Manual 13284243
LIBRARY (^CONGRESS.
lielf-Jl-i-l^
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
% c'^;
1s-h
4
Copyright, 1887,
By WHITE, STOKES, & ALLEN.
Copyright, 1892,
By
CHARLES
S.
J.
E.
BROWN &
CO.
PARKH1LL 4 CO., PRINTERS
BOSTON
PREFACE.
The
compiler desires to express her sense of the large
debt of gratitude she owes to the
lishers
many
authors and pub-
whose generous contributions have enabled her
carry out a cherished plan.
names of those
to
whom
desires to render her
she
so
is
to
a pleasure to mention the
It is
much
acknowledgments
indebted, and she
to the following
:
—
Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney,
Mrs. H. P. Spofford, Mrs. R. H. Davis, Mrs.
Mary Mapes
Dodge, Marion Harland, Mrs. D. A. Lincoln, Mrs. Mary
Stuart Smith, Miss
Juliet Corson,
and Miss Maria
Parloa,
Miss Estelle M. Hatch of the " Boston Globe," Mr. John
Burroughs, and Mr. Charles D. Warner.
Also to the Rev.
John H. Thomas of Indiana, the holder of the copyright
of the work published in Dayton, O.
Mifflin,
&
&
Co.
Brothers
Dodd, Mead,
J.
Peterson;
" Arthur's
of
;
Estes
&
Co.
;
Belford,
Home
"Good
&
Lauriat
J.
Messrs. Houghton.
Roberts Brothers
;
G. P. Putnam's Sons
;
;
•
Dick
B. Lippincott Co.
Clarke,
&
&
•
;
Harper
Fitzgerald
;
Mr. Charles
Co.; the publishers of
Magazine " and " Godey's Lady's Book,"
Housekeeping,"
"The
Caterer,"
and "The
Cook."
Also to the
papers
will
many
editors
who have aided
her,
and whose
be found duly credited throughout this volume.
v
"
INDEX TO LITERARY SELECTIONS AND
QUOTATIONS.
TAGE
Dinner Scene from "Riquet a la Houppe:" Mrs. Anne
Thackeray Ritchie
Thackeray
.
.
.
.
..........
from
Quotation
"
The
Ballad
of
Bouillabaisse
3
:
TheTrout:^.^.*;'^
7
15
Kisses at Market: Anonymous
.
.
.
.
.
.29
Beefsteak Pudding. " Martin Chuzzlewit " Dickens
32
Mutton and Turnips Charles Lamb
38
Roast Pig Charles Lamb
43
Bacon and Eggs Father Proufs Relics
-45
The Sabbath Supper Chime: Puck
49
On Tripe. "The Chimes: " Dickens
.50
Sam Lawson's Turkey. "Oldtown Folks :" Mrs. Stowe
59
Roast Goose. "A Christmas Carol :" Dickens
65
Stuffed Peacock Pierre Blot
67
Pigeon Pie. "The Sketch-Book: " Irving
71
On Game. "Steven Lawrence, Yeoman:" Mrs. Annie
Edwards
75
The 'Possum Arkansaw Traveller
77
"Toss us up an Omelet." "The Maid of Croissey:"
:
.
........
:
:
:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
...
.
:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
:
Mrs. Gore
83
Quotation from Essays
Description of Dairy.
The Mushroom:
Asparagus
The
:
R. W. Emerson
:
"Adam Bede:"
'
George Eliot
.
.87
.
93
Lamb
" Hiawatha
.96
Charles
...
" H. W. Longfellow
Maize.
Cabbage. "My Summer in a Garden:" C.Z). fTamr
The Onion. "My Summer in a Garden:" C. D. Warner
Celery John Burroughs
:
.
:
89
Campbell
97
103
105
"a6
INDEX TO SELECTIONS.
Extract from "Aunt Cindy's Dinner:" Sarah Winter
i37
Kellogg
Scene from " Mary Powell " Mrs. Manning
Quotation from " Locusts and Wild Honey " Burt ough
Scene from " Margaret " Sylvester Judd
Scene from "Margret Howth:" Mrs. R. H. Davis
Frumenty. " Essays of Elia " La?nb
An Apple Pudding. "We Girls :" Mrs. Whitney
Apple Dumplings: Charles Lamb
Strawberries Dr. Boteler and John Burroughs
Blackberries: Charles Mackay
Pumpkin Pie. "The Pumpkin:"/. G. Whittier
Mince Pie. " Legend of Sleepy Hollow " Irving
:
:
:
:
...
.
....
:
.
:
The Party.
Jessie's
"
Donald and Dorothy
Bargains
:
:
"
Mrs. Dodge
Mrs. H. P. Spofford
Precious Betsy -."Morton
.
Scene from "My
Poem on Herbs: Shenstone
Quotation from "The Culprit Fay:"/. R. Drake
146
i47
155
157
160
163
196
171
172
182
186
191
21 5
223
23I
2 33
CHAPTER
SOUPS,
;
UNIVERSAL COOKERY BOOK.
SOUPS.
" Where is Sylvia?" cried Colonel King, in a harsh voice.
His
back was turned to the window. " Sophy, why didn't you look after
her?"
"There she is! " cried Frank Lubworth. " What can she be doing
in the garden ? " And, in answer to an imploring look of Mrs. King's,
he added, " I will go after her don't you wait."
.
:
.
.
" It makes her father so nervous," said Mrs. King ..plaintively,
" I can't think what to do.
raising her voice.
It is just like her to go
for a walk in the garden, when we are all waiting dinner. Now, Sophy
never keeps us."
" Don't apologize," said the old lady.
" Sylvia is quite pretty
enough to keep us all waiting, and Sophy, who isn't pretty, is punctual
so it is all as it should be. Clear soup ? " " Yes."
"
poor Sophy " said the mother, who always seemed to take
a melancholy view of every thing. " It seems so hard that Sylvia
should have all the beauty of the family.
(No soup?) I can't take
soup it is a great privation to me.
Aunt Dormer
If you, with all
your experience, could suggest any means by which we could give her
"
little
her
sisters'
thoughtfulness
a
of
good sense and
" Suggest?" said the old lady, peppering her soup, "don't ask me
to suggest.
Find her a good husband, my dear a punctual man, who
can remind her when dinner is ready. Let him have a little money
to pay for it too."
Riquet A LA Houppe : Mrs. Anne Thackeray
Ritchie.
My
!
—
:
—
!
—
:
—
Brown
"Take one pound
or from the clod
tom
of lean beef, shin, leg, ox-cheek,
cut in slices, and place at the bot-
of a greased saucepan,
prevent
in
;
Stock.
its
slices
:
burning.
a
more
Add
adding a
little
water to
a piece of lean bacon, cut
or less quantity
is
immaterial,
—
from one-quarter to nearly the same amount of beef.
Cover close to draw out the gravy gently, and then
;
VEAL
4
allow
pour
it
STOCK'.
it becomes brown, then
water to entirely cover the
nearly to dry until
in sufficient boiling
meat, skimming it frequently, and putting in salt,
whole peppers, pot-herbs, and vegetables of any kind.
After boiling gently for five or six hours, pour the
broth from the meat, and let it stand during the
night to cool.
(Soup should never be suffered to
stand in any vessel of tin, copper, or iron, to get
cold.)
In the morning take off the scum and fat,
heat it, and put it away in a stone jar for future use.
This will form a foundation for all the best brown
soups."
Veal Stock.
Chop up three
bacon and two pounds of
the neck of veal
place in a stewpan with a pint
of water or beef-stock, and simmer for half an hour
then add two quarts of stock, one onion, a carrot, a
slices of
;
bouquet of herbs, four stalks of celery, half a teaspoonful of bruised whole peppers, and a pinch of
nutmeg with a teaspoonful of salt boil gently for
two hours, removing the scum in the mean time.
Strain into an earthen crock, and when cold remove
;
the
fat.
A few bones
an addiimprove it.
of poultry added, with
water or stock, will
White, Stokes,
Thomas J. Murrey.
tional quantity of
Fifty Soups
Alle?i,
:
—
&
Pubs.
Bouillon.
Four pounds of beef from the middle of the round,
two pounds bone, two quarts cold water, one tablespoonful
salt,
four peppercorns, four cloves, one table-
spoonful mixed herbs.
Wipe and
cut the meat and
POT-AU-FEU.
5
add the water, and heat
bones into small pieces
slowly add the seasoning, and simmer five hours.
strain, remove the fat, and
Boil down to three pints
;
;
;
season with salt and pepper.
Serve
in
cups at lunch-
eons, evening companies, etc.
Boil one onion, half
a carrot, and half a turnip, with
it
Boston Cook-Book
B rotIters,
you
if
like.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
:
— The
Roberts
{By per.)
Pubs.
Pot-au-Feu.
Put in a saucepan
cluded), cut into
a pound
of
of
carrots, turnips,
its
six
pounds
of beef (bones in-
two or three pieces three-quarters
mixed vegetables, such as onions,
leeks, white cabbage, and celery with
leaves left on,
;
all
cut in good-sized pieces
;
three
one of pepper, and one of
sugar add eight pints of water let it boil gently
three hours remove the fat add crusts of roll or
small spoonfuls of
salt,
;
;
;
;
slices
and
of
serve.
bread, either previously toasted or plain,
— Dainty Dishes: Lady Harriet
St. Clair.
Rabbit Soup.
Cut one or two rabbits into joints lay them for an
hour in cold water dry and fry them in butter till
about half done, with four or five onions and a
middling-sized head of celery, cut small add to this
;
;
;
three quarts of cold water, one pound of split peas,
some pepper and
five
hours,
Magazine..
salt
;
let
it
stew gently for four or
then strain and serve
{By per. Eds.)
it.
— Peterson's
EEL SOUP.
Eel Soup.
" Put three pounds of small eels in two quarts of
some mace, whole pepsweet herbs, and an onion cover them close,
and stew till the fish is quite broken then strain it
off, and serve with some toasted bread cut in slices.
It may be thickened with a quarter of a pint of rich
cream, and a teaspoonful of flour mixed in it, which
is a great improvement."
water, with a crust of bread,
per,
;
;
A
Marseilles Receipt for Bouillabaisse.
Almost any sort of fish may be used in making
and the more kinds the better. Those
bouillabaisse,
generally used, because caught in the Mediterranean,
are whitings, red mullets, soles, gurnet, turbot, lobsters,
and
them
in a
Slice two large onions, place
wide but deep stewpan made of thin
crayfish.
add four or five spoonfuls of the best oliveFry the onions of a pale brown color. Next
place the fish, previously washed and cut in small
pieces, in the pan, and cover them with warm water,
but not more than equals the depth of the contents
add salt in moderation, half a bay-leaf, and the flesh
of half a lemon without rind or pips, two tomatoes
cut in dice and the seeds removed, a few peppercorns, and four cloves of garlic.
Set it on a very
hot stove, and let it boil for twelve minutes.
By
this time the liquor should be reduced to a thkd of
metal
;
oil.
;
its
original quantity
add a small pinch of
;
saffron, a
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and allow
boil a
minute longer
;
taste,
it
to
and correct the seasoiv
!
;
OYSTER SOUP.
ing
if
Have ready
required.
7
youi
dish with two dozen slices of ligh:
an inch thick,
bread, cut half
laid
tureen
or deep
French roll or
in the bottom
;
pour some of the soup over, and turn the bread, so
that it may be thoroughly soaked then pour in the
;
remainder, keeping back the inferior parts of the
and serve very
fish,
Harriet
St.
Clair.
A
street there
hot.
is
in
— Dainty
Dishes: Lady
Paris famous,
For which no rhyme our language yields:
Rue Neuve des Petits Champs its name
The New Street of the Little Fields;
is
—
And
here's an inn, not rich and splendid,
But still in comfortable case,
The which in youth I oft attended,
To eat a bowl of Bouillabaisse.
This Bouillabaisse a noble dish
is
—
A
Or
sort of soup, or broth, or brew,
hotchpotch of all sorts of fishes,
That Greenwich never could outdo
Green herbs, red peppers, mussels, saffron,
Soles, onions, garlic, roach, and dace
All these you eat at Terre's tavern,
;
In that one dish of Bouillabaisse
W. M. Thackerax.
Oyster Soup.
"
Take one quart
small teacup
of
of water,
butter,
four
one pint
crackers
of milk,
one
rolled
fine,
one teaspoonful of salt, and half a teaspoonful of
pepper.
Bring to full boiling-heat as soon as possiLet the whole
ble, then add one quart of oysters.
come to a boiling-heat quickly, and remove from the
fire."
Mock Oyster Soup.
"One-half pint tomatoes; three-quarters pint
boiling water
;
butter a quarter size of an egg
of
;
a
;
POTAGE A LA RE IKE.
8
salt, and pepper
one pint sweet milk.
" Put the tomatoes and hot water over the fire,
Meanwhile, boil
strain, and rub through colander.
the milk, stir in soda and butter, and after one
boil keep hot (that is, not to let it more than come to
Put pepper and salt with tomatoes, simthe boil).
mer five minutes, and then stir in the milk. Serve
quarter of a teaspoonf ul each soda,
with crackers."
Potage a La Reine.
(
Queen
Victoria's Favorite Soup.)
Remove the fat from one quart of the water in
which a chicken has been boiled. Season highly with
salt, pepper, and celery-salt, and a little onion if deMash the yolks of three
sired, and put on to boil.
hard-boiled eggs fine, and mix them with half a cup of
bread or cracker crumbs soaked until soft in a little
milk.
Chop the white meat of the chicken until fine
like meal, and stir it into the egg and bread paste.
Add one pint of hot cream slowly, and then rub
all
into the hot chicken liquor.
add more
salt if
cream, or
if
dust.
It
needed, and
Boil five minutes,
too thick add
if
more
not thick enough add more fine cracker-
—
The Boston
should be like a puree.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln. Roberts Brothers,
Cook-Book
:
Pubs.
Okra or Gumbo Soup.
Boil a chicken
and a
slice
of
water to make a tureen of soup.
thoroughly done, take
it
ham
When
with the
in sufficient
the fowl
ham from
is
th^
CELERY sorr.
Q
Flavor the soup with onions, pepper,
broth.
and sweet herbs
roll it as
;
make
thin as wafers, dry a
and
tightly as possible,
salt,
a paste with eggs and flour,
little,
slice in thin
then
roll
shreds
;
it
as
put in
the soup a teacupful of this, a teacupful of chopped
okra, and a pint of oysters.
— Godey's Lady's Book.
{By per. Pub.)
Celery Soup.
Three pounds
of veal, three
bunches
of celery,
one
gallon of water, one teacupful of cream, one table-
spoonful of corn-starch
;
salt
and pepper
to
taste.
Put one-half of the celery in the water with the
and
veal,
covered pot for three hours, or
boil in a closely
meat is in pieces. Strain, and return to the
Seapot, and add the remaining half of the celery.
son, and boil twenty minutes longer.
Just before
taking off of the fire, add the cream, to which has
been stirred a tablespoonful of corn-starch. Boil ten
minutes longer, and serve with nicely-cut squares of
until the
fried toast.
— The
Kentucky Housekeeper: Mrs.
Peter A. White.
Pea Soup.
Use
half a pint, or
seven ounces, of dried pease
(cost three cents), for
every two quarts of soup you
Put them in three quarts of cold water, after
washing them well bring them slowly to a boil add
a bone, or a bit of ham, if you have it to spare, one
turnip, and one carrot peeled, one onion stuck with
three cloves (cost three cents), and simmer three
hours, stirring occasionally to prevent burning then
pass the soup through a sieve with the aid of a
want.
;
;
;
IO
CORN
potato-masher, and
if
it
SOUP.
shows any sign
of settling
one tablespoonful each of butter and flour
mixed together dry (cost two cents) this will prestir into it
;
meantime fry some dice of stale
bread, about two slices, cut half an inch square, in
hot fat, drain them on a sieve, and put them in the
bottom of the soup-tureen in which the pea-soup is
served
or cut some bits of very hard stale bread, or
vent settling
;
;
dry toast, to use instead of the fried bread.
By
the
have boiled down to
will
thick
and good. This
two quarts, and
be very
Twentyreceipt will cost you about ten cents.
five-Cent Dinners Miss Juliet Corson. (By per. O.
time the soup
is
done,
it
will
—
:
Judd
Co.,
Pubs.)
Corn Soup.
"
To each
quart of young corn cut from the cob*
allow three pints of water.
Boil until the grains are
tender, and then add two ounces of butter that have
been well mixed with one tablespoonful of flour.
Let this boil for fifteen minutes longer. Just before
serving, add one egg well beaten, and salt and pepper
to taste."
A
Delicious Soup.
" Peel
and slice six large onions, six potatoes, six
and four turnips fry them in half a pound
of butter, and pour on them four quarts of boiling
water.
Toast a crust of bread as brown and hard as
possible, but do not burn it, and put it in, with some
Stew it
celery, sweet herbs, white pepper, and salt.
all gently for four hours, and then strain it through
carrots,
a coarse
;
cloth.
Have ready
thinly
sliced
carrot,
;
CROUTONS.
II
Add them to your liking,
celery, and a little turnip.
and stew them tender in the soup. If approved of,
a spoonful of tomato catsup may be added."
Croutons,
Or
fried
this
way
bread-crumbs for soups, are prepared in
Cut slices of stale home-made bread half
an inch thick, trim off all crust, and cut each slice
drain them
into squares
fry these in very hot fat
:
;
;
on a clean napkin, and add six or eight to each porFifty Soups
Thomas J. Murrey.
tion of soup.
—
White, Stokes,
:
& Allen,
Pubs.
Marrow Dumplings
Soups.
for
Grate the crust of a breakfast roll, and break the
remainder into crumbs soak these in cold milk
chop up half a
drain, and add two ounces of flour
;
;
pound of beef-marrow freed from skin and sinews
beat up the yolks of five eggs mix all together
thoroughly, if too moist add some of the grated
crumbs salt and pepper to taste form into small
round dumplings boil them in the soup for half
Fifty Soups Tliomas J.
an hour before serving.
;
;
;
;
—
Murrey.
White, Stokes,
:
& Allen,
Pubs.
Vermicelli Soup.
vermicelli soup, take as much good stock
you require for your tureen strain, and set it on
the fire, and when it boils put in the vermicelli.
Let
it simmer for half an hour by a slow fire, that the
To make
as
vermicelli
;
may
not break.
The soup ought
not to
NOODLES FOR
12
SOUP.
Half a pound of vermicelli is suffiGodey's Lady's
cient for eight or ten persons.
be very
thick.
—
{By per. Pub.)
Book.
Noodles
Soup.
for
of salt, and flour
dough roll out in a very thin
sheet dredge with flour to keep from sticking then
begin at one end, and shave down
roll up tightly
Presbyterian Cook
fine like cabbage for slaw.
Book, Dayton, O. (By per.)
Beat up one egg
enough
to
make
a
;
add a pinch
stiff
;
;
;
;
—
CHAPTER
FISH
AND
II.
SHELL-FISH.
! ;
AND
FISH
!
;
;
;
SHELL-FISH.
We break from the
tree-groups, a glade deep with grass
clover's breath loads the sense as we pass.
sparkle
a broad glitter is seen,
a streak
The bright Callikoon through its thickets of green
its sweet music we hear
"We rush to the banks
Its gush, dash, and gurgle, all blent to the ear.
No shadows are drawn by the cloud-covered sun.
plunge in the crystal, our sport is begun.
Our line, where that ripple shoots onward we throw
It sweeps to the foam-spangled eddy below.
tremor
the trout upward is thrown.
a pull
the prize is our own
swings to our basket
The white
A
—
—
—
We
A
—
—
He
—
Street.
To Fry
Trout.
For those who love the real taste of this excellent
fish, there is no better way of dressing them than
plain frying.
It gives a crispness to the flesh, and
leaves its high flavor entire.
Cut and clean the
trout, wash them, dry them perfectly with napkins
cut the sides and back slightly with a very fine
knife, strew a little salt over them, and then dredge
them with flour set on a pan with some clarified
butter, and when it is hot lay in the trout fry them
to a delicate brown, and send them up in a napkin,
garnished with fried parsley.
Virginia CookeryBook Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith. Harper & Brothers,
;
;
—
:
Pubs.
(By per.)
Green Turtle Steak, Epicurean.
Raw
turtle steaks
may be had
at
any
first-class
restaurant, and occasionally at the fish-stands.
J
5
It
is
6
BOILED
1
BASS.
not advantageous for small families
whole
meat
or rather tortoises,
turtles,
steaks.
soup
for
Trim away the thigh-bone, and
in the
form of a steak.
butter in a chafing-dish
;
purchase
to
and
flatten the
Melt two ounces of
hot, add a tea-
when very
spoonful of Worcestershire sauce, a tablespoonful of
currant-jelly, a gill
Stew the steak
the chafing-dish.
J. Murrey.
of
port wine, and a
in this until tender,
little
— The Book of Entrees
White, Stokes,
& Allen,
salt.
and serve from
:
Thomas
Pubs.
Boiled Bass.
Clean and wash the fish, but do not
move the head and tail. Sew up in a
split it or re-
piece of mos-
quito-netting fitted to the shape of the
fish.
in the fish-kettle plenty of boiling water, in
Have
which
have been mixed a few tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a
dozen peppercorns, two Or three blades of mace, and
a tablespoonful of salt.
Cook ten minutes for each
pound, and ten minutes over. Undo the cloth, lay
the fish on a hot dish, and pour over it a cup of
drawn butter seasoned with a tablespoonful of capers and the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs chopped
fine.
Pass mashed potatoes with it.
Marion Harland.
The Post, Washington, D.C. (By per.)
—
Roast Sturgeon.
Rub
garlic.
fat,
the bottom of the saucepan with a clove of
Put into
it
a good bit of butter or clarified
a pinch of flour, salt
and pepper, a chopped
onion, and any herb you like the flavor
of.
Add
a
SALMON BROILED.
half pint of cold water
cook
As
all
and a
together, stirring
soon as
and when
all
it is
it
lj
of vinegar
gill
;
let
it
with a wooden spoon.
blended, take
it
from the
fire,
lukewarm put in the thick slices of
sturgeon, which you have previously trimmed and
cleaned.
Let them lie in this sauce for three hours,
turning them over now and then. Take from the
sauce, drain, and roast on a spit before a slow fire,
basting them continually with the sauce.
This is
the roast fish of the Italian monasteries.
It must
is
it
be served on a very hot
Philadelphia.
Salmon
Cut the
slice
dish.
— Public
Ledger,
{By per. Editor of The Household)
fish in slices
Broiled.
from the best part
should be an inch thick
;
;
each
season well with pep-
per and salt wrap each slice in white paper which
has been buttered with fresh butter fasten each end
by twisting or tying broil over a very clear fire
;
;
;
best.
A
coke fire, if kept clear and bright,
Serve with butter or tomato - sauce.
eight minutes.
is
American Home
Pubs.
-
—
Cook-Book.
Dick
&
Fitzgerald,
{By per)
Salmon Croquettes.
One pound cooked salmon, or about one and onepints when chopped, one cup of cream, two
half
tablespoonfuls butter, one of flour, three eggs, one
and salt.
This recipe is for cold boiled salmon.
pound
can of salmon will not hold the same bulk, as there
so,
is always some liquor which must be drained off
pint crumbs, pepper,
A
;
1
FILLETS OF HALIBUT A LA POULETTE.
8
canned salmon is used, the cream and other ingremust be graded in proportion to the bulk of
salmon used. Be sure to remove all bits of bone and
skin, and then chop the fish.
if
dients
Add
the flour to the butter, and mix thoroughly
Put the cream into a saucepan,
together.
come
let
it
and stir in the flour and butter, then
the salmon and seasoning.
Boil for one minute.
Stir into it one well-beaten egg, and remove from
the fire.
Then set the mixture, which will be quite
thin, away on the ice to get perfectly cold.
Then
shape into croquettes, as with other mixtures, and
to a boil,
fry.
much better if allowed
made and shaped, until thoroughly chilled. And when they are put into the frying basket, be careful to let none of them touch each
Croquettes of any sort are
to stand, after being
other.
— Mrs. Daniell: (No.
From The
5)
Globe, Boston, Mass.
Boston Cooking School.
(By per.)
Fillets of Halibut a la Poulette.
Take three pounds
of sliced halibut, one-half cup-
two large onions, juice of one lemon,
three hard-boiled eggs, salt and pepper.
If you buy halibut in a whole piece, pour boiling
water over it, and you can then skin it easily. Free
the fish from skin and bone, and cut into slices onehalf inch thick.
Cut these into strips about three
inches long and two inches wide.
Lay on a platter,
and sprinkle with lemon-juice, salt, and pepper, and
lay a thin slice of onion on each strip.
The lemonjuice had been squeezed out, and was all ready in a
ful
butter,
9
;
FRIED FLOUNDERS.
cup.
If
you have
to let
1
lemon -juice stand
for
any
length of time, said Mrs. Daniell, be sure you leave
no seeds in
it,
as they will
make
it
bitter.
Cover the
prepared above, and set away for half an hour.
After the fish has set for half an hour, remove the
fish as
Have
slices of onion.
soup-plate
;
a cup of butter melted in a
roll them
wooden toothpick or skewer
dip the strips into the butter,
up and pin with a
little
dip in the butter again, and place on a tin pan, and
flour.
Bake for twenty minutes
Cut the whites of the eggs into rings,
and rub the yolks through a sieve to a finevpowder.
When the fish is cooked, spread the rolls upon a hot
dish, remove the little skewers, pour whip sauce
around the fish, scatter the grated yolks over it, and
use the whites as a garnish.
(Very nice indeed.)
dredge thickly with
in a hot oven.
—
Mrs. Daniell: (No.
5)
Boston Cooking School.
From
Boston Globe.
Fried Flounders.
Clean the fish, dry them in a cloth, sprinkle with
and dredge them well with flour. Put them in
hot fat, and fry brown, turning them carefully, so as
American Home Cooknot to break the fish.
Book.
salt,
—
Broiled Mackerel.
" Prepare,
by boiling a short time, a little fennel,
and mint. When done, chop all together
fine
mix a piece of butter with it, a dust of flour,
pepper, and salt.
Cut the fish down the back, and
fill it with this stuffing.
Oil the gridiron, and oil the
parsley,
;
fish.
Broil over a clear, slow fire."
—
FRIED WHITEFISH, FRESH.
20
Fried Whitefish, Fresh.
Hash, and drain well dredge thickly with flour,
and season with salt and pepper. Put on in a skillet
containing sufficient boiling hot sweet lard cover,
and fry slowly. When a nice brown on one side,
Miss Lizzie
turn over, and cook until done.
;
;
—
Strohm.
Scalloped Fish.
Any
cold fresh fish, or cold boiled salt
codfish,
must be pulled into fine flakes, carefully taking out
skin and bones and dark parts mix in a bowl with
equal quantity of bread or cracker crumbs season
with salt, pepper, celery-salt, a little nutmeg, a very
little juice squeezed from a cut onion, and a very
moisten the mixture
little red pepper if preferred
melted
butter, flour, and
of
made
gravy
well with a
;
;
;
put into a baking-dish, cover with dry
crumbs and thickly strewn bits of butter bake till
hot water
;
;
This is a pretty dish for supper, baked in
small tin or earthen shells, or in the great sea-clam
shells found on the ocean shore, or in the blue crockServe
ery dishes that are sold for such purposes.
{By per. Pub. of
Mrs. Rose Terry Cooke.
very hot.
brown.
Good Housekeeping)
Fish Jelly.
Take a two-pound haddock, one
onion, and half
remove
flake the fish, or pound it in a
all the bones and skin
mortar, with a tablespoonful of butter, pepper and
Put back the bones, reduce the liquor
salt to taste.
rind
lemon
;
just cover with water,
and
boil
;
;
vO
one
pint,
add a quarter of a packet
of gelatine
;
TO
MAKE
A GOOD FORCEMEAT.
21
(previously dissolved in a quarter of a tumbler of
cold water).
Make some
veal
forcemeat, without
and drop into boiling water
Decorate a mould
they will cook in seven minutes.
with the balls and rings of lemon, mix the strained
liquor with the pounded fish, and, when nearly cold,
suet, roll in small balls,
Hard-boiled eggs may be
pour into the mould.
Cod or any remains of cold fish can be made
added.
over in this way.
To Make
Chop
a
Good Forcemeat.
a slice of lean veal and a slice of boiled
together, add a bay-leaf crumbled fine, a
basil.
— Public Ledger,
little
ham
sweet
Pliiladelphia.
Stewed Eels.
" Boil
parsley,
them
in a small quantity of water,
with some
which should be served up with them and
Chopped parsley and butter for sauce."
the liquor.
Fried Eels.
Clean and skin the eels. If large, cut them into
if small, skewer them round, and fry them
First dust them over with flour, then rub
whole.
pieces
;
an egg, and sprinkle them
with bread-crumbs. Put them in boiling lard, and
Peterson 's Magazine.
fry until nicely browned.
them with the yolk
of
—
(By per.)
Oyster Patties.
Cover small shells or patty-pans with a nice puff
paste bake them well when done, turn them out
en a plate stew oysters, season them to suit the
;
;
;
OYSTERS FRIED TO THE QUEEN'S TASTE.
22
taste,
fill
thicken their juice with egg, and
when coH
the patties with the oysters.
Oysters Fried to the Queen's Taste.
Small ones are just as toothsome for
grilling,
but
large,
plump specimens present a better appearance.
Keep
if
possible a soapstone griddle expressly for
cooking them, and
let
heat slowly on the back of
it
the range at least an hour before needed.
for
The
cannot be drained too long or too well,
oysters
one
of the secrets
them stand
of success is to
Ten hours
perfectly dry.
in the colander
is
;
have them
not too long to let
first
place
them under
a stream of water for three or four minutes to wash
wipe lightly afterward with a thin
in the ice-chest until wanted
desired unexpectedly, sop between towels,
off all impurities,
cloth,
but
if
and
place
;
When
out the moisture until dry.
ready to cook them, move the griddle to a hot part
lightly patting
of the stove,
and grease
it
very slightly with fresh
butter; lay on the oysters close together, but not
crowding
;
and as
fast as
browned
nicely, turn
them
with a spoon, not using a fork, for the piercing lets
out the liquor. When done, serve in a very hot dish
with a
trifle of melted butter.
If a griddle cannot
be procured, a skillet or frying-pan will answer, and
they can either be well shaken all the time, or turned
with a spoon.
Harper 's Bazar. (By per. Harper
—
&
Brothers?)
Scalloped Oysters.
One
pint of oysters (washed), the shells removed,
and then drained
;
one-third of
a cup of melted
—
BROILED OYSTERS.
2$
one cup of fine cracker-crumbs moistened
melted butter butter a shallow dish, put in
a layer of crumbs, then a layer of oysters, season
with salt and pepper, and so on, having a thick layer
butter,
in the
of
;
crumbs on top
;
bake
oven twenty min-
in a hot
To
utes, or until the cracker is brown.
larger dish with the
same quantity
prepare a
of oysters, heat
the oyster-liquor and the butter with an equal quantity of
milk,
and use more cracker
;
moisten each
layer with the hot liquid; reserve the
larger part
of the butter for the top layer of crumbs.
mercial Gazette, Cincinnati, O.
— Com-
{By per.)
Broiled Oysters.
Take the
your gridiron
largest
is
and
finest
very clean.
oysters.
Rub
See that
the bars with
and set it over a clear steady fire, enfrom smoke, or on a bed of bright hot
wood coals. Place the oysters on the gridiron, and
when done on one side, take a fork, and turn them on
the other, being careful not to let them burn. Put
some fresh butter in the bottom of a dish. Lay the
oysters on it, and season them slightly with pepper.
American Home CookSend them to table hot.
Book. {By per. Dick & Fitzgerald.)
fresh butter,
tirely clear
To
"Wash
Boil Hard-shelled Clams.
the shells very clean, put them in a pot
little water as will keep the pot from burnwith their edges down, and boil constantly.
When the shells open, they are done remove them,
with as
ing,
;
have ready nice butter
toast,
and pour the clams on
24
CLAM CHOWDER.
the toast, with as
much
absorb; add pepper
of the juice as the toast will
desired."
if
Clam Chowder.
"Put
in a
pot a layer of sliced pork, chopped
potatoes, chopped clams, salt, pepper,
and lumps of
and broken crackers soaked in milk cover
with the clam-juice and water, and stew slowly for
butter,
;
three hours
;
thicken with a
seasoned with spices
Clam
Chop
all
fifty
clams
little flour
it
;
may be
preferred."
if
Scallops.
and drain
fine,
off in
a colander
Mix
come away.
the liquor that will
this in a
bowl with a cupful of crushed cracker, half a cupful
of milk, two beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of melted
butter, half a teaspoonful of salt, a pinch of mace
and the same of cayenne-pepper. Beat into this
the chopped clams, and fill with the mixture clamshells, or
the silver or stone-china shell-shaped dishes
sold for this purpose.
Bake
sliced
lemon with them.
brown in a
Send around
to a light
quick oven, and serve in the
shells.
— Marion
Harland.
The
Post, Washington, D.C>
Stewed Terrapin.
Of the numerous ways and
styles
of
preparing
one.
Select two six-and-ahalf to seven inch terrapins
plunge them in boiling
water for five minutes take them out, and when
cool, rub off the skin found on the legs and neck;
terrapin, I
prefer this
;
;
LOBSTER CHOWDER.
2$
remove the under-shell carefully next, remove the
cut off the gall-bag from it, and throw it away,
for the bursting of the bag would spoil the whole
;
liver
;
The
dish.
other parts to be rejected are the claws,
head, and sand-bag
the remainder should be cut into
Put these in a stewpan or chafing-dish, and stew long enough to become tender
;
neat-sized pieces.
—
about one-half to three quarters of an hour.
Now
put in a chafing-dish a pat of butter rolled in a little
flour, a dash of cayenne, a gill of sherry, two drops
and a saltspoonful of
of soy,
it
When
salt.
hot beat
with a fork, and add the terrapin, and eggs
are any.
The creamy sauce
so universally
if
there
met with
consists of a combination of cream, butter, and eggs,
which
thing.
is
very nice for those
who
— The Book of Entrees
White, Stokes,
& Allen,
:
like that sort of
Thomas J. Murrey.
Pubs.
Lobster Chowder.
Meat
of one fine lobster, picked out from the
and cut into bits, one quart of milk, six Boston
crackers split and buttered, one even teaspoonful of
salt, one scant quarter-teaspoonful of cayenne, two
tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in one of prepared
shell
flour,
and
a pinch of soda in the milk.
stir
in
Scald the milk,
seasoning, butter, and flour, cook one
minute, add the lobster, and simmer five minutes.
Line a tureen with the toasted and buttered crackers,
dipping each quickly in boiling water before putting
and pour in the chowder. Send around
sliced lemon with it.
Marion Harland. The Post,
Washington, D.C.
{By per)
it
in place,
—
"
LOBSTER SAUCE.
26
Lobster Sauce.
One
small lobster, four tablespoonfuls of butter,
two of flour, one.fifth of a teaspoonful of cayenne,
two tablespoonfuls of lemon-juice, one pint of boiling
water.
Cut the meat into dice. Pound the "coral
with one tablespoonful of the butter.
Rub the flour
and the remainder of the butter to a smooth paste.
Add the water, pounded "coral," and butter, and the
Simmer five minutes, and then strain on
seasoning.
This sauce is
the lobster. Boil up once, and serve.
New Cook-Book Miss
for all kinds of boiled fish.
Maria Parloa. Estes & Lanriat, Pubs. (By per.)
—
:
CHAPTER
BEEF, VEAL, LAMB,
III.
AND MUTTON.
;
AND MUTTON.
LAMB,
VEAL,
BEEF,
;
Tell me,
"
dearest husband," Kitty said,
" Before you go, I pray,
shall I get the meat and bread
For our noon meal to-day ? "
How
"
Buy them with
"
smiles," the husband cried;
But that won't pay," says she.
Then
"
And
take this kiss," her lord replied,
to his
shop went
he.
The noontime came, and he came
too
And
A
the dinner was prepared.
tender steak was in full view,
" Quite splendid," he declared.
He
said he wished to have such meat
Three times a day in future
" But tell me, love, for this great treat
What did you pay the butcher ? "
"
W hat did I pay
'Twas
all
you
?
left,
I
paid the kiss
—
you know."
" A-a-11 right," said he
;
" but, after this,
Take money when you
go."
Kisses at
Market Anon.
:
French Beefsteak.
" Cut the steak two-thirds of an inch thick from a
of beef dip into melted fresh butter, lay them
on a heated gridiron, and broil over hot coals. When
Have ready
nearly done, sprinkle pepper and salt.
with
softened
some parsley chopped fine, and mixed
butter.
Beat them together to a cream, and pour
Dip each steak into the
into the middle of the dish.
butter, turning them over, and lay them round on the
fillet
;
29
—
;
A SPANISH STEAK.
30
If liked,
platter.
squeeze a few drops of lemon over,
and serve very hot."
A
"
Spanish Steak.
Take the tenderloin
Have onions
of beef.
cut
and put into a frying-pan with some boiling butter.
When quite soft, draw them to the back part of
the pan, and, having seasoned well the beef with pepper and salt, put it in the pan, and rather broil than
fry it. When done, put the onions over it, and just as
much boiling water as will make a gravy. Let it stew
a few minutes."
Roast Beef.
fine,
Prepare for the oven by dredging lightly with flour,
and seasoning with salt and pepper place in the oven,
and baste frequently while roasting. Allow a quarter
of an hour for a pound of meat, if you like it rare
longer, if you like it well done.
Serve with a sauce
made from the drippings in the pan, to which have
been added a tablespoonful of Harvey or Worcestershire sauce and a tablespoonful of tomato catsup.
E very-day Cook-Book: Miss Neill. {By per. Belford,
;
—
Clarke,
&
Co.)
Fried Beefsteaks.
Place the steak in a pan in which
of hot
butter or
fat.
is
an ounce
Fry ten or twelve minutes,
and watching
Season with salt and
pepper.
After removing the meat, a gravy may be
made by adding a little water, and thickening with
flour rubbed smooth in water.
Arthur's Home
Magazine. {By per.)
turning on each
side
three
that the meat does not burn.
times,
BEEF A LA MODE.
Beef a
Take three pounds
la
3
I
Mode.
of fresh beef, trim off the fat
cut half a pound of bacon into long, slender strips,
and lard the beef with
it.
Mix a few
cloves, mace,
cayenne, tablespoonful of powdered
allspice, peppers,
thyme, and two cloves of garlic, with half a pint of
malt vinegar.
Put the meat into an earthen crock,
with a thin slice of bacon under it, add the seasoning
and a pint
six hours.
but
it is
of soup-stock, cover the crock,
more
them
satisfactory to cook
The Book of Entrees Thomas
:
Stokes,
and simmer
When preferred, vegetables may be added,
& Allen,
separately.
J. Murrey.
—
White,
Pubs.
Beef Stew or Hash.
"
Take a pound
small
bits.
of cold boiled beef,
and
slice into
Put on to stew with six or eight medium-
sized potatoes
and three large onions peeled and cut
into small pieces.
Have
sufficient water, that,
when
be rather juicy than dry. Season with
salt and pepper, and add a little butter, if the meat
does not make it rich enough." This is a plain but
done,
it
will
savory stew.
Beefsteak Pie.
A
good common paste for meat pies, and which is
intended to be eaten, is made as follows
Three
:
ounces of butter and one pound of flour will be sufficient for one dish.
Rub the butter well amongst
the flour so as to incorporate them thoroughly.
the butter be fresh, add a
flour
little
salt.
If
Mix up the
and butter with as much cold water as
will
BEEFSTEAK
32
make
and
a thick paste.
roll it
upside
out
flat
Knead
PIE.
it
quickly on a board,
with a rolling-pin.
down upon the
Turn the
flattened paste,
shape out the piece required for the cover.
and place these
Roll out
Wet
the edges
strips neatly
round on
the parings, and cut them into strips.
of the dish,
dish
and cut or
the edges as a foundation for the cover.
Then
take
some slices of tender beef mixed with fat those
from the rump are the best. Season them with pepper and salt, and roll each slice up in a small bundle,
Put in a little gravy or
or lay them flat in the dish.
Then,
cold water, and a little flour for thickening.
after putting in the meat, lay the cover on the dish,
pressing down the edges closely to keep all tight.
If any paste remain, cut or stamp it into ornaments,
such as leaves, and place these as a decoration on
;
the cover.
On
taking pies from the oven, and while quite hot,
the crust
may be
glazed with white of egg and water
beaten together, or sugar and water laid on with a
brush.
Dick
— American
& Fitzgerald,
Home
Cook-Book.
(By per.
Pubs.)
Such a busy little woman as she was
So full of self-importance,
and trying so hard not to smile or seem uncertain about any thing.
It was a perfect treat to Tom to see her with her brows knit, and her
rosy lips pursed up, kneading away at the crust, rolling it out, cutting
it up into strips, lining the basin with it, shaving it off fine round the
rim; chopping up the steak into small pieces, raining down pepper
and salt upon them, packing them into the basin, pouring in cold
water for gravy and never venturing to steal a look in his direction,
!
;
her gravity should be disturbed until at last, the basin being
quite full and only wanting the top crust, she clapped her hands, all
covered with paste and flour, at Tom, and burst out heartily into such
a charming little laugh of triumph, that the pudding need have had
no other seasoning to commend it to the taste of any reasonable man
on earth.
Martin Chuzzlewit Charles Dickens.
lest
;
—
:
YORKSHIRE PUDDING WITH ROAST BEEF.
33
Yorkshire Pudding with Roast Beef.
" Five tablespoonfuls of flour
mixed with one of
one pint of milk, and three well-beaten eggs.
Butter a square pan, and put the batter in it set it
in the oven until it rises and is slightly crusted on
the top then place it under your beef roasting before the fire, or in the oven, and baste it as you do
your meat. In serving, cut it in squares, and lay
around the meat in the dish."
salt,
;
;
Beef Loaf.
Chop very
pounds
of
pepper,
salt,
or have your butcher mince, two
fine,
beef.
Season spicily with
nutmeg, summer savory or sweet mar-
coarse, lean
minced onion.
and work up with the mass.
joram, and a cautious sprinkling of
Beat two eggs
light,
Press hard into a bowl fit a saucer or plate (inverted)
upon the meat, and set in a dripping-pan of boiling
water to cook slowly for an hour and a quarter. Lay
a weight on the surface when it is done, and let it
Cut in perget perfectly cold before turning out.
Marion Harland.
The Post,
pendicular slices.
;
—
Washington, D.C.
{By per)
Frizzled Dried Beef.
Cut your beef very
thin,
then pull
it
into small
and
and cover with
cold water let it simmer on the back of the stove
till perfectly tender
then pour off the water, and
cover the beef with cream, add pepper, celery-salt,
pieces, taking out all the strings of sinew, fat,
bits of outside
;
put
it
;
;
in a frying-pan,
TO BOIL TONGUE.
34
and
salt
if
needed
;
mix one tablespoonful
of
melted
butter with one heaped tablespoon of flour, and
—
served.
stir
cream cover, and keep very hot till
Mrs. Rose Terry Cooke. {By per. Pub. of
into the hot
;
Good Housekeeping?)
To
"
A tongue is
or pickling, that
a
ham
:
Boil Tongue.
whether prepared by drying
much more cooking than
weight takes so long to dress
so hard,
it
nothing of
requires
its
properly.
"
tongue that has been salted
A
and dried should
hard, twenty-four
and
very
be put to soak
hours before it is wanted) in plenty of water one
fresh from the pickle requires soaking only a few
Put the tongue into plenty of cold water,
hours.
with a bunch of savory herbs, let it be an hour
gradually warming, and give it from three and a half
old
(if it is
;
to four hours very slow simmering, according to the
size.
"When
you choose a tongue, endeavor to learn
how long it has been dried or pickled pick out the
plumpest and that which has the smoothest skin,
which denotes its being young and tender."
;
Ragout of Liver.
Heat three or four spoonfuls
of nice dripping in a
add an onion sliced, a tablespoonful of
chopped parsley, and thrice as much minced breakfastbacon when all are hissing hot, lay in the liver cut in
pieces as long and wide as your middle finger, and fry
brown, turning often take out the liver, and keep
frying-pan
;
;
;
VEAL SWEETBREAD.
warm
in a covered hot-water dish
;
35
strain the gravy,
and return to the
rinse out the frying-pan,
fire
with
the gravy and an even tablespoonful of butter worked
up well in two of browned flour. Stir until you have
a smooth browned roux thin gradually with half a
cupful of boiling water and the juice of half a lemon,
add a teaspoonful of minced pickle and a scant halfteaspoonful of curry-powder wet with cold water.
;
Boil sharply, pour over the liver put fresh boiling
water in the pan under the dish, and let all stand
closely covered for ten minutes before serving.
Marion Harland. The Post, Washington, D. C.
;
—
Veal Sweetbread.
" Trim a fine sweetbread
parboil
;
it
for five min-
and throw it into a basin of cold water. When
the sweetbread is cold, dry it thoroughly in a cloth
run a skewer through it egg it with a paste-brush,
powder it well with bread-crumbs, and roast it."
utes,
;
;
Fricandeau a
l'Oseille.
Procure a piece of veal cut from the leg, and about
one inch and a half in thickness the small round
bone in the middle may be either left or removed.
Lard it well with salt pork put into a bake-pan one
ounce of salt pork to two pounds of veal, two or three
;
;
slices of onion, as
many
of carrot, as
many
sprigs of
lay the veal over the
and half a bay-leaf
add just broth enough to cover the bottom
set in the oven, and
of the pan, and a little salt
If the juice is absorbed, and
baste now and then.
there is not enough to baste, add a little more broth.
parsley,
whole
;
;
;
;
36
pur£e d'oseille {pur£e of
sorrel).
Bear in mind that veal must always be overdone.
Pierre Blot.
Serve on a purge of sorrel.
—
Puree d'Oseille (Puree of
Throw
the sorrel,
boiling water
;
when cleaned and washed,
the
at
Sorrel).
first
tender, turn into a colander
water, and then chop
boiling,
;
Put
press
into
and as soon as
it
to extract the
saucepan on the
Eire, with a piece of butter, and stir for five minutes
stir another five minutes, spread
.add a little broth
it around a dish, place the veal in the middle, pour
it.
it
in a
;
the gravy
all
over
it,
and
serve.
— Pierre
Blot.
Stewed Veal.
" Cut the veal in small bits, stew in a
with butter, pepper, and
with a
salt,
little
water
until tender; thicken
little flour."
Braised Veal.
Chop
half of
a half pound of fat salt pork
it
in the
bottom
of a
fine,
broad pot
;
and put
sprinkle
it
with minced onion, sweet herbs, and a teaspoonful of
chopped carrot. Lay a breast of veal on this bed,
and cover it with a similar layer. Pour in carefully
a quart of weak broth, if you have it if not, cold
water season with pepper and salt. Fit a tight lid
very
on the pot, and set where it will cook slowly
slowly
for two hours at least.
Now take up the
meat, rub butter all over it, and dredge thickly with
browned flour. Put it into a dripping-pan strain
the gravy from the pot into tins, not pouring it on
;
;
—
—
;
VEAL AND RICE.
37
the meat, and bake half an hour in a good oven,
basting every five minutes with the gravy.
the veal to a hot dish
;
Transfer
thicken the gravy in the
pan with browned flour wet with cold water, boil up,
Marion Harland. The Post,
and serve in a boat.
—
Washington, D.C.
Veal and Rice.
Put the scrag end of a neck of veal, which you can
usually
buy
for ten cents, into a pot half full of boil-
ing water, with a half tablespoonful of
a pound of bacon
pound
or salt
pork
of rice (cost five cents),
with six cloves
;
boil
it
salt,
and half
(cost six cents), half a
and an onion stuck
gently for three hours, and
put the meat in the middle of the
it hot
Twenty-fiveand the rice laid around it.
Cent Dinners Miss Juliet Corson. {By per))
then serve
;
—
platter,
:
Mutton au Chou.
Bake a leg or a breast of mutton in the oven, basting it well, and half an hour before it is done put in
the pan a cabbage, chopped fine as for cold slaw.
The cabbage will cook in the rich gravy, and the
basting must be continued so as to give the gravy all
the
possible taste of the osmazome of the meat,
browned crust that gives the flavor and pleasant odor
—
in all roasting or
baking meats.
Philadelphia Ledger.
{By per?)
Mutton Steaks.
" They should be broiled over a clear fire, seasoned
when half done, and often turned. Take them up
—
;
;
STEWED SHOULDER OF MUTTON.
38
into a very hot dish, rub a little butter over them,
and
serve quite hot."
Stewed Shoulder of Mutton.
" Select a shoulder of
bone
a
half.
Take
mutton that
a cloth, and boil
tie in
it,
it
it
for
is
not too fat
two hours and
up, put a little cold butter over
it,
and then strew thickly with bread-crumbs and parsley, with pepper and salt, all properly mixed
and
let it remain in the oven half an hour to be perfectly
browned."
;
A man
may feel
mutton with turnips.
thankful, heartily thankful, over a dish of plain
Grace before Meat : Charles La?nb.
—
Irish Stew.
Cut a neck
mutton in pieces, blanch the chops
and put them into another stewpan
of
in water, take
with four onions cut in slices
;
put to
it
a
little
stock
have ready some
potatoes pared put them into the stewpan with the
mutton, with salt and pepper. As some like the potatoes whole, and some mashed, to thicken the stew,
you must boil them accordingly. Dish the meat
round, and the vegetables in the middle.
Arthur s
Home Magazine.
let it boil
a quarter of an hour
;
;
Breast of Lamb, with Peas.
This part of the lamb is always cheaper than other
and not only has this to recommend it, but
portions,
is
readily adaptable to
many
ing dishes, one of which
is
delicate
and palate-pleas-
the following
:
Trim
off
LAMB
CHOPS.
39
the skin and part of the fat from the breast of a spring
lamb
;
cut the meat into squares or triangular pieces
dredge in flour
;
put them into a stewpan with a
;
small quantity of butter and herb seasonings
;
toss
them about, and brown them nicely add a pint of
soup-stock to each pound of meat simmer until ten;
;
and skim off all surplus fat. Just before serving,
add half a can of French peas, pour out on a hot dish,
garnish with large croutons, and serve. The tops of
asparagus, French beans, etc., may be used instead
of peas.
The Book of Entrees
Thomas J.
der,
—
Murrey.
:
White, Stokes,
& Allen,
Lamb
Fry them a
light
Pubs.
Chops.
brown, in butter, then add a
little
water, flour, salt, and a dust of pepper, to the gravy
let
it
brown, and pour
Peterson's Magazine.
it
over the chops.
From
(By per.)
To Roast Lamb.
The
hind-quarter of lamb usually weighs from
seven to ten pounds
;
this size will take
Have
about two
must be
very frequently basted while roasting, and sprinkled
with a little salt, and dredged all over with flour,
hours to roast
it.
about half an hour before
a brisk
it is
All joints of roast lamb
fire.
It
done.
may be
garnished with
double parsley, and served up with either asparagus
and new potatoes, spring spinach and new potatoes,
green peas and new potatoes, or with cauliflowers
or French beans and potatoes
and never forget to
send up mint sauce. The following will be found an
;
TO ROAST LAMB.
40
excellent receipt for mint sauce
With three heaped
:
tablespoonfuls of finely chopped young mint, mix
two
of
pounded and
vinegar;
stir it until
Lady's Book.
sifted sugar,
the sugar
(Byfler.)
is
and
six of the best
dissolved.
— Godey's
CHAPTER
PORK.
IV.
PORK.
Of all the delicacies in the whole mundus edibilis, I will maintain
There is no
to be the most delicate
frinceps obsoniorum. . .
flavor comparable, I will contend, to that of the crisp, tawny, wellwatched, not over-roasted, crackling, as it is well called,
the very
teeth are invited to their share of the pleasure at this banquet in overwith the adhesive oleaginous
coming the coy, brittle resistance,
oh, call it not fat, but an indefinable sweetness growing up to it;
the tender blossoming of fat; fat cropped in the bud, taken in the
shoot, in the first innocence ; the cream and quintessence of the
child-pig's yet pure food; the lean, no lean, but a kind of animal
manna ; or rather, fat and lean (if it must be so) so blended and running into each other, that both together make but one ambrosial result,
—
it
.
—
—
—
or
common
substance.
— A Dissertation upon Roast Pig:
Charles
Lamb.
Roast Pig.
Soak
in
milk some light bread
;
boil
onions in plenty of water, strain
very fine
;
it
some sage and
off,
and chop
it
press the milk from the bread, and then
mix the sage and onion with pepper and salt in the
bread put the yolk of an egg to bind it a little put
;
;
this in the inside of the pig
milk and butter, paper
Cut
off
it
roast
it
a beautiful brown.
drawn from the spit, and
down the back, and then you will not
the head before
likewise cut
it,
rub the pig over with
;
it is
break the skin take out the spit, cut off the ears
from the head, and crack the bone, and take out the
brains
put them in a stewpan with all the inside
:
;
and a little brown sauce dish the pig, the
back outside, and put the sauce in the middle and
American
some in a boat, the ears at each end.
Home Cook-Book. Dick & Fitzgerald, Puds. {By
stuffing
;
per.)
43
;
SPARE-RIB.
44
Spare-Rib.
A spare-rib will
if
take two hours and a half to roast
very large, three hours.
If
not already salted,
sprinkle with some, and while roasting baste with
about twenty minutes
powdered sage over it.
butter and dredge with flour
before
it is
Arthur'' s
done,
Home
sift
a
little
;
—
Magazine.
Pork Steaks.
" Cut
them from a loin or neck, not too thick, pepand
broil
per
them, turning often when nearly done,
add salt, rub a piece of butter over, and serve hot."
;
Tenderloin on Toast.
" Cut pork tenderloins in very thin slices
them
put a
in a little
little
water
till
they are nearly done
butter in a saucepan, and fry
them
;
;
till
stew
then
light
Serve on buttered toast and raw tomatoes
brown.
sliced thin."
Pork
Have
Fritters.
hand a thick batter of Indian meal and
flour
cut a few slices of pork, and fry them in the
frying-pan until the fat is fried out cut a few more
slices of the pork, dip them in the batter, and drop
them in the bubbling fat, seasoning with salt and
pepper cook until brown, and eat while hot.
Everyday Cook-Book Miss E. Neill.
at
;
;
—
;
:
Salt Pork and Apples.
" Cut half a
pound
of nicely cured
in a
deep frying-pan,
pork in
slices a
them slowly until brown
and take them up on a hot dish.
quarter of an inch thick, fry
BACON AND
EGGS.
45
Meantime wash, wipe, and slice six sour apples, and
when the pork is taken up put them into the fryingpan to cook until they are tender, but not broken.
Lay them on a dish with the pork, and serve them
hot."
Bacon and Eggs.
Take a quarter
it
of a
pound
into thin slices, and put
over a slow
when
fire
the meat
of streaked bacon, cut
them
into a frying-pan
take care to turn them frequently
;
done, take
is
it
the hot fat seven or eight eggs.
and serve with the bacon.
Magazine.
according to taste,
Arthur
s
Home
;
and break into
Cook more or less
out,
—
Oh 'tis eggs are a treat,
When so white and so sweet,
!
From under the manger they're
And by fair Margery —
Och
taken,
—
'tis she's full of glee
are fried with fat rashers of bacon.
They
!
Father Pront 's Relics.
To
Boil Pickled Pork.
Having washed and scraped it, put it into boiling
water with the skin-side uppermost. If it be thin,
a piece of four pounds will be done in less than an
hour a leg of eight pounds will take three hours.
Pork should be done enough, but if boiled too fast
;
or too long
it
will
skimmed, and send
become
it
jelly.
Keep
the pot well
to table with peas-pudding
and
—
Some persons like carrots, parsnips also.
American Home Cook-Book. Dick & Fitzgerald,
greens.
Pubs.
(By per.)
Soused Pig's Feet.
Take the
ears, feet,
and upper part
scrape clean, boil until the meat
is
of the
tender
;
head
take
it
JELLY OF PICS FEET AND EARS.
4-6
up
and put into pure vinegar spice
in a jar, and keep closely covered.
Tripe can be pickled in the same way.
American Home Cook-Book.
flavor properly,
;
you
as
like.
Put
;
it
—
Jelly of Pig's Feet and Ears.
Clean and prepare as for soused pig's feet, then
them in a very small quantity of water till every
bone can be taken out throw in half a handful of
chopped sage, the same of parsley, and a seasoning
boil
;
of pepper, salt,
and mace,
in fine
powder
simmer
;
the herbs are scalded, then pour the whole into
till
a melon form.
— American
To
Home
Boil a
Cook-Book.
Ham.
If the ham has been long cured, soak it in cold
water for from twelve to twenty hours. Scrape it,
and put it into a large vessel to boil with plenty of
cold water, and let
it
simmer gently from three
A
four or five hours according to the size.
of
twenty pounds
When
hours and a half.
remove the grease as it
off the rind, and strew
will require four
Skim the pot frequently
rises.
to
done, strip
bread-raspings over the top side, then set
the
or in the oven, to dry and brown.
fire,
ican
it
before
— Amer-
Home Cook-Book.
To
Broil
Ham.
Cut the ham about a third
broil
to
ham
it
hot dish,
butter.
an inch thick, and
fire
lay it on a
pepper it, and put on it a good lump of
American Home Cook-Book,
of
very quickly over a brisk
—
;
CHAPTER
V.
MISCELLANEOUS.
—
;
;
;
;
MISCELLANEOUS.
Two
swift-winged hours will bring the time
When sounds the sabbath supper
And I'll desert my easy nest
To
To
chime
—
reach the board before the rest,
reach the board so white and neat,
That
I
may something have
to eat.
know just what the feast will be
Some bread cut thin, and weakly tea,
Some cheap and highly-colored jam,
Some slices of transparent ham,
Some Gorgonzola, Jersey make,
Some tiny bits of frosted cake.
I
:
—
The napery
will be as white
the silverware is bright
The cups and saucers, fragile, thin,
Would suit a captious mandarin;
And then the waiter, black as night,
As
all
Will be both constant and
To
polite.
cheer the fond aesthetic heart,
The boarders will converse on
The drama, music, poesy,
And
And
politics, to-night at tea
;
Clara Vere de Vere will chat
About
A
art,
the latest Paris hat.
good meal makes a merrier heart
Than
When
your high aesthetic art.
one is hungry, frescoed walls
all
Can't take the place of codfish balls
substitutes are painted screens
No
And
porcelain, for pork
and beans
A banquet may be all that's sweet,
Even though all be incomplete
That's alien to the things to eat.
The Sabbath Supper Chime:
Puck.
{By per.
Ed)
Codfish Balls.
Pick up as fine as possible a teacup of nice white
codfish.
Freshen
all
night, or,
if
wanted
49
for
any
—
"
BAKED BEANS.
50
other meal than breakfast, from the morning
it
once, and drain off the water
until entirely fine
;
put
it
boiling.
should,
It
mashed work the
together as above, make
nicely
both
;
This
sides.
have tried
it
allow.
all
potatoes
fish
it
it
is
it
;
beat
it
thickens, without
mixed, be about a
ready prepared and
and potatoes thoroughly
and brown
in flat cakes,
a very nice dish, as
is
scald
with water, a bit
and two eggs
until
when
Have some
quart.
it
;
chop and work
in a basin
of butter the size of an egg,
thoroughly, and heat
;
— Godey's Lady's Book.
all
who
(By per.
Pub)
Baked Beans.
The
small white beans are the best for baking.
wash, and soak over night in
lukewarm water. Early the next morning set them
where they will boil, adding a teaspoonf ul of saleratus.
When partially done, take them out of the water
with a skimmer, and put them in an earthen jar or
Gash about a
crock, salting them at the same time.
pound of pork in narrow strips, put it with the
Pick out the bad ones
;
beans in such a way that all the rind will be covered.
Turn in water until you can just see it at the top.
Bake the beans from two to five hours in a moderate
oven. The beans when done should be of a nice even
brown over the top, the pork tender, and the rind
Arthur 's Home Magazine. {By per. Pubs.)
crispy.
" No, there's a
" Liver ? " said Toby, communing with himself.
mildness about it that don't answer to liver. Pettitoes ? No. It
ain't faint enough for pettitoes.
It wants the stringiness of cocks'
heads. And I know it ain't sausages. I'll tell you what it is. It's
chitterlings
!
" No, it ain't " cried Meg, in a burst of delight. " No, it ain't "
" Why, what am I a-thinking of " said Toby, suddenly recovering
!
!
1
1
STEWED
TRIPE.
5
a position as near the perpendicular as it was possible for him to
assume. " I shall forget my own name next. It's tripe."
Tripe it was and Meg, in high joy, protested he should say,
The
in half a minute more, it was the best tripe ever stewed.
Chimes: Charles Dickens.
;
—
Stewed Tripe.
Select two pounds of double tripe well cleaned and
blanched, cut in pieces of rather less than a quarter
of a
pound each put in a clean stewpan with a pint
and one of water, two teaspoonfuls of salt,
;
of milk
one
of
middle-sized onions carefully
pepper, eight
peeled.
Set
on to
it
boil,
which
it
should do at
first
rather fast, then simmer
till done, which will be in
more than half an hour. Put it into a deep
dish or tureen, and serve with the milk and onions.
Dainty Dishes Lady Harriet St. Clair.
rather
—
:
Pettitoes.
" Boil them, the liver,
and the
heart, very gently
then mince the meat fine, split the
thicken with
feet, and simmer till they are tender
flour, butter, and a spoonful of cream
add salt and
pepper, let it boil, pour it over a few sippets of bread,
in a little
water
;
;
;
and put the feet on the mince."
Sausages.
"
The proper seasoning
is
salt,
pepper, sage, sum-
mer
savory, or
may
not predominate over the others.
thyme
they should be one-third fat,
the remainder lean, finely chopped, and the seasonings well mixed, and proportioned so that one herb
;
used, they cannot be prepared with too
but they are about as well
made
If skins are
much
into cakes."
care
;
—
52
TO KEEP SAUSAGE FRESH ALL THE YEAR.
To keep Sausage Fresh
"Fry
if
as
if
pack
for present use;
the Year.
all
in stone jars, and,
the grease that fries out of the meat
is
not
suffi-
pour over hot lard so as to cover
and entirely exclude the air."
cient to cover
it,
White
Two
pounds
or Suet Pudding.
pounds
of suet, four
the suet thoroughly in the
Season with
salt
it,
and pepper
tablespoonful of cinnamon.
of flour.
flour, until
;
Rub
well mixed.
spice with a heaping
Make
little
muslin bags
that will hold about a teacupful of the mixture.
Fill
them, tie tightly, and boil slowly about half an hour.
Drain them off, and when dry spread out on shallow
dishes, and keep in a good cupboard.
When desired
to use, take one or more, as
may be
required, re-boil
a while, then remove the muslin, and put the pudding
on a patty-pan or baking-dish, and set in the oven a
short time to brown.
Send to the table hot. It >&
very nice to use for breakfast sometimes, taking the
place of sausages, hash, and kindred dishes.
To bake
a Beef's Heart.
Cut it open, remove the ventricles, and let it soak
an hour in lukewarm water. Wipe dry with a cloth,
and parboil for twenty minutes. Make a rich stuffing, fill the heart with it, and secure it with a string.
Let it bake an hour and a half or two hours, with
half a pint of water in the pan.
The gravy will not
Serve with currant or any
need any thickening.
Arthur 's Home Magazine. {By per.)
acid jelly.
LAMB'S HEAD.
53
Lamb's Head.
" Soak the head well
rately
till
very tender.
in cold
water, and boil
it
sepa-
Parboil the liver and lights,
mince them small, and stir them in a little of the
water in which they were boiled add seasoning,
thicken with floured butter, and serve the head with
the mince around it."
;
Little Pigs in Blankets.
Season large oysters with salt and pepper. Cut
English bacon in very thin slices wrap an oyster
in each slice, and fasten with a little wooden skewer
fat
;
Heat a frying-pan,
Cook just long enough
(tooth-picks are the best things).
and put
in the "little pigs."
— about
two minutes. Place on
slices of toast that have been cut into small pieces,
and serve immediately. Do not remove the skewers.
to crisp the bacon,
This
is
a nice relish for lunch or tea
with parsley,
is
a pretty one.
;
and, garnished
The pan must be very
hot before the "pigs " are put
in, and then great care
must be taken that they do not burn.
New CookBook Miss Maria Parloa. Estes & Lauriat, Pubs.
—
:
{By per.)
" Bubble and Squeak."
Take from a round
which has been well
two or three slices, amounting to
about one pound to one pound and a half in weight,
two carrots which have been boiled with the joint,
in a cold state, as also the hearts of two boiled greens
that are cold.
Cut the meat into small dice-formed
pieces, and chop up the vegetables together
pepper
of beef,
boiled and cold,
;
MEAT
54
and
pan
salt
the
latter,
PORCUPINE.
and fry them with the meat
in a
when
fully
in a quarter-pound of sweet butter
;
done, add to the pan in which the ingredients are
fried,
half
a
gill
of
fresh catsup, and serve
dish up to the dinner-table with
Godey's Lady's Book.
mashed
your
potatoes.
—
(By per.)
Meat Porcupine.
Chop fine some lean cooked veal, chicken, or lamb ;
and one-fourth its amount of cracker or bread crumbs
or mashed potato, and a small quantity of chopped
bacon ; season highly with salt, pepper, cayenne, and
lemon-juice ; moisten with beaten egg and stock or
water enough to shape it. Mould it into an oval
loaf, and put into a shallow pan well greased.
Cut
strips of fat bacon one-fourth of an inch wide and
one inch long. Make holes in the loaf with a small
skewer insert the strips of bacon, leaving the ends
out half an inch, and push the meat up firmly round
the bacon. Bake till brown. The bacon will baste
the meat sufficiently.
The Boston Cook-Book
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln. Roberts Brothers, Pubs. (By
;
—
:
per.)
Hints for Marketing.
"
Good
fresh beef has a fine grain, and
carnation color.
It is firm,
is
of a rich
but tender and elastic to
the touch.
The fat is yellowish white and firm.
" Veal should have firm white fat, and the lean
have a pinkish tinge.
"The
best mutton
is
of a fine grain, a bright color,
the fat firm and white.
" Lamb should be eaten very fresh.
In the fore-
HINTS FOR MARKETING.
quarter, the vein in the
than blue betrays
it
55
neck being any other color
to be stale.
" Pork, when fresh and young, is smooth and firm,
and the rind is thin. The lean must be of a uniform
color, and the fat white and not at all streaked.
"A good test for ham is to run a knife under the
bone if it comes out clean, and smells agreeably,
;
the ham is good.
" In the selection of
are
full,
stiff.
the
the
If
gills
gills
the flesh
of a
fish,
make
is
flabby, the eyes sunken,
dark color, the
should be thoroughly cleaned
and washed
If much water
in just sufficient
is
sure that the eyes
bright red, and the flesh firm and
fish
when
is
stale.
first
and
They
procured,
water to cleanse them.
used, the flavor will be diminished.
Sprinkle salt in the inside, and
if they are to be
add pepper. Keep them in a cool place till
you wish to cook them. Fresh-water fish are apt to
have an earthy taste, which may be removed by soaking them in salt and water after cleaning.
Most
should
soaked
fish
be
in
cold
kinds of salt
water ten
broiled,
or twelve hours before cooking.
" Flat fish, as a rule, keep
They should be chosen
than for their size."
better than round.
for their thickness rather
CHAPTER
VI.
POULTRY
POULTRY.
SAM LAWSON AND
"
There,
tions
were
to be sure," said
in full blast,
Aunt
HIS TURKEY.
Lois, one day
"there comes
when our
preparathe hill,
and mother'll
Sam Lawson down
limpsy as ever now he'll have his doleful story to tell,
him one of the turkeys."
And so, of course, it fell out. Sam came in with his usual air of
plaintive assurance, and seated himself a contemplative spectator in
the chimney-corner, regardless of the looks and signs of unwelcome
;
give
on the part of Aunt Lois.
" Lordy massy, how prosperous every thing does seem here " he
" so different
B aid in musing tones, over his inevitable mug of cider
from what 'tis t' our home. There's Hepsy, she's all in a stew, an'
I've just been an' got her thirty-seven cents wuth o' nutmegs, yet she
says she's sure she don't see how she's to keep Thanksgiving, an'
Yeh see, last
she's down on me about it, just as ef 'twas my fault.
You know, Mis' Badger, that 'ere
winter, our old gobbler got froze.
cold night we had last winter. Wal, I was off with Jake Marshall
that night ye see, Jake, he hed to take old Gen. Dearborn's corpse
into Boston, to the family vault, an' Jake, he kind o' hated to go
alone.
'Twas a drefful cold time, an' he ses to me, Sam, you jes' go
'long with me.'
So I was sort o' sorry for him, an' I kind o' thought
I'd go 'long.
Wal, come 'long to Josh Bissel's tahvern, there at the
Half-way House, you know, 'twas so swinging cold, we stopped to
!
;
:
'
we sort o' sot an' sot over the fire, till,
got asleep an' when we woke up, we found
we'd left the old general hitched up t' th' post pretty much all night.
Wal, didn't hurt him none, poor man 'twas allers a favorite spot o'
his'n.
But, takin' one thing with another, I didn't get home till about
noon next day, an' I tell you, Hepsy, she was right down on me. She
said the baby was sick, an' there hadn't been no wood split, nor the
barn fastened up, nor nothin'
Lordy massy, I didn't mean no harm.
I thought there was wood enough, an' I thought likely Hepsy'd git
out an' fasten up the barn. But Hepsy, she was in one o' her contrary streaks, an' she wouldn't do a thing.
An' when I went out to
look, why, sure 'nuff, there was our old tom-turkey froze as stiff as
Here
a stake,
his claws jist a-stickin' right straight up like this."
Sam struck an expressive attitude, and looked so much like a frozen
turkey, as to give a pathetic reality to the picture.
" Well, now, Sam, why need you be off on things that's none of
your business?" said my grandmother. "I've talked to you plainly
about that a great many times, Sam," she continued, in tones of severe
admonition. " Hepsy is a hard-working woman, but she can't be extake a
first
little
suthin' warmin', an'
we knew, we kind
o'
;
;
!
—
59
HOW
60
TO SELECT A TURKEY.
pected to see to every thing ; an' you oughter 'ave been at
night to fasten up your own barn, and look after your
home that
own cree-
turs."
Sam took the rebuke all the more meekly, as he perceived the stiff
black legs of a turkey poking out from under my grandmother's apron,
while she was delivering it. To be exhorted and told of his shortcomings, and then furnished with a turkey at Thanksgiving, was a
yearly part of his family programme. In time he departed, not only
with the turkey, but with us boys in procession after him, bearing a
mince and a pumpkin pie for Ilepsy's children.
" they ought to have
" Poor things " my grandmother remarked
something good to eat Thanksgiving Day; 'tain't their fault that
Oldtown Folks Mrs. H. B.
they've got a shiftless father."
Stowe. Houghton, Mifflin, &* Co., Pubs. {By per)
!
;
—
How
The
:
to Select a
Turkey.
practice of sending partially dressed fowls to
our markets
is
one which should be condemned by
every housekeeper
who
desires pure, untainted meat.
Therefore, in the selection of a turkey,
it
is
entirely cleansed
that the crop
is
inside
removed, as
;
this,
food, will very soon poison the
delicious portion of the fowl.
fine
texture,
first
see that
and especially see
with its undigested
whole of the most
The
skin should be of
and should disclose no purple
underneath, as that indicates age.
The
flesh
legs should
be smooth and dark, and the spurs soft and loose.
There should be no heavy layers of pale, unhealthy
fat along the back
this indicates a rapidly fattened,
if not a stall-fed turkey.
The flesh must be white
and the breast plump, and the fat yellow but, above
all, it should smell perfectly sweet inside.
Having
secured a good turkey, the next thing to do is to
thoroughly cleanse it, extract the pin-feathers, and
hang it up to dry.
:
;
1
HOW
TO ROAST A TURKEY.
How
While
it
Roast a Turkey.
to
drying, prepare a dressing in the
is
lowing manner
loaf,
6
:
fol-
you have no good home-made
If
take one-half or three-fourths of a stale loaf of
baker's bread, and cut into small pieces, over which
pour very scantily warm (not boiling) water enough
to make the bread Hght, soft, and still have it flaky,
is the desired quantity
boiling water poured over
bread until it is mushy and glutinous will never
make good stuffing add two well-beaten eggs, a
good pinch of finely powdered sage without the
stems, one small onion fried a golden brown in butNow put into a skillet a tableter, pepper and salt.
;
;
;
spoonful of butter, and, when turning a light brown,
add the dressing leave it to fry a golden brown,
then turn and stir until thoroughly heated. Take it
off, and fill the turkey, after salting the inside
do
;
;
not press the dressing in compactly, but leave room
for
it
to swell.
should have been said at the
It
proper place, to push back the skin from the neck,
and cut the latter off close to the body stuff the
breast from this opening, then turn the skin over on
the back, and sew it the other vent needs no sew;
;
ing,
when the
fowl
is
properly stuffed
now
;
press
the legs up as far as possible toward the breast, and
secure firmly to the end of the turkey.
bing over of
if
salt, it
is
now ready
With
a rub-
for the oven,
and
roasted in an enclosed pan, there will be no need
of basting
to start
;
otherwise, with about a half -pint of water
it, it
will
need to be basted frequently.
heat of the oven should be moderate at
increased afterward
;
if it
browns too
fast,
first,
The
but
wet a clean
TURKEY DRESSED WITH OYSTERS.
62
and lay over the turkey this can be
Allow about twenty minof
meat.
When the turkey is
utes to each pound
cloth in water,
;
remoistened occasionally.
taken out, there should be nothing but fat in the
if there is
more
pari with which to make gravy
;
than three or four tablespoonfuls, pour it out, as that
into what is left in the pan, put flour
is sufficient
;
enough
to absorb
it,
and
let it
cook, with constant
done then add a pint and
a half of cold water, and stir constantly until it
thickens.
To insure good gravy, the fat must on no
account be allowed to burn in the bottom of the pan,
stirring, until the flour is
while the turkey
is
be certain to avoid
roasting
to a pint
;
arrange the damper to
then chop them, and add either to
the dressing or gravy.
nati, O.
;
The giblets may be put on
which may be allowed to boil
this.
in a quart of water,
down
;
— Commercial Gazette, Cincin-
(By per.)
Turkey dressed with Oysters.
For a ten-pound turkey, take two pints
of bread-
crumbs, half a teacupful of butter cut in bits (not
melted), one teaspoonful of sweet basil, pepper, and
salt,
and mix thoroughly. Rub the turkey well,
and out, with salt and pepper then fill with
a spoonful of crumbs, then a few well-drained
inside
first
;
oysters, using half a can for the turkey.
oyster-liquor,
the giblets in
A
Strain the
and use to baste the turkey. Cook
the pan, and chop fine in the gravy.
fowl of this size will require three hours cooking
—
Presbyterian Cook-Book,
moderate oven.
{By per)
Dayton, O. Mrs. W. A. B.
in
a
:
UTILIZING THE "LEFT-OVERS."
6$
Utilizing the "Left-Overs."
The remnants
of the turkey, after the best
bits
have been removed from the bones for other use,
make a most delicious soup. Place all the bones and
bits of dressing in an earthen vessel, cover with cold
Remove the bones,
water, and simmer for two hours.
and strain the stock through a hair sieve or cloth, to
away
all bits of meat, skin, gristle, or breadHalf an hour before straining the stock,
prepare two medium-sized bunches of celery by washing, and cutting into pieces an inch long.
Use both
clear
crumbs.
the leaves and green parts of the stems, as well as the
on the stove in cold water, and
ready, add both water and celery
Season well with salt and whole peppers.
to it.
Variety may be given by using several kinds of vegetables for flavoring,
cabbage, turnip, onion, and
Put
blanched.
when
the stock
it
is
—
carrot, a
very small quantity of each.
Instead of
dumplings made thus may be added
Beat two eggs very light, add half a teaspoonful of
salt, same of baking-powder, and flour enough to
make a stiff dough pinch off bits the size of_ a large
hickory-nut, roll between the fingers round, and drop
them into the boiling stock half an hour before the
soup is to be served. One of the most simple ways
of warming up cold turkey is to separate all bits of
skin and gristle, from the pieces which have been cut
from the bones when preparing them for soup, and
vegetables,
;
placing the meat, not chopped, but shred in long
pieces, in a frying-pan with sufficient
to fry
it.
and not
It
melted butter
should be stirred lightly several times,
fried brown, or
it
will
be too hard.
If
there
—
CRANBERRIES.
64
any cold
is
stuffing, cut
it
edge
of the plate.
brown
in pieces, fry
the turkey has been taken up, and place
— Harper
's
Bazar.
it
after
around the
{By per. Harper
& Brothers.)
Cranberries.
Put three pints of washed cranberries in a granite
stewpan.
On top of them put three cups of granulated sugar and three gills of zvater.
After they begin
to boil, cook
do not
jelly
der.
stir
when
them ten minutes,
them.
Remove
They
and
will
—
and the skins will be soft and tenThe Boston Cook-Book: Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
cool,
(By per.)
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
A
the husks of
Slit
Chestnut Puree.
fifty
chestnuts^ and put
a saucepan with a bit of butter
let
closely covered,
the scum.
them
heat, tossing the
;
put the
them
lid on,
pan now and then.
about twenty minutes you can easily remove
hulls.
all
in
and
In
the
Put the nuts in a saucepan with a ladleful of
let them simmer gently
pound them put them through a sieve or
colander add a little nutmeg, salt, and sugar serve
up very hot with a dash of cream or butter.
stock, beef-tea, or hot water
until soft
;
;
;
;
This
is
;
for a garnish to chops or cutlets.
a gravy-boat, and then
it
will
keep
hot.
Serve in
To put
around roast turkey, they are prepared in the same
way, but kept whole, and the consomme or beef-tea
cooked down to a glaze and with a little butter, so
Toss them about in it to cover
them all over.
Public Ledger, Philadelphia.
(By
per. Editor of The Household?)
is
that they are shiny.
A
!
TO ROAST A GOOSE.
65
Such a bustle ensued, that you might have thought a goose the
rarest of all birds, a feathered phenomenon to which a black, swan
was a matter of course and in truth it was something very like it, in
Mrs. Cratchit made the gravy (ready beforehand in a
that house.
little saucepan) hissing hot; Master Peter mashed the potatoes with
incredible vigor Miss Belinda sweetened up the apple-sauce Martha
dusted the hot plates Bob took Tiny Tim beside him in a tiny corner at the table the two young Cratchits set chairs for everybody,
not forgetting themselves, and, mounting guard upon their posts,
crammed spoons into their mouths, lest they should shriek for goose
before their turn came to be helped. At last the dishes were set on,
and grace was said. It was succeeded by a breathless pause, as Mrs.
Cratchit, looking slowly all along the carving-knife, prepared to plunge
it in the breast; but when she did, and when the long-expected gush
of stuffing issued forth, one murmur of delight arose all round the
board, and even Tiny Tim, excited by the two young Cratchits, beat
on the table with the handle of his knife, and feebly cried, Hurrah
There never was such a goose. Bob said he didn't believe there
;
;
;
;
;
ever was such a goose cooked. Its tenderness and flavor, size and
cheapness, were the themes of universal admiration. Eked out by
apple-sauce and mashed potatoes, it was a sufficient dinner for the
whole family ; indeed, as Mrs. Cratchit said with great delight (surveying one small atom of a bone upon the dish), they hadn't ate it all
at last
Yet every one had had enough, and the youngest Cratchits
in particular were steeped in sage and onion to the eyebrows!
Christmas Carol: Charles Dickens.
!
—
To Roast
"
Take a young goose,
Make
a Goose.
pick, singe,
and clean
well.
the stuffing with two ounces of onions (about
and one ounce of green sage
chopped very fine then add a large coffee-cup of
stale bread-crumbs and the same of mashed potatoes, a little pepper and salt, a bit of butter as big
as a walnut, the yolk of an egg or two
mix these
well together, and then stuff the goose.
Do not fill
four common-sized)
;
;
it
entirely
will take
The
fire
at first,
"
A
:
the stuffing requires room to swell.
two hours or more to roast
must be brisk. Baste it with
then with
green
months old
—
its
own
—
thoroughly.
salt
and water
dripping.
goose
that is,
seasoned with
is
it
It
one under four
pepper and salt
APPLE-SAUCE FOR GOOSE.
66
instead
of
sage and onions.
It
will
roast
in
an
hour."
Apple-Sauce for Goose.
and cut up a gallon of pippins or other
stew them, with a little water added,
grate in a bit of the peel of a lemon and all its juice
sweeten to your taste when the apples are done verytender, mash them up perfectly smooth, and serve.
Virginia Cookery-Book Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith.
Harper & Brothers, Pubs. (By per.)
Peel, core,
fresh apples
;
;
—
:
Duckling Pot Roast.
This
way to cook this very acceptPut into a shallow crock a thin strip of
a very good
is
able bird.
bacon and a tablespoonful of mixed whole spice.
Clean and truss two ducklings, put them in the crock,
add hot water or soup-stock enough to come up half
way on the birds. Then add a sprig of celery and
two of parsfey place a narrow strip of bacon over
each bird cover close, and set the crock in a moderate oven, where the birds will cook slowly two
hours.
Remove the ducklings, strain the sauce, and
add a gill of dark
reduce it one-third by boiling
simmer
flour
dash
of
brown
wine thicken with a
add a teaspoonful of lemon-juice,
fifteen minutes
;
;
;
;
;
;
and serve with the duck. A small quantity of the
sauce may be boiled down until thick as cream.
This is called glaze it is brushed over the bird
The Book of Entrees Thomas
before serving.
:
—
J. Murrey.
White, Stokes,
:
&
Allen, Pubs.
CHICKEN FRICASSEE.
6?
The most elegant dish of the Romans was a stuffed peacock. A
young peacock is eatable when properly roasted, but an old one is
really very poor eating but the Romans used to prepare them in the
following way They selected those with the most beautiful plumage,
and stifled them to death, believing that that mode of killing gave
more brilliancy to the plumage. As soon as dead, they carefully split
the bird open by an incision all along the back, from the bill to the
rump. They then took out all the bones, meat, etc., leaving only the
bones of the legs to the first joint, those of the wings to the second
The
joint, and the head whole, except the brain, eyes, and tongue.
inside of the skin was now immediately lined with a coating of glue,
and filled with bran to keep it in shape. The feathers that were
spoiled were varnished, and false but brilliant eyes were placed instead of the natural ones. When dry the skin was filled with roasted
birds or with the flesh of birds chopped and cooked, and carefully
sewed up. The bird was served on a large silver dish made for that
purpose. The dish was of an oblong shape, and in the middle and
soldered to it was something resembling the trunk of a tree with a
kind of limb on which the bird was fastened. It was meant to look
just as if it were alive, and resting itself on a perch, with an ear of
It was always served at the beginning of the dinner,
millet in its bill.
Pierre Blot.
and was one of the last dishes eaten.
;
:
—
Chicken Fricassee.
"Take two
chickens, cut up, and lay
them
in skil-
with two slices of lean ham, two small eschalots,
and a few blades of mace. Then season fowls with
let,
Add a little water. When about
salt.
add half a pint of cream, and a lump of
pepper and
half done,
butter the size of a walnut, rolled in
fricassee constantly stirring
A
flour.
Keep
the
done."
Souffle of Chicken.
Take the white meat
of a chicken,
skin and sinews, and mince
Then put
till
it
up as
remove
all
the
fine as possible.
the meat into a stew-pan, together with
some white
sauce, a little parsley chopped fine, and
pepper and
salt.
it
until
a
little.
it
boils
Have
Set the pan on the
;
then remove
it
fire,
and
stir
to one side to cool
the yolks of three eggs beaten to a
CHICKEN CURRY.
68
firm froth, and stir these into the mixture.
Butter
well a mould, strew over the bottom and sides of
some
fine
it
bread-crumbs, and place a piece of white
paper around the top to allow the
souffle'
to rise.
oven to bake, and when
The
done, serve with white sauce poured round it.
Caterer.
(By per.)
Then put
it
in a very quick
—
Chicken Curry.
Fine-grained poultry does not
the curry-powder
of the flesh.
A
make good
curry, as
unable to permeate the centre
is
coarse-grained bird will be found the
Boil the chicken in the usual
manner, saving the broth. When cold, cut it neatly,
and rub the curry-powder into, the meat. Cut up one
large sour apple and half an onion fry these in butter add the meat, toss it about a moment, and add
half a pint of the chicken-broth and a tablespoonful of
chutney, simmer until thoroughly amalgamated, and
serve with rice or shredded maize.
A little sugar is
an improvement, and may thicken the sauce, but I
like it without flour.
The Book of Entrees
Thomas J. Murrey.
White, Stokes, & Allen, Pubs.
best for this purpose.
;
;
—
:
Chicken Salad.
"
Mince the white meat
in bits
;
of a
No.
chicken
chop the white parts of
salad-dressing thus
:
Rub
i.
fine,
celery.
or pull
it
Prepare a
the yolks of four hard-
smooth paste with a dessertspoontwo teaspoonfuls of made mustard,
one teaspoonful of salt, and one teacupful of strong
vinegar.
Mix the chicken and celery together, and
boiled eggs to a
ful of salad-oil,
;;
CHICKEN SALAD.
69
pour the dressing over when ready to serve. Garnish the dish with the delicate leaves of the celery.
White-heart
may be
lettuce
substituted
for
the
celery."
Chicken Salad.
"For one
No.
2.
good-sized chicken take one bunch of
celery chopped fine, a
little
pepper and
For
salt.
dressing for the above quantity, take the yolks of
two eggs boiled hard, make them fine, and add mustard, vinegar, oil, and a little cayenne-pepper and
The
salt to suit taste.
liquor the chicken
in is very nice to use in
enough
it is
to moisten
like a jelly,
but
it
mixing
nicely.
it is
When
it
is
boiled
Put in just
it.
becomes cold
a great improvement to the
salad."
Jellied Chicken.
Boil a fowl until
let
it
will slip easily
from the bones
the water be reduced to about one pint in boiling
pick the meat from the bones in good-sized pieces,
and bones place in a wet
mould skim the fat from the liquor, add a little
butter, pepper and salt to the taste, and one halfounce of gelatine. When this dissolves, pour it hot
over the chicken.
The liquor must be seasoned
pretty high, for the chicken absorbs.
The Everyday Cook-Book Miss E. Neill. {By per. Belford,
taking out
all
gristle, fat,
;
;
—
:
&
Clarke;
Co.)
Chicken Pie.
Boil the fowls until tender
;
prepare a crust of
buttermilk and cream, in the same manner as for soft
biscuit
;
line
your baking-dish with a portion of
it
—
CHICKEN PIE WITH SWEET POTATOES.
JO
in pieces, and place the poraround in the pie. Put in some lumps of butter
then put in the liquid in which the fowls were
boiled, until the pan is two-thirds full.
It should be
seasoned to the taste before putting in, but not have
any thickening in, or it will dry away too much.
Roll out, and wet the edge where the crust comes
then break the fowls
tions
;
together.
Make
Bake
steam.
a hole in the top to
moderately.
it
be necessary for a large
zine.
{By per.)
pie.
—
let
out the
At least two fowls will
From Peterson 's Maga-
Chicken Pie with Sweet Potatoes.
Cut up a chicken, and put on
has boiled a while (skimming
it
to stew
when
;
and
after
it
necessary), add
medium-sized sweet potatoes peeled and cut in
Stew until tender, and then place the pieces
halves.
six
of
chicken and potatoes alternately in a large pie-
with pepper and
stewing
crust,
the
made
as for biscuit.
Season
and the gravy furnished by
Cover with
chicken and potatoes.
dish lined with crust
and bake.
salt,
Lizzie Strohm.
Giblet Pie.
Wash and
clean the giblets, put
pan, season with pepper,
rolled in flour
;
salt,
them
and a
in a stew-
little
butter
cover them with water, stew them
till
Line the sides of your piedish with paste, put in the giblets, and if the gravy
is not quite thick enough, add a little more butter
rolled in flour, and let it boil once. Pour in the gravy,
put on the top crust, leaving an opening in the cen-
they are very tender.
PIGEON
tre of
it
in the
form of a square
leaves of the paste.
when
the crust
Magazine.
PIE.
;
Jl
ornament
this with
Set the pie in the oven, and
done take
is
it
out.
— Peterson's
(By per)
Pigeon Pie.
Having picked and cleaned five pigeons, fill them
with a stuffing of grated cold ham, grated cracker,
salt,
pepper, and butter.
may be
the green tops
asparagus
If
is
in season,
substituted for the cracker.
Pour milk and water into the dish until the pigeons
Put a lid of paste on the top,
and bake an hour. If you wish the pigeons very
tender, parboil them twenty minutes, and use the
water in which they were boiled to make the pie.
Arthur's Home Magazine.
(By per. Puds.)
are nearly covered.
—
The pigeons were snugly put to bed in a comfortable pie, and
tucked in with a coverlet of crust.
Legend of Sleepy Hollow:
Washington Irving. {By per. G. P. Pictnani's Sons.)
—
Roast Guinea Fowls.
Pick, clean, wash,
and
adding to the stuffing a
you would chickens,
minced ham. Roast as
stuff as
little
you would chickens, basting liberally with butter.
Season the gravy with a chopped shallot, and with
summer-savory
add the giblets, and thicken with
browned flour.
The Unrivalled Cook-Book Mrs.
Washington.
(By per. Harper & Brothers.)
;
—
Croquettes de Volaille.
:
(Poultry Croquettes.)
Melt a bit of butter in a stew-pan, put into
chopped parsley and mushrooms, two spoonfuls
it
of
—
CROQUETTES DE VOLAILLE.
72
flour, salt,
Fry it, and pour in
This sauce ought to have
pepper, and nutmeg.
stock and a
little
cream.
Cut up any poultry
which has been cooked the day before, into dice.
Put them into the sauce, and let it get cold. Form
cover them with bread-crumbs.
it into balls, and
Wash these in eggs which have been beaten up, and
roll them in bread-crumbs a second time.
Fry them
to a good color, and serve with a garnish of fried
Petersons Magazine.
{By per:)
parsley.
the consistence of thick milk.
CHAPTER
VII.
GAME.
GAME.
" I believe I agree with the English people generally," said Steven,
not without a smile. In the levity of youth, ignorance, and unbounded
" For
digestion, cooking to him was the least important of subjects.
myself, a venison steak broiled over a wood fire, a buck's head baked
in an earth oven, a partridge or quail quickly roasted, and a snatch of
cassava bread, have been my diet for years, with a mug of black coffee
to wash it down."
as long as our coffee held out
look almost of excitement came across Lord Petres' impassive
" Lawrence," said he earnestly, " I'm delighted to have met
face.
you. Sit down, pray. This conversation is most interesting to me.
not
At the present moment I am endeavoring to work out an idea,
original, nothing's original,
but an idea too much neglected by writers
on art generally which is, that the perfection of cookery is, in many
cases, to be sought, not by striving after new combinations, but by
reverting to the instinctive, untaught science of the simple hunter in
the woods. Your remark confirms all that I have been writing on the
subject. You speak of a venison steak smoking hot from the embers,
of small game quickly roasted, of a buck's head cooked by slow and
gradual heat.
Good God, sir! do you not know that all this is the
ne plus ultra of intuitive science, bearing out with accuracy the axiom
of the immortal Savarin, that On deviait cuisinier, mais on nait r6tisseur ? "
" I don't know French," said Steven, " except a few words I picked
up in the Canadian backwoods once but I know our food used to
Still I
taste deuced good to us in the forests or out prairie hunting.
can't' say I ever enjoyed any thing more than some cold beef and pickles that I ate when I landed in Southampton yesterday. After living
on wild flesh, as I have done, for years, I believe plain English beef
and mutton will be a treat to me, ill-cooked or well-cooked."
Steven
—
—
A
—
—
;
—
;
—
Lawrence, Yeoman
:
To Cook
Mrs. Edwards.
a Deer's
Head
in
Camp.
Dig a hole two
feet square and one foot deep
and allow it to burn to embers remove about half of the remaining coals, throw in the
hole a thin layer of green leaves, on top of which
put the head in the same condition as when taken
build a fire in
;
it,
;
75
VENISON
"j6
STEAK'S, BROILED.
from the animal cover it thoroughly with a layer of
green leaves, and the embers and ashes previously
taken from the hole allow the head to roast an
hour and a half, then remove it, and pull the skin
from it season with salt and pepper.
The Unrivalled Cook-Book Mrs. Washington. {By per.
Harper & BrotJiers)
;
;
—
;
:
Venison Steaks, Broiled.
"Wash and wipe them
Put them on the
and broil them then
and pepper, and baste them with
over a clear
gridiron,
season with salt
dry.
fire,
;
Serve with currant-jelly."
butter.
Venison Steaks, Fried.
"
Wash two
steaks
;
season with
salt,
black and
red pepper mixed, and fry a light brown on both
When
sides.
done,
them on a
place
dish,
and
dredge into the pan one dessertspoonful of browned
flour, to which add gradually one cupful of boiling
water
;
stir well,
and season to
Garnish the
taste.
top of each with currant-jelly, and send to table on
a well-heated dish."
Opossums.
Opossums are best in the autumn when the persimmons are ripe, as they eat that fruit, and become
very
A
They are never caught in the daytime.
moonlight night is the best time to catch
fat.
fine
When
opossums.
feed
them
sum, cut
caught, put
for several days
off
;
them
in a cage,
and
skin and draw the opos-
the legs to the
first joint,
and part
of
RABBIT CURRY.
the
tail
roast
;
it
eaten hot.
&
Harper
head and body
stuff the
before, a brisk
J?
like a turkey,
Opossums
fire.
and
are never
— The Unrivalled Cook-Book.
{By per
Brothers.)
De
frosts
dun come, an' de 'possum
Oh, Jurangy, ho
is ripe,
Better'n any beefsteak, better'n any tripe,
Oh, Jurangy, ho
Arkansaw
Traveller.
Rabbit Curry.
Select two fine rabbits, cut
them
into neat pieces
put in an earthen crock a thin slice of bacon, add a
few pieces of
rabbit, sprinkle over
it
a
little
curry-
powder, salt, fresh grated cocoanut, and a dozen
raisins
put in another layer of rabbit, and season it
;
as the first layer
;
repeat until the rabbit
all
is
used,
and meat of one
Moisten the
fresh or half a pound of dry cocoanut.
whole with a mild Catawba or Rhine wine let this
stand twenty-four hours then place the crock in a
pot of water, and let it simmer two hours, keeping it
When done serve it on a flat dish,
well covered.
The Book of Entrees
and serve rice separately.
and you have
also used the juice
;
;
—
Thomas J. Murrey.
:
White, Stokes,
& Allen,
Pubs.
Fricassee of Squirrels.
Put two young squirrels into a pot with two ounces
one or two ounces of ham, some salt and
Let
pepper, and just water enough to cover them.
of butter,
them stew slowly
until tender
;
take them up, and
pour half a teacup of cream and a beaten yolk of
egg into the gravy, and when it has boiled five min-
—
)
BROILED PARTRIDGES.
78
pour over the squirrels
Home Magazine. (By per.)
utes,
in the dish.
— Arthur's
Broiled Partridges.
"Time,
twenty minutes.
to
fifteen
Partridges,
gravy, butter, pepper, salt, cayenne.
" Thoroughly pick and draw the partridges, divide
each through the back and breast, and wipe the
Season them highly with pepper, salt, and
cayenne, and place them over a clear
bright fire to broil.
When done, rub a piece of fresh
butter over them, and serve them up hot with brown
insides.
a very
little
gravy."
Fillet of Grouse'.
Remove
pieces.
the breast, and separate into four or six
Disjoint and cook the remainder in boiling
tender then remove all
Thicken the broth (which
should be reduced to half a cup), season, and moisten
Spread the minced meat on squares of
the meat.
toast; put a layer of currant-jelly on each.
Rub
the fillets with butter, and broil them carefully season with salt, pepper, and butter, and lay them on
The Peerless Cook-Book Mrs. D. A.
the jelly.
L incoln. (By per.
salted water to cover,
the meat, and chop
it
till
;
fine.
;
:
Woodcock
Have a good
Pie.
puff-paste made, and with this line
Then have cut a' thin
bottom of the dish, and
season it with salt, pepper, and a little mace, laying
upon the top of it a thin slice of ham. (Ths ham, as
the sides of your baking-dish.
slice of veal
;
lay this on the
TO ROAST WILD DUCKS.
79
well as the veal, should have no fat about
Now
it.)
take a couple of brace of woodcock that have been
carefully plucked, and, without drawing, season
with pepper,
them
and mace. Have some bacon cut
wrap these round the birds, and lay
salt,
into thin slices,
them on the ham as closely together as possible, filling up the spaces around them with hard-boiled eggs
cut in small pieces.
Have ready made some very
strong beef-gravy
pour a pint of it over the birds,
whole a covering of the puff -paste, brush
it over with egg, and bake for three-quarters of an
hour in a well-heated oven. This pie is intended to
The Caterer. {By per?)
be eaten cold.
;
lay over the
—
To
roast
Wild Ducks.
Clean and prepare them as poultry.
Crumb
the
inside of a small loaf of baker's bread, to which add
three ounces of butter, one large onion chopped
with pepper and
salt to taste.
Mix
all
fine,
well together.
Season the ducks, both inside and out, with pepper,
and a little sage rubbed fine then fill them with
the dressing, and skewer tightly.
Place them in the
upward
dredge
little
pan, back
a
flour over, and a
tablespoonful in the pan, with water sufficient to make
gravy.
When a nice brown, turn them over baste
frequently.
Serve with currant -jelly.
Arthur's
Home Magazine. {By per.)
salt,
;
;
;
CHAPTER
VIII.
OMELETS, EGGS, AND CHEESE.
AND
OMELETS, EGGS,
CHEESE.
What
can you give us for luncheon ?
are pleased to choose but, unluckily,
we have neither beef, veal, nor mutton in the house.
Sergeant Austerlitz. Well, well, we are not particular; you
have only to twist the neck of one of your fine fat barn-door fowls,
and clap it on the gridiron.
Manette. Why, as to our fowls, gentlemen, I can't say much for
our fowls our fowls are apt to be tough but what say you to some
fine, fresh, new-laid eggs ?
If eggs would serve your turn, I could
make you out the prettiest bill of fare
Sergeant Austerlitz. Your larder does not seem likely to
burst from an overcharge, bright tulip of the Seine
Toss us up
an omelet, and we will make the best of your fare.
The Maid of
Francis.
Manette.
Whatever you
;
;
;
!
.
.
—
.
Croissey: Mrs. Gore.
Omelette aux Fines Herbes.
" Break eight eggs in a stew-pan, to which add a
teaspoonful of very finely chopped eschalots, one of
chopped parsley, a half-one of salt, a pinch of pepper,
and three large tablespoonfuls of cream beat them
well together then put two ounces of butter in an
omelet-pan, stand it over a sharp fire, and as soon
as the butter is sufficiently hot pour in the eggs stir
them round quickly until delicately set shake the
pan round, then leave it a moment to color the omelet
hold the pan in a slanting position, turn it on
to your dish, and serve it immediately.
It must not
be too much done."
;
;
;
;
;
Omelette au Sucre.
Break four eggs
minute
for half a
bowl beat them with a fork
add a tablespoonf ul of sugar
in a
;
;
83
;
OMELET WITH JELLY.
84
Put a teaspoonful of butter in a frying-pan over a quick fire, and when
melted, turn the eggs in stir with a fork, and see
beat another half-minute.
;
that
it
rather,
When becoming
does not burn.
when the under
rather liquid yet,
—
part
slide
it
hard,
— or
cooked, but the top
is
over the dish, and
when
pan upside
down so as to fold the omelet over into the form of
Have a red-hot
a semicircle then dust it with sugar.
which
just touch
with
of
iron,
piece
poker, or other
an
ornamental
make
the omelet in spots, so as to
The
design, burning each place slightly, and serve.
whole process must be completed in about three minabout half of
it is
on the
dish, turn the
;
utes
:
the quicker, the better the omelet.
— Pierre
Blot.
Omelet with
Jelly.
Put a small quantity of lard or
oil
into the pan, let
wipe the
it simmer a few minutes, and remove it
oil in
little
fresh
pan dry with a towel, and put in a
;
which the omelet may be
fried
;
care should be taken
does not burn, which would spoil the
Break three eggs separately
color of the omelet.
put them into a bowl, and whisk them thoroughly
that the
oil
with a fork.
will the
The
longer they are beaten, the lighter
Beat up a teaspoonful of milk
omelet be.
with the eggs, and continue to beat until the last
moment before pouring into the pan, which should
be over a hot fire. As soon as the omelet sets, re-
move the pan from the
a knife
under
it
to
hottest part of the
fire.
Slip
prevent sticking to the pan.
When the centre is almost firm, slant the pan, work
the omelet in shape to fold; just before folding add
OMELET AU RHUM.
a teaspoonful of currant-jelly
dish, dust a little
This recipe
amply
tested.
is
;
turn
85
out on a hot
it
powdered sugar over it, and serve.
from "The Cook," and has been
(By per.)
Omelet au Rhum.
Prepare an omelet as has been directed, fold it,
and turn out on a hot dish; dust a liberal quantity
of powdered sugar over it, and singe the sugar into
neat stripes with a hot iron rod heated on the
coals.
Pour a wineglassful of warmed Jamaica rum
around it, and when on the table set fire to it with
a tablespoon dash the burning rum over the omelet
blowout the fire, and serve.
Breakfast Dainties:
;
Thomas J. Murrey.
White, Stokes,
& Allen,
Pubs.
Bread Omelet.
One cup
of fine bread-crumbs
a cup of sweet milk
;
moistened with half
three eggs beaten separately
and thoroughly, adding the whites last season with
Put in the skillet or frysalt and pepper to taste.
ing-pan a good piece of butter, and when hot, pour
in the omelet.
Leave on the stove a short time, and
then finish cooking in a warm oven.
Mrs. Matilda
;
—
J. Anderson.
Plain Omelet.
Break four eggs into a large bowl
beat them
take a
season with salt and pepper
tablespoonful of flour, and mix very smoothly in a
small teacupful of sweet milk, then pour it into the
bowl with the eggs, and beat all well have ready a
skillet very hot, with a good lump of butter melted
;
thoroughly
;
;
;
HAM
86
in
it.
Pour
" set " in
OMELET.
in the omelet,
and as soon as
it
becomes
Serve
the middle, turn very carefully.
hot.
Ham
"Two
spoonful
Omelet.
eggs, four ounces of
ham. Mince the ham very
and fry it for two minutes
make
add any
salt-
minced
without any fat,
finely,
in a little butter
the batter for the omelet,
proceed as
a
butter, half
pepper, two tablespoonfuls of
of
stir in
in the case of a plain omelet.
salt to
the batter, as the
ham
then
;
the ham, and
Do
usually
is
not
suffi-
ciently salt to impart a flavor."
Asparagus Omelet.
"Boil some tender fresh-cut asparagus in very
water with a small portion of salt or, what is
better still, steam the asparagus without water until
it is tender; chop it very fine, mix it with the yolks
add
of five and whites of three well-beaten eggs
little
;
;
two tablespoonfuls
of
sweet cream;
fry,
and serve
quite hot."
Spanish Omelet.
Chop up
half of
a sweet Spanish pepper
;
peel
and cut up a large tomato cut two ounces of ham
mince three button mushrooms and half
into dice
an onion with a clove of garlic season with salt,
cayenne, and capers.
Put the onion and ham in a
pan, and fry add the other ingredients, and simmer
until a thick pulp
add to this an omelet just before
Pour a wellfolding it, and turning out on a dish.
made tomato-sauce round it, and serve.
;
;
;
;
;
OMELET
The
FRITTERS.
may be varied to suit the taste.
Dainties
Thomas J. Murrey.
ingredients
— Breakfast
:
&
White, Stokes,
Allen, Pubs.
Omelet
Make two
Fritters.
or three thin omelets, adding a
sweet basil to the usual ingredients
small pieces, and
when
S?
roll
them
cold, dip
them
;
them
cut
little
into
into the shape of olives
them
into batter, or enclose
them with fried
American Home Cook-Book. Dick &
puff -paste, fry, and serve
into
parsley.
—
Fitzgerald,
Pubs.
Soft-boiled Eggs.
warm saucepan, and cover with
Let them stand where they will keep
This method will
hot, but not boil, for ten minutes.
New
Cook-Book
yolks.
cook both whites and
Miss Parloa. Estes & Lauriat, Pubs. {By per.)
Put the eggs
in a
boiling water.
—
There
egg.
— R.
is
always a best way of doing every thing,
:
if
it
be to boil an
W.Emerson.
Scrambled Eggs.
Four eggs, one tablespoonful
spoonful of
them.
salt.
salt to
Turn
in the
Melt the butter
beaten eggs,
stir
of butter, half a tea-
Beat the eggs, and add the
in a saucepan.
quickly over a hot
fire
for
one
minute, and serve.
Fricasseed Eggs.
Boil half
slices.
a dozen eggs hard, and cut
Then make
a sauce as follows
:
them into
Chop very
FROTHED
88
EGGS.
and two or three
two
ounces of butter, seasoning with salt and pepper.
Let them stew gently, but do not brown them. Then
add a gill of cream mixed with a little flour, for
thickening the sauce, lay the sliced eggs in, allow all
The Caterer. (By
to come to a boil, and serve.
fine a small onion, a little parsley,
mushrooms, and put them
into a stew-pan with
—
per.)
Frothed Eggs.
Take the yolks of eight eggs and the whites of
four, and beat them up with a tablespoonful of water
and the strained juice of one lemon. Sweeten it to
taste, add a pinch of salt, and then fry the same as
an omelet. Have ready the four remaining whites
whipped to a stiff froth with a pound of pulverized
Then dish
sugar, and flavored with vanilla or lemon.
the omelet, heap the frothed egg high upon it, and
The
put it in the oven for a few minutes to brown.
(By per)
Caterer.
—
Cheese
"Three ounces
of flour,
Fritters.
one egg, one
gill
of tepid
pepper
and salt, and one ounce of butter. The flour and
condiments are put into a basin, and the water added
by degrees. Then the cheese with the yolk of the
egg is added, and last the white beaten to a stiff
Drop this by spoonfuls into boiling lard,
froth.
and cook three minutes. The results are delicious
golden-brown balls, as big as your fist, permeated
water, three ounces of grated cheese, a
with the flavor of the cheese."
little
WELSH RAREBIT.
Welsh
89
Rarebit.
Grate one pint of cheese
sprinkle on
;
it
half a
teaspoonful of mustard, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of
salt,
and a speck
Heap
of cayenne.
on
this
slices
Put in the hot oven for a few
moments, and when the cheese begins to melt, serve
at once.
New Cook-Book Miss Parloa. Estes
of
buttered toast.
—
&
:
(By per!)
Lauriat, Pubs.
The dairy was certainly worth looking at it was a scene to sicken
for with a sort of calenture in hot and dusty streets,
such coolness,
such purity, such fresh fragrance of new-pressed cheese, of firm
butter, of wooden vessels perpetually bathed in pure water
such
soft coloring of red earthenware and creamy surfaces, brown wood
;
—
;
and polished tin, gray limestone and rich orange-red rust on the iron
weights and hooks and hinges. But one gets only a confused notion
of these details when they surround a distractingly pretty girl of
seventeen, standing on her little pattens, and rounding her dimpled
arm to lift a pound of butter out of the scale.
Adam Bede
George Eliot.
—
:
Curds and Cream.
One gallon of milk will make a moderate dish.
Put one spoonful of prepared rennet to each quart
of milk, and when you find that it has become curd,
it loosely in a thin cloth, and
do not wring or press the cloth
the curd into a mug, and set in
must be frequently changed. (A
tie
;
this trouble.)
mug,
in the
When
ladle
it
you dish
it,
hang
when
it
to drain
;
drained, put
cool water, which
refrigerator saves
if
there
is
whey
gently out without pressing the
on a deep dish, and pour fresh cream
have powdered loaf-sugar to eat with it
also hand the nutmeg-grater.
Virginia CookeryBook Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith. Harper & Brothers,
Pubs.
(By per)
curd
over
lay
;
it
it
;
—
:
go
COTTAGE CHEESE.
Cottage Cheese.
Take two quarts of clabbered milk, and heat on
the stove until the curd separates from the whey.
(Be careful not to cook it.)
Place it to drain in a
thin muslin bag for six or eight hours, then take it
out, put in a dish, and dress it with half a pint of
cream, and salt and pepper to taste.
Ltdie Strohm.
—
CHAPTER
IX.
VEGETABLES AND SALADS.
VEGETABLES AND SALADS.
Glittering in the freshened fields,
The snowy mushroom springs.
Campbell.
Mushrooms, Stewed.
them lie in salt and water about one
them in the stew-pan, cover with
Dress them
water, and stew gently until tender.
If fresh, let
hour, then put
with cream, butter, and
flour, as oysters,
and season
to taste.
Fried Mushrooms.
Split,
and wash
carefully
;
roll
them
in
flour
season with salt and pepper, and fry them in butter.
— Lizzie Strohm.
Spinach and other Greens.
"Take
spinach, beet, or turnip tops, poke-sprouts,
etc., and wash thoroughly.
Put into just enough salted boiling water to cover.
When tender, squeeze out all the water, and press
curled dock, lamb^s-quarters,
through a colander.
salt,
Fry a few minutes with a
pepper, and butter.
Serve with
little
slices of hard-
boiled Qgg."
Water-Cresses.
Wash
decayed leaves, and leave in
you are ready to eat them. They
should then be shaken free of wet, and piled lightly
ice- water
well, pick off
until
93
—
DANDELION SALAD.
94
Eat with
in a glass dish.
salt.
The Post, Washington, D.C.
— Marion Harland.
{By per)
Dandelion Salad.
One
pint of the plants are carefully washed, and
placed in a salad-bowl with an equal quantity of
water-cresses, three green onions or leeks sliced, a
and plenty of oil or cream dressmost healthful and refreshThis is
ing:.
Cooking Manual: Miss
all
salads.
ing of
early
Dodd, Mead, & Co., Pubs. {By per)
Juliet Corson.
teaspoonful of
salt,
one
of the
Mayonnaise.
When
preparing a mayonnaise in summer, keep
Beat up the yolks of
the bowl as cold as possible.
two raw eggs to a smooth consistency add two saltspoonfuls of salt and one of white pepper, and a tableBeat up thoroughly, and by degrees
spoonful of oil.
add half a pint of oil. When it begins to thicken,
add a few drops of vinegar. The total amount of
vinegar to be used is two tablespoonfuls and the
proper time to stop adding oil, and to add drops of
;
;
vinegar,
is
when
the dressing has a glassy look,
instead of a velvet appearance.
After a few
make a mayonnaise, as it
Fifty Salads Thomas J. Murrey.
almost any one can
simple.
—
Stokes,
& Allen,
:
oil is
very
White,
Pubs.
Cream
Where
trials,
is
Dressing.
disliked in salads, the following dress-
ing will be found excellent.
Rub
the yolks of two
hard-boiled eggs very fine with a spoon, incorporate
LETTUCE SALAD.
95
with them a dessertspoonful of mixed mustard, then
stir in a tablespoonful of melted butter, half a teacupcream, a salt-spoonful of
ful of thick
salt,
and cay-
enne-pepper enough to take up on the point of a verysmall penknife blade, and a few drops of anchovy or
Worcestershire sauce
add very carefully
;
sufficient
vinegar to reduce the mixture to a smooth, creamy
consistency.
— Cooking
Dodd> Mead,
&
Co.,
Manual
Pubs.
:
Miss
Corson.
{By per.)
Lettuce Salad.
"Take two large lettuces, pull off the outer leaves,
and throw them away take off the others one by
one, and cut in two, and wash thoroughly.
Cut
them up, and put in a bowl sprinkle over a teaspoonful of salt, half a one of pepper, add three of oil and
two of vinegar, and with a spoon and fork turn the
the less it
salad lightly in the bowl till well mixed
Garnish with hard-boiled eggs
is handled, the better.
;
;
;
The
sliced.
flower
of
the nasturtium, intermixed
with taste and care, improves the appearance of the
salad."
Mustard and Cress.
" These,
Wash
if
quickly,
make an excellent
and dress as lettuce."
eaten alone,
salad.
Radishes.
Radishes should always be freshly gathered. Let
in cold water one hour before serving, then
cut off all their leaves and almost all their stalk.
Serve them in glasses half filled with water, or on a
plate.
(By per)
Arthur's Home Magazine.
them be
—
CUCUMBERS.
g6
Cucumbers.
"Let them be as fresh as possible, or they will
be unwholesome. Pare, cut off the stem end to the
and
water some time before they
Season well with salt, pepper, and vinegar.
Onions are frequently sliced with them, and are
an improvement."
Melons.
seeds,
slice in cold
are wanted.
musk and
summer break-
All varieties of the cantelope family,
nutmeg melons,
are
welcome
to the
Cut each in half lengthwise scoop out
the seeds, put a lump of ice in the hollows thus
fast-table.
;
made, and send to table. They are eaten by Southerners with pepper and salt
at the North, with
sugar.
Give your guests their choice of condi;
ments.
— Marion
Harland.
The Post,
Washington,
D.C,
To cook
Asparagus.
Asparagus must be carefully washed and cleaned,
and all the tough parts cut off. Put into salted boiling water, and boil until tender.
Arrange upon thin
slices of
buttered toast, put some melted butter over
them, and a
stewed.
I stick to
which they were
Set in the oven for a few minutes.
little
of the liquor in
asparagus, which still seems to inspire gentle thoughts.
Charles Lamb.
Grace before Meat:
Green Peas stewed with
Ham
and Lettuce.
Put a quart of young peas into a bowl of cold
water, with a piece of butter the size of an egg.
Work
the butter and the peas well together without
;
GREEN
PEAS.
;
97
mashing them, and then drain them, and put them
into a stew-pan, adding the hearts of two heads of
lettuce finely shredded, an onion cut into thin slices,
pound of ham cut into dice.
Now cover the stew-pan, and place it over a gentle
fire, where the contents may stew, shaking the stewpan occasionally that they may not burn, and adding
When the
a spoonful or two of water if necessary.
peas become tender, take out the ham and the onion
mix a dessertspoonful of flour with a little butter and
a tablespoonful of cream, and stir this into the peas.
Simmer them again gently for three or four minutes,
and serve hot.
The Caterer. (By per.)
a
little
parsley,
and
half a
;
—
Green Peas.
them into cold water to cook
them when tender (they will
twenty minutes) take them up with
Shell and wash, put
when
nearly done, salt
generally cook in
;
little of the liquor in which they were boiled, butter
and pepper them, and they are much better to add a
a
If they are
will do without.
will
need no
immediately
upon
gathering,
they
cooked
hours
or more, a
sugar if allowed to remain twelve
A
tablespoonful of sugar will be found an addition.
sprig of mint or a little parsley may be added.
little
sweet cream, but
;
—
Arthur's
Home
Magazine.
(By per.)
And
the maize-field grew and ripened,
stood in all the splendor
its garments green and yellow,
Till
Of
Of
it
its tassels-
and
its
plumage
And
the maize-ears full and shining
Gleamed from bursting sheaves of verdure.
Hiawatha: H. W.
Longfellow.
{By per. Houghton, Mifflin,
<S° Co.)
SWEET
98
CORAT.
Sweet Corn.
Husk and
clear
it
of the
silk,
put
in boiling
it
water enough to cover, and boil for twenty minutes
Arthur's
or half an hour. Send to table on the cob.
—
Home
Magazine.
ANOTHER WAY.
Cut the corn from the cob, and put
it
in
a stew-pan
with a teacupful of water to each quart of corn
it
closely,
and
salt.
Still
and
let it
stew gently.
— Arthur's Home Magazine.
another excellent
way
son corn as above, but stew
of water.
Add
is
;
cover
butter, pepper,
to prepare
and
sea-
sweet milk instead
Have sufficient milk to cover it well.
it
in
Corn Oysters.
"
Take young green
corn, grate in a dish
;
to one
pint of this add a small teacupful of flour, one egg,
half a
well.
of
cup of butter, some salt and pepper, and mix
Fry in butter. Drop by the spoonful, the si^e
an oyster."
Succotash.
Common
shelled beans may be used for succothough Lima beans are the best. Prepare and
cook the beans as usual. About twenty minutes before serving, add a quantity of sweet corn cut from
the cob season with butter, pepper, and salt, and add
a little sweet cream. This dish may be prepared with
pork if desirable."
String Beans.
"
tash,
;
String, snap,
and wash two quarts beans, boil in
off, and put on
plenty of water fifteen minutes, drain
—
LENTILS BOILED PLAIN.
again in two quarts boiling water
;
boil
gg
an hour and
a half, and add salt and pepper just before taking
up, stirring in one and a half tablespoonfuls butter
rubbed into two tablespoonfuls flour and a half-pint
sweet cream.
ANOTHER WAY.
Boil a piece of salted pork one hour, then add beans,
Every-day Cook-Book
and boil an hour and a half.
Miss Neill. {By per. Belford, Clarke, & Co.)
—
:
Lentils Boiled plain.
Wash one
pound, or one
full pint, of lentils
(cost
ten cents) well in cold water, put them over the
fire
one ounce of drippings, one tablespoonful of salt, and a saltspoonful of
pepper (cost about one cent), and boil slowly until
tender, that is, about three hours drain off the little
water which remains add to the lentils one ounce
of butter, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, a teaspoonful of sugar, and a little more salt and pepper
if required (cost about three cents), and serve them
in three quarts of cold water, with
;
;
Twenty-five-Cent
hot.
Corson.
O.
yudd
Co.,
Dinners:
Pubs.
Mashed
There
is
no dish which
into a delicious one, that
Miss
Juliet
{By per)
Potato.
is
is
capable of being
made
so often set before us in
an unpalatable, unsavory condition, as the apparently
It may be light unto
and with a dry creaminess that melts
simple one of mashed potato.
flakiness, white,
mouth or it may be a heavy, sodden, packeddown mass, strongly flavored by the old iron pot.
in the
To
;
insure the former composition, the potatoes
POTATO HILLOCKS.
IOO
should be put on in boiling water, and allowed from
twenty to twenty-five minutes for cooking; test them
at the end of twenty minutes, and if the fork will go
at all, take them right off.
Do not wait
they are so soft that the piercing of a fork will
tear them to pieces.
Pour every drop of water off,
into
them
until
set them back on the stove, with the lid off one or
two minutes to allow the steam to pass off, and then,
with a wire beater, begin the mashing process, salting
according to the taste of the family.
of peeled potatoes, a teaspoon
To
a half-gallon
rounded over with
salt
and a heaping tablespoonful of butter is sufficient.
When the lumps are thoroughly beaten out, add a
half-pint, or even a little less, of hot milk, and then
whip and beat until your arm aches badly. Put them
into a heated dish, but do not press, pat, or smooth
them down, and serve immediately.
Commercial
—
Gazette, Cincinnati, O.
{By per.)
Potato Hillocks.
Whip
boiled potatoes light with a
little
butter and
milk, and season with salt and pepper.
Beat in a
raw egg to bind the mixture shape into small conical heaps, set in a greased pan in the oven, and as
they brown glare with butter.
The oven must be
very hot.
Slip a cake-turner under each hillock,
and transfer to a hot platter.
Marion Harland:
The Post, Washington, D. C. (By per.)
;
—
Potatoes au Maitre
"
d' hotel.
Cut cold boiled potatoes into quarter-inch slices,
and put into a saucepan with four or five tablespoon-
1;
SARATOGA POTATOES.
of milk, two
chopped parsley.
fills
of butter,
Heat
some pepper and
quickly, stirring
when
until ready to boil,
10
all
salt
and
the time
the juice of half a
stir in
Serve very hot."
lemon.
Saratoga Potatoes.
Take four
large potatoes (new ones are best)
and
pare,
cut into thin slices on a slaw-cutter; put
them into salt water, and let stand while breakfast is
preparing.
Then have ready a skillet of boiling lard.
Take a handful of the potatoes, squeeze the water
from them, and dry in a napkin separate the slices,
and drop into the lard, being careful that the pieces
do not adhere to each other. Stir with a fork till they
are a light brown color.
Take them out with a wire
spoon, and drain well before putting into the dish.
;
;
Do
not put more than a handful into the lard at a
time.
Do
not cover the dish
when
served.
byterian Cook-Book Mrs. D. W.
{By per.)
Potato Scones.
:
"
Mash
adding a
boiled potatoes
little salt
thickness required
till
S.,
;
Dayton, O.
they are quite smooth,
then knead out with
;
— Pres-
flour to the
toast, pricking
them with a fork
When
eaten with fresh
to prevent their blistering.
butter, they are very nutritious."
Potato Stew.
Wash and pare three or four good-sized potatoes,
and cut them into small pieces boil until tender
then drain off the water, and put in three pints of
sweet milk when it begins to boil, add two cupfuls
;
;
;
POTATO SALAD.
102
of nice
with
wheat bread crumbed
pepper, and butter.
(not too small)
;
season
salt,
Potato Salad.
Cut up into
slices
two quarts
of boiled potatoes
while hot; add to them a teaspoonful each of chopped
onion and parsley
;
pour over them a
of plain salad-dressing.
appear too dry, add a
soup-stock
;
If
little
liberal quantity
the potatoes should then
hot water,
or,
better
still,
toss lightly so as not to break the slices
then place the salad on ice to become
cold.
Serve
by placing a leaf of lettuce on each small plate, and
add two tablespoonfuls of the potato to the lettuce,
for each person.
Cold boiled potatoes do not make
a good potato-salad.
Murrey.
— Fifty
White, Stokes,
To
Wash them
Boil
Salads
& Allen,
:
Thomas
J.
Pubs.
Sweet Potatoes.
them
perfectly clean, put
into a pot or
stew-pan, and pour boiling water over to cover
them
;
cover the pot close, and boil fast for half an hour, or
them with a fork
more
if
when
done, drain off the water, take off the skins, and
the potatoes are large
try
;
serve.
Cold sweet potatoes
may be
cut in slices across or
lengthwise, and fried or broiled as
— The
Every-day Cook-Book
:
common
Miss
potatoes.
Neill.
Society expects every man to have certain things in his garden.
to raise cabbage, is as if one had no pew in church.
Perhaps we
Not
come some day to free churches and free gardens when I can
show my neighbor through my tired garden, at the end of the season,
when skies are overcast, and brown leaves are swirling down, and not
mind if he does raise his eyebrows when he observes, " Ah I see
you have none of this, and of that." At present we want the moral
shall
;
!
BOILED CABBAGE.
103
courage to plant only what we need; to spend only what will bring us
peace, regardless of what is going on over the fence.
My Summer
IN A Garden Chas. D. Warner. Houghton, Mifflin, &> Co., Pubs.
—
:
(By per.)
Boiled Cabbage.
Cut the cabbage in quarters, and wash very thoroughly in cold water. Put it into a pot in which a
good piece of beef or pork has already been boiling
for
half
until the
an hour and
cabbage
is
Boil
been well skimmed.
and a little before dish-
tender,
ing out put in one-fourth of a teaspoonful of soda.
To Stew Cabbage
a la Cauliflower.
Parboil in milk and water, and drain
it,
put
it
it,
then shred
into a stew-pan with a small piece of butter,
a small teacupful of cream, and seasoning, and stew
tender.
— Peterson
's
Magazine.
{By per.)
Red Cabbage Stewed.
After slicing a small red cabbage, and well washit, put it into a saucepan with pepper, salt, and
ing
no more water than will hang about it
after the washing.
Let it stew until quite tender,
and shortly before serving add two or three spoonfuls of vinegar, and give it one boil over the fire.
It may be sent up with cold meat, or with sausages
on it.
Godey's Lady's Book.
{By per.)
butter, but
—
Cream Dressing
for
Cold Slaw.
In a small granite stewer beat the yolk of one egg
(this for a pint of finely
of butter the size of a
shaved cabbage), add a piece
nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls of
sugar, half a teaspoonful of salt, a sprinkle of pepper,
STEWED TOMATOES.
104
half a teacupful
each of vinegar and water
;
put on
the back of the stove to simmer, and stir in a scant
made smooth with water when
pour over the cabbage. This is a favorite
Commercial Gazette, Cincinnati, O. (By
dressing.
teaspoonful of flour
boiled,
;
—
per.)
Stewed Tomatoes.
Peel and slice a quart of fine ripe toma'toes.
Put
on to stew, and when nearly done add a good-sized
lump of butter, a little salt and pepper, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, and half a teacupful of stale breadcrumbs. Cook well and thoroughly, stirring often.
Broiled Tomatoes.
"
tomatoes are cut in halves crosson a gridiron or broiler, and put over a
In eight or ten minutes,
brisk fire, cut surface down.
according to size, turn, put upon each half salt,
pepper, and a lump of butter, and cook with the
skin-side down, rather more slowly than before, about
Large
solid
wise, placed
as
long, or until done.
When
sufficiently broiled,
place upon a platter with the cut side up, and nicely
This gives a proper seasoning
to the dish, which is now ready for the breakfastbutter the surface.
table."
Tomatoes au
Gratin.
This simple and delicious dish is made by cutting
ripe tomatoes in half, putting them in a buttered dish with bread-crumbs, butter, pepper, and
salt, and baking till slightly browned on the top.
Arthur's Home Magazine. (By per.)
some
—
BOILED ONIONS.
I
doubt not that
all
men and women
105
love the onion
Affection for it is concealed.
fess their love.
are as shy of owning it as they are of talking
people have days on which they eat onions
or their "Thursdays."
Warner. {By per.)
"retreats,"
Chas.
D.
;
but few con-
Good New-Englanders
about religion. Some
— what
My Summer
you might
call
in
a Garden:
if
large cut
Boiled Onions.
Wash
in half.
the onions well, and peel, and
Boil in several waters, draining well each
and when done, add for seasoning, butter,
cream or rich milk, and salt and pepper. Cook a
few minutes after seasoning is added.
time
;
Baked Onions.
Boil the onions slightly in water cut in halves,
and take out the centres. Fill the cups with a
stuffing of bread-crumbs moistened with an egg and
;
a
little
butter
;
season with grated cheese, pepper,
and thyme. Bake in a quick oven, with a little
Boston Bulletin.
gravy to prevent from burning.
Turnips a
Cut the turnips
When
Put a
Add
salt
boiled
little
a
gill
la Poulette.
in dice,
tender,
of milk,
and pepper to
Wash
in
into
a saucepan.
a
colander.
butter and flour in a saucepan, and
and
taste.
stir,
well,
stir.
then the turnips, and
— Peterson's Magazine.
To Stew
"
and put
turn them
Celery.
and cut into lengths
inches; stew them with a
little
of three or four
broth until tender;
then add two spoonfuls of cream, and some floured
—
BEETS.
lo6
butter seasoned with salt and pepper, and simmer
together."
all
Such vegetables as celery ought to lengthen human life, at least,
its biliousness, and make it more sweet and sanguine.
Locusts and Wild Honey: John Burroughs. Houghton, Mifflin,
&> Co., Pubs. {By per.)
to correct
Beets.
Clean these nicely, but do not pare them, leaving
on a short piece of the stalk. Then put on to boil in
'iot
Young
water.
beets will cook tender in an hour
old beets require several hours' boiling.
When
;
done,
skin quickly while hot, slice thin into your vegetable-
put on
ciish,
a
little
pepper, and a
salt,
little butter,
day Cook-Book
:
Miss
put over
— The
vinegar, and serve hot or cold.
Every-
Belford, Clarke,
Ncill.
& Co.,
{By per)
Pubs.
Parsnip Fritters.
Boil four or five parsnips
skin and
mash them
;
when
tender, take off the
add to them a teaspoonful
of wheat flour and a beaten egg.
Put a tablespoonful of lard
fire,
fine
or beef-dripping in a frying-pan over the
add to
a saltspoonful of salt
it
hot, put in the parsnips,
fried
;
;
dish, put a
very
over,
little of
and serve
;
making them
when one side
the other when both are
with a spoon
turn
;
is
when
done, take
them on
&
Co.,
a
the fat in which they were
hot.
:
cakes
a delicate brown,
These resemble very
nearly the taste of the salsify or oyster-plant.
Every-day Cook-Book
boiling
in small
Miss
Neill.
— The
Belford, Clarke,
Pubs.
Squashes.
"
Cut them up, and remove the seeds, and cook in
hot water until tender.
Then mash them, and dress
with butter, salt, and pepper."
EGG-PLANT.
107
Egg-Plant.
Cut the plant into slices one-third of an inch thick,
without removing the skin. Sprinkle salt over each
them, and cover with a weight to press out
slice, pile
the juice.
Drain, and dip each slice
first
crumbs, then in beaten egg, and again
in
—
in fine
crumbs,
and saute them in hot fat.
The Peerless CookBook Mrs. D. A. Lincoln. {By per)
:
Rice, Japanese Style.
Put half a pound of well-washed rice into a double
kettle,
with one pint of milk or water, one heaping
and quarter
medium-sized
nutmeg grated boil it until tender, about forty minutes if it seems very dry, add a little more liquid,
teaspoonful of
salt,
of a
;
;
taking care not to have
When
milk
is
used,
it
it
when
sloppy
may be
it
is
cooked.
served with milk and
sugar as a breakfast or tea dish
;
when water
takes
the place of milk, the addition of an ounce of butter
and half a saltspoonful of pepper makes a nice dinner
dish of it.
Twenty-five-Cent Dinners Miss Juliet
Corson.
{By per.)
—
:
Baked Macaroni.
Boil half a
put
it
pound
of
macaroni until quite
soft
into a vegetable-dish, with a little mustard,
a small piece of butter, and some
Bake ten or fifteen minutes.
Presbyterian Cook-Book. {By per.)
pepper, and
salt,
grated cheese.
—
CHAPTER
X.
PICKLES.
PICKLES.
Pickled Cucumbers.
Take small cucumbers, wash them
let them drain, then pack, them in a
carefully,
and
Make
jar.
a
brine of a pint of salt to a gallon and a half of water
boil
and skim
and
let
it,
and when cool pour over the
them stand
for twenty-four hours.
pickles,
Then
take
wipe them dry, and put in a
Boil strong vinegar with such spices as desired
jar.
(tie the spices in a little cloth), and when the vinegar
In a few days they
is cold pour it over the pickles.
Miss Lizzie Strohm.
will be ready for use.
them out
of the brine,
—
To
Pickle Ripe Cucumbers.
Pare them, take out the seeds, cut in rings an inch
thick, then simmer in weak alum-water an hour take
;
them out, drain them, and lay them carefully in a jar.
Then prepare a sirup of one gallon good vinegar, two
cups sugar, one ounce cinnamon, and one ounce ginpour it hot over your pickles. This is a
delightful pickle, and will keep, sealed up, a long
ger-root
time.
;
— Godey
's
Lady 's Book.
{By per.)
Pickled Onions.
Take
small white onions, and peel
in salt water for
two days
then drain them in a cloth,
them
;
lay
them
change the water once,
and put them in bottles.
;
2
I
GREEN TO MA TO
1
PICKLES.
Boil mace, pepper, and vinegar together let it cool,
and pour over the pickles.
Presbyterian CookBook, Dayton, O.
{By per.)
;
—
Green Tomato Pickles.
"
A
peck of green tomatoes, sliced
onions, sliced also
them stand
Then use
until
one dozen
sprinkle them with salt, and let
;
the next day,
;
when
drain them.
one box of mustard,
one and a half ounces of black pepper, one ounce of
whole cloves, one ounce of yellow mustard-seed, one
ounce of allspice. Put in the kettle a layer of spices,
and one of tomatoes and onions, alternately. Cover
them with vinegar wet the mustard before putting
it in.
Let the whole boil twenty minutes, and you
will have pickles so good that you will be pestered
by all your friends asking you for the recipe."
the following as spices
:
:
Piccalilly.
Take green tomatoes, chopped very
well with
salt, let
fine
;
sprinkle
stand tvventj'-four hours, drain
off,
and put in a stone jar. Take about half the quantity
of cucumbers, and the same of cabbage
after they
are chopped, put into jars separately, and cover with
;
cold vinegar.
onions
Take about one-quarter
chopped
as
much white
and pour boiling water on
them let stand a few hours, drain off, and cover
with vinegar as above.
Let all remain several days
in a cool place, then press very dry, and mix together.
Add some yellow and black mustard-seed, celeryseed, and a bountiful supply of grated horseradish,
with a few green peppers chopped fine. Then take
;
;
salt,
MANGO.
113
the best vinegar, and about four pounds of brown
sugar to each gallon.
Boil
in part of the vinegar,
it
and pour over the whole. Add as much
Presbyterian Cookcold vinegar as is required.
Book Mrs. J. F. Edgar.
skim
well,
—
:
Mango.
"A
green muskmelon, stuffed and pickled."
Take an unripe muskmelon,
wash it in
to ripen the better,
Worcester.
just before they begin
cold water
;
cut out a
small section on the side most rounded, and scoop
out the seeds and soft pulp
scrape off the soft mat-
;
from the section, and preserve it for the "lid."
Pare off the rind carefully, so as to leave all of the
tender portion of the shell. Put a tablespoonful of
salt in the cavity, place it in a bowl, and pour hot
water in and over it, and let it remain eight to twelve
hours.
Then have your filling,
generally of finely
it
cabbage,
is
chopped
but
a matter of taste.
Beetstems, tender string-beans, radish seed-pods, etc., can
be used. Three or four small slices of green pepper,
ter
—
lining the shell, will spice
it
;
white mustard-seed, or
any other condiment, is good. A preferable way is
to tie up in a small piece of muslin the spices you
desire, and boil them in the vinegar in which you
pickle
The
it.
make the shell soft and
and render the " stuffing " process easy.
filled, stitch the segment cut out of it carefully
hot water and salt
pliable,
When
over the aperture.
A
common
practice
is
red or green pepper, and
to
fill it
"disembowel" a largt
with the chopped vege-
TO PICKLE BEET-ROOT.
114
table.
But the advantage
in the
melon
is,
that the
rind is better than the best cucumber pickle.
" The E/ms," near Dayton, O.
To
—
/.
5.
Pickle Beet-root.
This vegetable makes an excellent pickle, and
from the brightness of its color has a very pretty
Wash
effect in a glass pickle-dish or jar.
perfectly
;
do not cut
off
any
the beet
of the fibrous roots, as
would allow the juice to escape, and thus the
Put it into sufficient water
lost.
will come off it will be
skin
to boil it, and when the
sufficiently cooked, and may be taken out and laid
upon a cloth to cool. Having rubbed off the skin,
cut the beet into thick slices, put it into a jar, and
this
coloring would be
pour over
it
cold vinegar prepared as follows
:
Boil
a quart of vinegar with one ounce of whole black
pepper and an equal weight of dry ginger, and let
The jar should be kept
it stand until quite cold.
closely corked.
— Peterson
To
s
Magazine.
{By per)
Pickle Carrot.
" Boil carrots until tender, cut
them
and put them in strong vinegar.
garnish and an excellent pickle.
in fancy shapes,
This is a pretty
It can be spiced
or flavored to suit the taste."
To
Pickle
Red Cabbage.
Cut the cabbage across
in
very thin
slices, lay it
on a large dish, sprinkle a good handful of salt over
let it stand twentyit, and cover it with another dish
;
TO PICKLE MUSHROOMS.
four hours
it
;
put
in the jar.
115
in a colander to drain,
and then lay
Take white-wine vinegar
sufficient to
it
mace, cloves, and allspice, and put
them in whole, with one pennyworth of cochineal
cover
it,
bruised
a
little
fine,
together, let
and some whole pepper.
it
cabbage, and
can
Home
stand
tie
till
cold,
Boil
then pour
it
the jar over with leather.
Cook-Book.
{By per. Dick
&
it
all
up
over the
— Ameri-
Fitzgerald,
Pubs.)
To
Pickle
Mushrooms.
Take button mushrooms rub and clean them with
and salt throw some salt over them, and lay
them in a stew-pan with mace and pepper. While
the liquor comes from them, keep shaking them well
till the whole is dried into them again
then pour in
as much vinegar as will cover them
warm them on
the fire, and turn them into a jar.
Mushrooms prepared in this manner are excellent,
and will keep for two years.
American Home
Cook-Book. (By per. Dick & Fitzgerald, Pubs.)
;
flannel
;
;
;
Pickled Eggs.
Boil one or
two dozen eggs
until hard
;
when
cool
enough, remove the shells carefully, and then put the
eggs in a jar containing vinegar in which beets have
been pickled.
They
will
pink, according to the
the eggs, cut
which
will
off
become a deep
hue
of the beets.
red, or fine
In serving
a thin slice from the large end,
make them stand
upright on the dish, and
stick several cloves in the top of each.
very pretty, and are as good as they look.
They
look
;
TO PICKLE NASTURTIUMS.
Il6
To
Pickle Nasturtiums.
Take green nasturtiums fresh from the vines put
them in salt and water for one day, then drain in a
napkin.
Put them in glass jars, and cover with
;
strong vinegar
Are equal
keep
;
the
bottles
closely
to capers, with roast lamb.
rian Cook-Book.
corked.
— Presbyte-
{By per)
Dayton, O.
Pickled Barberries.
Soak nice large bunches of barberries in salt and
water for a few hours. Remove from the water, and
pour scalding vinegar over them. Spice the vinegar
if
you
prefer.
These are ornamental
for salad-gar-
They may be kept for some time in the
brine, and freshened when used.
The Peerless
Cook-Book Mrs. D. A. Lincoln. Redding & Co., Pubs.
nishing.
—
:
{By per)
To
Pickle Walnuts.
Take one hundred walnuts
needle to pass through them
a good handful of
salt, for
;
soft
lay
enough to allow a
them in water, with
two days, then change to
fresh water and another handful of salt for three
then drain, and lay them on some clean straw
or a sieve, in the sun, until quite black and wrinkled
afterwards put into a clean, dry glass bottle or jar a
days
;
;
quarter of an ounce of allspice, quarter of an ounce
of mace, quarter of
an ounce
of ginger, half a pint of
mustard-seed, and half an ounce
of
peppercorns
these to be mixed in layers with the walnuts until
your walnuts are
all
used
;
then pour over them
ing vinegar to cover them.
months.
Ready
— Godey's Lady's Book.
for use in
{By per)
boil-
two
TOMATO CATSUP.
Tomato Catsup.
WJ
No.
i.
Take a half-bushel tomatoes, and peel, steam, and
strain them then boil down, and add one tablespoon;
ful ginger,
one-half tablespoonful of
cloves,
two
of
cinnamon, one of mace, one teaspoonful mustard, onehalf teaspoonful red pepper, two-thirds teacup of salt,
and one pint of cider-vinegar.
Osbom (O.) Local.
—
Tomato Catsup.
"
Take
No.
2.
and scald them just suffiyou to take off the skin then let them
stand for a day covered with salt strain them thoroughly to remove the seeds then to every two
quarts add three ounces of cloves, two of black pepper, two nutmegs, and a very little cayenne-pepper,
ripe tomatoes,
cient to allow
;
;
;
with a
Boil the liquor for half an hour,
and settle add a pint of the best
cider-vinegar, after which bottle it, corking and seal-
then
ing
it
little
salt.
let it cool
tightly.
;
Keep
it
always in a cool place."
Cucumber Catsup.
Take one peck
of large, ripe cucumbers, peel,
and take out the seeds chop very fine
add one dozen onions, also chopped fine salt them
well, and put to drain in a thin muslin bag for twentyfour hours. When taken out, season with one tablespoonful each of black and white mustard-seed, and
one large teaspoonful of black pepper; mix thoroughly, and add vinegar enough to cover well.
(A
little grated horseradish is an improvement.)
Put in
slice in half,
;
;
;
glass jars or bottles.
— Lizzie Strohm.
GRAPE CATSUP.
Il8
.Grape Catsup.
Five pints grapes, three pounds sugar, one pint of
cinnamon unground. Take the
skins from the pulp, and cook the latter until you can
vinegar, cloves and
separate
it
from the seeds
;
then boil the sugar,
vinegar, pulp, and spices fifteen or twenty minutes,
and
just before taking off
add the
skins.
— Osborn
(O.) Local.
Spiced Currants.
" Five
pounds sugar, one
pint of vinegar, four teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, four
No pepper or salt.
Boil three hours.
of cloves.
Delightful with venison or mutton."
pounds
of currants, four
Pear Pickles.
Take
half a
peck
of pears halved
the pieces together, and pack them
Add two
and cored, lay
all
closely in a
cinnamontwo
pounds
of
of
cloves,
ounce
an
bark and
them
up,
and
cover
sugar, and one pint of vinegar
set on a slow fire to boil. Boil down until thoroughly
cooked, requiring two or three hours. Put in a stone
jar, and cover with white paper wet with brandy.
preserving-kettle.
ounces of
half
;
—
Mrs. Matilda J. Anderson, Dayton, O.
Pickled Muskmelon.
Take a ripe melon (cantaloupe), peel, and cut in
Then take two tablespoonfuls of pulverized
blocks.
in hot water, pour over, and add cold
(Press them down
are covered.
they
water
them
stand
over
night, then drain
with a plate.) Let
alum dissolved
until
PICKLED MUSKMELON.
off,
and rinse well
in cold water.
vinegar and two pounds of sugar,
over.
Do
this
for
II9
Take a quart
boil,
of
and pour
nine mornings, adding to the
necessary.
The ninth morning
up in a thin muslin bag an ounce of cloves and
two ounces of cinnamon-bark, boil in the vinegar,
then add your melon, and boil a short time.
In putting the pickle away in a jar, place the muslin bag
containing the spices, among them on the top it
aids in preserving the flavor.
Mrs. Matilda J.
vinegar and sugar
if
tie
:
—
Anderson.
CHAPTER
XI.
PRESERVES, JAMS, AND JELLIES.
PRESERVES, JAMS,
To
"
The
yellow peaches, white at the
clear-stone
each pound of
JELLIES.
Preserve Peaches.
Weigh
stone, are the best.
To
AND
the fruit after
it is
pared.
pound of sugar. Put
a layer of sugar at the bottom of the preservingkettle, and then a layer of fruit, and so on until the
fruit is all in.
Stand it over the fire until the sugar
is entirely dissolved
then boil them until they are
clear take them out piece by piece, and spread them
on a dish free from sirup. Boil the sirup in the
pan until it jellies when the peaches are cold, fill
the jars half full with them, and fill up with boiling
sirup.
Let them stand a short time covered with a
thin cloth
then put on brandied paper, and cover
them close with corks, skin, or paper. From twenty
fruit allow a
;
;
;
;
to thirty
minutes
will generally
be sufficient to pre-
serve them."
Peach Leather.
Stew
as
many peaches
you choose, allowing a
mash it
when it is dry enough to
as
quarter of a pound of sugar to one of fruit
up smooth
as
it
cooks
;
;
spread in a thin sheet on a board greased with butter,
set
it
and when dry it can be
wrapped up in a cloth, and will
out in the sun to dry
;
rolled up like leather,
keep perfectly from season to season.
School
123
chil-
——
)
T0 PRESERVE PEARS.
124
dren regard
it
as a delightful addition to" their lunch
Apple and quince leather
same fashion, only a little flavoring
These leathers
of spice or lemon is added to them.
are made in the Valley of Virginia, and seldom seen
Virginia Cookery-Book
elsewhere in the State.
Mary Stuart Smith.
Harper & Brothers, Pubs.
of biscuit or cold bread.
are
made
in the
—
:
(By per)
To
Preserve Pears.
For preserving, small pears are better than large
Pare them, and make a sirup with their
weight of sugar and a little water. Leave the stem
on, and stick a clove in the blossom end of each.
Arthur's Home
Stew till perfectly transparent.
{By per)
Magazine.
ones.
Preserved Cherries.
Stone, and to every pound take a pound of sugar.
Place the fruit and sugar in your kettle in alternate
and boil and skim
and the sirup is
Magazine.
(By per.
until
layers,
tender
rich.
the cherries
Arthur's
are
Home
Preserved Crab Apple.
"
Take the red Siberian
crab-apple
stems on, and heat slowly to boiling
When
;
in
leave
water
the
suffi-
the skins break, skim
Allow
remove
the skins.
them out of the pan, and
one and one-fourth pounds of sugar and one teacup
of water to every pound of fruit.
Boil water and
sugar until the scum ceases to rise. To the sirup
cient to cover them.
TO PRESERVE WATERMELON-RINDS.
1
25
add the juice of one lemon to every three pounds of
add the fruit, boil until tender, and can imme-
fruit
;
diately."
To Preserve Watermelon-Rinds.
Do
not cut your rinds too thin
side green rind
pare
;
off
the out-
soak them two days in clean
;
Take
water, and then drain them.
soft
pounds
six
of
sugar and three pints of water, boil to a thick sirup
then add your watermelon-rinds, and boil until they
flavor with orange-flower water cool, and
are clear
;
;
put away in jars for use.
— Godey's
Lady's Book.
(By per.)
Tomato
"
Preserves.
Take the round yellow
scald and peel
;
variety as soon as ripe
then to seven pounds of tomatoes
add seven pounds of white sugar, and let them stand
over night take the tomatoes out of the sugar, and
put in the tomaboil the sirup, removing the scum
toes, and boil gently fifteen or twenty minutes
remove the fruit again, and boil until the sirup
On cooling, put the fruit into jars, and
thickens.
pour the sirup over it, and add a few slices of lemon
to each jar, and you will have something to please
;
;
the taste of the most fastidious."
To
In
Preserve Tomatoes.
many gardens
there
is
a
plentiful
supply of
green tomatoes yet on the vines, that will not ripen.
Allow one-half pound of white sugar to one pound
Put into the preserving-pan, and add just
of fruit.
enough water to make sufficient sirup. Do not put
PRESERVED BARBERRIES.
126
much water at first, as you can add it if
Lemons should be sliced and
too
not enough.
it
in
the proportion
pounds
of fruit.
sirup looks thick.
and taste much
of
there
is
put into
one lemon to every two
Cook until done through, and the
They make an excellent preserve,
like preserved figs.
— Public Ledger,
(By per. )
Philadelphia.
Preserved Barberries.
Stem the
barberries, then drop
them
either into
molasses that has been boiling ten minutes
(at
the
rate of a quart of fruit to a pint of molasses) or in
and half sugar, and then boil ten to
and skim out, and boil sirup slowly
about ten or fifteen minutes longer; then take off, and
half molasses
fifteen minutes,
drop berries
is
in.
The
addition of hard sweet apples
considered an improvement.
Pare and quarter
these, drop them in after berries are skimmed out,
and boil ten or fifteen minutes, or until apples are
cooked when take off, and put back the berries.
{By per)
J.J. H. Gregory.
—
;
Quince Cheese.
"
Have fine ripe quinces, and pare and core them.
Cut them into pieces, and weigh them, and to each
pound of the cut quinces allow half a pound of the
Put the cores and parings into a
best brown sugar.
kettle with water enough to cover them, keeping the
When you find that they
lid of the kettle closed.
are all boiled to pieces, and quite soft, strain off the
water over the sugar, and when it is entirely dis-
APPLE BUTTER.
1
27
and boil to a thick sirup,
no more scum rises, put
in the quinces, cover them closely, and boil them all
day over a slow fire, stirring them and mashing them
down with a spoon till they are a thick, smooth paste.
Then take it out, and put it into buttered tin pans or
deep dishes. Let it set to get cold. It will turn out
so firm that you may cut it into slices, like cheese.
Keep it in a dry place, in broad stone pots. It is intended for the tea-table."
solved, put
skimming
it
it
over the
well.
fire,
When
Apple Butter.
Boil a barrel of
it
out into
jars,
new
cider
and put
down one
half
;
then dip
in the kettle a couple of
buckets of cider not boiled.
In this put three bushels
pared and cut in quarters. When
stewed to a sauce, add the boiled cider. (Keep adding
of apples nicely
this until all is used.)
hours.
When
mon, and
when
half as
cool,
Stir constantly eight or ten
done, spice with a teacupful of cinna-
much
of cloves.
Put away in jars
cover nicely with paper.
Strawberry Jam.
Put the
fruit into a jar,
boiling water over the
and stand
fire.
As
this in a
pan of
the boiling proceeds,
keep mashing the strawberries with a wooden spatula
Then put them
and to every pound add threequarters of a pound of sugar.
Boil the whole until
of due consistence, which will occupy more than half
an hour, keeping the jam in constant agitation lest
until they are all bruised to a pulp.
into a preserving-pan,
—
1
RASPBERR Y JAM.
28
the bottom should burn.
it
—
off
and put
per)
(By
the
zine.
fire,
When
into pots.
it
done enough, take
— Peterson's Maga-
Raspberry Jam.
Mash
Let the raspberries be thoroughly ripe.
them with a wooden spoon. To every pound of raspBoil this well
berries add a pound of sifted sugar.
together during half an hour, stirring
lest
put
it
When
should burn.
it
into pots,
and proceed
of
it
continually
a good thickness,
to tie up.
Peterson's
(By per)
Magazine.
Blackberry Jam.
Six quarts of ripe berries and three pounds of
brown
and
sugar.
boil
Mash
together, and put into a kettle
two hours,
stirring frequently.
Spice to
omit spices altogether. When cool, put it
into a jar, cover with brandied paper, and seal, and
it will keep for years.
Arthur's Home Magazine.
taste, or
(By per)
Gooseberry Jam.
"Stew the
berries
through a coarse
sieve,
in
a
little
water,
put them
put them back into the kettle,
add three-quarters of a pound of sugar to each pound
Boil for about three-quarters
of the stewed berries.
of an hour and they will need constant stirring, or
they will certainly burn. You can easily determine
whether a jam requires more boiling, by taking a
small quantity out on a saucer.
If it looks bright
and glistening, and no water-like juice surrounds it
on the saucer, it is safe to infer that it is done."
;
RHUBARB JAM.
1
Rhubarb Jam. No.
"To
1.
seven pounds of rhubarb add four sweet
oranges and five pounds of sugar.
the rhubarb.
Peel and cut up
Put in the thin peel of the oranges and
the pulp, after taking out the seeds and
Boil
all
29
all
the whites.
together for an hour and a half."
Rhubarb Jam.
No.
2.
longer young.
made in June, when the rhubarb is no
Take ten pounds of large-sized rhu-
barb, and cut
it
"It
peel
is
best
(viz.,
up
;
add to
it
one pound of candied
lemon, and orange) shred,
and
two large fresh lemons chopped fine,
sugar to the same weight of fruit, and
citron,
also the rind of
one pound of
boil like other preserve."
Crab-Apple Jam.
Pare the crab-apples when quite
into a stone jar, cover
it
well,
ripe.
and put
it
Put them
in a
pan
of
Then prepare
boiling water for an hour and a half.
the sirup with two pounds of sugar in half a pint of
water, for every
pound
Then put
sirup.
whole to a jam.
—
of the apples.
Clarify the
and boil the
Peterson's Magazine.
{By per.)
the apples into
it,
Pine-apple Marmalade.
To
every pound of grated pine-apple allow a pound
of double-refined loaf-sugar.
pack
in
Boil until thick
;
then
tumblers, and paste over them papers wet with
the beaten whites of eggs.
place until wanted.
— Godey
Keep them in a dry cool
Lady 's Book. (By per)
's
1
APPLE JELL Y.
30
Apple
Cut
off all
Jelly.
spots and decayed places on the apples
quarter them, but do not pare or core
many lemons
the peel of as
dozen
to six or eight
as
you
of the apples
;
them
like,
fill
;
about two
the preserv-
ing-pan, and cover the fruit with spring-water
them
till
;
boil
they are in pulp, then pour them into a
jelly-bag; let
them.
;
put in
them
To every
strain all night, do not squeeze
pint
of
juice
put one pound of
white sugar; put in the juice of the lemons you had
before pared, but strain it through muslin you may
;
also put in about a teaspoonful of essence of lemon.
Let
twenty minutes it will
skim it well all the time.
Put it either in shapes or pots, and cover it the next
day.
It ought to be quite stiff and very clear.
Godey's Lady's Book.
(By per. Pub.)
it
boil
for
at
look redder than at
least
first
;
;
—
Cider Apple Jelly.
"
Cut good, ripe apples in quarters, put them in a
and cover them with szvcet cider just from
the press.
(It should, if possible, be used the day it
is made, or, at any rate, before it has worked at
all.)
Boil until well clone, and drain through a sieve.
Do not press it through. Measure the liquor, and
to each pint add one pound of sugar.
Boil from
twenty minutes to half an hour."
kettle,
Quince and Apple
"Cut
small,
and
apples and quinces
;
core,
Jelly.
an equal weight of tart
put the quinces in a preserving-
CURRANT JELL Y.
1
with water to cover them, and boil
kettle,
3
soft
till
keeping water to cover them,
and boil till the whole is nearly a pulp put the
whole into a jelly-bag, and strain without pressing.
To each quart of juice allow two pounds of lumpsugar.
Boil together half an hour."
acid
the apples,
still
;
Currant Jelly.
Pick fine red but long-ripe
stems
;
quart at a time through
gently, to get
and
;
set
it
;
over a gentle
boil for fifteen minutes.
a spoonful into a saucer
quite firm enough, boil
it
— Godey's Lady's Book.
thin muslin
a
the liquid
all
sugar to each pint of juice
solved
from
currants
the
them, and strain the juice from a
bruise
;
;
wring
;
it
put a pound of white
stir it until it
fire, let
it
Then try
when cold,
for a
is
all dis-
become
hot,
it
by taking
if
it
is
not
few minutes longer.
{By per.)
Elderberry Jelly.
Heat the
it
becomes a
will
not
and press out the juice, and to
add a half-pint of sugar. Boil until
berries,
every pint of
it
thick
make a
tumblers or bowls, but
to
it,
The
sirup.
jelly firm
if
elderberries
enough
the juice of grapes
— about one-third a pint to a pint
— then becomes very firm and
berries,
of
it
Miss Lizzie
is
of
added
of eldersolid.
—
Strolim.
Grape
" Strip
alone
to turn out
Jelly.
from their stalks some fine ripe blackand stir them with a wooden spoon
cluster grapes,
—
1
RED-HA W JELL Y.
32
have burst, and the juice
strain it off without pressflows freely from them
ure, and pass it through a jelly-bag, or through a
twice-folded muslin weigh, and then boil it rapidly
draw it from the fire, stir in it
for twenty minutes
till dissolved fourteen ounces of good sugar, roughly
powdered, to each pound of juice, and boil the
jelly quickly for fifteen minutes longer, keeping it
constantly stirred, and perfectly well skimmed.
It
will be perfectly clear, and of a beautiful pale
over a gentle
fire until all
;
;
;
rose-color."
Red-Haw
Jelly.
Wash the haws well, and put on in a kettle with
water sufficient to almost cover them (not too much
Boil until they are soft.
When cool enough,
water).
express the juice thoroughly through a thin muslin
cloth.
To three pints of juice add two pints of
granulated sugar, and boil until
it
bubbles.
Less
boiling will answer if it is not desired to mould into
"shapes " or "designs." It is a firm and handsome
jelly for
guava
moulds.
The
taste
is
delicious,
resembling
Lizzie Strohm.
jelly.
Strawberry Jelly.
The
fruit,
in
the
first
place, should be as fresh
it, and free
from the vines as is
from all sand or dirt. After picking the hulls from
them, put the berries into an enamelled preservingpan, and set it by the side of the fire to draw out
possible to obtain
the juice.
As soon
as this begins to flow freely,
place the pan over a slow
to
simmer very gently
fire,
until
and allow the berries
they begin to soften,
STRA WBERR Y JELL Y.
being careful to remove
mences
to thicken.
it
1
33
before the juice com-
Then pour them upon
a clean,
dry sieve, and when the juice has drained thoroughly
through, strain it through two or three thicknesses
weighing it, put it again into
Let it boil briskly for twenty
minutes, stirring frequently, then remove it from the
fire, and add the sugar, allowing fourteen ounces to
each pound of the juice.
(Loaf-sugar broken in small
lumps is the best for the purpose, and should be
added a little at a time.) As soon as the sugar
becomes dissolved, place the pan again on the fire,
and let the jelly boil until done. To test this, take
a little out, and put it on a plate or saucer if it
stiffens, it is done enough.
Then pour it into jars,
cover tightly, and set in a cool dry place till wanted
for use.
The Caterer. {By per.)
of muslin, and, after
the preserving-pan.
;
—
CHAPTER
BREAD,
XII.
RUSK, BUNS, ROLLS,
BISCUIT.
AND
BREAD, RUSK, BUNS, ROLLS,
AUNT
AND
BISCUIT.
CINDY'S DINNER.
"Well, Cindy," said the Rev. Mr. Burgiss,
a chance to-morrow to distinguish you'self."
"you
air goin' to
have
Cindy was a tall and fleshy woman, weighing three hundred and
seventeen pounds. She was sitting on the block which was seat or
meat-slab, as the occasion demanded.
She rose from this block with
a heaving, labored motion, which called to mind a steamboat getting
under way. " I's tolerbul distinguished a'ready," she replied. Perhaps the speaker found a difficulty in raising and lowering her astonishing lower jaw and double chin.
Her words had a queer, smothered
" What's gwyne on
sound, as though coming through hot mush.
ter-morrer ? " she asked.
" Why, we air goin' to have fou' persidin' elduz yere to dinner
to-morrow,
yes, fou' presidin' elduz."
" Good gracious " exclaimed Aunt Cindy, almost overwhelmed.
u Mussy on us fou' puzzidin' elduz
Reckons I hab ter stir my stumps
tolerbul lively 'bout dat dar dinner " and her eyes, hid away in rolls
of fat, like pin-heads in a cushion, began to twinkle in anticipation of
a culinary triumph. " But," she continued, clouding again, "' we-all
ain't got no little pig.
Can't git no dinner fit for shucks widouten a
pig roas' whole, wid a red apple in its mouf. Mus' hab a pig somehows, to be sartin."
" Oh, we can get a pig," said Mr. Burgiss assuredly.
" Jus' sen'
Tony over to Brother Phillpotts's early in the mawnin' to borrer one.
Tell him to tell Sister Phillpotts that I'll return it the fus' chance.
An' now, Cindy, my girl, jus' do you' bes' on that dinner."
" 'Deed, I'll do my very bes'.
Puffidin' dinner for fou' puzzidin'
elduz is a heap er 'spons'bil'ty, but I reckons yer'll fin' ole Cindy kin
—
!
!
!
;
tote
it.
Jes' don't worrit you'se'f."
.
.
.
"Dat light-bread ought to be sot ter raisin'," Aunt Cindy soliloquized when left alone. She spread out a fat hand on each knee, and
helped herself up from the meat-block. Then she mounted the bench
that served as her observatory, and began searching the log sleeper,
rummaging among the various paper parcels. " Wonder what's gone
wid defn twin brudders," she said (Aunt Cindy was looking for a small
package of Twin Brothers yeast cakes, which some Yankee had introduced in the neighborhood). "Dat dar Tony's gone an' toted off dem
To-nee! To-nee!" she called, at
dar twin brudders, I'll be boun'.
the height of her muffled voice. " I see yer sneakin' 'hin' dat dar
chicken-coop. Yere'd belter come yere, 'fo' I comes dar an' fotches
Hurry 'long outen dat dar snail's pace."
yer wid a peach-tree limb.
Tony appeared, looking like a tattered scarecrow with a live head.
—
137
"
"
AUNT CINDY'S DINNER.
138
Whar's dem dar twin brudders ? I wants ter put one uv um ter
What yer gone an' done wid dem dar twin brudders ? " persisted
Aunt Cindy.
" I hain't done nuffin 't all wid dem dar twin brudders,
nebber
tetched um," Tony declared, half frightened, half sullen.
" Hush you' mouf, yer story-teller
I'll be boun' yer's gone an'
feeded all dem twin brudders to de chickens. Yer's too lazy ter mix
a little cawn-meal fer um."
" Nebber feeded dem dar twin brudders to de chickens, no more'n
"
soak.
—
!
nuffin,"
"
Tony
insisted.
How yer reckons I'se gwine ter git dinner fer dem fou' puzzidin"
elduz ef I hain't got no twin brudders to make de light-bread?
" I dun know."
" Ob cou'se yer
dun know
;
yer dun
know
nuffin.
Come
yere while
boxes yer kase I lubbed you' gran'mudder. Me
an' her uster play togedder when we-all wus bofe gals togedder."
Aunt Cindy was heaving and balancing herself, preparatory to a
Down she
descent from the bench on which she was mounted.
stepped at length, her broad bare foot meeting the dirt floor with a
heavy thud,
or slap, rather.
" Come 'long up yere," continued Aunt Cindy.
Tony was moving
her
with
a reluctant, bewildered air, his dead grandmother
towards
and the twin brothers all in a jumble in his brain, when Aunt Cindy
suddenly exclaimed, " Dar's dem twin brudders now, on dat dar jam
Tony smiled from ear to ear, in his satisfaction at having escaped the
impending boxing. "Hush you' grinnin' dar, yer imperance, an' go
Wasn't yer
'long an' fotch me some hick'ry-bo'k to cook dat dinner.
I
boxes you' jaw.
I
—
!
'ware
I's
"
got ter git dinner fer fou' puzzidin' elduz?
a long whistle of astonishment, and went off toward
Tony gave
the woods.
While the yeast-cake was soaking, Aunt Cindy set to work collecting materials for a cake a pound-cake with icing, she had decided
upon. Although her movements were slow and labored, there were
strength and force in them, so that she accomplished a surprising
amount of work. She didn't lose much time looking for spoons and
forks.
She stirred things with her finger, and with it she tested her
gravies and sauces and custards. It needed but a few strokes of her
warm, strong hand, to beat the butter to a cream a few turns more, and
the sugar was thoroughly incorporated with this. Then with some
twigs hi crape-myrtle, in lieu of an egg-beater, the yolk of the eggs was
soon foaming, and the white standing alone.- -Lastly, she bethought
her of the cinnamon to make it "tasty," she said. Panting and blowing, she again ascended her observatory, and~ began snuffing, tasting,
and peering at the various paper parcels on the log sleeper. " Whar
;
:
kin dat cin'mon-bok be at ? " she said. " I hain't seed it sence I tuk it
to meetin' to scent my han'kercher.
I'll be bound dat dar Tony's done
gone an' tuck an' et dat dar cin'mon-bok, ha'r an' hide. Maybe I put
it in de big gou'd."
She waddled down from the bench and across the shed to a gourd
as large as a giant pumpkin, and with much the shape of one.
She
turned it bottom up on the dirt floor, and out poured an incredible assortment of things a fork, three partridge-eggs, a head-kerchief, a pair of
:
AUNT
CINDY'S DINNER.
I^Q
two peaches, a purple belt-ribbon, a phial of haira hymn-book, a lump of loaf-sugar, a stick of sassafras-root, a paper
" 'Tain't yere." She looked the
of saleratus, and another of snuff.
jambs over, and then, with a majestic waddle, she crossed the yard to
the house.
" Miss Rithy," she said, when she found herself in Mrs. Burgiss's
presence, "I ain't gwine ter take de 'spons'bil'ty uv no poun'-cake
widouten cin'mon-bok to puffume it, an' I hain't got no cin'mon-bok
on my premsis."
" Sen' over to Brother Phillpotts's an' borrer a stick," said the lady
appealed to, returning to her perforated cardboard, on which she was
working in rainbow worsteds a church with a man beside it. The
man was taller than the steeple.
In process of time, Tony appeared with three small pieces of bark,
and was, properly or improperly, belabored by Aunt Cindy's tongue,
she declaring that she could " eat all dat dar bok," and demanding to
be told how she was " gwine ter cook dinner fer fou' puzzidin' elduz
wid dat thimbulful of bok ? An' my cakes a-sottin' yere waitin' all
dis while, an' all dat 'nifikent white froff gittin' limber, an' all de lather
done gone outen dat dar yaller
An' I beat dat dar egg tell my arm
ache to de morrer-bone. Yer go 'long an' hurry an' cotch ole Jack,
an' go to Mis' Phillpotts's ter borrer somethin'."
Tony hurried off, glad to get away from Aunt Cindy and her uncertain moods.
It was over an hour, however, before he got started for
Mrs. Philpotts's for first he had to indulge himself in repeated climbings and slidings on the fodder-stacks then in divers tumblings and
leapings in the straw-pen then he " skinned the cat " a few dozen
times then he had a thrilling ride round and round the barnyard,
swinging on old Jack's tail then he made a raid on some blackberrybushes in the fence-corner, where he ate berries as long and thick
as his thumb for ten minutes. Then he put a bridle on the old gray
mule, mounted its bare back, and entered upon a course of pullings,
tuggings, and kickings, to the end of making the said mule go forward
to Mrs. Phillpotts's, instead of backward to its stall, as it seemed determined to do. As all the boy's thoughts and energies were thus
engaged, it never occurred to him that he didn't know what he was
going for, until he stood in Mrs. Phillpotts's presence, feeling and
looking very foolish. Nothing remained to be done but to remount his
gallant steed, return to Aunt Cindy, and ascertain the nature of the
something he was to borrow from Mrs. Phil! potts. Oh, how he shrunk
from the forthcoming interview with Aunt Cindy
Her dreaded hands
doubled in size to his frightened fancy, and his ears seemed to tingle
with the inevitable boxing which Aunt Cindy would be certain to feel
it her duty to administer, because she loved his grandmother.
" Wish she nebber lubbed my gran'mammy
wish she hate my
gran'mammy," Tony whispered to his beating heart, as on went old
Jack at a spanking, bouncing trot, that threatened to unhorse the
rider.
It seemed to Tony that no other mule ever trotted so relentlessly.
He clung desperately to the bridle and the roached mane,
and was trotted on by the merciless brute past the house, through the
barnyard, and into the stable, Tony throwing himself almost under the
belly to save himself from being rubbed off in the low doorway.
slippers, a dish-towel,
oil,
.
.
.
!
;
;
;
;
;
!
—
;
YEAST.
140
"Whyn't yer spen' de night at Mis' Phillpotts's?" Cindy asked,
when he appeared in her presence, his eyes distended.and rolling in
frightened anticipation. "Dat white's done gone back twict, waitin'
on you' lazy bones. Nobody but a bawn cook could fotch a poun'cake
fer fou' puzzidin' elduz outen sich trib'lations.
Don't yer
got ter git dinner fer fou' puzzidin' elduz ? But, law yer
fit
know
I's
!
wouldn't kere ef dey wus fou' bishops. What do yer kere 'bout rerligion ? Yer's so wicked
Gim me that cin'mon-bok, and don't stan'
dar shilly-shally, like a gobbler on hot tin."
Then came Tony's acknowledgment that he had gone all the way
to Mrs. Phillpotts's without once thinking that he did not know what
he was going for. You should have seen how Aunt Cindy received
this, when the idea had fairly taken possession of her mind.
It went
to her funny spot.
Planting her hands, outspread, on her sides, as if
to fortify herself against shaking to pieces, she began laughing almost
without a sound, as though she was too well cushioned to make any
noise.
She quivered all over like a great mass of jelly, swaying back
and forth, her head falling on her chest, on this shoulder and on that,
till she fell with a great flop on the meat-block, where she continued
to sway and roll and quiver.
Tony's intense appreciation of the turned
tide, expressed in broad grins, in titters, in giggles, in shuffles, in balancings, in hand-rubbings, was about as funny as Aunt Cindy's characteristic laughing.
Before this laughing was ended, he had made good
his escape, and in process of events was repeating his tuggings and
pullings at old Jack's bridle.
It was dark .before he returned from
his errand; for Mrs. Phillpotts not having any cinnamon, had sent a
runner to Mrs. McDonald for the article. Mrs. McDonald, in turn,
had sent to Mrs. Doubleday, and Mrs. Doubleday to the cross-roads
store.
Aunt Cindy never went to bed that night
never went to her
cabin she sat up with her cake and light-bread.
Aunt Cindy's
Dinner: Sarah Winter Kellogg. From Lippincotfs Magazine. {By
!
—
:
—
per.)
Yeast.
Ingredients
or, if
:
One
teacupful of lightly broken hops,
the Shaker packages are used, half a teacupful
one pint of sifted flour one teacupful of granulated
one tablespoonful of salt four large or six
medium-sized potatoes two quarts boiling water.
;
sugar
;
;
;
Boil the potatoes
;
drain off the water
when
done,
them dry off a few minutes, precisely as for
table.
At the same time, having tied the hops in a
cloth, boil them half an hour in the two quarts of
water, renewing it if it boils away.
Mix the flour,
and
let
YEAST.
141
sugar, and salt well together in a large mixing-bowl,
and pour on the boiling hop-water slowly, stirring
constantly.
Now add enough of this to the mashed
potato to thin it till it can be poured, and mix it all
together, straining it through a sieve to avoid any
possible
Add
lumps.
to
this,
when
cool, either a
from the last, or of baker's yeast,
or a cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a little
warm water. Let it stand two hours or so till partly
light, then stir it down two or three times in the
cupful of yeast
left
course of five or six hours, as this makes
At
the end of that time
it
will
be
it
stronger.
Keep
light.
in a
carefully corked stone jug, or in glass cans, the last
being the best
and in all cases be particular to
have whatever holds it perfectly sweet and well
;
scalded.
Be
the vessel
as careful with stopper or cover as with
itself.
For dry
yeast, stir in corn-meal
made, form
in small, thin
it
carefully in the sun.
venient form, as
in
it
warm water
half
Potato yeast
is
a
till
cakes, and
For hot weather
does not sour.
dough
is
dry them
this is a con-
Crumb and soak
an hour before using.
made by omitting hops and
flour,
but mashing the potatoes fine with the other ingre-
and adding the old yeast when cool, as before.
of potatoes can be doubled, or left the
same.
It is very nice, but must be made fresh every
week while the other, kept in a cool place, will be
Mrs. Helen Campbell. From Good
good a month.
dients,
The number
;
Housekeeping.
—
{By per. Pubs.)
;
BREAD.
142
Bread.
For four medium-sized loaves of bread allow as
follows Four quarts of flour one large cup of yeast
one tablespoonful of salt, one of sugar,
(half a pint)
and one of butter or lard one pint of milk mixed
with one of warm water, or one quart of water alone,
Sift the flour into a large pan or
for the "wetting."
:
;
;
;
bowl.
bottom
Put the sugar, salt, and shortening, in the
of the bread-pan or bowl, and pour on a
spoonful or two of boiling water, enough to dissolve
add the quart of wetting and the yeast. Now
stir in, slowly, two quarts of the flour, beating well
cover with a thick cloth, and set in a temperature
of about seventy-five degrees to rise until morning.
Bread mixed at nine in the evening will be ready to
mould into loaves or rolls by six the next morning.
all
;
,
summer
would be necessary to find a cool
a warm one the chief point being
If mixed early in the
to keep the temperature even.
mould
and
bake in the afteris
to
it
ready
morning,
all that it
being
hours
to
eight
noon, from seven
In
place
;
it
in winter,
should stand.
This
;
first
mixture
is
called a sponge;
if only a single loaf of Graham or rye bread, is
wanted, one quart of it can be measured and thickened with either flour as in the rules given hereafter.
To finish as wheat bread, stir in flour from the two
and
Flour the
remaining to make a dough.
moulding-board very thickly, and turn out. Now
begin kneading, flouring the hands, but after the
dough is gathered in a smooth lump, using as little
quarts
may be knead with the palm of the hand
much as possible. The dough quickly becomes a
flour as
as
;
BREAD.
143
Fold it over, and keep on kneading, not
than twenty minutes, half an hour being better.
Make into loaves put into the pans set them in a
warm place, and let them rise from thirty to fortycake.
flat
less
;
;
five
in
minutes, or until they have become nearly double
Bake
size.
in
an oven hot enough to brown a
teaspoonfu'l of flour in five minutes, spreading the
flour
on a
bit of
broken plate that
it
may have
an
even heat. The pan is an important point, the best
being made of block-tin or Russia iron.
brick
loaf bakes most easily, and it is quite worth while to
A
have a set of bread-pans made to order, ten inches
long by four wide and four deep.
Loaves of this
size will bake in from forty-five to sixty minutes.
Then take them from the pans, wrap them in thick
cloths kept for the purpose, and stand them tilted
up against the pans till cold. Never lay hot bread
on a pine table, as it will sweat, and absorb the pitchy
odor and taste
around
;
freely.
it
but
so
tilt
Keep
that the air will pass
well covered in a tin box or
which should be wiped out every
day or two, and scalded and dried thoroughly in the
sun once a week. Pans for wheat bread should be
large stone pot,
greased very lightly
as the
dough
a sponge,
at once,
when
all
;
sticks
the flour
for
Graham
and
clings.
and knead
turn out.
much
in
and kneaded
set to rise in the
Use
more,
Instead of mixing
may be moulded
and the dough
light,
or rye,
same way
as little flour as possible,
minutes less time being required,
as part of the kneading has already been done.
From Good Housekeeping.
Mrs. Helen Campbell.
(By per. Pubs)
fifteen
;
—
—
TO TEST THE OVEN.
144
To Test
Throw on the floor
new flour if it takes
color, the
temperature
cool.
oven a tablespoonful
of the
too high, and the oven must
is
If
the flour remains white after
the lapse of a few seconds, the temperature
When
low.
the
flour
the oven
turn
will
slightly scorched.
J. Murrey.
of
or assumes a dark-brown
fire,
;
be allowed to
the Oven.
is of
is
too
the proper temperature,
brownish yellow, and look
Breakfast Dainties: Thomas
a
&
White, Stokes,
Allen, Pubs.
Vienna Bread.
"
Two pounds
banked around pan, onewater
mix a thin
quickly
one-half
batter
add
pint milk, in which
has been dissolved one-half ounce salt and seveneighths ounce compressed yeast leave remainder of
flour against side of pan
cover and keep free from
air forty-five minutes then mix in rest of the flour
until dough leaves side and bottom of pan.
Let
stand for two and a half hours.
Divide into onepound pieces. Subdivide into twelve pieces. Fold
half
pint
milk,
sifted flour
one-half
pint
;
;
;
;
;
corner of each piece to centre, turn over to rise for
thirty minutes.
Put
in hot oven,
bake twenty min-
utes."
French Twist Bread.
Take one quart
made yeast mix
of light
dough raised with home-
sweet
add flour,
and knead well. Let it rise until light, then knead
very gently roll the dough in thin strips, measuring
an inch in diameter dredge lightly with flour, and
;
in a large tablespoonful of
butter, a saltspoon of salt,
;
;
and one egg
;
AERATED HOME-MADE BREAD.
braid loosely
let it
;
quickly without
1
45
stand a few moments, and bake
— Peterson
burning.
Magazine.
's
{By per})
Aerated
Mix
flour
Home-made
and water together
a thick batter
;
then beat
thoroughly permeate
it
;
it
Bread.
to the consistency of
until fine bubbles of air
for small biscuit,
pour
it
and bake in a good brisk oven for
bread in loaves, more flour is thoroughly kneaded in
with the hands, until the dough is full of air-bubbles,
and then baked at once, without being allowed to
Dodd,
Cooking Manual
Juliet Corson.
stand.
into patty-pans,
—
Mead,
&
;
:
Co.,
Pubs.
{By per.)
Gems.
These are the simplest form
erly
made
of bread,
and
are certain to be light and sweet.
if
prop-
A
hot
oven and hot pans are prime essentials, and there
must be no delay between making and baking. The
coldest water, ice-water preferred, should be used.
Use either whole-wheat flour or Graham, three parts
of flour to one of water being the right proportion.
a half-pint
For a dozen gems allow one large cup
of ice-water, one even -teaspoonful of salt, and
—
three cups of flour.
—
Stir in the flour slowly, beating
hard and steadily, not less than ten minutes. The
pans should have been set on top of the stove, and
Fill them two-thirds full, and
or buttered.
bake about half an hour. If properly made, they
are very light, and have the full flavor of the wheat.
Hygienic cook-books give the same rule as practicable for bread, but none tested by the writer has
oiled
;
SALT-RISrNG BREAD.
146
ever been really eatable.
Gems
can be freshened by
dipping in cold water and heating quickly, but
make no more than
best to
Rye can be
result.
will
be eaten
it
is
at once.
used, but with less certainty of a good
— Mrs.
From Good House-
Helen Campbell.
{By per Pubs)
keeping.
Salt-Rising Bread.
Put half a teaspoonful of
salt in half a
teacupful
pour on boiling water work it well very
stiff
put this where it will keep warm all night
next morning take a pint of milk, warm water, and
of flour
;
;
;
much salt as before mix in flour till you make a
good muffin-batter then add the scalded yeast to
the batter, and set it in warm water till it rises then
add flour to form a stiff dough, and bake. This is
the favorite bread all through the Valley of Virginia
and Maryland.
Some dyspeptics think it much
more digestible than bread made up with other
Mrs,
Virginia Cookery-Book
kinds of yeast.
Mary Stuart Smith. (By per. Harper & Brothers,
as
;
;
;
—
:
Pubs)
We found
Mr. Agnew equallie busie with his Apples, mounted ha^f
of the Trees, and throwing Cherry Pippins down into
Rose's Apron, and now and then making as though he would pelt her:
Her Donkey,
onlie she dared him, and woulde not be frightened.
chewing Apples in the Corner, with the Cider running out of his
Mouth, presented a ludicrous Image of Enjoyment, and 'twas evidently
way up one
enhanct by Giles' brushing his rough Coat with a Birch Besom, instead
The Sun,
of minding his owne businesse of sweeping the Walk.
shining with mellow Light on the mown Grass and fresh dipt Hornbeam Hedges, made even the commonest Objects distinct and cheerfulle
and the Air was soe eleare, we coulde hear the Village Children
;
afar off at theire Play.
Rose had abundance of delicious new Honey
Bread hot from the oven, for our earlie Supper.
Mrs. Manning.
in the
Comb, and
Powell:
— Mary
RUSK.
147
—
it is
Honey without the comb is the perfume without the rose,
sweet merely, and soon degenerates into candy. Half the delectableness is in breaking down these frail and exquisite walls yourself, and
tasting the nectar before it has lost its freshness by contact with the
Locusts and Wild Honey: John Burroughs. Houghton.
air.
{By per.)
Mifflin, 6* Co., Pubs.
—
Rusk.
One cup milk
ful
sugar
;
scalded and cooled
;
one tablespoon-
one-half teaspoonful salt
;
one-quarter cup
two cups flour.
Mix in a sponge at night, or very early in the
morning. When well risen, add flour enough to
make a stiff dough. Knead and let it rise again, then
add one-fourth of a cup of butter rubbed to a cream/
half a cup of sugar, and one egg beaten with butter
and sugar. Let it rise in the bowl till light. Shape
put them close together
into small round biscuit
yeast
;
;
in a shallow cake-pan, that they
When
may
rise
very high.
ready to bake, rub the tops with sugar
dis-
solved in milk, sprinkle with dry sugar, and bake
in
a
The Boston Cook-Book
moderate oven.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
Roberts Bros., Pubs.
:
{By per)
Buns.
" Into a
pound and a
half of well-dried flour
four ounces of moist sugar
;
warm
rub
a quarter of a
warm, but not hot enough
make a hole
to scald the yeast which you will use
in the middle of your flour, and put in a quarter of a
teacupful, or thereabout, of good thick yeast, which
pour
is not too bitter, or it will taste in the buns
on it your warm milk, and mix with it about onepint of milk about blood
;
;
third, or nearly half, of
your
flour,
leaving the rest
;;
SAFFRON BUNS.
148
of the flour
Set
it
in a
unmixed round the sides
warm
of
your pan.
place to rise for three-quarters of
When
an hour or an hour.
has risen well, melt a
it
quarter of a pound of butter, and mix
it
with milk
be on the fire till about blood warm, and then
mix it with the rest of the flour and sugar into your
let it
dough.
When
bread-dough.
mixed,
Put
it
it
should be rather softer than
to rise for about a quarter of
an hour, and then mould them put them on buttered
iron plates, and then into a warm place to rise light
when well risen, bake them in a hot oven. If you
wish to have currants or caraway-seeds in them,
mix them in along with the butter if you wish
them spiced, mix equal quantities of ground ginger,
put as much as
allspice, coriander, and caraway
;
;
;
you think sufficient, when you put in the butter.
When they are baked enough, brush them over
with egg and water mixed together, to give them
a gloss."
Saffron Buns.
"
Make
the dough for them the same as for plain
Put a little of the best saffron in a teacup,
and pour over a little boiling water let it stand on
the top of the oven, to extract the flavor and when
buns.
;
;
you put in the butter, mix in as much of the saffronwater as will make the dough of a bright yellow
Bake them as before directed. You may put
color.
in a few currants, but saffron buns are seldom
spiced."
Hot Cross Buns.
"
Two
pounds
of flour, half a
pound
of sugar,
and
a small quantity of grated nutmeg and allspice mixed
PARKER-HOUSE ROLLS.
Make
together.
and into
it
1
49
a hole in the centre of the flour,
put two tablespoonfuls of yeast, pouring
in also half a pint of
warm
milk.
With the
latter
and the surrounding flour make a thin batter cover
the dish, and let it stand before the fire till the leaven
begins to ferment.
Now add to the whole half a
pound of butter melted, and sufficient milk to make
all the flour into a soft paste.
Dust it over with
flour, and let it rise again for half an hour.
Make
the dough into the shape of buns, notch out on each
the form of the cross, and lay them separately in rows
on buttered tin plates to rise once more for half an
;
hour; after which, put them into a quick oven, watching them carefully lest the color should be spoiled by
over-baking."
Parker-House Rolls.
One teacup home-made
yeast, a little salt,
one
tablespoonful sugar, a piece of lard size of an egg,
one pint milk, flour sufficient to mix. Put the milk
on the stove to scald, with the lard in it. Prepare
Then add the
the flour with salt, sugar, and yeast.
thoroughly
when mixed
Knead
milk, not too hot.
in the morning but very slight kneading is
at night
Then roll out, and cut with large biscuitnecessary.
Spread a little butter on each roll, and lap
cutter.
together.
Let them rise very light, then bake in
a quick oven.
The Every-day Cook-Book Miss
Neill.
{By per. Belford, Clarke, & Co.)
;
—
:
Brown
Biscuit.
Three cups of Graham flour, one cup of white
one tablespoonful of lard and the same of but-
flour,
EGG
150
one tablespoonful
ter;
fuls of
brown
of
sugar,
two teaspoom
salt, two
baking-powder, one teaspoonful of
cups of milk.
baking-powder,
shortening
roll
BISCUIT.
;
brown and white
Sift
a bowl
salt, into
;
flour,
sugar,
rub or chop in the
wet up with the milk into a
out half an inch thick, handling as
soft
little
dough
;
as pos-
and with as few strokes of the rolling-pin cut
into round cakes, and bake quickly in a floured pan.
Marion Harland.
The Post, WasJiington, D.C.
{By per)
sible,
;
—
Egg
Two
cups of
warm
Biscuit.
milk, two eggs,
two heaping
tablespoonfuls of butter, half a cake of compressed
yeast dissolved in
warm
water, one quart of sifted
mix with the butter
salt, and three cups
of flour together over night, and set in a covered
bowl to rise. Early in the morning add the beaten
eggs and the rest of the flour, and set for a second
flour,
one teaspoonful of
salt
;
(melted but not hot) the yeast,
rising of an hour or longer.
When
light roll into a
sheet almost an inch thick, cut into round cakes, and
lay in a floured baking-pan.
At the end
of half
an
hour bake in a good oven. They are delicious cold
or hot.
Marion Harland. The Post, WasJiington,
—
D.C.
{By per)
Naples Biscuit.
" Beat eight
eggs
add to them one pound of
one pound of powdered sugar, one teaspoonful
essence of lemon.
Bake in a quick oven."
flour;
of
;
SODA BISCUITS.
Soda
One
151
Biscuits.
quart of flour, a pint of buttermilk, half a
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk
spoonful of salt
;
Mix
large egg, rubbed in the flour.
roll
;
half a tea-
a piece of lard about the size of a
well together,
out about an inch thick, and cut into biscuits.
Bake
in a
Mrs. Matilda J. Anderson,
quick oven.
Dayton, O.
Drop
One
Biscuit.
quart of flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking-
powder, tablespoonful of sugar, half a teacup of lard
worked in the flour; add sweet milk enough to make
a thick batter.
Drop
in little
pans or muffin-rings,
and bake.
Flyaways, or Souffle Biscuits.
Rub
four ounces of butter into one quart of flour
and make into a
Knead well, handling lightly, and
paste with milk.
roll out until they are as thin as paper and the size
stick here and there with a
of a common saucer
fork, and bake in a moderate oven until they look
flaky and white.
sifted,
add a saltspoonful
o"f
salt,
;
Butter, four ounces.
Flour, one quart.
Milk, one-half pint.
Salt,
Mrs.
one saltspoonful.
Mary
— Virginia Cookery-Book
Stuart Smith.
Harper
&
:
Brothers, Pubs.
(By per?)
Scotch Scones.
" Sift half a spoonful of soda into a quart of flour,
and mix
in rich buttermilk
enough
to
make a dough
as
FRENCH
152
TOAST.
stiff as for soda-biscuit.
Roll out half an inch thick,
and bake on a hot griddle in two large cakes the
size of dinner-plates.
Serve with dishes of Dundee
marmalade."
French Toast.
" Beat four eggs very light, and stir with
them a
some baker's bread, dip the pieces
into the egg, then lay them in a pan of hot lard, and
fry brown
sprinkle a little powdered sugar and cinpint of milk
;
slice
;
namon on each
pared, this
is
piece,
and serve
hot.
If nicely pre-
an excellent dish for breakfast or tea."
CHAPTER
BROWN
XIII.
BREAD, HOT CAKES, ETC.
BROWN
BREAD,
HOT
CAKES, ETC.
Margaret
seated herself on the door-step to eat her supper, conbrown bread and watered cider, served in a curiously
wrought cherry bowl and spoon. The family were taking their meal
in the kitchen.
The sun had gone down. The whippoorwill came
and sat on the butternut, and sang his evening note, always plaintive,
always welcome. The night-hawk dashed and hissed through the
woods and the air, on slim, quivering wings.
solitary robin chanted
sweetly a long time from the hill. Myriads of insects revolved and
murmured over her head. Crickets chirped in the grass and under
the deeaying sills of the house. She heard the voice of the waterfall
at the Outlet, and the croaking of a thousand frogs in the Pond.
She saw the stars come out, Lyra, the Northern Crown, the Serpent.
She looked into the heavens, she opened her ears to the dim evening
melodies of the universe yet as a child. She was interrupted by the
sharp voice of her mother, " Go to your roost, Peggy "
" Yes, Molly dear," said her father, very softly, " Dick and Robin
are asleep see who will be up first, you or the silver rooster who
will open your eyes first, you or the dandelion ? "
Margaret Sylvester Judd.
{By per. Roberts Brothers.)
sisting of toasted
A
;
!
:
;
—
Brown
:
Bread.
Make ready one even cup of Indian meal two
heaping cups of rye meal one teaspoonful of salt,
:
;
;
and one
mixed together with the sifted meal
one cupful of molasses, in a quart
measure or small bowl, with spoon a large beatof soda,
in a large
bowl
;
;
spoon
palette-knife, to scrape your mixture
from the bowl; a tin bread or pudding boiler, well
ing
;
buttered.
and soda, dry, until thoroughly
Pour one pint of hot water to the molasses,
up.
Pour the molasses and water into the
Stir the meal, salt,
mingled.
and
stir it
155
—
MAIZE MUFFINS.
156
middle of your meal, stirring to a smooth batter as
in previous directions
minutes
several
stir easily,
With some
;
it
;
beat
all
quickly and well for
should be of a consistence to
and break
in pouring, but
add from a spoonful or two to
warm
not to run.
you may need to
half a cup more of
qualities of molasses,
make
water, to
Put into your
it
right.
tin boiler, cover tight,
and put this
it.
Cover
into an iron kettle with boiling water in
Boil steadily for three hours, look-
the kettle also.
ing from time to time to see
kettle
is
Keep
boiling away.
it
if
the water in the
replenished, always
from boiling water. Take the bread-boiler out at
the end of the three hours, and set it into the oven
longer if the oven is not
for about ten minutes
This is to dry the outside steam off, and
quick.
form a tender crust. Put hot upon the table cut
and help hot.
Just How: A Key to the Cookbooks Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney. Houghton, Mifflin,
;
;
:
&
Co.,
Pubs.
(By per.)
Maize Muffins.
Shredded maize deserves special mention, as being
the highest and most scientific product of corn that
has been introduced for public consideration. From it
a most excellent porridge can be made in ten minutes.
Griddle-cakes, sweet puddings, and especially breakfast-rolls
made
of
it,
Most excellent
Mix together one
are delightful.
muffins are prepared as follows
:
shredded maize,, one pint of hot milk, a teaspoonful of salt, and one ounce of butter let it cool,
and whisk into it three beaten eggs, one ounce of
pound
of
;
JOHNNY-CAKE.
1
57
sugar, and two teaspoonfuls of wheat baking-powder
mix thoroughly half fill the muffin-rings, and bake
Breakfast Dainties Thomas J.
in a hot oven.
;
—
Murrey.
:
White, Stokes,
&
Allen, Pubs.
Johnny-Cake.
Sift
make a
warm water,
one quart of Indian meal into a pan
hole in the middle, and pour in a pint of
;
adding one teaspoonful of salt with a spoon mix
the meal and water gradually into a soft dough stir
it very briskly for a quarter of an hour or more, till it
;
;
becomes light and spongy then spread the dough
smooth and evenly on a straight, flat board (a piece
of the head of a flour barrel will serve for this purpose) place the board nearly upright before an open
fire, and put an iron against the back to support it
bake it well when done, cut it in squares send it
hot to table, split and buttered.
Virginia CookeryBook Mary Stuart Smith. Harper & Brothers, Pubs.
;
;
;
—
;
:
{By per)
—
was Lois and her
father,
Joe Yare being feeder that night.
one of the great furnace-rooms in the cellar,
a very
comfortable place that stormy night. Two or three doors of the wide
brick ovens were open, and the fire threw a ruddy glow over the stone
floor, and shimmered into the dark recesses of the shadows, very homelike after the rain and mud without.
Lois seemed to think so, at any
rate, for she had made a table of a store-box, put a white cloth on' it,
and was busy getting up a regular supper for her father,
down on
her knees before the red coals, turning something on an iron plate,
while some slices of ham sent up a cloud of juicy, hungry smell.
The old Stoker had just finished slaking the out-fires, and was
putting some blue plates on the table, gravely straightening them.
He had grown old, as Polston said, Holmes saw, stooped much,
with a low, hacking cough his coarse clothes were curiously clean
that was to please Lois, of course. She put the ham on the table, and
some bubbling coffee, and then, from a hickory-board in front of the
fire, took off, with a jerk, brown, flaky slices of Virginia johnny-cake.
Margret Howth Mrs. R. H. Davis. {By per.)
It
They were
—
in
—
—
;
—
:
;
CORN-MEAL FLAPJACKS.
158
Corn-Meal Flapjacks.
"
One
quart boiling milk, two cups of white corn-
Cook on
meal.
Serve
griddle.
rolled,
with sugar
between."
Corn Bread.
"
One
quart sour milk, three eggs, two tablespoon-
one tablespoonful sugar, one-quarter teaone teacup flour, and enough corn-meal
to make a good batter one teaspoonf ul soda, or enough
Stir thoroughly.
Bake in
to make the milk frothy.
fuls butter,
spoonful
salt,
;
long pans."
Fried Mush.
Into two quarts of boiling water, stir corn-meal,
until
add
it
salt,
makes a smooth mush
and
stir briskly.
Have
;
boil half
tablespoonful each of lard and butter
ing
mush
an hour
one
hot, in a skillet,
;
drop the
into the skillet in little pats
—
;
boil-
fry a light
brown on both sides.
Presbyterian CookBook: Mrs. W. A. B., Dayton, O.
crisp
Hominy Drop-Cakes.
"
One
pint of fresh boiled
may be used
;
if
the
hominy
latter,
(or cold
hominy
break into grains, as
and heat in a farinakettle without adding water), one tablespoonful of
water, two eggs
whites and yolks beaten separately.
Stir the yolks into the hominy first, then
the whites, and a teaspoonful of salt if the hominy
has not been salted in cooking or, if it has, use half
a teaspoonful.
Drop, in tablespoonfuls, on well-buttered tin sheets, and bake to a good brown in a quick
lightly as possible, with a fork,
—
;
oven."
SALLY LUNN.
1
59
Sally Limn.
"One
quart of flour, butter the size of an egg,
three tablespoonfuls of sugar, two eggs, two teacupmilk,
fuls of
one of soda, a
two teaspoonfuls
of cream-tartar
and
little salt.
" Stir the sugar, cream-tartar,
and salt in the flour,
add the eggs without beating, the butter melted, and
the milk with the soda dissolved in
it."
Rice Waffles.
Rub through
add to
it
a sieve one pint of
warm
boiled rice
a tablespoonful of dry flour, two-thirds of
two teaspoonfuls of bakingpowder.
Beat separately the yolks and whites of
three eggs
add to the yolks three gills of milk,
work it into the flour, then add an ounce of melted
butter beat the whites of eggs thoroughly mix the
whole together. Heat the waffle-iron, and grease it
evenly (a piece of salt pork is best for this purpose)
pour the batter into the half of the iron over the
range until nearly two-thirds full, cover, allow to
cook a moment, then turn and brown slightly on the
other side.
The Cook. {By per.)
a teaspoonful of
salt,
;
;
;
;
—
Rye
Two
Muffins.
cups rye, one-half cup of
one egg, onetwo
scant teaspoons Royal powder sifted with meal and
flour.
Have your pans very hot before putting in
flour,
fourth cup molasses, milk to mix quite soft
the mixture.
{By per.)
From " Woman
s
Hour"
;
Boston Globe.
OATEN
l6o
CAKES.
Oaten Cakes.
A
quarter of a pound of butter to two pounds of
much water
oatmeal, then add as
them
is
as will just
work
together, but the less the better, and hot water
best
roll
;
them out with a
One
possible.
and the other on the
Lady Harriet
rolling-pin, as thin as
done on the
side should be
toaster.
— Dainty
griddle,
Dishes
:
St. Clair.
Frumenty.
Boil
wheat till it comes to a jelly, and to a quart
by degrees, two quarts of new milk. Stir
of this add,
and
boil
till
eggs with a
to taste
;
Beat the yolks of three
nutmeg, and sugar to sweeten it
well in over the fire pour it into
well mixed.
little
stir this
;
deep dishes, and eat either hot or
Dishes Lady Harriet St. Clair.
cold.
— Dainty
:
am
somewhat of a devotee. I love to keep all festiI own that I
vals, to taste all feast-offerings, from fermety (or irumetry, frumentum)
These things always
at Christmas, to the pancakes at Shrovetide.
seem better on those days as the bread " in the holy days " is ever
;
better than the bread at school, though
— Essays
of Elia
:
Charles La?nb.
it
come from the same oven.
CHAPTER
XIV.
PUDDINGS.
PUDDINGS.
AN APPLE PUDDING.
One morning, a little while after our party, mother was making an
apple-pudding for dinner, when Madam Pennington and Miss Elizabeth drove round to the door.
Ruth was out at her lessons. Barbara was busy helping Mrs.
Holabird. Rosamond went to the door, and let them into the brown
room.
" Mother will be sorry to keep you waiting, but she will come directly.
She is just in the middle of an apple-pudding."
Rosamond said it with as much simple grace of pride as if she had
had to say, " Mother is busy at her modelling, and cannot leave her
clay till she has damped and covered it."
Her nice perception went
lo the very farthermost; it discerned the real best to be made of
things, the best that was ready made, and put that forth.
"And I know," said Madam Pennington, "that an apple-pudding
must not be left in the middle. I wonder if she would let an old
woman, who has lived in barracks, come to her where she is ? "
Rosamond's tact was superlative. She did not say, " I will go and
see."
She got right up, and said, " I am sure she will please come
this way," and opened the door, with a sublime confidence, full and
withourwarning, upon the scene of operations.
"Oh, how nice!" said Miss Elizabeth; and Madam Pennington
walked forward into the sunshine, holding her hand out to Mrs. Holabird, and smiling all the way from her smooth old forehead down to
the "seventh beauty" of her dimple-cleft and placid chin.
" Why, this is really coming to see people " she said.
Mrs. Holabird's white hand did not even want dusting. She just
laid down the bright little chopper with which she was re'ducing her
flour and butter to a golden powder, and took Madam Pennington's
nicely gloved fingers into her own, without a breath of apology.
Apology! It was very meek of her not to look at all set up.
Barbara rose from her chair, with a red ringlet of apple-paring
hanging down against her white apron, and seated herself again at her
work when the visitors had taken the two opposite corners of the
deep, cushioned sofa.
The red cloth was folded back across the end of the dining-table
and at the other end were mother's white board and rolling-pin, the
pudding-cloth wrung into a twist out of the scald, and waiting upon a
plate, and a pitcher of cold water with ice tinkling against its sides.
Mother sat with the deal bowl in her lap, turning and mincing with
;
!
the few last strokes the light, delicate dust of the pastry.
163
The
sun-
—
BOILED APPLE PUDDING.
164
shine
111,
;
— work and
and
filled the
Why,
"
sunshine always go so blessedly together
room up with
this is the pleasantest
— poured
and glory.
life
room
in all
your house
!
" said
Miss
Elizabeth.
"
That
is
just
what Ruth said
it
would be when we turned
it
into a
kitchen," said Barbara.
" You don't mean that this is really your kitchen "
" I don't think we are quite sure what it is," replied Barbara, laugh"
either dine in our kitchen, or kitch in our dining-room
ing.
and I don't believe we have found out yet which it is."
" You are wonderful people "
" You ought to have belonged to the army, and lived in quarters,"
" Only you would have made your rooms so
said Mrs. Pennington.
bewitching, you would have been always getting turned out."
" Turned out ? "
" Yes
by the ranking family. That is the way they do. The
major turns out the captain, and the colonel the major. There's no
rest for the sole of your foot till you're a general."
Mrs. Holabird set her bowl on the table, and poured in the icewater. Then the golden dust, turned and cut lightly by the chopper,
gathered into a tender, mellow mass, and she lifted it out upon the
board. She shook out the scalded cloth, spread it upon the emptied
bowl, sprinkled it snowy thick with flour, rolled out the crust with a
Barfree quick movement, and laid it on into the curve of the basin.
bara brought the apples, cut up in white, fresh slices, and slid them
into the round.
Mrs. Holabird folded over the edges, gathered up
the linen cloth in her hands, tied it tightly with a string, and Barbara
disappeared with it behind the damask screen, where a puff of steam
went up in a minute that told the pudding was in. Then Mrs. Holabird went into the pantry-closet and washed her hands, that never
really came to need more than a finger-bowl could do for them, and
Barbara carried after her the board and its etceteras, and the red
cloth was drawn on again, and there was nothing but a low, comfortable bubble in the chimney-corner to tell of housewifery or dinner.
" I am afraid
" I wish it had lasted longer," said Miss Elizabeth.
Girls: Mrs. A. D. T.
I shall feel like company again now."
Whitney. Houghton, Mifflin, &° Co., Puds. {By per.)
!
We
!
;
We
Boiled Apple Pudding.
"
Make
a butter crust, or a suet one, using for a
moderate-sized pudding from three-quarters to one
pound
of flour,
tion.
Butter a basin, line
with the other ingredients
it
in propor-
with some of the paste
;
and cut the apples into slices, and fill
the basin with these add sugar to taste, flavor with
pare, core,
;
SPANISH FRUIT rUDDING.
lemon peel and
juice,
the edges together
pudding,
tie
it
out
it
;
pinch
over the
it
and put it into plenty of
Let it boil from one and a half
half hours, according to the size; then
two and a
turn
and cover with crust
flour the cloth, place
;
securely,
fast-boiling water.
to
l6$
the basin,
of
and send
to
it
table
quickly."
Spanish Fruit Pudding.
add a
Line a baking-dish with a light puff-paste
it with powdered sugar add a layer of sweet oranges sliced
next add a
strew over them a thin layer of sugar
layer of sliced bananas with sugar strewn over them.
;
layer of shredded pine-apple, and cover
;
;
;
full.
Cover the
and bake to a delicate
Puddings and Dainty Desserts Thomas
Repeat the process
until the dish is
dish with a light puff-paste,
—
brown.
J. Murrey.
:
White, Stokes,
&
Allen, Pubs.
Apple Dumplings.
Add
two cups sour milk one teacpoonful soda
cup butter or lard, flour enough
or,
to make dough a little stiffer than for biscuit
make a good baking-powder crust peel and core
roll out crust, place apples on dough, fill
apples
to
and one
of salt, half
;
;
;
cavity of each with sugar, incase each apple in coat-
ing of the crust, press edges tight together
(it is
nice
around each one), put into kettle of
boiling water slightly salted, boil half an hour, taking
care that the water covers the dumplings. They are
also very nice steamed.
to tie a cloth
To
dough
bake,
;
make
in
the same way, using a soft
place in a shallow pan, bake in a hot oven,
1
BROWN
66
BETTY.
—
Every-day Cookand serve with cream and sugar.
Book Miss Neill. Be /ford, Clarke, & Co., Puds.
:
(By per.)
holds that a man cannot have a pure mind who refuses
C
Grace before
apple-dumplings. I am not certain but he is right.
Meat: Charles Lamb.
—
Brown
Betty.
"Take one cup bread-crumbs, two cups chopped
sour apples, one-half cup sugar, one teaspoonful cin-
namon, two tablespoonfuls butter cut into small
bits.
Butter a deep dish, and put a layer of chopped apple
bottom sprinkle with sugar, a few bits of
and cinnamon cover with bread-crumbs, then
at the
;
butter,
;
more apple
;
proceed
in this
way
until the dish
is full,
Cover closely, and
having a layer of
steam three-quarters of an hour in a moderate oven,
Eat warm with
then uncover and brown quickly.
sugar and cream or sweet sauce. This is a cheap but
good pudding."
crumbs on
top.
Gateau des Pommes.
"Take
a few apples, boil
them with
as little water
and make them into apple-sauce then
add a pound and a half of sugar, and the juice of a
lemon boil all together till quite firm, and put it
Garnish it with almonds stuck over
into a mould.
it.
It will keep for months if allowed to remain in
as possible,
;
;
the mould."
Sunday Apple-Sauce.
Core and bake,
or eight apples.
filling
When
the holes with sugar, seven
very
soft,
mash them through
a sieve into a small pudding-dish
of a fresh lemon,
;
grate in the rind
and spread over the top the white
RICE MERINGUE.
1
67
one egg beaten with half a cup of sugar, and brown
From "Woman's Hour" Boston
Eat cold.
(By per?)
Globe.
Rice Meringue.
of
—
slightly.
One cup boiled rice, one large pint milk, two eggs,
one large cup sugar, one lemon. Boil the milk, stir
in the rice.
Beat yolks with one-third of the sugar,
then add to the milk and rice, and cook until thick
as soft custard. Take from the fire, and grate in rind
of lemon
pour into a buttered dish. Beat whites
with the rest of sugar, and add juice of lemon pour
;
;
over pudding, and brown.
Woman 's
"
From
A
delicious pudding.
Hour," Boston Globe.
—
{By perl)
Rogrod.
"It
fruits,
is
made
of the juice, in
equal parts, of two
— cherries and currants, or raspberries, — with
Thicken
and turn into moulds.
Serve with sugar, cream, and powdered cinnamon."
one-third water, and sugar to suit the taste.
with
rice, flour,
or sago
boil,
;
Rice Black-cap Pudding.
"Butter a pudding-basin, stick raisins or prunes
over the bottom, and pour into the centre a teacupful of dry rice, this quantity being sufficient for
all
a basin that will hold a pint of water.
and plunge
tightly over the basin,
water.
Boil for an hour,
when
it
it
Tie a cloth
into
boiling
will turn out a nice
shape, with the raisins or prunes covering the top of
the
rice,
which form the black
cap.
It
can be eaten
with sugar and butter, or sirup, or plain puddingsauce."
;
1
INDIAN-MEAL PUDDING.
68
Indian-Meal Pudding.
One cup
of yellow Indian meal,
one quart and a
cupful of milk, three eggs, half a cup of molasses,
one generous tablespoonful of butter, one teaspoonone pint of boiling water, half teaspoonful
each of cinnamon and mace.
Scald the salted meal
with the water.
Heat the milk in a farina-kettle
stir in the scalded meal, and boil, stirring often, for
half an hour.
Beat the eggs light put in the butter
and molasses, stirred together until they are several
shades lighter than at first add the spice lastly, the
batter from the farina-kettle, beaten in a little at a
time, until all the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated. Grease a pudding-dish pour in the mixture,
and bake, covered, in a steady oven, three-quarters of
an hour. Remove the lid, and brown. This is the
ful of salt,
;
;
;
;
genuine, old-fashioned New-England "Indian" pud-
Eat with sauce, or with cream and sugar. It
Marion Harland. The Post, Wash*
ington, D.C.
{By per)
ding.
is
very nice.
—
Florentine Pudding.
" Put a quart of milk into your pan,
let it
mix smoothly three tablespoonfuls
starch and a little cold milk add the yolks
a boil
;
;
come
to
of cornof three
eggs beaten, half a teacup of sugar flavor with vanilla, lemon, or any thing your fancy suggests
stir
into the scalding milk, continue stirring till the con;
;
sistency of starch (ready for use), then put into the
pan or dish you wish
to serve
in.
Beat the whites
of the eggs with a teacup of pulverized sugar
;
spread
BAKED CUSTARDS.
oven a few minutes,
Can be eaten with
good enough without. For a change you
over the top
place
;
the frosting
till
cream, or
is
l6o,
it
in the
pretty brown.
is
can bake in cups."
Baked Custards.
"
One
quart of milk, five eggs, one cup of sugar,
and a very
Season with nutmeg, or flavor
little salt.
with rosewater, or any essence preferred.
cups, and set
them
Fill the
into a tin of hot water, and bake
the custards in a moderate oven.
When
you think
they are done, try them with the handle of a teaspoon
inserted at the edge, as they are spoiled by over-baking.
Some
persons like blanched almonds cut very
fine in the custard.
of
If
added, use only a
little flavor
any other kind."
Amber Pudding.
"Put twelve ounces of finely powdered loaf-sugar,,
melt the
and a pound of butter, into a saucepan
then add the yolks of fifbutter, and mix both well
teen eggs well beaten, and as much candied orange,
;
:
beaten to a fine paste, as will add color and flavor.
Line the dish with paste for turning out, fill it up
with the above, lay a crust over the top, and bake in
a slow oven."
Bread Pudding.
"
Take one
pint of
bread-crumbs soaked
in
one
quart of sweet milk, one-half cup of white sugar,
two eggs beaten thoroughly, heaping teaspoonful of
butter, and salt to suit the taste half cup of raisins
stir well together, and bake."
;
;
—
I
ENGLISH TAPIOCA PUDDING.
JO
English Tapioca Pudding.
"One cup
of tapioca, three pints fresh milk, five
eggs, two spoonfuls of butter, one cup of sugar, half
pound
and cut
raisins seeded
of
in
half
half,
the
grated peel of one lemon.
"
Soak tapioca one hour in a pint of the milk, pour
and set in a pot of warm water, and bring to
into jar,
a
When
boil.
the tapioca
is
soft all through, turn
out to cool somewhat, while you
make the
custard.
Beat the eggs very light rub butter and sugar together mix all with the tapioca, the fruit last. Bake
;
;
one hour."
in buttered dish
Chocolate Pudding.
Add one ounce
of grated chocolate to a quart of
milk, boil thoroughly, flavor with vanilla
cool,
then
bake
in a buttered pudding-dish until
custard.
stir in
;
set aside to
the yolks of six eggs well beaten
it
Beat the whites of six eggs, with a
spoonful of powdered sugar, to a
over the top of the pudding
;
stiff
;
stiffens like
froth
;
table,
spread
return to the oven, and
brown quickly.
Puddings and Dainty Desserts:
Thomas J. Murrey.
White, Stokes, & Allen, Pubs.
Strawberry Shortcake.
One cup
powdered sugar, one tablespoonful of
three eggs, one rounded cup of prepared flour,
butter,
of
two tablespoonfuls
berries.
in the
flour.
Rub
of cream,
one generous quart
beaten yolks, the milk, the whites, at
Bake
of
the butter and sugar to a cream, whip
in three jelly-cake tins,
and
let
last
the
the cakes
COMPOTE OF GOOSEBERRIES.
lyl
Cut the berries into halves, and lay between them, sprinkling the strata with sugar. Sift
sugar on the topmost layer. Slice, and eat with cream.
Marion Harland. The Post, WasJiiugton, D. C.
get cold.
—
Doubtless
God might have made a better berry
Dr. Boteler.
God never did.
—
but, doubtless,
We
than the strawberry,
may well celebrate it with festivals and music. It has that
that shy, uncloying, provokindescribable quality of all first things,
ing, barbed sweetness.
It is born
It is eager and sanguine as youth.
of the copious dews, the fragrant nights, the tender skies, the plentiful
rains of the early season.
The singing of birds is in it, and the health
and frolic of lusty nature. It is the product of liquid May, touched
by the June sun.
Locusts and Wild Honey John Burroughs.
Houghton, Mifflin, 6° Co., Pubs. {By per.)
—
—
:
Compote
Choose a quart
of Gooseberries.
of large, sound, ripe, green goose-
berries (cost ten cents), remove the stems and tops,
throw them into boiling water for two minutes drain
them, let them lie three minutes in cold water con;
taining a tablespoonful of vinegar to restore their
Meantime
color,
and then drain them quite
make
a thick sirup by boiling one pound of sugar
(cost
dry.
twelve cents) with one pint of water.
As
soon
as the sirup has boiled about ten minutes, put in the
them gently until
gooseberries, and boil
just tender,
—
Then pour both fruit and sirup
an earthen or glass dish, cool, and use. The
Twentydish will cost less than twenty-five cents.
O. Judd
five-Cent Dinners Miss Juliet Corson.
{By per.)
Co., Pubs.
about ten minutes.
into
—
:
Blackberry Flummery.
"Stew
moderately sweetened with
mix a thickening of flour and water,
blackberries,
sugar, until soft
;
;;
;
HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING.
172
and
stir into
Continue stirring while
the berries.
it
whole becomes incorporated into a
mass just sufficiently thick to pour into moulds
boils,
until the
when
cold turn out for dessert.
milk or cream and sugar."
To be
eaten with
Black as Beauty's tresses,
Sweet as Love's caresses,
Darlings of the people, beloved of high and low
Dear to age and childhood,
Gleaming in the wildwood,
Peeping to the sunshine in every green hedgerow
Through
;
Berries of the bramble,
How I love to ramble
the shady valleys, and pluck you as I go
Blackberries
!
Charles Mackay.
:
Huckleberry Pudding.
One
pint of best Orleans molasses
a pinch of
one teaspoonful cloves, and one of cinnamon
one of soda dissolved in a teacupful of sweet milk
flour enough to make it the consistency of poundcake one quart of huckleberries boil two and a
Eat with cream and
half hours in a pudding-mould.
Presbyterian Cook-Book.
sugar, or pudding-sauce.
Dayton, O. (By per.)
salt
;
;
;
;
;
—
Roly-Poly.
Take one quart
roll
of flour
make good
;
biscuit crust
out one-half inch thick, and spread with any kind
of fruit, fresh or
not run out
and lay
to swell
it
;
;
preserved
fold so that the fruit will
it,
leaving room
around the pudding closely,
steam one or one and one-half hours
with boiled sauce.
Neill.
;
dip cloth into boiling water, and flour
;
serve
Every-day Cook-Book: Miss
Be/ford, Clarke,
&
Co.,
Pubs.
{By per)
ENGLISH CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING.
One pound
rants, well
of raisins, well stoned
washed
;
73
Plum Pudding.
English Christmas
"
1
;
one pound cur-
one-quarter pound suet, finely
chopped one-quarter pound flour, or bread finely
crumbled three ounces of sugar one ounce and a
;
;
half
;
lemon-peel,
grated
of
a
blade
of
mace, half
a small nutmeg, one teaspoonful of ginger
firmly,
;
six eggs,
work well together put into a cloth, tie
leaving room to swell, and boil not less than
well beaten
five hours.
;
;
It
should not be allowed to stop boiling."
Cup Plum Pudding.
Take one cup each
of
raisins,
bread-crumbs, suet, and sugar
raisins,
wash and dry the
;
currants,
flour,
stone and cut the
currants, chop the suet,
and mix all the above ingredients well together then
add two ounces of cut candied peel and citron, a
little mixed spice, salt, and ginger, say half a teaspoonful of each stir in four well-beaten eggs, and
milk enough to make the mixture so that the spoon
;
;
will
stand upright in
put in a mould
for three
and a
;
it
plunge
;
tie
it
it
loosely in a cloth, or
into boiling water, and boil
half hours.
— Boston Budget.
Molasses Sauce.
One
cupful of molasses, half a cupful of water, one
tablespoonful of butter, a
little
cinnamon or nutmeg
(about half a teaspoonful), one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt, three tablespoonfuls of vinegar.
all together for twenty minutes.
The juice
lemon can be used instead of the vinegar. This
Boil
of a
A PR1C0 T SA UCE.
174
sauce
is
for apple
nice
Cook-Book
:
or rice
Miss Parloa.
Estes
puddings.
&
— New
Lauriai, Pubs.
{By per.)
Fruit-Sirup Sauce.
One cup
fruit-sirup, one-half
cup sugar, one
spoonful corn-starch, one teaspoonful butter.
tea-
Use
the sirup from apricots, peaches, cherries, quinces,
or any fruit you prefer.
depend upon the acidity
The amount
starch with the sugar, add
Add
together five minutes.
less Cook-Book
butter
last.
all
— The Peer
Redding
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
:
corn-
the sirup, and boil
&
{By per.)
Pubs.
Co.,
of sugar will
Mix the
of the fruit.
Hard Sauce.
Beat to a cream a quarter of a pound of butter, add
gradually a quarter of a pound of sugar
very white
on
top.
;
add a
— The
little
Every-day Cook-Book
Belford, Clarke,
&
Co.,
;
beat
it
until
nutmeg
Miss Neill.
lemon-juice, or grate
Pubs.
:
{By per.)
Foaming Sauce
May
be made,
all
time before using.
but adding the hot water, a long
Cream
half a cupful of butter,
add to it one cupful of powdered sugar, then the unbeaten white of one egg, and any flavoring you choose.
When the time comes for serving, add slowly an
eighth of a cupful of boiling water then set the
bowl into another of hot water, and stir till the sauce
;
is
smooth, but not
oily,
— say about two
Public Ledger, PJiiladelphia.
{By per)
minutes.
—
plain run ding-sauce.
175
Plain Pudding- Sauce.
"To
three pints of boiling water, add, to thicken,
three tablespoonfuls of wheat-flour
a
little
cold water
of sugar, a
lump
;
mixed smooth
in
put in a tablespoonful, or more,
of butter,
and essence of lemon or
and
vanilla."
flavor with
nutmeg
CHAPTER
PIES
XV.
AND SMALL CAKES.
PIES
AND SMALL
CAKES.
Murrey's Pie-crust.
It is
to-day
our firm conviction, that the average pie of
the direct cause of more ill-nature and gen-
is
"cussedness
eral
" in
mankind than any thing
and that there lurks more
else,
downright dyspepsia
solid,
in a square inch of baker's pie than in all the other
The
dyspeptic-producing compounds known.
desire to see
upon the American table
more the receptacle
with puff-paste
almost as
so
we
is
for fruit, than a blending of fruit
soggy that lead would digest
When
easily.
pie
one that
is
a top
is
used, let
there
and so light and delicate that
"fairy footfalls " would break through it.
Sift together one quart of flour, a teaspoonful of
salt, and a tablespoonful of Horsford's baking-powder add gradually three gills of milk work to a
dough, divide into four parts, and roll out the desired
PudThis crust when eaten is not harmful.
size.
Thomas J. Murrey.
dings and Dainty Desserts
be but
of
little
it,
;
;
—
:
White, Stokes,
&
Allen, Pubs.
Flake Pie-crust.
"Take
one-half cup of lard to a pint of flour
rub
add water sufficient to make a dough
roll out, and spread with butter, dust
(not too stiff)
Rewith flour, fold over evenly, and roll out again.
folding
peat this several times (spreading with butter,
well together
;
;
179
;
I
RHUBARB
So
over,
and rolling out again).
as possible
ter
when
:
Keep your
use ice-water in mixing.
crust as cold
Pastry
is
bet-
on marble."
rolled out
Rhubarb
Take the tender
skin,
PIE.
Pie.
stalks of rhubarb, strip off the
and cut the stalks into thin
plates with pie-crust
;
then put
in
slices.
Line deep
the rhubarb, with
a thick layer of sugar to each layer of rhubarb
little
pies with a crust, press
it
;
a
Cover the
down tight upon the edge
grated lemon-peel improves the
pie.
and prick the crust with a fork, so that
the crust will not burst while baking, and let out the
Rhubarb-pies should be baked
juices of the pie.
about an hour, in a slow oven it will not do to bake
them quickly. Some cooks stew the rhubarb before
making it into pies, but it is not so good as when
American Home Cookused without stewing.
Book. Dick & Fitzgerald, Pubs. {By per.)
of the plate,
:
—
Green-Apple Pie.
Stew and
taste
;
strain
the apples, and sugar to your
grate the peel of a fresh lemon, or flavor with
rosewater.
Bake
in
a rich paste half an hour.
Godey's Lady's Book.
—
{By per.)
Dried-Apple Pie.
To
a pint of stewed dried apples, passed through
pint of sweet milk, three eggs,
and three large tablespoonfuls of sugar, beaten well
a
colander, add a
together as for custard.
Spice with a teaspoonful of
cinnamon, and half a teaspoonful
of
ground
cloves.
PEACH
PIES.
l8l
Bake with upper and under crusts.
Lizzie Strohm.
make two pies.
This quantity
—
will
Peach
Take good ripe
make a good short
Pies.
peaches, halve and stone them
and lay
;
your pie-plates
then add to
lay your peaches evenly to cover it
each moderate-sized pie about three spoonfuls of
crust,
it
in
;
;
white sugar, and a few drops of essence of lemon
or rose, and half a teacupful of water
bake
like other pies.
— Godey
Prune
"
Stew the prunes
the stones.
Fill
spice with a
until soft,
;
then
little
cool,
and remove
cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.
crust."
Pie.
ripe tomatoes, wash, peel,
fill
and
your dish with them, sweeten, and
Tomato
Take
cover,
;
Lady 's Book.
Pie.
Bake with upper and under
slices
's
and cut
in thin
a pie-dish lined with good paste with
them sprinkle well with sugar, and sift a little
cinnamon and grated nutmeg over add two tea;
;
spoonfuls
of
vinegar, and
one
cover with crust, and bake.
Pumpkin
of
lemon-essence
Lulie Strohm.
Pie.
Wash, cut into halves, and slice a yellow " Yankee
pumpkin " scrape out the seeds and the stringy por;
tions lying next to them, peel,
steamer over a pot
and lay the
of boiling water.
be easily pierced by a fork, take
slices in a
When
off,
they can
and,
after
1
SQUASH
82
PIE.
emptying the pot of its water, turn the pumpkin into
and set back on to a moderate fire leave it uncovered, and stir frequently to prevent scorching, until
it seems quite dry, which should be in about fifteen
minutes while hot, press it through a coarse sieve
Now to one pint of pumpkin
with a potato-masher.
take three eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separit,
;
;
ately
into the yolks stir a small teacup of soft light-
;
sugar, half a teaspoonful of cinnamon, and a
brown
grate or two of
nutmeg
;
if
ginger
a flavoring, a very scant teaspoonful
preferred as
is
may be
used, and
Stir this to a cream, mix
half a teaspoonful of salt.
with the pumpkin, and add a quart of milk beat the
;
whites of the eggs, and
not have the crust
too
short,
else
there will be
trouble in getting the pie from the pan.
thin,
bake well
in the bottom,
oven when the pie
result in a
— Commercial Gazette,
Ah
Roll quite,
and remove from the
This will
the centre.
firm in
pie " fit to set before the king."
is
pumpkin
Do
stir all well together.
Cincinnati, O.
{By per.)
on Thanksgiving Day, when from East and from West,
South, come the pilgrim and guest,
When the gray-haired New-Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip, and what brightens the eye,
What calls back the past, like the rich pumpkin pie ?
!
From North and from
The Pumpkin
:
J. G. Whittier.
{By per. Houghton,
Mifflin,
&
Co.)
Squash Pie.
"
One cup stewed squash, one-half cup of sugar,
two eggs, and milk enough to fill pie-plate. First
line pie-plate with crust, then beat eggs and sugar
CUSTARD
PIE.
183
-
together, adding squash and milk.
Season with
namon, nutmeg, and
the taste.
till
allspice, to suit
cin-
Bake
well done."
Custard Pie.
"Take
three eggs beaten thoroughly, two heap-
ing tablespoonfuls of white sugar, one pint of milk,
nutmeg
and a
to suit the taste,
little
salt
;
stir all
together, adding the eggs last."
Cream
Pies.
" Make the crust as usual, and spread on the tins.
For each pie take one-half cup of pulverized sugar
and nearly as much of sifted flour rub together dry,
and spread over the crust. (It is quite essential that
the flour and sugar should be well mixed before
;
uniting with the cream, as
Pour over
to lumps.)
it
it
prevents
one cup
all
possibility
of sour cream,
and
a few spoonfuls of sour or loppered milk, stir gently
into the flour
and sugar.
and bake
quick oven.
in
iron grate in the
Grate over a
It
is
little
nutmeg,
better to place an
oven under the
liable to 'run over' if too hot at the
pies, as
bottom.
they are
These
good demand. If sweet cream is
used, no milk should be added.
They should always
be eaten fresh, but are good cold or warm."
pies are always in
Cocoanut Pies.
One cocoanut grated, four eggs, one-half cup butter,
two and one-half cups sugar, one pint milk. If the
desiccated cocoanut is used, take two and one-half
" Wocups, and soak in milk two or three hours.
man 's Hour," Sunday Globe, Boston, Mass. (By per)
—
1
LEMON
84
Lemon
"Take
PIE.
Pie.
No.
and grated rind
juice
i.
of
one lemon;
stir
together with three-fourths of a cup of white sugar
and one cup
water
of
;
lastly, stir in
four eggs, well
of two for frosting.
and bake. For frosting beat the
whites of two eggs reserved, to a stiff froth, with a
spread over the
tablespoonful of powdered sugar
top evenly, and return to oven until slightly
browned."
beaten, reserving the whites
Fill
into crust,
;
Lemon
"
No.
2.
To one lemon
ful of sugar,
the sugar.
cut in thin slices, add one teacup
and a tablespoonful of flour mixed with
Fill up with water, a'nd bake slowly."
Orange
"
Pie.
One orange
Bake
1.
two eggs well beaten, sugar to
as custard."
Orange Pie.
"Make
No.
grated, five crackers rolled fine, a
pint of sweet milk,
sweeten.
Pie.
No.
2.
a cake of one and a half cups of sugar,
one-half cup of butter, two-thirds of a cup of milk,
two cups
of
flour,
three eggs
;
one teaspoonf ul of
cream-tartar in the flour, one-half teaspoonful of soda
in the milk.
Flavor with the juice and grated rind
it in low tins as for Washington
add the juice of two oranges, and
the grated rind of one orange, mixed with sufficient
granulated sugar to thicken and sweeten it spread
of
an orange.
pie.
When
Bake
cool,
;
this like jelly
between the layers
of the cake.
Frost,
RAISIN
if
you
PIE.
185
with the white of one egg, a small cup
and flavor with orange."
like,
of sugar,
Raisin Pie.
"One
lemon, juice and yellow rind; one cup of
one cup water, one cup rolled crackers, one
cup of sugar. Stone the raisins, and boil in water to
raisins,
soften."
Mincemeat without Brandy.
pounds of beef from the shoulder, and
few moments so as to seal up the pores
of the meat; then more slowly until quite tender,
Allow it to simmer down
salting as if for table use.
Take
six
boil fast for a
as dry as possible without scorching, thereby saving
all
the juice of the meat.
clone,
It
use the liquor which
must be
every pint of
is left,
cold
perfectly
not successfully
If this is
in the
mincemeat.
To
chopping.
before
meat take three cups
of
chopped
the pies are preferred cold, use, instead
apple.
If
of suet,
two pints
of
melted butter
;
otherwise, one-
and one pound of finely
the juice of three lemons
half the quantity of butter
chopped suet
will
do
;
three pints of brown
;
sugar
(if
this
quantity does
not sweeten sufficiently, add cautiously to suit the
taste)
;
them
three pounds of raisins, the largest of
cut in two and seeded
;
two pounds
of well-washed
two gallons of sweet cider (if it has fermented, add another half-gallon, and boil in a grantwo
ite or porcelain kettle an hour and a half)
currants
;
;
heaping teaspoonfuls
of
cinnamon, one level spoonful
each of cloves and pepper, two small nutmegs, and,
1
EDITOR'S DOUGHNUTS.
86
if
It
citron
is
pound cut
liked, one-half
into small pieces.
should be mixed one day at least before using, and
keep two weeks
will
weather
in cold
they can be added
liked,
much.
:
or
;
may be
it
more spices are
better not enough than too
heated thoroughly and canned.
If
— Commercial Gazette, Cincinnati,
O.
(By per.)
was happy to find my old friend, minced-pie, in the retinue of the
and finding him to be perfectly orthodox, and that I need not
be ashamed of my predilection, I greeted him with all the warmth
wherewith we usually greet an old and very genteel acquaintance.
The Sketch-Book Christmas Eve Washington Irving. {By per.
G. P. Putnam's Sons.)
I
feast
;
—
:
:
Editor's Doughnuts.
"
One cup
spoonful
of
sugar, one of
of
buttermilk, one tea-
soda dissolved in the milk, one egg,
tablespoonful of lard, one-fourth of a nutmeg, and a
cinnamon flour to make stiff enough to roll.
Cut in shapes, and drop into boiling lard when taken
out and partly cool, clip in powdered sugar."
little
;
;
Crullers.
"One cup
of butter,
of sugar,
two and
two eggs, one large spoonful
a half spoonfuls baking-powder,
flour sufficient to roll, flavor to taste.
Fry
as dough-
nuts."
Sour-Cream Cookies.
"
One cup
of sour cream,
one cup of sugar, two
eggs, one teaspoonful (not heaping) of soda, a
salt,
and
flour
enough
to
make
with caraway-seeds."
a soft
dough
;
little
flavor
•
Jumbles.
"
One cup
two cups of sugar, one cup
one teaspoonful soda, six cups
of butter,
of milk, four eggs,
GINGER-SArAPS.
1
87
nutmeg. Roll them out, cut them with
and a wine-glass to form a ring dust over
with the white of an egg, and sift on a little sugar
Hour, a
little
a tumbler
;
before baking."
Ginger-Snaps.
"
One
pint of molasses, one-half
pound sugar, two
tablespoonfuls ginger, one teaspoonful of cinnamon,
half
pound
Mix
of butter.
well,
and
roll thin."
Soft Gingerbread.
" Half pint of buttermilk, half pint molasses, half
teacup butter, teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot
water, one tablespoonful of ginger, teaspoonful cin-
namon, and
half a nutmeg-.
thick batter.
Bake
Stir in flour until
in square
it is
a
pans half an hour."
Ginger Horse-Cakes.
"
One
quart of
flour,
half of ginger,
one pint
of
best Orleans
sugar, tablespoonful and a
molasses, one cupful of
two small teaspoonfuls
of soda, half
a cupful of sour cream, and a heaping tablespoonful
of lard.
and then sprinkle the
add the sugar and molasses,
Sift the flour first,
ginger well through
it
;
putting in lastly the soda dissolved in the cream.
Obtain from a tinner a cutter shaped
like a horse, for
cutting out the cakes."
Rock Cakes.
Mix
well together four ounces each of butter and
add four ounces of wellwashed currants (cost three cents), one pound of
flour (cost four cents), and three eggs (cost three
sugar (cost twelve cents)
;
1
ROCK CAKES.
88
cents)
them
;
beat
all
these ingredients thoroughly
into little balls, or rocks, and
buttered baking-pan.
twenty-two cents.
Miss Juliet
Corson.
A
good supply
will cost
— Twenty-five-Cent
O.Judd
Co.,
;
roll
bake them on a
Pubs.
about
Dinners
{By per.)
:
CHAPTER
CAKES,
XVI.
DESSERTS, ICE-CREAMS, TEA,
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE.
CAKES, DESSERTS, ICE-CREAMS,
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE.
TEA,
THE PARTY.
Donald
and Dorry joined the merry line, wondering what was
about to happen
when, to their great surprise (ah, that sly Uncle
George, and that innocent Liddy !), the double doors leading into the
dining-room were flung open, and there, sparkling in the light of a
hundred wax candles, was a collation fit for Cinderella and all her
royal court.
name some
—
I shall not
attempt to describe
it,
for fear of forgetting
good things. Imagine what you will, and I do
believe there was something just like it, or quite as good, upon that
to
of the
table, so beautiful with its airy, fairy-like structures of
its jagged rock of ice where
candied fruits, frostings, and flowers
chickens and turtles, made of ice-cream, were resting on every peak
and cranny; its gold-tinted jellies, and its snowy temples. ... At
this very moment, Gory Danby, quite unconscious of the feast upstairs, was having his own private table in the kitchen.
Having grown
hungry for his usual supper of bread and milk, he had stolen in upon
Norah, and begged for it so charmingly, that she was unable to resist
him. Imagine his surprise when, drowsily taking his last mouthful,
he saw Fandy rush into the room with a plate of white grapes.
" Gory Danby " exclaimed that disgusted brother, " I'm 'shamed
of you!
What you stufrin' yourse'f with common supper for when
there's a party upstairs?
Splendid things, all made of sugar! Pull
off that bib now, an' come along "
Donald and Dorothy
Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge. Roberts Bros., Pubs. {By per.)
delightful
;
!
!
—
•
Angel Cake.
The whites
one and a half cupone cupful of pastry-flour,
measured after being sifted four times one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one of vanilla extract.
Sift the flour and cream of tartar together.
Beat
the whites to a stiff froth.
Beat the sugar into the
fuls of
of eleven eggs,
granulated sugar
;
;
191
;
SILVER CAKE.
I92
and
eggs,
add
and
seasoning
the
flour,
stirring
quickly and lightly.
Beat until ready to put the
mixture in the oven.
Use
a pan that has
when
at the top corners, so that
down on the
upside
the pan
little
is
legs
turned
table, after the baking, a current
under and over it. Bake for forty
minutes in a moderate oven. Do not grease the
pan.
New Cook-Book Miss Maria Parloa. Estes
& Lauriat, Pubs. {By per!)
of air will pass
—
:
Silver Cake.
The whites of five eggs, one cup of sugar, two
and one-half cups of flour, one-half cup of butter,
one-half cup of milk one teaspoonful of cream-tartar, and one-half teaspooonful of soda.
Mix the
butter and sugar together add the milk, then the
flour in which has been mixed the cream-tartar,
then the whites of the eggs then the soda, dissolved
in a little boiling water.
Presbyterian Cook-Book.
Dayton, 0. (By per.)
;
;
;
—
Gold Cake.
One cup
of flour,
eggs
;
of butter,
two cups
of sugar, three
cups
one-half a cup of milk, the yolks of five
one teaspoonful
spoonful of soda
Cook-Book.
;
of cream-tartar, one-half tea-
flavor to taste.
Dayton, O.
— Presbyterian
(By per.)
Marble Cake.
Light part Whites of seven eggs, three cups of
white sugar, one of butter, one of milk, four of flour
:
one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking-powder.
Dark part Yolks of seven eggs, two cupfuls of
:
HICKORY-NUT CAKE.
brown
1
93
one of butter, one of milk, one of
one tablespoonful of baking-powder, one of cinnamon, one of allspice, and one-half tablespoonful of cloves.
Put
some of the white mixture first into the pan, then
with a large spoon drop in some of the dark, altersugar,
Orleans molasses, and four of flour
nating until
all
and one small
Miss J. A. E.
is
used.
This
;
will
make one large
Cook-Book
cake. — Presbyterian
:
Hickory-Nut Cake.
"
One cup broken
hickory-nut meats, one and onecup sugar, one-half cup butter, two cups flour,
three-fourths cup sweet milk two teaspoonfuls baking-powder, and the whites of four eggs well beaten
flavor with vanilla.
Add the meats last."
half
;
Watermelon Cake.
White part
one
butter,
:
of
Two cups of sugar, one-half cup of
sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls of bak-
ing-powder, two and one-half cups of
flour,
and one
lemon.
Pink part
:
Made
the same as the white, except
use pink sugar (which can be bought at the confec-
and one-half pound of raisins.
Put the
Put the pink part all in the
centre of the pan, and the white on the outside.
Presbyterian Cook-Book Mrs. Graham.
tioners),
raisins in the sugar.
—
:
Pound Cake.
One pound
butter,
one
of sugar, three-quarters of a
of flour, nine
eggs
;
pound
of
a piece of sal-volatile
the size of a pea, dissolved in a teaspoonful of water.
jeclairs.
194
Beat butter and sugar to a cream
beaten separately, lastly the
Cook-Book Miss P.
:
;
then add the eggs
flour.
— Presbyterian
,
Eclairs.
Put in a saucepan half a pound of butter whisk
into it a quart of boiled milk, and add gradually one
pound of sifted flour, and a saltspoonful of salt. Stir
the milk briskly with a wooden spoon, while the flour
;
is
being added
;
allow the paste to stand on the range
some of its moisture then
add one egg at a time, beating thoroughly, until the
paste shows signs of becoming sticky instead of
being smooth.
a few minutes to evaporate
No
definite
number
of
;
eggs can be prescribed to
attain this result, as there
in flour
;
but from
five to
so
is
seven
will
much
difference
be sufficient to
produce the desired consistency.
Put the paste in
a funnel-shaped bag, having a tin tube in the small
end, and squeeze it out on a buttered pan, making
the eclair three or four inches long.
Then bake
these forms of light paste for about twenty minutes.
Prepare a cream as follows
dered sugar.
flour,
:
Put two quarts of
pound of powPut together a quarter of a pound of
milk on the range, and add to
it
and four eggs, and one
half a
vanilla-bean
;
beat
when
boils, add it to the flour
and eggs, and whisk lively. Set the mixture on the
range let it come to a boil, and pour it into a bowl
to become cold.
When cold, stir into this cream a
pint of whipped cream.
Cut the eclairs on the side, and fill them with the
cream. They may be served plain or with a covering"
thoroughly
;
;
the milk
LAD Y-FWGERS.
K)t,
chocolate, icing, or coffee fondant.
of
and Dainty Desserts
& Allen,
Stokes,
:
Thomas
— Puddings
J. Murrey.
White,
Pubs.
Lady- Fingers.
One cup
sugar, three tablespoons milk, one egg,
one teaspoon cream-tartar, three tablespoons melted
butter, nutmeg, one even teaspoon soda.
Mix with
powdered
Bake quickly.
flour to roll out thin, sprinkle
sugar over, and cut in long thin
— The Peerless
Cook-Book
strips.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
:
{By per.)
Sponge Cake.
"
One cup
No.
of pulverized sugar,
i.
one cup of
flour,
one-
third cup of sweet milk, three eggs, one teaspoonful
of
cream
of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda.
Beat
the whites and yolks of the eggs separately and thop
oughly
;
add the whites
last.
Mix, and bake in a
hot oven."
Sponge Cake.
"
One teacup
of flour,
No.
2.
one of pulverized sugar, tea-
spoonful of baking-powder, three eggs well beaten
flavor with essence."
Dried-Apple Cake.
Two
cups of sweet dried apples, soak over night,
and chop add two cups of molasses, and let it
simmer two hours when cold add one cup of sugar,
two eggs, one-half cup each of sour cream, sour milk,
and butter two teaspoonfuls of soda, four cups of
flour, four teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful
Exchange.
of cloves, and one nutmeg.
;
;
;
—
JELLY FRUIT CAKE.
196
Jelly Fruit Cake.
"Two cups of sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one
cup sweet milk, three cups of flour, three eggs, one
teaspoonful baking-powder.
Flavor with lemon.
Bake one-half of the above mixture in two pans.
To the remainder add one teaspoonful molasses, one
cup of raisins, one-half cup currants, and piece of
citron chopped fine.
Bake in two tins.
Put the
four layers together alternately with frosting and
jelly."
Jelly for Cake.
"
One
sieve,
quart of cranberries, and one pound of brown
Cook
sugar.
and
as for table use
;
then strain through
let jelly."
Black Cake.
One pound
one pound sugar, beaten to a
cream stir in twelve eggs, beaten well sift in one
pound flour; add three pounds stoned raisins, three
pounds cleaned currants, five nutmegs, one-half ounce
cinnamon, one teaspoonful cloves, one pound citron
cut in small thin slices these must be well mixed
bake in a moderate oven. This improves by keeping.
Peterson 's Magazine.
(By per.)
butter,
;
;
;
—
Cocoanut Cakes.
" Half
pound
of
pounded sugar
grated, put into a preserving-pan
Form
into cakes
;
to a large cocoanut
till
the sugar melts.
put on white paper.
They should
be well baked in a very cool oven, and when cooked
ought to be pure white."
.
MACAROONS.
1
97
Macaroons.
" Blanch
and beat half a pound of sweet almonds
mortar with a spoonful of water till quite fine,
gradually adding the whites of eight eggs, whisked
or beaten to a froth then mix in half a pound of
in a
;
Spread sheets
loaf-sugar finely powdered.
of white
paper on your baking-tin, and over that the proper
wafer-paper.
Lay the paste on
the size of a walnut, and
pieces
about
sugar over.
Bake
it
sift fine
in
and when cold
If you choose, you can
cut the wafer-paper round.
lay two or three almond-strips on the top of each
cake as they begin to bake."
carefully in a moderately hot oven,
Dents de Loup Biscuit.
Fold two sheets of paper lengthwise like a fan,
it, butter the paper, and spread it open.
Break into a pan two eggs, and mix with them four
then double
spoonfuls of powdered sugar, two of flour, and the
and when these are well
mixed together, add a quarter pound of melted butPour a spoonful of this preparation on the edge
ter.
grated rinds of two lemons
of the paper, guiding
ger
;
it
;
along the folds with your
fin-
take another spoonful, and do the same, leaving
a space between the folds, that they
in baking.
may
not touch
Sprinkle them with sugared anise-seed,
or any other spice preferred,
and bake them
in a
well-heated oven, and as soon as they are taken out,
shake them from the paper carefully, that they may
not break."
DOMINOES.
198
Dominoes.
Have any kind
Cut
thin sheet.
of sponge-cake,
this into small,
the frosting
make the
dipped
in
is
hard,
oblong pieces, the
draw the black
dots, with a small
melted
in a rather
Frost the top and sides of them.
shape of a domino.
When
baked
chocolate.
Miss Maria Parloa.
per)
Estes
lines,
and
brush that has been
— New
&
Cook-Book
Lauriat, Pubs.
:
{By
Bachelor Buttons.
These delicious little cakes are prepared by rubbing two ounces of butter into five ounces of flour
add five ounces of white sugar beat an egg with
;
half the sugar, then put
it
to the other ingredients
add almond flavoring according to taste. Roll them
in the hand about the size of a large nut, sprinkle
them with white sugar, and place them on tins with
They should be slightly baked.
buttered paper.
Godey 's Lady 's Book. {By per.)
—
Maids
of
Honor.
Make some new milk lukewarm, then
spoonful of rennet, and stir
cloth to get rid of the
whey
put in a
well through a cheese-
it
;
to half a
pound
of the
curd put six ounces of butter, four yolks of eggs, and
Mix all the ingredients
sugar and nutmeg to taste.
well
;
line patty-pans
with a puff paste,
the mixture, and bake in a quick oven.
cakes
may be
flavored with
son s Magazine.
{By per)
lemon
if
fill
them with
The
cheese-
desired. — Peter-
BOW-KNOTS.
199
Bow-Knots.
Cut thin puff-paste into half-inch strips, and shape
them on the baking-pan into the form of a double
bow-knot.
When
baked, put jelly on each loop of
— Boston Cook-Book
the bow.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
{By per)
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
:
Cupid's Wells.
Cut the rounds
ferent sizes
;
of puff-paste of three or four dif-
use the largest one for the bottom, and
cut the centres from the others, leaving the rims of
and put them on the whole round,
Bake, and fill with
The Boston Cook-Book Mrs. D. A. Lin-
different widths,
with the narrowest at the top.
jelly.
:
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
coln.
(By per.)
Rich Bride-Cake.
Take
four pounds of fine flour, dry
it
;
four pounds
and two
add six eggs to every pound
of flour
mace and nutmeg, half an ounce each,
pound them fine. Wash through several waters, and
cream
of sweet, fresh butter, beaten to a
pounds
of white sugar
;
;
;
pick clean, four pounds of currants
;
spread them on
a thickly folded cloth to dry; stone and chop four
pounds
two pounds of citron in slices
an inch thickness, and chop or cut in
slices one pound of almonds.
Beat the yolks of the
eggs with the sugar to a smooth paste beat the butter and flour together, and add them to the yolks and
sugar and, lastly, add the spices, and the whites of
the eggs beaten to a high froth.
Beat the cake mixture well together then stir into it, by degrees, the
of raisins, cut
of a quarter of
;
;
;
TWELFTH-NIGHT CAKE.
200
and almonds.
currants, citron, raisins,
Butter the
them with paper, and put the mixture two
Bake according to the depth
inches deep in each.
pans, line
of
the
oven.
cakes, three
or
four hours, in
— Godey's Lady's Book.
a
moderate
{By per. Ptib.)
Twelfth-Night Cake.
Take one cup
half of flour,
one
butter,
two
of sugar, three
and a
of milk, yolks of five eggs, whites
of three, three teaspoonfuls of
baking-powder, one of
orange-extract, one pea, one bean, one clove.
In making cake, as in every thing else,
Have
sary to have every thing ready.
it is
neces-
a round pan
Take sheets of unglazed
and butter them
cut a hole for the
with a tube in the middle.
white, paper,
;
and place in the pan, lining it thoroughly.
When the cake is done, it can be lifted out by this
Have butter, milk, and flour measured out,
paper.
and eggs broken and separated.
Mix the bakingpowder into the flour.
Then, in cold weather always fill the bowl in which
you are to mix cake, with hot water let it stand a
moment, and then pour out. This heats the bowl
enough to warm the butter, which must not be melted.
Mix with your hand, or a spoon, as you please you
will find it much easier to mix with the hand.
Rub the butter to a soft smooth cream, and add the
flour with the flavoring extract gradually.
Beat very
light.
Meanwhile have the eggs beaten, the whites
first, and then the yolks.
The butter and sugar must
till
very
light.
be rubbed together
Use a fine granutube,
;
;
lated sugar for this.
Add
the milk, a
little at
a time,
TWELFTH-NIGHT CAKE.
201
and rub and mix to keep it smooth. If the whole
cupful should be added at once, the mixture would be
separated into a whey-like substance, and the consequence would be a coarse-grained cake. If inclined
to separate, add a little flour to stop it.
In making cake, be sure to make it as quickly as
possible.
Add
the
flour,
beat up quickly
with the baking-powder
;
in
it,
and
then the well-beaten yolks, then
Scrape down with a knife
from the sides of the bowl, so there will be no hard
lumps in the cake. Pour the dough into the pan,
and set into the oven. Have a quick heat at first,
the whites beaten
stiff.
especially from the bottom.
fill
It
should rise so as to
the pan.
When the cake is done, and before it is frosted,
push into it on one side the pea, and on the other the
bean and the clove. Mark with a broom-straw, so
you will remember where you put these. Then ice
and decorate the loaf.
When the cake is cut, gentlemen must be served
from the side containing the clove and bean, and the
ladies from the side containing the pea, according to
the ancient custom.
the bean
is
The
clove represents the knave,
the king, and the pea
is
the queen.
Those to whom these fall in the cutting of the cake
must assume the characters represented by them for
This is an ancient English custom,
which has been revived of late years.
A wreath of angelica leaves and red cherries about
the edge is a pretty decoration, and in the centre
should be placed a tiny Christmas-tree.
Have little
the evening.
PLAIN FROSTING.
202
figures of a king, queen,
fectioner's, and place
and knave made
them on top
of
at a con-
the cake.
Mrs. Daniell: (No. 5) Boston Cooking School.
(By per.)
Boston Globe.
—
From
Plain Frosting.
Place the whites of one, two, or more eggs in a
Throw
bowl.
into
ized white sugar
sugar
;
the best.
is
them a tablespoonful of pulver"
known as " confectioner's
Beat with a wooden spoon, adding
that
sugar by the spoonful, and beating well between the
additions.
It is
impossible to state the exact amount
of sugar, as the size
much
;
and freshness
of
eggs vary so
but use about one cupful of sugar for one
white of an egg.
If,
when drawing
the end of a
knife-blade through the frosting on the back of a
spoon,
it
leaves a clean-cut line, consider the frosting
sufficiently beaten.
It is best to frost
first
cake while
it
.
is
warm.
Spread
over the cake a thin coating of the frosting, with
This fills the pores, and the heat
cake melts the sugar, causing the frosting to
Next put on with a spoon sufficling very securely.
cient to cover the cake, spreading evenly over the
whole surface. After smoothing, mark where it is
a long, thin knife.
of the
to be cut,
juice
is
and
set in a cool place to harden.
Lemon-
the nicest flavoring, making the frosting light,
and may be used to thin frosting which spreads too
stiff.
This may be kept a few days, if covered very
Mrs. Daniell: (No. 5) Boston
closely from the air.
Cooking School. From Bostofi Globe. (By per)
—
TO STONE RAISINS EASILY.
To
2C>3
stone Raisins easily.
Pour boiling water over them, letting them stand
moment to soften, then pour it
may then be easily pinched out at
a
giving an " extra twist " to the
The
off.
stones
the stem end by
— Public Ledger,
fruit.
Philadelphia.
Charlotte Russe.
Whip one
drain well
quart rich cream to a
on a nice
sieve.
scant pint of
make very
Cook over hot
milk add six eggs beaten very light
»weet
water
;
flavor high with
till it is
Cox's gelatine in a very
hot water.
vanilla.
When
lightly the gelatine
little
;
Soak one
a thick custard.
water, and
the custard
is
and
froth,
stiff
To one
full
ounce
warm
over
very cold, beat in
and the whipped cream.
Line
the bottom of your mould with buttered paper, the
sides with
sponge-cake or lady-fingers fastened
gether with the white of an egg.
cream
To
;
put in a cold place, or in
Fill
to-
with the
summer on
ice.
mould for a moment in hot
water.
In draining the whipped cream, all that drips
The Every-day Cookthrough can be re -whipped.
Book Miss Neill. {By per. Belford, Clarke, & Co.).
turn
out, dip the
—
:
Raspberry Blancmange.
Three pints raspberries, one ounce and a half
one pint cream, one-half pound loaf-sugar.
Put the fruit into an enamelled preserving-pan, and
bruise it a little with a wooden spoon, then set the
pan on the side of the fire where the juice may be
drawn slowly from the berries. Have the gelatine
gelatine,
FLOATING ISLAND.
204
soaked for an hour in half a cup of cold water.
strain the juice from the raspberries, and put
Then
it
the pan together with the sugar and the
into
gelatine,
and
let
the whole boil gently until the gela-
Add, very gradually, the cream,
Have ready a dampened mould,
pour the blancmange into it, and place it on the ice.
The
When set, it is ready to turn out and serve.
tine
is
dissolved.
stirring
it
in well.
—
Caterer.
{By per.)
Floating Island.
Put a quart of milk on to boil meanwhile beat to
froth the whites of four eggs, and when the
milk is just boiling put them in it, stir once or twice,
;
a
stiff
lift out.
Use a ladle with
may not be taken out with the
Have ready the yolks well beaten
and then immediately
holes
in,
that the milk
frothed whites.
;
add to them a tablespoonful of corn-starch mixed
smoothly with a little milk, and sweeten all to taste.
After removing the whites from the milk, put in the
yolks and corn-starch, and let all just come to
the boil.
Flavor with vanilla or any essence preferred.
Take off, and pour in a deep glass dish, and
place upon the top the frothed whites.
— Miss Lizzie
Strohm.
Lemon Snow.
Soak one ounce of gelatine (cost eight cents) in
one pint of cold water for half an hour peel the
yellow rind from three lemons (cost six cents), and
squeeze and strain their juice put the rind and juice
of the lemons into a saucepan with eight ounces of
loaf-sugar (cost eight cents), and stir until the sugar
;
;
ORANGE BASKETS.
205
and gelatine are quite dissolved pour it into a bowl,
and let it it cool, and begin to grow firm. Then add
the whites of three eggs (cost, three cents), and beat
Pile by the tablespoonful high in
to a stiff froth.
It is pretty and delicious,
the centre of a glass dish.
Twentyand costs only about twenty-five cents.
{By
per.)
Dinners
Miss
Corson.
five-Cent
Juliet
;
:
Orange Baskets.
Cut as many oranges as will be required, leaving
half the peel whole for the baskets, and a strip half
an inch wide for the handle. Remove the pulp and
Place
juice, and use the juice in making orange-jelly.
the baskets in a pan of broken ice to keep upright.
Fill with orange-jelly.
When ready to serve, put a
spoonful of tvJiipped cream over the jelly in each
Serve in a bed of orange or laurel leaves.
basket.
The Boston Cook-Book Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
—
:
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
{By per.)
Ambrosia.
" Peel
removing all
Cover a layer of orange
with sugar and grated cocoanut, and proceed in this
way until the dish is filled. Cover the top with the
sugar and cocoanut."
and cut up a dish
of oranges,
the tough skin and seeds.
Ice-Cream,
"
One
Lemon
or Vanilla.
quart of cream, one pint of milk, cup and
a half of sugar, flavor with large tablespoonful es-
sence of lemon or vanilla.
froth
;
freeze,
stir in
Beat the cream to a
the milk and sugar thoroughly
and pack
for
two hours."
;
flavor,
STRAWBERRY ICE-CREAM.
206
Strawberry Ice-Cream.
Sprinkle two cups of sugar over two quarts of
Mash them, and let them stand half
an hour, or until the sugar is dissolved and meanwhile prepare the ice, and pack the freezer.
Turn
strawberries.
;
the berries into a large square of cheese-cloth, placed
over a bowl, and squeeze as long as any juice or
Then empty
pulp will come.
left
the pulp and seeds
and pour on gradually
in the cloth into a pan,
about a pint of milk
the pulp
is
mix
;
well with the pulp, until
it
Squeeze again
There should be nothing left in
separated from the seeds.
until perfectly dry.
the cloth save a ball of seeds.
much cream
Add
to the juice as
you may have, from one cup to three
pints, and sugar to make it very sweet.
Freeze as
usual.
After tasting this, you will never want any
The Peerless Cookother strawberry ice-cream.
Book Mrs. D. A. Lincoln. Redding & Co., Pubs.
{By per.)
Peach Ice-Cream.
as
—
:
" Pare and cut in small pieces one dozen peaches,
or
more
if
desired,
of loaf-sugar.
them through a
of
and
When
boil
them with
half a
pound
reduced to a marmalade, press
fine sieve.
When
cool add one pint
cream, and a few drops of cochineal to give a
deeper peach-color.
quarters
of
fresh
Freeze.
Serve with halves or
peaches half frozen around the
cream."
Coffee Cream.
Take very
rich cream, beat
it
well,
very sweet with powdered loaf-sugar.
and sweeten
Prepare in the
CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM.
manner a decoction
best
must be very
flavor
but
it
is
clear
highly,
;
207
of very strong coffee
and freeze
;
will
it
be a darkish color,
— Peterson
nighly esteemed by gentlemen.
Magazine.
it
;
the cream to
stir sufficient into
's
{By per. )
Chocolate Ice-Cream.
Scrape up a quarter of a pound of Baker's chocolate, and dissolve it in a little water ; then add to it
one quart of fresh milk, and put it on the fire in a
stewpan to boil, stirring it all the time. Make a paste
of a tablespoonful of corn-starch
tity of cold
until
it
fifteen
and
a
milk
;
stir it into
and the same quan-
the chocolate, and boil
has well thickened, which should be in about
minutes
;
add two teacupfuls
teaspoonful
of
of white sugar,
vanilla-extract
;
when
thickened, remove the chocolate from the
well
and
add it to a quart of rich cream. Freeze as usual.
Virginia Cookery-Book Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith.
{By per.) Harper
Brothers, Pubs.
fire,
—
:
&
Tutti Frutti.
One
gallon of cream, one can of peaches, one can
of apricots, six
lemons, six oranges, twelve bananas.
Chop the peaches and
apricots add the juice of the
lemons and oranges, with the pulp of three of each
whip the cream thoroughly, having first sweetened
it to your taste, and stir into the fruit.
Two pounds
will probably be about the quantity of sugar required.
Freeze all together to a paste then add the bananas,
cutting them up into quarter-inch slices with a silver
knife stir them in lightly with a silver spoon, and
;
;
;
SALTED ALMONDS.
208
complete the freezing. This quantity makes two galVirginia Cookery-Book Mrs.
when frozen.
lons
:
Mary Stuart
Harper
& Brothers,
Pubs.
(By
Shell the almonds, and blanch by throwing
them
Smith.
per.)
Salted Almonds.
into boiling water,
and leaving them there, covered,
for half an hour, or until the skins will slip off easily.
Skin, and spread
them out
to dry for several hours.
Put a good piece of butter into a hot dripping-pan,
and as it warms stir the almonds over and over in it
to coat them with the butter.
Set in the oven, and
them
Take them
roast, stirring
faintly.
of grease, spread
often until they begin to color
out,
shake
in a colander to rid
on a dish, and strew with fine dry
them about that each nut may have its
Eat cold. They are charmingly appetizing.
Avoid the dangers of getting the almonds too brown,
and, on the other hand, of putting them into the oven
before they are dry enough.
Brooklyn Times.
salt, stirring
share.
—
After-Dinner Croutons.
The hard
water-crackers being expensive in com-
have adopted the
them very
acceptable.
Cut sandwich-bread into slices onequarter of an inch thick
cut each slice into four
small triangles
dry them in the oven slowly until
they assume a delicate brownish tint, then serve
parison
with other crackers,
I
crispy croiUons as a substitute, and find
;
;
either hot or cold.
A
nice
way
to serve
them
is
to
spread a paste of part butter and part rich creamy
CANDIED CHERRIES.
may be added
cheese, to which
parsley.
2O9
a very
little
— Puddings and Dainty Desserts
J. Murrey.
White, Stokes,
&
:
minced
Thomas
Allen, Pubs.
Candied Cherries.
Choose a pound
leaf attached
;
of perfectly sound, ripe cherries
with the stalks and an occasional
(cost ten cents),
wipe them with a clean, dry,
soft cloth
dip the leaves and stems, but not the fruit, into boil-
ing vinegar, and set them, with the cherries upward,
a cardboard perforated with holes to
in
admit the
Meantime, boil a
stems, until the vinegar dries.
pound
loaf-sugar (cost about fifteen cents) with
of
a teaspoonful of cold water, using a thick, porcelainlined
the
skim
saucepan or copper sugar-boiler;
perfectly clear,
thumb and
and
way
test in the following
;
it
if
:
is
the sugar forms a
ready to use
;
if
it
little
thread between
does not, boil a few
When
minutes longer, and test again.
dip the leaves and branches into
it,
Keep
sugar at the boiling-point, and as soon as
clear,
brittle
the
forms
thread between the fingers
when
the cherries around
;
so
it,
moving
that the sugar completely
and dry them, placed as above
in the
cardboard frame, in the mouth of a cool oven.
Twenty-five-Cent Dinners
O.
Judd
Co.,
in
it
tested as above, dip the entire fruit into
covers them
ready,
is
it
and dry them
the cardboard frame as directed above.
a
in-
it
press the fingers together, and then draw
them apart
them,
Dip
forefinger into cold water, and then
quickly into the boiling sugar, withdrawing
stantly
until
:
Pubs.
(By per)
:
Miss Juliet
—
Corson.
ICED CURRANTS.
2IO
Iced Currants.
Beat the white of one egg (cost one cent) to a
mix it with three dessertspoonfuls of cold
water dip into it carefully some perfect bunches of
stiff froth,
;
and white currants, which can be bought
pound drain each bunch
a moment, and then dust it well with powdered
sugar lay each bunch carefully upon a large sheet
of white paper, so that there is plenty of room between the bunches, and set them in a cool, airy place
for five hours.
The sugar will partly crystallize upon
the fruit, and the effect will be very pretty.
The
ripe red
in season for ten cents a
;
;
cost of a good-sized dish will be about fifteen cents.
Twenty-five-Cent Dinners
O.
Judd
Co.,
Pubs.
:
Orange Water
Take
them in
Miss Juliet Corson.
{By per)
Ice.
many oranges
as will be necessary, cut
and press the juice from them take
the pulp carefully from the rind, and put it in a bowl,
pour a little boiling water on it, stir it well, and strain
it through a sieve
mix this with the orange-juice,
and stir in as much sugar as will make a rich sirup.
as
half,
;
;
If the
peel
oranges are
to
cream.
extract
fine,
the
rub some of the sugar on the
essence.
— Godey's Lady's Book.
Freeze
it
like
ice-
(By per)
Grape Sherbet.
Lay
a square of cheese-cloth over a bowl
a pound
;
put in
Concord grapes mash very thoroughly with a wooden masher. Squeeze out all the
of
ripe
;
TO
MAKE
TEA.
211
add an equal amount of cold water, the juice
one lemon, and sugar to make it very sweet.
Freeze as usual.
The Peerless Cook-Book Mrs.
D. A. Lincoln. Redding & Co., Pubs. {By per.)
juice
;
of
—
:
To make
Tea.
Put the tea in a perfectly clean and dry teapot ten
minutes or a quarter of an hour before it is required
warm both the pot and the tea by placing them in
the oven or before the
fire
boiling water, allow
to stand for five minutes,
ready.
it is
"
it
— Sayer.
;
then
fill
the teapot with
and
This method improves the fragrance of the tea
very considerably, slightly but pleasantly altering
the flavor
;
it
appears to act by removing any trace
of moisture or
dampness from the
tea,
and by devel-
oping the aromatic principle."
Iced Tea.
Make
the tea in the usual
cold on the leaves, but strain
way
it
;
do not
off at
let it
get
the end of ten
minutes after the boiling water is poured on, and set
In using it, put two or three lumps of
aside to cool.
sugar in a glass, half
the tea, and
a delicious
land.
fill it
with broken
stir rapidly until
and refreshing beverage.
The Post, Washington, D.C.
To
ice,
pour in
the sugar melts.
It is
Marion Har(By per.)
boil Coffee.
Grind a teacupful of coffee in the evening, and,
having first seen that your coffee-pot has been thoroughly cleansed and scalded, put in your ground
coffee,
CHOCOLATE.
212
with a
little
white of egg and a crushed egg-shell
if it
has not been already glazed with egg, and pour over
it
Cover
three pints of fresh, cold spring water.
excluding every particle of air
and
;
in the
up,
morning,
about half an hour before breakfast, set the pot on
the back part of the stove, and let it come to a boil
only just
By
when you
this
are ready to send
plan of infusion
it
to the table.
of the virtue in the
all
seems to be brought out. It is an admirable
Virginia Cookery-Book: Mrs. Mary
Harper & Brothers, Pubs. (By per.)
Stuart Smith.
coffee
method.
—
Chocolate.
Scrape fine an ounce (one of the small squares) of
Add two
or any other plain chocolate.
Baker's
tablespoonfuls of sugar, and put in a small saucepan
Stir over a hot
with a tablespoonful of hot water.
fire for
a minute or two, until
and glossy, and then
stir
it
it
all
is
perfectly
Mix
ing milk, or half milk and half water.
thor-
wanted
take twice as much chocolate, sugar, and
oughly, and serve at once.
richer,
smooth
into a quart of boil-
Made
water.
in
this
If
way,
the chocolate
chocolate
smooth, and free from oily particles.
to boil after the chocolate is
added
is
is
perfectly
If it is
allowed
to the milk,
—
it
New Cookbecomes oily, and loses its fine flavor.
Book Miss Maria Parloa. Estes & Lauriat, Pubs.
:
(By per.)
CHAPTER
XVII.
CONFECTIONERY.
CONFECTIONERY.
JESSIE'S BARGAINS.
—
When
which doubt-,
Uncle Feodorardo left this world of woes,
back upon with a sight that pierces the secret of the
he left a great gap in it for
storms and showers and sunshine of it,
What a blessing he was to child-kind, to be sure!
all the children.
And what a peculiar blessing to one mite out of that kind, Jessie by
less he looks
name
—
!
How this
little white mite would have kept alive at all, at one time,_
instead of dissolving back into her elements, if Uncle Feodorardo had
not taken her in hand, is one of those dark questions to be worked out
with chemical equations, lie reminded you, in the process, of those
Japanese jugglers who, with their fans, keep butterflies fluttering on
the air around them, which, if the fan ceased and they fell to the
ground, would be merely the original atoms of torn white paper again.
For the changeling was so slight a thing that you could see the sun
shine through her hand, and they had threatened to hang her up in
the window for a transparency; and she was finally allowed to run
wild, in hopes that she might lose her blanched, house-plant look, and
get a little of the vigor of the out-door weeds.
no uncle of
It was with this end in view that Uncle Feodorardo,
hers, by the by, any more than of all the little people in town, but an
exile who had been adopted into every body's heart in the new home,
— would entice the flaxen-haired piece of mischief into his garden
'.cross the way, and, giving her a little spade, would set her to digging anywhere in the warm brown earth. " She is our mother," said
When we are peakare made of her dust.
Uncle Feodorardo. "
He offered Jessie wages for the work
ing, her touch is our best cure."
she was to do with her little spade,
wages quite as large as Uncle
Feodorardo could afford, for he earned his own livelihood from his
garden and, at any rate, quite the market-value of the work performed,
wages of a penny an hour, and which she was to claim when she
could conscientiously say she had delved sixty minutes. Sometimes it
took Jessie a whole week before she could honestly earn her penny,
for she had a thousand things in that garden to divert her, since Nature
arid Feodorardo together conspired to keep her active when she could
be drinking in health from all the winds that blew about her.
But when at last the penny was hers, no more garden-work, or play
She hied
It was business, serious business.
either, for that day.
away with it to the corner grocery and it was a weary forenoon to
the wretched clerk behind the counter there, who must 'have grown
to dread the sight of that little figure, if he did not regard its approach
as an expiation of his own peccadilloes among the cakes and sweet-
—
We
—
—
;
.
;
215
.
.
JESSIE'S BAA' GAINS.
2l6
meats. Jessie was not like those good children who put their pennies
She felt, perhaps, that there was a little heain the missionary-box.
then here at home that wanted the penny; and though she was any
thing but starved, yet, except on the rare occasions when she bought a
tiny china baby as naked as a pappoose, she always spent that penny for
bargain it was always,
a
her palate. But stingy with her bargain,
jury of her peers could not have declared her; for though she quarrelled and scuffled with her sisters, in the morning, for the wash-basin
or the towels, she always gave them a bit of her macaroon, or her tart,
crying a little bit if they took too big
or her plum, in the afternoon,
a bite.
She would begin her bargaining by pricing every thing in all the
jars deliberately, until at last the half-distracted clerk would cry,
" Now you know the price of every thing in this shop, see here
And
you can buy, or you can let it alone. The gibraltars are a cent apiece,
and
the
ginger-snaps.
and so are the barley-sugar sticks, and the apples,
And we don't sell white grapes by the cent's worth, nor guava-jelly.
And I sha'n't let you have a quince anyway, because it would give
you a colic, and your ma wouldn't like it ; and, besides, quinces are
two cents this year."
"How much is jujube-paste ?" Jessie would ask then, oblivious of
the slight to her dignity involved in the reference to colic.
" Well, you can have a stick of that for a cent."
"I don't know as I like jujube-paste," hesitatingly, and climbing
higher with her dangerous elbows on the show-case.
"Then what did you ask about it for?" the clerk would say tartly.
have it in all flavors," he would add, from mere habit. "Then
there's Jenny Lind chewing-gum," in a tone half-questioning, half-ad-
—
—
—
!
"We
vising.
" I like real gum better than that," is the reply.
" We're all out of spruce," teetering back and forth
and
on
his heels
toes.
" Haven't you any gum-drops ? " Jessie would ask.
" Oh, yes, plenty of those," snatching at relief.
" How many "
" Six for a cent," plainly and emphatically.
" I don't think that's quite enough," gently, but full as decidedly.
" Very well.
That's the best we can do for you," taking out his
—
pocket-comb now, and soothing his mind by its use.
" Do you ever sell a piece of an apple ?"
" Good gracious
I'll give you a bite," cries the clerk desper!
ately.
" Oh, no,"
she answers sweetly ; " I don't want you to give me any
thing.
I'm not begging, I'm buying," grand as a little archduchess.
" Well, then, what will you have ? " he demands, leaning over the
counter in a state of exhaustion.
" I suppose, though, you don't throw any thing in when people
buy ? " she asks, slightly modifying her grandeur, as even archduchesses may.
" Not your sort," says this Bayard of the boxes.
" I didn't ask you to throw any thing in," indignantly.
supposed you
didn't."
" I said I
BARLEY SUGAR.
21
up !" cries her victim as a last resort. " What'll
I'm going to close, and go home to dinner."
" I guess, then, I'll take a cocoanut-cakc.
You said they were "
" A cent apiece.
Yes," with satisfaction at the prospect. And
then, as Jessie lays her little hand on the largest one, he is obliged to
remark, " But that size is three cents."
Sometimes Jessie withdrew with her cent at this point, outraged
and insulted, and made no purchase all that clay. But she carried the
cent to bed with her her first thought on waking in the morning was
concerning it her first act was to feel for it; it lay beside her breakfast-plate
and no sooner was she her own mistress again than she
returned, bright and early, to her charge, andj-enewed her haggling.
{By per.)
Jessie: Mrs. Harriet Prescott Spofford.
"Come,
time's
you take?
—
;
;
;
Barley Sugar.
One
pint of
two pounds
of
very strong barley-water, strained
rock -candy; lemon-juice to taste.
Boil without stirring then pour into buttered pans,
and score into long flat sticks. It is excellent.
The Unrivalled Cook-Book. (By per. Harper &
;
—
Brothers.)
Sugar a
Take a pound
la
Creme.
of maple-sugar, put
it
in a pan,
and
put the pan into another of boiling water, until
it
Then put
of
melts into a sirup.
in a half-teacupful
cream, and boil for ten minutes.
well-buttered dish
;
cut
it
Pour
it
out into a
into squares while cooling.
Public Ledger, Philadelphia.
(By per.)
Cocoanut Candy.
Equal quantities of white sugar and grated cocoanut add enough milk of the cocoanut to moisten
the sugar, and then put it on the fire to boil, stirring
almost constantly. When the candy begins to return
to sugar, stir in the cocoanut as quickly as possible,
and in a minute or two spread it on dishes to cool,
;
RED OR PINK COLORING.
21
marking
ciently.
If
you would
pokeberry-jelly
until
it
into
:
some
Mrs.
hardens
it
suffi-
like a portion pink, stir a little
of
the candy while hot,
has acquired the tint you
Cookery-Book
&
squares to cut after
in
it off
Mary
like.
— Virginia
Harper
Stuart Smith.
(By per.)
Brothers, Pubs.
Red
or Pink Coloring.
Gather pokeberries just before frost falls express
it drip clear through a flannel or
thin muslin bag; to one pint of juice allow threeboil rapidly
quarters of a pound of white sugar
and
away
in a small
minutes,
put
twent}^
together for
This quantity will last an ordinary
glass jar for use.
family for a whole year, and be found very useful
Virginia Cookery-Book:
in ornamental cookery.
Harper & Brothers, Puds.
Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith.
(By per.)
Ginger or Cinnamon Tablet.
;
the juice, and let
;
"
Melt one pound of loaf-sugar or sugar-candy with
water over the fire, and put in one ounce
of pounded ginger or cinnamon, and keep stirring it
till it begins to rise into a froth, then pour into a dish
which has been first rubbed with a little butter before it hardens, cut it into the size and shape you
approve of for table."
a
little
;
Chocolate Caramels.
Take
half a pint of rich milk,
a porcelain kettle
;
scrape
down
and put
it
to boil in
a square and a half
it into a very clean tin cup, and set
on the top of a stove till it becomes soft. Let the
milk boil up twice, then add gradually the chocolate,
of chocolate, put
it
VANILLA TOFFEE.
2IO,
both over the fire till thoroughly mixed and
from lumps. Stir in half a pint of the best
white sugar powdered, and four large tablespoonfuls
Let the whole boil fast and constantly
of molasses.
(so as to bubble), for at least one hour or more, till
When all is clone, add
it is nearly as stiff as mush.
a small teaspoonful of essence of vanilla, and transfer
the mixture to shallow tin pans slightly greased with
very nice sweet oil. Set it on ice, or in a very cool
and
stir
free
place, and, while yet soft,
mark
with a very sharp knife.
When
squares apart.
— Godey
's
deeply in squares
it
quite hard, cut the
Lady 's Book.
(By per. Pub.)
Vanilla Toffee.
Put one-quarter of a pound of butter at the bottom
of the saucepan, then put in one pound of sugar and
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Leave it to soak one
night.
If it looks too dry in the morning, add a
Then put it on the fire, and
little more vinegar.
When you think it likely to be
boil, not stirring it.
done, stick a knife into the middle of
and
into a cup of cold water,
clone.
Just before
of essence
all
it
's
Magazine.
it
it,
and drop
bites crisp
it
it
is
done, drop in a teaspoonful
Then pour
of vanilla.
over a buttered
Peterson
is
if
the toffee thinly
and it will soon be
(By per)
tin,
cold.
—
Stuffed Dates.
Remove
the stones from a pound of fine dates
(cost ten cents),
Remove
by cutting them open
at
one
side.
the shells and skins from half a pound of
almonds (cost ten cents) the skins can easily be
rubbed off by first pouring boiling water on the
;
CREAMED WALNUTS.
220
almond kernels
replace the date-stones with the
almonds, and arrange the dates neatly on a shallow
dish dust a little powdered sugar over them, and
keep them in a cool, dry place till ready to use. The
Twenty-fivedish will cost twenty-three cents.
Cent Dinners: Miss Juliet Corson. {By per)
;
;
—
Creamed Walnuts.
The white
one egg, and an equal amount of cold
Beat
water, one teaspoonful of lemon or vanilla.
until thoroughly mixed
then beat in confectioner's
sugar, sifted, until the dough is stiff enough to
mould.
Break off pieces the size of a nutmeg, roll
them till smooth and round. Press the halved walnut-meats on each side, letting the cream show
slightly between the meats.
One egg will require
The Peerabout a pound and a quarter of sugar.
(By per)
less Cook-Book Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
of
;
—
:
Walnut
Taffy.
Boil half a pint of molasses until
it
crisps
when
dropped into water stir into it one pint of walnutkernels, and let it cook about ten minutes on a slow
;
fire,
stirring constantly.
Then
teaspoonful of soda, stirring
out into a well-greased pan.
it
put in a quarter of a
thoroughly
Pour
in.
— Miss Lulie StroJim.
Peanut Candy.
"Boil together one pint of molasses, one
brown sugar, and two ounces
is growing thick, add one pint
peanuts
pour
it
;
of butter.
of
gill
When
of
this
parched and shelled
then boil the whole fifteen minutes, and
into a shallow dish to cool
and harden."
CHAPTER
XVIII.
COOKERY FOR THE
SICK.
COOKERY FOR THE
Bobtail. — " By the by, Bobtail,
SICK.
Wagtail to
I ought to apologize
for not having congratulated you on the fortune that you have just
stepped into."
" That my precious Betsy has just stepped into, you mean."
Bobtail.
" True ; rather odd, eh ? "
Wagtail.
" Odd
Bobtail.
" Queer
Wagtail.
umph "
" Queer
Bobtail.
what ? "
" Why, that old Brown, who was no sort of relation to
Wagtail.
Mrs. Bobtail, should have left the money to her, and not to you.
—
—
—
—
—
!
—
—
—
Eh, eh?"
!
—
Bobtail.
" Not at all odd, Mr. Wagtail neither is it queer, Mr.
Wagtail
/ never paid Brown any attention my precious Betsy did.
/ never took him up a basin of broth, or gruel, or arrowroot, in all
my life. Now, my precious Betsy was constantly brothing him, and
consequently Brown, very
gruelling him, and arrow-rooting him,
properly, appreciated her kindness and attentions."
My Precious
Betsy J. M. Morton.
;
:
!
—
—
:
Mutton Broth.
Boil a piece of
bone
mutton
until
it
then strain the broth, and
;
will fall
let it
from the
get cold, so
which must be taken off then
warm the liquor, and put in a little salt. Swelled
rice or barley may be added to it.
Veal or chicken
broth is made in the same way.
Presbyterian
Cook-Book. Dayton, O. {By per)
that the fat will rise,
;
—
Beef Tea.
Cut
lay
half
water
a
pound
of lean fresh beef into slices,
and pour over it a pint of boiling
cover the dish, and let it stand half an hour
in a dish,
it
;
223
A NOURISHING OMELET.
224
by the
salt it
then just boil it up, pour it off
Godey 's Lady 's Book.
a very little.
fire,
—
and
clear,
{By per.
Pub)
A
Nourishing Omelet.
Dissolve a saltspoon of beef-extract in half a cup of
stir into it half a cup of the crusts
hot water, and
of
whole-wheat bread rolled
Let them soak
fine.
over the teakettle while you beat the yolks and
Stir the soaked crumbs into
whites of two eggs.
the yolks, add a dash of
whites in lightly.
pan.
salt
Cook
and pepper, then
— The
L incoln.
the
Garnish with
Fold, and invert on a hot dish.
parsley.
stir
in a hot, buttered omelet-
Peerless Cook-Book
:
Mrs. D. A.
{By per.
Gruel.
"One
large
tablespoonful of fine Indian or oat
mixed smooth with cold water, and a saltspoon of salt pour upon this a pint of boiling water,
turn into a saucepan, and boil gently for nearly an
Stir it frequently, and thin with boiling wate-,hour.
When done, and cool enough,
if becoming too thick.
serve with sugar and a little new milk or cream.
Raisins boiled in gruel improve it."
meal,
;
Arrowroot.
Mix a
dessert-spoonful of arrowroot with a
little
and
becomes quite
add a little
clear, keeping it stirred all the time
sugar.
When milk may be taken, it is very good
made in the same way with milk instead of water,
cold water
pour
it
;
have ready boiling water
upon the arrowroot
until
in a kettle,
it
;
GROUND-RICE MILK.
225
a dessert-spoonful of arrowroot, and half a pint of
milk add a small bit
Magazine. {By per)
;
of lemon-peel.
— Arthur s Home
Ground-Rice Milk.
ground rice,
smooth, with one pint and a half of
cinnamon, lemon-peel, and nutmeg.
nearly done.
Godey's Lady's Book.
Boil one spoonful of
—
rubbed down
milk, a bit of
Sweeten when
(By per.)
Flour Caudle.
Take a
large
smoothly with a
Stir
it
of flour, mix very
and a pinch of salt.
tablespoonful
little
milk,
into a quart of boiling milk, stirring
it
very
and thoroughly to prevent burning or becoming "lumpy." Season it with grated nutmeg or
a little ground allspice.
carefully
(This caudle, or
call
it,
is
"pap"
as country people often
excellent in cases of diarrhoea.)
Panada.
two tablespoonfuls of
salt, and a little nutmeg enough boiling water to cover them well. Pile
the crackers in a bowl in layers, scatter the salt and
sugar and grated nutmeg among them.
Cover with
boiling water, and set on the hearth, with a close
"Six Boston crackers
split,
white sugar, a good pinch of
;
one hour.
The
crackers should be almost clear, and soft as jelly, but
not broken.
Eat from the bowl, with more sugar
sprinkled in if you wish it.
If properly made, this
panada is very nice."
top over the bowl,
for
at
least
MILK TOAST
226
Milk Toast
Take a couple
— that
crisp.
is,
(for invalids).
of slices of bread,
Take new milk
bit of butter (varying
and melt
{FOR INVALIDS).
well,
according to toast required),
a saucepan together.
in
and toast
or cream, also a
Then dip in the
a moment or two,
them soak for
on to a deep plate, and pour the remains of milk
and butter on top. Serve very hot add salt as
required.
New - York Herald.
slices of toast, let
lift
;
—
Irish-Moss Blancmange.
Pick over carefully one teacupful of Irish moss
wash
it first
times in fresh
of milk
;
;
put
it
it
in a tin bucket, with
;
several
one quart
cover closely, and set in a pot of boiling
Let
water.
then rinse
in saleratus-water,
stand until the milk begins to thicken,
it
then strain through a fine sieve, and sweeten with
powdered sugar flavor with lemon or vanilla. Wet
the mould in cold water, pour in the blancmange,
and set in a cool place. When quite firm, loosen the
edges from the mould, and turn out on a dish. To
be eaten with sugar and cream.
Presbyterian
Cook-Book. Dayton, O.
;
—
Calves'-Foot Jelly.
"Boil four nicely cleaned
calves'-feet
in
three
quarts of water, until reduced to one, very slowly
strain,
and
from the
away until cold
and remove the
set
top,
;
then take
off
the fat
jelly into a stew-pan,
avoiding the settlings, and adding half a pound of
white powdered sugar, the juice of two lemons, and
EGG MULLED IN TEA OR COFFEE.
the whites of two eggs, the latter to
Boil
parent.
away
trans-
it
together a few moments, and set
all
bowls or glasses
in
make
22J
;
it
excellent in a sick-
is
room."
Egg mulled
in
" Beat the yolk of an
coffee cup
pour on
it,
stirring
sufficient to
fill
all
little
If
the hot liquid
without stirring
will curdle, instead of uniting
valids are
recommended
as being light
fast,
well, in a tea or
milk or cream
;
then
the time, hot coffee or tea
the cup.
in too hastily, or
egg
it
or Coffee.
egg very
a
stir into it
;
Tea
it
is
poured
at the time, the
with the
tea.
In-
to try this mixture for break-
and nourishing, without being
heating."
Raspberry Vinegar.
To
four quarts red raspberries, put enough vinegar
them stand twenty-four hours scald
add a pound of sugar to one pint of
juice boil it twenty minutes, and bottle it is then
ready for use, and will keep years. To one glass of
water add a great spoonful. It is much relished by
and
and strain it
to cover,
let
;
;
;
;
— Every-day
the
sick.
Very
Miss
Neill.
Belford, Clarke,
nice.
&
Co.
Cook-Book
:
(By per.)
Apple Water.
"
One
large juicy pippin, the most finely flavored
you can get
;
the apple
very large.
is
three cups of cold water, one quart
but do not core
it.
if
Pare and quarter the apple,
Put
it
on the
fire
in a tin or
porcelain saucepan with the water, and boil, closely
covered, until the apple stews to pieces.
Strain the
BARLEY WATER.
228
liquor at once, pressing the apple hard in the cloth.
Strain this again through a finer bag, and set
to cool.
Sweeten with white sugar, and
away
ice
for
drinking."
Barley Water.
Put a large tablespoonful of well-washed pearlbarley into a pitcher pour over it boiling water
cover it, and let it remain till cold then drain off
;
;
'.he
water, sweeten to taste, and,
juice of a lemon,
Cook-Book
:
if
liked,
and grated nutmeg.
Miss NeilL Belford,
Clarke,
add the
Every-day
& Co., Pubs.
CHAPTER
HOME
XIX.
REMEDIES,
HOME
REMEDIES.
Herbs, too, she knew, and well of each could speak,
That in her garden sipped the silvery dew
Where no vain flower disclosed a gaudy streak
But herbs for use, and physic not a few,
Of gray renown, within those borders grew
The tufted Basil, pun-provoking Thyme,
Fresh Baum, and Marygold of cheerful hue
:
The lowly
And more
Gill, that
I fain
never dares to climb
sing, disdaining here to rhyme.
would
Yet Euphrasy may not be left unsung,
That gives dim eyes to wander leagues around
And pungent Radish, biting infant's tongue
And Plantain ribbed, that heals the reaper's wound;
And Marjoram sweet, in shepherd's posy found;
And Lavender, whose spikes of azure bloom
Shall be, erewhile, in arid bundles bound,
To lurk amidst the labors of her loom,
And crown her kerchiefs clean with mickle rare perfume.
William Shenstone.
Herb Teas.
Pour one cup
of the herbs.
water over one tablespoonful
Cover the bowl, set it over the tea-
of boiling
and steep ten minutes. Sweeten if desired.
Mullein tea is good for inflammation of the lungs
camomile tea, for sleeplessness calamus and catnip
kettle,
;
tea,
for colds
hemorrhages
;
and
cinnamon
tea,
for
watennelon-seed and pumpkin-seed
tea,
infant's colic
;
and summer-complaint. A few sprigs
and sorrel, half a lemon sliced,
and three pints of boiling water, sweetened to taste,
and covered closely until cold, make an agreeable
for strangury
of sage, burnet, balm,
231
PENNYROYAL
232
drink for a fever patient.
TEA.
— The Boston Cook-Book
:
(By
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
per.)
Pennyroyal Tea.
"The
virtues
of
this
old-fashioned
remedy are
vouched for in cholera years, by a correspondent,
who
says that the pennyroyal herb,
made
into a tea
most comforting and active
preventive that can be imagined when depressing
and drank
symptoms
hot, is the
set in."
Elder Tea.
"
Make
dried.
a strong tea of elder-flowers, either fresh or
Sweeten with honey.
This tea
as hot as possible, after the person
is
is
to be
warm
drunk
bed
in
produces a strong perspiration, and a slight cold or
cough yields to it immediately but the more stub-
it
;
Used in
born requires two or three repetitions.
Russia." This is an excellent remedy for colds attended with feverish symptoms and sore throat.
Slippery-Elm Tea.
Pour one cup
of slippery-elm
cool, strain,
This
is
of boiling
powder
and
water upon one teaspoonful
or a piece of the bark.
flavor with lemon-juice
soothing in any inflammation of
membrane.
— Boston Cook-Book
:
When
and sugar.
the mucous
Mrs. D. A. Lincoln.
Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
Flaxseed Lemonade.
Pour one quart of boiling water over four tablespoonStrain
fuls of whole flaxseed, and steep three hours.
CALAMUS CANDY.
233
and add the juice of two lemons.
if the liquid seems too thick.
Boston Cook-Book Mrs.
This is soothing in colds.
D. A. Lincoln. Roberts Brothers, Pubs.
(By per.)
and sweeten to
Add
a
little
taste,
more water
—
:
Calamus Candy.
"Two
cupfuls of small pieces of sliced root, an
eighth of an inch in thickness
;
cover with cold water,
and boil gradually then pour off the water, and add
a cup and a half of pulverized white sugar, with
water simmer long and slowly, stirring frequently
pour out in buttered pans.
In Turkey it is con;
;
;
sidered preventive of contagion."
And he felt new life in his sinews shoot,
As he drank the juice of the calamus-root;
And now he treads the fatal shore,
As fresh and vigorous as before.
The Culprit Fay: Joseph Hodman
Delightful
Drakt.
Cough Candy.
Break up a cupful of slippery-elm bark, and let it
in water poured over it in the measHalf fill a cup with flaxseed, and fill up
uring-cup.
to the brim with water, leaving it to soak the same
time as the slippery-elm. When you are ready to
make the candy, put one pound and a half of brown
sugar in a stew-pan over the fire pour the water
from the slippery-elm and flaxseed over it, straining
the last, and stir constantly until it boils and begins
to turn back to sugar then turn it out, and it will
break up into crumbly, small pieces. For preachers
or teachers who use their voices too much, it will
be found an admirable and agreeable medicine, the
soak for an hour
;
;
EXCELLENT COUGH MIXTURE.
234
taste being peculiarly pleasant.
mended
to
any one subject
It is
highly recom-
to throat affections.
The
Virginia
Cookery-Book Mrs. Mary Stuart Smith. Harper
& Brothers, Pubs. {By per.)
best flavor for
it
is
a
little
lemon-juice.
:
Excellent Cough Mixture.
Take a handful
water
;
pound
of hoarhound, boil in a quart of
add one pint
of
brown
of
Orleans molasses, and one
Boil to a thin sirup.
sugar.
Put
and add one tablespoonful of tar.
Shake while warm, until the tar is cut into small
beads. Dose
Take one tablespoonful whenever the
is
troublesome.
cough
Presbyterian Cook-Book, Day{
ton, O.
By per)
in a bottle,
all
:
Gargle for Sore Throat.
Make
a gargle of one teaspoonful of molasses, one
and one half-teaspoonful of cayenne-pepper.
Mix these with one teacupful of hot water. When
cool, add one quarter of a cup of cider-vinegar. ->
Presbyterian Cook-Book. {By per)
of salt,
Salve.
Four ounces of mutton-tallow, two of beeswax,
one of rosin, and one-half ounce of gum camphor.
Simmer well together take off the fire, and then
add one gill of alcohol. Good for all kinds of sores
and wounds.
Presbyterian Cook-Book
Mrs.
;
—
W.
C.
Two
jimson
:
Brown
Salve.
pounds of mutton-tallow, put in as many
(Jamestown weed) and plantain leaves as
BALSAM LINIMENT.
23$
fry until they crimp up, and then strain.
add about two tablespoonfuls of tar let it
boil up, then pour it into the vessel in which it is to
Presbyterian Cook-Book.
be kept, and let cool.
{By per.)
possible
To
;
this
;
—
Balsam Liniment.
"The
fruit
the balsam apple (momordica bal-
of
samina) picked when
is
ripe,
and preserved
considered very efficacious
applied
in alcohol,
to
a fresh
Bind a piece upon the wound or cut. In
Syria, the fruit is used for the same purpose that it
is here
but they cut it open when unripe, and infuse it in sweet oil, exposed to the sun for some days,
until the oil has become red.
This is dropped upon
cotton, and applied."
wound.
;
For a Gathering.
" Soak the leaves of
common
dock-plant in vinegar
apply warm, as often as possible."
Borage^
" This plant contains a certain
as
may be proved by burning
reason,
it
is
sore throats.
amount
a dried
of saltpetre,
leaf.
used with great benefit for the
The
root
is
rich in
gum, and
For
this
relief of
if
boiled
yields a mucilaginous emulsion, excellent for irrita-
and chest. Very violent attacks
of toothache, where the nerve has taken cold, are
often cured by holding a portion of the leaves, previously boiled in milk, and applied warm, in the
tion of the throat
mouth, against the affected tooth."
THIEVES' VINEGAR.
236
Thieves' Vinegar.
"Soak two ounces each of rue, sage, rosemary,
wormwood, for three days in one pint
lavender, and
of white-wine vinegar; stand at a short distance
from the fire. In each pint of vinegar, dissolve half
an ounce of camphor, and strain well. In cases of
infection, bathe the nostrils and around the mouth
with this preparation.
This powerful disinfectant
was used during the plague in London, by the thieves
who robbed the dead and dying hence its name."
:
Scent Sachets.
No.
1.
" Take of lavender-flowers, free from stalk, half a
pound dried thyme and mint, each half an ounce
ground cloves and caraways, of each a quarter of an
Mix the
ounce common salt dried, one ounce.
whole well together, and put into silk or cambric
It will perfume the drawers and linen very
bags.
;
;
;
nicely."
Scent Sachets.
No.
2.
" Coriander-seed one ounce, orris-root one ounce,
rose-leaves one ounce, mace one drachm, allspice one
drachm, lavender-flowers one ounce, sweet-flag {calamus aromaticus) one ounce."
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
PAGE
Almonds,
PAGE
208
Beef's Heart, to bake a
Ambrosia
205
Beefsteak, French
Angel Cake
191
Apple Butter
127
salted
"
165
"
Pudding, boiled..
164 Biscuit,
"
Sauce, for Goose.
"
Sunday
106
brown
149
drop
151
egg
15°
"
Naples
1
"
soda
151
"
flyaways, or souffle" 151
"
66
227
Arrowroot
224
Asparagus, to cook
31
Beets
166
Water
30
Pie
Dumplings
"
29
fried
"
"
52
.
96
50
Blanc-Mange, Irish moss. 226
Bachelor Buttons.
...
198
"
"
raspberry.. 203
Bacon and Eggs
45
Blackberry Flummery.
Baked Beans
50
Borage
"
Custards
169
.
171
235
Bouillabaisse, a Marseilles
Balsam Liniment
235
Barley Sugar
217
Bouillon
Water
228
Bow- Knots
6
receipt for
4
199
Bass, boiled
16
Bread
Beans, baked
50
"
aSrated
28
"
brown
31
"
corn
"
French
"
salt-rising
146
"
Vienna
144
"
string
Beef a
la
Mode
"
roast
"
Loaf
33
"
Stew or Hash
31
"
Tea
223
142
home-made
145
155
158
twist
Bride-Cake, rich
(237)
144
199
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
233
Brown
Betty.
166 Candied cherries
Bread
155
Broth, mutton
"
Bubble and Squeak
".
.
Buns
"
cocoanut
217
53
"
cough
233
147
"
peanut,
220
hot cross
148 Caramels, chocolate
"
saffron
148 Catsup,
"
red,
"
to stew a la
stewed
.
cauliflower
Cake angel
.
233
223
"
Cabbage, boiled
209
Candy, calamus
218
cucumber
117
"
grape
118
103
"
tomato, No.
103
"
tomato, No. 2
1
.
.
.
Caudle, flour
.
117
117
225
103
Celery, to stew
105
191
Charlotte Russe
203
"
black
196 Cheese, cottage
"
bride
199
"
cocoanut
196 Cherries, candied
"
dried-apple
195
Chestnut Puree
64
"
gold
19 2
Chicken, a
67
"
hickory-nut..
193
curry of
68
"
jelly, fruit
196
Fricassee of.
67
"
marble
192
jellied
69
"
pound
193
Pie
"
silver
192
"
"
sponge, No.
"
sponge, No. 2
195
"
twelfth-night
200
"
Caramels
218
"
watermelon
193
"
Pudding
170
Cakes, rock
"
oaten
1
195
90
88
Fritters
209
souffle of
69
with
potatoes
sweet
70
212
Chocolate
187 Chops, lamb
39
160 Chowder, clam
24
"
25
Calamus Candy
233
Calve's-Foot jelly
226
lobster
Clam Chowder
24
ALPHA BE TJCAL INDEX.
Clam Scallops
24 Currants, spiced
Clams, hard -shelled, to
boil
Cocoanut Candy
"
206 Dates, stuffed
"
to boil
211
Cold Slaw, cream dressing for
of Gooseberries 171
camp
75
198
Doughnuts, editor's
186
186 Dried Beef, frizzled
98 Drop-cakes,
Corn, sweet
33
hominy
158
158 Dumplings, apple
165
98 Duckling Pot Roast
66
mixture, excellent 234
Cranberries
Cream, coffee
"
197
Deer's Head, to cook in
103
Cookies, sour-cream
Cough
219
Dent de Loup Biscuit
218 Dominoes
Coloring, red or pink
Bread
169
49
Cream
Oysters
yy
217 Custards, baked
Codfish Balls
"
68
rabbit
Coffee
"
118
Curry, chicken
23
Compote
239
Dressing
21
220
n
Croutons
after dinner
.
.
.
208
"
stewed
Egg mulled
21
in
Tea or Cof227
fee
Eggs and bacon
45
"
fricasseed
87
(Poultry
"
frothed
88
Croquettes).
71
"
pickled
115
17
"
scrambled
87
186
"
soft boiled
87
de
Croquettes
"
194
94
Creamed Walnuts
"
64 Eclairs
206 Eels, fried
Salmon
Crullers
Cucumbers. ...
Cupid's Wells
Curds and Cream
Currants, iced
volatile
96 Egg-Plant
199
Pudding
89
210
..
107
English Christmas Plum
"
173
Tapioca Pudding 170
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
240
PAGE
20 Green Peas stewed with
Fish Jelly
"
20
scalloped
Flapjacks, corn-meal
..
158
.
Flaxseed Lemonade
232
Floating Island
204
Flounders, fried
19
Flour Caudle
Forcemeat,
225
to
make
Ham
and Lettuce
96
Green Turtle Steak (Epicurean)
15
Ground-Rice Milk
Grouse,
fillet
225
78
of
Gruel
224
Guinea Fowls, roast
a
good
71
21
French Toast
Fricaudeau a
152
Halibut,
35
Poulette
I'Oseille. ...
Fricassee of Squirrels
Fritters,
cheese
"
omelet
"
parsnep
"
pork
77
Ham,
88
"
87
106
fillets
of,
d la
18
to boil a
46
to broil
46
Herb Teas
231
Hominy Drop-Cakes
44 Huckleberry Pudding.
Frosting, plain
202
Frumenty
160
158
..
Ice-Cream, chocolate.
.
"
lemon or va-
"
peach
for Sore Throat. 234
"
strawberry
Gateau des Pommes
1
Gathering, for a
Gems
,
Giblet Pie
. .
.
,
66
172
207
205
nilla
Gargle
.
206
.
206
235
Iced Currants
210
145
Indian-Meal Pudding
168
70 Irish-Moss Blanc-mange. 226
Gingerbread, soft
187
Ginger Horse-Cakes
187
Jam, blackberry
128
187
"
crab-apple
129
65
"
gooseberry
128
Gooseberries, compote of. 171
"
raspberry
Grape Sherbet
"
rhubarb, No,
Ginger-snaps
Goose, to roast a
210
1
1
28
129
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
Jam, rhubarb, No. 2
"
strawberry
chicken
Jellied
Jelly,
,
129
Lobster,
127
"
241
chowder
25
sauce
26
69
.
apple
130
"
calve's-foot
226
Macaroni, baked
107
"
cider-apple
130
Macaroons
197
"
currant
131
Mackerel, broiled
"
elderberry
131
Maids of Honor
198
196
Mango, pickle
113
131
Marketing, hints for
"
for
"
grape
"
of
"
quince and apple.
"
Cake
Pig's
19
54
Marmalade, pine-apple.
Feet and
129
.
46 Mayonnaise
Ears
94
130
Meat Porcupine
54
red-haw
132
Melons
96
"
strawberry
132
Meringue, rice
"
Fruit-cake
196
Milk, ground-rice
.
.
Johnny-Cake
1
Jumbles
186
57
Mincemeat
167
225
without
Brandy
,
Molasses Sauce
173
Muffins, maize
Lady-Fingers
Lamb, breast
of,
195
with peas
38
"
158
fried
to roast. ..........
39 Mushrooms,
"
Chops
39
53
Lentils, boiled, plain
"Left-Overs,"
"
stewed
93
"
pickled
115
ate
Chou
95
,
.
Broth
53
"
34
of
stewed
37
223
Steaks
63
Pigs in Blankets "
Liver, ragout of
93
"
99 Mutton,
utilizing
the
" Little
fried
204 Mustard and Cress
Lemon Snow
56
159
"
Lamb's Head
1
rye
Mush,
185
37
shoulder
38
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
242
Nasturtiums,
to pickle
1
16
Peanut Candy
220
Pears, to preserve
1
24
Oaten Cakes
160 Peas, green
Omelet, a nourishing
224 Pettitoes
51
Piccalilly
112
"
an
"
Rhum
85
97
asparagus
86 Pickled Beet Root
bread
85
"
Carrots
1
"
ham
86
"
Barberries
116
"
plain.
85
"
Cucumbers .';•,'.,
1 1
.
.
,
114
14
"
Spanish
86
Eggs
115
"
au Sucre
83
"
Muskmelon
118
"
aux Fines Herbes
83
"
Onions
11
"
with jelly
84
"
Pork, to
"
Fritters
87
"
Mango
Onions, baked
boiled
Opossums
Oven, to test the
Oysters, broiled
Fried
to
"
scalloped
Ripe Cucumbers
Green Tomato
Pears
1 1
112
118
Pie, beefsteak
31
144
"
custard
23
"
cocoanut
1S3
"
cream
1S3
22
"
dried-apple
180
22
"
giblet
"
green apple.,
"
lemon, No.
225
Parsnep Fritters
106
chicken
"
Partridges, broiled
78
"
Patties, oyster
21
"
123
"
pigeon
123
"
prune
Peach Leather
.
"
Panada
Peaches, to preserve
45
113
210
the
Queen's Taste.
"
105
205
Water Ice
"
"
Pickles,
76
Orange Baskets
"
105
boil. ...
69
183
70
1
184
"2
184
orange, No.
"
1S0
"
1
184
2
184
71
181
...
.
.
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
243
pumpkin
181
"
peach
181
"
Cherries
124
"
raisin
185
"
Crab- Apple ..
124
Pie,
Preserved Barberries ...
"
rhubarb
180
"
squash
182
"
chocolate
"
tomato
181
"
cup plum
"
woodcock
78
"
English Christ-
"
crust, flake
"
Pigeon Pie.
and Ears,
179
"
71
"
Feet Soused
170
.
...
.
Florentine
168
172
46
"
Indian meal
rice black-cap
...
45
Pig, roast
43
"
Spanish
Pork, Fritters
44
"
white or suet.
44
"
sauce, plain
salt,
with apples..
"
Steaks
"
Tenderloin
"
to boil pickled
.
"
Toast
Potage a
au
.
8
52
64
{Purie of
Sorrel)
36
Quince Cheese
126
77
100 Radishes
95
.
102
Raisins, to stone easily.
"Hillocks"...
100
Raspberry Vinegar
mashed
165
175
Rabbit Curry
Maztre
to boil sweet
167
66
d' hotel
99
Red Cabbage,
to pickle
.
203
227
.
114
Saratoga
101
Scones
101
"
Japanese Style
107
101
"
Meringue
167
"
Waffles
159
Stewed
Pot-au-Feu
fruit..
168
45
Pot Roast, duckling
Potatoes,
(VOseille
44
Reine
la
.
44 Parie, chestnut
on
173
huckleberry
"
"
173
English tapioca 170
"
jelly
of
"
169
mas plum
179
Murrey's
Pig's Feet
Pudding, amber
126
5
Rice Black-cap Pudding. 167
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
244
3° Scent Sachets, No.
Roast Beef
"
1
236
"2
236
"
Goose
65
"
Guinea Fowls.
7i
Scones, Scotch
151
"
Lamb
39 Sherbet, grape
210
"
Pig
43
Shortcake, strawberry.
"
Turkey
61
Soup, a delicious
Wild Ducks.
"
79
.
"
"
celery.
corn
.
.
187
"
Rogrod
167
"
eel
Roly-Poly
172
"
mock
Rusk
147
"
noodles for
"
"
"
"
dandelion
"
lettuce..
"
Sally
i.
.
2.
.
Lunn
"
Sauce, foaming
6
oyster.
7
68
"
pea
9
69
"
rabbit
5
94
"
marrow dumplings
"
vermicelli. ........
Soused Pig's Feet
44
95
Sponge Cake
hard
174 Squirrels, fricassee of
"
Lobster
"
molasses
"
plain
19s
106
.
.
.
26 Steak, a Spanish
77
30
173
"
broiled venison ...
76
175
"
pork
44
Stew, Irish
38
5i
the year
165
234 Spare-Rib
"
to keep fresh
11
4.5
Spanish Fruit Pudding.
174 Squashes
Sausages
8
11
for
fruit-syrup
"
.
234 Spinach and other greens
174
....
7
12
gumbo..
"
pudding
.
okra, or
17
brown
9
10
oyster
159
Salve
10
"
95
Salmon, broiled
170
"
102
potato
.
.
Rock cakes
Salad, chicken, No.
.
Stock,
all
52
"
brown
3
veal
4
.
ALPHABETICAL INDEX.
Strawberry Shortcake
...
170 Turkey, dressed with Oys-
Sturgeon, roast
16
Succotash
98
"
217
"
Sugar, a la Creme
"
barley
217
Sweetbread, veal
mon
walnut
Tea, beef
"
elder
Veal and
to select a.
.
.
207
,
200
Rice
37
36
36
223
"
Sweetbread .......
232 Venison Steaks, broiled.
"
herb
231
"
slippery-elm
232
Vinegar, Thieves'
Waffles,
make
21
159
.
220
•
r
"
to pickle
116
"
Taffy
220
24
Thieves' Vinegar
236
Toast, French
152
Water-Cresses
"
milk
(for invalids)
Ice,
93
orange
210
226
Watermelon
Toffee, vanilla
Rinds,
to
219
preserve
Tomato, au Gratin
125
104
broiled
Welsh Rarebit
89
Whitefish, fresh, fried
20
104
Preserves
125
stewed
104
to preserve
125
Wild
Ducks, to roast ....
Woodcock
Pie
79
78
34
boil
Tripe, stewed
51
Yeast
Trout, to fry
15
Yorkshire Pudding with
Turnips, a la Poulette.
35
76
236
rice
Walnuts, creamed
Terrapin, stewed
61
60
stewed
211
Tongue, to
.
"
232
"
.
.
220
iced
"
.
braised
pennyroyal
"
a.
"
"
to
Tutti-Frutti
62
to roast
218
"
"
ters
how
how
35 Twelfth-Night Cake
Tablet, ginger or cinna-
Taffy,
245
...
105
Roast Beef
140
33
Blank Pages for Additional Recipes.
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