrate the associated channels. An exception can be made if
a repeater is disabled and will remain disabled. When the disabled repeater is
put back into service the associated channel should be recalibrated.
7-5
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
7.2.2. Data acquisition icons for uni-directional
In the System -> Calibration -> Manual Calibration dialog box, icons appear
beside the channel and repeater names to indicate the status of data acquisition.
The following tables list the icons, their descriptions, and possible remedies.
Table 7-3. Channel icons during uni-directional calibration
Channel
Icons
flashing
Description
Remedy
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
calibration proceeds.
Clicking the box will
collapse the repeater list.
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
calibration proceeds.
Clicking the box will
show the list of repeaters.
Data acquisition is in
progress.
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Section 7.2.1.
The channel is writeable.
Data acquisition for the
channel is completed.
Two or more repeaters
returned good data that
may be written to the
SMC.
Data acquisition for the
channel was completed
but not successful. No
timing values will be
written for this channel.
The channel is reverted;
calibration could not be
started.
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7-6
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Section 7.2.1.
Be patient until data acquisition has
finished. Each repeater takes
approximately 15 to 20 seconds.
If data is not to be acquired from
other channels, continue with the
write procedure in Section 7.2.3.
Fix any repeater problems and
recalibrate the channel.
Fix the problems that have caused
the channel to revert. Unrevert the
channel. Then, calibrate the channel.
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Channel
Icons
Description
Remedy
Unknown failure.
1. The channel controller may be
described incorrectly. In the channel
controller’s Describe dialog box, the
Repeater Type should be Simulcast
Controller.
2. IP address may be incorrect.
Check assignment in EFJ Site
Description dialog box. See Section
5.6.2.
3. System and/or Site numbers may
be incorrect. Check assignments in
EFJ System Description and EFJ
Site Description dialog boxes. See
Sections 5.6.1 and 5.6.2.
Table 7-4. Repeater icons during uni-directional calibration
Repeater
Icons
Description
Remedy
Data acquisition has not
occurred for the repeater.
Data acquisition was
successful.
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Section 7.2.1.
If data is not to be acquired from
other channels, continue with the
write procedure in Section 7.2.3.
Data acquisition failed.
Possible causes:
1. The repeater is
reverted.
1. Fix the problems that have caused
the repeater to revert. Unrevert the
repeater. Recalibrate the channel.
2. The channel
controller’s timing tone
gain is set too low.
2. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
3. The repeater’s
threshold is set too high.
3. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
7-7
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Repeater
Icons
Description
Remedy
1. Noise may have
interfered with access to
the repeater.
1. Retry data acquisition.
2. The repeater’s
threshold value may be
set incorrectly.
2. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
7.2.3. Write procedure (uni-directional)
CAUTION: If all repeaters on a channel do not have OK icons, writing that
channel’s data may cause poor simulcast performance. The recommended
procedure is to close the manual calibration dialog box, fix any unsuccessful
repeaters, and recalibrate the associated channels. An exception can be made if a
repeater is disabled and will remain disabled. When the disabled repeater is put
back into service the associated channel should be recalibrated.
Click the Write button to write the timing values to the repeaters’ SMCs. Only
repeaters that have OK icons will be written. If a channel has a check mark icon,
none of that channel’s repeaters will be written. A flashing icon next to the
channel name indicates that writing is in progress. An information alarm will
occur as each repeater is written.
The Write process will write the data for all channels that display the W icon
every time the Write button is clicked. For example, if data has been acquired for
Channel X and the button is clicked, the data will be written to all the repeaters
that show OK and are associated with Channel X. If data is then acquired for
Channel Y and the Write button is clicked, the data will be written to all the
repeaters that show OK and are associated with Channels X and Y. To avoid
rewriting data, close and reopen the Manual Calibration dialog box after clicking
the Write button.
7.3.
Calibrate bi-directional, non-redundant systems
Note: This section is for calibrating bi-directional, non-redundant microwave
systems. Section 7.2 is for uni-directional, non-redundant microwave systems.
The program will display the appropriate dialog box and help for the system.
Note: The System -> Calibration -> Edit Offsets dialog box defines the type of
system (uni- or bi-directional, and non-redundant or redundant). See Section 5.7.
If the system type is changed, OpenView must be restarted before changes take
effect.
Note: For a bi-directional microwave system, the IAC 1 input for repeater 1 at
each site should be configured so that the microwave default direction does not
cause an alarm.
June 1997
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7-8
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Simulcast systems must be calibrated to avoid distorted signals in areas that have
repeater coverage overlap. During calibration the channel controller sends a
timing tone that is used to determine the length of time it takes for a signal to
reach each repeater. The repeaters’ buffer and phase delays are then adjusted so
that all repeaters will transmit at the same time and phase. The timing of the entire
system is synchronized by GPS (global positioning system).
The manual bi-directional calibration process occurs in three steps: phase 1 data
acquisition, phase 2 data acquisition, and writing the values.
Phase 1 data acquisition requires that all sites receive data from the microwave
direction that does not cause an alarm. Phase 2 requires that all sites receive data
from the direction that does cause an alarm. IAC 1 (on Repeater 1 at each repeater
site) produces an alarm when the microwave is in one data direction and no alarm
when the microwave is in the opposite data direction.
The program checks for the proper alarm/no alarm condition before starting data
acquisition. If the wrong direction is detected, a message will be displayed, and
the microwave direction must be changed before data acquisition can occur.
Data acquisition collects information that is used to automatically calculate the
repeaters’ phase and buffer delays for both microwave directions. After data
acquisition is completed, the calculated values are written to the Simulcast
Modulation Cards (SMCs) in the repeaters. If an attempt is made to close the
dialog box before values are written, a message box will give the option to return
to the dialog box or to close the box and lose all unwritten data.
7.3.1. Phase 1 data acquisition (bi-directional)
1. Lock the microwave data direction at all sites in the no-alarm direction.
2. Select a System icon.
3. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> Manual Calibration.
4. Select a channel from the list.
5. Click the Acquire Data button.
If the channel is the status channel, a message box will appear. Clicking OK
will continue the process for the status channel; clicking Cancel will cancel
data acquisition for the status channel.
If a “Channel cannot be calibrated” message appears, the channel controller
may be described incorrectly. In the channel controller’s Describe dialog box,
the Repeater Type should be Simulcast Controller.
6. Data acquisition requires some time. A flashing icon next to the channel name
indicates that data acquisition is in progress. Status messages will appear below
the Phase 2 button.
7. When the data acquisition process for the selected channel finishes, the icons
next to the channel and associated repeaters will change.
7-9
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
• An H indicates that data acquisition was successful for this microwave
direction. Two or more repeaters on the channel are OK.
• Other icons indicate that data acquisition was not successful. See Section
7.3.3 for icon descriptions and remedies.
8. Repeat steps 4-7 for additional channels.
7.3.2. Phase 2 data acquisition (bi-directional)
1. Lock the microwave data direction at all sites in the alarm direction.
2. Click the Phase 2 button.
3. Select a channel from the list. Only channels that have an H icon will be
available for selection.
4. Click the Acquire Data button.
5. Data acquisition requires some time. A flashing icon next to the channel name
indicates that data acquisition is in progress. Status messages will appear below
the Phase 2 button.
6. When the data acquisition process for the selected channel finishes, the icons
next to the channel and associated repeaters will change.
• An OK icon indicates that data acquisition was successful for the
repeater.
• A W icon indicates that the channel is writeable (two or more repeaters
have returned good data).
• Other icons indicate that the data acquisition process was not successful.
See Section 7.3.3 for icon descriptions and remedies.
7. Repeat steps 3-6 for additional channels.
8. When data has been acquired for all channels to be calibrated, continue with
the write procedure in Section 7.3.4. Data will only be written to the repeaters
that display OK icons.
CAUTION: If all repeaters on a channel do not have OK icons, writing that
channel’s data may cause poor simulcast performance. The recommended
procedure is to close the manual calibration dialog box, fix any unsuccessful
repeaters, and recalibrate the associated channels. An exception can be made if
a repeater is disabled and will remain disabled. When the disabled repeater is
put back into service the associated channel should be recalibrated.
7.3.3. Data acquisition icons for bi-directional
In the System -> Calibration -> Manual Calibration dialog box, icons appear
beside the channel and repeater names to indicate the status of data acquisition.
The following tables list the icons, their descriptions, and possible remedies.
June 1997
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7-10
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Table 7-5. Channel icons during bi-directional calibration
Channel
Icons
flashing
Description
Remedy
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
calibration proceeds.
Clicking the box will
collapse the repeater list.
Other icons will appear
to the left of this icon as
calibration proceeds.
Clicking the box will
show the list of repeaters.
Data acquisition is in
progress.
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Sections 7.3.1 and 7.3.2.
The channel is writeable.
Data acquisition for the
channel is completed.
Two or more repeaters
returned good data that
may be written to the
SMC.
Data acquisition for the
channel was completed
but not successful. No
timing values will be
written for this channel.
Data acquisition for the
channel is half
completed.
The channel is reverted;
calibration could not be
started.
7-11
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Sections 7.3.1 and 7.3.2.
Be patient until data acquisition has
finished. Each repeater takes
approximately 15 to 20 seconds.
If data is not to be acquired from
other channels, continue with the
write procedure in Section 7.3.4.
Fix any repeater problems and
recalibrate the channel.
Continue to phase 2 data acquisition.
See Section 7.3.2.
Fix the problems that have caused
the channel to revert. Unrevert the
channel. Then, calibrate the channel.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Channel
Icons
Description
Remedy
Unknown failure.
1. The channel controller may be
described incorrectly. In the channel
controller’s Describe dialog box, the
Repeater Type should be Simulcast
Controller.
2. IP address may be incorrect.
Check assignment in EFJ Site
Description dialog box. See Section
5.6.2.
3. System and/or Site numbers may
be incorrect. Check assignments in
EFJ System Description and EFJ
Site Description dialog boxes. See
Sections 5.6.1 and 5.6.2.
Table 7-6. Repeater icons during bi-directional calibration
Repeater
Icons
Description
Remedy
Data acquisition has not
occurred for the repeater.
Data acquisition was
successful.
To calibrate, follow the instructions
in Sections 7.3.1 and 7.3.2.
If data is not to be acquired from
other channels, continue with the
write procedure in Section 7.3.4.
Data acquisition failed.
Possible causes:
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Part No: 001-0690-201
1. The repeater is
reverted.
1. Fix the problems that have caused
the revert. Unrevert the repeater.
Recalibrate the channel.
2. The channel
controller’s timing tone
gain is set too low.
2. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
3. The repeater’s
threshold is set too high.
3. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
1. Noise may have
interfered with access to
the repeater.
1. Retry data acquisition.
2. The repeater’s
threshold value may be
set incorrectly.
2. Perform the alignment described
in Section 7.1.
7-12
ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
7.3.4. Write procedure (bi-directional)
CAUTION: If all repeaters on a channel do not have OK icons, writing that
channel’s data may cause poor simulcast performance. The recommended
procedure is to close the manual calibration dialog box, fix any unsuccessful
repeaters, and recalibrate the associated channels. An exception can be made if a
repeater is disabled and will remain disabled. When the disabled repeater is put
back into service the associated channel should be recalibrated.
Click the Write button to write the timing values to the repeaters’ SMCs. Only
repeaters that have OK icons will be written. If a channel has a check mark icon,
none of that channel’s repeaters will be written. A flashing icon next to the
channel name indicates that writing is in progress. An information alarm will
occur as each repeater is written.
The Write process will write the data for all channels that display the W icon
every time the Write button is clicked. For example, if data has been acquired for
Channel X and the button is clicked, the data will be written to all the repeaters
that show OK and are associated with Channel X. If data is then acquired for
Channel Y and the Write button is clicked, the data will be written to all the
repeaters that show OK and are associated with Channels X and Y.
7.4.
Determine and set overlap offset
7.4.1. Description of overlap offset
In a simulcast system, repeater coverage areas overlap. A radio in the overlap area
may receive two or more signals. If the signal strengths are similar, the radio’s
receive circuits will capture two or more signals. The signals often will not arrive
at precisely the same time; therefore, the audio from the radio will be distorted.
The amount of distortion will be more noticeable in some locations than in other
locations, depending on the distance between the location and each site that is
heard.
The distortion pattern of the overlap area can be changed with overlap offsets.
Initially, repeaters are calibrated so that they all transmit at the same time. An
overlap offset will cause a repeater to transmit a little earlier or a little later than
the initial calibration time. A change in the time of transmission will change the
time the signal arrives at the location and therefore change the amount of
distortion at each location.
Overlap offset values are set in increments of 1 microsecond. For a rule of thumb:
A radio signal travels at 0.186 mile per microsecond, so a setting of 5
microseconds will move the distortion pattern approximately 1 mile.
Figure 7-1 illustrates the overlap offset concept.
7-13
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Figure 7-1. Overlap offset concept
Site 1
Site 2
Site 3
In overlap areas, a distorted audio signal is
heard when two or more signals are received.
Site 1
Site 2
Site 1
Site 2
Offset 0
Offset 0
50 µs
50 µs
Time to travel
Initial calibration sets all
repeaters to transmit at the
same time.
Best reception is where multiple
signals are received at precisely
the same time.
Site 1
Site 2
Site 1
Site 2
Offset 5
Offset -5
45 µs
55 µs
Time to travel
The delay at Site 1 is offset by 5
µs more and the delay at Site 2
is offset by 5 µs less than the
initial calibration.
Best reception can be moved by
setting an overlap offset.
Remember that the offset will also
affect overlap areas with other
repeaters.
7.4.2. Determine overlap offset values
Note: Calibration must be completed first. Refer to Section 7.2 for unidirectional, non-redundant systems, or Section 7.3 for bi-directional, nonredundant systems.
Note: This menu item will only be available if the service.ini file was present in
the C:\SITECTR\ directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Overlap offset values are determined by changing the buffer delay values from
the SMC Configuration dialog box. The buffer delay values must then be returned
to their original calibrated values and the overlap offset values are entered in the
Edit Offsets dialog box. With this arrangement, the system can be periodically
calibrated for minor propagation changes without affecting the overlap offset
values.
Overlap offset values apply to a site; therefore, only one channel needs to be used
to determine the values.
1. Select a System icon.
2. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> SMC Configuration.
3. Select a repeater from the list.
4. Click the Read button.
5. From the Buffer Delays section, make a note of the Buffer Delay value for the
active User Defined Setting. This value will be needed for a calculation at the
end of these instructions.
6. Modify the Buffer Delay value.
Each increment changes the transmit time 1 microsecond, which is the amount
of time it takes the signal to travel approximately 0.186 mile. The signal travels
approximately 1 mile in 5 increments of time.
Incrementing in a positive direction increases the delay before transmitting,
which moves the point of minimum distortion closer to the repeater.
Decrementing in a negative direction decreases the delay before transmitting,
which moves the minimum distortion point farther from the repeater.
7. Click the Write button.
8. Repeat steps 3 through 7 for other repeaters on the channel that affect the
overlap area.
9. Check the reception in the overlap area.
10. If necessary, repeat steps 3-4 and 6-9 until the overlap area distortion pattern
is acceptable. Do not repeat step 5.
11. Make a note of the new Buffer Delay value for each repeater that was
changed.
12. Subtract the values noted in step 5 from the values noted in step 11. Results
may be negative or positive and will be entered in the Edit Offsets dialog box
as described in Section 7.4.3.
7.4.3. Set overlap offset values and recalibrate system
Note: This menu item will only be available if the service.ini file was present in
the C:\SITECTR\ directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
1. Select a System icon.
2. Select menu item System -> Calibration -> Edit Offsets.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
3. Select a site from the list.
4. Enter the offset value in the Overlap Offset box. Enter a hyphen before
negative numbers. This value can be from -100 to 100 microseconds.
5. Click the Save Site button.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for all sites.
7. Recalibrate all affected channels. See Section 7.2 for uni-directional, nonredundant systems, or Section 7.3 for bi-directional, non-redundant systems.
7.5.
Set SMC parameters from OpenView
Note: Correct values are essential for proper simulcast reception in areas where
repeater coverage overlaps. These values should only be changed by a trained
simulcast technician.
Note: This menu item will only be available if the service.ini file was present in
the C:\SITECTR\ directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
Several parameters on the SMCs (Simulcast Modulation Cards) can be changed
from OpenView. Each repeater has an SMC and each channel has an SMC in the
channel controller, as shown in Figure 7-2.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
Figure 7-2. SMC channel communication links
Channel
Controller 1
Remote Site 1
MBC
IAC
MPC
SMC
MAC
IAC
MBC
MPC
Channel 1
SMC
MAC
IAC
MPC
SMC
MAC
Splitter
Channel 2
Channel 3
MPC
SMC
MAC
Channel 2
Repeater
etc .
MPC
SMC
MAC
Remote Site 2
MBC
IAC
MPC
SMC
MAC
MPC
Channel 4
Channel 1
Repeater
SMC
MAC
IAC
MPC
SMC
MAC
IAC - Interfac e Alarm Card
MBC - Message Bridge Card
MPC - Main Proc essor Card
SMC - Simulc ast Modulation Card
MAC - Main Audio Card
Channel 1
Repeater
Channel 2
Repeater
etc .
7.5.1. Read/Write parameters
SMC parameters are changed from the SMC Configuration dialog box, which is
accessed by selecting a System icon and then selecting menu item System ->
Calibration -> SMC Configuration.
The dialog box shows the system name and a list of sites and repeaters (including
channel controllers). To change parameters, select a repeater in the list and then
click the Read button. The program will read the current SMC parameters that are
in the selected repeater and display them in the dialog box.
After changing the desired values, write the changes to the SMC by clicking the
Write button.
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
7.5.2. Audio Gain
This value affects the gain or volume of the repeater’s audio output signal.
Changing the value in a repeater SMC will change the gain of the audio output of
that repeater. Changing the value in a channel controller SMC will change the
gain of the audio signal that is transmitted to all repeaters on the channel.
The output audio signal will be multiplied by the Audio Gain value. Values may
be from 0.0000 to 2.0000. Values greater than 1 will increase the gain; values less
than 1 will decrease the gain. A value of 0 will result in no signal and a value of
2.0000 may result in a clipped, distorted signal.
7.5.3. Data Gain
This value affects the gain or volume of the repeater’s data output signal.
Changing the value in a repeater SMC will change the gain of the data output of
that repeater. Changing the value in a channel controller SMC will change the
gain of the data signal that is transmitted to all repeaters on the channel.
The output data signal will be multiplied by the Data Gain value. Values may be
from 0.0000 to 2.0000. Values greater than 1 will increase the gain; values less
than 1 will decrease the gain. A value of 0 will result in no signal and a value of
2.0000 may result in a clipped, distorted signal.
7.5.4. Pilot Tone Gain
This value affects the gain or volume of the pilot tone sent by the channel
controller SMC. The channel controller sends a pilot tone (of 2600 Hz) when no
call is in progress. The absence of the pilot tone keys the remote repeaters pushto-talk circuit so that a call will be transmitted.
The output pilot tone signal will be multiplied by the Pilot Tone Gain value.
Values may be from 0.0000 to 1.0000. A value of 0 will result in no signal and a
value of 1.0000 will result in a clipped, distorted signal.
An SMC that is in a repeater does not use this value.
7.5.5. Threshold
A repeater SMC uses the threshold value to determine if the incoming signal is a
timing tone or noise. During calibration, a timing tone is sent by the channel
controller SMC. The repeater SMC detects when it starts receiving the timing
tone. The difference between when the channel controller SMC sent the tone and
the time the repeater SMC received the tone is the basis for buffer delays that are
necessary for good reception in overlapping areas. To ensure that all SMCs are
using the same time, the timing tone is sent once per second based on the 1 PPS
(pulse per second) signal from the GPS (global positioning system).
The threshold value is a number from 0.0000 to 1.0000. A threshold value that is
too low will cause noise to be detected as the timing tone and a value that is too
high will cause a late detection of the beginning of the tone. If the SMC in the
repeater detects a beginning of the timing tone that is not within one cycle time
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ALIGNMENT AND CALIBRATION
(125 microseconds) of the real beginning of the tone, the buffer delays will not be
calibrated correctly.
An SMC that is in a channel controller does not use this value.
7.5.6. Timing Tone Gain
This value affects the gain or volume of the timing tone sent by the channel
controller SMC during calibration.
The output timing tone signal will be multiplied by the Timing Tone Gain value.
Values may be from 0.0000 to 1.0000. A value of 0 will result in no signal and a
value of 1.0000 will result in a clipped, distorted signal.
An SMC that is in a repeater does not use this value.
7.5.7. Buffer Delays section
Buffer delays and phase used to begin transmitting can be defined by the dip
switch settings on the repeater’s SMC or by values entered into set 0 or set 1.
When parameters are read (with the Read button), the radio buttons show which
setting is currently being used. To change settings, select a different radio button,
change the values (if needed), and write the settings to the repeater’s SMC with
the Write button. Dip switch values cannot be changed from the program; they
can only be changed by physically moving the switches on the SMC. (An SMC
that is in a channel controller does not use these values.)
Buffer Delay: This value can be from 126 to 63,999 microseconds and is the
amount of time the repeater needs to delay after receiving a signal before
transmitting the signal.
It takes time for a signal to get from the channel controller to site 1. It takes a
different amount of time for a signal to get from the channel controller to site 2. If
site 1 and site 2 are going to transmit the signal at the same time, they must buffer
the signal and wait a period of time until they can both transmit at the same time.
Buffer Delay is the period of time the repeater must wait between the ending of
signal processing and the beginning of transmitting the signal.
Phase: This value can be from 0 to 255. Each increment is approximately 1.4
degrees.
The signals from all sites must be transmitted with the same phase for best
reception. The phase of the signals received at different sites will be different
because of the different amount of time it takes to get to each site. The phase
value should compensate for this difference so that all signals are transmitted with
the same phase.
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UPDATE SOFTWARE
SECTION
8. Update Software
8.1.
Update site controller application (Windows NT 4.0)
Note: Follow these instructions if the host computer is running Windows NT 4.0.
If the host computer is running Windows NT 3.51, follow the instructions in
Section 8.3.
Updating the site controller application in the site and channel computers is done
from the host computer. A connection will be made from the host computer to the
site/channel computer. Then, the sitectrl.exe file will be copied, or sent, to the
remote computer.
A. Connect to the remote computer
1. Double-click on the Network Neighborhood icon. The Network Neighborhood
window appears.
2. Click the Map Network Drive button (the second button on the toolbar). The
Map Network Drive dialog box appears.
3. In the Path box, enter:
\\<computername>\c$
where <computername> is the name of the remote site/channel computer.
For example: \\west-hub\c$
Alternatively, the computer’s IP address can be entered instead of
computername.
4. In the Connect As box, enter:
efjohnson
5. Click OK. A window appears that shows the directory of the remote computer.
B. Copy the sitectrl.exe file to the remote computer
1. Put the update disk into the A drive.
2. Click Start on the taskbar.
3. Select menu item Programs -> Windows NT Explorer. The Exploring window
appears.
4. Click the plus sign to the left of
c$ on <computername>
A list of folders appears under the computer name.
5. Click the plus sign to the left of the sitectr folder that is in the above list. The
folder opens.
6. Click on the 3-1/2 Floppy (A:) icon. The right window shows the A directory.
7. In the right window, click once on sitectrl.exe.
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8. Select menu item Edit -> Copy.
9. In the left window, click on the tmp folder that is in the sitectr folder of step 5.
10. Select menu item Edit -> Paste. A Confirm File Replace message box appears.
11. Click Yes. The file is copied (sent) to the remote computer.
12. Close the Exploring window.
C. Reboot and disconnect from the remote computer
1. Click Start on the taskbar.
2. Select menu item Programs -> Command Prompt. The Command Prompt
window appears.
3. At the C:\ prompt, enter:
reboot <computername>
4. Press Return.
5. Within 20 seconds:
A. Make the c$ on <computername> window the active window.
B. Click the Disconnect Net Drive icon (the third icon in the toolbar). The
Disconnect Network Drive dialog box appears.
C. Click OK. A warning message appears.
D. Click Yes. The directory window closes and the connection to the remote
computer is disconnected.
6. To update additional site/channel computers, repeat steps A1 through C5.
These instructions should be completed for each site/channel computer in the
system.
7. Remove the update disk from drive A.
8.2.
Uninstall host computer software (Windows NT 4.0)
Note: These instructions will uninstall the E.F. Johnson application, the Borland
database engine, and will modify any necessary files.
1. Exit OpenView.
2. Click Start on the taskbar.
3. Select menu item Programs -> Host Computer -> Uninstall E.F. Johnson Host
Computer. The Confirm File Deletion message box appears.
4. Click Yes.
5. The files are deleted and the Remove Programs From Your Computer dialog
box appears. Additional files do not need to be removed manually.
6. Click OK.
To install software, see Section 5.5.
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UPDATE SOFTWARE
8.3.
Update site controller application (Windows NT 3.51)
Note: Follow these instructions if the host computer is running Windows NT
3.51. If the host computer is running Windows NT 4.0, follow the instructions in
Section 8.1.
Updating the site controller application in the site and channel computers is done
from the host computer. A connection will be made from the host computer to the
site/channel computer. Then, the sitectrl.exe file will be copied, or sent, to the
remote computer.
A. Setup
1. Open the Program Manager.
2. Open the Main Program Group.
3. Open the File Manager.
4. Make the Program Manager the active window. (Hold the Alt key. Press the
Tab key repeatedly until the Program Manager name appears in the popup box.
Release the Alt key.)
5. Open the Command Prompt. Move the Command Prompt window so that some
part of the window will be visible when the File Manager is the active window.
6. Make the File Manager the active window.
7. Click on the Options menu.
8. Verify that “Open New Windows on Connect” has a check mark before it. If
there is a check mark, click the Options menu so that the menu disappears. If
there is no check mark, click on Open New Windows on Connect.
9. Put the update disk into the A drive.
10. Click on the A drive icon. The File Manager window displays the A drive
information.
B. Connect to the remote computer
1. Select menu item Disk -> Connect Network Drive. A dialog box appears.
2. In the Path box, enter:
\\<computername>\c$
where <computername> is the name of the remote site/channel computer.
For example: \\west-hub\c$
3. In the Connect As box, enter:
efjohnson
4. Click OK. The Enter Network Password dialog box appears.
5. Enter the password of the remote site/channel computer.
6. Click OK. A box appears that shows the directory of the remote computer.
7. Select menu item Window -> Tile Horizontally.
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C. Copy the sitectrl.exe file to the remote computer
1. In the directory of the remote computer, double-click on the sitectr directory
name to open the directory. A tmp directory appears below and is indented
from the sitectr directory.
2. Click once on the tmp directory name to select the tmp directory.
3. From the A directory, copy the sitectrl.exe file to the remote computer’s
\sitectr\tmp\ directory.
4. A Confirm Mouse Operation message box appears.
5. Click Yes.
6. A Confirm File Replace message box appears.
7. Click Yes.
D. Reboot and disconnect from the remote computer
1. Make the Command Prompt the active window.
2. Enter:
reboot <remote computer name>
where <remote computer name> is the name of the remote site/channel
computer. For example: reboot west-hub
3. Press the Enter key.
4. Within 20 seconds, in the File Manager window, select menu item Disk ->
Disconnect Network Drive. A dialog box appears.
5. Click OK.
6. To update additional site/channel computers, repeat these steps beginning with
“B. Connect to the remote computer”. These instructions should be completed
for each site/channel computer in the system.
7. Remove the update disk from drive A.
8.4.
Uninstall host computer software (Windows NT 3.51)
Note: These instructions will uninstall the E.F. Johnson application, the Borland
database engine, and will modify any necessary files.
1. Exit OpenView.
2. Open the Program Manager.
3. Open the Host Computer program group. (If this program group does not exist,
follow the instructions in Section 8.6.)
4. Open the Uninstall E.F. Johnson Host Computer program. The Confirm File
Deletion message box appears.
5. Click Yes.
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UPDATE SOFTWARE
6. The files are deleted and the Remove Programs From Your Computer dialog
box appears. Additional files do not need to be removed manually.
7. Click OK.
8.5.
Install host computer software (Windows NT 3.51)
Note: These instructions will install the E.F. Johnson application, the Borland
database engine, and will modify any necessary files.
1. Put the disk named E.F. Johnson Host Computer Disk 1 into the drive.
2. From the Program Manager, select menu item File -> Run.
3. Click Browse.
4. In the drive section, select the floppy drive.
5. In the filename section, select setup.exe.
6. Click OK.
7. Click OK in the Run dialog box.
8. Follow the on-screen instructions and insert disks as needed. Accept the
defaults in all dialog boxes.
9. When installation is completed, the Program Manager will appear with a new
program group named Host Computer.
8.6.
Remove host computer software (Windows NT 3.51)
Note: These instructions should only be used on computers where the programs
were not installed with the installation program. Look in the Program Manager
for a program group called Host Computer. If it exists, see Section 8.4 for
uninstalling the software.
The following instructions will remove the E.F. Johnson application from the hard
disk.
1. Exit OpenView.
2. Open the File Manager
3. Select the sitectr directory.
4. Press the Del key. The Delete message box appears.
5. Click OK. The Confirm Directory Delete message box appears.
6. Click Yes to All.
7. The files are deleted.
8. In the File Manager, select the OV directory.
9. Open the OVWIN.INI file in an ASCII editor, such as Notepad.
10. In the [OpenViewApps] section, delete the following line:
SITECTR=C:\SITECTR\SITECTR.EXE
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UPDATE SOFTWARE
11. Save the file.
12. Close the File Manager.
8.7.
Install Windows NT 4.0
Note: These instructions are for installing Windows NT 4.0 onto host computers
that come without Windows installed or that need to have Windows re-installed.
Windows NT 4.0 installation files are on 3 floppy disks and 1 CD.
1. Put Setup Disk 1 (or Boot Disk) into the disk drive.
2. Reboot the computer. The Window’s Setup program will be automatically
started.
3. Follow the screen instructions. Press Enter to accept the defaults and insert
floppy disks as requested.
4. When requested, put the CD disk in the drive and press Enter.
5. Page down through the License Agreement and press F8 to agree.
6. If a message says that Windows NT was found, press N to re-install Windows.
7. Except for the following, press Enter to accept defaults and continue.
Format the partition using the NTFS file system. (Use the up and down
arrow keys to make a selection.)
Press ESC to skip examination for corruption, unless the computer has
been having numerous disk errors.
8. Files are copied to the hard disk and this portion of the setup is completed.
Take the CD and floppy disk out of the drive and restart the computer.
9. When asked, put the CD into the drive and click OK. More files are copied to
the hard disk.
10. The Windows NT Setup wizard appears.
11. Click Next to gather information about the computer.
A. Gather information
1. In the Setup Options window, select Typical, and click Next.
2. In the Name and Organization window, enter the customer name and
organization. Click Next.
3. In the Registration window, enter the CD key from the back of the CD folder,
and click Next.
4. In the Computer Name window, enter the host name for the computer, and
click Next.
5. In the Administrator Account window, enter the Windows NT administrator
password in both the Password and the Confirm Password boxes. Click Next.
6. In the Emergency Repair Disk window, select Yes, and click Next.
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UPDATE SOFTWARE
7. In the Windows NT Components window, select “Install the most common
components”. Click Next.
8. The Windows NT Setup window appears. Click Next to install Windows NT
Networking.
B. Install Windows NT networking
1. A window appears that requests information on the method Windows NT
should use to participate on a network.
2. Select “This computer will participate on a network”.
3. Select “Wired to the network”.
4. Click Next. The network adapters window appears.
5. Click Start Search. Network adapters are added to the list.
6. When the search is finished, click Next. The network protocols window
appears.
7. Select “TCP/IP Protocol”.
8. Click Next. The network services window appears.
9. Click Next to accept the defaults. The install window appears.
10. Click Next to install files. A window asking for the CD drive letter appears.
11. Enter the CD drive letter and i386. For example,
D:\i386
12. Click Continue.
13. A window displays the setup for the card:
I/O Port Address
0x300
Interrupt Number
10
Transceiver Type
10BaseT
14. Click Continue to accept the defaults.
15. A setup message reports that the parameters are not verifiably correct.
16. Click OK to use them anyway.
17. The DHCP server window appears.
18. Click No.
19. Network files are copied and installed onto the hard disk.
C. TCP/IP Properties
1. The Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window appears.
2. Enter the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for this computer.
3. Click the DNS tab.
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4. Verify that the host name is correct for this computer. (It should be the same as
the computer name.)
5. Click OK.
6. Click Yes or Next to accept the defaults on the remaining networking setup
windows.
7. The Windows NT Setup window appears. Click Finish to finish setup.
D. Finishing setup
1. The Date & Time Properties window appears.
2. Select the appropriate time zone from the drop down list.
3. If appropriate, select Automatically adjust clock for daylight savings changes.
4. Click the Date & Time tab.
5. Select the current date and time. Remember to account for the time zone.
6. Click Close.
7. The Detected Display message box appears. Click OK.
8. The Display Properties window appears.
9. In the Color Palette section, select 65,536 colors.
10. In the Desktop Area section, move the pixel slider to 1024 by 768 pixels. This
may cause the palette section to change if the palette/pixel combination is not
supported by the monitor.
11. Click Test. The testing mode message box appears.
12. Click OK. The test screen appears.
13. Click Yes if the bitmap appeared properly. The display settings message box
appears.
14. Click OK.
15. Click OK in the Display Properties window.
16. Setup continues by copying files to the hard disk.
17. The Setup message box appears. Put a floppy in the drive to create the
Emergency Repair Disk and click OK.
18. Files are copied to the floppy disk. When copying is finished, remove the disk
from the drive.
19. The Windows NT Setup message box appears.
20. Click OK to reboot the computer.
21. This completes the installation of Windows NT. Remove any disks or CDs
from the drives. See Section 5 for additional Windows NT setup and other
host computer installations.
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TROUBLESHOOTING
SECTION
9. Troubleshooting
9.1.
Ping troubleshooting techniques
Ping (packet Internet groper) sends a message to a device and waits for a
response. The response will indicate that the network connection is working or
that a problem was detected. The ping messages and responses are ICMP (Internet
Control Message Protocol) echo messages and their replies.
If the device pinged does not respond, there could be a problem in several areas.
Figure 9-1 shows the path of a ping from the host computer to a site computer. If
the site computer does not respond, trying to ping the other addresses may show
that the problem is somewhere between the host computer and the site computer.
Figure 9-1. Troubleshoot by pinging several IP addresses
Host Computer
100.100.201.200
Router
100.100.102.1
Router
Site Computer
100.100.202.100
100.100.102.2
100.100.201.1
100.100.202.1
To verify that the IP stack in the current device is functioning properly, ping
address 127.0.0.1. (The current device is the device that sends the ping message.)
9.2.
Troubleshooting from a router
Routers have several commands that can be used for troubleshooting. These
commands can be accessed from a computer attached to the router (for attachment
information see Section 3.1). Some of the commands can also be accessed after
telnetting to the router from another router or computer. (To telnet from a router,
see Section 9.2.6. To telnet from a computer, see Section 9.3.3.)
When a computer is attached to a running router, press <Enter> to gain access to
the router. The router will then ask for a password. This is the <line password>
entered during configuration for “line con 0”.
When telnetting to a router, the router will send a sign-on message and then ask
for a password. This is the <virtual terminal password> entered during
configuration for “line vty 0 4”.
The “config t” command needs to be entered before the router will accept most
configuration commands (see Section 3.2).
When finished, the “logout” command will close the local or telnet connection. (If
the “config t” command was entered, enter the “end” command before the
“logout” command.)
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TROUBLESHOOTING
9.2.1. Show ARP - list of IP address in subnet
This command will list the IP addresses of all devices that are on the same subnet
as the router. If the router cannot communicate with a device, possibly because of
device problems or incorrect connections, the IP address of that device will not be
listed.
The example below shows the result of a show arp command that was given to a
router named oc_rtr. The devices with IP addresses 100.100.201.200 and
100.100.201.1 are on the same subnet as the router named oc_rtr.
oc_rtr>show arp
Protocol Address
Internet 100.100.201.200
Internet 100.100.201.1
oc_rtr>
Age (min)
5
-
Hardware Addr Type
00a0.24a3.7f1a ARPA
0000.0c5d.bb76 ARPA
Interface
Ethernet0
Ethernet0
9.2.2. Show hosts - list of host names and IP addresses
This command will list the host names and IP addresses of network devices, as
shown in the example below. The router was given this information during
configuration with the “ip host <name> <ip address>“ command.
oc_rtr>show hosts
Default domain is not set
Name/address lookup uses domain service
Name servers are 255.255.255.255
Host
west
south
oc_hub
oc_chan
west_hub
south_hub
oc_host
oc_rtr>
Flags
(perm,
(perm,
(perm,
(perm,
(perm,
(perm,
(perm,
OK)
OK)
OK)
OK)
OK)
OK)
OK)
Age Type
44
IP
44
IP
**
IP
**
IP
**
IP
**
IP
**
IP
Address(es)
100.100.102.2
100.100.103.2
100.100.201.100
100.100.201.101
100.100.202.100
100.100.203.100
100.100.201.200
9.2.3. Show IP route - list of known subnets and routes
The show IP route command displays a list of all subnets and routes that the
router knows about. If a remote router is working and the device(s) connected to
it is (are) not working, the list will show that the subnet is possibly down.
The following example shows the result of a show ip route command. The line
highlighted with a dashed box shows the network portion of the IP address
(100.0.0.0), the subnet mask (255.255.255.0), and the number of known subnets
(5 subnets).
Below the dashed box, the three lines beginning with “C” are the subnets that are
attached to the router’s ports. For example, the subnet 100.100.102.0 includes the
Serial0 port of the router.
The next two lines (that begin with “I”) show subnets that the router discovered
by using IGRP (Interior Gateway Routing Protocol). This information includes
the IP address of the remote router that is used to get to a subnet and the port of
this router that is used to reach the remote router. For example, subnet
100.100.202.0 is reached by going to IP address 100.100.102.2, which can be
reached through this router’s Serial0 port.
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oc_rtr>show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, * - candidate
default
Gateway of last resort is not set
100.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 is subnetted, 5 subnets
C
100.100.102.0 is directly connected, Serial0
C
100.100.103.0 is directly connected, Serial1
C
100.100.201.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0
I
100.100.202.0 [100/178771] via 100.100.102.2, 00:00:56, Serial0
I
100.100.203.0 [100/178771] via 100.100.103.2, 00:00:47, Serial1
oc_rtr>
The example below shows a response that includes a subnet that has problems.
The last line shows that subnet 100.100.203.0, subnet mask 255.255.255.0 is
possibly down. The router knows that the route to subnet 100.100.203.0 is
through IP address 100.100.103.2. The router can communicate with
100.100.103.2, but it cannot communicate with any devices on subnet
100.100.203.0.
oc_rtr#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, * - candidate
default
Gateway of last resort is not set
C
C
C
I
I
100.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 is subnetted, 5 subnets
100.100.102.0 is directly connected, Serial0
100.100.103.0 is directly connected, Serial1
100.100.201.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0
100.100.202.0 [100/178771] via 100.100.102.2, 00:00:09, Serial0
100.100.203.0 255.255.255.0 is possibly down,
routing via 100.100.103.2, Serial1
To further verify the problem, telnet to 100.100.103.2 and look at the response to
its show ip route command. (Telnet is described in Section 9.2.6.)
oc_rtr#telnet south
Trying south (100.100.103.2)... Open
South Site Cisco 2501
User Access Verification
Password:
<virtual terminal password>
As shown below, the show ip route command at the remote router only shows 4
subnets. The 100.100.203.0 subnet is not shown because there are no working
routes to devices on the subnet; therefore, the subnet does not exist.
south_rtr>show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP
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i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, * - candidate
default
Gateway of last resort is not set
100.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 is subnetted, 4 subnets
I
100.100.102.0 [100/178771] via 100.100.103.1, 00:00:28, Serial0
C
100.100.103.0 is directly connected, Serial0
I
100.100.201.0 [100/178771] via 100.100.103.1, 00:00:28, Serial0
I
100.100.202.0 [100/178871] via 100.100.103.1, 00:00:28, Serial0
south_rtr> logout
oc_rtr>
When finished with the remote router, the logout command will return the prompt
to the local router.
9.2.4. Show int - information on ports
Entering the show int command will display information about all serial and
Ethernet ports of the router. At the end of each port’s information, the router will
pause and display: ---more---. To see the next port’s information, press the space
bar. To abort the command, press the letter n (for no).
To get information on a specific port, also enter the port name.
Examples:
show int - Displays information about all ports.
show int e0 - Displays information about the Ethernet0 port.
show int s0 - Displays information about the Serial0 port.
9.2.5. Ping from router
To ping a device (router or computer), enter the ping command and the unique
host name or IP address of the device. (Host names were entered during
configuration with the “ip host <name> <ip address>“ command and can be
viewed with the “show hosts” command described in Section 9.2.2.) See Section
9.1 for ping troubleshooting techniques.
Example:
oc_rtr>ping south
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 100.100.103.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/41/44 ms
To ping all routers with one command, enter:
ping 255.255.255.255 ?
Each router that receives the ping will respond with its IP address.
The escape sequence to abort ping is entered by simultaneously pressing the Ctrl,
Shift, and 6 keys, releasing the keys, and then pressing the X key.
The chart below shows the possible responses when pinging a specific router.
!
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Reply was received.
9-4
TROUBLESHOOTING
.
U
C
I
?
&
Timed out while waiting for a reply.
Destination unreachable error was received.
Congestion experienced packet was received.
Test interrupted by user.
Unknown packet type.
Packet lifetime exceeded.
9.2.6. Telnet from router
Telnet (terminal emulation protocol) allows the local keyboard and monitor to act
as though they were attached to a remote device. Once a telnet connection is
made, the information typed on the local keyboard is sent to the remote device
and the local monitor displays information from the remote device.
To establish a connection from a router’s prompt, enter the telnet command and
the unique host name or IP address of a remote router. (Host names were entered
during configuration with the “ip host <name> <ip address>“ command and can
be viewed with the “show hosts” command described in Section 9.2.2.)
As shown in the following example, the router will show that it is trying to open
the connection. When the connection is made, a sign-on message will display and
the router will ask for a password. (This is the “virtual terminal password” entered
during configuration of the remote router for “line vty 0 4”.)
Next, enter the desired router commands. When finished, give the command
“logout”. The router will break the connection and display the local router’s
prompt.
oc_rtr#telnet south
Trying south (100.100.103.2)... Open
South Site Cisco 2501
User Access Verification
Password:
<virtual terminal password>
south_rtr>. . . <entered desired commands>
south_rtr>#logout
oc_rtr#
9.3.
Troubleshooting from a host computer
9.3.1. Ping from OpenView
Ping is controlled by moving the cursor over the desired map icon, clicking the
right mouse button, and selecting Ping. Alternatively, select a map icon and then
select menu item Monitor -> Ping. Only routers and computers can be pinged. See
Section 9.1 for ping troubleshooting techniques.
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The Ping window is used to start/stop pings and to set ping options. The bottom
of the window shows the number of pings sent, the number of pings received, and
the percentage of data lost. These numbers are reset to zero when a ping is started.
Start/Stop pings: This is a toggle operation that is selected by clicking the menu
item Start or Stop, in the Ping window. Alternatively, click on the hexagon (stopsign shaped) red (for stop) or green (for start) button.
If a response is received from the device, a message similar to the following will
appear in the Ping window.
reply from 100.100.103.2: sequence = 0 round-trip time = 30 ms
round-trip min/avg/max = 30/30/30 ms
The first line includes the network address of the pinged device (100.100.103.2),
the number of the ping (sequence = 0), and the time it took between when the
ping was sent and the response was received (round-trip time = 30 ms). If the
continuous option has been selected, the sequence number will increase for each
ping.
The second line shows the minimum, average, and maximum times for round-trip.
If a device is pinged and no response is received, a message similar to the
following will appear in the Ping window.
1 packet transmitted, 0 packets received 100% packet loss
Ping Options: Customize pings by selecting Options in the Ping window menu. If
Continuous Operation is unselected (default), selecting Start ping will ping the
device once. If Continuous Operation is selected, selecting Start ping will
repeatedly ping the device until Stop ping is selected. Ping time out is set in
milliseconds and defines the amount of time OpenView will wait for a response
from the pinged device.
9.3.2. Ping from Command Prompt
Routers and computers can be pinged from the Command Prompt. The response
will be displayed in the Command Prompt window. (In Windows NT 4.0, the
Command Prompt is started from taskbar menu item Start -> Programs ->
Command Prompt. In Windows NT 3.51, the Command Prompt is started from
the Main program group.)
To ping a device, enter ping and the device’s unique name or IP address. The
unique name is the name that was entered in the lmhosts file. See Section 9.1 for
ping troubleshooting techniques.
Example:
C:\> ping south
Pinging south [100.100.103.2] with
Reply from 100.100.103.2: bytes=32
Reply from 100.100.103.2: bytes=32
Reply from 100.100.103.2: bytes=32
Reply from 100.100.103.2: bytes=32
4 times total
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32 bytes of data:
time=30ms TTL=254
time=20ms TTL=254
time=20ms TTL=254
time=20ms TTL=254
TROUBLESHOOTING
9.3.3. Telnet from computer
The Telnet program can be started from the Accessories group. (In Windows NT
4.0, use the taskbar menu item Start -> Programs -> Accessories -> Telnet. In
Windows NT 3.51, open the Program Manager; then, open the Accessories
group.)
Telnet (terminal emulation protocol) allows the local keyboard and monitor to act
as though they were attached to a remote device. Once a telnet connection is
made, the information typed on the local keyboard is sent to the remote device
and the local monitor displays information from the remote device.
To telnet to a router, select the Connect menu. If the desired router is listed in the
bottom section of the menu, select the listing. Otherwise, select menu item
Remote System and a dialog box will display. In the Host Name field, enter the
unique name or IP address of the desired router. Alternatively, select a name or
address from the drop-down list, which lists the last few entries. In the dialog box,
Port should be telnet and Term Type should be vt100. Click the Connect button to
establish a telnet session with the router.
The router will (if able) send its sign-on message and ask for a password. This is
the <virtual terminal password> entered during router configuration for “line vty
0 4”. After the password is entered, the router will send its prompt and then router
commands can be entered. (See Section 9.2 for troubleshooting commands and
Section 3.2 for configuration commands.)
To end the telnet session, enter logout at the router prompt, or select menu item
Connect -> Disconnect. If logout is entered, a message box will show that the
connection was lost.
9.4.
Recovery (Reverts) setup and actions
CAUTION: Reverts require extreme caution and knowledge about the radio
system. Otherwise, reverts could cause more problems than the initial failure.
Setting up automatic reverts should be done with the assistance of the E.F.
Johnson project manager.
Reverts are actions that are performed if failures occur. Automatic actions can be
configured and performed through OpenView. If there is a failure, the remaining
working pieces need to be reconfigured to provide the best possible coverage for
the system’s communications needs. By setting up channel reverts and site
reverts, OpenView can provide automatic reconfiguration.
Channel reverts will shut down all repeaters on a channel. Site reverts will shut
down individual sites or reconfigure individual sites to stand-alone sites. If a
repeater failure can cause both reverts, both reverts will occur.
Some situations will be beyond the scope of automatic reverts. Therefore, it is
possible to manually revert channels and sites. Channels and sites are always
manually unreverted (returned to normal). Repeaters can also be individually
controlled (see Section 9.5).
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9.4.1. Consider interference problems
In a simulcast system, the repeaters in adjacent sites are on the same channel and
purposely overlap to fill in weak coverage areas. If one site is reverted to a standalone Multi-Net site, the overlapping areas will have interference problems. See
Figure 9-2.
Figure 9-2. Reverted sites can cause interference
Site 2
Site 1
Site 2
Site 1
Site 3
Site 3
In a simulcast system, all radios
receive the same signal.
If Site 1 is reverted to a stand-alone MultiNet site, radios in the black area will
receive a signal from Site 1 and a different
signal from Sites 2 and 3.
Interference problems could be minimized in several ways. Reducing the output
power level of the repeaters in Site 1 (Figure 9-2) might decrease the area affected
by interference; however, it may also create a hole in the coverage area of the
system. Reduced power level may also put more stations in fringe areas.
If only one repeater is not working at Site 1 (Figure 9-2), the channel with the
non-working repeater could be shut down. That is, the repeaters in sites 2 and 3
for that channel could be disabled. Except for having one less channel, the system
would continue to function as a normal simulcast system.
If a system has enough channels, each site could use different channels and be
reverted to a stand-alone Multi-Net site. The benefits of simulcast coverage would
be lost, but the holes and fringe areas would be reduced.
There will be trade-off decisions that must be made when equipment fails.
Knowing the coverage area of the working repeaters and considering the effects
on the whole system will lead towards a configuration that minimizes the loss as
much as possible.
9.4.2. Consider status channel and home channel access
In simulcast systems, communications between radios and repeaters use MultiNet signaling, as described in the Multi-Net Application Note (Part No. 0093039-003).
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Figure 9-3 shows the relationship between repeaters, channels, and sites in
Simulcast and Multi-Net systems. Multi-Net descriptions often refer to a single
repeater. In a simulcast system, the description would refer to all repeaters on the
same channel.
CAUTION: Radios monitor their home channel and the status channel for overthe-air instructions. If there are problems on either channel, radios may not
receive their instructions. Therefore, pay special attention to the status channel
and home channels when configuring reverts.
Figure 9-3. Relationship of repeaters, channels, and sites
Stand-Alone
Multi-Net
System
Site 1
R1, Ch1
R2, Ch2
R3, Ch3
R4, Ch4
R5, Ch5
R = Repeater
Ch = Channel
Multi-Site
Multi-Net
System
Simulcast
Multi-Net
System
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
1
2
3
4
5
Site 1
R1, Ch1
R2, Ch2
R3, Ch3
R4, Ch4
R5, Ch5
Site 2
R1, Ch6
R2, Ch7
R3, Ch8
R4, Ch9
R5, Ch10
Site 1
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
Site 2
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
9-9
Site 3
R1, Ch11
R2, Ch12
R3, Ch13
R4, Ch14
R5, Ch15
Site 3
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
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9.4.3. Configure automatic channel reverts
A simulcast system can be configured to automatically shut down all repeaters
that are on a channel that has simulcast failure, repeater failure, or RNT/CIM
Channel Problem alarms. If there are 10 channels, the loss of 1 channel may be
better than a large hole in coverage on 1 channel. When the problem is fixed, the
channel needs to be manually unreverted.
The number of channels that can not automatically shut down is selected when
describing the System icon. This is done when the OpenView map is made, and
can be changed by right clicking a System icon, selecting Describe, and changing
the value under Channel Revert MIN. This dialog box is also used to select
whether the Status Channel can be reverted.
Channel Revert MIN: Select the number of simulcast channels that will
not automatically shut down if simulcast failure, repeater failure, or
RNT/CIM Channel Problem alarms occur. This is the minimum number of
channels that will stay operational, even if there are additional problems.
To prevent any channels from automatically reverting, select the number
of channels that exist in the system.
Example: If the system has 10 channels and 8 channels are required to
remain operational, select 8. If problems occur, up to 2 channels that have
problems will be automatically shut down. The remaining 8 channels will
stay operational, even if additional problems occur. Additional changes
could be made manually. If automatic site reverts are configured, they
may further automatically change the system.
Allow Status Channel Revert: If the Status Channel has problems,
should the system automatically revert the Status Channel? When this
check box is checked, the system can automatically revert the Status
Channel. If the Status Channel should not automatically revert, leave this
box unchecked.
The alarm description list in Section 9.6 shows the alarms that cause simulcast
and repeater failures, which can result in channel reverts.
9.4.4. Manually unrevert and revert channels
The revert status of channels can be seen by selecting a System icon and then
selecting menu item System -> Channel Revert. A dialog box shows the system
name, the total number of channels in the system, and the number of reverted
channels. There is also a list of repeater numbers, channel numbers, and their
current revert status. If the system has automatically reverted a channel, its status
will be Reverted, otherwise the status is Normal.
The system will not automatically unrevert a channel. To unrevert a channel,
select the channel in the list and click the UnRevert button. If the problem(s) that
caused the revert has not been repaired, the channel will again automatically
revert. To manually revert a channel, select the channel in the list and click the
Revert button.
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To unrevert individual repeaters and keep the channel reverted, select a Repeater
icon and then select menu item Repeater -> UnRevert. Repeaters can also be
reconfigured by using the Manual Repeater Control dialog box covered in Section
9.5. The channel status will remain reverted and additional alarms on the channel
will not revert the channel.
9.4.5. Channel unrevert examples
The information in this section is for example only and may or may not apply to a
specific system. Each system should be analyzed for other situations that may
benefit from automatic reverts.
Note: If a channel that has failed repeaters is unreverted, radios that receive data
from the sites that have failed repeaters will not hear calls made on the unreverted
channel. Remember to consider the condition of home channels and the status
channel when unreverting channels.
A simulcast system can be configured to automatically shut down all repeaters
that are on a channel that has simulcast failure, repeater failure, or RNT/CIM
Channel Problem alarms. Channel reverts are configured in the Channel Revert
Configuration section of the system icon Describe dialog box. Channels are
unreverted using menu item System -> Channel Revert (as described in Section
9.4.4).
• Low-usage area with failure
If a system has reverted a channel because of a failure at a site in a low-usage
area, the channel may be unreverted to provide high-usage areas with all
channels. Radios receiving data from the site with the failed repeater will not hear
calls made on the unreverted channel.
• Status channel with failure
If the status channel is reverted, unreverting it will optimize system response at
sites with no failures. Radios in coverage areas with status channel failures will
still receive update information on their home channels. No calls will be heard on
the status channel from sites with failed repeaters.
The status channel can be configured to never revert.
• More failures than Channel Revert MIN
If the system has reverted as many channels as it can (as defined by Channel
Revert MIN), additional failures on other channels will not cause channel reverts.
Channels are reverted in the order that OpenView receives the alarms; however, if
Channel Revert MIN is reached and there are more problems, it may be wise to
unrevert some channels and revert others.
For example, a system may revert a home channel; then, a non-home channel has
problems but is not reverted because the system has already reverted the number
of channels that it is automatically allowed to revert. In this case, the system may
work more efficiently if the home channel is manually unreverted and the nonhome channel is manually reverted. Radios on the unreverted home channel that
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TROUBLESHOOTING
receive data from the site with the failed repeater will not receive data from the
home channel, but they will still receive data from the status channel.
9.4.6. Configure inputs for automatic site reverts
Configuring automatic site reverts requires two processes. One process is to set
up the revert inputs (criteria or conditions) that will cause a revert; and the other
process is to set up the revert actions. There can be several sets of revert inputs
per site, but there is only one revert action per site. Reverts are on a site by site
basis; if a revert input set is met for a site, only that site is reverted.
Two dialog boxes are used to set up site reverts. This section covers configuring
the revert inputs and the next section covers configuring the revert actions.
CAUTION: Use extreme caution when setting up automatic site reverts. Consider
the effects that changing one site will have on the entire system.
Selecting a System icon and then selecting menu item System -> Revert Input
Configuration will display the site Revert Input Configuration dialog box.
A revert input set defines the type of alarms (simulcast or repeater failures) and
the list of repeaters that must have these alarms before the system will
automatically revert the site. Besides revert input sets, a site can also have a revert
input that will cause the site to revert if the network link is lost.
Site Revert on HC Network Link Loss: Selecting a site from the Sites/Revert
Input Sets list and checking this check box, will set up a revert input. This input
will cause the site to revert if it can not communicate with the host computer,
which runs OpenView.
Creating Revert Input Sets: Each site can have up to 16 other input sets that will
cause the site to revert. To add a set, select a site from the Sites/Revert Input Sets
list and then click the Add Set button. A new entry, such as Set #1, will be added
to the list.
To define the type of alarms for the selected set, select either Simulcast Failure or
Repeater Failure in the Alarm Set Type section. The alarm description list in
Section 9.6 shows the alarms that will cause simulcast and repeater failures.
To define the repeaters that must have these alarms, select all of the desired
numbers in the Repeaters With Active Alarms section. These numbers correspond
to the numbers that have been programmed into the repeaters. Select/deselect
repeaters by clicking in the box to the left of the number. A selected repeater
number will show an x in the box.
Note: A channel controller site cannot be set to revert.
Changing Revert Input Sets: To change a set, first select the desired set from the
Sites/Revert Input Sets list. Then, select or deselect items in the Alarm Set Type
and Repeaters With Active Alarms sections. The Clear All button will deselect all
repeater numbers.
To remove a set, select the set (from the Sites/Revert Input Sets list) and then
click the Delete Set button.
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Tip: When several sets are desired, it may be beneficial to first make a chart of
the plan. Figure 9-4 shows an example chart for a site, which has 10 repeaters. In
this example, the site will revert if any one of the following sets exists.
• Set #1: Repeaters numbered 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 are reporting simulcast failure
alarms.
• Set #2: Repeaters numbered 1, 2, and 3 are reporting simulcast failure
alarms.
• Set #3: Repeaters numbered 3, 4, 5, and 6 are reporting repeater failure
alarms.
• Set # 4: Repeaters numbered 7, 8, 9, and 10 are reporting repeater failure
alarms.
Figure 9-4. Chart showing site revert conditions
Set #1
Set #2
Set #3
Set #4
.....
Set #16
Type
S
S
R
R
1
2
3
4
5
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
7
X
8
X
9
X
10
X
X
X
X
9.4.7. Configure actions for automatic site reverts
Two dialog boxes are used to set up site reverts. The previous section covers
configuring revert inputs and this section covers configuring the revert actions.
CAUTION: Use extreme caution when setting up automatic site reverts. Consider
the effects that changing one site will have on the entire system.
Selecting a System icon and then selecting menu item System -> Revert Action
Configuration will display the site Revert Action Configuration dialog box. The
dialog box lists each repeater and shows the repeater’s current revert setup in the
Revert Action column. Revert actions are set up for each repeater at a site. If the
site automatically reverts, all repeaters at the site will revert according to their
individual setup.
To change the setup for a repeater, select the repeater from the list and then select
the desired actions from the Site Revert Action section.
• Repeater Mode
Stand-Alone Multi-Net (MN): The repeater will use Multi-Net signaling,
but will not communicate with any other radio sites (Multi-Net sites or
other sites) within the system.
Disabled (DIS): The repeater will be shut down. It will not transmit or
receive in any mode.
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• Power Level
Select the desired transmit power level.
• Status Channel (SC)
When this check box is checked, the repeater is on the Status Channel.
The Status Channel transmits update information for all calls. There is
only one Status Channel in a simulcast system; although, a site configured
as a separate stand-alone site may have a different status channel.
9.4.8. Manually unrevert and revert sites
To see the revert status of sites, select a System icon and then select menu item
System -> Site Revert. A dialog box shows the system name, the total number of
sites in the system, and the number of reverted sites. There is also a list of sites
and their current revert status. If the system has automatically reverted a site, its
status will be Reverted, otherwise the status is Normal.
The system will not automatically unrevert a site. To unrevert a site, select the site
in the list and click the UnRevert button. If the problem(s) that caused the revert
has not been repaired, the site will again automatically revert. To manually revert
a site, select it from the list and click the Revert button. Alternatively, sites can be
reverted and unreverted by selecting a Site icon and then selecting menu item Site
-> Revert or Site -> UnRevert.
To unrevert individual repeaters and keep the site reverted, select a Repeater icon
and then select menu item Repeater -> UnRevert. Repeaters can also be
reconfigured by using the Manual Repeater Control dialog box covered in Section
9.5. The site status will remain reverted and additional alarms at the site will not
revert the site.
9.4.9. Site revert example
The information in this section is for example only and may or may not apply to a
specific system. Each system should be analyzed for other situations that may
benefit from automatic reverts.
If the home channel of an important group of users and the status channel both
fail at a site, the site can be automatically reverted and reconfigured to allow
communications within the site. If a system has very large overlap areas, the
affected site might be shut down without greatly degrading coverage. However, if
shutting down the site would leave large areas inaccessible, reconfiguring the site
to a stand-alone Multi-Net site may be a better alternative.
Note: Subscriber units on the system will need to have a “backup” system
programmed for a stand-alone Multi-Net site. When the fleet map is produced for
the subscriber units, the site revert actions and the backup system must be planned
together.
CAUTION: Radios monitor their home channel and the status channel for overthe-air instructions. If there are problems on either channel, radios may not
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
9-14
TROUBLESHOOTING
receive their instructions. Therefore, pay special attention to the status channel
and home channels when configuring reverts.
The following example shows how a 3-site, 10-channel system could be
configured for an automatic site revert.
Refer to Figure 9-5. Site 3 has been configured to revert to a stand-alone MultiNet site if repeaters 1 and 3 fail. In this system, repeater 1 is the status channel.
Repeater 3 is the home channel for the group used by a high-priority collection of
users. When repeaters 1 and 3 fail, groups that use channel 3 as the home channel
have no access to the radio system in the site 3 coverage area. When the system
reverts, groups that use a backup subscriber unit system will have local access for
site 3; other groups will have no access for site 3.
When the high-priority users need to use the repeater at site 3, they will need to
change their radios to a backup system that is programmed (in this example) with
repeater 8 as the status channel. Repeater 9 is the home channel for their group.
Trunked communication will then be available to them within the site; however,
no audio is sent back to the RNT. Therefore, there will be no consoles, unique ID
calls, or telco calls from site 3.
To configure the system for this type of revert involves two dialog boxes. The
dialog box from menu item System -> Revert Input Configuration, is used to set
up the input alarms (or conditions) that will cause a revert. Refer to Figure 9-6.
For this example, a set of inputs is defined for site 3. Repeater Failure is selected
in the Alarm Set Type section of the dialog box. Repeaters 1 and 3 are selected in
the Repeaters With Active Alarms section of the dialog box.
The dialog box from menu item System -> Revert Action Configuration, is used
to set up the actions that the system will take when the above inputs are met. (In
this example, when repeaters 1 and 3 of site 3 fail, the system will take the actions
defined for site 3.) Refer to Figure 9-7. In the dialog box, repeater 8 is configured
to be a stand-alone Multi-Net repeater and to be the status channel. Repeaters 9
and 10 are configured to be stand-alone Multi-Net repeaters. Repeaters 1 to 7 are
configured to be disabled. If desired, the power level can also be changed,
possibly to reduce interference in an overlap area.
9-15
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
TROUBLESHOOTING
Figure 9-5. Site 3 is configured to revert to a stand-alone Multi-Net site.
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
9-16
TROUBLESHOOTING
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Site 1
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 2
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 3
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 2
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 3
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Normal 3-site, 10-channel simulcast system.
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Site 1
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
At site 3, repeaters fail on the status channel (Channel 1) and
on the home c hannel for a high-priority group (Channel 3).
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Site 1
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 2
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8
R9
R10
Site 3
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R8 Status
R9 Home
R10
The system was configured to automatically revert site 3 to a stand-alone
Multi-Net site using repeaters 8, 9, and 10 and shutting down repeaters
1 through 7. To avoid interference, systems with large overlap areas may
also need to manually shut down repeaters 8, 9, and 10 at sites 1 and 2.
9-17
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
TROUBLESHOOTING
Figure 9-6. Revert Input Configuration
Revert Input Configuration
System Name:
Select Site to Configure:
Sites/Revert Input Sets
OK
Site Revert on HC Network Link Loss
CHANNELCTRL
SITE1
SITE2
Alarm Set Type
Cancel
Simulcast Failure
SITE3
Set #1
Help
Repeater Failure
Repeaters With Active Alarms
1
6
11
16
21
26
2
7
12
17
22
27
3
8
13
18
23
28
4
9
14
19
24
29
5
10
15
20
25
30
Clear All
Add Set
Delete Set
Duplicate Set
Figure 9-7. Revert Action Configuration
Revert Action Configuration
System Name:
OK
Select Repeater to Configure:
Cancel
Site/Repeater
SITE3
R1
Revert Action
Help
DIS-100%-SC
R2
DIS-100%
R3
R4
R5
DIS-100%
DIS-100%
DIS-100%
R6
DIS-100%
R7
R8
DIS-100%
MN-MIN-SC
R9
R10
MN-MIN
MN-MIN
Site Revert Action
Repeater Mode:
Stand-Alone Multi-Net (MN)
Disabled (DIS)
Power Level:
Full (100%)
3/4 (75%)
1/2 (50%)
Minimum (Min)
Status Channel (SC)
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
9-18
TROUBLESHOOTING
9.5.
Perform manual repeater control
Since each system has a unique installation and unique propagation patterns,
some situations will be beyond the scope of automatic reverts. Therefore, it is
possible to manually set the repeater mode and power level for each repeater and
also set if the repeater is on the Status Channel. Repeater control is done by
selecting a System icon and then selecting menu item System -> Manual Repeater
Control. The Manual Repeater Control dialog box will appear.
This dialog box shows the name of the system and a list of all sites/repeaters
within the system. The repeaters can be shown/hidden by clicking the +/- button
next to the site name or by double clicking the site name. For each repeater, the
mode, power level, and whether the repeater is on the Status Channel are shown.
The Current column shows if the information is “True” or “False”. True indicates
the conditions at the present time. False indicates that there is a communication
problem with the repeater, so current information is unavailable.
To make changes, select the repeater to change, select the desired options, and
then click either the Set Mode button, the Set Power button, or the Set Mode and
Set Power button. The repeater will be reprogrammed and the dialog box will be
updated accordingly.
• Repeater Mode
This section is used to select the trunking method of the repeater and
whether the repeater is on the Status Channel.
Disabled: The repeater will be shut down. It will not transmit or receive in
any mode.
Stand-Alone Multi-Net: The repeater will use Multi-Net signaling, but
will not communicate with any other radio sites (Multi-Net sites or other
sites) within the system. The enhanced operating features provided by
Multi-Net signaling will not be available.
Simulcast Channel Control: Select this option if the “repeater” is part of
the channel controller in a simulcast system. A channel controller makes
several simulcast remote repeaters look like one repeater to the RNT
(Radio Network Terminal, which controls the operating features of the
radio system).
Simulcast Remote Repeater: Select this option for any repeater that is
part of a simulcast system. A simulcast system has several sites. Each site
in a system has the same channels and the channel audio is rebroadcast at
each site.
Status Channel: When this check box is checked, the repeater is on the
Status Channel. The Status Channel transmits update information for all
calls. There is only one Status Channel in a simulcast system; although, a
site configured as a separate stand-alone site may have a different Status
Channel.
9-19
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
TROUBLESHOOTING
• Power Level
Select the desired transmit power level.
9.5.1. Repeater menu
Repeaters can also be controlled by selecting a repeater icon from the map and
then selecting a function from the Repeater menu. The following functions are
available.
Active Alarms: To view the active alarms for a repeater, select a repeater icon
and then select menu item Repeater -> Active Alarms. A dialog box shows the
repeater name and a list of active alarms, including active alarms that have been
manually acknowledged from the Alarm Log.
Restart: A repeater can be restarted by selecting a repeater icon on a map, and
then selecting menu item Repeater -> Restart.
Revert: To revert a repeater, select a repeater icon on a map, and then select
menu item Repeater -> Revert. The repeater will be reverted to the configuration
set in the Revert Action Configuration dialog box (see Section 9.4.7).
UnRevert: To unrevert a repeater, select a repeater icon on a map, and then select
menu item Repeater -> UnRevert. Unrevert returns the repeater to the
configuration set in the EFJ Repeater Description dialog box (see Section 5.6.3).
Setup State: To place a repeater in setup mode, select a repeater icon on a map,
and then select menu item Repeater -> Setup State. Note: This menu item will
only be available if the service.ini file was present in the C:\SITECTR\ directory
when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
Normal State: To take a repeater out of setup mode, select a repeater icon on a
map, and then select menu item Repeater -> Normal State. Note: This menu item
will only be available if the service.ini file was present in the C:\SITECTR\
directory when OpenView was started. See Section 5.11.
9.6.
Alarm list for E.F. Johnson components
9.6.1. Repeater generated alarms
Simulcast Failure alarms are caused by alarms listed in the “Disable Simcst”
column. Repeater Failure alarms are caused by alarms listed in the “RF
Shutdown” column.
DBase ID numbers are the same as the Alarm ID numbers for active alarms. For
cleared alarms, add 200 to the Alarm ID to get the DBase ID. Descriptions for
alarms 1 to 4 can be entered in the EFJ Repeater Description dialog box.
Alrm
ID
Disp
0
0
Led’ Alarm
s
Description
4 Repeater in Test
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
Dig
On/ A/D
Off Line
1/2 Disable
Pw Simcst
r
X
RF
Shut
down Causes For Alarm
Repeater put in test
9-20
TROUBLESHOOTING
Alrm
ID
Disp
Led’ Alarm
s
Description
Mode
4 IAC Input 1
Dig
On/ A/D
Off Line
1/2 Disable
Pw Simcst
r
RF
Shut
down Causes For Alarm
1
1
X
Value opposite of configuration
2
2
4
IAC Input 2
X
Value opposite of configuration
3
3
4
IAC Input 3
29
A/D value outside of trip range
4
4
4
IAC Input 4
30
A/D value outside of trip range
5
5
4
Reserved (5)
X
Old IAC card (same as 1)
6
6
4
Reserved (6)
X
Old IAC card (same as 1)
7
7
4
Reserved (7)
X
Old IAC card (same as 1)
8
8
4
Reserved (8)
X
Old IAC card (same as 1)
9
9
4
MAC Processor
X
10
A
4
HSDB Processor
X
Have not communicated with
MAC in 20 seconds
Problems with the bus
11
B
4
IRDB Cable
X
Problems with the bus
12
C
4
RNT/CIM Channel
Problem
X
13
D
4
TIC Processor
X
14
E
4
SMC Processor
X
15
F
4
VNC
X
16
0
5
AC Power Fail
X
17
1
5
Battery Power Fail
14
Have not heard from CIM in up
to 2.5 minutes. Consoles will
not receive audio from the
affected channel. The channel
will still be operating, unless it
was shut down by an automatic
channel revert.
Have not communicated with
TIC in 20 seconds
Have not communicated with
SMC in 20 seconds
Have not communicated with
VNC in 30 seconds
Pin on latch goes low indicating
AC fail
A/D value less than 183
18
2
5
28
19
3
5
Power Supply
Thermal
Fan 1 Current
13
A/D value greater than trip
point
Fan current not within spec
20
4
5
Fan 2 Current
12
Fan current not within spec
21
5
5
IAC Mismatch
X
22
6
5
GPS 1 PPS
X
X
23
7
5
SMC Link
X
X
24
8
5
No A/D Samples
X
25
9
5
GPS 10 MHz
X
26
A
5
Repeater in Setup
State
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
IAC and eeprom parameters
don’t match
SMC has indicated the 1 PPS is
gone
SMC link is gone - no data and
audio
Not able to sample any of the
A/D values
10 MHz reference is gone
Repeater setup state - ignore all
flags
9-21
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
TROUBLESHOOTING
Alrm
ID
Disp
Led’ Alarm
s
Description
5 Reserved
27
B
28
C
5
Reserved
29
D
5
Reserved
30
E
5
Reserved
31
F
5
Reserved
32
0
4,5
33
1
4,5
34
2
4,5
35
3
4,5
RF Shutdown
(several modes)
RF Half Power
Mode
Thermal Sense in
RF Portion
RF Finals 1 and 2
36
4
4,5
37
5
38
Dig
On/ A/D
Off Line
1/2 Disable
Pw Simcst
r
RF
Shut
down Causes For Alarm
*X
See RF shutdown column
*X
See half power column
22
X
X
17 & 18
X
X
RF Finals 3 and 4
19 & 20
X
X
4,5
RF VSWR
16 & 21
X
6
4,5
39
7
4,5
40
8
4,5
41
9
4,5
42
A
4,5
Normal
Synthesizer Tx
Lock
Normal
Synthesizer Rx
Lock
HS Synthesizer Tx
Lock
HS Synthesizer Rx
Lock
RF Quarter Power
43
B
4,5
Reserved
44
C
4,5
Reserved
45
D
4,5
Reserved
46
E
4,5
Reserved
47
F
4,5
Repeater Disabled
X
X
X
A/D value greater than trip
point
Power values below 40 or
spread is too far
Power values below 40 or
spread is too far
Fwd Power is < reflected or
ratio is too much
Lock line is low 8 of 8 reads
Lock line is low 8 of 8 reads
X
X
Lock line is low 8 of 8 reads
X
Lock line is low 8 of 8 reads
X
High Power only; 2 of the 4
finals are blown
Op_mode flag in EE trig by
columns 8&9
* Triggers based on other alarms
9.6.2. Site/Channel computer generated alarms
DBase ID Alarm ID
400
0
401
1
402
2
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
Alarm Status
Active
Active
Active
Alarm Description
SCS in Test Mode
SIB Link Alarm
Simulcast Failure
9-22
Causes For Alarm
Doesn’t have a repeater associated with it
Has a repeater ID associated with it
Repeater can’t simulcast
TROUBLESHOOTING
DBase ID Alarm ID
403
3
404
4
405
5
406
6
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Alarm Status
Active
Active
Active
Active
Cleared
Cleared
Cleared
Cleared
Cleared
Cleared
Cleared
Alarm Description
Repeater Failure
Site Reverted
Unable to configure repeater
Unconfigured Repeater
Causes For Alarm
Repeater can’t operate
SCS performed a site revert
Unable to configure a repeater
SCS knows of a repeater that wasn’t
configured by the host computer
SCS in Test Mode
Doesn’t have a repeater associated with it
SIB Link Alarm
Has a repeater ID associated with it
Simulcast Failure
Repeater can’t simulcast
Repeater Failure
Repeater can’t operate
Site Reverted
SCS performed a site revert
Unable to configure repeater Unable to configure a repeater
Unconfigured Repeater
SCS knows of a repeater that wasn’t
configured by the host computer
9.6.3. Host Computer generated alarms (for the site/channel computers)
DBase ID
800
801
Alarm ID
NA
NA
Alarm
Status
NA
NA
Alarm Description
HC-SCS Network Link Established
HC-SCS Network Link Lost
802
NA
NA
HC-SCS Connection Attempt Failed
Causes For Alarm
Site Computer connected
Site computer disconnected from the
host computer
Unable to connect to the site computer
9.6.4. Host Computer generated alarms (for the repeaters)
DBase ID
Alarm ID
1000
1001
1002
1003
1004
1005
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Alarm
Status
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Alarm Description
Causes For Alarm
Repeater Restarted
SMC Configuration Finished
SMC Configuration Failed
Repeater Configuration Finished
Calibration Write Failed
Calibration Write Finished
Received Opcode 37 (Repeater Restart Msg)
The SMC was successfully configured
The SMC could not be configured
The repeater was successfully configured
Unable to configure all repeaters
All repeaters successfully configured
9.6.5. Host Computer generated alarms (for a system)
DBase ID
Alarm ID
1200
1201
NA
NA
Alarm
Status
NA
NA
Alarm Description
Causes For Alarm
Channel Reverted
Channel Unreverted
A channel in this system was reverted
A channel in this system was unreverted
9-23
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
TROUBLESHOOTING
9.7.
Mnemonics
A/D - Analog to Digital
ARP - Address Resolution Protocol
CIM - Channel Interface Module
GPS - Global Positioning System
HC - Host Computer
HSDB - High-Speed Data Bus
IAC - Interface Alarm Card
IGRP - Interior Gateway Routing Protocol
IP - Internet Protocol
IRDB - Inter-Repeater Data Bus
MAC - Main Audio Card
MAC address - Media Access Control address
MBC - Message Bridge Card
NTP - Network Time Protocol
PPS - Pulse Per Second
RNT - Radio Network Terminal
SCS - Site Controller Station or Site/Channel computer
SIB - Serial Interface Bus
SMC - Simulcast Modulation Card
SNMP - Simple Network Management Protocol
TCP - Transmission Control Protocol
TIC - Telephone Interface Card
VNC - Viking Network Controller
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
9-24
INDEX
Index
—A—
abbreviations, 9-23
actions, site revert, 9-14
active alarms, 9-20
adapters, caution, 6-1
add to polling, 5-20
addresses, network, 2-6
administrator username, windows,
4-6, 5-5
alarms
descriptions, 9-20
iac, 5-17
log database id numbers, 9-20
repeater, 9-20
alignment, 7-1
bi-directional, 7-9
uni-directional, 7-5
assign ip addresses, 2-7
devices, 2-12
subnet, 2-10
assign subnets, 2-10
audio gain, smc, 7-18
auto logon, windows, 4-10
automatic
channel revert, 9-10
site revert actions, 9-14
site revert inputs, 9-12
—B—
backbone, 2-7
background map, 5-12, 5-18
bandwidth, router port, 3-5
bi-directional
calibration, 7-9
configure, 5-20
IAC1, 5-17
buffer delay
min, 5-20
offset, 5-19, 7-14
buffer delay, smc, 7-19
—C—
cable, 2-1
caution, 6-1
channel computer to channel
controller, 6-4
hub to host computer, 6-6
hub to router, 6-7
hub to site/channel computer, 65
router to channel bank, 6-8
router to host computer, 6-7
router to site/channel computer,
6-4
site computer to repeater, 6-3
calibration, 7-1
bi-directional, 7-9
uni-directional, 7-5
channel bank, 5-20
channel bank cable to router, 6-8
channel computer
cable to channel controller, 6-4
cable to hub, 6-5
cable to router, 6-4
configuration, 4-1
channel controller
cable to channel computer, 6-4
channel revert configure, 5-13, 9-10
channel revert status, 9-11
channel unrevert, 9-11
check maps, 5-18
cisco. See router
cisco router icon, 5-15
clock
computer, 4-8
router, 3-4, 3-8
community password, openview, 523
computer, 2-1
configuration, 4-1
host names, 4-5, 5-4
icon, 5-15
name, 2-14, 4-6, 4-9, 5-6, 5-8
passwords, 2-15
computers. See host, site, or channel
computer; or Windows
configure
channel computer, 4-1
channel reverts, 9-10
host computer, 5-1
mbc, 6-3
microwave type, 5-20
mouse, 4-2
offsets, 5-19
polling, 5-20
repeater control, 9-19
reverts, 9-7
router, 3-1
site computer, 4-1
site revert actions, 9-14
site revert inputs, 9-12
smc parameters, 7-17
traps, 5-21
windows, 4-1, 4-2
windows 3.51, 5-24
—D—
data acquisition
bi-directional, 7-9
uni-directional, 7-5
data gain, smc, 7-18
daylight savings time
router, 3-4
1
windows, 4-8
default gateway, 4-2
default, map, 5-18
describe
computer, 5-15
repeater, 5-16
router, 5-15
site, 5-14
system, 5-13
describe objects as added, 5-19
device map, 5-14
disable. See revert
distorted signals, 7-1, 7-5, 7-9, 7-14
—E—
e.f. johnson username, windows, 46, 5-5
edit
lmhosts file, 4-5, 5-4
offsets, 5-19
equipment location, 2-2
ethernet cable, 6-6
ethernet card, install, 4-1
ethernet crossover cable, 6-5
—F—
filename, maps, 5-12
flash code, mbc, 6-3
—H—
home channel, 9-9, 9-15
host computer
cable to hub, 6-6
cable to router, 6-7
configuration, 5-1
ping, 9-6
telnet, 9-7
host names, 2-14
computer, 4-5, 4-6, 4-9, 5-4, 5-6,
5-8
router, 3-5, 9-2
hosts file, 4-8, 5-9
hp openview. See openview
hub, 2-1, 2-9
cable to host computer, 6-6
cable to router, 6-7
cable to site/channel computer,
6-5
—I—
iac alarm, 5-17
icon
alignment, 7-2
computer, 5-15
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
INDEX
data acquisition, bi-directional,
7-11
data acquisition, uni-directional,
7-6
repeater, 5-16
router, 5-15
site, 5-14
system, 5-12
inputs, site revert, 9-12
install, 6-1
ethernet card, 4-1
mbc, 6-1
openview, 5-9
openview (old), 5-32
sitectrl, 4-10
windows, 8-6
windows networking, 4-3
install cable
channel computer to channel
controller, 6-4
hub to host computer, 6-6
hub to router, 6-7
hub to site/channel computer, 65
router to channel bank, 6-8
router to host computer, 6-7
router to site/channel computer,
6-4
site computer to repeater, 6-3
install software, 8-5
install software updates. See update
software. See update software
installation, site types, 2-2
ip addresses, 2-6, 9-2
ip subnets, 2-10
—L—
led on mbc, 6-3
link loss, 9-13
lmhosts file, 4-5, 4-7, 4-9, 5-4, 5-8
location of equipment, 2-2
log in openview password, 5-22
logon windows, auto, 4-10
—M—
ma-412 card, 6-8
manual calibration, 7-1
bi-directional, 7-9
uni-directional, 7-5
manual repeater control, 9-19
map
automatic submaps, 5-19
background image, 5-18
computer, 5-15
create, 5-11
device, 5-14
filename, 5-12
lines, 5-17
options, 5-18
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
protection, 5-18
repeater, 5-16
router, 5-15
set default, 5-18
site, 5-13
system, 5-12
text, 5-17
map protection password, 5-22
master site, 2-2
mbc, 2-1
configure, 6-3
install, 6-1
led, 6-3
message bridge cable kit, 6-3
microwave
bi-directional, 5-20, 7-9
redundant, 5-20
uni-directional, 7-5
mnemonics, 9-23
modify
lmhosts file, 4-5, 5-4
offsets, 5-19
monitoring point, 2-2, 5-13
mouse configuration, 4-2
multi-port router, 2-14
—N—
names. See host names
network addresses, 2-6
network link loss, 9-13
ntp, 3-6
number of symbols, 5-18
—O—
offset, overlap, 7-14
openview
community password, 5-23
install, 5-9
passwords, 2-15, 5-22
ping, 9-6
polling, 5-20
set community password, 5-23
traps, 5-21
openview (old), install, 5-32
overlap offset, 5-19, 7-14
—P—
passwords, 2-15
log in openview, 5-22
openview, 5-22
openview map protection, 5-22
openview snmp, 5-23
windows, 4-5
path, windows, 4-7
phase, smc, 7-20
pilot tone gain, smc, 7-18
ping, 9-1
from host computer, 9-6
2
from router, 9-4
polling, configure openview, 5-20
power level, repeater, 5-17, 9-15, 920
print object names, 5-18
protect map, 5-18
—R—
reconfigure repeater, 9-19
recovery. See reverts
redundant microwave, 5-20
remote site, 2-2
repeater
active alarms, 9-20
channel, 5-17
control, 9-19
describe, 5-16
failure, 9-13
icon, 5-16
mode, 9-19
power level, 5-17, 9-15, 9-20
restart, 9-20
revert, 9-20
setup mode, 9-20
unrevert, 9-20
repeater cable to site computer, 6-3
repeater controller. See channel
controller
restart repeater, 9-20
revert, 9-7
channel, automatic, 5-13, 9-10
channel, manual, 9-11
repeaters, 9-20
site manual, 9-15
site, automatic actions, 9-14
site, inputs, 9-12
status channel, 5-13, 9-11
revert action configuration, 9-14
revert input configuration, 9-12
round-trip time, 9-6
router, 2-1
cable to channel bank, 6-8
cable to host computer, 6-7
cable to hub, 6-7
cable to site/channel computer,
6-4
clock, 3-8
configuration, 3-1
daylight savings time, 3-4
host names, 3-5, 9-2
icon, 5-15
multi-port, 2-14
name, 2-14
passwords, 2-15
ping, 9-4
port bandwidth, 3-5
snmp, 3-7
telnet, 9-5
timezone, 3-4
traps, 3-7
INDEX
troubleshooting, 9-1
routes, 9-2
—S—
service functions, 5-23
service.ini, 5-23
set clock in router, 3-8
set community, openview password,
5-23
show, router commands, 9-2
shutdown. See revert
simulcast failure, 9-13
simulcast modulation card. See smc
site
describe, 5-14
icon, 5-14
site computer
cable to hub, 6-5
cable to repeater, 6-3
cable to router, 6-4
configuration, 4-1
site map, 5-13
site revert
automatic actions, 9-14
inputs, 9-12
manual, 9-15
site settings, 5-19
site types, 2-2
sitectrl.exe, 8-1, 8-3
smc configuration, 7-17
snmp
openview, 5-23
router, 3-7
software updates. See update
software. See update software
status
active alarms, 9-20
repeater, 9-19
reverted channel, 9-11
reverted sites, 9-15
status channel, 5-13, 5-17, 9-9,
9-11, 9-15, 9-19
submap. See maps
subnet, 2-7
subnet assignments, 2-10
subnet mask, 4-2
system
describe, 5-13
icon, 5-12
system map, 5-12
system settings, 5-19
—T—
tcp/ip parameters, windows, 4-7, 49, 5-6, 5-8
telnet
from host computer, 9-7
from router, 9-5
threshold alignment, 7-1
threshold, smc, 7-19
time
ntp, 3-6
router, 3-4, 3-8
timezone
router, 3-4
windows, 4-8
timing tone gain, 7-1
timing tone gain, smc, 7-19
traps
router, 3-7
traps, configure openview, 5-21
troubleshooting, 9-1
3
alarm list, 9-20
from computer, 9-6
from router, 9-1
—U—
uni-directional calibration, 7-5
uninstall software, 8-2, 8-5
unique host names. See host names
unprotect
map, 5-18
unrevert, 9-7
channel, 5-13, 9-11
repeaters, 9-20
sites, 9-15
update software
sitectrl.exe, 8-1, 8-3
username, windows, 4-5, 4-10, 5-5,
5-9
—W—
windows
configuration, 4-1, 4-2
daylight savings time, 4-8
install, 8-6
install networking, 4-3
passwords, 2-15, 4-5
path, 4-7
tcp/ip parameters, 4-7, 4-9, 5-6,
5-8
timezone, 4-8
username, 4-5, 4-10, 5-5, 5-9
windows 3.51
configuration, 5-24
words on map, 5-17
June 1997
Part No: 001-0690-201
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