SV7_HardwareManual_920
SV7
Hardware Manual
• SV7-S
920-0012F
12/18/2014
• SV7-Q
• SV7-Si
• SV7-IP
• SV7-C
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Contents
Introduction...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3
Features....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3
Block Diagrams.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4
Getting Started.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................6
Mounting the Drive...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................8
Connecting to the PC using RS-232........................................................................................................................................................................................................8
Connecting the Drive to Your PC using Ethernet.............................................................................................................................................................................9
Addresses, Subnets, and Ports...........................................................................................................................................................................................................9
Option 1: Connect a Drive to Your Local Area Network.............................................................................................................................................. 11
Option 2: Connect a Drive Directly to Your PC................................................................................................................................................................. 15
Option 3: Use Two Network Interface Cards (NICs)...................................................................................................................................................... 17
Connecting to a host using RS-485 option card............................................................................................................................................................................ 18
RS-232 to RS-485 2-wire Converter........................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Converting USB to RS-485............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Connecting the Power Supply................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20
Choosing a Power Supply.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Connecting the Motor................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 23
Driving a Brushed Motor:.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25
Connecting Input Signals............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 26
Connector Pin Diagram...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
High Speed Digital Inputs................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
Using High Speed Inputs with 12-24 Volt Signals..................................................................................................................................................... 28
Connecting Limit Switches................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 32
Wiring a Mechanical Limit Switch........................................................................................................................................................................................ 33
Wiring a Limit Sensor................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 33
Analog Inputs........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
Connecting a Potentiometer to Analog Input 1................................................................................................................................................................... 34
Connecting a Motion Controller to the Analog Input..................................................................................................................................................... 34
Programmable Outputs............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 35
Wiring Integral Holding Brakes................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 36
Interfacing to a Motion Controller......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 39
Encoder Outputs............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 39
Setting Drive Current Limits....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40
What is “Peak Current Limit”?......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Reference Materials........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 41
Recommended NEMA Motors..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Additional Motor Information:....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Recommended Metric Motors...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
Motor Outlines....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 43
Torque-Speed Curves........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 46
Mechanical Outline............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 50
Technical Specifications...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Mating Connectors and Accessories.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Alarm Codes............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 53
Connector Diagrams............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 53
2
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Introduction
Thank you for selecting an Applied Motion Products motor control. We hope our dedication to
performance, quality and economy will make your motion control project successful.
If there’s anything we can do to improve our products or help you use them better, please call or
fax. We’d like to hear from you. Our phone number is (800) 525-1609, or you can reach us by fax
at (831) 761-6544. You can also email [email protected]applied-motion.com.
Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Programmable, digital servo motor driver in compact package
Operates from a 24 to 80 volt DC power supply
Operates in torque, velocity or position mode
Accepts analog signals, digital signals and RS-232 serial commands
PID position loop with acceleration and velocity feedforward
Highly responsive digital “DQ” current loop
Optional RS-422/485 communication
Optional CANopen DS301 communication with DS402 motion control
Optional 100 Mbit Ethernet communication using SCL and Q
Optional Ethernet/IP communication
Quadrature encoder feedback
Motor current up to 7 amps rms continuous, 14 amps peak
Eight optically isolated digital inputs
Four optically isolated digital outputs
Two ±10 volt analog inputs for torque, speed and position control. Can also be configured for 0 to 10V, ±5V or 0 to 5V signal ranges.
3
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Block Diagrams
24 - 80 VDC
Note: analog inputs are
currently not supported
by Si Programmer™
INPUT X1
INPUT X2
INPUT X3
INPUT X4
INPUT X5
INPUT X6
X7/CWLIM
Internal
Logic
Supply
Status
MOSFET
PWM
Power
Amplifier
Optical
Isolation
Interface
X8/CCWLIM
OUTPUT Y1
OUTPUT Y2
OUTPUT Y3
OUTPUT Y4
DSP
motor
encoder
Si™
Chip
ANALOG IN1
ANALOG IN2
to PC/MMI
Option Card
RS-232
RS-485
SV7-Si
24 - 80 VDC
INPUT X1
INPUT X2
INPUT X3
INPUT X4
INPUT X5
INPUT X6
X7/CWLIM
Internal
Logic
Supply
Status
Optical
Isolation
X8/CCWLIM
OUTPUT Y1
OUTPUT Y2
OUTPUT Y3
OUTPUT Y4
MOSFET
PWM
Power
Amplifier
motor
Interface
encoder
Option Card
RS-485
DSP
ANALOG IN1
ANALOG IN2
to PC/MMI
RS-232
SV7-Q and SV7-S
4
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
24 - 80 VDC
INPUT X1
INPUT X2
INPUT X3
INPUT X4
INPUT X5
INPUT X6
X7/CWLIM
Internal
Logic
Supply
Status
MOSFET
PWM
Power
Amplifier
Optical
Isolation
X8/CCWLIM
OUTPUT Y1
OUTPUT Y2
OUTPUT Y3
OUTPUT Y4
Interface
motor
encoder
DSP
ANALOG IN1
Ethernet
Option Card
ANALOG IN2
to PC/MMI
RS-232
SV7-Q-EE and SV7-IP-EE
5
to Ethernet switch
or network interface
card
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Getting Started
This manual describes the use of three different drive models. What you need to know and what
you must have depends on the drive model. For all models, you’ll need the following:
• a 24 to 80 volt DC power supply. Please read the section Choosing a Power Supply for help
in choosing the right power supply.
• a compatible motor (see Recommended Motors)
• a small flat blade screwdriver for tightening the connectors (included).
• a personal computer running Windows 98, 2000, NT, Me, XP, Vista or 7. 32 or 64-bit.
• Applied Motion software (available for free download at www.applied-motion.com/software)
• An Applied Motion programming cable (included with non-Ethernet drives).
• For Ethernet drives you will need a CAT5 cable (not included).
If you’ve never used an SV drive before you’ll need to get familiar with the drive and the set
up software before you try to deploy the system in your application. We strongly recommend the
following:
1 For -S drives, download and install the QuickTuner™ software application.
For -Q and IP drives, download and install QuickTuner™ and Q Programmer™.
For -Si models, install and use the Si Programmer™ software for configuration and programming.
For -C drives, install the QuickTuner™ and the CANopen Example Program software. Q Programmer™ software may also be installed, if needed.
3 Launch the software by clicking Start...Programs...Applied Motion...
4 Connect the drive to your PC using the programming cable.
5 Connect the drive to the power supply.
6 Connect the drive to the motor.
7 Apply power to the drive.
8 For RS-232 connections, the software will recognize your drive, display the model and firmware
version and be ready for action.
9 For Ethernet drives, once the proper IP address has been entered, the software will recognize
your drive, display the model and firmware version and be ready for action.
6
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
The connectors and other points of interest are illustrated below. Depending on your drive model
and application, you’ll need to make connections to various parts of the drive. These are detailed
later in the manual.
HD-15 connector
• encoder feedback
B
A
V-
V+
SE
R
V
DR O M
IVE OT
R OR
lN
o
G
RD R=
=R Gre
ed en
ria
RJ11 connector
• RS-232 port
(not used on Ethernet model)
C
N
E
E
R
G R D
G
ID - R D
L R 1 R
O -G + 2 RD
D
S R R +
G G R +2 R D
1 G R +1 R D
1 G R +3 R D
s
2 G R +4 R D
e ED
2 G R +4 R D
d L
) 1 G R +5 R D
o B ED
D
1 G R +5 R D
E
C ISAABL L
L
2 G R +6 R D
B
1 G R +6 R
D R D EN TAL ISA
2 G R +7
E O
P
1 G R
L OT TOR R SMIT (D EM
2 G
E
M O TO LI IT V T
1
H
O R G
M O
E
E
IM
S AL
M CW L M V HI W T
C W ’T O E LO EN HA N
S
G
N
E
I
P
C A V G E R
C RI TA G UR HM R R S
D OL TA C O TO E
V OL R R O D OR
V VE TO M CO R
O O N N ER
M PE E
O AD M
B OM
C
X
X8 8 /
X / CC
X7 7 / CCCW WLIM
/ C W LIM IT
WL LIM IT IM IT +
2
Y IT+ 2 5
Y +5
Y 4
2 4
2 3
Y2 Y3 COM V O GND4+
1
2 2
Y1 / MO/ FA MO UT
1 3
2 1
1 2
1 0
/ B TIOUL N
1 1
1 9
RA N T
G
1 8
9 0
KE
X N
1 7
8
X 1 D
1 6
7
X 1 /S
14 5
6
X 2 / / STE TEP+
2
D
5
X
4
X C / D IR P 3
X 3 OM IR +
2
X 4 /E M 1
X 5 / C/ ALA NAB ON
6
/ C W RM LE
CW JO
ANANA
JO G RES
AL LOG
ET
G
OG IN
IN1 2
Se
communication option
• RS-485
• Ethernet
• CANopen
• Motion Controller Feedback (MCF)
SV
7- Q
LEDs
• status
& error codes
DB-25 connector
• digital inputs
• digital outputs
• analog input
grounding
screw
screw terminal
connector
• motor
• power supply
For applications requiring encoder outputs to a motion controller, please request the
Motion Controller Feedback (MCF) option.
7
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Mounting the Drive
You can mount your drive on the wide or the narrow side of the chassis using #6 screws. If possible, the drive should be securely fastened to a smooth, flat metal surface that will help conduct
heat away from the chassis. If this is not possible, then forced airflow from a fan may be required to
prevent the drive from overheating. The SV7 will automatically remove power from the motor and
generate an overtemperature fault at a chassis temperature of 65°C.
• Never use your drive in a space where there is no air flow or where other devices
cause the surrounding air to be more than 40°C.
• Never put the drive where it can get wet or where metal or other electrically conductive particles can get on the circuitry.
• Always provide air flow around the drive. When mounting multiple SV drives
near each other, maintain at least one half inch of space between drives.
Connecting to the PC using RS-232
(for Ethernet drives, see Connecting the Drive to Your PC using Ethernet)
• Locate your computer within 8 feet of the drive.
• Your drive was shipped with a communication cable. Plug the large end into the serial port of
your PC and the small end into the PC/MMI jack on your drive. Secure the cable to the PC with
the screws on the sides.
Never connect a drive to a telephone circuit. It uses the same connectors and cords
as telephones and modems, but the voltages
are not compatible.
If your PC does not have a serial port, you should
purchase a “USB Serial Converter”. We recommend
the USB-COM-CBL from byterunner.com. This
adapter is compatible with all versions of Windows
including Windows 7, 64 bit.
8
ground (to PC ground)
TX (to PC RX)
RX (to PC TX)
No connection
Pin Assignments of the PC/MMI Port
(RJ11 connector)
Not used for Ethernet drives.
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Connecting the Drive to Your PC using Ethernet
This process requires three steps
•
Get the drive physically connected to your network (or directly to the PC)
•
Set the drive’s IP address
•
Set the appropriate networking properties on your PC.
Note: the following pages are an excerpt from the “eSCL Communication Reference Guide”, which is available
on the SV7-Q-EE product page at http://www.applied-motion.com/products/servo-drives/sv7-q-ee. For more
information on Ethernet communications with the drive please refer to this guide.
Addresses, Subnets, and Ports
Every device on an Ethernet network must have a unique IP address. In order for two devices to
communicate with each other, they must both be connected to the network and they must have IP
addresses that are on the same subnet. A subnet is a logical division of a larger network. Members
of one subnet are generally not able to communicate with members of another unless they are connected through special network equipment (e.g. router). Subnets are defined by the choices of IP
addresses and subnet masks.
If you want to know the IP address and subnet mask of your PC, select Start…All Programs…Accessories…Command Prompt. Then type “ipconfig” and press Enter. You should see something like
this:
If your PC’s subnet mask is set to 255.255.255.0, a common setting known as a Class C subnet mask,
then your machine can only talk to another network device whose IP address matches yours in
the first three octets. (The numbers between the dots in an IP address are called an octet.) For
example, if your PC is on a Class C subnet and has an IP address of 192.168.0.20, it can talk to a de-
9
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
vice at 192.168.0.40, but not one at 192.168.1.40. If you change your subnet mask to 255.255.0.0
(Class B) you can talk to any device whose first two octets match yours. Be sure to ask your system
administrator before doing this. You network may be segmented for a reason.
Your drive includes a 16 position rotary switch for setting its IP address. The factory default address
for each switch setting is shown in the table below.
Rotary Switch
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
IP Address
10.10.10.10
192.168.1.10
192.168.1.20
192.168.1.30
192.168.0.40
192.168.0.50
192.168.0.60
192.168.0.70
192.168.0.80
192.168.0.90
192.168.0.100
192.168.0.110
192.168.0.120
192.168.0.130
192.168.0.140
DHCP
Settings 1 through E can be changed using the QuickTuner™ software. Setting 0 is always
“10.10.10.10”, the universal recovery address. If someone were to change the other settings and
not write it down or tell anyone (I’m not naming names here, but you know who I’m talking about)
then you will not be able to communicate with your drive. The only way to “recover” it is to use the
universal recovery address.
Setting F is “DHCP”, which commands the drive to get an IP address from a DHCP server on the
network. The IP address automatically assigned by the DHCP server may be “dynamic” or “static”
10
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
depending on how the administrator has configured DHCP. The DHCP setting is reserved for
advanced users.
Your PC, or any other device that you use to communicate with the drive, will also have a unique
address.
On the drive, switch settings 1 through E use the standard class B subnet mask (i.e. “255.255.0.0”).
The mask for the universal recovery address is the standard class A (i.e. “255.0.0.0”).
One of the great features of Ethernet is the ability for many applications to share the network at the
same time. Ports are used to direct traffic to the right application once it gets to the right IP address.
The UDP eSCL port in our drives is 7775. To send and receive commands using TCP, use port
number 7776. You’ll need to know this when you begin to write your own application. You will
also need to choose an open (unused) port number for your application. Our drive doesn’t care
what that is; when the first command is sent to the drive, the drive will make note of the IP address
and port number from which it originated and direct any responses there. The drive will also refuse
any traffic from other IP addresses that is headed for the eSCL port. The first application to talk to a
drive “owns” the drive. This lock is only reset when the drive powers down.
If you need help choosing a port number for your application, you can find a list of commonly used
port numbers at http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers.
One final note: Ethernet communication can use one or both of two “transport protocols”: UDP
and TCP. eSCL commands can be sent and received using either protocol. UDP is simpler and
more efficient than TCP, but TCP is more reliable on large or very busy networks where UDP packets might occasionally be dropped.
Option 1: Connect a Drive to Your Local Area Network
NIC
LAN
PC
SWITCH
or
ROUTER
11
DRIVE
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
If you have a spare port on a switch or router and if you are able to set your drive to an IP address
that is compatible with your network, and not used by anything else, this is a simple way to get
connected. This technique also allows you to connect multiple drives to your PC. If you are on a
corporate network, please check with your system administrator before connecting anything new to
the network. He or she should be able assign you a suitable address and help you get going.
If you are not sure which addresses are already used on your network, you can find out using
“Angry IP scanner”, which can be downloaded free from http://www.angryip.org/w/Download. But
be careful: an address might appear to be unused because a computer or other device is currently
turned off. And many networks use dynamic addressing where a DHCP server assigns addresses
“on demand”. The address you choose for your drive might get assigned to something else by the
DHCP server at another time.
Once you’ve chosen an appropriate IP address for your drive, set the rotary switch according to
the address table above. If none of the default addresses are acceptable for your network, you
can enter a new table of IP addresses using QuickTuner™ If your network uses addresses starting
with 192.168.0, the most common subnet, you will want to choose an address from switch settings 4
through E. Another common subnet is 192.168.1. If your network uses addresses in this range, the
compatible default selections are 1, 2 and 3.
If your PC address is not in one of the above private subnets, you will have to change your subnet
mask to 255.255.0.0 in order to talk to your drive. To change your subnet mask:
1. On Windows XP, right click on “My Network Places” and select properties. On Windows 7, click
Computer. Scroll down the left pane until you see “Network”. Right click and select properties.
Select “Change adapter settings”
2. You should see an icon for your network interface card (NIC). Right click and select properties.
12
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
3. Scroll down until you see “Internet Properties (TCP/IP)”. Select this item and click the Properties
button. On Windows 7 and Vista, look for “(TCP/IPv4)”
4. If the option “Obtain an IP address automatically” is selected, your PC is getting an IP address and
a subnet mask from the DHCP server. Please cancel this dialog and proceed to the next section of
this manual: “Using DHCP”.
5. If the option “Use the following IP address” is selected, life is good. Change the subnet mask to
“255.255.0.0” and click OK.
13
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Using DCHP
If you want to use your drive on a network where all or most of the devices use dynamic IP addresses supplied by a DHCP server, set the rotary switch to “F”. When the drive is connected to
the network and powered on, it will obtain an IP address and a subnet mask from the server that is
compatible with your PC.
The only catch is that you won’t know what address the server assigns to your drive. QuickTuner™
can find your drive using the Drive Discovery feature, as long as your network isn’t too large. With
the drive connected to the network and powered on, click the Drive Discovery button on the
Drive tab. You will see a dialog such as this:
Normally, Drive Discovery will only detect one network interface card (NIC), and will select it
automatically. If you are using a laptop and have both wireless and wired network connections, a
second NIC may appear. Please select the NIC that you use to connect to the network to which
you’ve connected your drive. Then click OK. Drive Discovery will notify you as soon as it has
detected a drive.
If you think this is the correct drive, click Yes. If you’re not sure, click Not Sure and Drive Discovery
will look for additional drives on you network. Once you’ve told Drive Discovery which drive
is yours, it will automatically enter that drive’s IP address in the IP address text box so that you are
ready to communicate.
14
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Option 2: Connect a Drive Directly to Your PC
It doesn’t get much simpler than this:
1. Connect one end of a CAT5 Ethernet cable into the LAN card (NIC) on your PC and the other
into the drive. You don’t need a special “crossover cable”; the drive will automatically detect the
direct connection and make the necessary physical layer changes.
2. Set the IP address on the drive to “10.10.10.10” by setting the rotary switch at “0”.
3. To set the IP address of your PC:
a. On Windows XP, right click on “My Network Places” and select properties.
b. On Windows 7, click Computer. Scroll down the left pane until you see “Network”. Right click
and select properties. Select “Change adapter settings”
4. You should see an icon for your network interface card (NIC). Right click and select properties.
15
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
a. Scroll down until you see “Internet Properties (TCP/IP)”. Select this item and click the Properties button.
b. On Windows 7 and Vista, look for “(TCP/IPv4)”
5. Select the option “Use the following IP address”. Then enter the address “10.10.10.11”. This will
give your PC an IP address that is on the same subnet as the drive. Windows will know to direct
any traffic intended for the drive’s IP address to this interface card.
6. Next, enter the subnet mask as “255.255.255.0”.
7. Be sure to leave “Default gateway” blank. This will prevent your PC from looking for a router on this
subnet.
16
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
8. Because you are connected directly to the drive, anytime the drive is not powered on your PC will
annoy you with a small message bubble in the corner of your screen saying “The network cable is
unplugged.”
Option 3: Use Two Network Interface Cards (NICs)
LAN
NIC1
PC
NIC2
DRIVE
This technique allows you to keep your PC connected to your LAN, but keeps the drive off the
LAN, preventing possible IP conflicts or excessive traffic.
1. If you use a desktop PC and have a spare card slot, install a second NIC and connect it directly to
the drive using a CAT5 cable. You don’t need a special “crossover cable”; the drive will automatically detect the direct connection and make the necessary physical layer changes.
2. If you use a laptop and only connect to your LAN using wireless networking, you can use the builtin RJ45 Ethernet connection as your second NIC.
3. Set the IP address on the drive to “10.10.10.10” by setting the rotary switch at “0”.
4. To set the IP address of the second NIC:
a. On Windows XP, right click on “My Network Places” and select properties.
b. On Windows 7, click Computer. Scroll down the left pane until you see “Network”. Right click
and select properties. Select “Change adapter settings”
5. You should see an icon for your newly instated NIC. Right click again and select properties.
a. Scroll down until you see “Internet Properties (TCP/IP)”. Select this item and click the Properties button.
b. On Windows 7 and Vista, look for “(TCP/IPv4)”
6. Select the option “Use the following IP address”. Then enter the address “10.10.10.11”. This will
give your PC an IP address that is on the same subnet as the drive. Windows will know to direct
any traffic intended for the drive’s IP address to this interface card.
7. Next, enter the subnet mask as “255.255.255.0”. Be sure to leave “Default gateway” blank. This will
prevent your PC from looking for a router on this subnet.
8. Because you are connected directly to the drive, anytime the drive is not powered on your PC will
annoy you with a small message bubble in the corner of your screen saying “The network cable is
unplugged.”
17
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Connecting to a host using RS-485 option card
RS-485/422
GND
TX–
TX+
RX–
RX+
RS-485 allows you to connect more than one drive to a single host PC, PLC, HMI
or other computer. It also allows the communication cable to be long (more than
1000 feet). But the device to which you connect must have an RS-422 or RS-485
port.
The RS-422/485 pin diagram is shown to the right. Wiring diagrams can be found below. We
recommend the use of Category 5 cable. It is widely used for computer networks, it is inexpensive,
easy to get and certified for quality and data integrity.
The SV drives can be used with either two wire or four wire RS-485 implementations. The connection can be point to point (i.e. one drive and one host) or a multi-drop network (one host and up
to 32 drives).
Four wire systems utilize separate transmit and receive wires. One pair of wires must connect the
host computer’s transmit signals to each drive’s RX+ and RX- terminals. Another pair connects the
TX+ and TX- drive terminals to the host computer’s receive signals. A logic ground terminal is provided on each drive and can be used to keep all drives at the same ground potential. This terminal
connects internally to the DC power supply return (V-), so if all the drives on the RS-485 network
are powered from the same supply it is not necessary to connect the logic grounds. You should
still connect one drive’s GND terminal to the host computer ground.
Four wire systems are better than two wire types because the host can send and receive data at the
same time, increasing system throughput. Furthermore, the host never needs to disable its transmitter, which simplifies your software. We recommend that a 120 ohm terminating resistor be connected between RX+ and RX- at the farthest drive from the host.
to PC GND
to PC RXto PC RX+
to PC TX120
to PC TX+
+RX- +TX- GND
+RX- +TX- GND
Drive #1
Drive #2
RS-485 Four Wire System
18
+RX- +TX- GND
Drive #3
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Two wire systems transmit and receive on the same pair of wires, which can lead to trouble. The
host must not only disable its transmitter before it can receive data, it must do so quickly, before a
drive begins to answer a query. The SV drives include a “transmit delay” parameter that can be adjusted to compensate for a host that is slow to disable its transmitter. This adjustment can be made
over the network using the TD command, or it can be set using the QuickTuner™ software. It is not
necessary to set the transmit delay in a four wire system.
to PC GND
to PC TX- (A)
120
to PC TX+ (B)
+RX- +TX- GND
+RX- +TX- GND
Drive #1
Drive #2
RS-485 Two Wire System
+RX- +TX- GND
Drive #3
RS-232 to RS-485 2-wire Converter
Model 485-25E from Integrity Instruments (800-450-2001) works well for converting your PC’s RS232 port to RS-485. It comes with everything you need. Connect the adaptor’s “B” pin to the
drive’s TX+ and RX+ terminals. Connect “A” to the drive’s TX- and RX- terminals.
Converting USB to RS-485
The USB-COMi-M from www.byterunner.com is an
excellent choice for USB to RS-485 conversion. It can
be used with 2 wire or 4 wire systems.
For two wire RS-485, set SW1 to ON and SW2-4 to
OFF. On the USB-COMi-M screw terminal connector:
Pin1 goes to RX- and TX-.
Connect pin 2 to RX+ and TX+.
Pin 6 is ground.
The DB-9 is not used.
19
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
For four wire RS-485, set SW1,3,4 to ON and SW2 to OFF. On the USB-COMi-M screw terminal
connector: USB-COMi-MSV Drive
pin1 RX-
pin 2
RX+
pin 3 TX+
pin 4 TX
pin 6 GND
Assigning Addresses in Multi-axis RS-485 Systems
Before wiring the entire system, you’ll need to connect each drive individually to the host computer
so that a unique address can be assigned to each drive. Use the RS-232 programming cable and
the QuickTuner™ software that came with your drive for this purpose.
Connect the drive to your PC, then launch QuickTuner™. Finally, apply power to your drive. If you
have already configured your drive, then you should click the Upload button so that the QuickTuner™ settings match those of your drive. Click on the Motion button, then select the “SCL” operating
mode. If you have a Q drive, you may want to select “Q Programming”. Either way, you’ll see the
RS-485 Address panel appear. Just click on the address character of your choice. You can use the
numerals 0..9 or the special characters ! “ # $ % & ‘ ( ) * + , - . / : ; < = > ? @ . Just make sure that
each drive on your network has a unique address. If you are using a 2 wire network, you may need
to set the Transmit Delay, too. 10 milliseconds works on the adapters we’ve tried. Once you’ve
made your choices, click Download to save the settings to your drive.
Connecting the Power Supply
If you need information about choosing a power supply, please read Choosing a Power Supply
located elsewhere in this manual.
Connect the motor power supply “+” terminal to the driver terminal labeled “V+”. Connect power
supply “-” to the drive terminal labeled “V-”. Use 18 or 20 gauge wire. The SV drives contain an
internal fuse that connects to the power supply + terminal. This fuse is not user replaceable. If you
want to install a user servicable fuse in your system install a fast acting fuse in line with the + power
supply lead. Use a 7 amp fuse.
The green ground screw on the corner of the chassis should be connected to earth ground.
20
21
RC050 Regen Clamp
to earth
ground
grounding
screw
+
V+
OR
OT
M R
O VE
RV RI
SE D
V
A+ -
E
L
D
lN
M
M O
M O T
C O T OR
C C T OR D
C W W OR E IS
S N A
L L
D A
V R N IMITIMIT TA ABL BLE
L
V O IV ’T
ED D
L
O O LT E M
M V LT AG OV OV
G
O O ER AGE E H ER E (D
R R=
C
B P T
S D= Gr
CO AD EN OR UR LO IGHTEM ISA
R e
G O
P BL
M EN MO OH RE W
1 R LID ed en
M C T M NT
ED
1 G -G
ER OD OR S
2 G R R GR
)
2 G R + -G E
R E
P
O
1 G R + 1 R EN
R R SIGHAS
1 G R + 2 RD
2 G R + 2 RD
NA E
1 G R + 1 RD
L
2 G R + 3 RD
1 G R + 4 RD
2 G R + 4 RD
1 GR R + + 5 5 R RD
GR + 6 R D
+ 6 R RD D
7
RD D
ria
A
B+ -
Se
s
e
1
d
o
C
1
14 5
2
V
S o
B-
X
X 8
/
8
X / CC
X 7 / CC W
L
7
/ C CW WLIM IMIT
W LIM IT L
IM IT +
2
Y IT+ 2 5
Y +5
Y 42 4
2 3
Y2 Y3 COM V O GND4+
2 2
Y1 / MO/ FA MO UT
2 1
1 0
/ B TIOUL N
1 9
RA N T
1 8
KE
16 7
1
1
1 3
11 2
G
9 0
X N
8
X 1 D
7
X2 1 / S / STE
6
5
X X2 / D TE P+
4
X C / D IR P 3
X 3 OM IR +
X 4 /E M X6 5 / C/ ALA NAB ON
/ C W RM LE
CW JO
ANANA
JO G RES
AL LOG
ET
G
OG IN
IN1 2
If you plan to use a regulated power supply you may encounter a problem with regeneration. If
you rapidly decelerate a load from a high speed, much of the kinetic energy of that load is transferred back to the power supply. This can trip the overvoltage protection of a switching power
supply, causing it to shut down. We offer the RC050 “regeneration clamp” to solve this problem. If
in doubt, buy an RC050 for your first installation. If the “regen” LED on
the RC050 never flashes, you don’t need the clamp.
!
Be careful not to reverse the wires. Reverse connection will destroy your
driver, void your warranty and generally wreck your day.
SV7 Hardware Manual
920-0012F
12/18/2014
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Choosing a Power Supply
When choosing a power supply, there are many things to consider. If you are manufacturing equipment that will be sold to others, you probably want a supply with all the safety agency approvals. If
size and weight are an issue get a switching supply.
And you must decide what size of power supply (in terms of voltage and current) is needed for
your application.
Voltage
PWM drives like the SV7 work by switching the voltage to the motor terminals on and off
while monitoring current to achieve a precise level of phase current. Depending on how fast you
want to run the motor, you may not need a power supply equal to the rated voltage of the motor.
To get a rough estimate of how much voltage you need, multiply the voltage constant of the motor
(Ke) by the maximum speed required for your application. For example, if you want to operate
the M0100-103-4 at 4000 rpm, you’ll need V = Ke * rpm = (4.6V/krpm)(4 krpm) = 18.4 volts. To
produce any real torque at that speed, add 30%, for a total of 24 V.
Always check the “no load” voltage of the power supply before using it with the drive, to be sure
that it does not exceed 80 VDC.
Current
The maximum supply current you could ever need is three times the motor current.
However, you will generally need a lot less than that, depending on the motor type, voltage, speed
and load conditions. That’s because the SV servo uses a switching amplifier, converting a high voltage and low current into lower voltage and higher current. The more the power supply voltage
exceeds the motor voltage, the less current you’ll need from the power supply. A motor running
from a 48 volt supply can be expected to draw only half the supply current that it would with a 24
volt supply. Furthermore, the servo loop only commands the amplifier to provide as much current
as load conditions require.
We recommend the following selection procedure:
1. If you plan to use only a few drives, get a power supply with at least 3X the rated continuous current of the motor.
2. If you are designing for mass production and must minimize cost, get one power supply
with more than twice the rated current of the motor. Install the motor in the application and moni-
22
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
tor the current coming out of the power supply and into the drive at various motor loads. This will
tell you how much current you really need so you can design in a lower cost power supply.
If you plan to use a regulated power supply you may encounter a problem with regeneration. If
you rapidly decelerate a load from a high speed, much of the kinetic energy of that load is transferred back to the power supply. This can trip the overvoltage protection of a switching power
supply, causing it to shut down. See Connecting the Power Supply for details on the RC-050
regeneration clamp. Unregulated power supplies are better because they generally do not have
overvoltage protection and have large capacitors for storing energy coming back from the drive.
They are also less expensive.
!
Connecting the Motor
Never connect or disconnect the motor while the power is on.
C
B
A
V–
V+
Applied Motion motor:
To connect an Applied Motion servo motor to your SV7, you’ll need a set of extension cables. For
M series (as well as N and A series) motors, use the BLUENC and the BLuMTR
MOTOR/POWER
cables. For V series motors, use the 3004-214 and 3004-230 cables. For JCONNECTOR
MOTOR
Series motors use 3004-300 and 3004-301 cables.
Connect the motor to one end of the cable. The other end of the motor
extension cable has lead wires that connect to the drive’s motor screw terminal
connector as follows:
A = red wire
B = white wire
C = black wire
chassis ground screw = green wire
Leave the last pin on the motor/power connector unconnected.
The encoder on the back of the V series motors can connect directly to the encoder connector on
the SV7, or a 3004-230 extension cable can be used when the motor must be located further than
18” from the drive. For M, N and A series motors, use a BLUENC series encoder extension cable.
23
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Non-Applied Motion motor:
Connect the motor leads to the screw terminal connector as follows:
A = motor phase A, R or U
B = motor phase B, S or V
C = motor phase C, T or W
chassis ground screw = green wire
The encoder connections use a HD-15 connector,
which you must connect to your encoder as shown
on the right. See Accessories for mating connector
information.
encoder B+ (3)
Hall 1+ (9)
encoder B- (4)
Hall 1-(10)
encoder Z+ (5)
(8) GND
(2) encoder A(7) +5VDC 200mA
(1) encoder A+
(6) encoder Z-
GND (15)
Hall 3- (14)
Hall 3+ (13)
(11) Hall 2+
(12) Hall 2-
Front View
Pin Assignments (facing drive)
If your encoder is single ended, connect the encoder outputs to the A+, B+ and Z+ inputs. Leave
A-, B- and Z- unconnected. (Z is the encoder index signal and is optional.)
1
5K
B+
4
B-
5
Z+
6
+5V
5K
499
3
8.3K
HD-15 Connector
499
+5V
Z8
GND
Internal Encoder Circuits
24
8.3K
H3+
14
H315
GND
+5V
1.25K
1.25K
H2+
12
H2-
13
A-
+5V
830
1.25K
11
A+
2
830
HD-15 Connector
H1+
10
H1-
inside drive
12.5K
9
+5V
5K
7
12.5K
inside drive
8.3K
12.5K
+5V
499
7
830
Single-end halls should also be connected to the “+” inputs with the “-” inputs left unconnected.
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Driving a Brushed Motor:
1. Connect the encoder so the counts increase when the shaft is turned CW as viewed from the
front.
2. Connect motor leads to A and B, leave C open.
3. The + direction of commanded motion will result in terminal B being positive with respect to
terminal A.
4. Armature inductance should be between .5mH and 15mH for best performance.
5. Use the Motor-Encoder tab in QuickTuner™ to configure the drive for a brushed motor.
25
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Connecting Input Signals
The SV drives have 8 digital inputs and 2 analog inputs categorized as follows:
· Two high speed digital inputs, 5 volt logic: X1/STEP and X2/DIR.
Digital signals for commanding position. Quadrature signals from encoders can also be used. These
inputs can also be connected to sensors, switches and other devices for use with Q and Si™ commands such as Wait input, Seek Home, Feed to Sensor, If Input and others.
· Four single-ended digital inputs, 12-24 volt logic: X3, X4, X5, and X6.
Software programmable inputs can be used for motor enable, alarm reset or jogging. These inputs
can also be connected to sensors, switches and other devices for use with Q and Si™ Wait Input,
Seek Home, Feed to Sensor, If Input and other commands.
· Two differential digital inputs, 12-24 volt logic: X7/CWLIMIT and X8/CCWLIMIT.
Can be used to inhibit motion in a given direction, forcing the motor and load to travel within
mechanical limits. Can be configured for active closed, active open, or not used which makes the
inputs act as general purpose inputs.
· Two single-ended analog inputs, +/-10 volt logic: Analog IN1 and Analog IN2.
Support 0-10, +/-5, or 0-5 volt logic as well. Can be wired together to create one differential analog input. Analog velocity or position command signal. Note: the analog inputs are currently not
supported by the Si Programmer™ software.
Connector Pin Diagram
IN/OUT
Analog IN1
Analog IN2
not used
X6 / CCWJOG
X5 / CWJOG
X4 / Alarm Reset
X3 / Enable
X COMMON
X2 / DIRX2 / DIR+
X1 / STEP X1 / STEP +
GND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Y1 / BRAKE
Y2 / MOTION
Y3 / FAULT
Y COMMON
+5V OUT
GND
Y4+
Y4X7/CWLIMIT+
X7/CWLIMITX8/CCWLIMIT+
X8/CCWLIMIT-
Front View
IN/OUT1 (DB-25) Connector
26
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
High Speed Digital Inputs
The SV drives include two high speed inputs called STEP and DIR. They accept 5 volt singleended or differential signals, up to 2 MHz. Normally these inputs connect to an external controller
that provides step & direction command signals. You can also connect a master encoder to the high
speed inputs for following applications. Or you can use these inputs with Wait Input, If Input,
Feed to Sensor, Seek Home and other such commands.
12
X1/STEP+
11
X1/STEP10
X2/DIR+
9
X2/DIR-
Connection diagrams follow.
330
inside SV7
220 pF
330
220 pF
SV7 Step & Direction Inputs
Indexer
with
Sourcing
Outputs
COM
X2/DIR-
DIR
X2/DIR+
IN/OUT 1
X1/STEPSTEP
X1/STEP+
Connecting to indexer with Sourcing Outputs
Indexer
with
Sinking
Outputs
+5V OUT
X2/DIR+
DIR
X2/DIR-
IN/OUT 1
X1/STEP+
STEP
X1/STEP-
Connecting to Indexer with Sinking Outputs
27
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Indexer
with
Differential
Outputs
DIR+
X2/DIR+
DIR-
X2/DIR-
STEP+
X1/STEP+
STEP-
X1/STEP-
IN/OUT 1
Master
Encoder
A+
X1/STEP+
A-
X1/STEP-
B+
X2/DIR+
B-
X2/DIR-
GND
GND
IN/OUT1
Connecting to Indexer with Differential Outputs
(Many High Speed Indexers have Differential Outputs)
Wiring for Encoder Following
Using High Speed Inputs with 12-24 Volt Signals
Most PLCs don’t use 5 volt logic. You can connect signal levels as high as 24 volts to the STEP and
DIR inputs if you add external dropping resistors, as shown below.
• For 12 volt logic, add 820 ohm, 1/4 watt resistors
• For 24 volt logic, use 2200 ohm, 1/4 watt resistors
!
!
The maximum voltage that can be applied to an input terminal is 24 volts
DC. Never apply AC voltage to an input terminal.
The pulse and direction wiring can pick up noise especially if resistors are
placed on terminal strips next to “noisy” wiring, resulting in stray step
pulses and a loss of position accuracy.
28
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
+12-24V
PLC
with
Sourcing
Outputs
OUT1
OUT2
X2/DIR+
R
X1/STEP-
R
IN/OUT 1
X1/STEP+
GND
X2/DIR-
Connecting to PLC with Sourcing (PNP) Outputs
(Most PLC’s use 24 volt logic)
PLC
with
Sinking
Outputs
+12-24V
DIR
STEP
X2/DIR+
X2/DIR-
R
IN/OUT 1
X1/STEP+
R
X1/STEP-
Connecting to PLC with Sinking (NPN) Outputs
(Most PLC’s use 24 volt logic)
+
+24VDC
Power
Supply
run/stop switch
(closed=run)
-
X2/DIR+
direction switch
2200
2200
X2/DIRX1/STEP+
X1/STEP-
Using Mechanical Switches at 24 Volts
29
IN/OUT 1
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Other Digital Inputs
DB-25 Connector
As we mentioned in the previous section, the high
speed STEP and DIR inputs are configured for five
volt logic. All other digital inputs are designed for
operation between 12 and 24 volts DC.
8
XCOM
7
X3/EN
inside drive
2200
6
X4/RST
2200
5
2200
X5
Single Ended Inputs
2200
4
The SV drives include four single ended, optically
X6
isolated input circuits that can be used with sourc22
X7/CWLIM+
ing or sinking signals, 12 to 24 volts. This allows
23
2200
connection to PLCs, sensors, relays and mechanical
X7/CWLIM24
switches. Because the input circuits are isolated,
X8/CCWLIM+
they require a source of power. If you are con25
2200
X8/CCWLIMnecting to a PLC, you should be able to get power
from the PLC power supply. If you are using relays
or mechanical switches, you will need a 12-24 V
power supply. This also applies if you are connecting the inputs to the programmable outputs of
an Si product from Applied Motion.
What is COM?
“Common” is an electronics term for an electrical connection to a common voltage. Sometimes
“common” means the same thing as “ground”, but not always. In the case of the SV drives, if you are
using sourcing (PNP) input signals, then you will want to connect COM to ground (power supply -).
If you are using sinking (NPN) signals, then COM must connect to power supply +.
Note: If current is flowing into or out of an input, the logic state of that input is low or
closed. If no current is flowing, or the input is not connected, the logic state is high or open.
The diagrams on the following pages show how to connect the inputs to various commonly used
devices.
30
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
12-24
VDC
Power
Supply
XCOM
+
IN/OUT1
switch or relay
(closed=logic low)
-
X3..X6
Connecting an Input to a Switch or Relay
XCOM
OUT+
X3..X6
12-24
VDC
Power
Supply
IN/OUT1
Si drive
+
OUT–
-
Connecting another drive to the SV
(When output closes, input goes low).
12-24
VDC
Power
Supply
+
-
+
output
NPN
Proximity
Sensor
–
XCOM
X3..X6
IN/OUT1
Connecting an NPN Type Proximity Sensor to an input
(When prox sensor activates, input goes low).
31
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
12-24
VDC
Power
Supply
+
+
output
PNP
Proximity
Sensor
–
-
X3..X6
IN/OUT1
XCOM
Connecting a PNP Type Proximity Sensor to a an input
(When prox sensor activates, input goes low).
Connecting Limit Switches
The CWLIMIT and CCWLIMIT inputs are used for connecting end of travel sensors. These inputs
can be driven by signals that are sinking (NPN), sourcing (PNP) or differential (line driver). By connecting switches or sensors that are triggered by the motion of the motor or load, you can force
the motor to operate within certain limits. This is useful if a program or operator error could cause
damage to your system by traveling too far.
The limit inputs are optically isolated. This allows you to choose a voltage for your limit circuits of
12 to 24 volts DC. This also allows you to have long wires on limit sensors that may be far from the
drive with less risk of introducing noise to the drive electronics. The schematic diagram of the limit
switch input circuit is shown below.
inside drive
22
X7/CWLIM+
23
X7/CWLIM24
X8/CCWLIM+
25
X8/CCWLIM-
IN/OUT 1 Connector
2200
2200
32
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Wiring a Mechanical Limit Switch
You can use normally open or normally closed limit switches. Either way, wire them as shown here.
Be sure to set the polarity using the Si Programmer™ for Si™ drives or QuickTuner™ software for the
SV7-S and SV7-Q.
CW LIMIT+
CW LIMIT-
IN/OUT1
CCW LIMIT+
+
12-24
VDC
SUPPLY
-
CCW LIMIT-
Wiring a Limit Sensor
Some systems use active limit sensors that produce a voltage output rather than a switch or relay
closure. These devices must be wired differently than switches.
If your sensor has an open collector output or a sinking output, wire it like this:
CW LIMIT+
+
DC
Power
Supply
–
+
Limit
Sensor
–
IN/OUT1
output
CW LIMIT-
If the sensor output goes low at the limit, select the option “closed” (in the software). If the output is
open, or high voltage, choose “open”.
Other sensors have sourcing outputs. That means that current can flow out of the sensor output,
but not into it. In that case, wire the sensor this way:
+
DC
Power
Supply
–
+
Proximity
Sensor
–
output
CW LIMIT+
IN/OUT1
CW LIMIT-
33
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Analog Inputs
inside drive
DB-25 Connector
The SV drives feature two analog inputs. Each input can
accept a signal range of 0 to 5 VDC, ±5 VDC, 0 to 10
VDC or ±10 VDC. The drive can be configured to operate in torque, speed or position modes. Input impedance
of each analog input is 10K ohms to GND.
1
AIN1
2
AIN2
Signal
Conditioning
Signal
Conditioning
13
GND
Note: The analog inputs and the communications
circuitry are referenced to GND only. Therefore a connection must be made to the SV7 GND to complete the signal path.
Use QuickTuner™ to set the signal function, range, offset, deadband and filter frequency. Please see
the QuickTuner™ manual or consult the software help for more information.
18
cw
+5V OUT
AIN1
ccw
2
AIN2
IN/OUT1
1
1-10kΩ
pot
13
GND
Connecting a Potentiometer to Analog Input 1
AIN1
2
AIN2
signal return
IN/OUT1
1
signal (from motion controller)
13
GND
Connecting a Motion Controller to the Analog Input
34
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Programmable Outputs
The SV drives feature four digital outputs. These outputs
can be set to automically control a motor brake, to signal
a fault condition, to indicate when the motor is moving or
to provide an output frequency proportional to motor
speed (tach signal). Or the outputs can be turned on and
off by program instructions like Set Output.
Note: an electric brake cannot be connected directly
to the programmable output of the SV. A relay must
be added between the output and brake coil. See
example relay wiring diagrams below.
IN/OUT1
14
Y1
17
YCOM
Y3
16
15
Y2
20
Y4+
21
Y4-
The outputs can be used to drive LEDs, relays and the inputs of other electronic devices like PLCs
and counters. For OUT4, the “+” (collector) and “-” (emitter) terminals of each transistor are available at the connector. This allows you to configure each output for current sourcing or sinking. The
OUT1-3 outputs can only sink current. The COM terminal must be tied to power supply (-).
Diagrams of each type of connection follow.
!
Do not connect the outputs to more than 30VDC.
The current through each output terminal must not exceed 80 mA.
5-24 VDC
Power Supply
5-24 VDC
Power Supply
+
Y1/2/3
+
–
Y4+
Load
Load
IN/OUT1
IN/OUT1
Y4-
YCOM
Sinking Output
Y1, Y2 or Y3
Sinking Output
Using Y4
35
–
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Wiring Integral Holding Brakes
The integral holding brakes of AMP servo motors require between 200 and 400 mA at 24 VDC to
operate properly. To wire and operate a holding brake from the Y1/Brake output of an Applied
Motion servo drive requires the following items:
•
•
•
•
A 24 VDC power supply with minimum output of 450 mA
A 24 VDC relay*
A clamp diode such as 1N4935*
An AMP servo motor with integral holding brake, designated by a “5” in the 7th position of the
motor part number. Example: M0400-151-4-000
• A “BK” type motor power cable or separate brake cable. Example: BLUMTR-BK-FA-10
* Relays with an integral clamp diode, like IDEC part number RU2S-D-D24, greatly simplify the wiring effort by including the relay and a clamp diode in one unit.
LL
YE
24 VDC relay
BL
UE
br
ak
el
ea
OW
d
bra
ke
lea
d
Following the diagram below, connect the power supply, relay, and diode to the brake leads of the
servo motor, as well as the Y1/Brake output connections of the servo drive.
Y1 / Brake (pin 14)
24 VDC
power
supply
clamp diode
Y COMMON (pin 17)
36
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
The holding brakes of J Series servo motors are fail-safe brakes, which means they are engaged
when no power is applied to the brake. When setting up a servo drive in QuickTuner™ , be sure
to set the Brake output options in the “Inputs-Outputs” tab as shown in the diagram below. Make
sure to select the check box for “Automatically release brake when moving by” and selecting the
radio button “closing the Brake output”.
The engaging and disengaging of the brake is done automatically by the servo drive. When the
drive is enabled and not faulted the brake will be disengaged. When the drive is disabled and/or
faulted the brake will be engaged.
There are two time delays associated with the Brake output function which are also set in QuickTuner™ (see diagram above). The first time delay controls how long the drive will delay a move
command if the move command immediately follows the disengagement of the brake. The second
time delay controls how long the drive will delay disabling the motor after engaging the brake
when a motor disable command is issued.
Reference Information
Below is a summary of specifications for the integral holding brakes available with J Series servo motors. Refer to motor drawing for details.
Motor Pow er (W)
Motor Frame Size
30
50
100
100
200
400
600
750
24 VDC
2.83
Static Friction (in-lb)
Input Current (A)
Armature Release
Time (msec Max)
Armature Pull-In
Time (msec Max)
400
NEMA 17 NEMA 17 NEMA 17 NEMA 23 NEMA 23 NEMA 23 NEMA 34 NEMA 34 NEMA 34 NEMA 34
40 mm 40 mm 40 mm 60 mm
60mm
60 mm 80 mm 80 mm 80 mm 80 mm
Rated Voltage
Input Pow er (W)
200
5
0.2
11.24
22.5
9
9
9.5
9.5
0.375
0.375
0.39
0.39
20
20
20
50
50
40
40
50
80
80
37
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
5-24 VDC
Power Supply
IN/OUT1
+
–
Y4+
COM
Y4-
IN
PLC
Sourcing Output
Using Y4
relay
5-24 VDC
Power Supply
+
–
Y1/2/3
IN/OUT1
1N4935 suppression diode
YCOM
Driving a Relay
Y1, Y2 or Y3
useful for connecting a motor brake
relay
5-24 VDC
Power Supply
+
Y4+
IN/OUT1
1N4935 suppression diode
Y4Driving a Relay
Using Y4
useful for connecting a motor brake
38
–
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Interfacing to a Motion Controller
In some applications, servo control is provided by a motion controller and the drive simply obeys a
velocity or torque command. The industry standard for this command signal is ±10V. In most cases,
the encoder signals from the motor must feed back to the controller. The SV7-S-AF servo drive
includes a special Motion Controller Feedback board to accomodate such applications.
To connect an SV7-S-AF to a motion controller, you must make a cable to connect the motion controller to the DB9 connector on the motion controller feedback board. Diagrams are shown below.
Providing the motion controller with access to the analog command, servo enable, alarm reset, and
fault output signals requires an additional cable to the SV7’s DB25 connector. See the diagram
below for pin numbers. Note: this diagram assumes that FAULT IN of the motion controller
can accept a sinking signal.
You’ll also need to use our QuickTuner™ software to set the drive for torque or velocity mode, to
set the scaling and offset of the analog input, and to configure the motor.
Encoder Outputs
If you are using the SV servo in torque or velocity mode with a servo controller, you may need
to feed the encoder signals back to the controller. The DB-9 connector on the motion controller
feedback option board includes encoder output signals for this purpose.
Connect cable shield to connector shell
Signal+
(4) encoder B- OUT
(5) encoder Z+ OUT
Motion
Controller
FAULT IN
16
COM
17
12-24VDC
8
RST OUT
6
EN OUT
A+
A-
(9) Not Connected
(8) Not Connected
B+
Front View of Motion Controller Feedback
(MCF) connector
BZ+
ZGND
YCOM
XCOM
X4/RESET
X3/ENABLE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
A+ OUT
A- OUT
B+ OUT
B- OUT
Z+ OUT
Z- OUT
DB-9 CONNECTOR
encoder Z- OUT (6)
GND (7)
7
GND
Y3/FAULT
SV Servo Drive
encoder B+ OUT (3)
encoder A- OUT (2)
encoder A+ OUT (1)
ANALOG+
DB-25 CONNECTOR
Signal-
1
13
GND
Connect cable shield to connector shell
Connecting a Motion Controller with Analog (±10V) Output
39
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Setting Drive Current Limits
The SV7 allows the user to set both the Motor Continuous and Peak current limits. Current settings
are an RMS value. Using the QuickTuner™ the current settings can be uploaded and downloaded.
Setting the current limits requires the user to know the limitations of the motor. In most cases referring to the motor manufacturers specification will give the proper information. For AMP motors,
motor settings are available in parameter files that are located on the PC where QuickTuner™ was
installed.
What is “Peak Current Limit”?
The SV7 uses this current value to establish the maximum possible RMS current that will be driven
to the motor. The peak current time is set to one second. That is, if the drive attempts to run at peak
current for more then one second it will fold back the current to the continuous current setting.
The peak current time is actually calculated on a curve using an I²/T method. For current values that
are less than the peak but greater than the continuous, the current foldback time is calculated from
the peak and continuous settings. As shown in the diagram below, current values below the peak
value can be used for longer periods of time.
40
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Reference Materials
Recommended NEMA Motors
Model
V0050-214-AV0100-214-BV0200-214-BV0250-214-B
Length “L” (mm)
455278104
Rated Output (W)
50 100200200
Power Supply (VDC)
48484848
Rated Current (Arms)
5.36.35.75.8
Peak Current (Arms)1
14.014.014.014.0
Rated Torque
N-m
0.0950.19 0.38 0.57
oz-in
13.426.953.880.7
Peak Torque1
N-m
0.250.420.931.38
oz-in
34 59 132195
Torque Constant2
N-m/A
0.0190.03 0.07 0.1
oz-in/A
2.74.29.914.2
Rated Speed (RPM)
5000500050003350
Max Speed(RPM)
8000800059004000
Voltage Constant2 (V/kRPM)
2.003.5 7.410.7
Resistance (Ω)2
0.450.450.60.89
Rotor Inertia (g-cm2) 29 93 182270
Additional Motor Information:
Model
V Series
J Series
Encoder Counts/rev:
8192 CPT
2500 CPT
Poles
4
8
With SV7 drive.
EDCM rating (equivalent DC motor). These values simplify performance calculations but differ from values measured at motor terminals.
1
2
41
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Recommended Metric Motors
Model
J0100-303-3 J0200-304-4 J0400-305-4
Length “L” (mm)
110
106
118
Rated Output (W)
100
200
400
Power Supply (VDC)
24
48
60
Cont/Peak Current (A)
5.2/15.6
4.9/14.7
6.5/19.5
0.32/0.91
0.64/1.7
1.27/3.5
0.61
0.133
0.197
Rated Speed (RPM)
3000
3000
3000
Max Speed (RPM)
6000
6000
6000
Voltage Const (V/krpm)
3.8
7.6
11.4
Resistance (Ω)
0.48
0.57
0.57
42.2
94
190
1
Cont/Peak Torque
1
N-m
Torque Constant
2
N-m/A
2
2
Rotor Inertia (g-cm )
2
With SV7 drive.
EDCM rating (equivalent DC motor). These values simplify performance calculations but differ from values measured at motor terminals.
1
2
42
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Motor Outlines
42
20±1
45±1
35
2
Ø5h6
Ø22h7
31
35
4.5 Flat
15±.25
4X M3
4.3 MIN DEEP
500±50
Dimensions in mm
V0050 Outline Drawing
L
20.00
35
5.00
1.60
Ø6.35h6
56.4
47.14
35
Ø38.1
Ø4.50
REF
5.8 FLAT
15 ±0.25
500±50
V0100, V0200, V0250 Outline Drawing
43
920-0012F
12/18/2014

 


 


 
 
 
 
SV7 Hardware Manual



 

 

  
 





 

 
 

 
 

   
 




  


J0100-303-3 Outline Drawing

 

 






 

  


 
J0200-304-4 Outline Drawing
44

920-0012F
12/18/2014
0.000
50 h7 - 0.025
0.04 A
M5
10
4-
5.5
-Key
0.04 A
30 ±50
300 ±50
SV7 Hardware Manual
14 h6
0.000
- 0.011
74
5 h9
0.00
-0.03
70
A
oil seal
3 ±0.2
30 ±1
8
16
81
118 ±1
60
J0400-305-4 Outline Drawing
45
+0.300
- 0.118
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Torque-Speed Curves
V0050-214-A-000
14A (peak) 24V
5.3A (continuous) 24V
40
35
Torque (oz-in)
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
Speed (RPM)
V0100-214-B-000
14A (Peak) 48V
14A (Peak) 24V
80
6.3A (Continuous) 48V
6.3A (Continuous) 24V
70
Torque (oz-in)
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
Speed (RPM)
46
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
VL0200-214-B-000
14A (Peak) 48V
14A (Peak) 24V
5.7A (Continuous) 48V
5.7A (Continuous) 24V
160
140
100
80
60
40
20
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
Speed (RPM)
V0250-214-B-000
14A (Peak) 60V
250
14A (Peak) 48V
14A (Peak) 24V
5.8A (Continuous) 60V
200
5.8A (Continuous) 48V
5.8A (Continuous) 24V
Torque (oz-in)
Torque (oz-in)
120
150
100
50
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
Speed (RPM)
47
3500
4000
4500
5000
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
J0100-303-4
140
SV7 24VDC
J0100-303-3-000
5.2A
120
J0100-303-3-000
14A
torque, oz-in
100
80
60
40
20
0
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
speed, rpm
J0200-304-4
300
SV7 48VDC
J0200-304-4-000
4.9A
J0200-304-4-000
14A
250
torque, oz-in
200
150
100
50
0
0
1000
2000
3000
speed, rpm
48
4000
5000
6000
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
J0400-305-4
450
SV7 60VDC
J0400-305-4-000
6.5A
400
J0400-305-4-000
14A
350
torque, oz-in
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
speed, rpm
49
5000
6000
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Mechanical Outline
4.74
0.61
3.0
1.98
1.775
6X SLOT 0.16
WIDE, FULL R
0.663
5.0
50
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Technical Specifications
Amplifier
Digital MOSFET. 16 kHz PWM.
Supply voltage: 18 - 88 VDC, motor current: 0.5 to 7 amps rms continuous,
0.5 to 14 amps rms peak (2 seconds max, i2t limiting)
Digital Inputs
Step & Direction: differential, optically isolated, 5V logic. 330 ohms internal
resistance.
0.5 µsec minimum pulse width. 2 µsec minimum set up time for direction
signal.
All other digital inputs: optically isolated, 12 - 24V logic. 2200 ohms. Maximum current: 10 mA.
Analog Inputs
±10VDC, 12 bit ADC, 100k ohms internal impedance.
Outputs
Photodarlington, 80 mA, 30 VDC max. Voltage drop: 1.2V max at 80 mA.
Physical
1.775 x 3 x 5 inches overall. 10 oz (280 g)
Ambient temperature range: 0°C to 40°C.
Encoder Inputs Differential line receiver, 5V logic.
Minimum resolution 400 lines (1600 counts/rev).
Maximum resolution: 32768 lines (131,072 counts/rev)
Mating Connectors and Accessories
Mating Connectors
Motor/power supply: PCD P/N ELV06100, included with drive.
IN/OUT1: DB-25 male. AMP P/N 747912-2. Shell Kit AMP P/N748678-3. Included.
Optional encoder feedback: HD-15 male. Norcomp P/N 180-015-102-001. Shell Kit AMP P/N
748678-1. Not included.
51
920-0012F
12/18/2014
SV7 Hardware Manual
Accessories
Breakout Box for DB-25 Connector
BOB-1, includes cable
Screw Terminal Connectors that mate directly to the DB-25 connector on the front panel of the
drive:
Phoenix Contact P/N 2761622
This connector is not available from Applied Motion. You must purchase it from a
Phoenix distributor.
See App. Note 16 for more detail: http://www.applied-motion.com/sites/default/files/APPN0016_
Simple-25-pin-mating-connections.pdf
Mating Cable for IN/OUT connector with “flying leads”
Black Box P/N: BC00702
This cable is not available from Applied Motion. You must purchase it from Black Box.
Useful for custom wired applications. This shielded cable has a DB-25 connector on each
end. You can cut off the female end to create a 6 foot “DB-25 to flying lead cable”.
It’ll be easier to wire if you get the cable color chart from Black Box’s web site.
See App. Note 16 for more detail: http://www.applied-motion.com/sites/default/files/APPN0016_
Simple-25-pin-mating-connections.pdf
Regeneration Clamp:
Applied Motion Products RC050.
Operator Terminal (-Si drives only)
Applied Motion Products MMI-01 or MMI-02 (backlit).
52
Alarm Codes
In the event of an error, the green LED on the main board will flash one or two times, followed by a series of red flashes. The pattern repeats until the alarm is cleared.
Code
solid green
flashing green
1 red, 1 green
1 red, 2 green
1 red, 3 green
2 red, 1 green
2 red, 2 green
2 red, 3 green
3 red, 1 green
3 red, 2 green
3 red, 3 green
4 red, 1 green
4 red, 2 green
4 red, 3 green
5 red, 1 green
5 red, 2 green
6 red, 1 green
6 red, 2 green
7 red, 1 green
7 red, 2 green
Error
no alarm, motor disabled
no alarm, motor enabled
position error limit
move attempted while drive disabled
subroutine stack overflow (Si only)
ccw end of travel limit
cw end of travel limit
subroutine stack underflow (Si only)
drive overheating
internal voltage out of range
attempt to load blank Q segment
power supply overvoltage
power supply undervoltage
bad instruction in Si program
over current / short circuit
peak current foldback
bad hall pattern
bad encoder signal
serial communication error
flash memory error
Connector Diagrams
IN/OUT
Analog IN1
Analog IN2
not used
X6 / CCWJOG
X5 / CWJOG
X4 / Alarm Reset
X3 / Enable
X COMMON
X2 / DIRX2 / DIR+
X1 / STEP X1 / STEP +
GND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Y1 / BRAKE
Y2 / MOTION
Y3 / FAULT
Y COMMON
+5V OUT
GND
Y4+
Y4X7/CWLIMIT+
X7/CWLIMITX8/CCWLIMIT+
X8/CCWLIMIT-
encoder B+ (3)
Hall 1+ (9)
encoder B- (4)
Hall 1-(10)
encoder Z+ (5)
GND (15)
Hall 3- (14)
Hall 3+ (13)
(11) Hall 2+
(12) Hall 2-
Front View
Front View
(8) GND
(2) encoder A(7) +5VDC 200mA
(1) encoder A+
(6) encoder Z-
DB-25 I/O Connector
CANopen
GND
TX–
TX+
RX–
RX+
GND
CAN_L
SHLD
CAN_H
RS-485/422
HD-15 Encoder Connector
404 Westridge Drive Watsonville, CA 95076
Tel (831) 761-6555 (800) 525-1609 Fax (831) 761-6544
www.appliedmotionproducts.com
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement