Consultation Report Volume 3 Annex A (PDF 5.18MB, opens in a new window)

Consultation Report Volume 3 Annex A (PDF 5.18MB, opens in a new window)
CORE STRATEGY
REPORT OF CONSULTATION
Workshop Reports
(September 2008 – January 2009)
Volume 3 Annex A
Includes:
Place Workshops Sept 2009
People Workshops Sept 2008-Jan 2009
First published: June 2009
Edited: April 2011
Reprinted: October 2011
This publication is Annex A of Volume 3 of the Report of Consultation on the
Core Strategy. If you would like this information in your own language, or you would
like to contact the Council about any other issue, please call 01442 867212.
If you would like this information in another format, such as large print or audio tape,
please call 01442 228660 or for Minicom only 01442 867877.
Report of Consultation
The Core Strategy for Dacorum Borough has been prepared taking account of
Government policy and regulation, technical evidence and consultation.
Consultation has spanned seven years, from 2005 to June 2011. This report
explains the consultation: i.e.
the means of publicity used;
the nature of the consultation;
the main responses elicited;
the main issues raised; and
how they have been taken into account.
It also explains how the actual consultation relates to the Council‟s policy on
consultation and engagement, the Statement of Community Involvement.
The report is presented in seven volumes:
Volume 1:
Emerging Issues and Options (July 2005 - July 2006)
- Annex A contains a summary of responses from the
organisations consulted
Volume 2:
Growth at Hemel Hempstead and Other Stakeholder
Consultation (July 2006 –April 2009)
Volume 3:
Stakeholder Workshops (September 2008 – January 2009)
- Annex A contains reports on each workshop
Volume 4:
Emerging Core Strategy (May - September 2009)
- Annex A contains a summary of responses to the general
public consultation
- Annex B contains reports from the Citizens‟ Panel and Gypsy
and Traveller community
Volume 5:
Writing the Core Strategy - from Working Draft to Consultation
Draft (June – September 2010)
Volume 6:
Consultation Draft Core Strategy (November 2010 – March
2011)
- Annex A contains a summary of responses to the general
public consultation and reports from the Citizens‟ Panel and
Town Centre Workshop. It also includes changes made to
the Draft Core Strategy.
Volume 7:
Overview
This is Annex A to Volume 3.
CONTENTS
PAGE
PLACE WORKSHOP REPORTS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Berkhamsted Workshop
Bovingdon Workshop
Countryside Workshop
Hemel Hempstead Workshop
Kings Langley Workshop
Markyate Workshop
Tring Workshop
1
1
21
41
67
105
125
139
PEOPLE WORKSHOP REPORTS
8
9
Senior Voice and Community Groups Workshop
Youth Workshop
155
193
1. Berkhamsted Place Workshop
Held: 18th September 2008
1
Contents
Page
The Workshop
3
Group Session 1 - Your People
4
Group Session 2 - Your Place
8
Visioning Priorities
14
Analysis of Priorities
16
‘Park It’ Notes
18
Other Comments
19
List of Attendees
20
2
The Workshop
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions covering the topics „Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of
these group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the
questions could be discussed within an allotted time the participants were split
into 4 groups answering relevant topics. The first group session was split as
follows: Group 1 covered Questions 1 and 4; Group 2 covered Questions 2, 3,
and 8; and Groups 3 and 4 covered Questions 5, 6, and 7. The second
session was split into a similar format: Group 1 answered Questions 1, 2 and
4; Group 2 and 4 answered Questions 3, and Group 3 answered Questions 5
and 6.
Answers that were given by the workshop participants can be found
underneath the questions for each of the group sessions below. The hash
mark # highlights an important issue.
The comments given for the top five priorities for Berkhamsted are identified
under „Visioning Priorities‟.
Any other comments made during the event or listed on the „Park It‟ board are
reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
3
Group Session 1 - Your People
1.
(a)
What problems do you think your town has with crime or antisocial behaviour?
(b)
How could these problems be reduced?
Answers
(a)
No problems walking around the town for me.
Tesco‟s is a gathering point for youths (Wilderness), this affects some
people. #
We have alcohol free zones but areas (Butts Meadow, Canal Fields) are
used by young people who drink.
Concern over perception! (need to report crime).
Not many children appear to walk to school – perhaps due to fears of
crime (traffic, paedophiles).
Douglas Gardens – Escape Routes.
Butts meadow – dark in evening.
Lack of police in evening – manpower in area reduced.
Small amount of petty crime.
(b)
Is there a lot for young people to do? #
Swan Youth Project.
Sports clubs.
Extended schools
Teenagers do like hanging around – it‟s social.
Youth Centre not used (near Sports Centre) – should be! #
PCSO‟s have played good role linking with young people. #
2.
Are the needs of children and young people being met? If not, how can
we better accommodate their needs?
Answers
No statutory provision – all charity (although not all statutory = good!)
Swan Youth centre = only „generic‟ youth club
- Building limits capacity
- Funding needed #
- Would like to extend hours
- Staffing
- 35-60 kids per after school club rarely open at weekends due to staff
etc.
4
- drama and different activities
Teenagers are the neglected group – hang out at Castle and Tescos. #
Skate Park – popular – needs enlarging, few problems with it. #
Little else for teens, Hemel caters better for teenagers.
Need inside venues – hanging around outside leads to “bad image”.
Need free facilities – i.e. kick football around, BMX facility?
Cycling – very good trails, but safety concerns – need better off road links.
– town = safety concerns. #
State school facilities poor – old pool, lots of land but poor facilities due to
lack of money. Private school facilities – excellent. Potential for sharing
facilities with the public?
3 tier schooling, school places a problem – travel to schools, lack of
choice.
HCC will seek funding from new developments to improve schools.
Insufficient primary school places. #
3. Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the town?
If so, what are they and where?
Answers
Car Parking #
- not enough spaces
- resident areas not designed for on-street parking
- congestion leads to safety issues and creates a bad
- enforcement issue.
Encourage more cycling – Cycle lanes? Need to be maintained. Links to
Ashridge are dangerous. Bike lock up space. #
Elderly Provision is poor. No day centre have to go elsewhere, but need
local provision for “community spirit”. #
Denists – no NHS? Very few
Quite well served by facilities for meetings. These are key benefit of living
in town.
Transport is a problem due to 2historic core2. Links out of Berkhamsted
limited on bus.
Need a “Cultural Centre”.
Collegiate school has high demand on its facilities i.e. Dacorum
Symphony, Pepper Fund.
Link/dual use of school facilities needs to be explored. #
4.
What problems do local businesses and services face in your town?
How can they be tackled?
Answers
Parking – lack of parking (GP Surgery losing car park). #
Take an interest in cost of station parking – leads to parking spreading
5
over. (Saturday expensive, Sunday‟s not free).
Film Archives – expansion of storage issues (it‟s not easy). #
Planning restrictions.
Increase number of cycle lanes and pedestrian ways. #
Expansion of large supermarkets.
5.
Is there a need for any more open space within the town? If so, how and
where should it be provided?
Answers
Short of green space, linear town
Visual green space – fronts and backs of houses #
Keep sports facilities central
Preserve existing green space, not develop private green space – need
more public land #
Maintain green corridor along canal
Stag Lane – new developments (150 units) have no green play areas,
must be integral #
Should gardens be designated as brown sites? – NO
Retain “envelope views” around the town
Stress local priorities rather than national targets.
Preserve sense of space surrounding dwellings #
Low level dwellings to preserve view!
Need space for outdoor sports. #
Shortage/young people – balance development with provision of these
facilities
Allotment demand – none south side of town, don‟t overlook future need,
not much current provision
Towards Hemel section of town not much current provision
Access to canal side is still important
BFI sites – open spaces (George Street, New Lodge)
Cemeteries provision sufficient except perhaps a green cemetery. Before
others fill extend existing ones. #
Town – so that access is provided.
Not green belt – green green belt #
Any development should make provision for open spaces within them #
6.
How can your town help us respond to the issues of climate change?
Answers
Transition group looking at part of national campaign
Provision in flats of energy efficiencies e.g. outdoor drying areas,
ventilation in bathrooms
Older housing – energy efficiency ratings
New developments – compulsory energy efficiency #
6
7.
What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained within
your town?
Answers
Promote community ownership by careful balance of amenities
Canal #
Enhance entrances to town #
Enhance highways
Preserve and protect historic buildings (via planning regulations?) #
Market Place #
Extend conservation area encompassing different eras of building. #
Traditional High Street
Extend conservation area?
Street furniture clutter
In character development – business & residential
Trees in public places
The “look of the place” #
Canal Fields
Canal and Canal walk
Extend canalside improvements to Northchurch e.g canal bridge signs and
interpretation boards.
Castle Street bridge
Town Hall/civic centre – character buildings
Open spaces
392 High Street (House)
8.
What other changes would you make elsewhere in your town to make it
more attractive place to live?
Answers
“Old” signage is good. Finger post signs to key locations #
Toilets – existing ones are revolting! #
Canal is very important to town character. #
Town centre redevelopment at old Tescos needs to be very high quality
and not led by supermarkets.
Historic buildings need looking after.
60‟s infill does not match in. #
Seating/picnic areas in parks.
7
Group Session 2 - Your Place
1.
Should young people be given the opportunity to stay in their town?
2.
(a)
If NO, what are your reasons?
(b)
If YES, How much of this population growth should the town
accommodate?
Answers
(a)
Yes
(b)
Proportionate growth for town – school roll issues – build another school #
Yes! I want a balanced community but will require affordable housing.
Not keen on in-filling though. #
Should have a choice
More sustainable as family visits easier.
Need employment to stay here #
If in shared ownership, then could never afford to move.
3.
Which of the housing sites shown on the map provided do you think are
the best sites for new housing and why?
Answers
Figure 1 highlights areas shaded in blue as suitable sites. There are two
further sites also shown, one has a question mark in the box as the ownership
of the land is not known - school? The other site to the west is a school site
that will come forward when the school moves.
Concerns
Consider social affordable housing
Careful of segregation
Too simplistic – need to consider infrastructure of individual sites
Town overdeveloped
Preserve character of town by protecting growth rate
Brickhill Green has been designated a nature reserve.
BFI – potential site, however sports fields on boundaries, neighbouring
land owned by L & G, parking concerns, heavily used area.
Durrants Lane – Earmarked as an amenity sports area
Greenfield Site – Ashlyns school has more land than it needs
Allotments – have been put forward in the past.
Focus on East & West – no sites proposed in North/central
Affordable Housing not peppered properly (Durrants Lane) – should be
included in smaller sites. #
8
Tackle housing waiting list
Issue of housing sites and/or traveller sites in south east Berkhamsted.
Consider land gradients
Manor Street – elderly not provided for – site ideal traveller site
BE/H1 and BE/H17 – poor road access/dangerous junction (allotments/Ivy
House Lane). #
Conservation area – consider this when looking at development.
Too many flats – lack of employment locally, should start at 2 bedrooms
Quality of architecture – 77 houses Ravens Lane a good example
Need to consider employment opportunities nearby, including small
businesses (not clone town)
Flats & community amenity space v private gardens. Gardens and
traditional houses more private.
Recycling issues with flats – lack of facilities
Schools/hospitals and other facilities should be considered along with new
housing.
Sports facility
Considered back garden development
Ivy House Lane - visibility
9
Figure 1: Housing Sites relating to Question 3
10
4.
Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the town?
Answers
Need more LA housing with a good mix within the same area. #
This is an expensive area, so rents high. #
We need more affordable housing, but would this attract incomers?
Reasonable provision for elderly, but what lies ahead?
Current balance is about right.
5.
We are required by Government to provide sites for gypsies and
travellers within the area. Some possible locations for sites have been
put forward by consultants. These were all considered to meet a set of
key criteria.
(a) Which of these options do you prefer?
(b) Are there any other sites either within or on the edge of the town that
we should consider instead?
Answers
Please see Figure 2, which identifies the Gypsy and traveller sites being
debated.
(a)
D6 – by canal, which has been identified as essential green belt.
Waterways Tomorrow against development.
Linear green park. –
preserve “envelope view” of AONB.
D3 – too close to the school – dangerous when moving caravans
D3,4,5 – Access from Swing Gate Lane – narrow road
D6/D3 – next to public facilities/housing which could degrade in quality.
D4 & 5 – isolated from community
The site in Hemel (existing) is under utilised, do we need another site?
Consider planned housing when looking at sites
D6 – access is privately owned.
(b)
D5 – access narrow
D4/5/6 – view on valley side
Smaller sites in varied locations
11
Figure 2: Gypsy and Traveller Sites near Berkhamsted and Northchurch
12
6. (a) How could your High Street be improved over the next 20 years?
Answers
traffic restrictions in centre
more parking
reassessment of town centre
previous improvements ineffective
create a “home zone”
mini roundabout instead of traffic lights
increase parking in new development
tax big stores on car parking space – ring fenced for public use
divert traffic away from town centre
(b) How can these improvements be achieved?
Answers
N/A
13
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Advance renewal of Infrastructure in the area – not reacting to the failures
of the systems
Through the planning process try and improve designs of new build to
reflect the areas in which the new development is to be placed
The town must provide for youth/teenagers, not just home owners
Keep the infrastructure and community feel
Slow down garden in-filling
Infrastructure must be considered & enhanced before any new
development
Sort infrastructure first (roads, schools, free sports facilities, hospital,
parking), before any more housing
Make it more obvious that the High Street from Castle Street to St Johns
Well Lane is the town centre. Tring has block paving – could have
coloured tarmac, which needs less maintenance.
No housing development on Manor Street site except Elderly Care Home,
Elderly Day centre.
Parking in conservation area – particularly Station Road
Opportunity for ongoing public involvement via DBC website
When the town grows we must provide public sports facilities and space
as well as schools/doctors etc.
Pepper affordable housing
Balance facilities/services with any increase in population/housing
Distinctiveness of place – character development in/near conservation
area e.g. Prague, Warsaw post WW2.
Promote market town image with rebuild of ancient market hall
Parking – providing infrastructure for all development
Preserving & Providing more green spaces
Community centre provision
Remember that Berkhamsted/Northchurch is a linear town and cannot be
sensibly developed until it has a real “centre”
Significant open space to be delivered through new housing development
to offset deficit.
Rather than taking possible areas shown for housing, use for lack of open
spaces.
Create open spaces from green belt
Cooperative planning is key to sustaining our waterways
Priority 2
We need at least one more unlimited height/weight road over railway and
canal. The town is very dependent on Billet Lane. See what happens
when the (low) station bridge is flooded due to heavy rain.
Stop in-filling on already scarce green space. The By-pass is becoming
the town boundary.
Facilities for young people (youth club, football, motor cycling training,
BMX)
14
Elderly services with equal measure with the young.
Increase demands on developers through the S106 process and ensure
monies raised benefit the local community.
Planning permission must demand open spaces as part of the
development
Ensure any housing, services, recreational opportunities are developed
and do not increase problems of congestion/parking
Provide more affordable/rental housing in the town
Keep housing in keeping with the local area
New developments should allow for adequate parking
Development of open spaces within the town for leisure and recreation
Traffic reduction in town centre
Cycling lanes from housing areas to school – cycling provision
Increase car parking in the town to enable small businesses to survive
Plan for a greener town – cycle lanes, use of canal, park area, water park
for children
Improve links to open space and the countryside
Priority 3
Adequate provision of school places to meet future demand
Maintain and improve built environment by ensuring development is „inkeeping‟ with the Victorian/Edwardian infrastructure
Access to sports centre from the main road
Quiet lanes (20mph)
If the PO site becomes available use it to build new GP surgery, it would
be on the flat, close to town and provide extra parking
Re-open the purpose built youth club on Lagley Meadow
Public footpaths within and between settlements & surrounding
countryside are not one, maintained but improve and extend
Affordable housing to give our younger generation a choice to stay
Build GP surgeries for sale to GP‟s and site them on the level and equally
distributed in Berkhamsted/Northchurch
Parking difficulties/access to GP surgeries getting more and more difficult,
sites needed on the flat and in centre of town.
Improve and increase activities for young people
We must include greater use of school facilities for the community
Priority 4
Don‟t develop wildlife sites for housing
Reserved parking for Doctors, Dentists
Residents parking
Priority 5
More emphasis on the use of buses/cycling etc.
Use of canal for transportation
Swimming pool in central plot
15
Analysis of Priorities
Table 1 groups and orders the key priorities according to what was written on
the Priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table, and each issue is then given a total score.
Table 1: Analysis of priorities
Issue
Improve infrastructure before
additional development
Design and develop with
local distinctiveness
Provide facilities for youth
and teenagers
Retain infrastructure and
community feel
Slow down garden infilling
Enhance and identify
gateways to the town centre
No housing on Manor Street
only elderly care facilities
Parking (either more
provision or better
enforcement)
Opportunity for more public
involvement online
Provide further community
facilities and open space
Provision and peppering of
affordable housing
Balance facilities/services
with any increase in
housing/population
Promote market town image
with rebuild of ancient
market hall
Berkhamsted/ Northchurch is
a linear town and requires a
real centre
Sustain and improve use of
waterways
Require additional unlimited
loaded bridge over the canal
to reduce heavy use on Billet
Lane
Increase s106 demands to
raise funds for local
community
Traffic reduction in town
Increase cycle lane
provision, buses
Improve links to countryside
and improve and extend
provision of more footpaths
Provide sufficient school
Priority
1
3x5
Priority
2
-
Priority
3
-
Priority
4
-
Priority
5
-
Total
Score
15
2x5
1x4
-
1x2
-
16
1x5
2x4
2x3
-
-
19
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
1x5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
2x5
3x4
1x3
2x2
-
29
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
6x5
5x4
1x3
-
-
53
1x5
1x4
1x3
-
-
12
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
1x5
-
-
-
1x1
6
-
2x4
-
-
-
8
-
1x4
-
-
-
4
-
1x4
2x4
-
-
1x1
4
9
-
1x4
1x3
-
-
7
-
-
1x3
-
-
3
16
places
Access to sports centre from
High Street
Provide quiet lanes at
20mph
New GP surgery on flat
surface near town centre
Don‟t develop wildlife sites
for housing
Swimming pool in central
plot
-
-
1x3
-
-
3
-
-
1x3
-
-
3
-
-
2x3
-
-
6
-
-
-
1x2
-
2
-
-
-
-
1x1
1
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5 points are
given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each
time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on
Priority board 5.
The table highlights that the majority of people thought that further community
facilities and open space should be provided for. This included the provision
of a community centre, public sports facilities and planned open spaces with
future residential development. It was also suggested that greater use could
be made of school facilities for the community.
The provision of additional parking was also sought after by a large number of
participants, particular to ensure that new residential, service and recreational
development delivered sufficient parking.
Additional facilities for children and teenagers were also identified as a
leading priority.
17
‘Park It’ Notes
Swimming pool of Olympic size could be built at Berkhamsted cricket club
Re-designate Chilterns young riders Motocross bike track at Dickshill
Woods. Shootersway, Berkhamsted to leisure use from agriculture – has
been leisure use for 14 years.
Reinforce “character areas” and possibly review existing areas that are
being eroded.
Transport/Communication in town – There is only 1 crossing route in
Berkhamsted across the railway and canal that is not restricted by width,
height or weight, i.e. Billet Lane. Station (Brownlow Rd) = height, New
Road = height, Gravel path = weight, Ivy House lane = width, New Road
Northchurch = to Dunstable only (no local connection).
Separate policies for garden in-filling, removing criteria for maximising use
of land etc.
High Street – length of A4251 from Castle Street to PO needs to be
emphasised as town centre. Could use coloured tarmac to emphasise –
existing block paved bumps only have short life due to lorry traffic
Save the employment at BFI, allow the expansion
Give more weight to Biodiversity corridors in planning decisions –
protection etc.
Outward development of town – A41 bypass forms a new „natural‟
Southern boundary for town. Area between Kingshill Way/Shootersway
therefore presents itself as an easy place for development, due to fields,
copses and general areas being “trapped” by the bypass and other
boundaries.
Ensure the Collegiate school is required to share facilities with town more
and at a lower cost to community groups
Small developments could include affordable housing e.g. 4 for sale = 1
affordable.
The Greenbelt needs to be shared! (shouldn‟t need to be affluent to see it)
More provision for live work units
More policies to protect the green linear park of canal
Manor Street – please return the building for the use of
Berkhamsted/Northchurch elderly
Affordable housing – no more flats for families, no children in flats, small
children need gardens.
Accommodation – developers will want to build more expensive properties
not affordable or sheltered housing.
Ashlyns area – stop the „rat-run‟ through this area and complement
„residents parking‟ in car parks within the area.
Manor Street social services site. No housing or flats – area already too
dense – should be care home for the elderly – something for the
community.
Ensure outdoor sports facilities and fields are designated in the space
allocation process – already in short supply. Any further population
explosion will exacerbate.
Garden in-fill – do not complain if you have done it!
18
Ensure facilities at Berkhamsted Sportspace are not changed from „sport‟
to „leisure‟ as is currently under review.
Give more weight to supplementary guidelines in planning policies
North Central Berkhamsted redevelopment to include affordable housing.
Old Berkhamsted laundry if redeveloped as housing, approximately 50
jobs gone.
Keep BFI
Lifts in flats – with an ageing population, lifts are essential.
These ordnance survey maps are out of date, e.g. the Cricket Club (20
years old) is not shown!
Be courageous in making development decisions, i.e. local policies are
important and should not be given second order to natural density
guidelines.
Review the conservation area as a matter of urgency
Manor Street future must still include elderly day care centre facility
Build a swimming pool centrally. Return Lagley Meadow to green space –
see covenant.
Other Comments
Need to consult with travellers/commuters using Berkhamsted railway
station
19
List of Attendees
Kevin Gladwell
Denise Delderfield
Clair Muir, Swan Youth Project
Dean Simpson, Berkhamsted Collegiate School
Tracey Evans, Berkhamsted Collegiate School
Caroline Bailey
Dr Theresa Finn
Lesley MacDonald
Graham Cox
Ron Turner
Patrick Lepper
Tony Statham, Berkhamsted Citizens Association
Gordon Bluck, Berkhamsted Citizens Association
Richard Sears, British Film Institute
Simon Newell, Chiltern Young Riders
Cherry Martin, Egerton Rothesay School
John Bowcock, Egerton Rothesay School
Colin Ivey
Mr G Lanchin
Cllr Nick Tiley, DBC
Cllr Ken Coleman, BTC
Cllr Lindy Foster, BTC
Dr Laurence Handy, BTC
Paul Beard
Julian Dent
Cllr Giles Batchelor, Northchurch PC
Geraldine Corry, BTC
Ted Dyer
Patsy Blackmore
Mick Thompson
Ashley Clancy, Berkhamsted Collegiate School
Cllr Jonathon Mole, DBC
Cllr Ian Reay, DBC
Cllr Julie Laws, DBC
Bob Chapman, HCC
Russell James
Karl Stonebank, DBC
Martin Hicks, HCC
Emma Adams, DBC
20
2. Bovingdon Place Workshop
Held: 4th September 2008
21
Contents
Page
The Workshop
23
Group Session 1 - Your Place
24
Group Session 2 - Your People
30
Visioning Priorities
35
Analysis of Priorities
38
‘Park It’ Notes
39
List of Attendees
40
22
The Workshop
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions covering the topics „Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of
these group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the
questions could be discussed within an allotted time the participants were split
into 2 groups answering relevant topics.
The first group session (Your Place) was split as follows:
Group 1 covered Questions 1, 2 and 4.
Group 2 covered Question 3.
Group 3 covered Questions 5 and 6.
The second group session (Your People) was split as follows:
Group 1 answered Questions 1 and 4.
Group 2 answered Questions 2, 3 and 8.
Group 3 covered Questions 5, 6 and 7.
Answers that were given by the workshop participants can be found
underneath the questions for each of the group sessions below. The hash
mark # highlights an important issue.
The comments given for the top five priorities for Bovingdon are identified
under „Visioning Priorities‟.
Any other comments made during the event or listed on the „Park It‟ board are
reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
23
Group Session 1 - Your Place
Group 1
1.
Do you think it is important to encourage people, and in particular
young people, to stay in the village?
Answers
Yes.
Encourage employees because of the shortage of local labour.
However, keep identity and community spirit.
Village is disenfranchised
Need to encourage demographic diversity as well as economic and social
stability of the village. This depends on encouraging youth to stay.
Secondary education is the key consideration. Affordable housing is
required above and beyond current legislation.
Comments from rest of group:
Resounding yes.
Would like to have a mix of ages.
Important to replenish the population.
Cost of housing for younger population is of concern.
2.
(a)
If no, what are your reasons?
N/a
(b)
If yes, how much of this population growth should the village
accommodate?
Answers
Limited natural growth.
Need more affordable housing.
Smaller accommodation.
Comments from rest of participants:
Yes, but only limited natural growth.
Implications of affordable housing – behaviour issues.
Concern about the provision of infrastructure in the village.
4.
Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the village?
Answers
24
Affordable housing
Smaller housing
Key worker
Comments from rest of participants:
No additional comments
Group 2
3.
Where are the best sites (for development)?
Answers [See Figure 1 also]
Some merit in village extension if open space is incorporated. #
Importance of maintaining settlement boundary. #
Do not want sprawl. #
Small communities prefer smaller developments.
Concern over detached housing at Leyhill Road.
Hempstead Road Site impacts fewer people.
Green Lane site affect significant numbers of residents.
Nuclear development preferred to linear development.
Concern over the village losing its identity. Residents felt that the
construction of the Moody estate resulted in the village losing its identity
Site to the rear of the Moody Estate is preferred. However, must seek to
include Open Space and recreation as part of the development.
Important to maintain open space in the village.
Something to be said about smaller sites way from the village.
Provide new connected open/leisure space with new development. #
Some additional sites where put forward.
Comments from rest of participants:
Large sites preferred rather than more infilling in the village because of the
importance of Open Space in the village. More Open Space should be
provided with any extension. Some Green Belt release may be
appropriate.
Shortage of affordable housing.
Sites other than those that have already been put forward were
considered.
Airfield site – should be used for other uses. Some potential for housing or
nature reserve. The Airfield is degraded and it would not be too much of a
loss – they may even be improvements. A small section of the site could
be released but no more.
Some use for sports facilities – cycle routes.
Option for Gypsy and Traveller site on the Airfield.
Landowner is reluctant to bring Airfield forward for development.
25
Figure 1: Additional sites put forward by workshop attendees
26
Group 3
5.
We are required by Government to provide sites for gypsies and
travellers within the area. Some possible locations for sites have been
put forward by consultants. These were all considered to meet a set of
key criteria1
(a)
Which of these options do you prefer?
(b)
Are there any other sites either within or on the edge of the town /
village that we should consider instead?
Answers
(a)
Airfield could be used.
Infrastructure is an issue that needs to be considered.
We have the prison so don‟t want any more.
D16 is an established travelling show people site.
Could we not extend the size of existing sites?
Infrastructure is important. New sites would stretch existing facilities such
as schools and shops.
(b)
D16 was preferred out the sites put forward but difficult access.
Locating the Gypsy and Traveller site on the Airfield would be the
preferred site. Would like it further away from the village (See Figure 2
below).
Comments from rest of participants:
Ideally none.
Overcrowded schools.
The sites are privately owned.
Near existing housing which is of concern re house prices and amenity.
Airfield would be the best site as it is used for show people over the winter
period. However, there are concerns regarding the infrastructure of the
site.
Understand that provision is required but not on our doorstep.
Not acceptable. Do not want a site.
Questions hang over the total numbers of sites that are needed over the
Borough. Clarification is sought.
1
These criteria included factors such as safe access to the main road network, being
within a reasonable distance of schools and health facilities, avoiding harm to
important wildlife designations, avoiding areas liable to flood and giving preference to
„brownfield‟ (previously developed) land.
27
Figure 2: Additional Gypsy and Traveller site put forward by work shop group
6.
The High Street has an important role to play in meeting the needs of the
local community. It is important that the High Street not only continues
to meet current needs but is able to respond to future requirements.
There maybe a need for additional shops and restaurants.
(a)
How could your High Street be improved over the next 20 years?
(b)
How can these improvements be achieved?
Answers
(a) and (b)
Improve street furniture.
Bollards outside school could be changed to something else. Still need to
prevent parking.
Important to remember pedestrians
Don‟t want yellow lines on the High Street.
Congestion and parking along the High Street are problematic. Need to
have a car park. #
Supermarket not needed.
Petrol station would be welcomed.
Lorries in the village is of concern.
Need some method of stopping large vehicles coming through the High
Street. Perhaps a one way system.
28
Village covers most shopping needs.
Playground for under 3s
Proposed Tesco site could be used for a car parking. #
Would like a place to meet in the High street.
Would like a study of the High Street to establish what is needed.
Comments from rest of participants:
(a)
Improve street furniture.
Would like a petrol station.
Congestion is a massive issue.
Need some shops to keep the village alive.
Traffic calming would be useful.
One way system could work.
Would like a playground for the under 3s.
(b)
Free car parking would be good.
Plot of garages could be converted for public car parking.
Need to think about the safety of pedestrians along the High Street.
People will not use the car park if they can park along the street.
Traffic calming would control this.
29
Group Session 2 – Your People
Group 1
1.
(b)
(a)
What problems do you think your village has with crime and
anti-social behaviour?
How could these problems be reduced?
Answers
(a) and (b)
Slight problems with teenagers as there are no places to go.
Some teenagers travel in and intimidate people
Reported crime is actually quite low. Lower than it was but must not get
complacent.
Trespassing and arson at the Brickworks but not in recent years.
Community policing is good and approachable. Local PC got to know
youths.
Need things for older people to do.
Some littering
Residents feel safe day and night.
More when weather is pleasant.
Comments from rest of participants:
(a)
There is some problem with anti-social behaviour.
Could have a „pod‟ for youths to go.
Noticeable reduction in crime – want this to continue.
(b)
Keep policing at current levels.
4.
What problems do local businesses and services face in your village?
How can they be tackled?
Answers
Shortage of local labour.
Most young people move out. Would like them to stay
Live/work units are a possibility.
Village faces dilemma: thrive or die.
Public transport is a problem as is parking provision.
Shortage of small business units (start-up).
30
Shortage of affordable housing.
Need to keep the village economy thriving.
Advocate a car sharing scheme.
Comments from rest of participants:
Supplementary question asked: Why do people choose not to come and
work here? Possible links to affordable housing. Perhaps some small
scale regeneration could kick start business.
Concerns around the implications of an ageing population. Number of
children is declining in the village.
Need employment opportunities for teenagers.
There are difficulties getting children into secondary school/ access is an
issue.
Majority of people employed are from outside the village. Not enough
incentive/opportunity to stay.
No one walks to work at the Brickworks.
Transportation throughout the village and to other external facilities is a
cross cutting issues.
Group 2
2.
Are the needs of children and young people met? If not, how can we
better accommodate their needs?
Answers
No facilities for 17+ i.e. football club.
Some facilities are under used.
Lack of adults to run clubs etc.
Need for secondary education locally in the village. #
Improved transport to schools.
Comments from rest of participants:
None
3.
Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the village? If
so, what are these and where?
Answers
Need allotments. #
Need more halls in the village plus money to refurbish existing. #
Floodlights for football club.
Astroturf pitch. #
There is a need for additional education in the village. However, expected
numbers are likely to drop in the forthcoming years.
31
Comments from rest of participants:
Would like some allotments.
8.
What other changes would you make elsewhere in your village to make
it a more attractive place to live?
Answers
More parks and gardens. #
Lack of awareness regarding the role of churches.
Disengage with airfield.
Refurbish ponds.
Improve footpaths.
All deliveries should be made out of key times.
Improve street furniture.
Need for parking.
Need for petrol station.
Option for a bypass.
Comments from rest of participants:
Improve street scene and make these user friendly for pedestrians.
Increase the number of park benches.
Group 3
5.
Is there a need for any more open space (parks, gardens, amenity green
space, green corridors, cycle paths, outdoor sports facilities and play
areas, allotments, cemeteries and churchyards) within the village? If so,
how and where should it be provided?
Answers
School need swimming pool and astroturf.
Not much open space in the village.
Cemetery is sufficient to serve the needs for quite some time to come.
There is no provision at the northern end of the village as the school
restricts access to the surrounding area.
Skate park and basketball court would be useful as there is little for
teenagers.
Need more informal space. #
Would like an allotment.
Would like better connectivity. #
There are no sizable facilities in the village for children/teenagers.
There is sufficient provision of formal space in the village.
The Green is currently over used so informal space is required. However
32
do not want the Green to change.
Comments from rest of participants:
The open space at the Brickworks needs better signage.
Need better connectivity from Boxmoor Trust to village.
Safety of Open Space is important.
6.
How can you or your village help us respond to the issues of climate
change?
Answers
Less fuel use if the there was better management of the high Street. #
Maintaining green areas.
Airfield to help deliver sustainable measures/
Better bus services. #
Restrict back garden development.
New tree planting. #
Sustainable drainage systems (SUDS).
Developers should contribute more.
Greening of the High Street. #
Comments from rest of participants:
Stop infilling development, maintain space but need to trade this off with
sprawl.
Tree planting in development.
SUDS
Improve s106 role.
However, would like to maintain the character of the settlement.
7.
What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained within
your village?
Answers
Enhance the High Street. #
The Well and Ryder memorial retained.
Enhance „The Dock‟.
All green spaces (hedges and verges) should be retained.
Maintain Green Lane.
Maintain the character of the village.
Enhance Memorial Hall‟s exterior.
Enhance shop fronts and forecourts.
Improve connectivity to and from the prison.
33
Enhance the airfield.
Comments from rest of participants:
Would like to maintain the character of the settlement not enhance it
through urban design.
High Street is most important element of Bovingdon.
Maintain soft boundaries and hedging. Stop building driveways.
Bovingdon is still a village, not a small town. The emphasis should be on
retaining that character and helping the High Street.
In some ways the prison is becoming part of the village, apart from the
permeability problems.
34
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Effective spending of government funding.
Secondary school transportation.
No to Tesco – keep shops small with local owners.
High Street congestion.
Preserve village character. Better Street management (High Street).
Improve connections internally within housing to shops and other services.
Secondary education
Secondary education (loss of heart if people have to move out).
High Street. Maintain character and function.
Keep village as is.
Need to create pride in the village.
Keep youngsters from leaving the village.
Secondary education
High Street congestion
Controlled natural growth
No Gypsy and Traveller sites near village.
High Street enhancement.
Street furniture
Keeping village community and improving character.
Priority 2
Resolve future use of airfield.
Affordable key worker housing for local families
No infilling
Restricted parking in the High Street
No Gypsy and traveller sites
Controlled development on airfield. Affordable housing and rented.
Possibility of relocating school and using other site for car parking.
Secondary school transportation
More informal Open Space
Improve traffic management in High Street
Traffic and parking in the High Street
Green Space – recognise role of surrounding countryside. Protection of
best areas.
No Gypsy and Traveller sites.
Encourage small businesses with start up units
Reduce traffic in High Street
Affordable housing
Cost of housing
Congestion in the High Street. Improve pedestrian safety.
Planned development of airfield i.e housing/leisure
Public transport.
35
Priority 3
Control development on airfield.
Very little housing growth
Car park for High Street
Youth facilities
Connections to surrounding wildlife sites/natural Green Spaces.
Encourage public transport
No airfield development
Maintaining open spaces. No more infilling.
Look for opportunities for airfield
Establish a future for the airfield
No landfill sites
Parking and traffic
Affordable housing for key workers and locals.
Encourage young adults to remain in the village.
Public transport
Allotments
Allocate suitable location for new houses (i.e field next to brickworks).
Priority 4
Improve existing greenspaces
Find a use for the airfield.
New business start up units
Funding to improve halls
Secondary school transfer
Increase green areas
Improve High Street appearance
Solve the parking problem
Identify activities that keep community functioning
Provision of green spaces within new development and to enhance the
moody estate
Create Secondary education facilities or improve transport to existing
ones.
Children/youth facilities
Parking in the High Street.
Priority 5
New school for children
Secondary school transportation
More facilities for local industry
Transport
More informal green space
Protect green and open space within the settlement.
Parking issues in the High Street.
Employment and transport issues. Encourage local living and working.
36
Improve water infrastructure if new development takes place.
Affordable public accommodation .
Improve pedestrian environment
Infrastructure improvements.
37
Analysis of Priorities
Table 1 groups and orders the key priorities according to what was written on
the Priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table above and each issue is then given a total score.
Table 1: Analysis of priorities
Issue
Improve High Street
Affordable housing
Secondary school and
transportation
Congestion
Resolve Airfield Issue
Environmental
improvements
Retain Village character
Parking (either more
provision or better
enforcement)
Public transport
Help local
shops/businesses
No Gypsy and Traveller
sites
Small sites for new
housing rather than
large estates
Improve facilities for
young people
Not too much housing
Keep village compact /
avoid coalescence
No to Tesco
Ensure new
development respects
local character
Maintain open spaces
Keep Bovingdon as a
village (i.e. not a town)
Priority
1
4x5
2x5
4x5
Priority
2
2x4
4x4
1x4
Priority
3
1x3
-
Priority
4
1x2
2x2
Priority
5
3x1
1x1
-
Total
Score
33
30
28
2x5
-
3x4
3x4
2x4
1x3
4x3
2x3
1x2
3x2
2x1
2x1
27
26
22
2x5
-
2x4
2x3
1x3
1x2
2x2
1x1
18
16
1x5
2x4
1x4
2x3
-
1x2
2x1
14
13
1x5
2x4
-
-
-
13
1x5
1x4
1x3
-
-
12
1x5
-
1x3
2x2
-
12
1x5
1x5
1x4
-
1x3
-
-
-
12
5
1x5
-
1x4
-
-
-
5
4
-
1x4
-
1x3
-
-
4
3
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a
priority board. 5 points are given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for
each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points
for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on Priority board 5.
The categories in the table are a representation of what was raised on the
38
priority boards, for example the „improve High Street‟ category incorporates all
responses relating to High Street improvements, e.g. High Street
enhancement, maintain character and function of High Street and preserve
village character – better management of High Street.
The table shows that improvements to the High Street were seen as the top
priority for the village, followed by the need for affordable housing. Secondary
School and transportation issues, traffic congestion and the airfield issue were
also seen as important matters to address.
‘Park It’ Notes
Airfield site for housing and improving landscape and biodiversity
39
List of Attendees
Ms Frances Evershed
Mr Ian Galbraith
Representative
Mr Les Cook
Mrs Mary Moody
Mr Terry Magee
Cllr Gill Chapman
Dr Allan Brown
Ms Gill Fisher
Mr Mathew Wood
Ms Nathalie Webb
Mrs Claire Covington
Mr Martin Hicks
Kathy Banks
Martin Mangon
Mike Kember
Mr Tony Trigg
Ms Janet Ayleward
Mr James Moir
Julie Steer
Mr David Hobson
Uniformed Groups
Bovingdon Day Care
F J Parish and Son
Bovingdon Brickworks ltd
Bovingdon Parish Church
Football Club
DBC
St Lawrence Church
St Lawrence Church
Herts property
DBC
DBC
HCC
Bovingdon Baptist Church
Primary School
Bovingdon Parish Council
Parish Council Chairman
Parish Council
DBC
Bovingdon Parish Council
Unknown
40
3. Countryside Place Workshop
October 2008
Held: 25th September 2008
41
Contents
Page
The Workshop
43
Workshop Session 1
44
-
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Workshop Session 2
-
50
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Visioning Priorities
59
Analysis of Priorities
63
Other Comments
65
List of Attendees
66
42
The Workshop
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions. Each of these group sessions covered a range of questions
covering the following broad issues:Rural Housing Provision
Local Businesses
Farming
Tourism
Protecting and Enhancing the Landscape
„Horseyculture‟
Tackling Climate Change
Local Facilities
In order that all of the questions could be discussed within an allotted time the
participants were split into 4 groups answering relevant topics. There was
some duplication of topic areas (and hence questions) between groups.
Answers that were given by the workshop participants can be found
underneath the questions for each of the group sessions below. The #
highlights those issues noted by the group as particularly an important.
The comments given for the top five priorities for the Countryside are
identified under „Visioning Priorities‟.
Any other comments made during the event or listed on the „Park It‟ board are
reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
43
WORKSHOP SESSION 1
Group 1
Rural Housing Provision
1. Do you think it is important to encourage people, and in particular
young people, to stay living within rural communities?
(a) If NO, what are your reasons?
(b) If YES, how much of this population should the rural villages
accommodate?
Answers
Yes #
what do you mean by „young people‟?
need to recognises that there are differences in the nature of villages
it is important for diversity / future generations #
one dominant age group can lead to pressure on infrastructure
young people still live with parents (national problem)
young family wishing to return to villages later in life need to be
accommodated
importance of better public transport
need to consult young people themselves #
danger of villages being “commuters” only
2. Do you think there is a specific need for particular types of
accommodation within the rural area?
Answers
affordable housing waiting list i.e. for those who do and don‟t live in the
village
what is meant by affordable housing and need for high quality
scheme/sympathetic to area
need for key worker housing
importance of being able to save for a house
“ring fence” affordable housing
lack of local facilities in the village
different life-cycle stages result in different housing needs
maintain identity/character of area
concern for village becoming a dormitory
no village “heart”
risk of unauthorised traveller encampment (they need to be
accommodated as well)
44
3. How should we choose sites for housing in the rural parts of the
Borough?
Answers
what control will we have with sites?
need to relate sites to infrastructure e.g. schooling, health / medical
facilities
must not create enclaves – need to „pepper pot‟ affordable housing
provision
must not swamp villages
must limit the impact on landscape, character of village and local
heritage
Group 2
Rural Housing Provision
1. Do you think it is important to encourage people, and in particular
young people, to stay living within rural communities?
(b) If NO, what are your reasons?
(c) If YES, how much of this population should the rural villages
accommodate?
Answers
Yes
have we asked young people?
what‟s pushing young people out?
many have a gap – they leave and then come back?
what about „older‟ young people?
transport issues are important i.e. buses
2. Do you think there is a specific need for particular types of
accommodation within the rural area?
Answers
Housing type – needs to be affordable housing for young families
Important to keep young people and families so schools remain viable
Challenge percentages of affordable housing in developments
Work with Registered Social Landlords (RSL to facilitate single unit
take-up within developments
45
3. How should we choose sites for housing in the rural parts of the
Borough?
Answers
Little Gaddesden – the site is the Village Green! (If it wasn‟t the
location would be perfect)
Little pockets – need to overcome resistance from Registered Social
Landlords (RSLs) to taking up small sites
Restrict post-development extensions of properties – via legal
agreements
Criteria for choosing sites
walking distance from facilities – schools, village shop
on a bus route
near other houses – to help create communities
consider inclines (for walking) and traffic volumes
don‟t „join‟ villages
had a Housing Needs Survey done
6-10 units is acceptable
does it have to be mixed tenure i.e. private and
affordable? (being aware of stigma)
Group 3
Local Businesses
1. What problems do local businesses and services face in villages and
the wider rural area? How can we help address these issues?
Answers
Availability of Broadband connections – poor quality and speed (Great
Gaddesden, Chipperfield and Flaunden specifically mentioned)
Availability of low cost housing – especially rented (not shared
ownership) #
lack of young people to work
companies are reliant on those who commute in from Dunstable,
Luton etc.
loss of employee potential
High cost of open market housing
Need Council housing
Aldwyck Housing Association – examples of small scale provision in
Tring Rural Parish
46
Lack of local co-operative grain store – nearest is in Cambridgeshire
Bank support required
where do staff come from?
increases costs
Nature of rural businesses has changed
no longer such an agricultural focus
Rural transport (lack of) #
relationship between farming and landscape
Distance travelled to processing facilities (i.e. there are no abattoirs in
Hertfordshire) #
grazing sheep – help protect landscape
timber processing facilities – helps protect landscape
Decline in supporting infrastructure. # Planning needs to support these
associated uses (within rural areas) via
broadband
Post Offices etc
agricultural facilities
Influence policy i.e. Post Offices etc.
Loss of Post Offices has impact on other rural businesses i.e. banking
facilities
How much do hobby farmers contribute to economy?
Need to encourage livestock farming
Farming
2. How can we encourage farming to adapt? What sort of uses should
be promoted as part of farm diversification?
Answers
New farm buildings often generate local objections
National policies have an impact i.e. set-aside
Farmers‟ Markets are not that significant, but help focus on LOCALLY
PRODUCED FOOD, which is very important to promote #
Publicity for Farmers‟ Markets
Local Authority run markets are the most successfully generally (like in
East Herts). #
47
Markets show inter-relationship between towns and villages with
countryside
Control the weather!
Genuine farmers v others who own land in rural areas
encourage “genuine” farmers, not lorry companies etc.
diversification can be negative as not always support the
agricultural business
subsidies are greater in France
abuse of Development Control system causes problems
“Good” diversification needs to support agriculture/rural businesses to
encourage the right activities #
What do we mean by „rural business‟?
Enforcement of illegal activities is crucial. Prompt action is required
and more money needs to be spent on this #
How deal with buildings at end of their practical life?
buildings are often too small now
i.e. 1960‟s
Group 4
Tourism
1. What sort of tourist facilities should we encourage in the
countryside?
Answers
Car parks / countryside Park & Ride / public transport
Issue of road structure for access
Economically led – alternatives have to be more profitable for farmers
than wheat. Need to think about increasing employment for local
people #
Utilising redundant buildings #
Utilising gardens / historical buildings
Need to educate people about the countryside (how to respect it) #
Possible Facilities
48
-
Fishing
Off roading
Golf courses
Adventure farms
Youth hostel
Riding stables
Bike hire
Tea shops / cafés / toilet facilities / bins #
B&Bs #
Camp sites #
Narrow boats / marinas
These need to be on maps and signposted.
2. Should visitor numbers at popular locations such as Ashridge be
controlled? If so, how?
Answers
Do country “parks” protect open countryside?
Does Ashridge have a problem? Yes – slow erosion
Potential controls
-
cordon off area for periods of time #
increase car park prices? – then need to control
irresponsible parking
dedicated buses running to specific areas – and change
routes to control usage #
improve/increase profile of other existing local area –
more publicity #
49
WORKSHOP SESSION 2
Group 1
Protecting and Enhancing the Landscape
1. Does the map show all of the most sensitive landscape areas? If not,
please mark on the maps any areas that we have missed.
Answers
Are we talking about LANDSCAPE or BIODIVERSITY? #
Map identifies best quality of landscape for biodiversity
Need to look at –
- sensitivity
- vulnerability
- urban fringe
- honey pot site e.g. Ashridge
Key areas at County level
-
Why not the upper and lower Bulbourne
Black Poplar area missing
Boxmoor Trust land missing
Protection of amenity spaces is important #
Should woodlands be protected?
Flaunden
(See annotated map in Figure 1)
Note that it is NOT a sensitivity map
2. Are there any particular areas of the countryside that are especially
in need of environmental improvements?
Answers
River corridors are key #
the rivers (overgrown, litter, dumping, maintenance)
low flow of rivers/protect against over extraction #
intrusive development along river valley
currently no vision for rivers (e.g. Hemel Hempstead town
centre)
encourage use of rivers
co-operation over river maintenance and adjacent development
50
Figure 1
51
Countryside on edge of settlements #
Can‟t control everything (land privately owned!)
Canal
- under utilised resource
- important wildlife corridor
Need the support of landowners
Keep the countryside alive – via leisure uses and amenities
3. What other key features do you think should be preserved and
enhanced within the villages and/or wider countryside?
Answers
preservation rather than innovation
historic gardens are important
building within garden plots can impact upon character of landscape
and lead to damage #
protect green space in villages and/or identify new spaces
protect countryside – use brownfield sites for new amenities e.g. areas
in Apsley #
no statutory protection of historic landscapes
mineral extraction
dumping sites / areas affected by fly-tipping – currently enforcement is
weak
MORI survey linked to landscape character study (re-visit this for info)
VISTAS important as a category #
Group 2
Protecting and Enhancing the Landscape
1. Does the map show all of the most sensitive landscape areas? If not,
please mark on the maps any areas that we have missed.
Answers
Hedgerows
AONB
Historical landscape
Conservation Areas
Footpaths
Canal
Reservoirs
52
SSSIs
Chalk streams & grasslands
Woodlands
Map needs more detail
2. Are there any particular areas of the countryside that are especially
in need of environmental improvements?
Answers
urban fringes – carry out a study
Hertfordshire‟s woodlands (extend AONB survey)
unknown – assessment needed to define improvements
consult with Natural England
consult on Dacorum Open Space Study (tie all relevant studies
together and consult) #
Chalk streams
Wildlife strips not adequate
Green Belt – regard as a local resource when considering planning
issues
3. What other key features do you think should be preserved and
enhanced within the villages and/or wider countryside?
Answers
If sites are provided then we need to protect them from the demand
you have created! #
Footpaths,– byelaws, Countryside Code, landowners responsibilities
Archaeological sites etc
Manage the use – e.g. bridleways #
Education – e.g. appropriate footwear, provide (through Dacorum
Digest?) #
If rights of way not up to standard it encourages diversions, which
results in damage to further areas
Linear walks with sightseeing bus
Village greens / Commons / open access land
Refer to Parish plans, village design statements etc
Tree planting – management
Churches and churchyards
Woodland (although sometimes landowner resistance).
Good
management of tree planting needed
Unlisted but still historical and integral to the area
Consider industrial heritage in development planning
Don‟t take eye off open countryside in all this (avoid „creep‟) – buffers
and linkages
53
Large space for wildlife
Horseyculture
Group 3
‘Horseyculture’
1. Should ‘horseyculture’ be more strictly controlled, and if so, how?
Answers
Issues
- Sub division of fields
- Affects management of fields – either monoculture of grass or
land taken over by problem species such as Ragwort
- Some good – can tie in well with farming, so a form of
diversification #
- Some bad – hedgerow loss etc #
„Ramshackle‟ appearance is more natural than if landscape is too
pristine
Need to encourage young people to ride therefore need grazing for
horses #
Must distinguish between impacts in AONB versus the Green Belt (the
former is more sensitive)
Soil conditions and economic conditions are natural controls
May slow down due to economic decline?
Accept it can help wider local economy – i.e. sell feed etc. #
OK on low grade grazing land
One of the reasons people come to the countryside
Needs to be controlled strictly in AONB – due to landscape quality.
Need to control less strictly in Green Belt? #
Key = quality of how its done and how it fits in with surrounding
landscape #
Cumulative issues – needs to be controlled #
54
Need to ensure appropriate location of stables i.e. near bridleways
Bridleway network is limited in Borough – improve and formalise?
It is an economic use for small fields that are no longer viable for other
agricultural uses.
Tackling Climate Change
2. What impacts do you think climate change may have on the
landscape and how should we respond to these changes?
Answers
Landscape - especially trees / woodland
-
impact on trees esp. Beech Trees #
very sensitive to drought Oak etc. affected by new insects etc. that
survive due to temp changes
Beech trees planted to serve furniture industry – should we replant
with Beech or other species now?
Beech monoculture isn‟t actually natural.
Look at trees that can be used for wood fuel in rural and urban
area, but avoid too many conifers etc #
„thinnings‟ – used as wood chip
Good to produce wood locally,
Need to manage landscape properly. i.e. positive management.
Need to look at fuel poverty issues
Buildings
- need to be well designed in terms of eco credentials
Crop changes #
- due to climate change
Transport
- encourage public transport
Water availability #
flooding, water table, more unpredictable and extreme
conditions
open space is key to helping ensure water available
Maintain and encourage woodland cover
via new development
Biomass / District Heating schemes in new sites #
55
good for new development at Hemel
-
Link areas together to increase biodiversity #
3. Are there any locations where you think we should encourage
renewable energy generation? If so, what type(s) of renewable
energy are suitable?
Answers
2 issues
a) Retrofitting at local level
b) Big commercial enterprises
We need to do both #
Old Cement works at Pitstone
Windfarms – problems due to visual impact on AONB and insufficient
wind
Good “feed in” tariff would encourage generation
Micro-generation can have implications in terms of its visual impact
Solar panels are ok if they fit in with character of area / building
Need to ensure people have the information to make rational decisions
Ground source heat pumps
installed #
are good as they are invisible once
Need to help community centre and village halls to use sustainable
fuels #
Leadership by the district #
Rainwater harvesting
Biomass
Coppiced woods
Support local people who want to be self-sustaining
56
Group 4
Local Facilities
1. Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the rural
areas? If so, what are these shortages and where?
Answers
Yes
-
Post Offices #
Buses – getting to doctors #
Hospital – reasonable access (distance and transport)
Fire station
Policing #
Drain cleaning
Repairs to (all) rural roads
Reliable electric and gas supply
Parking (2+ car household)
Mains drainage
Community gathering area (sport and leisure)
Defence of local pubs / shops
Schools over-subscribed – and first choice availability and
transport
Doctors, dentist and surgeries (transport to)
Graveyard (Chipperfield)
Always need a Church (and Church Hall)
Facilities for children
Parish Councils with more power
2. Are the needs of children, young people and the elderly being met?
If not, how can we better accommodate their needs?
Answers
Needs of elderly not being met
-
Those with cars can cope, those without cars have problems
Post Offices
Lack affordable accommodation
Access to Bank / Post Office / services
Need to have a community focal point
Sheltered/Warden Assisted Accommodation – which can
release housing for families etc.
More bungalows – accessible housing
Need shop
Young people
57
Need more starter homes / affordable accommodation #
Somewhere to meet and something to do
transport to get to other facilities / friends
-
Ideally a village will have
-
Pubs
Churches
Schools
Village Greens
Village Hall
Cricket Pitch/Sports Facilities
Awareness of historic assoc./canal/common etc.
Individual character
Style and location
58
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Renewable energy
Face the fact of climate change and plan for it – woodland management,
water, harvesting, transport, etc. No Heads in the Sand!
Protect greenfield sites
Value the countryside and protect it
Conservation and enhancement of the Chilterns AONB
Method of favouring affordable housing in rural villages
Landscape conservation without comprising areas outside key areas
Managed diversification of farmland to maintain the rural landscape
Take into account historic (heritage) assets which are essential to
distinctive local character
Green Belt – Protect to maintain separation function
- Enhance its value and promote them e.g. access
Strengthen importance and protection of AONB – valuable resource for
everyone in Dacorum. 17,000 new homes will put it under severe
pressure.
Protection of rural shops, pubs, Post Offices, ability of elderly to access
hospitals etc.
Conserve nature and extent of existing AONB
Support and encourage compatible, harmonious low cost housing
development in villages
Prevent sale of Green Belt land in plots
Create amenity land from brownfield sites
Vision for the Gade Valley
Support of farming for local food production
Deliver affordable housing (with others)
Consultation
Better access to healthcare and other essential facilities from villages
Keeping rural areas rural – keeping character of areas
Do not bypass Parish Councils
Increase awareness and protection of historic designed landscapes and
avoid incursions into these and other landscapes from building or other
development
Prevent erosion of village life – increase priorities (financial support) e.g.
loss of Post Offices, loss of buses
The Council must „opt in‟ to the new sustainable Communities Act
processes, when invited to do so in October.
Rented accommodation in villages to encourage young people to stay
Leadership re climate change and alternative heating
Local provision of agricultural and forestry infrastructure
Encouragement of rural businesses
Encouragement of micro-schemes of affordable houses
59
District heating schemes for new developments – using bio-fuels/ground
source heat.
Rural housing relevant to local need
Priority 2
Climate change and food - crops
Keep housing/other building development sympathetic to the existing
environment (ref. South Hill Church site)
Small appropriately sited amounts of affordable rural housing
Restrict density of any new dwellings
Sheltered housing
Rural exceptions housing sites – local houses for local people
Landscape – better protection for landscape outside AONB
- stronger planning guidance in landscape assessment SPG
Support and encourage rural (social) enterprises that feed the local
economy and community i.e. local accommodation for visitors, etc.
Keep green urban space in villages
Assessment of the potential of the rural/urban fringe
Recognise relationships between land use, infrastructure and biodiversity
and landscape
View applications separately in AONB with presumption against approval
Transport infrastructure to small villages
Encourage small scale, well designed and well integrated affordable
housing (for young, old, key workers)
Affordable housing with public transport links
Provision of more suitable housing for the elderly in rural areas
All new builds from now on must be energy self sufficient
Educate and inform the public of their responsibilities when accessing the
rural areas
Provide (encourage) alternative means of access to the countryside
(buses/cycles, visitor accommodation)
Preserve identity of villages
Encourage the development of low cost housing
Enforce your planning policies and decisions more effectively so there is a
level playing field
Sustainability e.g. developing woodlands/plantings for sustainable funds
Refine Green Infrastructure / Open Land work identifying opportunities for
enhanced links and buffers
Identify key Vistas
Maintain Green Belt and limit incursions into It with housing and therefore
avoid linking up towns and villages
Priority 3
Prevent urban sprawl and linking of villages
Build homes that people choose to live in rather than accept because they
have no alternative
60
Maintain diversity of countryside and recognise role of farming / land
management
Don‟t build without the infrastructure to support it
Consider all issues raised and integrate them into Council thinking
Biodiversity
- Better management of area
- Better linkages
- Increase overall area of higher biodiversity
Education of local communities to countryside issues
Local development prioritised if providing employment / housing /
opportunities for local people (not just families)
Tying all the new and old strategies together rather than re-investigating
Rural transport and infrastructure
Avoid urban creep and creep of equestrian and other development in the
countryside
Promotion of areas other than Ashridge
Canal and towpath as wildlife and cycling corridor
Support the agricultural economy when possible – they are the managers
of the countryside
Encouraging biodiversity in the countryside must always be a priority
Help to main schools, churches, sports facilities in rural areas
Young people – bored need transport to activity areas
Rural transport study for modal shift
More leisure activities promoted and sited in villages
Protect vistas and improve river valleys
Control of new developments
Educate people as to how/why countryside works (involve schools etc.)
Protect countryside & promote enhancement and wildlife
Priority 4
Preservation of biodiversity
Maintain higher quality landscapes and recognise role of less strictly
managed land
General consideration for rural enterprises – diversification is key but
should be appropriate
Prosecute those who drop litter in the countryside
Accommodation – bungalows and maisonettes
Support and enable individuals/landowners to adopt sustainable options –
energy, transport, community sharing
Identify key landscape character areas
Preserve village boundaries
Use Chilterns AONB as an example of good practice and use their studies
as a basis for your policy
Listen to the parishes and the organisations involved with the countryside
Balance between preservation and requirements for visitors
Continue feedback on developments to delegates
AONBs must be preserved
Support of farmers market
61
Work with partners to secure external funding for Green Infrastructure
developments
Balance biodiversity with people – people need green habitats (e.g. sports
fields) too.
Protect the Green Belt rural industries
Preserve, promote and educate about our rural sites – walks, etc.
Affordable housing - find mechanisms for provision that is not tied to
market housing provision
Allowing villages to be all age places
Priority 5
Keep all of us in the loop involved
Recreation - promote health benefits and therefore give greater value
- promote access in area close to towns
Woodland management needs to be done alongside industry/supply
needs to develop sustainable woodland economy for rural areas
Water use
Rural Area needs to grow organically not by allowing development of a
scale out of proportion to the size of the village
Encourage responsible use of our countryside
Thanks for listening to Parish Councils
Hospital and transport
Promising amenity green-space in and around settlements
Use brownfield sites whenever possible to prevent encroachment into the
countryside
Keep schools and nursery provision in the rural areas
Public open space linked to villages and smaller settlements
The Council must show leadership in promoting sustainable communities
Look innovatively at urban fringes
Set up (encourage) local forum for countryside issues
62
Analysis of Priorities
The following table groups the key priorities according to what was written on
the priority boards at the end of the workshop. The number of times an issue
was raised on each priority board is shown in the table above and each issue is
then given a total score.
The table highlights that most people felt that providing affordable housing of
an appropriate type and size for the area was the top issue affecting the
countryside.
Support for rural businesses, including farmers was the second priority. The
need to protect and enhance the AONB and the provision of, and access to,
rural facilities and services also scored highly.
Table 1: Summary of Priorities
Issue
Affordable housing of appropriate
type and size for the area
Support
for
rural
businesses,
including farmers
Provision of, and access to, rural
facilities and services
Protect and enhance the AONB
Maintain character of rural landscape
Maintain
and
enhance
public
engagement
and
consultation
processes
Provide for needs of young and/or
elderly
Protection of the Green Belt
Support, educate and inform the
public and landowners about rural
issues
Encourage renewable energy
Address the issue of climate change
Ensure
adequacy
of
rural
infrastructure provision (including
public transport)
Protect local character
Prioritise use of brownfield sites
Protect
and
enhance
historic
heritage
Protect and enhance existing
greenspaces
Value
the
countryside
and
encourage responsible use
Control density and scale of new
development
Protect and enhance biodiversity
Priority
1
6x5
Priority
2
6x4
Priority
3
1x3
Priority
4
2x2
Priority
5
-
Total
Score*
61
4x5
1x4
1x3
3x2
1x1
34
3x5
1x4
1x3
-
2x1
24
3x5
1x5
2x5
1x4
1x4
-
2x3
-
1x2
2x2
2x2
3x1
21
19
17
-
1x4
3x3
1x2
-
15
2x5
-
1x4
1x4
2x3
2x2
-
14
14
2x5
2x5
-
1x4
1x4
1x4
3x3
-
-
14
14
13
1x5
2x5
2x5
2x4
-
-
-
1x1
-
13
11
10
-
2x4
-
-
1x1
9
1x5
-
1x3
-
1x1
9
-
1x4
1x3
-
1x1
8
-
-
2x3
1x2
-
8
63
Identify and protect key vistas
Enhance the rural / urban fringe
Enforcement
Leadership of Council and promotion
of good practice
Develop a vision for the Gade Valley
Support
the
new
Sustainable
Communities Act
Balance conflicting needs and
demand
i.e.
biodiversity
and
recreation
Prevent merging of settlements
Recognise the inter-relationship of
landscape, land use and biodiversity
Sustainability
Link existing strategies together
Promote sites other than Ashridge
Promotion of canals and rivers for
wildlife
Green Infrastructure
Water Use
*
-
1x4
1x4
1x4
-
1x3
1x3
1x2
1x2
2x1
1x1
7
6
6
6
1x5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
2x2
1x1
5
-
1x4
1x3
-
1x2
-
-
5
4
-
1x4
-
1x3
1x3
1x3
-
-
4
3
3
3
-
-
-
1x2
-
1x1
2
1
Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5
points are given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority
board 2, 3 points for each time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4
and 1 point for each time it was on Priority board 5.
64
Other Comments
The following two points were placed on the „Park It‟ board:
Nobody mentioned the issue of TRANQUILLITY and the need to protect
„good‟ areas from more visual and audible intrusion.
Please keep workshops focussed.
65
List of Attendees
Alison MacDougall
Mrs Sylvia Fitzwilliam
Victoria Hopkirk
Norman Jones
Councillor Mike
Bradshaw
Vivian Adams
Louise Archer
Abby Fermont
Matthew Wood
Elizabeth Hamilton
Lizzy Savage
Colin White
Kate Batt
Fiona McWilliams
Andy Hardstaff
Carol Lodge
Mick Thompson
Pamela Esom
Councillor David
Davies
Francoise Culverhouse
Dawn Slade
John Hunt
Emma Norrington
Mrs Gill Moon
Phil Pennington
Kate Harwood
Anna Barnard
Matthew Mardling
Jez Perkins
Mark Staincliffe
Councillor Louise
Archer
Councillor Alan
Fantham
Councillor Colin Peter
Nicholas Halsey
Martin Hicks
Ian Richardson
Fiona McWilliams
Marion Baker
Nettleden, Frithsden and District Society
National Womens Register
Piccotts End Residents‟ Association
Hertfordshire County Council
Chipperfield Parish Council
Tring Rural Parish Council
Hertfordshire County Council - Property
Nettleden, Frithsden and District Society
Dacorum Borough Council – Environment &
Sustainability Officer
Chilterns Conservation Board
Hertfordshire County Council – Historic Environment
Little Gaddesden Parish Council
Hertfordshire Countryside Management Service
Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust
Ashridge Management College
Flaunden Parish Council
Piccotts End Residents‟ Association
Tring Rural Parish Council
Hertfordshire County Council
Groundwork Trust
St Johns Church, Great Gaddesden
Boxmoor Trust
Ashridge Management College
Potten End
Hertfordshire Countryside Management Service
Hertfordshire Countryside Management Service
Development Management – Dacorum Borough
Council
Little Gaddesden Parish Council
Northchurch Parish Council & Dacorum Borough
Council
Dacorum Borough Council
Country Land and Business Association
Hertfordshire Biological Records Centre
Boxmoor Trust
Little Gaddesden Parish Council
Dacorum Environmental Forum
66
4. Hemel Hempstead
Place Workshop
Held: 4th December 2008
67
Contents
Page
Introduction
69
Group Session 1 - Your People
70
Group Session 2 - Your Place
77
Group Session 3 – Growth of Hemel Hempstead
83
Visioning Priorities
92
Analysis of Priorities
98
Other Comments
102
List of Attendees
103
68
Introduction
There was an initial presentation setting the context for planning in Hemel
Hempstead, which was followed by 3 group sessions covering the topics
„Your People‟, „Your Place‟, and „Growth in Hemel Hempstead‟. Each of these
group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the questions
could be discussed within an allotted time the participants were split into 8
groups answering relevant topics. The first group session was split as follows:
Groups 1 & 5 covered Question 1 & 2; Groups 2 & 6 covered Questions 3 & 4;
Group 3 & 7 covered Questions 5 & 6; and Groups 4 & 8 Questions 7 & 8.
During the second session people moved round in order that skill and
knowledge were applied to relevant topics. The second group session was
split as follows: Groups 1 & 5 covered Question 1; Groups 2 & 6 covered
Questions 2; Groups 3 & 7 covered Questions 3 & 4; and Groups 4 & 8
Questions 5 & 6. All of the groups remained the same for the final group
session, where each group answered the same question about the growth of
Hemel Hempstead.
After the participants had answered their questions, the groups had to
determine and identify the most important responses made (the hash mark #
highlights an important issue). A nominated person or the facilitator from each
group recounted the question and the most important issues to all of the
participants in the room. The other groups were then given an opportunity to
add any further responses. The responses that were given by the workshop
participants are given in Sections 3 to 5 of this report. Answers to the
questions have been collated and noted underneath relevant questions (and
will therefore include more than one groups‟ answers), apart from answers
given to Group Session 3, Questions 1 (b) and 3, (1) and (2). Answers to
these questions are shown per workshop group to help with the analysis of
the answers given.
Workshop participants were also asked to write their top 5 priorities for the
Borough on „post it‟ notes and then to place them on the Priority Boards 1 to
5, Priority 1 being the highest. These are identified under „Visioning Priorities‟.
An „Analysis of Priorities‟ attributes points according to a sliding scale of
points for each priority i.e. 5 points for priority 1, down to 1 point for priority 5.
Any other comments made during the event were listed on the „Park It‟ boards
and are reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
69
Group Session 1 - People
Groups 1 & 5 - Existing Issues 1
Q1A) What problems do you think your town has with crime or antisocial behaviour?
Answers
Perception is worse than reality
Hemel Hempstead town centre is not as bad as Watford
Open space (Boxmoor, Apsley Church) is often a place where youngsters
meet up
Leisureworld is not a problem, as it provides youth with entertainment or
somewhere to go
Criminal damage
Vandalism – may be helped by if various services were linked together –
youth clubs, children‟s centres, pre-schools,etc.
Most is caused by „youngsters‟ – and this could be attributed to „parenting‟
issues
Grovehill/Highfield local shopping areas are the most deprived areas in the
Borough and houses a significant proportion of single parents
Litter in neighbourhood centres
Stone throwing at cars
Schools work closely with Police at primary schools – does this continue at
secondary school level? It needs to.
Litter from Sainsburys around Sainsburys, Apsley and the canal area
Graffiti is not such a big issue for schools or buses in this area
Big issue with drugs
Disaffected youths – problem is lots of facilities available but there is a lack
of will to use them i.e. adventure playgrounds
Some facilities for youths have problems with youths intimidating other
youths
Q1B) How can these be improved upon?
Answers
Need to focus on:
Youngster and related issues
Parenting
Various services working together e.g. children‟s centres and pre-school
CCTV monitoring at Skate park and other areas
Developer contributions could fund CCTV
Linking up services
Housing Associations need to work closely with Police to address issues
Issues in Woodhall Farm relate to Gypsy & Travellers, some criminal
activity and intimidation has been experienced.
Additional sites in the Woodhall Farm area will exacerbate problems
Less educationally orientated after school care/facilities provision would be
better – most youth facilities like guides or scouts are too educational and
70
do not appeal to young people.
Parents must be held responsible for their children‟s actions.
Q2)
What key social and community facilities/services are we deficient
in and where?
Answers
Centralising/co-ordinating CCTV
Health – Watford hospital is too close to football ground so when Watford
Football club play it‟s hard to get to
When the growth takes place, match housing with new social and
community facilities
Hard to influence the types of facilities brought forward – more community
involvement is needed.
Joined up working with regards to different community facilities instead of
similar range in every neighbourhood.
Youth workers are required in community facilities to provide guidance
and interaction
For new areas: sufficient range of community buildings i.e. community
hall, school, park etc
Post Offices are closing in some areas
Linking services to new areas – gives a sense of belonging and a sense of
community
Generally good sports facilities, however outdoor swimming pool opening
hours need extending
Woodhall Farm – Community Centre Full, no other facilities. “Needs a
heart” in terms of facilities. Adults need support too – as root cause of
problems.
Hospital provision
Faith groups need a „shared space‟ – not a Church
) Town Centre
- open to all to use ) Community space
to replace Pavilion
No faith groups have a big enough space at the moment
Public transport is the key to accessing facilities – co-ordinate buses and
trains - need to keep all key routes
Groups 2 & 6 - Existing Issues 2
Q3A) What problems do local businesses and services face?
Answers
Overloaded water and transport infrastructure in Hemel Hempstead which
has a knock on effect to businesses
We need a better roads and road linkages in Hemel Hempstead
Limited public transport
M1/M25 complex commuting and road system – problems locally around
Maylands
Retail regeneration changes are needed
Sports facilities are needed
71
People, who have short journeys to work, still drive to work!
Encourage businesses to the area which are appropriate to local
employment needs.
Remember „green agenda‟
Local supply of labour for business expansion is required
Skills required should be linked to the education agenda
Health – Hospital provision is needed (polyclinic not general hospital)
Q3B) How can we help address these issues?
Answers
Congestion – Access and new roads should be built into development,
and accommodate different types of transport; also suitable for emergency
vehicles
Consider identity of the town in the long term – i.e. is it industrial,
residential etc.
Maybe we could target economic sector in neighbourhood development
and plan to make multi-use community centre facilities available to
schools.
Anticipate social needs and infrastructure – whole picture of the settlement
as a location – i.e. congestion, local landscape, retail etc. housing quality
and costs
Deliver a much better quality of life for residents of Hemel Hempstead
Car parks are too congested at local shopping centres and are therefore
not as accessible as they could be.
Commitment to retention of local shops following expansion and
development
Plan for library expansion including local neighbourhood facilities
Linked local facilities
Roads – widen Redbourn Road
Northern Bypass – No! loss of green belt
- Improve public transport and links
- Need hospital – A & E facility. This facility must be
accessible
Do our views actually matter?
We need a culture change – get out of cars use: Park and Ride, green
travel network, address illegal parking on green space
Strong neighbourhood/town centres
Maternity care
Understand more about what people want and the real issues – what are
the options? – Do we know enough?
Further education provision
Area based/needs based support in local area is required
Q4 A) Are there sufficient indoor and outdoor sports facilities and or
open space?
Q4B) If not, where and how can we help address these issues?
72
Answers
A) and B)
More green space is required, especially in Hemel Hempstead town
centre, Maylands Business Park and Apsley.
Need to improve Nickey Line to link to other green spaces old and new.
Netball facilities for adults – maybe use of school facilities out of hours
All weather pitches
Private schools need to share facilities
Make all facilities accessible such as footpaths and cycle tracks
Potential loss of playing fields
Expansion of schools may result in loss of onsite pitch provision, which is
not ideal – need to ensure school facilities benefit the whole community
i.e. swimming pools, sports halls and playing fields
Concern about density increase creating a lack of social cohesion
Is green space promoted on site?
Need quality youth facilities
Green space needs to be planned into expansion
Allotments are needed
Groups 3 & 7 - Future Housing Issues
Q5 - Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the town?
Answers
There is a very high demand for additional rented social housing #
It is important to recognise the need for people to have a choice. In
addition people also need accommodation for visitors and family to stay.
The needs of homeless must not be overlooked.
There is a need for some form of intermediate housing and provision for
key workers e.g. shared ownership.
Some housing with shared communal facilities is needed. For example
„cluster flats‟.
Should investigate the scope for house and flat sharing.
More houses needed rather than flats.
More terraces with small gardens are required.
Cheaper, more affordable market housing is desperately needed #
Ground floor flats should have gardens. Top floor flats should have roof
gardens.
Q6 - We are required by Government to provide sites for Gypsies and
Travellers within the area. Some possible locations for sites have
been put forward by consultants. These were all considered to
meet a set of key criteria2
73
(a)
Which of these options do you prefer?
Answers



(b)
Any site should not be located at the entrances to the town.
Should not consider SA20 and SA21 or D1 and D2.
SA16 is near an under-subscribed secondary school
Are there any other sites either within or on the edge of the town
that we should consider instead?
Answers
No comments
Groups 4 & 8 - Future needs of People
Q7A) What do you think are the future needs of children, teenagers,
families and the elderly for Education, Health, Culture and
Religion?
Answers
Safe areas to play
Neighbourhood scale of growth is easier to plan for (needing a minimum of
1,000 dwellings for a new primary school)
It brings other facilities – health, community centre, and they are easier to
fund, because for example there would be a critical mass of local charges
raised through s.106 agreements.
An overall strategy is needed for phased infrastructure delivery, alongside
housing
For the elderly the level of care needs improvement. There is a concern
over the continuity of care between organisations
Open space (undeveloped)
Healthy lifestyles – sport and recreation
Access to services they want
Joint working – all services
Theatre/concert hall – bring in new things
Adequate pre-school provision
Facilities for teenagers (12 – 18 years) at reasonable price
A range of educational provision – vocational small secondary schools
Provision of services during school holidays
Given the means to live more sustainably – make it easier for people
Q7B) How can these be addressed?
Answers
Provision of education – primary schools and secondary schools, pre
school parenting advice and networks
Heart of town belonging to a community, not just shops
Addition of structural architectural interest
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Better integration of Old Town and New Town centre
More sustainable employment
No more cheap shops – investment brings more affluence to Hemel
Hempstead and better shops
Q8A) How can you or town development help us respond to issues of
climate change?
Answers
DBC should extend recycling to commercial (i.e. non-domestic) waste.
The group noted that DBC was responsible for collection, but HCC was
the waste authority. The initial priority should be given to collections from
schools, because of the link to education.
By recycling/managing construction “waste”
Modular construction techniques can use sustainable recyclable materials
Buildings (including schools) need to be more energy efficient – not just
legal requirements – be more aspirational “greenest town in ……..”
Thermal insulation initiatives should be pushed more
Attract high tech industries – innovative solutions
Trams – could be serviceable along roads with steep hills to the town
centre
Emphasis on long life of goods and repair – favouring industry that
replicates this
Buildings – long life, materials
Waterhouse Square – opportunity for leadership on climate change issues
and renewables
Policies adopted to encourage people to be green e.g. Park & Ride,
Schools., GPs
More space for allotments
Accessibility of places that people need to go to
Transport provision to Watford Hospital
Tree planting – shade (not summers)
Cooling of buildings (not air conditioning)
Warmer evenings – people more active at this time, open space provision
Q8B) Are there any locations where you think we should encourage
renewable energy generation?
Answers
Consider incineration and renewable energy generation (combined heat
and power) when planning new neighbourhoods and with the regeneration
of employment areas
Note that a critical mass is in important for incineration of non-recyclable
waste. HCC is likely to be looking for 1 facility in the county
A new hospital is to be planned – a great opportunity for PCT to be “green”
as well as looking after health.
The HCC Waste Strategy has areas of for search for waste transfer areas
in the west and east of the country, with a centrally located incinerator for
Hertfordshire as a whole
Building appropriate technologies in all plans
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Ground source heat pumps under landscaped areas of Council
offices/flats
Neighbourhood schemes e.g. community energy recovery from waste,
new neighbourhoods should be self sufficient
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4.
Group Session 2 - Place
Groups 1 & 5 - Town Centre
Q1A) We have prepared some draft policies for the town centre (your
facilitator will show you a summary of these). In light of these
policies, how else can the town centre be improved?
Answers
Enhance river and green corridor running through Town and out either end
Must join up the different areas of redevelopment/improvement
Reversing the view of building on Waterhouse Street looking over the
Water Gardens.
Town centre at moment is disjointed – we want it to have more specific
areas with identities and for them to be joined up
We have an opportunity to develop the gateways, and get rid of the current
windswept feel
Vision for HH centre must be a realistic goal to work towards and be in line
with the overall vision for Hemel as a whole
Welwyn Garden City has a really good feel to it and has stood the test of
time – is always vibrant without being packed. We should try and make
Hemel town centre have similar qualities
Norwich also good e.g. of mix old and new
Disabled access – bus services – to bus stops. Parking issues at
Waterhouse St. – bus access, need to have bus access to town centre
Create a welcoming and safe town centre in evenings
Mixed use buildings
Integration between 3 areas
Q1B) What and where are the key features to be preserved or
enhanced?
Answers
Heritage – lots of listed buildings that should be preserved
Difficult to maintain Old Town and people to use it
Marlowes and Riverside have taken focus away from Old Town
Hard to balance – helping the town remain distinctive and attracting the big
name retailers
We should maximise opportunities for sustainable development through:
SUDS and electric car charging points
View of Gadebridge Park and Church spire from Marlowes
Integrate Old Town into new development improvements to Queensway –
re-enhance listed buildings – currently town centre not obvious
Better pedestrian access between Old Town and Marlowes
Transport option to and from one end of town to other – shoppers‟ train?
bicycle
Pavilion is missed
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Good public houses to be achieved
Exemplar green town status to be achieved
Q1C) How can this be achieved?
Answers
Choice of shopping is key attraction
Integration of public transport is a key factor, as is owning a car
Town centre has to be a place people want use from 9-8 not just 9-5
Get vehicles out of the town centre
Need better public transport from neighbourhoods close to the town centre
as people won‟t walk both ways due to the hills
Need to link train station with town centre and Maylands
Home zones – shared space for cars and pedestrians – would make town
more pedestrian friendly and allow vehicles to use town centre
If strip of land on east of HH comes forward – Brent Cross or Milton
Keynes direction – then residential development along here may
encourage new shoppers into Hemel Hempstead town centre
SUDS should be used as much as possible to provide water to use for
watering/grey water uses
Safe, properly managed, well lit town centre
Improve parking – parking obscures views currently
Better access from train station to town centre and enhance station
Maylands employees travel into town, so improve facilities and public
transport in Maylands area
Groups 2 & 6 - Neighbourhoods
Q2A) What are the key features to be preserved or enhanced in our
neighbourhoods?
Answers
Sustainable pattern of development – don‟t need to drive
Post Office (loss of!)
Local shops (retention)
Need for public transport links
Good play facilities (regular maintenance) – quality of play space, quality
of equipment – not maintained
Maintain open space – well used and self policing
Diversity of housing – not as many flats, mix of housing important
Local shops
no more closures
having to walk further
breaks up community
Community facilities – managing building space and activities and
resources
Ensure built environment promotes a sense of community
Churches could have wider “multi-cultural” role – shared i.e. attached to
community centre in Grovehill. Sense of community is vital. Could include
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local Police presence to counteract with anti social behaviour
Local shopping facilities help create a community “Heart” they need to be
walkable (rather than having to drive to larger shops and fight for parking.
Post Office is a very important local facility.
Noticeboards to advertise local activities exist, but need to be more
obvious
Smaller scale parks – we should not concentrate on providing larger areas
such as adventure play facilities. Play spaces need to be: easy for all to
walk to, well maintained (maintenance is an issue that needs addressing).
Consider locking spaces at night to reduce problems.
Children‟s play areas and open space for informal use are important
Make neighbourhood centres more attractive i.e. more greenery and less
„harsh‟ in appearance
Signage is generally poor and could be improved
Publicity for neighbourhood facilities is often poor. Need to advertise
better
Need to encourage walking but also address dangerous parking and
accessibility conditions i.e. queues into Chaulden shops
Q2B) How could neighbourhoods be improved and made more
attractive?
Answers
Providing youth/elderly facilities
Flexible community facilities
Cost issues of facilities
Facilities are underused and need more promotion
Personal management and involvement in decision making
Promoting a sense of community
Provision of cemetery space – no bus service to the cemetery
Community leaders needed
Public transport – subsidy important, frequent service and cost!
Maintenance of play equipment
Getting children involved in projects and delivering new facilities – local
ownership
Lower rents in local shops to deliver more affordable produce/services in
local centres
Problems replacing closed Post Offices
Churches are well used i.e. Adeyfield Church
Flexible church space
Additional church/place of worship needed in neighbourhoods
Make more attractive – greenery esp. tree planting – need to look at
“greening” the environment in the context of climate change (shading, i.e.
importance of species, choice of tree etc.)
Higher density development around local centres would help encourage
walking etc.
Gateways to town need to be better landscaped
Signs directing people to local shopping centres need to be better
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Ensure town centre shops complement local centre provision i.e. make
sure town centre has space to provide key shops
Encourage people to shop locally
Library – small scale ones in all neighbourhoods
Good case study is in Japan where people have to register their cars in
order to park. This helps reduce parking problems
Groups 3 & 7 - GEAs – Maylands Business Park, Paradise and
Two Waters & Apsley
Q3A) There is currently a spread of employment areas in Hemel
Hempstead. Should we retain a spread of employment areas?
Answers
The type of business that goes into employment areas is important and
can have an impact on the land requirements. For example. Larger
storage areas can replace a precious high employment use.
Should look to retain a spread of „pockets‟ of employment around the town
but accommodate large developments at a single location (Maylands).
Q3B) For those that are retained how could they be improved or
enhanced?
Answers
Office and retail developments should be closer to where people live.
Public transport needs to be improved to employment areas.
Make employment areas more attractive.
Provide leisure and social facilities.
Q4A) Maylands Business Park has been suggested as an area for
additional future expansion. Do you agree with this?
Answers
There needs to be control over the types of businesses to be attracted #
Need to improve the centre of Maylands making it more attractive to users.
Need to consider the effect of Buncefield on the expansion of Maylands.
Should look to expand to the east (towards the M1) if we are looking to
provide a prestigious hub.
Should include Breakspear Park and the Gateway in any expansion.
Need regular, local bus services that are aligned to businesses‟ work times
(especially in the evening) #
Need to improve the network of green foot/cycle ways #
Should look to install good design and landscaping principles. Small
details make a difference #
Q4B) If not where else could be considered?
No comments given.
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Groups 4 & 8 - Open Space
Q5)
What are the key features of open space to be preserved or
enhanced (open space includes: parks, gardens, amenity green
space, green corridors, cycle paths, outdoor sports facilities and
play areas, allotments, cemeteries and churchyards)?
Answers
New woodlands/trees should replace lost woodlands/trees
Keep all of the open space
Buffer zone to surround expansion containing woodland/green space and
protected by a charitable trust
Bunkers Park to be protected
Featherbed Lane site not to be developed
Protect (Home Wood and land adjoining) and expand the green corridor
following Two Water/Boxmoor/Apsley
Maintain permeability through the town and along green corridors, interlinking existing and new parks
Enhance existing green space and ensure new development has new high
quality green space to support new residents
Stress importance of Gade Valley and Bulbourne Valley
Maintain green street scene with verges and trees etc.
Preserve nature corridors
Preserve and invest waterways/towpaths, Grand Union Canal and rivers
and wetlands
Value amenity green space within housing areas and community
Appropriate use of green space
Make Jarman Park more attractive
Green space should include planting
Bio-diversity
Q6A) How could open space be improved and made more attractive?
Answers
ensure accessibility i.e. public transport
avoid suburban clutter on boundaries to countryside and views
manage green space (dog waste) (litter) to ensure multi-functionality
move with the times – review suitability, community preference and need
give variety and diversify
Preserve access to high quality countryside (avoid suburban clutter)
Q6B) Is additional open space needed? If yes where?
Answers
New green space needs to be retained in proportion to new building
Dog walking and footpaths
Churchyards
Allotments
Outdoor sports space
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Need to make pathways “safe”
Place to “escape”
Diverse open space
Additional open space proportional to development
Make the most of the footpaths
Allotments - do we have sufficient?
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Group Session 3 - Growth of Hemel Hempstead
All groups - growth strategy question
Three ideas for strategies for the growth of Hemel Hempstead are
going to be discussed today. The comments that are made during the
workshop will help to develop our thinking for growth strategy options.
Participants were advised that the finalised options would be consulted
on publicly during summer 2009.
Q1A) During the presentation on growth you were shown 3 strategies
for growth: Eastern, Northern and Dispersed. What are the
advantages for each of the strategies, and why?
Figure 1 - The Dispersed Option with site reference table below
Site Ref.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 (a+b)
11
12 (a+b)
13
14 (a+b+c)
Location
Bunkers Park
Nash Mills
Shendish
Felden
Boxmoor
Pouchen End
Gadebridge North
Old Town
Marchmont Farm
Grovehill and Woodhall Farm
Holtsmere End
Wood End Farm
Breakspear Way
Leverstock Green
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Figure 2 - The Northern and Eastern Options
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Answers (refer to Figures 1 and 2)
Eastern option
Advantages:
 There are good opportunities to extend Bunkers Park and develop green
lungs.
 There is excellent access to areas of employment.
 Good road access.
 All options need to be „self-sufficient‟.
 Location for reserve site for secondary school – would fit with Eastern
option
 School would fit with Eastern option
 Needs solution, could focus efforts on one area
 Larger – better shopping facilities
 More flexibility for school provision - could deliver all needs on one site
 Flat area
 Accessible to motorways
 Accessible to employment
 District heating for employment and residential area
 Increases land area of Buncefield
 Eastern option – communications linked to employment zone are good
 More funding for infrastructure
 Better served neighbourhood centres - multipurpose
 Ability to design direct public transport
 New neighbourhoods – so opportunities for place shaping
 Short journey to work in Maylands
 Preferred to Northern Option because: Huge cost of northern link
road/bypass mean it would not be viable/realist to provide; and a bypass
would also require a huge green belt area.
 Need to link location of housing and employment to reduce need to travel
etc.
 Several other locations too far from the main employment area, Maylands
 Sites (11 & 12 a + b) are likely to generate less local opposition
 M1 marks a clear boundary for an expanded town
 Sites (10 a + b) are prime farmland – so should be avoided
 Sites (6 + 7) - attractive areas so should be avoided
 The M1 is fast and has good accessibility to Maylands
 Accessible motorway to the north via the M, which is a direct route to
Buncefield and Maylands for business purposes
 East could be attractive option
Disadvantages:
 Accessibility to train station
 Sites (11), (12 a + b) would result in Ml junction problems
 A motorway near residential development may be a problem
 There is likely to be noise from the M1.
 Why long squashed settlements when we could have one new town?
 New transport infrastructure
 Bovingdon Airfield – Develop on it!
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Possibility of favouring it over town centre redevelopment and investment
Noise from M1 – buy good transport links
Presence Buncefield Oil Terminal
Northern option
Advantages:
 Utilises current capacity in local schools.
 Could enhance the area.
 Could introduce more facilities.
 Traffic problems on St. Albans Road
 NE reasonably close to M1, Maylands and existing schools (established
secondary schools)
 NW has a reserve site for school playing fields: NW closer to HH train
station
 Traffic effects varied, but problems on Redbourn Road
 Northern bypass (but we won‟t get it).
 Infrastructure (sewage works network location)
 Too far from trunk road, would damage landscape of high value
 More funding for infrastructure
 Better served neighbourhood centres – multipurpose
 Ability to design direct public transport links
 New neighbourhoods – opportunities for place shaping
Disadvantages:
 There is difficult road access.
 Need to create a new community.
 Ecological constraints exist in the area.
 New transport infrastructure
 Possibility of favouring it over town centre redevelopment and investment
 Bypass opens possibility for new urban boundary
Dispersed option
Advantages:
 Different areas should take the „pain‟ – so prefer a dispersed approach to
sites
 Dispersal option for sustainable – sustainable options
 Would help to „spread the load‟ around the town.
 Can create links to canal.
 Link possibly to existing infrastructure but hard to plan/manage
 Link to M1, Maylands, existing school, but no new infrastructure at
Leverstock Green, Grovehill, Grovehill/Woodhall Farm/Holtsmere
End/Wood End Farm
 Preferred new option NE - (10 a+b), (11) and (12 a+b)
 Lower impact on infrastructure – less costly
 Retain community identify and concept
 Reduces impact on individual communities
 Lower local impact but hard to manage creeping development
 Traffic congestion would be less concentrated
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More deliverable
Disadvantages:
 Dispersed may have a smaller impact but there will be a pressure on bus
services
 More rat running
 Unlikely to support new road building
 Difficult road access to north and west areas.
 Limited utility (water) provision in southern areas.
We want low density development
Some areas have poor access e.g. (10 a+b); other areas have good
access but have already congested routes (12a + b)
(13) would be ideal if Buncefield was not there
(4) would be a low density development as is close to existing low density
Need big blob to get funding for neighbourhood e.g. (12a +b)
(8 & 9) are close to existing infrastructure
Eastern option has good links to M1 but has problems with linking to rest
of town
(3) is a congestion nightmare, especially given manor estate development
Eastern option may lead to the blurring of boundary between HH and St.
Albans: St. Albans is growing towards Hatfield etc.
(6) is possible for development due to existing roads
Worse public transport service than larger areas
Q1B) Which strategy do you prefer and why?
Answers
Group 1
 Cannot pick one
 Explore the option of a new town as opposed to adding on to edge of
Hemel
 (11 & 12a+b) would be quick to deliver and slightly better than others as it
has a road running through it – but it is already congested
Group 2
 Northern or Eastern preferred because of links to M1 and new road
infrastructure required
Group 3
 (First) Eastern, (Second) Dispersed, (Third) Northern – Eastern is
preferred slightly more because of the advantages.
Group 4
 Eastern area is preferred.
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Group 5
 Undecided – both schemes have strong advantages and disadvantages.
Eastern favoured over Northern Option but issues over boundaries.
Northern Option has a better balance with the town centre. The Eastern
Option has transport links but the M1 is a barrier, although this option has
less environmental impacts
Group 6
 Dispersal would ease pressure approach on infrastructure, but not solve
the infrastructure problem
 Look at potential for housing sites south of Bunkers Park?
 Look at gypsy & traveller provision as part of new neighbourhoods in
preference to edge of existing residential areas
 (3), (4), (6), (11), (8), (12b) and part (12a) – preferred sites as part of a
„dispersed growth‟ pattern
Group 7
 Northern option is the least preferred. There are concerns because the
area is so large. There needs to be careful planning of the area.
 Dispersed option has some merit.
Group 8
 Eastern & Bovingdon
Q2
What specific elements of infrastructure are needed to make your
preferred strategy work?
Answers
 Improved roads and access.
 Hospital. Particularly additional maternity facilities.
 More employment.
 More shops.
 More pubs and restaurants.
 Better provision in schools.
 Need better access to „cultural facilities‟. Including links to education and
other authorities in the region.
 Increase library provision.
 Need places of worship particularly a mosque.
 More community centres.
 Improved water supply.
 Drainage
 Social and community facilities associated with neighbourhood principles
 Build infrastructure first, then develop housing
 Get rid of the blobs and have a new town
 (11) is next to Redbourn Road so infrastructure is there, but it is already
very congested so would be made worse
 A northern bypass may contain the town
 Water/power
 Health – access to all hospital facilities
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Fire station
Road capacity – link to M1 – northern and eastern options
SE – bypass to Leverstock Green
Better local road network, although there are constraints to achieving this
Buffer zones to create separate community/communities
Health, education and shopping
Transport in all forms, including “green” transport
Option of small new village, near Redbourn though there are issues about
transport links and the impact of the existing centre (at Redbourn)
Term „village‟ to replace neighbourhood (would give an extra focus to
facilities and the centre)
Good tree planting to screen development
Train link
Employment opportunities
Eastern Option – favoured over Northern option but issues over
boundaries
Northern Option – better balance with town centre
Eastern Option – transport links, M1 barrier, environmental – less impact
Need good linkages to the town centre
Dispersed option does not need huge road infrastructure i.e. bypass
Each neighbourhood needs a „heart‟ i.e. central community facility
Road safety – creation of “home zones” are a very important consideration
Shendish – access over railway is potentially problematic – new bridge is
needed
(11) & (12) – there are issues with M1 junction (already a problem) (11 is
least problematic) for DBC – though not for St Albans due to landscape
quality
(6) has good connections to railway station at Apsley
Need to look at ease of delivery across different administrative boundaries
i.e. St. Albans
Water (sewage)
Transport links to station and centre - tram?
Economic centre
Viable local centre
Community „heart‟
Bovingdon – secondary school, incorporate G & T site, incorporate open
space
Eastern and Bovingdon – sports facilities, country park, Breakspear Park,
new general hospital, old hospital should become a cultural centre
Nickey Line
Transport routes – non car and extended through to the station through
the hospital
Wind farms
Sewage works
New roads and Park & Ride
Water (drinking)
District heating
Social and community facilities
Schools
Local centres
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Q3
Libraries
Health care
Identity – community/neighbourhood
Green space and allotments
We may need to provide more land,
Firstly – to make up the numbers by using one of the smaller
sites, and
Secondly – to meet regional planning demands by using more
of the blue blobs
We therefore need to ask about your priorities:
(1) Which of the smaller sites would you choose to develop first
in order of priority (green blobs)?
Answers
Group 1
 First priority - Green blobs: (8 & 9) – accessibility to Link Road
 Second priority - (4) Concerns low density levels
 Third Priority - (2) Is feasible but would be contentious
Group 2
(8) or (9) - Old Town or Marchmont Farm
Group 3
In listed order:
Old Town/Fletcher Way (part of right hand site)
 (2) Marchmont Farm
 Waterhouse Square
 Sappi – Nash Mills
 Felden
Group 4
 First priority - (9) Resisted but thought inevitable
 Second priority - (2) Assuming green corridor maintained
 Third priority - (4)
 (8) – Never, due to impact on woodland (Howe Grove)
Group 5
 First priority - (4) Bad public transport – buses;
 Second priority - (8 & 9) Favoured (8 more)
Group 6
In listed order:
 (2) Nash Mills – extension of what is being proposed at Sappi graphics
and extension of the Gade Valley.
 (8) Fletcher Way would be a logical extension.
 (9) Grovehill and (4) Felden. There would be no impact on valley side.
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Group 7
 First priority (4), second (8) and third (2)
Group 8
 First priority - (8) Close to Old Town, rejuvenation, Access to Link Road
 (4) good communications, small, no facilities existing
 (2) good communications, Apsley Station, local facilities
 (9) Existing structural road
(2)
Which additional two neighbourhood areas would you choose, in
order of priority (blue blobs)?
Answers
Group 1
 (11 & 12a+b) would be quicker to deliver or new town
Group 2
 Eastern Option – firstly, Holtsmere End – secondly, (10a+b) – Woodhall
Farm, Grovehill
 North East Option – Leverstock Green (14a +b)
Group 3
 (3 & 11)
 Not Shendish because Apsley has had a lot of development already.
Unless there is a link to Manor Estate.
Group 4
 First priority - (6) Transport – Station
 Second priority - (10b) Local to most development further from Gade
Valley/AONB
Group 5
 (3) close to station, for employment Eastern & (3)
 (14b) Have good public transport links with St. Albans
 Northern + (14) – Transport
 Eastern + (3) + (10) (parts)
Group 6
Did not have enough time to complete
Group 7
 Shendish, (12 a+b) and (11), and possibly (14 a+b+c)
Group 8
No answer
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Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
No northern bypass
Better transport options into town centre
Improve Public Transport – cheaper (prioritise subsidies), better routes
(improve links with neighbourhoods and outer villages, and more services
per route.
Hospital including A&E
Non car transport
Retain and enhance local distinctiveness, which relates to biodiversity,
landscape, the built environment, sense of community, economic
character (i.e. retail, manufacturing etc.)
Social family housing with gardens and suitable community housing for the
elderly.
Dealing sustainably with waste
With increasing population, retention of hospital or a new hospital is a
must.
Town Centre soft play area (came out in consultation with all Children‟s
Centres areas.
Responding to climate change in terms of energy.
Education – no more school closures, any new houses must have
supporting school places or new schools.
Schools (locations/size/facilities).
Development of connecting green areas linked with new town centre.
Responding to climate change in all activities and developments
Development cannot take place near the Old Town – no schools or food
stores.
To provide supporting infrastructure (roads, schools, medical facilities,
water availability before (NOT AFTER) housing availability).
Reconsider whole strategy in favour of building new village/town of
13,000(?) homes plus infrastructure e.g. on land opposite Herts
showground.
Plan for reduction of car use and increased local services and improved
public transport.
Protection of Gade and Bourne River valleys in AONB
Landscape
Design of new localities – careful design around a centre with shop/post
office, pub or equivalent, community hall and faith centre, play area –
Green and junior school.
Protect green corridors and ensure structural build for wildlife in place as
part of development.
A place people are proud to live in.
Take advantage of what is possible now (college?) – don‟t wait and delay
until overall plan is agreed
Minimise adding to traffic congestion on southern side of town – it‟s
already unbearable.
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Look after existing neighbourhoods with a clean and safe agenda.
Improving public transport
Planning of development to facilitate good public transport
Strong, vibrant town centre
Ensure that new development brings recreational/cultural enhancements
to neighbouring (i.e. existing) areas.
Infrastructure (particularly roads are well thought out proactively and not
left to drift as secondary requirements.
A “fine weave” for the town, i.e. not huge big new areas.
Protect Green Belt designations.
Utility services (particularly water and sewage) are not only ensured by the
developer/provider but take into consideration of upgrading current
facilities.
Speed of redevelopment of town centre – Hemel Hempstead needs some
heart and soul.
Provision for places of worship
Lobby Government for them to re-instate full service hospital.
Most new housing at Bovingdon airfield
Take advantage of what‟s possible – build a new college
Hospital not GP surgery
Moving Gypsy & Traveller sites away from Woodhall Farm.
That any development has to be seen to consider the aesthetics of the rest
of the town (valley etc.). This enhances the town and its attractiveness to
new people and businesses.
Seek to develop a well-balanced town re: all functions. I know this is very
general but sometimes developments can „unbalance‟ an area.
Ensuring the right supply of affordable housing, for purchase and rent.
More analysis of growth directions.
Gypsy & Traveller sites should not all be put in Woodhall Farm area, but
spread around fairly.
Priority 2
Protect Local Nature Reserve, wildlife corridors
Be radical about green approach.
Seek to ensure high calibre design in all matters is achieved not the
cheapest but the best.
Lots of affordable housing
No Northern By-pass
Preserve areas of natural beauty such as Ashridge.
“Whatever” and “wherever” local public transport must be included for all
areas – and not only available but must be affordable to the users on a
long term usage customer.
Put new development where it will have least environmental impact.
Hospital, including A&E and maternity.
Investing in sports facilities
Good accident & emergency centre in Hemel Hempstead.
Ensure any new development(s) are “integrated” with the
areas/communities they will border.
93
Old hospital site – new cultural centre.
More growth close to town centre area.
Protect, preserve and improve current green space.
Provision for young people aged12-18.
Providing better subsidised public transport.
Provision of affordable housing.
Realistic infrastructure delivery plan.
Make Hemel Hempstead a happy mix of first generation New Town and
“exemplar” in sustainable urban extensions (use other examples nationally
and internationally).
Responding to climate change in terms of water
Not to over-develop Hemel Hempstead east area.
Improvement of existing road systems
Community spirit.
Green corridors and pathways between residential centres
Old town should be one way (going north).
Include sufficient open space within new development and use as
opportunity to redress quantity deficiencies in wider neighbourhood.
Joined up thinking and finance provision – schools (junior/infant), local
health centre/hospital, post office & shop as community hub.
Restore full hospital with A&E.
Far better policing with more presence in and around neighbourhoods.
Hemel Hempstead really must have its own central police station!
Sustainable design.
Reducing the need to travel from Hemel Hempstead for work, leisure,
shopping etc.
Build complete neighbourhoods.
Special needs care and respite for families integrated into the community.
Youth provision developed for the borough to avoid problems.
Community facilities e.g. for youth and childcare special needs.
Focus on local neighbourhoods and communities and build up form there.
Open spaces/play areas – keep them available and well maintained.
Education/schools – adequate sites re: provision.
Provide more sustainable transport links – especially to railway stations.
Maintain and enhance all green infrastructure – including spaces and
corridors at different levels of resolution.
Provide church/community buildings when planning new „areas‟. – faith
groups are not able to afford land and buildings but could be community
facilities.
Open Space – retain and improve/extend, should be public open space
(parks, allotments, playing fields). Not stadiums.
Go for the easier choices to facilitate progress e.g. willing landowners
rather than compulsory purchase.
Priority 3
„A town for life‟, old peoples homes closed down and replaced by flats.
Redevelopment and enhancement of the canal environment to allow
greater access to the canal from surrounding areas.
94
Enough and good quality doctor surgeries.
Stimulate local employment opportunities
Reduce reliance on private car.
Restriction of car usage.
Keeping grasslands.
Protect green wedges and continuity into open countryside.
Affordable housing – not rented/housing association but for those on
low/middle income.
Put a hold on the expansion until central government accept an expanded
town needs a proper hospital.
Put people at the centre of decisions if difficult options need to be
delivered.
Well designed neighbourhoods.
Protect and enhance all green spaces.
Careful decisions made in Gypsy and Traveller sites.
Breakspear Park – new hospital site.
Transport links.
Innovative new high density housing near to town centre.
Encouraging and working along the “green” agenda.
Providing community services in areas, particularly Woodhall Farm.
Provide more affordable facilities for young children and teenagers.
Look at large scale development, not lots of smaller ones.
Community facilities (including special needs).
Schools (local) – investment in facilities to share with community.
Town centre crèche for under 4‟s while parents shop.
Energy efficiency
Health facilities – children need to be seen quickly in an emergency.
Ensure planning/provision links with Hertfordshire County Council etc. e.g.
around providing community facilities that are fully resourced.
Libraries
Encourage sense of “belonging” and community through parents and local
facilities.
Seek significant contributions to improve existing green spaces as part of
development.
To avoid, where possible, high levels of housing density.
No development along the Gade or the Bourne.
Council houses
Complete review of the road infrastructure to “even out” over busy roads
and repair them properly.
Improve housing mix – no more flats, more small/affordable family houses
with private gardens, more elderly accommodation but not flats, i.e. areas
of bungalows thus retaining independence.
Include green buffer zones between existing and future large
developments.
Ensure development is functional and provides a good quality of life, this
includes environmental and social infrastructure, such as shop, school and
leisure.
Preserve areas of natural beauty i.e. Bunkers Park
95
Inclusive provision
Keep heavy traffic out of town.
Dispersal of sites to ease burden on existing infrastructure.
Priority 4
Provide theatre, cultural centre in town centre.
School provision (high quality)
Promote walking instead of traffic.
Priority for building housing.
Find a new identity for the town centre
Town Centre housing
Necessary improvements to infrastructure to cope with growth.
Provide a better more exciting town centre
More neighbourhood enhancement
Eastern route for housing and accessibility
To prevent overcrowding and too dense housing solutions.
Avoid lopsided „growth‟ and stress importance to easy access to the town
centre and railway station.
Provision of attractive town centre
Existing and new neighbourhoods have real “heart”.
Preserve green open spaces.
Improve and co-ordinate public transport.
„Green lungs‟, easily accessible should be a priority, but include leisure
use – not just open field and not just football.
Sustainable development socially & environmentally.
Care for the elderly facilities
Keep Bunkers Park
Public transport more affordable and more frequent.
Developments should be predominantly houses rather than flats.
Good schools and elderly provision in all new developments.
Re-think how to run community centres.
Plan in opportunities for local people to grow/produce local goods that are
used/sold locally.
Transport and infrastructure, quality and affordable.
Elderly facilities (places to meet etc.); homes for life.
New roads through estates to have significant verges & trees- replicate
character of High Street Green, Leverstock Green etc.
As far as possible preserve Green Belt.
Ensure development itself is of a high standard and quality – give new
communities a sense of pride and interest in Hemel Hempstead.
Enhance open land and green belt areas. Let‟s get Hemel Hempstead
back to being a place to be proud of.
Saving energy
New college on edge of Hemel Hempstead– not an extension. Its own
identity and facilities surrounded by open land.
A greener environment
Improved urban design.
Minimise impact of new development on existing neighbourhoods.
96
Priority 5
Make Hemel Hempstead a more impressive & inviting town.
Health provision
Address the transport issues.
Improve current neighbourhood facilities i.e. police, environment
Provide commonly needed facilities within walking distance of most users.
Promote and put into place all forms of renewable energy.
Locally make a real push for better cycling and walking opportunities and
better access to them in the cause of health, sustainable transport and
leisure & recreation.
Investing in schools.
Consider carefully attracting specific type of new business.
Minimise impact on the Green Belt and re-use of brownfield sites.
All towns (not just Hemel Hempstead) to play their part in delivery of
growth.
Town centre housing
Developments to be as green as possible.
Schools.
Define good quality space. Quality not quantity.
Dacorum or Herts Bank.
Libraries – secure either new sites or contributions to improvements to
existing ones.
Seek to reduce congestion, which may result from increased pressure on
existing transport routes and modes. Encourage innovative transport
solutions for work, shopping and leisure.
Provide for all ages in all areas.
Recycling – from business and schools.
Improved landscaping – not just leftovers.
Better road development to Maylands to avoid congestion in Leverstock
Green.
Think varied housing – not just one-bedroom flats – family homes, elderly
houses (small bungalow with garden) – not high density for profit.
Housing, infrastructure, health, congestion and regeneration.
Local employment.
Sufficient schools to give all pupils the best start, also increase their sense
of belonging to and being proud of their town.
No loss of schools or health facilities – retain these within the urban area.
Resist incremental loss of green space through small-scale developments
around the periphery of existing provision.
Provide direct access to Maylands from motorway slip roads.
Image of Hemel Hempstead to be enhanced, which can be achieved
through good community facilities
Access to and by emergency services.
Early years local education/support that really works for children and their
parents.
Gypsy & Traveller sites – consider existing unofficial sites as well as
brownfield sites – spread out rather than concentrate – not at gateway to
Hemel Hempstead.
97
Analysis of Priorities
The priority summary table below groups the key priorities according to what
was written on the Priority Boards 1 to 5. The number of times an issue was
raised on each priority board is shown in the table above and each issue is
then given a total score.
Table 1 – Analysis of Priorities
Issue
Improve public transport
service,
links
and
affordability
Protect and enhance
existing
wildlife
corridors, greenspaces,
nature reserves, AONB,
SAC and provide joined
up
green
corridors
through the town centre
Provide
suitable
affordable housing for
the demographic range
with a mix of type and
tenure
Sustainable design of
new neighbourhoods –
to include shops, pub
community
hall/faith,
Post Office centre, play
area, green and school
Retention of or new
hospital
with
full
facilities – A&E and
maternity
Provide
supporting
infrastructure alongside
development - including
upgrading existing
Provide
sufficient
accessible open space
to readdress shortfalls
and maintain existing
Responding to climate
change
Planning new schools in
line with growth
No new large areas of
development seek to
develop a balanced
town for all functions
Make HH a place
people are proud to live
in with a „sense of
belonging‟
Provision for young
people in the Borough
Priority
1
6x5
Priority
2
5x4
Priority
3
2x3
Priority
4
4x2
2x5
5x4
5x3
2x2
3x5
2x4
3x3
3x2
3x1
41
1x5
5x4
3x3
1x2
1x1
37
4x5
2x4
1x3
2x1
33
3x5
3x4
1x1
32
2x2
Priority
5
1x1
Total
Score
65
49
28
4x4
2x3
3x2
2x5
1x4
2x3
2x2
1x1
25
2x5
1x4
1x3
2x2
4x1
25
2x5
1x4
1x3
1x2
1x5
1x4
1x3
2x2
3x4
1x3
98
19
2x1
18
15
(12-18)
Strong vibrant town
centre
–
speedy
redevelopment
Improve
existing
neighbourhood facilities
Build a new college
Special needs care and
respite for families
Retain and enhance
local distinctiveness
New Strategy for growth
– new town opposite
Herts showground or
Bovingdon airfield
Move proposed Gypsy
and Traveller sites away
from Woodhall Farm
Protect the Green Belt
Growth close to town
centre
Protection of landscape
No Northern Bypass
Provision for places of
worship
Be radical about green
approach
in
development
Integrate
new
development
with
existing communities
Improve
traffic
congestion in the south
of HH
Finance provision for
necessary infrastructure
and to improve existing
facilities
Seek to ensure high
calibre design
Complete a review of
the road infrastructure
to improve congested
areas and keep heavy
traffic out of town
More analysis of growth
direction
Dealing sustainably with
waste
Town centre soft play
area
No development near
the Old Town
Improve
policing
in
neighbourhoods
Avoid
high
density
housing
Facilitate development
without
compulsory
2x5
1x5
1x3
2x5
2x2
1x1
15
2x2
1x1
13
12
11
1x2
2x4
1x3
2x5
1x1
11
2x5
10
2x5
10
1x5
1x4
2x5
1x5
1x5
1x3
2x2
1x2
1x1
1x1
10
10
10
9
9
1x4
1x4
2x4
1x1
9
8
2x4
1x5
2x1
1x4
7
1x3
1x4
7
6
1x2
6
2x3
1x5
5
1x5
5
1x5
5
1x5
5
1x4
1x1
1x3
1x4
5
1x2
1x1
99
5
5
purchase
Improve the housing
mix – more houses less
flats
Include green buffer
zones between new and
existing
neighbourhoods
New cultural centre at
Hospital site
Seek low environmental
impact
from
new
development
Invest in sports facilities
Old Town High Street
should be one way
(north)
No stadiums
Put people at the centre
of
development
planning
Provision of libraries
Provide
sufficient
doctor‟s surgeries
Restriction of car usage
Hold development until
government addresses
full hospital needs
Consider Gypsy and
Traveller sites carefully
Breakspear Park new
Hospital site
Look at large scale
development not small
scale
dispersed
approach
Town centre crèche for
while parents shop
Ensure
planning
provision links with HCC
Promote
walking,
cycling and to improve
health,
sustainable
transport and leisure
and recreation
Provide theatre/cultural
centre in town centre
Eastern strategy for
housing
and
accessibility
Stimulate
local
employment
opportunities
and
specific businesses
Rethink how to run
community centres
Plan for allotments and
opportunities for people
to sell their goods
1x3
1x2
5
1x3
1x2
5
1x4
4
1x4
4
1x4
1x4
4
4
1x4
1x3
1x1
1x3
1x3
1x1
4
3
1x3
1x3
3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x2
1x1
3
1x2
2
1x2
2
2x1
100
4
4
2
1x2
2
1x2
2
locally
Improve
landscaping
design - new roads to
have significant verges
and trees
Improved urban design
Re-use brownfield sites
All towns to receive a
share of housing growth
Define quality space
Dacorum or Herts Bank
Encourage innovative
transport solutions
Recycling business and
school waste
Better
roads
in
Maylands
Resist incremental loss
of green space through
small
scale
development
Provide direct access to
Maylands from M1 slip
way
Access to and by
emergency services
Early years support for
children and parents
Gypsy & Traveller Sites
Consider
existing
unofficial Gypsy and
Traveller sites coming
forward as well as
brownfield
1x2
1x1
3
1x1
1x1
2
1
1
1x1
1x1
1x1
1
1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x2
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5 points are
given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each
time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on
Priority board 5.
The table highlights the top 5 priorities suggested by workgroup attendees.
The top priority for Hemel Hempstead and the Borough is for an improvement
to public transport. This includes improving links to places, improving
frequency of services and making the service more affordable. The second
priority is to protect and enhance all green wildlife spaces and green corridors,
including linking up existing green corridors through the town. The third
priority is to provide suitable affordable housing for the demographic range
with a mix of type and tenure.
Sustainably designed neighbourhoods were also sought for the growth
strategy, which should include a variety of shops, services and facilities for
children and young people as well schools. Provision of appropriate
infrastructure alongside new development was also an important
consideration, including upgrading any existing infrastructure.
101
Other Comments
An attendee suggested we make available the Dacorum Environmental
Forum Water Group‟s web address to all of the attendees to raise the
awareness of water issues within the Borough. The web address is as follows:
http://www.dacenvforum.org.uk/defwg/
102
Attendees
Mr
Mr.
John
Lillian
Allen
ANDREASEN
Cllr
Ms
Mr.
Ms
Mr
Brian
Terri
John
Anna
BOB
Ayling
Bailey
Baldwin
Barnard
BENNETT
Mr
Mr
Mr
Ms
Mr
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mr
Mrs.
Mr.
Mr
Cllr
Mrs.
Mr
Mr
Mr
Mr
Mr.
Ms.
Mr.
Mr
Mr.
Mrs.
Mr.
Mr
Mr.
Cllr
Cllr
Ms
Rev.
Mr
Paul
Stewart
Tim
Jacqui
Philip
Claire
Francoise
George
Yvonne
GRUFF
Julian
Fiona
Pam
Roger
Andy
Paul
Ross
Martin
Victoria
Nick
Peter
Peter
Margaret
David
Paul
Clive
Mike
Sue
John
Graham
Biswell
Blake
Bourne
Bunce
Bylo
Covington
Culverhouse
Edkins
Edwards
EDWARDS
Groves
Guest
Halliwell
Hands
Hardstaff
Harris
Herbert
HICKS
Hopkirk
Knox
Lamprill
Lardi
Lewis
Mahon
Mason
Matthews
Moore
Pedlow
Prowse
Quill
Richardson
Ms
Ms
Mr
Miss.
Mr
Mr
Rev.
Elizabeth
Ann
Khalid
Lizzy
Mervyn
John
Norman
Rushton
Ryan
Sadiq
Savage
Sellick
Silvester
Spink
WOODHALL FARM COMMUNITY
ASSOCIATION
PIXIES HILL JMI SCHOOL
Leverstock Green Village Association
Nettleden with Potten End Parish Council
HEMEL HEMPSTEAD COMMUNITY
CHURCH
ASTLEY COOPER SCHOOL
Lime Walk Primary School
Church of England
East & North Herts & West Herts PCTs
St Albans District Council
Picotts End Residents Association
HIGHTOWN PRAETORIAN HOUSING ASSN
THE CONSERVATION SOCIETY (HERTS)
West Herts College
Chaulden & Warners End Ward
DBC
BOXMOOR TRUST
CMS
FOE HEMEL HEMPSTEAD & DISTRICT
HERTS BIOLOGICAL RECORDS CENTRE
Picotts End Residents Association
ARRIVA THE SHIRES
Longdean Park Residents Association
Brockwoods Primary School
Hemel Hempstead Police Station
British Waterways
Community Safety and Crime Reduction Unit
Church of England
HEMEL HEMPSTEAD COMMUNITY
CHURCH
West Herts College
Lime Walk Primary School
Picotts End Residents Association
Churches Together
103
Mr
Mrs.
Cllr
Ms
Cllr
Ms
Mr
Phil
Chris
Nick
Mandy
John
Sarah
Roy
Stanley
Taylor
Tiley
Wharfe
Whitman
Wiles
Wood
Mr.
Cllr
Matthew
Colette
Wood
Wyatt-Lowe
WESTBROOK HAY SCHOOL
West Herts Hospitals
HEMEL HEMPSTEAD LOCAL HISTORY
SOCIETY
HCC CORPORATE SEVICES
104
5. Kings Langley Place Workshop Report
Held: 19th September 2008
105
Contents
Page
Introduction
107
Group Session 1 - Your People
108
Group Session 2 - Your Place
112
Visioning Priorities
118
Analysis of Priorities
121
Other Comments
123
List of Attendees
124
106
Introduction
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions covering the topics „Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of
these group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the
questions could be discussed within an allotted time the participants were split
into 3 groups answering relevant topics. The first group session was split as
follows: Group 1 covered Questions 1 and 2; Group 2 covered Questions 3, 4
and 5; and Group 3 covered Questions 6, 7 and 8. The second session was
split into a similar format: Group 1 answered Questions 1, 2 and 3; Group 2
answered Questions 4, 5 and 6; and Group 3 answered Questions 7 and 8.
Answers that were given by the workshop participants can be found
underneath the questions for each of the group sessions below. The hash
mark # highlights an important issue.
The comments given for the top five priorities for Kings Langley are identified
under „Visioning Priorities‟.
Any other comments made during the event or listed on the „Park It‟ board are
reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
107
Group Session 1 - Your People
1.
(a)
(b)
What problems do you think your village has with crime or
anti-social behaviour?
How could these problems be reduced?
Answers
(a)
Scooter riding along the towpath #
Teenagers congregating at the Common/Green Park which leads to
vandalism, graffiti and anti-social behaviour
Large numbers of school children are intimidating
Most people feel fairly safe #
Work with an anti-social behaviour officer is important
Levels of crime are low/static #
Vandalism of cars in car park
(b)
Improve youth facilities (not always appropriate)
Encourage schools to get young people to participate in more sports
Partnership working
- schools/police
- community support officers #
Kings Langley Sports actively encourage young people in sports
Underage drinking (stricter control)
Introduce CCTV (car park, High Street, Green Park) # (No. 1)
Develop Telephone Exchange site for residential which would improve
the area and its safety
More investment in youth clubs
Better consultation with young people
Church youth co-ordinator/liaison
More visible policing/community police officer #
Restrict access onto towpath for motor bikes #
2.
Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the
village? If so, what are these and where?
Answers
Banks required #
More parking around The Nap/north end of High Street #
Retain Post Office #
A free cash point is needed #
Retain High Street shops
108
Reduce business rates to encourage High Street shops #
Delivery vehicles for Flower Shop poor
Bus service to Abbotts Langley is insufficient
No NHS dentists
Haverfield Surgery – improve parking
Road maintenance poor #
Cycle parking is needed
3.
What problems do local businesses and services face in your
town / village? How can they be tackled?
Answers
Poor public transport #
The station is outside of Kings Langley
Need for a mini-bus service to get into Kings Langley
Parking is a problem for locals, the car park at the doctors surgery gets full
very quickly #
Parking rules should be enforced #
Kings Langley is hilly so people are less inclined to walk
There‟s only 1 supermarket in Kings Langley
Locals would like to be loyal to local shops but it‟s very easy to get to
Sainsbury
Elderly people‟s dwellings are in poor locations
Motorcycle parking is not needed at community centre – takes up 2
parking spaces – same for recycling bins.
4.
Do you think pedestrian linkages to and from the village, open
space and local facilities need to be improved?
Answers
Towpath in Kings Langley is in poor condition – it is a pedestrian only
route, but is difficult for the elderly to use #
Overhanging hedge in Blackwell Road (and lamp post)
All paths should be well lit at night #
Vegetation makes it darker at night #
Lack of signage: visitors would not know how to get to parks and open
spaces.
Woodland at the Common is not very accessible but is important to keep
as is local beauty – a short trail through the wood would increase its
accessibility
Need more amenity areas (although some people thought there were
enough)
Residents of Kings Langley would not cross over to Primrose Hill
109
5.
What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained
within your village / town?
Answers
Allotments
Making better use of Canal (improve the quality of the towpath)
Wildlife trail on areas on the Common
Protect historic buildings #
Wayside Farm should be retained
Hill Farm should be retained
Choice of shopping is limited
Bank needed
Need to keep post office #
Need to keep local school (growth area) #
Hill Farm may be a problem to the school if it is developed for housing
Need to preserve Kings Langley Station #
6.
Are the needs of children and young people met? If not, how can
we better accommodate their needs?
Answers
The youth club might not be what the kids want
Lack of sports facilities – lack of public tennis courts
Schools provide some shared space
Encourage angling on the canal
Children‟s centre – under 5s only
Emphasis at the community centre is currently only for older people
Kids hang around shops etc #
Need an informal space for them to gather – eg a juice bar? – needs to be
open in the evenings
Canoe centre
The canal is on the border of TRDC and DBC – don‟t miss it out #
Difference between organised facilities and informal – kids don‟t always
need organised activities #
Need to focus activities at key times of year – i.e. school holidays
Dual use hall considered by Parish Council (at school) about 10 years ago
#
Towpath – not good for access (pushchairs etc) – IWA are a pressure
group concerned with access.
7.
How can your village help us respond to the issues of climate
change?
Answers
Renewable Energy Systems (RES) is located near village (at Old Ovaltine
Farm) and has/does the following: #
110
Sells electricity to the National Grid
Good exemplar projects
An educational role
The new development at Jubilee Walk has solar panels and good double
glazing and insulation.
New development needs to include all of the above #
Need an integrated strategy, rather than looking at it on a house by house
basis
Canal path improvement will encourage cycling but it is no good just
improving small stretches #
Secure cycle parking would also encourage cycling
Encourage walking to station
Bus fares are expensive for short journeys compared to long journeys
Could provide free bus travel to kids (or other incentives) but who would
pay?
Downturn in economy will encourage us to be more energy efficient,
although this may only be short term
Must educate people – but can‟t be a nanny state #
Energy efficient compliances etc.
8. What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained
within your village / town?
Answers
Open space #
Historic look of High Street #
Shopfronts need to be in keeping with character
Views
Railings – unique to Kings Langley #
Primary School – survey showed 90 species of plants (native) in grounds
Canal is an important wildlife link
Signage needs to be maintained. There is too much in some places and
not enough in others (i.e. footpath links) #
111
Group Session 2 - Your Place
1.
Do you think it is important to encourage people, and in particular
young people, to stay in your village?
Answers
Yes #
Young people are diverse group with different needs
Important for young people to stay as they contribute to village life #
Need for balanced population #
Survive or die – the residents recognised the need to accommodate some
growth in order to remain a vibrant village
Low availability of affordable housing
Encourage young people to participate in village life
2.
(a)
(b)
If NO to Question 1, what are your reasons?
If YES, how much of this population growth should the
village accommodate?
Answers
(a)
not applicable
(b)
Yes, but limited growth #
Balance needs of all groups
Requires stability, but balance growth
New development should be sympathetic to the village and its character #
Capacity in primary schools must be considered
Right facilities for young people should be provided to encourage them
such as cheap bus/mini bus service
Limited growth – need to maintain village character #
Affordable housing (but not blocks of flats) #
Must be distinctive
Avoid coalescence #
Don‟t sacrifice all local employment (i.e. Sundarlands Yard) [balance] #
Encourage home-working
3.
Which of the housing sites shown on the map provided do you
think are the best sites for new housing and why?
Answers
KL/H8 - too large
- but smaller parcel could be rounded off
112
KL/H8a – potential for affordable housing site.
highly protected because of Green Belt Land.
However, previously been
KL H4 – concerns as sympathetic to waterways. Also may lead to merging of
Kings Langley with Nash Mills.
The groups also wrote some comments on a map which are included at
the end of this section. A map similar to that which the groups
annotated is shown in Figure 1, with the potential housing sites
discussed by the groups outlined in red.
4.
Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the village?
Answers
1-2 bed starter homes (private and housing association)
Affordable housing should be for local young people (Local Ties)
Sheltered accommodation within the village (must be of a reasonable size
– the units within Willow Edge are too small)
5.
What changes would you make in your village to make it a more
attractive place to live?
Answers
Regular maintenance eg. Grass cutting, Church Yard – War memorial and
railings and most open spaces within Kings Langley
Improve traffic within Kings Langley High Street – down grade from A road
- Road humps with restrictions
- Surface of the roads
Poor state of the verge (By football ground)
Planting trees
More plants/hanging baskets
Improve Home Park Link roundabout
Improve parking by college
Welcome feature to Kings Langley
Semi pedestrianise with cobbles on street (similar to Berkhamsted)
Quaintness
Define Boundary
6.
Which of the housing sites shown on the map provided do you
think are the best sites for new housing and why?
Answers
113
KLH8 – West side and south east side – access to M25 rest of Farmland to be
preserved.
KLH1 – Yes – does away with industrial area access.
affordable housing for local people.
Potential site for
KLH4 – south has good access – keep football club. Southern and northern
ends only. (Should be a parking area rather than housing).
KLH10 – Affordable housing for young people. Very close to motorway – noisy.
Historic constraints.
KLH5 – Been developed already, no more housing!!
The group also wrote some comments on a map which are included at the end
of this section. A map similar to that which the groups annotated is shown in
Figure 1, with the potential housing sites discussed by the groups outlined in
red.
7.
The High Street has an important role to play in meeting the needs
of the local community. It is important that the High Street not only
continues to meet current needs but is able to respond to future
requirements. There may be a need for additional shops and
restaurants. On that note:
(a)
How could your High Street/village centre be improved over
the next 20 years?
(b)
How can these improvements be achieved?
(c)
Is there currently a local need for a supermarket in Kings
Langley, and if not, do you think there will be in the future?
Answers
(a) and (b)
The main problems are high levels of traffic # and heavy lorries driving fast
# through village – caused by sat nav. Local people can‟t even cross the
road at times, there is congestion. Need deterrents such as cameras #.
1 hour parking isn‟t a problem
Delivery vehicles and dust carts double parking are problems #
Lorries have to drive through the village in order to service it
Shops often open and then close shortly afterwards
There are no banks – Abbotts Langley has 2 banks and other good shops
There is concern about the post office potentially closing
Over-signing v under-signing leads to confusion
The lighting is ok
Do not want a supermarket
114
(c)
Do not want a supermarket #
It is important to retain the village shops in order to keep the village
thriving #
8.
Which of the housing sites shown on the map provided do you
think are the best sites for new housing and why?
Answers
Rectory Farm – No industrial site
Rear of Watford Road site – could it be capable of more development? (is about
the maximum scale we‟d aim for)
Do not want much development, and didn‟t want to comment on any sites
without more info/site visit so have drawn up some criteria for assessing sites:
Keep village compact #
Don‟t join with Hemel #
Smaller sites better than all in one lump #
Want the minimum number of houses possible #
Infill can be less bad – provided it is well designed
Build smaller units for young families #
Smaller houses are needed – especially affordable housing #
Best sites for new housing
Although each group made comments about which of the housing sites they
preferred, some people preferred to annotate the maps provided with the
potential housing sites marked on. A summary of comments from all groups
written on the maps is given below:
KL/h1 (Sunderlands Yard) could be an acceptable site for a development
of affordable housing.
KL/h4 represents an important gap between Hemel Hempstead and Kings
Langley and should remain undeveloped, although it may be acceptable to
develop a small area towards the south of the site (shown as h4a on the map
in Figure 1). There was a desire to keep the football ground (which is within
site KL/h4), and the green space next to the canal. KL/h4 was also
considered important as it is an area where the canal is open on both sides.
KL/h8 is too large for all of it to be developed, a small portion of it, marked
as h8a on the map in Figure 1, could be developed for affordable housing.
KL/h10 was noted as a site of historic interest, and M25 (running through
the southern end of it) as an important green belt boundary.
115
Figure 1 shows a map similar to that which the group annotated, it has the
potential housing sites they discussed outlined in red, and a few sites they
marked out shown by dashed red lines.
116
Figure1
117
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Retention and preservation of the character of the village
Maintain open spaces
Keep Kings Langley compact
Overall traffic issues as raised by group sessions
Public transport perpendicular to valley (St Albans & Chesham)
Keep Rectory Farm industrial – use other industrial sites for housing
Possible extension of hotel and car park may be needed for extra jobs
High Street Traffic calming and improvements
Undertake accurate assessment of housing type taking into account
numbers, tenure and services to support them
Extend The Nap car park to grass area at rear of community centre
Protect and keep Kings Langley as a village
Traffic problems must be resolved
Keep Kings Langley a village
Prevent coalescence (north and south)
Environmental improvements – brighten up verges entering village with
planting and trees
Improve High Street traffic; i.e. Lorries to be diverted onto A41 bypass,
also control speed of traffic with cameras
Not too much housing development
Preservation of “village” – not town
Ensure any changes are in keeping with the current nature of the village;
i.e. no higher than a traditional house – no 3 or 4 storey and above
Restrict traffic through village especially with restriction to exclude heavy
lorries
Priority 2
Smaller sites – not large estates (for housing development)
Watch the „Villager‟ newspaper for info
Make the most of the towpath for cycling and walking
Need more parking and more enforcement of parking restrictions
High Street traffic calming and stop heavy lorries driving through
Develop a clear sustainability strategy which considers education and
practical exemplars
Reduce traffic within village
Provide somewhere for kids to go
Retention of shops including banks/post office
Stop heavy lorries driving through the High Street
Protect Green Belt, but allow redevelopment of existing buildings in the
Green Belt to same volume
Canal access and towpath improvement
No supermarket but need a bank
Move forward attractiveness issues
Improve facilities for teenagers to prevent vandalism
Avoid coalescence with neighbouring Hemel and Watford even if it means
118
using land towards Chipperfield. Although it may not be sustainable,
people do live there and manage now.
Provision of homes for elderly
Keep the attraction of living in the village stable and desirable
Affordable housing
Priority 3
Keep Kings Langley compact
Traffic calming in the High Street
Traffic calming measures in the High Street
Keep employment in the village
Keep a well maintained village
Public transport
Address appearance of High Street and traffic calming measures
Replace PCSO ASAP
Affordable/starter homes for local people
Sympathetic housing development
Have small areas for housing development
PCSOs/CCTV to deter anti-social behaviour
Retain village character (through design and limited growth so it does not
become a town)
2-3 bedroom houses only for families. To be built on small estates of 1520 houses.
Increased support for local shops and local businesses
Keep Kings Langley image
Maintain enough employment land for lower skilled/manual work
Maintenance of roads
Better use of school facilities
Priority 4
Control traffic speed
Affordable housing for local young people
Take appropriate measure to keep businesses and shops viable
Improvements to pedestrian/cycle routes to open space (disabled/prams)
Enhance towpath
Retain the village – don‟t join with Hemel or Watford
Keep Kings Langley compact with housing
Keep enough variety of shops in High Street for „critical mass‟
Retain and maintain open spaces and Green Belt
Ensure sites of ecological/historical value are protected
Stop building large houses – small affordable only
Look after local businesses
Encouragement of young people to live in village
Small private housing for young families
Provide affordable housing
More policing of teenagers
Reduce traffic
119
Maintenance of Churchyard and war memorial
Calm traffic through the centre by pushing most onto the by-pass
Priority 5
More help removing litter and cutting back overgrown vegetation
Provision of attractive and desirable hosing for young and old
New development to be dense and sympathetic
Development of affordable housing
Joint use sports facilities
Provide affordable housing
Improve facilities for kids
No more large houses
Use partnerships and planning gain to help/force partners to solve their
problems
Tow path is one of village‟s areas of interest – stop motorbikes etc
Maintain footpaths by cutting back vegetation
Traffic control
120
Analysis of priorities
Table 1 groups and orders the key priorities according to what was written on
the Priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table above and each issue is then given a total score.
Table 1: Analysis of priorities
Issue
Traffic calming
Keep village compact / avoid
coalescence
Help local shops/businesses
Keep KL as a village (i.e. not a town)
Affordable housing
Retain Village character
Canal/Towpath
Environmental improvements
Small sites for new housing rather
than large estates
More police/PCSO presence/install
CCTV
Parking (either more provision or
better enforcement)
Ensure new development is in
keeping with existing character
Improve facilities for young people
Public transport
Maintain open spaces
Not too much housing
Keep Rectory Farm industrial
Hotel may need extending to provide
extra jobs
Carry out assessment of housing
type needed and type of services to
support them
Maintain village as desirable place to
live
Make better use of school facilities
Enhance footpaths (cut back
vegetation)
Watch the 'Villager' newspaper for
information
Protect Green Belt
Provision of homes for the elderly
Maintenance of Roads
Encourage young people to live in
the village
Protect sites of ecological/historic
value
No more large houses
Use of partnerships/planning gain to
help solve problems
Priority
1
5x5
2x5
Priority
2
3x4
1x4
Priority
3
3x3
1x3
Priority
4
3x2
2x2
Priority
5
1x1
-
Total
Score
53
21
3x5
1x5
1x5
-
1x4
1x4
2x4
1x4
1x4
3x3
1x3
1x3
3x3
2x3
3x2
3x2
1x2
1x2
-
2x1
1x1
-
19
18
15
14
11
11
10
-
2x4
-
1x2
-
10
1x5
1x4
-
-
-
9
1x5
-
1x3
-
1x1
9
1x5
1x5
1x5
1x5
1x5
2x4
-
1x3
-
1x2
-
1x1
-
9
8
7
5
5
5
1x5
-
-
-
-
5
-
1x4
-
-
1x1
5
-
1x4
-
-
1x2
1x1
2x1
5
4
-
1x4
-
-
-
4
-
1x4
1x4
1x4
-
-
2x2
-
4
4
4
4
-
-
-
1x2
-
2
-
-
-
-
1x1
1x1
1
1
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5 points are
given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each
time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on
Priority board 5.
121
Table 1 groups and orders the key priorities according to what was written on
the Priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table above and each issue is then given a total score.
The categories in the table are a representation of what was raised on the
priority boards, for example the „traffic calming‟ category incorporates all
responses relating to traffic concerns, e.g. heavy traffic, lorries in the High
Street, and traffic congestion.
The table shows that traffic calming through the village is seen as the top
priority, followed by the desire to avoid the coalescence of Kings Langley with
any surrounding settlements. Other aims considered important helping local
shops/businesses, keeping Kings Langley as a village, rather than allowing it
to become a town, retention of the village‟s character, and the provision of
affordable housing.
122
Other Comments
Schools - possible expansion
- access to all 3 schools via same roads
Infrastructure – if we‟re having so much extra housing – particularly
schools
How will peak oil affect the viability of the community? Does Dacorum
have a plan?
From consultation with families – some parks are not in a good state of
repair and are tired
Station footpath is secluded and overgrown by hedges – don‟t feel safe
Busy roads – difficult to cross, especially junction of Vicarage Lane and
the High Street, especially for pushchairs
Delivery Lorries, especially to the Rose and Crown park on pavement –
blocking the way
Mews style development of housing would suit Kings Langley.
More should be made of the Church memorial – it should be made visible
on the way into the village.
Strong feeling against the linking of Kings Langley with Hemel Hempstead
or Watford.
Site KL/H8 is far too big for all of it to be developed, but it would be ok if
some smaller areas along the edge were developed.
Sunderland Yard suffers from heavy traffic, and associated dirt and dust.
There were concerns about the loss of employment land associated with
developing Sunderland Yard for residential uses, although it was
suggested that if it did come forward Rectory Farm could be used for a
small amount of employment uses as it has better access that Sunderland
Yard.
The High Street should be managed as a whole.
Although there was a desire to provide affordable housing, it was felt that it
should be targeted at key workers.
Strong desire to keep the football ground.
Meadowbank was cited as a good example of affordable housing.
123
List of Attendees
Mr Danny Bonnett
Inbuilt & Renewable Energy Systems
Ms Sarah Royse
Inbuilt & Renewable Energy Systems
Mr Ken Satterthwaite
Inland Waterways Association
Mrs Sheila Satterthwaite Inland Waterways Association
Mrs Ann Johnson
Kings Langley Residents Association
Reverend Gill Hulme
Kings Langley Methodist Church
Mrs Tri Sleat
All Saints Church
Cllr Mike Morton
Abbotts Langley Parish Council
Cllr Ivy Young
Abbotts Langley Parish Council
Mrs Shelley Hannaway
Willow Edge (Housing Assoc) (DBC
Services)
Cllr Alan Anderson
Borough Councillor for KL Ward
Cllr Bob McLean
Borough Councillor for KL Ward
Cllr Donald Abbott
Kings Langley Parish Council
Ms Angela Welsh
Three Villages Children‟s Centre
Mr David Windsor
Kings Langley Community Association
Ms J Barton
Kings Langley Community Association
Mr Paul Dunham
Kings Langley Parish Council
Mrs C Green
Ms Sue Swain
Hertfordshire Property (HCC)
Ms Sheila Abbott
Good Neighbours Association
Ms Mira Masters
Good Neighbours Association
Mr Stephen Clarke
Good Neighbours Association
Ms Hayley Martin
Premier Inn
Miss Joanna Bowyer
Three Rivers District Council
Mrs Briony Curtain
DBC (Development Control)
Miss Elizabeth Savage
DBC
Mr James Moir
DBC (Conservation and Design)
124
Elderly
6. Markyate Place Workshop Report
Held: 29th September 2008
125
Contents
Page
Introduction
127
Group Session 1 - Your People
128
Group Session 2 - Your Place
131
Visioning Priorities
135
Analysis of Priorities
137
List of Attendees
138
126
Introduction
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions covering the topics „Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of
these group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the
questions could be discussed within an allotted time the participants were split
into 2 groups answering relevant topics.
The first group session (Your People) was split as follows:
Group 1 covered Questions 1, 2, 3 and 4.
Group 2 covered Questions 5, 6, 7 and 8.
The second group session (Your Place) was split as follows:
Group 1 answered Questions 1, 2 and 3.
Group 2 answered Questions 4, 5 and 6.
The comments given for the top five priorities for Markyate are reported under
„Visioning Priorities‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this feedback report.
127
Group Session 1 - Your People
Group 1
1.
(a) What problems do you think your village has with crime or antisocial behaviour?
(b) How could these problems be reduced?
Answers
(a)
Young people and teenagers cause anti-social behaviour.
Outsiders “visiting” to offend i.e. stealing number plates and increased car
crime.
Minor burglaries.
Safe in daytime but the elderly feel intimidated at night.
Vandalism of isolated areas – car park by doctors surgery.
Windows are broken at the surgery and in the industrial area.
(b)
More CCTV is needed particularly at the doctors surgery.
Increased police presence.
Need to engage with youth
2.
Are the needs of children and young people met? If not, how can
we better accommodate their needs?
Answers
Would like to have a swimming pool, skate park and a sports centre.
Would like a secondary school.
We do have a primary school, fire station, youth club, Football clubs,
Cricket club and Cubs/Scouts/Brownies/Rainbows.
Public transport to surround facilities/services needs improving.
3.
Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the
village? If so, what are these and where?
Answers
No community centre in the centre of the village
Public transport is poor and needs improving.
Need improved access to hospital particularly by public transport.
Need to improve provision of leisure facilities namely sports and theatre.
No public transport to Harpenden for school activities.
There is a lack of burial space.
128
There is no dentist.
Doctor surgery needs substantial improvement. It currently serves a wide
area and needs better facilities to meet demand. Increasing capacity and
improving access are important.
4.
What problems do local businesses and services face in your
village? How can they be tackled?
Answers
Need to increase parking provision for new developments.
Need to improve parking situation in the High Street.
There are too many cars parked in the village.
Cars parked on the pavement is hazardous for pedestrians.
Car ownership is very high in the village and adds to congestion.
“Rat-run” village.
Need to limit speed throughout village to 20mph. Perhaps create areas
that are completely pedestrianised.
Hicks Road Industrial Estate is dilapidated but should remain in its current
use and not be lost to housing.
The provision of health care in the village needs improving.
Group 2
5.
Is there a need for any more open space (parks, gardens, amenity
green space, green corridors, cycle paths, outdoor sports facilities
and play areas, allotments, cemeteries and churchyards) within the
village? If so, how and where should it be provided?
Answers
Need to increase the provision of allotments.
Need to increase cemetery space.
New recreation ground is needed especially if village grows.
Need to increase the number of public gardens and flower beds.
Need more public tennis courts and a bowling green.
6.
How can you / your town or village help us respond to the issues of
climate change?
Answers
Need to improve local shopping facilities which will reduce the need to
travel.
Need to improve accessibility to public transport nodes.
Perhaps installing a wind turbine and solar panels on the school and
village hall would help.
Need to provide subsidies to support grey water recycling.
129
Grants should be available for renewable energy, water recycling and
green roofs.
Cheverells Green should be managed as a “common” for wildlife.
More should be done to conserve hedgerows.
More items should be collected for recycling (at the kerb) e.g. light bulbs,
plastic trays and batteries.
7.
What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained
within your village / town?
Answers
The doctors surgery, fire station and village hall would all benefit from
improvement.
St. John‟s Church and other places of worship should be enhanced.
Keep buildings in conservation area/High Street (uniqueness of High
Street)
8.
What other changes would you make elsewhere in your town /
village to make it a more attractive place to live?
Answers
Create road humps on Buckwood Road to limit traffic travelling to/from
Dunstable.
Improve entrance from A5.
Improve maintenance of green spaces, verges and hedgerows.
Increase policing.
Need better parking provision.
Need to improve pedestrian safety in the High Street. However there is
split opinion on the need for railings.
130
Group Session 2 - Your Place
Group 1
1.
Should young people be given the opportunity to stay in their
town / village?
Answers
Yes
2.
(a)
(b)
If NO to Question 1, what are your reasons?
If YES, How much of this population growth should the
town / village accommodate?
Answers
(a)
No comments
(b)
Concern that people cannot afford to live in the village and whether they
can find appropriate housing in the village.
Want population growth to maintain local economy and local infrastructure.
3.
The level of housing growth for Markyate represents 89 dwellings
by 2031 to maintain the population and 222 dwellings to
accommodate natural growth to encourage young people to stay
in the village. 30dph to 50dph are expected as the rates of density
and the size of more realistic sites are shown on laminated maps.
Bearing this in mind, which of these sites are more appropriate to
fulfil the level of growth desired?
Answers
There are access problems with MH4.
We agree that 20 dwellings could be provided on the MH6/7 site.
What would the GEA be redeveloped for? Difficult to judge as little is
known about the proposals.
MH2 is a good location for housing if the industrial area could be relocated
to Mh4 or to the edge of the village.
It is important to maintain the Doctor‟s surgery and some shops in the
village.
Do not want to lose the industrial area. It is important to keep small
businesses.
Re-locating industry to the edge of village would reduce traffic problems
through the village.
Mh/1/Mh/9 sites are too peripheral and would encourage people to travel
by car.
131
Density should be kept at 40 dph.
Figure 1: Additional sites (marked in red) put forward by workshop
attendees
Group 2
4.
Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the town / village?
Answers
Sheltered homes including private accommodation.
Starter homes.
Accommodation for single people.
Flats. Although careful consideration needs to be given to accessibility
particularly parents with children and the elderly.
132
5.
We are required by Government to provide sites for gypsies and
travellers within the area. Some possible locations for sites have
been put forward by consultants. These were all considered to
meet a set of key criteria3
(a)
(b)
Which of these options do you prefer?
Are there any other sites either within or on the edge of the
town / village that we should consider instead?
Answers
(a)
Access to each site is poor.
The access would need improving to both sites. D14 is currently a single
track, which leads to the A5 (accident blackspot).
Both sites are unsuitable.
D13 – backs onto gun club which could cause problems.
Gypsy sites that fall just outside the Borough surround Markyate. The
cumulative impact needs to be considered.
D13 ability to access the site is a concern
D14 overlooks the whole village. There is also a small community there
already. The impact on them needs to be considered.
(b)
It is very difficult to make informed decisions because little is known on the
actual requirements for a site. Do they need to be located in close
proximity to particular services etc?
Not much space within parish boundaries/village area.
Can we make existing sites bigger to negate the need to find new sites?
Markyate has poor access to public transport, schools etc.
3
These criteria included factors such as safe access to the main road network, being
within a reasonable distance of schools and health facilities, avoiding harm to
important wildlife designations, avoiding areas liable to flood and giving preference to
„brownfield‟ (previously developed) land.
133
Figure 2: Gypsy and Traveller Sites near Markyate
6. (a) How could your High Street be improved over the next 20 years?
(b) How can these improvements be achieved?
Answers
(a) and (b)
Need to encourage more local independent shops.
More support with business rates to help small businesses.
Congestion (due to parking) needs to be improved.
More needs to be done to enforce HGV routes as these are currently not
enforced.
Traffic lights would help reduce speed in the High Street.
Congestion is a problem along Pickford Road.
Signs and lights should be put on buildings.
Investigate one way traffic along the High Street.
Reducing the speed limit along the High Street would bring benefits.
Install a speed camera or flashing sign to improve safety.
Railings should be installed outside the Happy Shopper.
The footpath on Buckwood Road should be highlighted.
Developers should be contributing more to the provision of schools, village
hall, all-weather pitch and a health centre.
134
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Traffic and Parking control needs to be improved with pedestrian needs in
mind.
Improve transport/circulation within village and pedestrian safety.
Improve road safety along the High Street, Pickford Road and Buckwood
Road.
Ensure that Buckwood Road infrastructure (Traffic calming, Junction
improvements and drainage) is adequate and is in place before
development begins.
Improve the health centre.
Reduce traffic through the village to improve safety along Buckwood Road
and Pickford Road.
Provide additional burial space.
Allow sufficient new housing to maintain viability of local services (shops
and schools etc). However, do not want to see increased density
development.
Ensure that housing development is phased over the LDF period to match
forecast population change.
It is important to maintain the vitality of the community in order to avoid
Markyate becoming a dormitory town.
Improve road system.
Priority 2
Improve public transport radically.
New housing development to include off-street parking for one car for each
anticipated adult resident.
Improve pedestrian safety along the High Street.
Provision for a health centre
Provision for a health centre
Improve infrastructure inline with expansion.
Redevelop Hick Road site to improve local facilities (health centre).
Need to improve accessibility of affordable housing to local people.
Improve pedestrian safety.
Priority 3
Improve local health provision.
Ensure that village facilities improve as more houses/dwellings are built.
More visible Police presence in evenings.
Provision of adequate parking in High Street and nearby roads.
Improve public transport.
Improve local health centre to offer multiple services like Antenatal,
Dentist, Chiropody and small surgery.
Improve prospects for first time buyers.
135
Priority 4
Improve access to secondary schools for local children.
Ensure that crime is kept at an acceptable level.
Improve cycle paths.
Increase police patrols (foot).
Priority 5
More attractive High Street which is accessible for all
Integrate school services with community needs.
Ensure village discussion/input on decision for Gypsy site location.
‘Park it’ Notes
Every sports provision is self provided and not from Dacorum Borough
Council.
Concerned with developers not building to approved plans and the lack of
enforcement taken in response.
136
Analysis of Priorities
Table 1 groups and orders the key priorities according to what was written on
the Priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table and each issue is then given a total score.
Table 1: Analysis of priorities
Issue
Improve health provision
Improve safety in High
Street
Improve Local roads
Parking (either more
provision or better
enforcement)
Public transport
Congestion
Keep Markyate as a
village (i.e. not a town)
Ensure new development
respects local character
Affordable housing
Burial space
Secondary school and
transportation
Reduce crime
Improve High Street
Further involvement in
Gypsy and Traveller sites
Priority
1
1x5
2x5
Priority
2
3x4
2x4
Priority
3
2x3
1x3
Priority
4
-
Priority
5
-
Total
Score
23
21
3x5
1x5
1x4
1x4
1x3
-
-
19
12
2x5
2x5
1x4
-
2x3
-
1x2
-
-
12
10
10
1x5
1x4
-
-
-
9
1x5
-
1x4
-
1x3
-
2x2
-
7
5
4
-
-
-
2x2
1x2
-
1x1
1x1
4
3
1
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a
priority board. 5 points are given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for
each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points
for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on Priority board 5.
The categories in the table are a representation of what was raised on the
priority boards, for example the „improve High Street‟ category incorporates all
responses relating to High Street improvements, e.g. High Street
enhancement, maintain character and function of High Street and preserve
village character – better management of High Street.
The table shows that improvements to health provision are seen as the top
priority for the village, followed by the need for improvements to the High
Street. Improving local roads, parking and public transport were also seen as
important matters to address.
137
List of Attendees
Dr Sepai
Miss P Bunyan
Mr D Glauch
Mr M Wood
Mr M Davies
Mr P Thring
Mrs A Mead
Ms J Ivey
Mrs I Hewitt
Mr S Ratcley
Iris Southwood
Helen Vaites
Faye Sanders
Ms T Evers
Mr John Fry
Markyate Surgery
'Markyate Village Hall Committee
Methodist Church
Hertfordshire Property
Allotments and Gardens Association
Markyate Society
Markyate Neighbourhood Watch
Methodist Church
Hewitt Fabrication
Markyate Fire Station
M & F Care Group
Friends of Markyate School
Friends of Markyate School
Unknown
Unknown
138
7. Tring Place Workshop Report
Held: 11th September 2008
139
Contents
Page
Introduction
141
Group Session 1 - Your People
142
Group Session 2 - Your Place
146
Visioning Priorities
151
Analysis of Priorities
153
Other Comments
154
List of Attendees
154
140
Introduction
There was an initial presentation setting the context, which was followed by 2
group sessions covering the topics „Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of
these group sessions covered a range of questions. In order that all of the
questions were discussed within an allotted time, the participants were split
into 3 groups answering relevant topics. The first group session was split as
follows: Group 1 covered Questions 1 and 4; Group 2 covered Questions 2,3
and 8; and Group 3 Questions 5, 6 and 7. The second session was split into a
similar format: Group 1 answered Questions 1, 2 and 4; Group 2 answered
Question 3; and Group 3, Questions 5 and 6.
Answers that were given by the workshop participants can be found
underneath the questions for each of the group sessions below. The hash
mark # highlights an important issue.
Comments given for the top five priorities for Tring are identified in Table 1,
„Visioning Priorities‟.
Additional comments made during the event or listed on the „Park It‟ board are
reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees can be found at the end of this report.
141
Group Session 1 - Your People
1.
(a)
(b)
What problems do you think your town has with crime or
anti-social behaviour?
How could these problems be reduced?
Answers
(a)
Reasonably safe place, not an issue
Shop Lifting #
Drug dealing in pubs
Figures „dumb down‟
Increase due to G&T- generic issues/problems, trouble outside
Luton/Aylesbury
Minor Crime
Visibility of police important #
Off-licence Miswell Lane and outside Tesco – anti-social behaviour
Grove Housing area youth
(b)
Not enough in Tring for children youth?
Find out the needs of the young – speak to them
Activities between 3.30pm to 6.30pm #
Survey of Tring School needed
Good mix of current facilities
Need support/time of parents
Internet café funding lost
Problems booking halls- busy
Turnover and population
Visible policing #
2.
Are the needs of children and young people met? If not, how can
we better accommodate their needs?
Answers
Temperance Hall Christchurch Road – grant of £2K to help young people.
It will be a youth centre for after school hours and community use during
the day. Including PCs, coffee bar, etc. #
Tring input of monetary funds
High no. Of sports clubs that are well attended and attract outside people
as well as from surrounding areas
Old Church House accommodates youth activities
Film Clubs – future, in existence but early days (maintaining interest may
142
be an issue)
Children‟s Centre – extended schools #
Sports Clubs in Cow Lane
3.
Is there a shortage of any key facilities and/or services in the town?
If so, what are they and where is the shortage?
Answers
Bus service (No. 387) must be kept - vital service for all (Tring & Villages).
Need to increase quality and service of provision (HCC). #
Proposed closure of cash office at Victoria Hall. Often Used by elderly
whilst visiting lunch clubs. Knock on effect to lots of other services
buildings etc. #
Secondary school capacity – more houses = more schools #
Increase facilities for elderly and preserve existing facilities
Have and want to keep: Doctors, dentists and opticians
4.
What problems do local businesses and services face in your
town? How can they be tackled?
Answers
Difficult access to Berkhamsted [alternative location?]
Range and variety of shops is declining – maintaining range is important #
Do local people use local shops?
Availability of parking important #
Friday market in decline!
5.
Is there a need for any more open space (parks, gardens, amenity
green space, green corridors, cycle paths, outdoor sports facilities
and play areas, allotments, cemeteries and churchyards) within the
town / village? If so, how and where should it be provided?
Answers
Tring Rural has enough open space to meet local need
Because of the high proportion of young children we may need more
facilities for children/teenagers in the future
Low quality of open space
One size doesn‟t fit everything
Need for good basic facilities
Miswell Lane recreational ground is very accessible and well used but has
a privately owned part in the middle #
Site T/h15 is currently an important open space
New Mill is not well served for play areas #
Cycle paths put forward by interest groups #
143
6.
How can you / your town help us respond to the issues of climate
change?
Answers
Plans to close tip at Tring – strongly opposed people will have to drive a lot
further to get rid of rubbish
387 bus is threatened with cuts and it serves the town and station
subsidies for buses to be cut
closure of 2 local post offices (Long Marston and Wilstone)
All of the above imply more and longer car journeys #
Retain and encourage local employment
Use Coppice Woodland (Local) to produce some energy locally
Oppose airport expansion
Encourage greywater use and install on all new houses and renewable
energy #
Use local businesses to carry out national schemes like loft insulation
Encourage use of local footpaths, cycle paths – difficult at moment to find
safe cycle paths, may be more use of more permissive paths
Whilst people want to support local shops, it is more convenient to shop
once a week in one shop
Street tree planting
7.
What key features do you think should be enhanced or retained
within your village / town?
Answers
„Tring Together‟ enhance conservation area and shop fronts #
Conservation area review should have happened
Green spaces should be retained and increased
More focus on medieval heritage should be encouraged through
workshops, schools and other opportunities #
Market town character
Retain existing character
Restrict designs more through planning
More local distinctiveness
Tring Reservoirs very important but poor accessibility by bike
8.
What other changes would you make elsewhere in your town to
make it a more attractive place to live?
Answers
Renovation of playgrounds
Pavements – quality and access issues
Keep flowers in beds and tubs around towns
Encourage shop owners to maintain facades
144
Improve access and signage to Tring Park
Lighting – skateboard park and Brook Street but not intrusive to local
residents #
Car parking – need to keep free parking to encourage people to use the
High Street #
145
Group Session 2 - Your Place
1.
Do you think it is important to encourage people, and in particular
young people, to stay in your town?
Answers
Yes, vitality of town #
Loss of young
Affordability of housing
Leave town, then ageing population
Balanced population #
Primary schools need more capacity
Merging of schools if further decline
2.
(a)
(b)
If NO to Question 1, what are your reasons?
If YES, How much of this population growth should the town /
village accommodate?
Answers
(a) Not applicable
(b)
Maintain character – stay small #
Sustainable Growth #
Issue around infilling – quality of development and character change
Sensitively done
Gradual growth OK #
3.
The population growth for Tring represents 564 (11Ha @ 50dph)
dwellings by 2031 for static growth [i.e. no change in the population
level] and 1,118 (22Ha @ 50dph) to accommodate natural growth to
encourage young people to stay in the village/town. 30dph to 50dph
are expected as the rates of density and the size of more realistic
sites are shown on laminated maps. Bearing this in mind, which of
these sites are the more appropriate ones to fulfil the level of
growth desired?
Answers
Potential housing sites identified by the group are illustrated in Figure 1. This
includes greenfield and brownfield sites. North/north west of Icknield Way was
considered too beautiful to develop and some of the space is considered
leisure space.
146
Figure 1: Sites noted from Question 3
147
4.
Do you think there is a particular need for any specific types of
accommodation within the town?
Answers
More affordable housing for the young
Mix of tenure/house sizes
Key worker housing
Downsizing for elderly home owners – shortage of suitable
accommodation
Flats for single households
Need more housing for ageing population i.e. independent and supported
living
HCC Extra-Care Housing
5.
We are required by Government to provide sites for Gypsies and
Travellers within the area. Some possible locations for sites have
been put forward by consultants. These were all considered to
meet a set of key criteria4
(a)
(b)
Which of these options do you prefer?
Are there any other sites either within or on the edge of the
town / village that we should consider instead?
Answers
Figure 2 indicates the Gypsy and Traveller sites that were discussed.
(a)
D11 is close to the industrial estate and so is slightly removed from
residential
Dependant on new housing sites
Strong opposition to all – Town Council opposed initial study on Green Belt
grounds – Town Council‟s has discussed this
People will choose the sites furthest away from their homes
Need to address the archaeology of a site before the site taken further
The people of Tring don‟t want G&T sites, however D11 is the most
practical option.
(b)
Due to density of town little scope for sites within town
If sites are out in the Green Belt people won‟t have access to facilities
If in middle of nowhere, there is no way of monitoring size or behaviour
Fear of crime (and experience)
Terminology changes to the name Gypsy & Travellers
Need by-laws so troublesome families can be ejected
No other sites identified #
148
Figure 2: Gypsy and Traveller Sites identified in Technical Study by Consultants
149
6.
(a)
(b)
How could your High Street be improved over the next 20
years? What are the key problems that need to be resolved?
How can these improvements be achieved?
Answers to (a) and (b)
Pedestrianise it (possibly 1-2 days/week ) – good for congestion and
character
Make sure repairs last, specifically the roads
Not enough Shops
Need more variety of shops
Better stocked shops with more produce
Empty shops
Development of evening economy would be good
Encourage local people to use local shops
Encourage shopkeepers to maintain their facades
Remember many listed buildings in High Street
Size of unit - some too small for cafes etc.
150
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Retain intrinsic character of this historic market town x2
Improve the quality of local greenspace x2
Better parking facilities and free parking hour maintained. Lift-up barriers
and pay on exit, which will discourage people from rushing away x2
Greater improved public transport
Local facilities to enable Tring people to function in their own town.
Accommodation for single people either elderly or single mothers.
Retain the countryside around the town – this also means its functionality
as well i.e. farming.
More affordable housing to keep young families in the area.
Keep current size/type of community – no major housing developments
Evening economy – consider issues
Gradual growth
Maintain the present pattern of mixed land use e.g. mix of residential,
retail, farming, sport, industrial commercial with adjustments to achieve
better sustainability.
Priority 2
Wider variety of shops – no more hairdressers or estate agents
Retain local services
Retain market character and plan development to suit
Improve quality of facilities for children and young people x2
Facilities for young parents i.e. advice consultation parenting
Preserve Green Belt around Tring
Retain the vitality of the town – business shops, leisure opportunities, pubs
and restaurants
Encourage local business, especially shops
An end to the constant erosion of existing facilities
Priority 3
Improve accessibility to countryside x2
Keep free 1 hour parking
Conservation Areas and listed buildings properly valued and supported
Encourage voluntary support of sport and youth services
Affordable housing for young people
Affordable local housing young old first time buyers
Improve facilities and opportunities for outdoor sport – rugby and football
etc
Promote range of population ages – to secure retain facilities for all age
classes
Improve public transport particularly to the railway station
Keep new housing growth gradual not sudden new large estates
151
Priority 4
Avoid large developments – maintain Green Belt
Maintain facilities for people for all ages, youth clubs, medical and disabled
facilities
Modest growth providing opportunities for local people to remain
Retain Historic character of the town – medieval and Rothschild base
Reduce the need to travel for work, leisure and shopping
Evaluate and debate potential development sites
Priority 5
Maintain present parking system
Maintain character of town and discourage urban sprawl
Ensure future development is in keeping with local distinctiveness
A local studies resource centre associated with local history museum
Attractive accessible employment opportunities
Improve biodiversity of green corridors
152
Analysis of Priorities
Table 1 groups the key priorities according to what participants wrote on the
priority boards. The number of times an issue was raised on each priority
board is shown in the table: each issue is then given a total score
Table 1: Analysis of priorities
Issue
Improve local facilities
Affordable housing
Town parking
Retain town character
Encourage
commercial enterprise
and local employment
Retain the countryside
or Green Belt
Keep town the same
Gradual growth
Improve public transport
Improve Greenspace
Retain the vitality of the
town – leisure, shops
and restaurants
Improve accessibility to
the countryside
Value
and
support
conservation areas and
listed buildings
Modest
growth
for
locals to remain
Evaluate and debate
potential development
sites
Priority
1
1x5
2x5
2x5
1x5
1x5
Priority
2
5x4
1x4
1x4
Priority
3
3x3
2x3
1x3
-
Priority
4
1x2
1x2
1x2
Priority
5
1x1
1x1
2x1
1x1
Total
Score
37
16
14
13
12
1x5
1x4
-
1x2
-
11
2x5
1x5
1x5
1x5
-
1x4
1x4
1x3
-
-
1x1
-
10
9
8
6
4
-
-
1x3
-
-
3
-
-
1x3
-
-
3
-
-
-
1x2
-
2
-
-
-
1x2
-
2
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5 points are
given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each
time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on
Priority board 5.
The table highlights that most people felt that local facilities should be
improved to make the town more self-sufficient. A wider variety of shops,
services and facilities for children and young people were sought, including
opportunities for more outdoor sport and a local studies resource centre
associated with the local history museum.
Affordable housing was also a high priority for Tring, especially for single
parents and the elderly, first time buyers and local young people.
153
Other Comments
Additional comments from the participants were noted. These included:
a need for secure parking facilities all over the town; and
measures to deter hardstanding in front of drives.
One Wilstone resident spoke in support of Gypsy and Traveller sites in the
light of local personal experience.
List of Attendees
Mr. Tim Amsden
Ms. Kate Batt
Cllr Mary Booth
Ms. Sue Gore
Mrs Pat Gray
Mrs Susan Johnson
Ms Carol Lawrence
Mr John Maitland
Mr Mel Matthews
Mr Peter Hearn
Mr Mike Thomlinson
Ms Helen Wells
Mr Matthew Wood
Cllr Nick Hollinghurst
Claire Covington
Martin Hicks
Paul Newton
James Moir
Karl Stonebank
Local History & Museum Society
HCC Archaeologist
Tring History Society
Tring Access Committee
Tring Town Council Clerk
Tring Youth Project & The Crime Prevention Panel
Tring Community Association
Tring & District Chamber of Commerce
Friends of Tring Reservoir
Tring Rural Parish Council
Arts Educational School
HCC Property
Landscape & Recreation
HCC Ecology/Biodiversity
DBC Development Control
DBC Conservation & Design
DBC LSP
154
8. Senior Voice and Community
Groups Workshop
Held: 16th January 2009
155
Contents
Page
Introduction
157
Group Session 1 - Your People
158
Group Session 2 - Your Place
162
Visioning Priorities
163
Analysis of Priorities
167
Key issues from workshop questions
170
Other Comments
170
List of Attendees
171
156
Introduction
There was an initial presentation setting the context for planning in Hemel
Hempstead, which was followed by 2 group sessions covering the topics
„Your People‟ and „Your Place‟. Each of the group sessions covered a range
of questions. In order that all of the questions could be discussed within the
allotted time, the participants were split into 3 groups answering questions on
relevant topics. The first group session was split as follows: Group 1 covered
Question 1; Group 2 covered Question 2; and Group 3 Question 3. During the
second session people stayed in the same groups and answered the same
question about housing.
After the participants had answered their questions, the groups had to
determine and identify the most important responses made (the hash mark #
highlights an important issue). A nominated person or the facilitator from each
group recounted the question and the most important issues to all of the
participants in the room. The other groups were then given an opportunity to
add any further responses. The responses that were given by the workshop
participants are given in Sections 3 to 4 of this report. Answers to the
questions have been noted per group underneath the relevant questions.
Workshop participants were also asked to write their top 5 priorities for the
Borough on „post it‟ notes and then to place them on the Priority Boards 1 to
5, Priority 1 being the highest. These are reported under „Visioning Priorities‟.
The „Analysis of Priorities‟ attributes points according to a sliding scale for
each priority, i.e. 5 points for priority 1, down to 1 point for priority 5.
Any other comments made during the event were listed on a „Park It‟ board
and are reported under „Other Comments‟.
A list of attendees and groups can be found at the end of this feedback report.
157
Workshop 1 - Your People
Group 1 – Facilities and Services
1a) What facilities and services should be accommodated in local
centres, residential development and town centres?
Local Centres
Day Centres in all areas; and
Enough space for GP surgeries to expand, or new sites to enable easier
access to Doctors/Practice Nurses.
Residential Development
need for better road access (Woodhall Farm, Manor Estate mentioned);
wider roads in new and existing neighbourhoods would help improve bus
access and other service vehicles; and
cars should be limited to parking off road or on one side of the road only.
Town Centres
an integrated transport system is needed especially in HH town centre with
good bus links, a bus station, and links to the railway stations; #
frequency of bus services is important (Arriva need to ensure timetables
are adhered to – no service runs should be kept;
dial-a-ride is important; and
removal of acute Hospital services to Watford provides a few problems for
this district: there access issues getting to Watford via the car or public
transport; there is an increasing population with growing needs; and
precedence shows that Hemel will be the largest Herts town without an A
& E department;
in terms of a “new site” for Hemel Hospital – ensure space for expansion
(and bringing back of A & E and other services).
1b) If there are deficiencies in existing areas, how do you think they
can be tackled?
extra facilities in Gossoms End;
by providing accessibility to local shopping areas/cultural leisure facilities,
such as community centres in walking distance; #
additional sports/leisure provision for areas outside HH, Berkhamsted and
Tring;
make better use of canal/rivers for informal leisure use;
158
policing of „blue badge‟/disabled parking spaces to avoid misuse and more
control over who is issued badges;
improved accessibility to facilities, such as Jarman Park/Sports Centre by
public transport; #
more sports/leisure facilities in HH town centre;
income gap may grow if people cannot afford to travel to different areas of
the Borough; and
challenge to accommodate needs * of disabled people (including young
ones) and elderly often housebound people.
* leisure, stimulation, basic needs
Group 2 – Design and Renewables
2a) How should we integrate new housing and employment with new
communities?
New housing should have a neighbourhood centre with facilities such as
shops and a community centre #
Wide roads with adequate off-street parking #
No „Cul-de-Sacs‟
Family homes with garages #
Support to Park & Ride
More public transport with access for the disabled and pushchairs
Strengthen public transport links to Watford General Hospital with
frequent and low cost services
Manageable green space and gardens
Family Accommodation (not flats)
Not flats for the elderly, but housing that is integrated into the community
and close to community facilities
Elderly people need bigger rooms
Better pedestrian access to community facilities
Varied choice of design – traditional and modern
Designed for security
159
Sensory lighting, toilets and taps
Downstairs W.C
Use of natural light in homes
Energy efficient homes
2b) What do you think are the most important things to take into
account in designing new buildings?
See above
2c) What types of renewable energy should be encouraged in
development?
See above
Group 3 – Recreational and Open Space
3a) Are there any recreational deficiencies in the Borough? If so what
and where?
Yes
Cultural and community facilities in the Borough #
Access to swimming facilities for the disabled is poor
Replacement Pavilion #
Deficiency in parking at community meeting places #
Cycle ways deficiency in Tring & Borough. More cycle ways are needed to
encourage cycling to school and healthy lifestyles
A separate sports centre for Tring
Key playing space for young children is missing in Tring (like Canal Fields,
Berkhamsted)
Wheelchair access is poor in the Borough #
Allotments needed – dotted around settlements rather than larger sites #
160
Green spaces to be included in new development – soft landscaping is
missing in new development #
3b) What changes do we want to see with our open spaces in the
Borough?
Parking by open spaces
Retain flowers and flowerbeds around the towns/villages #
Improve maintenance of roads and pavements in the Borough i.e. litter,
dog mess and glass #
Do not build on open space #
Disabled access to open space
Play areas
Additional allotments
Do not merge settlements i.e. Berkhamsted and Bourne End #
161
Workshop 2 - Your Place
All of the groups answered the same question:
How and where do we accommodate all of this growth?
Group 1
HH – avoid developing in the river valleys
Berkhamsted/and smaller settlement – Green Belt provides a valuable
area of open space for the town (because of local deficiencies of open
space this land should not be developed)
Prevent coalescence of settlements, and keep as much of the Green Belt
as possible
Consider less attractive areas of GB
HH options – focus on (1) Pouchen End and (2) East Hemel
Very important to ensure adequate infrastructure – is there an optimum
size?
Minority view – northern option with access essential to the northern by
pass
Group 2
Should be phased
Proper infrastructure should be in place
Facilities more important than location BUT Green Belt should be
protected
Preserve separation of communities
Housing should be close to employment (e.g. Maylands)
Prefer Eastern [Hemel Hempstead] option
Need good transport links
Group 3
Growth option for Hemel – northern or dispersed
Infrastructure, community facilities and local centres
neighbourhoods are vital
Support a new road, whether northern bypass or another road
162
for
new
Visioning Priorities
Priority 1
Provision of an integrated traffic system and utilities, with 7.5 ton limits in
new areas
Avoiding building too near to Buncefield
Public transport – e.g. Hop on Hop off bus (free preferably) – going to
major areas e.g. shopping/leisure/station etc
Consult older people for their needs
Phase areas of development
Adequate infrastructure is needed including transport, health, schools and
community
Dacorum/Hemel Hempstead Acute General Hospital is needed to serve
the district now and in the future
Provide good public transport to serve the existing area and new
development i.e. an increase in bus services is required
Provide adequate disabled access
Provide a Hospital and appropriate health services
Existing Hospital services should remain open
Large community centres are needed for a variety of functions (offices,
etc.)
Access – in general for the disabled, mums with children etc. (buses, cycle
route etc.)
Better use of Gossoms End (Elderly Care Unit) Day Centre in
Berkhamsted
A better transport system
Family homes with gardens are essential to help combat childhood obesity
Community halls/concert halls should be included for all social in future
developments
No building near Buncefield
No extension to the Green Belt around Berkhamsted – it is accepted that
Berkhamsted is under served with recreation space within the town
Affordable housing provision
Retain green spaces – to lift the spirits and keep the flowerbeds
throughout the Borough
What has happened to all the shops in Hemel Hempstead? Maintain a
variety of occupied shops
Pavilion replacement - large meeting place for 400+ people with cultural
entertainment space
New growth areas to include community infrastructure
What about the hospital, is it going?
Blue Badge Council should be able to check how many BB holders there
are and Dacorum should provide enough parking spaces for them.
A Hospital with full facilities such as A&E, operating theatres and adequate
parking
Urgent Regeneration of “Old Town” and new “Civic Centre” with Transport
Centre, major cultural facility, health facility, education facility, leisure
centre (not more housing)
163
Priority 2
Save Hemel Hospital – travelling from Tring to Watford is too far
Provide a residential home for elderly persons sensitive to cultural needs
New housing needs to include not just a proportion of social housing, but
also a proportion of houses with wider doorways and corridors, rooms
large enough for a wheelchairs turning circle, and large bathrooms to
accommodate hoist facilities needed for disabled children
Pavilion – access to cultural events
Good public transport to all parts of Dacorum
Build new communities with facilities, rather than “adding on” houses
without facilities
Adequate infrastructure
Enough activities for young people which are sensitive everyone‟s needs
Health, schools and community infrastructures must be provided in new
areas
Preserving Green Belt e.g. Bulbourne Valley
Multi-cultural centres and community meeting places
Better bus services and reinstatement of Park and Ride
Developments to be in keeping with the character of the local area
Social care facilities available throughout the borough (HH, Berkhamsted,
Tring and villages)
More parking
Retain green spaces where practicable
Local Hospital
Allow for future development but keep open space as it is a good quality of
Hemel
Prefer West rather than East development areas in HH
Northern area for small buildings etc. i.e. bungalows/small flats
Maintain green area between settlements
Accessible local transport includes Park and Ride
Develop new Civic area
Health (hospital) and community support systems – (vital if 17,000 new
homes to be built)
Hospital – Hemel needs its own hospital and have more centres for walk in
and out doctors
Priority 3
Remember older housebound people when planning new and existing
estates
Parking, road links commuting facilities
Good access and transport
Affordable reliable public transport
Decent transport
Improve public transport system especially Tring and the villages. Tring to
Aldbury and Wigginton bus is under threat of termination
Good primary health care for all residents old and young
164
New build to concentrate on East of town – up to Motorway – plus smaller
amount West of town also avoid flood plains, brownfield areas to be
investigated
Houses to be built
Accelerate program of Civic Zone Development
Northern option 3,200
Principle – negate the concept of NlMBY – i.e. don‟t let it sway the
decisions (in relation to Traveller Sites)
Transport links to be in place to cope with new build – include cycle ways
Consultation with older people re. their community
Cultural centre
Better health facilities
Follow the rules of the Sustainable Communities Act to keep services as
local as possible
Eastern area through to Western
Well managed open spaces with access for all must be a condition of all
new development
Disability access to community and leisure facilities as well as open
spaces. Important to consider wheelchair users who do not use standard
NHS size wheelchairs, and also mobility scooters. The nature of the
surface on paths is important too! Wheelchairs and pushchairs do not
move well on stone/shingle!
Space for people parking at health care premises including hospital;
Transport – more frequent transport throughout the whole borough
Affordable housing
Priority 4
Security safety and policing, cleaner town
Better internal design of housing – find priorities of various age groups
Ensure adequate community facilities that cater for all the community
Maintain accessibility in all existing and install in new neighbourhoods
Provide easily accessible schools, community centres, concert halls etc. –
need for transport
Facilities – community, shops and schools – leisure social service
provision
Town appearance important – design to avoid concrete boxes and Water
Gardens to be upgraded (litter collections improved)
All areas should have small shopping amenities
Look to the future:- encourage healthier lives by: more cycle ways, more
allotments, easier access to green areas i.e. parking, wheelchairs & buggy
access
Development to East and West of HH – 2 larger developments
Integrated transport facilities including cycle ways in new neighbourhoods
Adequate parking both in housing areas and local facilities
Eastern options
Principle – Integrated transport system – reduce cars. No new “Northern
Bypass Road” – oppose i.e. link with Sustainability and low carbon plan
School playgrounds
165
Hold all existing facilities and land used by hospital and NHS Services until
alternative available
Replace the Pavilion ASAP
Future housing must include housing for those with learning
disabilities/difficulties who wish to live independently also include small
(3/4) people community homes for those with LDD who need to live with
resident carers
Through roads in new development
Excellent shopping facilities
As much as possible the Green Belt to remain
Decent infrastructure, hospital and schools
Priority 5
A good bus service – access for all
Do not put young families in flats without gardens!
Take into account the feel of well-being in the communities
Promoting community
Need for safer walking, cycling routes round the town – can also be safe
routes to school, wheelchair/mobility scooter routes etc.
Flower beds and green areas deserve higher maintenance and litter
cleared away to make people feel better!
Leisure pursuits for different cultures required such as „Bollywood‟ films
Do not develop all the infill opportunities – gaps are important
More money
Good infrastructure in place for existing and future communities
Facilities for disables
More community centres
Houses in two estates on west and east sites 6 [Pouchen End] & 14b
[Leverstock Green - Blackwater}
Principles – maintain Green Belt as far as possible, given that Green
Corridors between settlements to be maintained with the housing
development in all of 3 major settlements – Hemel, Berkhamsted and
Tring
Facilities for youth – not youth clubs
Use rivers and canal to enhance the whole of Dacorum. Remember that
Hemel should be an attraction – to hold its own
Tramway system would be great, and improvements to the pedestrian
accessibility at the circular crossing (Plough Roundabout) to the centre of
the town
New housing ecologically sustained. Low C footprint if possible
Road to skirt from west to east – north – around Grovehill to Bourne End
Build up and improve all local centres
166
Analysis of Priorities
The table below groups the key priorities according to what was written on the
priority boards 1 to 5. The number of times an issue was raised on each
priority board is shown in the table: each issue is then given a total score.
Issue
HH
Acute
General
Hospital and health
facilities
Good frequent public
transport systems in the
Borough - free bus to
major destinations in
HH and park and ride,
Provision of community
facilities such as large
community centres/halls
and cultural centres
Adequate safe access
and parking for the
disabled, and parents
with small children
Affordable homes
Retain and preserve
open
space,
green
space and flowerbeds
Provision of integrated
traffic and transport
systems to cope with
new development
Adequate infrastructure
Develop
new
Civic
Centre with transport
centre,
cultural
educational and health
facilities and a leisure
centre
More parking
Avoid building too near
to Buncefield
Performing Arts Centre
for HH
Older peoples‟ needs
Family homes
Preserve Green Belt
Social care facilities
An eastern and western
option preferred
Activities for
young
people
Maintain
a variety
of shops in HH
Regeneration of the Old
Town
Better use of Gossoms
Priority
1
5x5
Priority
2
4x4
Priority
3
2x3
3x5
3x4
4x3
3x5
1x4
1x3
1x3
3x5
1x5
1x5
1x4
2x4
Priority
5
Total
Score
47
1x1
40
1x2
2x1
26
2x2
1x1
25
1x1
15
14
2x3
1x5
1x5
1x5
Priority
4
2x3
1x4
1x4
1x3
1x4
2x3
13
1x2
1x2
1x1
12
10
1x2
2x5
1x5
1x4
1x1
1x5
1x5
1x1
1x1
5
1x1
2x1
1x3
1x4
1x2
1x2
10
8
6
6
6
6
1x3
1x4
1x4
12
12
1x5
5
1x5
5
1x5
5
167
End Elderly Care Day
Centre
Manage open spaces
and
make
them
accessible to all
Phasing growth
Lifetime homes
New communities with
facilities, rather than
communities with no
facilities
Culturally
sensitive
residential home for
elderly persons
Incorporate
local
character
in
new
developments
Prefer developing to the
west rather the east
Northern area of HH for
smaller buildings like
bungalows
Maintain green spaces
between settlements
Build to the east of HH
Limit northern option to
3,200
Don‟t let NIMBYism
influence the siting of
Gypsy and Traveller
sites
Consult
the
elderly
sector of the community
Follow the sustainable
Communities Act to
keep services local
Encourage
healthier
lifestyles and the wellbeing in communities more cycle ways, more
allotments etc
Security, safety and
policing
Better internal design of
housing
Provide
community
facilities such as shops
and schools
Improve the town‟s
appearance – avoid
concrete boxes and
litter collection important
Local centres important
Include cycle ways
Eastern option
No Northern Bypass
School playgrounds
Prevent redevelopment
of the hospital site until
1x3
5
1x2
1x4
1x4
5
4
4
1x4
4
1x4
4
1x4
4
1x4
4
1x4
4
1x5
1x3
1x3
3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x3
3
1x2
168
1x1
3
1x2
2
1x2
2
1x2
2
1x2
2
1x2
1x2
1x2
1x2
1x2
1x2
2
2
2
2
2
2
alternative
facilities
available
Homes for people who
need live-in carers
Through roads in new
development
Excellent
shopping
facilities
Appropriate
leisure
pursuits for different
cultures – Bollywood
films at the cinema
Do not develop all the
infill opportunities –
gaps are important
Money
Facilities
for
the
disabled
Use rivers and canals to
enhance Dacorum
Low-carbon housing
Tram system in the
town centre
Northern Bypass is
needed
Build up and improve
local centres
1x2
2
1x2
2
1x2
2
1x1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1x1
1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1x1
1
1
1x1
1
1x1
1
*Total score is calculated by giving an issue points for each time it was mentioned on a priority board. 5 points are
given for each time it appeared on Priority board 1, 4 points for each time it was on Priority board 2, 3 points for each
time it was on Priority board 3, 2 points for each time it was on Priority board 4 and 1 point for each time it was on
Priority board 5.
The table shows the top 5 priorities suggested by workgroup attendees. The
top priority is to bring back a hospital to Hemel Hempstead with full acute
service facilities, to avoid lengthy and sometimes expensive travel to Watford
General Hospital. The second priority for Hemel Hempstead and the Borough
is for an improvement to public transport. This includes improving links to
places, improving frequency of services and making the service more
affordable. The third priority is to provide more community facilities such as
community centres, concert halls and cultural centres.
Safe and access and parking for the disabled and parents with young children
is also sought, as well as the provision of more affordable homes with
gardens.
169
Key issues from workshop questions
1. Facilities and Services
Deliver further cultural and community facilities
Replace the PavilionAccessibility
HH town centre needs an integrated transport system with good bus links,
a bus station and links to the railway stations
Improve accessibility to local shops, services and facilities
More parking at community meeting places
Wheelchair access across the Borough
2. Borough management
Improve maintenance of roads and pavements
Retain flowerbeds and flowers around the towns and villages
3. New development/neighbourhoods
should have local centres with shops, and services and facilities
should have wide roads with adequate off-street parking
should have a large proportion of family homes with garages
green spaces and soft landscaping to be included in new developments
do not build on open space
do not merge settlements
Development Options
development in the east was preferred by 2 out of the 3 groups
infrastructure and new transport links/roads are needed
good quality Green Belt should be protected from development
Other Comments
Some people could not hear very well.
170
Attendees
Title First Name Surname
Ms
Ms
Mr
Ms
Anil
Anne
Zena
Derek
June
Padania
Janes
Bullmore
Baulch
Crawley
Mr
Bob
Hewitt
Ms
Ms
Mr
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Mr
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Mr
Ms
June
Marion
Ken
Margaret
Audrey
Eleanor
Betty
Hilda
Denise
Jim
Pamela
Terri
Nicky
Elizabeth
Elizabeth
Derek
Beth
Street
Cowe
Hayes
Fricker
Newbould
Jones
Harris
Pittman
Chennell
Sheth
Haynes
Burfield
Flynn
Rathbone
Bendall
Grant
Palfrey
Miss N W
Miss L J
Garnham
Ibett
Ms
Freestone
Rosemary
Company Name
Dacorum Action on Disability
Dacorum Hospital Action Group
Grovehill Church
Dacorum Senior Voice - Older Persons
Forum
Dacorum Senior Voice - Older Persons
Forum
Age Concern
St Johns Church / HACRO
Shopmobility
Breathe Easy Dacorum
Tring University of the Third Age
Dacorum Hospital Action Group
Age Concern
Adeyfield Free Church / Red Cross
Dacorum Indian Society
Shopmobility
Tring University of the Third Age
Tring Lions Club
Dacorum Senior Voice - Older Persons
Forum
Age Concern
Civil Service Retirement Fellowship (Hemel
Group)
171
172
9. Youth Workshop
Held: 25th September 2008
173
Contents
Page
Introduction
175
Workshop 1: Providing new accommodation
176
Workshop 2: Managing the countryside
183
Workshop 3: Shopping and Leisure
186
Workshop 4: Access to work, services and facilities
190
Key Issues raised
194
List of Attendees
194
174
Introduction
The students participating in these workshops all attended the Dacorum
Youth Environmental Forum.
The students initially voted on a new name for the „Youth Environment
Forum‟. The „Dacorum Green Team‟ was declared the winning name.
The students listened to presentations on the Regional Plan and the Core
Strategy before being split into four workshop groups. Each group covered
one of the following themes:
Providing new homes
Managing the countryside
Shopping and Leisure
Access to work, services and facilities
They were given some context to the workshop theme that they covered and
then they were asked to answer some questions. The answers that they gave
are listed under the facilitator‟s note below for each of the workshops.
175
Workshop 1: Providing new accommodation
Briefing note and questions for facilitators
The Council must plan to provide around 17,000 dwellings between 2006 and
2031, at a rate of about 680 dwellings every year. This is about double the
current rate of provision each year, and in total is the equivalent of half of
Hemel Hempstead. Many people think this is a ‘bad thing’. However people
do need homes, and for many years now people have had to move away from
the borough to find accommodation. The growth rate implies some inmigration (i.e. people moving into the borough), but around 95% of the
demand would come from local people.
We are told a large proportion of the growth should be at Hemel Hempstead
and the Green Belt boundary must be changed here.
Gypsies and travellers also need places to live, about 60 pitches compared to
the 17,000 dwellings. This would occupy the space of around 3-4 football
pitches. Any suggestion of provision has brought out opposition and
prejudice, usually based on actual experience or media observation of
unauthorised encampments. The aim is to have 4 or more sites, which can
be properly designed and managed.
Questions
1. Where would you put the main housing areas around Hemel Hempstead?
(Think about the locations on the map and see Q2 in addition) What
factors do you think are important? [Use map for Q1 and Q2]
2. Would you locate any new housing on the edge of Berkhamsted and Tring
and the large villages in Dacorum, and where? What scale of housing
should be planned for (e.g. approximate numbers, numbers in relation to
the size of the settlement, approximate land area that should be used – ref
maps showing Berkhamsted, Tring, Kings Langley and Bovingdon, and
montage showing housing densities and sites)
3. What new housing should be allowed within these places and where – e.g.
by infilling (i.e. filling in gaps between buildings) or by redevelopment of
existing property?
4. Should villages be treated any differently from towns (in terms of the scale
and type of housing)? If so, how?
5. How should we integrate new (housing) development with existing
communities? (or should new development be kept separate?)
6. How and where should we accommodate Gypsies and Travellers? (Do
you see this as a big issue? What factors would you take into account?)
[Use AO Map of potential Gypsy Sites and montage showing a typical site]
Supplementary question - What do you think are the most important things to
take into account in designing new buildings?
[Visual aids
176
AO Borough Map showing settlements and their boundaries and the key
housing options at Hemel Hempstead: where you live – red dot; 3 selected
housing locations – blue dots; where elsewhere – yellow dot
Montage showing housing densities and sites
AO Borough Map or other maps showing potential Gypsy sites – pick 4 –
green dots
Montage showing a typical 15 pitch Gypsy site]
Feedback from Workshop 1
Schools involved:
Adeyfield
Broadfield Primary
St Albert the Great
Q1. Where would you put the main housing areas around Hemel
Hempstead? (Think about the locations on the map and see Q2 in addition)
What factors do you think are important? [Use map for Q1 and Q2]
Please see Figure 1 for areas in Hemel Hempstead that were considered
appropriate.
Factors considered important:
If there are more houses, we need more schools;
Houses should not be near rivers or canals;
There should be quiet areas for elderly people;
They should be near green areas;
They should not be next to the dual carriageway;
They should not be on fields, as we need fields for crops; and
The types of housing should be divided as follows: 10% flats, 10%
bungalows and 80% houses.
177
Figure 1 – Main Housing Areas around Hemel Hempstead
178
Q2. Would you locate any new housing on the edge of Berkhamsted,
Tring and the large villages in Dacorum, and where? What scale of
housing should be planned for (e.g. approximate numbers, numbers in
relation to the size of the settlement, approximate land area that should be
used – ref maps showing Berkhamsted, Tring, Kings Langley and Bovingdon,
and montage showing housing densities and sites)?
Yes. Most of the houses should be in Hemel Hempstead but there should
be some split between Tring and Berkhamsted. See map for preferred
locations
Berkhamsted has a big population, already so shouldn‟t be increased too
much. Houses should be built near main roads. It needs more facilities
e.g. leisure centres. 2,000-5,000 dwellings.
Kings Langley is close to Hemel Hempstead and near to the motorway.
Areas around the village that could be infilled (like a jigsaw). 200-1,000
dwellings.
Bovingdon should be made bigger and have a greater population. There
is an area on the edge of the village that was considered suitable. 200-500
dwellings.
Nettleden is close to Hemel Hempstead and would be a good place for
families.
Q3. What new housing should be allowed within these places and where
– e.g. by infilling (i.e. filling in gaps between buildings) or by
redevelopment of existing property?
Houses should be built on the outskirts so that it is less stressful for
people.
Don‟t want to lose green space so some development should be inside the
towns.
It would be too busy if areas were infilled.
Don‟t build houses on old factories; renew them for businesses.
Refurbish old houses.
Q4. Should villages be treated any differently from towns (in terms of the
scale and type of housing)? If so, how?
No time to answer.
Q5. How should we integrate new (housing) development with existing
communities? (Or should new development be kept separate?)
No time to answer.
179
Q6. How and where should we accommodate Gypsies and Travellers?
(Do you see this as a big issue? What factors would you take into
account?) [Use AO Map of potential Gypsy Sites and montage showing a
typical site]
See Figure 2. Sites should be located on the edge of the Borough.
180
Figure 2 – Main Gypsy and Traveller Sites
182
Workshop 2: Managing the countryside
Briefing note and questions for facilitators
The countryside covers the greater part of Dacorum, with the scarp slope of
the Chiltern Hills near Tring and dip slope with valleys to the south. A small
area at Long Marston and Wilstone is relatively flat claylands in the Vale of
Aylesbury. Many of the changes in the appearance of the countryside stem
from changes in
- agriculture, changes in consumer behaviour (e.g. more vegetarians) and
viability of agriculture itself
- woodland management, and
- urban pressures (e.g. conversion of buildings to homes in the country,
visitor pressures on sites).
Our challenges are to promote positive management of the countryside:
- promoting green infrastructure (a network of space for wildlife, recreation
and cultural experience)
- promoting biodiversity (Dacorum is an important area within the region)
- conserving the landscape of the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (part
of the Chiltern Hills)
- promoting the sustainable use of soils and agriculture
- increasing woodland;
- management of water supply and drainage, and
- adapting to climate change
The countryside is a resource for our settlements, including where minerals
are, where a lot of our waste is/would be buried, where large scale renewable
energy plant would be located.
Questions:
1. What do you like and what do you dislike about the countryside around
us?
2. In 20 years time, what do you want the countryside to
(a) look like; [Use montage as a prompt] and
(b) be used for?
3. How do we make this happen?
4. How should urban pressures (e.g. buildings, cars trampling, horseyculture)
be controlled, if at all?
5. Given that Hemel Hempstead will be extended, how would you select the
areas of countryside for development? [Use Map as prompt]
[Visual aids
AO Borough Map showing key housing options at Hemel
Montage of types of countryside]
183
Feedback from Workshop 2
Schools involved:
Brockswood Primary
Grove Road Primary
Q1. What do you like and what do you dislike about the countryside
around us?
Like: Open space, views, and bigger gardens
Dislike: smell, weeds, no shops or toilets
Q2. In 20 years time, what do you want the countryside to:
(a) look like; [Use montage as a prompt] and
(b) be used for?
a)More hedges.
b) Farming
Q3. How do we make this happen?
Community volunteers
Q4. How should urban pressures (e.g. buildings, cars trampling,
horseyculture) be controlled, if at all?
Use cars wisely
Use buses
Q5. Given that Hemel Hempstead will be extended, how would you select
the areas of countryside for development? [Use Map as prompt]
Key:
Green: where they live
Yellow, Blue, Orange: areas preferred for development.
See Figure 3 on next page
184
Figure 3 – Preferred Areas for Future Development
185
Workshop 3: Shopping and Leisure
Briefing note and questions for facilitators
The population will grow quite substantially – by over 20,000 people. Most of
this growth will be at Hemel Hempstead. In places where there is no new
housing the population will decline because each household is on average
becoming smaller.
Food and basic provisions are always needed. People want more material
(non-food) goods and the forecast recession aside, we can expect in the
longer term to have money to spend on material goods, home improvements,
eating and drinking out and various other leisure activities. Open space and
provision for active leisure assists health and general well-being. Arts and
cultural facilities provide diversity and meet a different range of leisure needs.
Questions
Shopping
1. How do you foresee shopping changing in the next 20 years?
2. What changes would you make to the town centres and to local or village
centres?
3. What else would you like to see in your town/local centre(s)?
Leisure
4. What recreational needs are not being met for young people? If any
deficiencies are met immediately, will you be using the facilities in 20 years
time, and will they still be needed? (What are your reasons?)
5. Should Leisureworld be demolished? What are your reasons? (If yes,
what should it be replaced with?)
6. Are there any (other) new large scale leisure facilities that should be
provided? If so, what and where? [Use AO Borough Map to answer where]
7. What do you think of open spaces (e.g. parks, playgounds and playing
fields) generally? Should they be managed any differently (compared to
now)? If so, how?
[Visual aid
AO Borough Map]
Feedback from Workshop 3
Schools involved:
Bovingdon Primary
Cavendish
Lockers Park
186
Shopping
Q1. How do you foresee shopping changing in the next 20 years?
Designer clothes
Less variety
More expensive
Less open space
More grow your own
Smaller shops
Order stuff in
Internet
Some shops will close – „credit crunch‟
Travel more to get to shops e.g. London
Competition might mean that shops consolidate
Big companies take over the market and control
People buy less luxuries e.g.toys
Value for money
Q2. What changes would you make to the town centres and to local or
village centres?
Free stuff for local people
Lower prices for facilities
Facilities all in one place
Q3. What else would you like to see in your town/local centre(s)?
Free fun outdoor (healthy) activities
Something (e.g.gym classes) for old people
More little local shops
More privately/family run shops
Pick your owns
Leisure
Q4. What recreational needs are not being met for young people? If any
deficiencies are met immediately, will you be using the facilities in 20
years time, and will they still be needed? (What are your reasons?)
Opens space – flat and mowed
Improve canal
Bike racks
Cycle paths/routes off road
Free bikes (with rules) or fees
Restaurants just for young people or at least with discounts
Set menus for set amounts
Lego/play stuff
187
Q 5. Should Leisureworld be demolished? What are your reasons? (If
yes, what should it be replaced with?)
For demolition: manky and ugly
Against demolition: good facilities, fun for all ages
Q 6. Are there any (other) new large scale leisure facilities that should be
provided? If so, what and where? [Use AO Borough Map to answer where]
See Figure 4 on the next page
Q7. What do you think of open spaces (e.g. parks, playgounds and
playing fields) generally? Should they be managed any differently
(compared to now)? If so, how?
No time to answer.
188
Figure 4 – Large scale leisure facilities that should be provided
Leisure
Facilitiy
Youthfull
fun
Sport
Rowing
facilities
History
museum
for school
Leisure
World
Nash Mills should
have a leisure
world because
then the children
can go there after
school
189
Workshop 4: Access to work, services and facilities
Briefing note and questions for facilitators
The population will grow quite substantially – by over 20,000 people. Most of
this growth will be at Hemel Hempstead. In places where there is no new
housing the population will decline because each household is on average
becoming smaller.
With new homes we need jobs and services and facilities. We need social
and physical infrastructure (for example community halls, open space and
doctors’ surgeries or drainage and roads). It should be possible to plan some
new development within existing built up areas, together with extension of the
built up area into the countryside. At Hemel Hempstead these will be the
equivalent of new neighbourhoods (each with 1,000-1,250 dwellings). The
challenge is to improve the planning of all areas.
The two issues are where new infrastructure and facilities should be located
and how easy it is to get to and use them.
Questions
1. What facilities and services do you regard as important for each residential
area?
2. What would you expect within walking distance?
3. How would you get to other facilities and services?
4. If there are deficiencies (in the provision of facilities and services) in
existing areas, how do you think they can be tackled?
5. How should we integrate new (housing) development with existing
communities?
Feedback from Workshop 4
Schools involved:
Bridgewater Middle
Dundale Primary
Bold items were voted the most popular by the groups
Q1. What facilities and services do you regard as important for each
residential area?
Post offices, buses, new trains, leisure activities, parks, pharmacy, wind
turbines, shops, roads, parking spaces, doctors, countryside, sports centre,
larger schools or more schools, supermarkets, offices, football pitch,
swimming pool, leisure, public transport, clinic, roads, community areas,
public transport
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Q2. What would you expect within walking distance?
Post offices, buses, leisure activities, parks, pharmacy, shops, roads,
countryside, sports centre, larger schools or more schools, supermarkets,
offices, football pitch, swimming pool, leisure, community areas
Q3. How would you get to other facilities and services?
Facilities are important for each residential area which would be within
walking distance, provide travel to other facilities.
new trains, wind turbines, parking spaces, supermarkets, doctors, clinic,
public transport - all of these could be reached by car or any public
transport
See Figure 5 on next page
Q4. If there are deficiencies (in the provision of facilities and services) in
existing areas, how do you think they can be tackled?
Red road linking current estates to new facilities, new estates
Upgrade facilities in current estates
Footpaths that lead to the country
New cycle-lanes connecting old and new estates / facilities
New roads connecting old and new estates / facilities
A medium sizes town centre with smaller versions dotted around the
town that serve a number of estates (for convenience)
See Figure 6 on next page
Q5. How should we integrate new (housing) development with existing
communities?
Match people with the relevant type of housing for them, some like older
houses with big gardens, some prefer modern ones with smaller gardens.
Facilitate Community Days between the estates
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Figure 5 – How would you get to facilities and
services?
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Figure 6 – What are the deficiencies in facilities and
services?
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Key Issues raised
More leisure activities for children, such as rowing on the canal in
Boxmoor
More flat open spaces needed
More bike racks are needed around the town and a bike pool which offers
free bikes for use with rules or a fee
Public transport should be improved so that it is more accessible and
provides a more frequent service
Community areas are important and should be enhanced
Facilitate community days between estates
More quiet spaces for the elderly
Housing should be delivered, in the following overall proportion - 10% flats,
10% bungalows and 80% houses
Avoid infilling
Attendees
The students who attended the Youth Forum included representatives from
the following primary schools:
Adeyfield
Broadfield Primary
St Albert the Great
Brockswood Primary
Grove Road Primary
Bovingdon Primary
Cavendish
Lockers Park
Bridgewater Middle
Dundale Primary
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